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Sample records for radiation induced lesions

  1. Radiation-induced lesions of the aorta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doessing, M; Rasmussen, S [Medical Department C, Diakonissestiftelsen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Fischer-Hansen, B; Walbom-Joergensen, S

    1977-04-09

    A description is given of pathological changes detected in the aortic arch of a 21-year-old man. The patient died from an acute myocardial infarction 16 months after a dose of 3696 rads to a mantle field for Hodgkin's disease confined to the midcervical lymph nodes on the left side of the neck. Histological examination of the exposed part of the aortic arch showed the wall to be focally thickened owing to a pronounced fibrosis of the luminal third of the wall. The elastic lamellae in this area were reduced in number, broken up, and haphazardly arranged. The intima appeared normal. There was no leucocytic infiltration, no proliferation of vasa vasorum and no significant adventitial fibrosis. It is suggested that these noncharacteristic changes may have been early radiation-induced lesions which later might induce fibrotic scarring with perhaps clinically evident disease.

  2. Radiation-induced vascular lesions of the skin: an overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flucke, U.E.; Requena, L.; Mentzel, T.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced cutaneous vascular neoplasms occur infrequently and comprise benign, so-called atypical vascular lesions (AVL) and angiosarcomas (AS), often being high-grade malignant tumors. Both arise most frequently within previously irradiated skin in breast-conserving-treated mammary cancer

  3. Radiation-induced intestinal lesions. Prognosis and surgical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Haecke, P.; Vitaux, J.; Michot, F.; Hay, J.-M.; Flamant, Y.; Maillard, J.-N.

    1981-01-01

    Thirteen patients with intestinal lesions consecutive to radiotherapy for carcinoma of the uterus were operated upon between 1973 and 1979. The small bowel was involved in 9 patients and the colon and rectum in 4 patients. Urinary tract lesions were associated in 3 patients of each group. Intestinal necrosis, progression of the lesions and extensive pelvic fibrosis were the only criteria of poor prognosis. Twenty-two operations were performed: 4 for urinary tract lesions and 18 for intestinal lesions. Five patients died during the immediate post-operative period and five died within 2 to 30 months after surgery, including 4 whose carcinoma recurred. The operative technique should be selected according to the extent and severity of radiation-induced damage, as determined by pre-operative examination and thorough exploration of the abdominal cavity once opened. Limited lesions of the small bowel can be treated by resection, but intestinal bypass with latero-lateral anastomosis seems to be preferable in cases with extensive lesions. Patients with colorectal lesions should have defunctioning colostomy prior to any other procedure dictated by the state of affairs. Multiple anastomosis, extensive resections and excessive dissections should be avoided [fr

  4. Modification of radiation-induced DNA lesions by oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyn, R.E.; Jenkins, W.T.

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of DNA strand break production by radiation under aerated and hypoxic conditions was determined in CHO cells using the technique of alkaline elution. The resulting oxygen enhancement ratio was surprisingly high, 7.8. When the pH of the elution was increased from 12.1, the normally used pH, to 12.8, a substantial increase in the strand breaks produced in the hypoxic cells was observed, resulting in an OER of 4.8. This difference in susceptibility of DNA strand break detection as a function of pH suggested a difference in the type of lesions produced in DNA when irradiated under aerated and hypoxic conditions. Further experiments to examine the DNA-protein crosslinks produced by radiation suggested that the apparent lower level of strand breaks in hypoxic cells may be due to a higher level of DNA-protein crosslinks produced under hypoxic conditions. Thus, oxygen may not only act by modifying the quantity of radiation-induced DNA lesions but may also cause qualitative changes. If the different types of DNA lesions have different contributions to lethality, the OER for cell survival may represent a complex composite of these changes at the molecular level

  5. Radiation induced testicular lesions and their modification by vitamin E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pareek, T.K.; Gajawat, S.; Singh, N.; Goyal, P.K.; Dev, P.K.

    2001-01-01

    Man is subjected to radiation exposure from cosmic rays and radioactivity from soil; apart from these natural sources of radiation, diagnostic and therapeutic radiological procedures are the largest source of radiation dose to human beings. These radiations have been shown to cause lesions in various mammalian tissues and organs. Testis is one of the most radiosensitive organs because of its cell renewal system. A number of chemical compounds have been and are being tested for their radioprotective effects on different animals. The antioxidant nature of Vitamin E and its role in maintenance of member structure suggests the presumptive radioprotective nature of this vitamin as well as its possible role in repair of radiation damage. In spite of some controversial reports, the radioprotective effect of Vitamin E has been observed by some investigators. In the light of above, the present study has been undertaken to assess the presumptive prophylactic effects of Vitamin E on the testes of Swiss albino mice subjected to sub-lethal whole-body gamma radiations

  6. Lead and radiation induced hepatic lesions in Swiss albino mice and their inhibition by vitamin E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajawat, Sunita; Goyal, P.K.

    2002-01-01

    The present study has been carried out to access the protective role of vitamin E against hepato-toxicity induced by lead and radiation. The present study demonstrates that the application of vitamin E prior to lead and gamma radiation exposure is quite potential to provide protection against hepatic lesions induced by such teratogens

  7. Appearance of radiation-induced lesions after radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease of the mediastinum and lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zomer-Drozda, J [Instytut Onkologii, Warsaw (Poland)

    1976-01-01

    The incidence of radiation-induced lesions of lung tissue adjacent to the mediastinum and covered by radiation was established on the basis of a retrospective analysis of radiograms of 245 patients treated at the Institute of Oncology in Warsaw in the years 1951-1968, who received radiotherapy to the mediastinal lymph nodes. The radiation-induced lesions were divided into 4 grades depending on their extent and intensity of pulmonary tissue damage. Criteria for classification of radiation-induced fibrosis into the above mentioned grades were established. The correlation between radiation-induced injury and the doses of X-rays applied to the mediastinal lymph nodes was analysed. The importance of radiation-induced changes in the mediastinum and lungs for the diagnosis of recurrences in the irradiated fields, in the marginal areas and granulomatous infiltrations in pulmonary tissue is discussed.

  8. Liv. 52 protection against radiation induced lesions in mammalian liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, M.R.; Saini, N.

    1985-01-01

    Effect of Liv. 52 on mammalian liver was studied after whole-body exposure to 5.5 Gy of 60 Co gamma radiation. It was found that the drug protected the organ against radiation-induced changes. The protective effect was manifested in the form of early recovery as indicated by the absence of pathological changes like cytoplasmic degranulation, loss of nulei from many cells and abnormal architecture at 10 days and restoration of normal structure by 4 weeks. Liv. 52 may neutralize the peroxides formed from water molecules after irradiation which are toxic and cause the damage to the organ. Thus it seems that the drug may act as detoxicating agent. (author)

  9. Are lesions induced by ionizing radiation direct blocks to DNA chain elongation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Painter, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    Ionizing radiation blocks DNA chain elongation in normal diploid fibroblasts but not in fibroblasts from patients with ataxia-telangiectasia, even though there are no differences in the damage induced between the two cell types. This difference suggests that radiation-induced lesions in DNA are not themselves blocks to chain elongation in ataxia cells and raises the possibility that in normal cells a mediator exists between DNA damage and chain termination

  10. Radiation-induced liver lesions in beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, F.F.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Boecker, B.B.

    1994-01-01

    The risk for liver disease from internally deposited beta-emitting radionuclides is unknown because there are no human populations exposed to hepatotropic beta-emitting radionuclides available for study. In this report, we discuss the hepatic lesion in dogs exposed to a beta-emitting radionuclide, 144 CeCl 3 , and held for their life spans

  11. Vascular lesions following radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, L.F.; Berthrong, M.

    1988-01-01

    The special radiation sensitivity of the vascular system is mainly linked to that of endothelial cells, which are perhaps the most radiation-vulnerable elements of mesenchymal tissues. Within the vascular tree, radiation injures most often capillaries, sinusoids, and small arteries, in that order. Lesions of veins are observed less often, but in certain tissues the veins are regularly damaged (e.g., intestine) or are the most affected structures (i.e., liver). Large arteries do suffer the least; however, when significant damage does occur in an elastic artery (e.g., thrombosis or rupture), it tends to be clinically significant and even fatal. Although not always demonstrable in human tissues, radiation vasculopathy generally is dose and time dependent. Like other radiation-induced lesions, the morphology in the vessels is not specific, but it is characteristic enough to be often recognizable. Vascular injury, especially by therapeutic radiation is not just a morphologic marker. It is a mediator of tissue damage; perhaps the most consistent pathogenetic mechanism in delayed radiation injury

  12. Radiological protection optimization derived from radiation induced lesions in interventional cardiology finding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.; Arranz, L.; Sastre, J.M.; Ferrer, N.

    1997-01-01

    Interventional Cardiology is one of the specialties in which patients are submitted to the greatest radiation doses with x ray systems used for diagnostic purposes and then, it is also a specialty of high occupational radiation risk. In the last years, several cases of radiation induced lesions produced on patients derived of new complex interventional procedures have been described. As consequence, different rules for avoiding this kind of incidents have been recommended by International Organisations and regulatory Bodies. Nevertheless it has been devoted relatively few attention to the evaluation of the occupational risks that inevitably are also high in these facilities. In this work, some cases of radioinduced skin lesions produced on patients submitted to cardiac ablation procedures are described. Radiological protection considerations of interest for the regulatory Bodies are made, that permit to minimize the probability of these incidents, in what to the X-rays equipment is referred as well as to the operation procedures and level of radiation protection training of the medical specialists. (author)

  13. Radiation-induced focal cortical necrosis of the femur presenting as a lytic lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilaslan, Hakan; Schils, Jean [Cleveland Clinic, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Joyce, Michael [Cleveland Clinic, Orthopedic Oncology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Shah, Chirag [Cleveland Clinic, Radiation Oncology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Zhang, Yaxia [Cleveland Clinic, Pathology, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Management of soft tissue sarcomas is often complicated, requiring radiation before and in some cases after limb-sparing surgery. Radiation necrosis is a severe complication after radiation treatment and is typically dose related and involves medullary bone. We report on two cases of hitherto unreported focal circumscribed intra-cortical lytic lesions within the radiation portal, which appeared 19 months and 31 months, respectively, after the conclusion of radiation treatment. Both patients had a history of soft tissue sarcoma treated with radiation (66 Gy) and surgical resection. Biopsy of these lesions showed necrotic bone attributed to radiation. (orig.)

  14. Attenuation of radiation- and drug-induced conditioned taste aversions following area postrema lesions in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, B.M.; Hunt, W.A.; Lee, J.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of lesions of the area postrema on the acquisition of radiation- and drug-induced (histamine and lithium chloride) conditioned taste aversions were investigated. The results indicated that area postrema lesions caused a significant attenuation of the aversion produced by pairing a novel sucrose solution with radiation (100 rad) or drug injection. Further, the area postrema lesions produced a similar level of attenuation of the taste aversion in all three treatment conditions. The results are discussed in terms of the implications of this finding for defining the mechanisms by which exposure to ionizing radiation can lead to the acquisition of a conditioned taste aversion

  15. Gamma radiation-induced conditioned taste aversions in rats: A comparison of the protective effects of area postrema lesions with differing doses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ossenkopp, K.P.; Giugno, L.

    1989-01-01

    Lesions which destroy the area postrema (AP) and damage the adjacent nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) attenuate or abolish conditioned taste aversions (CTA) induced by a variety of pharmacological agents as well as exposure to radiation. In the present experiment, 4 groups of male rats received lesions of AP and 4 groups were given sham lesions. One sham-lesioned and one AP-lesioned group were given a single pairing of 1-hr access to a novel 0.10% sodium saccharin solution followed immediately with exposure to 0, 100, 200, or 400 rad of gamma radiation, respectively. Four days later all groups were given daily two-bottle preference tests (saccharin vs. water) on 4 consecutive days. The sham-lesioned groups exposed to the radiation (100, 200, or 400 rad) developed profound aversions to the saccharin on all test days (p less than 0.001). In contrast, all of the AP-lesioned groups as well as the sham-irradiated (0 rad) sham-lesioned group exhibited strong, comparable (p greater than 0.30) preferences for saccharin. Thus, lesion of AP abolished the radiation-induced CTA at all dose levels of radiation. These results raise the possibility of pharmacological intervention at the level of AP to prevent radiation-induced CTA in cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy

  16. Radiation-induced osteochondroma-like lesion in young rat radius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, E.; Rodriguez, J.I.; Serrada, A.; Tellez, M.; Paniagua, R.

    1985-01-01

    To investigate the effects of radiation on the perichondrial groove of Ranvier in osteochondroma development, the external surface of the distal growth plate of the radius in both forelimbs of 30 ten-day-old rats was exposed to a single low dose of radiation (150 r), which was focused on the perichondrial groove. This induced the formation of a chondrocyte nest at the proximal external edge of the growth plate (five to nine days after irradiation). With advancing longitudinal growth of the bone, the chondrocyte nest occupied a diaphyseal position. At nine to 11 days the chondrocyte nest underwent endochondral ossification. At 13-15 days, this osteochondroma-like lesion began to regress with the disappearance of the chondrocyte nest. After 19-21 days, only an irregularly thickened cortical bone remains at the osteochondroma site. Although the possible role of the growth plate subjacent to the irradiated perichondrial groove must be taken into account, the continuity between the perichondrial groove and the osteochondroma, which is separated from the growth plate by the periosteal ring (bone bark), suggests that the perichondrial groove was involved in osteochondroma-like lesion development

  17. Improvement of cerebral hypometabolism after resection of radiation-induced necrotic lesion in a patient with cerebral arteriovenous malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Yae; Hirata, Kenji; Nakayama, Naoki; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Yoshida, Michiharu; Onodera, Shunsuke; Manabe, Osamu; Shiga, Tohru; Terae, Satoshi; Shirato, Hiroki; Tamaki, Nagara

    2015-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman underwent radiosurgery for a left cerebral hemisphere arteriovenous malformation (AVM) and developed radiation-induced necrosis causing a massive edema in the surrounding brain tissues. Despite various therapies, the edema expanded to the ipsilateral hemisphere and induced neurological symptoms. The radiation-induced necrotic lesion was surgically removed 4 years after radiosurgery. While the preoperative FDG PET revealed severe hypometabolism in the left cerebrum, the necrotomy significantly ameliorated the brain edema, glucose metabolism (postoperative FDG PET), and symptoms. This case indicates that radiation necrosis-induced neurological deficits may be associated with brain edema and hypometabolism, which could be reversed by appropriate necrotomy

  18. Effect of acyclovir on radiation- and chemotherapy-induced mouth lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubley, G.J.; Chapman, B.; Chapman, S.K.; Crumpacker, C.S.; Schnipper, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    Several chemotherapeutic regimens and radiation therapy, if delivered to the oral mucosa, are associated with a high frequency of mouth lesions. The cause of this side effect is not known for certain, but in past studies it has sometimes been associated with the ability to culture herpes simplex virus type 1 from the mouth. In a double-blind prospective trial, patients with head and neck tumors treated with chemotherapy or radiation therapy were treated with either acyclovir or placebo. Although the frequency of culture-positive herpes simplex virus was low in the untreated group, it was significantly lower, zero, in the acyclovir-treated group. However, there were no differences in the frequency or type of mouth lesions experienced by patients receiving either radiation or chemotherapy who were taking acyclovir or placebo. These results suggest that herpes simplex virus is not a frequent cause or complication of oral lesions afflicting this patient population

  19. Fine needle aspiration cytology of radiation-induced changes in nonneoplastic breast lesions. Possible pitfalls in cytodiagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterse, J.L.; Thunnissen, F.B.; van Heerde, P.

    1989-01-01

    The range of radiation-induced changes in fine needle aspiration (FNA) smears of the breast is described. In 41 of more than 800 patients who underwent breast-conserving treatment, a palpable breast lesion developed, and FNA was performed. In six cases, a recurrent carcinoma was present. In the remaining cases, three patterns of nonneoplastic lesions could be discerned: epithelial atypia (14 cases), fat necrosis (10 cases) and poorly cellular smears without epithelial atypia or fat necrosis (13 cases). It is important to be familiar with the patterns of radiation-induced epithelial atypia, since such atypia may lead to a misdiagnosis of recurrent carcinoma. These atypical cells may show impressive anisocytosis and anisonucleosis; however, the nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio remains normal and an admixture of bipolar cells is present. Cell dissociation and necrotic cell debris, as often seen in breast cancer smears, were never encountered in FNA smears from radiated nonneoplastic breasts

  20. Surgical therapy of radiation-induced lesions of the colon and rectum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miholic, J.; Schwarz, C.; Moeschl, P.

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-six operations for late sequelae of radiotherapy were carried out in 31 patients from 1971 to 1986. The most frequent indications for surgery were stricture (58 percent) and fistula (29 percent). In the first 8 year period from 1971 through 1978, 13 of 14 operations were diversions (colostomy or by-pass). From 1979 through 1986, a more aggressive approach prevailed. Only 32 percent of the operations were diversions. This more aggressive strategy was accompanied by a decrease of the postoperative mortality rate from 21 percent through 1978 to 0 in the later period. The overall complication rate was 23 percent. Complications were relatively more frequent after two-layer sutured or stapled anastomoses and after resection or fistula closure without temporary colostomy. We conclude that in radiation-induced colonic and rectal lesions, diversion should be performed in patients with unproved cure of disease or tumor persistence. Resection and fistula closure can be carried out safely, and a temporary colostomy is strongly recommended

  1. Influence of caffeine on chromosome lesions induced by chemical mutagens and radiation. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, B.

    1977-01-01

    The modifying influence of caffeine on γ-ray induced chromosome lesions was studied by chromosome aberration anaysis. Caffeine was applied as a pre- and post-treatment agent following seed (G 1 ) and root meristem (G 2 and S) irradiation of C.capillaris. The frequency of chromosome aberrations induced in G 1 was changed neither by post- nor by pre-treatment with caffeine. This fact proves the lack of caffeine modifying effect. Applied as a post-treatment agent caffeine enhances considerably the frequency of chromosome aberrations induced in root meristem cells. This is especially valid for G 2 irradiated cells, while in S cells no synergistic effect was established between induced chromosome lesions and caffeine. The enhancement of chromosome aberration frequency produced in G 2 shows a clearly manifested dependence on the time (moment) of caffeine application post irradiation. Most considerable enhancement was obtained following post-treatment with caffeine immediately after irradiation. In the following intervals - 15 and 30 min - it decreases progressively, while after 60, 180 and 300 min no enhancing effect is observed. The probable causes for the manifestation and the lack of synergistic effect between chromosome lesions induced in the various mitotic cycle phases and caffeine are discussed. (author)

  2. Selective brain lesions reduce morphine- and radiation-induced locomotor hyperactivity of the C57BL/6J mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickley, G.A.; Stevens, K.E.; White, G.A.; Gibbs, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    The apparent resemblance between the stereotypic locomotor hyperactivity observed after either an injection of morphine or irradiation of the C57BL/6J mouse has suggested the possibility of similar biochemical and neuroanatomical substrates of these behaviors. In this study the authors made selective brain lesions in an attempt to reverse the locomotor response observed after morphine (30 mg/kg) or radiation (1500 rads /sup 60/Co) treatments. Lesions impinging on both the dorso-medial caudate and lateral septal nuclei caused a significant decrease in morphine-induced and radiogenic locomotion. Lesions of the individual brain areas did not significantly alter the opiate locomotor response. This reduction in locomotion could not be attributed to a generalized post-surgical lethargy since other brain lesions of similar size did not significantly suppress these behaviors. These data suggest the possibility of some common central nervous system mechanisms which may support the stereotypic locomotor hyperactivity observed in the C57BL/6J mouse after either morphine or radiation treatment

  3. Radiation-induced emesis in the dog: effects of lesions and drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, D.O.; Briggs, D.B.; Knox, A.P.; Strominger, N.L.

    1986-01-01

    Dogs exposed to 8 Gy 60 Co gamma mid-abdominal irradiation exhibited emesis with an average latency of 102 min and an average of 7.4 episodes over 96 min. There were no significant changes in dogs subjected to a chronic bilateral subdiaphragmatic vagotomy, but emesis was prevented by ablation of the area postrema. Indomethacin pretreatment also prevented radiation-induced emesis in two of seven dogs and in the remainder reduced the average number of episodes. Domperidone pretreatment prevented radiation-induced emesis in all of four dogs tested. In electrophysiological studies recording from the area postrema the chemosensitive neurons were found to be normally silent in anesthetized preparations but excitable by a variety of emetic agents. After irradiation of the abdomen spontaneously active neurons were found with a discharge pattern that mirrored the behavioral pattern of postirradiation emesis. These studies are consistent with radiation-induced emesis being humorally mediated in the dog and implicate dopamine and/or prostaglandins as possible mediators

  4. Modulatory influence of Aloe vera against radiation and cadmium induced hepatic lesions in Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harsha, Radha; Purohit, R.K.

    2012-01-01

    The major objectives in radiobiology has been the development of agents that can mitigate the damage produced by ionizing radiation to normal tissues and thus reduces the side effects caused by radiation and improvement of cancer radiotherapy. The various agents have drawn attention of researchers as they provide wider acceptability and least side effects. The current study was aimed to investigate the protective effect of Aloe vera against radiation and cadmium induced changes in the liver of Swiss albino mice. For the study healthy male Swiss albino mice (6 to 8 weeks old) were selected from an inbred colony and kept in polypropylene cages. They were provided with standard mice feed and tap water ad libitum. The animals were exposed to 3.0 and 6.0 Gy of gamma radiation with or without cadmium chloride treatment. The animals of experimental groups were administered Aloe vera juice seven days prior to irradiation or cadmium chloride treatment. The animals of each group were autopsied at each post treatment interval of 1, 2, 4, 7, 14 and 28 days of treatment. The various biochemical parameters estimated were total proteins, glycogen, cholesterol, acid and alkaline phosphatase activities, DNA and RNA. After routine procedure, histopathological changes were also observed. The changes in various biochemical parameters were observed in the form of increase of decrease in values. The histopathological changes observed on day-1 after exposure to 3.0 Gy were distortion of hepatic architecture, intracellular oedema, narrower sinusoids, cytoplasmic degranulation, vacuolation and pycnotic nuclei. The changes were more marked on day-4 and continued up to day-14. But on day-28 the sign of recovery was observed. After exposure to a higher dose (6.0 Gy) similar changes were noticed but they were more pronounced and there was late manifestation of recovery. In the combined treatment of radiation and cadmium chloride synergistic effects were observed. The liver of Aloe vera treated

  5. Protective potential of Emblica Officinalis Linn. against radiation and lead induced hepatic lesion in Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purohit, R.K.; Bhartiya, K.M.; Isran, Rakesh; Bhati, Sharwan; Pyarelal; Basu, Arindam

    2013-01-01

    cholesterol and DNA showed a decreasing trend up to day - 14 in non drug treated groups and day - 7 in drug treated groups, thereafter value elevated up to day - 28. The biochemical parameters were observed in the form of increase or decrease in the values. The changes were found dose dependent. After combined treatment of radiation and lead acetate synergistic effect were observed. The liver of Emblica treated animals exhibited less severe damage as compared to non-drug treated animals at all the corresponding intervals. An early and fast recovery was also noticed in Emblica pretreated animals. Thus, it appears that Emblica is potent enough to check lead and radiation induced heptic lesion in Swiss albino mice. (author)

  6. Interaction of DNA-lesions induced by sodium fluoride and radiation and its influence in apoptotic induction in cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Podder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluoride is an essential trace element but also an environmental contaminant with major sources of exposure being drinking water, food and pesticides. Previous studies showed that sodium fluoride (NaF at 5 mM or more is required to induce apoptosis and chromosome aberrations and proposed that DNA damage and apoptosis play an important role in toxicity of excessive fluoride. The aim of this study is directed to understand the nature of DNA-lesions induced by NaF by allowing its interaction with radiation induced DNA-lesions. NaF 5 mM was used after observing inability to induce DNA damages and apoptosis by single exposure with 50 μM or 1 mM NaF. Co-exposure to NaF and radiation significantly increased the frequency of aberrant metaphases and exchange aberrations in human lymphocytes and arrested the cells in G1 stage instead of apoptotic death. Flow cytometric analysis, DNA fragmentation and PARP-cleavage analysis clearly indicated that 5 mM NaF together with radiation (1 Gy induced apoptosis in both U87 and K562 cells due to down regulation of expression of anti-apoptotic proteins, like Bcl2 in U87 and inhibitors of apoptotic proteins like survivin and cIAP in K562 cells. This study herein suggested that single exposure with extremely low concentration of NaF unable to induce DNA lesions whereas higher concentration induced DNA lesions interact with the radiation-induced DNA lesions. Both are probably repaired rapidly thus showed increased interactive effect. Coexposure to NaF and radiation induces more apoptosis in cancer cell lines which could be due to increased exchange aberrations through lesions interaction and downregulating anti-apoptotic genes.

  7. On the biophysical interpretation of lethal DNA lesions induced by ionising radiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kundrát, Pavel; Stewart, R.D.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 122, 1-4 (2006), s. 169-172 ISSN 0144-8420 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/2728 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : clustered DNA lesions * V79 cells * proton tracks * DNA damage * DNA repair * radiobiological modelling Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 0.446, year: 2006

  8. Modification of radiation induced intestinal lesions by Aegle marmelos fruit extract, an Indian medicinal plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, Annapurna; Jahan, Swafiya; Goyal, R.K.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, some plant extracts have been screened out against radiation and found to be quite promising. Aegle marmelos (Bael), belonging to family Rutaceae, fruits are very good source of proteins which form 5.12% of the edible portion. It is claimed to be useful in treating pain, fever, inflammation, respiratory disorders, cardiac disorders, dysentery and diarrhea. The ripe fruit is used for the treatment of digestive and stomachic complications. Aegle marmelos is a useful medicine for herbalist and it holds a reputed position in Ayurvedic system of medicine. Protection of intestinal constituents by Aegle marmelos extract (AME) was studied after exposure to 6 Gy gamma radiations in mice. For this purpose, Swiss albino mice were divided in various groups. Group I was administered with double distilled water (DDW), volume equal to AME (100 mg/kg body wt./animal), by oral gavage to serve as normal. Group II was administered orally AME extract once daily at a dose of 100 mg/kg b.wt./animal for 5 consecutive days. Group III was exposed to 6 Gy gamma radiations to serve as irradiated control. Group IV was treated with AME, orally for 5 consecutive days (as in Group-II), and were exposed to gamma radiation half an hour after the last administration of AME on day 5. Animals from all these group autopsied on 12 hrs, days 1, 3, 7, 15 and 30 post-treatment intervals

  9. Behavior of Schistosoma mansoni-induced histopathological lesions in Biomphalaria glabrata submitted to ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo Carine M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Present report demonstrates that repeated radiation of Schistosoma mansoni-infected Biomphalaria glabrata, totaling 15,000 rads, caused a sudden, albeit transient, suppression of cercarial shedding. Initially, sporocysts practically disappeared from the snail tissues. The more resistant developing cercariae presented nuclear clumping and vacuolation, before undergoing lysis. No host tissue reaction was evident at any time. Thirty-four days after the last irradiation, the snails resumed cercarial elimination. By that time numerous sporocysts and developing cercariae were detected, disseminated throughout snail tissues in a pattern similar to that of a highly malignant neoplasm, with no signs of host cellular reactions, which on the other hand were present in non-irradiated infected controls. The region of the ovo-testis was apparently destroyed after radiation, but returned to its normal appearance around 40 days after the last radiation. Ionizing radiation affected both host and parasite in S. mansoni-infected Biomphalaria glabrata, but the resulting impressive changes were soon reversed.

  10. Use of Human Cadaveric Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cell Therapy of a Chronic Radiation-Induced Skin Lesion: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portas, M.; Coppola, A.; Mansilla, E.; Drago, H.; Dubner, D.; Radl, A.; Di Giorgio, M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute and late radiation-induced injury on skin and subcutaneous tissues are associated with substantial morbidity in radiation therapy, interventional procedures and also are of concern in the context of nuclear or radiological accidents. Pathogenesis is initiated by depletion of acutely responding epithelial tissues and damage to vascular endothelial micro-vessels. Efforts for medical management of severe radiation-induced lesions have been made. Nevertheless, the development of strategies to promote wound healing, including stem cell therapy, is required. From 1997 to 2014, over 248 patients were referred to the Radio-pathology Committee of Hospital de Quemados del Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Burns Hospital) for the diagnosis and therapy of radiation-induced localized lesions. As part of the strategies for the management of severe cases, there is an ongoing research and development protocol on 'Translational Clinical Trial phases I/II to evaluate the safety and efficacy of adult mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow for the treatment of large burns and radiological lesions'. The object of this work was to describe the actions carried out by the Radio-pathology Committee of the Burns Hospital in a chronic case with more than 30 years of evolution without positive response to conventional treatments. The approach involved the evaluation of the tissular compromise of the lesion, the prognosis and the personalized treatment, including regenerative therapy. (authors)

  11. Use of Human Cadaveric Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cell Therapy of a Chronic Radiation-Induced Skin Lesion: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portas, M; Mansilla, E; Drago, H; Dubner, D; Radl, A; Coppola, A; Di Giorgio, M

    2016-09-01

    Acute and late radiation-induced injury on skin and subcutaneous tissues are associated with substantial morbidity in radiation therapy, interventional procedures and also are of concern in the context of nuclear or radiological accidents. Pathogenesis is initiated by depletion of acutely responding epithelial tissues and damage to vascular endothelial microvessels. Efforts for medical management of severe radiation-induced lesions have been made. Nevertheless, the development of strategies to promote wound healing, including stem cell therapy, is required. From 1997 to 2014, over 248 patients were referred to the Radiopathology Committee of Hospital de Quemados del Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Burns Hospital) for the diagnosis and therapy of radiation-induced localized lesions. As part of the strategies for the management of severe cases, there is an ongoing research and development protocol on 'Translational Clinical Trial phases I/II to evaluate the safety and efficacy of adult mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow for the treatment of large burns and radiological lesions'. The object of this work was to describe the actions carried out by the Radiopathology Committee of the Burns Hospital in a chronic case with more than 30 years of evolution without positive response to conventional treatments. The approach involved the evaluation of the tissular compromise of the lesion, the prognosis and the personalized treatment, including regenerative therapy. © World Health Organisation 2016. All rights reserved. The World Health Organization has granted Oxford University Press permission for the reproduction of this article.

  12. Study protocol for an approach based on diagnosis and therapy of cutaneous radiation induced lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giorgio, Marina; Vallerga, Maria B.; Radl, Analia; Portas, Mercedes

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In the frame of an agreement between the 'Hospital de Quemados del Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires'-Burn Center- (a reference hospital of the Medical Radiological Emergency Response Network of Argentina) and the Nuclear Regulatory Authority, a research project for diagnostic and therapeutic approach of cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS) is in progress. Sixty seven persons, which developed acute and/or late CRS, were included in this protocol from 1997 to 2007, treated with an equivalent therapeutic scheme and evaluated through clinical follow-up, serial photographic record and complementary tests (tele-thermography and high frequency ultrasonography). There exist individual variations that could condition the response to ionizing radiation (IR) in not only accidental but also planned exposures (such as radiotherapy and interventional radiology). Deficiencies in DNA repair mechanisms would be involved on hypersensitivity to deterministic effects of IR. Consequently, the characterization of DNA repair capacity in lymphocytes through cytokinesis blocked micronucleus (MN) and alkaline single-cell microgel electrophoresis (comet) assays could be suitable approaches to evaluate in vitro individual radiosensitivity. Under this context, individual radiosensitivity assessment was conducted in patients included in this research protocol that showed acute and/or late cutaneous reactions with grades 3 and 4 of the Toxicity Criteria of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer. DNA repair capacity was evaluated through MN and comet assay for initial damage and after specific times of repair (0-120 minutes). DNA damage and repair capacity were quantified by the Olive tail moment. Previous own studies have identified three subpopulations, characterized by the mean values of their repair mean half-time: healthy controls (2.6 ± 0.3 minutes), average-reactor cancer patients (4.7 ± 2.9 minutes) and over

  13. Study Protocol for an Approach Based on Diagnosis and Therapy of Cutaneous Radiation Induced Lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giorgio, M.; Vallerga, M.B.; Radl, A.; Portas, M.

    2011-01-01

    In the frame of an agreement between the 'Hospital de Quemados del Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires' - Burn Center - (a reference hospital of the Medical Radiological Emergency Response Network of Argentina) and the Nuclear Regulatory Authority, a research project for diagnostic and therapeutic approach of cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS) is in progress. Sixty seven persons, which developed acute and/or late CRS, were included in this protocol from 1997 to 2007, treated with an equivalent therapeutic scheme and evaluated through clinical follow-up, serial photographic record and complementary tests (telethermography and high frequency ultrasonography). There exist individual variations that could condition the response to ionizing radiation (IR) in not only accidental but also planned exposures (such as radiotherapy and interventional radiology). Deficiencies in DNA repair mechanisms would be involved on hypersensitivity to deterministic effects of IR. Consequently, the characterization of DNA repair capacity in lymphocytes through cytokinesis blocked micronucleus (MN) and alkaline single-cell microgel electrophoresis (comet) assays could be suitable approaches to evaluate in vitro individual radiosensitivity. Under this context, individual radiosensitivity assessment was conducted in patients included in this research protocol that showed acute and/or late cutaneous reactions with grades 3 and 4 of the Toxicity Criteria of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer. DNA repair capacity was evaluated through MN and comet assay for initial damage and after specific times of repair (0-120 minutes). DNA damage and repair capacity were quantified by the Olive tail moment. Previous own studies have identified three subpopulations, characterized by the mean values of their repair mean half-time: healthy controls (2.6 ± 0.3 minutes), average-reactor cancer patients (4.7 ± 2.9 minutes) and over

  14. Diagnosis and therapy of cutaneous radiation syndrome. Individual radiosensitivity assessment in patients undergoing medical exposures presenting severe cutaneous radiation induced lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giorgio, Marina; Vallerga, Maria B.; Perez, Maria R.; Portas, Mercedes

    2007-01-01

    Hospital de Quemados del Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Burn Center) is one of the reference hospitals of the Medical Radiological Emergency Response Network of Argentina. In the frame of an agreement between the Burn Center and the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina, a research project for an approach based on diagnosis and therapy of cutaneous radiation induced lesions is in progress. Individual radiosensitivity assessment was conducted in patients included in this research protocol that showed acute and/or late cutaneous reactions with grades 3 and 4 of the Toxicity criteria of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) and the European organization for research and treatment of cancer (EORTC). DNA repair capacity and its kinetics were evaluated in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using alkaline comet assay and micronucleus test. In this paper, two representative cases, in which the research protocol was applied, are presented. Therapeutic response and its correlation with radiosensitivity test results are described. Case 1: female patient undergoing external radiotherapy for invasive ductal breast cancer that presented acute cutaneous radiotoxicity, grade 3 (confluent moist epithelitis, )that led to treatment break. Case 2: male patient undergoing coronary angioplasty (interventional radiology), which developed late cutaneous radiotoxicity, grade 4 (ulceration at the dorsal region). Patients were treated with: topic administration of trolamine and silver sulfadiazine with lidocaine, associated with systemic administration of pentoxiphiline and anti-oxidants. The therapeutic response was evaluated through clinical follow-up, serial photographic record and complementary tests (tele thermography and high frequency ultrasonography). Case 1 response was positive (favorable) with early local recovery and complete remission of signs and symptoms after 5 months. Both MN frequencies and comet assay showed values compatible with normal radiosensitivity

  15. Radiation-induced myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaenshirt, H [Heidelberg Univ. (F.R. Germany). Neurologische Klinik

    1975-10-01

    12 cases of radiation-induced myelopathy after /sup 60/Co teletherapy are reported on. Among these were 10 thoracal lesions, one cerviothoracal lesion, and one lesion of the medulla oblongata. In 9 cases, Hodgkin's disease had been the primary disease, tow patients had been irradiated because of suspected vertebral metastases of cancer of the breast, and one patient had suffered from a glomus tumour of the petrous bone. The spinal doses had exceeded the tolerance doses recommended in the relevant literature. There was no close correlation between the radiation dose and the course of the disease. The latency periods between the end of the radiotherapy and the onset of the neurological symptons varied from 6 to 16 mouths and were very constant in 7 cases with 6 to 9 months. The segmental height of the lesion corresponded to the level of irradiation. The presenting symptons of radiation-induced myelopathy are buruing dysaesthesias and Brown-Sequard's paralysis which may develop into transverse lesion of the cord with paraplegia still accompanied by dissociated perception disorders. The disease developed intermittently. Disturbances of the bladder function are frequent. The fluid is normal in most cases. Myelographic examinations were made in 8 cases. 3 cases developed into stationary cases exhibiting. Brown-Sequard syndrome, while 9 patients developed transverse lesion of the cord with paraplegia. 3 patients have died; antopsy findings are given for two of these. In the pathogenesis of radiation-induced myelopathy, the vascular factor is assumed to be of decisive importance.

  16. The caretakers of the genome. Repair of DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet-light and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiteux, S.; Radicella, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    The DNA contained in the nucleus of each of our cells daily suffers of thousand damages caused by solar ultraviolet radiations or ionizing radiations, with a natural or not origin, agents able to modify the genetic information. This information stays stable. True caretakers of the genome repair the DNA, provided that the cell is not over-taken by the level of the attack. Alterations of the repair mechanism are at the origin of extremely severe syndromes. The failure of one of these caretakers of the genome, the O.G.G.1 gene, seems implicated in the cancer development. It can be a lead to discover a predisposition to radioinduced or caused by other toxic agents cancers. (N.C.)

  17. Two cases of greater omentum use for treatment of radiation-induced chest lesions in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luboinski, G [Instytut Onkologii, Warsaw (Poland)

    1977-01-01

    Two cases of extensive ulcerations induced by radiotherapy during treatment of breast cancer are described. The ulcerations were excised and the remaining tissue defect was covered with greater omentum shifted to the chest. The omentum was covered with a free dermo-epidermal graft. In both cases rapid healing of the wound and disappearance of pain was obtained.

  18. First Patagonian Course on 'Diagnosis and Therapy of Injuries Induced by Ionizing Radiation'; Primer curso patagonico 'Diagnostico y Tratamiento de Lesiones Inducidas por Radiaciones Ionizantes'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellotti, Mariela I., E-mail: bellotti@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CAB/CNEA), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche. Lab. de Cavitacion y Biotecnologia; Andres, Pablo A., E-mail: andresp@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CAB/CNEA), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche. Division Proteccion Radiologica; Cascón, Adriana S., E-mail: adrianacascon@yahoo.com [Instituto de Medicina, Radiomedicina y Seguridad (IMERASE SA), Buenos Aires, (Argentina)

    2013-07-01

    In Patagonia there are academic centers, health and industrial facilities that use ionizing radiations in its usual practices. However, they do not have protocols that respond to local needs. For this reason was held from October 5 to November 10, 2012 in Bariloche Atomic Center, a training course for health personnel. The range of topics covered ranged from the definition of dosimetry quantities, types of radiation and biological dosimetry, biological effects, radiation acute syndrome, radiation-induced cutaneous syndrome, internal contamination, screening in radiological emergencies, etc.The course provided a theoretical and practical guide about how to recognize and treat people exposed to radiations, guidelines for acting in radiological emergencies and a perception of the psychosocial impact of the radiation accidents.The result was a pocket book for health personnel that will be used in case of having a patient with radiation induced injury.

  19. DNA Damage by Ionizing Radiation: Tandem Double Lesions by Charged Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Chaban, Galina M.; Wang, Dunyou; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2005-01-01

    Oxidative damages by ionizing radiation are the source of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, damage to the central nervous system, lowering of the immune response, as well as other radiation-induced damages to human health. Monte Carlo track simulations and kinetic modeling of radiation damages to the DNA employ available molecular and cellular data to simulate the biological effect of high and low LET radiation io the DNA. While the simulations predict single and double strand breaks and base damages, so far all complex lesions are the result of stochastic coincidence from independent processes. Tandem double lesions have not yet been taken into account. Unlike the standard double lesions that are produced by two separate attacks by charged particles or radicals, tandem double lesions are produced by one single attack. The standard double lesions dominate at the high dosage regime. On the other hand, tandem double lesions do not depend on stochastic coincidences and become important at the low dosage regime of particular interest to NASA. Tandem double lesions by hydroxyl radical attack of guanine in isolated DNA have been reported at a dosage of radiation as low as 10 Gy. The formation of two tandem base lesions was found to be linear with the applied doses, a characteristic of tandem lesions. However, tandem double lesions from attack by a charged particle have not been reported.

  20. Inducible DNA-repair systems in yeast: competition for lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchel, R E; Morrison, D P

    1987-03-01

    DNA lesions may be recognized and repaired by more than one DNA-repair process. If two repair systems with different error frequencies have overlapping lesion specificity and one or both is inducible, the resulting variable competition for the lesions can change the biological consequences of these lesions. This concept was demonstrated by observing mutation in yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) exposed to combinations of mutagens under conditions which influenced the induction of error-free recombinational repair or error-prone repair. Total mutation frequency was reduced in a manner proportional to the dose of 60Co-gamma- or 254 nm UV radiation delivered prior to or subsequent to an MNNG exposure. Suppression was greater per unit radiation dose in cells gamma-irradiated in O2 as compared to N2. A rad3 (excision-repair) mutant gave results similar to wild-type but mutation in a rad52 (rec-) mutant exposed to MNNG was not suppressed by radiation. Protein-synthesis inhibition with heat shock or cycloheximide indicated that it was the mutation due to MNNG and not that due to radiation which had changed. These results indicate that MNNG lesions are recognized by both the recombinational repair system and the inducible error-prone system, but that gamma-radiation induction of error-free recombinational repair resulted in increased competition for the lesions, thereby reducing mutation. Similarly, gamma-radiation exposure resulted in a radiation dose-dependent reduction in mutation due to MNU, EMS, ENU and 8-MOP + UVA, but no reduction in mutation due to MMS. These results suggest that the number of mutational MMS lesions recognizable by the recombinational repair system must be very small relative to those produced by the other agents. MNNG induction of the inducible error-prone systems however, did not alter mutation frequencies due to ENU or MMS exposure but, in contrast to radiation, increased the mutagenic effectiveness of EMS. These experiments demonstrate

  1. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) induces cell-surface Ro/SSA antigen expression by human keratinocytes in vitro: a possible mechanism for the UVR induction of cutaneous lupus lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies are useful markers of connective tissue disease. In this study, UVB but not UVA induced the expression of Ro/SSA antigen on keratinocyte surfaces in vitro. This expression was also found with the extractable nuclear antigens RnP and Sm, but not with single or double-stranded DNA. The expression was prevented by blocking protein synthesis, suggesting that it was an active process. The results suggest that UVB exposure may result in the expression of Ro/SSA antigen on the surfaces of basal keratinocytes in vivo. This antigen could then bind circulating antibody leading to the cutaneous lesions in neonatal and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. (Author)

  2. Dosimetric analysis of radiation sources to use in dermatological lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Ariane

    2010-01-01

    Skin lesions undergoing therapy with radiation sources may have different patterns of malignancy. Malignant lesions or cancer most commonly found in radiotherapy services are carcinomas. Radiation therapy in skin lesions is performed with low penetration beams and orthovoltage X-rays, electron beams and radioactive sources ( 192 Ir, 198 Au, e 90 Sr) arranged on a surface mold or in metal applicator. This study aims to analyze the therapeutic radiation dose profile produced by radiation sources used in skin lesions radiotherapy procedures. Experimental measurements for the analysis of dosimetric radiation sources were compared with calculations obtained from a computer system based on the Monte Carlo Method. Computational results had a good agreement with the experimental measurements. Experimental measurements and computational results by the MCNP4C code have been used to validate the calculations obtained by MCNP code and to provide a reliable medical application for each clinical case. (author)

  3. Radiation induced glioblastoma. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Naoki; Kayama, Takamasa; Sakurada, Kaori; Saino, Makoto; Kuroki, Akira [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-05-01

    We report a surgical case of a 54-year-old woman with a radiation induced glioblastoma. At the age of 34, the patient was diagnosed to have a non-functioning pituitary adenoma. It was partially removed followed by 50 Gy focal irradiation with a 5 x 5 cm lateral opposed field. Twenty years later, she suffered from rapidly increasing symptoms such as aphasia and right hemiparesis. MRI showed a large mass lesion in the left temporal lobe as well as small mass lesions in the brain stem and the right medial temporal lobe. These lesions situated within the irradiated field. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed relatively high lactate signal and decreased N-acetyl aspartate, choline, creatine and phosphocreatine signals. Increased lactate signal meant anaerobic metabolism that suggested the existence of a rapidly growing malignant tumor. Thus, we planned surgical removal of the left temporal lesion with the diagnosis of a radiation induced malignant glioma. The histological examination revealed a glioblastoma with radiation necrosis. MIB-1 staining index was 65%. Postoperatively, her symptoms improved, but she died from pneumonia 1 month after the surgery. A autopsy was obtained. The lesion of the left temporal lobe was found to have continuity to the lesion in the midbrain, the pons and the right temporal lobe as well. High MIB-1 staining index suggested that a radiation induced glioblastoma had high proliferative potential comparing with a de novo and secondary glioblastoma. (author)

  4. Interventions for preventing and managing of skin lesions after radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Bafe

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Radiotherapy has a pivotal role in the fight against cancer. However 85% of patients, who undergo radiotherapy, will face moderate to severe skin reactions, for the treatment of which various local products, available in the market, are used. Aim: The aim of this systematic literature review was to investigate the prevention and treatment of these skin lesions induced by radiation. Methods: For this purpose 34 articles were collected concerning materials, approved by the FDA, for the prevention and treatment of skin damage due to radiation, preclinical factors tested in animal models, factors involved in the prevention and treatment of moist desquamation and unauthorized agents or with little information about them. Results: According to the study results, the moisturizing and hydrophilic creams, herbal preparations, gels based on hyaluronic acid, and Vitamin E, heparinoid creams and formulations based on oils appear to have a positive effect in preventing dermatitis as well as in providing symptom relief. Patches are suitable for the case of moist desquamation. Vasculotide, agent EUK-207, agent RTA 408, agent ALDH2 and the agent Celecoxib are still in the preclinical stage but may become future therapeutic targets. Conclusion: Skin reactions due to radiation remain a significant problem for patients undergoing radical treatment. However, thanks to the multitude of formulations available in the market and several clinical trials it is possible that early prevention and treatment for actinic dermatitis could be achieved. In conclusion, it is crucial that health professionals are aware of the formulations indicated and contraindicated in case of skin reactions induced by radiation and adjust the treatment for the prevention and management of skin reactions in patients receiving radiation therapy.

  5. Radiation-induced pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, D.M.; Littman, P.; Gefter, W.B.; Miller, W.T.; Raney, R.B. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Pneumothorax is an uncommon complication of radiation therapy to the chest. The proposed pathogenesis is radiation-induced fibrosis promoting subpleural bleb formation that ruptures resulting in pneumothorax. We report on two young patients with primary sarcomas without pulmonary metastases who developed spontaneous pneumothorax after irradiation. Neither patient had antecedent radiographic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis

  6. Radiation-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyama, Harumi

    1995-01-01

    Apoptosis is an active process of gene-directed cellular self-destruction that can be induced in many cell types via numerous physiological and pathological stimuli. We found that interphasedeath of thymocytes is a typical apoptosis showing the characteristic features of apoptosis including cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation and DNA degradation. Moderate dose of radiation induces extensive apoptosis in rapidly proliferating cell population such as the epithelium of intestinal crypt. Recent reports indicate that the ultimate form of radiation-induced mitotic death in several cells is also apoptosis. One of the hallmarks of apoptosis is the enzymatic internucleosomal degradation of chromatin DNA. We identified an endonuclease responsible for the radiation-induced DNA degradation in rat thymocytes. The death-sparing effects of interrupting RNA and protein synthesis suggested a cell genetic program for apoptosis. Apoptosis of thymocytes initiated by DNA damage, such as radiation and radio mimetic substance, absolutely requires the protein of p53 cancer suppresser gene. The cell death induced by glucocorticoid, or aging, has no such requirement. Expression of oncogene bcl-2 rescues cells from the apoptosis. Massive apoptosis in radiosensitive cells induced by higher dose radiation may be fatal. It is suggested that selective apoptotic elimination of cells would play an important role for protection against carcinogenesis and malformation through removal of cells with unrepaired radiation-induced DNA damages. Data to evaluate the significance of apoptosis in the radiation risk are still poor. Further research should be done in order to clarify the roles of the cell death on the acute and late effects of irradiation. (author)

  7. Peritoneal macrophages mediated delivery of chitosan/siRNA nanoparticle to the lesion site in a murine radiation-induced fibrosis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nawroth, Isabel; Alsner, Jan; Deleuran, B.W.

    2013-01-01

    of chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles directed towards silencing TNF alpha in local macrophage populations, but the mechanism for the therapeutic effect at the lesion site remains unclear. Methods. Using the same murine RIF model we utilized an optical imaging technique and fluorescence microscopy to investigate...... the uptake of chitosan/fluorescently labeled siRNA nanoparticles by peritoneal macrophages and their subsequent migration to the inflamed tissue in the RIF model. Results. We observed strong accumulation of the fluorescent signal in the lesion site of the irradiated leg up to 24 hours using the optical...... imaging system. We further confirm by immunohistochemical staining that Cy3 labeled siRNA resides in macrophages of the irradiated leg. Conclusion. We provide a proof-of-concept for host macrophage trafficking towards the inflamed region in a murine RIF model, which thereby suggests that the chitosan...

  8. Dosimetric analysis of radiation sources for use dermatological lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Ariane

    2010-01-01

    Skin lesions undergoing therapy with radiation sources may have different patterns of malignancy. Malignant lesions or cancer most commonly found in radiotherapy services are carcinomas. Radiation therapy in skin lesions is performed with low penetration beams and orthovoltage X-rays, electron beams and radioactive sources ( 192 Ir, 198 Au, e 90 Sr) arranged on a surface mold or in metal applicator. This study aims to analyze the therapeutic radiation dose profile produced by radiation sources used in skin lesions radiotherapy procedures . Experimental measurements for the analysis of dosimetric radiation sources were compared with calculations obtained from a computer system based on the Monte Carlo Method. Computational results had a good agreement with the experimental measurements. Experimental measurements and computational results by the MCNP4C code were both physically consistent as expected. These experimental measurements compared with calculations using the MCNP-4C code have been used to validate the calculations obtained by MCNP code and to provide a reliable medical application for each clinical case. (author)

  9. Radiation induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Satheesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene

  10. Radiation induced pesticidal microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Yup; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, S. J.; Lim, D. S

    2001-01-01

    To isolate pesticidal microbes against plant pathogenic fungi, 4 strains of bacteria(K1. K3, K4, YS1) were isolated from mushroom compost and hot spring. K4, K1, K3, YS1 strain showed wide antifungal spectrum and high antifungal activities against 12 kinds of fungi. Specific proteins and the specific transcribed genes were found from the YS1 and its radiation-induced mutants. And knock-out mutants of antifungal activity were derived by transposon mutagenesis. From these knock-out mutants, the antifungal activity related genes and its modification by gamma-ray radiation are going to be studied. These results suggested that radiation could be an useful tool for the induction of functional mutants.

  11. Radiation induced genomic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.

    2003-01-01

    This presentation will focus on delayed genetic effects occurring in the progeny of cells after exposure to ionizing radiation. We have developed a model system for investigating those genetic effects occurring multiple generations after radiation exposure. The presentation will describe some of the delayed effects observed after radiation exposures including delayed chromosomal rearrangements, and recombination events as determined by a plasmid based assay system. We will present new data on how changes in gene expression as measured by differential display and DNA microarray analysis provides a mechanism by which cells display a memory of irradiation, and introduce candidate genes that may play a role in initiating and perpetuation the unstable phenotype. These results will be discussed in terms of the recently described non-targeted Death Inducing Effect (DIE) where by secreted factors from clones of unstable cells can elicit effects in non irradiated cells and may serve to perpetuate the unstable phenotype in cells that themselves were not irradiated

  12. Radiation induced pesticidal microbes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Yup; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, S. J.; Lim, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    To isolate pesticidal microbes against plant pathogenic fungi, 4 strains of bacteria(K1. K3, K4, YS1) were isolated from mushroom compost and hot spring. K4, K1, K3, YS1 strain showed wide antifungal spectrum and high antifungal activities against 12 kinds of fungi. Specific proteins and the specific transcribed genes were found from the YS1 and its radiation-induced mutants. And knock-out mutants of antifungal activity were derived by transposon mutagenesis. From these knock-out mutants, the antifungal activity related genes and its modification by gamma-ray radiation are going to be studied. These results suggested that radiation could be an useful tool for the induction of functional mutants

  13. Constants of the Alper and Howard-Flanders oxygen equation for damage to bacterial membrane, deduced from observations on the radiation-induced penicillin-sensitive lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obioha, F.I.; Gillies, N.E.; Cullen, B.M.; Walker, H.C.; Alper, T.

    1984-01-01

    E. coli were irradiated in the presence of 100% oxygen, oxygen-free nitrogen and mixtures of 1.01, 0.59, 0.3, 0.1 and 0.06% oxygen in nitrogen. Changes in sensitivity with pO 2 conformed with the Alper and Howard-Flanders equation for bacteria treated after irradiation by penicillin as well as for the untreated ones. Values of m were respectively 4.8 and 3.3; values of K were identical, within experimental error, (4.4 mmHg). Sensitivity to induction of the bacterial membrane penicillin-sensitive lesion was calculated from the difference in the reciprocals of D 0 values proper to untreated and treated bacteria, for every gas used. The value of m could not be directly calculated because the effect of penicillin on anoxically irradiated bacteria was not detectable. For that reason, a transformation of the oxygen equation was used, allowing estimates to be made of both m and K, provided the results conformed with the equation. Within experimental error they did. Calculated values of m and K for induction of the penicillin-sensitive lesion were respectively 8 and 5.9 mmHg, but it is shown that the oxygen enhancement ratio was probably underestimated and the value overestimated. (author)

  14. Radiation-induced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutrillaux, B.; CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92

    1998-01-01

    The induction of malignant diseases is one of the most concerning late effects of ionising radiation. A large amount of information has been collected form atomic bomb survivors, patients after therapeutic irradiation, occupational follow-up and accidentally exposed populations. Major uncertainties persist in the (very) low range i.e, population and workers radioprotection. A review of the biological mechanisms leading to cancer strongly suggests that the vast majority of radiation-induced malignancies arise as a consequence of recessive mutations can be unveiled by ageing, this process being possibly furthered by constitutional or acquired genomic instability. The individual risk is likely to be very low, probably because of the usual dose level. However, the magnitude of medical exposure and the reliance of our societies on nuclear industry are so high that irreproachable decision-making processes and standards for practice are inescapable. (author)

  15. Radiation induced microbial pesticide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Yup; Lee, Young Keun; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Sang Jae

    2000-01-01

    To control plant pathogenic fungi, 4 strains of bacteria (K1, K3, K4, YS1) were isolated from mushroom compost and hot spring. K4, K1, K3, YS1 strain showed wide antifungal spectrum and high antifungal activities against 13 kinds of fungi. Mutants of K1 and YS1 strains were induced by gamma-ray radiation and showed promising antifungal activities. These wild type and mutants showed resistant against more than 27 kinds of commercial pesticides among 30 kinds of commercial pesticides test particularly, YS1-1006 mutant strain showed resistant against hydrogen oxide. And mutants had increased antifungal activity against Botryoshaeria dothidea. These results suggested that radiation could be an useful method for the induction of functional mutants. (author)

  16. Three cases of radiation-induced cancer in oral regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hiroshi; Shinoki, Kunihiko; Endo, Yoshitaka; Fujita, Yasushi; Hayashi, Susumu

    1985-01-01

    Three cases of radiation-induced cancer in the oral regions were reported with relation to radiation therapy. One was the general radiation-induced cancer following radiotherapy for the hemangioma. The other two cases, which belonged in the B-1 group of Sakai and his coworker's diagnostic criteria for radiation-induced cancer, were those occurring after radiotherapy for the malignant tumors. Due to the relatively high dosage exposure by the patient in the radiotherapy it is necessary to look out the latency of the radiation-induced cancer. After radiotherapy, careful and periodical observation is important for immediate treatment in an early stage for the radiation-induced cancer to have a favorable prognosis. In addition careful observation of the changes after radiotherapy helps in discovering the precancerous lesions from the therapy. For the radiation-induced cancer, surgical treatment would be the best, however, radiation therapy is also effective in certain cases. (author)

  17. [Direct assays of radiation-induced DNA base lesions in mammalian cells.] Final progress report, February 1, 1984-June 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, K.T.

    1986-01-01

    Adenine (Ade), 2'-deoxyadenosine (dAdo) and 5'-deoxyadenosine monophosphate (5'-dAMP) were irradiated with 50 to 15,000 Gy under oxic and hypoxic conditions. HPLC procedures providing satisfactory separation of the adenine damage products formed during irradiation of DNA model compounds were found. Structures of some of the damage products were confirmed to include 8-OHAde, 4,6-diamino-5-formamidopyrimidine, and 8-OH-5'-dAMP. Two damage products of dAdo (8-OHdAdo and the major isomer of 8,5'-cdAdo), the formation of which depends on the presence or absence of oxygen, were determined quantitatively by HPLC. The limit for HPLC detection was estimated as 4 to 50 pmoles for these compounds. This corresponds to a detection limit of about 50 Gy in radiation dose units. These two products were also detected in mixtures of all four nucleosides irradiated with 50 Gy

  18. Radiation and chemically induced potentially lethal lesions in noncycling mammalian cells: recovery analysis in terms of x-ray- and ultraviolet-like-systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, G.M.

    1975-01-01

    Recovery from and fixation of potentially lethal damage after exposure of Chinese hamster cells to uv and to x irradiation were investigated, as was recovery after exposure to chemotherapeutic agents. Recovery after uv radiation has a T/sub 1 / 2 / of about 20 hr; the fraction of cells able to undergo recovery depends upon nutritional factors both before and after exposure. After x irradiation, recovery proceeds with a T/sub 1 / 2 / of approximately 2 hr and is much less influenced by nutritional factors. Fixation after serum stimulation has a T/sub 1 / 2 / of 3 to 4 hr in uv-irradiated cells, a T/sub 1 / 2 / of 30 min in x-irradiated cells. Recovery kinetics after nitrogen mustard and bleomycin exposures mimic those for x-ray exposure; after methyl methane sulfonate the kinetics are mainly uv-like, though with an x-ray-like component. Recovery by cells with BUdR-substituted DNA and irradiated with visible light is primarily x-ray-like, though with a uv-like component. There is no recovery by cells exposed to adriamycin or to 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea

  19. Spectrum of rectal radiation lesions in cases of cancer cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, V.K.; Rohatgi, V.K.; Gupta, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    The study was carried out in 70 cases of carcinoma cervix uteri, showing varying degree of proctitis following radiotherapy treatment for cervical cancer. Grossly, the rectal mucosa showed oedema, congestion, granular proctitis, ulceration, and microscopically stromal connective tissue as well as epithelial changes. The stromal changes have been emphasised as useful diagnostic criteria of radiation reaction. The familarity of these changes is considered necessary because it is imperative to know categorically that a given lesion is entirely or in part due to radiation or due to extension of adjacent tumour in the cervix. Further, this issue is very important in management of cases of cancer cervix. The criteria of distinguishing the lesions in the rectal tissue have been laid down. (auth.)

  20. Radiation-induced bone neoplasma in facial cranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zomer-Drozda, J; Buraczewska-Lipinska, H; Buraczewski, J [Instytut Onkologii, Warsaw (Poland)

    1976-01-01

    Radiation-induced bone neoplasms in the region of facial cranium account for about 40% of all radiation-induced tumours of bones, although the number of cases with lesions irradiated in this area is proportionally much lower than the number of cases treated with radiotherapy in other parts of the body. Four personal cases of radiation-induced tumours with complicated course are reported. Attention is called to the value of radiological investigations in the diagnosis of bone diseases and in differential diagnosis of radiation-induced tumours of bones.

  1. First Patagonian Course on 'Diagnosis and Therapy of Injuries Induced by Ionizing Radiation'; Primer curso patagonico 'Diagnostico y Tratamiento de Lesiones Inducidas por Radiaciones Ionizantes'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellotti, Mariela I., E-mail: bellotti@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CAB/CNEA), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche. Lab. de Cavitacion y Biotecnologia; Andres, Pablo A., E-mail: andresp@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CAB/CNEA), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche. Division Proteccion Radiologica; Cascón, Adriana S., E-mail: adrianacascon@yahoo.com [Instituto de Medicina, Radiomedicina y Seguridad (IMERASE SA), Buenos Aires, (Argentina)

    2013-07-01

    In Patagonia there are academic centers, health and industrial facilities that use ionizing radiations in its usual practices. However, they do not have protocols that respond to local needs. For this reason was held from October 5 to November 10, 2012 in Bariloche Atomic Center, a training course for health personnel. The range of topics covered ranged from the definition of dosimetry quantities, types of radiation and biological dosimetry, biological effects, radiation acute syndrome, radiation-induced cutaneous syndrome, internal contamination, screening in radiological emergencies, etc.The course provided a theoretical and practical guide about how to recognize and treat people exposed to radiations, guidelines for acting in radiological emergencies and a perception of the psychosocial impact of the radiation accidents.The result was a pocket book for health personnel that will be used in case of having a patient with radiation induced injury.

  2. X-irradiation-induced nuclear lesions in cultured mammaliam cells: an ultrastructural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barham, S.S.; Walters, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    Electron-dense chromatin aggregates, hereafter referred to as lesions, have been characterized morphologically within interphase nuclei of Chinese hamster cells (line CHO) after a single acute exposure to 400, 800, 1200, or 2000 rad of x irradiation. At all doses studied, lesions were observed only after termination of radiation-induced division delay. Cell profiles were scored by electron microscopy for the presence or absence of nuclear lesions at various times after irradiation. The mitotic fraction from each irradiated population was also scored for each sample by light and electron microscopy. From these data and from simultaneous cell-density counts for each sample, it is apparent that postirradiation cell division is a prerequisite to formation of interphase nuclear lesions. Irradiated cell populations blocked in mitosis by Colcemid beyond the normal period of postirradiation division-delay failed to display nuclear lesions until after Colcemid was removed and cell division was completed. Enzyme digestions of isolated nuclei from irradiated cells with DNase I, RNase A, and Pronase suggest that the nuclear lesions are comprised primarily of chromatin. Nucleolar lesions, as well as various aberrant morphological forms of nucleoli, were also observed in cell populations after the onset of postirradiation cell division during the first 72 hr following exposure to irradiation. Delayed radiation-induced ultrastructural alterations of the nucleus included the formation of cytoplasmic invaginations into the nuclear space and inclusions of membranes within nuclei

  3. Radiation-induced nondisjunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, I.A.

    1979-01-01

    The methodology and results of epidemiological studies of the effects of preconception diagnostic x-rays of the abdomen on chromosome segregation in humans are described. The vast majority of studies show the same positive, though not significant, trend to increased nondisjunction among the offspring of irradiated women. The results of the various studies, however, cannot be pooled because of differing methodologies used. Abnormal chromosome segregation during mitotic division has been inducted experimentally by the in vitro exposure of human lymphocytes to a low dose of 50 R gamma irradiation. First meiotic nondisjunction has been successfully induced by whole body exposure of female mice to a low dose of radiation. The question of time-related repair of the mechanism involved in chromosome segregation is raised

  4. Radiation induced nano structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibragimova, E.M.; Kalanov, M.U.; Khakimov, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Nanometer-size silicon clusters have been attracting much attention due to their technological importance, in particular, as promising building blocks for nano electronic and nano photonic systems. Particularly, silicon wires are of great of interest since they have potential for use in one-dimensional quantum wire high-speed field effect transistors and light-emitting devices with extremely low power consumption. Carbon and metal nano structures are studied very intensely due to wide possible applications. Radiation material sciences have been dealing with sub-micron objects for a long time. Under interaction of high energy particles and ionizing radiation with solids by elastic and inelastic mechanisms, at first point defects are created, then they form clusters, column defects, disordered regions (amorphous colloids) and finally precipitates of another crystal phase in the matrix. Such irradiation induced evolution of structure defects and phase transformations was observed by X-diffraction techniques in dielectric crystals of quartz and corundum, which exist in and crystal modifications. If there is no polymorphism, like in alkali halide crystals, then due to radiolysis halogen atoms are evaporated from the surface that results in non-stoichiometry or accumulated in the pores formed by metal vacancies in the sub-surface layer. Nano-pores are created by intensive high energy particles irradiation at first chaotically and then they are ordered and in part filled by inert gas. It is well-known mechanism of radiation induced swelling and embrittlement of metals and alloys, which is undesirable for construction materials for nuclear reactors. Possible solution of this problem may come from nano-structured materials, where there is neither swelling nor embrittlement at gas absorption due to very low density of the structure, while strength keeps high. This review considers experimental observations of radiation induced nano-inclusions in insulating

  5. Radiation-Induced Alopecia after Endovascular Embolization under Fluoroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipawee Ounsakul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced alopecia after fluoroscopically guided procedures is becoming more common due to an increasing use of endovascular procedures. It is characterized by geometric shapes of nonscarring alopecia related to the area of radiation. We report a case of a 46-year-old man presenting with asymptomatic, sharply demarcated rectangular, nonscarring alopecic patch on the occipital scalp following cerebral angiography with fistula embolization under fluoroscopy. His presentations were compatible with radiation-induced alopecia. Herein, we also report a novel scalp dermoscopic finding of blue-grey dots in a target pattern around yellow dots and follicles, which we detected in the lesion of radiation-induced alopecia.

