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Sample records for radiation ii oxidation

  1. Radiation annealing in cuprous oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vajda, P.

    1966-01-01

    Experimental results from high-intensity gamma-irradiation of cuprous oxide are used to investigate the annealing of defects with increasing radiation dose. The results are analysed on the basis of the Balarin and Hauser (1965) statistical model of radiation annealing, giving a square-root relati......-root relationship between the rate of change of resistivity and the resistivity change. The saturation defect density at room temperature is estimated on the basis of a model for defect creation in cuprous oxide....

  2. Far-infrared radiation acutely increases nitric oxide production by increasing Ca{sup 2+} mobilization and Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at serine 1179

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Sangmi [Department of Molecular Medicine and Ewha Medical Research Institute, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Du-Hyong [Department of Neuroscience, School of Medicine, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Mi [Department of Molecular Medicine and Ewha Medical Research Institute, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Duk-Hee [Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Inho, E-mail: inhojo@ewha.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Medicine and Ewha Medical Research Institute, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Far-infrared (FIR) radiation increases eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation and NO production in BAEC. •CaMKII and PKA mediate FIR-stimulated increases in eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. •FIR increases intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. •Thermo-sensitive TRPV Ca{sup 2+} channels are unlikely to be involved in the FIR-mediated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation pathway. -- Abstract: Repeated thermal therapy manifested by far-infrared (FIR) radiation improves vascular function in both patients and mouse model with coronary heart disease, but its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Using FIR as a thermal therapy agent, we investigate the molecular mechanism of its effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. FIR increased the phosphorylation of eNOS at serine 1179 (eNOS-Ser{sup 1179}) in a time-dependent manner (up to 40 min of FIR radiation) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) without alterations in eNOS expression. This increase was accompanied by increases in NO production and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. Treatment with KN-93, a selective inhibitor of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor, inhibited FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. FIR radiation itself also increased the temperature of culture medium. As transient receptors potential vanilloid (TRPV) ion channels are known to be temperature-sensitive calcium channels, we explore whether TRPV channels mediate these observed effects. Reverse transcription-PCR assay revealed two TRPV isoforms in BAEC, TRPV2 and TRPV4. Although ruthenium red, a pan-TRPV inhibitor, completely reversed the observed effect of FIR radiation, a partial attenuation (∼20%) was found in cells treated with Tranilast, TRPV2 inhibitor. However, ectopic expression of siRNA of TRPV2 showed no significant alteration in FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. This

  3. Silver(II) Oxide or Silver(I,III) Oxide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudela, David

    2008-01-01

    The often called silver peroxide and silver(II) oxide, AgO or Ag[subscript 2]O[subscript 2], is actually a mixed oxidation state silver(I,III) oxide. A thermochemical cycle, with lattice energies calculated within the "volume-based" thermodynamic approach, explain why the silver(I,III) oxide is more stable than the hypothetical silver(II) oxide.…

  4. Radiation oxidation and subsequent thermal curing of polyacrylonitrile fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weihua; Wang, Mouhua; Xing, Zhe; Wu, Guozhong

    2014-01-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers were exposed to gamma-ray irradiation at room temperature under vacuum, air and oxygen to investigate the radiation oxidation effects on PAN fibers. Radiation-induced oxidation degradation and crosslinking was evaluated by measuring the gel fraction. It was found that radiation oxidation took place mainly on the fiber surface due to the limited penetration of oxygen into PAN fibers from the surface, and the oxidation thickness increased with the oxygen pressure. Chain scission was dominant in the oxidized area, and crosslinking occurred in the inner part of the fibers. However, the oxidized regions of the fibers can be converted to gel via crosslinking by thermal curing at 160 °C in a N2 atmosphere. Higher extents of radiation oxidation degradation led to a greater increase in the gel fraction. These results suggest that the radiation treatment of PAN fibers prior to thermal oxidation may be useful for manufacturing carbon fibers.

  5. Oxidation of Fe(II)-EDTA by nitrite and by two nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing Acidovorax strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klueglein, N; Picardal, F; Zedda, M; Zwiener, C; Kappler, A

    2015-03-01

    The enzymatic oxidation of Fe(II) by nitrate-reducing bacteria was first suggested about two decades ago. It has since been found that most strains are mixotrophic and need an additional organic co-substrate for complete and prolonged Fe(II) oxidation. Research during the last few years has tried to determine to what extent the observed Fe(II) oxidation is driven enzymatically, or abiotically by nitrite produced during heterotrophic denitrification. A recent study reported that nitrite was not able to oxidize Fe(II)-EDTA abiotically, but the addition of the mixotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizer, Acidovorax sp. strain 2AN, led to Fe(II) oxidation (Chakraborty & Picardal, 2013). This, along with other results of that study, was used to argue that Fe(II) oxidation in strain 2AN was enzymatically catalyzed. However, the absence of abiotic Fe(II)-EDTA oxidation by nitrite reported in that study contrasts with previously published data. We have repeated the abiotic and biotic experiments and observed rapid abiotic oxidation of Fe(II)-EDTA by nitrite, resulting in the formation of Fe(III)-EDTA and the green Fe(II)-EDTA-NO complex. Additionally, we found that cultivating the Acidovorax strains BoFeN1 and 2AN with 10 mM nitrate, 5 mm acetate, and approximately 10 mM Fe(II)-EDTA resulted only in incomplete Fe(II)-EDTA oxidation of 47-71%. Cultures of strain BoFeN1 turned green (due to the presence of Fe(II)-EDTA-NO) and the green color persisted over the course of the experiments, whereas strain 2AN was able to further oxidize the Fe(II)-EDTA-NO complex. Our work shows that the two used Acidovorax strains behave very differently in their ability to deal with toxic effects of Fe-EDTA species and the further reduction of the Fe(II)-EDTA-NO nitrosyl complex. Although the enzymatic oxidation of Fe(II) cannot be ruled out, this study underlines the importance of nitrite in nitrate-reducing Fe(II)- and Fe(II)-EDTA-oxidizing cultures and demonstrates that Fe(II)-EDTA cannot

  6. Coherent Radiation in Insertion Devices-II

    CERN Document Server

    Bessonov, E G

    2011-01-01

    We represent results of calculations of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) of the relativistic bunch in an undulator with a vacuum chamber of arbitrary cross section with a new algorithm. This algorithm associated with direct calculations of electric field rather than the vector potential. CSR normalized to the incoherent one and compared with analytical calculations for a free space.

  7. Infrared [Fe II] Emission Lines from Radiative Atomic Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Kim, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    [Fe II] emission lines are prominent in the infrared (IR), and they are important diagnostic tools for radiative atomic shocks. We investigate the emission characteristics of [Fe II] lines using a shock code developed by Raymond (1979) with updated atomic parameters. We first review general characteristics of IR [Fe II] emission lines from shocked gas, and derive [Fe II] line fluxes as a function of shock speed and ambient density. We have compiled the available IR [Fe II] line observations of interstellar shocks and compare them to the ratios predicted from our model. The sample includes both young and old supernova remnants in the Galaxy and the Large Magellanic Cloud and several Herbig-Haro objects. We find that the observed ratios of IR [Fe II] lines generally fall on our grid of shock models, but the ratios of some mid-infrared lines, e.g., [Fe II] 35.35 um/[Fe II] 25.99 um, [Fe II] 5.340 um/[Fe II] 25.99 um, and [Fe II] 5.340 um/[Fe II] 17.94 um, are significantly offset from our model grid. We discuss ...

  8. Large numbers hypothesis. II - Electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper develops the theory of electromagnetic radiation in the units covariant formalism incorporating Dirac's large numbers hypothesis (LNH). A direct field-to-particle technique is used to obtain the photon propagation equation which explicitly involves the photon replication rate. This replication rate is fixed uniquely by requiring that the form of a free-photon distribution function be preserved, as required by the 2.7 K cosmic radiation. One finds that with this particular photon replication rate the units covariant formalism developed in Paper I actually predicts that the ratio of photon number to proton number in the universe varies as t to the 1/4, precisely in accord with LNH. The cosmological red-shift law is also derived and it is shown to differ considerably from the standard form of (nu)(R) - const.

  9. Effects of cell phone radiation on lipid peroxidation, glutathione and nitric oxide levels in mouse brain during epileptic seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmekaya, Meric Arda; Tuysuz, Mehmet Zahid; Tomruk, Arın; Canseven, Ayse G; Yücel, Engin; Aktuna, Zuhal; Keskil, Semih; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the this study was to evaluate the effects of cellular phone radiation on oxidative stress parameters and oxide levels in mouse brain during pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced epileptic seizure. Eight weeks old mice were used in the study. Animals were distributed in the following groups: Group I: Control group treated with PTZ, Group II: 15min cellular phone radiation+PTZ treatment+30min cellular phone radiation, Group III: 30min cellular phone radiation+PTZ treatment+30min cellular phone radiation. The RF radiation was produced by a 900MHz cellular phone. Lipid peroxidation, which is the indicator of oxidative stress was quantified by measuring the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). The glutathione (GSH) levels were determined by the Ellman method. Tissue total nitric oxide (NOx) levels were obtained using the Griess assay. Lipid peroxidation and NOx levels of brain tissue increased significantly in group II and III compared to group I. On the contrary, GSH levels were significantly lower in group II and III than group I. However, no statistically significant alterations in any of the endpoints were noted between group II and Group III. Overall, the experimental findings demonstrated that cellular phone radiation may increase the oxidative damage and NOx level during epileptic activity in mouse brain.

  10. MECHANISM OF THE OXIDATION OF HEMOGLOBIN BY COPPER (II COMPLXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. BAYATI

    1994-07-01

    Full Text Available An outer sphere electron transfer mechanism by which human hemoglobin reduces the complexes of copper(II and, in turn, is oxidized to methemoglobin has been characterized. We have found that the rate of oxidation of hemoglobin is a function of pH, temperature, concentration of copper(II, and the environment of the hemoglobin. Prior to oxidation, copper(II complex binds to specific sites on the surface of the protein by losing one or more of its ligands, forming a ternary complex. This process is followed by electron transfer between the Cu(II and Fe(H with the Cu(II-deoxyhemoglobin being the active intermediate. The dominant factors which govern the rate of oxidation of hemoglobin by coppcr(I I complexes seem to be the stability constant of the Cu(II complexes and the overall redox potential of the ternary complex.

  11. Movable radiation shields for the CLEO II silicon vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumas, D.J.; Ward, C.W.; Alexander, J.; Cherwinka, J.; Henderson, S. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Cinabro, D. [Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Fast, J. [Purdue University, Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Morrison, R. [University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); O`Neill, M. [CRPP, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ont. (Canada)

    1998-02-11

    Two movable tungsten radiation shields were installed on the beam pipe during the upgrade of the CLEO II detector, operating at the Cornell electron storage ring (CESR). This upgrade included the installation of a silicon vertex detector (SVX) and the purpose of the shields is to protect the SVX readout electronics from synchrotron radiation produced during injection and non-high-energy physics operation of CESR. Shield motion is controlled remotely by cables, keeping the associated motors and controls outside the detection volume. We discuss the design and performance of the radiation shields and the associated control system. (orig.). 8 refs.

  12. Electrocatalytic water oxidation with a copper(II) polypeptide complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Tian; Chen, Zuofeng; Kang, Peng; Meyer, Thomas J

    2013-02-13

    A self-assembly-formed triglycylglycine macrocyclic ligand (TGG(4-)) complex of Cu(II), [(TGG(4-))Cu(II)-OH(2)](2-), efficiently catalyzes water oxidation in a phosphate buffer at pH 11 at room temperature by a well-defined mechanism. In the mechanism, initial oxidation to Cu(III) is followed by further oxidation to a formal "Cu(IV)" with formation of a peroxide intermediate, which undergoes further oxidation to release oxygen and close the catalytic cycle. The catalyst exhibits high stability and activity toward water oxidation under these conditions with a high turnover frequency of 33 s(-1).

  13. Differential expression of Prx I and II in mouse testis and their up-regulation by radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keesook; Park, Ji-Sun; Kim, Yun-Jeong; Soo Lee, Yong Soo; Sook Hwang, Tae Sook; Kim, Dae-Joong; Park, Eun-Mi; Park, Young-Mee

    2002-08-16

    Testis is one of the most sensitive organs to ionizing radiation. The present study was designed to unravel the possible role of antioxidant proteins, peroxiredoxin I and II (Prx I and II) in the testis. Our results show that Prx I and II are constitutively expressed in the testis and their expression levels are decreased to some extent as the testis develops. Interestingly, immunohistochemical analysis revealed a preferential expression of Prx I and II in Leydig and Sertoli cells, respectively. Neither Prx I nor Prx II expression was obvious in the testicular germ cells including spermatogonia and spermatocytes. Ionizing radiation exerted oxidative stress on the testis and induced apoptosis primarily in the germ cells. When the irradiated testis was examined, the Prx system was found to be transiently up-regulated. Taken together, we suggest that the relative radiation-resistance of Leydig and Sertoli cells could be attributed in part to the antioxidant function of the Prx system in these cells.

  14. II. Biological studies of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.H.

    1948-05-24

    With the completion of the 184 inch cyclotron in Berkeley and the successful construction of a deflector system, it was possible to bring the 190 Mev deuteron and the 380 Mev alpha beams out into the air and to begin a study of the effects of high-energy deuteron beams by direct irradiation of biological specimens. The direct biological use of deuteron beams was attempted earlier in Berkeley by Marshak, MacLeish, and Walker in 1940. These and other investigators have been aware for some time of the potential usefulness of high energy particle beams for radio-biological studies and their suitability for biological investigations. R.R. Wilson advanced the idea of using fast proton beams to deliver radiation and intervening tissues. R.E. Zirkle pointed out that such particle beams may be focused or screened until a cross-section of the beam is small enough to study effects of irradiation under the microscope on single cells or on parts of single cells. This article gives an overview of the radiological use of high energy deuteron beams, including the following topics: potential uses of high energy particle beams; experiments on the physical properties of the beam; lethal effect of the deuteron beam on mice.

  15. Single Molecule Scanning of DNA Radiation Oxidative Damage Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal will develop an assay to map genomic DNA, at the single molecule level and in a nanodevice, for oxidative DNA damage arising from radiation exposure;...

  16. Radiative emission of solar features in Ca II K

    CERN Document Server

    Criscuoli, S; Fontenla, J; Giorgi, F; Rast, M; Solanki, S; Uitenbroek, H

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the radiative emission of different types of solar features in the spectral range of the Ca II K line. We analyzed full-disk 2k x 2k observations from the PSPT Precision Solar Photometric Telescope. The data were obtained by using three narrow-band interference filters that sample the Ca II K line with different pass bands. Two filters are centered in the line core, the other in the red wing of the line. We measured the intensity and contrast of various solar features, specifically quiet Sun (inter-network), network, enhanced network, plage, and bright plage (facula) regions. Moreover, we compared the results obtained with those derived from the numerical synthesis performed for the three PSPT filters with a widely used radiative code on a set of reference semi-empirical atmosphere models.

  17. Evaluation of the oxidative stress modulation in Drosophila melanogaster strains deficient in endogenous antioxidants and with chronic exposure to casiopeina Cas II-gly and gamma radiation; Evaluacion de la modulacion del estres oxidante en cepas de Drosophila melanogaster deficientes en antioxidantes endogenos y con exposicion cronica a casiopeina CII-gly y radiacion gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez V, E. R.

    2013-07-01

    The casiopeinas are a family of coordination compounds with copper metallic center that have shown to have antineoplastic activity. The experimental evidences suggest that its action mechanism is through the generation of free radicals. The casiopeina (Cas II-gly) is believed to causes oxidative damage in the mitochondria, leading to the cellular death. The present study has the purpose to evaluate the antioxidant potential of the tetrapyrroles: cupro-sodica chlorophyllin (CSC), protoporphyrin-Ix (Pp-Ix) and the bilirubin (Bili) against the oxidant action of the Cas II-gly. The present study will also contribute in the characterization of the biological activity of the Cas II-gly. For this purpose is quantifies the effect of these compounds in the enzymes activity, superoxide dismutase (Sod) and catalase (Cat) in wild Drosophila melanogaster strains Canton-S and in the deficient in Sod and Cat. Two protocols were used, in the first male of 1-24 h of age were pre-treated with 0, 0.01, 0.1 and 1 m M of Cas II-gly and later on they were treated with radiation (15 Gy), and the second 69 m M of CSC, Pp-Ix or Bili, during 8 days and later they were treated with 0.1 m M of Cas II-gly during 24 h. The enzymatic activity was measured with the detection packages of enzymes Sod and Cat of Sigma. It was found that none of the three pigments increment the Sod activity but, if they diminished that of Cat (p≤0.007). The three concentrations of Cas II-gly did not increase the Sod activity significantly, only the concentration of 0.1 m M diminishes in 5.6 U the Cat activity (p <0.03) the same as the treatment with 15 Gy of gamma rays (8 U, p <0.004). The Cas II-gly combination 0.1 m M with the pigments does not modify the Sod and Cat activity. These results suggest that the proven pigments act as antioxidants, avoiding the induction of exogenous antioxidants caused by the gamma rays or the Cas II-gly. (Author)

  18. On the formation of iron(III) oxides via oxidation of iron(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bongiovanni, R.; Pelizzetti, E. [Torino Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Analitica; Borgarello, E. [Eniricerche SpA, Milan (Italy); Meisel, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Formation of iron oxides in aqueous salt solutions is reviewed. The discussion is focused on the oxidation of iron(II) and the following hydrolysis process that leads to the formation of a solid phase from homogeneous solutions. Results from our own studies on the kinetics of the oxidation reactions and the ensuing growth processes are presented.

  19. Atomistic simulations of the radiation resistance of oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chartier, A., E-mail: alain.chartier@cea.fr [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DPC/SCP, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Van Brutzel, L. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DPC/SCP, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Crocombette, J.-P. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMP, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France)

    2012-09-01

    Fluorite compounds such as urania and ceria, or related compounds such as pyrochlores and also spinels show different behaviors under irradiations, which ranges from perfect radiation resistance to crystalline phase change or even complete amorphization depending on their structure and/or their composition. Displacement cascades - dedicated to the understanding of the ballistic regime and performed by empirical potentials molecular dynamics simulations - have revealed that the remaining damages of the above mentioned oxides are reduced to point defects unlike what is observed in zircon and zirconolite, which directly amorphize during the cascade. The variable behavior of these point defects is the key of the various responses of these materials to irradiations. This behavior can be investigated by two specific molecular dynamics methodologies that will be reviewed here: (i) the method of point defects accumulation as a function of temperature that gives access to the dose effects and to the critical doses for amorphization; (ii) the study Frenkel pairs life-time - i.e. their time of recombination as function of temperature - that may be used as a tool to understand the results obtained in displacements cascades or to identify the microscopic mechanisms responsible for the amorphization/re-crystallization during the point defects accumulations.

  20. On Radiation Pressure in Static, Dusty H II Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draine, B. T.

    2011-05-01

    Radiation pressure acting on gas and dust causes H II regions to have central densities that are lower than the density near the ionized boundary. H II regions in static equilibrium comprise a family of similarity solutions with three parameters: β, γ, and the product Q 0 n rms; β characterizes the stellar spectrum, γ characterizes the dust/gas ratio, Q 0 is the stellar ionizing output (photons/s), and n rms is the rms density within the ionized region. Adopting standard values for β and γ, varying Q 0 n rms generates a one-parameter family of density profiles, ranging from nearly uniform density (small Q 0 n rms) to shell-like (large Q 0 n rms). When Q 0 n rms >~ 1052 cm-3 s-1, dusty H II regions have conspicuous central cavities, even if no stellar wind is present. For given β, γ, and Q 0 n rms, a fourth quantity, which can be Q 0, determines the overall size and density of the H II region. Examples of density and emissivity profiles are given. We show how quantities of interest—such as the peak-to-central emission measure ratio, the rms-to-mean density ratio, the edge-to-rms density ratio, and the fraction of the ionizing photons absorbed by the gas—depend on β, γ, and Q 0 n rms. For dusty H II regions, compression of the gas and dust into an ionized shell results in a substantial increase in the fraction of the stellar photons that actually ionize H (relative to a uniform-density H II region with the same dust/gas ratio and density n = n rms). We discuss the extent to which radial drift of dust grains in H II regions can alter the dust-to-gas ratio. The applicability of these solutions to real H II regions is discussed.

  1. RADIATIVE LIFETIMES OF V I AND V II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Hartog, E. A.; Lawler, J. E.; Wood, M. P., E-mail: eadenhar@wisc.edu, E-mail: jelawler@wisc.edu, E-mail: mpwood@wisc.edu [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    New radiative lifetimes are reported for 168 levels of V I ranging in energy from 18086 cm{sup –1} to 47702 cm{sup –1}, and for 31 levels of V II ranging in energy from 34593 cm{sup –1} to 47420 cm{sup –1}. These lifetimes are measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on a slow atomic/ionic beam as part of an ongoing study of the radiative properties of the iron group elements. All but two of the V II lifetimes have been measured before using modern laser-based methods, but a large fraction of the V I lifetimes are reported here for the first time. Comparison to earlier measurements is discussed. These new lifetimes are, for the most part, accurate to ±5%. They will be combined with branching fraction measurements to produce a large set of transition probabilities for V I and V II which are needed by the astrophysics community for stellar abundance determinations.

  2. Abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) by reactive nitrogen species in cultures of the nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizer Acidovorax sp. BoFeN1 - questioning the existence of enzymatic Fe(II) oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klueglein, N; Kappler, A

    2013-03-01

    Nitrate-reducing, Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria were suggested to couple with enzymatic Fe(II) oxidation to nitrate reduction. Denitrification proceeds via intermediates (NO2 -, NO) that can oxidize Fe(II) abiotically at neutral and particularly at acidic pH. Here, we present a revised Fe(II) quantification protocol preventing artifacts during acidic Fe extraction and evaluate the contribution of abiotic vs. enzymatic Fe(II) oxidation in cultures of the nitrate-reducing, Fe(II) oxidizer Acidovorax sp. BoFeN1. Sulfamic acid used instead of HCl reacts with nitrite and prevents abiotic Fe(II) oxidation during Fe extraction. Abiotic experiments without sulfamic acid showed that acidification of oxic Fe(II) nitrite samples leads to 5.6-fold more Fe(II) oxidation than in anoxic samples because the formed NO becomes rapidly reoxidized by O(2) , therefore leading to abiotic oxidation and underestimation of Fe(II). With our revised protocol using sulfamic acid, we quantified oxidation of approximately 7 mm of Fe(II) by BoFeN1 within 4 days. Without addition of sulfamic acid, the same oxidation was detected within only 2 days. Additionally, abiotic incubation of Fe(II) with nitrite in the presence of goethite as surface catalyst led to similar abiotic Fe(II) oxidation rates as observed in growing BoFeN1 cultures. BoFeN1 growth was observed on acetate with N(2) O as electron acceptor. When adding Fe(II), no Fe(II) oxidation was observed, suggesting that the absence of reactive N intermediates (NO2 -, NO) precludes Fe(II) oxidation. The addition of ferrihydrite [Fe(OH)(3) ] to acetate/nitrate BoFeN1 cultures led to growth stimulation equivalent to previously described effects on growth by adding Fe(II). This suggests that elevated iron concentrations might provide a nutritional effect rather than energy-yielding Fe(II) oxidation. Our findings therefore suggest that although enzymatic Fe(II) oxidation by denitrifiers cannot be fully ruled out, its contribution to the observed Fe(II

  3. Adsorption and surface oxidation of Fe(II) on metal (hydr)oxides.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2007-01-01

    The Fe(II) adsorption by non-ferric and ferric (hydr)oxides has been analyzed with surface complexation modeling. The CD model has been used to derive the interfacial distribution of charge. The fitted CD coefficients have been linked to the mechanism of adsorption. The Fe(II) adsorption is

  4. Oxidation of naringenin by gamma-radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Tristan O.; Ledolter, Karin; Solar, Sonja

    2008-06-01

    The reaction of rad OH with naringenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavanone) in the presence of air induced the formation of the hydroxylation product eriodictyol (3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavanone). Its yield was dependent on pH. The initial degradation yield of naringenin was Gi(-Nar)=(2.5±0.2)×10 -7 mol dm -3 J -1. For the reaction with rad OH, a rate constant k ( rad OH+naringenin)=(7.2±0.7)×10 9 M -1 s -1 was determined. In the presence of N 2O and NaN 3/N 2O, no eriodyctiol was formed. Apigenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavon) was detected as decay product of the naringenin phenoxyl radicals. In Ar-saturated solutions, naringenin exhibited a pronounced radiation resistance, G(-naringenin) ˜0.3×10 -7 mol dm -3 J -1.

  5. Radiation effects on II-VI compound-based detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cavallini, A; Dusi, W; Auricchio, N; Chirco, P; Zanarini, M; Siffert, P; Fougeres, P

    2002-01-01

    The performance of room temperature CdTe and CdZnTe detectors exposed to a radiation source can be strongly altered by the interaction of the ionizing particles and the material. Up to now, few experimental data are available on the response of II-VI compound detectors to different types of radiation sources. We have carried out a thorough investigation on the effects of gamma-rays, neutrons and electron irradiation both on CdTe : Cl and Cd sub 0 sub . sub 9 Zn sub 0 sub . sub 1 Te detectors. We have studied the detector response after radiation exposure by means of dark current measurements and of quantitative spectroscopic analyses at low and medium energies. The deep traps present in the material have been characterized by means of PICTS (photo-induced current transient spectroscopy) analyses, which allow to determine the trap apparent activation energy and capture cross-section. The evolution of the trap parameters with increasing irradiation doses has been monitored for all the different types of radiati...

  6. Oxidation of naringenin by gamma-radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Tristan O. [Department of Nutritional Sciences, Section Radiation Biology, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Ledolter, Karin [Department of Biomolecular Structural Chemistry, University of Vienna, Campus-Vienna-Biocenter 5, A-1030 Vienna (Austria); Solar, Sonja [Department of Nutritional Sciences, Section Radiation Biology, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: sonja.solar@univie.ac.at

    2008-06-15

    The reaction of {sup {center_dot}}OH with naringenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavanone) in the presence of air induced the formation of the hydroxylation product eriodictyol (3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavanone). Its yield was dependent on pH. The initial degradation yield of naringenin was G{sub i}(-Nar)=(2.5{+-}0.2)x10{sup -7} mol dm{sup -3} J{sup -1}. For the reaction with {sup {center_dot}}OH, a rate constant k ({sup {center_dot}}OH+naringenin)=(7.2{+-}0.7)x10{sup 9} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} was determined. In the presence of N{sub 2}O and NaN{sub 3}/N{sub 2}O, no eriodyctiol was formed. Apigenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavon) was detected as decay product of the naringenin phenoxyl radicals. In Ar-saturated solutions, naringenin exhibited a pronounced radiation resistance, G(-naringenin) {approx}0.3x10{sup -7} mol dm{sup -3} J{sup -1}.

  7. Oxygen dependency of neutrophilic Fe(II) oxidation by Leptothrix differs from abiotic reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollrath, S.; Behrends, T.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophilic Fe(II) oxidizing microorganisms are found in many natural environments. It has been hypothesized that, at low oxygen concentrations, microbial iron oxidation is favored over abiotic oxidation. Here, we compare the kinetics of abiotic Fe(II) oxidation to oxidation in the presence of

  8. Oxidative Stress and Autophagy Responses of Osteocytes Exposed to Spaceflight-like Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahimic, Candice; Rael, Victoria E.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2015-01-01

    Weightlessness and radiation, two of the unique elements of the space environment, causes a profound decrement in bone mass that mimics aging. This bone loss is thought to result from increased activity of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and functional changes in bone-forming osteoblasts, cells that give rise to mature osteocytes. Our current understanding of the signaling factors and mechanisms underlying bone loss is incomplete. However, it is known that oxidative stress, characterized by the excess production of free radicals, is elevated during radiation exposure. The goals of this study is to examine the response of osteocytes to spaceflight-like radiation and to identify signaling processes that may be targeted to mitigate bone loss in scenarios of space exploration, earth-based radiotherapy and accidental radiation exposure. We hypothesize that (1) oxidative stress, as induced by radiation, decreases osteocyte survival and increases pro-osteoclastogenic signals and that (2) autophagy is one of the key cellular defenses against oxidative stress. Autophagy is the process by which cellular components including organelles and proteins are broken down and recycled. To test our hypothesis, we exposed the osteocyte-like cell line, MLO-Y4, to 0.5, 1, and 2 Gy of simulated space radiation (Iron-56 radiation at 600 MeV/n) and assessed cell numbers, cell growth-associated molecules as well as markers of autophagy and oxidative stress at various time points post-irradiation. We observed a reduction in cell numbers in the groups exposed to 1 and 2 Gy of Iron-56 radiation. Collectively, flow cytometry and gene expression analysis revealed that radiation caused a shift in cell cycle distribution consistent with growth arrest. Compared to sham-treatment, 2 Gy of Iron-56 increased FoxO3, SOD1, and RANKL gene expression yet unexpectedly decreased LC3B-II protein levels at 4 and 24 hours post-IR. Taken together, these findings suggest that simulated space radiation invoke

  9. Low intensity microwave radiation induced oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megha, Kanu; Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar; Ahmed, Rafat; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade people have been constantly exposed to microwave radiation mainly from wireless communication devices used in day to day life. Therefore, the concerns over potential adverse effects of microwave radiation on human health are increasing. Until now no study has been proposed to investigate the underlying causes of genotoxic effects induced by low intensity microwave exposure. Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine the influence of low intensity microwave radiation on oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain. The study was carried out on 24 male Fischer 344 rats, randomly divided into four groups (n=6 in each group): group I consisted of sham exposed (control) rats, group II-IV consisted of rats exposed to microwave radiation at frequencies 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz, specific absorption rates (SARs) 0.59, 0.58 and 0.66 mW/kg, respectively in gigahertz transverse electromagnetic (GTEM) cell for 60 days (2h/day, 5 days/week). Rats were sacrificed and decapitated to isolate hippocampus at the end of the exposure duration. Low intensity microwave exposure resulted in a frequency dependent significant increase in oxidative stress markers viz. malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PCO) and catalase (CAT) in microwave exposed groups in comparison to sham exposed group (pmicrowave exposed groups (pmicrowave exposed animal (pmicrowave exposed groups as compared to their corresponding values in sham exposed group (pmicrowave radiation induces oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in brain by exerting a frequency dependent effect. The study also indicates that increased oxidative stress and inflammatory response might be the factors involved in DNA damage following low intensity microwave exposure.

  10. Effects of nano-copper(II) oxide and nanomagnesium oxide particles on activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoqiang; Wang, Jianmin

    2012-07-01

    Effects of nano-copper(II) oxide (nano-CuO) and nanomagnesium oxide (nano-MgO) particles on activated sludge endogenous respiration (aerobic digestion), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) biodegradation, and nitrification were investigated through respiration rate measurement. For comparison, the effects of Cu(II) and Mg(II) ions on activated sludge were also studied. Results indicated that soluble Cu(II) has half maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 19, 5.5, 53, and 117 mg Cu/L for endogenous respiration, BOD biodegradation, ammonium oxidation, and nitrite oxidation, respectively. However, nano-CuO only inhibited BOD biodegradation at 240 mg Cu/L or more, and its associated toxicity was primarily caused by soluble Cu(II). In contrast, soluble Mg(II) was not toxic to activated sludge in the experimental concentration range, but nano-MgO inhibited BOD biodegradation and nitrification with IC50 values of 70 and 143 mg Mg/L, respectively. Further study indicated that the toxicity of nano-MgO resulted primarily from increased pH following MgO hydrolysis.

  11. Neurological AdverseEffects after Radiation Therapyfor Stage II Seminoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liv Ebbeskov Lauritsen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We report 3 cases of patients with testicular cancer and stage II seminoma who developed neurological symptoms with bilateral leg weakness about 4 to 9 months after radiation therapy (RT. They all received RT to the para-aortic lymph nodes with a total dose of 40 Gy (36 Gy + 4 Gy as a boost against the tumour bed with a conventional fractionation of2 Gy/day, 5 days per week. RT was applied as hockey-stick portals, also called L-fields. In 2 cases, the symptoms fully resolved. Therapeutic irradiation can cause significant injury to the peripheral nerves of the lumbosacral plexus and/or to the spinal cord. RT is believed to produce plexus injury by both direct toxic effects and secondary microinfarction of the nerves, but the exact pathophysiology of RT-induced injury is unclear. Since reported studies of radiation-induced neurological adverse effects are limited, it is difficult to estimate their frequency and outcome. The treatment of neurological symptoms due to RT is symptomatic.

  12. A Bioinspired Molecular Polyoxometalate Catalyst with Two Cobalt(II) Oxide Cores for Photocatalytic Water Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jie; Feng, Yingying; Zhou, Panpan; Liu, Yan; Xu, Jingyin; Xiang, Rui; Ding, Yong; Zhao, Chongchao; Fan, Linyuan; Hu, Changwen

    2015-08-24

    To overcome the bottleneck of water splitting, the exploration of efficient, selective, and stable water oxidation catalysts (WOCs) is crucial. We report an all-inorganic, oxidatively and hydrolytically stable WOC based on a polyoxometalate [(A-α-SiW9 O34)2Co8(OH)6(H2O)2(CO3)3](16-) (Co8 POM). As a cobalt(II)-based cubane water oxidation catalyst, Co8POM embeds double Co(II)4O3 cores. The self-assembled catalyst is similar to the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PS II). Using [Ru(bpy)3](2+) as a photosensitizer and persulfate as a sacrificial electron acceptor, Co8POM exhibits excellent water oxidation activity with a turnover number (TON) of 1436, currently the highest among bioinspired catalysts with a cubical core, and a high initial turnover frequency (TOF). Investigation by several spectroscopy, spectrometry, and other techniques confirm that Co8POM is a stable and efficient catalyst for visible light-driven water oxidation. The results offer a useful insight into the design of water oxidation catalysts.

  13. Large area radiation detectors based on II VI thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo-Lopez, Manuel

    2015-03-01

    The development of low temperature device technologies that have enabled flexible displays also present opportunities for flexible electronics and flexible integrated systems. Of particular interest are possible applications in flexible, low metal content, sensor systems for unattended ground sensors, smart medical bandages, electronic ID tags for geo-location, conformal antennas, neutron/gamma-ray/x-ray detectors, etc. In this talk, our efforts to develop novel CMOS integration schemes, circuits, memory, sensors as well as novel contacts, dielectrics and semiconductors for flexible electronics are presented. In particular, in this presentation we discuss fundamental materials properties including crystalline structure, interfacial reactions, doping, etc. defining performance and reliability of II-VI-based radiation sensors. We investigate the optimal thickness of a semiconductor diode for thin-film solid state thermal neutron detectors. Besides II-VI materials, we also evaluated several diode materials, Si, CdTe,GaAs, C (diamond), and ZnO, and two neutron converter materials,10B and 6LiF. We determine the minimum semiconductor thickness needed to achieve maximum neutron detection efficiency. By keeping the semiconductor thickness to a minimum, gamma rejection is kept as high as possible. In this way, we optimize detector performance for different thin-film semiconductor materials.

  14. Role of Oxidative Damage in Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Alwood, Joshua S.; Limoli, Charles L.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2014-01-01

    During prolonged spaceflight, astronauts are exposed to both microgravity and space radiation, and are at risk for increased skeletal fragility due to bone loss. Evidence from rodent experiments demonstrates that both microgravity and ionizing radiation can cause bone loss due to increased bone-resorbing osteoclasts and decreased bone-forming osteoblasts, although the underlying molecular mechanisms for these changes are not fully understood. We hypothesized that excess reactive oxidative species (ROS), produced by conditions that simulate spaceflight, alter the tight balance between osteoclast and osteoblast activities, leading to accelerated skeletal remodeling and culminating in bone loss. To test this, we used the MCAT mouse model; these transgenic mice over-express the human catalase gene targeted to mitochondria, the major organelle contributing free radicals. Catalase is an anti-oxidant that converts reactive species, hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. This animal model was selected as it displays extended lifespan, reduced cardiovascular disease and reduced central nervous system radio-sensitivity, consistent with elevated anti-oxidant activity conferred by the transgene. We reasoned that mice overexpressing catalase in mitochondria of osteoblast and osteoclast lineage cells would be protected from the bone loss caused by simulated spaceflight. Over-expression of human catalase localized to mitochondria caused various skeletal phenotypic changes compared to WT mice; this includes greater bone length, decreased cortical bone area and moment of inertia, and indications of altered microarchitecture. These findings indicate mitochondrial ROS are important for normal bone-remodeling and skeletal integrity. Catalase over-expression did not fully protect skeletal tissue from structural decrements caused by simulated spaceflight; however there was significant protection in terms of cellular oxidative damage (MDA levels) to the skeletal tissue. Furthermore, we

  15. Mitochondrial-Derived Oxidants and Cellular Responses to Low Dose/Low LET Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitz, Douglas R.

    2009-11-09

    Exposure to ionizing radiation results in the immediate formation of free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS). It has been assumed that the subsequent injury processes leading to genomic instability and carcinogenesis following radiation, derive from the initial oxidative damage caused by these free radicals and ROS. It is now becoming increasingly obvious that metabolic oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions can be altered by irradiation leading to persistent increases in steady-state levels of intracellular free radicals and ROS that contribute to the long term biological effects of radiation exposure by causing chronic oxidative stress. The objective during the last period of support (DE-FG02-05ER64050; 5/15/05-12/31/09) was to determine the involvement of mitochondrial genetic defects in metabolic oxidative stress and the biological effects of low dose/low LET radiation. Aim 1 was to determine if cells with mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) subunits C and D (SDHC and SDHD in mitochondrial complex II) demonstrated increases in steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS; O2•- and H2O2) as well as demonstrating increased sensitivity to low dose/low LET radiation (10 cGy) in cultured mammalian cells. Aim #2 was to determine if mitochondrially-derived ROS contributed to increased sensitivity to low dose/low LET radiation in mammalian cells containing mutations in SDH subunits. Aim #3 was to determine if a causal relationship existed between increases in mitochondrial ROS production, alterations in electron transport chain proteins, and genomic instability in the progeny of irradiated cells. Evidence gathered in the 2005-2009 period of support demonstrated that mutations in genes coding for mitochondrial electron transport chain proteins (ETC); either Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH) subunit C (SDHC) or subunit D (SDHD); caused increased ROS production, increased genomic instability, and increased sensitivity to low dose/low LET radiation

  16. Mechanisms of Mn(II) catalytic oxidation on ferrihydrite surfaces and the formation of manganese (oxyhydr)oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Shuai; Wang, Xiaoming; Xiang, Quanjun; Yin, Hui; Tan, Wenfeng; Qiu, Guohong; Liu, Fan; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Xionghan

    2017-08-01

    Oxidation of Mn(II) is an important process that controls the mobility and bioavailability of Mn, as well as the formation of Mn (oxyhydr)oxides in natural systems. It was found that the surfaces of minerals, such as iron (oxyhydr)oxides, can accelerate Mn(II) oxidation to a certain degree, but the underlying mechanism has not been clearly understood. This study explores the reaction pathways and mechanisms of Mn(II) oxidation on ferrihydrite surfaces at neutral pH, commonly found in natural environments, by comparisons with montmorillonite, amorphous Al(OH)3, goethite, and magnetite using macroscopic experiments and spectroscopic analyses. Results show that when Mn(II) concentrations are below 4 mM, macroscopic Mn(II) adsorption on the three iron (oxyhydr)oxide surfaces conforms well to the Langmuir equation, with ferrihydrite showing the highest adsorption capacity. With Mn(II) concentrations ranging within 6-24 mM, the adsorbed Mn(II) is mainly oxidized into manganite (γ-MnOOH) and/or feitknechtite (β-MnOOH) by dissolved O2, and Mn(II) removal on a unit mass basis in the presence of magnetite is the highest compared with ferrihydrite and goethite. Ferrihydrite, a semiconductor material, shows stronger catalytic ability for Mn(II) oxidation on the same surface area than insulator minerals (i.e., montmorillonite and amorphous Al(OH)3). Additionally, the products of Mn(II) oxidation in the presence of semiconductor iron (oxyhydr)oxides (i.e., ferrihydrite, goethite, or magnetite) at the same Fe/Mn molar ratio include both manganite and a small amount of Mn(IV) minerals, and the Mn average oxidation states (Mn AOSs) of these products follow the order: magnetite > goethite > ferrihydrite. Magnetite and goethite, with relatively smaller SSAs and lower band gap energies, exhibit greater catalysis for Mn(II) oxidation than ferrihydrite at the same Fe/Mn ratio, which goes against the conventional interfacial effect and is related to the electrochemical properties. Thus

  17. Radiation-hydrodynamical modelling of underluminous type II plateau Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Pumo, M L; Spiro, S; Pastorello, A; Benetti, S; Cappellaro, E; Manicò, G; Turatto, M

    2016-01-01

    With the aim of improving our knowledge about the nature of the progenitors of low-luminosity Type II plateau supernovae (LL SNe IIP), we made radiation-hydrodynamical models of the well-sampled LL SNe IIP 2003Z, 2008bk and 2009md. For these three SNe we infer explosion energies of $0.16$-$0.18$ foe, radii at explosion of $1.8$-$3.5 \\times 10^{13}$ cm, and ejected masses of $10$-$11.3$\\Msun. The estimated progenitor mass on the main sequence is in the range $\\sim 13.2$-$15.1$\\Msun\\, for SN 2003Z and $\\sim 11.4$-$12.9$\\Msun\\, for SNe 2008bk and 2009md, in agreement with estimates from observations of the progenitors. These results together with those for other LL SNe IIP modelled in the same way, enable us also to conduct a comparative study on this SN sub-group. The results suggest that: a) the progenitors of faint SNe IIP are slightly less massive and have less energetic explosions than those of intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP, b) both faint and intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP originate from low-energy explo...

  18. Mercury Oxidation via Catalytic Barrier Filters Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayne Seames; Michael Mann; Darrin Muggli; Jason Hrdlicka; Carol Horabik

    2007-09-30

    In 2004, the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory awarded the University of North Dakota a Phase II University Coal Research grant to explore the feasibility of using barrier filters coated with a catalyst to oxidize elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas streams. Oxidized mercury is substantially easier to remove than elemental mercury. If successful, this technique has the potential to substantially reduce mercury control costs for those installations that already utilize baghouse barrier filters for particulate removal. Completed in 2004, Phase I of this project successfully met its objectives of screening and assessing the possible feasibility of using catalyst coated barrier filters for the oxidation of vapor phase elemental mercury in coal combustion generated flue gas streams. Completed in September 2007, Phase II of this project successfully met its three objectives. First, an effective coating method for a catalytic barrier filter was found. Second, the effects of a simulated flue gas on the catalysts in a bench-scale reactor were determined. Finally, the performance of the best catalyst was assessed using real flue gas generated by a 19 kW research combustor firing each of three separate coal types.

  19. Radiation induced defects and thermoluminescence mechanism in aluminum oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atobe, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Awata, T. [Naruto Univ. of Education, Tokushima (Japan); Okada, M. [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst; Nakagawa, M. [Kagawa Univ., Faculty of Education, Takamatsu, Kagawa (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    The thermoluminescence of the irradiated aluminum oxides were measured to study the radiation induced defects and their behaviors. Neutron and {gamma}-ray irradiation were performed for a shingle crystal of the high purity aluminum oxide. The thermoluminescence glow curve and its activation energy were measured. The spectroscopy measurement on the thermoluminescence and the absorption are also carried out. The observed 430 and 340 nm peaks are discussed relating to the F{sup +} and F centers, respectively. Activation state of the F center transits to 3P state through 1P state by emitting phonons. Trapped electron on 3P state emits phonon of 2.9 eV (430 nm) during transition to the ground state. The above reaction can be written by the equation. F{sup +} + e {yields} (F){sup *} {yields} F + h{nu}(2.9 eV, 470 nm). (Katsuta, H.)

  20. Evaluation of radiation effects in re-oxidized nitrided oxide devices by hot carrier stressing at 77 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, N. C.; Nathan, V.

    1993-01-01

    An attempt has been made to understand the mechanisms of radiation induced degradation by using different types of hot carrier (HC) stressing experiments. The degradation of re-oxidized nitrided oxide gate dielectric due to irradiation and hot carriers are reported. The effect of electron and hole traps of the virgin device on radiation induced threshold voltage shift is discussed.

  1. Theory of edge radiation. Part II: Advanced applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni; Schneidmiller, Evgeni; Yurkov, Mikhail

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we exploit a formalism to describe edge radiation, which relies on Fourier optics techniques [G. Geloni, V. Kocharyan, E. Saldin, E. Schneidmiller, M. Yurkov, Theory of edge radiation. Part I: foundations and basic applications, submitted for publication]. First, we apply our method to develop an analytical model to describe edge radiation in the presence of a vacuum chamber. Such model is based on the solution of the field equation with a tensor Green's function technique. In particular, explicit calculations for a circular vacuum chamber are reported. Second, we consider the use of edge radiation as a tool for electron-beam diagnostics. We discuss coherent edge radiation, extraction of edge radiation by a mirror, and other issues becoming important at high electron energy and long radiation wavelength. Based on this work we also study the impact of edge radiation on X-ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL) setups and we discuss recent results.

  2. Tetraaquabis[3-(2-pyridylsulfanylpropionato N-oxide]nickel(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ravindran Durai Nayagam

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In the centrosymmetric title compound, [Ni(C8H8NO3S2(H2O4], the NiII ion, which lies on an inversion centre, is six coordinated by four water molecules and two propionate O atoms from two 2-pyridylsulfanylpropionate N-oxide ligands, forming a slightly distorted octahedral geometry. An intramolecular O—H...O hydrogen bond stabilizes the molecular conformation. The crystal packing is consolidated by intermolecular O—H...O and C—H...O hydrogen bonding.

  3. Radiation-hydrodynamical modelling of underluminous Type II plateau supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumo, M. L.; Zampieri, L.; Spiro, S.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Manicò, G.; Turatto, M.

    2017-01-01

    With the aim of improving our knowledge about the nature of the progenitors of low-luminosity Type II plateau supernovae (LL SNe IIP), we made radiation-hydrodynamical models of the well-sampled LL SNe IIP 2003Z, 2008bk and 2009md. For these three SNe, we infer explosion energies of 0.16-0.18 foe, radii at explosion of 1.8-3.5 × 1013 cm and ejected masses of 10-11.3 M⊙. The estimated progenitor mass on the main sequence is in the range ˜13.2-15.1 M⊙ for SN 2003Z and ˜11.4-12.9 M⊙ for SNe 2008bk and 2009md, in agreement with estimates from observations of the progenitors. These results together with those for other LL SNe IIP modelled in the same way enable us also to conduct a comparative study on this SN sub-group. The results suggest that (a) the progenitors of faint SNe IIP are slightly less massive and have less energetic explosions than those of intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP; (b) both faint and intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP originate from low-energy explosions of red (or yellow) supergiant stars of low to intermediate mass; (c) some faint objects may also be explained as electron-capture SNe from massive super-asymptotic giant branch stars; and (d) LL SNe IIP form the underluminous tail of the SNe IIP family, where the main parameter `guiding' the distribution seems to be the ratio of the total explosion energy to the ejected mass. Further hydrodynamical studies should be performed and compared to a more extended sample of LL SNe IIP before drawing any conclusion on the relevance of fall-back to this class of events.