  6. Radiation-induced thermoacoustic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, T.

    1984-01-01

    This invention provides a new technique for obtaining information non-invasively on the composition and structures of a material or body by detecting radiation-induced thermoacoustic image features. This is accomplished by utilizing the acoustic wave generated by sudden thermal stress. The sudden thermal stress is induced by a pulse of radiation which deposits energy causing a rapid, but very small, rise of temperature (typically, ΔT approximately 10sup(-6) - 10sup(-5) deg C). The radiation may be ionizing radiation, such as high energy electrons, photons (x-rays), neutrons, or other charged particles or it may be non-ionizing radiation, such as R.F. and microwave electromagnetic radiation and ultrasonic radiation. The choice of radiation depends on the nature of the body to be imaged and the type of information desired

  7. Progressive tumefactive fibroinflammatory lesion of the infratemporal fossa treated by radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian O’Sullivan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumefactive fibroinflammatory lesion (TFIL is a rare benign tumor in the head and neck region. We present a case of a 40-year-old female with a benign but progressive lesion of the infratemporal fossa, which was diagnosed as TFIL. Patient responded briefly to a course of steroid treatment but eventually showed progression and was unresponsive to further steroids. She was then treated with external beam radiation to a dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. After radiation a slow, gradual decrease in tumor size was noted over the course of years and she is free of disease after more than 11 years of follow-up. The major longterm side effect this patient developed was an expected unilateral radiation-induced retinopathy, due to the close proximity of the lesion to the orbit. The dilemma of treatment of benign disease with radiation with potential long-term complications is discussed and a review of the literature on TFIL is presented.

  8. Radiation-induced cerebrovasculopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeyama, Yukihide; Abiko, Seisho; Kurokawa, Yasushi; Okamura, Tomomi; Watanabe, Kohsaku; Inoue, Shinichi; Fujii, Yasuhiro.

    1993-01-01

    We reported a patient who suffered from cerebrovasculopathy after irradiation therapy for astrocytoma located at the left temporal lobe. An eleven year-old boy who presented with headache and vomiting received partial removal of a tumor. Histological diagnosis of the tumor was astrocytoma (grade II). His preoperative cerebral angiograms showed mass sign solely, without stenosis or occlusion of the cerebral vessel. Postoperatively, he was treated with irradiation therapy involving the whole brain with a total of 30 Gy, and gamma knife therapy. Six months after irradiation, he started suffering from frequent cerebral ischemic attacks, but there was no regrowth of the tumor visible on CT scans. Cerebral angiograms were made again, and revealed multifocal stenoses in the bilateral internal carotid arteries, middle cerebral arteries, and the anterior cerebral artery. His symptoms did not improve after conservative treatment with steroids, calcium antagonist, or low molecular weight dextran. Although he received a superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomoses bilaterally, multiple cerebral infarctions appeared. Although irradiation therapy is acceptable in patients with brain tumor, cerebrovasculopathy after irradiation should be considered as one of the most important complications, and the risk incurred by irradiation therapy should lead to more careful consideration and caution when treating intracranial brain tumors, especially in children. From our experience, the usefulness of bypass surgery for radiation-induced cerebrovasculopathy is still controversial. (author)

  9. Acquisition of a non-matching to place task by rats with neonatal hippocampal lesion induced by ionizing radiation / Aquisição de uma tarefa espacial por ratos submetidos a lesão hipocampal neonatal induzida por radiação ionizante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Catelli Infantozzi Costa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Costa, Bueno e Xavier (2005 showed that rats with hippocampus dentate gyrus lesions produced by colchicine have post-surgical tests deficits in spatial tasks involving conditional discrimination (non-matching-to-place, NMTP, although repetitive training does promote the recovery of the lamed subject's performance. The purpose of this experiment was to assess the performance of rats with selective lesions of dentate gyrus induced by neonatal ionizing radiation in the NMTP task. The irradiated group showed deficits in the first training sessions when compared to the control group. Nevertheless, the performance of lesion and control groups was similar at the end of the sessions, as previously reported. The results are discussed in light of the cognitive map theory.

  10. Radiation induced crosslinking of polytetrafluoroethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Akihiro; Tabata, Yoneho; Ikeda, Shigetoshi; Otsuhata, Kazushige; Kudoh, Hisaaki; Seguchi, Tadao.

    1995-01-01

    The Irradiation temperature effect on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) from room temperature to 380degC was investigated by tensile test and thermal analysis. The behavior of tensile properties and changes of crystallinity on irradiation indicated the formation of a network structure in PTFE by radiation induced crosslinking in inert gas in the molten state just above the melting temperature of PTFE (327degC). The crosslinked PTFE showed a much improved radiation resistance in an atmospheric radiation field. (author)

  11. Photothermal lesions in soft tissue induced by optical fiber microheaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel-Domínguez, Reinher; Moreno-Álvarez, Paola; Hautefeuille, Mathieu; Chavarría, Anahí; Hernández-Cordero, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Photothermal therapy has shown to be a promising technique for local treatment of tumors. However, the main challenge for this technique is the availability of localized heat sources to minimize thermal damage in the surrounding healthy tissue. In this work, we demonstrate the use of optical fiber microheaters for inducing thermal lesions in soft tissue. The proposed devices incorporate carbon nanotubes or gold nanolayers on the tips of optical fibers for enhanced photothermal effects and heating of ex vivo biological tissues. We report preliminary results of small size photothermal lesions induced on mice liver tissues. The morphology of the resulting lesions shows that optical fiber microheaters may render useful for delivering highly localized heat for photothermal therapy.

  12. Radiation-induced enteropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sher, M.E.; Bauer, J. (Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-02-01

    The incidence of chronic radiation enteritis appears to have risen in recent years due to the increasing utilization of radiotherapy for abdominal and pelvic malignancies. The etiology, pathogenesis, and management of radiation enteritis are discussed. Two case reports exemplify the progressive nature of the disease. Case 1 demonstrates the classical picture of multiple exacerbations and remissions of partial small bowel obstruction and the eventual need for surgical management ten years after radiation therapy. Case 2 presents the more severe sequelae of an acute perforation with a 14-yr latency period. Predisposing factors in the progression of radiation injury include excessive radiation, underlying cardiovascular disease, fixation of the bowel, and an asthenic habitus. In both cases, radiation injury was localized to a discrete segment of bowel; therefore, resection with a primary end-to-end anastomosis was performed. In addition, diseased bowel was eliminated and, therefore, would not cause further complications such as intractable bleeding or fistula formation. The review focuses on current knowledge which may be applied to the treatment and prevention of radiation enteritis.

  13. Association of malignancy with rapid growth in early lesions induced by irradiation of rat skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGregor, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Epithelial lesions induced by irradiation of rat skin were studied to determine (a) the relationship of malignancy to dose, (b) the types of lesions and circumstances leading to overt malignancy, and (c) the growth rates of lesions progressing to malignancy versus those of lesions remaining benign. High doses of radiation were shown to be associated with the production of epidermal cancers, the maximum yield being obtained at 6,400 rads. Conversely, a peak yield of noncancerous lesions was obtained at 1,600 rads. This association between malignancy and high dose was consistent for cancers evolving from warts, cysts, and chronic ulcers. Although the proportion of warts among the induced lesions was much higher than that of the cysts or chronic ulcers (76, 14, and 10%, respectively), the likelihood of warts becoming cancerous was substantially lower (14, 23, and 21%). The combined data for all doses showed that the latency period of the epidermal cancers was significantly (P = 0.015) shorter than that of the benign tumors. Rapid growth rates were observed for warts, cysts, and chronic ulcers progressing to overt cancer, and these did not overlap at any point on the growth scale with rates for benign tumors. This finding suggested that the potential for malignant development had been established early in the carcinogenic process, very likely at induction

  14. Localized lesions induced by 137Cs during the Goiania accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, A.R.; Brandao-Mello, C.E.; Valverde, N.J.; Farina, R.; Curado, M.P.

    1991-01-01

    A description is given of initial symptoms and clinical observations regarding acute localized radiation lesions in 28 persons exposed to 137Cs during the Goiania radiological accident. Specialized procedures to estimate the extent and gravity of the lesions and establish a therapeutic strategy, as well as to anticipate the prognosis in each case, are briefly discussed. Measures taken for reduction of pain and inflammation are noted, and an explanation is given for difficulties encountered due to adverse working conditions and the serious clinical manifestations presented by various patients concomitantly with their lesions. Also noted is the difficulty in obtaining credible information regarding exposure, such as source-to-object distance, duration of exposure, and source activity, which precluded dosimetry studies in most cases

  15. Basic reactions induced by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlesby, A.

    1980-01-01

    This paper summarises some of the basic reactions resulting from exposure to high energy radiation. In the initial stages energy is absorbed, but not necessarily at random, giving radical and ion species which may then react to promote the final chemical change. However, it is possible to intervene at intermediate stages to modify or reduce the radiation effect. Under certain conditions enhanced reactions are also possible. Several expressions are given to calculate radiation yield in terms of energy absorbed. Some analogies between radiation-induced reactions in polymers, and those studied in radiobiology are outlined. (author)

  16. Pulmonary lesions induced by inhaled plutonium in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagle, G.E.; Lund, J.E.; Park, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    The histopathologic features of pulmonary fibrosis and bronchiolo-alveolar carcinoma in beagles exposed to aerosols of 238 Pu or 239 Pu oxide are reviewed. A hypothesis of the pathogenesis of radiation pneumonitis induced by inhalation of plutonium oxide is presented; this hypothesis included phagocytosis of Pu particles, fibrosis responding to the necrosis, and alveolar cell hyperplasia compensating for alveolar cells killed by alpha radiation. Histopathologic features of the epithelial changes suggest a progression from hyperplasia to metaplasia and, finally, to bronchiolo-alveolar carcinoma. The possibility of concurrent radiation-induced lymphopenia contributing to the development of bronchiolo-alveolar carcinoma through a loss of immunologic surveillance is discussed

  17. Pulmonary lesions induced by inhaled plutonium in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagle, G.E.; Lund, J.E.; Park, J.F.

    1975-01-01

    The histopathologic features of pulmonary fibrosis and bronchiolo-alveolar carcinoma in beagles exposed to aerosols of plutonium oxide were reviewed. A hypothesis of the pathogenesis of radiation pneumonitis induced by inhalation of plutonium oxide was presented; this hypothesis included phagocytosis of plutonium particles, fibrosis responding to the necrosis, and alveolar cell hyperplasia compensating for alveolar cells killed by alpha radiation. Histopathologic features of the epithelial changes suggest a progression from hyperplasia to metaplasia and, finally, to bronchiolo-alveolar carcinoma. The possibility of concurrent radiation-induced lymphopenia contributing to the development of bronchiolo-alveolar carcinoma through a loss of immunologic surveillance was discussed

  18. Radiation-induced cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martignoni, K.

    1986-01-01

    Dose assessments for cataract threshold doses are available based on epidemiological studies of radiotherapy patients, survivors of the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and of persons with occupational exposure to radiation. According to these, short-term application of low-level LET radiation of a dose ranging between 0.5 and 2.0 Gy may suffice to cause a cataract in the course of a few months or years which results in inpairment of vision (UNSCEAR, 1982). In fractionated irradiation, cataractogenic threshold dose increases to 4 Sv at treatment times between 3 weeks and 3 months, and to more than 5 Sv at more than 3 months (ICRP 41). Densely ionizing radiation must be assumed to have threshold doses between 2 and 20 Sv. An ICRP assessment (ICRP Publ. No. 41, 1984) gives a threshold dose of more than 8 Sv for a vision-impairing cataract if these was protracted irradiation at a low-level dose rate. Concerning radiation protection, a maximum lens dose of 150 mSv per annum was recommended which should not be exceeded. This indicates a maximum of 7.5 Sv of exposure throughout a period of 50 years of working life. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Delayed Radiation-Induced Vasculitic Leukoencephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauch, Philipp J. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Faculty of Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Park, Henry S. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Knisely, Jonathan P.S. [Department of Radiation Medicine, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York (United States); Chiang, Veronica L. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Vortmeyer, Alexander O., E-mail: alexander.vortmeyer@yale.edu [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Recently, single-fraction, high-dosed focused radiation therapy such as that administered by Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used increasingly for the treatment of metastatic brain cancer. Radiation therapy to the brain can cause delayed leukoencephalopathy, which carries its own significant morbidity and mortality. While radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy is known to be clinically different from that following fractionated radiation, pathological differences are not well characterized. In this study, we aimed to integrate novel radiographic and histopathologic observations to gain a conceptual understanding of radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy. Methods and Materials: We examined resected tissues of 10 patients treated at Yale New Haven Hospital between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, for brain metastases that had been previously treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, who subsequently required surgical management of a symptomatic regrowing lesion. None of the patients showed pathological evidence of tumor recurrence. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data for each of the 10 patients were then studied retrospectively. Results: We provide evidence to show that radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy may present as an advancing process that extends beyond the original high-dose radiation field. Neuropathologic examination of the resected tissue revealed traditionally known leukoencephalopathic changes including demyelination, coagulation necrosis, and vascular sclerosis. Unexpectedly, small and medium-sized vessels revealed transmural T-cell infiltration indicative of active vasculitis. Conclusions: We propose that the presence of a vasculitic component in association with radiation-induced leukoencephalopathy may facilitate the progressive nature of the condition. It may also explain the resemblance of delayed leukoencephalopathy with recurring tumor on virtually all imaging modalities used for posttreatment follow-up.

  20. Peculiarities of radiation induced craniopharyngioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sataev, N.M. (Uzbekskij Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Onkologii i Radiologii, Tashkent (USSR))

    1982-03-01

    Due to intracranial implantation of a radiosource in rabbit brain craniopharyngioma appeared. Its specific feature is grandular differentiation of embryonal epithelium of residuals of hypophysical (craniopharyngial) passage and the presence of focuses of blood vessel tumor degeneration of hemangioma type in its stroma. It is suggested that radiation craniopharyngioma is developed along the way of epigenetic changes of cellular elements of embryonal epithelium induced by radiation.

  1. Peculiarities of radiation induced craniopharyngioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sataev, N.M.

    1982-01-01

    Due to intracranial implantation of a radiosource in rabbit brain craniopharyngioma appeared. Its specific feature is grandular differentiation of embryonal epithelium of residuals of hypophysical (craniopharyngial) passage and the presence of focuses of blood vessel tumor degeneration of hemangioma type in its stroma. It is suggested that radiation craniopharyngioma is developed along the way of epigenetic changes of cellular elements of embryonal epithelium induced by radiation

  2. A case of radiation induced cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Kazuyoshi; Tsuchikawa, Kohzo; Sato, Akira; Kato, Joji (Nippon Dental Univ., Niigata (Japan). School of Dentistry at Niigata)

    1994-06-01

    A case of carcinoma on the right buccal mucosa is presented. The case was suspected to have been induced by irradiation therapy for a carcinoma on the left buccal mucosa. An external radiotherapy, 6-MeV Linac, had been done for the carcinoma on the left buccal mucosa in a 55-year-old female, with single lateral direction from the left to the right in 1977. In 1985, a papillary lesion on the right buccal mucosa was detected, and histological examination revealed a papilloma without atypism. In 1991, as an ulcer on the right upper buccal fold as well as three papillary lesions in the central portion of the right buccal mucosa were found, the patient was referred to our clinic. Microscopical findings were consistent with the early invasive carcinomas. A surgical excision of these whole lesions and skin graft were completed. The criteria of this case for the suspicion of radiation-induced carcinoma were as follows. There was a long latent period of 14 years. The previous dose of irradiation, 60 Gy, was sufficient. The right buccal mucosa was involved in the radiation field. A severe scar on the left cheek resulted from the previous irradiation. Anatomically, there is no evidence of the secondary carcinoma on the right buccal mucosa with the primary carcinoma on the left buccal mucosa. No evidence for recurrence of the tumors on both sides of buccal mucosa has been detected so far. Further observations will be necessary to detect other tumors in the irradiated field later on. (author).

  3. Radiation-induced myelomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuzick, J.

    1981-01-01

    It is well known that radiation can cause myeloid leukemia. However, no excess of chronic lymphocytic leukemia has been observed. Myelomatosis, like chronic lymphocytic leukemia, is a tumor of B lymphocytes. To determine whether this disease has a radiogenic origin, we surveyed all cohorts of persons exposed to radiation for which data on cancer-related mortaility are available. An excess of myeloma was found in most cohorts. However, a striking deficit was found in two groups irradiated intensely for uterine neoplasms (three cases observed, 10.71 expected; P = 0.012). All other groups combined had a highly significant excess (50 observed, 22.21 expected; P = 2 x 10 -7 ). The largest relative risk appeared among persons receiving internal doses of α-particles (14 observed, 3.24 expected; P = 2 x 10 -5 ), but a significant excess (13 observed, 6.33 expected; P = 0.026) was also found in patients receiving only therapeutic or diagnostic γ-rays or x-rays. Most cases occurred 15 to 25 years after exposure

  4. Radiation induced emulsion polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stannett, V.T.; Stahel, E.P.

    1990-01-01

    High energy radiation is particularly favored for the initiation of emulsion polymerization. The yield of free radicals, for example, from the radiolysis of the aqueous phase, is high; G(radical) values of 5-7. In addition, the rather special kinetics associated with emulsion polymerization lead, in general, to very large kinetic chain lengths, even with 'non-ideal' monomers such as vinyl acetate. Together, high polymerization rates at low doses become possible. There are some important advantages of radiation polymerization compared with chemical initiators, such as potassium persulfate. Perhaps the most important among them is the temperature independence of the initiation step. This makes low temperature polymerization very accessible. With monomers such as vinyl acetate, where chain termination to monomer is predominant, low temperatures lead to often highly desirable higher molecular weights. With styrene, the classical ideally behaved monomer, there are the advantages such as, for example, the feasibility of using cationic monomers. These and some attendant disadvantages are discussed in detail, including pilot plant studies

  5. Radiation-induced heart injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yoshihiko; Niibe, Hideo

    1975-01-01

    In order to identify radiation-induced heart injury and to differentiate it from heart disease, an attempt was made to clarify post-irradiation heart injury by investigating the histological changes which occur during the internal between the irradiation and the time of demonstrable histological changes. A study was made of 83 autopsies in which most of the primary neoplasms were breast cancers, lung cancers and mediastinal tumors. In 43 of these autopsies the heart had been irradiated. Sixty eight dd-strain mice were also used for microautoradiographic study. Histological changes in the heart were observed in 27 of the 43 cases receiving irradiation. The limit of the tolerance dose to the heart for indicating histological changes was 1220 ret in humans. The latent period without histological changes was 2.7 months after initiation of radiation therapy. Greater heart injury was observed after re-irradiation or after the combined therapy of radiation and chemotherapy especially mitomycin (MMC). The histological findings after treatment with MMC were similar to those of radiation-induced heart injury. Results of the study indicate that the damage is secondary to radiation-induced changes of the vascula connective tissue. (Evans, G.)

  6. Fracture induced electromagnetic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frid, V; Rabinovitch, A; Bahat, D

    2003-01-01

    In our laboratory, we combine accurate electromagnetic radiation (EMR) measurements during fracture of rocks (carbonate and igneous) and transparent materials (glass, PMMA and glass ceramics) with careful fractographic methods. A critical analysis of experimental observations, accumulated here during the last decade together with supporting material from the works of other authors are used in this study to demonstrate the failure of all current models to explain the properties of EMR arising from fracture. The basic elements of a new model are proposed. These are (a) the EMR amplitude increases as long as the crack continues to grow, since new atomic bonds are severed and their contribution is added to the EMR. As a result, the atoms on both sides of the bonds are moved to 'non-equilibrium' positions relative to their steady state ones and begin to oscillate collectively in a manner similar to Debye model bulk oscillations - 'surface vibrational optical waves'; (b) when the crack halts, the waves and the EMR pulse amplitude decay by relaxation. These basic elements are already enough to describe the characteristics of the experimentally obtained isolated individual EMR pulses. These characteristics include the shape of the EMR pulse envelope, and the frequency, time duration and rise - fall time of the pulse

  7. Fracture induced electromagnetic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frid, V [Geological and Environmental Sciences Department, Deichmann Rock Mechanics Laboratory of the Negev, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel); Rabinovitch, A [Physics Department, Deichmann Rock Mechanics Laboratory of the Negev, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel); Bahat, D [Geological and Environmental Sciences Department, Deichmann Rock Mechanics Laboratory of the Negev, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel)

    2003-07-07

    In our laboratory, we combine accurate electromagnetic radiation (EMR) measurements during fracture of rocks (carbonate and igneous) and transparent materials (glass, PMMA and glass ceramics) with careful fractographic methods. A critical analysis of experimental observations, accumulated here during the last decade together with supporting material from the works of other authors are used in this study to demonstrate the failure of all current models to explain the properties of EMR arising from fracture. The basic elements of a new model are proposed. These are (a) the EMR amplitude increases as long as the crack continues to grow, since new atomic bonds are severed and their contribution is added to the EMR. As a result, the atoms on both sides of the bonds are moved to 'non-equilibrium' positions relative to their steady state ones and begin to oscillate collectively in a manner similar to Debye model bulk oscillations - 'surface vibrational optical waves'; (b) when the crack halts, the waves and the EMR pulse amplitude decay by relaxation. These basic elements are already enough to describe the characteristics of the experimentally obtained isolated individual EMR pulses. These characteristics include the shape of the EMR pulse envelope, and the frequency, time duration and rise - fall time of the pulse.

  8. Contemporary state of the problem of radiation lesions of the lungs: scientometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamonova, N.O.; Kulyinyich, G.V.; Gajsenyuk, L.O.; Masyich, O.V.; Pavlyichenko, Yu.V.

    2011-01-01

    Scientometric analysis of the contemporary state and prospects of development of the problem of lung radiation lesion allowed to prove its urgency. But among separate questions, the most important is solving the problem of lung radiation toxicity. The majority of publications about clinical trials suggest about a constant search for new means of prevention and treatment. It was established that the information search efficacy about lung radiation lesions depended on the adequate use of term corpus of PubMed database.

  9. A Correlative Study of Smokeless Tobacco induced Lesion and Smoke-induced Leukoplakia in Various Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parita K Chitroda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Various oral mucosal lesions are attributed to tobacco use. The presence of these conditions vanes with particular type of tobacco used (smoking or smokeless and the form in which it is used, such as cigarettes, pipes, cigars and chewing moist snuff. The frequency and duration of use as well as the ways in which the tobacco product is used also contributes to the clinical presentation and seventy of the lesion. The present study is mainly focused on the correlation between the smokeless tobacco-induced lesion and smoke-induced leukoplakia on various aspects with an objective to determine smokeless tobacco as a possible cause for leukoplakia.

  10. Ultrastructural apoptotic lesions induced in rat thymocytes after borax ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvain, I C; Berry, J P; Galle, P

    1998-01-01

    Apoptosis has gained increasing attention in recent years. Several chemical compounds induce apoptotic lesions in the thymus. Male Wistar rats received 2000 ppm of borax (Na2B4O7.10H2O) in their food for 16 days. The rats were sacrificed 2, 5, 9, 12, 19, 21, 26 and 28 days after the beginning of treatment. Thymus samples of all rats were taken. A Philips EM 300 electron microscopy was used to study the ultrastructural morphology. Serious nuclear and cytoplasmic lesions were observed. Moreover, numerous macrophages containing apoptotic cells were present in the thymus. The alterations were observed from the 2nd to the 28th day. The extent of damage was much more important in the rats sacrificed 21, 26 and 28 days after borax ingestion.

  11. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies on radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the progeny of exposed mammalian cells were briefly described as well as other related studies. For the analysis of chromosomal damage in clones, cells were seeded directly after exposure in cell well-dish to form single cell clones and post-irradiation chromosome aberrations were scored. Both exposure to isoeffective doses of X-ray or 270 MeV/u C-ions (13 keV/μm) increased the number of clones with abnormal karyotype and the increase was similar for X-ray and for C-ions. Meanwhile, in the progeny of cells for mass cultures, there was no indication of a delayed expression of chromosomal damage up to 40 population doublings after the exposure. A high number of aberrant cells were only observed directly after exposure to 10.7 MeV/u O-ions, i.e. in the first cycle cells and decreased with subsequent cell divisions. The reason for these differences in the radiation-induced chromosomal instability between clonal isolates and mass culture has not been clarified. Recent studies indicated that genomic instability occurs at a high frequency in the progeny of cells irradiated with both sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. Such genomic instability is thought likely to increase the risk of carcinogenesis, but more data are required for a well understanding of the health risks resulting from radiation-induced delayed instability. (M.N.)

  12. Diseases induced by ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    An interim report is presented by the Industrial Injuries Advisory Council in accordance with Section 141 of the Social Security Act 1975 on the question whether the terms of prescription for occupational diseases induced by ionising radiation should be amended to cover a wider range of conditions. A lack of persuasive statistical data has prevented reliable estimates of health risks of radiation workers in the UK to be made. However the report gives details of the progress made so far and the difficulties encountered. (U.K.)

  13. Ethanol induces rotational behavior in 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverman, P.B.

    1987-03-09

    Mice with unilateal striatal lesions created by 6-hydroxydopamine (6HDA) injection were screened for rotational (circling) behavior in response to injection of amphetamine and apomorphine. Those that rotated ipsilaterally in response to amphetamine and contralaterally in response to apomorphine were subsequently challenged with 1 to 3 g/kg (i.p.) ethanol. Surprisingly, ethanol induced dose related contralateral (apomorphine-like) rotation which, despite gross intoxication, was quite marked in most animals. No significant correlation was found between the number of turns made following ethanol and made after apomorphine or amphetamine. 14 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  14. Endodontic periapical lesion-induced mental nerve paresthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadmehr, Elham; Shekarchizade, Neda

    2015-01-01

    Paresthesia is a burning or prickling sensation or partial numbness, resulting from neural injury. The symptoms can vary from mild neurosensory dysfunction to total loss of sensation in the innervated area. Only a few cases have described apical periodontitis to be the etiological factor of impaired sensation in the area innervated by the inferior alveolar and mental nerves. The aim of the present paper is to report a case of periapical lesion-induced paresthesia in the innervation area of the mental nerve, which was successfully treated with endodontic retreatment. PMID:25878687

  15. Radiation-induced life-shortening and premature aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walburg, H.E. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Data from a number of studies on irradiated laboratory animals showed that almost none of the characteristic lesions associated with senescence that were studied adequately reflects a radiation effect analogous to premature aging. In fact, most of the age-related changes showed no effect of radiation at all, and many of those that did (for example, graying of hair, sterility, cataract formation) did not appear to be due to similar mechanisms. It is concluded that, in the light of more recent information, the hypothesis of radiation-induced premature aging requires reassessment. (80 references) (CH)

  16. Radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the calvaria; Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugita, Yasuo; Shigemori, Minoru; Miyagi, Jun; Ochiai, Satoshi; Lee, Souichi; Watanabe, Toshinori; Abe, Hitoshi; Morimatsu, Minoru [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1992-01-01

    The authors report a case of radiation-induced calvarial osteosarcoma. A 58-year-old female received subtotal removal of the pituitary adenoma and 5000 rads postoperative irradiation. Seven years later, an osteoblastic osteosarcoma occurred in the frontotemporal region. She received total tumor removal and chemotherapy. However, computed tomography subsequently revealed multiple small lesions at the margin of the bone flap. A chest x-ray film demonstrated lung metastasis. Local recurrence and lung metastasis require careful attention in radiation-induced osteosarcoma patients. (author).

  17. Pathology of radiation induced lung damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Yoshinori; Murata, Yoshihiko; Ogata, Hideo; Katagiri, Shiro; Sugita, Hironobu; Iwai, Kazuo; Sakurai, Isamu.

    1985-01-01

    We examined pathological findings of radiation induced lung damage. Twenty-three cases are chosen from our hospital autopsy cases for 9 years, which fulfil strict criteria of radiation lung damage. Lung damage could be classified into 3 groups : 1) interstitial pneumonia type (9 cases), 2) intermediate pneumonia type (8 cases), and 3) alveolar pneumonia type (6 cases), according to the degree of intra-luminal exudation. These classification is well correlated with clinical findings. Pathological alveolar pneumonia type corresponds to symptomatic, radiologic ground glass pneumonic shadow. And pathologic interstitial type corresponds to clinical asymptomatic, radiologic reticulo-nodular shadow. From the clinico-pathological view point these classification is reasonable one. Radiation affects many lung structures and showed characteristic feature of repair. Elastofibrosis of the alveolar wall is observed in every cases, obstructive bronchiolitis are observed in 5 cases, and obstructive bronchiolitis in 9 cases. They are remarkable additional findings. Thickening of the interlobular septum, broncho-vascular connective tissue, and pleural layer are observed in every cases together with vascular lesions. (author)

  18. Radiation induced estane polymer crosslinking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, M.; Foster, P.

    1997-01-01

    The exposure of polymeric materials to radiation has been known to induce the effects of crosslinking and degradation. The crosslinking phenomena comes about when two long chain polymers become linked together by a primary bond that extends the chain and increases the viscosity, molecular weight and the elastic modules of the polymer. This process has been observed in relatively short periods of time with fairly high doses of radiation, on the order of several megarads/hour. This paper address low dose exposure over long periods of time to determine what the radiation effects are on the polymeric binder material in PBX 9501. An experimental sample of binder material without explosives will be placed into a thermal and radiation field produced from a W-48 put mod 0. Another sample will be placed in a thermal environment without the radiation. The following is the test plan that was submitted to the Pantex process. The data presented here will be from the first few weeks of exposure and this test will be continued over the next few years. Subsequent data will hopefully be presented in the next compatibility and aging conference

  19. Repair of UVC induced DNA lesions in erythrocytes from Carassius auratus gibelio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagdonas, E.; Zukas, K.

    2004-01-01

    The kinetics of UVC (254 nm) irradiation induced DNA single-strand breaks generated during the excision repair of UV induced DNA damage in erythrocytes from Carassius auratus gibelio were studied using alkaline comet assay. Nucleotide excision repair recognised DNA lesions such as UVC induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 6-4 pyrimidine-pyrimidone photoproducts and produced DNA single-stranded breaks that were easily detected by comet assay. After irradiation of erythrocytes with 58 j/m 2 UVC dose, there was an increase in comet tail moment (CTM) at 2 hours post-radiation, whereas at 4 hours post-radiation CTM decreased and did not differ significantly from the control level (P=0,127). When erythrocytes were exposed to 173 J/m 2 UVC dose, the excision repair delayed in the beginning (0 hours), reached maximum level at 2 hours post-radiation (CTM-54,8) and showed slightly decreased level at 4 hours post-radiation (CTM=18,5). (author)

  20. Identification of potentially cytotoxic lesions induced by UVA photoactivation of DNA 4-thiothymidine in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reelfs, Olivier; Macpherson, Peter; Ren, Xiaolin; Xu, Yao-Zhong; Karran, Peter; Young, Antony R.

    2011-01-01

    Photochemotherapy—in which a photosensitizing drug is combined with ultraviolet or visible radiation—has proven therapeutic effectiveness. Existing approaches have drawbacks, however, and there is a clinical need to develop alternatives offering improved target cell selectivity. DNA substitution by 4-thiothymidine (S4TdR) sensitizes cells to killing by ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation. Here, we demonstrate that UVA photoactivation of DNA S4TdR does not generate reactive oxygen or cause direct DNA breakage and is only minimally mutagenic. In an organotypic human skin model, UVA penetration is sufficiently robust to kill S4TdR-photosensitized epidermal cells. We have investigated the DNA lesions responsible for toxicity. Although thymidine is the predominant UVA photoproduct of S4TdR in dilute solution, more complex lesions are formed when S4TdR-containing oligonucleotides are irradiated. One of these, a thietane/S5-(6-4)T:T, is structurally related to the (6-4) pyrimidine:pyrimidone [(6-4) Py:Py] photoproducts induced by UVB/C radiation. These lesions are detectable in DNA from S4TdR/UVA-treated cells and are excised from DNA more efficiently by keratinocytes than by leukaemia cells. UVA irradiation also induces DNA interstrand crosslinking of S4TdR-containing duplex oligonucleotides. Cells defective in repairing (6-4) Py:Py DNA adducts or processing DNA crosslinks are extremely sensitive to S4TdR/UVA indicating that these lesions contribute significantly to S4TdR/UVA cytotoxicity. PMID:21890905

  1. Seven cases of radiation-induced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugita, Kazunari; Yamamoto, Osamu; Suenaga, Yoshinori

    2000-01-01

    We report 7 cases of radiation-induced skin cancer. The diagnosis was based on the history of radiotherapy for benign skin diseases (5 cases) and of occupational exposures to medical doctors (2 cases). All cases were squamous cell carcinomas which arose from chronic radiodermatitis. The estimated latent period of these tumors ranged from 6 to 64 years, with an average of 29.9 years. After surgical treatments of the lesions, no local recurrences were observed in all cases. Benign skin diseases had sometimes been treated with low-energy radiation before the 1960s. Considering the estimated latent period, the peak time point of developing risk of radiation-induced skin cancer by such treatment has been already passed, however, the danger of it should not be ignored in future. In association with multiplicity of radiation usage, occupational exposure of radiation may develop the risk of occurrence of skin cancer in future. Therefore, we should recognize that radiation-induced skin cancer is not in the past. In the cases of chronic skin diseases showing warty keratotic growth, erosion and ulcer, we should include chronic radio-dermatitis in the differential diagnosis. It is necessary to recall all patients about the history of radiotherapy or radiation exposure. Rapid histopathological examination is mandatory because of the suspicion of radiation-induced skin cancer. (author)

  2. Seven cases of radiation-induced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugita, Kazunari; Yamamoto, Osamu; Suenaga, Yoshinori [Univ. of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-09-01

    We report 7 cases of radiation-induced skin cancer. The diagnosis was based on the history of radiotherapy for benign skin diseases (5 cases) and of occupational exposures to medical doctors (2 cases). All cases were squamous cell carcinomas which arose from chronic radiodermatitis. The estimated latent period of these tumors ranged from 6 to 64 years, with an average of 29.9 years. After surgical treatments of the lesions, no local recurrences were observed in all cases. Benign skin diseases had sometimes been treated with low-energy radiation before the 1960s. Considering the estimated latent period, the peak time point of developing risk of radiation-induced skin cancer by such treatment has been already passed, however, the danger of it should not be ignored in future. In association with multiplicity of radiation usage, occupational exposure of radiation may develop the risk of occurrence of skin cancer in future. Therefore, we should recognize that radiation-induced skin cancer is not in the past. In the cases of chronic skin diseases showing warty keratotic growth, erosion and ulcer, we should include chronic radio-dermatitis in the differential diagnosis. It is necessary to recall all patients about the history of radiotherapy or radiation exposure. Rapid histopathological examination is mandatory because of the suspicion of radiation-induced skin cancer. (author)

  3. Mechanisms of radiation-induced neoplastic cell transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T.C.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1984-04-01

    Studies with cultured mammalian cells demonstrated clearly that radiation can transform cells directly and can enhance the cell transformation by oncogenic DNA viruses. In general, high-LET heavy-ion radiation can be more effective than X and gamma rays in inducing neoplastic cell transformation. Various experimental results indicate that radiation-induced DNA damage, most likely double-strand breaks, is important for both the initiation of cell transformation and for the enhancement of viral transformation. Some of the transformation and enhancement lesions can be repaired properly in the cell, and the amount of irrepairable lesions produced by a given dose depends on the quality of radiation. An inhibition of repair processes with chemical agents can increase the transformation frequency of cells exposed to radiation and/or oncogenic viruses, suggesting that repair mechanisms may play an important role in the radiation transformation. The progression of radiation-transformed cells appears to be a long and complicated process that can be modulated by some nonmutagenic chemical agents, e.g., DMSO. Normal cells can inhibit the expression of transforming properties of tumorigenic cells through an as yet unknown mechanism. The progression and expression of transformation may involve some epigenetic changes in the irradiated cells. 38 references, 15 figures, 1 table

  4. Mechanisms of radiation-induced neoplastic cell transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, T.C.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1984-04-01

    Studies with cultured mammalian cells demonstrated clearly that radiation can transform cells directly and can enhance the cell transformation by oncogenic DNA viruses. In general, high-LET heavy-ion radiation can be more effective than X and gamma rays in inducing neoplastic cell transformation. Various experimental results indicate that radiation-induced DNA damage, most likely double-strand breaks, is important for both the initiation of cell transformation and for the enhancement of viral transformation. Some of the transformation and enhancement lesions can be repaired properly in the cell, and the amount of irrepairable lesions produced by a given dose depends on the quality of radiation. An inhibition of repair processes with chemical agents can increase the transformation frequency of cells exposed to radiation and/or oncogenic viruses, suggesting that repair mechanisms may play an important role in the radiation transformation. The progression of radiation-transformed cells appears to be a long and complicated process that can be modulated by some nonmutagenic chemical agents, e.g., DMSO. Normal cells can inhibit the expression of transforming properties of tumorigenic cells through an as yet unknown mechanism. The progression and expression of transformation may involve some epigenetic changes in the irradiated cells. 38 references, 15 figures, 1 table.

  5. Radiation-induced neuropathies: collateral damage of improved cancer prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradat, Pierre-Francois; Maisonobe, Thierry; Psimaras, Dimitri; Lenglet, Timothee; Porcher, Raphael; Lefaix, J.L.; Delenian, S.

    2012-01-01

    Because of the improvement of cancer prognosis, long-term damages of treatments become a medical and public health problem. Among the iatrogenic complications, neurological impairment is crucial to consider since motor disability and pain have a considerable impact on quality of life of long cancer survivors. However, radiation-induced neuropathies have not been the focus of great attention. The objective of this paper is to provide an updated review about the radiation-induced lesions of the peripheral nerve system. Radiation-induced neuropathies are characterized by their heterogeneity in both symptoms and disease course. Signs and symptoms depend on the affected structures of the peripheral nerve system (nerve roots, nerve plexus or nerve trunks). Early-onset complications are often transient and late complications are usually progressive and associated with a poor prognosis. The most frequent and well known is delayed radiation-induced brachial plexopathy, which may follow breast cancer irradiation. Radiation-induced lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy is characterized by pure or predominant lower motor neuron signs. They can be misdiagnosed, confused with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or with leptomeningeal metastases since nodular MRI enhancement of the nerve roots of the cauda equina and increased cerebrospinal fluid protein content can be observed. In the absence of specific markers of the link with radiotherapy, the diagnosis of post-radiation neuropathy may be difficult. Recently, a posteriori conformal radiotherapy with 3D dosimetric reconstitution has been developed to link a precise anatomical site to unexpected excess irradiation. The importance of early diagnosis of radiation-induced neuropathies is underscored by the emergence of new disease-modifying treatments. Although the pathophysiology is not fully understood, it is already possible to target radiation-induced fibrosis but also associated factors such as ischemia, oxidative stress and

  6. Radiation induced sulfur dioxide removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    The biggest source of air pollution is the combustion of fossil fuels, were pollutants such as particulate, sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), nitrogen oxides (NO x ), and volatile organic compounds (VOC) are emitted. Among these pollutants, sulfur dioxide plays the main role in acidification of the environment. The mechanism of sulfur dioxide transformation in the environment is partly photochemical. This is not direct photooxidation, however, but oxidation through formed radicals. Heterogenic reactions play an important role in this transformation as well; therefore, observations from environmental chemistry can be used in air pollution control engineering. One of the most promising technologies for desulfurization of the flue gases (and simultaneous denitrification) is radiation technology with an electron accelerator application. Contrary to the nitrogen oxides (NO x ) removal processes, which is based on pure radiation induced reactions, sulfur dioxide removal depends on two pathways: a thermochemical reaction in the presence of ammonia/water vapor and a radiation set of radiochemical reactions. The mechanism of these reactions and the consequent technological parameters of the process are discussed in this paper. The industrial application of this radiation technology is being implemented in an industrial pilot plant operated by INCT at EPS Kaweczyn. A full-scale industrial plant is currently in operation in China, and two others are under development in Japan and Poland. (author)

  7. Acute skin lesions due to localized ''hot particle'' radiation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.W.; Carsten, A.L.; Kaurin, D.G.L.; Schaefer, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose of the studies was to determine incidence and severity of lesions resulting from localized deposition of dose to the skin from small ( 2 at 70μm depth) from isotopes having max beta particle energies from about 0.3-3 MeV. Incidence of erythema and scabs (indicating ulceration) were scored routinely for up to 71 days post-irradiation. Responses followed normal probability distributions, and thus, no true threshold could be defined. Ten and 50% incidence rates were deduced using probit analyses. Lowest dose producing 10% incidence was about 1 Gy for exposures to Yb-175 (0.5 MeV max energy) beta particles. Severity of lesions was estimated using diameters and persistence. From preliminary considerations of probability of induction, size, and persistence of acute lesions, a special limit for hot particle exposures in the range of 5-50 Gy may be reasonable, with an action level between about 1 Gy and the limit

  8. Radiation planning in small complex lesions and experimental verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jess-Hempen, A.; Wowra, B.; Mack, A.; Kreiner, H.J.; Heck, B.

    2003-01-01

    The Gamma Knife is used as a sterotactic tool for the conformal treatment of very small, complex-shape cranial lesions. The combination of planning software and treatment equipment enables a highly-precise conformal dose distribution and positioning. The purpose of the present study was to experimentally verify the precision actually achievable in case of extremely irregular, small target volumes. For this purpose, a complete treatment procedure was performed using a standard head phantom complemented with a specially developed insert that simulates an L-shaped lesion. The spatial precision of the irradiation was recorded by means of high-resolution film dosimetry using GafChromic TM films. The analysis of the films showed for the film in the center plane an excellent conformity of the 75% isodose line used to circumscribe the lesion. A very good agreement between planning and measurement resulted also for isodose lines residing outside of the target volume. (orig.) [de

  9. UVA photoactivation of DNA containing halogenated thiopyrimidines induces cytotoxic DNA lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brem, Reto; Zhang, Xiaohui; Xu, Yao-Zhong; Karran, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Photochemotherapy, the combination of a photosensitiser and ultraviolet (UV) or visible light, is an effective treatment for skin conditions including cancer. The high mutagenicity and non-selectivity of photochemotherapy regimes warrants the development of alternative approaches. We demonstrate that the thiopyrimidine nucleosides 5-bromo-4-thiodeoxyuridine (SBrdU) and 5-iodo-4-thiodeoxyuridine (SIdU) are incorporated into the DNA of cultured human and mouse cells where they synergistically sensitise killing by low doses of UVA radiation. The DNA halothiopyrimidine/UVA combinations induce DNA interstrand crosslinks, DNA-protein crosslinks, DNA strand breaks, nucleobase damage and lesions that resemble UV-induced pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproducts. These are potentially lethal DNA lesions and cells defective in their repair are hypersensitive to killing by SBrdU/UVA and SIdU/UVA. DNA SIdU and SBrdU generate lethal DNA photodamage by partially distinct mechanisms that reflect the different photolabilities of their C–I and C–Br bonds. Although singlet oxygen is involved in photolesion formation, DNA SBrdU and SIdU photoactivation does not detectably increase DNA 8-oxoguanine levels. The absence of significant collateral damage to normal guanine suggests that UVA activation of DNA SIdU or SBrdU might offer a strategy to target hyperproliferative skin conditions that avoids the extensive formation of a known mutagenic DNA lesion. PMID:25747491

  10. 241Am induced thyroid lesions in the beagle: interim observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.N.; Zizumbo, I.; Angus, W.; Jones, A.; Elliot, D.

    1976-01-01

    Injected doses of 2.88, 0.91 or 0.296 μCi 241 Am/kg in young adult beagles produced morphological changes in the thyroid gland and produce lower concentrations of thyroxin in the sera. Interstitial fibrosis without functional impairment was induced by the 0.099 μCi 241 Am/kg dose level. Clinical symptoms of hypothyroidism were not observed, even in those dogs with the most extreme thyroid lesions. The changes were characterized by a decrease in thyroid weight, interfollicular fibrosis, loss of colloid, loss of follicular epithelium, and hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the residual epithelium. Thus far, thyroid tumors have not been observed, however, a significant percentage of the animals in the lower dose levels are still living

  11. A Case of Lung Lesions Induced by a soccer Ball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Takemoto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An 18-year-old youth soccer forward received a direct hit from a kicked soccer ball on the anterior right chest when the goal keeper kicked the ball from a distance of 1 meter. Immediately following the hit, the subject experienced dypnea, chest pain and had a cough, with several milliliters of hemoptysis. His symptoms subsided after 20 minutes of rest. However, he still felt mild discomfort and was taken to our department for evaluation. On examination, all vital signs were normal. A computed tomography scan of the chest was obtained, and revealed a small area of opacification in the right lung field suggesting a pulmonary contusion or traumatic lung edema. Ten days after the initial injury, he was cleared for full participation. We herein reported the first case of a lung lesion induced by a soccer ball. Conservative treatment resulted in a favorable outcome.

  12. Operative treatment of radiation-induced fistulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balslev, I.; Harling, H.

    1987-01-01

    Out of 136 patients with radiation-induced intestinal complications, 45 had fistulae. Twenty-eight patients had rectovaginal fistulae while the remainder had a total of 13 different types of fistulae. Thirty-seven patients were treated operatively and eight were treated conservatively. Thirty-three patients were submitted to operation for rectal fistulae. Of these, 28 were treated by defunctioning colostomy, three were treated by Hartmann's method and resection and primary anastomosis was carried out in two patients. In the course of the period of observation, 35% of the patients developed new radiation damage. The frequency in the basic material without fistulae was 21% (0.05< p<0.10). Following establishment of defunctioning colostomy on account of rectovaginal fistulae in 25 patients, eight patients developed new fistulae, Significantly more patients with fistulae died of recurrence as compared with patients with other lesions (p<0.01). Defunctioning colostomy in the treatment of rectal fistula is a reasonable form of treatment in elderly patients and in case of recurrence. Younger patients should be assessed in a special department in view of the possibility of a sphincter-preserving procedure following resection of the rectum and restorative anastomosis. (author)

  13. Operative treatment of radiation-induced fistulae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balslev, I.; Harling, H.

    1987-01-01

    Out of 136 patients with radiation-induced intestinal complications, 45 had fistulae. Twenty-eight patients had rectovaginal fistulae while the remainder had a total of 13 different types of fistulae. Thirty-seven patients were treated operatively and eight were treated conservatively. Thirty-three patients were submitted to operation for rectal fistulae. Of these, 28 were treated by defunctioning colostomy, three were treated by Hartmann's method and resection and primary anastomosis was carried out in two patients. In the course of the period of observation, 35% of the patients developed new radiation damage. The frequency in the basic material without fistulae was 21% (0.05lesions (p<0.01). Defunctioning colostomy in the treatment of rectal fistula is a reasonable form of treatment in elderly patients and in case of recurrence. Younger patients should be assessed in a special department in view of the possibility of a sphincter-preserving procedure following resection of the rectum and restorative anastomosis. 11 refs.

  14. Personnel radiation safety. A case of hand lesion in a radiologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilipenko, M.Yi.; Kulyinyich, G.V.; Stadnik, L.L.

    2012-01-01

    The work featured the questions of norma and rules of radiation safety at work with ionizing radiation. The history of the question about the permissible doses is dabbler's. The changes in the skin when exceeding the tolerant dose are described. A case of severe local lesions of the hand caused by chronic occupational over irradiation, when the safety rules were neglected, is described

  15. Role of acoustic radiation force impulse elastography in the characterization of focal solid hepatic lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshavardhan Nagolu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the study is to investigate the usefulness of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI elastography in the characterization of focal solid liver lesions as benign, malignant, or metastatic using ARFI two-dimensional (2D imaging and ARFI quantification (shear wave velocities [SWVs]. Materials and Methods: Sixty lesions were included in this study. The lesions were classified into three groups: Group I included benign lesions (n = 25, Group II included malignant lesions (n = 27, and Group III included metastatic lesions (n = 8. ARFI elastography was performed in all these patients using a Siemens ACUSON S 2000TM ultrasound machine. Stiffness and size of the lesions were assessed on ARFI 2D images in correlation with B-mode ultrasound images. SWVs were obtained in these lesions for the quantification of stiffness. Results: In ARFI 2D images, malignant lesions were predominantly stiffer and larger, while benign lesions were softer and similar in size (P < 0.05. The mean SWVs in benign, malignant, and metastatic lesions were 1.30 ± 0.35 m/s, 2.93 ± 0.75 m/s, and 2.77 ± 0.90 m/s, respectively. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve of SWV for differentiating benign from malignant lesions was 0.877, suggesting fair accuracy (95% confidence interval: 0.777–0.976; with a cutoff value of 2 m/s, showing sensitivity: 92%; specificity: 96%; positive predictive value: 96%; negative predictive value: 93% (P < 0.05. Statistically significant difference exists in SWV of benign and malignant or metastatic lesions. Conclusion: ARFI elastography with 2D imaging and quantification might be useful in the characterization of benign and malignant liver lesions.

  16. DNA radio-induced tandem lesions: formation, introduction in oligonucleotides and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdat, Anne-Gaelle

    2000-01-01

    Cell killing induced by excited photosensitizers, ionizing radiation or radiomimetic drugs can not be only explained by the formation of single DNA lesions. Thus, multiply damaged sites, are likely to have harmful biological consequences. One example of tandem base damage induced by ".OH radical in X-irradiated aqueous solution of DNA oligomers is N-(2-deoxy-β-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-formyl-amine (dβF)/8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo). In order to investigate the biological significance of such a tandem lesion, both 8-oxodGuo and dβF were introduced in synthetic oligonucleotides at vicinal positions using the solid phase phosphoramidite method with the 'Pac phosphoramidite' chemistry. The purity of the synthetic DNA fragments and the integrity of modified nucleosides was confirmed using different complementary techniques: HPLC, PAGE, ESI MS, MALDI-TOF MS and capillary electrophoresis. Using the above synthetic substrates, investigations were carried out in order to determine the substrate specificity and the excision mechanism of three glycosylases involved in the base excision repair pathway: endonuclease III, Fpg and yOggl. Both tandem lesions were substrates for the BER enzymes. However, the tandem lesion are not completely excised by the repair enzymes. The rates of excision as inferred from the determination of the ratios of Vm/Km Michaelis kinetics constants were not found to be significantly affected by the presence of the tandem lesions. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was used in order to gain insights into mechanistic aspects of oligonucleotide cleavage by the BER enzymes. During in vitro DNA synthesis by Taq DNA polymerase, Klenow fragment exo- and DNA polymerase β, tandem base damage were found to block the progression of the enzymes. Finally, the level of tandem base damage in the DNA exposed to γ-ray using the liquid chromatography coupled to electro-spray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was determined. Both dβF-8-oxodGuo and 8

  17. Hypofractionated electron-beam radiation therapy for keloids. Retrospective study of 568 cases with 834 lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Jie; Lian Xin; Sun Yuliang

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to analyze the outcomes of hypofractionated high-energy electron beam radiotherapy for the treatment of keloids. From February 1998 to January 2012, 568 patients with a total of 834 keloids underwent radiotherapy: 826 lesions with postoperative radiotherapy, and 36 with skin-grafting. Lesion size was >5 cm in 335 keloids. An electron-beam of 6 or 7 MeV was used, with a total dose of 18 Gy (two fractions with a 1-week interval) covering the lesion with a 1-cm margin. The time between surgery and radiotherapy was 24–48 h. Skin-grafted patients underwent radiotherapy 10–15 days after the operation. The median follow-up was 40 months (range: 12–160 months). The local control rate was 88.25% (736/834). The relapse rate was 9.59% (80/834), and the time to relapse was 6–28 months (median: 12 months). Univariate analyses showed that gender, age, keloid size, keloid site, skin grafting, and operation-to-irradiation interval influenced the local control rate. Multivariate analysis showed that the relapse rate was correlated with gender (P = 0.048), age (P < 0.01), operation-to-irradiation interval (P < 0.01), keloid site (P < 0.01), surgical method (P = 0.04) and keloid size (P < 0.02). Adverse effects were observed in 9.83% (82/834). No radiation-induced cancers were observed. Hypofractionated high-energy electron beam radiotherapy for keloids yielded excellent outcomes, especially in cases without skin grafting. Early postoperative radiotherapy with limited hypofractionation could be a good choice for keloid treatment. (author)

  18. Delayed radiation-induced necrosis of the brain stem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukawa, Osamu; Kodama, Yasunori; Kyoda, Jun; Yuki, Kiyoshi; Taniguchi, Eiji; Katayama, Shoichi; Hiroi, Tadashi; Uozumi, Toru.

    1993-01-01

    A 46-year-old man had surgery for a mixed glioma of the frontotemporal lobe. Postoperatively he received 50 Gy of irradiation. Sixteen months later he developed left hemiparesis and left facial palsy. MRI revealed lesion brain stem and basal ganglia. Despite chemotherapy and an additional 50 Gy dose, the patient deteriorated. Autopsy revealed a wide spread radiation-induced necrosis in the right cerebral hemisphere, midbrain and pons. In radiation therapy, great care must be taken to protect the normal brain tissue. (author)

  19. Radiation-induced instability of human genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabchenko, N.N.; Demina, Eh.A.

    2014-01-01

    A brief review is dedicated to the phenomenon of radiation-induced genomic instability where the increased level of genomic changes in the offspring of irradiated cells is characteristic. Particular attention is paid to the problems of genomic instability induced by the low-dose radiation, role of the bystander effect in formation of radiation-induced instability, and its relationship with individual radiosensitivity. We believe that in accordance with the paradigm of modern radiobiology the increased human individual radiosensitivity can be formed due to the genome instability onset and is a significant risk factor for radiation-induced cancer

  20. Radiation-induced centers in inorganic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brekhovskikh, S.M.; Tyul'nin, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    The nature, structure and formation mechanisms of radiation-induced colour centers, EPR, luminescence, generated ionizing radiation in nonorganic oxide glasses are considered. Experimental material covering both fundamental aspects of radiation physics and glass chemistry, and aspects intimately connected with the creation of new materials with the given radiation-spectral characteristics, with possibilities to prepare radiation-stable and radiation-sensitive glasses is systematized and generalized. Considerable attention is paid to the detection of radiation-induced center binding with composition, glass structures redox conditions for their synthesis. Some new possibilities of practical application of glasses with radiation-induced centers, in particular, to record optical information are reflected in the paper

  1. Protection from ionizing radiation induced damages by phytoceuticals and nutraceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, C.K.K.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of living systems to ionizing radiation cause a variety of damages to DNA and membranes due to generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species. The radiation induced lesions in the cellular DNA are mainly strand breaks, damage to sugar moiety, alterations and elimination of bases, cross links of the intra and inter strand type and cross links to proteins while peroxidation of the lipids and oxidation of proteins constitute the major lesions in the membranes. The radioprotectors elicit their action by various mechanisms such as i) by suppressing the formation of reactive species, ii) detoxification of radiation induced species, iii) target stabilization and iv) enhancing the repair and recovery processes. The radioprotective compounds are of importance in medical, industrial, environmental, military and space science applications. Radiation protection might offer a tactical advantage on the battlefield in the event of a nuclear warfare. Radioprotectors might reduce the cancer risk to populations exposed to radiations directly or indirectly through industrial and military applications. The antioxidant and radioprotective properties a few of these agents under in vitro and in vivo conditions in animal models will be discussed

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells favour healing of the cutaneous radiation syndrome; Les cellules souches mesenchymateuses favorisent la cicatrisation des lesions cutanees radio induites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francois, S.; Mouiseddine, M.; Mathieu, N.; Semont, A.; Monti, P.; Dudoignon, N.; Sache, A.; Boutarfa, A.; Thierry, D.; Voisin, P.; Gourmelon, P.; Chapel, A. [IRSN, Dir. de radioprotection de l' Homme, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2006-10-15

    It has been suggested that human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSC) could be used to repair numerous injured tissues. We have studied the potential use of hMSC in order to limit radiation-induced skin lesions. Immuno-deficient NOD/SCID mice were locally irradiated to the leg (30 Gy, dose rate 2.7 Gy/mn) using a {sup 60} Co source in order to induce a severe skin lesion. Cultured bone marrow hMSC were delivered intravenously to the mice. The irradiated skin samples were studied for the presence of the human cells, the severity of the lesions and the healing process. Macroscopic analysis and histology results showed that the lesions were evolving to a less severe degree of radiation dermatitis following hMSC transplant when compared to irradiated non-transplanted controls. Clinical scores for the studied skin parameters of treated mice were significantly improved. A faster healing was observed when compared to untreated mouse. Immuno-histology and Polymerase Chain reaction (PCR) analysis provided evidence that the human cells were found in the irradiated area. These results suggest a possible use of hMSC for the treatment of the early phase of the cutaneous radiation syndrome. A successful transplant of stem cells and subsequent reduction in radiation-induced complication may open the road to completely new strategies in cutaneous radiation syndrome therapy. (authors)

  3. Contribution to the study of radiation induced bone tissue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouet, Monique.

    1975-01-01

    In this work four original observations of more or less long-delayed cancers induced by ionizing radiations are compared with 34 other cases in the literature, after which an attempt is made to establish a general and prognostic synthesis of the results; the indications to emerge are as follows: - Ionizing radiation-induced cancers are very rare, especially when compared with the extensive therapeutic use made of X-rays; - The probability of radio-cancer formation, though no figures are given in the many papers consulted, seems nevertheless to be higher in cases of benign lesion irradiation; - Induced cancers have been observed after treatments with all types of radiation, whether or not the lesion is tumoral or cancerous, whatever the patient's age at the time of irradiations; - As a general rule these neoplasms appear after a variable latency period but usually from the 6th post-radiotherapy year onwards, with a greater frequency range between 6 and 12 years; - These induced cancers are generally epitheliomas or sarcomas, the latter being noticeably more predominant than in the case of spontaneous cancers. Leukoses may also be observed [fr

  4. Aquisição de uma tarefa espacial por ratos submetidos a lesão hipocampal neonatal induzida por radiação ionizante Acquisition of a non-matching to place task by rats with neonatal hippocampal lesion induced by ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Catelli Infantozzi Costa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Costa, Bueno e Xavier (2005 mostraram que ratos com lesão do giro denteado hipocampal produzida por colchicina apresentam prejuízo de desempenho em testes pós-operatórios em uma tarefa espacial de discriminação condicional (tarefa de non-matching-to-place, NMTP, embora o treino repetitivo promova recuperação do desempenho dos animais lesados. O objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar o desempenho de ratos com danos seletivos no giro denteado, induzidos pela exposição neonatal a radiação ionizante, na tarefa de NMTP. O grupo irradiado apresentou prejuízo nas primeiras sessões de treino quando comparado ao grupo controle; porém, seu desempenho se igualou ao dos animais controles nas últimas sessões, replicando resultados anteriores. Os resultados são discutidos no contexto da teoria do mapa espacial cognitivo.Costa, Bueno e Xavier (2005 showed that rats with hippocampus dentate gyrus lesions produced by colchicine have post-surgical tests deficits in spatial tasks involving conditional discrimination (non-matching-to-place, NMTP, although repetitive training does promote the recovery of the lamed subject's performance. The purpose of this experiment was to assess the performance of rats with selective lesions of dentate gyrus induced by neonatal ionizing radiation in the NMTP task. The irradiated group showed deficits in the first training sessions when compared to the control group. Nevertheless, the performance of lesion and control groups was similar at the end of the sessions, as previously reported. The results are discussed in light of the cognitive map theory.

  5. Imitation of radiation-induced damages to DNA with a radionuclide incorporated into polynucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolev, V.G.

    1984-01-01

    Because of a great variety and different reparability of radiation-induced DNA lesions it is difficult to evaluate the radiobiologacal significance of certain individual alterations. It is suggested that the radionuclides incorporated anto DNA can be used to imitate different types of radiation damages to DNA. Both qualitative and quantitative aspects of the problem are discussed

  6. No interaction between X-ray induced lesions in maternal and paternal chromosomes in inseminated eggs of Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuergler, F.E.; Graf, U.; Jeanneret, P.

    1978-01-01

    X-ray induced premutational lesions persist in mature gametes of drosophila until fertilization. Repairable lesions in sperm and oocyte chromosomes are repaired exclusively by maternal repair systems in the inseminated egg. Interactions between irradiated genomes in inseminated eggs might result in additional lethality if breaks induced in separate nuclei, which would normally be repaired, could interact to form dicentric chromosomes. Adult drosophila flies were X-irradiated (up to 5 kR), individual females crossed to three or four males, and the dose-response curves for dominant lethals (embryonic lethality) compared. The results indicate thet the potentially lethal damage present in irradiated sperm chromosomes was expressed independently of whether or not the oocyte was also irradiated. There were no (or only very few) interactions between maternal and paternal chromosome complements, and the maternal repair systems acting on radiation-induced chromosome breaks in sperm were resistant to X-rays. (U.K.)

  7. Impact of cavitation on lesion formation induced by high intensity focused ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Pengfei; Jie Yu; Yang Xin; Tu Juan; Guo Xiasheng; Zhang Dong; Huang Pintong

    2017-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has shown a great promise in noninvasive cancer therapy. The impact of acoustic cavitation on the lesion formation induced by HIFU is investigated both experimentally and theoretically in transparent protein-containing gel and ex vivo liver tissue samples. A numerical model that accounts for nonlinear acoustic propagation and heat transfer is used to simulate the lesion formation induced by the thermal effect. The results showed that lesions could be induced in the samples exposed to HIFU with various acoustic pressures and pulse lengths. The measured areas of lesions formed in the lateral direction were comparable to the simulated results, while much larger discrepancy was observed between the experimental and simulated data for the areas of longitudinal lesion cross-section. Meanwhile, a series of stripe-wiped-off B-mode pictures were obtained by using a special imaging processing method so that HIFU-induced cavitation bubble activities could be monitored in real-time and quantitatively analyzed as the functions of acoustic pressure and pulse length. The results indicated that, unlike the lateral area of HIFU-induced lesion that was less affected by the cavitation activity, the longitudinal cross-section of HIFU-induced lesion was significantly influenced by the generation of cavitation bubbles through the temperature elevation resulting from HIFU exposures. Therefore, considering the clinical safety in HIFU treatments, more attention should be paid on the lesion formation in the longitudinal direction to avoid uncontrollable variation resulting from HIFU-induced cavitation activity. (paper)

  8. Effects of dose and of partial body ionizing radiation on taste aversion learning in rats with lesions of the area postrema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, B.M.; Hunt, W.A.; Lee, J.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of area postrema lesions on the acquisition of a conditioned taste aversion following partial body exposure to ionizing radiation was investigated in rats exposed to head-only irradiation at 100, 200 and 300 rad or to body-only irradiation at 100 and 200 rad. Following head-only irradiation area postrema lesions produced a significant attenuation of the radiation-induced taste aversion at all dose levels, although the rats still showed a significant reduction in sucrose preference. Following body-only exposure, area postrema lesions completely disrupted the acquisition of the conditioned taste aversion. The results are interpreted as indicating that: (a) the acquisition of a conditioned taste aversion following body-only exposure is mediated by the area postrema; and (b) taste aversion learning following radiation exposure to the head-only is mediated by both the area postrema and a mechanism which is independent of the area postrema

  9. Radiation induced liver disease: A clinical update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, R.; Madan, R.; Chander, S.; Kilambi, R.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) or radiation hepatitis is a sub-acute form of liver injury due to radiation. It is one of the most dreaded complications of radiation which prevents radiation dose escalation and re irradiation for hepatobiliary or upper gastrointestinal malignancies. This complication should be kept in mind whenever a patient is planned for irradiation of these malignancies. Although, incidence of RILD is decreasing due to better knowledge of liver tolerance, improved investigation modalities and modern radiation delivery techniques, treatment options are still limited. In this review article, we have focussed on pathophysiology, risk factors, prevention and management of RILD

  10. A juvenile case of radiation-induced meningioma two years after radiation for craniopharyngioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, Tomoaki; Zama, Akira; Ono, Nobuo; Nakamura, Tadashi; Tamura, Masaru; Ohe, Tihiro; Nakazato, Yoichi

    1994-01-01

    The patient was a 7-years-old boy who received radiation therapy of 50 Gy after total gross removal of a craniopharyngioma. After two years a follow up CT scan showed a new enhanced lesion in the right temporal tip within the previous irradiation field. Total removal of the tumor was performed and its histological examination showed it to be an atypical meningioma. This atypical meningioma satisfied Cahan's criteria. So we diagnosed this atypical meningioma as radiation-induced meningioma. Immunohistochemically this meningioma stained for Vimentin. An electron microscopical examination showed neither desmosome nor interdigitation. The score of Ki-67 and BrdU-L. I was very small. Compared with previously reported juvenile radiation-induced meningioma, the latency was very short. The patient received growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy. We suspected relation between GH replacement therapy and short latency. He was discharged without any new neurological deficits and we haven't detected tumor recurrence for two years. (author)

  11. Radiation-induced gene responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Oryhon, J.

    1996-01-01

    In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5' region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression

  12. Diseases induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The instruction sheet for medical examinations presents information on clinical symptoms and diagnostic procedures relating to the following cases: 1. Acute radiation injury due to whole-body exposure; 2. acute, local radiation injury due to partial body exposure; 3. chronic general affections due to whole-body exposure; 4. chronic, local affections due to partial body exposure; 5. delayed radiation effects. (HP) [de

  13. Study on DNA damages induced by UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doan Hong Van; Dinh Ba Tuan; Tran Tuan Anh; Nguyen Thuy Ngan; Ta Bich Thuan; Vo Thi Thuong Lan; Tran Minh Quynh; Nguyen Thi Thom

    2015-01-01

    DNA damages in Escherichia coli (E. coli) exposed to UV radiation have been investigated. After 30 min of exposure to UV radiation of 5 mJ/cm"2, the growth of E. coli in LB broth medium was about only 10% in compared with non-irradiated one. This results suggested that the UV radiation caused the damages for E. coli genome resulted in reduction in its growth and survival, and those lesions can be somewhat recovered. For both solutions of plasmid DNAs and E. coli cells containing plasmid DNA, this dose also caused the breakage on single and double strands of DNA, shifted the morphology of DNA plasmid from supercoiled to circular and linear forms. The formation of pyrimidine dimers upon UV radiation significantly reduced when the DNA was irradiated in the presence of Ganoderma lucidum extract. Thus, studies on UV-induced DNA damage at molecular level are very essential to determine the UV radiation doses corresponding to the DNA damages, especially for creation and selection of useful radiation-induced mutants, as well as elucidation the protective effects of the specific compounds against UV light. (author)

  14. Oral lesions following radiation therapy and their preventive considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghavam M

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancers account for a relatively high percent of neoplasms in the elderly population. Treatment protocols often include anti-neoplastic pharmaco-therapeutics, irradiation of the head and neck region, and surgery. These treatments, specially radiation, have detrimental effects on oral hard and soft tissues. Salivary glands undergo a distinct and longterm dysfunction, which leads to decrease in salivary How. Xerostomia is a common clinical problem in these patients which contributes to dry mouth, mucosites, change in oral ecosystem and dental caries, followed by difficulties in speech, swallowing and use of dentures which cause malnutrition. This phenomenon has an irreversible weakening effect on the patient's health. To prevent this negative impact on oral health in this group of patients, definitive dental treatments prior to the initiation of medical therapies is imperative, and will decrease the morbidity rates. Today's dentistry benefits from improved methods and materials, which enable us to give these patients a better preventive dental treatment. Consultation between dentist and medical team would be the best way to help our sufferer patients.

  15. 3 cases of radiation-induced sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiba, Keiichiro; Fukuma, Hisatoshi; Beppu, Yasuo; Hirota, Teruyuki; Shinohara, Norio.

    1982-01-01

    Criteria for the diagnosis of radiation-induced sarcoma have been previously described. All cases must have a history of irradiation and the second neoplasm must have arisen in the area of the radiation field. A latent period of several years must have elapsed after irradiation before clinical evidence of a second malignant neoplasm. Most important thing is that, all suspected cases must have been proved histologically. We have experienced 3 cases of radiation-induced sarcoma, they were 42-years-old man who developed an osteosarcoma of the lumbar spine at the field of postoperative irradiation for seminoma 7 years previously, 69-years-old woman who developed a malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the buttock at the field of radical radiation for uterine carcinoma 7 years previously and 59-years-old woman who developed an extraskeletal osteosarcoma of the abdominal wall at the field of postoperative irradiation for uterine sarcoma 7 years previously. The last case is very rare and only 8 cases of radiation-induced extraskeletal osteosarcoma have been reported. Since there has been a definite trend in the treatment of cancer toward employing radiation for more favorable cases, in addition to technical improvements in the administration of radiotherapy and more modern equipment, survival data may have been altered considerably in many malignant tumors. Accordingly, more radiation-induced tumors may be encountered in the future. The clinical presentation and histopathology of these radiation-induced sarcomas are presented with a review of the literature. (author)

  16. Immunohistochemical study of p53 overexpression in radiation-induced colon cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Kazunori; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Mokarim, A.; Matsuzaki, Sumihiro; Ito, Masahiro; Sekine, Ichiro.

    1998-01-01

    The expressions of p53 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were studied immunohistochemically from paraffin sections of 7 cases (9 lesions) of radiation-induced colon cancer and 42 cases of spontaneous colon cancer. Age distribution of radiation-induced and spontaneous colon cancer were 68.1 years (range, 56 to 77 years) and 67.4 years (range, 31 to 85 years), respectively. Among the radiation-induced colon cancers, there were 3 lesions of mucinous carcinoma (33%), a much higher than found for spontaneous mucinous cancer. Immunohistochemically, p53 protein expression was detected in 7/9 (78%) of radiation-induced cancers and in 23/42 (55%) of spontaneous colon cancers. χ 2 analysis found no significant differences between radiation-induced and spontaneous colon cancers in age distribution or p53-positive staining for frequency, histopathology, or Dukes'' classification. In radiation colitis around the cancers including aberrant crypts, spotted p53 staining and abnormal and scattered PCNA-positive staining were observed. In histologically normal cells, p53 staining was almost absent and PCNA-positive staining was regularly observed in the lower half of the crypt. In radiation colitis including aberrant glands, cellular proliferation increased and spotted p53 expression was observed. This study suggests that radiation colitis and aberrant glands might possess malignant potential and deeply associate with carcinogenesis of radiation-induced colon cancer. (author)

  17. Radiation-induced pseudotumor following therapy for soft tissue sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Lacey F.; Kransdorf, Mark J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Buskirk, Steven J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jacksonville, FL (United States); O' Connor, Mary I. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Menke, David M. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Pathology, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2009-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence and imaging appearance of radiation induced pseudotumors in patients following radiation therapy for extremity soft tissue sarcomas. We retrospectively reviewed the serial magnetic resonance (MR) images of 24 patients following radiation therapy for extremity soft tissue sarcomas. A total of 208 exams were reviewed (mean, 8.7 exams per patient) and included all available studies following the start of radiation therapy. Exams were analyzed for the identification of focal signal abnormalities within the surgical bed suggesting local tumor recurrence. Histopathologic correlation was available in nine patients suspected of having local tumor recurrence. Additional information recorded included patient demographics, tumor type and location, radiation type, and dose. The study group consisted of 12 men and 12 women, having an average age of 63 years (range, 39-88 years). Primary tumors were malignant fibrous histiocytoma (n = 13), leiomyosarcoma (n = 6), liposarcoma (n = 3), synovial sarcoma (n = 1), and extraskeletal chondrosarcoma (n = 1). All lesions were high-grade sarcomas, except for two myxoid liposarcomas. Average patient radiation dose was 5,658 cGy (range, 4,500-8,040 cGy). Average follow-up time was 63 months (range, 3-204 months). Focal signal abnormalities suggesting local recurrence were seen in nine (38%) patients. Three of the nine patients with these signal abnormalities were surgically proven to have radiation-induced pseudotumor. The pseudotumors developed between 11 and 61 months following the initiation of radiation therapy (mean, 38 months), with an average radiation dose of 5,527 cGy (range, 5,040-6,500 cGy). MR imaging demonstrated a relatively ill-defined ovoid focus of abnormal signal and intense heterogeneous enhancement with little or no associated mass effect. MR imaging of radiation-induced pseudotumor typically demonstrates a relatively ill-defined ovoid mass-like focus of intense

  18. Cellular therapy to treat ionizing radiation-induced cutaneous radiation syndrome: 2 cases report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benderitter, M.; Chapel, A.; Trompier, F.; Clairand, I.; Bottolier-Depois, J.F.; Gourmelon, P.; Bey, E.; Lataillade, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text: Localized irradiation at high dose exposition could induce severe radiation burns characterized by the occurrence of unpredictable successive inflammatory waves leading to the extension in surface and depth of necrotic processes. The medical management of these severe radiation burns remains today a challenging issue unresolved by the classical therapeutical approach. For the first time, two victims (accident of Chile, 2006 and accident of Senegal, 2007) accidentally exposed to an iridium gammagraphy radioactive source experienced a new and innovative therapeutic strategy combining dosimetry-guided surgery lesion excision and injection of MSC. The clinical evolution was remarkable. The clinical transfer of this therapeutic option was possible based on the research perform in the Institute and the IRSN/Percy hospital cooperation. Our data suggested that cellular therapy based on Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) injection could be used to repair numerous injured tissues. We have studied the potential use of human MSC (hMSC) in order to limit radiation-induced skin lesions. Our pre-clinical data suggest a possible use of hMSC for the treatment of the early phase of the cutaneous radiation syndrome. The understanding of the precise healing mechanisms of hMSC in animal model is under investigation. These results will be helpful to generalize this innovative therapy to the treatment of other radiological complications. (author)

  19. Radiation induced sarcomas of bone following therapeutic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.H.; Chu, F.C.H.; Woodward, H.Q.; Huvos, A.

    1983-01-01

    Because of new therapeutic trends of multi-modality and the importance of late effects, we have updated our series of radiation induced bone sarcomas seen at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center over the past four decades. A total of 37 cases of bone sarcoma arising from normal bone in the irradiated field was analyzed. The median for latent period from irradiation to diagnosis of bone sarcoma was 11 years with a minimum latent period of four years. The median radiation dose for the bone sarcoma was 6000 rad in 6 weeks with a minimum total radiation dose of 3000 rad in 3 weeks. We have found nine patients who developed bone sarcomas in the radiation field after successful treatment of Hodgkin's disease. Criteria for radiation induced bone sarcomas and the magnitude of the risk of bone sarcomas are briefly discussed

  20. Radiation-induced thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxon, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has been demonstrated to result in a number of changes in the human thyroid gland. At lower radiation dose levels (between 10 and 1500 rads), benign and malignant neoplasms appear to be the dominant effect, whereas at higher dose levels functional changes and thyroiditis become more prevalent. In all instances, the likelihood of the effect is related to the amount and type of radiation exposure, time since exposure, and host factors such as age, sex, and heredity. The author's current approach to the evaluation of patients with past external radiation therapy to the thyroid is discussed. The use of prophylactic thyroxine (T4) therapy is controversial. While T4 therapy may not be useful in preventing carcinogenesis when instituted many years after radiation exposure, theoretically T4 may block TSH secretion and stimulation of damaged cells to undergo malignant transformation when instituted soon after radiation exposure

  1. Radiation induced degradation of DNA in photodynamic therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion, Rodica; Scarlat, F.; Niculescu, V.I.R.; Scarlat, Fl.; Gunaydin, Keriman

    2001-01-01

    DNA is a critical cellular target for oxidative processes induced by physical and chemical stresses. It is known that the direct effect of ionizing radiation on DNA results mainly in base ionization and may lead to mutation, carcinogenesis and cell death. The degradation of DNA induced by laser and ionizing radiation (electron and photon beam) is analyzed in this paper. The ionizing radiation degradation of DNA is a radical process. A series of lesions among the major base degradation product has been measured in isolated DNA exposed to gamma radiation in aerated aqueous solution. Degradation can be accounted for by the formation of hydroxyl radicals upon radiolysis of water (indirect effect). The production of DNA damage by ionizing radiation involves two mechanisms, direct and indirect effects. Direct effect leads to ionization and excitation of DNA molecules, while indirect effect is due to the interaction of reactive species, in particular of OH radicals produced by water radiolysis, with targets in DNA. The relative contribution of the two mechanisms in damaging DNA depends on the type of radiation. Single strand breaks and base damage seem to be mainly produced by the attack of hydroxyl radicals on DNA, whereas double strand breaks result predominantly of direct energy deposition. The four bases are degraded in high yield. Direct effect has been mimicked by photo-induced electron abstraction from the bases producing their radical cation. The base damage may also occur from the formation of radical cation of purine and pyrimidine components. When DNA is irradiated in solution, single strand breaks are mainly due to the abstraction of an H atom from the 4 ' position of 2 ' -deoxyribose by the attack of OH radicals produced by water radiolysis. Quantification of the modified bases showed the guanine is the preferential target. Ionizing radiation induces several types of DNA modifications, including chain breaks, DNA-protein cross-links, oxidized DNA bases

  2. Radiation-induced recurrent intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, J.L.; Anuras, S.

    1981-01-01

    The syndrome of intestinal pseudo-obstruction is a complex of signs and symptoms of intestinal obstruction without evidence of mechanical obstruction of the intestinal lumen. A patient with radiation-induced intestinal pseudoobstruction is described. The patient is a 74-year old woman with a history of chronic diarrhea, recurrent episodes of crampy abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting since receiving a 13,000 rad radiation dose to the pelvis in 1954. She has been hospitalized on many occasions for symptoms and signs of bowel obstruction. Upper gastrointestinal contrast roentgenograms with small bowel follow-through done during these episodes revealed multiple dilated loops of small bowel with no obstructing lesion. Barium enemas revealed no obstructing lesion. Each episode resolved with conservative therapy. Other secondary causes for intestinal pseudo-obstruction were ruled out in our patient. She gave no history of familial gastrointestinal disorders. Although postirradiation motility abnormalities have been demonstrated experimentally this is the first report of radiation induced intestinal pseudo-obstruction

  3. Better flocculants by radiation induced polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laizier, J.; Gaussens, G.

    1978-01-01

    The use of radiation induced polymerization should theoritically allow to prepare better flocculants. The testings of several products prepared by such a process shows that better properties are indeed obtained: better efficiencies, lower amounts needed, better overall properties [fr

  4. Ionizing radiation induced malignancies in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutrillaux, B.

    1997-01-01

    Using data on gene and chromosome alterations in human cancers, it is proposed that most radiation induced cancers are a consequence of recessive mutations of tumor suppressor genes. This explains the long delay between radiation exposure and the cancer onset. As a consequence, radiation induced cancers belong to groups of tumors where no specific translocations (forming or activating oncogenes) but multiple unbalanced chromosome rearrangements (deletions unmasking recessive mutations) exist. This explains why osteosarcomas, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, chondrosarcomas are frequently induced, but not liposarcoma, Ewing sarcomas and rhabdomyosarcomas, among others. A single exception confirms this rule: papillary thyroid cancer, frequently induced in exposed children, in which structural rearrangements frequently form a RET/PTC3 fusion gene. This fusion gene is the results of the inversion of a short segment of chromosome 10, and it is assumed that such rearrangement (small para-centric inversion) can easily occur after exposure to radiations, at contrast with translocations between to genes belonging to different chromosomes. (author)

  5. Radiation-induced degradation of pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proksch, E.

    1988-01-01

    This article outlines the fundamentals of radiation-induced degradation of noxious substances in drinking water and waste water and discusses the relevant literature. Radiation methods present a number of advantages and disadvantages, which should carefully be considered in each case. In many cases, there seems to be merit in combining the radiation method with other techniques, as e.g. ozone treatement and biodegradation. 30 refs., 3 figs. (Author)

  6. Partridge embryo pathology in relation to gentamicin-induced lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Tavakkoli

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the macroscopic and microscopic lesions of various dosages of gentamicin in the partridge embryo. Methods: Fertile chukar partridge eggs were allocated into four groups. Group 1: salineinjected group whose individuals were administered by sterile physiological saline solution of 0.2 mL/egg inserted into yolk sac. Groups 2, 3 and 4 whose individuals were similarly administered by gentamicin sulfate at a dosage of 80 mg/kg egg-weight once, twice and three times, respectively. Results: Results showed that the embryos were congested and stunted in the gentamicininjected groups. Defects in feet, wings and feather development were accompanied by microscopic lesions in brain, meninges, heart, lungs, liver and kidneys. Histopathological lesions were noticed as edema, undeveloped tissues, necrosis and degeneration in the affected organs. Conclusions: Based on acquired results, it is concluded that gentamicin at above-described dosages causes toxicopathological effects to the partridge embryo in a dose dependent manner.

  7. Management of radiation-induced accelerated carotid atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loftus, C.M.; Biller, J.; Hart, M.N.; Cornell, S.H.; Hiratzka, L.F.

    1987-01-01

    Patients with long survival following cervical irradiation are at risk for accelerated carotid atherosclerosis. The neurologic presentation in these patients mimics naturally occurring atheromatous disease, but patients often present at younger ages and with less concurrent coronary or systemic vascular disease. Hypercholesterolemia also contributes to this accelerated arteriosclerosis. Angiographic findings in this disorder include disproportionate involvement of the distal common carotid artery and unusually long carotid lesions. Pathologic findings include destruction of the internal elastic lamina and replacement of the normal intima and media with fibrous tissue. This article describes two surgical patients with radiation-induced accelerated carotid atherosclerosis who typify the presentation and characteristics of this disease

  8. Radiation-induced bilateral cystic frontal lobe necroses demonstrating a fluid-blood level; Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mineura, Katsuyoshi; Sasajima, Toshio; Kowada, Masayoshi [Akita Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Ogawa, Toshihide

    1992-02-01

    A 41-year-old male developed radiation-induced bilateral cystic frontal lobe necroses after irradiation for an olfactory neuroblastoma. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed the lesions, one containing a fluid-blood level on CT scans and niveau formation on MR images. It was proved to be a coagulated hematoma within the cyst at surgery. Such a fluid-blood level in a radiation-induced cyst has never been reported, although hemorrhage frequently accompanies delayed radiation necrosis. Positron emission tomography with multiple tracers may be useful in differentiating cerebral radiation necrosis from tumor recurrence, because of absence of abnormal tracer accumulation. (author).

  9. Radiation-induced cancer of the esophagus after postoperative irradiation for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Ichiro; Miyaishi, Kazuo; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Ito, Jun; Inoue, Tomio

    1978-01-01

    Two cases of radiation-induced cancer of the esophagus after postoperative irradiation for breast cancer were reported. Latent period of case 1 (cervical esophagus) was 12 years, and case 2 (middle thoracic esophagus) was 16 years. Radiographically the lesions were both serrated, and histologically, case 1 was ''poorly differentiated'' and case 2 was ''moderately differentiated'' squamous cell carcinoma. Histological types of basic breast cancer were both papillotubular carcinomas. Previous irradiation doses were 4180 rads for case 1 and 1860 rads for case 2. The esophageal cancers were remarkably improved by radiation therapy. It should be emphasized that radiation therapy is useful for the radiation-induced cancer of the esophagus. (author)

  10. Application of radiation-induced apoptosis in radiation oncology and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crompton, N.E.A.; Emery, G.C.; Ozsahin, M.; Menz, R.; Knesplova, L.; Larsson, B.

    1997-01-01

    A rapid assay of the ability of lymphocytes to respond to radiation-induced damage is presented. Age and genetic dependence of radiation response have been quantified. The assay is sensitive to low doses of radiation. Its ability to assess the cytotoxic response of blood capillaries to radiation has been evaluated. (author)

  11. A study of radiation-induced cerebral vascular injury in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhong Ye

    Full Text Available To investigate radiation-induced carotid and cerebral vascular injury and its relationship with radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC patients.Fifty eight NPC patients with radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis (TLN were recruited in the study. Duplex ultrasonography was used to scan bilateral carotid arterials to evaluate the intima-media thickness (IMT and occurrence of plaque formation. Flow velocities of bilateral middle cerebral arteries (MCAs, internal carotid arteries (ICAs and basal artery (BA were estimated through Transcranial Color Doppler (TCD. The results were compared with data from 33 patients who were free from radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis after radiotherapy and 29 healthy individuals.Significant differences in IMT, occurrence of plaques of ICAs and flow velocities of both MCAs and ICAs were found between patients after radiotherapy and healthy individuals (p<0.05. IMT had positive correlation with post radiation interval (p = 0.049. Compared with results from patients without radiation-induced TLN, the mean IMT was significantly thicker in patients with TLN (p<0.001. Plaques were more common in patients with TLN than patients without TLN (p = 0.038. In addition, flow velocities of MCAs and ICAs in patients with TLN were much faster (p<0.001, p<0.001. Among patients with unilateral TLN, flow velocity of MCAs was significantly different between ipsilateral and contralateral sides to the lesion (p = 0.001.Thickening of IMT, occurrence of plaque formation and hemodynamic abnormality are more common in patients after radiotherapy, especially in those with TLN, compared with healthy individuals.

  12. A schedule to demonstrate radiation-induced sister chromatid exchanges in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    The reciprocal interchange between the chromatids of a chromosome, termed sister chromatid exchange (SCE), is considered to be one of the most sensitive and accurate cytogenetic parameters and respond to toxic chemicals at very low doses. But the response of SCE to ionizing radiation is very poor. Human lymphocytes fail to give SCE response when irradiated at G 0 . Probably the primary lesions induced at G 0 do not remain available long enough to find expression as SCEs. Based on this assumption a schedule was developed using caffeine to demonstrate radiation induced SCEs. Following this schedule a dose-dependent increase in the frequency of radiation induced SCEs has been observed. (orig.)

  13. Radiation-induced optic neuropathy: A magnetic resonance imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guy, J.; Mancuso, A.; Beck, R.; Moster, M.L.; Sedwick, L.A.; Quisling, R.G.; Rhoton, A.L. Jr.; Protzko, E.E.; Schiffman, J.

    1991-01-01

    Optic neuropathy induced by radiation is an infrequent cause of delayed visual loss that may at times be difficult to differentiate from compression of the visual pathways by recurrent neoplasm. The authors describe six patients with this disorder who experienced loss of vision 6 to 36 months after neurological surgery and radiation therapy. Of the six patients in the series, two had a pituitary adenoma and one each had a metastatic melanoma, multiple myeloma, craniopharyngioma, and lymphoepithelioma. Visual acuity in the affected eyes ranged from 20/25 to no light perception. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed sellar and parasellar recurrence of both pituitary adenomas, but the intrinsic lesions of the optic nerves and optic chiasm induced by radiation were enhanced after gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA) administration and were clearly distinguishable from the suprasellar compression of tumor. Repeated MR imaging showed spontaneous resolution of gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of the optic nerve in a patient who was initially suspected of harboring recurrence of a metastatic malignant melanoma as the cause of visual loss. The authors found the presumptive diagnosis of radiation-induced optic neuropathy facilitated by MR imaging with gadolinium-DTPA. This neuro-imaging procedure may help avert exploratory surgery in some patients with recurrent neoplasm in whom the etiology of visual loss is uncertain

  14. Radiation-induced renovascular hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staab, G.E.; Tegtmeyer, C.J.; Constable, W.C.

    1976-01-01

    Radiation is known to produce changes in the small vessels and interstitium of the kidneys resulting in hypertension. Two cases of renal artery stenosis and resultant hypertension secondary to abdominal irradiation are reported and the literature is reviewed

  15. Lesion bacterial communities in American lobsters with diet-induced shell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Robert A; Metzler, Anita; Tlusty, Michael; Smolowitz, Roxanna M; Leberg, Paul; Chistoserdov, Andrei Y

    2012-04-26

    In southern New England, USA, shell disease affects the profitability of the American lobster Homarus americanus fishery. In laboratory trials using juvenile lobsters, exclusive feeding of herring Clupea harengus induces shell disease typified initially by small melanized spots that progress into distinct lesions. Amongst a cohabitated, but segregated, cohort of 11 juvenile lobsters fed exclusively herring, bacterial communities colonizing spots and lesions were investigated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rDNA amplified using 1 group-specific and 2 universal primer sets. The Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria predominated in both spots and lesions and included members of the orders Flavobacteriales (Bacteriodetes), Rhodobacterales, Rhodospirillales and Rhizobiales (Alphaproteobacteria), Xanthomonadales (Gammaproteobacteria) and unclassified Gammaproteobacteria. Bacterial communities in spot lesions displayed more diversity than communities with larger (older) lesions, indicating that the lesion communities stabilize over time. At least 8 bacterial types persisted as lesions developed from spots. Aquimarina 'homaria', a species commonly cultured from lesions present on wild lobsters with epizootic shell disease, was found ubiquitously in spots and lesions, as was the 'Candidatus Kopriimonas aquarianus', implicating putative roles of these species in diet-induced shell disease of captive lobsters.

  16. Radiation-induced neurobehavioral dysfunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manda, Kailash

    2013-01-01

    There is a lacuna between sparsely reported immediate effects and the well documented delayed effects on cognitive functions seen after ionizing radiation exposure. We reported the radiation-dose dependent incongruity in the early cognitive changes and its correlation with the structural aberration as reported by imaging study. The delayed effect of radiation was investigated to understand the role of hippocampal neurogenesis in the functional recovery of cognition. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to different doses of γ-radiation and 24 hrs after exposure, the stress and anxiety levels were examined in the Open Field Exploratory Paradigms (OFT). 48hrs after irradiation, the hippocampal dependent recognition memory was observed by the Novel Object Recognition Test (NORT) and the cognitive function related to memory processing and recall was tested using the Elevated Plus Maze (EPM). Visualization of damage to the brain was done by diffusion tensor imaging at 48 hours post-irradiation. Results indicate a complex dose independent effect on the cognitive functions immediately after exposure to gamma rays. Radiation exposure caused short term memory dysfunctions at lower doses which were seen to be abrogated at higher doses, but the long term memory processing was disrupted at higher doses. The Hippocampus emerged as one of the sensitive regions to be affected by whole body exposure to gamma rays, which led to profound immediate alterations in cognitive functions. Furthermore, the results indicate a cognitive recovery process, which might be dependent on the extent of damage to the hippocampal region. While evaluating the delayed effect of radiation on the hippocampal neurogenesis, we observed that higher doses groups showed comparatively more adaptive regenerative neurogenic potential which they could not sustain at later stages. Our studies reported an important hitherto uncovered phenomenon of neurobehavioral dysfunctions in relation to radiation dose. Nevertheless, a

  17. CT imaging of congenital lung lesions: effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggerty, Jay E.; Smith, Ethan A.; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Kunisaki, Shaun M.

    2015-01-01

    Different iterative reconstruction techniques are available for use in pediatric computed tomography (CT), but these techniques have not been systematically evaluated in infants. To determine the effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance, image quality and radiation dose in infants undergoing CT evaluation for congenital lung lesions. A retrospective review of contrast-enhanced chest CT in infants (<1 year) with congenital lung lesions was performed. CT examinations were reviewed to document the type of lung lesion, vascular anatomy, image noise measurements and image reconstruction method. CTDI vol was used to calculate size-specific dose estimates (SSDE). CT findings were correlated with intraoperative and histopathological findings. Analysis of variance and the Student's t-test were used to compare image noise measurements and radiation dose estimates between groups. Fifteen CT examinations used filtered back projection (FBP; mean age: 84 days), 15 used adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR; mean age: 93 days), and 11 used model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR; mean age: 98 days). Compared to operative findings, 13/15 (87%), 14/15 (93%) and 11/11 (100%) lesions were correctly characterized using FBP, ASiR and MBIR, respectively. Arterial anatomy was correctly identified in 12/15 (80%) using FBP, 13/15 (87%) using ASiR and 11/11 (100%) using MBIR. Image noise was less for MBIR vs. ASiR (P < 0.0001). Mean SSDE was different among groups (P = 0.003; FBP = 7.35 mGy, ASiR = 1.89 mGy, MBIR = 1.49 mGy). Congenital lung lesions can be adequately characterized in infants using iterative CT reconstruction techniques while maintaining image quality and lowering radiation dose. (orig.)

  18. CT imaging of congenital lung lesions: effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance and radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggerty, Jay E.; Smith, Ethan A.; Dillman, Jonathan R. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kunisaki, Shaun M. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Different iterative reconstruction techniques are available for use in pediatric computed tomography (CT), but these techniques have not been systematically evaluated in infants. To determine the effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance, image quality and radiation dose in infants undergoing CT evaluation for congenital lung lesions. A retrospective review of contrast-enhanced chest CT in infants (<1 year) with congenital lung lesions was performed. CT examinations were reviewed to document the type of lung lesion, vascular anatomy, image noise measurements and image reconstruction method. CTDI{sub vol} was used to calculate size-specific dose estimates (SSDE). CT findings were correlated with intraoperative and histopathological findings. Analysis of variance and the Student's t-test were used to compare image noise measurements and radiation dose estimates between groups. Fifteen CT examinations used filtered back projection (FBP; mean age: 84 days), 15 used adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR; mean age: 93 days), and 11 used model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR; mean age: 98 days). Compared to operative findings, 13/15 (87%), 14/15 (93%) and 11/11 (100%) lesions were correctly characterized using FBP, ASiR and MBIR, respectively. Arterial anatomy was correctly identified in 12/15 (80%) using FBP, 13/15 (87%) using ASiR and 11/11 (100%) using MBIR. Image noise was less for MBIR vs. ASiR (P < 0.0001). Mean SSDE was different among groups (P = 0.003; FBP = 7.35 mGy, ASiR = 1.89 mGy, MBIR = 1.49 mGy). Congenital lung lesions can be adequately characterized in infants using iterative CT reconstruction techniques while maintaining image quality and lowering radiation dose. (orig.)

  19. Case of radiation induced carcinoma of the cervical esophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwase, K.; Miura, K.; Kawase, K.; Yamaguchi, A.; Kondo, S. (Fujita-Gakuen Univ., Nagoya (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1980-07-01

    A patient with carcinoma of the cervical esophagus who visited a hospital with a complaint of difficulty in swallowing was reported. This patient was a 50 year old woman. It was 32 years since she had had external irradiation with x- ray over the neck for Basedow's disease at the age of 18. From the age of 30, she had had hypothyroidism and had used thyroid. She became aware of difficulty in swallowing in October, 1976. Then this symptom progressed gradually, and she also had hoarseness. She visited a hospital in August, 1977. At the first medical examination, pigmentation and atrophic changes in the neck induced by radiation were observed, and some lymphnodes with the size of a red bean were palpated. Esophageal roentogenography revealed circular and spiral type lesion in the cervical esophagus, which was 4 cm in length and had a clear boundary. Endoscopic examination revealed circular stenotic lesion. This lesion was diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma by biopsy. Total of 3,000 rad of Linac x-ray was irradiated over the neck and the clavicle before operation. Operation findings revealed fibrosis, atrophy, and hardening of the thyroid gland caused by radiation. Carcinoma with the size 35 mm x 18 mm was limited to the cervical esophagus, and the degree of the progress was A/sub 2/, N/sub 2/, M/sub 0/ (Pl/sub 0/). Histological findings revealed moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma and its metastases to the right supraclaviclar lymphnodes. This carcinoma was diagnosed as radiation-induced carcinoma of the cervical esophagus, because this patient had had irradiation over the neck, locally marked atrophic changes and scar remained, and carcinoma occurred in the area which had been irradiated with x-ray.

  20. Radiation- induced aneuploidy in mammalian germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tease, C.

    1989-01-01

    The ability of ionizing radiation to induce aneuploidy in mammalian germ cells has been investigated experimentally in the laboratory mouse using a variety of cytogenetic and genetic methods. These studies have provided unambiguous evidence of induced nondisjunction in both male and female germ cells when the effect of irradiation is screened in meiotic cells or preimplantation embryos. In contrast, however, cytogenetic analyses of post-implantation embryos and genetic assays for induced chromosome gains have not found a significant radiation effect. These apparently contradictory findings may be reconciled if (a) radiation induces tertiary rather than primary trisomy, or (b) induces embryo-lethal genetic damage, such as deletions, in addition to numerical anomalies. Either or both of these explanations may account for the apparent loss during gestation of radiation-induced trisomic embryos. Extrapolating from the information so far available, it seems unlikely that environmental exposure to low doses if low dose rate radiation will result in a detectable increase in the rate of aneuploidy in the human population. (author)

  1. Development of system technology for radiation cancer therapy with the dexterous auto lesions tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seungho; Jeong, Kyungmin; Jung, Seungho; Lee, Namho

    2013-01-01

    The project objectives are to establish the fundamental core technologies for precise auto lesions tracking radiation cancer therapy and developing related system technology as well. Radiation cancer therapy apparatus should be domestically produced to reduce medical expenses, hence advanced technologies are suggested and developed to make cost down medical expenses and save expenditure for importing 10 million dollars/set from overseas. To achieve these targets, we have carried out reviewing of domestic and foreign technology trend. Based on review of state-of-the-art technology, radiation sensory system is studied. 3m high precise image processing technique and intelligent therapy planning software are developed. Also precedent study on the redundant robot for dexterous motion control system has been performed for developing of radiation cancel therapy robot system

  2. Radiation-induced liver damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcial, V.A.; Santiago-Delpin, E.A.; Lanaro, A.E.; Castro-Vita, H.; Arroyo, G.; Moscol, J.A.; Gomez, C.; Velazquez, J.; Prado, K.

    1977-01-01

    Due to the recent increase in the use of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer with or without chemotherapy, the risk of liver radiation damage has become a significant concern for the radiotherapist when the treated tumour is located in the upper abdomen or lower thorax. Clinically evident radiation liver damage may result in significant mortality, but at times patients recover without sequelae. The dose of 3000 rads in 3 weeks to the entire liver with 5 fractions per week of 200 rads each, seems to be tolerated well clinically by adult humans. Lower doses may lead to damage when used in children, when chemotherapy is added, as in recent hepatectomy cases, and in the presence of pre-existent liver damage. Reduced fractionation may lead to increased damage. Increased fractionation, limitation of the dose delivered to the entire liver, and restriction of the high dose irradiation volume may afford protection. With the aim of studying the problems of hepatic radiation injury in humans, a project of liver irradiation in the dog is being conducted. Mongrel dogs are being conditioned, submitted to pre-irradiation studies (haemogram, blood chemistry, liver scan and biopsy), irradiated under conditions resembling human cancer therapy, and submitted to post-irradiation evaluation of the liver. Twenty-two dogs have been entered in the study but only four qualify for the evaluation of all the study parameters. It has been found that dogs are susceptible to liver irradiation damage similar to humans. The initial mortality has been high mainly due to non-radiation factors which are being kept under control at the present phase of the study. After the initial experiences, the study will involve variations in total dose and fractionation, and the addition of anticoagulant therapy for possible prevention of radiation liver injury. (author)

  3. Effects of radiation quality and oxygen on clustered DNA lesions and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Robert D; Yu, Victor K; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Koumenis, Constantinos; Park, Joo Han; Carlson, David J

    2011-11-01

    Radiation quality and cellular oxygen concentration have a substantial impact on DNA damage, reproductive cell death and, ultimately, the potential efficacy of radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer. To better understand and quantify the effects of radiation quality and oxygen on the induction of clustered DNA lesions, we have now extended the Monte Carlo Damage Simulation (MCDS) to account for reductions in the initial lesion yield arising from enhanced chemical repair of DNA radicals under hypoxic conditions. The kinetic energy range and types of particles considered in the MCDS have also been expanded to include charged particles up to and including (56)Fe ions. The induction of individual and clustered DNA lesions for arbitrary mixtures of different types of radiation can now be directly simulated. For low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiations, cells irradiated under normoxic conditions sustain about 2.9 times as many double-strand breaks (DSBs) as cells irradiated under anoxic conditions. New experiments performed by us demonstrate similar trends in the yields of non-DSB (Fpg and Endo III) clusters in HeLa cells irradiated by γ rays under aerobic and hypoxic conditions. The good agreement among measured and predicted DSBs, Fpg and Endo III cluster yields suggests that, for the first time, it may be possible to determine nucleotide-level maps of the multitude of different types of clustered DNA lesions formed in cells under reduced oxygen conditions. As particle LET increases, the MCDS predicts that the ratio of DSBs formed under normoxic to hypoxic conditions by the same type of radiation decreases monotonically toward unity. However, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of higher-LET radiations compared to (60)Co γ rays (0.24 keV/μm) tends to increase with decreasing oxygen concentration. The predicted RBE of a 1 MeV proton (26.9 keV/μm) relative to (60)Co γ rays for DSB induction increases from 1.9 to 2.3 as oxygen concentration

  4. Radiation-induced transgenerational instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrova, Yuri E

    2003-10-13

    To date, the analysis of mutation induction has provided an irrefutable evidence for an elevated germline mutation rate in the parents directly exposed to ionizing radiation and a number of chemical mutagens. However, the results of numerous publications suggest that radiation may also have an indirect effect on genome stability, which is transmitted through the germ line of irradiated parents to their offspring. This review describes the phenomenon of transgenerational instability and focuses on the data showing increased cancer incidence and elevated mutation rates in the germ line and somatic tissues of the offspring of irradiated parents. The possible mechanisms of transgenerational instability are also discussed.

  5. Lesion-induced pseudo-dominance at functional magnetic resonance imaging: implications for preoperative assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, John L; Hacein-Bey, Lotfi; Mathews, Vincent P; Mueller, Wade M; DeYoe, Edgar A; Prost, Robert W; Meyer, Glenn A; Krouwer, Hendrikus G; Schmainda, Kathleen M

    2004-09-01

    To illustrate how lesion-induced neurovascular uncoupling at functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can mimic hemispheric dominance opposite the side of a lesion preoperatively. We retrospectively reviewed preoperative fMRI mapping data from 50 patients with focal brain abnormalities to establish patterns of hemispheric dominance of language, speech, visual, or motor system functions. Abnormalities included gliomas (31 patients), arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) (11 patients), other congenital lesions (4 patients), encephalomalacia (3 patients), and tumefactive encephalitis (1 patient). A laterality ratio of fMRI hemispheric dominance was compared with actual hemispheric dominance as verified by electrocortical stimulation, Wada testing, postoperative and posttreatment deficits, and/or lesion-induced deficits. fMRI activation maps were generated with cross-correlation (P frontal gyrus gliomas and in one patient with focal tumefactive meningoencephalitis, fMRI incorrectly suggested strong right hemispheric speech dominance. In two patients with lateral precentral gyrus region gliomas and one patient with a left central sulcus AVM, the fMRI pattern incorrectly suggested primary corticobulbar motor dominance contralateral to the side of the lesion. In a patient with a right superior frontal gyrus AVM, fMRI revealed pronounced left dominant supplementary motor area activity in response to a bilateral complex motor task, but right superior frontal gyrus perilesional hemorrhage and edema subsequently caused left upper-extremity plegia. Pathophysiological factors that might have caused neurovascular uncoupling and facilitated pseudo-dominance at fMRI in these patients included direct tumor infiltration, neovascularity, cerebrovascular inflammation, and AVM-induced hemodynamic effects. Sixteen patients had proven (1 patient), probable (2 patients), or possible (13 patients) but unproven lesion-induced homotopic cortical reorganization. Lesion-induced neurovascular

  6. Uncertainties associated with treatments of hepatic lesions in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using respiratory tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charoy, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Oscar Lambret Center treated with Cyberknife R , since June 2007, liver lesions in stereotactic conditions with respiratory tracking using external LEDs correlated with seeds implanted near the target. Clinical results show excellent local control but there are still uncertainties in the preparation and delivery of treatment. The aims of this thesis are to identify and quantify these uncertainties, to define solutions and/or alternatives and to assess their added value. As a first step, the method of the target definition by the radiation oncologist is evaluated. Improvement of the method currently used in routine is considered, including the choice of the most appropriate imaging and the intervention of a second operator, expert in imaging (radiologist). The organ at risk and target movements induced by the respiratory motion are not taken into account in the treatment planning step, performed on the 3D images (the so-called planning CT). The dosimetric impact associated with this type of planning is evaluated using 4D Monte Carlo simulations that take into account patient and linear accelerator movements and the synchrony between both movements. The question of 4D planning as prospect of improvement is then investigated. Movements and deformations of the liver due to respiration are also implicated in the uncertainties involved in the treatment. The correlation model of external markers with the target, used for respiratory tracking, ignores eventual deformations and rotations within the liver. A study of the impact on the target tracking is performed. All these studies were conducted using real patient data sets. (author) [fr

  7. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eRobbins

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (> 6 months to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses > 30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses > 60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain

  8. Radiation-induced linking reactions in polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoepfl, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    Three types of measurements are reported relating to chemical reactions in polyethylene induced by ionizing radiation: 1) viscometric and low-angle laser light scattering measurements to determine the effect of a radical scavenger on the yield of links; 2) calorimetric measurements to determine the effect of radiation-induced linking on the melting behavior of polyethylene; and 3) high-resolution solution carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry measurements to determine the nature of the links and the method of their formation. The NMR results present the first direct detection of radiation-induced long-chain branching (Y links) in polyethylene, and place an apparent upper limit on the yield of H-shaped crosslinks that are formed when polyethylene is irradiated to low absorbed doses. The effect of radiation-induced linking on the melting behavior of polyethylene was examined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It was found that radiation-induced links do not change the heat of fusion of polythylene crystals, but decrease the melt entropy and increase the fold surface free energy per unit area of the crystals. The carbon 13 NMR results demonstrate that long-chain branches (Y links) are formed much more frequently than H-shaped crosslinks at low absorbed doses. The Y links are produced by reactions of alkyl free radicals with terminal vinyl groups in polyethylene

  9. Carcinogenesis induced by low-dose radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotrowski Igor

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Although the effects of high dose radiation on human cells and tissues are relatively well defined, there is no consensus regarding the effects of low and very low radiation doses on the organism. Ionizing radiation has been shown to induce gene mutations and chromosome aberrations which are known to be involved in the process of carcinogenesis. The induction of secondary cancers is a challenging long-term side effect in oncologic patients treated with radiation. Medical sources of radiation like intensity modulated radiotherapy used in cancer treatment and computed tomography used in diagnostics, deliver very low doses of radiation to large volumes of healthy tissue, which might contribute to increased cancer rates in long surviving patients and in the general population. Research shows that because of the phenomena characteristic for low dose radiation the risk of cancer induction from exposure of healthy tissues to low dose radiation can be greater than the risk calculated from linear no-threshold model. Epidemiological data collected from radiation workers and atomic bomb survivors confirms that exposure to low dose radiation can contribute to increased cancer risk and also that the risk might correlate with the age at exposure.

  10. Radiation-induced polymerization and radiation effect on polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seguchi, Tadao

    1977-12-01

    The processes of radiation-induced polymerization of monomers and also radiation effects on polymers have been studied by instrumental analyses of electron spin resonance (ESR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron microscopy. In radiation-induced polymerization, graft-copolymerization and absorbed state polymerization were taken up. For graft-copolymerization, monomers such as methylmethacrylate and butadiene were made to react with irradiated polyethylene, and behaviors of the initiating radicals and propagating radicals were followed under the reaction by ESR. For absorbed state polymerization, acrylonitrile/zeolite and methylmethacrylate/zeolite were chosen. Absorbed monomers were irradiated at 77 0 K and polymerized at room temperature. Active species and the concentrations were measured by ESR and the yields of polymer were observed by NMR. In radiation effect on polymers, polyvinylfluoride, polyvinylidenfluoride and polytetrafluoroethylene were taken up. Active species trapped in the polymer matrixes were identified and decay and reactivity of the species were also studied. On the basis of information from the electron microscopy and x-ray analysis, radiation effects on these polymers are described. In polytetrafluoroethylene produced by radiation polymerization, the relation between morphology and polymerization conditions and also the process of crystallization during polymerization were studied. (auth.)

  11. The role of the HCR system in the repair of lethal lesions of Bacillus subtilis phages and their transfecting DNA damaged by radiation and alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizdalova, M.; Janovska, E.; Zhestyanikov, V.D.

    1980-01-01

    The role of the HCR system in the repair of prelethal lesions induced by UV light, γ radiation and alkylating agents was studied in the Bacillus subtilis SPP1 phage, its heat sensitive mutants (N3, N73 nad ts 1 ) and corresponding infectious DNA. The survival of phages and their transfecting DNA after treatment with UV light is substantially higher in hcr + cells than in hcr cells, the differences being more striking in intact phages than in their transfecting DNA's. Repair inhibitors reduce survival in hcr + cells: caffeine lowers the survival of UV-irradiated phage SPP1 in exponentially growing hcr + cells but has no effect on its survival in competent hcr + cells; acriflavin and ethidium bromide decrease the survival of the UV-irradiated SPP1 phage in both exponentially growing and competent hcr + cells to the level of survival observed in hcr cells; moreover, ethidium bromide lowers the number of infective centres in hcr + cells of the UV-irradiated DNA of the SPP1 phage. Repair inhibitors do not lower the survival of the UV-irradiated phages or their DNA in hcr cells. The repair mechanism under study also effectively repairs lesions induced by polyfunctional alkylating agents in the transfecting DNA's of B. subtilis phages but is not functional with lesions induced by these agents in free phages and lesions caused in the phages and their DNA by ethyl methanesulphonate or γ radiation. (author)

  12. Radiation-induced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, J.L.

    1977-01-01

    Concern is expressed over a recent U.K. newspaper report (The Times, 21 January 1977, 5) on the possible hazards of mammography, as women may over-react to the extent of refusing mammography. The problems of radiation risk estimates, particularly at low dose levels, are very briefly reviewed. Recent improvements in mammography techniques have minimised the radiation hazard. Conflicting reports of the mortality rates following mammography screening programmes are discussed. In England and Wales, breast cancer is the commonest cause of death in women aged 35 to 54, and it would be unfortunate if the possible benefits of screening were denied to this age group before the latest mammographic techniques have been fully evaluated. (U.K.)

  13. Radiation-induced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, J L [Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK). Postgraduate Medical School

    1977-03-12

    Concern is expressed over a recent U.K. newspaper report (The Times, 21 January 1977, 5) on the possible hazards of mammography, as women may over-react to the extent of refusing mammography. The problems of radiation risk estimates, particularly at low dose levels, are very briefly reviewed. Recent improvements in mammography techniques have minimised the radiation hazard. Conflicting reports of the mortality rates following mammography screening programmes are discussed. In England and Wales, breast cancer is the commonest cause of death in women aged 35 to 54, and it would be unfortunate if the possible benefits of screening were denied to this age group before the latest mammographic techniques have been fully evaluated.

  14. Radiation-induced cerebrovascular complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Haruko; Koizumi, Nobuhiko; Nihei, Kenji; Taguchi, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Haruki.

    1982-01-01

    A 3-year-old boy with non-Hodgkin malignant lymphoma came to complete remission after combined chemotherapy, intrathecal methotrexate, and whole brain irradiation of 2,400 rad. Two years after diagnosis, he developed it hemiparesis. CT scan showed cerebral infarction and hydrocephalus, and angiography revealed obstruction of the left middle cerebral artery. He survived with marked neurological deficits and no relapse of lymphoma. The literature was reviewed concerning complications after radiation to the brain. (Kondo, M.)

  15. Radiator-induced erythema ab igne in 8-year-old girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzezinski, Piotr; Ismail, Samir; Chiriac, Anca

    2014-04-01

    The cutaneous lesion of erythema ab Igne are characterized by a reticulate erythema, hyperpigmentation, fine scaling, epidermal atrophy and telangiectasias, and reticulated erythema. We report a case of erythema ab igne on the hands of a 8-year-old girl, induced by classic homemade radiator.

  16. A novel topical protectant for the prevention of β-radiation induced moist desquamation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, L.; Wilcock, S.; Rezvani, M.; Hsia, C.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Effective therapies for the prevention of radiation-induced skin burns that could be readily deployed under a nuclear accident or nuclear terrorism scenario are urgently needed. In this report we describe the efficacy of a novel radioprotectant (DMZ911) in a model of b-radiation induced moist desquamation (MD) in pig skin. DMZ911 is a nitroxide-based topical cream that effectively delivers the nitroxide into viable skin cells. Stable nitroxide compounds have been shown to be effective against both X-ray and ?-ray-induced damage in vivo and in vitro. A pig skin model of β-radiation-induced MD was employed in this study. Exposure to 30 Gy was used to induce skin lesions involving >80% moist desquamation in prescribed test sites on flank skin of female Large White pigs. DMZ911 or placebo was applied to various test sites 2 hours prior to radiation exposure. Lesions were scored based on the area of the test site containing 50% MD (severe) as determined by clinical assessment using blinded observers. Treatment with DMZ911 resulted in a 31% net reduction in MD when compared to placebo treated sites following an 8-week study period. This reduction was observed whether all sites or only those with severe MD were considered. Skin damage (as indicated by MD) from radiation exposure was significantly reduced by 31% (p = 0.05) following pretreatment with the novel topical radioprotectant DMZ911. This observation suggests that skin lesion development from radiation-induced oxidative damage cascades may be successfully inhibited by treatment with DMZ911. This topical therapeutic agent represents a novel treatment for nuclear radiation induced skin injury. DMZ911 may have unique applications in radiation oncology, cosmetic and therapeutic UV, laser, glycolic and dermabrasion procedures

  17. Effect of Sucralfate on Radiation-induced Esophageal Changes in Rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ki Mun; Chai, Gyu Young [Gyeongsang National Univ., Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sei Chul [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    The study was designed to evaluate the response of sucralfate against the esophageal damage of rat by irradiation. Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200-250 gm were divided into six groups including only sucralfate group, the group of 10 Gy or 20 Gy radiation alone, the groups of 10 Gy or 20 Gy radiation-sucralfate combination, and control. Each group was sacrificed at 3, 7, 14 and 28 days after irradiation. For evaluation of the radiation-induced esophageal lesions, there were examined the change of body weight, barium-esophagogram and histopathologic findings. Mean body weight gain was decreased in the groups with 10 Gy or 20 Gy radiation alone and 10 Gy or 20 Gy radiation-sucralfate combination as comparing with control (p=0.03, p=0.02, p=0.04, p=0.02), but there was no difference between the groups of 10 Gy or 20 Gy radiation alone and the groups of 10 Gy or 20 Gy radiation-sucralfate combination. In the 20 Gy and 20 Gy radiation alone groups, barium esophagograms showed diffuse narrowing and stiffness through the entire esophagus from 7 days after irradiation, but there was similar pattern of esophagograms between the groups of 10 Gy radiation-sucralfate combination and the control. Histopathologic lesion scores of 10 Gy and 20 Gy radiation groups were significantly higher than the control (p=0.03, p=0.008). In the 10 Gy radiation group, there were significantly higher lesion scores ar 3 and 7 days after irradiation as comparing with those in the group of radiation-sucralfate combination (p=0.04, p=0.03). These results suggest that sucralfate might be played as a role of protection from acute radiation-induced esophagitis within the limit of tolerable radiation doses.

  18. Effect of Sucralfate on Radiation-induced Esophageal Changes in Rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ki Mun; Chai, Gyu Young; Yoon, Sei Chul

    2001-01-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the response of sucralfate against the esophageal damage of rat by irradiation. Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200-250 gm were divided into six groups including only sucralfate group, the group of 10 Gy or 20 Gy radiation alone, the groups of 10 Gy or 20 Gy radiation-sucralfate combination, and control. Each group was sacrificed at 3, 7, 14 and 28 days after irradiation. For evaluation of the radiation-induced esophageal lesions, there were examined the change of body weight, barium-esophagogram and histopathologic findings. Mean body weight gain was decreased in the groups with 10 Gy or 20 Gy radiation alone and 10 Gy or 20 Gy radiation-sucralfate combination as comparing with control (p=0.03, p=0.02, p=0.04, p=0.02), but there was no difference between the groups of 10 Gy or 20 Gy radiation alone and the groups of 10 Gy or 20 Gy radiation-sucralfate combination. In the 20 Gy and 20 Gy radiation alone groups, barium esophagograms showed diffuse narrowing and stiffness through the entire esophagus from 7 days after irradiation, but there was similar pattern of esophagograms between the groups of 10 Gy radiation-sucralfate combination and the control. Histopathologic lesion scores of 10 Gy and 20 Gy radiation groups were significantly higher than the control (p=0.03, p=0.008). In the 10 Gy radiation group, there were significantly higher lesion scores ar 3 and 7 days after irradiation as comparing with those in the group of radiation-sucralfate combination (p=0.04, p=0.03). These results suggest that sucralfate might be played as a role of protection from acute radiation-induced esophagitis within the limit of tolerable radiation doses

  19. Perinatal radiation-induced renal damage in the beagle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaenke, R.S.; Angleton, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    The developing perinatal kidney is particularly sensitive to radiation. The pathogenesis of the radiation-induced lesion is related to the destruction of outer cortical developing nephrons and direct radiation injury with secondary hemodynamic alterations in remnant nephrons. In this study, which is part of a life span investigation of the effects of whole-body gamma radiation during prenatal and early postnatal life, dogs were given 0, 0.16, 0.83, or 1.25 Gy irradiation at either 55 days postcoitus or 2 days postpartum and were examined morphometrically and histopathologically at 70 days of age. Although irradiated dogs showed no reduction in the total number of nephrons per kidney, there was a significant increase in the total number and relative percentage of immature, dysplastic glomeruli. In addition, deeper cortical glomeruli of irradiated kidneys exhibited mesangial sclerosis similar to that associated with progressive renal failure in our previous studies. These findings are in accord with those reported at doses of 2.24 to 3.57 Gy and demonstrate that the perinatal kidney is affected by radiation doses much lower than previously demonstrated

  20. Transplantation of hamster lung lesions induced by 239PuO2 or benz(a)pyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, K.E.; Sanders, C.L.

    1980-01-01

    None(0%) of 1000 recipients of lung lesions for 239 PuO 2 -exposed hamsters that were transplanted into other hamsters' cheek pouches, developed tumors, whereas 90% of transplants from benz(a)pyrene-induced lung lesions were malignant

  1. An integrated model for radiation induced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Varma, M.

    1994-01-01

    Risk estimates for radiation induced cancer are based on epidemiological data, principally the Japanese A bomb survivors. These estimates for radiation are better known than for any other environmental pollutant, but they do not relate directly to exposure to low doses and low dose rate. Recent rapid advances in molecular genetics, coupled with steady gains in cellular biology, radiation physics and chemistry led to the notion that the time may not be far off when it may be possible to arrive at human cancer risk estimates entirely from laboratory data. Whether risk estimates based on laboratory data will ever replace estimates based on epidemiological studies is an open question. What is clear is that laboratory data can supplement the present risk estimates by providing information on the relative effectiveness of high LET radiations, the importance of dose rate and dose protraction, and by identifying subpopulations which are unusually sensitive or resistant to radiation carcinogenesis. (author)

  2. Radiation-induced cerebrovascular disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, T.L.; Bresnan, M.J.

    1976-01-01

    Radiation-induced internal carotid artery occlusion has not been well recognized previously as a cause of childhood cerebrovascular disease. A child who had received radiation as a neonate for a hemangioma involving the left orbit at the age of 6 years experienced a recurrent right-sided paresis, vascular headaches, and speech difficulties. Angiography showed a hypoplastic left carotid artery with occlusion of both the anterior and middle cerebral arteries. Collateral vessels bypassed the occluded-stenotic segments. Review of the literature showed two additional cases of large vessel occlusion in childhood associated with anastomatic telangiectatic vessel development following early radiation therapy of facial hemangioma

  3. Radiation induced peroxidation in model lipid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlan, K.Z.B.H.M.

    1981-08-01

    In the studies of radiation induced lipid peroxidation, lecithin-liposomes and aqueous micellar solutions of sodium linoleate (or linoleic acid) have been used as models of lipid membrane systems. The liposomes and aqueous linoleate micelles were irradiated in the presence of O 2 and N 2 O/O 2 (80/20 v/v). The peroxidation was initiated using gamma radiation from 60 Co radiation source and was monitored by measuring the increase in absorbance of conjugated diene at 232 nm and by the thiobarbituric acid (TBA) test. The oxidation products were also identified by GLC and GLC-MS analysis. (author)

  4. A report on radiation-induced gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvati, M.; Artico, M.; Caruso, R.; Rocchi, G.; Orlando, E.R.; Nucci, F.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas are uncommon, with only 73 cases on record to date. The disease that most frequently occasioned radiation therapy has been acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Three more cases are added here, two after irradiation for ALL and one after irradiation for tinea capitis. In a review of the relevant literature, the authors stress the possibility that the ALL-glioma and the retinoblastoma-glioma links point to syndromes in their own right that may occur without radiation therapy.56 references

  5. The genetics of radiation-induced osteosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosemann, M.; Kuosaite, V.; Nathrath, M.; Atkinson, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Individual genetic variation can influence susceptibility to the carcinogenic effects of many environmental carcinogens. In radiation-exposed populations those individuals with a greater genetically determined susceptibility would be at greater risk of developing cancer. To include this modification of risk into radiation protection schemes it is necessary to identify the genes responsible for determining individual sensitivity. Alpha-particle-induced osteosarcoma in the mouse has been adopted as a model of human radiation carcinogenesis, and genome-wide screens have been conducted for allelic imbalance and genetic linkage. These studies have revealed a series of genes involved in determining the sensitivity to radiogenic osteosarcoma formation. (author)

  6. Role of plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 in radiation-induced normal tissues injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abderrahmani, R.

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an essential tool for cancer treatment, but there is a balance between benefits and risks related to the use of ionizing radiation: the objective is to deliver a maximum dose to the tumour to destroy or to sterilize it while protecting surrounding normal tissues. Radio-induced damages to normal tissues are therefore a limiting factor when increasing the dose delivered to the tumour. One of the objectives of this research thesis is to bring to the fore a relationship between the initiation of lesions and the development of late damages, more particularly in the intestine, and to identify the involved molecular actors and their inter-connectivity. After a first part presenting ionizing radiation, describing biological effects of ionizing radiation and their use in radiotherapy, presenting the intestine and the endothelium and discussing the intestine radio-sensitivity, discussing the radio-induced intestine damages and radiotherapy-induced complications, and presenting the plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) and its behaviour in presence of ionizing radiation, two articles are reproduced. The first one addresses the effect of a pharmacological inhibition and of genetic deficiency in PAI-1 on the evolution of radio-induced intestine lesions. The second one discusses the fact that radio-induced PAI-1-related death of endothelial cells determines the severity of early radio-induced intestine lesions

  7. Radiation-induced damage of membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonei, Shuji

    1977-01-01

    An outline of membranous structure was stated, and radiation-induced damage of membranes were surveyed. By irradiation, permeability of membranes, especially passive transportation mechanism, was damaged, and glycoprotein in the surface layers of cells and the surface layer structures were changed. The intramembranous damage was induced by decrease of electrophoresis of nuclear mambranes and a quantitative change of cytochrome P450 of microsomal membranes of the liver, and peroxidation of membranous lipid and SH substitute damage of membranous protein were mentioned as the mechanism of membranous damage. Recovery of membranous damage depends on radiation dose and temperature, and membranous damage participates largely in proliferation death. (tsunoda, M.)

  8. Delayed repair of radiation induced clustered DNA damage: Friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, Laura J.; O’Neill, Peter; Lomax, Martine E.

    2011-01-01

    A signature of ionizing radiation exposure is the induction of DNA clustered damaged sites, defined as two or more lesions within one to two helical turns of DNA by passage of a single radiation track. Clustered damage is made up of double strand breaks (DSB) with associated base lesions or abasic (AP) sites, and non-DSB clusters comprised of base lesions, AP sites and single strand breaks. This review will concentrate on the experimental findings of the processing of non-DSB clustered damaged sites. It has been shown that non-DSB clustered damaged sites compromise the base excision repair pathway leading to the lifetime extension of the lesions within the cluster, compared to isolated lesions, thus the likelihood that the lesions persist to replication and induce mutation is increased. In addition certain non-DSB clustered damaged sites are processed within the cell to form additional DSB. The use of E. coli to demonstrate that clustering of DNA lesions is the major cause of the detrimental consequences of ionizing radiation is also discussed. The delayed repair of non-DSB clustered damaged sites in humans can be seen as a “friend”, leading to cell killing in tumour cells or as a “foe”, resulting in the formation of mutations and genetic instability in normal tissue. PMID:21130102

  9. Delayed repair of radiation induced clustered DNA damage: Friend or foe?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eccles, Laura J.; O'Neill, Peter; Lomax, Martine E.

    2011-01-01

    A signature of ionizing radiation exposure is the induction of DNA clustered damaged sites, defined as two or more lesions within one to two helical turns of DNA by passage of a single radiation track. Clustered damage is made up of double strand breaks (DSB) with associated base lesions or abasic (AP) sites, and non-DSB clusters comprised of base lesions, AP sites and single strand breaks. This review will concentrate on the experimental findings of the processing of non-DSB clustered damaged sites. It has been shown that non-DSB clustered damaged sites compromise the base excision repair pathway leading to the lifetime extension of the lesions within the cluster, compared to isolated lesions, thus the likelihood that the lesions persist to replication and induce mutation is increased. In addition certain non-DSB clustered damaged sites are processed within the cell to form additional DSB. The use of E. coli to demonstrate that clustering of DNA lesions is the major cause of the detrimental consequences of ionizing radiation is also discussed. The delayed repair of non-DSB clustered damaged sites in humans can be seen as a 'friend', leading to cell killing in tumour cells or as a 'foe', resulting in the formation of mutations and genetic instability in normal tissue.

  10. X-radiation-induced differentiation of xenotransplanted human undifferentiated rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, T.; Matsui, T.; Maeda, Y.