  4. Protection against inhaled oxidants through scavenging of oxidized lipids by macrophage receptors MARCO and SR-AI/II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Bauer, Alison K; Arredouani, Mohamed

    2007-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) express the class A scavenger receptors (SRAs) macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) and scavenger receptor AI/II (SRA-I/II), which recognize oxidized lipids and provide innate defense against inhaled pathogens and particles. Increased MARCO expression......, consistent with SRA function in binding oxidized lipids. SR-AI/II-/- mice showed similar enhanced acute lung inflammation after beta-epoxide or another inhaled oxidant (aerosolized leachate of residual oil fly ash). In contrast, subacute ozone exposure did not enhance inflammation in SR-AI/II-/- versus SR-AI...

  5. On the backscatter of solar He II, 304 A radiation from interplanetary He/+/.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paresce, F.; Bowyer, S.

    1973-01-01

    Backscatter of solar He II, 304 A radiation by interplanetary positive helium ions is shown to be insufficient to account for recent observations of this airglow radiation in the night sky at rocket altitudes. In fact, for most viewing directions, the expected intensities probably fall well below the sensitivity threshold of existing extreme ultraviolet instrumentation.

  6. Sorption and catalytic oxidation of Fe(II) at the surface of calcite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mettler, S.; Wolthers, M.; Charlet, L.; Von Gunten, U.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of sorption and coprecipitation of Fe(II) with calcite on the kinetics of Fe(II) oxidation was investigated. The interaction of Fe(II) with calcite was studied experimentally in the absence and presence of oxygen. The sorption of Fe(II) on calcite occurred in two distinguishable steps: (a

  7. Investigation of the interaction of copper(II) oxide and electron beam irradiation crosslinkable polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bee, Soo-Tueen, E-mail: direct.beest@gmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lee Kong Chian Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Sungai Long, Bandar Sungai Long, Cheras, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Sin, Lee Tin, E-mail: direct.tinsin@gmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lee Kong Chian Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Sungai Long, Bandar Sungai Long, Cheras, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Ratnam, C.T. [Radiation Processing Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Haraveen, K.J.S.; Tee, Tiam-Ting [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lee Kong Chian Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Sungai Long, Bandar Sungai Long, Cheras, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Rahmat, A.R. [Department of Polymer Engineering, Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the effects of electron beam irradiation on the properties of copper(II) oxide when added to low-density polyethylene (LDPE) blends were investigated. It was found that the addition of low loading level of copper(II) oxide (⩽2 phr) to LDPE results in significantly poorer gel content and hot set results. However, the incorporation of higher loading level of copper(II) oxide (⩾3 phr) could slightly increase the degree of crosslinking in all irradiated LDPE composites. This is due to the fact that higher amounts of copper(II) oxide could slightly induce the formation of free radicals in LDPE matrix. Besides, increasing irradiation doses was also found to gradually increase the gel content of LDPE composites by generating higher amounts of free radicals. As a consequence, these higher amounts of free radicals released in the LDPE matrix could significantly increase the degree of crosslinking. The addition of copper(II) oxide could reduce the tensile strength and fracture strain (elongation at break) of LDPE composites because of poorer interfacial adhesion effect between copper(II) oxide particles and LDPE matrix. Meanwhile, increasing irradiation doses on all copper(II) oxide added LDPE composites could marginally increase the tensile strength. In addition, increasing irradiation dose could enhance the thermal stability of LDPE composites by increasing the decomposition temperature. The oxidation induction time (OIT) analysis showed that, because of the crosslinking network in the copper(II) oxide added LDPE composites, oxidation reaction is much delayed.

  8. Radiation induced oxidative degradation of polymers. 3. Effect of radiation on mechanical properties. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seguchi, T.; Arakawa, K.; Ito, M.; Hayakawa, N.; Machi, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma. Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment)

    1983-01-01

    The changes of mechanical properties of various kinds of polyethylene (PE) and ethylene-propylene copolymer (EPR) with the irradiation in air, in oxygen of 10 atm, and under vacuum were investigated. The decrease in the elongation (Esub(b)) and the tensile strength (Tsub(b)) of PE by the irradiation in oxygen is larger than under vacuum. The changes of Esub(b) well reflect the degradation of PE. In case of EPR, the Tsub(b) decreases sharply with dose in any environments, and the Esub(b) decreases under vacuum to a larger extent than in oxygen. The modulus at 200% elongation of EPR increases with dose under vacuum, but decreases in oxygen. When the samples were irradiated in air, the changes of the mechanical properties were the intermediate between oxygen and vacuum and dependent on the ratio of oxidation and non-oxidation layers in the film. The antioxidant (Irganox 1010 or DPPD) mixed in polymers was found to retard effectively the polymer degradation by the irradiation in oxygen.

  9. Radiation hardness of single-crystalline zinc oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koike, Kazuto; Aoki, Takahiro; Fujimoto, Ryugo; Sasa, Shigehiko; Yano, Mitsuaki [Nanomaterials Microdevices Research Center, Osaka Institute of Technology, Ohmiya, Asahi-ku, Osaka 535-8585 (Japan); Gonda, Shun-ichi [The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Mihogaoka, Ibaraki-city, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Ishigami, Ryoya; Kume, Kyo [The Wakasa Wan Energy Research Center, Nagatani, Tsuruga-city, Fukui 914-0192 (Japan)

    2012-07-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a potential semiconductor to exhibit high radiation hardness since large threshold displacement energy for damage can be expected due to the small unit-cell volume and large bandgap energy. In order to study the radiation hardness, single-crystalline c-axis-oriented ZnO films with and without two-dimensional electron gas, and bulk crystals of ZnO and gallium nitride (GaN) for comparison, were irradiated with 8 MeV protons at the wide range of fluences from 2 x 10{sup 13} to 1 x 10{sup 17} p/cm{sup 2}. For both ZnO films, decrease of luminescence intensity followed by increase of electrical resistance was observed at larger fluences than {proportional_to}5 x 10{sup 14} p/cm{sup 2}. This threshold fluence was found to be much larger and larger than those of GaN and ZnO bulk crystals, respectively, indicating that ZnO thin films should be useful for such device applications as the electronics for space satellites and nuclear reactors. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Effects of copper-oxide nanoparticles, dissolved copper and ultraviolet radiation on copper bioaccumulation, photosynthesis and oxidative stress in the aquatic macrophyte Elodea nuttallii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regier, Nicole; Cosio, Claudia; von Moos, Nadia; Slaveykova, Vera I

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the uptake and sub-toxic effects of CuO nanoparticles (CuO-NPs), dissolved Cu(II) alone or in combination with UV radiation on the aquatic macrophyte Elodea nuttallii were studied. Emphasis was on Cu accumulation, growth, photosynthesis and the oxidative stress related enzymes peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). The results showed stronger Cu accumulation in plants exposed to 10 mg L(-1) CuO-NPs, corresponding to 1.4-2 mg L(-1) dissolved Cu(II), than to 256 μg L(-1) Cu(II). However, the ratio between the accumulated Cu and dissolved Cu in CuO treatments was lower than in Cu(II) treatments. Additional UV exposure increased accumulation in both treatments, with the effect being stronger for Cu accumulation from CuO-NPs than for dissolved Cu(II). Photosynthetic capacity was strongly reduced by UV treatment, whereas remained unaffected by Cu(II) or CuO-NP treatments. Similarly, the increase of SOD activity was more pronounced in the UV treatments. On the other hand, POD activity enhancement was strongest in the plants exposed to CuO-NPs for 24 h. Expression of the copper transporter COPT1 as revealed by RT-qPCR was inhibited by Cu(II) and CuO-NP treatment, limiting the uptake of excess Cu into the cells. Overall, the combined exposure of E. nuttallii to UV radiation with CuO-NPs or Cu(II) has a higher impact than exposure to CuO-NPs or Cu(II) alone. The results imply that heavy pollution of natural water with CuO-NPs or dissolved Cu might have stronger effects in combination with natural UV irradiation on organisms in situ.

  11. Silica functionalized Cu(II) catalysed selective oxidation of benzyl alcohols using TEMPO and molecular oxygen as an oxidant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manjulla Gupta; Pankaj Sharma; Monika Gupta; Rajive Gupta

    2015-08-01

    A general scheme for the oxidation of benzyl alcohols catalyzed by silica functionalized copper (II) has been designed. TEMPO, a free radical, assists this oxidation that was initiated by molecular oxygen which converts it to a primary oxidant. This catalytic combination i.e. SiO2 -Cu(II) in presence of TEMPO and oxygen provides excellent results in terms of yields and reaction time. SiO2 -Cu(II) was very well characterized by different spectroscopic techniques such as FTIR, XRD, TGA, XPS, EDAX, SEM, TEM and AAS and is recyclable upto five times which makes it economically beneficial.

  12. nIFTy galaxy cluster simulations - II. Radiative models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembolini, Federico; Elahi, Pascal Jahan; Pearce, Frazer R.; Power, Chris; Knebe, Alexander; Kay, Scott T.; Cui, Weiguang; Yepes, Gustavo; Beck, Alexander M.; Borgani, Stefano; Cunnama, Daniel; Davé, Romeel; February, Sean; Huang, Shuiyao; Katz, Neal; McCarthy, Ian G.; Murante, Giuseppe; Newton, Richard D. A.; Perret, Valentin; Puchwein, Ewald; Saro, Alexandro; Schaye, Joop; Teyssier, Romain

    2016-07-01

    We have simulated the formation of a massive galaxy cluster (M_{200}^crit = 1.1 × 1015 h-1 M⊙) in a Λ cold dark matter universe using 10 different codes (RAMSES, 2 incarnations of AREPO and 7 of GADGET), modelling hydrodynamics with full radiative subgrid physics. These codes include smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH), spanning traditional and advanced SPH schemes, adaptive mesh and moving mesh codes. Our goal is to study the consistency between simulated clusters modelled with different radiative physical implementations - such as cooling, star formation and thermal active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback. We compare images of the cluster at z = 0, global properties such as mass, and radial profiles of various dynamical and thermodynamical quantities. We find that, with respect to non-radiative simulations, dark matter is more centrally concentrated, the extent not simply depending on the presence/absence of AGN feedback. The scatter in global quantities is substantially higher than for non-radiative runs. Intriguingly, adding radiative physics seems to have washed away the marked code-based differences present in the entropy profile seen for non-radiative simulations in Sembolini et al.: radiative physics + classic SPH can produce entropy cores, at least in the case of non cool-core clusters. Furthermore, the inclusion/absence of AGN feedback is not the dividing line -as in the case of describing the stellar content - for whether a code produces an unrealistic temperature inversion and a falling central entropy profile. However, AGN feedback does strongly affect the overall stellar distribution, limiting the effect of overcooling and reducing sensibly the stellar fraction.

  13. Diverse manganese(II)-oxidizing bacteria are prevalent in drinking water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Daniel N; Pinto, Ameet; Anantharaman, Karthik; Ruberg, Steven A; Kramer, Eva L; Raskin, Lutgarde; Dick, Gregory J

    2016-12-09

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are highly reactive minerals that influence the speciation, mobility, bioavailability and toxicity of a wide variety of organic and inorganic compounds. Although Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria are known to catalyze the formation of Mn oxides, little is known about the organisms responsible for Mn oxidation in situ, especially in engineered environments. Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria are important in drinking water systems, including in biofiltration and water distribution systems. Here, we used cultivation dependent and independent approaches to investigate Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria in drinking water sources, a treatment plant and associated distribution system. We isolated 29 strains of Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria and found that highly similar 16S rRNA gene sequences were present in all culture-independent datasets and dominant in the studied drinking water treatment plant. These results highlight a potentially important role for Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria in drinking water systems, where biogenic Mn oxides may affect water quality in terms of aesthetic appearance, speciation of metals and oxidation of organic and inorganic compounds. Deciphering the ecology of these organisms and the factors that regulate their Mn(II)-oxidizing activity could yield important insights into how microbial communities influence the quality of drinking water.

  14. Low-temperature Synthesis of Tin(II) Oxide From Tin(II) ketoacidoximate Precursor

    KAUST Repository

    Alshankiti, Buthainah

    2015-04-01

    Sn (II) oxide finds numerous applications in different fields such as thin film transistors1, solar cells2 and sensors.3 In this study we present the fabrication of tin monoxide SnO by using Sn (II) ketoacid oximate complexes as precursors. Tin (II) ketoacidoximates of the type [HON=CRCOO]2Sn where R= Me 1, R= CH2Ph 2, and [(MeON=CMeCOO)3Sn]- NH4 +.2H2O 3 were synthesized by in situ formation of the ketoacid oximate ligand. The crystal structures were determined via single crystal X- ray diffraction of the complexes 1-3 revealed square planar and square pyramidal coordination environments for the Sn atom. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding is observed in all the complexes. Furthermore, the complexes were characterized by Infrared (IR), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and elemental analysis. From thermogravimetric analysis of 1-3, it was found that the complexes decomposed in the range of 160 – 165 oC. Analysis of the gases evolved during decomposition indicated complete loss of the oximato ligand in one step and the formation of SnO. Spin coating of 1 on silicon or glass substrate show uniform coating of SnO. Band gaps of SnO films were measured and found to be in the range of 3.0 – 3.3 eV by UV-Vis spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated surface oxidation of the SnO film. Heating 1 above 140 oC in air gives SnO of size ranging from 10 – 500 nm and is spherical in shape. The SnO nanomaterial is characterized by powder X-ray diffraction(XRD), Raman spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM).

  15. Effect of ozone oxidative preconditioning in preventing early radiation-induced lung injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.H. Bakkal

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation causes its biological effects mainly through oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Previous studies showed that ozone oxidative preconditioning attenuated pathophysiological events mediated by reactive oxygen species. As inhalation of ozone induces lung injury, the aim of this study was to examine whether ozone oxidative preconditioning potentiates or attenuates the effects of irradiation on the lung. Rats were subjected to total body irradiation, with or without treatment with ozone oxidative preconditioning (0.72 mg/kg. Serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative damage markers, and histopathological analysis were compared at 6 and 72 h after total body irradiation. Irradiation significantly increased lung malondialdehyde levels as an end-product of lipoperoxidation. Irradiation also significantly decreased lung superoxide dismutase activity, which is an indicator of the generation of oxidative stress and an early protective response to oxidative damage. Ozone oxidative preconditioning plus irradiation significantly decreased malondialdehyde levels and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, which might indicate protection of the lung from radiation-induced lung injury. Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta levels, which increased significantly following total body irradiation, were decreased with ozone oxidative preconditioning. Moreover, ozone oxidative preconditioning was able to ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury assessed by histopathological evaluation. In conclusion, ozone oxidative preconditioning, repeated low-dose intraperitoneal administration of ozone, did not exacerbate radiation-induced lung injury, and, on the contrary, it provided protection against radiation-induced lung damage.

  16. Effect of ozone oxidative preconditioning in preventing early radiation-induced lung injury in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakkal, B.H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Bulent Ecevit University, Kozlu, Zonguldak (Turkey); Gultekin, F.A. [Department of General Surgery, School of Medicine, Bulent Ecevit University, Kozlu, Zonguldak (Turkey); Guven, B. [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Bulent Ecevit University, Kozlu, Zonguldak (Turkey); Turkcu, U.O. [Mugla School of Health Sciences, Mugla Sitki Kocman University, Mugla (Turkey); Bektas, S. [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Bulent Ecevit University, Kozlu, Zonguldak (Turkey); Can, M. [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Bulent Ecevit University, Kozlu, Zonguldak (Turkey)

    2013-09-27

    Ionizing radiation causes its biological effects mainly through oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Previous studies showed that ozone oxidative preconditioning attenuated pathophysiological events mediated by reactive oxygen species. As inhalation of ozone induces lung injury, the aim of this study was to examine whether ozone oxidative preconditioning potentiates or attenuates the effects of irradiation on the lung. Rats were subjected to total body irradiation, with or without treatment with ozone oxidative preconditioning (0.72 mg/kg). Serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative damage markers, and histopathological analysis were compared at 6 and 72 h after total body irradiation. Irradiation significantly increased lung malondialdehyde levels as an end-product of lipoperoxidation. Irradiation also significantly decreased lung superoxide dismutase activity, which is an indicator of the generation of oxidative stress and an early protective response to oxidative damage. Ozone oxidative preconditioning plus irradiation significantly decreased malondialdehyde levels and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, which might indicate protection of the lung from radiation-induced lung injury. Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta levels, which increased significantly following total body irradiation, were decreased with ozone oxidative preconditioning. Moreover, ozone oxidative preconditioning was able to ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury assessed by histopathological evaluation. In conclusion, ozone oxidative preconditioning, repeated low-dose intraperitoneal administration of ozone, did not exacerbate radiation-induced lung injury, and, on the contrary, it provided protection against radiation-induced lung damage.

  17. Formation of globular clusters induced by external ultraviolet radiation II: Three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Makito; Hasegawa, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    We explore the possibility of the formation of globular clusters under ultraviolet (UV) background radiation. One-dimensional spherical symmetric radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) simulations by Hasegawa et al. have demonstrated that the collapse of low-mass (10^6-10^7 solar masses) gas clouds exposed to intense UV radiation can lead to the formation of compact star clusters like globular clusters (GCs) if gas clouds contract with supersonic infall velocities. However, three-dimensional effects, such as the anisotropy of background radiation and the inhomogeneity in gas clouds, have not been studied so far. In this paper, we perform three-dimensional RHD simulations in a semi-cosmological context, and reconsider the formation of compact star clusters in strong UV radiation fields. As a result, we find that although anisotropic radiation fields bring an elongated shadow of neutral gas, almost spherical compact star clusters can be procreated from a "supersonic infall" cloud, since photo-dissociating radiation supp...

  18. Toxic variability and radiation sensitization by Pt(II) analogs in Salmonella typhimurium cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, R.C.; Khokhar, A.R.; Teicher, B.A.; Douple, E.B.

    1984-09-01

    A rationale is presented for the development of toxic, i.e., cytocidal, antitumor drugs as clinical hypoxic cell radiation sensitizers. Pt(II) complex-induced hypoxic cell radiation sensitization may occur from Pt(II) complex in free solution and Pt(II) bound to DNA. Although both the free solution and the bound compartments may operate, the free solution compartment is more likely amenable to experimental and clinical control in the case of systemically active Pt drugs. Assuming equivalent cell uptake of different Pt(II) complexes, the free solution compartment of Pt(II) sensitization can be increased by utilizing less toxic analogs of the antitumor drug cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum(II). One such less toxic Pt(II) sensitizer currently in clinical use is found to be cis-(1,1-cyclobutanedicarboxylato)diammineplatinum(II). A new finding of both clinical and mechanistic usefulness is described: irradiation of hypoxic solutions of four cis-Pt(II) complexes, but not two trans-Pt(II) complexes, creates products that cause toxicity in excees of the unirradiated solutions.

  19. Characterization of the physiology and cell-mineral interactions of the marine anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II) oxidizer Rhodovulum iodosum--implications for Precambrian Fe(II) oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenfang; Swanner, Elizabeth D; Hao, Likai; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Obst, Martin; Pan, Yongxin; Kappler, Andreas

    2014-06-01

    Anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (photoferrotrophs) are suggested to have contributed to the deposition of banded iron formations (BIFs) from oxygen-poor seawater. However, most studies evaluating the contribution of photoferrotrophs to Precambrian Fe(II) oxidation have used freshwater and not marine strains. Therefore, we investigated the physiology and mineral products of Fe(II) oxidation by the marine photoferrotroph Rhodovulum iodosum. Poorly crystalline Fe(III) minerals formed initially and transformed to more crystalline goethite over time. During Fe(II) oxidation, cell surfaces were largely free of minerals. Instead, the minerals were co-localized with EPS suggesting that EPS plays a critical role in preventing cell encrustation, likely by binding Fe(III) and directing precipitation away from cell surfaces. Fe(II) oxidation rates increased with increasing initial Fe(II) concentration (0.43-4.07 mM) under a light intensity of 12 μmol quanta m(-2) s(-1). Rates also increased as light intensity increased (from 3 to 20 μmol quanta m(-2) s(-1)), while the addition of Si did not significantly change Fe(II) oxidation rates. These results elaborate on how the physical and chemical conditions present in the Precambrian ocean controlled the activity of marine photoferrotrophs and confirm the possibility that such microorganisms could have oxidized Fe(II), generating the primary Fe(III) minerals that were then deposited to some Precambrian BIFs. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 17: Radiation Protection II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  1. nIFTy galaxy cluster simulations II: radiative models

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sembolini, F

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We have simulated the formation of a massive galaxy cluster (M(supcrit)(sub200) = 1.1×10(sup15)h(sup-1)M) in a CDM universe using 10 different codes (RAMSES, 2 incarnations of AREPO and 7 of GADGET), modeling hydrodynamics with full radiative...

  2. nIFTy galaxy cluster simulations II: radiative models

    CERN Document Server

    Sembolini, Federico; Pearce, Frazer R; Power, Chris; Knebe, Alexander; Kay, Scott T; Cui, Weiguang; Yepes, Gustavo; Beck, Alexander M; Borgani, Stefano; Cunnama, Daniel; Davé, Romeel; February, Sean; Huang, Shuiyao; Katz, Neal; McCarthy, Ian G; Murante, Giuseppe; Newton, Richard D A; Perret, Valentin; Saro, Alexandro; Schaye, Joop; Teyssier, Romain

    2015-01-01

    We have simulated the formation of a massive galaxy cluster (M$_{200}^{\\rm crit}$ = 1.1$\\times$10$^{15}h^{-1}M_{\\odot}$) in a $\\Lambda$CDM universe using 10 different codes (RAMSES, 2 incarnations of AREPO and 7 of GADGET), modeling hydrodynamics with full radiative subgrid physics. These codes include Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), spanning traditional and advanced SPH schemes, adaptive mesh and moving mesh codes. Our goal is to study the consistency between simulated clusters modeled with different radiative physical implementations - such as cooling, star formation and AGN feedback. We compare images of the cluster at $z=0$, global properties such as mass, and radial profiles of various dynamical and thermodynamical quantities. We find that, with respect to non-radiative simulations, dark matter is more centrally concentrated, the extent not simply depending on the presence/absence of AGN feedback. The scatter in global quantities is substantially higher than for non-radiative runs. Intriguingly, a...

  3. Incorporation of oxidized uranium into Fe (hydr)oxides during Fe(II) catalyzed remineralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nico, Peter S.; Stewart, Brandy D.; Fendorf, Scott

    2009-07-01

    The form of solid phase U after Fe(II) induced anaerobic remineralization of ferrihydrite in the presence of aqueous and absorbed U(VI) was investigated under both abiotic batch and biotic flow conditions. Experiments were conducted with synthetic ground waters containing 0.168 mM U(VI), 3.8 mM carbonate, and 3.0 mM Ca{sup 2+}. In spite of the high solubility of U(VI) under these conditions, appreciable removal of U(VI) from solution was observed in both the abiotic and biotic systems. The majority of the removed U was determined to be substituted as oxidized U (U(VI) or U(V)) into the octahedral position of the goethite and magnetite formed during ferrihydrite remineralization. It is estimated that between 3% and 6% of octahedral Fe(III) centers in the new Fe minerals were occupied by U(VI). This site specific substitution is distinct from the non-specific U co-precipitation processes in which uranyl compounds, e.g. uranyl hydroxide or carbonate, are entrapped with newly formed Fe oxides. The prevalence of site specific U incorporation under both abiotic and biotic conditions and the fact that the produced solids were shown to be resistant to both extraction (30 mM KHCO{sub 3}) and oxidation (air for 5 days) suggest the potential importance of sequestration in Fe oxides as a stable and immobile form of U in the environment.

  4. Incorporation of oxidized uranium into Fe (hydr)oxides during Fe(II) catalyzed remineralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nico, Peter S.; Stewart, Brandy D.; Fendorf, Scott

    2009-07-01

    The form of solid phase U after Fe(II) induced anaerobic remineralization of ferrihydrite in the presence of aqueous and absorbed U(VI) was investigated under both abiotic batch and biotic flow conditions. Experiments were conducted with synthetic ground waters containing 0.168 mM U(VI), 3.8 mM carbonate, and 3.0 mM Ca{sup 2+}. In spite of the high solubility of U(VI) under these conditions, appreciable removal of U(VI) from solution was observed in both the abiotic and biotic systems. The majority of the removed U was determined to be substituted as oxidized U (U(VI) or U(V)) into the octahedral position of the goethite and magnetite formed during ferrihydrite remineralization. It is estimated that between 3% and 6% of octahedral Fe(III) centers in the new Fe minerals were occupied by U(VI). This site specific substitution is distinct from the non-specific U co-precipitation processes in which uranyl compounds, e.g. uranyl hydroxide or carbonate, are entrapped with newly formed Fe oxides. The prevalence of site specific U incorporation under both abiotic and biotic conditions and the fact that the produced solids were shown to be resistant to both extraction (30 mM KHCO{sub 3}) and oxidation (air for 5 days) suggest the potential importance of sequestration in Fe oxides as a stable and immobile form of U in the environment.

  5. Microbial Fe(II) oxidation at circumneutral pH: Reaction kinetics, mineral products, and distribution of neutrophilic iron oxidizers in wetland soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollrath, S.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple studies have shown that neutrophilic Fe(II) oxidizers can conserve energy from Fe(II) oxidation, however, it is still unclear how they can compete against the fast abiotic reaction at neutral pH, or to which extent these bacteria increase the overall Fe(II) oxidation rate. Similar to

  6. Abiotic reduction of nitroaromatic compounds by Fe(II) associated with iron oxides and humic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Fubo; Xie, Li; Li, Jun; Zhou, Qi

    2013-05-01

    Experiments were conducted to examine the reduction of nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) by Fe(II) associated with iron oxides (goethite, hematite and magnetite) and humic acid. The reduction rate of nitrobenzene decreased in the order of Fe(II) associated with magnetite>Fe(II) associated with goethite>Fe(II) associated with hematite. We proposed a four-step model (adsorption, electron transfer to conduction band, electron transfer to nitrobenzene and electron transfer to crystal lattice) for nitrobenzene reduction by Fe(II) associated with iron oxides. Fe(II)-humic acid complexes did not present reduction capability of nitrobenzene. Furthermore, Humic acid significantly inhibited nitrobenzene reduction by Fe(II) associated with iron oxides. The inhibitory effect of humic acid toward the reduction of nitrobenzene decreased in the order of magnetite>goethite>hematite. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ion irradiation and biomolecular radiation damage II. Indirect effect

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wei; Su, Wenhui

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that damage of genome in a living cell by ionizing radiation is about one-third direct and two-thirds indirect. The former which has been introduced in our last paper, concerns direct energy deposition and ionizing reactions in the biomolecules; the latter results from radiation induced reactive species (mainly radicals) in the medium (mainly water) surrounding the biomolecules. In this review, a short description of ion implantation induced radical formation in water is presented. Then we summarize the aqueous radical reaction chemistry of DNA, protein and their components, followed by a brief introduction of biomolecular damage induced by secondary particles (ions and electron). Some downstream biological effects are also discussed.

  8. A New PLS-II In-Vacuum Undulator and Characterization of Undulator Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, D-E; Park, K-H; Seo, H-S; Ha, T; Jeong, Y-G; Han, H-S; Lee, W W; Huang, J-Y; Nam, S; Kim, K-R; Shin, S

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the result of overall studies from development to characterization of undulator radiation. After three years of upgrading, PLS-II [1, 2] has been operating successfully since 21st March 2012. During the upgrade, we developed and installed an in-vacuum undulator (IVU) that generates brilliant X-ray beam. The IVU with 3 GeV electron beam generates undulator radiation up to ~ 21 keV using 11th higher harmonic. The characterizations of the undulator radiation at an X-ray beam line in PLS-II agreed well with the simulation. Based on this performance demonstration, the in-vacuum undulator is successfully operating at PLS-II.

  9. Gauge-independent Wigner functions. II. Inclusion of radiation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanainen, J.; Varró, S.; Serimaa, O. T.

    1987-04-01

    We investigate the effects of quantized radiation reaction fields on the motion of a charged particle using the gauge-independent Wigner operator (GIWO) and gauge-independent Wigner function (GIWF) introduced earlier [Phys. Rev. A 33, 2913 (1986)]. To complement the equation of motion of the GIWO, the Heisenberg equations of motion of the quantized electromagnetic fields are solved within the Markov approximation. After considering the operator orderings and orders of magnitude of the radiation reaction terms, we eliminate the quantum fields from the evolution equation of the GIWO, and obtain for the GIWF a closed equation containing relaxation terms. As an example of the formalism we derive a Fokker-Planck equation (FPE) for the GIWF of a particle in a constant magnetic field. To the order ħ 0 the classical radiation damping ensues, and the first quantum correction proportional to ħ emerges as diffusion. The diffusion operator turns out to be indefinite and the FPE consequently defies our attempts at a complete analysis, but we demonstrate that at least the coherent states constructed from the Landau levels exhibit a manifestly physical time evolution under the FPE. We point out that the GIWF calculated with quantized electromagnetic fields is divergent even if the fields are in the vacuum state, and suggest that the GIWF should be associated with the particle state by ignoring the quantized fields altogether.

  10. Formation of globular clusters induced by external ultraviolet radiation - II. Three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Makito; Umemura, Masayuki; Hasegawa, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    We explore the possibility of the formation of globular clusters (GCs) under ultraviolet (UV) background radiation. One-dimensional spherical symmetric radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) simulations by Hasegawa et al. have demonstrated that the collapse of low-mass (106-7 M⊙) gas clouds exposed to intense UV radiation can lead to the formation of compact star clusters like GCs if gas clouds contract with supersonic infall velocities. However, three-dimensional effects, such as the anisotropy of background radiation and the inhomogeneity in gas clouds, have not been studied so far. In this paper, we perform three-dimensional RHD simulations in a semicosmological context, and reconsider the formation of compact star clusters in strong UV radiation fields. As a result, we find that although anisotropic radiation fields bring an elongated shadow of neutral gas, almost spherical compact star clusters can be procreated from a `supersonic infall' cloud, since photodissociating radiation suppresses the formation of hydrogen molecules in the shadowed regions and the regions are compressed by UV heated ambient gas. The properties of resultant star clusters match those of GCs. On the other hand, in weak UV radiation fields, dark-matter-dominated star clusters with low stellar density form due to the self-shielding effect as well as the positive feedback by ionizing photons. Thus, we conclude that the `supersonic infall' under a strong UV background is a potential mechanism to form GCs.

  11. Enzymatic microbial Mn(II) oxidation and Mn biooxide production in the Guaymas Basin deep-sea hydrothermal plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Gregory J.; Clement, Brian G.; Webb, Samuel M.; Fodrie, F. Joel; Bargar, John R.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2009-11-01

    Microorganisms play important roles in mediating biogeochemical reactions in deep-sea hydrothermal plumes, but little is known regarding the mechanisms that underpin these transformations. At Guaymas Basin (GB) in the Gulf of California, hydrothermal vents inject fluids laden with dissolved Mn(II) (dMn) into the deep waters of the basin where it is oxidized and precipitated as particulate Mn(III/IV) oxides, forming turbid hydrothermal "clouds". Previous studies have predicted extremely short residence times for dMn at GB and suggested they are the result of microbially-mediated Mn(II) oxidation and precipitation. Here we present biogeochemical results that support a central role for microorganisms in driving Mn(II) oxidation in the GB hydrothermal plume, with enzymes being the primary catalytic agent. dMn removal rates at GB are remarkably fast for a deep-sea hydrothermal plume (up to 2 nM/h). These rapid rates were only observed within the plume, not in background deep-sea water above the GB plume or at GB plume depths (˜1750-2000 m) in the neighboring Carmen Basin, where there is no known venting. dMn removal is dramatically inhibited under anoxic conditions and by the presence of the biological poison, sodium azide. A conspicuous temperature optimum of dMn removal rates (˜40 °C) and a saturation-like (i.e. Michaelis-Menten) response to O 2 concentration were observed, indicating an enzymatic mechanism. dMn removal was resistant to heat treatment used to select for spore-forming organisms, but very sensitive to low concentrations of added Cu, a cofactor required by the putative Mn(II)-oxidizing enzyme. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and synchrotron radiation-based X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD) revealed the Mn oxides to have a hexagonal birnessite or δ-MnO 2-like mineral structure, indicating that these freshly formed deep-sea Mn oxides are strikingly similar to primary biogenic Mn oxides produced by laboratory cultures of bacteria

  12. Tin( ii ) ketoacidoximates: synthesis, X-ray structures and processing to tin( ii ) oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Khanderi, Jayaprakash

    2015-10-21

    Tin(ii) ketoacidoximates of the type [HONCRCOO]Sn (R = Me 1, CHPh 2) and (MeONCMeCOO)Sn] NH·2HO 3 were synthesized by reacting pyruvate- and hydroxyl- or methoxylamine RONH (R = H, Me) with tin(ii) chloride dihydrate SnCl·2HO. The single crystal X-ray structure reveals that the geometry at the Sn atom is trigonal bipyramidal in 1, 2 and trigonal pyramidal in 3. Inter- or intramolecular hydrogen bonding is observed in 1-3. Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis shows that the decomposition of 1-3 to SnO occurs at ca. 160 °C. The evolved gas analysis during TG indicates complete loss of the oximato ligand in one step for 1 whereas a small organic residue is additionally removed at temperatures >400 °C for 2. Above 140 °C, [HONC(Me)COO]Sn (1) decomposes in air to spherical SnO particles of size 10-500 nm. Spin coating of 1 on Si or a glass substrate followed by heating at 200 °C results in a uniform film of SnO. The band gap of the produced SnO film and nanomaterial was determined by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to be in the range of 3.0-3.3 eV. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates surface oxidation of the SnO film to SnO in ambient atmosphere.

  13. Kinetics of Mn(II) oxidation by spores of the marine Bacillus sp. SG-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2016-09-01

    The kinetics of Mn(II) oxidation by spores of the marine Bacillus sp. SG-1 was measured under controlled conditions of the initial Mn(II) concentration, spore concentration, chemical speciation, pH, O2, and temperature. Mn(II) oxidation experiments were performed with spore concentrations ranging from 0.7 to 11 × 109 spores/L, a pH range from 5.8 to 8.1, temperatures between 4 and 58 °C, a range of dissolved oxygen from 2 to 270 μM, and initial Mn(II) concentrations from 1 to 200 μM. The Mn(II) oxidation rates were directly proportional to the spore concentrations over these ranges of concentration. The Mn(II) oxidation rate increased with increasing initial Mn(II) concentration to a critical concentration, as described by the Michaelis-Menten model (Km = ca. 3 μM). Whereas with starting Mn(II) concentrations above the critical concentration, the rate was almost constant in low ionic solution (I = 0.05, 0.08). At high ionic solution (I = 0.53, 0.68), the rate was inversely correlated with Mn(II) concentration. Increase in the Mn(II) oxidation rate with the dissolved oxygen concentration followed the Michaelis-Menten model (Km = 12-19 μM DO) in both a HEPES-buffered commercial drinking (soft) water and in artificial and natural seawater. Overall, our results suggest that the mass transport limitations of Mn(II) ions due to secondary Mn oxide products accumulating on the spores cause a significant decrease of the oxidation rate at higher initial Mn(II) concentration on a spore basis, as well as in more concentrated ionic solutions. The optimum pH for Mn(II) oxidation was approximately 7.0 in low ionic solutions (I = 0.08). The high rates at the alkaline side (pH > 7.5) may suggest a contribution by heterogeneous reactions on manganese bio-oxides. The effect of temperature on the Mn(II) oxidation rate was studied in three solutions (500 mM NaCl, ASW, NSW solutions). Thermal denaturation occurred at 58 °C and spore germination was evident at 40 °C in all three

  14. Protein film photoelectrochemistry of the water oxidation enzyme photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Masaru; Zhang, Jenny Z; Paul, Nicholas; Reisner, Erwin

    2014-09-21

    Photosynthesis is responsible for the sunlight-powered conversion of carbon dioxide and water into chemical energy in the form of carbohydrates and the release of O2 as a by-product. Although many proteins are involved in photosynthesis, the fascinating machinery of Photosystem II (PSII) is at the heart of this process. This tutorial review describes an emerging technique named protein film photoelectrochemistry (PF-PEC), which allows for the light-dependent activity of PSII adsorbed onto an electrode surface to be studied. The technique is straightforward to use, does not require highly specialised and/or expensive equipment, is highly selective for the active fractions of the adsorbed enzyme, and requires a small amount of enzyme sample. The use of PF-PEC to study PSII can yield insights into its activity, stability, quantum yields, redox behaviour, and interfacial electron transfer pathways. It can also be used in PSII inhibition studies and chemical screening, which may prove useful in the development of biosensors. PSII PF-PEC cells also serve as proof-of-principle solar water oxidation systems; here, a comparison is made against PSII-inspired synthetic photocatalysts and materials for artificial photosynthesis.

  15. Kinetics study on photochemical oxidation of polyacrylamide by ozone combined with hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Guang-meng; SUN De-zhi; CHUNG Jong Shik

    2006-01-01

    An investigation on the process of ozone combined with hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet radiation has been carried out in order to establish the kinetics for photochemical oxidation of polyacrylamide (PAM) in aqueous solution. Effects of operating parameters, including initial PAM concentration, dosages of ozone and hydrogen peroxide, UV radiation and pH value on the photochemical oxidation of PAM, have been studied. There was an increase in photochemical oxidation rate of PAM with increasing of dosages of O3, H2O2 and ultraviolet radiation. Upon increasing of the initial PAM concentration, the photochemical oxidation rate of PAM decreased. Slight effect of pH value on the photochemical oxidation rate of PAM was observed in the experiments. The kinetics equation for the photochemical oxidation of PAM by the system has been established.

  16. EXAFS spectra using synchrotron radiation of Cu (II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninama, Samrath; Mishra, A.

    2016-10-01

    EXAFS analysis of Cu (II) complex as a ligand of 2-methyl-3-[(bis-aniline(R) phenyl]- 3H-1, 5 benzodiazepine. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra have been recorded at the K-edge of Cu (II) using the energy dispersive EXAFS beam line at 2.5GeV Indus - 2 synchrotron source at RRCAT, Indore, India. A theoretical EXAFS data analysis is also carried out by Fourier analysis of experimental EXAFS data of the copper (II) complexes. This analysis includes details of the Fourier transform of the data and the extraction of metal-ligand bond length. Bond lengths determined from data analysis methods are compared with the bond lengths obtained from several other known techniques, namely, Levy's, Lytle's and Lytle, Sayers and Stern's (LSS) methods. These data have also been calibrated by derivative method and bond lengths have also been obtained from Fourier transformation method and the results have been compared with the each other. The EXAFS data have been analyzed using the computer software Athena.

  17. Extracellular haem peroxidases mediate Mn(II) oxidation in a marine Roseobacter bacterium via superoxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andeer, Peter F; Learman, Deric R; McIlvin, Matt; Dunn, James A; Hansel, Colleen M

    2015-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants in environmental systems. A number of biotic and abiotic pathways induce the oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn oxides. Here, we use a combination of proteomic analyses and activity assays, to identify the enzyme(s) responsible for extracellular superoxide-mediated Mn oxide formation by a bacterium within the ubiquitous Roseobacter clade. We show that animal haem peroxidases (AHPs) located on the outer membrane and within the secretome are responsible for Mn(II) oxidation. These novel peroxidases have previously been implicated in direct Mn(II) oxidation by phylogenetically diverse bacteria. Yet, we show that in this Roseobacter species, AHPs mediate Mn(II) oxidation not through a direct reaction but by producing superoxide and likely also by degrading hydrogen peroxide. These findings point to a eukaryotic-like oscillatory oxidative-peroxidative enzymatic cycle by these AHPs that leads to Mn oxide formation by this organism. AHP expression appears unaffected by Mn(II), yet the large energetic investment required to produce and secrete these enzymes points to an as yet unknown physiological function. These findings are further evidence that bacterial peroxidases and secreted enzymes, in general, are unappreciated controls on the cycling of metals and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and by extension carbon, in natural systems. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Adsorption behavior of multiwall carbon nanotube/iron oxide magnetic composites for Ni(II) and Sr(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changlun; Hu, Jun; Shao, Dadong; Li, Jiaxing; Wang, Xiangke

    2009-05-30

    Multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/iron oxide magnetic composites were prepared, and were characterized by scan electron microscopy using a field emission scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and vibrating sample magnetometer. The adsorptions of Ni(II) and Sr(II) onto MWCNT/iron oxide magnetic composites were studied as a function of pH and ionic strength. The results show that the adsorptions of Ni(II) and Sr(II) on the magnetic composites is strongly dependent on pH and ionic strength. The adsorption capacity of the magnetic composites is much higher than that of MWCNTs and iron oxides. The solid magnetic composites can be separated from the solution by a magnetic process. The Langmuir model fits the adsorption isotherm data of Ni(II) better than the Freundlich model. Results of desorption study shows that Ni(II) adsorbed onto the magnetic composites can be easily desorbed at pH<2.0. MWCNT/iron oxide magnetic composites may be a promising candidate for pre-concentration and solidification of heavy metal ions and radionuclides from large volumes of aqueous solution, as required for remediation purposes.

  19. Black hole and hawking radiation by type-II Weyl fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volovik, G. E.

    2016-11-01

    The type-II Weyl and type-II Dirac fermions may emerge behind the event horizon of black holes. Correspondingly, the black hole can be simulated by creation of the region with overtilted Weyl or Dirac cones. The filling of the electronic states inside the "black hole" is accompanied by Hawking radiation. The Hawking temperature in the Weyl semimetals can reach the room temperature, if the black hole region is sufficiently small, and thus the effective gravity at the horizon is large.

  20. Black hole and Hawking radiation by type-II Weyl fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Volovik, G E

    2016-01-01

    The type-II Weyl and type-II Dirac fermions may emerge behind the event horizon of black holes. Correspondingly the black hole can be simulated by creation of the region with overtilted Weyl or Dirac cones. The filling of the electronic states inside the "black hole" is accompanied by Hawking radiation. The Hawking temperature in the Weyl semimetals can reach the room temperature, if the black hole region is sufficiently small, and thus the effective gravity at the horizon is large.

  1. Assessment of DNA damage and oxidative stress induced by radiation in Eisenia fetida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Nili, Mohammad [Dawnesh Radiation Research Institute, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-04-15

    Exposure of eukaryotic cells to ionizing radiation results in the immediate formation of free radicals and the occurrence of oxidative cell damage. Recently International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) requires the effect data of ionizing radiation on non-human biota for the radiological protection of the environment. Based on their radioecological properties and their important role in the soil ecosystem, earthworms have been identified by the ICRP as one of the reference animals and plants (RAPs) to be used in environmental radiation protection. The investigation shows that oxidative stress is closely related to the exposed dose of radiation in the environment. To evaluate oxidative stress by ionizing radiation in the earthworm, we performed several experiments. The comet assay is known as a measurement which is one of the best techniques in assessing the DNA damage by oxidative stress. The SOD is a key enzyme in protecting cells against oxidative stress. An increase in the level of antioxidant enzyme such as SOD indicated that the exposure to radiation caused stress responses. Glutathione oxidation is considered as a maker for detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The GSSG levels increased progressively with increased exposure dose of ionizing radiation, which suggested a dose-dependent ROS generation.

  2. Mechanistic studies of copper(II)-mediated oxidation of vic-dioxime to furoxan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Oindrila Das; Tapan Kanti Paine

    2012-11-01

    The oxidation of vic-dioximes to furoxans by copper(II) perchlorate in acetonitrile as the oxidant has been discussed. This method was found to be applicable for a broad range of vic-dioximes. Copper complexes of 1,10-phenanthroline derived furoxans were isolated by oxidation of the corresponding copper(II) complexes of 1,10-phenanthroline based dioximes. In exploring the mechanism of copper(II)-mediated oxidative cyclization of vic-dioxime, a transient blue species was observed in the reaction pathway. Based on the spectroscopic signatures and reactivity patterns, the intermediate was proposed to be a dioximatecopper(II)-dinitrosoalkene complex. These results along with the role of metal ion and solvent in the oxidative transformation reaction are discussed in this review.

  3. Formation of iron (hydr)oxides during the abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) in the presence of arsenate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jia; Jia, Shao-Yi; Yu, Bo; Wu, Song-Hai; Han, Xu

    2015-08-30

    Abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) is a common pathway in the formation of Fe (hydr)oxides under natural conditions, however, little is known regarding the presence of arsenate on this process. In hence, the effect of arsenate on the precipitation of Fe (hydr)oxides during the oxidation of Fe(II) is investigated. Formation of arsenic-containing Fe (hydr)oxides is constrained by pH and molar ratios of As:Fe during the oxidation Fe(II). At pH 6.0, arsenate inhibits the formation of lepidocrocite and goethite, while favors the formation of ferric arsenate with the increasing As:Fe ratio. At pH 7.0, arsenate promotes the formation of hollow-structured Fe (hydr)oxides containing arsenate, as the As:Fe ratio reaches 0.07. Arsenate effectively inhibits the formation of magnetite at pH 8.0 even at As:Fe ratio of 0.01, while favors the formation of lepidocrocite and green rust, which can be latterly degenerated and replaced by ferric arsenate with the increasing As:Fe ratio. This study indicates that arsenate and low pH value favor the slow growth of dense-structured Fe (hydr)oxides like spherical ferric arsenate. With the rapid oxidation rate of Fe(II) at high pH, ferric (hydr)oxides prefer to precipitate in the formation of loose-structured Fe (hydr)oxides like lepidocrocite and green rust. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Enhanced radiation response in radioresistant MCF-7 cells by targeting peroxiredoxin II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz AJG

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Anthony Joseph Gomez Diaz,1 Daniel Tamae,2 Yun Yen,3 JianJian Li,4 Tieli Wang1 1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University at Dominguez Hills, Carson, CA, 2Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology, Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 3Department of Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA, 4Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA, USA Abstract: In our previous study, we identified that a protein target, peroxiredoxin II (PrxII, is overexpressed in radioresistant MCF+FIR3 breast-cancer cells and found that its expression and function is associated with breast-cancer radiation sensitivity or resistance. Small interference RNA (siRNA targeting PrxII gene expression was able to sensitize MCF+FIR3 radioresistant breast-cancer cells to ionizing radiation. The major focus of this work was to investigate how the radiation response of MCF+FIR3 radioresistant cells was affected by the siRNA that inhibits PrxII gene expression. Our results, presented here, show that silencing PrxII gene expression increased cellular toxicity by altering cellular thiol status, inhibiting Ca2+ efflux from the cells, and perturbing the intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. By combining radiotherapy and siRNA technology, we hope to develop new therapeutic strategies that may have potential to enhance the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents due to this technology's property of targeting to specific cancer-related genes. Keywords: siRNA, PrxII, radiation resistance, Ca2+, MCF+FIR3

  5. Radiation and Ethylene Oxide Terminal Sterilization Experiences with Drug Eluting Stent Products

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lambert, Byron J; Mendelson, Todd A; Craven, Michael D

    2011-01-01

    Radiation and ethylene oxide terminal sterilization are the two most frequently used processes in the medical device industry to render product within the final sterile barrier package free from viable microorganism...