    1989-01-01

    A serially xenotransplantable strain of undifferentiated embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma originating from the nasal cavity of a 42-year-old woman has been established in our laboratory. After radiotherapy for the tumor donor, distinct rhabdomyoblastic differentiation of the undifferentiated sarcoma cells appeared in the primary lesion, and it is a reasonable assumption that X-irradiation has a certain potentiality to induce morphologic differentiation of tumor cells. To study this possibility, tissue fragments of undifferentiated embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma that had grown to more than 10 mm after being transplanted to nude mice were selectively irradiated in situ. The degree of rhabdomyoblastic differentiation according to radiation dose was evaluated by light and electron microscopy and by immunostainability for myoglobin, creatine phosphokinase-MM, and desmin. Distinct morphologic differentiation of undifferentiated sarcoma cells could be induced by repeated X-irradiations at several-week intervals

  11. Radiation-induced brain damage in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, Shizuo; Kokunai, Takashi; Ijichi, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Raimondi, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    The nature and sequence of the radiation-induced changes in the brain were studied postmortem in 34 children with glioma, 22 of whom underwent central nervous system radiation therapy. Twenty received whole-brain or whole-neuroaxis radiation at a total mean dosage of 4063 cGy. Brain tissue alternations were analyzed histologically by means of various staining methods, including immunohistochemical techniques. The histological features of irradiated brains were compared with those of non-irradiated brains. Microscopic findings included demyelination (seven cases), focal necrosis (six cases), cortical atrophy (four cases), endothelial proliferation (four cases), and telangiectatic vascular proliferation with vascular thickening and oozing of a thick fluid (one case). Such findings were rare in non-irradiated patients. Demyelination was observed earliest in a patient who died 5 months after radiation therapy and was more common after 9 months. Focal necrosis was first observed 9 months post-irradiation but was more advanced and extensive after 1 year. Calcified foci were found only after 60 months. Various vascular changes such as vascular thickening and thrombosis suggested ischemic insult to the brain as a late effect of radiation injury. The results of this study suggest that the immature brain may be more sensitive to radiation than is the adult brain, and that the manifestations of radiation-induced injury depend on the time elapsed after irradiation. (author)

  12. Radiation Induced Precipitation in Iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solly, B

    1964-02-15

    Foils of iron have been neutron-irradiated in the Swedish re- search reactor R2 to integrated doses in the range 10{sup 17} - 10{sup 19} nvt (> 1 MeV) and examined by transmission electron microscopy. Features have been observed having diffraction contrast similar to that of the prismatic dislocation loops formed in f.c.c. metals by the collapse of point-defect clusters. The features have been shown to be due to precipitation of impurities at radiation damage centres in the iron matrix.

  13. Radiation Induced Precipitation in Iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solly, B.

    1964-02-01

    Foils of iron have been neutron-irradiated in the Swedish re- search reactor R2 to integrated doses in the range 10 17 - 10 19 nvt (> 1 MeV) and examined by transmission electron microscopy. Features have been observed having diffraction contrast similar to that of the prismatic dislocation loops formed in f.c.c. metals by the collapse of point-defect clusters. The features have been shown to be due to precipitation of impurities at radiation damage centres in the iron matrix

  14. Detection and repair of a UV-induced photosensitive lesion in the DNA of human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.A.; Regan, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Irradiation with UV light results in damage to the DNA of human cells. The most numerous lesions are pyrimidine dimers; however, other lesions are known to occur and may contribute to the overall deleterious effect of UV irradiation. The authors have observed evidence of a UV-induced lesion other than pyrimidine dimers in the DNA of human cells by measuring DNA strand breaks induced by irradiating with 313-nm light following UV (254-nm) irradiation. The data suggest that, in normal cells, the lesion responsible for this effect is rapidly repaired or altered; whereas, in xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells it seems to remain unchanged. Some change apparently occurs in the DNA of xeroderma pigmentosum group A cells which results in an increase in photolability. These data indicate a deficiency in DNA repair of xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells as well as in xeroderma pigmentosum group A cells. (Auth.)

  15. Fundamental study of the radiation monitoring system based on evaluation of DNA lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, K.; Matuo, Y.; Izumi, Y.; Ikeda, T.

    2011-01-01

    The biological dosemeter that measures biological responses to ionising radiation is useful for radiation protection. This paper presents the development and characterisation of a gamma ray irradiation dosimetry system based on real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction) methodology. Real-time PCR is used to amplify and simultaneously quantify a targeted DNA molecule. If there are no limitations due to limiting substrates or reagents, at each extension step, the amount of DNA target is doubled, leading to exponential (geometric) amplification of the specific DNA fragment. The essential point of this assay is that DNA lesions caused by ionising radiation block DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase, resulting in a decrease in the amplification of a damaged DNA template compared with that of non-damaged DNA templates. (authors)

  16. Genetic alterations during radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Seiji

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews radiation-induced genetic alterations and its carcinogenesis, focusing on the previous in vitro assay outcome. A colony formation assay using Syrian hamster fetal cells and focus formation assay using mouse C3H10T1/2 cells are currently available to find malignant transformation of cells. Such in vitro assays has proposed the hypothesis that radiation-induced carcinogenesis arises from at least two-stage processes; i.e., that an early step induced by irradiation plays an important role in promoting the potential to cause the subsequent mutation. A type of genetic instability induced by radiation results in a persistently elevated frequency of spontaneous mutations, so-called the phenomenon of delayed reproductive death. One possible mechanism by which genetic instability arises has been shown to be due to the development of abnormality in the gene group involved in the maintenance mechanism of genome stability. Another possibility has also been shown to stem from the loss of telomere (the extremities of a chromosome). The importance of search for radiation-induced genetic instability is emphasized in view of the elucidation of carcinogenesis. (N.K.)

  17. Treatment of radiation skin lesions in various stages with different preparations of vitamin B12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Hui; Chen Qiang; Yang Xiaohong

    1989-01-01

    Since the aqueous solution of Vit. B 12 was firstly used to treat efficaciously the acute radiation injury of skin and superficial second-degree skin burn, we have successfully treated radiation skin lesions in acute, chronic and recovering stages with the cream or oil preparation of Vit. B 12 . In the period of ten years (1979-1988), altogether 418 cases of radiation or non-radiation skin injury were observed and 48 out of 49 cases with acute radiation skin ulcer treated with aqueous solution of Vit. B 12 were healed with an effective rate of 97.95% and average healing time of 12.6 days. All of 37 cases with chronic radiation skin injury treated with oil preparation of Vit. B 12 were healed or improved with an effective rate of 100% and average healing time of 21.49 days. However, in the control group, of 18 cases treated with conventional drugs only 13 were healed, the effective rate being 72.22% and healing time 63.5 days, and both of these indices were of significant difference, as compared with those treated with Vit. B 12

  18. The Role of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy with Photons, Protons and Heavy Ions for Treating Extracranial Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Michael Laine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the ability to deliver large doses of ionizing radiation to a tumor has been limited by radiation induced toxicity to normal surrounding tissues. This was the initial impetus for the development of conventionally fractionated radiation therapy, where large volumes of healthy tissue received radiation and were allowed the time to repair the radiation damage. However, advances in radiation delivery techniques and image guidance have allowed for more ablative doses of radiation to be delivered in a very accurate, conformal and safe manner with shortened fractionation schemes. Hypofractionated regimens with photons have already transformed how certain tumor types are treated with radiation therapy. Additionally, hypofractionation is able to deliver a complete course of ablative radiation therapy over a shorter period of time compared to conventional fractionation regimens making treatment more convenient to the patient and potentially more cost-effective. Recently there has been an increased interest in proton therapy because of the potential further improvement in dose distributions achievable due to their unique physical characteristics. Furthermore, with heavier ions the dose conformality is increased and in addition there is potentially a higher biological effectiveness compared to protons and photons. Due to the properties mentioned above, charged particle therapy has already become an attractive modality to further investigate the role of hypofractionation in the treatment of various tumors. This review will discuss the rationale and evolution of hypofractionated radiation therapy, the reported clinical success with initially photon and then charged particle modalities, and further potential implementation into treatment regimens going forward.

  19. Radiation-induced heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroobandt, R; Knieriem, H J; De Wolf, L; Joossens, J V

    1975-01-01

    A 45-year old woman underwent a radical mastectomy in 1965 for carcinoma of the left breast with metastasis in the left axillar lymph nodes. Fifty per cent of the heart received 4,000 rads during postoperative X-ray therapy. Patient developed radiopneumonia and symptoms of acute pericarditis in 1967. Constrictive pericarditis developed gradually from 1972 on. A pericardiectomy was performed in June 1974 and a thickened pericardium could be removed. Light and electron microscopic examination of a surgical biopsy of the left ventricular epi-myocardium revealed epicardial fibrosis, interstitial fibrosis of the myocardium and perivascular fibrosis. The diagnosis of post-radiation pericarditis was made. The myocardial involvement may be responsible for the subsequent clinical course.

  20. Radiation-induced valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujral, Dorothy M; Lloyd, Guy; Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev

    2016-02-15

    Radiation to the mediastinum is a key component of treatment with curative intent for a range of cancers including Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast cancer. Exposure to radiation is associated with a risk of radiation-induced heart valve damage characterised by valve fibrosis and calcification. There is a latent interval of 10-20 years between radiation exposure and development of clinically significant heart valve disease. Risk is related to radiation dose received, interval from exposure and use of concomitant chemotherapy. Long-term outlook and the risk of valve surgery are related to the effects of radiation on mediastinal structures including pulmonary fibrosis and pericardial constriction. Dose prediction models to predict the risk of heart valve disease in the future and newer radiation techniques to reduce the radiation dose to the heart are being developed. Surveillance strategies for this cohort of cancer survivors at risk of developing significant heart valve complications are required. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Radiation-induced Genomic Instability and Radiation Sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnum, Susan M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2013-01-19

    The obvious relationships between reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammatory type responses and reactive chemokines and cytokines suggests a general stress response induced by ionizing radiation most likely leads to the non-targeted effects described after radiation exposure. We argue that true bystander effects do not occur in the radiation therapy clinic. But there is no question that effects outside the target volume do occur. These “out of field effects” are considered very low dose effects in the context of therapy. So what are the implications of non-targeted effects on radiation sensitivity? The primary goal of therapy is to eradicate the tumor. Given the genetic diversity of the human population, lifestyle and environment factors it is likely some combination of these will influence patient outcome. Non-targeted effects may contribute to a greater or lesser extent. But consider the potential situation involving a partial body exposure due to a radiation accident or radiological terrorism. Non-targeted effects suggest that the tissue at risk for demonstrating possible detrimental effects of radiation exposure might be greater than the volume actually irradiated.

  2. Radiation-induced cancers in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Fumio

    1978-01-01

    Radiation-induced cancers in man were divided into three groups, a group in which cancers occurred after atomic bomb exposure, a group in which cancers occurred in radiologists and other medical specialists, and a group in which cancers occurred after exposure to diagnostic radiation, and they were summarized. In atomic bomb survivors leukemia, thyroid cancer, salivary gland cancer, lung cancer, and breast cancer occurred so frequently. In addition to them, mortality ratios by malignant lymphoma, stomach cancer, esophageal cancer, and by cancer of urinary tract were increased. The incidence of leukemia was decreased in those who treated radiation owing to the development of the protection of occupational exposure, and the incidence of radiation-induced cancers was decreased in patients owing to the improvement of therapy. However, a new problem has arisen as to the occurrence of cancers after medical exposure, such as various histological types of cancers after the treatment of skin diseases on the head, and breast cancer after the treatment of pneumothorax. Dose-to-effect relation, hereditary factors, effect of age, immunological influences and endocrine actions were also studied in each radiation-induced cancer. (Ichikawa, K.)

  3. Study on radiation-inducible genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sang Yong; Kim, Dong Ho; Joe, Min Ho; Park, Hae Jun; Song, Hyu Npa

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-inducible genes of E. coli, which is a model strain for bacterial study, and Salmonella, which is a typical strain for pathogenic bacteria were compared through omic analysis. Heat shock response genes and prophage genes were induced by radiation in Salmonella, not in E. coli. Among prophage genes tested, STM2628 showed the highest activation by radiation, and approximately 1 kb promoter region was turned out to be necessary for radiation response. To screen an artificial promoter showing activation by 2 Gy, the high-throughput screening method using fluorescent MUG substrate was established. The use of bacteria as anticancer agents has attracted interest. In this study, we tried to develop tumor targeting bacteria in which the radiation-inducible promoter activate a transgene encoding a cytotoxic protein. To do this, a tumor-targeting hfq Salmonella mutant strain was constructed, and we found that its virulence decreased. For outward secretion of anticancer protein produced inside bacteria, the signal peptide of SspH1 was determined and the signal peptide was proven to be able to secrete an anticancer protein. Tumor xenograft mouse model was secured, which can be used for efficiency evaluation of bacterial tumor therapy

  4. Radiation-induced heart injury. Radiopathological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Y; Niibe, H [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine

    1975-11-01

    In order to identify radiation-induced heart injury and to differentiate it from heart disease, an attempt was made to clarify post-irradiation heart injury by investigating the histological changes which occur during the interval between the irradiation and the time of demonstrable histological changes. A study was made of 83 autopsies in which most of the primary neoplasms were breast cancers, lung cancers and mediastinal tumors. In 43 of these autopsies the heart had been irradiated. Sixty eight dd-strain mice were also used for microautoradiographic study. Histological changes in the heart were observed in 27 of the 43 cases receiving irradiation. The limit of the tolerance dose to the heart for indicating histological changes was 1220 ret in humans. The latent period without histological changes was 2.7 months after initiation of radiation therapy. Greater heart injury was observed after re-irradiation or after the combined therapy of radiation and chemotherapy especially mitomycin (MMC). The histological findings after treatment with MMC were similar to those of radiation-induced heart injury. Results of the study indicate that the damage is secondary to radiation-induced changes of the vascula connective tissue.

  5. Study on radiation-inducible genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Yong; Kim, Dong Ho; Joe, Min Ho; Park, Hae Jun; Song, Hyu Npa

    2012-01-15

    Radiation-inducible genes of E. coli, which is a model strain for bacterial study, and Salmonella, which is a typical strain for pathogenic bacteria were compared through omic analysis. Heat shock response genes and prophage genes were induced by radiation in Salmonella, not in E. coli. Among prophage genes tested, STM2628 showed the highest activation by radiation, and approximately 1 kb promoter region was turned out to be necessary for radiation response. To screen an artificial promoter showing activation by 2 Gy, the high-throughput screening method using fluorescent MUG substrate was established. The use of bacteria as anticancer agents has attracted interest. In this study, we tried to develop tumor targeting bacteria in which the radiation-inducible promoter activate a transgene encoding a cytotoxic protein. To do this, a tumor-targeting hfq Salmonella mutant strain was constructed, and we found that its virulence decreased. For outward secretion of anticancer protein produced inside bacteria, the signal peptide of SspH1 was determined and the signal peptide was proven to be able to secrete an anticancer protein. Tumor xenograft mouse model was secured, which can be used for efficiency evaluation of bacterial tumor therapy.

  6. Radiation-induced cancers in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, F [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology

    1978-07-01

    Radiation-induced cancers in man were divided into three groups, a group in which cancers occurred after atomic bomb exposure, a group in which cancers occurred in radiologists and other medical specialists, and a group in which cancers occurred after exposure to diagnostic radiation, and they were summarized. In atomic bomb survivors leukemia, thyroid cancer, salivary gland cancer, lung cancer, and breast cancer occurred so frequently. In addition to them, mortality ratios by malignant lymphoma, stomach cancer, esophageal cancer, and by cancer of urinary tract were increased. The incidence of leukemia was decreased in those who treated radiation owing to the development of the protection of occupational exposure, and the incidence of radiation-induced cancers was decreased in patients owing to the improvement of therapy. However, a new problem has arisen as to the occurrence of cancers after medical exposure, such as various histological types of cancers after the treatment of skin diseases on the head, and breast cancer after the treatment of pneumothorax. Dose-to-effect relation, hereditary factors, effect of age, immunological influences and endocrine actions were also studied in each radiation-induced cancer.

  7. Radiation Induced Polymerization of Pyrrole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarada Idris; Ratnam, C.T.; Ahmad Ashrif Abu Bakar

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the polymerization of pyrrole by gamma irradiation. The pyrrole films were exposed to gamma ray from cobalt 60 source at doses ranging from 0 to 150 kGy. The films were subjected to structural and morphological analyses by using FTIR, SEM and AFM techniques. Similar studies were also made on pristine pyrrole film which serve as control. Results revealed that pyrrole has been successfully polymerized through irradiation induced reactions. The SEM images depicted the formation of cauliflower shape upon gamma irradiation. The structural changes of pyrrole also evidenced by FTIR spectra. Surface topography and roughness of pyrrole before and after gamma irradiation found to show significant differences. (author)

  8. Study on radiation-inducible genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sang Yong; Kim, Dong Ho; Joe, Min Ho; Song, Hyu Npa

    2012-01-01

    Transcription of previously identified radiation-inducible genes, uscA and cyoA, was examined responding to radiation. The putative promoter regions of both genes were cloned into pRS415 vector containing lacZ, and the core promoter region necessary for radiation response were determined through promoter deletion method. To investigate the role of uscA, which is assumed to be small RNA related with radiation response, a deletion mutant strain of uscA was constructed. However, uscA deletion did not affect bacterial survival against radiation exposure. The use of bacteria as anticancer agents has attracted interest. In this study, we tried to develop tumor targeting bacteria in which the radiation-inducible promoter activate a transgene encoding a cytotoxic protein. For outward secretion of anticancer protein produced inside bacteria, the N-terminal 140 amino acid of SspH1 was found to function as a secretion signal peptide. To create an attenuated tumor-targeting bacteria, Salmonella ptsI mutant strain was constructed, and we found that its virulence decreased. Finally, the tumor-targeting ability of ptsI mutant was verified by the use of in-vivo imaging analysis

  9. Study of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfring, E.

    2004-06-01

    A method for determining chromosomal aberrations was established for the purpose of examining the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of photon radiation with respect to mammary epithelium cells. Cells were exposed to 25 kV X-radiation and to 200 kV X-radiation for comparison and the resulting concentrations of chromosomal aberrations were compared. The RBE M value for radiation-induced fragmentation was found to be 4.2 ± 2.4, while the RBE M value for radiation-induced generation of dicentric chromosomes was found to be 0.5 ± 0.5. In addition to the evaluation of chromosomal aberrations the number of cell cycles undergone by the cells was monitored by means of BrDU staining. As expected, the proportion of cells which underwent more than one cell cycle following exposure to 5 Gy was very low in both cases, amounting to 1.9% (25 kV) and 3.2 (200 kV). Non-radiated cells yielded control values of 26.0% and 12.6%, suggesting variations in external conditions from day to day

  10. Cell cycle arrest induced by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okaichi, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Hideki; Ohnishi, Takeo

    1994-01-01

    It is known that various chemical reactions, such as cell cycle arrest, DNA repair and cell killing, can occur within the cells when exposed to ionizing radiation and ultraviolet radiation. Thus protein dynamics involved in such chemical reactions has received considerable attention. In this article, cell cycle regulation is first discussed in terms of the G2/M-phase and the G1/S-phase. Then, radiation-induced cell cycle arrest is reviewed. Cell cycle regulation mechanism involved in the G2 arrest, which is well known to occur when exposed to radiation, has recently been investigated using yeasts. In addition, recent study has yielded a noticeable finding that the G1 arrest can occur with intracellular accumulation of p53 product following ionization radiation. p53 is also shown to play an extremely important role in both DNA repair and cell killing due to DNA damage. Studies on the role of genes in protein groups induced by radiation will hold promise for the elucidation of cell cycle mechanism. (N.K.) 57 refs

  11. Study on radiation-inducible genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Yong; Kim, Dong Ho; Joe, Min Ho; Song, Hyu Npa

    2012-01-15

    Transcription of previously identified radiation-inducible genes, uscA and cyoA, was examined responding to radiation. The putative promoter regions of both genes were cloned into pRS415 vector containing lacZ, and the core promoter region necessary for radiation response were determined through promoter deletion method. To investigate the role of uscA, which is assumed to be small RNA related with radiation response, a deletion mutant strain of uscA was constructed. However, uscA deletion did not affect bacterial survival against radiation exposure. The use of bacteria as anticancer agents has attracted interest. In this study, we tried to develop tumor targeting bacteria in which the radiation-inducible promoter activate a transgene encoding a cytotoxic protein. For outward secretion of anticancer protein produced inside bacteria, the N-terminal 140 amino acid of SspH1 was found to function as a secretion signal peptide. To create an attenuated tumor-targeting bacteria, Salmonella ptsI mutant strain was constructed, and we found that its virulence decreased. Finally, the tumor-targeting ability of ptsI mutant was verified by the use of in-vivo imaging analysis.

  12. Radiation induced genetic damage in Aspergillus nidulans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiou, J.T.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism by which ionizing radiation induces genetic damage in haploid and diploid conidia of Aspergillus nidulans was investigated. Although the linear dose-response curves obtained following low LET irradiation implied a 'single-hit' action of radiation, high LET radiations were much more efficient than low LET radiations, which suggests the involvement of a multiple target system. It was found that the RBE values for non-disjunction and mitotic crossing-over were very different. Unlike mitotic crossing-over, the RBE values for non-disjunction were much greater than for cell killing. This suggests that non-disjunction is a particularly sensitive genetical endpoint that is brought about by damage to a small, probably non-DNA target. Radiosensitisers were used to study whether radiation acts at the level of the DNA or some other cellular component. The sensitisation to electrons and/or X-rays by oxygen, and two nitroimidazoles (metronidazole and misonidazole) was examined for radiation induced non-disjunction, mitotic crossing-over, gene conversion, point mutation and cell killing. It was found that these compounds sensitised the cells considerably more to genetic damage than to cell killing. (author)

  13. Mechanisms of transient radiation-induced creep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyatiletov, Yu.S.

    1981-01-01

    Radiation-induced creep at the transient stage is investigated for metals. The situation, when several possible creep mechanisms operate simultaneously is studied. Among them revealed are those which give the main contribution and determine thereby the creep behaviour. The time dependence of creep rate and its relation to the smelling rate is obtained. The results satisfactorily agree with the available experimental data [ru

  14. Visual sensations induced by Cherenkov radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNulty, P.J.; Pease, V.P.; Bond, V.P.

    1975-01-01

    Pulses of relativistic singly charged particles entering the eyeball induce a variety of visual phenomena by means of Cerenkov radiation generated during their passage through the vitreous. These phenomena are similar in appearance to many of the visual sensations experienced by Apollo astronauts exposed to the cosmic rays in deep space

  15. Reducing radiation induced emesis in abdominal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, K.

    1994-01-01

    In patients with seminoma testes, a comparison was made between radiation induced emesis suffered by patients receiving 'dogleg' radiotherapy with those suffered by patients who received para-aortic radiotherapy. The same comparisons were made between the effects suffered by those patients who received the anti-emetic, Ondansetron, and those suffered by patients who received conventional anti-emetics. (UK)

  16. Photoreactivation reverses ultraviolet radition induced premutagenic lesions leading to frameshift mutations in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuo

    1985-01-01

    The effect of photoreactivation of the ultraviolet radiation induced reversion of a trpE9777 frameshift mutation was studied in a uvr A6 derivative of Escherichia coli K12. Two different photoreactivation treatments were used, one providing a single flash of photoreactivating light and another providing 10 min of light from fluorescent lamps. The reversion frequency of the trpE9777 frameshift mutation was strongly reduced when subsueqently exposed to visible light. The dose modification factor (the ratio of equally effective doses), for cells challenged with single-flash photoreactivation, for survival and induction of reversion to Trp + was 3.6 and 3.4, respectively. UV induction of RecA protein synthesis was not reversed by a single flash of photoreactivation. The dose modification factor for 10 min of fluorescent lamp photoreactivation for survival and for induction of reversion to Trp + was 6.5 and 6.3, respectively. The dose modification factor for 10 min of photoreactivation for induction of RecA protein was 1.7-2.5. Photoreactivation decreased the reversion of trpE9777 and increased survival to the same extent. We concluded that cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers are the premutagenic lesions of UV mutagenesis of the trpE9777 allele in a uvr A6 background. (orig.)

  17. RECENT ADVANCES IN STRATEGIES FOR IMMUNOTHERAPY OF HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS-INDUCED LESIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanodia, Shreya; Da Silva, Diane M.; Kast, W. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced lesions are distinct in that they have targetable foreign antigens, the expression of which is necessary to maintain the cancerous phenotype. Hence, they pose as a very attractive target for “proof of concept” studies in the development of therapeutic vaccines. This review will focus on the most recent clinical trials for the immunotherapy of mucosal and cutaneous HPV-induced lesions as well as emerging therapeutic strategies that have been tested in pre-clinical models for HPV-induced lesions. Progress in peptide-based vaccines, DNA-based vaccines, viral/bacterial vector-based vaccines, immune response modifiers, photodynamic therapy and T cell receptor based therapy for HPV will be discussed. PMID:17973257

  18. Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, S.D.; Rockswold, G.L.; Chou, S.N.; Yock, D.; Berger, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature

  19. Radiation-induced mutations and plant breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, S.H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation could cause genetic changes in an organism and could modify gene linkages. The induction of mutation through radiation is random and the probability of getting the desired genetic change is low but can be increased by manipulating different parameters such as dose rate, physical conditions under which the material has been irradiated, etc. Induced mutations have been used as a supplement to conventional plant breeding, particularly for creating genetic variability for specific characters such as improved plant structure, pest and disease resistance, and desired changes in maturity period; more than 200 varieties of crop plants have been developed by this technique. The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission has used this technique fruitfully to evolve better germplasm in cotton, rice, chickpea, wheat and mungbean; some of the mutants have become popular commercial varieties. This paper describes some uses of radiation induced mutations and the results achieved in Pakistan so far

  20. A case of radiation-induced squamous cell carcinoma of an 87-year-old physician

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Eiichiro; Takatsuka, Sumiko; Takenouchi, Tatsuya

    2005-01-01

    We reported a case of radiation-induced squamous cell carcinoma on the bilateral middle finger of an 87-year-old physician. He had exposed his hands to radiation without defense when he took an X-ray photograph. Squamous papules and ulcers occurred on both of his hands 10-years ago. The ulcer on the right middle finger enlarged rapidly after a one-month duration. A biopsy specimen showing squamous cell carcinoma derived from chronic radiation dermatitis, and disarticulation at the proximal interpharyngeal joint (PIP) joint of the right middle finger was performed. Six month later, hyperkeratotic tumor newly occurred on the opposite middle finger, and were operated on in the same way. The remaining lesions of chronic radiation dermatitis were treated by topical bleomycin hydrochloride. Since medical workers carelessly exposed their skin to radiation several decades ago, attention to late occurrence of radiation-induced skin cancer is needed. (author)

  1. Cataracts induced by microwave and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipman, R.M.; Tripathi, B.J.; Tripathi, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Microwaves most commonly cause anterior and/or posterior subcapsular lenticular opacities in experimental animals and, as shown in epidemiologic studies and case reports, in human subjects. The formation of cataracts seems to be related directly to the power of the microwave and the duration of exposure. The mechanism of cataractogenesis includes deformation of heat-labile enzymes, such as glutathione peroxide, that ordinarily protect lens cell proteins and membrane lipids from oxidative damage. Oxidation of protein sulfhydryl groups and the formation of high-molecular-weight aggregates cause local variations in the orderly structure of the lens cells. An alternative mechanism is thermoelastic expansion through which pressure waves in the aqueous humor cause direct physical damage to the lens cells. Cataracts induced by ionizing radiation (e.g., X-rays and gamma rays) usually are observed in the posterior region of the lens, often in the form of a posterior subcapsular cataract. Increasing the dose of ionizing radiation causes increasing opacification of the lens, which appears after a decreasing latency period. Like cataract formation by microwaves, cataractogenesis induced by ionizing radiation is associated with damage to the lens cell membrane. Another possible mechanism is damage to lens cell DNA, with decreases in the production of protective enzymes and in sulfur-sulfur bond formation, and with altered protein concentrations. Until further definitive conclusions about the mechanisms of microwaves and ionizing radiation induced cataracts are reached, and alternative protective measures are found, one can only recommend mechanical shielding from these radiations to minimize the possibility of development of radiation-induced cataracts. 74 references

  2. Second primary tumor and radiation induced neoplasma in the uterine cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Tomoyasu; Nishio, Masamichi; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Narimatsu, Naoto; Kanemoto, Toshitaka

    1984-01-01

    This report is concerned with multiple primary cancers developing in invasive uterine cancer. Second primary tumors were recorded 27 women with a total of 30 non-uterine cancer (exception of radiation-induced cancer). 17 patients of radiation-induced neoplasm were observed (Rectal cancer 4, soft part sarcoma 4, cancer of urinary bladder 3, bone tumor 3, uterin cancer 2 and cancer of Vulva 1). One case is 4 legions (corpus, sigma, thymoma and stomach), 2 cases are 3 lesions (uterine cervix, stomach and maxillay siuis: uterine cervix, thyroidal gland and radiation-induced soft part sarcoma). Only 5 of these 17 patients were known irradiated dose (50 Gy--55 Gy), however others unknown. The mean latent periods of 17 cases of radiation induced neoplasms are 19.4 years. 16 patients of late second cancers of the cervix appearing from 11 to 36 years (average 19.5 years) after initial radiotherapy were recorded. (author)

  3. Electromagnetic navigation-guided neuroendoscopic removal of radiation-induced intraforniceal cavernoma as a late complication of medulloblastoma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liby, Petr; Zamecnik, J; Kyncl, M; Zackova, J; Tichy, M

    2017-11-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most frequent malignant brain tumour in children. Radiation-induced cavernous haemangiomas (RICHs) are a known late complication of radiation exposure, especially in young children. We present a patient who underwent subtotal resection of posterior fossa medulloblastoma with subsequent chemotherapy and radiotherapy at the age of 10 years. A new lesion in the region of the left foramen of Monro appeared 16 years later. Based on the imaging results, metastasis or radiation-induced cavernoma was considered. The lesion had the same appearance on imaging as a rarely published intraventricular cavernoma of the foramen of Monro. Unlike the cavernoma of the foramen of Monro, this lesion was subependymal and intraforniceal. Using electromagnetic navigation and neuroendoscopy, the lesion was completely removed. Histopathological examination revealed a cavernous haemangioma. This is a unique case of intraforniceal paraforaminal cavernoma that was successfully removed endoscopically using electromagnetic neuronavigation and without neurological sequelae.

  4. Bile acids in radiation-induced diarrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlow, F.L.; Dekovich, A.A.; Priest, R.J.; Beher, W.T.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation-induced bowel disease manifested by debilitating diarrhea is an unfortunate consequence of therapeutic irradiation for pelvic malignancies. Although the mechanism for this diarrhea is not well understood, many believe it is the result of damage to small bowel mucosa and subsequent bile acid malabsorption. Excess amounts of bile acids, especially the dihydroxy components, are known to induce water and electrolyte secretion and increase bowel motility. We have directly measured individual and total bile acids in the stool samples of 11 patients with radiation-induced diarrhea and have found bile acids elevated two to six times normal in eight of them. Our patients with diarrhea and increased bile acids in their stools had prompt improvement when given cholestyramine. They had fewer stools and returned to a more normal life-style

  5. Inflammatory markers of radiation-induced late effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubner, D.; Gallegos, C.; Michelin, S.; Portas, M.

    2011-01-01

    Up to now there is no established parameters for the follow-up of delayed radiation injuries. Late toxicity is generally irreversible and can have devastating effects on quality of life of people exposed either accidentally or during therapeutic radiation treatments. Histologically, late manifestations of radiation damage include fibrosis, necrosis, atrophy and vascular lesions. Although many etiologies have been suggested regarding these late toxicities, persistent inflammation has been described as playing a key role. The recruitment of leukocytes from circulating blood is decisive in the inflammatory reaction. All the steps in the recruitment cascade are orchestrated by cell-adhesion molecules (CAMs) on both leukocytes and endothelial cells, and different subsets of CAMs are responsible for different steps in extravasation. A link between radiationinduced inflammatory processes and alterations in T-cell immunity are still demonstrable in the blood of A-bomb survivors. The following study was conducted to examine the response of the immune system in the inflammatory reactions in patients with late skin injuries after radiotherapy or interventional fluoroscopy procedures. The expression of adhesion molecules ICAM1 and β1-integrin on granulocytes and lymphocytes, as well as changes in subpopulations of T lymphocytes and the level of C-reactive protein, a well- studied inflammatory marker were evaluated. (authors)

  6. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Robbins, Mike E.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Shaw, Edward G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest School of Medicine,, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Brain Tumor Center of Excellence, Wake Forest School of Medicine,, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Wheeler, Kenneth T. [Brain Tumor Center of Excellence, Wake Forest School of Medicine,, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Department of Radiology, Wake Forest School of Medicine,, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Chan, Michael D., E-mail: mrobbins@wakehealth.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest School of Medicine,, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Brain Tumor Center of Excellence, Wake Forest School of Medicine,, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2012-07-19

    Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (>6 months) to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses >30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses >60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain regions as well as their

  7. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Robbins, Mike E.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Shaw, Edward G.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Chan, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (>6 months) to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses >30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses >60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain regions as well as their

  8. Toxic clinical hypoxic radiation sensitizers plus radiation-induced toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    The operational definition espoused twelve years ago that clinical hypoxic radiation sensitizers should be nontoxic interferes with the recognition and research of useful radiation sensitizers. Eight years ago the toxic antitumor drug cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum(II) was reported to be a hypoxic radiation sensitizer and the selective antitumor action of this drug was stressed as potentially creating tumor-targeted radiation sensitization. This rationale of oxidative antitumor drugs as toxic and targeted clinical sensitizers is useful, and has led to the study reported here. The antitumor drug cis-(1,1-cyclobutane-dicarboxylato)diammineplatinum(II), or JM-8, is being tested in clinical trials. Cells of S. typhimurium in PBS in the presence of 0.2mM JM-8 are found to be sensitized to irradiation under hypoxic, but not oxic, conditions. JM-8 is nontoxic to bacteria at this concentration, but upon irradiation the JM-8 solution becomes highly toxic. This radiation induced toxicity of JM-8 preferentially develops from hypoxic solution, and thus contributes to the rationale of hypoxic tumor cell destruction

  9. Lesions of the lateral hypothalamus impair pilocarpine-induced salivation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzi, A; De Luca, L A; Menani, J V

    2002-09-15

    In the present study we investigated the effects of electrolytic lesions of the lateral hypothalamus (LH) in the salivation induced by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) or intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of the cholinergic agonist pilocarpine. Rats with sham or LH lesions and stainless steel cannulas implanted into the lateral ventricle (LV) were used. In rats anesthetized with urethane (1.25mg/kg of body weight) saliva was collected using pre-weighed cotton balls inserted in the animal mouth during a period of 7 min following i.c.v. or i.p. injection of pilocarpine. Injection of pilocarpine (1mg/kg of body weight) i.p. in sham-operated rats (6h, 2, 7, and 15 days after the surgery) induced salivation (497+/-24, 452+/-26, 476+/-30, and 560+/-75 mg/7 min, respectively). The effects of i.p. pilocarpine was reduced 6h, 2 and 7 days after LH lesions (162+/-37, 190+/-32, and 229+/-27 mg/7 min, respectively), not 15 days after LH lesions (416+/-89 mg/7 min). Injection of pilocarpine (120 micro g/micro l) i.c.v., in sham-operated rats (6h, 2, 7, and 15 days after the surgery) also produced salivation (473+/-20, 382+/-16, 396+/-14, and 427+/-47 mg/7 min, respectively). The salivation induced by i.c.v. pilocarpine was also reduced 6h, 2 and 7 days after LH lesions (243+/-19, 278+/-24, and 295+/-27 mg/7 min, respectively), not 15 days after LH lesions (385+/-48 mg/7 min). The present results show the participation of the LH in the salivation induced by central or peripheral injection of pilocarpine in rats, reinforcing the involvement of central mechanisms on pilocarpine-induced salivation.

  10. Molecular epidemiology of radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trosko, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    The role of ionizing radiation in carcinogenesis is discussed. Every cell contains proto-oncogenes, which if damaged may lead to cell transformation. Every cell also contains tumor suppressor genes, which guard against transformation. Thus, transformation would seem to require a double injury to the DNA in a cell. Ionizing radiation is known to be a relatively weak mutagen, but a good clastogen (inducer of chromosome breaks, deletions and rearrangements). Ionizing radiation may therefore be a 'promoter' of cancer, i.e. a stimulant of the clonal expansion of transformed cells, if it kills enough cells to induce compensatory hyperplasia - i.e. rapid growth of cells. Ionizing radiation may be a 'progressor', if it deactivates tumor suppressor genes tending to suppress the growth of existing clones of transformed cells resulting from any of numerous causes. It may therefore be an oversimplification to say that radiation causes cancer; rather, it seems to be a weak initiator, an indirect promoter, and a late-stage progressor. 2 figs

  11. Ionizing radiation induces stemness in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ghisolfi

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC model posits the presence of a small number of CSCs in the heterogeneous cancer cell population that are ultimately responsible for tumor initiation, as well as cancer recurrence and metastasis. CSCs have been isolated from a variety of human cancers and are able to generate a hierarchical and heterogeneous cancer cell population. CSCs are also resistant to conventional chemo- and radio-therapies. Here we report that ionizing radiation can induce stem cell-like properties in heterogeneous cancer cells. Exposure of non-stem cancer cells to ionizing radiation enhanced spherogenesis, and this was accompanied by upregulation of the pluripotency genes Sox2 and Oct3/4. Knockdown of Sox2 or Oct3/4 inhibited radiation-induced spherogenesis and increased cellular sensitivity to radiation. These data demonstrate that ionizing radiation can activate stemness pathways in heterogeneous cancer cells, resulting in the enrichment of a CSC subpopulation with higher resistance to radiotherapy.

  12. Design of a phased array for the generation of adaptive radiation force along a path surrounding a breast lesion for dynamic ultrasound elastography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekeom, Didace; Hadj Henni, Anis; Cloutier, Guy

    2013-03-01

    This work demonstrates, with numerical simulations, the potential of an octagonal probe for the generation of radiation forces in a set of points following a path surrounding a breast lesion in the context of dynamic ultrasound elastography imaging. Because of the in-going wave adaptive focusing strategy, the proposed method is adapted to induce shear wave fronts to interact optimally with complex lesions. Transducer elements were based on 1-3 piezocomposite material. Three-dimensional simulations combining the finite element method and boundary element method with periodic boundary conditions in the elevation direction were used to predict acoustic wave radiation in a targeted region of interest. The coupling factor of the piezocomposite material and the radiated power of the transducer were optimized. The transducer's electrical impedance was targeted to 50 Ω. The probe was simulated by assembling the designed transducer elements to build an octagonal phased-array with 256 elements on each edge (for a total of 2048 elements). The central frequency is 4.54 MHz; simulated transducer elements are able to deliver enough power and can generate the radiation force with a relatively low level of voltage excitation. Using dynamic transmitter beamforming techniques, the radiation force along a path and resulting acoustic pattern in the breast were simulated assuming a linear isotropic medium. Magnitude and orientation of the acoustic intensity (radiation force) at any point of a generation path could be controlled for the case of an example representing a heterogeneous medium with an embedded soft mechanical inclusion.

  13. Radiation-induced reactions in polydimethyl siloxanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menhofer, H.

    1988-01-01

    The dissertation reports an investigation into the behaviour of polydimethyl soloxanes (PDMS) subject to the radiation field of a 60 Co-γ radiation source at different irradiation conditions. Several different analytical methods have been applied for the detection of chemical changes in the material and their effects on the polymeric segment mobility. Application of the ESR-spintrap technique identifies the primary radicals x CH 3 , -Si x , and -Si-CH 2 x , induced by the radiolysis of the PDMS. The individual rates of radical formation have been found to be strongly dependent on temperature. (orig./LU) [de

  14. Injection profiles with radiation induced copolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, B.L.; Rhudy, J.S.; Gogarty, W.B.

    1976-01-01

    The injectivity profile of a heterogeneous formation and/or vertical conformance is improved by injecting an aqueous solution into the formation, the solution containing a polymer obtained as a product of radiation-induced polymerization of acrylamide and/or methacrylamide and acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, and/or alkali metal salts thereof. The polymerization is preferably carried out in a 10 to 60 percent aqueous solution with gamma radiation; the aqueous monomer solution preferably contains 25 to 99 percent acrylamide and 1 to 75 percent sodium acrylate. Immiscible, miscible, or miscible-like displacing processes can be used in conjunction with this invention. 20 claims

  15. The nature and principles of the radiation-induced cancerogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lips'ka, A.YI.; Serkyiz, Ya.Yi.

    2004-01-01

    The paper represents the analysis of the authors and literary data concerning the nature and principles of the radiation-induced neoplasms. The mechanisms of the radiation-induced cancerogenesis development are not clear understood. The experimental data altogether do not allow developing the mathematical model of the radiation-induced cancerogenesis at the molecular level. This model has to take into account all necessary indices including radiation factor and the state of the organism. The general principles of the radiation-induced cancerogenesis have been formulated in the present review. It is possible to use these principles in order to predict and calculate the risks of the radiation-induced neoplasms

  16. Usefulness of acoustic radiation force impulse elastography in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant solid pancreatic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Min Kyoung; Jo, Jeong Hyun; Kwon, Hee Jin; Cho, Jin Han; Oh, Jong Young; Noh, Myung Hwan; Nam, Kyung Jin [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the tissue stiffness of solid pancreatic lesions by using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography to differentiate benign from malignant pancreatic lesions. ARFI elastography was performed in 26 patients who had 27 focal solid pancreatic lesions, including 8 benign lesions (mass-forming pancreatitis, 5; autoimmune pancreatitis, 3) and 19 malignant lesions (pancreatic adenocarcinoma, 16; metastasis from colorectal cancer, 2; malignant neuroendocrine tumor, 1). On the elastographic images of virtual touch tissue imaging (VTI), the echogenicity of the mass was categorized on a 5-grade scale. On the elastographic image of virtual touch tissue quantification (VTQ), the shear wave velocities (SWVs) of the lesion and surrounding parenchyma were measured. On the VTI images, the mean echogenicity score of the malignant lesions (3.7±1.0) was higher than that of the benign lesions (3.1±0.4; P=0.023). On the VTQ images, there were no statistical differences in the mean SWV between the benign (2.4±1.1 m/sec) and malignant (3.3±1.0 m/sec) lesions (P=0.101). However, the mean SWV difference values between the lesion and background parenchyma of the malignant lesions (1.5±0.8 m/sec) were higher than those of the benign lesions (0.4±0.3 m/sec; P=0.011). ARFI elastography can determine the relative stiffness between a lesion and the background pancreatic parenchyma using VTI and VTQ, which is helpful in the differentiation between benign and malignant solid pancreatic lesions.

  17. Radiation-induced ηe-modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, P.K.; Yu, M.Y.

    1990-01-01

    Impurity radiation in a plasma can cause not only static instabilities, but also dynamic instabilities related to the drift and acoustic waves. Radiative instabilities are of much interest because they are associated with relatively high frequency and short wavelength fluctuations, which have been suspected to be responsible for anomalous electron energy transport in tokamak edge plasmas. In this paper, we consider radiation-induced η e instabilities, taking into account electrostatic effects as well as density and temperature inhomogeneities. Also included are the effects of finite gyroradius and dissipation. It is found that the latter can cause strong linear coupling between the modes of interest. The resulting instabilities can have larger growth rates than the static radiative instability. Analytical expressions for the growth rates and instability regimes are given for the limiting cases of practical interest. In particular, it is shown that the η e -mode can couple to both radiation and dissipation to cause resistive instabilities. The parameter regimes of the original radiative as well as the dissipative modes are thereby broadened and shifted because of the interaction. (author) 3 refs

  18. A juvenile case of radiation-induced meningioma two years after radiation for craniopharyngioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kano, Tomoaki; Zama, Akira; Ono, Nobuo; Nakamura, Tadashi; Tamura, Masaru; Ohe, Tihiro; Nakazato, Yoichi (Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-04-01

    The patient was a 7-years-old boy who received radiation therapy of 50 Gy after total gross removal of a craniopharyngioma. After two years a follow up CT scan showed a new enhanced lesion in the right temporal tip within the previous irradiation field. Total removal of the tumor was performed and its histological examination showed it to be an atypical meningioma. This atypical meningioma satisfied Cahan's criteria. So we diagnosed this atypical meningioma as radiation-induced meningioma. Immunohistochemically this meningioma stained for Vimentin. An electron microscopical examination showed neither desmosome nor interdigitation. The score of Ki-67 and BrdU-L. I was very small. Compared with previously reported juvenile radiation-induced meningioma, the latency was very short. The patient received growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy. We suspected relation between GH replacement therapy and short latency. He was discharged without any new neurological deficits and we haven't detected tumor recurrence for two years. (author).

  19. Increased sensitivity of DNA damage response-deficient cells to stimulated microgravity-induced DNA lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Li

    Full Text Available Microgravity is a major stress factor that astronauts have to face in space. In the past, the effects of microgravity on genomic DNA damage were studied, and it seems that the effect on genomic DNA depends on cell types and the length of exposure time to microgravity or simulated microgravity (SMG. In this study we used mouse embryonic stem (MES and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF cells to assess the effects of SMG on DNA lesions. To acquire the insight into potential mechanisms by which cells resist and/or adapt to SMG, we also included Rad9-deleted MES and Mdc1-deleted MEF cells in addition to wild type cells in this study. We observed significant SMG-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in Rad9-/- MES and Mdc1-/- MEF cells but not in their corresponding wild type cells. A similar pattern of DNA single strand break or modifications was also observed in Rad9-/- MES. As the exposure to SMG was prolonged, Rad9-/- MES cells adapted to the SMG disturbance by reducing the induced DNA lesions. The induced DNA lesions in Rad9-/- MES were due to SMG-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS. Interestingly, Mdc1-/- MEF cells were only partially adapted to the SMG disturbance. That is, the induced DNA lesions were reduced over time, but did not return to the control level while ROS returned to a control level. In addition, ROS was only partially responsible for the induced DNA lesions in Mdc1-/- MEF cells. Taken together, these data suggest that SMG is a weak genomic DNA stress and can aggravate genomic instability in cells with DNA damage response (DDR defects.

  20. DNA lesions induced by replication stress trigger mitotic aberration and tetraploidy development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Ichijima

    Full Text Available During tumorigenesis, cells acquire immortality in association with the development of genomic instability. However, it is still elusive how genomic instability spontaneously generates during the process of tumorigenesis. Here, we show that precancerous DNA lesions induced by oncogene acceleration, which induce situations identical to the initial stages of cancer development, trigger tetraploidy/aneuploidy generation in association with mitotic aberration. Although oncogene acceleration primarily induces DNA replication stress and the resulting lesions in the S phase, these lesions are carried over into the M phase and cause cytokinesis failure and genomic instability. Unlike directly induced DNA double-strand breaks, DNA replication stress-associated lesions are cryptogenic and pass through cell-cycle checkpoints due to limited and ineffective activation of checkpoint factors. Furthermore, since damaged M-phase cells still progress in mitotic steps, these cells result in chromosomal mis-segregation, cytokinesis failure and the resulting tetraploidy generation. Thus, our results reveal a process of genomic instability generation triggered by precancerous DNA replication stress.

  1. The spatial resolution of the porcine multifocal electroretinogram for detection of laser-induced retinal lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyhn, Maria Voss; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Scherfig, Erik

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the spatial resolution of a porcine multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) protocol by testing its ability to detect laser-induced retinal lesions. Furthermore, we wanted to describe time-dependent changes in implicit time and amplitude of the different mfERG peaks...

  2. Axonal lesion-induced microglial proliferation and microglial cluster formation in the mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dissing-Olesen, L; Ladeby, R; Nielsen, Helle Hvilsted

    2007-01-01

    Microglia are innate immune cells and form the first line of defense of the CNS. Proliferation is a key event in the activation of microglia in acute pathology, and has been extensively characterized in rats, but not in mice. In this study we investigated axonal-lesion-induced microglial prolifer...

  3. Radiation-induced gene expression in human subcutaneous fibroblasts is predictive of radiation-induced fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødningen, Olaug Kristin; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Alsner, Jan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Breast cancer patients show a large variation in normal tissue reactions after ionizing radiation (IR) therapy. One of the most common long-term adverse effects of ionizing radiotherapy is radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF), and several attempts have been made over the last...... years to develop predictive assays for RIF. Our aim was to identify basal and radiation-induced transcriptional profiles in fibroblasts from breast cancer patients that might be related to the individual risk of RIF in these patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fibroblast cell lines from 31 individuals......-treated fibroblasts. Transcriptional differences in basal and radiation-induced gene expression profiles were investigated using 15K cDNA microarrays, and results analyzed by both SAM and PAM. RESULTS: Sixty differentially expressed genes were identified by applying SAM on 10 patients with the highest risk of RIF...

  4. Synthesis of modified oligonucleotides that contain purine and pyrimidine radio-induced base lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romieu, Anthony

    1999-01-01

    Different factors as oxidizing or carcinogenesis agents, UV and ionizing radiations,.... can generate a wide, spectrum of DNA base damages. In order to study the biochemical and structural features of these DNA damages, it is important to prepare short DNA fragments (20 to 50 bases long) bearing a single or several modifications at specific sites in their sequences. The chemical synthesis is a powerful tool to prepare such modified DNA fragments. This work focusses on the chemical incorporation of several modified nucleosides formed in DNA by ionizing radiations or by photo-sensitization. The first part of this study describes the preparation of a phosphoramidite synthon of 5-hydroxy-2'-deoxyuridine and its subsequent incorporation into synthetic oligonucleotides ranging from 14 to 33 bases long. In a second part (chapters Ill and IV), the synthesis and incorporation of original radiation-induced tandem lesions: the carbon-bridged cyclo-nucleosides are presented. Both (5'R)- and (5'S) diastereomers of 5',8-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine and 5',8-cyclo-2'-deoxyguanosine have been individually inserted into various different oligonucleotides (3 to 22 bases long) by using the standard phosphoramidite chemistry. The chemical incorporation of a pyrimidine analogue: (5'S, 6S)-5',6-cyclo-5,6-dihydro-thymidine has been also achieved. The loss of aromaticity of this modified nucleoside and its poor reactivity required the development of a synthetic strategy entirely different from that used for the preparation and subsequent incorporation of the phosphoramidite synthons of 5',8-cyclo-purine-2'-deoxyribo-nucleosides. The third part of this study deals with the synthesis of a phosphoramidite synthon of 4-hydroxy-8-oxo-4,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine. The two (4R)- and (4S)- diastereomers of this oxidized purine have been separated and individually inserted in several synthetic DNA fragments. No epimerization of C-4 position was observed during the solid-phase synthesis and during the

  5. Radiation-induced cancer in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Shoji; Sekizuka, Eiichi; Yamashita, Hisao; Takami, Akira; Kubo, Atsushi

    2001-01-01

    Results of two questionnaire surveys on radiation-induced malignant tumors conducted in 1977 and 1984 in Japan are briefly summarized. A total of 234 universities and general hospitals (139 in 1977, and 95 in 1984) responded and provided data from 1945 to 1977 and from 1978 to 1984. The number of patients with benign disease who developed secondary malignant tumors following radiation therapy was 150 in the first survey (1977) and 86 in the second survey (1984). The underlying benign diseases of these patients included tuberculous lymphadenitis, skin disease, hemangioma, and thyroid disease, and the most frequent radiation-induced malignant tumors in these patients were malignant tumors of the pharynx (80), cancer of the larynx (26), malignant tumors of the thyroid gland (22), cancer of the esophagus (219), and skin cancer (21). In patients with head and neck diseases the highest correlation between underlying benign disease and radiation-induced malignant tumors was between cervical tuberculous lymphadenitis and tumors of the pharynx (67 patients), followed by cancer of the larynx (19), and malignant tumors of the thyroid gland (11). There were also correlations between thyroid disease and malignant tumors of the thyroid gland (8 patients), hemangioma and skin cancer (7), and skin disease and skin cancer (8). The ratio of the observed values to predicted values (O/E ratio) in these patients was highest for cancer of the pharynx (118), followed by cancer of the parotid gland (42), skin cancer (31), cancer of the esophagus (22), malignant tumors of the thyroid gland (21), and cancer of the larynx (16). The number of patients with malignant tumors who developed secondary malignant tumors following radiation therapy was 140 in 1977 and 108 in 1984, and the underlying malignant tumors in these patients included tumors of the uterus (106), breast (32), and head and neck (80). The most frequent secondary malignant tumors were soft tissue tumors, followed by leukemia, and

  6. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubrova, Y.E.; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-01-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of γ-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure 137 Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed

  7. Radiation-induced conductivity of polynaphthoyl benzimidazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiutnev, A P; Berlin, A M; Saenko, V S; Rusanov, A L; Korshak, V V

    1985-01-01

    The nonstationary radiation-induced conductivity of polynaphthoyl benzimidazole, synthesized by single-stage high-temperature catalytic polycondensation, is investigated experimentally. It is shown that the radiation-induced conductivity of this material is characterized by an anomalous (non-Gaussian) transfer of excess charge carriers. The activation energy of the delayed component (0.1 ms after pulse termination) is determined to be 0.12 eV; the volt-ampere characteristic of this component is nonlinear, with the coefficient of nonlinearity increasing with the intensity of the external electric field. Experimental results are interpreted on the basis of the phenomenological theory of jump conductivity proposed by Zviagin. 15 references.

  8. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Han, Bing [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Setoyama, Kentaro [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamamoto, Toshiyuki [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Guzman-Lepe, Jorge [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Galambos, Csaba [Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Fong, Jason V. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamanouchi, Kosho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Marion Bessin Liver Research Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro [Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); and others

    2014-02-01

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

  9. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao; Han, Bing; Setoyama, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M.; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Galambos, Csaba; Fong, Jason V.; Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A.; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury

  10. Radiation-induced premature menopause: a misconception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, Berit L.; Giudice, Linda; Donaldson, Sarah S.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To disprove the common view that women who have undergone irradiation to fields excluding the pelvis are at risk for radiation-induced premature menopause, we reviewed menstrual function and fertility among women treated with subtotal lymphoid irradiation for Hodgkin's Disease. Methods and Materials: Treatment and follow-up records of all women less than age 50 at the time of diagnosis of Stage I or II supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's Disease, treated with subtotal lymphoid irradiation alone and enrolled in radiotherapy trials from 1967 to 1985, were reviewed. In addition, patients were surveyed regarding their menstrual status and fertility history. Results: Thirty-six women, aged 10 to 40 years, with normal menstrual function at the time of Hodgkin's diagnosis, were identified. Mean follow-up was 14 years, with a range of 1.25-22.75 years. The average radiation dose to mantle and paraaortic fields was 40-44 Gy; the calculated scatter radiation dose to the pelvis at the ovaries was 3.2 Gy. There were 38 pregnancies in 18 women; all offspring are normal. One of 36 women (2.7%) experienced premature menopause. The reported rate of premature menopause in women who have not undergone irradiation is 1-3%; not significantly different than the rate in our study. There is a syndrome whereby antibodies to several endocrine organs occur (including the ovary), which is associated with premature ovarian failure. This syndrome may be associated with prior radiation to the thyroid, such as that given by mantle-irradiation for Hodgkin's Disease. We report such a case. Conclusion: There is little risk of premature menopause in women treated with radiation fields that exclude the pelvis. Women with presumed radiation-induced premature menopause warrant an evaluation to exclude other causes of ovarian failure, such as autoimmune disorders

  11. Heat pump processes induced by laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.

    1980-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser system was constructed for the demonstration of heat pump processes induced by laser radiation. The system consisted of a frequency doubling stage, a gas reaction cell with its vacuum and high purity gas supply system, and provisions to measure the temperature changes by pressure, or alternatively, by density changes. The theoretical considerations for the choice of designs and components are dicussed.

  12. Radiation-induced structural changes, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogasawara, M.; Matsuyama, T.

    1992-11-01

    This seminar is aimed at understanding both the physical and chemical aspects of the structural changes of materials induced by photons or ionizing radiation. The seminar was held on December 19th, 1991 and from February 13 to 14th, 1992 in this institute. The most active areas of the material science, in addition to the previous subjects, such as organic superconductors, silicon-based polymers, and fullerenes were included in this seminar. (J.P.N.)

  13. Cell kinetic studies on radiation induced leukemogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Isamu; Suzuki, Gen; Imai, Yasufumi; Kawase, Yoshiko; Nose, Masako; Hirashima, Kunitake; Bessho, Masami

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was threefold: (1) to determine the clonal origin of radiation-induced thymic lymphoma in mice with cellular mosaicism for phosphoglycerate kinase; (2) to determine the incidence and latent period of myeloid leukemia and thymic lymphoma induced by whole-body exposure to median doses (3.0 Gy or less) in RFM/MsNrs-2 mice; and (3) to examine the influence of human recombinant interleukin-2 (hrIL-2). Thymic lymphoma was of a single cell origin. The incidence of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia and thymic lymphoma in RFM mice increased in a dose dependent fashion. Mean latent periods of both myeloid leukemia and thymic lymphoma after irradiation became shorter in proportion to radiation doses. When hrIL-2 was injected to RFM mice receiving 3.0 Gy, mean survivals were shorter in thymoma-bearing mice than the control mice. This suggested that hrIL-2 shortens the promotion step of thymoma. Administration of hrIL-2 failed to alter the incidence of myeloid leukemia or the mean survival of mice having myeloid leukemia, indicating that the protocol of hrIL-2 administration was not so sufficient as to alter the myeloid leukemogenesis. (Namekawa, K)

  14. Role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Harris, A.H.

    1991-01-01

    The role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia was examined. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of neurotensin produced dose-dependent hypothermia. Histamine appears to mediate neurotensin-induced hypothermia because the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate and antihistamines blocked the hypothermic effects of neurotensin. An ICV pretreatment with neurotensin antibody attenuated neurotensin-induced hypothermia, but did not attenuate radiation-induced hypothermia, suggesting that radiation-induced hypothermia was not mediated by neurotensin

  15. Vinorelbine induced perforation of a metastatic gastric lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullally, W J; O'Súilleabháin, C B; Brady, C; O'Reilly, S

    2017-08-01

    Breast carcinoma metastasis to the gastrointestinal tract is rare and more frequently associated with lobular than ductal carcinoma (Borst and Ingold, Surg 114(4):637-641 [1]). The purpose of this article is to present a case based review of a unique gastrointestinal metastasis and literature review. A 46 year old lady with metastatic invasive ductal breast cancer was admitted to A&E with sudden onset of epigastric and left shoulder pain. She completed the first cycle of capecitabine/vinorelbine 1 week previously. Clinical examination revealed a tender epigastrium with rigidity in the upper abdomen. Free air under the diaphragm and a positive Rigler's sign was radiologically identified. A laparoscopy demonstrated a fibrinous exudate in the left upper quadrant consistent with a walled off lesser curvature gastric perforation. A subsequent oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) demonstrated a healed gastric ulcer of benign appearance; however the pathology confirmed metastatic breast carcinoma. Literature review confirmed no previously reported cases of vinorelbine induced gastric perforation. Four cases of metastatic breast cancer with gastric metastasis presenting with perforation were identified; three of these cases (Fra et al., Presse Med 25(26):1215 (1996) [2], Solis-Caxaj et al., Gastroenterol Clin Biol 28(1):91-92 (2004) [3], Ghosn et al., Bull Cancer 78(11):1071-1073 (1991) [4]), were in the French medical literature, including one male patient (Fra et al., Presse Med 25(26):1215 (1996) [2]) and at least one ductal breast carcinoma (Solis-Caxaj et al., Gastroenterol Clin Biol 28(1):91-92 (2004) [3]). The fourth case (van Geel et al., Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd 144(37):1761-1763 (2000) [5]), was in the Dutch medical literature and a lobular breast carcinoma. This case represents a rare complication of breast cancer chemotherapy, the subsequent significant benefit the patient received from treatment is consistent with the chemosensitivity to therapy that also resulted

  16. The characters and developments of therapy and research of neutron-induced acute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xinru; Luo Qingliang; Wang Baoqing; Dong Shukui

    2003-01-01

    Neutron radiation will exert seriously lesions on body and lead to acute radiation sickness (ARS). Neutron induced ARS is characterized by complicated symptoms of gastrointestinal, high earlier death rate and lacking of specially therapeutic approaches. The primarily curable method is to treat patients with comprehensive means such as anti-infection, anti-bleeding and blood infusion, et. Cytokines can improve the hematopoietic functions of bone marrow. With the rapid development of the molecular biology and the emergence of cytokines such as recombinant human interleukin-11 that could help the regeneration of the gastrointestinal mucosa, neutron-induced ARS will be treated with new methods

  17. Mitochondrial mutagenesis induced by tumor-specific radiation bystander effects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, Sheeona

    2012-02-01

    The radiation bystander effect is a cellular process whereby cells not directly exposed to radiation display cellular alterations similar to directly irradiated cells. Cellular targets including mitochondria have been postulated to play a significant role in this process. In this study, we utilized the Random Mutation Capture assay to quantify the levels of random mutations and deletions in the mitochondrial genome of bystander cells. A significant increase in the frequency of random mitochondrial mutations was found at 24 h in bystander cells exposed to conditioned media from irradiated tumor explants (p = 0.018). CG:TA mutations were the most abundant lesion induced. A transient increase in the frequency of random mitochondrial deletions was also detected in bystander cells exposed to conditioned media from tumor but not normal tissue at 24 h (p = 0.028). The increase in both point mutations and deletions was transient and not detected at 72 h. To further investigate mitochondrial dysfunction, mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species were assessed in these bystander cells. There was a significant reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and this was positively associated with the frequency of random point mutation and deletions in bystander cells treated with conditioned media from tumor tissue (r = 0.71, p = 0.02). This study has shown that mitochondrial genome alterations are an acute consequence of the radiation bystander effect secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction and suggests that this cannot be solely attributable to changes in ROS levels alone.

  18. Lesions induced in rodent pancreas by azaserine and other pancreatic carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longnecker, D.S.

    1984-06-01

    Focal proliferative changes in the acinar cells of the pancreas of rats have been induced by several systemically administered carcinogens including azaserine, N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine, N-nitroso(2-hydroxypropyl) (2-oxopropyl)amine, and Ndelta-(N-methyl-N-nitrosocarbamoyl)-L-ornithine (MNCO). Foci, nodules, and adenomas induced by these carcinogens are usually made up of atypical-appearing acinar cells that maintain a high degree of differentiation, but a minority of these lesions exhibit anaplastic cellular changes that suggest the development of malignant potential. Such anaplasia may occupy the whole of smaller lesions or may occur as a secondary focal change within larger nodules or adenomas. Many foci and nodules per pancreas have been induced by single or multiple exposures to these known genotoxic carcinogens, but relatively few of them develop into carcinomas. Azaserine and MNCO have induced acinar cell carcinomas in rats. Those induced by azaserine have exhibited a broad spectrum of histologic variants, including ductlike, cystic and undifferentiated patterns. Higher doses of MNCO have induced a second pattern of change in the pancreatic lobules of rats, which includes cystic and tubular ductlike structures that have been called cystic and tubular ductal complexes. MNCO has also induced focal acinar cell lesions, cystic and tubular ductal complexes, and adenocarcinomas in the pancreas of Syrian golden hamsters. In this species, ductal complexes are much more numerous than are proliferative lesions of acinar cells, and the histologic appearance of the carcinomas is ductlike. Hyperplasia and atypical changes were also seen in the epithelium of the intralobular ducts of hamsters. 20 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  19. Comparative pathogenesis of radium-induced intracortical bone lesions in humans and beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool, R.R.; Morgan, J.P.; Parks, N.J.; Farnham, J.E.; Littman, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    An interlaboratory research team from our Laboratory and the Center for Human Radiobiology at Argonne National Laboratory has performed an initial comparison of intracortical lesions in the long bones of dog and man following chronic radium deposition in the skeleton. The sequential radiographic appearance and morphology of radiation osteodystrophy is discussed. The role of osteodystrohy in the evaluation of bone tumors in the dog is examined

  20. In vitro enzymatic studies on the nature and repair of x-ray induced lesions in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, S.S.