  6. Radiation Hard and High Light Yield Scintillator Search for CMS Phase II Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Tiras, Emrah

    2015-01-01

    The CMS detector at the LHC requires a major upgrade to cope with the higher instantaneous luminosity and the elevated radiation levels. The active media of the forward backing hadron calorimeters is projected to be radiation-hard, high light yield scintillation materials or similar alternatives. In this context, we have studied various radiation-hard scintillating materials such as Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET), Polyethylene Naphthalate (PEN), High Efficiency Mirror (HEM) and quartz plates with various coatings. The quartz plates are pure Cerenkov radiators and their radiation hardness has been confirmed. In order to increase the light output, we considered organic and inorganic coating materials such as p-Terphenyl (pTp), Anthracene and Gallium-doped Zinc Oxide (ZnO Ga) that are applied as thin layers on the surface of the quartz plates. Here, we present the results of the related test beam activities, laboratory measurements and recent developments.

  7. Radiation Hard & High Light Yield Scintillator Search for CMS Phase II Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081071

    2015-01-01

    The CMS detector at the LHC requires a major upgrade to cope with the higher instantaneous luminosity and the elevated radiation levels. The active media of the forward backing hadron calorimeters is projected to be radiation-hard, high light yield scintillation materials or similar alternatives. In this context, we have studied various radiation-hard scintillating materials such as Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET), Polyethylene Naphthalate (PEN), High Efficiency Mirror (HEM) and quartz plates with various coatings. The quartz plates are pure Cerenkov radiators and their radiation hardness has been confirmed. In order to increase the light output, we considered organic and inorganic coating materials such as p-Terphenyl (pTp), Anthracene and Gallium-doped Zinc Oxide (ZnO:Ga) that are applied as thin layers on the surface of the quartz plates. Here, we present the results of the related test beam activities, laboratory measurements and recent developments.

  8. Radiation hardness of indium oxide films in the Cooper-pair insulator state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarević Đorđe R.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates possible radiation effects in the Cooper-pair insulator state of indium oxide films. Radiation effects are predicted on the basis of Monte Carlo simulations. Results of a combined theoretical and numerical analysis suggest that radiation-induced changes in the investigated films could significantly affect their current-voltage characteristics, and that a transition to a metallic state is possible, due to radiation-induced disruption of the fine-tuned granular structure. Dissociation of Cooper pairs, caused by both the incident radiation and the ions displaced within InOx films, can also destroy the conditions for this specific insulating state to subsist.

  9. Tin(II) ketoacidoximates: synthesis, X-ray structures and processing to tin(II) oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanderi, Jayaprakash; Davaasuren, Bambar; Alshankiti, Buthainah Ameen; Rothenberger, Alexander

    2015-12-14

    Tin(II) ketoacidoximates of the type [HON=CRCOO]2Sn (R = Me 1, CH2Ph 2) and (MeON=CMeCOO)3Sn](-) NH4(+)·2H2O 3 were synthesized by reacting pyruvate- and hydroxyl- or methoxylamine RONH2 (R = H, Me) with tin(II) chloride dihydrate SnCl2·2H2O. The single crystal X-ray structure reveals that the geometry at the Sn atom is trigonal bipyramidal in 1, 2 and trigonal pyramidal in 3. Inter- or intramolecular hydrogen bonding is observed in 1-3. Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis shows that the decomposition of 1-3 to SnO occurs at ca. 160 °C. The evolved gas analysis during TG indicates complete loss of the oximato ligand in one step for 1 whereas a small organic residue is additionally removed at temperatures >400 °C for 2. Above 140 °C, [HON=C(Me)COO]2Sn (1) decomposes in air to spherical SnO particles of size 10-500 nm. Spin coating of 1 on Si or a glass substrate followed by heating at 200 °C results in a uniform film of SnO. The band gap of the produced SnO film and nanomaterial was determined by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to be in the range of 3.0-3.3 eV. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates surface oxidation of the SnO film to SnO2 in ambient atmosphere.

  10. Polylogarithmic representation of radiative and thermodynamic properties of thermal radiation in a given spectral range: II. Real-body radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I

    2015-01-01

    The general analytical expressions for the thermal radiative and thermodynamic properties of a real-body are obtained in a finite range of frequencies at different temperatures. The frequency dependence of the spectral emissivity is represented as a power series. The Stefan-Boltzmann law, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, internal energy density, enthalpy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, pressure, and total emissivity are expressed in terms of the polylogarithm functions. The general expressions for the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions are applied for the study of thermal radiation of liquid and solid zirconium carbide. These functions are calculated using experimental data for the frequency dependence of the normal spectral emissivity in the visible-near infrared range at the melting (freezing) point. The gaps between the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions of liquid and solid zirconium carbide are observed. The g...

  11. Newton's 2nd Law, Radiation Reaction & Type II Einstein-Maxwell Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Newman, Ezra T

    2011-01-01

    Considering perturbations off the Reissner-Nordstrom metric while keeping the perturbations in the class of type II Einstein-Maxwell metrics, we do a spherical harmonic expansion of all the variables up to the quadrupole term. This leads to a rather surprising results. Referring to the source of the metric as a type II particle (analogous to referring to a Schwarzschild-Reissner-Nordstrom or Kerr-Newman particle), we see immediately that the Bondi momentum of the particle take the classical form of mass times velocity plus an electromagnetic radiation reaction term while the Bondi mass loss equation become the classical gravitational and electromagnetic (electric and magnetic) dipole and quadrupole radiation. The Bondi momentum loss equation turns into Newtons second law of motion containing the Abraham, Lorentz, Dirac radiation reaction force plus a momentum recoil (rocket) force while the reality condition on the Bondi mass aspect yields the conservation of angular momentum.

  12. Transition metal catalysed Grignard-like allylic activation across tetragonal tin(II) oxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pradipta Sinha; Moloy Banerjee; Abhijit Kundu; Sujit Roy

    2002-08-01

    The reaction of allyl halide and a carbonyl compound under the aegis of tetragonal tin(II) oxide and catalytic 8, 10 metal complexes provides the corresponding homoallylic alcohol, via a novel allyl tin intermediate.

  13. Graphene oxide-modified nickel (II) tetra-aminophthalocyanine nanocomposites for high-power symmetric pseudocapacitor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Makgopa, K

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudocapacitive properties of nickel (II) tetraaminophthalocyanine-modified graphene oxide sheets (GO/NiTAPc) composites have been studied. Microscopic and spectroscopic analysis of the GO/NiTAPc electrode material with its precursors (GO and Ni...

  14. Effect of oxidative stress on Rho kinase II and smooth muscle contraction in rat stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shboul, Othman; Mustafa, Ayman

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that both Rho kinase signaling and oxidative stress are involved in the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. However, very little is known about the effect of oxidative stress on the gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscle Rho kinase pathway. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of oxidative stress on Rho kinase II and muscle contraction in rat stomach. The peroxynitrite donor 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and peroxynitrite were used to induce oxidative stress. Rho kinase II expression and ACh-induced activity were measured in control and oxidant-treated cells via specifically designed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and activity assay kits, respectively. Single smooth muscle cell contraction was measured via scanning micrometry in the presence or absence of the Rho kinase blocker, Y-27632 dihydrochloride. All oxidant agents significantly increased ACh-induced Rho kinase II activity without affecting its expression level. Most important, oxidative stress induced by all three agents augmented ACh-stimulated muscle cell contraction, which was significantly inhibited by Y-27632. In conclusion, oxidative stress activates Rho kinase II and enhances contraction in rat gastric muscle, suggesting an important role in GI motility disorders associated with oxidative stress.

  15. Evidence for the Existence of Autotrophic Nitrate-Reducing Fe(II)-Oxidizing Bacteria in Marine Coastal Sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Katja; Røy, Hans; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-10-15

    Nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms were described for the first time ca. 20 years ago. Most pure cultures of nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers can oxidize Fe(II) only under mixotrophic conditions, i.e., when an organic cosubstrate is provided. A small number of nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing cultures have been proposed to grow autotrophically, but unambiguous evidence for autotrophy has not always been provided. Thus, it is still unclear whether or to what extent Fe(II) oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction is an enzymatically catalyzed and energy-yielding autotrophic process or whether Fe(II) is abiotically oxidized by nitrite from heterotrophic nitrate reduction. The aim of the present study was to find evidence for the existence of autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers in coastal marine sediments. Microcosm incubations showed that with increasing incubation times, the stoichiometric ratio of reduced nitrate/oxidized Fe(II) [NO3(-)reduced/Fe(II)oxidized] decreased, indicating a decreasing contribution of heterotrophic denitrification and/or an increasing contribution of autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidation over time. After incubations of sediment slurries for >10 weeks, nitrate-reducing activity ceased, although nitrate was still present. This suggests that heterotrophic nitrate reduction had ceased due to the depletion of readily available organic carbon. However, after the addition of Fe(II) to these batch incubation mixtures, the nitrate-reducing activity resumed, and Fe(II) was oxidized, indicating the activity of autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers. The concurrent reduction of (14)C-labeled bicarbonate concentrations unambiguously proved that autotrophic C fixation occurred during Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction. Our results clearly demonstrated that autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria were present in the investigated coastal marine sediments.

  16. Hydration Study of Ordinary Portland Cement in the Presence of Lead(II) Oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Barbir, D.; Dabić, P.; Krolo, P.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of the addition of lead(II) oxide on hydration heat and specific conductivity of a CEM I Portland cement. The heat released during hydration was determined by differential microcalorimetry up to 48 hours of hydration and the specific conductivity by a digital conductometer. Thermogravimetric analysis was employed in the characterization of the cement structure. The hydration heat results show that the addition of lead(II) oxide affects the...

  17. Polylogarithmic Representation of Radiative and Thermodynamic Properties of Thermal Radiation in a Given Spectral Range: II. Real-Body Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I.; Lemberg, Vladimir

    2015-11-01

    There are several classes of materials and space objects for which the frequency dependence of the spectral emissivity is represented as a power series. Therefore, the study of the properties of thermal radiation for these real bodies is an important task for both fundamental science and industrial applications. The general analytical expressions for the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions of a real body are obtained in a finite range of frequencies at different temperatures. The Stefan-Boltzmann law, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, internal energy density, enthalpy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, pressure, and total emissivity are expressed in terms of the polylogarithm functions. The obtained general expressions for the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions are applied for the study of thermal radiation of liquid and solid zirconium carbide. These functions are calculated using experimental data for the frequency dependence of the normal spectral emissivity in the visible and near-infrared range at the melting (freezing) point. The gaps between the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions of liquid and solid zirconium carbide are observed. The general analytical expressions obtained can easily be presented in the wavenumber domain.

  18. Smart Radiation Device based on a perovskite manganese oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachikawa, Sumitaka; Shimazaki, Kazunori; Ohnishi, Akira; Hirosawa, Haruto; Shimakawa, Yuichi; Ochi, Atsushi; Okamoto, Akira; Nakamura, Yasuyuki

    2003-09-01

    A new thermal control material named the Smart Radiation Device (SRD) was studied and improved. An SRD can be used as a variable emittance radiator; it controls the heat radiated to deep space without electrical instruments or mechanical parts, simply by changing emissivity. This device reduces the energy consumption of the on-board electrical heater, and decreases the weight and the cost of the thermal control system on the spacecraft. Three types of SRD were tried in the process of improving optical properties. In order to reduce solar absorptance, we designed and applied multilayer films for SRDs to reflect solar radiation while retaining its infrared radiative properties. In this paper, we introduce the optical properties of the SRD, a space environmental simulation test on ground, and environmental tests in space. In addition, we report the optical properties of the value-added SRD.

  19. A convective and radiative heat transfer analysis for the FIRE II forebody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greendyke, Robert B.; Hartung, Lin C.

    1993-01-01

    A Navier-Stokes flowfield solution method (LAURA code) using finite-rate chemistry and two-temperature thermal nonequilibrium was used in combination with two nonequilibrium radiative heat transfer codes to calculate heating for the FIRE II vehicle. An axisymmetric model of the actual body shape was used. One radiative heating code (NEQAIR) was used in uncoupled fashion with the flowfield solver's energy equations, while the other code (LORAN) was used in both coupled and uncoupled variations. Several trajectory points ranging from highly nonequilibrium flow to near-equilibrium flow were used for a study of both convective and radiative heating over the vehicle. Considerable variation in radiative heating was seen at the extremes, while agreement was good in the intermediate trajectory points. Total heat transfer calculations gave good comparison until the peak heating trajectory points were encountered, and returned to good agreement for the last two equilibrium points.

  20. Angiotensin II activates endothelial constitutive nitric oxide synthase via AT1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, S; Hirata, Y; Emori, T; Imai, T; Marumo, F

    1996-09-01

    To determine whether angiotensin (ANG) II, a vasoconstrictor hormone, activates constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) in endothelial cells (ECs), we investigated the cellular mechanism by which ANG II induces nitric oxide (NO) formation in cultured bovine ECs. ANG II rapidly (within 1 min) and dose-dependently (10(-9)-10(-6) M) increased nitrate/nitrite (NOx) production. This effect of ANG II was abolished by a NOS inhibitor, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine. An ANG II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist (DuP 753), but not an ANG II type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist (PD 123177), dose-dependently inhibited ANG II-induced NOx production. A Ca(2+)-channel blocker (barnidipine) failed to affect ANG II-induced NOx production, whereas an intracellular Ca2+ chelator (BAPTA) and a calmodulin inhibitor (W-7) abolished NOx production induced by ANG II. A protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor (H-7) and down-regulation of endogenous PKC after pretreatment with phorbol ester decreased NOx production stimulated by ANG II. ANG II transiently stimulated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) formation, and increased cytosolic free Ca2+ concentrations; these effects were blocked by DuP 753. Our data demonstrate that ANG II stimulates NO release by activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent cNOS via AT1 receptors in bovine ECs.

  1. Phototrophic Fe(II-oxidation in the chemocline of a ferruginous meromictic lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Alexis eWalter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Precambrian Banded Iron Formation (BIF deposition was conventionally attributed to the precipitation of iron-oxides resulting from the abiotic reaction of ferrous iron (Fe(II with photosynthetically-produced oxygen. Earliest traces of oxygen date from 2.7 Ga, thus raising questions as to what may have caused BIF precipitation before oxygenic photosynthesis evolved. The discovery of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria thriving through the oxidation of Fe(II has provided support for a biological origin for some BIFs, but despite reports suggesting that anoxygenic phototrophs may oxidize Fe(II in the environment, a model ecosystem of an ancient ocean where they are demonstrably active was lacking. Here we show that anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria contribute to Fe(II oxidation in the water column of the ferruginous sulfate-poor, meromictic lake La Cruz (Spain. We observed in-situ photoferrotrophic activity through stimulation of phototrophic carbon uptake in the presence of Fe(II, and determined light-dependent Fe(II-oxidation by the natural chemocline microbiota. Moreover, a photoferrotrophic bacterium most closely related to Chlorobium ferrooxidans was enriched from the ferruginous water column. Our study for the first time demonstrates a direct link between anoxygenic photoferrotrophy and the anoxic precipitation of Fe(III-oxides in a ferruginous water column, providing a plausible mechanism for the bacterial origin of BIF’s before the advent of free oxygen.

  2. Oxidation of manganese(II) with ferrate: Stoichiometry, kinetics, products and impact of organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwill, Joseph E; Mai, Xuyen; Jiang, Yanjun; Reckhow, David A; Tobiason, John E

    2016-09-01

    Manganese is a contaminant of concern for many drinking water utilities, and future regulation may be pending. An analysis of soluble manganese (Mn(II)) oxidation by ferrate (Fe(VI)) was executed at the bench-scale, in a laboratory matrix, both with and without the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) and at two different pH values, 6.2 and 7.5. In the matrix without NOM, the oxidation of Mn(II) by Fe(VI) followed a stoichiometry of 2 mol Fe(VI) to 3 mol Mn(II). The presence of NOM did not significantly affect the stoichiometry of the oxidation reaction, indicating relative selectivity of Fe(VI) for Mn(II). The size distribution of resulting particles included significant amounts of nanoparticles. Resulting manganese oxide particles were confirmed to be MnO2 via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The rate of the Mn(II) oxidation reaction was fast relative to typical time scales in drinking water treatment, with an estimated second order rate constant of approximately 1 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 9.2 and > 9 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 6.2. In general, ferrate is a potential option for Mn(II) oxidation in water treatment.

  3. Multiporphyrin coordination arrays based on complexation of magnesium(II) porphyrins with porphyrinylphosphine oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atefi, Farzad; McMurtrie, John C; Arnold, Dennis P

    2007-06-07

    Di- and triporphyrin arrays consisting of 5,15-diphenylporphyrinatomagnesium(II) (MgDPP) coordinated to free-base and Ni(II) porphyrinyl mono- and bis-phosphine oxides, as well as the self-coordinating diphenyl[10,20-diphenylporphyrinatomagnesium(II)-5-yl]phosphine oxide [MgDPP(Ph(2)PO)], were synthesised in excellent yields and characterised by various spectroscopic techniques. Phosphine oxides stabilise Mg(II) coordination to porphyrins and the resulting complexes have convenient solubilities, while the Ni(II) complexes exhibit interesting intramolecular fluorescence quenching behaviour. The binding constant of MgDPP to triphenylphosphine oxide (5.3 +/- 0.1 x 10(5) M(-1)) and the very high self-association constant of [MgDPP(Ph(2)PO)] (5.5 +/- 0.5 x 10(8) M(-1)) demonstrate the strong affinity of phosphine oxides towards Mg(II) porphyrins. These complexes are the first strongly bound synthetic Mg(II) multiporphyrin complexes and could potentially mimic the "special pair" in the photosynthetic reaction centre.

  4. Physiology and Mechanism of Phototrophic Fe(II) Oxidation by Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Y.; Newman, D.

    2007-12-01

    Phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria use electrons from ferrous iron [Fe(II)] and energy from light to drive reductive CO2 fixation. This metabolism is thought to be ancient in origin, and plays an important role in environmental iron cycling. It has been implicated in the deposition of Banded Iron Formations, a class of ancient sedimentary iron deposits. Consistent with this hypothesis, we discovered that hydrogen gas, a thermodynamically favorable electron donor to Fe(II), in an Archean atmosphere would not have inhibited phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation. To understand this physiology and the connection to BIF formation at the molecular level, the mechanisms of phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation were examined in a model organism Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1. Increased expression of a putative decaheme c-type cytochrome, encoded by pioA, was observed when cells were grown under Fe(II)-oxidizing conditions. Two genes located immediately downstream of pioA in the same operon, pioB and pioC, encode a putative outer membrane beta-barrel protein and a putative high potential iron-sulfur protein, respectively. Deletion studies demonstrated that all three genes are involved in phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation. This study provides our first insight into the molecular mechanisms of this metabolism, which will be further characterized by in vitro biochemical studies.

  5. Investigation of thermal oxidative break-down of polyethylene films modified with grafted polyacrylonitrile. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krul, L.P.; Gert, E.V. (Belorusskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Minsk)

    1981-11-01

    Thermal oxidative destruction of polyethylene (PE) films modified by radiation (..gamma..-radiation, dose rate is 0.56 Mrad/hr) liquid-phase graft polymerization of acrylonitrile (AN) has been studied. Comparative stability of grafted copolymers, homopolymers and mechanical mixtures of PE and PAN (polyacrylonitrile) to thermal oxidative destruction is studied using the derivatographic method. It is shown that graft of PAN considerably decelerates the development of oxidative and destructive processes in PE, at that, the efficiency of PE chain stabilization increases with the increase of grafted PAN amount. The sample with PAN content x=0.367 (in parts of the mass of grafted film) possesses the highest stability.

  6. Cu(II)-catalyzed transformation of benzylpenicillin revisited: the overlooked oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiabin; Sun, Peizhe; Zhou, Xuefei; Zhang, Yalei; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2015-04-07

    Penicillins, a class of widely used β-lactam antibiotics, are known to be susceptible to catalyzed hydrolysis by metal ions such as Cu(II). However, new results in this study strongly indicate that the role of Cu(II) is not merely a hydrolysis catalyst but also an oxidant. When benzylpenicillin (i.e., penicillin G (PG)) was exposed to Cu(II) ion at an equal molar ratio and pH 7, degradation of PG occurred rapidly in the oxygen-rich solution but gradually slowed down to a halt in the oxygen-limited solution. In-depth studies revealed that Cu(II) catalyzed hydrolysis of PG to benzylpenicilloic acid (PA) and oxidized PA to yield phenylacetamide and other products. The availability of oxygen played the role in reoxidizing Cu(I) back to Cu(II), which sustained fast degradation of PG over time. The overall reaction was also influenced by pH, with Cu(II)-catalyzed hydrolysis of PG occurring throughout pH 5, 7 and 9, while Cu(II) oxidation of PA occurring at pH 7 and 9. Note that the potential of Cu(II) to oxidize penicillins was largely overlooked in the previous literature, and catalyzed hydrolysis was frequently assumed as the only reaction. This study is among the first to identify the dual roles of Cu(II) in the entire degradation process of PG and systematically investigate the overlooked oxidation reaction to elucidate the mechanism. The new mechanistic knowledge has important implications for many other β-lactam antibiotics for their interactions with Cu(II), and significantly improves the ability to predict the environmental fate and transformation products of PG and related penicillins in systems where Cu(II) species are also present.

  7. Graphene produced by radiation-induced reduction of graphene oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Prashant; K. S. Subrahmanyam; Rao, C. N. R.

    2010-01-01

    Effect of irradiation on graphene oxide by sunlight, UV light and KrF excimer laser has been investigated in detail. Both sunlight and ultraviolet light reduce graphene oxide well after prolonged irradiation, but laser irradiation produces graphene with negligible oxygen functionalities within a short time. Laser irradiation is also useful for one-step synthesis of metal particle decorated graphene. Laser irradiation of graphene oxide appears to be an efficient procedure for large-scale synth...

  8. Graphene produced by radiation-induced reduction of graphene oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Prashant; Subrahmanyam, K. S.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2010-01-01

    Effect of irradiation on graphene oxide by sunlight, UV light and KrF excimer laser has been investigated in detail. Both sunlight and ultraviolet light reduce graphene oxide well after prolonged irradiation, but laser irradiation produces graphene with negligible oxygen functionalities within a short time. Laser irradiation is also useful for one-step synthesis of metal particle decorated graphene. Laser irradiation of graphene oxide appears to be an efficient procedure for large-scale synth...

  9. Ionizing radiation, antioxidant response and oxidative damage: A meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einor, D., E-mail: daniel@einor.com [Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Bonisoli-Alquati, A., E-mail: andreabonisoli@gmail.com [Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); School of Renewable Natural Resources, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Costantini, D., E-mail: davidcostantini@libero.it [Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk, B-2610, Antwerp (Belgium); Mousseau, T.A., E-mail: mousseau@sc.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Faculty of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Chubu University, Kasugai (Japan); Møller, A.P., E-mail: anders.moller@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire d' Ecologie, Systématique et Evolution, CNRS UMR 8079, Université Paris-Sud, Bâtiment 362, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2016-04-01

    One mechanism proposed as a link between exposure to ionizing radiation and detrimental effects on organisms is oxidative damage. To test this hypothesis, we surveyed the scientific literature on the effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) on antioxidant responses and oxidative damage. We found 40 publications and 212 effect sizes for antioxidant responses and 288 effect sizes for effects of oxidative damage. We performed a meta-analysis of signed and unsigned effect sizes. We found large unsigned effects for both categories (0.918 for oxidative damage; 0.973 for antioxidant response). Mean signed effect size weighted by sample size was 0.276 for oxidative damage and − 0.350 for antioxidant defenses, with significant heterogeneity among effects for both categories, implying that ionizing radiation caused small to intermediate increases in oxidative damage and small to intermediate decreases in antioxidant defenses. Our estimates are robust, as shown by very high fail-safe numbers. Species, biological matrix (tissue, blood, sperm) and age predicted the magnitude of effects for oxidative damage as well as antioxidant response. Meta-regression models showed that effect sizes for oxidative damage varied among species and age classes, while effect sizes for antioxidant responses varied among species and biological matrices. Our results are consistent with the description of mechanisms underlying pathological effects of chronic exposure to LDIR. Our results also highlight the importance of resistance to oxidative stress as one possible mechanism associated with variation in species responses to LDIR-contaminated areas. - Highlights: • There is interest in variation in metabolic effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation • A random effect meta-analysis of effect sizes of radioactive contamination was performed • We found significant effects of radiation on oxidative damage and antioxidant response • We found significant heterogeneity among

  10. Dexmedetomidine acts as an oxidative damage prophylactic in rats exposed to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutanis, Dilek; Erturk, Engin; Besir, Ahmet; Demirci, Yucel; Kayir, Selcuk; Akdogan, Ali; Vanizor Kural, Birgul; Bahat, Zumrut; Canyilmaz, Emine; Kara, Hanife

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the effects of dexmedetomidine on oxidative injury caused by ionizing radiation. Randomized controlled experimental study. Department of radiation oncology and research laboratory of an academic hospital. Twenty-eight rats were randomized to 4 groups (n=7 per group). Group S rats were administered physiologic serum; group SR rats were administered physiologic serum and 10 Gy external ionizing radiation. Groups D100 and D200 were administered 100 and 200 μg/kg dexmedetomidine intraperitoneally, respectively, 45 minutes before ionizing radiation. Liver, kidney, lung, and thyroid tissue and serum levels of antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase [GPX], superoxide dismutase, and catalase) and oxidative metabolites (advanced oxidation protein products, malondialdehyde, and nitrate/nitrite, and serum ischemia-modified albumin) were measured 6 hours postprocedure. In group SR, IR decreased antioxidant enzyme levels and increased oxidative metabolite levels (PD100 and D200 than in group SR (PD100 and D200 than in group SR (PD100 and D200 than in group SR (PD100 and D200 than in group SR (P<.01). Hepatic, renal, and lung nitrate/nitrite levels were lower in group D200 than in group SR (P<.05). Dexmedetomidine preserves the antioxidant enzyme levels and reduces toxic oxidant metabolites. Therefore, it can provide protection from oxidative injury caused by ionizing radiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Exposure to 1800 MHz radiofrequency radiation induces oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA in primary cultured neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shangcheng; Zhou, Zhou; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Zhengping; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Yuan; Wang, Xubu; Li, Maoquan; Chen, Yang; Chen, Chunhai; He, Mindi; Zhang, Guangbin; Zhong, Min

    2010-01-22

    Increasing evidence indicates that oxidative stress may be involved in the adverse effects of radiofrequency (RF) radiation on the brain. Because mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) defects are closely associated with various nervous system diseases and mtDNA is particularly susceptible to oxidative stress, the purpose of this study was to determine whether radiofrequency radiation can cause oxidative damage to mtDNA. In this study, we exposed primary cultured cortical neurons to pulsed RF electromagnetic fields at a frequency of 1800 MHz modulated by 217 Hz at an average special absorption rate (SAR) of 2 W/kg. At 24 h after exposure, we found that RF radiation induced a significant increase in the levels of 8-hydroxyguanine (8-OHdG), a common biomarker of DNA oxidative damage, in the mitochondria of neurons. Concomitant with this finding, the copy number of mtDNA and the levels of mitochondrial RNA (mtRNA) transcripts showed an obvious reduction after RF exposure. Each of these mtDNA disturbances could be reversed by pretreatment with melatonin, which is known to be an efficient antioxidant in the brain. Together, these results suggested that 1800 MHz RF radiation could cause oxidative damage to mtDNA in primary cultured neurons. Oxidative damage to mtDNA may account for the neurotoxicity of RF radiation in the brain.

  12. Reduction of aqueous transition metal species on the surfaces of Fe(II)-containing oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A.F.; Peterson, M.L.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental studies demonstrate that structural Fe(II) in magnetite and ilmenite heterogeneously reduce aqueous ferric, cupric, vanadate, and chromate ions at the oxide surfaces over a pH range of 1-7 at 25??C. For an aqueous transition metal m, such reactions are 3[Fe2+Fe3+2]O4(magnetite) + 2/nmz ??? 4[Fe3+2]O3(maghemite) + Fe2+ + 2/nmz-n and 3[Fe2+Ti]O3(ilmenite) + 2/nmz ??? Fe3+2Ti3O9(pseudorutile) + Fe2+ + 2/nmz-n, where z is the valance state and n is the charge transfer number. The half cell potential range for solid state oxidation [Fe(II)] ??? [Fe(III)] is -0.34 to -0.65 V, making structural Fe(II) a stronger reducing agent than aqueous Fe2+ (-0.77 V). Reduction rates for aqueous metal species are linear with time (up to 36 h), decrease with pH, and have rate constants between 0.1 and 3.3 ?? 10-10 mol m-2 s-1. Iron is released to solution both from the above reactions and from dissolution of the oxide surface. In the presence of chromate, Fe2+ is oxidized homogeneously in solution to Fe3+. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) denotes a Fe(III) oxide surface containing reduced Cr(III) and V(IV) species. Magnetite and ilmenite electrode potentials are insensitive to increases in divalent transition metals including Zn(II), Co(II), Mn(II), and Ni(II) and reduced V(IV) and Cr(III) but exhibit a log-linear concentration-potential response to Fe(III) and Cu(II). Complex positive electrode responses occur with increasing Cr(VI) and V(V) concentrations. Potential dynamic scans indicate that the high oxidation potential of dichromate is capable of suppressing the cathodic reductive dissolution of magnetite. Oxide electrode potentials are determined by the Fe(II)/Fe(III) composition of the oxide surface and respond to aqueous ion potentials which accelerate this oxidation process. Natural magnetite sands weathered under anoxic conditions are electrochemically reactive as demonstrated by rapid chromate reduction and the release of aqueous Fe(III) to experimental

  13. Mn(II) oxidation by an ascomycete fungus is linked to superoxide production during asexual reproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansel, C. M.; Zeiner, C. A.; Santelli, C. M.; Webb, S. M.

    2012-07-16

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the most reactive minerals within the environment, where they control the bioavailability of carbon, nutrients, and numerous metals. Although the ability of microorganisms to oxidize Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides is scattered throughout the bacterial and fungal domains of life, the mechanism and physiological basis for Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. Here, we use a combination of compound-specific chemical assays, microspectroscopy, and electron microscopy to show that a common Ascomycete filamentous fungus, Stilbella aciculosa, oxidizes Mn(II) to Mn oxides by producing extracellular superoxide during cell differentiation. The reactive Mn oxide phase birnessite and the reactive oxygen species superoxide and hydrogen peroxide are colocalized at the base of asexual reproductive structures. Mn oxide formation is not observed in the presence of superoxide scavengers (e.g., Cu) and inhibitors of NADPH oxidases (e.g., diphenylene iodonium chloride), enzymes responsible for superoxide production and cell differentiation in fungi. Considering the recent identification of Mn(II) oxidation by NADH oxidase-based superoxide production by a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp.), these results introduce a surprising homology between some prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms in the mechanisms responsible for Mn(II) oxidation, where oxidation appears to be a side reaction of extracellular superoxide production. Finally, given the versatility of superoxide as a redox reactant and the widespread ability of fungi to produce superoxide, this microbial extracellular superoxide production may play a central role in the cycling and bioavailability of metals (e.g., Hg, Fe, Mn) and carbon in natural systems.

  14. Mn(II) oxidation by an ascomycete fungus is linked to superoxide production during asexual reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, Colleen M; Zeiner, Carolyn A; Santelli, Cara M; Webb, Samuel M

    2012-07-31

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the most reactive minerals within the environment, where they control the bioavailability of carbon, nutrients, and numerous metals. Although the ability of microorganisms to oxidize Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides is scattered throughout the bacterial and fungal domains of life, the mechanism and physiological basis for Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. Here, we use a combination of compound-specific chemical assays, microspectroscopy, and electron microscopy to show that a common Ascomycete filamentous fungus, Stilbella aciculosa, oxidizes Mn(II) to Mn oxides by producing extracellular superoxide during cell differentiation. The reactive Mn oxide phase birnessite and the reactive oxygen species superoxide and hydrogen peroxide are colocalized at the base of asexual reproductive structures. Mn oxide formation is not observed in the presence of superoxide scavengers (e.g., Cu) and inhibitors of NADPH oxidases (e.g., diphenylene iodonium chloride), enzymes responsible for superoxide production and cell differentiation in fungi. Considering the recent identification of Mn(II) oxidation by NADH oxidase-based superoxide production by a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp.), these results introduce a surprising homology between some prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms in the mechanisms responsible for Mn(II) oxidation, where oxidation appears to be a side reaction of extracellular superoxide production. Given the versatility of superoxide as a redox reactant and the widespread ability of fungi to produce superoxide, this microbial extracellular superoxide production may play a central role in the cycling and bioavailability of metals (e.g., Hg, Fe, Mn) and carbon in natural systems.

  15. Site-specifically Hydrolytic Cleavage of Oxidized Insulin B Chain With Cu(II) Ion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Electrospray mass spectrometry investigation shows that denatured oxidized insulin B chain can be selectively cleaved by simple Cu(II) ion and the site of cleavage is at Gly8-Ser9 bond which is second amide bond left from His 10 in the sequence of oxidized insulin B chain.

  16. ANGIOTENSIN II DECREASES NOS3 EXPRESSION VIA NITRIC OXIDE AND SUPEROXIDE IN THE THICK ASCENDING LIMB

    OpenAIRE

    Ramseyer, Vanesa D.; Garvin, Jeffrey L.

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by NO synthase type 3 (NOS3) in medullary thick ascending limbs (mTHALs) inhibits Cl− reabsorption. Acutely, angiotensin II stimulates THAL NO production. In endothelial cells NO inhibits NOS3 expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that angiotensin II decreases NOS3 expression via NO in mTHALs. After 24 hrs, 10 and 100 nmol/L angiotensin II decreased NOS3 expression by 23 ± 9% (n=6, p

  17. Effect of oxidation rate and Fe(II) state on microbial nitrate-dependent Fe(III) mineral formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senko, John M; Dewers, Thomas A; Krumholz, Lee R

    2005-11-01

    A nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium was isolated and used to evaluate whether Fe(II) chemical form or oxidation rate had an effect on the mineralogy of biogenic Fe(III) (hydr)oxides resulting from nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The isolate (designated FW33AN) had 99% 16S rRNA sequence similarity to Klebsiella oxytoca. FW33AN produced Fe(III) (hydr)oxides by oxidation of soluble Fe(II) [Fe(II)sol] or FeS under nitrate-reducing conditions. Based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fe(III) (hydr)oxide produced by oxidation of FeS was shown to be amorphous, while oxidation of Fe(II)sol yielded goethite. The rate of Fe(II) oxidation was then manipulated by incubating various cell concentrations of FW33AN with Fe(II)sol and nitrate. Characterization of products revealed that as Fe(II) oxidation rates slowed, a stronger goethite signal was observed by XRD and a larger proportion of Fe(III) was in the crystalline fraction. Since the mineralogy of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides may control the extent of subsequent Fe(III) reduction, the variables we identify here may have an effect on the biogeochemical cycling of Fe in anoxic ecosystems.

  18. Surface Mn(II) oxidation actuated by a multicopper oxidase in a soil bacterium leads to the formation of manganese oxide minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Zhongming; Chen, Hong; Liu, Jin; Liu, Chang; Ni, Hong; Zhao, Changsong; Ali, Muhammad; Liu, Fan; Li, Lin

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, we report that a bacterial multicopper oxidase (MCO266) catalyzes Mn(II) oxidation on the cell surface, resulting in the surface deposition of Mn(III) and Mn(IV) oxides and the gradual formation of bulky oxide aggregates. These aggregates serve as nucleation centers for the formation of Mn oxide micronodules and Mn-rich sediments. A soil-borne Escherichia coli with high Mn(II)-oxidizing activity formed Mn(III)/Mn(IV) oxide deposit layers and aggregates under laboratory culture conditions. We engineered MCO266 onto the cell surfaces of both an activity-negative recipient and wild-type strains. The results confirmed that MCO266 governs Mn(II) oxidation and initiates the formation of deposits and aggregates. By contrast, a cell-free substrate, heat-killed strains, and intracellularly expressed or purified MCO266 failed to catalyze Mn(II) oxidation. However, purified MCO266 exhibited Mn(II)-oxidizing activity when combined with cell outer membrane component (COMC) fractions in vitro. We demonstrated that Mn(II) oxidation and aggregate formation occurred through an oxygen-dependent biotic transformation process that requires a certain minimum Mn(II) concentration. We propose an approximate electron transfer pathway in which MCO266 transfers only one electron to convert Mn(II) to Mn(III) and then cooperates with other COMC electron transporters to transfer the other electron required to oxidize Mn(III) to Mn(IV). PMID:26039669

  19. Kinetics of oxidation of nickel(II) aza macrocycles by peroxydisulphate in aqueous media

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Lalitham; V R Vijayaraghavan

    2000-10-01

    The kinetics of the oxidation of nickel (II) hexaaza and nickel (II) pentaaza macrocycles by the peroxydisulphate anion, S2O8 2-, were studied in aqueous media. Effect of H on reaction rate was also studied. The rate increases with increase of S2OO8 2- concentration. Rates are almost independent of acid between H 4 and 2, giving overall a relatively simple second-order rate law followed by oxidation within the ion pair solvent shell. Using rate = +1/2 d[Ni(L)3+]/dt = k[Ni(L)2+][S2O8 2-], oxidation rate constants were determined.

  20. Removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution by oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Di; Tan, Xiaoli; Chen, Changlun; Wang, Xiangke

    2008-06-15

    Oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were employed as sorbent to study the sorption characteristic of Pb(II) from aqueous solution as a function of contact time, pH, ionic strength, foreign ions, and oxidized MWCNTs' contents under ambient conditions using batch technique. The results indicate that sorption of Pb(II) on oxidized MWCNTs is strongly dependent on pH values, and independent of ionic strength and the type of foreign ions. The removal of Pb(II) to oxidized MWCNTs is rather quickly and the kinetic sorption can be described by a pseudo-second-order model very well. Sorption of Pb(II) is mainly dominated by surface complexation rather than ion exchange. The efficient removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution is limited at pH 7-10. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is performed to study the sorption mechanism at a molecular level and thereby to identify the species of the sorption processes. The 3-D relationship of pH, Ceq and q indicates that all the data of Ceq-q lie in a straight line with slope -V/m and intercept C0V/m for the same initial concentration of Pb(II) and same content of oxidized MWCNTs of each experimental data.

  1. Compliance of Bhabhatron-II telecobalt unit with IEC standard - Radiation safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahani, G; Kumar, Munish; Dash Sharma, P K; Sharma, D N; Chhokra, Kanta; Mishra, Bibekananda; Agarwal, S P; Kher, R K

    2009-04-28

    Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India designed and developed a telecobalt unit, which was named as Bhabhatron-II. In this paper, the results pertaining to radiation safety of indigenously developed Bhabhatron-II telecobalt unit are reported. The various tests were carried out as per requirements of International Electrotechnical Commission standard and acceptance criteria developed nationally. Various devices such as CaSO4:Dy based thermoluminescent dosimeters, farmer type ionization chamber, water phantom and radiographic films were used. All the parameters pertaining to radiation leakage/transmission were within the tolerance limits as per IEC-60601-2-11 standard except the collimator transmission through X collimators (upper jaw), which marginally exceeds the tolerance limit.

  2. Pb(II) Distributions at Biofilm-Metal Oxide Interfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alexis S. Templeton; Thomas P. Trainor; Samuel J. Traina; Alfred M. Spormann; Gordon E. Brown

    2001-01-01

    .... Attached bacteria and adsorbed organic matter may interfere with sorption processes on metal oxide surfaces by changing the characteristics of the electrical double layer at the solid-solution...

  3. Anaerobic, Nitrate-Dependent Fe(II) Oxidation Under Advective Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, K. A.; Coates, J. D.

    2005-12-01

    Microbially-catalyzed nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation has been identified as a ubiquitous biogeochemical process contributing to anaerobic iron redox cycling in sedimentary environments. Most probable number enumeration revealed nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidizing microbial communities in groundwater and subsurface sediments in the order of 0 - 2.04 x 103 cells mL-1 and 2.39 x 102 - 1.17 x 103 cells (g wet sediment)-1, respectively. The efficacy of nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation under advective flow was evaluated in a meso-scale column reactor packed with sterile low iron sand amended with subsurface sediments collected from the NABIR FRC background field site (10% mass/mass). Continuous flow of minimal medium mimicked the natural groundwater. Periodic FeCl2 and nitrate injections over a period of 49 days resulted in the retention of 95% of the iron (290 mmol). Extraction of solid-phase Fe revealed a net increase in Fe(III) of 160 mmol above background Fe(III) content indicating that 55% of the injected Fe(II) was oxidized. Differential solubility analysis of 0.5M HCl-extractable Fe and 3M HCl-extractable Fe indicated that the oxidation product was crystalline in nature as only 20% was soluble in 0.5M HCl. This formation of crystalline biogenic Fe(III) oxides is consistent with previous studies. Periodic injections of nitrate and acetate did not result in significant changes in Fe(II) or Fe(III) throughout a control column. Together these results demonstrate that native subsurface sediments harbor microbial communities capable of nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation under advective flow. The biogenic formation of reactive Fe(III) oxide minerals capable of immobilizing heavy metals and radionuclides presents a plausible bioremediative strategy for contaminated subsurface environments.

  4. Fluorescence studies on radiation oxidative damage to membranes with implications to cellular radiosensitivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K P Mishra

    2002-12-01

    Radiation oxidative damage to plasma membrane and its consequences to cellular radiosensitivity have received increasing attention in the past few years. This review gives a brief account of radiation oxidative damage in model and cellular membranes with particular emphasis on results from our laboratory. Fluorescence and ESR spin probes have been employed to investigate the structural and functional alterations in membranes after g-irradiation. Changes in the lipid bilayer in irradiated unilamellar liposomes prepared from egg yolk lecithin (EYL) were measured by using diphenylhexatriene (DPH) as a probe. The observed increase in DPH polarization and decrease in fluorescence intensity after g-irradiation of liposomes imply radiationinduced decrease in bilayer fluidity. Inclusion of cholesterol in liposome was found to protect lipids against radiation damage, possibly by modulation of bilayer organization e.g. lipid packing. Measurements on dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes loaded with 6-carboxyfluorescein (CF) showed radiation dose-dependent release of the probe indicating radiation-induced increased permeability. Changes in plasma membrane permeability of thymocytes were monitored by fluorescein diacetate (FDA) and induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined by 2,7-dichlorodihydro fluorescein diacetate (DCH-FDA). Results suggest a correlation between ROS generation and membrane permeability changes induced by radiation within therapeutic doses (0-10 Gy). It is concluded that increase in membrane permeability was the result of ROS-mediated oxidative reactions, which might trigger processes leading to apoptotic cell death after radiation exposure.

  5. Chromosome damage induced by DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors combined with {gamma}-radiation in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Maria Cristina P.; Dias, Francisca da Luz; Cecchi, Andrea O.; Antunes, Lusania M.G.; Takahashi, Catarina S. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Genetica

    1998-09-01

    Combined radiation and antineoplastic drug treatment have important applications in cancer therapy. In the present work, an evaluation was made of two known topoisomerase II inhibitors, doxorubicin (DXR) and mitoxantrone (MXN), with {gamma}-radiation. The effect of DXR or MXN on {gamma}radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were analyzed. Two concentrations of each drug, 0.5 and 1.0 {mu}g/ml DXR, and 0.02 and 0.04 {mu}g/ml MXN, were applied in combination with two doses of {gamma}-radiation (20 and 40 cGy). A significant potentiating effect on chromosomal aberrations was observed in CHO cells exposed to 1.0 {mu}g/ml DXR plus 40 cGy. In the other tests, the combination of {gamma}-radiation with DXR or MXN gave approximately additive effects. Reduced mitotic indices reflected higher toxicity of the drugs when combined with radiation. (author) 55 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.; e-mail: mcaraujo at spider.usp.br

  6. Analytic Models for Radiation Induced Loss in Optical Fibers II. A Physical Model,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    and identify by Mock number) PIEL GRUP UB.GR. Optical fibers Analytical models Radiation effects 19. ABSTRACT (ConinueII. anl mwr,f fneciua,, and...conditions specified in the derivation of the equations existed during the irradiations. This is because the functional form of the equations is not...tion is not necessarily incorrect. If one assumes a relatively simple form of re- covery as a function of time, such as an exponential recovery, it can

  7. Characterization of the native oxide of CuInSe2 using synchrotron radiation photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Art J.; Gebhard, Steven; Kazmerski, L. L.; Colavita, Elio; Engelhardt, Mike; Höchst, Hartmut

    1990-10-01

    Synchrotron radiation soft x-ray photoemission spectroscopy was used to investigate the native oxide of n-type single-crystal CuInSe2. Photoemission measurements were acquired on the oxide surface before and after removal using sputter etching. Observed changes in the valence-band electronic structure as well as changes in the In 4d and Se 3d core lines were correlated with the interface chemistry at the oxide/CuInSe2 interface. These results show the native oxide to be composed of an In2O3 outer layer (no SeO2) with an additional Cu2Se interface layer.

  8. Belle-II VXD radiation monitoring and beam abort with sCVD diamond sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, T.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, C.; Kandra, J.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kvasnička, P.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Negishi, K.; Nisar, N. K.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Park, H.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rao, K. K.; Rizzo, G.; Rozanska, M.; Sandilya, S.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G. N.; Thalmeier, R.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, Lorenzo; Volpi, M.; Watanuki, S.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.

    2016-07-01

    The Belle-II VerteX Detector (VXD) has been designed to improve the performances with respect to Belle and to cope with an unprecedented luminosity of 8 ×1035cm-2s-1 achievable by the SuperKEKB. Special care is needed to monitor both the radiation dose accumulated throughout the life of the experiment and the instantaneous radiation rate, in order to be able to promptly react to sudden spikes for the purpose of protecting the detectors. A radiation monitoring and beam abort system based on single-crystal diamond sensors is now under an active development for the VXD. The sensors will be placed in several key positions in the vicinity of the interaction region. The severe space limitations require a challenging remote readout of the sensors.

  9. Solar absorptance of copper–cobalt oxide thin film coatings with nano-size, grain-like morphology: Optimization and synchrotron radiation XPS studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amri, Amun [School of Engineering and Energy, Murdoch University, Murdoch, 6150 WA (Australia); Department of Chemical Engineering, Riau University, Pekanbaru (Indonesia); Duan, XiaoFei [School of Chemistry, The University of Melbourne, VIC 3010 (Australia); Yin, Chun-Yang, E-mail: c.yin@murdoch.edu.au [School of Chemical and Mathematical Sciences, Murdoch University, Murdoch, 6150 WA (Australia); Jiang, Zhong-Tao, E-mail: z.jiang@murdoch.edu.au [School of Engineering and Energy, Murdoch University, Murdoch, 6150 WA (Australia); Rahman, M. Mahbubur; Pryor, Trevor [School of Engineering and Energy, Murdoch University, Murdoch, 6150 WA (Australia)

    2013-06-15

    Copper–cobalt oxides thin films had been successfully coated on reflective aluminium substrates via a facile sol–gel dip-coating method for solar absorptance study. The optimum absorptance in the range of solar radiation is needed for further optimum design of this material for selective solar absorber application. Field emission scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the surface morphology of the coating whereby nano-size, grain-like morphology was observed. Synchrotron radiation X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was employed to analyze the electronic structure of the coated surface showing that the (i) oxygen consisted of lattice, surface and subsurface oxygen, (ii) copper consisted of octahedral and tetrahedral Cu{sup +}, as well as octahedral and paramagnetic Cu{sup 2+} oxidation states, and (iii) cobalt consisted of tetrahedral and paramagnetic Co(II), octahedral Co(III) as well as mixed Co(II,III) oxidation states. In order to optimize the solar absorptance of the coatings, relevant parameters such as concentrations of cobalt and copper, copper/cobalt concentration ratios and dip-speed were investigated. The optimal coating with α = 83.4% was produced using 0.25 M copper acetate and 0.25 M cobalt chloride (Cu/Co ratio = 1) with dip-speed 120 mm/min (four cycles). The operational simplicity of the dip-coating system indicated that it could be extended for coating of other mixed metal oxides as well.

  10. Radiative transfer meets Bayesian statistics: where does a galaxy's [C II] emission come from?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurso, G.; Saintonge, A.; Bisbas, T. G.; Viti, S.

    2017-01-01

    The [C II] 158 μm emission line can arise in all phases of the interstellar medium (ISM), therefore being able to disentangle the different contributions is an important yet unresolved problem when undertaking galaxy-wide, integrated [C II] observations. We present a new multiphase 3D radiative transfer interface that couples STARBURST99, a stellar spectrophotometric code, with the photoionization and astrochemistry codes MOCASSIN and 3D-PDR. We model entire star-forming regions, including the ionized, atomic, and molecular phases of the ISM, and apply a Bayesian inference methodology to parametrize how the fraction of the [C II] emission originating from molecular regions, f_{[C II],mol}, varies as a function of typical integrated properties of galaxies in the local Universe. The main parameters responsible for the variations of f_{[C II],mol} are specific star formation rate (SSFR), gas phase metallicity, H II region electron number density (ne), and dust mass fraction. For example, f_{[C II],mol} can increase from 60 to 80 per cent when either ne increases from 101.5 to 102.5 cm-3, or SSFR decreases from 10-9.6 to 10-10.6 yr-1. Our model predicts for the Milky Way that f_{[C II],mol} = 75.8 ± 5.9 per cent, in agreement with the measured value of 75 per cent. When applying the new prescription to a complete sample of galaxies from the Herschel Reference Survey, we find that anywhere from 60 to 80 per cent of the total integrated [C II] emission arises from molecular regions.

  11. Rate law of Fe(II) oxidation under low O2 conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, Yoshiki; Murakami, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    Despite intensive studies on Fe(II) oxidation kinetics, the oxidation rate law has not been established under low O2 conditions. The importance of Fe(II) oxidation under low O2 conditions has been recently recognized; for instance, the Fe(II)/Fe(III) compositions of paleosols, ancient soils formed by weathering, can produce a quantitative pattern of the atmospheric oxygen increase during the Paleoproterozoic. The effects of partial pressure of atmospheric oxygen (PO2) on the Fe(II) oxidation rate were investigated to establish the Fe(II) oxidation rate - PO2 relationships under low O2 conditions. All oxidation experiments were carried out in a glove box by introducing Ar gas at ∼10-5-∼10-4 atm of PO2, pH 7.57-8.09 and 22 °C. Luminol chemiluminescence was adopted to measure low Fe(II) concentrations (down to ∼2 nM). Combining previous data under higher PO2 conditions (10-3-0.2 atm) with the present data, the rate law for Fe(II) oxidation over a wide range of PO2 (10-5-0.2 atm) was found to be written as: d[Fe(II)]/dt=-k[Fe(II)][[]2 where the exponent of [O2], x, and the rate constant, k, change from x = 0.98 (±0.04) and log k = 15.46 (±0.06) at ∼6 × 10-3-0.2 atm of PO2 to x = 0.58 (±0.02) and log k = 13.41 (±0.03) at 10-5-∼6 × 10-3 atm of PO2. The most plausible mechanism that explains the change in x under low O2 conditions is that, instead of O2, oxygen-derived oxidants, H2O2 and to some extent, O2rad -, dominate the oxidation reactions at oxygen in the Precambrian.

  12. DIETARY FLAXSEED PREVENTS RADIATION-INDUCED OXIDATIVE LUNG DAMAGE, INFLAMMATION AND FIBROSIS IN A MOUSE MODEL OF THORACIC RADIATION INJURY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James C.; Krochak, Ryan; Blouin, Aaron; Kanterakis, Stathis; Chatterjee, Shampa; Arguiri, Evguenia; Vachani, Anil; Solomides, Charalambos C.; Cengel, Keith A.; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo

    2009-01-01

    Flaxseed (FS) has high contents of omega-3 fatty acids and lignans with antioxidant properties. Its use in preventing thoracic X-ray radiation therapy (XRT)-induced pneumonopathy has never been evaluated. We evaluated FS supplementation given to mice given before and post-XRT. FS-derived lignans, known for their direct antioxidant properties, were evaluated in abrogating ROS generation in cultured endothelial cells following gamma radiation exposure. Mice were fed 10% FS or isocaloric control diet for three weeks and given 13.5 Gy thoracic XRT. Lungs were evaluated at 24 hours for markers of radiation-induced injury, three weeks for acute lung damage (lipid peroxidation, lung edema and inflammation), and at four months for late lung damage (inflammation and fibrosis). FS-Lignans blunted ROS generation in vitro, resulting from radiation in a dose-dependent manner. FS-fed mice had reduced expression of lung injury biomarkers (Bax, p21, and TGF-beta1) at 24 hours following XRT and reduced oxidative lung damage as measured by malondialdehyde (MDA) levels at 3 weeks following XRT. In addition, FS-fed mice had decreased lung fibrosis as determined by hydroxyproline content and decreased inflammatory cell influx into lungs at 4 months post XRT. Importantly, when Lewis Lung carcinoma cells were injected systemically in mice, FS dietary supplementation did not appear to protect lung tumors from responding to thoracic XRT. Dietary FS is protective against pulmonary fibrosis, inflammation and oxidative lung damage in a murine model. Moreover, in this model, tumor radioprotection was not observed. FS lignans exhibited potent radiation-induced ROS scavenging action. Taken together, these data suggest that dietary flaxseed may be clinically useful as an agent to increase the therapeutic index of thoracic XRT by increasing the radiation tolerance of lung tissues. PMID:18981722

  13. Inhibition of central angiotensin II enhances memory function and reduces oxidative stress status in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bild, Walther; Hritcu, Lucian; Stefanescu, Cristinel; Ciobica, Alin

    2013-06-03

    While it is now well established that the independent brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has some important central functions besides the vascular ones, the relevance of its main bioactive peptide angiotensin II (Ang II) on the memory processes, as well as on oxidative stress status is not completely understood. The purpose of the present work was to evaluate the effects of central Ang II administration, as well as the effects of Ang II inhibition with either AT1 and AT 2 receptor specific blockers (losartan and PD-123177, respectively) or an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (captopril). These effects were studied on the short-term memory (assessed through Y-maze) or long-term memory (as determined in passive avoidance) and on the oxidative stress status of the hippocampus. Our results demonstrate memory deficits induced by the administration of Ang II, as showed by the significant decrease of the spontaneous alternation in Y-maze (p=0.015) and latency-time in passive avoidance task (p=0.001) when compared to saline. On the other side, the administration of all the aforementioned Ang II blockers significantly improved the spontaneous alternation in Y-maze task, while losartan also increased the latency time as compared to saline in step-through passive avoidance (p=0.042). Also, increased oxidative stress status was induced in the hippocampus by the administration of Ang II, as demonstrated by increased levels of lipid peroxidation markers (malondialdehyde-MDA concentration) (p0.0001) vs. saline. Moreover, significant correlations were found between all of the memory related behavioral parameters and the main oxidative stress markers from the hippocampus, which is known for its implication in the processes of memory and also where RAS components are well expressed. This could be relevant for the complex interactions between Ang II, behavioral processes and neuronal oxidative stress, and could generate important therapeutic approaches. Copyright

  14. Purification and Characterization of the Manganese(II) Oxidizing Protein from Erythrobacter sp. SD-21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakama, K. R.; Lien, A.; Johnson, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    The manganese(II) oxidizing protein (Mop) found in the alpha-proteobacterium Erythrobacter sp. SD-21 catalyzes the formation of insoluble Mn(III/IV) oxides from soluble Mn(II). These Mn(III/IV) oxides formed are one of the strongest naturally occurring oxides, next to oxygen, and can be used to adsorb and oxidize toxic chemicals from the surrounding environment. Because of the beneficial use in the treatment of contaminated sources, the mechanism and biochemical properties of this novel enzyme are being studied. Due to low expression levels in the native host strain, purification of Mop has been problematic. To overcome this problem the gene encoding Mop, mopA, was cloned from the native host into a C-terminal histidine tag vector and expressed in Escherichia coli cells. Affinity chromatography under denaturing conditions have been applied in attempts to purify an active Mop. Western blots have confirmed that the protein is being expressed and is at the expected size of 250 kDa. Preliminary characterization on crude extract containing Mop has shown a Km and vmax value of 2453 uM and 0.025 uM min-1, respectively. Heme and pyrroloquinoline quinone can stimulate Mn(II) oxidizing activity, but hydrogen peroxide does not affect activity, despite the sequence similarity to animal heme peroxidase proteins. Research has been shown that calcium is essential for Mop activity. Purifying an active Mn(II) oxidizing protein will allow for a better understanding behind the enigmatic process of Mn(II) oxidation.

  15. Benzylic oxidation catalyzed by dirhodium(II,III) caprolactamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catino, Arthur J; Nichols, Jason M; Choi, Hojae; Gottipamula, Sidhartha; Doyle, Michael P

    2005-11-10

    [reaction: see text] Dirhodium caprolactamate [Rh2(cap)4] is an effective catalyst for benzylic oxidation with tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) under mild conditions. Sodium bicarbonate is the optimal base additive for substrate conversion. Benzylic carbonyl compounds are readily obtained, and a formal synthesis of palmarumycin CP2 using this methodology is described.

  16. Study of thin oxide films by electron, ion and synchrotron radiation beams

    CERN Document Server

    Sammelselg, V; Tarre, A; Asari, J; Rauhala, E; Arstila, K; Seppaelae, A; Zakharov, A; Aarik, J; Karlis, J; Martinson, Indrek

    2002-01-01

    Titanium oxide and zirconium oxide thin films deposited on silicon substrates were characterized using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis (TOF-ERDA) and scanning photoelectron microscopy (SPEM). The composition and mass thickness of the films were determined and the results of different methods compared. lt was revealed that the synchrotron radiation used for SPEM studies caused considerable modification of zirconia films grown at low temperatures. (author)

  17. Radiation Detection and Classification of Heavy Oxide Inorganic Scintillator Crystals for Detection of Fast Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    and alkali-halide scintillators for potential use in neutron and gamma detection systems .” M.S. thesis, Dept. Physics , Naval Posgraduate School...DETECTION AND CLASSIFICATION OF HEAVY OXIDE INORGANIC SCINTILLATOR CRYSTALS FOR DETECTION OF FAST NEUTRONS by Jacob W. Capps June 2016 Thesis...DATE June 2016 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE RADIATION DETECTION AND CLASSIFICATION OF HEAVY OXIDE

  18. Angiotensin II stimulates superoxide production by nitric oxide synthase in thick ascending limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Vicente, Agustin; Saikumar, Jagannath H; Massey, Katherine J; Hong, Nancy J; Dominici, Fernando P; Carretero, Oscar A; Garvin, Jeffrey L

    2016-02-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) causes nitric oxide synthase (NOS) to become a source of superoxide (O2 (-)) via a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent process in endothelial cells. Ang II stimulates both NO and O2 (-) production in thick ascending limbs. We hypothesized that Ang II causes O2 (-) production by NOS in thick ascending limbs via a PKC-dependent mechanism. NO production was measured in isolated rat thick ascending limbs using DAF-FM, whereas O2 (-) was measured in thick ascending limb suspensions using the lucigenin assay. Consistent stimulation of NO was observed with 1 nmol/L Ang II (P thick ascending limbs via a PKC- and NADPH oxidase-dependent process; and (2) the effect of Ang II is not due to limited substrate.

  19. General relativistic radiation hydrodynamics of accretion flows - II. Treating stiff source terms and exploring physical limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roedig, C.; Zanotti, O.; Alic, D.

    2012-10-01

    We present the implementation of an implicit-explicit (IMEX) Runge-Kutta numerical scheme for general relativistic (GR) hydrodynamics coupled to an optically thick radiation field in two existing GR-(magneto)hydrodynamics codes. We argue that the necessity of such an improvement arises naturally in most astrophysically relevant regimes where the optical thickness is high as the equations become stiff. By performing several simple 1D tests, we verify the codes' new ability to deal with this stiffness and show consistency. Then, still in one spatial dimension, we compute a luminosity versus accretion rate diagram for the set-up of spherical accretion on to a Schwarzschild black hole and find good agreement with previous work which included more radiation processes than we currently have available. Lastly, we revisit the supersonic Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton (BHL) accretion in two dimensions where we can now present simulations of realistic temperatures, down to T ˜ 106 K or less. Here we find that radiation pressure plays an important role, but also that these highly dynamical set-ups push our approximate treatment towards the limit of physical applicability. The main features of radiation hydrodynamics BHL flows manifest as (i) an effective adiabatic index approaching γeff ˜ 4/3; (ii) accretion rates two orders of magnitude lower than without radiation pressure, but still super-Eddington; (iii) luminosity estimates around the Eddington limit, hence with an overall radiative efficiency as small as ηBHL˜10-2; (iv) strong departures from thermal equilibrium in shocked regions; (v) no appearance of the flip-flop instability. We conclude that the current optically thick approximation to the radiation transfer does give physically substantial improvements over the pure hydro also in set-ups departing from equilibrium, and, once accompanied by an optically thin treatment, is likely to provide a fundamental tool for investigating accretion flows in a large variety of

  20. One-Pot Synthesis of Cu(II Complex with Partially Oxidized TTF Moieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Oshio

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The one-pot synthesis of a Cu(II complex with partially oxidized tetrathiafulvalene (TTF moieties in its capping MT-Hsae-TTF ligands, [CuII(MT-sae-TTF2] [CuICl2] was realized by the simultaneous occurrence of Cu(II complexation and CuIICl2 mediated oxidation of TTF moieties. The crystal structure was composed of one-dimensional columns formed by partially oxidized TTF moieties and thus the cation radical salt showed relatively high electrical conductivity. Tight binding band structure calculations indicated the existence of a Peierls gap due to the tetramerization of the TTF moieties in the one-dimensional stacking column at room temperature, which is consistent with the semiconducting behavior of this salt.

  1. Heat transfer in vertical Bridgman growth of oxides - Effects of conduction, convection, and internal radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, S.; Derby, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    In the present investigation of crystalline phase internal radiation and heat conduction during the vertical Bridgman growth of a YAG-like oxide crystal, where transport through the melt is dominated by convection and conduction, heat is also noted to be conducted through ampoule walls via natural convection and enclosure radiation. The results of a quasi-steady-state axisymmetric Galerkin FEM indicate that heat transfer through the system is powerfully affected by the optical absorption coefficient of the crystal. The coupling of internal radiation through the crystal with conduction through the ampoule walls promotes melt/crystal interface shapes that are highly reflected near the ampoule wall.

  2. Role of glipizide therapy on oxidative stress parameters in the patient with Type-II diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash P. Malam

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Glipizide therapy significantly reduced oxidative free radicals and increased antioxidant mechanism, which reduced oxidative stress, progression DM-II and its related complication. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(6.000: 995-999

  3. Phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidation in the chemocline of a ferruginous meromictic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Xavier A.; Picazo, Antonio; Miracle, Maria R.; Vicente, Eduardo; Camacho, Antonio; Aragno, Michel; Zopfi, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Precambrian Banded Iron Formation (BIF) deposition was conventionally attributed to the precipitation of iron-oxides resulting from the abiotic reaction of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) with photosynthetically produced oxygen. Earliest traces of oxygen date from 2.7 Ga, thus raising questions as to what may have caused BIF precipitation before oxygenic photosynthesis evolved. The discovery of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria thriving through the oxidation of Fe(II) has provided support for a biological origin for some BIFs, but despite reports suggesting that anoxygenic phototrophs may oxidize Fe(II) in the environment, a model ecosystem of an ancient ocean where they are demonstrably active was lacking. Here we show that anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria contribute to Fe(II) oxidation in the water column of the ferruginous sulfate-poor, meromictic lake La Cruz (Spain). We observed in-situ photoferrotrophic activity through stimulation of phototrophic carbon uptake in the presence of Fe(II), and determined light-dependent Fe(II)-oxidation by the natural chemocline microbiota. Moreover, a photoferrotrophic bacterium most closely related to Chlorobium ferrooxidans was enriched from the ferruginous water column. Our study for the first time demonstrates a direct link between anoxygenic photoferrotrophy and the anoxic precipitation of Fe(III)-oxides in a ferruginous water column, providing a plausible mechanism for the bacterial origin of BIFs before the advent of free oxygen. However, photoferrotrophs represent only a minor fraction of the anoxygenic phototrophic community with the majority apparently thriving by sulfur cycling, despite the very low sulfur content in the ferruginous chemocline of Lake La Cruz. PMID:25538702

  4. Nickel(II)-induced nasal epithelial toxicity and oxidative mitochondrial damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon-Jin; Lim, Soo-Sung; Baek, Byoung Joon; An, Je-Min; Nam, Hae-Seon; Woo, Kee-Min; Cho, Moon-Kyun; Kim, Sung-Ho; Lee, Sang-Han

    2016-03-01

    In probing the underlying mechanisms of nickel(II)-induced cytotoxicity on nasal epithelium, we investigated the effects of nickel(II) acetate on nasal epithelial RPMI-2650 cells. Nickel(II) elicited apoptosis, as signified by pyknotic and fragmented nuclei, increased caspase-3/7 activity, and an increase in annexin V binding, hypodiploid DNA, and Bax/Bcl-2 protein ratio. Nickel(II)-induced G2/M arrest was associated with up-regulation of p21(WAF1/CIP1) expression, decrease in phosphorylation at Thr(161) of Cdc2, and down-regulation of cyclin B1. Associated with these responses, ROS generation and mitochondrial depolarization increased in a nickel(II) concentration-dependent fashion. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) attenuated these changes. p53 reporter gene assay and analyses of p53, Puma, Bax, and Bcl-2 protein levels indicated that NAC inhibited nickel(II)-induced activation of p53-mediated mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Collectively, our study provides evidences that nickel(II) may induce oxidative damage on nasal epithelium in which antioxidant NAC protects cells against nickel(II)-induced apoptosis through the prevention of oxidative stress-mediated mitochondrial damage.

  5. Oxidation of Dodecanoate Intercalated Iron(II)–Iron(III) Layered Double Hydroxide to Form 2D Iron(III) (Hydr)oxide Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Li‐Zhi; Ayala‐Luis, Karina B.; Fang, Liping;

    2013-01-01

    A planar trioctahedral iron(II)–iron(III) hydroxide (green rust, GR) intercalated with dodecanoate (GRC12) has been oxidized by dioxygen to produce the corresponding planar iron(III) (hydr)oxide. The formulae of GRC12 and the final iron(III) product (oxGRC12) were determined to be FeII2.00FeIII1...

  6. Phenol-oxidizing peroxidases contribute to the protection of plants from ultraviolet radiation stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, M.A.K.; Noort, van den R.E.; Tan, M.Y.A.; Prinsen, E.; Lagrimini, L.M.; Thorneley, R.N.F.

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the mechanism of UV protection in two duckweed species (Lemnaceae) by exploiting the UV sensitivity of photosystem II as an in situ sensor for radiation stress. A UV-tolerant Spirodela punctata G.F.W. Meyer ecotype had significantly higher indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels than a UV-

  7. Radiative emission of solar features in the Ca II K line: comparison of measurements and models

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolli, I; Uitenbroek, H; Giorgi, F; Rast, M P; Solanki, S K

    2010-01-01

    We study the radiative emission of various types of solar features, such as quiet Sun, enhanced network, plage, and bright plage regions, identified on filtergrams taken in the Ca II K line. We analysed fulldisk images obtained with the PSPT, by using three interference filters that sample the Ca II K line with different bandpasses. We studied the dependence of the radiative emission of disk features on the filter bandpass. We also performed a NLTE spectral synthesis of the Ca II K line integrated over the bandpass of PSPT filters. The synthesis was carried out by utilizing both the PRD and CRD with the most recent set of semi­empirical atmosphere models in the literature and some earlier atmosphere models. We measured the CLV of intensity values for various solar features identified on PSPT images and compared the results obtained with those derived from the synthesis. We find that CRD calculations derived using the most recent quiet Sun model, on average, reproduce the measured values of the quiet Sun regi...

  8. Electrical integrity of oxides in a radiation field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Kinoshita, C.

    1996-04-01

    In the absence of an applied electric field, irradiation generally produces a decrease in the permanent (beam-off) electrical conductivity of ceramic insulators. However, in the past 6 years several research groups have reported a phenomenon known as radiation induced electrical degradation (RIED), which produces significant permanent increases in the electrical conductivity of ceramic insulators irradiated with an applied electric field. RIED has been reported to occur at temperatures between 420 and 800 K with applied electric fields as low as 20 V/mm.

  9. Radiation Stability of Nanoclusters in Nano-structured Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Certain, Alicia G.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Shutthanandan, V.; Hoelzer, D. T.; Allen, T. R.

    2013-03-01

    Nanostructured oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are considered candidates for nuclear fission and fusion applications at high temperature and dose. The complex oxide nanoclusters in these alloys provide high-temperature strength and are expected to afford better radiation resistance. Proton, heavy ion, and neutron irradiations have been performed to evaluate cluster stability in 14YWT and 9CrODS steel under a range of irradiation conditions. Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography were used in this work to analyze the evolution of the oxide population.

  10. Modification of radiation-induced oxidative damage in liposomal and microsomal membrane by eugenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, B.N. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Lathika, K.M. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Mishra, K.P. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)]. E-mail: kpm@magnum.barc.ernet.in

    2006-03-15

    Radiation-induced membrane oxidative damage, and their modification by eugenol, a natural antioxidant, was investigated in liposomes and microsomes. Liposomes prepared with DPH showed decrease in fluorescence after {gamma}-irradiation, which was prevented significantly by eugenol and correlated with magnitude of oxidation of phospholipids. Presence of eugenol resulted in substantial inhibition in MDA formation in irradiated liposomes/microsomes, which was less effective when added after irradiation. Similarly, the increase in phospholipase C activity observed after irradiation in microsomes was inhibited in samples pre-treated with eugenol. Results suggest association of radio- oxidative membrane damage with alterations in signaling molecules, and eugenol significantly prevented these membrane damaging events.

  11. Modification of radiation-induced oxidative damage in liposomal and microsomal membrane by eugenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, B. N.; Lathika, K. M.; Mishra, K. P.

    2006-03-01

    Radiation-induced membrane oxidative damage, and their modification by eugenol, a natural antioxidant, was investigated in liposomes and microsomes. Liposomes prepared with DPH showed decrease in fluorescence after γ-irradiation, which was prevented significantly by eugenol and correlated with magnitude of oxidation of phospholipids. Presence of eugenol resulted in substantial inhibition in MDA formation in irradiated liposomes/microsomes, which was less effective when added after irradiation. Similarly, the increase in phospholipase C activity observed after irradiation in microsomes was inhibited in samples pre-treated with eugenol. Results suggest association of radio- oxidative membrane damage with alterations in signaling molecules, and eugenol significantly prevented these membrane damaging events.

  12. Ultraviolet radiation does not increase oxidative stress in the lizard Psammodromus algirus along an elevational gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reguera, Senda; Zamora-Camacho, Francisco J; Melero, Elena; García-Mesa, Sergio; Trenzado, Cristina E; Cabrerizo, Marco J; Sanz, Ana; Moreno-Rueda, Gregorio

    2015-05-01

    Lizards, as ectotherms, spend much time basking for thermoregulating exposed to solar radiation. Consequently, they are subjected to ultraviolet radiation (UVR), which is the most harmful component of solar radiation spectrum. UVR can provoke damages, from the molecular to tissue level, even cause death. Photooxidation triggered by UVR produces reactive oxidative species (ROS). When antioxidant machinery cannot combat the ROS concentration, oxidative stress occurs in the organisms. Given that UVR increases with elevation, we hypothesised that lizards from high elevations should be better adapted against UVR than lizards from lower elevations. In this work, we test this hypothesis in Psammodromus algirus along an elevation gradient (three elevational belts, from 300 to 2500 m above sea level). We ran an experiment in which lizards from each elevation belt were exposed to 5-hour doses of UVR (UV-light bulb, experimental group) or photosynthetically active radiation (white-light bulb, control group) and, 24 h after the exposure, we took tissue samples from the tail. We measured oxidative damage (lipid and protein peroxidation) and antioxidant capacity as oxidative-stress biomarkers. We found no differences in oxidative stress between treatments. However, consistent with a previous work, less oxidative damage appeared in lizards from the highlands. We conclude that UVR is not a stressor agent for P. algirus; however, our findings suggest that the lowland environment is more oxidative for lizards. Therefore, P. algirus is well adapted to inhabit a large elevation range, and this would favour the lizard in case it ascends in response to global climate change.

  13. Does the oxidative stress theory of aging explain longevity differences in birds? II. Antioxidant systems and oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Magdalene K; Buttemer, William A; Hulbert, A J

    2012-03-01

    The oxidative damage hypothesis of aging posits that the accumulation of oxidative damage is a determinant of an animal species' maximum lifespan potential (MLSP). Recent findings in extremely long-living mammal species such as naked mole-rats challenge this proposition. Among birds, parrots are exceptionally long-living with an average MLSP of 25 years, and with some species living more than 70 years. By contrast, quail are among the shortest living bird species, averaging about 5-fold lower MLSP than parrots. To test if parrots have correspondingly (i) superior antioxidant protection and (ii) lower levels of oxidative damage compared to similar-sized quail, we measured (i) total antioxidant capacity, uric acid and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, as well as the activities of enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase), and (ii) markers of mitochondrial DNA damage (8-OHdG), protein damage (protein carbonyls) and lipid peroxidation (lipid hydroperoxides and TBARS) in three species of long-living parrots and compared these results to corresponding measures in two species of short-living quails (average MLSP=5.5 years). All birds were fed the same diet to exclude differences in dietary antioxidant levels. Tissue antioxidants and oxidative damage were determined both 'per mg protein' and 'per g tissue'. Only glutathione peroxidase was consistently higher in tissues of the long-living parrots and suggests higher protection against the harmful effects of hydroperoxides, which might be important for parrot longevity. The levels of oxidative damage were mostly statistically indistinguishable between parrots and quails (67%), occasionally higher (25%), but rarely lower (8%) in the parrots. Despite indications of higher protection against some aspects of oxidative stress in the parrots, the pronounced longevity of parrots appears to be independent of their antioxidant mechanisms and their accumulation of oxidative damage. Copyright

  14. Au@Cu(II)-MOF: Highly Efficient Bifunctional Heterogeneous Catalyst for Successive Oxidation-Condensation Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Si; Jin, Fa-Zheng; Ma, Hui-Chao; Li, Xiao-Bo; Liu, Ming-Yang; Kan, Jing-Lan; Chen, Gong-Jun; Dong, Yu-Bin

    2016-07-05

    A new composite Au@Cu(II)-MOF catalyst has been synthesized via solution impregnation and full characterized by HRTEM, SEM-EDS, XRD, gas adsorption-desorption, XPS, and ICP analysis. It has been shown here that the Cu(II)-framework can be a useful platform to stabilize and support gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). The obtained Au@Cu(II)-MOF exhibits a bifunctional catalytic behavior and is able to promote selective aerobic benzyl alcohol oxidation-Knoevenagel condensation in a stepwise way.

  15. Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Exposure, Oxidative Stress and Epigenetic Programing of Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharmalingam, Sujeenthar; Sreetharan, Shayenthiran; Kulesza, Adomas V; Boreham, Douglas R; Tai, T C

    2017-07-28

    Ionizing radiation exposure from medical diagnostic imaging has greatly increased over the last few decades. Approximately 80% of patients who undergo medical imaging are exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR). Although there is widespread consensus regarding the harmful effects of high doses of radiation, the biological effects of low-linear energy transfer (LET) LDIR is not well understood. LDIR is known to promote oxidative stress, however, these levels may not be large enough to result in genomic mutations. There is emerging evidence that oxidative stress causes heritable modifications via epigenetic mechanisms (DNA methylation, histone modification, noncoding RNA regulation). These epigenetic modifications result in permanent cellular transformations without altering the underlying DNA nucleotide sequence. This review summarizes the major concepts in the field of epigenetics with a focus on the effects of low-LET LDIR (programing.

  16. Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulation of a cavity solar reactor for the reduction of cerium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villafan-Vidales, H.I.; Arancibia-Bulnes, C.A.; Dehesa-Carrasco, U. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Privada Xochicalco s/n, Col. Centro, A.P. 34, Temixco, Morelos 62580 (Mexico); Romero-Paredes, H. [Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No.186, Col. Vicentina, A.P. 55-534, Mexico D.F 09340 (Mexico)

    2009-01-15

    Radiative heat transfer in a solar thermochemical reactor for the thermal reduction of cerium oxide is simulated with the Monte Carlo method. The directional characteristics and the power distribution of the concentrated solar radiation that enters the cavity is obtained by carrying out a Monte Carlo ray tracing of a paraboloidal concentrator. It is considered that the reactor contains a gas/particle suspension directly exposed to concentrated solar radiation. The suspension is treated as a non-isothermal, non-gray, absorbing, emitting, and anisotropically scattering medium. The transport coefficients of the particles are obtained from Mie-scattering theory by using the optical properties of cerium oxide. From the simulations, the aperture radius and the particle concentration were optimized to match the characteristics of the considered concentrator. (author)

  17. Radiation Hard Silicon Particle Detectors for Phase-II LHC Trackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblakowska-Mucha, A.

    2017-02-01

    The major LHC upgrade is planned after ten years of accelerator operation. It is foreseen to significantly increase the luminosity of the current machine up to 1035 cm‑2s‑1 and operate as the upcoming High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) . The major detectors upgrade, called the Phase-II Upgrade, is also planned, a main reason being the aging processes caused by severe particle radiation. Within the RD50 Collaboration, a large Research and Development program has been underway to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation tolerance for HL-LHC trackers. In this summary, several results obtained during the testing of the devices after irradiation to HL-LHC levels are presented. Among the studied structures, one can find advanced sensors types like 3D silicon detectors, High-Voltage CMOS technologies, or sensors with intrinsic gain (LGAD). Based on these results, the RD50 Collaboration gives recommendation for the silicon detectors to be used in the detector upgrade.

  18. Contribution of radiation-induced, nitric oxide-mediated bystander effect to radiation-induced adaptive response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, H.; Ohnishi, T.

    There has been a recent upsurge of interest in radiation-induced adaptive response and bystander effect which are specific modes in stress response to low-dose low-dose rate radiation Recently we found that the accumulation of inducible nitric oxide NO synthase iNOS in wt p53 cells was induced by chronic irradiation with gamma rays followed by acute irradiation with X-rays but not by each one resulting in an increase in nitrite concentrations of medium It is suggested that the accumulation of iNOS may be due to the depression of acute irradiation-induced p53 functions by pre-chronic irradiation In addition we found that the radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells against acute irradiation with X-rays was reduced after chronic irradiation with gamma rays This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells was nearly completely suppressed by the addition of NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO to the medium This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells is just radiation-induced adaptive response suggesting that NO-mediated bystander effect may considerably contribute to adaptive response induced by radiation

  19. Studies of radiation fields of LCLS-II super conducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana Leitner, M.; Ge, L.; Li, Z.; Xu, C.; Adolphsen, C.; Ross, M.; Carrasco, M.

    2016-09-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) will be a hard X-ray Free Electron Laser whose linac can deliver a 1.2 MW CW electron beam with bunch rates up to 1 MHz. To efficiently generate such a high power beam, Super-Conducting Radio-Frequency (SCRF) cavities will be installed in the upstream portion of the existing 3 km Linac at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The 9-cell niobium cavities will be cooled at 2K inside 35 cryomodules, each containing a string of eight of those cavities followed by a quadrupole. The strong electromagnetic fields in the SCRF cavities will extract electrons from the cavity walls that may be accelerated. Most such dark current will be deposited locally, although some electrons may reach several neighboring cryomodules, gaining substantial energy before they hit a collimator or other aperture. The power deposited by the field emitted electrons and the associated showers may pose radiation and machine protection issues at the cryomodules and also in other areas of the accelerator. Simulation of these effects is therefore crucial for the design of the machine. The in-house code Track3P was used to simulate field emitted electrons from the LCLS-II cavities, and a sophisticated 3D model of the cryomodules including all cavities was written to transport radiation with the Fluka Monte Carlo code, which was linked to Track3P through custom-made routines. This setup was used to compute power deposition in components, prompt and residual radiation fields, and radioisotope inventories.

  20. Manganese-II oxidation and Copper-II resistance in endospore forming Firmicutes isolated from uncontaminated environmental sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Dorador

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of metals in natural environments is a growing concern of modern societies since they constitute persistent, non-degradable contaminants. Microorganisms are involved in redox processes and participate to the biogeochemical cycling of metals. Some endospore-forming Firmicutes (EFF are known to oxidize and reduce specific metals and have been isolated from metal-contaminated sites. However, whether EFF isolated from uncontaminated sites have the same capabilities has not been thoroughly studied. In this study, we measured manganese oxidation and copper resistance of aerobic EFF from uncontaminated sites. For the purposes of this study we have sampled 22 natural habitats and isolated 109 EFF strains. Manganese oxidation and copper resistance were evaluated by growth tests as well as by molecular biology. Overall, manganese oxidation and tolerance to over 2 mM copper was widespread among the isolates (more than 44% of the isolates exhibited Mn (II-oxidizing activity through visible Birnessite formation and 9.1% tolerate over 2 mM copper. The co-occurrence of these properties in the isolates was also studied. Manganese oxidation and tolerance to copper were not consistently found among phylogenetically related isolates. Additional analysis correlating the physicochemical parameters measured on the sampling sites and the metabolic capabilities of the isolates showed a positive correlation between in situ alkaline conditions and the ability of the strains to perform manganese oxidation. Likewise, a negative correlation between temperature in the habitat and copper tolerance of the strains was observed. Our results lead to the conclusion that metal tolerance is a wide spread phenomenon in unrelated aerobic EFF from natural uncontaminated environments.

  1. Annealing of natural metamict zircons: II high degree of radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Colombo, M

    1998-01-01

    In situ time-dependent high-temperature X-ray powder diffraction was used to study the amorphous to crystalline transition in natural zircons which are characterized by a high degree of radiation damage. It was possible to distinguish two stages of the annealing process: (i) the recovery of the heavily disturbed but still crystalline domains and (ii) the recrystallization of the amorphous regions. The first stage is very fast under the chosen experimental conditions and, at least apparently, is not thermally activated. The second stage is a diffusion-controlled process, whose products (zircon or zircon and zirconia phases) are strongly correlated to the annealing temperature.

  2. Considerations for NSLS-II Synchrotron Radiation Protection When Operating Damping Wigglers at Low Machine Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seletskiy, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Photon Sciences Dept.; Podobedov, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Photon Sciences Dept.

    2015-12-30

    The NSLS-II storage ring vacuum chamber, including frontends (FE) and beamlines (BL), is protected from possible damage from synchrotron radiation (SR) emitted from insertion devices (IDs) by a dedicated active interlock system (AIS). The system monitors electron beam position and angle and triggers a beam dump if the beam orbit is outside of the active interlock envelope (AIE). The AIE was calculated under the assumptions of 3 GeV beam energy and ID gaps set to their minimum operating values (i.e. “fully closed”). Recently it was proposed to perform machine studies that would ramp the stored beam energy significantly below the nominal operational value of 3 GeV. These studies may potentially include the use of NSLS-II damping wigglers (DWs) for electron beam emittance reduction and control.

  3. Novel Double-Hit Model of Radiation and Hyperoxia-Induced Oxidative Cell Damage Relevant to Space Travel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph A. Pietrofesa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Spaceflight occasionally requires multiple extravehicular activities (EVA that potentially subject astronauts to repeated changes in ambient oxygen superimposed on those of space radiation exposure. We thus developed a novel in vitro model system to test lung cell damage following repeated exposure to radiation and hyperoxia. Non-tumorigenic murine alveolar type II epithelial cells (C10 were exposed to >95% O2 for 8 h only (O2, 0.25 Gy ionizing γ-radiation (IR only, or a double-hit combination of both challenges (O2 + IR followed by 16 h of normoxia (ambient air containing 21% O2 and 5% CO2 (1 cycle = 24 h, 2 cycles = 48 h. Cell survival, DNA damage, apoptosis, and indicators of oxidative stress were evaluated after 1 and 2 cycles of exposure. We observed a significant (p < 0.05 decrease in cell survival across all challenge conditions along with an increase in DNA damage, determined by Comet analysis and H2AX phosphorylation, and apoptosis, determined by Annexin-V staining, relative to cells unexposed to hyperoxia or radiation. DNA damage (GADD45α and cleaved-PARP, apoptotic (cleaved caspase-3 and BAX, and antioxidant (HO-1 and Nqo1 proteins were increased following radiation and hyperoxia exposure after 1 and 2 cycles of exposure. Importantly, exposure to combination challenge O2 + IR exacerbated cell death and DNA damage compared to individual exposures O2 or IR alone. Additionally levels of cell cycle proteins phospho-p53 and p21 were significantly increased, while levels of CDK1 and Cyclin B1 were decreased at both time points for all exposure groups. Similarly, proteins involved in cell cycle arrest was more profoundly changed with the combination challenges as compared to each stressor alone. These results correlate with a significant 4- to 6-fold increase in the ratio of cells in G2/G1 after 2 cycles of exposure to hyperoxic conditions. We have characterized a novel in vitro model of double-hit, low-level radiation and hyperoxia

  4. Novel Double-Hit Model of Radiation and Hyperoxia-Induced Oxidative Cell Damage Relevant to Space Travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Velalopoulou, Anastasia; Lehman, Stacey L; Arguiri, Evguenia; Solomides, Pantelis; Koch, Cameron J; Mishra, Om P; Koumenis, Constantinos; Goodwin, Thomas J; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo

    2016-06-16

    Spaceflight occasionally requires multiple extravehicular activities (EVA) that potentially subject astronauts to repeated changes in ambient oxygen superimposed on those of space radiation exposure. We thus developed a novel in vitro model system to test lung cell damage following repeated exposure to radiation and hyperoxia. Non-tumorigenic murine alveolar type II epithelial cells (C10) were exposed to >95% O₂ for 8 h only (O₂), 0.25 Gy ionizing γ-radiation (IR) only, or a double-hit combination of both challenges (O₂ + IR) followed by 16 h of normoxia (ambient air containing 21% O₂ and 5% CO₂) (1 cycle = 24 h, 2 cycles = 48 h). Cell survival, DNA damage, apoptosis, and indicators of oxidative stress were evaluated after 1 and 2 cycles of exposure. We observed a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in cell survival across all challenge conditions along with an increase in DNA damage, determined by Comet analysis and H2AX phosphorylation, and apoptosis, determined by Annexin-V staining, relative to cells unexposed to hyperoxia or radiation. DNA damage (GADD45α and cleaved-PARP), apoptotic (cleaved caspase-3 and BAX), and antioxidant (HO-1 and Nqo1) proteins were increased following radiation and hyperoxia exposure after 1 and 2 cycles of exposure. Importantly, exposure to combination challenge O₂ + IR exacerbated cell death and DNA damage compared to individual exposures O₂ or IR alone. Additionally levels of cell cycle proteins phospho-p53 and p21 were significantly increased, while levels of CDK1 and Cyclin B1 were decreased at both time points for all exposure groups. Similarly, proteins involved in cell cycle arrest was more profoundly changed with the combination challenges as compared to each stressor alone. These results correlate with a significant 4- to 6-fold increase in the ratio of cells in G2/G1 after 2 cycles of exposure to hyperoxic conditions. We have characterized a novel in vitro model of double-hit, low-level radiation and hyperoxia

  5. Ionizing radiation-induced metabolic oxidative stress and prolonged cell injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Edouard I.; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul; Pain, Debkumar

    2013-01-01

    Cellular exposure to ionizing radiation leads to oxidizing events that alter atomic structure through direct interactions of radiation with target macromolecules or via products of water radiolysis. Further, the oxidative damage may spread from the targeted to neighboring, non-targeted bystander cells through redox-modulated intercellular communication mechanisms. To cope with the induced stress and the changes in the redox environment, organisms elicit transient responses at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels to counteract toxic effects of radiation. Metabolic pathways are induced during and shortly after the exposure. Depending on radiation dose, dose-rate and quality, these protective mechanisms may or may not be sufficient to cope with the stress. When the harmful effects exceed those of homeostatic biochemical processes, induced biological changes persist and may be propagated to progeny cells. Physiological levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species play critical roles in many cellular functions. In irradiated cells, levels of these reactive species may be increased due to perturbations in oxidative metabolism and chronic inflammatory responses, thereby contributing to the long-term effects of exposure to ionizing radiation on genomic stability. Here, in addition to immediate biological effects of water radiolysis on DNA damage, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in the delayed outcomes of ionization radiation. Defects in mitochondrial functions lead to accelerated aging and numerous pathological conditions. Different types of radiation vary in their linear energy transfer (LET) properties, and we discuss their effects on various aspects of mitochondrial physiology. These include short and long-term in vitro and in vivo effects on mitochondrial DNA, mitochondrial protein import and metabolic and antioxidant enzymes. PMID:22182453

  6. Mn(II) Oxidation by the Multicopper Oxidase Complex Mnx: A Binuclear Activation Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatova, Alexandra V; Tao, Lizhi; Romano, Christine A; Stich, Troy A; Casey, William H; Britt, R David; Tebo, Bradley M; Spiro, Thomas G

    2017-08-23

    The bacterial protein complex Mnx contains a multicopper oxidase (MCO) MnxG that, unusually, catalyzes the two-electron oxidation of Mn(II) to MnO2 biomineral, via a Mn(III) intermediate. Although Mn(III)/Mn(II) and Mn(IV)/Mn(III) reduction potentials are expected to be high, we find a low reduction potential, 0.38 V (vs Normal Hydrogen Electrode, pH 7.8), for the MnxG type 1 Cu(2+), the electron acceptor. Indeed the type 1 Cu(2+) is not reduced by Mn(II) in the absence of molecular oxygen, indicating that substrate oxidation requires an activation step. We have investigated the enzyme mechanism via electronic absorption spectroscopy, using chemometric analysis to separate enzyme-catalyzed MnO2 formation from MnO2 nanoparticle aging. The nanoparticle aging time course is characteristic of nucleation and particle growth; rates for these processes followed expected dependencies on Mn(II) concentration and temperature, but exhibited different pH optima. The enzymatic time course is sigmoidal, signaling an activation step, prior to turnover. The Mn(II) concentration and pH dependence of a preceding lag phase indicates weak Mn(II) binding. The activation step is enabled by a pKa > 8.6 deprotonation, which is assigned to Mn(II)-bound H2O; it induces a conformation change (consistent with a high activation energy, 106 kJ/mol) that increases Mn(II) affinity. Mnx activation is proposed to decrease the Mn(III/II) reduction potential below that of type 1 Cu(II/I) by formation of a hydroxide-bridged binuclear complex, Mn(II)(μ-OH)Mn(II), at the substrate site. Turnover is found to depend cooperatively on two Mn(II) and is enabled by a pKa 7.6 double deprotonation. It is proposed that turnover produces a Mn(III)(μ-OH)2Mn(III) intermediate that proceeds to the enzyme product, likely Mn(IV)(μ-O)2Mn(IV) or an oligomer, which subsequently nucleates MnO2 nanoparticles. We conclude that Mnx exploits manganese polynuclear chemistry in order to facilitate an otherwise difficult

  7. Preparation of poly(chitosan-acrylamide) flocculant using gamma radiation for adsorption of Cu(II) and Ni(II) ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Alaaeldine Sh.; Ibrahim, Ahmed G.; Abdelhai, Farag; Elsharma, Emad M.; Metwally, Essam; Siyam, Tharwat

    2017-05-01

    Poly(chitosan-acrylamide), P(CTS-AAm), flocculant was prepared using gamma radiation and used for the adsorption of copper(II) and nickel(II) from aqueous solutions. The effect of reaction parameters, such as acetic acid, monomer and polymer concentrations, and absorbed dose, on the conversion percentage and intrinsic viscosity of P(CTS-AAm) was investigated. The prepared polymer was characterized by Fourier-transform infrared and Thermogravimetric analysis. The factors influencing copper(II) and nickel(II) adsorption on P(CTS-AAm), such as contact time, solution pH, polymer and metal ion concentrations, were also studied. The sorption capacity of P(CTS-AAm) was 196.84 mg/g and 63.15 mg/g for Cu(II) and Ni(II), respectively.

  8. Steam assisted oxide growth on aluminium alloys using oxidative chemistries: Part II corrosion performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    Surface treatment of aluminium alloys using steam with oxidative chemistries, namely KMnO4 and HNO3 resulted in accelerated growth of oxide on aluminium alloys. Detailed investigation of the corrosion performance of the treated surfaces was carried out using potentiodynamic polarisation...

  9. Adsorption of Co(II), Ni(II), Pb(II) and U(VI) from Aqueous Solutions using Polyaniline/Graphene Oxide Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhengjie; Li, Changzhen; Dong, Yunhui; Li, Yueyun [Shandong University of Technology, Zibo (China); Yang, Jianwei [Shandong Moris Technology Co.. Ltd, Weifang (China); Li, Jiaxing [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Jiang, Yajuan [Sinopec Beijing Yanshan Company, Beijing (China)

    2014-12-15

    Polyaniline modified graphene oxide (PANI/GO) composites were synthesized by dilute polymerization technique and were characterized by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The characterization results indicated that polyaniline molecules were successfully grafted on GO surfaces. The application of PANI/GO composites to the adsorption of heavy metals from aqueous solutions was investigated under ambient conditions. The maximum adsorption capacities of Co(II), Ni(II), Pb(II) and U(VI) ions on PANI/GO composites calculated from Langmuir models are 22.28, 25.67, 65.40 and 1552.31 mg/g, respectively. The excellent adsorption capacity suggests that PANI/GO composites can be applied as a promising adsorbent in heavy metal pollution cleanup in environmental pollution management.

  10. Biological iron(II) oxidation as pre-treatment to limestone neutralisation of acid water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maree, JP

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron (II) should be oxidised to iron (III) before the neutralisation of acid water with limestone, otherwise the oxidation will occur downstream of the neutralisation plant with the formation of acid (reactions 1 and 2). This study aimed...

  11. Homogeneous, heterogeneous and biological oxidation of iron(II) in rapid sand filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van C.G.E.M.; Hiemstra, T.; Hofs, B.; Nederlof, M.M.; Paassen, van J.A.M.; Reijnen, G.K.