    1979-01-01

    Areas studied include: purification and properties of enzyme probes for x-ray induced DNA lesions using E. Coli x-ray endonuclease and S. cerevisiae endonuclease E; use of enzymes probes; and use of physical, chemical and enzymatic probes to quantify x-ray-induced lesions in viruses and cells

  1. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together

  2. The yield, processing, and biological consequences of clustered DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikazono, Naoya; Noguchi, Miho; Fujii, Kentaro; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yokoya, Akinari

    2009-01-01

    After living cells are exposed to ionizing radiation, a variety of chemical modifications of DNA are induced either directly by ionization of DNA or indirectly through interactions with water-derived radicals. The DNA lesions include single strand breaks (SSB), base lesions, sugar damage, and apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (AP sites). Clustered DNA damage, which is defined as two or more of such lesions within one to two helical turns of DNA induced by a single radiation track, is considered to be a unique feature of ionizing radiation. A double strand break (DSB) is a type of clustered DNA damage, in which single strand breaks are formed on opposite strands in close proximity. Formation and repair of DSBs have been studied in great detail over the years as they have been linked to important biological endpoints, such as cell death, loss of genetic material, chromosome aberration. Although non-DSB clustered DNA damage has received less attention, there is growing evidence of its biological significance. This review focuses on the current understanding of (1) the yield of non-DSB clustered damage induced by ionizing radiation (2) the processing, and (3) biological consequences of non-DSB clustered DNA damage. (author)

  3. Functional remineralization of dentin lesions using polymer-induced liquid-precursor process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anora K Burwell

    Full Text Available It was hypothesized that applying the polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP system to artificial lesions would result in time-dependent functional remineralization of carious dentin lesions that restores the mechanical properties of demineralized dentin matrix. 140 µm deep artificial caries lesions were remineralized via the PILP process for 7-28 days at 37°C to determine temporal remineralization characteristics. Poly-L-aspartic acid (27 KDa was used as the polymeric process-directing agent and was added to the remineralization solution at a calcium-to-phosphate ratio of 2.14 (mol/mol. Nanomechanical properties of hydrated artificial lesions had a low reduced elastic modulus (E(R = 0.2 GPa region extending about 70 μm into the lesion, with a sloped region to about 140 μm where values reached normal dentin (18-20 GPa. After 7 days specimens recovered mechanical properties in the sloped region by 51% compared to the artificial lesion. Between 7-14 days, recovery of the outer portion of the lesion continued to a level of about 10 GPa with 74% improvement. 28 days of PILP mineralization resulted in 91% improvement of E(R compared to the artificial lesion. These differences were statistically significant as determined from change-point diagrams. Mineral profiles determined by micro x-ray computed tomography were shallower than those determined by nanoindentation, and showed similar changes over time, but full mineral recovery occurred after 14 days in both the outer and sloped portions of the lesion. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis showed similar morphologies that were distinct from normal dentin with a clear line of demarcation between the outer and sloped portions of the lesion. Transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction showed that the starting lesions contained some residual mineral in the outer portions, which exhibited poor crystallinity. During remineralization

  4. Radiation-induced endometriosis in Macaca mulatta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanton, J.W.; Golden, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    Female rhesus monkeys received whole-body doses of ionizing radiation in the form of single-energy protons, mixed-energy protons, X rays, and electrons. Endometriosis developed in 53% of the monkeys during a 17-year period after exposure. Incidence rates for endometriosis related to radiation type were: single-energy protons, 54%; mixed-energy protons, 73%; X rays, 71%; and electrons, 57%. The incidence of endometriosis in nonirradiated control monkeys was 26%. Monkeys exposed to single-energy protons, mixed-energy protons, and X rays developed endometriosis at a significantly higher rate than control monkeys (chi 2, P less than 0.05). Severity of endometriosis was staged as massive, moderate, and minimal. The incidence of these stages were 65, 16, and 19%, respectively. Observations of clinical disease included weight loss in 43% of the monkeys, anorexia in 35%, space-occupying masses detected by abdominal palpation in 55%, abnormal ovarian/uterine anatomy on rectal examination in 89%, and radiographic evidence of abdominal masses in 38%. Pathological lesions were endometrial cyst formation in 69% of the monkeys, adhesions of the colon in 66%, urinary bladder in 50%, ovaries in 86%, and ureters in 44%, focal nodules of endometrial tissue throughout the omentum in 59%, and metastasis in 9%. Clinical management of endometriosis consisted of debulking surgery and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy combined in some cases with total abdominal hysterectomy. Postoperative survival rates at 1 and 5 years for monkeys recovering from surgery were 48 and 36%, respectively

  5. The influence of septal lesions on sodium and water retention induced by Walker 256 tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Guimarães

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In the course of studies on the effects of septal area lesions on neuroimmunomodulation and Walker 256 tumor development, it was observed that tumor-induced sodium and water retention was less marked in lesioned than in non-lesioned rats. In the present study possible mechanisms involved in this phenomenon were investigated. The experiments were performed in septal-lesioned (LW; N = 15 and sham-operated (SW; N = 7 8-week-old male Wistar rats, which received multifocal simultaneous subcutaneous (sc inoculations of Walker 256 tumor cells about 30 days after the stereotaxic surgery. Control groups (no tumor, sham-operated food-restricted (SFR, N = 7 and lesioned food-restricted (LFR, N = 10 were subjected to a feeding pattern similar to that observed in tumor-bearing animals. Multifocal inoculation of Walker 256 tumor rapidly induces anorexia, which is paradoxically accompanied by an increase in body weight, as a result of renal Na+ and fluid retention. These effects of the tumor were also seen in LW rats, although the rise in fractional sodium balance during the early clinical period was significantly smaller than in SW rats (day 4: SW = 47.6 ± 6.4% and LW = 13.8 ± 5.2%; day 5: SW = 57.5 ± 3.5% and LW = 25.7 ± 4.8%; day 6: SW = 54.4 ± 3.8% and LW = 32.1 ± 4.4%; P<0.05, suggesting a temporary reduction in tumor-induced sodium retention. In contrast, urine output was significantly reduced in SW rats and increased in LW rats (LW up to -0.85 and SW up to 4.5 ml/100 g body weight, with no change in osmolar excretion. These temporary changes in the tumor's effects on LW rats may reflect a "reversal" of the secondary central antidiuretic response induced by the tumor (from antidiuretic to diuretic.

  6. Strategic lesions in the anterior thalamic radiation and apathy in early Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Torso

    Full Text Available Behavioural disorders and psychological symptoms of Dementia (BPSD are commonly observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD, and strongly contribute to increasing patients' disability. Using voxel-lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM, we investigated the impact of white matter lesions (WMLs on the severity of BPSD in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (a-MCI.Thirty-one a-MCI patients (with a conversion rate to AD of 32% at 2 year follow-up and 26 healthy controls underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI examination at 3T, including T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated-inversion-recovery images, and T1-weighted volumes. In the patient group, BPSD was assessed using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-12. After quantitative definition of WMLs, their distribution was investigated, without an a priori anatomical hypothesis, against patients' behavioural symptoms. Unbiased regional grey matter volumetrics was also used to assess the contribution of grey matter atrophy to BPSD.Apathy, irritability, depression/dysphoria, anxiety and agitation were shown to be the most common symptoms in the patient sample. Despite a more widespread anatomical distribution, a-MCI patients did not differ from controls in WML volumes. VLSM revealed a strict association between the presence of lesions in the anterior thalamic radiations (ATRs and the severity of apathy. Regional grey matter atrophy did not account for any BPSD.This study indicates that damage to the ATRs is strategic for the occurrence of apathy in patients with a-MCI. Disconnection between the prefrontal cortex and the mediodorsal and anterior thalamic nuclei might represent the pathophysiological substrate for apathy, which is one of the most common psychopathological symptoms observed in dementia.

  7. Repair of endogenous and ionizing radiation-induced DNA damages: mechanisms and biological functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiteux, S.

    2002-01-01

    The cellular DNA is continuously exposed to endogenous and exogenous stress. Oxidative stress due to cellular metabolism is the major cause of endogenous DNA damage. On the other hand, ionizing radiation (IR) is an important exogenous stress. Both induce similar DNA damages: damaged bases, abasic sites and strand breakage. Most of these lesions are lethal and/or mutagenic. The survival of the cell is managed by efficient and accurate DNA repair mechanisms that remove lesions before their replication or transcription. DNA repair pathways involved in the removal of IR-induced lesions are briefly described. Base excision repair (BER) is mostly involved in the removal of base damage, abasic sites and single strand breaks. In contrast, DNA double strand breaks are mostly repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). How DNA repair pathways prevent cancer process is also discussed. (author)

  8. Irradiation of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal area induces complete regression of mucocutaneous lesions in disseminated histiocytosis X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmieri, G.; Stefani, S.; Gridelli, C.; Conte, A.; Airoma, G.; Contegiacomo, A.; Bianco, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    We report on a 54-year-old woman with disseminated histiocytosis X who had a complete regression of all mucocutaneous lesions within 1 month from the completion of radiation therapy (4500 cGy) to the hypothalamic-hypophyseal (H-H) area. This response lasted 12 months, after which new cutaneous and bone lesions appeared

  9. Experimental nickel-induced pulmonary lesions in nonhuman primates: Histologic and ultrastructural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haley, P.J.; Bice, D.E.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Hahn, F.F.

    1988-01-01

    The histologic and ultrastructural alterations of lung were evaluated in cynomolgus monkeys instilled with nickel subsulfide (Ni 3 S 2 ) at a final dose of 0.06 μmol/g lung with and without repeated intrapulmonary exposure to sheep red blood cells (SRBC). individual lung lobes were exposed to nickel alone, SRBC alone, or nickel and SRBC together. Lesions were found in nickel-exposed lobes only, regardless of exposure to SRBC. Lesions were more developed at 14 days than at 21 days after exposure to nickel, and were characterized by multifocal perivascular and peribronchiolar lymphocytic infiltrates along with microgranuloma formation, occasional fibrosis and moderate type II epithelial cell hyperplasia. Microgranulomas consisted of either central histiocytic cores surrounded by lymphocytic mantles or dense aggregates of epithelioid cells forming irregular interstitial nodules. Tracheobronchial lymph nodes had marked reactive hyperplasia of cortical and paracortical zones. Ultrastructural analysis of lung lesions revealed numerous well-differentiated lymphocytes intermixed with macrophages, in a background of mature collagen bundles. Cell associated particles were evaluated by energy dispersive microanalysis and found to consist of nickel and sulfur. These lesions appeared to be distinct from pneumoconiotic lesions induced by inert dusts and had histologic qualities compatible with immune-mediated phenomena. Because nickel compounds stimulate strong humoral and cellular immune responses in man, we conclude that pulmonary exposure of nonhuman primates to nickel compounds may provide information useful in delineating Immune mediated pulmonary disorders of man. (author)

  10. Breast cancer induced by protracted radiation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkind, M.M.

    1997-01-01

    The experience at Hiroshima/Nagasaki demonstrated that breast cancer can be induced by single doses of ionizing radiation following latencies of 10-40 years. Several epidemiological studies, usually involving ancillary low-LET radiation to the breast, have demonstrated that breast cancer can be induced by protracted exposures, with similar latencies, and with similar dependencies on dose. Radiobiologically these results suggest that the target cells involved were deficient in repair of low-LET damage even when the protraction was over months to years. Since three-quarters of breast tumors originate in the ducts where their proliferation is controlled by menstrual-cycle timed estrogen/progesterone secretions, these cells periodically were in cycle. Thus, the two main elements of a conceptual model for radon-induced lung cancer -- kinetics and deficient repair -- are satisfied. The model indicates that breast cancer could be the cumulative effect of protracted small exposures, the risk from any one of which ordinarily would be quite small. (author)

  11. Studies on radiation-induced graft polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omichi, Hideki

    1978-09-01

    Radiation-induced graft polymerization is used extensively to improve physical properties of polymers, but few processes are now commercialized. The reason for this is partly inadequate basic research on the reaction and partly the difficulty in developing the grafting process with large radiation source. Firstly, new techniques are proposed of studying kinetics of the graft polymerization in heterogeneous system. Based on the grafting yield, the molecular weight of graft chains, and the amount of radicals given by ESR and activation analysis, kinetic parameters are obtained and the reaction mechanism of grafting process is discussed. Secondly, the development of grafting process of poly (vinyl chloride)-butadiene is described. By study of the reaction, process design, construction and operation of the pilot plant, and economic analysis of the process, this process with 60 Co gamma ray sources is shown to be industrially promising. (author)

  12. Radiation-induced mutations in mammals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehling, U.H.

    1993-01-01

    The aims of the proposed project are to provide a better basis for extrapolation of animal data to man. Genetic endpoint, strain and species comparisons are made, which will provide critical experimental data regarding strategies in extrapolating laboratory animal data to man. Experiments were conducted to systematically compare the spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation rates for recessive specific-locus, dominant cataract and enzyme activity alleles in the mouse as well as a comparison of the mutation rate in the mouse and hamster for dominant cataract and enzyme activity alleles. The comparison of the radiation-dose response for recessive specific-locus and dominant cataract mutations are extended. Selected mutations are characterized at the genetic, biochemical and molecular levels. (R.P.) 5 refs., 3 tabs

  13. Radiation-induced electron migration along DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuciarelli, A.F.; Sisk, E.C.; Miller, J.H.; Zimbrick, J.D.

    1994-04-01

    Radiation-induced electron migration along DNA is a mechanism by which randomly produced stochastic energy deposition events can lead to nonrandom types of damage along DNA manifested distal to the sites of the initial energy deposition. Electron migration along DNA is significantly influenced by the DNA base sequence and DNA conformation. Migration along 7 base pairs in oligonucleotides containing guanine bases was observed for oligonucleotides irradiated in solution which compares to average migration distances of 6 to 10 bases for Escherichia coli DNA irradiated in solution and 5.5 base pairs for Escherichia coli DNA irradiated in cells. Evidence also suggests that electron migration can occur preferentially in the 5' to 3' direction along DNA. Our continued efforts will provide information regarding the contribution of electron transfer along DNA to formation of locally multiply damaged sites created in DNA by exposure to ionizing radiation

  14. Diagnostic value of coustic radiation force impulse for BI-RADS category 4 breast lesions of different sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rong

    2018-04-14

    To determine the diagnostic value of combined conventional ultrasound (US) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging for the differential diagnosis of BI-RADS category 4 breast lesions of different sizes. From April 2013 to January 2015, 283 patients (with a total of 292 breast lesions) who underwent US and ARFI examination were included in this retrospective study. The SWV for the lesion and adjacent normal breast tissue were measured and the SWV ratio was calculated. VTI grade was also assessed. The lesions were separated into three groups on the basis of size, and two combinations of ARFI parameters (SWV + VTI and SWV ratio + VTI) were applied to reassess the BI-RADS categories. Diagnoses were confirmed by pathological examination after biopsy or surgery. ROC analysis was performed to assess the diagnostic efficiency of each method. The Z test was used to compare the difference between AUC of the two methods. Significant improvement was seen in the diagnostic performance of US with the use of the ARFI parameters SWV + VTI (77/179 [43.0%] of BI-RADS category 4A breast lesions were downgraded) and SWV ratio + VTI (64/179 [35.8%] of BI-RADS category 4A breast lesions were downgraded, including two malignant cases that were misdiagnosed as benign) (P BI-RADS category 4 breast lesions. The combination of SWV ratio + VTI can improve BI-RADS classification of small lesions (<10 mm size).

  15. Gastroprotective effect of esculin on ethanol-induced gastric lesion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weifeng; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xiumei; Zhang, Hailin; He, Zehong; Zhi, Wenbing; Liu, Fang; Niu, Xiaofeng

    2017-04-01

    The gastroprotective effect of esculin was investigated in a mouse model of ethanol-induced gastric lesion. Administration of esculin at doses of 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg body weight prior to ethanol ingestion led to significant gastroprotection compared with untreated mice. Gastric mucosal lesions were evaluated by macroscopic and histopathological alterations, lesion index, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Pretreatment with esculin significantly reduced macroscopic and histopathological damage, gastric lesion index, and MPO activity in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, esculin significantly reduced nitric oxide (NO) production, inducible NO synthase (iNOS) levels, and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65 protein expression in gastric tissues after ethanol challenge. Analysis of inflammatory cytokines indicated that esculin pretreatment markedly suppressed the increased expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in ethanol-treated mice. The results demonstrate a protective effect of esculin against gastric injury and suggest that the underlying mechanism might be associated with inhibition of NF-κB activation, which subsequently reduces expression of iNOS, TNF-α, and IL-6. © 2016 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  16. Spontaneous perseverative turning in rats with radiation-induced hippocampal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickley, G.A.; Ferguson, J.L.; Nemeth, T.J.; Mulvihill, M.A.; Alderks, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    This study found a new behavioral correlate of lesions specific to the dentate granule cell layer of the hippocampus: spontaneous perseverative turning. Irradiation of a portion of the neonatal rat cerebral hemispheres produced hypoplasia of the granule cell layer of the hippocampal dentate gyrus while sparing the rest of the brain. Radiation-induced damage to the hippocampal formation caused rats placed in bowls to spontaneously turn in long, slow bouts without reversals. Irradiated subjects also exhibited other behaviors characteristic of hippocampal damage (e.g., perseveration in spontaneous exploration of the arms of a T-maze, retarded acquisition of a passive avoidance task, and increased horizontal locomotion). These data extend previously reported behavioral correlates of fascia dentata lesions and suggest the usefulness of a bout analysis of spontaneous bowl turning as a measure of nondiscrete-trial spontaneous alternation and a sensitive additional indicator of radiation-induced hippocampal damage

  17. Synthesis of modified oligonucleotides for repair and replication studies of single and double radio-induced DNA lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, E.

    2002-01-01

    Several oxidative processes induce the formation of DNA lesions. In order to evaluate the biological and structural significance of such damage, several DNA lesions were inserted into synthetic oligonucleotides at defined sites. The research work aimed at describing the preparation of oligonucleotides t hat contained DNA damage and the evaluation of the biological properties of the lesions. A first part described the incorporation of radiation-induced lesions, namely (5'S,6S)-5',6-cyclo-5,6-dihydro-2'-deoxyuridine and (5'S,5S,6S)-5',6-cyclo-5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydro-2'-desoxyuridine into oligonucleotides. The modified DNA fragments were characterised by several spectroscopic and biochemical analyses including ESI MS, MALDI-TOF MS, CLHP and enzymatic digestions. During in vitro DNA synthesis by Taq DNA polymerase and Klenow exo fragment, the pyrimidine cyclo-nucleosides were found to block the progression of the enzymes. Then, repair studies by ADN N glycosylases, operating in the base excision repair pathway, have shown that the anhydro-nucleoside lesions were not recognised nor excised by Fpg, endo III, endo VIII, yNtg1 yNtg2 and yOgg1. Interestingly, the Latococcus lactis Fpg protein recognises (formation of a non covalent complex) but do not excise the damage. The incorporation into oligonucleotides of the (5R*) and (5S*) diastereoisomers of 1-[2-deoxy-β-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl]-5-hydroxy-hydantoin, generated by several oxidative processes was then described. In vitro DNA replication assays using modified oligonucleotides matrix showed a lethal potential of the latter base damage. Repair studies by ADN N-glycosylases showed that the damage was substrate for Fpg, endo III, endo VIII, Ntg1, Ntg2 and Fpg-L1. The rates of excision as inferred from the determination of the Michaelis kinetics constants were found to be affected by the presence of the damage. MALDI-TOF MS was used in order to gain insights into mechanistic aspects of oligonucleotides cleavage by the

  18. Radiation induced mutations for plant selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, H.

    1994-01-01

    The successful use of plant breeding for improving crops requires the existence of genetic variation of useful traits. Unfortunately, the desired variation is often lacking. However, radiation can be used to induce mutations and thereby generate genetic variation from which desired mutants may be selected. Mutation induction has become a proven way of creating variation within a crop variety. It offers the possibility of inducing desired attributes that either cannot be expressed in nature or have been lost during evolution. More than 1700 mutant cultivars of crop plants with significantly improved attributes such as increased yield, improved quality, disease and stress resistance, have been released worldwide in the last thirty years. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture has contributed to these achievements through the promotion of research and development in mutation breeding techniques using nuclear and related biotechnological methods and the provision of in plant breeding is then transferred to Member States of the IAEA and the FAO through training in mutation breeding methods and the provision of technical advice. Moreover, radiation treatment services are provided to foster applications of nuclear techniques in crop improvement programmes of member states and more specifically to render direct support to plant breeders by efficient generation of mutations. Plant materials are standardized prior to radiation exposure to warrant reproducibility of the induced effects within practical limits and a radiosensitivity test is implemented to affirm useful doses for applied objectives of a request. This review deals with irradiation methods applied at the IAEA laboratories for the efficient induction of mutations in seeds, vegetative propagules and tissue and cell cultures and the establishment of genetically variable populations upon which selection of desired traits can be based. 3 tabs., 18 refs. (author)

  19. Oxidized low density lipoprotein induced caspase-1 mediated pyroptotic cell death in macrophages: implication in lesion instability?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Macrophage death in advanced lesion has been confirmed to play an important role in plaque instability. However, the mechanism underlying lesion macrophage death still remains largely unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: Immunohistochemistry showed that caspase-1 activated in advanced lesion and co-located with macrophages and TUNEL positive reaction. In in-vitro experiments showed that ox-LDL induced caspase-1 activation and this activation was required for ox-LDL induced macrophages lysis, IL-1β and IL-18 production as well as DNA fragmentation. Mechanism experiments showed that CD36 and NLRP3/caspase-1/pathway involved in ox-LDL induced macrophage pyroptosis. CONCLUSION: Our study here identified a novel cell death, pyroptosis in ox-LDL induced human macrophage, which may be implicated in lesion macrophages death and play an important role in lesion instability.

  20. Radiation-induced sensitisation of stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, D.I.R.

    1987-01-01

    The book contains the proceedings of a symposium on radiation-induced sensitization of stainless steels, which took place at Berkeley, United Kingdom, 1986. The purpose of the symposium was to examine the mechanism leading to inter-granular corrosion of 20%Cr/25% Ni/Nb stainless steel cladding of AGR fuel following irradiation. Nine papers are presented, of which three are theoretical, two papers are based upon corrosion studies of 20%Cr/25%Ni/Nb steel, and the remaining are concerned with compositional redistribution and its measurement. (U.K.)

  1. Radiation-induced diploid spermatids in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker-Klom, U.; Heiden, Th.; Otto, F.J.; Goehde, W.; Mauro, F.

    1989-01-01

    Diploid elongated spermatids of mice were enriched by flow cytometry and cell sorting using a new type of sorter (Partec). The sorted abnormal spermatids were identified morphologically and by nuclear area integration. The radiation-induced increase in the frequency of diploid elongated spermatids was monitored with time following acute X-ray exposure of mice. Dose-response curves for acute 60 Co-gamma and 14 MeV neutron irradiations yielded an RBE value of 4.3 for the doubling of the control level. (author)

  2. Radiation-induced diploid spermatids in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker-Klom, U; Heiden, Th; Otto, F J; Goehde, W; Mauro, F

    1989-05-01

    Diploid elongated spermatids of mice were enriched by flow cytometry and cell sorting using a new type of sorter (Partec). The sorted abnormal spermatids were identified morphologically and by nuclear area integration. The radiation-induced increase in the frequency of diploid elongated spermatids was monitored with time following acute X-ray exposure of mice. Dose-response curves for acute /sup 60/Co-gamma and 14 MeV neutron irradiations yielded an RBE value of 4.3 for the doubling of the control level. (author).

  3. Radiation-induced creep and swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heald, P.T.

    1977-01-01

    The physical basis for radiation induced creep and swelling is reviewed. The interactions between the point defects and dislocations are recalled since these interactions are ultimately responsible for the observable deformation phenomena. Both the size misfit interaction and the induced inhomogeneity interaction are considered since the former gives rise to irradiation swelling while the latter, which depends on both internal and external stresses, results in irradiation creep. The defect kinetics leading to the deformation processes are discussed in terms of chemical rate theory. The rate equations for the spatially averaged interstitial and vacancy concentrations are expressed in terms of the microstructural sink strengths and the solution of these equations leads to general expressions for the deformation rates

  4. Allogeneic radiation chimeras induced in SPF mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sado, Toshihiko; Kamisaku, Hitoko

    1977-01-01

    During the past two decades much has been learned concerning the immunobiology of bone marrow chimeras induced in experimental animals as well as in man. However, from the basic as well as clinical points of view, there still remain many unsolved questions yet to be resolved. In this presentation, we discussed some of our recent results on the immunobiology of radiation chimeras induced in specific-pathogen-free (SPF) mice. These included the following: (a) contribution of graft versus host reaction (GVHR) as well non- GVHR mediated immunologic mechanism(s) to the expression of immunologic dysfunctions observed in allogeneic and certain semiallogeneic chimeras, (b) existence of immunoregulatory mechanism as a basis for the apparent lack of immunologic reactivity (tolerance) to the host- as well as to the donor-type alloantigens in situ in successful allogeneic bone marrow chimeras, and (c) the effect of microflora of the environment on the stability of such immunoregulatory mechanisms and its possible mechanism of action. (auth.)

  5. Inter-chromosomal heterogeneity in the formation of radiation induced chromosomal aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, A.T.; Vermeulen, S.; Boei, J.J.W.A.

    1997-01-01

    It is generally assumed that radiation induced chromosomal lesions are distributed randomly and repaired randomly among the genome. Recent studies using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and chromosome specific DNA libraries indicate that some chromosomes are more sensitive for radiation induced aberration formation than others. Chromosome No. 4 in human and chromosome No. 8 in Chinese hamster have been found to involve more in exchange aberrations than others, when calculated on the basis of their DNA content. Painting with arm specific chromosome libraries indicate that the frequencies of radiation induced intra-chromosome exchanges (i.e., between the arms of a chromosome, such as centric rings and inversions) are far in excess than one would expect on the basis of the frequencies of observed inter-chromosomal exchanges. The possible factors leading to the observed heterogeneity will be discussed

  6. Radiation induced sarcoma after treatment of glioblastoma: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Victor Domingos Lisita; Anjos, Caroline Souza dos; Candido, Priscila Barile Marchi; Dias Junior, Antonio Soares; Santos, Evandro Airton Sordi dos; Godoy, Antonio Carlos Cavalcante; Saggioro, Fabiano P.; Carlotti Junior, Carlos Gilberto; Oliveira, Harley Francisco de; Peria, Fernanda Maris

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Glioblastoma multiform is the most lethal central nervous system neoplasm, with a median survival of around 13 months and the worst prognosis among all gliomas. The therapeutic approach of glioblastoma consists in neurosurgery with maximum possible resection of tumor volume, followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Radiotherapy reduces the risk of tumor recurrence through direct and indirect damage to tumor deoxyribonucleic acid. The long-term effects of radiation therapy include tissue necrosis, vasculopathy, and radiation-induced neoplasia. The most reported secondary intracranial malignant tumors include meningiomas, gliomas, and sarcomas. The latency period between skull radiotherapy and the appearance of radioinduced lesions varies in the literature from six months to 47 years, with an average of 18.7 years. Case report: The present report describes the appearance of high-grade spindle cell sarcoma after ten months in a patient who received glioblastoma treatment at Hospital das Clínicas of Ribeirão Preto of the University of São Paulo. Conclusion: The rarity of this association is probably due to the poor survival of patients with glioblastoma, thus limiting the time to development of secondary neoplasia

  7. Radiation induced micrencephaly in guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, L.K.; Johnston, D.A.; Felleman, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    A brain weight deficit of about 70 mg was induced at doses of approximately 75-mGy and a deficit of 60 mg was induced at 100 mGy. This confirms the effects projected and observed by Wanner and Edwards. Although the data do not demonstrate a clear dose-response relationship between the 75-mGy and 100-mGy groups, the data are statistically consistent with a dose-response effect because of the overlapping confidence intervals. The lack of a statistically significant observation is most likely related to the small difference in doses and the limited numbers of animals examined. There are several factors that can influence the brain weight of guinea pig pups, such as caging and housing conditions, the sex of the animal, and litter size. These should be taken into account for accurate analysis. Dam weight did not appear to have a significant effect. The confirmation of a micrencephalic effect induced x rays at doses of 75-mGy during this late embryonic stage of development is consistent with the findings of small head size induced in those exposed prior to the eight week of conception at Hiroshima. This implies a mechanism for micrencephaly different from those previously suggested and lends credence to a causal relation between radiation and small head size in humans at low doses as reported by Miller and Mulvihill. 16 refs., 13 tabs

  8. Clustered DNA damages induced in isolated DNA and in human cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, B. M.; Bennett, P. V.; Sidorkina, O.; Laval, J.; Lowenstein, D. I. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Clustered DNA damages-two or more closely spaced damages (strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases) on opposing strands-are suspects as critical lesions producing lethal and mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. However, as a result of the lack of methods for measuring damage clusters induced by ionizing radiation in genomic DNA, neither the frequencies of their production by physiological doses of radiation, nor their repairability, nor their biological effects are known. On the basis of methods that we developed for quantitating damages in large DNAs, we have devised and validated a way of measuring ionizing radiation-induced clustered lesions in genomic DNA, including DNA from human cells. DNA is treated with an endonuclease that induces a single-strand cleavage at an oxidized base or abasic site. If there are two closely spaced damages on opposing strands, such cleavage will reduce the size of the DNA on a nondenaturing gel. We show that ionizing radiation does induce clustered DNA damages containing abasic sites, oxidized purines, or oxidized pyrimidines. Further, the frequency of each of these cluster classes is comparable to that of frank double-strand breaks; among all complex damages induced by ionizing radiation, double-strand breaks are only about 20%, with other clustered damage constituting some 80%. We also show that even low doses (0.1-1 Gy) of high linear energy transfer ionizing radiation induce clustered damages in human cells.

  9. Honey potentiates the gastric protection effects of sucralfate against ammonia-induced gastric lesions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abu Taib Mohammad Mobarok; Al Swayeh, Othman Abdullah

    2003-09-01

    Natural honey is widely used all over the world as a complementary and alternative medicine in various disorders including gastrointestinal lesions. To evaluate the effects of combination of low dosage of honey (0.312 g/kg) and sucralfate (0.125 or 0.250 g /kg) on gastric protection and to determine any potentiating interactions between them against ammonia-induced gastric lesions in rats. Twenty-four hours fasted rats were given I ml of ammonium hydroxide 1 % intragastrically and they were killed one hour later under deep ether anesthesia. The gastric lesion index was calculated according to the method of Takaishi et al 1998. Non protein sulthydryls level was determined spectrophotometrically as described by Sedlak and Lindsay 1968. Administration of ammonium hydroxide produced red and black linear lesions and significant depletion of gastric nonprotein sulthydryls level. Oral administration of honey (0.312g/kg) or sucralfate (0.125 and 0.250 g/kg) 30 min before ammonium hydroxide reduced the severity of gastric mucosal lesions by 1 I or 18 and 42 % respectively, and has shown the changes in nonprotein sulfhydryls level induced by ammonium hydroxide. Furthermore, pretreatment with a combination of a low dose of honey (0.312 g /kg) and sucralfate (0.125 g or 0.250 g/kg) afforded significantly greater protection (58 and 77 %) than that obtained with either of them administered alone. The present results suggest potentiation of gastric protection effect of sucralfate by honey and this may have a clinical value in the treatment of peptic ulcer diseases in Helicobacter pylori positive patients.

  10. Radiation induced color in topaz crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castagnet, A.C.; Rocca, H.C.C.; Rostilato, M.E.C.M.

    1989-08-01

    The presence of defects and impurities in the crystal lattice alters the eletric field distribution within the crystal, allowing the electrons to occupy energy levels in the forbbiden band. Ionizing radiation supply the required energy to permit the electrons originaly bound to lattice atoms, to occupy effectively those intermediate levels, forming color centers. Dependig upon the nature and energy of the radiation, it is possible to produce defects in regions of the crystal, generating color centers. Based on these premises, a technique to induce color in originally colorless topaz, by using the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor, was developed at Engineering and Industrial Application Department (TE). Samples were irradiated inside iron capsules coated with cadmium foils. The iron, and principaly the cadmium, absorb the thermal neutrons that could activate crystal impurities generating long-lived radioisotopes. The epithermal neutrons that overpass the iron and cadmium barriers interact with the crystal atoms, causing lattice defects which give rise to color center, by subsequent ionization processes. The procedure used at TE induces permanent blue color, in natural colorless topaz. (author) [pt

  11. [Intelligence and creativity changes induced by pathological growth of space-occupying cerebral lesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfil'ev, A M; Razumnikova, O M; Stupak, V V

    2013-01-01

    Creativity and intelligence changes depending on tumor localization in frontal or parietal cortex before surgical procedure in 24 patients in comparison with control group are studied. Brain damage-induced intelligence impairment and a decrease of fluency, flexibility of figural divergent thinking, and originality of verbal one without specificity of tumor localization were found. Intelligence decrease was more presented while performing of figural tasks and least of all in verbal ones. The left prefrontal brain damage induced a decrease of all components of intelligence and a trend to a decrease of verbal creativity and figural fluency. The right parietal brain lesion was more associated with a decline of divergent thinking originality.

  12. Radiation induced changes in the airway - anaesthetic implications

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    CASE REPORT. Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia & Analgesia - May 2004. 19. Radiation ... Summary: Radiation induces a variety of changes in the airway that can potentially lead to difficult intubation. ... Mask holding and ventilation is.

  13. Image Guidance and Assessment of Radiation Induced Gene Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pelizzari, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Image guidance and assessment techniques are being developed for combined radiation/gene therapy, which utilizes a radiation-inducible gene promoter to cause expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha...

  14. Hazard of the radiation induced thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buglova, Ye.Ye.

    2001-01-01

    The level of thyroid cancer in Belarus before Chernobyl accident was low and made in different age and sex groups 0,03-2,5 (male) and 0,1-3,9 (female) per 100000 correspondingly. Different risk factors, which can influence the thyroid cancer development, are being taken into account. They are the factors of environment (strong external irradiation, long-time irradiation for medical purposes or in result of disaster), endo gen factors (hormonal, reproductive, genetic predisposition), some medicinal preparations and other. The protective effect of vegetable and fish consumption was found out. Among the factors of thyroid cancer development one of the most important is radiation. There is a point of view, which assumes that one of the reasons of thyroid cancer cases increase among the population of developed countries is increase of radiation induced thyroid cancer. The results of first research testify the influence of radiation factor on thyroid cancer development. During the period 1920 -1960 in the USA X-ray therapy was applied for the treatment of different good-quality diseases. Thyroid got in the zone of irradiation during the complex treatment with using of radiation. The results of the research of 1970 revealed that 70% of children with thyroid cancer were exposed to radiation in children's age. The subsequent researches of by-effects from the side of a thyroid at beam therapy of various diseases alongside with the results of the estimation of consequences of inhabitants of Hiroshima and Nagasaki irradiation owing to nuclear bombardment have shown the influence of irradiation of a thyroid on cancer development. High quantity of radio-epidemiological researches was directed to the studying of the consequences of thyroid external irradiation at young age. In all carried out researches the quantity of observed thyroid cancer cases among irradiated people has exceeded number of expected. The influence of thyroid internal irradiation by I-131 at young age was

  15. Quantitative determination of the contribution of indirect and direct radiation action to the production of lethal lesions in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlit, W.; Drenkard, S.

    1985-01-01

    For quantitative models of radiation action in living cells it is necessary to know what fraction of the absorbed dose affects the target molecule by direct radiation action and what fraction by indirect radiation action. Mammalian cells were irradiated in suspension, saturated with N 2 O or CO 2 . With these gases the production of OH-radicals is changed by a factor of two in aqueous solutions and a corresponding change in cell survival would be expected, if only indirect radiation action is involved in the production of lethal lesions in the living cell. No difference could be detected, however, and it is concluded that indirect radiation action does not contribute to radiation lethality in mammalian cells. (author)

  16. Methyl and isopropyl N-methylanthranilates attenuate diclofenac- and ethanol-induced gastric lesions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulović, Niko S; Jovanović, Ivan; Ilić, Ivan R; Randjelović, Pavle J; Stojanović, Nikola M; Miltojević, Ana B

    2013-11-19

    Two natural alkaloids, methyl (M) and isopropyl (I) N-methylanthranilates, with recently demonstrated significant pharmacological activities, were assayed for their possible overall effect on intact gastric mucosa and their protective properties towards the onset of gastric lesions induced by diclofenac (a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, NSAID) or ethanol. The influence of I and M on gastric mucosa integrity was assessed by oral administration in doses of 200mg/kg. The gastroprotective action of I and M in doses of 50, 100 and 200mg/kg was analyzed in the diclofenac and ethanol-induced gastric lesion models in rats. After the treatment, the stomachs of the animals were analyzed (captured by a digital camera). Ulcer scoring, morphometric and histopathological analyses of the stomachs were done. The oral application of these compounds on their own, even in quite high doses (200mg/kg) did not induce gastric lesions. Both alkaloids exerted a very strong antiulcer activity, even in low doses (50mg/kg), by decreasing the number of lesions caused by the application of either diclofenac or ethanol, eliminating them completely or reducing them to a form of mucosal hyperemia. Their possible mechanism of action was discussed and due to their many positive properties including anxiolytic, antidepressant, antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and gastroprotective activities, as well as a cheap and simple synthetic route for their preparation, methyl and isopropyl N-methylanthranilates, both alike, might represent a cost effective alternative sought for in the treatment of peptic ulcers and/or new safer NSAIDs for pain management. © 2013.

  17. Optimization of extracranial stereotactic radiation therapy of small lung lesions using accurate dose calculation algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobler, Barbara; Walter, Cornelia; Knopf, Antje; Fabri, Daniella; Loeschel, Rainer; Polednik, Martin; Schneider, Frank; Wenz, Frederik; Lohr, Frank

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare and to validate different dose calculation algorithms for the use in radiation therapy of small lung lesions and to optimize the treatment planning using accurate dose calculation algorithms. A 9-field conformal treatment plan was generated on an inhomogeneous phantom with lung mimics and a soft tissue equivalent insert, mimicking a lung tumor. The dose distribution was calculated with the Pencil Beam and Collapsed Cone algorithms implemented in Masterplan (Nucletron) and the Monte Carlo system XVMC and validated using Gafchromic EBT films. Differences in dose distribution were evaluated. The plans were then optimized by adding segments to the outer shell of the target in order to increase the dose near the interface to the lung. The Pencil Beam algorithm overestimated the dose by up to 15% compared to the measurements. Collapsed Cone and Monte Carlo predicted the dose more accurately with a maximum difference of -8% and -3% respectively compared to the film. Plan optimization by adding small segments to the peripheral parts of the target, creating a 2-step fluence modulation, allowed to increase target coverage and homogeneity as compared to the uncorrected 9 field plan. The use of forward 2-step fluence modulation in radiotherapy of small lung lesions allows the improvement of tumor coverage and dose homogeneity as compared to non-modulated treatment plans and may thus help to increase the local tumor control probability. While the Collapsed Cone algorithm is closer to measurements than the Pencil Beam algorithm, both algorithms are limited at tissue/lung interfaces, leaving Monte-Carlo the most accurate algorithm for dose prediction

  18. Repair of 313-nm induced lesions and photoprotection in yeast Candida guilliermondii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraikin, G.Y.; Pospelov, M.E.; Rubin, L.B.

    1977-01-01

    The present communication is concerned with the effects of near-UV radiation (300-380 nm) on yeast Candida guilliermondii. It was found that certain doses of 313 nm irradiation caused inactivation of the yeast which was exhibited in a way different from the lethal action of far-UV radiation. It was also found that the cells inactivated by 313 nm are capable of recovering vitality, if incubated for some time in a non-nutrient medium. The yeast inactivated by far-UV radiation also proved to be capable of recovering, though to a lesser degree. Both 334 nm radiation and non-lethal doses at 313 nm induced the photoprotective effect against far-UV damage. The effect was exhibited if there was a certain time interval (2-4 h) between the exposures to photoprotective light and subsequent far-UV radiation. Within this time interval the extent of photoprotection was dependent on temperature. (author)

  19. Assessment of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae-induced Pneumonia using Different Lung Lesion Scoring Systems: a Comparative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Morante, B; Segalés, J; Fraile, L; Pérez de Rozas, A; Maiti, H; Coll, T; Sibila, M

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the primary aetiological agent of swine enzootic pneumonia (EP) and one of the major contributors to the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). Gross lung lesions in pigs affected by EP consist of cranioventral pulmonary consolidation (CVPC), usually distributed bilaterally in the apical, intermediate, accessory and cranial parts of the diaphragmatic lobes. Several lung scoring methods are currently in place for the evaluation of CVPC. The aims of this study were (1) to review the lung lesion scoring systems used to assess pneumonia associated with M. hyopneumoniae infection, and (2) to evaluate eight of these scoring systems by applying them to the lungs of 76 pigs with experimentally-induced M. hyopneumoniae pneumonia. A significant correlation between all lung lesion scoring systems was observed and the coefficients of determination in a regression analysis were very high between each pair-wise comparison, except for a unique scoring system based on image analysis. A formula of equivalence between lung scoring methods was developed in order to compare the results obtained with these methods. The present review provides a basis for comparison (even retrospectively) of lesions evaluated using different lung scoring systems. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. [Peripheral facial nerve lesion induced long-term dendritic retraction in pyramidal cortico-facial neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrego, Diana; Múnera, Alejandro; Troncoso, Julieta

    2011-01-01

    Little evidence is available concerning the morphological modifications of motor cortex neurons associated with peripheral nerve injuries, and the consequences of those injuries on post lesion functional recovery. Dendritic branching of cortico-facial neurons was characterized with respect to the effects of irreversible facial nerve injury. Twenty-four adult male rats were distributed into four groups: sham (no lesion surgery), and dendritic assessment at 1, 3 and 5 weeks post surgery. Eighteen lesion animals underwent surgical transection of the mandibular and buccal branches of the facial nerve. Dendritic branching was examined by contralateral primary motor cortex slices stained with the Golgi-Cox technique. Layer V pyramidal (cortico-facial) neurons from sham and injured animals were reconstructed and their dendritic branching was compared using Sholl analysis. Animals with facial nerve lesions displayed persistent vibrissal paralysis throughout the five week observation period. Compared with control animal neurons, cortico-facial pyramidal neurons of surgically injured animals displayed shrinkage of their dendritic branches at statistically significant levels. This shrinkage persisted for at least five weeks after facial nerve injury. Irreversible facial motoneuron axonal damage induced persistent dendritic arborization shrinkage in contralateral cortico-facial neurons. This morphological reorganization may be the physiological basis of functional sequelae observed in peripheral facial palsy patients.

  1. Is the ipsilateral cortex surrounding the lesion or the non-injured contralateral cortex important for motor recovery in rats with photochemically induced cortical lesions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Kotaro; Yamauchi, Hideki; Tatsuno, Hisashi; Hashimoto, Keiji; Abo, Masahiro

    2006-01-01

    To determine whether the ipsilateral cortex surrounding the lesion or the non-injured contralateral cortex is important for motor recovery after brain damage in the photochemically initiated thrombosis (PIT) model. We induced PIT in the sensorimotor cortex in rats and examined the recovery of motor function using the beam-walking test. In 24 rats, the right sensorimotor cortex was lesioned after 2 days of training for the beam-walking test (group 1). After 10 days, PIT was induced in the left sensorimotor cortex. Eight additional rats (group 2) received 2 days training in beam walking, then underwent the beam-walking test to evaluate function. After 10 days of testing, the left sensorimotor cortex was lesioned and recovery was monitored by the beam-walking test for 8 days. In group 1 animals, left hindlimb function caused by a right sensorimotor cortex lesion recovered within 10 days after the operation. Right hindlimb function caused by the left-side lesion recovered within 6 days. In group 2, right hindlimb function caused by induction of the left-side lesion after a total of 12 days of beam-walking training and testing recovered within 6 days as with the double PIT model. The training effect may be relevant to reorganization and neuromodulation. Motor recovery patterns did not indicate whether motor recovery was dependent on the ipsilateral cortex surrounding the lesion or the cortex of the contralateral side. The results emphasize the need for selection of appropriate programs tailored to the area of cortical damage in order to enhance motor functional recovery in this model. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Study of a bland dentifrice for persons with radiation-induced mucositis and vesiculo-erosive disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, D.; Silverman, S. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Persons with lesions of the mucous membrane induced by radiation or vesiculo-erosive disease often find commercial dentifrices irritating to the tissues, yet maintenance of their oral hygiene practices is important. A bland monofluorophosphate dentifrice was formulated for use by these persons and tested in a double-blind cross-over study

  3. The impact of locally multiply damaged sites (LMDS) induced by ionizing radiation in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averbeck, D.; Boucher, D.

    2006-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have shown that ionising radiations produce a specific type of clustered cell damage called locally multiply damaged sites or LMDS. These lesions consist of closely positioned single-strand breaks, (oxidative) base damage and DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in between one helical turn of DNA. As specific markers of radiation-induced damage these lesions are likely to condition biological responses and are thus of great interest for radiation protection. Calculations indicate that there should be more LMDS induced by high than by low LET radiation, and they should be absent in un-irradiated cells. Processes like K-shell activation and local Auger electron emission can be expected to add complex DSB or LMDS, producing significant chromosomal damage. In the discussion of the specificity of ionising radiation in comparison to other genotoxic agents, many arguments have been put forward that these lesions should be particularly deleterious for living cells. Complex lesions of that type should represent big obstacles for DNA repair and give rise to high lethality. Moreover, cellular attempts to repair them could accentuate harm, leading to mutations, genetic instability and cancer. In vitro experiments with oligonucleotides containing an artificially introduced set of base damage and SSB in different combinations have shown that depending on the close positioning of the damage on DNA, repair enzymes, and even whole cell extracts, are unable to repair properly and may stimulate mis-repair. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in conjunction with enzymatic treatments has been used to detect LMDS in mammalian cells after high and low LET radiation. In order to further define the importance of LMDS for radiation induced cellular responses, we studied the induction of LMDS as a function of radiation dose and dose rate in mammalian cells (CHO and MRC5) using 137 Cs gamma-radiation. Using PFGE and specific glycosylases to convert oxidative damage into

  4. The impact of locally multiply damaged sites (LMDS) induced by ionizing radiation in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D.; Boucher, D. [Institut Curie-Section de Recherche, UMR2027 CNRS, LCR-V28 du CEA, Centre Universitaire, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2006-07-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have shown that ionising radiations produce a specific type of clustered cell damage called locally multiply damaged sites or LMDS. These lesions consist of closely positioned single-strand breaks, (oxidative) base damage and DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in between one helical turn of DNA. As specific markers of radiation-induced damage these lesions are likely to condition biological responses and are thus of great interest for radiation protection. Calculations indicate that there should be more LMDS induced by high than by low LET radiation, and they should be absent in un-irradiated cells. Processes like K-shell activation and local Auger electron emission can be expected to add complex DSB or LMDS, producing significant chromosomal damage. In the discussion of the specificity of ionising radiation in comparison to other genotoxic agents, many arguments have been put forward that these lesions should be particularly deleterious for living cells. Complex lesions of that type should represent big obstacles for DNA repair and give rise to high lethality. Moreover, cellular attempts to repair them could accentuate harm, leading to mutations, genetic instability and cancer. In vitro experiments with oligonucleotides containing an artificially introduced set of base damage and SSB in different combinations have shown that depending on the close positioning of the damage on DNA, repair enzymes, and even whole cell extracts, are unable to repair properly and may stimulate mis-repair. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in conjunction with enzymatic treatments has been used to detect LMDS in mammalian cells after high and low LET radiation. In order to further define the importance of LMDS for radiation induced cellular responses, we studied the induction of LMDS as a function of radiation dose and dose rate in mammalian cells (CHO and MRC5) using {sup 137}Cs gamma-radiation. Using PFGE and specific glycosylases to convert oxidative damage

  5. Delayed radiation-induced necrosis of the brain stem; A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukawa, Osamu; Kodama, Yasunori; Kyoda, Jun; Yuki, Kiyoshi; Taniguchi, Eiji; Katayama, Shoichi; Hiroi, Tadashi (National Kure Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan)); Uozumi, Toru

    1993-03-01

    A 46-year-old man had surgery for a mixed glioma of the frontotemporal lobe. Postoperatively he received 50 Gy of irradiation. Sixteen months later he developed left hemiparesis and left facial palsy. MRI revealed lesion brain stem and basal ganglia. Despite chemotherapy and an additional 50 Gy dose, the patient deteriorated. Autopsy revealed a wide spread radiation-induced necrosis in the right cerebral hemisphere, midbrain and pons. In radiation therapy, great care must be taken to protect the normal brain tissue. (author).

  6. Radiation-induced radical ions in calcium sulfite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogushevich, S. E.

    2006-07-01

    We have used EPR to study the effect of γ radiation on calcium sulfite. We have observed and identified the radiation-induced radical ions SO 2 - (iso) with g = 2.0055 and SO 2 - (orth-1) with g1 = 2.0093, g2 = 2.0051, g3 = 2.0020, identical to the initial and thermally induced SO 2 - respectively, SO 3 - (iso) with g = 2.0031 and SO 3 - (axial) with g⊥ = 2.0040, g∥ = 2.0023, identical to mechanically induced SO 3 - . We have established the participation of radiation-induced radical ions SO 3 - in formation of post-radiation SO 2 - .

  7. Gastroprotective effect of Cymbopogon citratus infusion on acute ethanol-induced gastric lesions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagradas, Joana; Costa, Gustavo; Figueirinha, Artur; Castel-Branco, Maria Margarida; Silvério Cabrita, António Manuel; Figueiredo, Isabel Vitória; Batista, Maria Teresa

    2015-09-15

    Treatment of gastric ulcers with medicinal plants is quite common in traditional medicine worldwide. Cymbopogon citratus (DC) Stapf. leaves infusion has been used in folk medicine of many tropical and subtropical regions to treat gastric disturbances. The aim of this study was to assess the potential gastroprotective activity of an essential oil-free infusion from C. citratus leaves in acute gastric lesions induced by ethanol in rat. The study was performed on adult male Wistar rats (234.0±22.7g) fasted for 24h but with free access to water. The extract was given orally before (prevention) or after (treatment) intragastric administration of absolute ethanol. Effects of dose (28 or 56mg/kg of body weight) and time of contact of the extract with gastric mucosa (1 or 2h) were also assessed. Animals were sacrificed, being the stomachs removed and the lesions were assessed by macroscopic observation and histopathology. C. citratus extract, given orally before or after ethanol, significantly (P<0.01) reduced gastric mucosal injury compared with control group (vehicle+ethanol). The effect does not appear to be dose-dependent. Results also suggested that the extract is more effective when the time of contact with gastric mucosa increases. The results of this assay confirm the gastroprotective activity of C. citratus extract on experimental gastric lesions induced by ethanol, contributing for the pharmacological validation of its traditional use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ascorbic acid deficiency aggravates stress-induced gastric mucosal lesions in genetically scorbutic ODS rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Y; Chiba, S; Imai, Y; Kamiya, Y; Arisawa, T; Kitagawa, A

    2006-12-01

    We examined whether ascorbic acid (AA) deficiency aggravates water immersion restraint stress (WIRS)-induced gastric mucosal lesions in genetically scorbutic ODS rats. ODS rats received scorbutic diet with either distilled water containing AA (1 g/l) or distilled water for 2 weeks. AA-deficient rats had 12% of gastric mucosal AA content in AA-sufficient rats. AA-deficient rats showed more severe gastric mucosal lesions than AA-sufficient rats at 1, 3 or 6 h after the onset of WIRS, although AA-deficient rats had a slight decrease in gastric mucosal AA content, while AA-sufficient rats had a large decrease in that content. AA-deficient rats had more decreased gastric mucosal nonprotein SH and vitamin E contents and increased gastric mucosal lipid peroxide content than AA-sufficient rats at 1, 3 or 6 h of WIRS. These results indicate that AA deficiency aggravates WIRS-induced gastric mucosal lesions in ODS rats by enhancing oxidative damage in the gastric mucosa.

  9. Distribution of ultraviolet-induced lesions in Simian Virus 40 DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourre, F.; Renault, G.; Sarasin, A.; Seawell, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    In order to analyze the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis in mammalian cells, we devised an analytical assay using Simian Virus 40 as biological probe. To study the possible correlations between the distribution of the lesions on the treated DNA and the distribution of mutations, we have located and quantified the lesions induced by ultraviolet light (254 nm) on a SV40 DNA fragment. At a fluence of 2,000J/m 2 , our results show that the formation frequency of thymine-thymine dimers (TT) is three to four times higher than the formation frequency of the other types of dimers (TC, CT, CC). On the other hand, the formation frequency of a dimer is influenced by the adjacent sequence. In particular, a pyrimidine in the 5' position of a thymine-thymine dimer enhances its formation frequency. At the dose used the formation frequency of the pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts is twenty times less than the formation frequency of pyrimidine dimers. This paper shows the distribution of the major lesions induced by UV-light on a defined fragment of SV40 genome after UV irradiation. This work is necessary to get an insight in the molecular mechanisms of UV-mutagenesis

  10. Radiation-induced DNA damage and cellular lethality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, K.; Okada, S.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation-induced DNA scissions and their repair were investigated in mammalian cells using an alkaline separation method. DNA breaks in mouse L5178Y cells and Chinese hamster V79 cells were grouped into three in terms of their repair profile; fast-reparable breaks (FRBs; T1/2 = 5 min), slow-reparable breaks (SRBs; T1/2 = 70 min) and non-reparable breaks (NRBs). The three types of DNA lesions were studied under conditions where cellular radiosensitivity was modified. The authors obtained the following results: 1. Cell cycle fluctuation: L5178Y showed maximum sensitivity at M and G/sub 1/-S boundary, and minimum sensitivity at G/sub 1/ and late S. Cycle dependency was not found for FRBs or SRBs, but NRBs showed bimodal fluctuation with peaks at M and G/sub 1/-S, and with bottoms at G/sub 1/ and late S. 2. Different sensitivity of L5178Y and V79: L5178Y cells were more sensitive to X-rays (D/sub ο/ = 0.9 Gy) than V79 (D/sub ο/ = 1.8 Gy). The amount of FRBs or SRBs was identical in the two cell lines. However, the amount of NRBs in L5178Y was greater than that in V79. 3. Split dose irradiation: The time interval between two doses resulted in a gradual decrease of NRBs. The time course of the decrease was similar to the split dose recovery in terms of cell death. The parallel relationship between NRBs and cell killing implies that NRBs could play an important role in radiation-induced cell death

  11. Spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome enhances infection susceptibility dependent on lesion level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brommer, Benedikt; Engel, Odilo; Kopp, Marcel A; Watzlawick, Ralf; Müller, Susanne; Prüss, Harald; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J; Finkenstaedt, Felix W; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Liebscher, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Schwab, Jan M

    2016-03-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death after acute spinal cord injury and is associated with poor neurological outcome. In contrast to the current understanding, attributing enhanced infection susceptibility solely to the patient's environment and motor dysfunction, we investigate whether a secondary functional neurogenic immune deficiency (spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome, SCI-IDS) may account for the enhanced infection susceptibility. We applied a clinically relevant model of experimental induced pneumonia to investigate whether the systemic SCI-IDS is functional sufficient to cause pneumonia dependent on spinal cord injury lesion level and investigated whether findings are mirrored in a large prospective cohort study after human spinal cord injury. In a mouse model of inducible pneumonia, high thoracic lesions that interrupt sympathetic innervation to major immune organs, but not low thoracic lesions, significantly increased bacterial load in lungs. The ability to clear the bacterial load from the lung remained preserved in sham animals. Propagated immune susceptibility depended on injury of central pre-ganglionic but not peripheral postganglionic sympathetic innervation to the spleen. Thoracic spinal cord injury level was confirmed as an independent increased risk factor of pneumonia in patients after motor complete spinal cord injury (odds ratio = 1.35, P spinal cord injury directly causes increased risk for bacterial infection in mice as well as in patients. Besides obvious motor and sensory paralysis, spinal cord injury also induces a functional SCI-IDS ('immune paralysis'), sufficient to propagate clinically relevant infection in an injury level dependent manner. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  13. Oral mucosal lesions, microbial changes, and taste disturbances induced by adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Siri Beier; Mouridsen, Henning T.; Bergmann, Olav Jonas

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to examine oral mucosal lesions, microbial changes, and taste disturbances induced by adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) in breast cancer patients during and 1 year after treatment. STUDY DESIGN: Forty-five consecutive breast cancer patients, eligible for adjuvant CT...... with cyclophosphamide, epirubicin or methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil were followed before, during, 6 months and 1 year after CT and were compared to a control group of 31 breast cancer patients not receiving adjuvant CT. RESULTS: During CT, oral mucosal lesions developed including erythema (n = 10, 22%) and ulceration...... (n = 7, 16%). Five patients (11%) were diagnosed with oral candidosis. Scores of dental bacterial plaque and gingival inflammation increased during CT and the oral microbial composition changed towards a more acidophilic flora. Taste disturbances were experienced by 84% (n = 38) of the patients...

  14. Low dose radiation in the treatment of HIV related benign lymphoepithelial lesions of the parotid gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchelebi, Anca E.; Ming Teng; Moscatello, Augustine; Moorthy, Chitti R.; Kaufmann, Thomas; Ahmed, Tauseef

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To determine the effectiveness of Radiation Therapy (RT) in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) related benign lymphoepithelial (BLL) of the parotid gland. Materials and Methods: The records of 16 patients treated between 1991 to 1995 with BLL were retrospectively reviewed. Three patients had bilateral disease, thus 19 parotid glands were radiated. Only (2(16)) had AIDS. Virtually all patients were on antiretroviral therapy. There were 11 males and 5 females. The median age was 38 years (range 31 to 58 years). The median duration of parotid enlargement was 1.5 years (range 1 month to 6 years). All patients had biopsy prior to treatment. Histopathology revealed two patterns: solid or cystic. Patient were treated using electron beam RT. The beam energy was determined by computed transaxial tomography. The median dose delivered was 1000 cGy in 5 fractions over 5 days (range 600 cGy to 2160 cGy in daily fractions ranging from 180 cGy to 200 cGy). Results: Six parotid glands achieved a complete response (CR), 5 a partial response (PR), while 8 were non-responders (NR). Our overall response rate was therefore 58% Of the NR's, 3 patients were re-treated. Two achieved a PR, one was an NR. Toxicity was minimal and limited to mild xerostomia. Conclusion: RT in patients with HIV related BLL is well tolerated. Our preliminary results show that while this modality of treatment has marked activity in the solid pattern. Higher doses may be required for large lesions or cystic in nature

  15. Radiation-induced emulsion polymerization of tetrafluoroethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwa, Takeshi

    1979-10-01

    The radiation-induced emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization of tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) has been studied at initial pressure 2 - 25 kg/cm 2 and temperature 30 0 - 110 0 C for dose rate 0.57 x 10 4 - 3.0 x 10 4 rad/hr. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), a hydrophobic polymer, forms as a stable latex in the absence of an emulsifier. Stability of the latex is governed by the dose rate/TFE pressure ratio; it increases with sufficient TFE monomer. PTFE particles produced in this polymerization system are stable due to the carboxyl end groups and adsorption of OH - and HF on the particles. PTFE latex of molecular weight higher than 2 x 10 7 is obtained by addition of a radical scavenger such as hydroquinone. The molecular weight of PTFE can be measured from the heat of crystallization conveniently with high reliability, which was found in the course of study on the melting and crystallization behavior. (author)

  16. Radiation-induced structural changes. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Yasuhiro; Matsuyama, Tomochika; Ogasawara, Masaaki

    1993-05-01

    This meeting is the fourth of series meetings on the structural change in materials induced by ionizing radiation. The present meeting was organized to discuss specifically on the x-ray storage phosphors such as BaFBr:Eu 2+ or RbI x Br 1-x :Tl and to get a clear understanding of the present status of the research on the storage mechanisms, nature of the rare earth impurities, and the optical properties of BaFBr. It was also expected that all the participants became aware of unsolved problems in these storage materials and that some of them would start research work on the storage phosphors. Therefore this report was edited mainly to provide basic knowledge correlated with the storage phosphors and related phenomena rather than to report simply on the experimental results. (J.P.N.)

  17. Ionizing radiation-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szumiel, I.

    1994-01-01

    Selected aspects of radiation-induced cell death, connected with signal transduction pathways are reviewed. Cell death is defined as insufficiency of the cellular signal transducing system to maintain the cell's physiological functions. The insufficiency may be due to impaired signal reception and/or transduction, lack or erroneous transcription activation, and eventual cellular ''misexpression'' of the signal. The molecular basis of this insufficiency would be damage to genomic (but also other cellular) structures and closing of specific signalling pathways or opening of others (like those leading to apoptosis). I describe experimental data that suggest an important role of RAS/NFI and p53/p105 Rb proteins in cell cycle control-coupled responses to DNA damage. (Author)

  18. Radiation-induced segregation in model alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezawa, T.; Wakai, E.; Oshima, R.

    2000-12-01

    The dependence of the size factor of solutes on radiation-induced segregation (RIS) was studied. Ni-Si, Ni-Co, Ni-Cu, Ni-Mn, Ni-Pd, and Ni-Nb binary solid solution alloys were irradiated with electrons in a high voltage electron microscope at the same irradiation conditions. A focused beam and a grain boundary were utilized to generate a flow of point defects to cause RIS. From the concentration profile obtained by an energy dispersive X-ray analysis, the amount of RIS was calculated. The amount of RIS decreased as the size of the solute increased up to about 10%. However, as the size increased further, the amount of RIS increased. This result shows that RIS is not simply determined by the size effect rule.

  19. Radiation-induced grafting onto wool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller-Schulte, D.

    1979-10-01

    Radiation-induced grafting tests were done on single wool fibres. Different vinyl monomers were used for this purpose and they were grafted in twenty different solvents which were selected for their swelling effiency and solvent parameters. The tests were done once with and once without the addition of water. The presence of water causes the polymer uptake to increase considerably. Formic acid/methanol and methanol were found to be the most suitable solvent systems, as they have the highest hydrogen-bond interaction effiency. The moisture uptake of wool depends on the hydrophily and hydrophoby of the grafted polymers. The single-fibre tests serve as a basis for analogous grafting tests on wool fabrics. The permanent- press was improved by graftng with hydrophoric polymers and polymers with a high glass-transition temperature [af

  20. Evaluation of the chemical model of vestibular lesions induced by arsanilate in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignaux, G.; Chabbert, C.; Gaboyard-Niay, S.; Travo, C.; Machado, M.L.; Denise, P.; Comoz, F.; Hitier, M.; Landemore, G.; Philoxène, B.; Besnard, S.

    2012-01-01

    Several animal models of vestibular deficits that mimic the human pathology phenotype have previously been developed to correlate the degree of vestibular injury to cognate vestibular deficits in a time-dependent manner. Sodium arsanilate is one of the most commonly used substances for chemical vestibular lesioning, but it is not well described in the literature. In the present study, we used histological and functional approaches to conduct a detailed exploration of the model of vestibular lesions induced by transtympanic injection of sodium arsanilate in rats. The arsanilate-induced damage was restricted to the vestibular sensory organs without affecting the external ear, the oropharynx, or Scarpa's ganglion. This finding strongly supports the absence of diffusion of arsanilate into the external ear or Eustachian tubes, or through the eighth cranial nerve sheath leading to the brainstem. One of the striking observations of the present study is the complete restructuring of the sensory epithelia into a non sensory epithelial monolayer observed at 3 months after arsanilate application. This atrophy resembles the monolayer epithelia observed postmortem in the vestibular epithelia of patients with a history of lesioned vestibular deficits such as labyrinthectomy, antibiotic treatment, vestibular neuritis, or Ménière's disease. In cases of Ménière's disease, aminoglycosides, and platinum-based chemotherapy, vestibular hair cells are destroyed, regardless of the physiopathological process, as reproduced with the arsanilate model of vestibular lesion. These observations, together with those presented in this study of arsanilate vestibular toxicity, suggest that this atrophy process relies on a common mechanism of degeneration of the sensory epithelia.