    2012-01-01

    Homogeneous, heterogeneous and biological oxidation may precipitate iron(II) as iron(III) hydroxides. In this paper we evaluate the conditions under which each of these processes is dominant in rapid sand filtration (RSF). It is demonstrated that in the presence of iron(III) hydroxide precipitates

  12. Homogeneous, heterogeneous and biological oxidation of iron(II) in rapid sand filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van C.G.E.M.; Hiemstra, T.; Hofs, B.; Nederlof, M.M.; Paassen, van J.A.M.; Reijnen, G.K.

    2012-01-01

    Homogeneous, heterogeneous and biological oxidation may precipitate iron(II) as iron(III) hydroxides. In this paper we evaluate the conditions under which each of these processes is dominant in rapid sand filtration (RSF). It is demonstrated that in the presence of iron(III) hydroxide precipitates h

  13. Integrated iron(II) oxidation and limestone neutralisation of acid mine water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maree, JP

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Volumetric iron (II) oxidation rates exceeding 100 g/(l.d) were achieved by dosing powdered limestone to a bio-reactor treating artificial acid mine water. Neutralisation and partial sulphate removal were achieved as well. The rate is highly...

  14. Investigating the air oxidation of V(II) ions in a vanadium redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngamsai, Kittima; Arpornwichanop, Amornchai

    2015-11-01

    The air oxidation of vanadium (V(II)) ions in a negative electrolyte reservoir is a major side reaction in a vanadium redox flow battery (VRB), which leads to electrolyte imbalance and self-discharge of the system during long-term operation. In this study, an 80% charged negative electrolyte solution is employed to investigate the mechanism and influential factors of the reaction in a negative-electrolyte reservoir. The results show that the air oxidation of V(II) ions occurs at the air-electrolyte solution interface area and leads to a concentration gradient of vanadium ions in the electrolyte solution and to the diffusion of V(II) and V(III) ions. The effect of the ratio of the electrolyte volume to the air-electrolyte solution interface area and the concentrations of vanadium and sulfuric acid in an electrolyte solution is investigated. A higher ratio of electrolyte volume to the air-electrolyte solution interface area results in a slower oxidation reaction rate. The high concentrations of vanadium and sulfuric acid solution also retard the air oxidation of V(II) ions. This information can be utilized to design an appropriate electrolyte reservoir for the VRB system and to prepare suitable ingredients for the electrolyte solution.

  15. Copper(II)–imida‐salen Complexes Encapsulated into NaY Zeolite for Oxidations Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuźniarska‐Biernacka, Iwona; Carvalho, M. Alice; Rasmussen, Søren Birk

    2013-01-01

    The oxidation of phenol, cychohexanol and hydroquinone has been screened in the presence of copper(II) complexes with the Schiff‐base salen ligand, 1,5‐bis[(E)‐5‐chloro‐2‐hydroxybenzylideneamino]‐1H‐imidazole‐4‐carbonitrile, and encapsulated into NaY zeolite by using two different methods. The new...

  16. Chromosome damage induced by DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors combined with g-radiation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina P. Araújo

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Combined radiation and antineoplastic drug treatment have important applications in cancer therapy. In the present work, an evaluation was made of two known topoisomerase II inhibitors, doxorubicin (DXR and mitoxantrone (MXN, with g-radiation. The effects of DXR or MXN on g-radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells were analyzed. Two concentrations of each drug, 0.5 and 1.0 µg/ml DXR, and 0.02 and 0.04 µg/ml MXN, were applied in combination with two doses of g-radiation (20 and 40 cGy. A significant potentiating effect on chromosomal aberrations was observed in CHO cells exposed to 1.0 µg/ml DXR plus 40 cGy. In the other tests, the combination of g-radiation with DXR or MXN gave approximately additive effects. Reduced mitotic indices reflected higher toxicity of the drugs when combined with radiation.A associação de radiação ionizante com drogas antineoplásicas tem importante aplicação na terapia do câncer. No presente trabalho, foram avaliados os efeitos de dois inibidores de topoisomerase II, doxorubicina (DXR e mitoxantrona (MXN, sobre as aberrações cromossômicas induzidas pelas radiações-g em células do ovário de hamster chinês (CHO. Foram usadas as concentrações 0,5 e 1,0 mg/ml de DXR e 0,02 e 0,04 mg/ml de MXN, combinadas com duas doses de radiações gama (20 e 40 cGy. Um significativo efeito potenciador das aberrações cromossômicas foi observado em células CHO tratadas com 1,0 mg/ml de DXR e expostas a 40 cGy de radiação. Nos outros testes, a combinação da radiação-g com a DXR ou MXN apresentou um efeito próximo ao aditivo. A redução dos índices mitóticos refletiu a alta citotoxicidade das drogas quando combinadas às radiações-g.

  17. Radiation dosimetry measurements with real time radiation monitoring device (RRMD)-II in Space Shuttle STS-79.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, T; Doke, T; Hayashi, T; Kikuchi, J; Hasebe, N; Kashiwagi, T; Takashima, T; Takahashi, K; Nakano, T; Nagaoka, S; Takahashi, S; Yamanaka, H; Yamaguchi, K; Badhwar, G D

    1997-12-01

    The real-time measurement of radiation environment was made with an improved real-time radiation monitoring device (RRMD)-II onboard Space Shuttle STS-79 (S/MM#4: 4th Shuttle MIR Mission, at an inclination angle of 51.6 degrees and an altitude of 250-400km) for 199 h during 17-25 September, 1996. The observation of the detector covered the linear energy transfer (LET) range of 3.5-6000 keV/micrometer. The Shuttle orbital profile in this mission was equivalent to that of the currently planned Space Station, and provided an opportunity to investigate variations in count rate and dose equivalent rate depending on altitude, longitude, and latitude in detail. Particle count rate and dose equivalent rate were mapped geographically during the mission. Based on the map of count rate, an analysis was made by dividing whole region into three regions: South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) region, high latitude region and other regions. The averaged absorbed dose rate during the mission was 39.3 microGy/day for a LET range of 3.5-6000 keV/micrometer. The corresponding average dose equivalent rates during the mission are estimated to be 293 microSv/day with quality factors from International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)-Pub. 60 and 270 microSv/day with quality factors from ICRP-Pub. 26. The effective quality factors for ICRP-Pub. 60 and 26 are 7.45 and 6.88, respectively. From the present data for particles of LET > 3.5keV/micrometer, we conclude that the average dose equivalent rate is dominated by the contribution of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles. The dose-detector depth dependence was also investigated.

  18. Leaf extract of Moringa oleifera prevents ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Mahuya; Das, Dipesh K; Bhattacharjee, Surajit; Majumdar, Subrata; Dey, Sanjit

    2011-10-01

    The present study evaluated the hepatoprotective effect of aqueous ethanolic Moringa oleifera leaf extract (MoLE) against radiation-induced oxidative stress, which is assessed in terms of inflammation and lipid peroxidation. Swiss albino mice were administered MoLE (300 mg/kg of body weight) for 15 consecutive days before exposing them to a single dose of 5 Gy of ⁶⁰Co γ-irradiation. Mice were sacrificed at 4 hours after irradiation. Liver was collected for immunoblotting and biochemical tests for the detection of markers of hepatic oxidative stress. Nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and lipid peroxidation were augmented, whereas the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) values were decreased by radiation exposure. Translocation of NF-κB from cytoplasm to nucleus and lipid peroxidation were found to be inhibited, whereas increases in SOD, CAT, GSH, and FRAP were observed in the mice treated with MoLE prior to irradiation. Therefore pretreatment with MoLE protected against γ-radiation-induced liver damage. The protection may be attributed to the free radical scavenging activity of MoLE, through which it can ameliorate radiation-induced oxidative stress.

  19. The Reduction of Aqueous Metal Species on the Surfaces of Fe(II)-Containing Oxides: The Role of Surface Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A.F.; Peterson, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    The reduction of aqueous transition metal species at the surfaces of Fe(II)- containing oxides has important ramifications in predicting the transport behavior in ground water aquifers. Experimental studies using mineral suspensions and electrodes demonstrate that structural Fe(II) heterogeneously reduces aqueous ferric, cupric, vanadate and chromate ions on magnetite and ilmenite surfaces. The rates of metal reduction on natural oxides is strongly dependent on the extent of surface passivation and redox conditions in the weathering environment. Synchrotron studies show that surface oxidation of Fe(II)-containing oxide minerals decreases their capacity for Cr(VI) reduction at hazardous waste disposal sites.

  20. Preliminary study of EEHG-based superradiant undulator radiation at the HLS-II storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei-Wei; Li, He-Ting; Wang, Lin

    2017-07-01

    We investigate storage ring-based Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG) superradiant undulator radiation as a possible scheme to obtain shorter wavelengths at the HLS-II (Hefei Light Source-II) storage ring. In this paper we give the designation of the storage ring based EEHG up to the 26th harmonic, where 31 nm vacuum ultraviolet light is radiated from an 800 nm seeded laser. The novelty of our design is that both the two dispersion sections of EEHG are realized by the storage ring’s own magnet structure. In particular, the whole ring is used as the first dispersion section, and two modulators of the traditional EEHG can be done with the same undulator. These two dispersion sections are realized by changing the superperiod of the present lattice structure, and more precisely by changing the focusing strengths of the present structure. Since no additional magnets and chicanes are used, the beam circulates around the storage ring repeatedly, and thus this storage ring-based EEHG can have a higher repetition rate than a linac-based EEHG. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11305170)

  1. Reduced angiotensin II levels cause generalized vascular dysfunction via oxidant stress in hamster cheek pouch arterioles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priestley, Jessica R C; Buelow, Matthew W; McEwen, Scott T; Weinberg, Brian D; Delaney, Melanie; Balus, Sarah F; Hoeppner, Carlyn; Dondlinger, Lynn; Lombard, Julian H

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the effect of suppressing plasma angiotensin II (ANG II) levels on arteriolar relaxation in the hamster cheek pouch. Arteriolar diameters were measured via television microscopy during short-term (3-6days) high salt (HS; 4% NaCl) diet and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition with captopril (100mg/kg/day). ACE inhibition and/or HS diet eliminated endothelium-dependent arteriolar dilation to acetylcholine, endothelium-independent dilation to the NO donor sodium nitroprusside, the prostacyclin analogs carbacyclin and iloprost, and the KATP channel opener cromakalim; and eliminated arteriolar constriction during KATP channel blockade with glibenclamide. Scavenging of superoxide radicals and low dose ANG II infusion (25ng/kg/min, subcutaneous) reduced oxidant stress and restored arteriolar dilation in arterioles of HS-fed hamsters. Vasoconstriction to topically-applied ANG II was unaffected by HS diet while arteriolar responses to elevation of superfusion solution PO2 were unaffected (5% O2, 10% O2) or reduced (21% O2) by HS diet. These findings indicate that sustained exposure to low levels of circulating ANG II leads to widespread dysfunction in endothelium-dependent and independent vascular relaxation mechanisms in cheek pouch arterioles by increasing vascular oxidant stress, but does not potentiate O2- or ANG II-induced constriction of arterioles in the distal microcirculation of normotensive hamsters. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar Motwani

    2011-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  3. SORPTION EXTRACTION OF Cu (II AND Co (II BY MODIFIED COMPOSITE BASED ON NANOPOROUS ALUMINUM OXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. E. Silina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of modified nanoporous aluminum oxide (PAO as a composite for concentration and extraction of heavy metals is discussed in the article. There are identified the conditions for the synthesis of PAO matrix, selected the optimum surface-active agent for its modification. Spectrophotometric investigations have shown that the synthesized sorbent has complexing properties and it is suitable for concentration of metals from solutions.

  4. Androgen Induces Adaptation to Oxidative Stress in Prostate Cancer: Implications for Treatment with Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jehonathan H. Pinthus

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is a standard treatment for prostate cancer (PC. The postulated mechanism of action for radiation therapy is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Adjuvant androgen deprivation (AD therapy has been shown to confer a survival advantage over radiation alone in high-risk localized PC. However, the mechanism of this interaction is unclear. We hypothesize that androgens modify the radioresponsiveness of PC through the regulation of cellular oxidative homeostasis. Using androgen receptor (AR+ 22rv1 and AR− PC3 human PC cell lines, we demonstrated that testosterone increased basal reactive oxygen species (bROS levels, resulting in dose-dependent activation of phospho-p38 and pAKT, increased expression of clusterin, catalase, manganese superoxide dismutase. Similar data were obtained in three human PC xenografts; WISH-PC14, WISH-PC23, CWR22, growing in testosterone-supplemented or castrated SCID mice. These effects were reversible through AD or through incubation with a reducing agent. Moreover, testosterone increased the activity of catalase, superoxide dismutases, glutathione reductase. Consequently, AD significantly facilitated the response of AR+ cells to oxidative stress challenge. Thus, testosterone induces a preset cellular adaptation to radiation through the generation of elevated bROS, which is modified by AD. These findings provide a rational for combined hormonal and radiation therapy for localized PC.

  5. Role of Internal Radiation in Oxide Crystal Growth by Heat Exchanger Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wencheng Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Internal radiation was investigated using the finite volume method for the heat exchanger method (HEM growth of oxide crystals. Special attention was devoted to the temperature and thermal stress distributions in the bottom region of the grown crystal at the end of the solidification process. The numerical results show that internal radiation strongly strengthens heat transport through the crystal. However, it causes isotherms to intensively concentrate in the crystal bottom region, leading to a significant increase in the temperature gradient and thermal stress in this region. Then, the effect of absorption coefficient on this phenomenon was numerically investigated. It was found that the radiation heat transfer rate at the bottom surface of the crystal monotonically decreases as the absorption coefficient is increased, while the conduction heat transfer rate first increases and then decreases as the absorption coefficient is increased, under the interaction between internal radiation and heat conduction. The variations of the maximum temperature gradient and thermal stress in the crystal bottom show the same tendency as the conduction heat transfer rate. This study indicates that the role of internal radiation on the heat transfer and thermal stress in oxide crystal by HEM process shows some differences from that by Czochralski and Kyropoulos processes.

  6. Antioxidant activity of capsaicin on radiation-induced oxidation of murine hepatic mitochondrial membrane preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangabhagirathi R

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ramachandran Gangabhagirathi,1 Ravi Joshi,2 1Bioorganic Division, 2Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai, India Abstract: Capsaicin is the major capsaicinoid in chili peppers and is widely used as a spice. It is also used for topical applications in cases of peripheral neuropathy. The present study deals with its role in modulation of gamma radiation-induced damages of the biochemical constituents of rat liver mitochondrial membrane (RLM preparation. The extent of lipid hydroperoxide formation, depletion in protein thiols, and formation of protein carbonyls have been biochemically assessed in the presence of varying concentrations of capsaicin in RLM. Decrease in the activities of the important antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase, which is involved in the scavenging of free radicals, and the mitochondrial marker enzyme succinate dehydrogenase have been also looked into. Capsaicin has been found to efficiently inhibit radiation-induced biochemical alterations, namely lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation. It also significantly prevented radiation-induced loss in the activity of antioxidant enzyme and the important endogenous antioxidant glutathione. The study suggests that capsaicin can act as an antioxidant and radioprotector in physiological systems. Keywords: capsaicin, gamma radiation, radioprotection, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, enzyme activity

  7. Storm time variation of radiative cooling of thermosphere by nitric oxide emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, M. V. Sunil; Bag, Tikemani; Bharti, Gaurav

    2016-07-01

    The fundamental vibration-rotation band emission (Δν=1, Δ j=0,± 1) by nitric oxide (NO) at 5.3 µm is one of the most important cooling mechanisms in thermosphere. The collisional vibrational excitation of NO(ν=0) by impact with atomic oxygen is the main source of vibrationally excited nitric oxide. The variation of NO density depends on latitude, longitude and season. The present study aims to understand how the radiative flux gets influenced by the severe geomagnetic storm conditions. The variation of Nitric Oxide (NO) radiative flux exiting thermosphere is studied during the superstorm event of 7-12 November, 2004. The observations of TIMED/SABER suggest a strong anti-correlation with the O/N_2 ratio observed by GUVI during the same period. On a global scale the NO radiative flux showed an enhancement during the main phase on 8 November, 2004, whereas maximum depletion in O/N_2 is observed on 10 November, 2004. Both O/N_2 and NO radiative flux were found to propagate equatorward due to the effect of meridional wind resulting from joule and particle heating in polar region. Larger penetrations is observed in western longitude sectors. These observed variations are effectively connected to the variations in neutral densities. In the equatorial sectors, O/N_2 shows enhancement but almost no variation in radiative flux is observed. The possible reasons for the observed variations in NO radiative emission and O/N_2 ratios are discussed in the light of equator ward increase in the densities and prompt penetration.

  8. Effective atomic number, electron density and kerma of gamma radiation for oxides of lanthanides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R S Niranjan; B Rudraswamy; N Dhananjaya

    2012-03-01

    An attempt has been made to estimate the effective atomic number, electron density (0.001 to 105 MeV) and kerma (0.001 to 20 MeV) of gamma radiation for a wide range of oxides of lanthanides using mass attenuation coefficient from WinXCom and mass energy absorption coefficient from Hubbell and Seltzer. The values of these parameters have been found to change with energy for different oxides of lanthanides. The lanthanide oxides find remarkable applications in the field of medicine, biology, nuclear engineering and space technology. Nano-oxides of lanthanide find applications in display and lighting industry.

  9. Shielding NSLS-II light source: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.; Wahl, W.

    2016-11-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produces significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than a lower energy beam injection and ramped operations. Minimizing this dose will require adequate knowledge of where the miss-steered beam can occur and sufficient EM shielding close to the loss point, in order to attenuate the energy of the particles in the EM shower below the neutron production threshold (Designing supplemental shielding near the loss point using the analytic shielding model is shown to be inadequate because of its lack of geometry specification for the EM shower process. To predict the dose rates outside the tunnel requires detailed description of the geometry and materials that the beam losses will encounter inside the tunnel. Modern radiation shielding Monte-Carlo codes, like FLUKA, can handle this geometric description of the radiation transport process in sufficient detail, allowing accurate predictions of the dose rates expected and the ability to show weaknesses in the design before a high radiation incident occurs. The effort required to adequately define the accelerator geometry for these codes has been greatly reduced with the implementation of the graphical interface of FLAIR to FLUKA. This made the effective shielding process for NSLS-II quite accurate and reliable. The principles used to provide supplemental shielding to the NSLS-II accelerators and the lessons learned from this process are presented.

  10. Radiation-MHD models of elephant trunks and globules in H II regions

    CERN Document Server

    Mackey, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    We study the formation and evolution of pillars of dense gas, known as elephant trunks, at the boundaries of H II regions, formed by shadowing of ionising radiation by dense clumps. The effects of magnetic fields on this process are investigated using 3D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics simulations. For a simulation in which an initially uniform magnetic field of strength |B|=50 uG is oriented perpendicular to the radiation propagation direction, the field is swept into alignment with the pillar during its dynamical evolution, in agreement with observations of the "Pillars of Creation" in M16, and of some cometary globules. This effect is significantly enhanced when the simulation is re-run with a weaker field of 18 uG. A stronger field with |B|=160 uG is sufficient to prevent this evolution completely, also significantly affecting the photoionisation process. Using a larger simulation domain it is seen that the pillar formation models studied in Mackey & Lim (2010) ultimately evolve to cometary structures ...

  11. The effect of non ionising electromagnetic radiation on RAAF personnel during World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, J A

    1994-05-01

    Did exposure to non ionising electromagnetic radiation during World War II in the short term have a stimulating effect on the anterior pituitary gland, and in turn on the gonads of both sexes, since the figures obtained appeared to affect the sexes equally? Is it that the long-term effect of microwave radiation on personnel is to cause adenoma and carcinoma? Is this long-term effect similar to the long-term effect of X-rays on infants, children and adolescents? According to Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine 1980 (page 1710): "X-rays to the head and neck in infancy, childhood or adolescence is associated with a high incidence of thyroid disease later in life. Nodular disease is found to be particularly common on 20% of patients at risk, and may not be apparent until 30 years or more after exposure. One-third of the nodular type are found to be carcinomatous." The effect of non ionising electromagnetic and microwave radiation on those who work in these fields certainly needs much more investigation. What will be the long-term effect of using micro-ovens on the rising generation?

  12. Radiation Tolerant Interfaces: Influence of Local Stoichiometry at the Misfit Dislocation on Radiation Damage Resistance of Metal/Oxide Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Choudhury, Samrat [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM 87545 USA; Manandhar, Sandeep [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Kaspar, Tiffany C. [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Wang, Chongmin [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Devaraj, Arun [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Wirth, Brian D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville TN 37996 USA; Thevuthasan, Suntharampilli [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Hoagland, Richard G. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM 87545 USA; Dholabhai, Pratik P. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM 87545 USA; Uberuaga, Blas P. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM 87545 USA; Kurtz, Richard J. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA

    2017-04-24

    To understand how variations in interface properties such as misfit-dislocation density and local chemistry affect radiation-induced defect absorption and recombination, we have explored a model system of CrxV1-x alloy epitaxial films deposited on MgO single crystals. By controlling film composition, the lattice mismatch with MgO was adjusted so that the misfit-dislocation density varies at the interface. These interfaces were exposed to irradiation and in situ results show that the film with a semi-coherent interface (Cr) withstands irradiation while V film, which has similar semi-coherent interface like Cr, showed the largest damage. Theoretical calculations indicate that, unlike at metal/metal interfaces, the misfit dislocation density does not dominate radiation damage tolerance at metal/oxide interfaces. Rather, the stoichiometry, and the precise location of the misfit-dislocation density relative to the interface, drives defect behavior. Together, these results demonstrate the sensitivity of defect recombination to interfacial chemistry and provide new avenues for engineering radiation-tolerant nanomaterials.

  13. Particularities of interaction of CO sub 2 -laser radiation with oxide materials

    CERN Document Server

    Salikhov, T P

    2002-01-01

    The results of experimental investigation of vapor phase influence on the interaction parameters of the infrared laser radiation with oxide materials (Al sub 2 O sub 3 , ZrO sub 2 , CeO sub 2) have been presented. A phenomenon of laser radiation by the samples investigated under laser heating has been experimentally discovered for the first time. This phenomenon connected with forming of the stable vapor shell above the irradiated samples was expressed as a sharp drop in temperature on the heating curve and called as an absorption flash. (author)

  14. Changing of Bacteria Catalase Activity Under the Influence of Electro-Magnetic Radiation on a Frequency of Nitric Oxide Absorption and Radiation Molecular Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Shub

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of catalase activity degree changing in Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa is described under the influence of electro-magnetic radiation on a frequency of nitric oxide absorption and radiation molecular spectrum. The panoramic spectrometric measuring complex, developed in Central Scientific Research Institute of measuring equipment Public corporation, Saratov, was used while carrying out the research. Electromagnetic vibrations of extremely high frequencies were stimulated in this complex imitating the structure of nitric oxide absorption and radiation molecular spectrum. The growth of activity of the mentioned enzyme of the strains under research was detected. The most significant changes were observed under 60-minutes exposure.

  15. Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction coupled with Fe(II)EDTA oxidation by a nitrate- and Fe(III)-reducing bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiyang; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Jiti; Chen, Mingxiang; Wang, Xiaojun; Shi, Zhuang

    2013-06-01

    The nitrate- and Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Paracoccus versutus LYM was characterized in terms of its ability to perform Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction coupled with Fe(II)EDTA oxidation (NO-dependent Fe(II)EDTA oxidation, NDFO). It experienced a single anaerobic FeEDTA redox cycling through NDFO and dissimilatory Fe(III)EDTA reduction in FeEDTA culture. The increase in the Fe(II)EDTA concentration contributed to the ascending Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction rate. The amount of glucose controlled the rate and extent of Fe(II) oxidation during NDFO. Without glucose addition, Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction rate was at a rather slow rate even in presence of relatively sufficient Fe(II)EDTA. Unlike aqueous Fe(2+) and solid-phase Fe(II), Fe(II)EDTA could prevent cells from encrustations. These findings suggested the occurrence of NDFO preferred being beneficial via a mixotrophic physiology in the presence of an organic cosubstrate to being out of consideration for metabolic strategy.

  16. Experimental study on NO oxidation by K2S2O8 + Fe(II)EDTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hui; Huang, Hao; Tao, Gong-Kai; Xie, Jing; Yang, Cheng; Huang, Ting

    2017-06-01

    NO absorption and oxidation by K2S2O8 + Fe(II)EDTA system was studied in a lab-scale bubble reactor. The effects of different additives, reaction temperatures, pH values, K2S2O8 and Fe(II)EDTA concentrations on NO conversion were systematic investigated. Results indicated that NO conversion rate of K2S2O8 + Fe(II)EDTA system increased to 91.6% when concentrations of K2S2O8 and Fe(II)EDTA were both 30 mmol/L at 80 °C. NO conversion rate was positively correlated with the SO42- concentration in absorption solution, and it kept around 80% in a wide pH range, which made this technology to be a promising method for the denitrification of coal-fired flue gas.

  17. Single-Site Palladium(II) Catalyst for Oxidative Heck Reaction: Catalytic Performance and Kinetic Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Hui; Li, Mengyang; Zhang, Guanghui; Gallagher, James R.; Huang, Zhiliang; Sun, Yu; Luo, Zhong; Chen, Hongzhong; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Zou, Ruqiang; Lei, Aiwen; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The development of organometallic single-site catalysts (SSCs) has inspired the designs of new heterogeneous catalysts with high efficiency. Nevertheless, the application of SSCs in certain modern organic reactions, such as C-C bond formation reactions, has still been less investigated. In this study, a single-site Pd(II) catalyst was developed, where 2,2'-bipyridine-grafted periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) was employed as the support of a Pd(II) complex. The overall performance of the single-site Pd(II) catalyst in the oxidative Heck reaction was then investigated. The investigation results show that the catalyst displays over 99% selectivity for the product formation with high reaction yield. Kinetic profiles further confirm its high catalytic efficiency, showing that the rate constant is nearly 40 times higher than that for the free Pd(II) salt. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals that the catalyst has remarkable lifetime and recyclability.

  18. Simultaneous removal of methylene blue and copper(II) ions by photoelectron catalytic oxidation using stannic oxide modified iron(III) oxide composite electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Jinqiu [College of Water Conservancy and Civil Engineering, Shandong Agricultural University, Tai' an, Shandong 271018 (China); Li, Xiaochen, E-mail: lixiaochen02@163.com [College of Water Conservancy and Civil Engineering, Shandong Agricultural University, Tai' an, Shandong 271018 (China); Zheng, Hao [College of Water Conservancy and Civil Engineering, Shandong Agricultural University, Tai' an, Shandong 271018 (China); Li, Peiqiang; Wang, Huying [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Shandong Agricultural University, Tai' an, Shandong 271018 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Photoelectron catalytic oxidation was used for methylene blue and Cu{sup 2+} removal. • SnO{sub 2}/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} was prepared and characterized for use as photoanodes and photocathodes. • Optimal reaction conditions were determined for methylene blue and Cu{sup 2+} removal. • Methylene blue removal followed the Langmuir–Freundlich–Hinshelwood kinetic model. • Cu{sup 2+} removal followed the first-order rate model. - Abstract: Stannic oxide modified Fe(III) oxide composite electrodes (SnO{sub 2}/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were synthesized for simultaneously removing methylene blue (MB) and Cu(II) from wastewater using photoelectron catalytic oxidation (PEO). The SnO{sub 2}/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} electrodes were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and photoelectrochemical techniques. The removal of MB and Cu(II) by PEO using the SnO{sub 2}/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite electrodes was studied in terms of reaction time, electric current density, and pH of the electrolyte. The kinetics of the reactions were investigated using batch assays. The optimal reaction time, pH, and electric current density of the PEO process were determined to be 30 min, 6.0, and 10 mA/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The removal rates of MB from wastewater treated by PEO and electron catalytic oxidation process were 84.87% and 70.64%, respectively, while the recovery rates of Cu(II) were 91.75% and 96.78%, respectively. The results suggest that PEO is an effective method for the simultaneous removal of MB and Cu(II) from wastewater, and the PEO process exhibits a much higher removal rate for MB and Cu(II) compared to the electron catalytic oxidation process. Furthermore, the removal of MB was found to follow the Langmuir–Freundlich–Hinshelwood kinetic model, whereas the removal of Cu(II) fitted well to the first-order reaction model.

  19. Interrelation between compensation of carbohydrate metabolism and severity of manifestations of oxidative stress in type II diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedosugova, L V; Lankin, V Z; Balabolkin, M I; Konovalova, G G; Lisina, M O; Antonova, K V; Tikhaze, A K; Belenkov, Yu N

    2003-08-01

    Glycosylation end-products formed during diabetes mellitus promoted atherogenic oxidative modification of low-density lipoproteins. We evaluated the effects of compensation of carbohydrate metabolism and therapy with antioxidant probucol on parameters of free radical oxidation in patients with type II diabetes mellitus. Compensation of carbohydrate metabolism reduced manifestations of oxidative stress, which was manifested in accelerated enzymatic utilization of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxides and decreased content of free radical oxidation products in low-density lipoproteins. In patients with type II diabetes mellitus combination therapy with antioxidant probucol decreased the severity of oxidative stress and stabilized carbohydrate metabolism without increasing the dose of hypoglycemic preparations.

  20. Platinum(II)-porphyrin as a sensitizer for visible-light driven water oxidation in neutral phosphate buffer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, H.C.; Hetterscheid, D.G.H.; Williams, R.M.; van der Vlugt, J.I.; Reek, J.N.H.; Brouwer, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    A water-soluble Pt(II)-porphyrin with a high potential for one-electron oxidation (similar to 1.42 V vs. NHE) proves very suitable for visible-light driven water oxidation in neutral phosphate buffer solution in combination with a variety of water oxidation catalysts (WOCs) . Two homogeneous WOCs (i

  1. Oxidative stress may explain how hypertension is maintained by normal levels of angiotensin II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Romero

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that essential hypertension evolves in most patients with "near normal" levels of plasma renin activity. However, these levels appear to be responsible for the high levels of arterial pressure because they are normalized by the administration of angiotensin II converting inhibitors or angiotensin receptor antagonist. In experimental animals, hypertension can be induced by the continuous intravenous infusion of small doses of angiotensin II that are not sufficient to evoke an immediate pressor response. However, this condition resembles the characteristics of essential hypertension because the high levels of blood pressure exist with normal plasma levels of angiotensin II. It is suggested that small amounts of angiotensin whose plasma levels are inappropriate for the existing size of extracellular volume stimulate oxidative stress which binds nitric oxide forming peroxynitrite. The latter compound oxidizes arachidonic acid producing isoprostaglandin F2a (an isoprostane which is characterized by a strong antinatriuretic vasoconstrictor renal effect. In this chain of reactions the vasoconstrictor effects derived from oxygen quenching of nitric oxide and increased isoprostane synthesis could explain how hypertension is maintained with normal plasma levels of renin.

  2. Role of Postmastectomy Radiation After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowble, Barbara L., E-mail: bfowble@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Einck, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Kim, Danny N. [Athena Breast Health Network, Program Management Office, San Francisco, CA (United States); McCloskey, Susan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Mayadev, Jyoti [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Yashar, Catheryn [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Chen, Steven L. [Department of Surgery, University of California, Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Hwang, E. Shelley [Department of Surgery, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To identify a cohort of women treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy for whom postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) may be omitted according to the projected risk of local-regional failure (LRF). Methods and Materials: Seven breast cancer physicians from University of California cancer centers created 14 hypothetical clinical case scenarios, identified, reviewed, and abstracted the available literature (MEDLINE and Cochrane databases), and formulated evidence tables with endpoints of LRF, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Using the American College of Radiology appropriateness criteria methodology, appropriateness ratings for postmastectomy radiation were assigned for each scenario. Finally, an overall summary risk assessment table was developed. Results: Of 24 sources identified, 23 were retrospective studies from single institutions. Consensus on the appropriateness rating, defined as 80% agreement in a category, was achieved for 86% of the cases. Distinct LRF risk categories emerged. Clinical stage II (T1-2N0-1) patients, aged >40 years, estrogen receptor-positive subtype, with pathologic complete response or 0-3 positive nodes without lymphovascular invasion or extracapsular extension, were identified as having {<=}10% risk of LRF without radiation. Limited data support stage IIIA patients with pathologic complete response as being low risk. Conclusions: In the absence of randomized trial results, existing data can be used to guide the use of PMRT in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy setting. Using available studies to inform appropriateness ratings for clinical scenarios, we found a high concordance of treatment recommendations for PMRT and were able to identify a cohort of women with a low risk of LRF without radiation. These low-risk patients will form the basis for future planned studies within University of California Athena Breast Health Network.

  3. Effects of temperature on rates and mineral products of microbial Fe(II) oxidation by Leptothrix cholodnii at microaerobic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollrath, Susann; Behrends, Thilo; Koch, Christian Bender; Cappellen, Philippe Van

    2013-05-01

    Oxygen concentrations are important in constraining the geochemical niche of neutrophilic iron oxidizers. However, other factors like temperature may affect the competition between microbial and abiotic Fe(II) oxidation and may cause community changes. Here, rates and mineral products of Fe(II) oxidation (initial concentration 150 μmol Fe(II)/l) by the Fe(II) oxidizing bacterial strain Leptothrix cholodnii Appels were compared to those of abiotic oxidation in the temperature range 11-37 °C. Experiments were carried out in a batch reactor at 12-13 μmol O2/l (0.92-1% O2 saturation), pH 7 and, for the microbial experiments, a cell density of around 108 cells/ml. The iron precipitates formed at the different temperatures were characterized by SEM, XRD, FTIR and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Abiotic and microbial Fe(II) oxidation proceeded in two stages. During the initial stage, rates of microbial oxidation exhibited a temperature optimum curve. In contrast, the temperature dependency of abiotic Fe(II) oxidation rate followed the Arrhenius equation. As a consequence, microbial oxidation rates were about 10 times higher compared to the abiotic oxidation at 30 °C. During the second stage, microbial and abiotic rates and their temperature dependencies were similar. Independent of temperature or presence of bacteria, lepidocrocite and ferrihydrite were identified as reaction products, but the characteristics of the precipitates differed. At 37 °C, less lepidocrocite was precipitated in microbial and abiotic experiments due to high oxidation rates. Abiotic oxidation produced larger lepidocrocite crystals mixed with smaller, less crystalline oxides. Large crystals were absent in the microbial products, possibly due to growth inhibition of the minerals by EPS substances. Nevertheless, Mössbauer spectra revealed a better crystal structure of the smaller, microbial precipitates compared to the abiotically formed oxides.

  4. HRTEM Study of Oxide Nanoparticles in K3-ODS Ferritic Steel Developed for Radiation Tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiung, L; Fluss, M; Tumey, S; Kuntz, J; El-Dasher, B; Wall, M; Choi, W; Kimura, A; Willaime, F; Serruys, Y

    2009-11-02

    Crystal and interfacial structures of oxide nanoparticles and radiation damage in 16Cr-4.5Al-0.3Ti-2W-0.37 Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} ODS ferritic steel have been examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. Oxide nanoparticles with a complex-oxide core and an amorphous shell were frequently observed. The crystal structure of complex-oxide core is identified to be mainly monoclinic Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} (YAM) oxide compound. Orientation relationships between the oxide and the matrix are found to be dependent on the particle size. Large particles (> 20 nm) tend to be incoherent and have a spherical shape, whereas small particles (< 10 nm) tend to be coherent or semi-coherent and have a faceted interface. The observations of partially amorphous nanoparticles and multiple crystalline domains formed within a nanoparticle lead us to propose a three-stage mechanism to rationalize the formation of oxide nanoparticles containing core/shell structures in as-fabricated ODS steels. Effects of nanoparticle size and density on cavity formation induced by (Fe{sup 8+} + He{sup +}) dual-beam irradiation are briefly addressed.

  5. Radiation induced oxidative degradation of polymers—III. Effect of radiation on mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguchi, Tadao; Arakawa, Kazuo; Ito, Masayuki; Hayakawa, Naohiro; Machi, Sueo

    The changes of mechanical properties of various kinds of polyethylene (PE) and ethylene-propylene copolymer (EPR) with the irradiation in air, in oxygen of 10 atm, and under vacuum were investigated. The decrease in the elongation ( E b) and the tensile strength ( T b) of PE by the irradiation in oxygen is larger than under vacuum. The changes of E b well reflect the degradation of PE. In case of EPR, the T b decreases sharply with dose in any environments, and the E b decreases under vacuum to a larger extent than in oxygen. The modulus at 200% elongation of EPR increases with dose under vacuum, but decreases in oxygen. When the samples were irradiated in air, the changes of the mechanical properties were the intermediate between oxygen and vacuum and dependent on the ratio of oxidation and non-oxidation layers in the film. The antioxidant (Irganox 1010 or DPPD) mixed in polymers was found to retard effectively the polymer degradation by the irradiation in oxygen.

  6. Radiation Response of a 9 Cr Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel to Heavy Ion Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Todd R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Gan, J. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Cole, James I. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Ukai, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Shutthanandan, S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Thevuthasan, S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2008-01-01

    Ferritic-martensitic (FM) alloys are expected to play an important role as cladding or structural components in Generation IV systems operating in the temperature range 350-700 C and to doses up to 200 dpa. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic-martensitic steels have been developed to operate at higher temperatures than traditional FM steels. These steels contain nanometer-sized Y-Ti-O nanoclusters as a strengthening mechanism. Heavy ion irradiation has been used to determine the nanocluster stability over a temperature range of 500-700 C to doses of 150 dpa. At all temperatures, the average nanocluster size decreases but the nanocluster density increases. The increased density of smaller nanoclusters under radiation should lead to strengthening of the matrix. While a reduction in size under irradiation has been reported in some other studies, many report oxide stability. The data from this study are contrasted to the available literature to highlight the differences in the reported radiation response.

  7. Effect of ionizing radiation on the thermal oxidative stability of medical polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, L.; Ling, M.T.K.; Ding, S.Y.; Westphal, S.P. [Baxter International, Round Lake, IL 60073 (United States)

    1998-12-21

    In the medical-device industry, most products need to be sterilized prior to use. Sterilization by ionizing radiation is fast becoming the preferred method on account of its effectiveness and economy. However, energetic secondary electrons released from the primary irradiation event can cause significant damage and degrade the polymer. We have undertaken a study on the thermal oxidative stability of several medical polymers as measured by the oxidative induction time (OIT) on radiation exposures. It was found that, in selected cases with polyolefins, active antioxidants can be completely consumed during the sterilization process, leaving the polymer unprotected for the required shelf life. In addition, comparison between {gamma}- and electron-beam irradiation sources revealed major differences on OIT reduction, primarily due to the dose rate effect. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  8. The role of oxidative DNA damage in radiation induced bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havaki, Sophia; Kotsinas, Athanassios; Chronopoulos, Efstathios; Kletsas, Dimitris; Georgakilas, Alexandros; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) has been described as a double-edged sword, since it is used for diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, and at the same time it is a well known human mutagen and carcinogen, causing wide-ranging chromosomal aberrations. It is nowadays accepted that the detrimental effects of IR are not restricted only in the irradiated cells, but also to non-irradiated bystander or even distant cells manifesting various biological effects. This review presents the role of oxidative stress in the induction of bystander effects referring to the types of the implicated oxidative DNA lesions, the contributing intercellular and intracellular stress mediators, the way they are transmitted from irradiated to bystander cells and finally, the complex role of the bystander effect in the therapeutic efficacy of radiation treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of Mn(II)-Manganese Oxide Reactions on Ni and Zn Speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Margaret A G; Dye, Katherine G; Catalano, Jeffrey G

    2017-03-01

    Layered Mn oxide minerals (phyllomanganates) often control trace metal fate in natural systems. The strong uptake of metals such as Ni and Zn by phyllomanganates results from adsorption on or incorporation into vacancy sites. Mn(II) also binds to vacancies and subsequent comproportionation with structural Mn(IV) may alter sheet structures by forming larger and distorted Mn(III)O6 octahedra. Such Mn(II)-phyllomanganate reactions may thus alter metal uptake by blocking key reactive sites. Here we investigate the effect of Mn(II) on Ni and Zn binding to phyllomanganates of varying initial vacancy content (δ-MnO2, hexagonal birnessite, and triclinic birnessite) at pH 4 and 7 under anaerobic conditions. Dissolved Mn(II) decreases macroscopic Ni and Zn uptake at pH 4 but not pH 7. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy demonstrates that decreased uptake at pH 4 corresponds with altered Ni and Zn adsorption mechanisms. These metals transition from binding in the interlayer to sheet edges, with Zn increasing its tetrahedrally coordinated fraction. These effects on metal uptake and binding correlate with Mn(II)-induced structural changes, which are more substantial at pH 4 than 7. Through these structural effects and the pH-dependence of Mn(II)-metal competitive adsorption, system pH largely controls metal binding to phyllomanganates in the presence of dissolved Mn(II).

  10. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS II) is constitutive in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedergren, Jan; Follin, Per; Forslund, Tony; Lindmark, Maria; Sundqvist, Tommy; Skogh, Thomas

    2003-10-01

    The objective was to study the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS II) in and NO production by human blood neutrophils and in in vivo exudated neutrophils. Cellular expression of NOS II was evaluated by flow cytometry in whole blood, in isolated blood neutrophils, and in neutrophils obtained by exudation in vivo into skin chambers. Neutrophil NOS II was also demonstrated by Western blotting. Uptake of 3H-labelled L-arginine was studied in vitro and NOS activity measured in a whole cell assay by the conversion of 3H-arginine to 3H-citrulline. In contrast to unseparated blood cells, NOS II was demonstrable both in isolated blood neutrophils and exudated cells. The failure to detect NOS II by flow cytometry in whole blood cells thus proved to be due to the quenching effect of hemoglobin. Western blotting revealed a 130 kD band corresponding to NOS II in isolated blood neutrophils, but detection was dependent on diisopropylfluorophosphate for proteinase inhibition. L-arginine was taken up by neutrophils, but enzymatic activity could not be demonstrated. We conclude that human neutrophils constitutively express NOS II, but that its demonstration by FITC-labelling is inhibited by hemoglobin-mediated quenching in whole blood samples.

  11. Mn(II) Oxidation in Fenton and Fenton Type Systems: Identification of Reaction Efficiency and Reaction Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Genuchten, Case M; Peña, Jasquelin

    2017-03-07

    Efficient and low-cost methods of removing aqueous Mn(II) are required to improve the quality of impacted groundwater supplies. In this work, we show that Fe(0) electrocoagulation (EC) permits the oxidative removal of Mn(II) from solution by reaction with the reactive oxidant species produced through Fe(II) oxidation. Manganese(II) removal was enhanced when the accumulation of aqueous Fe(II) was minimized, which was achieved at low Fe(II) production rates, high pH, the presence of H2O2 instead of O2 as the initial Fe(II) oxidant, or a combination of all three. In addition, in the EC-H2O2 system, Mn(II) removal efficiency increased as pH decreased from 6.5 to 4.5 and as pH increased from 6.5 to 8.5, which implicates different reactive oxidants in acidic and alkaline solutions. Chemical analyses and X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that Mn(II) removal during Fe(0) EC leads to the formation of Mn(III) (0.02 to >0.26 Mn·Fe(-1) molar ratios) and its incorporation into the resulting Fe(III) coprecipitates (lepidocrocite and hydrous ferric oxide for EC-O2 and EC-H2O2, respectively), regardless of pH and Fe(II) production rate. The Mn(II) oxidation pathways elucidated in this study set the framework to develop kinetic models on the impact of Mn(II) during EC treatment and in other Fenton type systems.

  12. Influence of calcium(II) and chloride on the oxidative reactivity of a manganese(II) complex of a cross-bridged cyclen ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhan; Coats, Katherine L; Chen, Zhuqi; Hubin, Timothy J; Yin, Guochuan

    2014-11-17

    Available data from different laboratories have confirmed that both Ca(2+) and Cl(-) are crucial for water oxidation in Photosystem II. However, their roles are still elusive. Using a manganese(II) complex having a cross-bridged cyclen ligand as a model, the influence of Ca(2+) on the oxidative reactivity of the manganese(II) complex and its corresponding manganese(IV) analogue were investigated. It has been found that adding Ca(2+) can significantly improve the oxygenation efficiency of the manganese(II) complex in sulfide oxidation and further accelerate the oxidation of sulfoxide to sulfone. Similar improvements have also been observed for Mg(2+), Sr(2+), and Ba(2+). A new monomeric manganese(IV) complex having two cis-hydroxide ligands has also been isolated through oxidation of the corresponding manganese(II) complex with H2O2 in the presence of NH4PF6. This rare cis-dihydroxomanganese(IV) species has been well characterized by X-ray crystallography, electrochemistry, electron paramagnetic resonance, and UV-vis spectroscopy. Notably, using the manganese(IV) complex as a catalyst demonstrates higher activity than the corresponding manganese(II) complex, and adding Ca(2+) further improves its catalytic efficiency. However, adding Cl(-) decreases its catalytic activity. In electrochemical studies of manganese(IV) complexes with no chloride ligand present, adding Ca(2+) positively shifted the redox potential of the Mn(IV)/Mn(III) couple but negatively shifted its Mn(V)/Mn(IV) couple. In the manganese(II) complex having a chloride ligand, adding Ca(2+) shifted both the Mn(IV)/Mn(III) and Mn(V)/Mn(IV) couples in the negative direction. The revealed oxidative reactivity and redox properties of the manganese species affected by Ca(2+) and Cl(-) may provide new clues to understanding their roles in the water oxidation process of Photosystem II.

  13. Heptanuclear Co(II)5Co(III)2 Cluster as Efficient Water Oxidation Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia-Heng; Guo, Ling-Yu; Su, Hai-Feng; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Wen-Guang; Tung, Chen-Ho; Sun, Di

    2017-02-06

    Inspired by the transition-metal-oxo cubical Mn4CaO5 in photosystem II, we herein report a disc-like heptanuclear mixed-valent cobalt cluster, [Co(II)5Co(III)2(mdea)4(N3)2(CH3CN)6(OH)2(H2O)2·4ClO4] (1, H2mdea = N-methyldiethanolamine), for photocatalytic oxygen evolution. The topology of the Co7 core resembles a small piece of cobaltate protected by terminal H2O, N3(-), CH3CN, and multidentate N-methyldiethanolamine at the periphery. Under the optimal photocatalytic conditions, 1 exhibits water oxidation activity with a turnover number (TON) of 210 and a turnover frequency (TOFinitial) of 0.23 s(-1). Importantly, electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was used to not only identify the possible main active species in the water oxidation reaction but also monitor the evolutions of oxidation states of cobalt during the photocatalytic reactions. These results shed light on the design concept of new water oxidation catalysts and mechanism-related issues such as the key active intermediate and oxidation state evolution in the oxygen evolution process. The magnetic properties of 1 were also discussed in detail.

  14. Light intensity dependence of the kinetics of the photocatalytic oxidation of nitrogen(II) oxide at the surface of TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillert, Ralf; Engel, Astrid; Große, Julia; Lindner, Patrick; Bahnemann, Detlef W

    2013-12-28

    Air pollution by nitrogen oxides represents a serious environmental problem in urban areas where numerous sources of these pollutants are concentrated. One approach to reduce the concentration of these air pollutants is their light-induced oxidation in the presence of molecular oxygen and a photocatalytically active building material which uses titanium dioxide as the photocatalyst. Herein, results of an investigation concerning the influence of the photon flux and the pollutant concentration on the rate of the photocatalytic oxidation of nitrogen(ii) oxide in the presence of molecular oxygen and UV(A) irradiated titanium dioxide powder are presented. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood-type rate law for the photocatalytic NO oxidation inside the photoreactor comprising four kinetic parameters is derived being suitable to describe the influence of the pollutant concentration and the photon flux on the rate of the photocatalytic oxidation of nitrogen(ii) oxide.

  15. Graphenothermal reduction synthesis of 'exfoliated graphene oxide/iron (II) oxide' composite for anode application in lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petnikota, Shaikshavali; Marka, Sandeep Kumar; Banerjee, Arkaprabha; Reddy, M. V.; Srikanth, V. V. S. S.; Chowdari, B. V. R.

    2015-10-01

    Graphenothermal Reduction process is used to obtain exfoliated graphene oxide (EG)/iron (II) oxide (FeO) composite prepared at 650 °C for 5 h in argon. Structural and compositional analyses of the sample confirm the formation of EG/FeO composite. This composite shows a reversible capacity of 857 mAh g-1 at a current rate of 50 mA g-1 in the voltage range 0.005-3.0 V versus Li. An excellent capacity retention up to 60 cycles and high coulombic efficiency of 98% are also observed. Characteristic Fe2+/0 redox peaks observed in Cyclic Voltammetry measurement are explained in correlation with lithium storage mechanism. Thermal, electrical and impedance spectroscopy studies of EG/FeO composite are discussed in detail. Comparative electrochemical cycling studies of EG/FeO composite with Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 materials prepared under controlled conditions are also discussed.

  16. A modal analysis for the acoustic radiation problems,II.Examples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Zhe

    2004-01-01

    The acoustic radiation modes and the field distribution modes describe the radiation patterns of a complex vibrating surface and the field distribution patterns respectively.The physical meanings of the acoustic radiation modes and the field distribution modes are revealed by numerical method. For a sphere body, a spinning body and a rectangular body, the geometrical patterns of the acoustic radiation modes and the field distribution modes are given.The radiation mode 1 represents the radiation behavior of a monopole radiator, the radiation modes 2 through 4 represent the radiation behavior of dipole radiators respectively, and the radiation modes 5 through 9 represent the radiation behavior of quadrapole radiators respectively. The acoustic radiation modes and the field distribution modes introduce the multi-pole decomposition method into discussion of the acoustic radiation problems.

  17. Compression and radiation of high-power short rf pulses. II. A novel antenna array design with combined compressor/radiator elements

    KAUST Repository

    Sirenko, Kostyantyn

    2011-01-01

    The paper discusses the radiation of compressed high power short RF pulses using two different types of antennas: (i) A simple monopole antenna and (ii) a novel array design, where each of the elements is constructed by combining a compressor and a radiator. The studies on the monopole antenna demonstrate the possibility of a high power short RF pulse\\'s efficient radiation even using simple antennas. The studies on the novel array design demonstrate that a reduced size array with lower pulse distortion and power decay can be constructed by assembling the array from elements each of which integrates a compressor and a radiator. This design idea can be used with any type of antenna array; in this work it is applied to a phased array.

  18. As(III) removal and speciation of Fe (Oxyhydr)oxides during simultaneous oxidation of As(III) and Fe(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Song, Jia; Li, Yi-Liang; Jia, Shao-Yi; Wang, Wen-Hui; Huang, Fu-Gen; Wu, Song-Hai

    2016-03-01

    Abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) is an important pathway in the formation of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides. However, how can As(III) affect the oxidation rate of Fe(II) and the speciation of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides, and what's the extent of the newly formed Fe (oxyhydr)oxides on the removal of aqueous arsenic are still poorly understood. Oxidation of Fe(II) under neutral pH conditions was therefore investigated under different molar ratios of As:Fe. Our results suggest that co-existence of aqueous As(III) significantly slows down the oxidation rate of Fe(II). Speciation of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides is dependent on pH and As:Fe ratios. At pH 6.0, formation of lepidocrocite and goethite is apparently inhibited at low As:Fe ratios, and ferric arsenate is favored at high As:Fe ratios. At pH 7.0, lepidocrocite gradually degenerates with the increasing As:Fe ratios. At pH 8.0, arsenite significantly inhibits the development of magnetite and favors a formation of lepidocrocite. XPS analysis further reveals that more than half of As(III) is oxidized to As(V) at pH 6.0 and 7.0, whereas at pH 8.0, the rapid oxidation of Fe(II) as well as the rapid formation of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides facilitate a rapid removal of dissolved As(III) before its further oxidation to As(V). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiation cured epoxy acrylate composites based on graphene, graphite oxide and functionalized graphite oxide with enhanced properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuqiang; Bao, Chenlu; Song, Lei; Qian, Xiaodong; Yuan, Bihe; Hu, Yuan

    2012-03-01

    Epoxy acrylate (EA) composites containing graphite oxide (GO), graphene and nitrogen-double bond functionalized graphite oxide (FGO) were fabricated using UV-radiation and electron beam radiation via in-situ polymerization. Graphene and FGO were homogenously dispersed in EA matrix and enhanced properties, including thermal stability, flame retardancy, electrical conductivity and reduced deleterious gas releasing in thermo decomposition were obtained. Microscale combustion colorimeter results illustrated improved flame retardancy; EA/FGO composites achieved a 29.7% reduction in total heat release (THR) when containing only 0.1% FGO and a 38.6% reduction in peak-heat release rate (PHRR) when containing 3% FGO. The onset decomposition temperatures were delayed and the maximum decomposition values were reduced, according to thermogravimetric analysis which indicated enhanced thermal stabilities. The electrical conductivity was increased by 6 orders of magnitude (3% graphene) and the deleterious gas released during the thermo decomposition was reduced with the addition of all the graphite samples. This study represented a new approach to functionalize GO with flame retardant elements and active curable double bond to achieve better dispersion of GO into polymer matrix to obtain nanocomposites and paved a way for achieving graphene-based materials with high-performance of graphene in enhancement of flame retardancy of polymers for practical applications.

  20. Low-temperature atomic layer deposition of copper(II) oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iivonen, Tomi, E-mail: tomi.iivonen@helsinki.fi; Hämäläinen, Jani; Mattinen, Miika; Popov, Georgi; Leskelä, Markku [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Marchand, Benoît; Mizohata, Kenichiro [Division of Materials Physics, Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Kim, Jiyeon; Fischer, Roland A. [Chair of Inorganic Chemistry II, Ruhr-University Bochum, Universitätsstrasse 150, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Copper(II) oxide thin films were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using bis-(dimethylamino-2-propoxide)copper [Cu(dmap){sub 2}] and ozone in a temperature window of 80–140 °C. A thorough characterization of the films was performed using x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, UV‐Vis spectrophotometry, atomic force microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis techniques. The process was found to produce polycrystalline copper(II) oxide films with a growth rate of 0.2–0.3 Å per cycle. Impurity content in the films was relatively small for a low temperature ALD process.

  1. Dichloroacetate Decreases Cell Health and Activates Oxidative Stress Defense Pathways in Rat Alveolar Type II Pneumocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Valauri-Orton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dichloroacetate (DCA is a water purification byproduct that is known to be hepatotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic and to induce peripheral neuropathy and damage macrophages. This study characterizes the effects of the haloacetate on lung cells by exposing rat alveolar type II (L2 cells to 0–24 mM DCA for 6–24 hours. Increasing DCA concentration and the combination of increasing DCA concentration plus longer exposures decrease measures of cellular health. Length of exposure has no effect on oxidative stress biomarkers, glutathione, SOD, or CAT. Increasing DCA concentration alone does not affect total glutathione or its redox ratio but does increase activity in the SOD/CAT oxidative stress defense pathway. These data suggest that alveolar type II cells rely on SOD and CAT more than glutathione to combat DCA-induced stress.

  2. Magnesium oxide-impregnated tuff soil-derived ceramic: a novel cadmium(II) adsorbing media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Md; Bhakta, Jatindra N.; Maneesh, Namburath; Munekage, Yukihiro; Motomura, Kevin

    2017-07-01

    The contamination of cadmium (Cd) in the aquatic environment is one of the serious environmental and human health's risks. The present study attempted to develop the potential magnesium oxide (MgO)-impregnated tuff soil-derived ceramic (MITDC)-based novel adsorbent media for adsorbing higher rate of cadmium [Cd(II)] from water phase. A potential MITDC adsorbent media was developed using volcanic raw tuff soil and its Cd(II) adsorption capacity from water phase was evaluated comparing with the raw tuff soil. A series of studies were carried out in an agitated batch method at 20 ± 2 °C to characterize the adsorption capacity of MITDC under different conditions of factors, such as contact time (0-360 min), initial pH (3-11) of solution, dose of MITDC (2, 5, 7.5 and 10 g/L), and initial concentration of Cd(II) (5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 mg/L), influencing the adsorption mechanism. MITDC exhibited the equilibrium state of maximum Cd(II) adsorption at the contact time 120 min and pH 4.7 (removed 98.2 % Cd) when initial Cd(II) concentration was 10 mg/L in the present study. The dose of 7.5 g MITDC/L showed maximum removal of Cd(II) from water. Experimental data were described by the Freundlich and the Langmuir isotherms and equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model ( R 2 = 0.996). The Cd(II) adsorption capacity of MITDC was 31.25 mg/g. The high Cd(II) adsorption capacity indicated that novel MITDC could be used as a potential ceramic adsorbent media to remove high rate of Cd(II) from aqueous phase.

  3. Magnesium oxide-impregnated tuff soil-derived ceramic: a novel cadmium(II) adsorbing media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Md; Bhakta, Jatindra N.; Maneesh, Namburath; Munekage, Yukihiro; Motomura, Kevin

    2015-07-01

    The contamination of cadmium (Cd) in the aquatic environment is one of the serious environmental and human health's risks. The present study attempted to develop the potential magnesium oxide (MgO)-impregnated tuff soil-derived ceramic (MITDC)-based novel adsorbent media for adsorbing higher rate of cadmium [Cd(II)] from water phase. A potential MITDC adsorbent media was developed using volcanic raw tuff soil and its Cd(II) adsorption capacity from water phase was evaluated comparing with the raw tuff soil. A series of studies were carried out in an agitated batch method at 20 ± 2 °C to characterize the adsorption capacity of MITDC under different conditions of factors, such as contact time (0-360 min), initial pH (3-11) of solution, dose of MITDC (2, 5, 7.5 and 10 g/L), and initial concentration of Cd(II) (5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 mg/L), influencing the adsorption mechanism. MITDC exhibited the equilibrium state of maximum Cd(II) adsorption at the contact time 120 min and pH 4.7 (removed 98.2 % Cd) when initial Cd(II) concentration was 10 mg/L in the present study. The dose of 7.5 g MITDC/L showed maximum removal of Cd(II) from water. Experimental data were described by the Freundlich and the Langmuir isotherms and equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model (R 2 = 0.996). The Cd(II) adsorption capacity of MITDC was 31.25 mg/g. The high Cd(II) adsorption capacity indicated that novel MITDC could be used as a potential ceramic adsorbent media to remove high rate of Cd(II) from aqueous phase.

  4. Linking Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria to natural attenuation at a former U mining site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akob, D.; Bohu, T.; Beyer, A.; Schäffner, F.; Händel, M.; Johnson, C.; Merten, D.; Büchel, G.; Totsche, K.; Küsel, K.

    2012-04-01

    Uranium mining near Ronneburg, Germany resulted in widespread environmental contamination with acid mine drainage (AMD) and high concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides. Despite physical remediation of the area, groundwater is still a source of heavy metal contaminants, e.g., Cd, Ni, Co, Cu and Zn, to nearby ecosystems. However, natural attenuation of heavy metals is occurring in Mn oxide rich soils and sediments ranging in pH from 5 to 7. While microorganisms readily oxidize Mn(II) and precipitate Mn oxides at pH ~7 under oxic conditions, few studies describe Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) at pH ~5 and/or in the presence of heavy metals. In this study we (1) isolated MOB from the contaminated Ronneburg area at pH 5.5 and 7 and (2) evaluated the biological formation of Mn oxides. We isolated nine MOB strains at pH 7 (members of the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes phyla) and a single isolate at pH 5.5 (Oxalobacteraceae isolate AB_14, within the β-Proteobacteria). LA-ICP-MS showed that all isolates accumulated Mn and Fe in their biomass. However, the Oxalobacteraceae isolate AB_14 oxidizes more Mn without additional Fe in the medium. Preliminary FTIR analysis indicated that all isolates formed precipitates, which showed absorption bands that were characteristic for birnessite. High resolution TEM showed variable morphology of precipitates and EDS confirmed the presence of Mn oxides. Isolate AB_14 was not surrounded with precipitates whereas our Actinobacteria isolate AB_18 was encrusted with Mn oxides. Electron diffraction is currently being used to confirm the presence of birnessite and other Mn oxide phases. This, the first known report of any organism capable of Mn oxidation at low pH, demonstrated that MOB can be involved in the natural attenuation of both moderately acidic and neutral pH soils and sediments via the formation of biogenic Mn oxides. Future work will fully evaluate the minerals formed in this process as well

  5. Uranium Immobilization through Fe(II) bio-oxidation: A Column study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coates, John D.

    2009-09-14

    Current research on the bioremediation of heavy metals and radionuclides is focused on the ability of reducing organisms to use these metals as alternative electron acceptors in the absence of oxygen and thus precipitate them out of solution. However, many aspects of this proposed scheme need to be resolved, not the least of which is the time frame of the treatment process. Once treatment is complete and the electron donor addition is halted, the system will ultimately revert back to an oxic state and potentially result in the abiotic reoxidation and remobilization of the immobilized metals. In addition, the possibility exists that the presence of more electropositive electron acceptors such as nitrate or oxygen will also stimulate the biological oxidation and remobilization of these contaminants. The selective nitrate-dependent biooxidation of added Fe(II) may offer an effective means of “capping off” and completing the attenuation of these contaminants in a reducing environment making the contaminants less accessible to abiotic and biotic reactions and allowing the system to naturally revert to an oxic state. Our previous DOE-NABIR funded studies demonstrated that radionuclides such as uranium and cobalt are rapidly removed from solution during the biogenic formation of Fe(III)-oxides. In the case of uranium, X-ray spectroscopy analysis indicated that the uranium was in the hexavalent form (normally soluble) and was bound to the precipitated Fe(III)-oxides thus demonstrating the bioremediative potential of this process. We also demonstrated that nitrate-dependent Fe(II)- oxidizing bacteria are prevalent in the sediment and groundwater samples collected from sites 1 and 2 and the background site of the NABIR FRC in Oakridge, TN. However, all of these studies were performed in batch experiments in the laboratory with pure cultures and although a significant amount was learned about the microbiology of nitrate-dependent bio-oxidation of Fe(II), the effects of

  6. Use of a palladium(II)-catalyzed oxidative kinetic resolution in synthetic efforts toward bielschowskysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael E; Phillips, John H; Ferreira, Eric M; Stoltz, Brian M

    2013-09-09

    Progress toward the cyclobutane core of bielshowskysin is reported. The core was thought to arise from a cyclopropane intermediate via a furan-mediated cyclopropane fragmentation, followed by a 1,4-Michael addition. The synthesis of the cyclopropane intermediate utilizes a Suzuki coupling reaction, an esterification with 2-diazoacetoacetic acid, and a copper catalyzed cyclopropanation. An alcohol intermediate within the synthetic route was obtained in high enantiopurity via a highly selective palladium(II)-catalyzed oxidative kinetic resolution (OKR).

  7. Effect of 900 MHz radiofrequency radiation on oxidative stress in rat brain and serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgici, Birsen; Akar, Aysegul; Avci, Bahattin; Tuncel, Ozgur Korhan

    2013-03-01

    The increasing use of mobile telephones raises the question of possible adverse effects of the electromagnetic fields (EMF) that these phones produce. In this study, we examined the oxidative stress in the brain tissue and serum of rats that resulted from exposure to a 900-MHz EMF at a whole body average specific absorption rate (SAR) of 1.08 W/kg for 1 h/day for 3 weeks. We also examined the antioxidant effect of garlic powder (500 mg/kg/day) given orally to EMF-exposed rats. We found that malondialdehyde (MDA) (p advanced oxidation protein product (AOPP) (p electromagnetic radiation (EMR) exposure and that garlic has a protective effect against this oxidative stress.

  8. Direct Oxidative Damage of Naked DNA Generated upon Absorption of UV Radiation by Nucleobases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Mendoza, Miguel; Banyasz, Akos; Douki, Thierry; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2016-10-06

    It has been shown that in addition to formation of pyrimidine dimers, UV irradiation of DNA in the absence of photosensitizer also induces formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine, but the mechanism of formation of that oxidized base has not been clearly established. In the present study, we provide an unambiguous demonstration that absorption of UVC and UVB radiation by the nucleobases induces DNA oxidation via a direct process (one-electron oxidation) and not singlet oxygen. Evidence arose from the fact that polyamine-guanine adducts that are specifically produced through the transient formation of guanine radical cation are generated following UV irradiation of DNA in the presence of a polyamine even in the absence of any photosensitizer.

  9. Steam assisted oxide growth on aluminium alloys using oxidative chemistries: Part II corrosion performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-11-01

    Surface treatment of aluminium alloys using steam with oxidative chemistries, namely KMnO4 and HNO3 resulted in accelerated growth of oxide on aluminium alloys. Detailed investigation of the corrosion performance of the treated surfaces was carried out using potentiodynamic polarisation and standard industrial test methods such as acetic acid salt spray (AASS) and filiform corrosion on commercial AA6060 alloy. Barrier properties of the film including adhesion were evaluated using tape test under wet and dry conditions. Electrochemical results showed reduced cathodic and anodic activity, while the protection provided by steam treatment with HNO3 was a function of the concentration of NO3- ions. The coating generated by inclusion of KMnO4 showed highest resistance to filiform corrosion. Overall, the performance of the steam treated surfaces under filiform corrosion and AASS test was a result of the local coverage of the alloy microstructure resulting from steam containing with KMnO4 and HNO3.

  10. Water exchange in manganese-based water-oxidizing catalysts in photosynthetic systems: from the water-oxidizing complex in photosystem II to nano-sized manganese oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Isaloo, Mohsen Abbasi; Eaton-Rye, Julian J; Tomo, Tatsuya; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Satoh, Kimiyuki; Carpentier, Robert; Shen, Jian-Ren; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-09-01

    The water-oxidizing complex (WOC), also known as the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), of photosystem II in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms efficiently catalyzes water oxidation. It is, therefore, responsible for the presence of oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere. The WOC is a manganese-calcium (Mn₄CaO₅(H₂O)₄) cluster housed in a protein complex. In this review, we focus on water exchange chemistry of metal hydrates and discuss the mechanisms and factors affecting this chemical process. Further, water exchange rates for both the biological cofactor and synthetic manganese water splitting are discussed. The importance of fully unveiling the water exchange mechanism to understand the chemistry of water oxidation is also emphasized here. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy.

  11. Biochemistry and Ecology of Novel Cytochromes Catalyzing Fe(II) Oxidation by an Acidophilic Microbial Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, S. W.; Jeans, C. J.; Thelen, M. P.; Verberkmoes, N. C.; Hettich, R. C.; Chan, C. S.; Banfield, J. F.

    2007-12-01

    An acidophilic microbial community found in the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain, CA forms abundant biofilms in extremely acidic (pHcytochromes with unique properties. Sulfuric acid extraction of biofilm samples liberated one of these proteins, a 16 kDa cytochrome with an unusual alpha-band absorption at 579 (Cyt579). Genomic sequencing of multiple biofilms indicated that several variants of Cyt579 were present in Leptospirillum strains. Intact protein MS analysis identified the dominant variants in each biofilm and documented multiple N-terminal cleavage sites for Cyt579. By combining biochemical, geochemical and microbiological data, we established that the sequence variation and N-terminal processing of Cyt579 are selected by ecological conditions. In addition to the soluble Cyt579, the second cytochrome appears as a much larger protein complex of ~210 kDa predominant in the biofilm membrane fraction, and has an alpha-band absorption at 572 nm. The 60 kDa cytochrome subunit, Cyt572, resides in the outer membrane of LeptoII, and readily oxidizes Fe(II) at low pH (0.95 - 3.0). Several genes encoding Cyt572 were localized within a recombination hotspot between two strains of LeptoII, causing a large range of variation in the sequences. Genomic sequencing and MS proteomic studies established that the variants were also selected by ecological conditions. A general mechanistic model for Fe(II) oxidation has been developed from these studies. Initial Fe(II) oxidation by Cyt572 occurs at the outer membrane. Cyt572 then transfers electrons to Cyt579, perhaps representing an initial step in energy flow to the biofilm community. Amino acid variations and post-translational modifications of these unique cytochromes may represent fine-tuning of function in response to local environmental conditions.

  12. Removal of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solutions on few-layered graphene oxide nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guixia; Ren, Xuemei; Gao, Xing; Tan, Xiaoli; Li, Jiaxing; Chen, Changlun; Huang, Yuying; Wang, Xiangke

    2011-11-07

    Few-layered graphene oxide (FGO) was synthesized from graphite by using the modified Hummers method, and was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The prepared FGO was used to adsorb Pb(II) ions from aqueous solutions. The abundant oxygen-containing groups on the surfaces of FGO played an important role in Pb(II) ion adsorption on FGO. The adsorption of Pb(II) ions on FGO was dependent on pH values and independent of ionic strength. The adsorption of Pb(II) ions on FGO was mainly dominated by strong surface complexation. From the adsorption isotherms, the maximum adsorption capacities (C(smax)) of Pb(II) ions on FGO calculated from the Langmuir model were about 842, 1150, and 1850 mg g(-1) at 293, 313, and 333 K, respectively, higher than any currently reported. The FGO had the highest adsorption capacities of today's nanomaterials. The thermodynamic parameters calculated from the temperature dependent adsorption isotherms indicated that the adsorption of Pb(II) ions on FGO was a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  13. Compatibilization of recycled and virgin PET with radiation-oxidized HDPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burillo, Guillermina; Herrera-Franco, Pedro; Vazquez, Margarito; Adem, Esbaide

    2002-03-01

    Blends of high-density polyethylene (HDPE), which cross-links on radiation, and both, recycled and pristine polyethylene terephtalate (PET), one of the most radiation-stable polymers, that contain aromatic groups, which are effective at dissipation of the energy of the ionizing radiation, were irradiated with gamma rays, in order to form a copolymer capable of improving the compatibility of the blend HDPE/PET. Due to the low content of the PET in the resulting copolymer, blends PET and radiation-oxidized HDPE, were also studied. The tensile and flexural properties were improved when the PET content was increased and when the HDPE was pre-irradiated; the largest increase in the mechanical properties was observed for PET contents between 10% and 20% (w/w). The improvement in the properties is believed to occur because of a percolation effect of the PET in the HDPE matrix and the radiation-improved compatibility by means of polar groups formed in the polyethylene. However, impact properties were observed to decrease when the PET content increased in spite of the irradiation.

  14. Radiatively Induced Type II seesaw and Vector-like 5/3 Charge Quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Franceschini, R

    2013-01-01

    Understanding small neutrino masses in type II seesaw models with TeV scale SM triplet Higgs bosons requires that its coupling with the standard model Higgs doublet H be dialed down to be order eV to KeV, which is a fine-tuning by a factor of $10^{-11}-10^{-8}$ with respect to the weak scale. We present a SUSY extension of the type II seesaw model where this dimensionful small coupling is radiatively induced, thus making its smallness natural. This model has an exotic vector-like quark doublet which contains a quark X with electric charge 5/3 and a top partner t'. We discuss in details the phenomenology of the model paying special attention to the consequences of the interactions of the the exotic heavy quarks and the scalars of the model. Implications for neutrinoless double beta decay and for the LHC experiments are discussed in detail. Remarkably, in this model both the seesaw triplet and the heavy quarks can manifest at colliders in a host of different signatures, including some that significantly differ ...

  15. Reactive Transport Modeling of Microbe-mediated Fe (II) Oxidation for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surasani, V.; Li, L.

    2011-12-01

    Microbially Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) aims to improve the recovery of entrapped heavy oil in depleted reservoirs using microbe-based technology. Reservoir ecosystems often contain diverse microbial communities those can interact with subsurface fluids and minerals through a network of nutrients and energy fluxes. Microbe-mediated reactions products include gases, biosurfactants, biopolymers those can alter the properties of oil and interfacial interactions between oil, brine, and rocks. In addition, the produced biomass and mineral precipitates can change the reservoir permeability profile and increase sweeping efficiency. Under subsurface conditions, the injection of nitrate and Fe (II) as the electron acceptor and donor allows bacteria to grow. The reaction products include minerals such as Fe(OH)3 and nitrogen containing gases. These reaction products can have large impact on oil and reservoir properties and can enhance the recovery of trapped oil. This work aims to understand the Fe(II) oxidation by nitrate under conditions relevant to MEOR. Reactive transport modeling is used to simulate the fluid flow, transport, and reactions involved in this process. Here we developed a complex reactive network for microbial mediated nitrate-dependent Fe (II) oxidation that involves both thermodynamic controlled aqueous reactions and kinetic controlled Fe (II) mineral reaction. Reactive transport modeling is used to understand and quantify the coupling between flow, transport, and reaction processes. Our results identify key parameter controls those are important for the alteration of permeability profile under field conditions.

  16. Catalytic wet oxidation of thiocyanate with homogeneous copper(II) sulphate catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado, Sergio; Laca, Adriana [Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology, University of Oviedo, c/ Julian Claveria s/n, E-33071, Oviedo (Spain); Diaz, Mario, E-mail: mariodiaz@uniovi.es [Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology, University of Oviedo, c/ Julian Claveria s/n, E-33071, Oviedo (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    The wet oxidation of thiocyanate has been investigated in a semi-batch reactor at temperatures between 423 and 473 K and pressures between 6.1 x 10{sup 3} and 1.0 x 10{sup 4} kPa in the presence of copper(II) sulphate as catalyst. The effects of copper concentration, initial thiocyanate concentration, pressure and temperature on the reaction rate were analyzed and the main products of reaction were identified. A kinetic model for the Cu-catalyzed reaction is here proposed, including temperature, oxygen concentration, and the reduction of Cu{sup 2+} to Cu{sup +} that gives an accurate prediction of the oxidation process under the assayed conditions. A mechanistic model based on the formation of a transition complex between a copper cation and two thiocyanate anions has been proposed for the catalytic wet oxidation.

  17. Catalytic wet oxidation of thiocyanate with homogeneous copper(II) sulphate catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Sergio; Laca, Adriana; Díaz, Mario

    2010-05-15

    The wet oxidation of thiocyanate has been investigated in a semi-batch reactor at temperatures between 423 and 473 K and pressures between 6.1 x 10(3) and 1.0 x 10(4)kPa in the presence of copper(II) sulphate as catalyst. The effects of copper concentration, initial thiocyanate concentration, pressure and temperature on the reaction rate were analyzed and the main products of reaction were identified. A kinetic model for the Cu-catalyzed reaction is here proposed, including temperature, oxygen concentration, and the reduction of Cu(2+) to Cu(+) that gives an accurate prediction of the oxidation process under the assayed conditions. A mechanistic model based on the formation of a transition complex between a copper cation and two thiocyanate anions has been proposed for the catalytic wet oxidation.

  18. [Use of terahertz electromagnetic radiation at nitric oxide frequencies for the correction of thyroid functional state during stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichuk, V F; Tsymbal, A A

    2010-01-01

    The influence of terahertz electromagnetic radiation at nitric oxide frequencies (150.176-150.664 Ghz) on the functional activity of rat thyroid gland subjected to acute immobilization stress has been studied. It is shown that terahertz radiation totally normalizes thyroid activity in stressed animals within 30 min after application.

  19. [Sorption characteristics of tea waste modified by hydrated ferric oxide toward Pb(II) in water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Shun-Li; Xue, Yao; Ma, Zhao-Zhao; Liu, Guo-Bin; Yu, Yan-Xia; Ma, Ming-Hai

    2014-10-01

    Hydrated ferric oxide was successfully impregnated onto tea waste by precipitation to obtain a new sorbent named HFO-TW, the adsorption characteristics of which toward Pb(II) in aqueous solution was investigated by evaluating the effects of pH value, contact time, coexisting ion, temperature, and initial concentration of Pb(II). The Pb(II) sorption onto HFO-TW was pH- dependent, and the higher pH value was more helpful for Pb(II) adsorption onto HFO-TW in the pH range of 2.5-7. Lead sorption speed was quick and could reach equilibrium within 100 min, and the kinetics curve could be fitted well by both pseudo-first and pseudo-second models. The related coefficient was 98.8%. HFO-TW exhibited highly selective lead retention and the adsorption capacity of Pb(II) onto HFO-TW was declined by only 12.1 mg · g(-1) and 8.1 mg · g(-1) in the presence of competing Ca(II), Mg(II) at 50 times of the target ion. In addition, Pb(II) sorption onto HFO-TW could be described satisfactorily by Langmuir model, and the maximal sorption capacity calculated by Langmuir equation was 89.43 mg · g(-1), which was much higher than the unmodified tea waste and other bio-sorbents. All the results validated that HFO-TW was a promising sorbent for removal of lead from waters.

  20. Interactions of radiation and adriamycin, bleomycin, mitomycin C or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II in intestinal crypt cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von der Maase, H

    1984-01-01

    The interactions of radiation and adriamycin (ADM), bleomycin (BLM), mitomycin C (MM-C), or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II (cis-DDP) in mouse jejunal crypt cells were studied using the microcolony survival assay. ADM administered from 24 h before to 48 h after irradiation resulted in an almost...

  1. Effect of biofilm coatings at metal-oxide/water interfaces II: Competitive sorption between Pb(II) and Zn(II) at Shewanella oneidensis/metal-oxide/water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingge; Gélabert, Alexandre; Michel, F. Marc; Choi, Yongseong; Eng, Peter J.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2016-09-01

    Competitive sorption of Pb(II) and Zn(II) on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilm-coated single-crystal α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) surfaces was investigated using long-period X-ray standing wave-florescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy. In situ partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between the biofilms and underlying metal-oxide substrates was probed following exposure of these complex interfaces to equi-molar Pb and Zn solutions (0.01 M NaNO3 as background electrolyte, pH = 6.0, and 3-h equilibration time). At higher Pb and Zn concentrations (⩾10-5 M), more than 99% of these ions partitioned into the biofilms at S. oneidensis/α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2)/water interfaces, which is consistent with the partitioning behavior of both Pb(II) or Zn(II) in single-metal-ion experiments. Thus, no apparent competitive effects were found in this system at these relatively high metal-ion concentrations. However, at lower equi-molar concentrations (⩽10-6 M), Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning in the same system changed significantly compared to the single-metal-ion systems. The presence of Zn(II) decreased Pb(II) partitioning onto α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) substantially (∼52% to ∼13% at 10-7 M, and ∼23% to ∼5% at 10-6 M), whereas the presence of Pb(II) caused more Zn(II) to partition onto α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces (∼15% to ∼28% at 10-7 M, and ∼1% to ∼7% at 10-6 M). The higher observed partitioning of Zn(II) (∼28%) at the α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces compared to Pb(II) (∼13%) in the mixed-metal-ion systems at the lowest concentration (10-7 M) suggests that Zn(II) is slightly favored over Pb(II) for sorption sites on α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces under our experimental conditions. Competitive sorption of Pb(II) and Zn(II) at S. oneidensis/α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1)/water interfaces at equi-molar metal-ion concentrations of ⩽10-6 M showed that the presence of Pb(II) ions decreased Zn(II) partitioning onto α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) significantly (∼45% to biofilm

  2. Study of Interfacial Interactions Using Thing Film Surface Modification: Radiation and Oxidation Effects in Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Zhang, Jinsuo

    2014-01-09

    Interfaces play a key role in dictating the long-term stability of materials under the influence of radiation and high temperatures. For example, grain boundaries affect corrosion by way of providing kinetically favorable paths for elemental diffusion, but they can also act as sinks for defects and helium generated during irradiation. Likewise, the retention of high-temperature strength in nanostructured, oxide-dispersion strengthened steels depends strongly on the stoichiometric and physical stability of the (Y, Ti)-oxide particles/matrix interface under radiation and high temperatures. An understanding of these interfacial effects at a fundamental level is important for the development of materials for extreme environments of nuclear reactors. The goal of this project is to develop an understanding stability of interfaces by depositing thin films of materials on substrates followed by ion irradiation of the film-substrate system at elevated temperatures followed by post-irradiation oxidation treatments. Specifically, the research will be performed by depositing thin films of yttrium and titanium (~500 nm) on Fe-12%Cr binary alloy substrate. Y and Ti have been selected as thin-film materials because they form highly stable protective oxides layers. The Fe-12%Cr binary alloy has been selected because it is representative of ferritic steels that are widely used in nuclear systems. The absence of other alloying elements in this binary alloy would allow for a clearer examination of structures and compositions that evolve during high-temperature irradiations and oxidation treatments. The research is divided into four specific tasks: (1) sputter deposition of 500 nm thick films of Y and Ti on Fe-12%Cr alloy substrates, (2) ion irradiation of the film-substrate system with 2MeV protons to a dose of 2 dpa at temperatures of 300°C, 500°C, and 700°C, (3) oxidation of as-deposited and ion-irradiated samples in a controlled oxygen environment at 500°C and 700°C, (4

  3. Fe(II)-mediated reduction and repartitioning of structurally incorporated Cu, Co, and Mn in iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frierdich, Andrew J; Catalano, Jeffrey G

    2012-10-16

    The reduction of trace elements and contaminants by Fe(II) at Fe(III) oxide surfaces is well documented. However, the effect of aqueous Fe(II) on the fate of redox-active trace elements structurally incorporated into iron oxides is unknown. Here, we investigate the fate of redox-active elements during Fe(II)-activated recrystallization of Cu-, Co-, and Mn-substituted goethite and hematite. Enhanced release of Cu, Co, and Mn to solution occurs upon exposure of all materials to aqueous Fe(II) relative to reactions in Fe(II)-free fluids. The quantity of trace element release increases with pH when Fe(II) is present but decreases with increasing pH in the absence of Fe(II). Co and Mn release from goethite is predicted well using a second-order kinetic model, consistent with the release of redox-inactive elements such as Ni and Zn. However, Cu release and Co and Mn release from hematite require the sum of two rates to adequately model the kinetic data. Greater uptake of Fe(II) by Cu-, Co-, and Mn-substituted iron oxides relative to analogues containing only redox-inactive elements suggests that net Fe(II) oxidation occurs. Reduction of Cu, Co, and Mn in all materials following reaction with Fe(II) at pHs 7.0-7.5 is confirmed by X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy. This work shows that redox-sensitive elements structurally incorporated within iron oxides are reduced and repartitioned into fluids during Fe(II)-mediated recrystallization. Such abiotic reactions likely operate in tandem with partial microbial and abiotic iron reduction or during the migration of Fe(II)-containing fluids, mobilizing structurally bound contaminants and micronutrients in aquatic systems.

  4. Mn(II)/O2-promoted oxidative annulation of vinyl isocyanides with boronic acids: synthesis of multi-substituted isoquinolines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Yu, Yang; Hong, Xiaohu; Xu, Bin

    2014-11-14

    An efficient manganese(II)/O2-promoted oxidative radical cascade reaction was developed for the modular synthesis of multi-substituted isoquinolines from easily accessible vinyl isocyanides and boronic acids.

  5. High Dietary Iron and Radiation Exposure Increase Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Blood and Liver of Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Theriot, Corey A.; Wu, Honglu; Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exposure and increased iron (Fe) status independently cause oxidative damage that can result in protein, lipid, and DNA oxidation. During space flight astronauts are exposed to both increased radiation and increased Fe stores. Increased body Fe results from a decrease in red blood cell mass and the typically high Fe content of the food system. In this study we investigated the combined effects of radiation exposure (0.375 Gy of Cs-137 every other day for 16 days for a total of 3 Gy) and high dietary Fe (650 mg Fe/kg diet compared to 45 mg Fe/kg for controls) in Sprague-Dawley rats (n=8/group). Liver and serum Fe were significantly increased in the high dietary Fe groups. Likewise, radiation treatment increased serum ferritin and Fe concentrations. These data indicate that total body Fe stores increase with both radiation exposure and excess dietary Fe. Hematocrit decreased in the group exposed to radiation, providing a possible mechanism for the shift in Fe indices after radiation exposure. Markers of oxidative stress were also affected by both radiation and high dietary Fe, evidenced by increased liver glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and serum catalase as well as decreased serum GPX. We thus found preliminary indications of synergistic effects of radiation exposure and increased dietary Fe, warranting further study. This study was funded by the NASA Human Research Project.

  6. Electro-oxidation of chlorophenols at glassy carbon electrodes modified with polyNi(II)complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrios, Cristhian [Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Departamento de Ciencias del Ambiente, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACh), casilla 40, correo 33, Santiago (Chile); Marco, Jose F.; Gutierrez, Claudio [Instituto de Quimica Fisica ' Rocasolano' , CSIC, C. Serrano, 119, 28006, Madrid (Spain); Ureta-Zanartu, Maria Soledad [Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Departamento de Ciencias del Ambiente, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACh), casilla 40, correo 33, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: soledad.ureta@usach.cl

    2009-11-01

    The effect of the ligand macrocycle (phenylporphyrin (PP) or phthalocyanine (Pc)) and of the ligand substituent (-NH{sub 2} or -SO{sub 3}{sup -}) on the catalytic activity for the electro-oxidation in a pH 11 buffer electrolyte of 2- and 4-chlorophenol (2-CP and 4-CP), 2,4- and 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP and 2,6-DCP), 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), and pentachlorophenol (PCP) at glassy carbon electrodes modified with electropolymerized Ni(II) macrocycles was studied. The polyphenolic residue deposited at the electrode surface was characterized by cyclic voltammetry, impedance measurements, ex situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). A band of aliphatic C=O stretching in the IR spectrum of the fouling film produced by potential cycling in 2,4,6-TCP indicated that the aromatic ring had been broken, yielding ketones, aldehydes and/or carboxylic acids. The sulphonated Ni(II) polymers, which showed the Ni(III)/Ni(II) process in the CV, had XP spectra typical of paramagnetic Ni(II), indicating that they contained Ni(OH){sub 2} clusters. On the contrary, the CVs of the amino Ni(II) did not show the Ni(III)/Ni(II) process at all, this process appearing only after previous activation by potential cycling, and only to a small extent. As was to be expected, the XP spectra of activated amino films corresponded to diamagnetic Ni(II), showing that the concentration of Ni(OH){sub 2} clusters was very small. The amino films were less active than the sulpho films for the oxidation of chlorophenols, in agreement with the lower concentration of Ni(OH){sub 2} clusters in the former films. For all electrodes the highest activity was observed for 2,4,6-TCP, since its oxidation yields a phenolic residue which is much more porous than those produced by the other CPs.

  7. Pressure promotes angiotensin II--mediated migration of human coronary smooth muscle cells through increase in oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Kenichi; Maeda, Kensaku; Nakamura, Munehiro; Yoshikawa, Junichi

    2002-02-01

    Angiotensin II--mediated oxidative stress may play a role in the pathogenesis of coronary atherosclerosis. We examined the effects of pressure on the angiotensin II--mediated increase in oxidative stress and migration of cultured human coronary smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Increased pressure (100 mm Hg) by helium gas for 48 hours increased angiotensin II--mediated oxidative stress as evaluated by flow cytometry and SMC migration (from 15.9 +/- 2.2 to 32.0 +/- 2.4 cells per 4 high-power fields, P<0.05; n=8). The pressure-induced increases in oxidative stress observed appear to involve phospholipase D (PLD) and protein kinase C (PKC), inasmuch as the indirect PLD inhibitor suramin, at 100 micromol/L, and the PKC inhibitor chelerythrine, at 1 micromol/L, completely blocked the increase in angiotensin II--mediated oxidative stress induced by pressure. Pressure-induced increase in angiotensin II--mediated oxidative stress was inhibited by diphenylene iodonium chloride, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, by 79% (P<0.05, n=8). Losartan (1 micromol/L), its active metabolite E3174 (1 micromol/L), and the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (100 mmol/L) but not PD123319 (1 micromol/L) also blocked pressure-induced increases in angiotensin II--mediated oxidative stress and SMC migration (P<0.05, n=8). These findings suggest a novel cellular mechanism whereby pressure regulates the angiotensin II--mediated migration of SMCs, possibly via angiotensin II type 1 receptors, and which involves PLD-mediated, PKC-mediated, and NADPH oxidase--mediated increases in oxidative stress.

  8. Singlet Oxygen-Mediated Oxidation during UVA Radiation Alters the Dynamic of Genomic DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graindorge, Dany; Martineau, Sylvain; Machon, Christelle; Arnoux, Philippe; Guitton, Jérôme; Francesconi, Stefania; Frochot, Céline; Sage, Evelyne; Girard, Pierre-Marie

    2015-01-01

    UVA radiation (320–400 nm) is a major environmental agent that can exert its deleterious action on living organisms through absorption of the UVA photons by endogenous or exogenous photosensitizers. This leads to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as singlet oxygen (1O2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which in turn can modify reversibly or irreversibly biomolecules, such as lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. We have previously reported that UVA-induced ROS strongly inhibit DNA replication in a dose-dependent manner, but independently of the cell cycle checkpoints activation. Here, we report that the production of 1O2 by UVA radiation leads to a transient inhibition of replication fork velocity, a transient decrease in the dNTP pool, a quickly reversible GSH-dependent oxidation of the RRM1 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase and sustained inhibition of origin firing. The time of recovery post irradiation for each of these events can last from few minutes (reduction of oxidized RRM1) to several hours (replication fork velocity and origin firing). The quenching of 1O2 by sodium azide prevents the delay of DNA replication, the decrease in the dNTP pool and the oxidation of RRM1, while inhibition of Chk1 does not prevent the inhibition of origin firing. Although the molecular mechanism remains elusive, our data demonstrate that the dynamic of replication is altered by UVA photosensitization of vitamins via the production of singlet oxygen. PMID:26485711

  9. Role of extracellular DNA oxidative modification in radiation induced bystander effects in human endotheliocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostyuk, Svetlana V. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ermakov, Aleksei V., E-mail: avePlato@mail.ru [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Alekseeva, Anna Yu.; Smirnova, Tatiana D.; Glebova, Kristina V.; Efremova, Liudmila V. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baranova, Ancha [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); School of System Biology, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Veiko, Natalya N. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-01-03

    The development of the bystander effect induced by low doses of irradiation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) depends on extracellular DNA (ecDNA) signaling pathway. We found that the changes in the levels of ROS and NO production by human endothelial cells are components of the radiation induced bystander effect that can be registered at a low dose. We exposed HUVECs to X-ray radiation and studied effects of ecDNA{sup R} isolated from the culture media conditioned by the short-term incubation of irradiated cells on intact HUVECs. Effects of ecDNA{sup R} produced by irradiated cells on ROS and NO production in non-irradiated HUVECs are similar to bystander effect. These effects at least partially depend on TLR9 signaling. We compared the production of the nitric oxide and the ROS in human endothelial cells that were (1) irradiated at a low dose; (2) exposed to the ecDNA{sup R} extracted from the media conditioned by irradiated cells; and (3) exposed to human DNA oxidized in vitro. We found that the cellular responses to all three stimuli described above are essentially similar. We conclude that irradiation-related oxidation of the ecDNA is an important component of the ecDNA-mediated bystander effect.

  10. Singlet Oxygen-Mediated Oxidation during UVA Radiation Alters the Dynamic of Genomic DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graindorge, Dany; Martineau, Sylvain; Machon, Christelle; Arnoux, Philippe; Guitton, Jérôme; Francesconi, Stefania; Frochot, Céline; Sage, Evelyne; Girard, Pierre-Marie

    2015-01-01

    UVA radiation (320-400 nm) is a major environmental agent that can exert its deleterious action on living organisms through absorption of the UVA photons by endogenous or exogenous photosensitizers. This leads to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as singlet oxygen (1O2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which in turn can modify reversibly or irreversibly biomolecules, such as lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. We have previously reported that UVA-induced ROS strongly inhibit DNA replication in a dose-dependent manner, but independently of the cell cycle checkpoints activation. Here, we report that the production of 1O2 by UVA radiation leads to a transient inhibition of replication fork velocity, a transient decrease in the dNTP pool, a quickly reversible GSH-dependent oxidation of the RRM1 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase and sustained inhibition of origin firing. The time of recovery post irradiation for each of these events can last from few minutes (reduction of oxidized RRM1) to several hours (replication fork velocity and origin firing). The quenching of 1O2 by sodium azide prevents the delay of DNA replication, the decrease in the dNTP pool and the oxidation of RRM1, while inhibition of Chk1 does not prevent the inhibition of origin firing. Although the molecular mechanism remains elusive, our data demonstrate that the dynamic of replication is altered by UVA photosensitization of vitamins via the production of singlet oxygen.

  11. Osmium(ii) complexes for light-driven aerobic oxidation of amines to imines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Le; Yu, Zhen-Tao; Li, Zhao-Sheng; Yan, Shi-Cheng; Chen, Guang-Hui; Zou, Zhi-Gang

    2016-08-02

    Herein, we describe the synthesis and characterization of three Os(ii) complexes (i.e., [Os(fptz)2(PPhMe2)2] (1, fptzH = 3-trifluoromethyl-5-pyridyl-1,2,4-triazole), [Os(fptz)2(CO)(L1)] (2, L1 = PPh3; 3, L1 = pyridine)) that have been successfully utilized as good photocatalysts to promote aerobic oxidative coupling of amines to imines with molecular oxygen in air as a green oxidant. Complex 1 is the most effective catalyst for the oxidative coupling of benzylamine with molecular O2 (air) as the oxidant because of the complex's strong absorption of visible light and long-lived triplet state. The application of a low catalyst loading (0.06 mol%) of complex 1 to the oxidative coupling of a wide range of amines affords the corresponding imines efficiently and selectively in most cases. The reaction mechanism was investigated via relevant control and quenching experiments. The results indicated that the reaction occurs via an active (1)O2-involved pathway. The (1)O2-generating ability of complex 1 as a photosensitizer was evaluated using 9,10-dimethylanthracene (DMA) as a chemical trap for (1)O2.