  1. Evaluation of the chemical model of vestibular lesions induced by arsanilate in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vignaux, G. [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); Chabbert, C.; Gaboyard-Niay, S.; Travo, C. [INSERM U1051, Institut des Neurosciences de Montpellier, Montpellier, F-34090,France (France); Machado, M.L. [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); Denise, P. [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); CHRU Caen, Explorations Fonctionnelles, Caen, F-14000 (France); Comoz, F. [CHRU Caen, Laboratoire d' anatomopathologie, Caen, F-14000 (France); Hitier, M. [CHRU Caen, Service d' Otorhinolaryngologie, Caen, F-14000,France (France); Landemore, G. [CHRU Caen, Laboratoire d' anatomopathologie, Caen, F-14000 (France); Philoxène, B. [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); CHRU Caen, Explorations Fonctionnelles, Caen, F-14000 (France); Besnard, S., E-mail: besnard-s@phycog.org [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); CHRU Caen, Explorations Fonctionnelles, Caen, F-14000 (France)

    2012-01-01

    Several animal models of vestibular deficits that mimic the human pathology phenotype have previously been developed to correlate the degree of vestibular injury to cognate vestibular deficits in a time-dependent manner. Sodium arsanilate is one of the most commonly used substances for chemical vestibular lesioning, but it is not well described in the literature. In the present study, we used histological and functional approaches to conduct a detailed exploration of the model of vestibular lesions induced by transtympanic injection of sodium arsanilate in rats. The arsanilate-induced damage was restricted to the vestibular sensory organs without affecting the external ear, the oropharynx, or Scarpa's ganglion. This finding strongly supports the absence of diffusion of arsanilate into the external ear or Eustachian tubes, or through the eighth cranial nerve sheath leading to the brainstem. One of the striking observations of the present study is the complete restructuring of the sensory epithelia into a non sensory epithelial monolayer observed at 3 months after arsanilate application. This atrophy resembles the monolayer epithelia observed postmortem in the vestibular epithelia of patients with a history of lesioned vestibular deficits such as labyrinthectomy, antibiotic treatment, vestibular neuritis, or Ménière's disease. In cases of Ménière's disease, aminoglycosides, and platinum-based chemotherapy, vestibular hair cells are destroyed, regardless of the physiopathological process, as reproduced with the arsanilate model of vestibular lesion. These observations, together with those presented in this study of arsanilate vestibular toxicity, suggest that this atrophy process relies on a common mechanism of degeneration of the sensory epithelia.

  2. 13th AINSE radiation biology conference: conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The forty one papers presented at this conference covered the areas of radiation induced lesions, apoptosis, genetics and radiobiological consequences of low level radiation exposure, clinical applications of radiation, mammalian cells radiosensitivity and radiation-activated proteins

  3. Naturally occurring and radiation-induced tumors in SPF mice, and genetic influence in radiation leukemogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasuga, T.

    1979-01-01

    The data obtained so far in this study point to a strong genetic influence not only on the types and incidence of naturally occurring and radiation-induced tumors but also on radiation leukemogenesis. (Auth.)

  4. Radiation induced mutations in Phaseolus vulgaris L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Rubeai, M.A.F.

    1982-01-01

    A selection of various macro- and micro-mutations was undertaken in the M2 generation of Phaseolus vulgaris cultivars after seed exposure to acute gamma radiation doses of 2.5, 5, 7, 10 and 15 Kr. The chlorophyll mutation was positively correlated with dose. Nevertheless, the highest frequency was at 7 Kr. Several interesting morphological mutants were observed. There were dwarf, stiff stem, shiny small leaf, narrow leaf and green giant mutants. Two selected micromutants were superior in seed yield capacity to their parents. The high yields were related to the high number of pods per plant. In 'The Prince' (seed color: red with beige marbling) several mutants with seeds of black color marbled with beige were selected. These seeds gave M3 segregants exhibiting a range of seed colors including white. Many of these M3 plants were short, early flowering and highly sterile. The work demonstrated that the pigmentation character can readily be changed, and confirmed that the variability induced by radiation can be exploited to obtain desirable mutations. (Author) [pt

  5. Radiation-Induced Mutation and Crop Improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. I.; Song, H. S.; Kim, J. S.; Shin, I. C.; Lee, S. J.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation induced mutations have not only been used directly as a cultivar in crop plants, but also indirectly as a genetic resource that is essential to conventional plant breeding. M 1 plant survivals of three rice cultivars treated with gamma rays of 200-350 Gy varied from 30-40%. The survival of the Sawing variety was less sensitive to radiation, but its fertility was more sensitive in comparison with Seomjin and Sponging. Various dwarf or semi-dwarf mutants and early=matured mutants have been selected in the M 2 and M 3 generations of the three rice cultivars irradiated with gamma rays. Other desirable mutants also have been selected, such as high-yielding, high-tailoring and disease-resistant. The genetic nature of most of the selected short calm and earliness mutants was fixed in M 2 or M 3 generations. Dwarfism of IEAR 308 and Monogynol 10 were found to have a single recessive gene. However, the dwarf of IEAR 308 has a recessive deficit phenomenon. The highest genetic heritability of plant height was observed in the cross combination of Monogynol 10 Χ Pawling

  6. Radiation induced mutations for breeding of sorghum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretaudeau, A [Rural Polytechnic Inst., Katibougou, Koulikoro (Mali)

    1997-07-01

    Several sorghum cultivars of Mali were irradiated with different doses of gamma rays and compared with the Caudatum types. Radio-sensitivity studies suggested that the local types were less sensitive to radiation than the introduced types. Whereas the local varieties survived dose of 300 Gy, in Caudatum types, seed germination and growth were significantly reduced at 200 Gy. Several agronomically important mutants were obtained among the progeny of the local types. Some of the mutants were shorter and had improved panicle characteristics. Radiation-induced variation was observed in several characters such as plant height, resistance to lodging, plant architecture, drought tolerance, panicle length and compactness, seed size and color, seed quality (viterous or floury) and protein content, glume color and structure, flowering data (early and late maturity), and tillering capacity. One mutant was drought tolerant. Promising mutants were selected and are presently under evaluation in the National List Trials to confirm their potential and future release. Selected variants have been also crossed with local types to obtain promising material. (author). 8 refs, 2 tabs.

  7. Radiation induced mutations for breeding of sorghum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretaudeau, A.

    1997-01-01

    Several sorghum cultivars of Mali were irradiated with different doses of gamma rays and compared with the Caudatum types. Radio-sensitivity studies suggested that the local types were less sensitive to radiation than the introduced types. Whereas the local varieties survived dose of 300 Gy, in Caudatum types, seed germination and growth were significantly reduced at 200 Gy. Several agronomically important mutants were obtained among the progeny of the local types. Some of the mutants were shorter and had improved panicle characteristics. Radiation-induced variation was observed in several characters such as plant height, resistance to lodging, plant architecture, drought tolerance, panicle length and compactness, seed size and color, seed quality (viterous or floury) and protein content, glume color and structure, flowering data (early and late maturity), and tillering capacity. One mutant was drought tolerant. Promising mutants were selected and are presently under evaluation in the National List Trials to confirm their potential and future release. Selected variants have been also crossed with local types to obtain promising material. (author). 8 refs, 2 tabs

  8. Automation of the solution type of intensity modulated radiation therapy with direct planning neoplastic breast lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuente Rosales, Liset De La; Larrinaga Cortina, Eduardo Francisco

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer ranks first among the lesions malignancies involving the Cuban women and the second in mortality only surpassed by lung injury. The breast-conserving surgery is becoming less appeal, with an increase in the choice of radiotherapy to the breast operated, and the surgical bed. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy, IMRT has demonstrated better results in the dose distribution for irradiation dimensional treatment breast shaping, 3DCRT. We developed a MATLAB application to obtain the solution type to direct planning IMRT for breast neoplasm. The technique was implemented in the Planning System Treatment Plus Theraplan v3.8 and Precise1 ELEKTA linear accelerator. Static segments are constructed for each portal of incidence and Excel files are exported as the positions of the blades. The technique was validated with a patient, which he performed a radiographic study of computerized axial tomography planning purposes. The standard solution built is consistent with those reported internationally and consists of a segment type and at least two segments of type B. The assignment of the relative weights of the segments is done manually by trial and error procedure, with the general rule of 90% by weight assigned to segment A and the remaining 10% divided equally between B-type segments IMRT breast obtained in a dose 17% homogeneity better than 3DCRT and reduced the average dose in the lung ipsilateral 15%. (author)

  9. Elemental concentration in normal skin and fibroepithelial polip lesions by synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Julio C.A.C.R.; Canellas, Catarine G.L.; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Anjos, Marcelino J.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the concentrations of trace elements were measured in acrochordon, a skin lesion also known as skin tag or fibroepithelial polyp, as well as in normal skin from the same patient. The samples were analysed by Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X- ray Fluorescence (SRTXRF) in the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (LNLS) in Campinas/Sao Paulo-Brazil. The collection of lesion and healthy skin samples, including papillary dermis and epidermis, has involved 17 patients. It was evaluated the presence of P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br and Rb in the paired samples, which were compared, and significant differences were found in some of them. (author)

  10. Post-angioplasty far infrared radiation therapy improves 1-year angioplasty-free hemodialysis access patency of recurrent obstructive lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, C-C; Fang, H-C; Mar, G-Y; Liou, J-C; Tseng, C-J; Liu, C-P

    2013-12-01

    To explore the role of far infrared (FIR) radiation therapy for hemodialysis (HD) access maintenance after percutaneous transluminal angioplasties (PTA). This was a prospective observational study. Eligible patients were those who received repeated PTA with the last PTA successfully performed within 1 week before the study enrollments. Consecutively enrolled patients undergoing successful HD treatments after PTA were randomly assigned to the FIR-radiated group or control group without radiation. FIR-radiated therapy meaning 40-minute radiation at the major lesion site or anastomosed site three times a week was continued until an end-point defined as dysfunction-driven re-PTA or the study end was reached. Of 216 participants analyzed, including 97 with arteriovenous grafts (AVG) (49 FIR-radiated participants and 48 control participants) and 119 with arteriovenous fistulas (AVF) (69 FIR-radiated participants and 50 control participants), the FIR-radiated therapy compared with free-radiated usual therapy significantly enhanced PTA-unassisted patency at 1 year in the AVG subgroup (16.3% vs. 2.1%; p radiated therapy improves PTA-unassisted patency in patients with AVG who have undergone previous PTA. Copyright © 2013 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Radiation-induced skin cancer and radiodermatitis of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Vloten, W.A.; Hermans, J.; van Daal, W.A.

    1987-01-01

    From a cohort of 2400 patients who had been irradiated 19 to 48 years previously for benign diseases in the head and neck region a randomly selected group of 605 patients was selected and traced back. From the 360 patients alive, 257 were examined clinically and 49 were examined by questionnaire for radiation-induced skin tumors and radiodermatitis. In 21 patients, a total of 30 skin tumors were diagnosed. In 8 of 21 patients, 10 skin carcinomas were detected at recall. A dose-effect relationship of 40 carcinomas/10(4) persons/Gy for a median follow-up period of 41 years for the area exposed was calculated. The severity of radiodermatitis is associated with a higher prevalence of skin cancer. The number of radiation-induced skin cancers rises with the post-treatment time. Because of these late radiation effects, radiotherapy of benign skin lesions is contraindicated, especially now that other therapy modalities are available

  12. Protective effect of flax seed oil against radiation induced hematological alterations in mammals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Jyoti; Singh, Ritu; Goyal, P.K.; Singh, Seema

    2014-01-01

    Human beings are exposed to ionizing and non ionizing radiation from natural as well as manmade sources. Ionizing radiations are one of the predominant exogenous factors that have deleterious consequences to human life. Exposure to ionizing radiations damages the hematopoietic, gastrointestinal or central nervous systems, depending on radiation dose. Hence, there is an urgent need to prevent such deleterious effects caused due to ionizing radiations. Chemical protection involves the use of synthetic and natural products against planned radiation exposure. Medicinal plants are rich in antioxidants and their chemical constituents may be the potential source for radioprotective agents. Linum usitatissimum plant (family: Linaceae), source of flaxseed oil (FSO), is well known for its anticarcinogenic, antidiabetic, cardioprotector, antiulcer properties owing to the presence of various phytochemicals. The present study has been focused to find out the preventive action of flaxseed oil against radiation induced hematological and biochemical lesions in mammals. For this purpose, FSO (50μL/animal/day) was orally administered to Swiss albino mice for five days, prior to 6 Gy gamma radiation exposure. The animals were sacrificed on 1 st , 3 rd , 7 th , 15 th and 30 th day after irradiation. Radiation treated control group exhibited significant reduction in erythrocytes count, hemoglobin content, hematocrit value and total WBC count in peripheral blood. In contrast, pretreatment with FSO significantly increased all these blood constituents. Further, the antioxidant parameters such as reduced glutathione, catalase, and superoxide dismutase showed a significant elevation in FSO pretreated group which were reduced in irradiated control group. Similarly, radiation induced increase lipid peroxidation in blood was significantly inhibited after FSO treatment. The present results indicate that the flaxseed oil has the ability to debilitate the radiation induced adverse alterations in

  13. The inflammatory response plays a major role in the acute radiation syndrome induced by fission radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agay, D.; Chancerelle, Y.; Hirodin, F.; Mathieu, J.; Multon, E.; Van Uye, A.; Mestries, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    At high dose rates, both gamma and neutron irradiation induce an acute inflammatory syndrome with huge intercellular communication disorders. This inflammatory syndrome evolves in two phases, separated by a latency phase. During the prodromal phase, the molecular and cellular lesions induced by free radicals trigger an initial response which associates cellular repair and multicellular interactions involving both humoral and nervous communications. A large part of perturbations constitute a non specific inflammatory syndrome and clinically silent coagulation disorders which are linked by common intercellular mediators. All these perturbations are rapidly reversible and there is no correlation between the radiation dose and the severity of the response. During the manifest-illness phase, both inflammatory and coagulation disorders resume, slightly preceding the clinical symptoms. Biochemical symptoms are moderate in the animals which will survive, but they escape regulatory mechanisms in those which will die, giving rise to a vicious circle. These biochemical disorders are largely responsible for the death. With lower dose rates, it cannot be excluded that great cellular communication disorders take place at the tissue level, with limited blood modifications. This aspect should be taken into account for the optimization of cytokine therapies. (authors)

  14. Multivoxel proton MRS for differentiation of radiation-induced necrosis and tumor recurrence after gamma knife radiosurgery for brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernov, M.F.; Hayashi, Motohiro; Izawa, Masahiro

    2006-01-01

    Multivoxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used for differentiation of radiation-induced necrosis and tumor recurrence after gamma knife radiosurgery for intracranial metastases in 33 consecutive cases. All patients presented with enlargement of the treated lesion, increase of perilesional brain edema, and aggravation or appearance of neurological signs and symptoms on average 9.3±4.9 months after primary treatment. Metabolic imaging defined four types of lesions: pure tumor recurrence (11 cases), partial tumor recurrence (11 cases), radiation-induced tumor necrosis (10 cases), and radiation-induced necrosis of the peritumoral brain (1 case). In 1 patient, radiation-induced tumor necrosis was diagnosed 9 months after radiosurgery; however, partial tumor recurrence was identified 6 months later. With the exception of midline shift, which was found to be more typical for radiation-induced necrosis (P<0.01), no one clinical, radiologic, or radiosurgical parameter either at the time of primary treatment or at the time of deterioration showed a statistically significant association with the type of the lesion. Proton MRS-based diagnosis was confirmed histologically in all surgically treated patients (7 cases) and corresponded well to the clinical course in others. In conclusion, multivoxel proton MRS is an effective diagnostic modality for identification of radiation-induced necrosis and tumor recurrence that can be used for monitoring of metabolic changes in intracranial neoplasms after radiosurgical treatment. It can be also helpful for differentiation of radiation-induced necrosis of the tumor and that of the peritumoral brain, which may have important clinical and medicolegal implications. (author)

  15. In vitro study of platelet function confirms the contribution of the ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation in the lesions observed in riboflavin/UVB-treated platelet concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abonnenc, Mélanie; Sonego, Giona; Crettaz, David; Aliotta, Alessandro; Prudent, Michel; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Lion, Niels

    2015-09-01

    Platelet inactivation technologies (PITs) have been shown to increase platelet storage lesions (PSLs). This study investigates amotosalen/ultraviolet (UV)A- and riboflavin/UVB-induced platelet (PLT) lesions in vitro. Particular attention is given to the effect of UVB alone on PLTs. Buffy coat-derived PLT concentrates (PCs) were treated with amotosalen/UVA, riboflavin/UVB, or UVB alone and compared to untreated PCs throughout storage. In vitro PLT function was assessed by blood gas and metabolite analyses, flow cytometry-based assays (CD62P, JC-1, annexin V, PAC-1), hypotonic shock response, and static adhesion to fibrinogen-coated wells. In our experimental conditions, riboflavin/UVB-treated PCs showed the most pronounced differences compared to untreated and amotosalen/UVA-treated PCs. The riboflavin/UVB treatment led to a significant increase of anaerobic glycolysis rate despite functional mitochondria, a significant increase of CD62P on Day 2, and a decrease of JC-1 aggregates and increase of annexin V on Day 7. The expression of active GPIIbIIIa (PAC-1) and the adhesion to fibrinogen was significantly increased from Day 2 of storage in riboflavin/UVB-treated PCs. Importantly, we showed that these lesions were caused by the UVB radiation alone, independently of the presence of riboflavin. The amotosalen/UVA-treated PCs confirmed previously published results with a slight increase of PSLs compared to untreated PCs. Riboflavin/UVB-treated PCs present significant in vitro PSLs compared to untreated PCs. These lesions are caused by the UVB radiation alone and probably involve the generation of reactive oxygen species. The impact of these observations on clinical use must be investigated. © 2015 AABB.

  16. Protective effects of cannabidiol on lesion-induced intervertebral disc degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João W Silveira

    Full Text Available Disc degeneration is a multifactorial process that involves hypoxia, inflammation, neoinnervation, accelerated catabolism, and reduction in water and glycosaminoglycan content. Cannabidiol is the main non-psychotropic component of the Cannabis sativa with protective and anti-inflammatory properties. However, possible therapeutic effects of cannabidiol on intervertebral disc degeneration have not been investigated yet. The present study investigated the effects of cannabidiol intradiscal injection in the coccygeal intervertebral disc degeneration induced by the needle puncture model using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and histological analyses. Disc injury was induced in the tail of male Wistar rats via a single needle puncture. The discs selected for injury were punctured percutaneously using a 21-gauge needle. MRI and histological evaluation were employed to assess the results. The effects of intradiscal injection of cannabidiol (30, 60 or 120 nmol injected immediately after lesion were analyzed acutely (2 days by MRI. The experimental group that received cannabidiol 120 nmol was resubmitted to MRI examination and then to histological analyses 15 days after lesion/cannabidiol injection. The needle puncture produced a significant disc injury detected both by MRI and histological analyses. Cannabidiol significantly attenuated the effects of disc injury induced by the needle puncture. Considering that cannabidiol presents an extremely safe profile and is currently being used clinically, these results suggest that this compound could be useful in the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  17. Topical photosan-mediated photodynamic therapy for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch early cancer lesions: an in vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yih-Chih; Chang, Walter Hong-Shong; Chang, Junn-Liang; Liu, Kuang-Ting; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Liu, Chung-Ji; Chen, Chih-Ping

    2011-03-01

    Oral cancer has becomes the most prominent cancer disease in recent years in Taiwan. The reason is the betel nut chewing habit combing with smoking and alcohol-drinking lifestyle of people results in oral cancer becomes the fastest growth incident cancer amongst other major cancer diseases. In previous studies showed that photosan, haematoporphyrin derivative (HPD), has demonstrated effective PDT results on human head and neck disease studies. To avoid the systemic phototoxic effect of photosan, this study was designed to use a topical photosan-mediated PDT for treatment of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch cancerous lesions. DMBA was applied to one of the buccal pouches of hamsters thrice a week for 10 to 12 weeks. Cancerous lesions were induced and proven by histological examination. These DMBA-induced cancerous lesions were used for testing the efficacy of topical photosan-mediated PDT. Before PDT, fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine when photosan reached its peak level in the lesional epithelial cells after topical application of photosan gel. We found that photosan reached its peak level in cancerous lesions about 13.5 min after topical application of photosan gel. The cancerous lesions in hamsters were then treated with topical photosan-mediated PDT (fluence rate: 600 mW/cm2; light exposure dose 200 J/cm2) using the portable Lumacare 635 nm fiber-guided light device. Visual examination demonstrated that topical photosan-mediated PDT was an applicable treatment modality for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch cancerous lesions.

  18. Combination therapies in adjuvant with topical ALA-mediated photodynamic therapy for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch premalignant lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deng-Fu; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2012-03-01

    In Taiwan, oral cancer has becomes the fastest growth male cancer disease due to the betel nut chewing habit combing with smoking and alcohol-drinking lifestyle of people. In order to eliminate the systemic phototoxic effect of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), this study was designed to use a topical ALA-mediated PDT for treatment of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch precancerous lesions. DMBA was applied to one of the buccal pouches of hamsters thrice a week for 10 to 12 weeks. Cancerous lesions were induced and proven by histological examination. These DMBA-induced cancerous lesions were used for testing the efficacy of topical ALA-mediated PDT. Before PDT, fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine when ALA reached its peak level in the lesional epithelial cells after topical application of ALA gel. We found that ALA reached its peak level in precancerous lesions about 2.5 hrs after topical application of ALA gel. The cancerous lesions in hamsters were then treated with topical ALA -mediated PDT with light exposure dose of 150 J/cm2 using LED 635 nm fiber-guided light device. Visual examination demonstrated that adjuvant topical ALA -mediated PDT group has shown better therapeutic results in compared to those of non-adjuvant topical ALA-mediated PDT group for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch precancerous lesions.

  19. UVA/UVB-induced genotoxicity and lesion repair in Colossoma macropomum and Arapaima gigas Amazonian fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groff, Aline Aparecida; da Silva, Juliana; Nunes, Emilene A; Ianistcki, Martus; Guecheva, Temenouga N; de Oliveira, Alzira Miranda; de Oliveira, Christiane Patrícia Feitosa; Val, Adalberto Luis; Henriques, João A P

    2010-05-03

    Ultraviolet radiation is known to cause adverse effects to aquatic species and aquatic environments. The fish Colossoma macropomum (tambaqui) and Arapaima gigas (pirarucu) live in the Amazon basin, near the Equator, and thus receive high intensity of ultraviolet radiation. Deforestation further aggravates the situation by reducing shade at ground level. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic effects of UVA and UVB radiation on erythrocytes of tambaqui and pirarucu fish using Micronuclei test and Comet assay. Our study showed that UV radiation caused DNA damage in both species as detected by Comet assay. In addition, there were differences in response to genotoxicity between both species, which are possibly related to their evolutionary history. Tambaqui fish exposed to ultraviolet radiation for different periods presented clear dose-response in DNA damage profile. Significant damage repair was observed 24h after cessation of ultraviolet radiation exposure. At the test conditions used, no significant increase in micronucleated cells was observed in tambaqui and pirarucu fish. Tambaqui proved to be more sensitive to ultraviolet radiation than Pirarucu, as detected by Comet assay, showing statistically higher baseline DNA damage. The present results demonstrated that alkaline Comet assay was very sensitive for detecting the UV-induced genotoxicity during the short exposure period in our study. In addition, the present study also suggests that tambaqui and pirarucu fish are useful sentinel organisms, as their UV sensitivity allows them to be effective monitors of biological hazards in the Amazon region. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of Tang Mai Kang Capsule on Angioneurotic Lesions in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李华; 王军; 高丽君; 郭永成

    2004-01-01

    The effects of Tang Mai Kang Capsule (糖脉康胶囊) on blood sugar level, gangrene of the tail-tip, pain threshold and learning and memory abilities were investigated in alloxan-induced diabetic mice. The results showed that Tang Mai Kang Capsule could significantly decrease blood sugar level and incidence rate of gangrene of the tail-tip, increase pain threshold, and strengthen learning and memory abilities, suggesting that Tang Mai Kang Capsule functions to decrease blood sugar level and improve the complicated angioneurotic lesions of diabetes.

  1. Radiation induced diffusion as a method to protect surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumvol, I.J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation induced diffusion forms a coating adeherent and without interface on the surface of metalic substrates. This coating improves the behaviour of metal to corrosion and abrasion. The effect of radiation induced diffusion of tin and calcium on pure iron surface is described and analyzed in this work. (author) [pt

  2. Radiation induced changes in the airway - anaesthetic implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Radiation induced changes in the airway - anaesthetic implications: case report. Mallika Balakrishnan, Renju Kuriakose, Rachel Cherian Koshy. Abstract. Radiation induces a variety of changes in the airway that can potentially lead to difficult intubation. Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the mandible, a severe consequence of ...

  3. Radiation-induced xerostomia in a patient with nasopharyngeal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OBJECTIVE: This study reports a case of radiation-induced xerstomia in a patient with nasopharyngeal cancer, to emphasize the need for prompt oral care to prevent untoward effects of xerostomia and to improve patients' quality of life. CASE REPORT: A 60 year old man diagnosed of radiation-induced xerostomia, after 6 ...

  4. Protective effect of ginsenoside Re on acute gastric mucosal lesion induced by compound 48/80

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sena Lee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The protective effect of ginsenoside Re, isolated from ginseng berry, against acute gastric mucosal lesions was examined in rats with a single intraperitoneal injection of compound 48/80 (C48/80. Ginsenoside Re (20 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg was orally administered 0.5 h prior to C48/80 treatment. Ginsenoside Re dose-dependently prevented gastric mucosal lesion development 3 h after C48/80 treatment. Increases in the activities of myeloperoxidase (MPO; an index of neutrophil infiltration and xanthine oxidase (XO and the content of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS; an index of lipid peroxidation and decreases in the contents of hexosamine (a marker of gastric mucus and adherent mucus, which occurred in gastric mucosal tissues after C48/80 treatment, were significantly attenuated by ginsenoside Re. The elevation of Bax expression and the decrease in Bcl2 expression after C48/80 treatment were also attenuated by ginsenoside Re. Ginsenoside Re significantly attenuated all these changes 3 h after C48/80 treatment. These results indicate that orally administered ginsenoside Re protects against C48/80-induced acute gastric mucosal lesions in rats, possibly through its stimulatory action on gastric mucus synthesis and secretion, its inhibitory action on neutrophil infiltration, and enhanced lipid peroxidation in the gastric mucosal tissue.

  5. Effect of probiotics on the development of dimethylhydrazine-induced preneoplastic lesions in the mice colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Costa Liboredo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine the effect of probiotics on the development of chemically induced (1, 2-dimethylhydrazine colonic preneoplastic lesions, in mice. METHODS: The animals were divided into five groups. The control group was injected with carcinogen alone and the other groups also received probiotics (1- Lactobacillus delbrueckii UFV-H2b20; 2- Bifidobacterium animalis var. lactis Bb12; 3- L. delbrueckii UFV-H2b20 plus B. animalis var. lactis Bb12; and 4- Saccharomyces boulardii administered orally in drinking water throughout fourteen weeks. RESULTS: Consumption of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria alone resulted in a significant reduction of the total number of aberrant crypt foci (55.7% and 45.1%, respectively. Significant reduction in the number of these small foci (3 aberrant crypts crypts had no significant reduction. CONCLUSION: L. delbrueckii UFV-H2b20 and B. animalis var. lactis Bb12 administered alone protect colonic preneoplastic lesions in mice, while the combined treatment of these bacteria and the administration of S.boulardii were not effective in reducing such colonic lesions.

  6. A case of radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the maxilla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Rie; Asato, Ryo; Tanaka, Shinzo; Hiratsuka, Yasuyuki; Ito, Juichi

    2003-01-01

    Radiation-induced osteosarcoma in the head and neck region is very rare. A 68-year-old female, who had been treated with radiation for malignant lymphoma of the right maxillary sinus, presented with right cheek swelling. Imaging examinations demonstrated a huge mass occupying the right nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Total maxillectomy was performed, and the tumor was histologically diagnosed as osteosarcoma. Diagnosis and treatment for radiation-induced osteosarcoma in the head and neck is discussed. (author)

  7. A case of radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the maxilla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Rie [Shimada City Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan); Asato, Ryo; Tanaka, Shinzo; Hiratsuka, Yasuyuki; Ito, Juichi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    2003-02-01

    Radiation-induced osteosarcoma in the head and neck region is very rare. A 68-year-old female, who had been treated with radiation for malignant lymphoma of the right maxillary sinus, presented with right cheek swelling. Imaging examinations demonstrated a huge mass occupying the right nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Total maxillectomy was performed, and the tumor was histologically diagnosed as osteosarcoma. Diagnosis and treatment for radiation-induced osteosarcoma in the head and neck is discussed. (author)

  8. Radiation-induced carotid artery atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gujral, Dorothy M.; Chahal, Navtej; Senior, Roxy; Harrington, Kevin J.; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Carotid arteries frequently receive significant doses of radiation as collateral structures in the treatment of malignant diseases. Vascular injury following treatment may result in carotid artery stenosis (CAS) and increased risk of stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA). This systematic review examines the effect of radiotherapy (RT) on the carotid arteries, looking at the incidence of stroke in patients receiving neck radiotherapy. In addition, we consider possible surrogate endpoints such as CAS and carotid intima-medial thickness (CIMT) and summarise the evidence for radiation-induced carotid atherosclerosis. Materials and methods: From 853 references, 34 articles met the criteria for inclusion in this systematic review. These papers described 9 studies investigating the incidence of stroke/TIA in irradiated patients, 11 looking at CAS, and 14 examining CIMT. Results: The majority of studies utilised suboptimally-matched controls for each endpoint. The relative risk of stroke in irradiated patients ranged from 1.12 in patients with breast cancer to 5.6 in patients treated for head and neck cancer. The prevalence of CAS was increased by 16–55%, with the more modest increase seen in a study using matched controls. CIMT was increased in irradiated carotid arteries by 18–40%. Only two matched-control studies demonstrated a significant increase in CIMT of 36% and 22% (p = 0.003 and <0.001, respectively). Early prospective data demonstrated a significant increase in CIMT in irradiated arteries at 1 and 2 years after RT (p < 0.001 and <0.01, respectively). Conclusions: The incidence of stroke was significantly increased in patients receiving RT to the neck. There was a consistent difference in CAS and CIMT between irradiated and unirradiated carotid arteries. Future studies should optimise control groups

  9. In vivo study of the adaptive response induced by radiation of different types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klokov, D.Yu.; Zaichkina, S.I.; Rozanova, O.M.; Aptikaeva, G.F.; Akhmadieva, A.Kh.; Smirnova, E.N.; Surkenova, G.N.; Kuzin, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    Low doses of X- and gamma-rays are known to induce the adaptive response (AR), i.e. a reduction in the damage caused by subsequent high doses. Using micronucleus test, we investigated the in vivo induction of AR in mouse bone marrow cells by low doses of radiation of different types. In our experiments we used low-LET gamma-radiation, high-LET secondary radiation from 70 GeV protons and secondary biogenic radiation. The latter is a novel type of radiation discovered only recently. Secondary biogenic radiation is known to be induced in biological objects after exposure to radiation and thought to be responsible for stimulating and protecting effects in cells in response to external irradiation. To expose mice to the secondary biogenic radiation, animals were housed in plastic cages containing gamma-irradiated oat seeds as bedding and food for 2 weeks before challenging with a high dose (1.5 Gy at a dose rate of 1 Gy/min) of 60 Co gamma-radiation. It was found that the yield of cytogenetic damage in mice exposed to both secondary biogenic and gamma-radiation was significantly reduced as compared to that in animals exposed to the challenge dose alone, i.e. the AR was induced. Pretreatment of animals with a low dose of gamma-radiation (0.1 Gy at a dose rate of 0.125 Gy/min) also induced the AR. In contrast, preliminary exposure of mice to a low dose (0.09 Gy at a dose rate of 1 Gy/min) of secondary radiation from 70 GeV protons induced no AR, suggesting that triggering the cascade of events leading to the AR induction depends on the DNA single-strand to double- strand breaks ratio. The precise mechanisms underlying the AR are of great importance since the phenomenon of AR can be used for medical benefits and in assessment of risks for carcinogens. But they have not been elucidated well at present. Taken together, our results suggest the crucial role of particular types of initial DNA lesions and the secondary biogenic radiation induced in cells in response to external

  10. Role of endothelium in radiation-induced normal tissue damages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milliat, F.

    2007-05-01

    More than half of cancers are treated with radiation therapy alone or in combination with surgery and/or chemotherapy. The goal of radiation therapy is to deliver enough ionising radiation to destroy cancer cells without exceeding the level that the surrounding healthy cells can tolerate. Unfortunately, radiation-induced normal tissue injury is still a dose limiting factor in the treatment of cancer with radiotherapy. The knowledge of normal tissue radiobiology is needed to determine molecular mechanisms involved in normal tissue pathogenic pathways in order to identify therapeutic targets and develop strategies to prevent and /or reduce side effects of radiation therapy. The endothelium is known to play a critical role in radiation-induced injury. Our work shows that endothelial cells promote vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, migration and fibro-genic phenotype after irradiation. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time the importance of PAI-1 in radiation-induced normal tissue damage suggesting that PAI-1 may represent a molecular target to limit injury following radiotherapy. We describe a new role for the TGF-b/Smad pathway in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced damages. TGF-b/Smad pathway is involved in the fibro-genic phenotype of VSMC induced by irradiated EC as well as in the radiation-induced PAI-1 expression in endothelial cells. (author)

  11. Lung Function Impairment in Relation to Asbestos-Induced Pleural Lesions with Reference to the Extent of the Lesions and the Initial Parenchymal Fibrosis.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lebedová, J.; Dlouhá, B.; Rychlá, L.; Neuwirth, J.; Brabec, Marek; Pelclová, D.; Fenclová, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 5 (2003), s. 388-395 ISSN 0355-3140 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : asbestos exposure * asbestos-induced pleural lesion * asbestosis * lung function impairmentp * arenchymal fibrosis * pleural change * pleural thickening * ventilation impairment Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 1.816, year: 2003 http://www.jstor.org/stable/40967314

  12. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, S.B., E-mail: ahmad.rabilal@gmail.com [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); McNeill, F.E., E-mail: fmcneill@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Byun, S.H., E-mail: soohyun@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Prestwich, W.V., E-mail: prestwic@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Seymour, C., E-mail: seymouc@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Mothersill, C.E., E-mail: mothers@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced 'bystander effects' studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} H{sup +}/cm{sup 2} s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3}, 10 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6}, and 35 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} cps for wavelengths of 280 {+-} 5 nm, 320 {+-} 5 nm and 340 {+-} 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a 'damage cross section' of the order of 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  13. Effect of radiomodifying agents on the ratios of X-ray-induced lesions in cellular DNA: use in lethal lesion determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, I.R.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of three radiomodifying agents, cysteamine, hyperthermia, and hypoxia, on the induction of the major classes of X-ray-induced DNA lesions, was studied using mouse L cells and Chinese hamster V79 cells. The use of filter elution techniques allowed most of these studies to be conducted at X-ray doses within the survival-curve range. Cysteamine was found to protect against DNA single-strand breakage (ssb), DNA base damage, and DNA-protein crosslinkage. Hyperthermia had no effect on the level of DNA ssb or DNA base damage, but in L cells (but not in V79 cells) it increased the level of DNA-protein crosslinkage relative to DNA ssb. Hypoxia protected against DNA ssb, had no significant effect on the level of DNA base damage, and enhanced the level of DNA-protein crosslinkage relative to DNA ssb. These results support the previous suggestion that the X-ray-induced lethal lesion is DNA double-strand breakage. Implications of these findings for the mechanisms of formation of X-ray-induced DNA lesions are also discussed. (author)

  14. Acute skin lesions following psoralen plus ultraviolet A radiation investigated by optical coherence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Z M; Zhong, H Q; Zhai, J; Wang, C X; Xiong, H L; Guo, Z Y

    2013-01-01

    Psoralen plus ultraviolet A radiation (PUVA) therapy is a very important clinical treatment of skin diseases such as vitiligo and psoriasis, but associated with an increased risk of skin photodamage, especially photoaging. In this work, optical coherence tomography (OCT), a novel non-invasive imaging technology, was introduced to investigate in vivo the photodamage induced by PUVA qualitatively and quantitatively. Balb/c mouse dorsal skin was treated with 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), and then exposed to UVA radiation. OCT images of the tissues were obtained by an OCT system with a 1310 nm central wavelength. Skin thickness and the attenuation coefficient were extracted from the OCT images to analyze the degree of injury to mouse skin. The results demonstrated that PUVA-treated skin showed an increase in skin thickness, and a reduction of attenuation coefficient in the OCT signal compared with the control groups. The data also showed good correlation with the results observed in histological sections using hematoxylin and eosin staining. In conclusion, OCT is a promising tool for photobiological studies aimed at assessing the effect of PUVA therapy in vivo. (paper)

  15. Complex DNA Damage: A Route to Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability and Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ifigeneia V. Mavragani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cellular effects of ionizing radiation (IR are of great variety and level, but they are mainly damaging since radiation can perturb all important components of the cell, from the membrane to the nucleus, due to alteration of different biological molecules ranging from lipids to proteins or DNA. Regarding DNA damage, which is the main focus of this review, as well as its repair, all current knowledge indicates that IR-induced DNA damage is always more complex than the corresponding endogenous damage resulting from endogenous oxidative stress. Specifically, it is expected that IR will create clusters of damage comprised of a diversity of DNA lesions like double strand breaks (DSBs, single strand breaks (SSBs and base lesions within a short DNA region of up to 15–20 bp. Recent data from our groups and others support two main notions, that these damaged clusters are: (1 repair resistant, increasing genomic instability (GI and malignant transformation and (2 can be considered as persistent “danger” signals promoting chronic inflammation and immune response, causing detrimental effects to the organism (like radiation toxicity. Last but not least, the paradigm shift for the role of radiation-induced systemic effects is also incorporated in this picture of IR-effects and consequences of complex DNA damage induction and its erroneous repair.

  16. Silymarin protects epidermal keratinocytes from ultraviolet radiation-induced apoptosis and DNA damage by nucleotide excision repair mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh K Katiyar

    Full Text Available Solar ultraviolet (UV radiation is a well recognized epidemiologic risk factor for melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. This observation has been linked to the accumulation of UVB radiation-induced DNA lesions in cells, and that finally lead to the development of skin cancers. Earlier, we have shown that topical treatment of skin with silymarin, a plant flavanoid from milk thistle (Silybum marianum, inhibits photocarcinogenesis in mice; however it is less understood whether chemopreventive effect of silymarin is mediated through the repair of DNA lesions in skin cells and that protect the cells from apoptosis. Here, we show that treatment of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK with silymarin blocks UVB-induced apoptosis of NHEK in vitro. Silymarin reduces the amount of UVB radiation-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by reduced amounts of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs and as measured by comet assay, and that ultimately may lead to reduced apoptosis of NHEK. The reduction of UV radiation-induced DNA damage by silymarin appears to be related with induction of nucleotide excision repair (NER genes, because UV radiation-induced apoptosis was not blocked by silymarin in NER-deficient human fibroblasts. Cytostaining and dot-blot analysis revealed that silymarin repaired UV-induced CPDs in NER-proficient fibroblasts from a healthy individual but did not repair UV-induced CPD-positive cells in NER-deficient fibroblasts from patients suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation-A disease. Similarly, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that silymarin did not reduce the number of UVB-induced sunburn/apoptotic cells in the skin of NER-deficient mice, but reduced the number of sunburn cells in their wild-type counterparts. Together, these results suggest that silymarin exert the capacity to reduce UV radiation-induced DNA damage and, thus, prevent the harmful effects of UV radiation on the genomic stability of epidermal cells.

  17. Indomethacin attenuation of radiation-induced hyperthermia does not modify radiation-induced motor hypoactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, J.L.; Kandasamy, S.B.; Harris, A.H.; Davis, H.D.; Landauer, M.R. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Exposure of rats to 5-10 Gy of ionizing radiation produces hyperthermia and reduces motor activity. Previous studies suggested that radiation-induced hyperthermia results from a relatively direct action on the brain and is mediated by prostaglandins. To test the hypothesis that hypoactivity may be, in part, a thermoregulatory response to this elevation in body temperature, adult male rats were given indomethacin (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), a blocker of prostaglandin synthesis, and were either irradiated (LINAC 18.6 MeV (nominal) high-energy electrons, 10 Gy at 10 Gy/min, 2.8 {mu}sec pulses at 2 Hz) or sham-irradiated. The locomotor activity of all rats was then measured for 30 min in a photocell monitor for distance traveled and number of vertical movements. Rectal temperatures of irradiated rats administered vehicle only were elevated by 0.9{+-}0.2degC at the beginning and the end of the activity session. Although indomethacin, at the two higher doses tested, attenuated the hyperthermia in irradiated rats by 52-75%, it did not attenuate radiation-induced reductions in motor activity. These results indicate that motor hypoactivity after exposure to 10 Gy of high-energy electrons is not due to elevated body temperature or to the increased synthesis of prostaglandins. (author)

  18. Indomethacin attenuation of radiation-induced hyperthermia does not modify radiation-induced motor hypoactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, J.L.; Kandasamy, S.B.; Harris, A.H.; Davis, H.D.; Landauer, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    Exposure of rats to 5-10 Gy of ionizing radiation produces hyperthermia and reduces motor activity. Previous studies suggested that radiation-induced hyperthermia results from a relatively direct action on the brain and is mediated by prostaglandins. To test the hypothesis that hypoactivity may be, in part, a thermoregulatory response to this elevation in body temperature, adult male rats were given indomethacin (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), a blocker of prostaglandin synthesis, and were either irradiated (LINAC 18.6 MeV (nominal) high-energy electrons, 10 Gy at 10 Gy/min, 2.8 μsec pulses at 2 Hz) or sham-irradiated. The locomotor activity of all rats was then measured for 30 min in a photocell monitor for distance traveled and number of vertical movements. Rectal temperatures of irradiated rats administered vehicle only were elevated by 0.9±0.2degC at the beginning and the end of the activity session. Although indomethacin, at the two higher doses tested, attenuated the hyperthermia in irradiated rats by 52-75%, it did not attenuate radiation-induced reductions in motor activity. These results indicate that motor hypoactivity after exposure to 10 Gy of high-energy electrons is not due to elevated body temperature or to the increased synthesis of prostaglandins. (author)

  19. Gamma Radiation-Induced Template Polymerization Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siyam, T.

    2005-01-01

    Gamma radiation induced copolymerization of acrylamide sodiumacrylate (AM-AANa) in the presence and absence of the polymer additive was studied at low monomer concentration(1.4M/l). The results showed that the exponents of the dose rate for the polymerization rate was found to be 1.3 and 1.4 in the absence and in the presence of the polymer additive respectively. The molecular weight of the formed polymer increased by addition of the polymer to the system. In the presence of the polymer the comonomers polymerize on the added polymer. In the absence of the added polymer the comonomers polymerize according to the copolymerization process at the initial stage of the copolymerization. While at high conversion the residual comonomers polymerize on the formed macromolecular chains of the produced polymer. These studies showed that the copolymerization in the presence of added polymer is completely template copolymerization while in the absence of the polymer the copolymerization process is only template process with a high conversion

  20. Radiation-induced cancer in laryngectomized patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Hiroshi; Tsuruta, Yoshihiro; Sato, Takeo; Yoshino, Kunitoshi; Umatani, Katunori

    1991-01-01

    Three patients developed hypopharyngo-cervical esophageal carcinoma, 6.5, 13, and 12 years after total laryngectomy. The first patient had received irradiation (60 Gy) for hypopharyngeal carcinoma. The recurrent tumor was removed with total pharyngolaryngoesophagectomy and reconstruction was performed with a local skin flap. After 6 years and 6 months, she developed progressive dysphagia. A new cervical esophageal skin cancer was diagnosed by pharyngoesophagography and treated. The second patient had had total laryngectomy for laryngeal carcinoma and received irradiation (100 Gy) post-operatively. After 13 years, he developed progressive dysphagia. Pharyngoesophagography revealed cervical esophageal carcinoma. The third patient had received irradiation for laryngeal carcinoma (60 Gy) and underwent total laryngectomy because of recurrence. After 12 years she developed dysphagia, and was treated for hypopharyngeal carcinoma. These three patients seemed to have radiation-induced carcinoma. Patients treated with total laryngectomy and irradiation who later complain of progressive dysphagia should be examined carefully to differentiate between postoperative stenosis due to scarring and a new carcinoma. (author)

  1. Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, P.S.; Bataini, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with 35 cranial nerve palsies were seen at the Fondation Curie during follow-up after radical radiotherapy for head and neck tumors. The twelfth nerve was involved in 19 cases, the tenth in nine, and the eleventh in five; the fifth and second nerves were involved once each and in the same patient. The twelfth nerve was involved alone in 16 patients and the tenth nerve alone in three, with multiple nerves involved in the remaining six patients. The palsy was noted from 12 to 145 months after diagnosis of the tumor. The latency period could be correlated with dose so that the least square fit equation representing NSD vs delay is NSD = 2598--Delay (in months) x 4.6, with a correlation coefficient of -0.58. The distinction between tumor recurrence and radiation-induced nerve palsy is critical. It can often be inferred from the latency period but must be confirmed by observation over a period of time

  2. A case showing a blistering disorder in radiation dermatitis during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonoshita, Takeshi; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki

    2007-01-01

    We experienced a case showing a blistering disorder in radiation dermatitis during radiation therapy for thymic cancer. Application of steroid to the lesion improved blisters. The literature on bullous eruption including radiation-induced bullous pemhigoid was critically reviewed. (author)

  3. Nephroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of aqueous extract of Melissa officinalis L. on acetaminophen-induced and pleurisy-induced lesions in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Pereira Müzell

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the bioactive properties of an aqueous extract of M. officinalis for its anti-inflammatory activity and its protection against hepatic and renal lesions induced by acetaminophen (APAP. Animals pre-treated with the crude extract in pleurisy induced by carrageenan showed a reduction in the amounts of exudate, in the numbers of leukocytes and polymorphonuclear cells. Intragastric administration of the extract for seven days prior to the APAP-induced lesion showed no protective effect on the liver. The treatment with the extract induced an increase of serum aspartate aminotransferase, indicating a rise of toxicity. Contrarily, the same treatment reduced the APAP induced lesion in kidney, with respect to ν-glutamyltransferase. The results suggested that the extract was not hepatoprotective and could lead to an increase in the lesions induced by the APAP. On the other hand, the extract was nephroprotective against the lesions induced by the APAP and showed an anti-inflammatory effect on pleurisy carrageenan-induced.

  4. The pathogenetic mechanisms of lesion and reconstruction of hematosis at critical radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukhtaev, T.M.

    1978-01-01

    In this chapter author made conclusion that for understanding pathogenetic mechanisms lead to critical radiation sickness after influence ionizing radiation it is necessary to take into account the consecution of all reactions beginning from physical and chemical processes of interaction radiation with matter till displaying final radiation effect on cell level and organism

  5. Mutations induced by X-rays and UV radiation during the nuclear cycle in the yeast Schizosarccharomyces pombe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barale, R.; Rusciano, D.; Loprieno, N.

    1982-01-01

    The availability of a cell-division-cycle (cdc) mutant in the fission yeast S. pombe, wee 1-50, has made possible the production of a large population of G 1 nuclear-stage synchronized cells. During their development, yeast cells from the G 1 into the G 2 nuclear stages were treated with X-rays and UV radiation at various doses. The DNA pre-replicative and replicative phases were the most sensitive to both cell lethality and mutant induction with either X-rays or UV radiation. The trends of induced biological effects that were observed suggest that the induction of mutations is dependent on the number of unrepaired DNA lesions that reach the replicating fork or of those that occur at that time. The X-ray-induced mutations were earlier saturated, possibly because of the higher number of lethal lesions so induced. (orig.)

  6. Radiation induced cancer: risk assessment and prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shore, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    A number of factors have to be considered in defining the cancer risk from ionizing radiation. These include the radiation sensitivity of the target tissue(s), the temporal pattern of risk, the shape of the dose-incidence curve, the effects of low dose rates, host susceptibility factors, and synergism with other environmental exposures. For the population as a whole the largest sources of radiation exposure are natural background radiation and medical/dental radiation. Radiation exposures in the medical field make up the largest volume of occupational exposures as well. Although new technologies offer opportunities to lower exposures, worker training, careful exposure monitoring with remedial feedback, and monitoring to prevent unnecessary radiodiagnostic procedures may be even more important means of reducing radiation exposure. Screening of irradiated populations can serve a useful preventive function, but only for those who have received very high doses

  7. [Terbinafine : Drug-induced lupus erythematodes and triggering of psoriatic skin lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayser, P

    2016-09-01

    Based on the technical information that oral terbinafine must be used with caution in patients with pre-existing psoriasis or lupus erythematosus, the literature was summarized. Terbinafine belongs to the drugs able to induce subcutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE)-with a relatively high risk. The clinical picture of terbinafine-induced SCLE may be highly variable and can also include erythema exsudativum multiforme-like or bullous lesions. Thus, differentiation of terbinafine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis may be difficult. Therefore, terbinafine should be prescribed with caution in patients who show light sensitivity, arthralgias, positive antinuclear antibodies or have a history of SLE or SCLE. Case reports include wide-spread, but mostly nonlife-threatening courses, which did not require systemic therapy with steroids or antimalarials in every case. Terbinafine is also able to induce or to aggravate psoriasis. The latency period seems to be rather short (Terbinafine therefore is not first choice if a systemic therapy with antimycotics is indicated in a patient with psoriasis or psoriatic diathesis. Azole derivatives according to the guidelines may be used as an alternative.

  8. Role of the area postrema in radiation-induced taste aversion learning and emesis in cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, B.M.; Hunt, W.A.; Chedester, A.L.; Lee, J.

    1986-01-01

    The role of the area postrema in radiation-induced emesis and taste aversion learning and the relationship between these behaviors were studied in cats. The potential involvement of neural factors which might be independent of the area postrema was minimized by using low levels of ionizing radiation (100 rads at a dose rate of 40 rads/min) to elicit a taste aversion, and by using body-only exposures (4500 and 6000 rads at 450 rads/min) to produce emesis. Lesions of the area postrema disrupted both taste aversion learning and emesis following irradiation. These results, which indicate that the area postrema is involved in the mediation of both radiation-induced emesis and taste aversion learning in cats under these experimental conditions, are interpreted as being consistent with the hypotheses that similar mechanisms mediate both responses to exposure to ionizing radiation, and that the taste aversion learning paradigm can therefore serve as a model system for studying radiation-induced emesis

  9. Prickly pear cactus (Opuntia ficus indica var. saboten) protects against stress-induced acute gastric lesions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Hyun; Jeon, Byung Ju; Kim, Dae Hyun; Kim, Tae Il; Lee, Hee Kyoung; Han, Dae Seob; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Tae Bum; Kim, Jung Wha; Sung, Sang Hyun

    2012-11-01

    The protective activity of prickly pear cactus (Opuntia ficus indica var. saboten) fruit juice and its main constituent, betanin, were evaluated against stress-induced acute gastric lesions in rats. After 6 h of water immersion restraint stress (WIRS), gastric mucosal lesions with bleeding were induced in Sprague-Dawley rats. Pretreatment of a lyophilized powder containing O. ficus indica var. saboten fruit juice and maltodextrin (OFSM) and betanin significantly reduced stress lesions (800-1600 mg/kg). Both OFSM and betanin effectively prevented the decrease in gastric mucus content as detected by alcian blue staining. In addition, OFSM significantly suppressed WIRS-induced increases in the level of gastric mucosal tumor necrosis factor-α and myeloperoxidase (MPO). Betanin alone was only effective in decreasing MPO. These results revealed the protective activity of OFSM against stress-induced acute gastric lesions and that betanin may contribute to OFSM's gastric protective activity, at least in part. When OFSM and betanin were taken together, OFSM exerted gastroprotective activity against stress-induced gastric lesions by maintaining gastric mucus, which might be related to the attenuation of MPO-mediated damage and proinflammatory cytokine production.

  10. Effect of radiation dose and iterative reconstruction on lung lesion conspicuity at MDCT: Does one size fit all?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botelho, Marcos Paulo Ferreira; Agrawal, Rishi, E-mail: rishi.agrawal@northwestern.edu; Gonzalez-Guindalini, Fernanda Dias; Hart, Eric M.; Patel, Suresh K.; Töre, Hüseyin Gürkan; Yaghmai, Vahid

    2013-11-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of different acquisition parameters and reconstruction algorithms in lung lesions conspicuity in chest MDCT. Methods: An anthropomorphic chest phantom containing 6 models of lung disease (ground glass opacity, bronchial polyp, solid nodule, ground glass nodule, emphysema and tree-in-bud) was scanned using 80, 100 and 120 kVp, with fixed mAs ranging from 10 to 110. The scans were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms. Three blinded thoracic radiologists reviewed the images and scored lesions conspicuity and overall image quality. Image noise and radiation dose parameters were recorded. Results: All acquisitions with 120 kVp received a score of 3 (acceptable) or higher for overall image quality. There was no significant difference between IR and FBP within each setting for overall image quality (p > 0.05), even though image noise was significantly lower using IR (p < 0.0001). When comparing specific lower radiation acquisition parameters 100 kVp/10 mAs [Effective Dose (ED): 0.238 mSv] vs 120 kVp/10 mAs (ED: 0.406 mSv) vs 80 kVp/40 mAs (ED: 0.434 mSv), we observed significant difference in lesions conspicuity (p < 0.02), as well as significant difference in overall image quality, independent of the reconstruction algorithm (p < 0.02), with higher scores on the 120 kV/10 mAs setting. Tree-in-bud pattern, ground glass nodule and ground glass opacity required lower radiation doses to get a diagnostic score using IR when compared to FBP. Conclusion: Designing protocols for specific lung pathologies using lower dose acquisition parameters is feasible, and by applying iterative reconstruction, radiologists may have better diagnostic confidence to evaluate some lesions in very low dose settings, preserving acceptable image quality.

  11. Radiation induced mitotic delay and stimulation of growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmann, A.

    1974-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the radiation induced mitotic delay and stimulation of growth are discussed in connection with the results of studies in Lemna minor and Lepidium sativum. The action of temperature seems to be of major importance. As many authors suggest that various chemical agents and slight intoxications also affect mitosis in a way similar to that induced by ionizing radiation, the radiation induced stimulation has lost its specific character and approaches might be found for further investigations of this phenomenon. (MG) [de

  12. Radiation-induced base substitution mutagenesis in single-stranded DNA phage M13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandenburger, A.; Godson, G.N.; Glickman, B.W.; Sluis, C.A. van

    1981-01-01

    To elucidate the relative contributions of targeted and untargeted mutations to γ and UV radiation mutagenesis, the DNA sequences of 174 M13 revertant phages isolated from stocks of irradiated or unirradiated amber mutants grown in irradiated (SOS-induced) or unirradiated (non-induced) host bacteria, have been determined. Differences in the spectra of base change mutations induced in the various conditions were apparent, but no obvious specificity of mutagenesis was detected. In particular, under the present conditions, pyrimidine dimers did not seem to be the principal sites of UV-induced base substitution mutagenesis, suggesting that such mutagenesis occurs at the sites of lesions other than pyrimidine dimers, or is untargeted. (U.K.)

  13. Pre-existing Periapical Inflammatory Condition Exacerbates Tooth Extraction–induced BRONJ Lesions in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minju; Alshaikh, Abdullah; Kim, Terresa; Kim, Sol; Dang, Michelle; Mehrazarin, Shebli; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Kang, Mo; Park, No-Hee; Kim, Reuben H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surgical interventions such as tooth extraction increase a chance of developing osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) in patients receiving bisphosphonates (BPs) for treatment of bone-related diseases. Tooth extraction is often performed to eliminate pre-existing pathological inflammatory conditions that make the tooth unsalvageable; however, the role of such conditions on bisphosphonate-related ONJ (BRONJ) development following tooth extraction is not clearly defined. Here, we examined the effects of periapical periodontitis on tooth extraction-induced BRONJ development in mice. Methods Periapical periodontitis was induced by exposing the pulp of the maxillary first molar for 3 weeks in C57/BL6 mice that were intravenously administered with BP. The same tooth was extracted, and after 3 additional weeks, the mice were harvested for histological, histomorphometric, and histochemical staining analyses. Results Pulp exposure induced periapical radiolucency as demonstrated by increased inflammatory cells, TRAP+ osteoclasts, and bone resorption. When BP was administered, pulp exposure did not induce apical bone resorption despite the presence of inflammatory cells and TRAP+ osteoclasts. While tooth extraction alone induced BRONJ lesions, pulp exposure further increased tooth extraction-induced BRONJ development as demonstrated by the presence of more bone necrosis. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that pre-existing pathological inflammatory condition such as periapical periodontitis is a predisposing factor that may exacerbate BRONJ development following tooth extraction. Our study further provides a clinical implication whereby periapical periodontitis should be controlled before performing tooth extraction in BP-users in order to reduce the risk of developing BRONJ. PMID:27637460

  14. Prostate Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy to Dominant Intraprostatic Lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, Louise J.; Lilley, John; Thompson, Christopher M.; Cosgrove, Vivian; Mason, Josh; Sykes, Jonathan; Franks, Kevin; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Henry, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate boosting dominant intraprostatic lesions (DILs) in the context of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) and to examine the impact on tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate datasets were selected. DILs were defined using T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Four plans were produced for each dataset: (1) no boost to DILs; (2) boost to DILs, no seminal vesicles in prescription; (3) boost to DILs, proximal seminal vesicles (proxSV) prescribed intermediate dose; and (4) boost to DILs, proxSV prescribed higher dose. The prostate planning target volume (PTV) prescription was 42.7 Gy in 7 fractions. DILs were initially prescribed 115% of the PTV Prostate prescription, and PTV DIL prescriptions were increased in 5% increments until organ-at-risk constraints were reached. TCP and NTCP calculations used the LQ-Poisson Marsden, and Lyman-Kutcher-Burman models respectively. Results: When treating the prostate alone, the median PTV DIL prescription was 125% (range: 110%-140%) of the PTV Prostate prescription. Median PTV DIL D50% was 55.1 Gy (range: 49.6-62.6 Gy). The same PTV DIL prescriptions and similar PTV DIL median doses were possible when including the proxSV within the prescription. TCP depended on prostate α/β ratio and was highest with an α/β ratio = 1.5 Gy, where the additional TCP benefit of DIL boosting was least. Rectal NTCP increased with DIL boosting and was considered unacceptably high in 5 cases, which, when replanned with an emphasis on reducing maximum dose to 0.5 cm 3 of rectum (Dmax 0.5cc ), as well as meeting existing constraints, resulted in considerable rectal NTCP reductions. Conclusions: Boosting DILs in the context of SABR is technically feasible but should be approached with caution. If this therapy is adopted, strict rectal constraints are required including Dmax 0.5cc . If

  15. Radiation-Induced Second Cancer Risk Estimates From Radionuclide Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Bryan; Besemer, Abigail

    2017-09-01

    The use of radionuclide therapy in the clinical setting is expected to increase significantly over the next decade. There is an important need to understand the radiation-induced second cancer risk associated with these procedures. In this study the radiation-induced cancer risk in five radionuclide therapy patients was investigated. These patients underwent serial SPECT imaging scans following injection as part of a clinical trial testing the efficacy of a 131Iodine-labeled radiopharmaceutical. Using these datasets the committed absorbed doses to multiple sensitive structures were calculated using RAPID, which is a novel Monte Carlo-based 3D dosimetry platform developed for personalized dosimetry. The excess relative risk (ERR) for radiation-induced cancer in these structures was then derived from these dose estimates following the recommendations set forth in the BEIR VII report. The radiation-induced leukemia ERR was highest among all sites considered reaching a maximum value of approximately 4.5. The radiation-induced cancer risk in the kidneys, liver and spleen ranged between 0.3 and 1.3. The lifetime attributable risks (LARs) were also calculated, which ranged from 30 to 1700 cancers per 100,000 persons and were highest for leukemia and the liver for both males and females followed by radiation-induced spleen and kidney cancer. The risks associated with radionuclide therapy are similar to the risk associated with external beam radiation therapy.

  16. In vitro growth potential of fibroblasts isolated from pigs with radiation-induced fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, M.; Remy, J.; Daburon, F.

    1986-01-01

    Degenerative processes were studied in pig muscles irradiated with single doses of 30 or 40 Gy. Damaged muscle was gradually replaced by an invasive fibrotic tissue. As a control, surgical muscle exeresis was performed of the same size as the radiation-induced lesions at the same anatomical site. Primary cultures were set up comprising cells freshly extracted from normal dermis, or from tissue exhibiting either normal wound fibrosis or radiation-induced fibrosis. The growth potential of cells taken from the latter region far exceeded that of the two other types; attachment efficiency was higher, and fibronectin was detected early by immunofluorescence. These in vivo and in vitro observations imply that a pathological repair process occurs after localized irradiation. (author)

  17. Neural control of locomotion and training-induced plasticity after spinal and cerebral lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knikou, Maria

    2010-10-01

    Standing and walking require a plethora of sensorimotor interactions that occur throughout the nervous system. Sensory afferent feedback plays a crucial role in the rhythmical muscle activation pattern, as it affects through spinal reflex circuits the spinal neuronal networks responsible for inducing and maintaining rhythmicity, drives short-term and long-term re-organization of the brain and spinal cord circuits, and contributes to recovery of walking after locomotor training. Therefore, spinal circuits integrating sensory signals are adjustable networks with learning capabilities. In this review, I will synthesize the mechanisms underlying phase-dependent modulation of spinal reflexes in healthy humans as well as those with spinal or cerebral lesions along with findings on afferent regulation of spinal reflexes and central pattern generator in reduced animal preparations. Recovery of walking after locomotor training has been documented in numerous studies but the re-organization of spinal interneuronal and cortical circuits need to be further explored at cellular and physiological levels. For maximizing sensorimotor recovery in people with spinal or cerebral lesions, a multidisciplinary approach (rehabilitation, pharmacology, and electrical stimulation) delivered during various sensorimotor constraints is needed. Copyright 2010 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) ultrasound imaging of pancreatic cystic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Onofrio, M., E-mail: mirko.donofrio@univr.it [Department of Radiology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, University of Verona, 37134 Verona (Italy); Gallotti, A. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, University of Verona, 37134 Verona (Italy); Salvia, R. [Department of Surgery, University Hospital G.B. Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, University of Verona, 37134 Verona (Italy); Capelli, P. [Department of Pathology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, University of Verona, 37134 Verona (Italy); Mucelli, R. Pozzi [Department of Radiology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, University of Verona, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the ARFI ultrasound imaging with Virtual Touch tissue quantification in studying pancreatic cystic lesions, compared with phantom fluid models. Materials and methods: Different phantom fluids at different viscosity or density (water, iodinate contrast agent, and oil) were evaluated by two independent operators. From September to December 2008, 23 pancreatic cystic lesions were prospectively studied. All lesions were pathologically confirmed. Results: Non-numerical values on water and numerical values on other phantoms were obtained. Inter-observer evaluation revealed a perfect correlation (rs = 1.00; p < 0.0001) between all measurements achieved by both operators per each balloon and fluid. Among the pancreatic cystic lesions, 14 mucinous cystadenomas, 4 pseudocysts, 3 intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms and 2 serous cystadenomas were studied. The values obtained ranged from XXXX/0-4,85 m/s in mucinous cystadenomas, from XXXX/0-3,11 m/s in pseudocysts, from XXXX/0-4,57 m/s in intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms. In serous cystadenomas all values measured were XXXX/0 m/s. Diagnostic accuracy in benign and non-benign differentiation of pancreatic cystic lesions was 78%. Conclusions: Virtual Touch tissue quantification can be applied in the analysis of fluids and is potentially able to differentiate more complex (mucinous) from simple (serous) content in studying pancreatic cystic lesions.

  19. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) ultrasound imaging of pancreatic cystic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Onofrio, M.; Gallotti, A.; Salvia, R.; Capelli, P.; Mucelli, R. Pozzi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the ARFI ultrasound imaging with Virtual Touch tissue quantification in studying pancreatic cystic lesions, compared with phantom fluid models. Materials and methods: Different phantom fluids at different viscosity or density (water, iodinate contrast agent, and oil) were evaluated by two independent operators. From September to December 2008, 23 pancreatic cystic lesions were prospectively studied. All lesions were pathologically confirmed. Results: Non-numerical values on water and numerical values on other phantoms were obtained. Inter-observer evaluation revealed a perfect correlation (rs = 1.00; p < 0.0001) between all measurements achieved by both operators per each balloon and fluid. Among the pancreatic cystic lesions, 14 mucinous cystadenomas, 4 pseudocysts, 3 intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms and 2 serous cystadenomas were studied. The values obtained ranged from XXXX/0-4,85 m/s in mucinous cystadenomas, from XXXX/0-3,11 m/s in pseudocysts, from XXXX/0-4,57 m/s in intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms. In serous cystadenomas all values measured were XXXX/0 m/s. Diagnostic accuracy in benign and non-benign differentiation of pancreatic cystic lesions was 78%. Conclusions: Virtual Touch tissue quantification can be applied in the analysis of fluids and is potentially able to differentiate more complex (mucinous) from simple (serous) content in studying pancreatic cystic lesions.