  12. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor antagonists inhibit platelet adhesion and aggregation by nitric oxide release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, Leszek; Matys, Tomasz; Chabielska, Ewa; Buczko, Włodzimierz; Malinski, Tadeusz

    2002-10-01

    This study investigated the process of nitric oxide (NO) release from platelets after stimulation with different angiotensin II type 1 (AT1)-receptor antagonists and its effect on platelet adhesion and aggregation. Angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonist-stimulated NO release in platelets was compared with that in human umbilical vein endothelial cells by using a highly sensitive porphyrinic microsensor. In vitro and ex vivo effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists on platelet adhesion to collagen and thromboxane A2 analog U46619-induced aggregation were evaluated. Losartan, EXP3174, and valsartan alone caused NO release from platelets and endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner in the range of 0.01 to 100 micro mol/L, which was attenuated by NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. The angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists had more than 70% greater potency in NO release in platelets than in endothelial cells. The degree of inhibition of platelet adhesion (collagen-stimulated) and aggregation (U46619-stimulated) elicited by losartan, EXP3174, and valsartan, either in vitro or ex vivo, closely correlated with the NO levels produced by each of these drugs alone. The inhibiting effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists on collagen-stimulated adhesion and U46619-stimulated aggregation of platelets were significantly reduced by pretreatment with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Neither the AT2 receptor antagonist PD123319, the cyclooxygenase synthase inhibitor indomethacin, nor the selective thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 receptor antagonist SQ29,548 had any effect on angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonist-stimulated NO release in platelets and endothelial cells. The presented studies clearly indicate a crucial role of NO in the arterial antithrombotic effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists.

  13. Evaluation of parameters of oxidative stress after in vitro exposure to FMCW- and CDMA-modulated radiofrequency radiation fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Graham J; Spitz, Douglas R; Sim, Julia E; Higashikubo, Ryuji; Baty, Jack D; Moros, Eduardo G; Roti Roti, Joseph L

    2004-11-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether radiofrequency (RF) radiation is capable of inducing oxidative stress or affecting the response to oxidative stress in cultured mammalian cells. The two types of RF radiation investigated were frequency-modulated continuous-wave with a carrier frequency of 835.62 MHz (FMCW) and code division multiple access centered on 847.74 MHz (CDMA). To evaluate the effect of RF radiation on oxidative stress, J774.16 mouse macrophage cells were stimulated with gamma-interferon (IFN) and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) prior to exposure. Cell cultures were exposed for 20-22 h to a specific absorption rate of 0.8 W/kg at a temperature of 37.0 +/- 0.3 degrees C. Oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring oxidant levels, antioxidant levels, oxidative damage and nitric oxide production. Oxidation of thiols was measured by monitoring the accumulation of glutathione disulfide (GSSG). Cellular antioxidant defenses were evaluated by measuring superoxide dismutase activity (CuZnSOD and MnSOD) as well as catalase and glutathione peroxidase activity. The trypan blue dye exclusion assay was used to measure any changes in viability. The results of these studies indicated that FMCW- and CDMA-modulated RF radiation did not alter parameters indicative of oxidative stress in J774.16 cells. FMCW- and CDMA-modulated fields did not alter the level of intracellular oxidants, accumulation of GSSG or induction of antioxidant defenses in IFN/LPS-stimulated cells. Consistent with the lack of an effect on oxidative stress parameters, no change in toxicity was observed in J774.16 cells after either optimal (with or without inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase) or suboptimal stimulation.

  14. Albuminuria enhances NHE3 and NCC via stimulation of mitochondrial oxidative stress/angiotensin II axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhanjun; Zhuang, Yibo; Hu, Caiyu; Zhang, Xintong; Ding, Guixia; Zhang, Yue; Rohatgi, Rajeev; Hua, Hu; Huang, Songming; He, John Ci-Jiang; Zhang, Aihua

    2016-07-26

    Imbalance of salt and water is a frequent and challenging complication of kidney disease, whose pathogenic mechanisms remain elusive. Employing an albumin overload mouse model, we discovered that albuminuria enhanced the expression of NHE3 and NCC but not other transporters in murine kidney in line with the stimulation of angiotensinogen (AGT)/angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)/angiotensin (Ang) II cascade. In primary cultures of renal tubular cells, albumin directly stimulated AGT/ACE/Ang II and upregulated NHE3 and NCC expression. Blocking Ang II production with an ACE inhibitor normalized the upregulation of NHE3 and NCC in cells. Interestingly, albumin overload significantly reduced mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD2), and administration of a SOD2 mimic (MnTBAP) normalized the expression of NHE3, NCC, and the components of AGT/ACE pathway affected by albuminuria, indicating a key role of mitochondria-derived oxidative stress in modulating renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and renal sodium transporters. In addition, the functional data showing the reduced urinary excretion of Na and Cl and enhanced response to specific NCC inhibitor further supported the regulatory results of sodium transporters following albumin overload. More importantly, the upregulation of NHE3 and NCC and activation of ACE/Ang II signaling pathway were also observed in albuminuric patient kidneys, suggesting that our animal model accurately replicates the human condition. Taken together, these novel findings demonstrated that albuminuria is of importance in resetting renal salt handling via mitochondrial oxidative stress-initiated stimulation of ACE/Ang II cascade. This may also offer novel, effective therapeutic targets for dealing with salt and water imbalance in proteinuric renal diseases.

  15. Exposure to mobile phone electromagnetic field radiation, ringtone and vibration affects anxiety-like behaviour and oxidative stress biomarkers in albino wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehu, Abubakar; Mohammed, Aliyu; Magaji, Rabiu Abdussalam; Muhammad, Mustapha Shehu

    2016-04-01

    Research on the effects of Mobile phone radio frequency emissions on biological systems has been focused on noise and vibrations as auditory stressors. This study investigated the potential effects of exposure to mobile phone electromagnetic field radiation, ringtone and vibration on anxiety-like behaviour and oxidative stress biomarkers in albino wistar rats. Twenty five male wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups of 5 animals each: group I: exposed to mobile phone in switched off mode (control), group II: exposed to mobile phone in silent mode, group III: exposed to mobile phone in vibration mode, group IV: exposed to mobile phone in ringtone mode, group V: exposed to mobile phone in vibration and ringtone mode. The animals in group II to V were exposed to 10 min call (30 missed calls for 20 s each) per day for 4 weeks. Neurobehavioural studies for assessing anxiety were carried out 24 h after the last exposure and the animals were sacrificed. Brain samples were collected for biochemical evaluation immediately. Results obtained showed a significant decrease (P electromagnetic radiation, vibration, ringtone or both produced a significant effect on anxiety-like behavior and oxidative stress in young wistar rats.

  16. Mammalian Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism and Intercellular Communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzam, Edouard I

    2013-01-16

    The objective of the project was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the biological effects of low dose/low dose rate ionizing radiation in organs/tissues of irradiated mice that differ in their susceptibility to ionizing radiation, and in human cells grown under conditions that mimic the natural in vivo environment. The focus was on the effects of sparsely ionizing cesium-137 gamma rays and the role of oxidative metabolism and intercellular communication in these effects. Four Specific Aims were proposed. The integrated outcome of the experiments performed to investigate these aims has been significant towards developing a scientific basis to more accurately estimate human health risks from exposures to low doses ionizing radiation. By understanding the biochemical and molecular changes induced by low dose radiation, several novel markers associated with mitochondrial functions were identified, which has opened new avenues to investigate metabolic processes that may be affected by such exposure. In particular, a sensitive biomarker that is differentially modulated by low and high dose gamma rays was discovered.

  17. Electric radiation mapping of silver/zinc oxide nanoantennas by using electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, J. E.; Mendoza-Santoyo, F.; Cantu-Valle, J.; Velazquez-Salazar, J.; José Yacaman, M.; Ponce, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio 78249 (United States); González, F. J. [Coordinación para la Innovación y la Aplicación de la Ciencia y la Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma de San Luís Potosí, San Luis Potosí 78210 (Mexico); Diaz de Leon, R. [Instituto Tecnológico de San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosi 78437 (Mexico)

    2015-01-21

    In this work, we report the fabrication of self-assembled zinc oxide nanorods grown on pentagonal faces of silver nanowires by using microwaves irradiation. The nanostructures resemble a hierarchal nanoantenna and were used to study the far and near field electrical metal-semiconductor behavior from the electrical radiation pattern resulting from the phase map reconstruction obtained using off-axis electron holography. As a comparison, we use electric numerical approximations methods for a finite number of ZnO nanorods on the Ag nanowires and show that the electric radiation intensities maps match closely the experimental results obtained with electron holography. The time evolution of the radiation pattern as generated from the nanostructure was recorded under in-situ radio frequency signal stimulation, in which the generated electrical source amplitude and frequency were varied from 0 to 5 V and from 1 to 10 MHz, respectively. The phase maps obtained from electron holography show the change in the distribution of the electric radiation pattern for individual nanoantennas. The mapping of this electrical behavior is of the utmost importance to gain a complete understanding for the metal-semiconductor (Ag/ZnO) heterojunction that will help to show the mechanism through which these receiving/transmitting structures behave at nanoscale level.

  18. Direct functionalization of M-C (M = Pt(II), Pd(II)) bonds using environmentally benign oxidants, O2 and H2O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedernikov, Andrei N

    2012-06-19

    Atom economy and the use of "green" reagents in organic oxidation, including oxidation of hydrocarbons, remain challenges for organic synthesis. Solutions to this problem would lead to a more sustainable economy because of improved access to energy resources such as natural gas. Although natural gas is still abundant, about a third of methane extracted in distant oil fields currently cannot be used as a chemical feedstock because of a dearth of economically and ecologically viable methodologies for partial methane oxidation. Two readily available "atom-economical" "green" oxidants are dioxygen and hydrogen peroxide, but few methodologies have utilized these oxidants effectively in selective organic transformations. Hydrocarbon oxidation and C-H functionalization reactions rely on Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes. These reagents have practical advantages because they can tolerate moisture and atmospheric oxygen. But this tolerance for atmospheric oxygen also makes it challenging to develop novel organometallic palladium and platinum-catalyzed C-H oxidation reactions utilizing O(2) or H(2)O(2). This Account focuses on these challenges: the development of M-C bond (M = Pt(II), Pd(II)) functionalization and related selective hydrocarbon C-H oxidations with O(2) or H(2)O(2). Reactions discussed in this Account do not involve mediators, since the latter can impart low reaction selectivity and catalyst instability. As an efficient solution to the problem of direct M-C oxidation and functionalization with O(2) and H(2)O(2), this Account introduces the use of facially chelating semilabile ligands such as di(2-pyridyl)methanesulfonate and the hydrated form of di(2-pyridyl)ketone that enable selective and facile M(II)-C(sp(n)) bond functionalization with O(2) (M = Pt, n = 3; M = Pd, n = 3 (benzylic)) or H(2)O(2) (M = Pd, n = 2). The reactions proceed efficiently in protic solvents such as water, methanol, or acetic acid. With the exception of benzylic Pd(II) complexes, the

  19. The FERRUM Project: experimental and theoretical transition rates of forbidden [Sc II] lines and radiative lifetimes of metastable Sc II levels

    CERN Document Server

    Hartman, H; Lundin, P; Schef, P; Hibbert, A; Lundberg, H; Mannervik, S; Norlin, L -O; Royen, P

    2008-01-01

    Context. In many plasmas, long-lived metastable atomic levels are depopulated by collisions (quenched) before they decay radiatively. In low-density regions, however, the low collision rate may allow depopulation by electric dipole (E1) forbidden radiative transitions, so-called forbidden lines (mainly M1 and E2 transitions). If the atomic transition data are known, these lines are indicators of physical plasma conditions and used for abundance determination. Aims. Transition rates can be derived by combining relative intensities between the decay channels, so-called branching fractions (BFs), and the radiative lifetime of the common upper level. We use this approach for forbidden [Sc ii] lines, along with new calculations. Methods. Neither BFs for forbidden lines, nor lifetimes of metastable levels, are easily measured in a laboratory. Therefore, astrophysical BFs measured in Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) spectra of the strontium filament of Eta Carinae are combined with lifetime measurements u...

  20. Aromatic N-oxides in construction of different carboxylate coordination polymers of zinc(II), cadmium(II) and mercury(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Rupam; Baruah, Jubaraj B.

    2011-09-01

    The coordination polymers [Zn(C 6H 5COO) 2(PNO)] n ( 1), [Zn 2(C 6H 5COO) 4(4,4'-BPNO)] n ( 2), [Zn 4(C 6H 4C 2O 4) 4(4,4'-BPNO) 2(H 2O) 5] n· nH 2O ( 3), [Cd(C 6H 5COO) 2(PNO)] n ( 4), [Cd 3(C 6H 5COO) 6(4,4'-BPNO) 2] n·2 nH 2O ( 5), [Cd(C 6H 4C 2O 4)(4,4'-BPNO)(H 2O)] n ( 6) and [Hg(C 6H 5COO) 2(4,4'-BPNO) 2] n ( 7), (where PNO = pyridine N-oxide, 4,4'-BPNO = 4,4'-bipyridyl- N,N'-dioxide) are synthesized and structurally characterized. The structures of these coordination polymers exhibit mononuclear to trinuclear nodes built by ligation of carboxylate to metal ions connected by N-oxide ligands. Pyridine N-oxide interconnects metal nodes by acting as μ 2-bridging ligand in complexes 1, and 4. In the linear coordination polymer 2, the paddle wheel structure of zinc(II) benzoate units are interconnected by 4,4'-bipyridyl- N,N'-dioxide which acts as a bidentate spacer ligand adopting a trans μ 2-η 1 : η 1 coordination mode. The polymeric structure of 3 formed by terephthalate and 4,4'-bipyridyl- N,N'-dioxide with zinc(II) contains self-assembled dinuclear Zn 2O 2 type of carboxylate cores, with 4,4'-bipyridyl- N,N'-dioxide coordinating through cis μ 2-η 1 : η 1 coordination mode. The cadmium coordination polymer 5, comprising of 4,4'-bipyridyl- N,N'-dioxide and benzoate, has trinuclear cadmium benzoate cores wherein the terminal cadmium ions are interconnected by monodentate 4,4'-bipyridyl- N,N'-dioxide bridges. The coordination polymer 6 comprises of mononuclear cadmium nodes independently bridged by terephthalate and 4,4'-bipyridyl- N,N'-dioxide thereby leading to a 3-fold interpenetrated three dimensional network. Double helical polymeric structure is observed in the coordination polymer 7 derived from mononuclear mercury(II) benzoate nodes bridged by 4,4'-bipyridyl- N,N'-dioxide with cis μ 2-η 1 : η 1 coordination mode.

  1. The Outcome of Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Patients with Stage II Pancreatic Cancer (T3 or N1 Disease)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Won; Chun, Misun; Kim, Myung Wook; Kim, Wook Hwan; Kang, Seok Yun; Kang, Seung Hee; Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Sunyoung; Yang, Juno [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the outcome of postoperative radiation therapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy for curatively resected stage II pancreatic cancer with T3 or N1 disease. Materials and Methods: Between January 1996 and December 2005, twenty-eight patients completed adjuvant radiation therapy at Ajou University Hospital. The patients had either pathologic T3 stage or N1 stage. The radiation target volume encompassed the initial tumor bed identified preoperatively, resection margin area and celiac nodal area. In the case of N1 patients, the radiation field extended to the lower margin of the L3 vertebra for covering both para-aortic lymph nodes bearing area. The median total radiation dose was 50 Gy. Ten patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Thirteen patients (46%) showed loco-regional recurrences. The celiac axis nodal area was the most frequent site (4 patients). Five patients showed both loco-regional recurrence and a distant metastasis. Patients with positive lymph nodes had a relatively high probability of a distant metastasis (57.1%). Patients that had a positive resection margin showed a relatively high local failure rate (57.1%). The median disease-free survival period of all patients was 6 months and the 1- and 2-year disease free survival rates were 27.4% and 8.2%, respectively. The median overall survival period was 9 months. The 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 31.6% and 15.8%, respectively. Conclusion: The pancreatic cancer patients with stage II had a high risk of local failure and a high risk of a distant metastasis. We suggest the concurrent use of an effective radiation-sensitizing chemotherapeutic drug and adjuvant chemotherapy after postoperative radiation therapy for the treatment of patients with stage II pancreatic cancer.

  2. Oxidized calmodulin kinase II regulates conduction following myocardial infarction: a computational analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Christensen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII mediates critical signaling pathways responsible for divergent functions in the heart including calcium cycling, hypertrophy and apoptosis. Dysfunction in the CaMKII signaling pathway occurs in heart disease and is associated with increased susceptibility to life-threatening arrhythmia. Furthermore, CaMKII inhibition prevents cardiac arrhythmia and improves heart function following myocardial infarction. Recently, a novel mechanism for oxidative CaMKII activation was discovered in the heart. Here, we provide the first report of CaMKII oxidation state in a well-validated, large-animal model of heart disease. Specifically, we observe increased levels of oxidized CaMKII in the infarct border zone (BZ. These unexpected new data identify an alternative activation pathway for CaMKII in common cardiovascular disease. To study the role of oxidation-dependent CaMKII activation in creating a pro-arrhythmia substrate following myocardial infarction, we developed a new mathematical model of CaMKII activity including both oxidative and autophosphorylation activation pathways. Computer simulations using a multicellular mathematical model of the cardiac fiber demonstrate that enhanced CaMKII activity in the infarct BZ, due primarily to increased oxidation, is associated with reduced conduction velocity, increased effective refractory period, and increased susceptibility to formation of conduction block at the BZ margin, a prerequisite for reentry. Furthermore, our model predicts that CaMKII inhibition improves conduction and reduces refractoriness in the BZ, thereby reducing vulnerability to conduction block and reentry. These results identify a novel oxidation-dependent pathway for CaMKII activation in the infarct BZ that may be an effective therapeutic target for improving conduction and reducing heterogeneity in the infarcted heart.

  3. Protective actions of estrogen on angiotensin II-induced hypertension: role of central nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Baojian; Singh, Minati; Guo, Fang; Hay, Meredith; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2009-11-01

    The present study tested the hypotheses that 1) nitric oxide (NO) is involved in attenuated responses to ANG II in female mice, and 2) there is differential expression of neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) in the subfornical organ (SFO) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in response to systemic infusions of ANG II in males vs. females. Aortic blood pressure (BP) was measured in conscious mice with telemetry implants. N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; 100 microg x kg(.-1)day(-1)), an inhibitor of NOS, was administrated into the lateral cerebral ventricle for 14 days before and during ANG II pump implantation. Central infusion of l-NAME augmented the pressor effects of systemic ANG II in females (Delta21.5 + or - 2.2 vs. Delta9.2 + or - 1.5 mmHg) but not in males (Delta29.4 + or - 2.5 vs. Delta30.1 + or - 2.5 mmHg). Central administration of N(5)-(1-imino-3-butenyl)-l-ornithine (l-VNIO), a selective nNOS inhibitor, also significantly potentiated the increase in BP induced by ANG II in females (Delta17.5 + or - 3.2 vs. Delta9.2 + or - 1.5 mmHg). In gonadectomized mice, central l-NAME infusion did not affect the pressor response to ANG II in either males or females. Ganglionic blockade after ANG II infusion resulted in a greater reduction in BP in central l-NAME- or l-VNIO-treated females compared with control females. Western blot analysis of nNOS protein expression indicated that levels were approximately 12-fold higher in both the SFO and PVN of intact females compared with those in intact males. Seven days of ANG II treatment resulted in a further increase in nNOS protein expression only in intact females (PVN, to approximately 51-fold). Immunohistochemical studies revealed colocalization of nNOS and estrogen receptors in the SFO and PVN. These results suggest that NO attenuates the increase in BP induced by ANG II through reduced sympathetic outflow in females and that increased nNOS protein expression associated with the presence of female sex hormones plays a

  4. Mechanisms in Ruthenium(II) photochemistry and Iron(III) catalyzed oxidations : Photochemical, Electrochemical and Spectroscopic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unjaroen, Duenpen

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, photochemical, electrochemical and spectroscopic studies of Ru(II), Fe(II), and Fe(III) complexes are described. The overall goal in this studies was to understanding process that occur during oxidation catalysis and photo irradiation and especially the changes in the structure that

  5. Hypercholesterolemia blunts the oxidative stress elicited by hypertension in venules through angiotensin II type-2 receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Alper; Senchenkova, Elena; Granger, D. Neil

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Hypertension and hypercholesterolemia elicit inflammatory and thrombogenic responses in the microvasculature. However, little is known about whether and how risk factor combinations alter microvascular function. We examined how the actions of HTN+HCh on the microvasculature differ from the responses elicited by either risk factor alone. METHODS Intravital microscopy was used to monitor the adhesion and emigration of leukocytes and dihydrorhodamine oxidation in cremaster muscle venules of wild type mice that were infused with angiotensin II for 2 wks (HTN), placed on a high cholesterol diet (HCD), or both. RESULTS Either HTN or HCh alone enhanced the production of reactive oxygen species and promoted the recruitment of leukocytes in venules. However, the combination of HTN and HCh produced changes in ROS production and leukocyte recruitment that were greatly attenuated compared to HTN alone. The inhibitory effects of HCh on the AngII mediated responses were also observed in genetically-induced HCh (ApoE-deficient mice). Treating HCh + HTN mice with an antagonist to AT2r reversed the HCh-dependent protection against oxidative stress and inflammation during HTN. CONCLUSIONS These findings indicate that HCh blunts the oxidative stress and inflammatory cell recruitment elicited by hypertension in venules through a mechanism that involves AT2 receptor activation. PMID:26775070

  6. Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1 the first genome of a marine Fe(II oxidizing Zetaproteobacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Singer

    Full Text Available Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1 has provided the first genome of the recently discovered Zetaproteobacteria subdivision. Genome analysis reveals a complete TCA cycle, the ability to fix CO(2, carbon-storage proteins and a sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS. The latter could facilitate the transport of carbohydrates across the cell membrane and possibly aid in stalk formation, a matrix composed of exopolymers and/or exopolysaccharides, which is used to store oxidized iron minerals outside the cell. Two-component signal transduction system genes, including histidine kinases, GGDEF domain genes, and response regulators containing CheY-like receivers, are abundant and widely distributed across the genome. Most of these are located in close proximity to genes required for cell division, phosphate uptake and transport, exopolymer and heavy metal secretion, flagellar biosynthesis and pilus assembly suggesting that these functions are highly regulated. Similar to many other motile, microaerophilic bacteria, genes encoding aerotaxis as well as antioxidant functionality (e.g., superoxide dismutases and peroxidases are predicted to sense and respond to oxygen gradients, as would be required to maintain cellular redox balance in the specialized habitat where M. ferrooxydans resides. Comparative genomics with other Fe(II oxidizing bacteria residing in freshwater and marine environments revealed similar content, synteny, and amino acid similarity of coding sequences potentially involved in Fe(II oxidation, signal transduction and response regulation, oxygen sensation and detoxification, and heavy metal resistance. This study has provided novel insights into the molecular nature of Zetaproteobacteria.

  7. Pyoverdine synthesis by the Mn(II-oxidizing bacterium Pseudomonas putida GB-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Lundquist Parker

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When iron-starved, the Mn(II-oxidizing bacteria Pseudomonas putida strains GB-1 and MnB1 produce pyoverdines (PVDGB-1 and PVDMnB1, siderophores that both influence iron uptake and inhibit manganese(II oxidation by these strains. To explore the properties and genetics of a PVD that can affect manganese oxidation, LC-MS/MS and various siderotyping techniques were used to identify the peptides of PVDGB-1 and PVDMnB1 as being (for both PVDs: chromophore-Asp-Lys-OHAsp-Ser-Gly-aThr-Lys-cOHOrn, resembling a structure previously reported for P. putida CFML 90-51, which does not oxidize Mn. All three strains also produced an azotobactin and a sulfonated PVD, each with the peptide sequence above, but with unknown regulatory or metabolic effects. Bioinformatic analysis of the sequenced genome of P. putida GB-1 suggested that a particular non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, coded by the operon PputGB1_4083-4086, could produce the peptide backbone of PVDGB-1. To verify this prediction, plasmid integration disruption of PputGB1_4083 was performed and the resulting mutant failed to produce detectable PVD. In silico analysis of the modules in PputGB1_4083-4086 predicted a peptide sequence of Asp-Lys-Asp-Ser-Ala-Thr-Lsy-Orn, which closely matches the peptide determined by MS/MS. To extend these studies to other organisms, various Mn(II-oxidizing and non-oxidizing isolates of P. putida, P. fluorescens, P. marincola, P. fluorescens-syringae group, P. mendocina-resinovorans group and P. stutzerii group were screened for PVD synthesis. The PVD producers (12 out of 16 tested strains were siderotyped and placed into four sets of differing PVD structures, some corresponding to previously characterized PVDs and some to novel PVDs. These results combined with previous studies suggested that the presence of OHAsp or the flexibility of the pyoverdine polypeptide may enable efficient binding of Mn(III.

  8. Propolis Supplementation and the Changes in the Oxidative Metabolism of Blood Platelets Exposed to Electromagnetic Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrykowska Gabriela

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Electromagnetic radiation (EMR that has an effect on living organisms may be a source of oxidative stress. A lack of proper compensation by antioxidant defences on the part of proteins leading to an uncontrolled growth of reactive forms of oxygen, which may give rise to numerous health conditions. Various scientific studies have indicated that propolis has multiple valuable medicinal properties: antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, protective - in relation to liver parenchyma, as well as anti-cancer. Nonetheless, the results of studies concerned with its antioxidant capabilities are not explicit and require further tests and analyses.

  9. Complexation facilitated reduction of aromatic N-oxides by aqueous Fe(II)-tiron complex: reaction kinetics and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiling; Zhang, Huichun

    2013-10-01

    Rapid reduction of carbadox (CDX), olaquindox and several other aromatic N-oxides were investigated in aqueous solution containing Fe(II) and tiron. Consistent with previous work, the 1:2 Fe(II)-tiron complex, FeL2(6-), is the dominant reactive species as its concentration linearly correlates with the observed rate constant kobs under various conditions. The N-oxides without any side chains were much less reactive, suggesting direct reduction of the N-oxides is slow. UV-vis spectra suggest FeL2(6-) likely forms 5- or 7-membered rings with CDX and olaquindox through the N and O atoms on the side chain. The formed inner-sphere complexes significantly facilitated electron transfer from FeL2(6-) to the N-oxides. Reduction products of the N-oxides were identified by HPLC/QToF-MS to be the deoxygenated analogs. QSAR analysis indicated neither the first electron transfer nor N-O bond cleavage is the rate-limiting step. Calculations of the atomic spin densities of the anionic N-oxides confirmed the extensive delocalization between the aromatic ring and the side chain, suggesting complex formation can significantly affect the reduction kinetics. Our results suggest the complexation facilitated N-oxide reduction by Fe(II)-tiron involves a free radical mechanism, and the subsequent deoxygenation might also benefit from the weak complexation of Fe(II) with the N-oxide O atom.

  10. Effect of sulfur compounds on biological reduction of nitric oxide in aqueous Fe(II)EDTA2- solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manconi, I.; Maas, van der P.M.F.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2006-01-01

    Biological reduction of nitric oxide (NO) in aqueous solutions of EDTA chelated Fe(II) is one of the main steps in the BioDeNOx process, a novel bioprocess for the removal of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from polluted gas streams. Since NOx contaminated gases usually also contain sulfurous pollutants, the

  11. Pt(II) coordination complexes as visible light photocatalysts for the oxidation of sulfides using batch and flow processes

    OpenAIRE

    Casado-Sánchez, A.; Gómez-Ballesteros, R.; Tato, F.; Soriano, F.J.; Pascual-Coca, G.; Cabrera, S.; J. Alemán

    2016-01-01

    A new catalytic system for the photooxidation of sulfides based on Pt(ii) complexes is presented. The catalyst is capable of oxidizing a large number of sulfides containing aryl, alkyl, allyl, benzyl, as well as more complex structures such as heterocycles and methionine amino acid, with complete chemoselectivity. In addition, the first sulfur oxidation in a continuous flow process has been developed

  12. Evaluation of dosimetric characteristics of graphene oxide/PVC nanocomposite for gamma radiation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feizi, Shahzad; Malekie, Shahryar; Ziaie, Farhood [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Application Research School; Rahighi, Reza; Tayyebi, Ahmad [Univ. of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Physics

    2017-04-01

    Graphene oxide-polyvinyl chloride composite was prepared using tetrahydrofuran solvent-assisted dispersion of characterized nano flakes of graphene oxide in polymer matrix. Electrical percolation threshold of GO/PVC nanocomposite was determined via a finite element simulation method with a 2D model and compared with experimental results. A conductive cell with two silver coated walls was designed and fabricated for exploring dosimetric properties of the composite. Some characteristics of the new nanocomposite such as linearity of dose response, repeatability, sensitivity and angular dependence are investigated. According to 2D proposed method, obtained data associated to electrical conductivity of the GO/polymer composite for PVC matrix plotted in different GO weight percentages and had good compatibility (validity) with experimental data. The dose response is linear in the 17-51 mGy dose range and it can be introduced for gamma radiation dosimetry in diagnostic activities.

  13. Anti-oxidant, in vitro, in vivo anti-inflammatory activity and antiproliferative activity of mefenamic acid and its metal complexes with manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and zinc(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovala-Demertzi, Dimitra; Hadjipavlou-Litina, Dimitra; Staninska, Malgorzata; Primikiri, Alexandra; Kotoglou, Chronis; Demertzis, Mavroudis A

    2009-06-01

    Some new complexes of mefenamic acid with potentially interesting biological activity are described. The complexes of mefenamic acid [Mn(mef)(2)(H(2)O)(2)], 1, [Co(mef)(2)(H(2)O)(2)], 2, [Ni(mef)(2)(H(2)O)(2)], 3, [Cu(mef)(2)(H(2)O)](2), 4 and [Zn(mef)(2)], 5, were prepared by the reaction of mefenamic acid, a potent anti-inflammatory drug with metal salts. Optical and infrared spectral data of these new complexes are reported. Monomeric six-coordinated species were isolated in the solid state for Mn(II), Ni(II) and Co(II), dimeric five-coordinated for Cu(II) and monomeric four-coordinated for Zn(II). In DMF or CHCl(3) solution the coordination number is retained and the coordinated molecules of water are replaced by solvent molecules. The anti-oxidant properties of the complexes were evaluated using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, DPPH, free radical scavenging assay. The scavenging activities of the complexes were measured and compared with those of the free drug and vitamin C. We have explored their ability to inhibit soybean lipoxygenase, beta-glucuronidase and trypsin- induced proteolysis. The complex [Mn(mef)(2)(H(2)O)(2)] exhibits the highest antioxidant activity and the highest inhibitory effect against the soybean lipogygenase (LOX), properties that are not demonstrated by mefenamic acid. Their inhibitory effects on rat paw edema induced by Carrageenan was studied and compared with those of mefenamic acid. The complex [Zn(mef)(2)] exhibited a strong inhibitory effect at 0.1 mmol/Kg B.W. (81.5 +/- 1.3% inhibition), superior to the inhibition induced by mefenamic acid at the same dose (61.5 +/- 2.3% inhibition). Mefenamic acid and its metal complexes have been evaluated for antiproliferative activity in vitro against the cells of three human cancer cell lines: MCF-7 (human breast cancer cell line), T24 (bladder cancer cell line), A-549 (non-small cell lung carcinoma) and a mouse fibroblast L-929 cell line. The copper(II) complex displays against T24, MCF-7

  14. Mn(II) Oxidation by the Multicopper Oxidase Complex Mnx: A Coordinated Two-Stage Mn(II)/(III) and Mn(III)/(IV) Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatova, Alexandra V; Romano, Christine A; Tao, Lizhi; Stich, Troy A; Casey, William H; Britt, R David; Tebo, Bradley M; Spiro, Thomas G

    2017-08-23

    The bacterial manganese oxidase MnxG of the Mnx protein complex is unique among multicopper oxidases (MCOs) in carrying out a two-electron metal oxidation, converting Mn(II) to MnO2 nanoparticles. The reaction occurs in two stages: Mn(II) → Mn(III) and Mn(III) → MnO2. In a companion study , we show that the electron transfer from Mn(II) to the low-potential type 1 Cu of MnxG requires an activation step, likely forming a hydroxide bridge at a dinuclear Mn(II) site. Here we study the second oxidation step, using pyrophosphate (PP) as a Mn(III) trap. PP chelates Mn(III) produced by the enzyme and subsequently allows it to become a substrate for the second stage of the reaction. EPR spectroscopy confirms the presence of Mn(III) bound to the enzyme. The Mn(III) oxidation step does not involve direct electron transfer to the enzyme from Mn(III), which is shown by kinetic measurements to be excluded from the Mn(II) binding site. Instead, Mn(III) is proposed to disproportionate at an adjacent polynuclear site, thereby allowing indirect oxidation to Mn(IV) and recycling of Mn(II). PP plays a multifaceted role, slowing the reaction by complexing both Mn(II) and Mn(III) in solution, and also inhibiting catalysis, likely through binding at or near the active site. An overall mechanism for Mnx-catalyzed MnO2 production from Mn(II) is presented.

  15. Biological low pH Mn(II) oxidation in a manganese deposit influenced by metal-rich groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohu, Tsing; Akob, Denise M.; Abratis, Michael; Lazar, Cassandre S.; Küsel, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms, key organisms, and geochemical significance of biological low-pH Mn(II) oxidation are largely unexplored. Here, we investigated the structure of indigenous Mn(II)-oxidizing microbial communities in a secondary subsurface Mn oxide deposit influenced by acidic (pH 4.8) metal-rich groundwater in a former uranium mining area. Microbial diversity was highest in the Mn deposit compared to the adjacent soil layers and included the majority of known Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) and two genera of known Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi (MOF). Electron X-ray microanalysis showed that romanechite [(Ba,H2O)2(Mn4+,Mn3+)5O10] was conspicuously enriched in the deposit. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that certain fungal, bacterial, and archaeal groups were firmly associated with the autochthonous Mn oxides. Eight MOB within the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes and one MOF strain belonging to Ascomycota were isolated at pH 5.5 or 7.2 from the acidic Mn deposit. Soil-groundwater microcosms demonstrated 2.5-fold-faster Mn(II) depletion in the Mn deposit than adjacent soil layers. No depletion was observed in the abiotic controls, suggesting that biological contribution is the main driver for Mn(II) oxidation at low pH. The composition and species specificity of the native low-pH Mn(II) oxidizers were highly adapted to in situ conditions, and these organisms may play a central role in the fundamental biogeochemical processes (e.g., metal natural attenuation) occurring in the acidic, oligotrophic, and metalliferous subsoil ecosystems.

  16. Synthesis of iron(II,III) oxide/zinc oxide/copper(II) oxide (Fe3O4/ZnO/CuO) nanocomposites and their photosonocatalytic property for organic dye removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taufik, Ardiansyah; Saleh, Rosari

    2017-04-01

    A facile sol-gel method was adopted to synthesize iron(II,III) oxide/zinc oxide/copper(II) oxide (Fe3O4/ZnO/CuO) nanocomposites with various CuO loadings at a low temperature. The prepared nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analyses. The photosonocatalytic properties of the nanocomposites were tested by methylene blue removal in aqueous solutions under the combination of UV or visible light and ultrasound. The catalyst with the lowest CuO loading exhibited the highest photosonocatalytic performance under UV light, while the fastest degradation under visible light was achieved at the highest CuO loading. Overall, the photosonocatalytic process with light and ultrasound irradiation led to more complete degradation compared to using light alone. According to the experiments performed with radical scavengers, the holes and OH radicals are the dominant oxidative species. The nanocomposites can be easily separated from the treated solution using an external magnetic field, and the samples remain very stable after 4 cycles. These results indicate that these materials have great potential for treating organic pollutants in wastewaters.

  17. Effect of metal oxides on the reactivity of persulfate/Fe(II) in the remediation of diesel-contaminated soil and sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Si-Hyun; Kwon, Yong-Jae; Kong, Sung-Ho

    2010-10-15

    The effect of metal oxides on the ability of persulfate (PS) with Fe(II) to remediate diesel-contaminated soil was investigated. In both natural soil and purchased sand, the highest diesel degradation occurred at pH 3 and the optimum molar ratio of PS/Fe(II) was 100:1 (i.e. 500 mM PS to 5 mM Fe(II)). Moreover, adding Fe(II) increased PS reactivity more in soil than it did in sand, indicating the involvement of metal oxides in the soil matrix. Evaluating the effects of metal oxides (i.e. goethite, hematite, magnetite, and manganese oxide) on the reactivity of PS with/without Fe(II) in a system containing diesel-contaminated sand revealed that manganese oxide increased PS activity the most and that the highest diesel degradation by PS occurred when both manganese oxide and Fe(II) were used as activators. XRD did not show the transformation of manganese oxide in the presence of Fe(II). SEM-EDS showed the association of Fe(II) on the surface of manganese oxide, and ICP analysis revealed that almost all the added Fe(II) adsorbed to manganese oxide but almost none adsorbed to iron oxides under acidic conditions. Therefore, the high reactivity of PS could be due to the high density of Fe(II) over the surface of manganese oxide. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Removal of Pb(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solution using multiwalled carbon nanotubes/iron oxide magnetic composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Zhao, Donglin; Wang, Xiangke

    2011-01-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/iron oxide magnetic composites (named as MCs) were prepared by co-precipitation method, and were characterised by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in detail. The prepared MCs were employed as an adsorbent for the removal of Pb(II) and Cu(II) ions from wastewater in heavy metal ion pollution cleanup. The results demonstrated that the sorption of Pb(II) and Cu(II) ions was strongly dependent on pH and temperature. The experimental data were well described by Langmuir model, and the monolayer sorption capacity of MCs was found to vary from 10.02 to 31.25 mg/g for Pb(II) and from 3.11 to 8.92 mg/g for Cu(II) at temperature increasing from 293.15 to 353.15 K at pH 5.50. The sorption capacity of Pb(II) on MCs was higher than that of Cu(II), which was attributed to their ionic radius, hydration energies and hydrolysis of their hydroxides. The thermodynamic parameters (i.e., ΔH(0), ΔS(0) and ΔG(0)) were calculated from temperature dependent sorption isotherms, and the results indicated that the sorption of Pb(II) and Cu(II) ions on MCs were spontaneous and endothermic processes.

  19. Nuclear angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptors are functionally linked to nitric oxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwathmey, Tanya M; Shaltout, Hossam A; Pendergrass, Karl D; Pirro, Nancy T; Figueroa, Jorge P; Rose, James C; Diz, Debra I; Chappell, Mark C

    2009-06-01

    Expression of nuclear angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptors in rat kidney provides further support for the concept of an intracellular renin-angiotensin system. Thus we examined the cellular distribution of renal ANG II receptors in sheep to determine the existence and functional roles of intracellular ANG receptors in higher order species. Receptor binding was performed using the nonselective ANG II antagonist (125)I-[Sar(1),Thr(8)]-ANG II ((125)I-sarthran) with the AT(1) antagonist losartan (LOS) or the AT(2) antagonist PD123319 (PD) in isolated nuclei (NUC) and plasma membrane (PM) fractions obtained by differential centrifugation or density gradient separation. In both fetal and adult sheep kidney, PD competed for the majority of cortical NUC (> or =70%) and PM (> or =80%) sites while LOS competition predominated in medullary NUC (> or =75%) and PM (> or =70%). Immunodetection with an AT(2) antibody revealed a single approximately 42-kDa band in both NUC and PM extracts, suggesting a mature molecular form of the NUC receptor. Autoradiography for receptor subtypes localized AT(2) in the tubulointerstitium, AT(1) in the medulla and vasa recta, and both AT(1) and AT(2) in glomeruli. Loading of NUC with the fluorescent nitric oxide (NO) detector DAF showed increased NO production with ANG II (1 nM), which was abolished by PD and N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, but not LOS. Our studies demonstrate ANG II receptor subtypes are differentially expressed in ovine kidney, while nuclear AT(2) receptors are functionally linked to NO production. These findings provide further evidence of a functional intracellular renin-angiotensin system within the kidney, which may represent a therapeutic target for the regulation of blood pressure.

  20. Fe(II) oxidation during acid mine drainage neutralization in a pilot-scale sequencing batch reactor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Zvimba, JN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available the suspended solids impacted more positively on Fe(II) oxidation during pilot scale AMD neutralization in a SBR, a phenomenon ascribed to generation of acidity by hydrolysis of Fe(II) as shown in equation 2. Figure 3 shows the chemical behavior... to the acidity generation resulting from hydrolysis of Fe(III) (Reaction 2) that would require further neutralization by CaCO3 (Reaction 3), and as such promotes further CaCO3 dissolution with AMD pH increasing to above 6.8 following complete Fe(II) oxidation...

  1. Oxidative Stress and Vascular Damage in Hypertension: Role of Angiotensin II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Virdis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species are oxygen derivates and play an active role in vascular biology. These compounds are generated within the vascular wall, at the level of endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, as well as by adventitial fibroblasts. In healthy conditions, ROS are produced in a controlled manner at low concentrations and function as signaling molecules regulating vascular contraction-relaxation and cell growth. Physiologically, the rate of ROS generation is counterbalanced by the rate of elimination. In hypertension, an enhanced ROS generation occurs, which is not counterbalanced by the endogenous antioxidant mechanisms, leading to a state of oxidative stress. In the present paper, major angiotensin II-induced vascular ROS generation within the vasculature, and relative sources, will be discussed. Recent development of signalling pathways whereby angiotensin II-driven vascular ROS induce and accelerate functional and structural vascular injury will be also considered.

  2. Study on the adsorption of Cu(II) by folic acid functionalized magnetic graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuicui; Ge, Heyi; Zhao, Yueying; Liu, Shanshan; Zou, Yu; Zhang, Wenbo

    2017-02-01

    The folic acid functionalized magnetic graphene oxide (FA-mGO) as a new adsorbent has been synthesized in this work for the elimination of Cu(II) from waste water. The as-prepared FA-mGO was tested by SEM, TEM, particle size analyzer, FTIR, XRD, Roman spectrum, TGA and magnetic properties analyzer. Some factors, such as adsorbent dose, pH, contact time, initial concentration of adsorbate and temperature were explored. The results showed that the FA-mGO had the better adsorption performance than mGO. After 40 min, the adsorption equilibrium could be reached. Furthermore, the adsorption property obeyed the pseudo-second order kinetic model and the Temkin isotherms well. The maximum adsorption capacity was 283.29 mg/g for Cu(II) from Pseudo-second-order model at pH=5 and 318 K. The chelation action between FA and Cu(II) along with electrostatic incorporation between GO and Cu(II) determined the favourable adsorption property. Besides, thermodynamic studies results ∆G00, ∆S0>0 suggested that the adsorption mechanism was an endothermic and spontaneous process essentially. Finally, desorption and reusability studies imply FA-mGO has an excellent reproducibility and is benefit to environmental protection and resource conservation.

  3. Highly effective removal of Cu(II) by triethylenetetramine-magnetic reduced graphene oxide composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jian Hua, E-mail: jhchen73@126.com [College of Chemistry and Environmental, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Fujian Province University Key Laboratory of Modern Analytical Science and Separation Technology, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Xing, Hai Tao; Sun, Xue; Su, Zhen Bo; Huang, Yi Hong [College of Chemistry and Environmental, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Weng, Wen [College of Chemistry and Environmental, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Fujian Province University Key Laboratory of Modern Analytical Science and Separation Technology, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Hu, Shi Rong; Guo, Hong Xu; Wu, Wen Bing; He, Ya Shan [College of Chemistry and Environmental, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China)

    2015-11-30

    Graphical abstract: Magnetization curve of TMT-MRGO composite. - Highlights: • A novel magnetic composite TET-MRGO is prepared. • TET-MRGO is highly magnetic and can be easily separated from aqueous solution. • TET-MRGO shows excellent adsorption capacity for Cu(II) (209.1 mg g{sup −1}). • TET-MRGO shows excellent adsorption selectivity toward Cu(II). • The reusability of TET-MRGO is encouraging and hopeful for practical use. - Abstract: In the present paper a new type of triethylenetetramine-magnetite reduced graphene oxide (TET-MRGO) composite showing a high adsorption capacity (209.1 mg g{sup −1}) toward Cu(II) ions was prepared. The morphological, structural, and magnetic properties of TET-MRGO were characterized using infrared spectrometer, X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electronic Microscope, nitrogen adsorption–desorption measurement, Raman spectroscopy, and Transmission Electron Microscopy. TET-MRGO exhibits strong saturation magnetization (42.13 emu g{sup −1}) and can be easily separated from aqueous solution by an external magnetic field. A series of batch adsorption experiments were systematically conducted to study the adsorption property of TET-MRGO. The high adsorption capacity, excellent selectivity, and effective adsorption–desorption results indicated the prepared TET-MRGO composite could be an effective adsorbent for removing Cu(II) ions from aqueous solution.

  4. Catalytic Mechanism and Efficiency of Methane Oxidation by Hg(II) in Sulfuric Acid and Comparison to Radical Initiated Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Fuller, Jack T.; Butler, Steven; Devarajan, Deepa; Jacobs, Austin; Hashiguchi, Brian G.; Konnick, Michael M.; Goddard, William A.; Gonzales, Jason M.; Periana, Roy A.; Ess, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Methane conversion to methyl bisulfate by Hg^(II)(SO_4) in sulfuric acid is an example of fast and selective alkane oxidation catalysis. Dichotomous mechanisms involving C–H activation and electron transfer have been proposed based on experiments. Radical oxidation pathways have also been proposed for some reaction conditions. Hg^(II) is also of significant interest because as a d^(10) transition metal it is similar to d^(10) main-group metals that also oxidize alkanes. Density-functional cal...

  5. Mn(II,III) oxidation and MnO2 mineralization by an expressed bacterial multicopper oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Cristina N.; Soldatova, Alexandra V.; Lee, Sung-Woo; Spiro, Thomas G.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2013-07-01

    Reactive Mn(IV) oxide minerals are ubiquitous in the environment and control the bioavailability and distribution of many toxic and essential elements and organic compounds. Their formation is thought to be dependent on microbial enzymes, because spontaneous Mn(II) to Mn(IV) oxidation is slow. Several species of marine Bacillus spores oxidize Mn(II) on their exosporium, the outermost layer of the spore, encrusting them with Mn(IV) oxides. Molecular studies have identified the mnx (Mn oxidation) genes, including mnxG, encoding a putative multicopper oxidase (MCO), as responsible for this two-electron oxidation, a surprising finding because MCOs only catalyze single-electron transfer reactions. Characterization of the enzymatic mechanism has been hindered by the lack of purified protein. By purifying active protein from the mnxDEFG expression construct, we found that the resulting enzyme is a blue (absorption maximum 590 nm) complex containing MnxE, MnxF, and MnxG proteins. Further, by analyzing the Mn(II)- and (III)-oxidizing activity in the presence of a Mn(III) chelator, pyrophosphate, we found that the complex facilitates both electron transfers from Mn(II) to Mn(III) and from Mn(III) to Mn(IV). X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the Mn mineral product confirmed its similarity to Mn(IV) oxides generated by whole spores. Our results demonstrate that Mn oxidation from soluble Mn(II) to Mn(IV) oxides is a two-step reaction catalyzed by an MCO-containing complex. With the purification of active Mn oxidase, we will be able to uncover its mechanism, broadening our understanding of Mn mineral formation and the bioinorganic capabilities of MCOs.

  6. Testing Type II Radiative Seesaw Model: from Dark Matter Detection to LHC Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Shu-Yuan; Liao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the testability of the type II radiative seesaw in which neutrino mass and dark matter (DM) are related at one-loop level. Under the constraints from DM relic density, direct and indirect detection, and invisible Higgs decays, we find three possible regions of DM mass $M_{s_1}$ that can survive the present and even the future experiments: (1) the Higgs resonance region with $M_{s_1}\\sim M_h/2$, (2) the Higgs region with $M_{s_1}\\sim M_h$, and (3) the coannihilation region with $M_{s_2}\\sim M_{s_1}$. Here $s_{1,2}$ are two scalar singlets with the lighter $s_1$ being the DM candidate. Based on DM properties and direct collider constraints, we choose three benchmark points to illustrate the testability of this model at LHC. We perform a detailed simulation of the four-lepton and tri-lepton signatures at 13 (14) TeV LHC. While both signatures are found to be promising at all benchmark points, the tri-lepton one is even better: it is possible to reach the $5\\sigma$ significance with an integrated lumin...