  20. Computer modelling of radiation-induced bystander effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvostunov, Igor K.; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2002-01-01

    Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects are now well established consequences of exposure of living cells to ionising radiation. It has been observed that cells not directly hit by radiation tracks may still exhibit radiation effects. We present a quantitative modelling of the radiation-induced bystander effect based on a diffusion model of spreading the bystander signal. The model assumes the bystander factor to be a protein of low molecular weight, given out by the hit cell, diffusing in the medium and reacting with non-hit cells. The model calculations successfully predict the results of cell survival in an irradiated conditioned medium. The model predicts the shape of dose-effect relationship for cell survival and oncogenic transformation induced by broad-beam and micro-beam irradiation by alpha-particles. (author)

  1. Novel features of radiation-induced segregation and radiation-induced precipitation in austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Z., E-mail: zjiao@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Was, G.S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Three stainless steel alloys, high-purity 304 (HP304), high-purity 304 with high Si (HP304 + Si) and commercial purity 304 (CP304), were irradiated with 2 MeV protons to a dose of 5 dpa at 360 deg. C and subsequently examined using atom probe tomography (APT) and scanning transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (STEM-EDS). Several novel features of radiation-induced segregation and radiation-induced precipitation were observed. There is a significant variation in the composition of enriched and depleted elements in the grain boundary plane and along the dislocation loop core. Boron segregation to the grain boundary prior to irradiation is not affected by the irradiation. Phosphorus segregation is enhanced by irradiation. Carbon depletes at the grain boundary and may be affected by co-segregation with Cr. APT and STEM-EDS measurements are in excellent agreement for almost all the elements studied. The segregation behavior of elements at dislocations mirrors that at the grain boundary, but at a lower magnitude, except for Si. Ni/Si-rich clusters formed in irradiated HP304 + Si and CP304 are probably the precursors of {gamma}' or other Si- and Ni-rich phases. Copper depletion was observed at both the grain boundary and the dislocation loops. Regions adjacent to the depleted zones were sites for Cu cluster formation, which were also spatially correlated with Ni/Si-rich clusters.

  2. Radiation-induced DNA-protein cross-links: Mechanisms and biological significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Toshiaki; Xu, Xu; Salem, Amir M H; Shoulkamy, Mahmoud I; Ide, Hiroshi

    2017-06-01

    Ionizing radiation produces various DNA lesions such as base damage, DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs), DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs). Of these, the biological significance of DPCs remains elusive. In this article, we focus on radiation-induced DPCs and review the current understanding of their induction, properties, repair, and biological consequences. When cells are irradiated, the formation of base damage, SSBs, and DSBs are promoted in the presence of oxygen. Conversely, that of DPCs is promoted in the absence of oxygen, suggesting their importance in hypoxic cells, such as those present in tumors. DNA and protein radicals generated by hydroxyl radicals (i.e., indirect effect) are responsible for DPC formation. In addition, DPCs can also be formed from guanine radical cations generated by the direct effect. Actin, histones, and other proteins have been identified as cross-linked proteins. Also, covalent linkages between DNA and protein constituents such as thymine-lysine and guanine-lysine have been identified and their structures are proposed. In irradiated cells and tissues, DPCs are repaired in a biphasic manner, consisting of fast and slow components. The half-time for the fast component is 20min-2h and that for the slow component is 2-70h. Notably, radiation-induced DPCs are repaired more slowly than DSBs. Homologous recombination plays a pivotal role in the repair of radiation-induced DPCs as well as DSBs. Recently, a novel mechanism of DPC repair mediated by a DPC protease was reported, wherein the resulting DNA-peptide cross-links were bypassed by translesion synthesis. The replication and transcription of DPC-bearing reporter plasmids are inhibited in cells, suggesting that DPCs are potentially lethal lesions. However, whether DPCs are mutagenic and induce gross chromosomal alterations remains to be determined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Tumor-induced Osteomalacia in a 3-Year-Old With Unresectable Central Giant Cell Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossen, Stephanie S; Zambrano, Eduardo; Newman, Beverley; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Messner, Anna H; Bachrach, Laura K; Twist, Clare J

    2017-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare cause of hypophosphatemia involving overproduction of fibroblast growth factor 23. TIO has been described largely in adults with small mesenchymal tumors. We report a case of TIO in a child who presented with knee pain and radiographic findings concerning for rickets, and was found to have maxillomandibular giant cell lesions. The patient was treated with oral phosphorus and calcitriol, surgical debulking, and intralesional corticosteroids, which resulted in tumor regression and normalization of serum fibroblast growth factor 23 and phosphorus. This case illustrates the occurrence of this rare paraneoplastic syndrome in children and adds to our knowledge about clinical manifestations and pathologic findings associated with pediatric TIO.

  4. Heart and radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro Martins Júnior

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRATC The heart exposition to ionizing radiation may produce lesions in cardiac structures, acute (in most of cases benign and reversible, or months and even years later. There is a direct relationship of severity of lesions with radiation doses. The clinical picture receives a new denomination: radiation induced cardiopathy. The more frequent use of radiation in diagnosis and therapeutics increases the importance of their knowledge and especially their prevention.

  5. Induced Compton scattering effects in radiation transport approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, D.R. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    In this thesis the method of characteristics is used to solve radiation transport problems with induced Compton scattering effects included. The methods used to date have only addressed problems in which either induced Compton scattering is ignored, or problems in which linear scattering is ignored. Also, problems which include both induced Compton scattering and spatial effects have not been considered previously. The introduction of induced scattering into the radiation transport equation results in a quadratic nonlinearity. Methods are developed to solve problems in which both linear and nonlinear Compton scattering are important. Solutions to scattering problems are found for a variety of initial photon energy distributions

  6. Induced Compton-scattering effects in radiation-transport approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, D.R. Jr.

    1982-02-01

    The method of characteristics is used to solve radiation transport problems with induced Compton scattering effects included. The methods used to date have only addressed problems in which either induced Compton scattering is ignored, or problems in which linear scattering is ignored. Also, problems which include both induced Compton scattering and spatial effects have not been considered previously. The introduction of induced scattering into the radiation transport equation results in a quadratic nonlinearity. Methods are developed to solve problems in which both linear and nonlinear Compton scattering are important. Solutions to scattering problems are found for a variety of initial photon energy distributions

  7. Characterization of a Novel Radiation-Induced Sarcoma Cell Line

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lang, J.; Zhu, W.Z.; Nokes, B.; Sheth, S.G.; Novák, Petr; Fuchs, L.; Watts, G.; Futscher, B. W.; Mineyev, N.; Ring, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 6 (2015), s. 669-682 ISSN 0022-4790 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Sarcoma * radiation-induced * breast * cancer Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 3.151, year: 2015

  8. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  9. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS induces necrotizing enterocolitis-like lesions in neonatal mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ginzel

    Full Text Available Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC is an inflammatory bowel disease of preterm human newborns with yet unresolved etiology. An established neonatal murine model for NEC employs oral administration of lipopolysaccharides (LPS combined with hypoxia/hypothermia. In adult mice, feeding dextran sodium sulfate (DSS represents a well-established model for experimental inflammatory bowel disease. Here we investigated the effect of DSS administration on the neonatal murine intestine in comparison with the established NEC model.3-day-old C57BL/6J mice were either fed formula containing DSS or LPS. LPS treated animals were additionally stressed by hypoxia/hypothermia twice daily. After 72 h, mice were euthanized, their intestinal tissue harvested and analyzed by histology, qRT-PCR and flow cytometry. For comparison, adult C57BL/6J mice were fed with DSS for 8 days and examined likewise. Untreated, age matched animals served as controls.Adult mice treated with DSS exhibited colonic inflammation with significantly increased Cxcl2 mRNA expression. In contrast, tissue inflammation in neonatal mice treated with DSS or LPS plus hypoxia/hypothermia was present in colon and small intestine as well. Comparative analysis of neonatal mice revealed a significantly increased lesion size and intestinal Cxcl2 mRNA expression after DSS exposure. Whereas LPS administration mainly induced local neutrophil recruitment, DSS treated animals displayed increased monocytes/macrophages infiltration.Our study demonstrates the potential of DSS to induce NEC-like lesions accompanied by a significant humoral and cellular immune response in the small and large intestine of neonatal mice. The new model therefore represents a good alternative to LPS plus hypoxia/hypothermia administration requiring no additional physical stress.

  10. Simulating Space Radiation-Induced Breast Tumor Incidence Using Automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuskin, A C; Osseiran, A I; Tang, J; Costes, S V

    2016-07-01

    Estimating cancer risk from space radiation has been an ongoing challenge for decades primarily because most of the reported epidemiological data on radiation-induced risks are derived from studies of atomic bomb survivors who were exposed to an acute dose of gamma rays instead of chronic high-LET cosmic radiation. In this study, we introduce a formalism using cellular automata to model the long-term effects of ionizing radiation in human breast for different radiation qualities. We first validated and tuned parameters for an automata-based two-stage clonal expansion model simulating the age dependence of spontaneous breast cancer incidence in an unexposed U.S. We then tested the impact of radiation perturbation in the model by modifying parameters to reflect both targeted and nontargeted radiation effects. Targeted effects (TE) reflect the immediate impact of radiation on a cell's DNA with classic end points being gene mutations and cell death. They are well known and are directly derived from experimental data. In contrast, nontargeted effects (NTE) are persistent and affect both damaged and undamaged cells, are nonlinear with dose and are not well characterized in the literature. In this study, we introduced TE in our model and compared predictions against epidemiologic data of the atomic bomb survivor cohort. TE alone are not sufficient for inducing enough cancer. NTE independent of dose and lasting ∼100 days postirradiation need to be added to accurately predict dose dependence of breast cancer induced by gamma rays. Finally, by integrating experimental relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for TE and keeping NTE (i.e., radiation-induced genomic instability) constant with dose and LET, the model predicts that RBE for breast cancer induced by cosmic radiation would be maximum at 220 keV/μm. This approach lays the groundwork for further investigation into the impact of chronic low-dose exposure, inter-individual variation and more complex space radiation

  11. Radiation-induced camptocormia and dropped head syndrome. Review and case report of radiation-induced movement disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, Clemens; Kuhnt, Thomas; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Hering, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, camptocormia and dropped head syndrome (DHS) have gained attention as particular forms of movement disorders. Camptocormia presents with involuntary forward flexion of the thoracolumbar spine that typically increases during walking or standing and may severely impede walking ability. DHS is characterized by weakness of the neck extensors and a consecutive inability to extend the neck; in severe cases the head is fixed in a ''chin to chest position.'' Many diseases may underlie these conditions, and there have been some reports about radiation-induced camptocormia and DHS. A PubMed search with the keywords ''camptocormia,'' ''dropped head syndrome,'' ''radiation-induced myopathy,'' ''radiation-induced neuropathy,'' and ''radiation-induced movement disorder'' was carried out to better characterize radiation-induced movement disorders and the radiation techniques involved. In addition, the case of a patient developing camptocormia 23 years after radiation therapy of a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the abdomen is described. In total, nine case series of radiation-induced DHS (n = 45 patients) and - including our case - three case reports (n = 3 patients) about radiogenic camptocormia were retrieved. Most cases (40/45 patients) occurred less than 15 years after radiotherapy involving extended fields for Hodgkin's disease. The use of wide radiation fields including many spinal segments with paraspinal muscles may lead to radiation-induced movement disorders. If paraspinal muscles and the thoracolumbar spine are involved, the clinical presentation can be that of camptocormia. DHS may result if there is involvement of the cervical spine. To prevent these disorders, sparing of the spine and paraspinal muscles is desirable. (orig.) [de

  12. Low-dose radiation-induced endothelial cell retraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantak, S.S.; Onoda, J.M.; Diglio, C.A.; Harper Hospital, Detroit, MI

    1993-01-01

    The data presented here are representative of a series of studies designed to characterize low-dose radiation effects on pulmonary microvascular endothelium. Data suggest that post-irradiation lung injuries (e.g. oedema) may be induced with only a single fraction of therapeutic radiation, and thus microscopic oedema may initiate prior to the lethal effects of radiation on the microvascular endothelium, and much earlier than would be suggested by the time course for clinically-detectable oedema. (author)

  13. Skin aspergillosis induced in the region of radiation ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niimura, Yumiko; Nakauchi, Yohichi; Ushijima, Tsugako

    1980-01-01

    A case of skin aspergillosis in the region of radiation ulcer which was caused by Aspergillus fumigatus was reported. The patient was a 51 year-old man. This fungal infection was probably induced by a local factor, that is, chronic radiation ulcer. Histological findings suggested that Aspergillus fumigatus which increased saprophytically at the beginning possessed parasitic nature gradually, invaded into connective tissues in the deep layer of true skin, and made radiation ulcer more intractable. (Tsunoda, M.)

  14. Radiation-Induced Bystander Response: Mechanism and Clinical Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Absorption of energy from ionizing radiation (IR) to the genetic material in the cell gives rise to damage to DNA in a dose-dependent manner. There are two types of DNA damage; by a high dose (causing acute or deterministic effects) and by a low dose (related to chronic or stochastic effects), both of which induce different health effects. Among radiation effects, acute cutaneous radiation syndrome results from cell killing as a consequence of high-dose exposure.

  15. Radiation induced skeletal changes in beagle: dose rates, dose, and age effect analysis from 226Ra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momeni, M.H.; Williams, J.R.; Rosenblatt, L.S.

    1976-01-01

    Radiation-induced skeletal injury (E) and the rate of skeletal injury were studied as a function of time and dose in beagles administered 226 Ra Cl 2 in eight semimonthly iv injections starting at 2, 4, or 14 months of age. Skeletal changes were evaluated with a radiographic x-ray scoring system in 20 skeletal regions; each region was scored on a 0 to 6 scale. Bone changes in six regions of humeri were qualitatively analyzed for comparison with total skeletal changes. Skeletal changes were classified by endosteal or periosteal cortical sclerosis and thickening, fractures, osteolytic lesions, and trabecular coarsening

  16. Radiation-induced nitration of organic compounds in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ershov, B.G.; Gordeev, A.V.; Bykov, G.L.

    2009-01-01

    Radiation-induced nitration of organic compounds in aqueous solutions was studied. It was found that γ-irradiation of solutions containing acetic and nitric acid and/or their salts gives nitromethane. Dependences of the product yield on the absorbed dose and the contents of components were established. The mechanism of radiation nitration involving radicals is discussed. (author)

  17. Does trans-lesion synthesis explain the UV-radiation resistance of DNA synthesis in C.elegans embryos?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, Phil; Reddy, Jennifer; Svendsen, Betty-Ann

    1991-01-01

    Over 10-fold larger fluences were required to inhibit both DNA synthesis and cell division in wild-type C.elegans embryos as compared with other model systems or C.elegans rad mutants. In addition, unlike in other organisms, the molecular weight of daughter DNA strands was reduced only after large, superlethal fluences. The molecular weight of nascent DNA fragments exceeded the interdimer distance by up to 19-fold, indicating that C.elegans embryos can replicate through non-instructional lesions. This putative trans-lesion synthetic capability may explain the refractory nature of UV-radiation on embryonic DNA synthesis and nuclear division in C.elegans. (author). 42 refs.; 7 figs

  18. Does trans-lesion synthesis explain the UV-radiation resistance of DNA synthesis in C. elegans embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, Phil; Reddy, Jennifer; Svendsen, Betty-Ann [Texas Christian Univ., Fort Worth, TX (United States). Dept. of Biology

    1991-09-01

    Over 10-fold larger fluences were required to inhibit both DNA synthesis and cell division in wild-type C.elegans embryos as compared with other model systems or C.elegans rad mutants. In addition, unlike in other organisms, the molecular weight of daughter DNA strands was reduced only after large, superlethal fluences. The molecular weight of nascent DNA fragments exceeded the interdimer distance by up to 19-fold, indicating that C.elegans embryos can replicate through non-instructional lesions. This putative trans-lesion synthetic capability may explain the refractory nature of UV-radiation on embryonic DNA synthesis and nuclear division in C.elegans. (author). 42 refs.; 7 figs.

  19. [Secondary male hypogonadism induced by sellar space-occupying lesion: Clinical analysis of 22 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hong-Lei; Wang, Tao; Xu, Hao; Chen, Li-Ping; Rao, Ke; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Hui-Xing; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2016-08-01

    To analyze the clinical characteristics of secondary male hypogonadism induced by sellar space-occupying lesion, explore its pathogenesis, and improve its diagnosis and treatment. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data about 22 cases of secondary male hypogonadism induced by sellar space-occupying lesion, reviewed related literature, and investigated the clinical manifestation, etiological factors, and treatment methods of the disease. Hypogonadism developed in 10 of the patients before surgery and radiotherapy (group A) and in the other 12 after it (group B). The patients received endocrine therapy with Andriol (n=7) or hCG (n=15). The average diameter of the sellar space-occupying lesions was significantly longer in group A than in B ([2.35±0.71] vs [1.83±0.36] cm, P<0.05) and the incidence rate of prolactinomas was markedly higher in the former than in the latter group (60% vs 0, P<0.01). The levels of lutein hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone (T) were remarkably decreased in group B after surgery and radiotherapy (P<0.01). Compared with the parameters obtained before endocrine therapy, all the patients showed significant increases after intervention with Andriol or hCG in the T level ([0.78±0.40] vs [2.71±0.70] ng/ml with Andriol; [0.93±0.44] vs [3.07±0.67] ng/ml with hCG) and IIEF-5 score (5.00±2.61 vs 14.50±3.62 with Andriol; 5.36±1.82 vs 15.07±3.27 with hCG) (all P<0.01). The testis volume increased and pubic hair began to grow in those with hypoevolutism. The patients treated with hCG showed a significantly increased testis volume (P<0.01) and sperm was detected in 7 of them, whose baseline testis volume was markedly larger than those that failed to produce sperm ([11.5±2.3] vs [7.5±2.3] ml, P<0.01). Those treated with Andriol exhibited no significant difference in the testis volume before and after intervention and produced no sperm, either. Hypothyroidism might be attributed

  20. Radiation-induced mutation breeding of papaya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Y. K. [Horticulture Research Centre, Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (MARDI), Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2009-05-15

    Irradiation-induced mutation breeding of papaya commenced at the Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (MARDI) in August, 2000. This research was initiated under a Coordinated Research Project (CRP - D23023) with assistance from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In the preliminary dosimetry study, seeds from two local papaya varieties, Sekaki and Eksotika were irradiated, either as dry seeds or as pre-soaked seeds (soaked overnight in water and surface-dried) with radiation doses ranging from 0 to 300 Gy. 100 Gy dose was lethal for all wet presoaked seeds while dry seed did not show loss of viability, even at 300 Gy. From the growth data it was estimated that dose of 525 Gy reduced shoot elongation by 50%, and this dose was recommended for mass irradiation of dry seeds. For wet, pre-soaked seeds results indicated that 42.5 Gy was the optimal dose for mass irradiation. At this dose, both seeds germination and seedlings growth were reduced by 50%. In a massive irradiation experiment 2,000 Eksotika seeds were irradiated at 42.5 Gy (pre-soaked) and another 2,000 at 525 Gy (dry). In the M2 population, numerous physiological defects were observed, including stem splitting, leaf variegation and puckering, and crinkled dwarfs. In the M3 population, a wide variability was recorded for a number of traits. M3 seedlings derived from presoaked seeds irradiated a low 42.5 Gy dose presented a high number of plants that were shorter and more vigorous in leaf development compared to those irradiated at 525 Gy and to non-irradiated control seedlings. The distribution patterns of M3 progenies for nine quantitative field characters showed great variation, often exceeding the limits of the control population. There appears to be good prospects in improving Eksotika papaya especially in the development of dwarf trees with lower fruit bearing stature, higher total soluble solids in fruits and larger fruit size. Several M2 and M3 putative mutants also

  1. Long-term effects of localized spinal radiation therapy on vertebral fractures and focal lesions appearance in patients with multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecouvet, Frederic; Richard, Francoise; Berg, B. Vande; Malghem, Jacques; Maldague, Baudouin; Ferrant, Augustin; Michaux, J.-L.

    1997-01-01

    The occurrence of new vertebral fractures and focal marrow lesions was determined and compared in irradiated and nonirradiated vertebrae of 12 patients with multiple myeloma (MM), prospectively followed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoraco-lumbar spine after localized spinal radiation therapy. During follow-up (mean 35 months), fractures appeared in 5% of irradiated vertebrae and in 20% of nonirradiated vertebrae; new focal lesions appeared in 4% of irradiated vertebrae and in 27% of nonirradiated vertebrae. This study demonstrates a beneficial long-term effect of localized radiation therapy, consisting of a reduced incidence of vertebral fractures and focal marrow lesions in irradiated vertebrae. (author)

  2. Lithium delays the radiation-induced apoptotic process in external granule cells of mouse cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inouye, Minoru; Yamamura, Hideki; Nakano, Atsuhiro.

    1995-01-01

    Proliferating cells of the external granular layer (EGL) in the developing cerebellum are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation. We examined the effect of lithium, an inhibitor of intracellular signaling, on the manifestation of radiation-induced apoptosis. Newborn mice were exposed to 0.5 Gy gamma-irradiation alone, or first were treated with lithium (10 μmol/g, SC) then given 0.5 Gy irradiation 2 hr later. The EGL was examined histologically for apoptosis at various times after treatment. Apoptotic cells increased rapidly, peaked (about 14%) 6 hr after irradiation, then decreased gradually to the control level by 24 hr. Prior treatment with lithium delayed the manifestation of apoptosis, the peak appearing at 12 hr. The disappearance of dead cells was delayed for about one day. The lithium concentration in the whole brain increased rapidly, being 30 μg/g at the time of irradiation and remaining at more than 40 μg/g for 40 hr. Lithium is reported to inhibit guanine-nucleotide binding to G proteins as well as phosphoinositide turnover. Of the variety of lesions induced by radiation, DNA double strand breaks are the most important source of cell lethality. The present findings, however, suggest that cyclic AMP-mediated and/or phosphoinositide-mediated signaling systems regulate radiation-induced apoptosis. (author)

  3. Lithium delays the radiation-induced apoptotic process in external granule cells of mouse cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, M; Yamamura, H; Nakano, A

    1995-09-01

    Proliferating cells of the external granular layer (EGL) in the developing cerebellum are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation. We examined the effect of lithium, an inhibitor of intracellular signaling, on the manifestation of radiation-induced apoptosis. Newborn mice were exposed to 0.5 Gy gamma-irradiation alone, or first were treated with lithium (10 mumol/g, SC) then given 0.5 Gy irradiation 2 hr later. The EGL was examined histologically for apoptosis at various times after treatment. Apoptotic cells increased rapidly, peaked (about 14%) 6 hr after irradiation, then decreased gradually to the control level by 24 hr. Prior treatment with lithium delayed the manifestation of apoptosis, the peak appearing at 12 hr. The disappearance of dead cells was delayed for about one day. The lithium concentration in the whole brain increased rapidly, being 30 micrograms/g at the time of irradiation and remaining at more than 40 micrograms/g for 40 hr. Lithium is reported to inhibit guanine-nucleotide binding to G proteins as well as phosphoinositide turnover. Of the variety of lesions induced by radiation, DNA double strand breaks are the most important source of cell lethality. The present findings, however, suggest that cyclic AMP-mediated and/or phosphoinositidemediated signaling systems regulate radiation-induced apoptosis.

  4. Lithium delays the radiation-induced apoptotic process in external granule cells of mouse cerebellum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inouye, Minoru; Yamamura, Hideki [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. of Environmental Medicine; Nakano, Atsuhiro

    1995-09-01

    Proliferating cells of the external granular layer (EGL) in the developing cerebellum are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation. We examined the effect of lithium, an inhibitor of intracellular signaling, on the manifestation of radiation-induced apoptosis. Newborn mice were exposed to 0.5 Gy gamma-irradiation alone, or first were treated with lithium (10 {mu}mol/g, SC) then given 0.5 Gy irradiation 2 hr later. The EGL was examined histologically for apoptosis at various times after treatment. Apoptotic cells increased rapidly, peaked (about 14%) 6 hr after irradiation, then decreased gradually to the control level by 24 hr. Prior treatment with lithium delayed the manifestation of apoptosis, the peak appearing at 12 hr. The disappearance of dead cells was delayed for about one day. The lithium concentration in the whole brain increased rapidly, being 30 {mu}g/g at the time of irradiation and remaining at more than 40 {mu}g/g for 40 hr. Lithium is reported to inhibit guanine-nucleotide binding to G proteins as well as phosphoinositide turnover. Of the variety of lesions induced by radiation, DNA double strand breaks are the most important source of cell lethality. The present findings, however, suggest that cyclic AMP-mediated and/or phosphoinositide-mediated signaling systems regulate radiation-induced apoptosis. (author).

  5. Influence of the complexity of radiation-induced DNA damage on enzyme recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, Philip

    2002-01-01

    Ionising radiation is unique in inducing DNA clustered damage together with the simple isolated lesions. Understanding how these complex lesions are recognised and repaired by the cell is key to understanding the health risks associated with radiation exposure. This study focuses on whether ionising radiation-induced complex single-strand breaks (SSB) are recognised by DNA-PK and PARP, and whether the complexity of DSB influence their ligation by either DNA ligase lV/XRCC4 (LX) complex or T4 DNA ligase. Plasmid DNA, irradiated in aqueous solution using sparsely ionising γ-rays and densely ionising α-particles produce different yields of complex DNA damages, used as substrates for in vitro DNA-PK and PARP activity assays. The activity of DNA-PK to phosphorylate a peptide was determined using HF19 cell nuclear extracts as a source of DNA-PK. PARP ADP-ribosylation activity was determined using purified PARP enzyme. The activation of DNA-PK and PARP by irradiated DNA is due to SSB and not the low yield of DSB (linear plasmid DNA <10%). A ∼2 fold increase in DNA-PK activation and a ∼3-fold reduction in PARP activity seen on increasing the ionising density of the radiation (proportion of complex damage) are proposed to reflect changes in the complexity of SSB and may relate to damage signalling. Complex DSB synthesised as double-stranded oligonucleotides, with a 2 bp 5'-overhang, and containing modified lesions, 8-oxoguanine and abasic sites, at known positions relative to the termini were used as substrates for in vitro ligation by DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 or T4 ligase. The presence of a modified lesion 2 or 3 bp but not 4 bp from the 3'-termini and 2 or 6 bp from the 5'-termini caused a drastic reduction in the extent of ligation. Therefore, the presence of modified lesions near to the termini of a DSB may compromise their rejoining by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) involving the LX complex. (author)

  6. Radiation-Induced Testicular Injury and Its Amelioration by Tinospora cordifolia (An Indian Medicinal Plant Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this investigation is to determine the deleterious effects of sub lethal gamma radiation on testes and their possible inhibition by Tinospora cordifolia extract (TCE. For this purpose, one group of male Swiss albino mice was exposed to 7.5 Gy gamma radiation to serve as the irradiated control, while the other group received TCE (75 mg/kg b. wt./day orally for 5 consecutive days half an hr before irradiation to serve as experimental. Exposure of animals to 7.5 Gy gamma radiation resulted into significant decrease in body weight, tissue weight, testes- body weight ratio and tubular diameter up to 15 days of irradiation. Cent percent mortality was recorded by day 17th in irradiated control, whereas all animals survived in experimental group. TCE pretreatment rendered significant increase in body weight, tissue weight, testes- body weight ratio and tubular diameter at various intervals as compared to irradiated group. Radiation induced histological lesions in testicular architecture were observed more severe in irradiated control then the experimental. TCE administration before irradiation significantly ameliorated radiation induced elevation in lipid peroxidation and decline in glutathione concentration in testes. These observations indicate the radio- protective potential of Tinospora cordifolia root extract in testicular constituents against gamma irradiation in mice.

  7. Characterization of radiation-induced Apoptosis in rodent cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Min; Chen, Changhu; Ling, C.C.

    1997-01-01

    For REC:myc(ch1), Rat1 and Rat1:myc b cells, we determined the events in the development of radiation-induced apoptosis to be in the following order: cell division followed by chromatin condensation, membrane blebbing, loss of adhesion and the uptake of vital dye. Experimental data which were obtained using 4 He ions of well defined energies and which compared the dependence of apoptosis and clonogenic survival on 4 He range strongly suggested that in our cells both apoptosis and loss of clonogenic survival resulted from radiation damage to the cell nucleus. Corroboratory evidence was that BrdU incorporation sensitized these cells to radiation-induced apoptosis. Comparing the dose response for apoptosis and the clonogenic survival curves for Rat1 and Rat1:myc b cells, we concluded that radiation-induced cell inactivation as assayed by clonogenic survival, and that a modified linear-quadratic model, proposed previously, modeled such a contribution effectively. In the same context, the selective increase in radiation-induced apoptosis. Comparing the dose response for apoptosis and the clonogenic survival curves for Rat1 and Rat1:myc b cells, we concluded that radiation-induced apoptosis contributed to the overall radiation-induced cell inactivation as assayed by clonogenic survival, and that a modified linear-quadratic model, proposed previously, modeled such a contribution effectively. In the same context, the selective increase in radiation-induced apoptosis during late S and G 2 phases reduced the relative radioresistance observed for clonogenic survival during late S and G 2 phases. 30 refs., 8 figs

  8. Angioplasty and stent placement in the treatment of radiation-induced arterial injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Pengcheng; Pierre, P.; Philippe, O.; Danial, C.; Jean-Paul, B.; Cyril, B.; Jean-Pierre, C.; Denis, K.; Helve, R.; Francis, J.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: Evaluation of therapeutic efficacy and longterm patency of angioplasty and stent for the treatment of radiation induced arterial disease. Methods: PTA was attempted in 18 arterial lesions following irradiation in 14 patients. Thirteen stents were placed in 8 patients to treat occlusion (n = 3), aneurysm (n = 1), residual stenosis (n =2), multiple stenoses (n = 1), and delayed restenosis after previous balloon angioplasty (n = 1). The stents were readily visualized and patency of the stent and the target artery determined with Doppler US and (or) CT in all patients. Results: Interventional procedure was successful in 14 patients of which 8 underwent stent placement for their arterial lesions. Eleven of these patients demonstrated primary patency with relief of clinical symptoms with a mean follow-up of 2 years (range, 8 months -60 months). Clinical improvement was noted for the other patients. Eleven patients underwent PTA once or twice. One patient had PTA four times and three stents were installed, two of which were in the area of the aortic bifurcation, and one in the celiac trunk. another patient also had PTA four times and two stents were placed in the superior mesenteric artery. A stent was implanted in one patient because of PTA induced dissection and occlusion, and the arterial lesion was considered to be cured clinically after a follow-up of 5 years. Conclusions: The results suggested that PTA with single or multiple techniques may be effective immediately in the treatment of arterial lesions caused by radiation and can be considered the first therapeutic option in these cases

  9. Radiation-induced coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunsmore, L.D.; LoPonte, M.A.; Dunsmore, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes three patients who developed myocardial infarction at an untimely age, 4 to 12 years after radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease. These cases lend credence to the cause and effect relation of such therapy to coronary artery disease

  10. Ferulic acid ameliorates radiation induced duodenal inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Ujjal; Manna, Krishnendu; Sengupta, Aaveri; Biswas, Sushobhan; Chakrabarty, Arpita; Dey, Sanjit

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation creates oxidative stress followed by inflammation through reactive oxygen species (ROS) and altering the status of redox sensitive enzymes. In the current study we aimed to evaluate the effect of ferulic acid (FA) on increasing doses of ionizing radiation mediated oxidative stress and inflammation using in vivo murine duodenum. To delineate the hypothesis we exposed mice with 2.5, 5 and 10 Gy gamma radiation doses in presence and absence of the (FA). FA was administered orally at a fixed dose of 50mg/ kg bw for 5 days before radiation exposure. Different techniques such as biochemical assays, immune blot, and microscopic analysis for histopathology, flow cytometry and scanning electron microscopy were employed to achieve the goal

  11. Coenzyme Q10 protects retinal cells from apoptosis induced by radiation in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lulli, M.; Witort, E.; Papucci, L.; Torre, E.; Schiavone, N.; Capaccioli, S.; Dal Monte, M.

    2012-01-01

    The key pathogenetic event of many retinopathies is apoptosis of retinal cells. Our previous studies have demonstrated that Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) prevents apoptosis of corneal keratocytes both in vitro and in vivo, by virtue of its ability to inhibit mitochondrial depolarization, independently of its free radical scavenger role. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether CoQ10 can protect cultured retinal cells and the retinas of rats from radiation-induced apoptosis, if instilled as eye drops in the cornea. In vitro experiments were carried out on cultured ARPE-19 or retinal ganglion cells (RGC)-5 cells pretreated with CoQ10 before eliciting apoptosis by ultraviolet (UV)- and γ-radiation, chemical hypoxia (Antimycin A) and serum starvation. Cell viability was evaluated by light microscopy and fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis. Apoptotic events were scored by time-lapse videomicroscopy. Mitochondrial permeability transition was evaluated by JC-1. The anti-apoptotic effectiveness of CoQ10 in retina was also evaluated by an in situ end-labeling assay in Wistar albino rats treated with CoQ10 eye drops prior to UV irradiation of the eye. CoQ10 substantially increased cell viability and lowered retinal cell apoptosis in response both to UV- and γ-radiation and to chemical hypoxia or serum starvation by inhibiting mitochondrion depolarization. In the rat, CoQ10, even when applied as eye drops on the cornea, protected all retina layers from ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced apoptosis. The ability of CoQ10 to protect retinal cells from radiation-induced apoptosis following its instillation on the cornea suggests the possibility for CoQ10 eye drops to become a future therapeutic countermeasure for radiation-induced retinal lesions. (author)

  12. Protective Effect of Repeatedly Preadministered Brazilian Propolis Ethanol Extract against Stress-Induced Gastric Mucosal Lesions in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Nakamura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to clarify the protective effect of Brazilian propolis ethanol extract (BPEE against stress-induced gastric mucosal lesions in rats. The protective effect of BPEE against gastric mucosal lesions in male Wistar rats exposed to water-immersion restraint stress (WIRS for 6 h was compared between its repeated preadministration (50 mg/kg/day, 7 days and its single preadministration (50 mg/kg. The repeated BPEE preadministration attenuated WIRS-induced gastric mucosal lesions and gastric mucosal oxidative stress more largely than the single BPEE preadministration. In addition, the repeated BPEE preadministration attenuated neutrophil infiltration in the gastric mucosa of rats exposed to WIRS. The protective effect of the repeated preadministration of BPEE against WIRS-induced gastric mucosal lesions was similar to that of a single preadministration of vitamin E (250 mg/kg in terms of the extent and manner of protection. From these findings, it is concluded that BPEE preadministered in a repeated manner protects against gastric mucosal lesions in rats exposed to WIRS more effectively than BPEE preadministered in a single manner possibly through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions.

  13. Comparsion of light dose on topical ALA-mediated photodynamic therapy for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch premalignant lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deng-Fu; Tseng, Meng-Ke; Liu, Chung-Ji; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2012-03-01

    Oral cancer has becomes the most prominent male cancer disease due to the local betel nut chewing habit combing with smoking and alcohol-drinking lifestyle. In order to minimize the systemic phototoxic effect of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), this study was designed to use a topical ALA-mediated PDT for treatment of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch cancerous lesions. DMBA was applied to one of the buccal pouches of hamsters thrice a week for 8 to 10 weeks. Precancerous lesions were induced and proven by histological examination. These DMBA-induced cancerous lesions were used for testing the efficacy of topical ALA -mediated PDT. We found that ALA reached its peak level in cancerous lesions about 2.5 hrs after topical application of ALA gel. The precancerous lesions in hamsters were then treated with topical ALA -mediated PDT with light exposure dose of 75 and 100 J/cm2 using LED 635 nm Wonderlight device. It is suggesting that optimization of the given light dose is critical to the success of PDT results.

  14. Enhancing repair of radiation-induced strand breaks in cellular DNA as a radiotherapeutic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, C.K.K.

    2014-01-01

    Protection of mammalian organisms including man from deleterious effects of ionizing radiation is of paramount importance and development of effective approaches to combat radiation damages using non-toxic radioprotectors is of considerable interest for defence, nuclear industries, radiation accidents, space travels, etc., besides the protection of normal tissues during radiotherapy of tumours. Many synthetic as well as natural compounds have been investigated in the recent past for their efficacy to protect the biological systems from radiation induced damages. They include sulfhydryl compounds, antioxidants, plant extracts, immune-modulators, and other agents. However, the inherent toxicity of many of the synthetic agents at the effective radio-protective concentration warranted further search for safer and more effective radio-protectors. In this context, therapeutic radioprotectors which are effective on post irradiation administration are of special relevance. One of the property that can be applied while screening for such radiation protective therapeutics is their ability to enhance repair of radiation-induced lesions in cellular DNA in terms of cellular repair index based on the parameters of the DNA following comet assay. Post irradiation administration of some natural and synthetic agents have shown their potential to enhance repair of radiation-induced strand breaks in cellular DNA in mice. These include phytoceuticals such as gallic acid, sesamol etc., extracts of medicinal plants such as Andrographis panniculata, and a few synthetic compounds such as tocopherol-mono-glucoside. The talk will give an overview of the work on DNA repair enhancement by a few natural and synthetic agents. (author)

  15. Association of matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) with the expression of matrix metalloproteinases-1, -2 and -9 during periapical lesion development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Natália Guimarães Kalatzis; Cardoso, Cristina Ribeiro de Barros; Silva, João Satana da; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário; Faria, Gisele

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the expression of matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) and its correlation with the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-1, -2 and -9 during the development of periapical lesion in mice. Periapical lesions were induced in the lower first molars of mice and after 7, 14, 21 and 42 days the mandibles were removed. The periapical lesions were measured by micro-computed tomography. The expression of EMMPRIN, MMPs-1, -2, and -9 genes were determined by real-time RT-PCR. The location and expression of EMMPRIN and MMPs were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. At 14 days, the periapical lesion area was higher than at 7 days. At 21 and 42 days no statistically significant bone loss was observed in comparison to 14 days. The control group showed discrete and occasional EMMPRIM, MMP-1, -2 and -9 immunostaining in the periodontal ligament fibroblasts. At 7, 14, 21 and 42 days intense immunoexpression was observed for EMMPRIN, MMPs-1, -2 and -9 in the region adjacent to the apical foramen. The EMMPRIN immunoexpression was higher at 7, 14, 21 and 42 days compared with the control. There was a positive correlation between gene expression of EMMPRIN and MMPs in the active phase of periapical lesion development. There is a high expression of EMMPRIM mainly by the inflammatory infiltrate in the region adjacent to the apical foramen during periapical lesion development. Furthermore, the positive correlation with MMP-1, -2, and -9 during the first days after periapical lesion induction indicates that EMMPRIM may be involved in the active phase of periapical lesions development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Functional Deficits Precede Structural Lesions in Mice With High-Fat Diet-Induced Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Rithwick; Bligard, Gregory W; Zhang, Sheng; Yin, Li; Lukasiewicz, Peter; Semenkovich, Clay F

    2016-04-01

    Obesity predisposes to human type 2 diabetes, the most common cause of diabetic retinopathy. To determine if high-fat diet-induced diabetes in mice can model retinal disease, we weaned mice to chow or a high-fat diet and tested the hypothesis that diet-induced metabolic disease promotes retinopathy. Compared with controls, mice fed a diet providing 42% of energy as fat developed obesity-related glucose intolerance by 6 months. There was no evidence of microvascular disease until 12 months, when trypsin digests and dye leakage assays showed high fat-fed mice had greater atrophic capillaries, pericyte ghosts, and permeability than controls. However, electroretinographic dysfunction began at 6 months in high fat-fed mice, manifested by increased latencies and reduced amplitudes of oscillatory potentials compared with controls. These electroretinographic abnormalities were correlated with glucose intolerance. Unexpectedly, retinas from high fat-fed mice manifested striking induction of stress kinase and neural inflammasome activation at 3 months, before the development of systemic glucose intolerance, electroretinographic defects, or microvascular disease. These results suggest that retinal disease in the diabetic milieu may progress through inflammatory and neuroretinal stages long before the development of vascular lesions representing the classic hallmark of diabetic retinopathy, establishing a model for assessing novel interventions to treat eye disease. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  17. Oral Lesions Induced by Chronic Khat Use Consist Essentially of Thickened Hyperkeratinized Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochiba Mohammed Lukandu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The habit of khat chewing is prevalent in many Middle Eastern and African cultures and has been associated with various adverse conditions in humans. This study aimed to describe histological changes induced by chronic khat chewing on the buccal mucosa. Methods. Biopsies of the buccal mucosa from 14 chronic khat chewers, 20 chronic khat chewers who also smoked tobacco, and 8 nonchewers were compared for epithelial thickness, degree and type of keratinization, and connective tissue changes. Results. Tissues from khat chewers depicted abnormal keratinization of the superficial cell layer and showed increased epithelial thickness affecting all layers. Epithelial thickness in control samples was 205 ± 26 μm whereas thickness in khat chewers and khat chewers who smoked tobacco was significantly higher measuring 330 ± 35 μm and 335 ± 19 μm, respectively. Tissues from khat chewers also showed increased intracellular edema, increased melanin pigment deposits, and increased number of rete pegs most of which were thin and deep. Conclusions. These results show that oral lesions induced by chronic chewing of khat in the buccal mucosa present with white and brown discoloration due to increased epithelial thickness, increased keratinization, and melanin deposition.

  18. Processing of radiation-induced clustered DNA damage generates DSB in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulston, M.K.; De Lara, C.M.; Davis, E.L.; Jenner, T.J.; O'Neill, P.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Clustered DNA damage sites, in which two or more lesions are formed within a few helical turns of the DNA after passage of a single radiation track, are signatures of DNA modifications induced by ionizing radiation in mammalian cell. With 60 Co-radiation, the abundance of clustered DNA damage induced in CHO cells is ∼4x that of prompt double strand breaks (DSB) determined by PFGE. Less is known about the processing of non-DSB clustered DNA damage induced in cells. To optimize observation of any additional DSB formed during processing of DNA damage at 37 deg C, xrs-5 cells deficient in non-homologous end joining were used. Surprisingly, ∼30% of the DSB induced by irradiation at 37 deg C are rejoined within 4 minutes in both mutant and wild type cells. No significant mis-repair of these apparent DSB was observed. It is suggested that a class of non-DSB clustered DNA damage is formed which repair correctly within 4 min but, if 'trapped' prior to repair, are converted into DSB during the lysis procedure of PFGE. However at longer times, a proportion of non-DSB clustered DNA damage sites induced by γ-radiation are converted into DSB within ∼30 min following post-irradiation incubation at 37 deg C. The corresponding formation of additional DSB was not apparent in wild type CHO cells. From these observations, it is estimated that only ∼10% of the total yield of non DSB clustered DNA damage sites are converted into DSB through cellular processing. The biological consequences that the majority of non-DSB clustered DNA damage sites are not converted into DSBs may be significant even at low doses, since a finite chance exists of these clusters being formed in a cell by a single radiation track

  19. γ-radiation induced tetracycline removal in an aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Fei; Guo Zhaobing; Zhang Chaozhi; Lin Mingyue; Wu Menglong; Zhao Yongfu

    2012-01-01

    Degradation effect of tetracycline (TC) by γ-radiation was investigated in an aqueous solution. The effects of initial concentrations of TC, pH values, combining with H 2 O 2 or CH 3 OH on degradation of TC were studied. Results showed that TC can be effectively degradated by γ-irradiation in an aqueous solution. Degradation of TC could be remarkably improved both in acid solution and alkaline solution, especially when pH value was 9.0. In addition, H 2 O 2 could gently promote degradation of TC induced by γ-radiation. While, CH 3 OH markedly restrained degradation of TC induced by γ-radiation. The degradation mechanism of TC was supposed by results of quantum chemical calculations and LC-MS. Results proved that degradation of TC induced by γ-radiation was mainly ascribed to · OH oxidation. (authors)

  20. Effect of dose on radiation-induced conductivity in polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyutnev, A.P.; Saenko, V.S.; Pozhidaev, E.D.; Ikhsanov, R.Sh.

    2007-01-01

    Numerical simulation of radiation-induced conductivity in polymers upon long-term irradiation on the basis of the generalized Rose-Fowler-Vaisberg model, which allows for both dipolar carrier transport and generation of radiation traps during irradiation, was performed. The unusual properties of radiation-induced conductivity, such as the appearance of a maximum on current transients, the absence of a steady state, and a substantial difference between these curves for the first and subsequent irradiation, are rationalized in terms of the formation of free radicals, the major feature of radiolysis in the chemical aspect. This interpretation does not require the involvement of degradation or crosslinking processes, unlike other interpretations that appear in the literature. With the use of low-density polyethylene as an example, it was shown that radiation-induced conductivity both upon pulse and continuous irradiation can satisfactorily be described with the unified set of parameters of the generalized Rose-Fowler-Vaisberg model [ru

  1. Membrane phospholipids and radiation-induced death of mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolters, H.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation-induced cell killing is generally believed to be a consequence of residual DNA damage or damage that is mis-repaired. However, besides this DNA damage, damage to other molecules or structures of the cell may be involved in the killing. Especially membranes have been suggested as a determinant in cellular radiosensitivity. In this thesis experiments are described, dealing with the possible involvement of membranes in radiation-induced killing of mammalian cells. A general treatise of membrane structure is followed by information concerning deleterious effects of radiation on membranes. Consequences of damage to structure and function of membranes are reviewed. Thereafter evidence relating to the possible involvement of membranes in radiation-induced cell killing is presented. (Auth.)

  2. Radiation-induced gene amplification in rodent and human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luecke-Huhle, C.; Gloss, B.; Herrlich, P.

    1990-01-01

    Ionizing and UV radiations induce amplification of SV40 DNA sequences integrated in the genome of Chinese hamster cells and increase amplification of the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene during methotrexate selection in human skin fibroblasts of a patient with ataxia telangiectasia. Various types of external (60-Co-γ-rays, 241-Am-α-particles, UV) or internal radiation (caused by the decay of 125 I incorporated into DNA in form of I-UdR) were applied. By cell fusion experiments it could be shown that SV40 gene amplification is mediated by one or several diffusible trans-acting factors induced or activated in a dose dependent manner by all types of radiation. One of these factors binds to a 10 bp sequence within the minimal origin of replication of SV40. In vivo competition with an excess of a synthetic oligonucleotide comprising this sequence blocks radiation-induced amplification. (author) 25 refs.; 8 figs

  3. Free radicals in wood induced by γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Honglin; Zhang Wenhui

    1994-01-01

    The free radicals in wood induced by γ-radiation were studied by electron spin resonance. The fine structure of the ESR signal from sawdust samples irradiated could be resolved into various radicals. These free radicals have a very long lifetime. The major spectrum for the free radicals will exponentially increased along with the radiation dose according to Y 1-Exp(-α a D). The intensity of radiation radicals is dependent on tree species. The stronger the intensity of mechanic free radicals is, the stronger the intensity of radiation free radicals

  4. Perspectives in the paradigm of radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugakhara, T.; Vatanabe, M.; Niva, O.; Nikajdo, O.

    1995-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is analysed as a multistage process consisting of initiation, promotion and progression. This model includes the mutation of oncogenes and the loss of hetrezygosity by tumor-suppressor genes. The threshold concept of radiation cancerogenesis is proposed, under which ionizing radiation can induce in somatic cell genetic effects a s result of DNA damage and epigenetic changes as well. The epigenetic changes (through DNA or cytoplasma) can be stabilized as mutations observed in many cancer cells and play a dominant role in radiation cancerogenesis induction. The ration of epigenetic and genetic effects largely depends on radiation doses

  5. Non-targeted bystander effects induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, William F.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects refer to those responses occurring in cells that were not subject to energy deposition events following ionizing radiation. These bystander cells may have been neighbors of irradiated cells, or physically separated but subject to soluble secreted signals from irradiated cells. Bystander effects have been observed in vitro and in vivo and for various radiation qualities. In tribute to an old friend and colleague, Anthony V. Carrano, who would have said 'well what are the critical questions that should be addressed, and so what?', we review the evidence for non-targeted radiation-induced bystander effects with emphasis on prevailing questions in this rapidly developing research field, and the potential significance of bystander effects in evaluating the detrimental health effects of radiation exposure

  6. Radiation-induced brain disorders in patients with pituitary tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhansali, A.; Chanda, A.; Dash, R.J.; Banerjee, A.K.; Singh, P.; Sharma, S.C.; Mathuriya, S.N.

    2004-01-01

    Radiation-induced brain disorders (RIBD) are uncommon and they are grave sequelae of conventional radiotherapy. In the present report, we describe the clinical spectrum of RIBD in 11 patients who received post-surgery conventional megavoltage irradiation for residual pituitary tumours. Of these 11 patients (nine men, two women), seven had been treated for non-functioning pituitary tumours and four for somatotropinomas. At the time of irradiation the age of these patients ranged from 30 to 59 years (mean, 39.4 ± 8.3; median, 36) with a follow-up period of 696 months (mean, 18.3 ± 26.4; median, 11). The dose of radiation ranged from 45 to 90 Gy (mean, 51.3 ± 13.4; median, 45), which was given in 1530 fractions (mean, 18.6 ± 5.0; median, 15) with 2.8 ± 0.3 Gy (median, 3) per fraction. The biological effective dose calculated for late complications in these patients ranged from 78.7 to 180 Gy (mean, 99.1 ± 27.5; median, 90). The lag time between tumour irradiation and the onset of symptoms ranged from 6 to 168 months (mean, 46.3 ± 57.0; median, 57). The clinical spectrum of RIBD included new-onset visual abnormalities in five, cerebral radionecrosis in the form of altered sensorium in four, generalized seizures in four, cognitive dysfunction in five, dementia in three and motor deficits in two patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/CT of the brain was suggestive of radionecrosis in eight, cerebral oedema in three, cerebral atrophy in two and second neoplasia in one patient. Associated hormone deficiencies at presentation were hypogonadism in eight, hypoadrenalism in six, hypothyroidism in four and diabetes insipidus in one patient. Autopsy in two patients showed primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) and brainstem radionecrosis in one, and a cystic lesion in the left frontal lobe following radionecrosis in the other. We conclude that RIBD have distinctive but varying clinical and radiological presentations. Diabetes insipidus and PNET as a second neoplastic

  7. Vestibular lesion-induced developmental plasticity in spinal locomotor networks during Xenopus laevis metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyeler, Anna; Rao, Guillaume; Ladepeche, Laurent; Jacques, André; Simmers, John; Le Ray, Didier

    2013-01-01

    During frog metamorphosis, the vestibular sensory system remains unchanged, while spinal motor networks undergo a massive restructuring associated with the transition from the larval to adult biomechanical system. We investigated in Xenopus laevis the impact of a pre- (tadpole stage) or post-metamorphosis (juvenile stage) unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL) on young adult swimming performance and underlying spinal locomotor circuitry. The acute disruptive effects on locomotion were similar in both tadpoles and juvenile frogs. However, animals that had metamorphosed with a preceding UL expressed restored swimming behavior at the juvenile stage, whereas animals lesioned after metamorphosis never recovered. Whilst kinematic and electrophysiological analyses of the propulsive system showed no significant differences in either juvenile group, a 3D biomechanical simulation suggested that an asymmetry in the dynamic control of posture during swimming could account for the behavioral restoration observed in animals that had been labyrinthectomized before metamorphosis. This hypothesis was subsequently supported by in vivo electromyography during free swimming and in vitro recordings from isolated brainstem/spinal cord preparations. Specifically, animals lesioned prior to metamorphosis at the larval stage exhibited an asymmetrical propulsion/posture coupling as a post-metamorphic young adult. This developmental alteration was accompanied by an ipsilesional decrease in propriospinal coordination that is normally established in strict left-right symmetry during metamorphosis in order to synchronize dorsal trunk muscle contractions with bilateral hindlimb extensions in the swimming adult. Our data thus suggest that a disequilibrium in descending vestibulospinal information during Xenopus metamorphosis leads to an altered assembly of adult spinal locomotor circuitry. This in turn enables an adaptive compensation for the dynamic postural asymmetry induced by the vestibular imbalance

  8. Construction of radiation - induced metastasis model in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Kuk; Jang, Su Jin; Kang, Sung Wook; Kim, Jae Sung; Hwang, Sang Gu; Kang, Joo Hyun [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    In treatment of cancer, distant metastases are important limiting factor because an estimated 50% of all cancer patients will develop metastases, and the metastases are major causing of cancer treatment failure. Recently a few reports indicated {gamma}-radiation induced an increase of invasiveness of several cancer cells. In this study, we had tried to show the possibility that radiation could also induce metastasis in vivo system. To prove our hypothesis, we constructed primary tumor by using C6-TL transfectant cell line expressing HSV1-tk and firefly luciferase (fLuc), and then {gamma}-radiation was treated to xenografts locally. Treatment of {gamma}-radiation to primary C6-TL xenografts of mice reduced size of xenografts and elongated survival of mice than those of mock control mice. But we also show that {gamma}-radiation treatment was followed by the growth of dormant metastases in various organs including lung and intestine after 2-4 weeks of {gamma}-radiation treatment. When bioluminescence imaging indicated growth of tumor in organs in mice, we sacrificed the mice and repeat acquired bioluminescence imaging after repeatedly. These images presented tumor growth locations exactly in organs. Because metastatic tumor candidates have morphology of foci, biopsies were performed for histological analysis or PCR analysis to confirm metastases. In most foci, histological analysis indicated several features of typical cancer tissue and PCR analysis showed present of fLuc gene in metastases. Detection of fLuc gene in metastases indicated these foci were originated from primary C6-TL xenografts, and the results suggest that {gamma}-radiation could promote metastasis in vivo as well as in vitro system. Although we need to understand changes of intracellular signaling or physiological phenomena of the radiation-induced metastasis yet, these results also imply that {gamma}-radiation treatment only to cancer patients need to pay attention carefully, and development of new

  9. Seizure-induced brain lesions: A wide spectrum of variably reversible MRI abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cianfoni, A.; Caulo, M.; Cerase, A.; Della Marca, G.; Falcone, C.; Di Lella, G.M.; Gaudino, S.; Edwards, J.; Colosimo, C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction MRI abnormalities in the postictal period might represent the effect of the seizure activity, rather than its structural cause. Material and Methods Retrospective review of clinical and neuroimaging charts of 26 patients diagnosed with seizure-related MR-signal changes. All patients underwent brain-MRI (1.5-Tesla, standard pre- and post-contrast brain imaging, including DWI-ADC in 19/26) within 7 days from a seizure and at least one follow-up MRI, showing partial or complete reversibility of the MR-signal changes. Extensive clinical work-up and follow-up, ranging from 3 months to 5 years, ruled out infection or other possible causes of brain damage. Seizure-induced brain-MRI abnormalities remained a diagnosis of exclusion. Site, characteristics and reversibility of MRI changes, and association with characteristics of seizures were determined. Results MRI showed unilateral (13/26) and bilateral abnormalities, with high (24/26) and low (2/26) T2-signal, leptomeningeal contrast-enhancement (2/26), restricted diffusion (9/19). Location of abnormality was cortical/subcortical, basal ganglia, white matter, corpus callosum, cerebellum. Hippocampus was involved in 10/26 patients. Reversibility of MRI changes was complete in 15, and with residual gliosis or focal atrophy in 11 patients. Reversibility was noted between 15 and 150 days (average, 62 days). Partial simple and complex seizures were associated with hippocampal involvement (p = 0.015), status epilepticus with incomplete reversibility of MRI abnormalities (p = 0.041). Conclusions Seizure or epileptic status can induce transient, variably reversible MRI brain abnormalities. Partial seizures are frequently associated with hippocampal involvement and status epilepticus with incompletely reversible lesions. These seizure-induced MRI abnormalities pose a broad differential diagnosis; increased awareness may reduce the risk of misdiagnosis and unnecessary intervention

  10. Seizure-induced brain lesions: A wide spectrum of variably reversible MRI abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cianfoni, A., E-mail: acianfoni@hotmail.com [Neuroradiology, Neurocenter of Italian Switzerland–Ospedale regionale Lugano, Via Tesserete 46, Lugano, 6900, CH (Switzerland); Caulo, M., E-mail: caulo@unich.it [Department of Neuroscience and Imaging, University of Chieti, Via dei Vestini 33, 6610 Chieti. Italy (Italy); Cerase, A., E-mail: alfonsocerase@gmail.com [Unit of Neuroimaging and Neurointervention NINT, Department of Neurological and Sensorineural Sciences, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Policlinico “Santa Maria alle Scotte”, V.le Bracci 16, Siena (Italy); Della Marca, G., E-mail: dellamarca@rm.unicatt.it [Neurology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Falcone, C., E-mail: carlo_falc@libero.it [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Di Lella, G.M., E-mail: gdilella@rm.unicatt.it [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Gaudino, S., E-mail: sgaudino@sirm.org [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Edwards, J., E-mail: edwardjc@musc.edu [Neuroscience Dept., Medical University of South Carolina, 96J Lucas st, 29425, Charleston, SC (United States); Colosimo, C., E-mail: colosimo@rm.unicatt.it [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy)

    2013-11-01

    Introduction MRI abnormalities in the postictal period might represent the effect of the seizure activity, rather than its structural cause. Material and Methods Retrospective review of clinical and neuroimaging charts of 26 patients diagnosed with seizure-related MR-signal changes. All patients underwent brain-MRI (1.5-Tesla, standard pre- and post-contrast brain imaging, including DWI-ADC in 19/26) within 7 days from a seizure and at least one follow-up MRI, showing partial or complete reversibility of the MR-signal changes. Extensive clinical work-up and follow-up, ranging from 3 months to 5 years, ruled out infection or other possible causes of brain damage. Seizure-induced brain-MRI abnormalities remained a diagnosis of exclusion. Site, characteristics and reversibility of MRI changes, and association with characteristics of seizures were determined. Results MRI showed unilateral (13/26) and bilateral abnormalities, with high (24/26) and low (2/26) T2-signal, leptomeningeal contrast-enhancement (2/26), restricted diffusion (9/19). Location of abnormality was cortical/subcortical, basal ganglia, white matter, corpus callosum, cerebellum. Hippocampus was involved in 10/26 patients. Reversibility of MRI changes was complete in 15, and with residual gliosis or focal atrophy in 11 patients. Reversibility was noted between 15 and 150 days (average, 62 days). Partial simple and complex seizures were associated with hippocampal involvement (p = 0.015), status epilepticus with incomplete reversibility of MRI abnormalities (p = 0.041). Conclusions Seizure or epileptic status can induce transient, variably reversible MRI brain abnormalities. Partial seizures are frequently associated with hippocampal involvement and status epilepticus with incompletely reversible lesions. These seizure-induced MRI abnormalities pose a broad differential diagnosis; increased awareness may reduce the risk of misdiagnosis and unnecessary intervention.

  11. Radiation induces aerobic glycolysis through reactive oxygen species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Jim; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Brizel, David M.; Frees, Amy E.; Ramanujam, Nirmala; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Although radiation induced reoxygenation has been thought to increase radiosensitivity, we have shown that its associated oxidative stress can have radioprotective effects, including stabilization of the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). HIF-1 is known to regulate many of the glycolytic enzymes, thereby promoting aerobic glycolysis, which is known to promote treatment resistance. Thus, we hypothesized that reoxygenation after radiation would increase glycolysis. We previously showed that blockade of oxidative stress using a superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimic during reoxygenation can downregulate HIF-1 activity. Here we tested whether concurrent use of this drug with radiotherapy would reduce the switch to a glycolytic phenotype. Materials and methods: 40 mice with skin fold window chambers implanted with 4T1 mammary carcinomas were randomized into (1) no treatment, (2) radiation alone, (3) SOD mimic alone, and (4) SOD mimic with concurrent radiation. All mice were imaged on the ninth day following tumor implantation (30 h following radiation treatment) following injection of a fluorescent glucose analog, 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diaxol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxyglucose (2-NBDG). Hemoglobin saturation was measured by using hyperspectral imaging to quantify oxygenation state. Results: Mice treated with radiation showed significantly higher 2-NBDG fluorescence compared to controls (p = 0.007). Hemoglobin saturation analysis demonstrated reoxygenation following radiation, coinciding with the observed increase in glycolysis. The concurrent use of the SOD mimic with radiation demonstrated a significant reduction in 2-NBDG fluorescence compared to effects seen after radiation alone, while having no effect on reoxygenation. Conclusions: Radiation induces an increase in tumor glucose demand approximately 30 h following therapy during reoxygenation. The use of an SOD mimic can prevent the increase in aerobic glycolysis when used

  12. The role of thymus-dependent T cells in hexachlorobenzene-induced inflammatory skin and lung lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, CCPPC; Bloksma, N; Klatter, FA; Rozing, J; Vos, JG; van Dijk, JE

    1999-01-01

    The involvement of thymus-dependent T cells in the inflammatory skin and lung lesions and spleen effects induced by hexachlorobenzene (HCB) was investigated by using genetically athymic and euthymic WAG/Rij rats and Brown Norway (BN) rats with or without depletion of T cells by adult thymectomy,

  13. Radiations - induced disorders in ovarian function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, S.; Roushdy, H.M.; Abdel-Aziz, M.T.; Eldenshary, A.E.; Abdel-Khalek, A.; Ramadan, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of whole body gamma radiation exposure (7.5 and 6.5 Gy) on the secretory activity and the structure of the ovaries was investigated. The parameters studied were serum levels of oestrogen, progesterone, Lh and FSH, beside histopathological studies of the ovaries of femaler rats. These were measured on the next day after radiation exposure and then after one two oestrus cycles. Whole body gamma - irradiation of females rats at two levels of exposure progressively decreased the level of oestrogen and progesterone while increased the level of LH and FSH as compared with the control. moreover, the changes in the ovaries were demonstrated in the histopathological investigation. Keywords: Radiation exposure - ovarian function - hormone radioimmunoassay - oestrogen - progesterone - LH - FSH

  14. Radiation-induced emesis in monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattsson, J.L.; Yochmowitz, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    To determine the emesis ED 50 for 60 Co radiation, 15 male rhesus monkeys were exposed to whole-body radiation doses ranging from 350 to 550 rad midline tissue dose. An up-and-down sequence of exposures was used. Step size between doses was 50 rad, and dose rate was 20 rad/min. There had been no access to food for 1 to 2 h. The ED 50 +- SE was found to be 446 +- 27 rad. To determine the effect of motion on emesis ED 50 , six more monkeys were exposed to 60 Co radiation as above, except that the chair in which they were seated was oscillated forward and backward 5 to 15 0 (pitch axis) at a variable rate not exceeding 0.3 Hz. Radioemesis ED 50 +- SE with motion was 258 +- 19 rad, a value significantly lower (P < 0.01) than for stationary monkeys

  15. Radiation-induced changes in carboxymethylated chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Ling; Peng Jing; Zhai Maolin; Li Jiuqiang; Wei Genshuan

    2007-01-01

    This study focuses on the radiation effect of γ-ray on carboxymethylated chitosan (CM-chitosan) in solid state. The changes in molecular weight of CM-chitosan with absorbed dose were monitored by viscosity method. Experimental results indicated that random chain scissions took place under irradiation. Radiation chemical yield (G d ) of CM-chitosan in solid state with N 2 -saturated was 0.49, which showed CM-chitosan has high radiation stability. Biomaterials composed of CM-chitosan can be thought to sterilize with low absorbed dose. FTIR and UV spectra showed that main chain structures of CM-chitosan were retained, carbonyl/carboxyl groups were formed and partial amino groups were eliminated in high absorbed dose. XRD patterns identified that the degradation of CM-chitosan occurred mostly in amorphous region

  16. Radiation induced cancer risk, detriment and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, W.K.

    1992-01-01

    Recommendations on radiation protection limits for workers and for the public depend mainly on the total health detriment estimated to be the result of low dose ionizing radiation exposure. This detriment includes the probability of a fatal cancer, an allowance for the morbidity due to non-fatal cancer and the probability of severe hereditary effects in succeeding generations. In a population of all ages, special effects on the fetus particularly the risk of mental retardation at defined gestational ages, should also be included. Among these components of detriment after low doses, the risk of fatal cancer is the largest and most important. The estimates of fatal cancer risk used by ICRP in the 1990 recommendations were derived almost exclusively from the study of the Japanese survivors of the atomic bombs of 1945. How good are these estimates? Uncertainties associated with them, apart from those due to limitations in epidemiological observation and dosimetry, are principally those due to projection forward in time and extrapolation from high dose and dose rate to low dose and dose rate, each of which could after the estimate by a factor of 2 or so. Recent estimates of risk of cancer derived directly from low dose studies are specific only within very broad ranges of risk. Nevertheless, such studies are important as confirmation or otherwise of the estimates derived from the atomic bomb survivors. Recent U.S. British and Russian studies are examined in this light. (author)

  17. Radiation-induced hondrosarcoma - a clinical case from our practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinova, L.; Georgiev, R.; Mihaylova, I.

    2013-01-01

    We present a clinical case of radiation - induced occipital extracerebral chondrosarcoma in 36 years old young man. The patient had undergone two brain operations 8 years ago due to oligodendroglioma in the left temporo - parietal area. These surgical interventions were partial and subtotal tumor extirpation, followed by local radiotherapy to the brain to a total dose of 56Gy. The necessity of immunohistochemistry (IHH) analysis for pathologic differential diagnosis in high grade brain and peripheral tumors was discussed. In this particular case a precise differential diagnosis between peripheral chondrosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma/pPNET is needed. important risk factors for the development of radiation-induced brain tumors and chondrosarcoma, extremely rarely diagnosed, was discussed. A very accurate precising of the treatment radiation dose is needed in young patients with malignant brain tumors, not only in the surrounding healthy brain tissues, but also in other tissues, such as skin, subcutaneous layer and bone. The exceeding of the radiation dose in the bone above 45-50 Gy, increases the risk of radiation - induced sarcoma with latent period over 8 years. Key words: Hondrosarcoma. Radiotherapy. Radiation-induced Sarcoma. Complex Treatment. Immunohistochemistry

  18. Radiation-induced life shortening. Annex K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this Annex is to review the cumulative evidence in the field of non-neoplastic long-term effects of whole-body irradiation. In particular, the existence and extent of life-span shortening in irradiated animals and man, and the relationships of life shortening to the physical and biological variables which may influence this effect of radiation are examined.

  19. Radiation-induced cerebellar chondrosarcoma. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, M.; Perrin, R.G.; Platts, M.E.; Simpson, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    The authors report a case of chondrosarcoma arising in the cerebellum 16 years after treatment of a cerebellar malignant astrocytoma by subtotal resection and irradiation. It is thought that the chondrosarcoma arising within the intracranial cavity was a probable consequence of previous ionizing radiation

  20. Prevention Of Radiation Induced Hematological Alterations By ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The modulatory influence of Rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary) leaves extract was investigated in Swiss albino mice at a dose of 3 Gy gamma radiation. For this purpose, adult Swiss albino mice were irradiated with 3 Gy gamma rays in the presence (experimental) or absence (control) of rosemary (1000 mg/kg body wt.).

  1. Crack velocity measurement by induced electromagnetic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frid, V.; Rabinovitch, A.; Bahat, D.

    2006-01-01

    Our model of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) emanated from fracture implies that EMR amplitude is proportional to crack velocity. Soda lime glass samples were tested under uniaxial tension. Comparison of crack velocity observed by Wallner line analysis and the peak amplitude of EMR signals registered during the test, showed very good correlation, validating this proportionality

  2. Radiation recall dermatitis induced by trastuzumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Kaynak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiation recall phenomenon is an acute, egzematous reaction that develops throughout a previously irradiated area, precipitated by the administration of docetaxel, doxorubicin, gemcitabine and paclitaxel. We report a 52-year-old woman with breast cancer who received locoregional radiotherapy followed by trastuzumab monotherapy. Three day after the first cycle of trastuzumab monotherapy, dermatitis developed in the previously irradiated skin.

  3. Crack velocity measurement by induced electromagnetic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frid, V. [Deichmann Rock Mechanics Laboratory of the Negev, Geological and Environmental Sciences Department, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel)]. E-mail: vfrid@bgu.ac.il; Rabinovitch, A. [Deichmann Rock Mechanics Laboratory of the Negev, Physics Department, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel); Bahat, D. [Deichmann Rock Mechanics Laboratory of the Negev, Geological and Environmental Sciences Department, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel)

    2006-07-31

    Our model of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) emanated from fracture implies that EMR amplitude is proportional to crack velocity. Soda lime glass samples were tested under uniaxial tension. Comparison of crack velocity observed by Wallner line analysis and the peak amplitude of EMR signals registered during the test, showed very good correlation, validating this proportionality.

  4. Vacuum alignment and radiatively induced Fermi scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alanne Tommi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We extend the discussion about vacuum misalignment by quantum corrections in models with composite pseudo-Goldstone Higgs boson to renormalisable models with elementary scalars. As a concrete example, we propose a framework, where the hierarchy between the unification and the Fermi scale emerges radiatively. This scenario provides an interesting link between the unification and Fermi scale physics.

  5. Hyperprolactinemia from radiation-induced hypothalamic hypopituitarism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corkill, G.; Hanson, F.W.; Gold, E.M.; White, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    In 1975 Samaan et al., described the effects of radiation damage of the hypothalamus in 15 patients with head and neck cancer. Shalet et al., in 1977 described endocrine morbidity in adults who as children had been irradiated for brain tumors. This report describes instances of hyperprolactinemia and associated hypothalamic, pituitary, and thyroid dysfunction following irradiation of a young adult female for brain neoplasia

  6. [Induced thymus aging: radiation model and application perspective for low intensive laser radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevost'ianova, N N; Trofimov, A V; Lin'kova, N S; Poliakova, V O; Kvetnoĭ, I M

    2010-01-01

    The influence of gamma-radiation on morphofunctional state of thymus is rather like as natural thymus aging. However gamma-radiation model of thymus aging widely used to investigate geroprotectors has many shortcomings and limitations. Gamma-radiation can induce irreversible changes in thymus very often. These changes are more intensive in comparison with changes, which can be observed at natural thymus aging. Low intensive laser radiation can not destroy structure of thymus and its effects are rather like as natural thymus aging in comparison with gamma-radiation effects. There are many parameters of low intensive laser radiation, which can be changed to improve morphofunctional thymus characteristics in aging model. Using low intensive laser radiation in thymus aging model can be very perspective for investigations of aging immune system.

  7. Radiation-induced tumors of the nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, M.; Laperriere, N.

    1991-01-01

    Therapeutic and nontherapeutic ionizing radiation has long been recognized as a putative carcinogenic agent, but the evidence that radiation causes tumors is circumstantial at worst and statistically significant at best. There are no distinct histological, biochemical, cytogenetic, or clinical criteria that can be used to determine if an individual tumor was caused directly by previous irradiation of the anatomic area. Additional supportive evidence for radiation-induced tumors includes a position correlation between radiation dose and tumor incidence (usually in the low dose range) and experimental induction of the same neoplasm in appropriate animal models. even if these criteria are fulfilled, coincidental development of a second tumor can never be discounted in an individual patient, particularly if there is an underlying diathesis to develop multiple tumors of different histology, such as in Recklinghausen's disease, or if there is an strong family history for the development of neoplastic disease. In this paper, the authors critically evaluate the available evidence to support the hypothesis that radiation induces tumors in the nervous system. The current concepts of radiation carcinogenesis are discussed and are followed by a discussion of animal data and clinical experience in humans. Finally, a brief discussion on treatment of radiation-induced nervous system tumors is presented

  8. Systemic sclerosis complicated with localized scleroderma-like lesions induced by Köbner phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigusa, Ryosuke; Asano, Yoshihide; Yamashita, Takashi; Takahashi, Takehiro; Nakamura, Kouki; Miura, Shunsuke; Ichimura, Yohei; Toyama, Tetsuo; Taniguchi, Takashi; Sumida, Hayakazu; Tamaki, Zenshiro; Miyazaki, Miki; Yoshizaki, Ayumi; Sato, Shinichi

    2018-03-01

    Scleroderma is a chronic disease of unknown etiology characterized by skin fibrosis and is divided into two clinical entities: systemic sclerosis (SSc) and localized scleroderma (LSc). In general, LSc is rarely complicated with SSc, but a certain portion of SSc patients manifests bilateral symmetric LSc-like lesions on the trunk and extremities. We investigated SSc patients with LSc-like lesions to clarify the underlying pathophysiology. Nine SSc cases complicated with LSc-like lesions were clinically and histologically characterized. SSc patients with LSc-like lesions exhibited multiple progressive hyper- and/or hypo-pigmented plaques with mild sclerosis symmetrically distributed on the trunk and extremities, especially abdominal region. In histological assessment, epidermal IL-1α expression was elevated in both forearms and LSc-like lesions of these patients to a greater extent than in forearms of control patients (SSc patients without LSc-like lesions). Of note, the infiltration and degranulation of mast cells were evident throughout the dermis of LSc-like lesions, while detectable to a lesser extent in forearms of SSc patients with LSc-like lesions and control patients. The epidermis of SSc patients with LSc-like lesions seems to possess an inflammatory phenotype, leading to the activation of mast cells in the dermis of mechanically stressed skin. Köbner phenomenon may be involved in the induction of LSc-like lesions in a certain subset of SSc. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 escorts XPC to UV-induced DNA lesions during nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robu, Mihaela; Shah, Rashmi G; Purohit, Nupur K; Zhou, Pengbo; Naegeli, Hanspeter; Shah, Girish M

    2017-08-15

    Xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) protein initiates the global genomic subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER) for removal of UV-induced direct photolesions from genomic DNA. The XPC has an inherent capacity to identify and stabilize at the DNA lesion sites, and this function is facilitated in the genomic context by UV-damaged DNA-binding protein 2 (DDB2), which is part of a multiprotein UV-DDB ubiquitin ligase complex. The nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) has been shown to facilitate the lesion recognition step of GG-NER via its interaction with DDB2 at the lesion site. Here, we show that PARP1 plays an additional DDB2-independent direct role in recruitment and stabilization of XPC at the UV-induced DNA lesions to promote GG-NER. It forms a stable complex with XPC in the nucleoplasm under steady-state conditions before irradiation and rapidly escorts it to the damaged DNA after UV irradiation in a DDB2-independent manner. The catalytic activity of PARP1 is not required for the initial complex formation with XPC in the nucleoplasm but it enhances the recruitment of XPC to the DNA lesion site after irradiation. Using purified proteins, we also show that the PARP1-XPC complex facilitates the handover of XPC to the UV-lesion site in the presence of the UV-DDB ligase complex. Thus, the lesion search function of XPC in the genomic context is controlled by XPC itself, DDB2, and PARP1. Our results reveal a paradigm that the known interaction of many proteins with PARP1 under steady-state conditions could have functional significance for these proteins.

  10. Radiation-Induced Differentiation in Human Lung Fibroblast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sa-Rah; Ahn, Ji-Yeon; Han, Young-Soo; Shim, Jie-Young; Yun, Yeon-Sook; Song, Jie-Young

    2007-01-01

    One of the most common tumors in many countries is lung cancer and patients with lung cancer may take radiotherapy. Although radiotherapy may have its own advantages, it can also induce serious problems such as acute radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by excessive production of α-SMA and accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) such as collagen and fibronectin. There has been a great amount of research about fibrosis but the exact mechanism causing the reaction is not elucidated especially in radiation-induced fibrosis. Until now it has been known that several factors such as transforming growth factor (TGF-β), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) are related to fibrosis. Among them TGF-β with Smad signaling is known to be the main stream and other signaling molecules such as MAPK, ERK and JNK (3) also participates in the process. In addition to those above factors, it is thought that more diverse and complicate mechanisms may involve in the radiationinduced fibrosis. Therefore, to investigate the underlying mechanisms in radiation induced fibrosis, first of all, we confirmed whether radiation induces trans differentiation in human normal lung fibroblasts. Here, we suggest that not only TGF-β but also radiation can induce trans differentiation in human lung fibroblast WI-38 and IMR-90

  11. Contribution to the pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury to large arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidar, Nina; Ferluga, Dusan; Hvala, Asta; Popovic, Mara; Soba, Erika

    1997-01-01

    We report a case of a 35-year-old man who died of a brain infarct 20 months after radiotherapy for carcinoma of the tonsil with metastases to the cervical lymph nodes. Histology revealed mild atherosclerosis, necrotizing vasculitis, and occlusive thrombosis of the internal carotid artery. Significant changes were observed in the vasa vasorum; swelling and detachment of the endothelium, subendothelial oedema, hyaline change, fibrinoid necrosis of the vessel walls with mononuclear cellular infiltration, accompanied by focal haemorrhages and chronic inflammation in the periadventitial soft tissue. We believe that these changes of the vasa vasorum and necrotizing vasculitis are causally related and that vasculitis represents focal ischaemic necroses with inflammatory reaction. Our findings support the hypothesis, based on experimental studies, that injury to the vasa vasorum is an important mechanism in the development of radiation-induced vasculopathy of large arteries. They also suggest an evolution of the injury to the vasa vasorum and periadventitial tissue from the early lesions described in our patient, to late stages resulting in dense periadventitial fibrosis as reported previously. We suggest that injury to the vasa vasorum and the consequent ischaemic lesions of the arterial wall are morphological features distinguishing radiation-induced arterial injury from spontaneous atherosclerosis. (author)

  12. Action spectrum and mechanisms of UV radiation-induced injury in lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochevar, I.E.

    1985-01-01

    Photosensitivity associated with lupus erythematosus (LE) is well established. The photobiologic basis for this abnormal response to ultraviolet radiation, however, has not been determined. This paper summarizes the criteria for elucidating possible photobiologic mechanisms and reviews the literature relevant to the mechanism of photosensitivity in LE. In patients with LE, photosensitivity to wavelengths shorter than 320 nm has been demonstrated; wavelengths longer than 320 nm have not been adequately evaluated. DNA is a possible chromophore for photosensitivity below 320 nm. UV irradiation of skin produces thymine photodimers in DNA. UV-irradiated DNA is more antigenic than native DNA and the antigenicity of UV-irradiated DNA has been proposed, but not proven, to be involved in the development of clinical lesions. UV irradiation of mice previously injected with anti-UV-DNA antibodies produces Ig deposition and complement fixation that appears to be similar to the changes seen in lupus lesions. Antibodies to UV-irradiated DNA occur in the serum of LE patients although a correlation between antibody titers and photosensitivity was not observed. Defective repair of UV-induced DNA damage does not appear to be a mechanism for the photosensitivity in LE. Other mechanisms must also be considered. The chromophore for photosensitivity induced by wavelengths longer than 320 nm has not been investigated in vivo. In vitro studies indicate that 360-400 nm radiation activates a photosensitizing compound in the lymphocytes and serum of LE patients and causes chromosomal aberrations and cell death. The mechanism appears to involve superoxide anion

  13. Surgical techniques in radiation induced temporal lobe necrosis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfotih, Gobran Taha Ahmed; Zheng, Mei Guang; Cai, Wang Qing; Xu, Xin Ke; Hu, Zhen; Li, Fang Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Radiation induced brain injury ranges from acute reversible edema to late, irreversible radiation necrosis. Radiation induced temporal lobe necrosis is associated with permanent neurological deficits and occasionally progresses to death. We present our experience with surgery on radiation induced temporal lobe necrosis (RTLN) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with special consideration of clinical presentation, surgical technique, and outcomes. This retrospective study includes 12 patients with RTLN treated by the senior author between January 2010 and December 2014. Patients initially sought medical treatment due to headache; other symptoms were hearing loss, visual deterioration, seizure, hemiparesis, vertigo, memory loss and agnosia. A temporal approach through a linear incision was performed for all cases. RTLN was found in one side in 7 patients, and bilaterally in 5. 4 patients underwent resection of necrotic tissue bilaterally and 8 patients on one side. No death occurred in this series of cases. There were no post-operative complications, except 1 patient who developed aseptic meningitis. All 12 patients were free from headache. No seizure occurred in patients with preoperative epilepsy. Other symptoms such as hemiparesis and vertigo improved in all patients. Memory loss, agnosia and hearing loss did not change post-operatively in all cases. The follow-up MR images demonstrated no recurrence of necrotic lesions in all 12 patients. Neurosurgical intervention through a temporal approach with linear incision is warranted in patients with radiation induced temporal lobe necrosis with significant symptoms and signs of increased intracranial pressure, minimum space occupying effect on imaging, or neurological deterioration despite conservative management. Copyright © 2016 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  14. Topical efficacy of dimercapto-chelating agents against lewisite-induced skin lesions in SKH-1 hairless mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouret, Stéphane, E-mail: stephane.mouret@irba.fr [Département de Toxicologie et Risques Chimiques, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, Centre de Recherches du Service de Santé des Armées, 24 avenue Maquis du Grésivaudan, 38700 La Tronche (France); Wartelle, Julien; Emorine, Sandy; Bertoni, Marine; Nguon, Nina; Cléry-Barraud, Cécile [Département de Toxicologie et Risques Chimiques, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, Centre de Recherches du Service de Santé des Armées, 24 avenue Maquis du Grésivaudan, 38700 La Tronche (France); Dorandeu, Frédéric [Département de Toxicologie et Risques Chimiques, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, Centre de Recherches du Service de Santé des Armées, 24 avenue Maquis du Grésivaudan, 38700 La Tronche (France); Ecole du Val-de-Grâce, 1 place Alphonse Laveran, Paris (France); Boudry, Isabelle [Département de Toxicologie et Risques Chimiques, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, Centre de Recherches du Service de Santé des Armées, 24 avenue Maquis du Grésivaudan, 38700 La Tronche (France)

    2013-10-15

    Lewisite is a potent chemical warfare arsenical vesicant that can cause severe skin lesions. Today, lewisite exposure remains possible during demilitarization of old ammunitions and as a result of deliberate use. Although its cutaneous toxicity is not fully elucidated, a specific antidote exists, the British anti-lewisite (BAL, dimercaprol) but it is not without untoward effects. Analogs of BAL, less toxic, have been developed such as meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and have been employed for the treatment of heavy metal poisoning. However, efficacy of DMSA against lewisite-induced skin lesions remains to be determined in comparison with BAL. We have thus evaluated in this study the therapeutic efficacy of BAL and DMSA in two administration modes against skin lesions induced by lewisite vapor on SKH-1 hairless mice. Our data demonstrate a strong protective efficacy of topical application of dimercapto-chelating agents in contrast to a subcutaneous administration 1 h after lewisite exposure, with attenuation of wound size, necrosis and impairment of skin barrier function. The histological evaluation also confirms the efficacy of topical application by showing that treatments were effective in reversing lewisite-induced neutrophil infiltration. This protective effect was associated with an epidermal hyperplasia. However, for all the parameters studied, BAL was more effective than DMSA in reducing lewisite-induced skin injury. Together, these findings support the use of a topical form of dimercaprol-chelating agent against lewisite-induced skin lesion within the first hour after exposure to increase the therapeutic management and that BAL, despite its side-effects, should not be abandoned. - Highlights: • Topically applied dimercapto-chelating agents reduce lewisite-induced skin damage. • One topical application of BAL or DMSA is sufficient to reverse lewisite effects. • Topical BAL is more effective than DMSA to counteract lewisite-induced skin damage.

  15. Compound Poisson Processes and Clustered Damage of Radiation Induced DNA Double Strand Breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudowska-Nowak, E.; Ritter, S.; Taucher-Scholz, G.; Kraft, G.

    2000-01-01

    Recent experimental data have demonstrated that DNA damage induced by densely ionizing radiation in mammalian cells is distributed along the DNA molecule in the form of clusters. The principal constituent of DNA damage are double-strand breaks (DSB) which are formed when the breaks occur in both DNA strands and are directly opposite or separated by only a few base pairs. DSBs are believed to be most important lesions produced in chromosomes by radiation; interaction between DSBs can lead to cell killing, mutation or carcinogenesis. The paper discusses a model of clustered DSB formation viewed in terms of compound Poisson process along with the predictive essay of the formalism in application to experimental data. (author)

  16. Transvaginal coloanal anastomosis after rectal resection for the treatment of a rectovaginal fistula induced by radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezean, I

    2014-01-01

    Although decreasing in number, radiation induced rectovaginal fistulas are caused by some radiation injuries and chronic ischemic lesions. Most of the experienced authors recommend anterior rectal resection with coloanal anastomosis accessed through the abdominal-perineum area for high fistula. We present a patient with a fistula that developed 23 years after hysterectomy and radiotherapy. In this case we performed an abdominal-transvaginal rectal resection with transverse coloplastypouch, coloanal anastomosis and protection ileostomy three months after a terminal sigmoidostomy. The dissection of the distal rectum by posteriour colpotomy and coloanal transvaginalan astomosis is a technical variant that may prove advantage ous compared to the procedures featured in the literature as solutions by rectal resection for rectovaginal fistula. Celsius.

  17. Characterization of radiation-induced emesis in the ferret

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, G.L.

    1988-01-01

    Forty-eight ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) were individually head-shielded and radiated with bilateral 60 Co gamma radiation at 100 cGy min-1 at doses ranging between 49 and 601 cGy. The emetic threshold was observed at 69 cGy, the ED50 was calculated at 77 cGy, and 100% incidence of emesis occurred at 201 cGy. With increasing doses of radiation, the latency to first emesis after radiation decreased dramatically, whereas the duration of the prodromal period increased. Two other sets of experiments suggest that dopaminergic mechanisms play a minor role in radiation-induced emesis in the ferret. Twenty-two animals were injected either intravenously or subcutaneously with 30 to 300 micrograms/kg of apomorphine. Fewer than 50% of the animals vomited to 300 micrograms/kg apomorphine; central dopaminergic receptor activation was apparent at all doses. Another eight animals received 1 mg/kg domperidone prior to either 201 (n = 4) or 401 (n = 4) cGy radiation and their emetic responses were compared with NaCl-injected-irradiated controls (n = 8). At 201 cGy, domperidone significantly reduced only the total time in emetic behavior. At 401 cGy, domperidone had no salutary effect on radiation-induced emesis. The emetic responses of the ferret to radiation and apomorphine are compared with these responses in other vomiting species

  18. Ubiquitin-dependent system controls radiation induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delic, J.; Magdelenat, H.; Glaisner, S.; Magdelenat, H.; Maciorowski, Z.

    1997-01-01

    The selective proteolytic pathway, dependent upon 'N-end rule' protein recognition/ubiquitination and on the subsequent proteasome dependent processing of ubiquitin conjugates, operates in apoptosis induced by γ-irradiation. The proteasome inhibitor peptide aldehyde, MG132, efficiently induced apoptosis and was also able (at doses lower than those required for apoptosis induction) to potentiate apoptosis induced by DNA damage. Its specificity is suggested by the induction of the ubiquitin (UbB and UbC) and E1 (ubiquitin activating enzyme) genes and by an altered ubiquitination pattern. More selectively, a di-peptide competitor of the 'N-end rule' of ubiquitin dependent protein processing inhibited radiation induced apoptosis. This inhibition is also followed by an altered ubiquitination pattern and by activation of Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). These data strongly suggest that early apoptosis radiation induced events are controlled by ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic processing. (author)

  19. Differential effects of unilateral lesions in the medial amygdala on spontaneous and induced ovulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, M A; Dominguez, R

    1995-01-01

    The possible existence of asymmetry in the control of ovulation by the medial amygdala was explored. Unilateral lesions of the medial amygdala were performed on each day of the estrous cycle. The estral index diminished in almost all animals with a lesion in the right side of medial amygdala. Lesions of the right medial amygdala, when performed on diestrus-1, resulted in a significant decrease in the number of rats ovulating compared to controls (4/8 vs. 8/8, p rats with lesions of the right medial amygdala. However, sequential injections of PMSG-hCG did result in ovulation by all members of a group of lesioned animals. In this last condition a significant decrease in the number of ova shed by the right ovary was found compared to animals in the lesion-only condition (1.5 +/- 0.5 vs. 6.0 +/- 1.5, p cycle.

  20. Radiation-induced circumscribed superficial morphea after brachytherapy for endometrial adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apoorva Trivedi, BS

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced morphea (RIM is a rare and underrecognized complication of radiation therapy that most commonly occurs in women after treatment for breast cancer. Although not fully understood, RIM is hypothesized to arise from an increase in cytokines that stimulate collagen production and extracellular matrix formation. Most documented cases of RIM occur 1 year after radiation therapy and are localized to areas that were treated for breast cancer. We report on a case of a female patient with stage IB endometrial adenocarcinoma who was treated with 24 Gray of adjuvant brachytherapy. The patient developed a diffuse morpheaform, pruritic eruption only at distant sites from the brachytherapy treatment field. Although treatment for RIM is generally unsatisfactory, our patient experienced improvement in the pruritus and a regression of the lesions while applying topical 0.1% tacrolimus ointment and 0.1% triamcinolone creme. An early diagnosis of RIM can prevent extensive workup, guide treatment, and improve quality of life for patients. Keywords: radiation-induced morphea, postirradiation morphea

  1. Modulation of radiation induced DNA damage by natural products in hemopoietic tissue of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, S.; Bhilwade, H.N.; Chaubey, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is known to induce oxidative stress through generation of ROS leading to a variety of DNA lesions. However, the most dangerous DNA lesions which are responsible for the origin of lethal effects, mutagenesis, genomic instability and carcinogenesis are the DSBs. During recent years efforts are being made to identify phytochemicals, antioxidants or neutraxeuticals which can reduce harmful effect of radiation during accidental exposure or prevent normal tissue injury during radiotherapy. In the present study, we have investigated the radioprotective role of curcumin, a dietary antioxidant, taurine, malabaricone-C, and umbelliferone, for their radioprotective properties in hemopoietic cells of mice. Groups of mice-were fed 1% of curcumin in diet for three weeks. Similarly other groups of mice were injected i.p. with 50 mg/kg body weight of taurine for five consecutive days. After the completion of the treatment mice pre-treated with curcumin and taurine were exposed to 3 Gy of gamma rays. Malabaricone-C was tested for its radiomodulation potential in vitro, in spleenocytes of mouse. Spleenocytes were isolated and treated with different concentrations (0.5-25 ìM) of malabaricone-C. Immediately after irradiation, alkaline comet assay were performed using standard procedures. Twenty four post radiation exposure mice were sacrificed for micronucleus test. Results of these studies showed significant reduction in DNA damage by curcumin. The micronucleus data showed marginal increase in the frequency of micronucleated erythrocytes in curcumin fed group as compared to the controls. Mice receiving curcumin for 3 weeks in diet followed by gamma radiation (3 Gy), showed approximately 50% reduction in the frequency of micro nucleated polychromatic erythrocytes. Pre-treatment of mice with taurine significantly (p < 0.01) reduced the frequency of gamma rays induced mn-PCEs in bone marrow tissue. Malabaricone-C at 1.5 ìM concentration showed very good protection

  2. Virtual lesions of the inferior parietal cortex induce fast changes of implicit religiousness/spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescentini, Cristiano; Aglioti, Salvatore M; Fabbro, Franco; Urgesi, Cosimo

    2014-05-01

    Religiousness and spirituality (RS) are two ubiquitous aspects of human experience typically considered impervious to scientific investigation. Nevertheless, associations between RS and frontoparietal neural activity have been recently reported. However, much less is known about whether such activity is causally involved in modulating RS or just epiphenomenal to them. Here we combined two-pulse (10 Hz) Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) with a novel, ad-hoc developed RS-related, Implicit Association Test (IAT) to investigate whether implicit RS representations, although supposedly rather stable, can be rapidly modified by a virtual lesion of inferior parietal lobe (IPL) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). A self-esteem (SE) IAT, focused on self-concepts nonrelated to RS representations, was developed as control. A specific increase of RS followed inhibition of IPL demonstrating its causative role in inducing fast plastic changes of religiousness/spirituality. In contrast, DLPFC inhibition had more widespread effects probably reflecting a general role in the acquisition or maintenance of task-rules or in controlling the expression of self-related representations not specific to RS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Laser-induced fluorescence studies of premalignant and benign lesions in the female genital tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    af Klinteberg, Claes; Wang, Ingrid; Lindquist, Charlotta; Vaitkuviene, Aurelija; Svanberg, Katarina

    1997-12-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) was studied in vivo from premalignant and benign lesions in the female genital tract, in particular the cervix. The aim of the study was to investigate the possibilities to differentiate cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) from normal tissue by means of two different fluorescence modalities. Most of the patients were given a low dose (5 mg/kg bw) of (delta) -amino levulinic acid (ALA). The ALA was orally administered 2 - 4 hours prior to the investigation. During this time, the ALA is transformed to the strongly fluorescent protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) via the haem cycle. Excitation light with a wavelength of 405 nm was used to excite the PpIX fluorescence. Excess amounts of PpIX were accumulated preferentially in diseased tissue. However, the variability in the PpIX accumulation from patient to patient was large. By using excitation light at 337 nm, the endogenous fluorophores are more efficiently excited. Therefore, this excitation modality was exploited for studying spectral characteristics of the autofluorescence in different tissue types. The spectra obtained were evaluated by forming fluorescence intensity ratios. The tissue types were grouped according to the histopathological examination. A correlation with the fluorescence ratios was performed. Some problems with the classification remain, mostly due to the difficulties in obtaining histopathologic evaluation of the biopsies at the exact location of the LIF measurements.

  4. Learning tasks as a possible treatment for DNA lesions induced by oxidative stress in hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DragoCrneci; Radu Silaghi-Dumitrescu

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been implicated in conditions ranging from cardiovascular dysfunc-tion, arthritis, cancer, to aging and age-related disorders. The organism developed several path-ways to counteract these effects, with base excision repair being responsible for repairing one of the major base lesions (8-oxoG) in al organisms. Epidemiological evidence suggests that cognitive stimulation makes the brain more resilient to damage or degeneration. Recent studies have linked enriched environment to reduction of oxidative stressin neurons of mice with Alzheimer’s dis-ease-like disease, but given its complexity it is not clear what specific aspect of enriched environ-ment has therapeutic effects. Studies from molecular biology have shown that the protein p300, which is a transcription co-activator required for consolidation of memories during specific learning tasks, is at the same time involved in DNA replication and repair, playing a central role in the long-patch pathway of base excision repair. Based on the evidence, we propose that learning tasks such as novel object recognition could be tested as possible methods of base excision repair faci-litation, hence inducing DNA repair in the hippocampal neurons. If this method proves to be effective, it could be the start for designing similar tasks for humans, as a behavioral therapeutic complement to the classical drug-based therapy in treating neurodegenerative disorders. This review presents the current status of therapeutic methods used in treating neurodegenerative diseases induced by reactive oxygen species and proposes a new approach based on existing data.

  5. Radiation-induced transformations of cellulose ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nud'ga, L.A.; Petropavlovskii, G.S.; Plisko, E.A.; Isakova, O.V.; Ershov, B.G.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the transformation which take place under the action of γ-radiation in a number of cellulose ethers containing both saturated (carboxymethyl, hydroxyethyl) and unsaturated (allyl, methacryloyl) groups. Irradiation was carried out on a 60 Co unit in air at 77 and 300 K; the dose rate was 37 and 50 kGy/h respectively. The EPR spectra of γ-irradiated hydroxyethyl- and allylhydroxyethylcelluloses are identical. Under the action of γ-radiation extensive changes took place in cellulose ethers which are exhibited in degradation or the formation of three-dimensional structures and are accompanied by a change in the functional composition. The efficiency in the formation of radicals and their localization are determined by the nature and number of substituents in the cellulose ethers

  6. Simulation of radiation-induced defects

    CERN Document Server

    Peltola, Timo

    2015-09-14

    Mainly due to their outstanding performance the position sensitive silicon detectors are widely used in the tracking systems of High Energy Physics experiments such as the ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb at LHC, the world's largest particle physics accelerator at CERN, Geneva. The foreseen upgrade of the LHC to its high luminosity (HL) phase (HL-LHC scheduled for 2023), will enable the use of maximal physics potential of the facility. After 10 years of operation the expected fluence will expose the tracking systems at HL-LHC to a radiation environment that is beyond the capacity of the present system design. Thus, for the required upgrade of the all-silicon central trackers extensive measurements and simulation studies for silicon sensors of different designs and materials with sufficient radiation tolerance have been initiated within the RD50 Collaboration. Supplementing measurements, simulations are in vital role for e.g. device structure optimization or predicting the electric fields and trapping in the silicon...

  7. Chromosomal instability induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.F.; Marder, B.A.; Day, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence indicating genomic instability can manifest multiple generations after cellular exposure to DNA damaging agents. For instance, some cells surviving exposure to ionizing radiations show delayed reproductive cell death, delayed mutation and / or delayed chromosomal instability. Such instability, especially chromosome destabilization has been implicated in mutation, gene amplification, cellular transformation, and cell killing. To investigate chromosomal instability following DNA damage, we have used fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect chromosomal rearrangements in a human/hamster somatic hybrid cell line following exposure to ionizing radiation. Delayed chromosomal instability was detected when multiple populations of uniquely arranged metaphases were observed in clonal isolates raised from single cells. The relationship between delayed chromosomal destabilization and other endpoints of genomic instability, namely; delayed mutation and gene amplification will be discussed, as will the potential cytogenetic and molecular mechanisms contributing to delayed chromosomal instability

  8. Radiation induced growth of micro crystallites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisel, D.

    1991-01-01

    Generation of colloidal particles during the radiolysis of aqueous solutions was already observed in the early days of radiation chemistry. Systematic studies using radiation chemistry techniques as synthetic tools in the preparation of colloidal particles, primarily metallic particles, were begun approximately a decade ago in conjunction since they were found to catalyze multi-electron redox processes. A large number of metallic colloidal particles were then synthesized, including silver, gold, platinum, iridium, nickel, cadmium, and others. More recently, attention has turned to semiconductor colloidal particles. The stimulus to these studies is the observation of quantum size effects in small semiconductor particles that exhibit hybrid properties between those of the molecular species and the solid state bulk material. In the following we discuss our own observations on the evolution of semiconductor particles whose growth has been initiated by pulse radiolysis. 13 refs., 2 figs

  9. Laser radiation effect on radiation-induced defects in heavy ion tracks in dielectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, A.N.; Zhiryakov, B.M.; Kushin, V.V.; Lyapidevskij, V.K.; Khokhlov, N.B.

    1988-01-01

    Possibility of laser radiation resonance effect on radiation-induced defects in heavy ion tracks in dielectric materials is investigated. Absorption spectra in infrared, visible and ultraviolet ranges for cellulose nitrate samples irradiated by 6 MeV/nucleon 58 Ni ions and reactor gamma radiation are measured. Absorption spectra for irradiated and reference samples are presented. Two absorption bands λ 1 =0.33 μm (E 1 =3.9 eV) and λ 2 =0.72 μm (E 2 =1.7 eV) are detected. Etching rate decrease in a track under laser radiation effect is noticed. 3 refs.; 1 fig

  10. Treatment of Radiation Induced Biological Changes by Bone Marrow Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Missiry, M.A.; Shehata, G.; Roushdy, H.M; Fayed, Th.A.

    1999-01-01

    Preventing the propagation of radiation induced oxidative damage has been a subject of considerable investigations. The ultimate goal of the present study is to use bone marrow cells to ameliorate or to treat the radiation sickness. Transplantation of bone marrow cell has shown promising results in the present experimental radiation treatment. In this report, suspension of bone marrow cells was injected into rats 12 h. after exposure to 4.5 Gy whole body gamma irradiation. Significant results were recorded on the successful control of the radiation induced disorders in a number of biochemical parameters including certain enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase and glutathione) and certain parameters related to kidney function including creatinine, urea as well as Atpase Activity in blood serum, urine and kidney tissue

  11. Radiation-induced spindle cell sarcoma: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Mubeen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation has been known to induce malignant transformation in human beings. Radiation-induced sarcomas are a late sequel of radiation therapy. Most sarcomas have been reported to occur after exposure to a radiation dose of 55 Gray (Gy and above, with a dose ranging from 16 to 112 Gys. Spindle cell sarcomas, arising after radiotherapy given to treat the carcinoma of head and neck region is a very uncommon sequel. This is a rare case report of spindle cell sarcoma of left maxilla, in a 24-year-old male, occurring as a late complication of radiotherapy with Cobalt-60 given for the treatment of retinoblastoma of the left eye 21 years back.

  12. Radiation induced DNA damage and repair in mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strniste, G.F.; Chen, D.J.; Okinaka, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    The central theme in cellular radiobiological research has been the mechanisms of radiation action and the physiological response of cells to this action. Considerable effort has been directed toward the characterization of radiation-induced DNA damage and the correlation of this damage to cellular genetic change that is expressed as mutation or initiating events leading to cellular transformation and ultimately carcinogenesis. In addition, there has been a significant advancement in their understanding of the role of DNA repair in the process of mutation leading to genetic change in cells. There is extensive literature concerning studies that address radiation action in both procaryotic and eucaryotic systems. This brief report will make no attempt to summarize this voluminous data but will focus on recent results from their laboratory of experiments in which they have examined, at both the cellular and molecular levels, the process of ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis in cultured human cells

  13. Relationship between radiation induced activation of DNA repair genes and radiation induced apoptosis in human cell line A431

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bom, Hee Seung; Min, Jung Jun; Kim, Kyung Keun; Choi, Keun Hee

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between radiation-induced acivation of DNA repair genes and radiation induced apoptosis in A431 cell line. Five and 25 Gys of gamma radiation were given to A431 cells by a Cs-137 cell irradiator. Apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry using annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate and propidium iodide staining. The expression of DNA repair genes was evaluated by both Northern and Western blot analyses. The number of apoptotic cells increased with the increased radiation dose. It increased most significantly at 12 hours after irradiation. Expression of p53, p21, and ℎRAD50 reached the highest level at 12 hours after 5 Gy irradiation. In response to 25 Gy irradiation, ℎRAD50 and p21 were expressed maximally at 12 hours, but p53 and GADD45 genes showed the highest expression level after 12 hours. Induction of apoptosis and DNA repair by ionizing radiation were closely correlated. The peak time of inducing apoptosis and DNA repair was 12 hours in this study model. ℎRAD50, a recently discovered DNA repair gene, was also associated with radiation-induced apoptosis.=20

  14. Control of radiation-induced diarrhea with cholestyramine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heusinkveld, R.S.; Manning, M.R.; Aristizabal, S.A.

    1978-01-01

    Cholestyramine is a non-absorbable ion-exchange resin which specifically binds bile salts. We have treated seven patients with acute or chronic radiation-induced diarrhea that was refractory to the usual methods of control with cholestyramine. In each case, the diarrhea was controlled with cholestyramine. This observation supports previous experimental work with animals which indicated that bile salts contribute to the genesis of radiation-induced diarrhea. Cholestyramine is well-tolerated, but should not be administered with certain oral medications. The results of this small series are preliminary, but point the way toward a more extensive clinical trial to define the usefulness of cholestyramine in the treatment of refractory acute or chronic radiation-induced diarrhea

  15. Radiation-induced Pulmonary Damage in Lung Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Su Mi; Choi, Ihl Bohng; Kang, Mi Mun; Kim, In Ah; Shinn, Kyung Sub

    1993-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective analysis was performed to evaluate the incidence of radiation induced lung damage after the radiation therapy for the patients with carcinoma of the lung. Method and Materials: Sixty-six patients with lung cancer (squamous cell carcinoma 27, adenocarcinoma 14, large cell carcinoma 2, small cell carcinoma 13, unknown 10) were treated with definitive, postoperative or palliative radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy between July 1987 and December 1991. There were 50 males and 16 females with median age of 63 years(range: 33-80 years). Total lung doses ranged from 500 to 6,660 cGy (median 3960 cGy) given in 2 to 38 fractions (median 20) over a range of 2 to 150 days (median 40 days) using 6 MV or 15 MV linear accelerator. To represent different fractionation schedules of equivalent biological effect, the estimated single dose(ED) model, ED=D·N-0.377·T-0.058 was used in which D was the lung dose in cGy, N was the number of fractions, and T was the overall treatment time in days. The range of ED was 370 to 1357. The endpoint was a visible increase in lung density within the irradiated volume on chest X-ray as observed independently by three diagnostic radiologists. Patients were grouped according to ED, treatment duration, treatment modality and age, and the percent incidence of pulmonary damage for each group was determined. Result: In 40 of 66 patients, radiation induced change was seen on chest radiographs between 11 days and 314 days after initiation of radiation therapy. The incidence of radiation pneumonitis was increased according to increased ED, which was statistically significant (p=0.001). Roentgenographic charges consistent with radiation pneumonitis were seen in 100% of patients receiving radiotherapy after lobectomy or pneumonectomy, which was not statistically significant. In 32 patients who also received chemotherapy, there was no difference in the incidence of radiation induced charge between the group with radiation

  16. Radiation Therapy Induces Macrophages to Suppress T-Cell Responses Against Pancreatic Tumors in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Giao Ly, Nancy Ngoc; Nguy, Susanna; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Tippens, Daniel; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R; Hajdu, Cristina; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Oh, Philmo; Du, Kevin; Miller, George

    2016-06-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is controversial. Randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced unresectable PDA have reported mixed results, with effects ranging from modest benefit to worse outcomes compared with control therapies. We investigated whether radiation causes inflammatory cells to acquire an immune-suppressive phenotype that limits the therapeutic effects of radiation on invasive PDAs and accelerates progression of preinvasive foci. We investigated the effects of radiation therapy in p48(Cre);LSL-Kras(G12D) (KC) and p48(Cre);LSLKras(G12D);LSL-Trp53(R172H) (KPC) mice, as well as in C57BL/6 mice with orthotopic tumors grown from FC1242 cells derived from KPC mice. Some mice were given neutralizing antibodies against macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 or MCSF) or F4/80. Pancreata were exposed to doses of radiation ranging from 2 to 12 Gy and analyzed by flow cytometry. Pancreata of KC mice exposed to radiation had a higher frequency of advanced pancreatic intraepithelial lesions and more foci of invasive cancer than pancreata of unexposed mice (controls); radiation reduced survival time by more than 6 months. A greater proportion of macrophages from radiation treated invasive and preinvasive pancreatic tumors had an immune-suppressive, M2-like phenotype compared with control mice. Pancreata from mice exposed to radiation had fewer CD8(+) T cells than controls, and greater numbers of CD4(+) T cells of T-helper 2 and T-regulatory cell phenotypes. Adoptive transfer of T cells from irradiated PDA to tumors of control mice accelerated tumor growth. Radiation induced production of MCSF by PDA cells. A neutralizing antibody against MCSF prevented radiation from altering the phenotype of macrophages in tumors, increasing the anti-tumor T-cell response and slowing tumor growth. Radiation treatment causes macrophages

  17. Radiation induced desynaptic mutants in barley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, H.M.

    1974-01-01

    Spontaneous occurrence of asynapsis and desynapsis has been frequently reported in a number of crop plants (Beadle 1930, 1933; Beasley and Brown 1942; Li et al. 1945; Magoon et al. 1961; Miller 1963) and other angiospermic texa (Calarier 1955; Chennaveraiah and Krisnappa 1968; Ehrenberg 1949; Johnson 1941, 1944; Roy and Jha 1958). However, there are only a few reports of induced asynapsis or desynapsis (Gottschalk and Baquar 1971; Martini and Bozzini 1966). The present paper deals with the morphology and meiotic behavior of gamma-ray induced barley mutants showing high degree of desynapsis resulting in partial to complete sterility. (author)

  18. Protection against radiation-induced performance decrement in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, S.K.; Pant, Kanchan; Goel, H.C.; Jain, Viney

    1997-01-01

    Recognizing that there is lack of information on the effects of low-level ionizing radiations and the modifying role of radioprotectors, an attempt has been made in this study to explore the relationship between impairment of spatial learning and low level of radiation exposure. A radial arm maze was utilised to evaluate radiation-induced behavioural alterations and performance decrement in mice. Immediately after whole body exposure to gamma radiation (absorbed dose, 1 Gy) significant perturbations in the learned behaviour of the animals were observed. The regular control movement became irregular and the food consumption time was reduced appreciably (40%). Recovery took place in four days. If diltiazem (7 mg/kg b.w.), a Ca 2+ channel blocker and a radioprotector, was administered i.p. 20-30 min prior to irradiation, radiation-induced behavioural abnormalities were reduced. Mechanisms underlying protection by diltiazem against radiation-induced performance decrement observed in the present study need to be investigated. (author). 23 refs., 2 figs

  19. Inhibition of radiation-induced polyuria by histamine receptor antagonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donlon, M.A.; Melia, J.A.; Helgeson, E.A.; Wolfe, W.W.

    1986-03-01

    In previous studies the authors have demonstrated that gamma radiation results in polyuria, which is preceded by polydypsia. This suggests that the increased thirst elicited by radiation causes increased urinary volume (UV). Histamine, which is released following radiation exposure, also elicits drinking by nonirradiated rats when administered exogenously. In this study the authors have investigated both the role of water deprivation and the effect of histamine receptor antagonists (HRA) on radiation-induced polyuria. Sprague-Dawley rats were housed individually in metabolic cages. Water was allowed ad libitum except in deprivation experiments where water was removed for 24 hr immediately following radiation. Cimetidine (CIM), an H2 HRA, and dexbromopheniramine (DXB), an H1 HRA, were administered i.p. (16 and 1 mg/kg, respectively) 30 min prior to irradiation (950 rads from a cobalt source). UV was determined at 24-hr intervals for 3 days preceding irradiation and 24 hr postirradiation. UV in DXB treated rats was significantly reduced 24 hr postirradiation (CON = 427 +/- 54%; DXB = 247 +/- 39% of preirradiated CON) compared to postirradiation control values. CIM did not affect postirradiation UV. These data suggest that radiation-induced polyuria is caused by polydypsia which is, in part, mediated by histamine induced by an H1 receptor.

  20. Inhibition of radiation-induced polyuria by histamine receptor antagonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donlon, M.A.; Melia, J.A.; Helgeson, E.A.; Wolfe, W.W.

    1986-01-01

    In previous studies the authors have demonstrated that gamma radiation results in polyuria, which is preceded by polydypsia. This suggests that the increased thirst elicited by radiation causes increased urinary volume (UV). Histamine, which is released following radiation exposure, also elicits drinking by nonirradiated rats when administered exogenously. In this study the authors have investigated both the role of water deprivation and the effect of histamine receptor antagonists (HRA) on radiation-induced polyuria. Sprague-Dawley rats were housed individually in metabolic cages. Water was allowed ad libitum except in deprivation experiments where water was removed for 24 hr immediately following radiation. Cimetidine (CIM), an H2 HRA, and dexbromopheniramine (DXB), an H1 HRA, were administered i.p. (16 and 1 mg/kg, respectively) 30 min prior to irradiation (950 rads from a cobalt source). UV was determined at 24-hr intervals for 3 days preceding irradiation and 24 hr postirradiation. UV in DXB treated rats was significantly reduced 24 hr postirradiation (CON = 427 +/- 54%; DXB = 247 +/- 39% of preirradiated CON) compared to postirradiation control values. CIM did not affect postirradiation UV. These data suggest that radiation-induced polyuria is caused by polydypsia which is, in part, mediated by histamine induced by an H1 receptor

  1. Submandibular salivary gland transfer prevents radiation-induced xerostomia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Naresh; Seikaly, Hadi; McGaw, Timothy; Coulter, Linda

    2000-01-01

    Background: Xerostomia is a significant morbidity of radiation therapy in the management of head and neck cancers. We hypothesized that the surgical transfer of one submandibular salivary gland to submental space, outside the proposed radiation field, prior to starting radiation treatment, would prevent xerostomia. Methods: We are conducting a prospective clinical trial where the submandibular gland is transferred as part of the surgical intervention. The patients are followed clinically, with salivary flow studies and University of Washington quality of life questionnaire. Results: We report early results of 16 patients who have undergone this procedure. Seven patients have finished and 2 patients are currently undergoing radiation treatment. In 2 patients, no postoperative radiation treatment was indicated. Two patients are waiting to start radiation treatment and 2 patients refused treatment after surgery. The surgical transfer was abandoned in 1 patient. All of the transferred salivary glands were positioned outside the proposed radiation fields and were functional. The patients did not complain of any xerostomia and developed only minimal oral mucositis. There were no surgical complications. Conclusions: Surgical transfer of a submandibular salivary gland to the submental space (outside the radiation field) preserves its function and prevents the development of radiation-induced xerostomia

  2. Radiation-induced malignant tumors of skin and their histogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guomin; Chen Yunchi; Yang Yejing

    1987-01-01

    Seven cases of radiation-induced malignant tumors and 60 cases of chronic radiation damage of skin are reported. Severe hyperplasia, false epitheliomatoid hyperpiasia and atypical proliferation of epithelia and atypical proliferation of fibrohistocytes were the main changes found in chronic radiation damage of skin. The development of malignant tumors from chronic radiation damage of skin can be divided into 4 periods: necrotic and degenerative change period, benign proliferative period, atypical proliferative period and malignant change period. The incidence of hyperplastic changes of skin is related to the time elapse after irradiation and the integrated dose of radiation. The longer the duration after irradiation and the larger the integrated dose are, the higher will be the incidence of hyperplastic changes

  3. Radiological-morphological synopsis of radiation-induced lung fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bublitz, G.

    1977-01-01

    As delayed radiation damage after treatment of bronchial carcinoma and mamma carcinoma, fibroses occur as a reaction of the tissues. They have become a clinical-functional syndrome because of their uniform clinicaL-radiological symptomatology and pathophysiology. Pulmonary fibrosis as delayed radiation damage has a special importance with its two different radiation effects on connective tissue: a) on existing structures, b) delayed alterations of the connective tissue. As seen from experiments on lungs of men and rats, radiation-induced alterations can be measured by testing the different solubilities of the collagen types. In addition to the pathologically disordered collagen production, 9 weeks after the irradiation the radiation fibrosis leads to an isolated increase of insoluble collagen corresponding to the formation of metabolism-resistant fibrils. (MG) [de

  4. Radiation-induced cationic curing of vinyl ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapin, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    Recently there has been an increasing interest in nonacrylate radiation-curable coatings. Vinyl ethers are particularly reactive under cationic polymerization reaction conditions. The high efficiency of the photoacid initiators combined with the high reactivity of vinyl ether monomers makes this a potentially very useful system. This chapter discusses the preparation of vinyl ethers, introduces vinyl ether-functional monomers and oligomers, describes radiation-induced cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers, and discusses various coating systems. Throughout the chapter, an emphasis is placed on radiation-curable coating applications. 64 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs

  5. Mechanistic issues for modeling radiation-induced segregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonen, E.P.; Bruemmer, S.M.

    1993-03-01

    Model calculations of radiation-induced chromium depletion and radiation-induced nickel enrichment at grain boundaries are compared to measured depletions and enrichments. The model is calibrated to fit chromium depletion in commercial purity 304 stainless steel irradiated in boiling water reactor (BWR) environments. Predicted chromium depletion profiles and the dose dependence of chromium concentration at grain boundaries are in accord with measured trends. Evaluation of chromium and nickel profiles in three neutron, and two ion, irradiation environments reveal significant inconsistencies between measurements and predictions

  6. Radiation induced ionic polymerisation and grafting of vinyl monomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stannett, V.T.

    1981-01-01

    Some special aspects of the radiation induced ionic polymerisation and grafting of vinyl monomers will be described. In particular the effects of solvents on the cationic polymerisation of the vinyl ethers will be discussed in detail. The unequivocal free ion nature of the polymerisation makes such information of considerable general interest. Estimates of the propagation rate constants with free cation polymerisation in solvents of different dielectric constants and solvation powers will be presented. Finally, some observations on the radiation induced graft polymerisation of ethyl vinyl ether to poly(vinyl chloride) and to polypropylene will be presented. (author)

  7. Social impacts induced by radiation risk in Fukushima prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    An accident of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant induced by an earthquake of M9.0 and subsequent tsunami gave various kinds of impacts around the plant. After reviewing arguments of local governments for low dose radiation risk, this paper analyzed social impacts by the risk in terms of a gap of emergency response between national and local governments, corruption of communities in various levels induced by plural statements for risk levels in low level radiation, and economic impacts for agricultural crops made in Fukushima prefecture. Afterwards, clues for improving the situation were discussed, which include understanding of characteristics of public perception, attitudes of experts and interactive risk communication. (author)

  8. Radiation-induced void swelling in metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelinskij, V.F.; Neklyudov, I.M.; Ozhigov, L.S.; Reznichenko, Eh.A.; Rozhkov, V.V.; Chernyaeva, T.T.

    1979-01-01

    Main regularities in the development of radiation-induced void swelling are considered. Special attention is paid to consideration of a possibility to obtain information on material behaviour under conditions of reactor irradiation proceeding from the data of simulation experiments and to methods of rate control, for the processes which occur in material during irradiation and further annealing by the way of rationalized alloying, of thermomechanical treatment and programmed change of irradiation conditions under operation. Problems of initiation and growth of voids in irradiated materials are discussed as well as the ways to decrease the rate of radiation-induced void swelling

  9. The radiation induced degradation of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilski, H.

    1987-01-01

    A compilation was made of all data about the radiation stability of thermoplastic polymeric materials, published in the literature up to the end of 1985. From those experiments in which the irradiation was carried out in air half value doses (elongation) (= hvd) as a measure of radiation stability were extracted and compared on the basis of the chemical structure of the polymers, the chemical composition of the materials under test and the dose rate, respectively. The first result is that our knowledge of the radiation stability of polymers, if irradiated in air, is still very incomplete. On the other hand enough data were found for some polymers, to see that there is a region at low dose rates where the half value dose Dsub(e) increases with the dose rate (dD/dt) according to the equation Dsub(e)=Dsub(el).(dD/dt)sup(n). This seems to be the normal behavior. Values for the hvd at 1 Gy/h (in air) were found to lie between 1 and 500 kGy (with PTFE and PS at the respective ends of the scale), whereas n varied only between 0.1 and 0.4. The range of validity of the equation and the magnitude of the coefficients strongly depend on the chemical nature of the polymer and also on the kind and amount of the additives used. At dose rates in the neighborhood of 10 5 Gy/h the influence of the dose rate (and the atmosphere) disappears. (author)

  10. Radiation induced effects in the developing central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisone, P.; Dubner, D.; Michelin, S.C.; Perez, M.R. Del

    1997-01-01

    The embryo and the human foetus are particularly sensitive to ionizing radiation and this sensitivity presents various qualitative and quantitative functional changes during intra-uterine development. Apart from radiation induced carcinogenesis, the most serious consequence of prenatal exposure in human beings is severe mental retardation. The principal data on radiation effects on human beings in the development of the central nervous system come form epidemiological studies carried out in individuals exposed in utero during the atomic explosion at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These observations demonstrate the existence of a time of maximum radiosensitivity between the weeks 8 and 15 of the gestational period, a period in which the proliferation and neuronal migration takes place. Determination of the characteristics of dose-response relationship and the possible existence of a threshold dose of radiation effects on the development of the central nervous system is relevant to radiation protection against low dose radiation and the establishment of dose limits for occupational exposure and the public. Studies were conducted on the generation of nitrous-oxide and its relation with the production of active species of oxygen in brains of exposed rats in utero exposed to doses of up to 1 Gy during their maximum radiosensitivity. The possible role of the mechanism of radiation induced damage in the development of the central nervous system is discussed

  11. The effects of cysteamine on the radiation-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Min; Cho, Heung Lae; Park, Chang Gyo; Lee, Hyung Sik; Hur, Won Joo

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the pathways of radiation induced apoptosis and the effect of cysteamine (β-mercaptoethylamine), as a radioprotector, on it. HL-60 cells were assigned to control, irradiated, and cysteamine (1 mM, 10 mM) pretreated groups. Irradiation was given in a single fraction of 10 Gy (6 MV x-ray) and cysteamine was administered 1 hour before irradiation. The activities of caspase-8 were measured in control and irradiated group to evaiuate its relation to the radiation induced apoptosis. To evaluate the role of cysteamine in radiation induced apoptosis, the number of viable cells, the expression and activity or caspase-3, and the expression of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) were measured and compared after irradiating the HL cells with cysteamine pretreatment or not. The intracellular caspase-8 activity, known to be related to the death receptor induced apoptosis, was not affected by irradiation( p>0.05). The number of viable cells began to decrease from 6 hours after irradiation (p>0.05), but the number of viable cells in 1 mM cysteamine pretreated group was not decreased after irradiation and was similar to those in the control group. In caspase-3 analyses, known as apoptosis executioner, its expression was not different but its activity was increased by irradialion(p>0.05). However, this increase of activity was suppressed by the pretreatment of 1 mM cysteamine. The cleavage of PARP, thought to be resulted from caspase-3 activation, occurred, after irradiation, which was attenuated by the pretreatment of 1 mM cysteamine. These results show that radiation induced apoptotic process is somewhat different from death receptor induced one and the pretreatment of 1 mM cysteamine has a tendency to decrease the radiation-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells

  12. Radiation-induced anorexia in Syrian hamsters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindt, A.; Sattler, E.L.; Schraub, A.

    1980-01-01

    The recovery of Syrian hamsters after split dose application (interval 11 days) was studied on the basis of the weight response and of food uptake. Two periods of weight loss and anorexia can be distinguished, an early one immediately after irradiation and a secondary one 6-10 days later. The secondary response is a function of the radiation dose and allows to distinguish survivors from non-survivors, since it is much more pronounced and longerlasting in the latter than in the former. The first response appears not to be influenced by a previous conditioning irradiation. (orig.) [de

  13. Radiation-induced corrosion of stellite-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behazin, M.; Wren, J.C.

    2012-09-01

    Stellite-6 is a Co-based (58%) alloy that is used for components that require high wear-resistance, such as valve facings and ball bearings in nuclear reactors. In the reactor core, stable 59 Co can be neutron activated by absorption of a neutron to become the radioactive isotope, 60 Co. The 60 Co that is created constitutes a safety hazard for plant workers who have to perform maintenance on the reactor. One of the operational and safety issues in a nuclear reactor is the potential corrosion of Co-based alloys and the introduction of dissolved Co ions into the reactor core. While the corrosion of Stellite-6 has been studied its corrosion behaviour with ionizing radiation present has not been well established. Corrosion kinetics depend on both the aqueous redox conditions and the physical and chemical nature of the alloy surface. The high radiation fields present in a reactor core will cause water to decompose to a range of redox-active species (both highly oxidizing (e.g., ·OH, H 2 O 2 ) and highly reducing (e.g., ·eaq - , ·O 2 - )). These species can significantly influence corrosion kinetics. The effect of γ-radiation on the corrosion of Stellite-6 at pH 10.6 was investigated at temperatures ≤ 150 deg. C. Since the corrosion rate depends strongly on the type of oxide that is present on the material surface, the focus of this corrosion study was to establish the mechanism by which radiolysis affects the nature of the oxide that is present on Stellite-6. The results show that γ-radiation (at a dose rate of 5.5 kGy.h -1 ) increases the corrosion potential on Stellite-6 from -0.7 VSCE to 0.12 VSCE . The corrosion potential without irradiation present is in a potential range where oxidation is limited to the formation of a Co (OH) 2 and CoCr 2 O 4 outer oxide layer on a pre-existing Cr 2 O 3 film. The corrosion potential with irradiation is in a potential range where further oxidation of Co (OH) 2 to CoOOH also occurs. However, since CoOOH is less soluble than

  14. Radiation-induced anorexia in Syrian hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kindt, A.; Sattler, E.L.; Schraub, A.

    1980-10-01

    The recovery of Syrian hamsters after split dose application (interval 11 days) was studied on the basis of the weight response and of food uptake. Two periods of weight loss and anorexia can be distinguished, an early one immediately after irradiation and a secondary one 6-10 days later. The secondary response is a function of the radiation dose and allows to distinguish survivors from non-survivors, since it is much more pronounced and longerlasting in the latter than in the former. The first response appears not to be influenced by a previous conditioning irradiation.

  15. Radiation induced oxidation for water remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehringer, P.

    1997-01-01

    The action of ionizing radiation on halogenated hydrocarbons, in the presence and absence of ozone, was studied in water and wastewater. The combined ozone/electron-beam irradiation process was found especially suited for remediation of low-level contaminated groundwater. This combined treatment was often more effective than irradiation alone for wastewater decontamination. It reduced the COD without a simultaneous increase of BOD. Introduction of gaseous ozone directly into the irradiation chamber improved the water-flow turbulence, allowing treatment in layers thicker than the penetration range of the electrons, with increased decontamination efficiency. (author)

  16. Contribution of radiation-induced, nitric oxide-mediated bystander effect to radiation-induced adaptive response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, H.; Ohnishi, T.

    There has been a recent upsurge of interest in radiation-induced adaptive response and bystander effect which are specific modes in stress response to low-dose low-dose rate radiation Recently we found that the accumulation of inducible nitric oxide NO synthase iNOS in wt p53 cells was induced by chronic irradiation with gamma rays followed by acute irradiation with X-rays but not by each one resulting in an increase in nitrite concentrations of medium It is suggested that the accumulation of iNOS may be due to the depression of acute irradiation-induced p53 functions by pre-chronic irradiation In addition we found that the radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells against acute irradiation with X-rays was reduced after chronic irradiation with gamma rays This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells was nearly completely suppressed by the addition of NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO to the medium This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells is just radiation-induced adaptive response suggesting that NO-mediated bystander effect may considerably contribute to adaptive response induced by radiation

  17. EXERCISE-INDUCED SYMPATHETIC FFA MOBILIZATION IN VMH-LESIONED RATS IS NORMALIZED BY FASTING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balkan, B.; Dijk, G. van; Strubbe, J.H.; Bruggink, J.E.; Steffens, A.B.

    This study investigates whether reduced sympathetic responses during physical exercise in ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH)-lesioned obese rats are the direct result of damage to hypothalamic circuits or a secondary effect of the altered metabolism in obesity. Obese, VMH-lesioned rats and lean

  18. Radiation-Induced Esophagitis is Mitigated by Soy Isoflavones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Fountain

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lung cancer patients receiving radiotherapy present with acute esophagitis and chronic fibrosis, as a result of radiation injury to esophageal tissues. We have shown that soy isoflavones alleviate pneumonitis and fibrosis caused by radiation toxicity to normal lung. The effect of soy isoflavones on esophagitis histopathological changes induced by radiation was investigated. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were treated with 10 Gy or 25 Gy single thoracic irradiation and soy isoflavones for up to 16 weeks. Damage to esophageal tissues was assessed by H&E, Masson’s Trichrome and Ki-67 staining at 1, 4, 10, 16 weeks after radiation. The effects on smooth muscle cells and leukocyte infiltration were determined by immunohistochemistry using anti-αSMA and anti-CD45 respectively. Results: Radiation caused thickening of esophageal tissue layers that was significantly reduced by soy isoflavones. Major radiation alterations included hypertrophy of basal cells in mucosal epithelium and damage to smooth muscle cells in muscularis mucosae as well as disruption of collagen fibers in lamina propria connective tissue with leukocyte infiltration. These effects were observed as early as one week after radiation and were more pronounced with a higher dose of 25 Gy. Soy isoflavones limited the extent of tissue damage induced by radiation both at 10 and 25 Gy.Conclusions: Soy isoflavones have a radioprotective effect on the esophagus, mitigating the early and late effects of radiation injury in several esophagus tissue layers. Soy could be administered with radiotherapy to decrease the incidence and severity of esophagitis in lung cancer patients receiving thoracic radiation therapy.

  19. Effect of salidroside on radiation-induced bone marrow adipogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jincan; Chen Xiaoyu; Liu Chengcheng; Zhu Aizhen; Liu Shantao; Liu Gexiu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the potential and underlying molecular mechanism of salidroside in ameliorating radiation-induced bone marrow adipogenesis and stimulating hematopoiesis. Methods: The female BALB/c mice aged 6-7 weeks were randomly divided into normal control group, radiation group and salidroside group. The radiation group and salidroside group were irradiated with 6.0 Gy of "6"0Co γ-rays. The salidroside group was intraperitoneally inje