  7. On the Existence of Radiation Gauges in Petrov type II spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Price, L R; Whiting, B F; Price, Larry R.; Shankar, Karthik; Whiting, Bernard F.

    2006-01-01

    The radiation gauges used by Chrzanowski (his IRG/ORG) for metric reconstruction in the Kerr spacetime seem to be over-specified. Their specification consists of five conditions: four (which we treat here as) ``gauge'' conditions plus an additional condition on the trace of the metric perturbation. In this work, we utilize a newly developed form of the perturbed Einstein equations to establish a condition -- on a particular tetrad component of the stress-energy tensor -- under which one can impose the full IRG/ORG. In a Petrov type II background, imposing the IRG/ORG additionally requires (consistently) setting a particular component of the metric perturbation to zero ``by hand''. By contrast, in a generic type D background, gauge freedom can generally be used to achieve this. As a specific example, we work through the process of imposing the IRG in a Schwarzschild background, using a more traditional approach. Implications for metric reconstruction using the Teukolsky curvature perturbations in type D spacet...

  8. Diagnostic development in precise opacity measurement of radiatively heated Al plasma on Shenguang II laser facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Yang [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Institute of Optoelectronics Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yang Jiamin; Zhang Jiyan [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Liu Jinsong; Yuan Xiao [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Institute of Optoelectronics Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Jin Fengtao [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Department of Physics, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2009-04-15

    Simultaneous measurements of the self-emission spectrum, the backlighting source spectrum, and the transmission spectrum in one shot, which reduce the experimental uncertainties from shot-to-shot fluctuation, are essential for precise opacity experiments. In order to achieve precise absorption spectrum of Al plasmas, a special half sample sandwich target was designed and short backlighter was used to provide time- and space-resolving diagnostics on the Shenguang II high power laser facility. In the measurement, a cylindrical cavity with CH foam baffles was used to provide a clean x-ray radiation environment for sample heating. The x-ray source spectrum, the transmission spectrum, and the self-emission spectrum of the soft x-ray heated Al sample were recorded in one shot with a penta-erythritol tetrakis (hydroxymethy) methane C(CH{sub 2}OH){sub 4} (PET) crystal spectrometer by using the point-projection method. Experimental results have been compared with the calculation results of a detailed level accounting opacity code.

  9. Testing the type II radiative seesaw model: From dark matter detection to LHC signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shu-Yuan; Han, Zhi-Long; Liao, Yi

    2016-12-01

    We analyze the testability of the type II radiative seesaw in which neutrino mass and dark matter (DM) are related at one-loop level. Under the constraints from DM relic density, direct and indirect detection, and invisible Higgs decays, we find three possible regions of DM mass Ms1that can survive the present and even the future experiments: (1) the Higgs resonance region with Ms 1˜Mh/2 , (2) the Higgs region with Ms1˜Mh, and (3) the coannihilation region with Ms 2˜Ms 1. Here s1 ,2 are two scalar singlets with the lighter s1 being the DM candidate. Based on DM properties and direct collider constraints, we choose three benchmark points to illustrate the testability of this model at the LHC. We perform a detailed simulation of the four-lepton and trilepton signatures at 13(14) TeV LHC. While both signatures are found to be promising at all benchmark points, the trilepton one is even better: it is possible to reach the 5 σ significance with an integrated luminosity of 100 fb-1.

  10. Influence of complex impurity centres on radiation damage in wide-gap metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lushchik, A., E-mail: aleksandr.lushchik@ut.ee [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Lushchik, Ch. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Popov, A.I. [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Kengaraga 8, Riga LV-1063 (Latvia); Schwartz, K. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Shablonin, E.; Vasil’chenko, E. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia)

    2016-05-01

    Different mechanisms of radiation damage of wide-gap metal oxides as well as a dual influence of impurity ions on the efficiency of radiation damage have been considered on the example of binary ionic MgO and complex ionic–covalent Lu{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} single crystals. Particular emphasis has been placed on irradiation with ∼2 GeV heavy ions ({sup 197}Au, {sup 209}Bi, {sup 238}U, fluence of 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}) providing extremely high density of electronic excitations within ion tracks. Besides knock-out mechanism for Frenkel pair formation, the additional mechanism through the collapse of mobile discrete breathers at certain lattice places (e.g., complex impurity centres) leads to the creation of complex defects that involve a large number of host atoms. The experimental manifestations of the radiation creation of intrinsic and impurity antisite defects (Lu|{sub Al} or Ce|{sub Al} – a heavy ion in a wrong cation site) have been detected in LuAG and LuAG:Ce{sup 3+} single crystals. Light doping of LuAG causes a small enhancement of radiation resistance, while pair impurity centres (for instance, Ce|{sub Lu}–Ce|{sub Al} or Cr{sup 3+}–Cr{sup 3+} in MgO) are formed with a rise of impurity concentration. These complex impurity centres as well as radiation-induced intrinsic antisite defects (Lu|{sub Al} strongly interacting with Lu in a regular site) tentatively serve as the places for breathers collapse, thus decreasing the material resistance against dense irradiation.

  11. Response of Phaseolus vulgaris L. plants to low-let ionizing radiation: Growth and oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, C.; De Micco, V.; Aronne, G.; Pugliese, M.; Virzo De Santo, A.; De Maio, A.

    2013-10-01

    The scenarios for the long-term habitation of space platforms and planetary stations involve plants as fundamental part of Bioregenerative Life Support Systems (BLSS) to support the crew needs. Several constraints may limit plant growth in space: among them ionizing radiation is recognized to severely affect plant cell at morphological, physiological and biochemical level. In this work, plants of Phaseolus vulgaris L. were subjected to four different doses of X-rays (0.3, 10, 50 and 100 Gy) in order to assess the effects of ionizing radiation on this species and to analyze possible mechanisms carried out to overcome the radiation injuries. The effects of X-rays on plant growth were assessed by measuring stem elongation, number of internodes and leaf dry weight. The integrity of photosynthetic apparatus was evaluated by photosynthetic pigment composition and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) activity, whereas changes in total antioxidant pool and glutathione S transferase activity (GST) were utilized as markers of oxidative stress. The distribution of phenolic compounds in leaf tissues as natural shielding against radiation was also determined. Irradiation of plants at 0.3 and 10 Gy did not determine differences in all considered parameters as compared to control. On the contrary, at 50 and 100 Gy a reduction of plant growth and a decrease in photosynthetic pigment content, as well as an increase in phenolic compounds and a decrease in total antioxidant content and GST activity were found. Only a slight reduction of Rubisco activity in leaves irradiated at 50 and 100 Gy was found. The overall results indicate P. vulgaris as a species with a good potential to face ionizing radiation and suggest its suitability for utilization in BLSSs.

  12. Nickel(II) oxide nanostructure derived from metal-organic frameworks and its adsorption capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ru, Shuai; Xu, Lina; Xiao, Hongping; Li, Xinhua

    2016-11-01

    Nanosized nickel(II) oxide (NiO) was obtained by oxidation of ([(Ni2(nic)4(H2O)] n , nic = nicotinic acid), a metal-organic framework (MOF), at 350 °C. Nanosized NiO assembled to form block NiO having a mesoporous structure similar to the porous structure of activated carbon block. This bulk NiO exhibits excellent adsorbing capability, with 100% higher adsorption capacities than the [(Ni2(nic)4(H2O)] n MOF towards toluene and water steam; therefore, it can find potential application in gas adsorption. Moreover, this bulk NiO can be synthesized using a facile, environment-friendly, and cost-effective method, and exhibits excellent hydrothermal stability, which is not commonly observed for MOFs.

  13. Covalent immobilization of oriented photosystem II on a nanostructured electrode for solar water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Masaru; Cardona, Tanai; Rutherford, A William; Reisner, Erwin

    2013-07-24

    Photosystem II (PSII) offers a biological and sustainable route of photochemical water oxidation to O2 and can provide protons and electrons for the generation of solar fuels, such as H2. We present a rational strategy to electrostatically improve the orientation of PSII from a thermophilic cyanobacterium, Thermosynechococcus elongatus , on a nanostructured indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode and to covalently immobilize PSII on the electrode. The ITO electrode was modified with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of phosphonic acid ITO linkers with a dangling carboxylate moiety. The negatively charged carboxylate attracts the positive dipole on the electron acceptor side of PSII via Coulomb interactions. Covalent attachment of PSII in its electrostatically improved orientation to the SAM-modified ITO electrode was accomplished via an amide bond to further enhance red-light-driven, direct electron transfer and stability of the PSII hybrid photoelectrode.

  14. Radiative lifetime measurements of some Tm I and Tm II levels by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yanshan; Wang, Xinghao; Yu, Qi; Li, Yongfan; Gao, Yang; Dai, Zhenwen

    2016-04-01

    Radiative lifetimes of 88 levels of Tm I in the energy range 22 791.176-48 547.98 cm-1 and 29 levels of Tm II in the range 27 294.79-65 612.85 cm-1 were measured by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in laser-ablation plasma. The lifetime values obtained are in the range from 15.4 to 7900 ns for Tm I and from 36.5 to 1000 ns for Tm II. To the best of our knowledge, 77 lifetimes of Tm I and 22 lifetimes of Tm II are reported for the first time. Good agreements between the present results and the previous experimental values were achieved for both Tm I and Tm II.

  15. Diaqua-bis(2-pyridylphospho-nato N-oxide-κO,O)cobalt(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yun-Sheng; Lu, Tian-Xian

    2008-11-13

    In the title complex, [Co(C(5)H(5)NO(4)P)(2)(H(2)O)(2)], the Co(II) ion, which lies on a crystallographic inversion center, is coordin-ated by four O atoms from two bidentate 2-phospho-nato-pyridine N-oxide ligands and two O atoms from two water ligands in a slightly distorted octa-hedral environment. Mol-ecules are inter-linked by three O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds and one weak C-H⋯O inter-action, forming a three-dimensional supra-molecular structure.

  16. Advanced oxidation removal of hypophosphite by O3/H2O2 combined with sequential Fe(II) catalytic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zilong; Dong, Wenyi; Wang, Hongjie; Chen, Guanhan; Wang, Wei; Liu, Zekun; Gao, Yaguang; Zhou, Beili

    2017-08-01

    Elimination of hypophosphite (HP) was studied as an example of nickel plating effluents treatment by O3/H2O2 and sequential Fe(II) catalytic oxidation process. Performance assessment performed with artificial HP solution by varying initial pH and employing various oxidation processes clearly showed that the O3/H2O2─Fe(II) two-step oxidation process possessed the highest removal efficiency when operating under the same conditions. The effects of O3 dosing, H2O2 concentration, Fe(II) addition and Fe(II) feeding time on the removal efficiency of HP were further evaluated in terms of apparent kinetic rate constant. Under improved conditions (initial HP concentration of 50 mg L(-1), 75 mg L(-1) O3, 1 mL L(-1) H2O2, 150 mg L(-1) Fe(II) and pH 7.0), standard discharge (oxidation treatment favored the improvement of phosphorus removal due to the formation of more metal hydroxides. Moreover, as a comparison with lab-scale Fenton approach, the O3/H2O2─Fe(II) oxidation process had more competitive advantages with respect to applicable pH range, removal efficiency, sludge production as well as economic costs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Biological Oxidation of Fe(II) in Reduced Nontronite Coupled with Nitrate Reduction by Pseudogulbenkiania sp. Strain 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Linduo; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Agrawal, A.; Liu, Deng; Zhang, Jing; Edelmann, Richard E.

    2013-10-15

    Nitrate contamination in soils, sediments, and water bodies is a significant issue. Although much is known about nitrate degradation in these environments, especially via microbial pathways, a complete understanding of all degradation processes, especially in clay mineral-rich soils, is still lacking. The objective of this study was to study the potential of removing nitrate contaminant using structural Fe(II) in clay mineral nontronite. Specifically, the coupled processes of microbial oxidation of Fe(II) in microbially reduced nontronite (NAu-2) and nitrate reduction by Pseudogulbenkiania species strain 2002 was investigated. Bio-oxidation experiments were conducted in bicarbonate-buffered medium under both growth and nongrowth conditions. The extents of Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction were measured by wet chemical methods. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), and 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy were used to observe mineralogical changes associated with Fe(III) reduction and Fe(II) oxidation in nontronite. The bio-oxidation extent under growth and nongrowth conditions reached 93% and 57%, respectively. Over the same time period, nitrate was completely reduced under both conditions to nitrogen gas (N2), via an intermediate product nitrite. Magnetite was a mineral product of nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation, as evidenced by XRD data and TEM diffraction patterns. The results of this study highlight the importance of iron-bearing clay minerals in the global nitrogen cycle with potential applications in nitrate removal in soils.

  18. A supramolecular ruthenium macrocycle with high catalytic activity for water oxidation that mechanistically mimics photosystem II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Marcus; Kunz, Valentin; Frischmann, Peter D.; Würthner, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the ingenuity of nature and exploiting the billions of years over which natural selection has developed numerous effective biochemical conversions is one of the most successful strategies in a chemist's toolbox. However, an inability to replicate the elegance and efficiency of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II (OEC-PSII) in its oxidation of water into O2 is a significant bottleneck in the development of a closed-loop sustainable energy cycle. Here, we present an artificial metallosupramolecular macrocycle that gathers three Ru(bda) centres (bda = 2,2‧-bipyridine-6,6‧-dicarboxylic acid) that catalyses water oxidation. The macrocyclic architecture accelerates the rate of water oxidation via a water nucleophilic attack mechanism, similar to the mechanism exhibited by OEC-PSII, and reaches remarkable catalytic turnover frequencies >100 s-1. Photo-driven water oxidation yields outstanding activity, even in the nM concentration regime, with a turnover number of >1,255 and turnover frequency of >13.1 s-1.

  19. Oxidation of plastohydroquinone by photosystem II and by dioxygen in leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laisk, Agu; Eichelmann, Hillar; Oja, Vello

    2015-01-01

    In sunflower leaves linear electron flow LEF=4O2 evolution rate was measured at 20 ppm O2 in N2. PSII charge separation rate CSRII=aII∙PAD∙(Fm-F)/Fm, where aII is excitation partitioning to PSII, PAD is photon absorption density, Fm and F are maximum and actual fluorescence yields. Under 630 nm LED+720 nm far-red light (FRL), LEF was equal to CSRII with aII=0.51 to 0.58. After FRL was turned off, plastoquinol (PQH2) accumulated, but LEF decreased more than accountable by F increase, indicating PQH2-oxidizing cyclic electron flow in PSII (CEFII). CEFII was faster under conditions requiring more ATP, consistent with CEFII being coupled with proton translocation. We propose that PQH2 bound to the QC site is oxidized, one e- moving to P680+, the other e- to Cyt b559. From Cyt b559 the e- reduces QB- at the QB site, forming PQH2. About 10-15% electrons may cycle, causing misses in the period-4 flash O2 evolution and lower quantum yield of photosynthesis under stress. We also measured concentration dependence of PQH2 oxidation by dioxygen, as indicated by post-illumination decrease of Chl fluorescence yield. After light was turned off, F rapidly decreased from Fm to 0.2 Fv, but further decrease to F0 was slow and O2 concentration dependent. The rate constant of PQH2 oxidation, determined from this slow phase, was 0.054 s(-1) at 270 μM (21%) O2, decreasing with Km(O2) of 60 μM (4.6%) O2. This eliminates the interference of O2 in the measurements of CEFII.

  20. Effects of copper(II) and copper oxides on THMs formation in copper pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Qu, Jiuhui; Liu, Huijuan; Hu, Chengzhi

    2007-08-01

    Little is known about how the growth of trihalomethanes (THMs) in drinking water is affected in copper pipe. The formation of THMs and chlorine consumption in copper pipe under stagnant flow conditions were investigated. Experiments for the same water held in glass bottles were performed for comparison. Results showed that although THMs levels firstly increased in the presence of chlorine in copper pipe, faster decay of chlorine as compared to the glass bottle affected the rate of THMs formation. The analysis of water phase was supplemented by surface analysis of corrosion scales using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX). The results showed the scales on the pipe surface mainly consisted of Cu(2)O, CuO and Cu(OH)(2) or CuCO(3). Designed experiments confirmed that the fast depletion of chlorine in copper pipe was mainly due to effect of Cu(2)O, CuO in corrosion scales on copper pipe. Although copper(II) and copper oxides showed effect on THMs formation, the rapid consumption of chlorine due to copper oxide made THM levels lower than that in glass bottles after 4h. The transformations of CF, DCBM and CDBM to BF were accelerated in the presence of copper(II), cupric oxide and cuprous oxide. The effect of pH on THMs formation was influenced by effect of pH on corrosion of copper pipe. When pH was below 7, THMs levels in copper pipe was higher as compared to glass bottle, but lower when pH was above 7.

  1. Mobilization of manganese by basalt associated Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria from the Indian Ridge System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujith, P P; Mourya, B S; Krishnamurthi, S; Meena, R M; Loka Bharathi, P A

    2014-01-01

    The Indian Ridge System basalt bearing Mn-oxide coatings had todorokite as the major and birnesite as the minor mineral. We posit that microorganisms associated with these basalts participate in the oxidation of Mn and contribute to mineral deposition. We also hypothesized that, the Mn-oxidizing microbes may respond reversibly to pulses of fresh organic carbon introduced into the water column by mobilizing the Mn in Mn-oxides. To test these two hypotheses, we enumerated the number of Mn-oxidizers and -reducers and carried out studies on the mobilization of Mn by microbial communities associated with basalt. In medium containing 100 μM Mn(2+), 10(3) colony forming units (CFU) were recovered with undetectable number of reducers on Mn-oxide amended medium, suggesting that the community was more oxidative. Experiments were then conducted with basalt fragments at 4±2 °C in the presence 'G(+)' and absence 'G(-)' of glucose (0.1%). Controls included set-ups, some of which were poisoned with 15 mM azide and the others of which were heat-killed. The mobilization of Mn in the presence of glucose was 1.76 μg g(-1) d(-1) and in the absence, it was 0.17 μg g(-1) d(-1) after 150 d. Mn mobilization with and without added glucose was 13 and 4 times greater than the corresponding azide treated controls. However, rates in 'G(+)' were 16 times and 'G(-)' 24 times more than the respective heat killed controls. The corresponding total counts in the presence of added glucose increased from 1.63×10(6) to 6.71×10(7) cells g(-1) and from 1.41×10(7) to 3.52×10(7) cells g(-1) in its absence. Thus, the addition of glucose as a proxy for organic carbon changed the community's response from Mn(II)-oxidizing to Mn(IV)-reducing activity. The results confirm the participation of Mn oxidizing bacteria in the mobilization of Mn. Identification of culturable bacteria by 16S rRNA gene analysis showed taxonomic affiliations to Bacillus, Exiguobacterium, Staphylococcus, Brevibacterium and

  2. GAMMA RADIATION INTERACTS WITH MELANIN TO ALTER ITS OXIDATION-REDUCTION POTENTIAL AND RESULTS IN ELECTRIC CURRENT PRODUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C.; Ekechukwu, A.; Milliken, C.

    2011-05-17

    The presence of melanin pigments in organisms is implicated in radioprotection and in some cases, enhanced growth in the presence of high levels of ionizing radiation. An understanding of this phenomenon will be useful in the design of radioprotective materials. However, the protective mechanism of microbial melanin in ionizing radiation fields has not yet been elucidated. Here we demonstrate through the electrochemical techniques of chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry and cyclic voltammetry that microbial melanin is continuously oxidized in the presence of gamma radiation. Our findings establish that ionizing radiation interacts with melanin to alter its oxidation-reduction potential. Sustained oxidation resulted in electric current production and was most pronounced in the presence of a reductant, which extended the redox cycling capacity of melanin. This work is the first to establish that gamma radiation alters the oxidation-reduction behavior of melanin, resulting in electric current production. The significance of the work is that it provides the first step in understanding the initial interactions between melanin and ionizing radiation taking place and offers some insight for production of biomimetic radioprotective materials.

  3. Activation of chemical biological defense mechanisms and remission of vital oxidative injury by low dose radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaoka, K. [Okayama University Medical School, Okayama (Japan); Nomura, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Kojima, S. [Science University of Tokyo, Chiba (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    Excessive active oxygen produced in vivo by various causes is toxic. Accumulation of oxidation injuries due to excessive active causes cell and tissue injuries, inducing various pathologic conditions such as aging and carcinogenesis. On the other hand, there are chemical defense mechanisms in the body that eliminate active oxygen or repair damaged molecules, defending against resultant injury. It is interesting reports that appropriate oxidation stress activate the chemical biological defense mechanisms. In this study, to elucidate these phenomena and its mechanism by low dose radiation, we studied on the below subjects. Activation of chemical biological defense mechanisms by low dose radiation: (1) The effects radiation on lipid peroxide (LPO) levels in the organs, membrane fluidity and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were examined in rats and rabbits. Rats were irradiated with low dose X-ray over their entire bodies, and rabbits inhaled vaporized radon spring water, which primarily emitted {alpha}-ray. The following results were obtained. Unlike high dose X-ray, low dose X-ray and radon inhalation both reduced LPO levels and made the state of the SH-group on membrane-bound proteins closer to that of juvenile animals, although the sensitivity to radioactivity varied depending on the age of the animals and among different organs and tissues. The SOD activity was elevated, suggesting that low dose X-ray and radon both activate the host defensive function. Those changes were particularly marked in the organs related to immune functions of the animals which received low dose X-ray, while they were particularly marked in the brain after radon inhalation. It was also found that those changes continued for longer periods after low dose X-irradiation. (2) Since SOD is an enzyme that mediates the dismutation of O{sub 2}- to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, the question as to whether the resultant H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is further detoxicated into H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} or not must

  4. Managing radiation degradation of CCDs on the Chandra X-ray Observatory II

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Bissell, Bradley A.; Blackwell, William C.; Cameron, Robert A.; Chappell, Jon II.; DePasquale, Joseph M.; Gage, Kenneth R.; Grant, Catherine E.; Harbison, Christine F.

    2005-01-01

    The CCDs on the Chandra X-ray Observatory are vulnerable to radiation damage from low-energy protons scattered off the telescope's mirrors onto the focal plane. Following unexpected damage incurred early in the mission, the Chandra Team developed, implemented, and maintains a radiation-protection program. This program - involving scheduled radiation safing during radiation-belt passes, intervention based upon real-time space-weather conditions and radiation-environment modeling, and on-board radiation monitoring with autonomous radiation safing - has successfully managed the radiation damage to the CCDs. Since implementing the program, the charge-transfer inefficiency (CTI) has increased at an average annual rate of only 2.9x10^-6 (2.3%) for the front- illuminated CCDs and 0.95x10^-6 (6.5%) for the back-illuminated CCDs. This paper describes the current status of Chandra radiation-management program.

  5. ESR, zero-field splitting, and magnetic exchange of exchange-coupled copper(II)-copper(II) pairs in copper(II) tetraphenylporphyrin N-oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fuh-An; Guo, Chih-Wei; Chen, Yao-Jung; Chen, Jyh-Horung; Wang, Shin-Shin; Tung, Jo-Yu; Hwang, Lian-Pin; Elango, Shanmugam

    2007-01-22

    The crystal structures of the dimer form of copper(II) tetraphenylporphyrin N-oxide, [Cu(tpp-N-O)]2 (3-dimer), and zinc(II) tetraphenylporphyrin N-oxide, [Zn(tpp-N-O)]2 (4-dimer), were established. The geometry at the copper ion in 3-dimer is essentially square-pyramidal with one oxygen bridge [O(1A)] occupying the apical site, giving a much larger Cu-O bond distance compared to those at the basal plane. The respective Cu...Cu distance and Cu-O-Cu angle in the core of 3-dimer are 3.987(4) A and 148.1(3) degrees. The Zn(1) atom in 4-dimer has a distorted square-pyramidal [4 + 1] coordination geometry that gives a tau-value of 0.19. The respective Zn...Zn distance and Zn-O-Zn angle in the dimeric unit of 4-dimer are 4.025(3) A and 148.1(2) degrees. The 3-dimer displays axial X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectral features (Es = 0) in the powder state at 4 K, giving g parallel = 2.51 (A(parallel,s) = (9.6 +/- 0.2) x 10-3 cm(-1)) and g(perpendicular) = 2.11 and in the same powder state at 293 K giving Ds = 0.0731 cm(-1) (as derived from DeltaMs = 1 lines) or 0.0743 cm(-1) (as derived from the DeltaMs = 2 lines). In addition, 3-dimer displays a DeltaMs = 2 transition at g = 4.17 indicating the presence of spin-exchange coupling. The anisotropic exchange interaction (Ds(ex)= 0.132 cm(-1)) gives the main contribution to Ds in 3-dimer. The theoretical fit of the susceptibility and effective magnetic moment data of 3-dimer in the temperature range of 5-300 K gives 2J = 68 cm(-1), g = 2.01, p = 0.06, and a temperature-independent paramagnetism of 10(-6) cm3 mol(-1). This magnetic susceptibility data indicates that the copper(II) ions in 3-dimer are coupled in a ferromagnetic manner with the ground-spin triplet stabilized by 68 cm(-1) with regard to the singlet.

  6. Acclimation of a marine microbial consortium for efficient Mn(II) oxidation and manganese containing particle production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hao, E-mail: zhouhao@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (Ministry of Education), School of Food and Environment, Dalian University of Technology, Panjin 124221 (China); Pan, Haixia [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (Ministry of Education), School of Food and Environment, Dalian University of Technology, Panjin 124221 (China); Xu, Jianqiang [School of Life Science and Medicine, Dalian University of Technology, Panjin 124221 (China); Xu, Weiping; Liu, Lifen [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (Ministry of Education), School of Food and Environment, Dalian University of Technology, Panjin 124221 (China)

    2016-03-05

    Highlights: • An efficient Mn(II) oxidation marine sediments microbial community was obtained. • High-throughput sequencing indicated new Mn(II) oxidation associated genus. • Na{sub 3}MnPO{sub 4}CO{sub 3} and MnCO{sub 3} were synthesized by the consortium. • Consortium exhibited Mn(II) oxidation performance over a range of harsh conditions. - Abstract: Sediment contamination with metals is a widespread concern in the marine environment. Manganese oxidizing bacteria (MOB) are extensively distributed in various environments, but a marine microbial community containing MOB is rarely reported. In this study, a consortium of marine metal-contaminated sediments was acclimated using Mn(II). The shift in community structure was determined through high-throughput sequencing. In addition, the consortium resisted several harsh conditions, such as toxic metals (1 mM Cu(II) and Fe(III)), and exhibited high Mn(II) oxidation capacities even the Mn(II) concentration was up to 5 mM. Meanwhile, biogenic Mn containing particles were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption. Dye removal performance of the Mn containing particles was assayed using methylene blue, and 20.8 mg g{sup −1} adsorption capacity was obtained. Overall, this study revealed several new genera associated with Mn(II) oxidation and rare biogenic Na{sub 3}MnPO{sub 4}CO{sub 3.} Results suggested the complexity of natural microbe-mediated Mn transformation.

  7. The Effects of Radiation Shield and Laser Heating on the Soot Formation and Oxidation of Diffusion Flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun Beom; Shin, Hyun Dong

    The effects of radiation heat transfer on the soot formation and oxidation process in laminar diffusion flames have been studied experimentally using a “radiation shield” for an ethylene flame and a laser heating technique for propylene flames. The soot volume fraction of ethylene diffusion flames was measured for two different radiation boundary conditions. One is the “radiation shield” boundary condition (AL), established by placing the flame inside a highly polished aluminum cylinder, and the other is the fully absorbing radiation boundary condition (BB), obtained with a “black body cylinder enclosure”. The soot formation and oxidation processes are enhanced under the “radiation shield” boundary condition. A second set of experiments was conducted for propylene diffusion flames around the sooting conditions. A non-sooting flame can be converted to a sooting flame when a laser light heats up a flame at a height of 7mm above the burner (HAB), where soot particles are formed. On the contrary, a sooting flame can be changed to a non-sooting flame when the flame is heated with a laser light at 13mm HAB, where soot particles are oxidized. In this study, the absorbed amounts of radiation energy, the soot volume fraction, and the increased soot temperatures were measured.

  8. Relief of delayed oxidative stress by ascorbic acid can suppress radiation-induced cellular senescence in mammalian fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobashigawa, Shinko; Kashino, Genro; Mori, Hiromu; Watanabe, Masami

    2015-03-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced cellular senescence is thought to be caused by nuclear DNA damage that cannot be repaired. However, here we found that radiation induces delayed increase of intracellular oxidative stress after irradiation. We investigated whether the relief of delayed oxidative stress by ascorbic acid would suppress the radiation-induced cellular senescence in Syrian golden hamster embryo (SHE) cells. We observed that the level of oxidative stress was drastically increased soon after irradiation, then declined to the level in non-irradiated cells, and increased again with a peak on day 3 after irradiation. We found that the inductions of cellular senescence after X-irradiation were reduced along with suppression of the delayed induction of oxidative stress by treatment with ascorbic acid, but not when oxidative stress occurred immediately after irradiation. Moreover, treatment of ascorbic acid inhibited p53 accumulation at 3 days after irradiation. Our data suggested a delayed increase of intracellular oxidative stress levels plays an important role in the process of radiation-induced cellular senescence by p53 accumulation.

  9. Harnessing the Cancer Radiation Therapy by Lanthanide-Doped Zinc Oxide Based Theranostic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Behnaz; Mashinchian, Omid; Mousavi, Tayebeh; Karimi, Roya; Kharrazi, Sharmin; Amani, Amir

    2016-02-10

    In this paper, doping of europium (Eu) and gadolinium (Gd) as high-Z elements into zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) was designed to optimize restricted energy absorption from a conventional radiation therapy by X-ray. Gd/Eu-doped ZnO NPs with a size of 9 nm were synthesized by a chemical precipitation method. The cytotoxic effects of Eu/Gd-doped ZnO NPs were determined using MTT assay in L929, HeLa, and PC3 cell lines under dark conditions as well as exposure to ultraviolet, X-ray, and γ radiation. Doped NPs at 20 μg/mL concentration under an X-ray dose of 2 Gy were as efficient as 6 Gy X-ray radiation on untreated cells. It is thus suggested that the doped NPs may be used as photoinducers to increase the efficacy of X-rays within the cells, consequently, cancer cell death. The doped NPs also could reduce the received dose by normal cells around the tumor. Additionally, we evaluated the diagnostic efficacy of doped NPs as CT/MRI nanoprobes. Results showed an efficient theranostic nanoparticulate system for simultaneous CT/MR imaging and cancer treatment.

  10. Dragon's blood and its extracts attenuate radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Yuanyuan; Wang, Ran; Gao, Qian; Jia, Qiutian; Hasan, Murtaza; Awan, Muhammad Umer Farooq; Tang, Bo; Zhou, Rui; Dong, Yiming; Wang, Xiao; Li, Qiang; Ma, Hong; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

    2014-07-01

    Dragon's blood (DB) possesses great medicinal values due to the presence of several phenolic compounds. This study was designed to investigate the effects of DB and its extracts (DBEs) on oxidative stress in mice exposed to whole body (60)Co-γ irradiation (4 Gy). DB and DBEs were intragastrically administered to mice for 5 d prior to radiation. The antioxidant activities, including malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione (GSH) levels in liver and spleen were measured using kits. Furthermore, DB and DBE effects were determined by organ indices and histology of liver and spleen. Our results indicated that the DB and DBE-treated groups showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in levels of MDA in liver and spleen compared with the irradiation-only group. Moreover, the activity of SOD, CAT and the level of GSH in liver and spleen tissue were enhanced significantly (P < 0.05) in the DB and DBE groups. DB and DBE also had a significant effect on the recovery of thymus indices. The histological observations of groups having treatment with DB and DBE indicated significant reduction in the radiation-induced damage to the liver and spleen, together with improvement in the morphology of the liver and spleen. These results suggest that DB and DBE treatment prevents radiation-induced oxidative stress injury and restores antioxidant status and histopathological changes in the liver and spleen, but there is need for further study to explore the precise molecular mechanism and strategy for optimal practical application of DB and DBE.

  11. Identification of Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria from a low-pH contaminated former uranium mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akob, Denise M.; Bohu, Tsing; Beyer, Andrea; Schäffner, Franziska; Händel, Matthias; Johnson, Carol A.; Merten, Dirk; Büchel, Georg; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Küsel, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Biological Mn oxidation is responsible for producing highly reactive and abundant Mn oxide phases in the environment that can mitigate metal contamination. However, little is known about Mn oxidation in low-pH environments, where metal contamination often is a problem as the result of mining activities. We isolated two Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) at pH 5.5 (Duganella isolate AB_14 and Albidiferax isolate TB-2) and nine strains at pH 7 from a former uranium mining site. Isolate TB-2 may contribute to Mn oxidation in the acidic Mn-rich subsoil, as a closely related clone represented 16% of the total community. All isolates oxidized Mn over a small pH range, and isolates from low-pH samples only oxidized Mn below pH 6. Two strains with different pH optima differed in their Fe requirements for Mn oxidation, suggesting that Mn oxidation by the strain found at neutral pH was linked to Fe oxidation. Isolates tolerated Ni, Cu, and Cd and produced Mn oxides with similarities to todorokite and birnessite, with the latter being present in subsurface layers where metal enrichment was associated with Mn oxides. This demonstrates that MOB can be involved in the formation of biogenic Mn oxides in both moderately acidic and neutral pH environments.

  12. Final Report: Molecular mechanisms and kinetics of microbial anaerobic nitrate-dependent U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Day, Peggy A. [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Asta, Maria P. [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Kanematsu, Masakazu [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Beller, Harry [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Zhou, Peng [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Steefel, Carl [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-02-27

    In this project, we combined molecular genetic, spectroscopic, and microscopic techniques with kinetic and reactive transport studies to describe and quantify biotic and abiotic mechanisms underlying anaerobic, nitrate-dependent U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation, which influences the long-term efficacy of in situ reductive immobilization of uranium at DOE sites. In these studies, Thiobacillus denitrificans, an autotrophic bacterium that catalyzes anaerobic U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation, was used to examine coupled oxidation-reduction processes under either biotic (enzymatic) or abiotic conditions in batch and column experiments with biogenically produced UIVO2(s). Synthesis and quantitative analysis of coupled chemical and transport processes were done with the reactive transport modeling code Crunchflow. Research focused on identifying the primary redox proteins that catalyze metal oxidation, environmental factors that influence protein expression, and molecular-scale geochemical factors that control the rates of biotic and abiotic oxidation.

  13. SYK regulates macrophage MHC-II expression via activation of autophagy in response to oxidized LDL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Gonen, Ayelet; Diehl, Cody J; Kim, Jungsu; Almazan, Felicidad; Witztum, Joseph L; Miller, Yury I

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, which plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis, is mediated by major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-dependent antigen presentation. In atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages constitute an important class of antigen-presenting cells that activate adaptive immune responses to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL). It has been reported that autophagy regulates adaptive immune responses by enhancing antigen presentation to MHC class II (MHC-II). In a previous study, we have demonstrated that SYK (spleen tyrosine kinase) regulates generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of MAPK8/JNK1 in macrophages. Because ROS and MAPK8 are known to regulate autophagy, in this study we investigated the role of SYK in autophagy, MHC-II expression and adaptive immune response to OxLDL. We demonstrate that OxLDL induces autophagosome formation, MHC-II expression, and phosphorylation of SYK in macrophages. Gene knockout and pharmacological inhibitors of NOX2 and MAPK8 reduced OxLDL-induced autophagy. Using bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from wild-type and myeloid-specific SYK knockout mice, we demonstrate that SYK regulates OxLDL-induced ROS generation, MAPK8 activation, BECN1-BCL2 dissociation, autophagosome formation and presentation of OxLDL-derived antigens to CD4+ T cells. ldlr−/− syk−/− mice fed a high-fat diet produced lower levels of IgG to malondialdehyde (MDA)-LDL, malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA)-LDL, and OxLDL compared to ldlr−/− mice. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms by which SYK regulates MHC-II expression via autophagy in macrophages and may contribute to regulation of adaptive immune responses in atherosclerosis. PMID:25946330

  14. Disrupted Nitric Oxide Metabolism from Type II Diabetes and Acute Exposure to Particulate Air Pollution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley P Pettit

    Full Text Available Type II diabetes is an established cause of vascular impairment. Particulate air pollution is known to exacerbate cardiovascular and respiratory conditions, particularly in susceptible populations. This study set out to determine the impact of exposure to traffic pollution, with and without particle filtration, on vascular endothelial function in Type II diabetes. Endothelial production of nitric oxide (NO has previously been linked to vascular health. Reactive hyperemia induces a significant increase in plasma nitrite, the proximal metabolite of NO, in healthy subjects, while diabetics have a lower and more variable level of response. Twenty type II diabetics and 20 controls (ages 46-70 years were taken on a 1.5 hr roadway traffic air pollution exposure as passengers. We analyzed plasma nitrite, as a measure of vascular function, using forearm ischemia to elicit a reactive hyperemic response before and after exposure to one ride with and one without filtration of the particle components of pollution. Control subjects displayed a significant increase in plasma nitrite levels during reactive hyperemia. This response was no longer present following exposure to traffic air pollution, but did not vary with whether or not the particle phase was filtered out. Diabetics did not display an increase in nitrite levels following reactive hyperemia. This response was not altered following pollution exposure. These data suggest that components of acute traffic pollution exposure diminish vascular reactivity in non-diabetic individuals. It also confirms that type II diabetics have a preexisting diminished ability to appropriately respond to a vascular challenge, and that traffic pollution exposure does not cause a further measureable acute change in plasma nitrite levels in Type II diabetics.

  15. SYK regulates macrophage MHC-II expression via activation of autophagy in response to oxidized LDL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Gonen, Ayelet; Diehl, Cody J; Kim, Jungsu; Almazan, Felicidad; Witztum, Joseph L; Miller, Yury I

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, which plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis, is mediated by major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-dependent antigen presentation. In atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages constitute an important class of antigen-presenting cells that activate adaptive immune responses to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL). It has been reported that autophagy regulates adaptive immune responses by enhancing antigen presentation to MHC class II (MHC-II). In a previous study, we have demonstrated that SYK (spleen tyrosine kinase) regulates generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of MAPK8/JNK1 in macrophages. Because ROS and MAPK8 are known to regulate autophagy, in this study we investigated the role of SYK in autophagy, MHC-II expression and adaptive immune response to OxLDL. We demonstrate that OxLDL induces autophagosome formation, MHC-II expression, and phosphorylation of SYK in macrophages. Gene knockout and pharmacological inhibitors of NOX2 and MAPK8 reduced OxLDL-induced autophagy. Using bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from wild-type and myeloid-specific SYK knockout mice, we demonstrate that SYK regulates OxLDL-induced ROS generation, MAPK8 activation, BECN1-BCL2 dissociation, autophagosome formation and presentation of OxLDL-derived antigens to CD4(+) T cells. ldlr(-/-) syk(-/-) mice fed a high-fat diet produced lower levels of IgG to malondialdehyde (MDA)-LDL, malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA)-LDL, and OxLDL compared to ldlr(-/-) mice. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms by which SYK regulates MHC-II expression via autophagy in macrophages and may contribute to regulation of adaptive immune responses in atherosclerosis.

  16. Using ACIS on the Chandra X-ray Observatory as a particle radiation monitor II

    CERN Document Server

    Grant, C E; Bautz, M W; O'Dell, S L

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer is an instrument on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. CCDs are vulnerable to radiation damage, particularly by soft protons in the radiation belts and solar storms. The Chandra team has implemented procedures to protect ACIS during high-radiation events including autonomous protection triggered by an on-board radiation monitor. Elevated temperatures have reduced the effectiveness of the on-board monitor. The ACIS team has developed an algorithm which uses data from the CCDs themselves to detect periods of high radiation and a flight software patch to apply this algorithm is currently active on-board the instrument. In this paper, we explore the ACIS response to particle radiation through comparisons to a number of external measures of the radiation environment. We hope to better understand the efficiency of the algorithm as a function of the flux and spectrum of the particles and the time-profile of the radiation event.

  17. Formation of Fe(0-Nanoparticles via Reduction of Fe(II Compounds by Amino Acids and Their Subsequent Oxidation to Iron Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Klačanová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron nanoparticles were prepared by the reduction of central Fe(II ion in the coordination compounds with amino acid ligands. The anion of the amino acid used as a ligand acted as the reducing agent. Conditions for the reduction were very mild; the temperature did not exceed 52°C, and the optimum pH was between 9.5 and 9.7. The metal iron precipitated as a mirror on the flask or as a colloid in water. Identification of the product was carried out by measuring UV/VIS spectra of the iron nanoparticles in water. The iron nanoparticles were oxidized by oxygen yielding a mixture of iron oxides. Oxidation of Fe(0 to Fe(II took several seconds under air. The size and properties of iron oxide nanoparticles were studied by UV/VIS, TEM investigation, RTG diffractometry, Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetometry, thermogravimetry, and GC/MS.

  18. Catalytic activity of copper (II) oxide prepared via ultrasound assisted Fenton-like reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angı, Arzu; Sanlı, Deniz; Erkey, Can; Birer, Özgür

    2014-03-01

    Copper (II) oxide nanoparticles were synthesized in an ultrasound assisted Fenton-like aqueous reaction between copper (II) cations and hydrogen peroxide. The reactions were initiated with the degradation of hydrogen peroxide by ultrasound induced cavitations at 0 °C or 5 °C and subsequent generation of the OH radical. The radical was converted into hydroxide anion in Fenton-like reactions and copper hydroxides were readily converted to oxides without the need of post annealing or aging of the samples. The products were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis. Catalytic activity of the nanoparticles for the hydrogen peroxide assisted degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the dark was tested by UV-visible spectroscopy with methylene blue as the model compound. The rate of the reaction was first order, however the rate constants changed after the initial hour. Initial rate constants as high as 0.030 min(-1) were associated with the high values of surface area, i.e. 70 m(2)/g. Annealing of the products at 150 °C under vacuum resulted in the decrease of the catalytic activity, underlying the significance of the cavitation induced surface defects in the catalytic process.

  19. Experimental diagenesis of organo-mineral structures formed by microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Aude; Kappler, Andreas; Schmid, Gregor; Quaroni, Luca; Obst, Martin

    2015-02-18

    Twisted stalks are organo-mineral structures produced by some microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria at O2 concentrations as low as 3 μM. The presence of these structures in rocks having experienced a diagenetic history could indicate microbial Fe(II)-oxidizing activity as well as localized abundance of oxygen at the time of sediment deposition. Here we use spectroscopy and analytical microscopy to evaluate if--and what kind of--transformations occur in twisted stalks through experimental diagenesis. Unique mineral textures appear on stalks as temperature and pressure conditions increase. Haematite and magnetite form from ferrihydrite at 170 °C-120 MPa. Yet the twisted morphology of the stalks, and the organic matrix, mainly composed of long-chain saturated aliphatic compounds, are preserved at 250 °C-140 MPa. Our results suggest that iron minerals might play a role in maintaining the structural and chemical integrity of stalks under diagenetic conditions and provide spectroscopic signatures for the search of ancient life in the rock record.

  20. Solid state chemistry of nitrogen oxides--part II: surface consumption of NO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioppolo, S; Fedoseev, G; Minissale, M; Congiu, E; Dulieu, F; Linnartz, H

    2014-05-14

    Nitrogen oxides are considered to be important astrochemical precursors of complex species and prebiotics. However, apart from the hydrogenation of solid NO that leads to the surface formation of hydroxylamine, little is known about the full solid state reaction network involving both nitrogen and oxygen. Our study is divided into two papers, hereby called Part I and Part II. In the accompanying paper, we investigate the surface reactions NO + O/O2/O3 and NO + N with a focus on the formation of NO2 ice. Here, we complement this study by measurements of the surface destruction of solid NO2, e.g., NO2 + H/O/N. Experiments are performed in two separate ultra-high vacuum setups and therefore under different experimental conditions to better constrain the experimental results. Surface reaction products are monitored by means of Fourier Transform Reflection Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-RAIRS) and Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) techniques using mass spectrometry. The surface destruction of solid NO2 leads to the formation of a series of nitrogen oxides such as NO, N2O, N2O3, and N2O4 as well as HNO, NH2OH, and H2O. When NO2 is mixed with an interstellar more relevant apolar (i.e., CO) ice, solid CO2 and HCOOH are also formed due to interactions between different reaction routes. The astrophysical implications of the full nitrogen and oxygen reaction network derived from Parts I and II are discussed.

  1. Removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solutions by graphene oxide aerogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, N S; Zamani, S

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the application of graphene oxide aerogels (GOAs) for adsorption of lead(II) ions from aqueous solutions. The aerogels were fabricated from graphene oxide (GO) colloidal suspensions by unidirectional freeze drying method. The synthesized GO powders, as well as the aerogels, were thoroughly characterized by various techniques. The experimental data showed that the kinetic of adsorption followed a pseudo-second-order model with sharp lead(II) ions uptake within the first 90 min. Kinetic data analysis revealed that the adsorption process was controlled by film diffusion mechanism. The equilibrium data were best fitted to Langmuir model and the qmax was calculated to be as high as 158 mg/g. Thermodynamic analysis demonstrated that the adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic with increased randomness at the solid-liquid interface. Experiments showed that almost all the adsorbed ions could desorb into the solution only by decreasing the solution pH below the isoelectric point of the adsorbent. In addition to abundant oxygen containing functional groups existing on the surface of GO sheets, high porosity and surface area of the aerogel are believed to be influential factors in the adsorption process.

  2. ACR Appropriateness Criteria for external beam radiation therapy treatment planning for clinically localized prostate cancer, part II of II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas G. Zaorsky, MD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: External beam radiation is a key component of the curative management of T1 and T2 prostate cancer. By combining the most recent medical literature, these Appropriateness Criteria can aid clinicians in determining the appropriate treatment delivery and personalized approaches for individual patients.

  3. Biological Effects of Laser Radiation. Volume II. Review of Our Studies on Biological Effects of Laser Radiation-1965-1971.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-17

    Ben Fine. 8. W.T. Ham,Jr., R.C. Williams, H.A. Mueller, Du Pont Guerry,III, A.M. Clarke and W.J. Geeraets, Effects of Laser Radiation on the Mammalian...and Applications course, Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn Graduate Center, September, 1969 35. S. Fine and E. Klein, "Biological Effects of Laser

  4. Photochemical activation of ruthenium(II)-pyridylamine complexes having a pyridine-N-oxide pendant toward oxygenation of organic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Takahiko; Nakayama, Kazuya; Sakaguchi, Miyuki; Ogura, Takashi; Ohkubo, Kei; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2011-11-09

    Ruthenium(II)-acetonitrile complexes having η(3)-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (TPA) with an uncoordinated pyridine ring and diimine such as 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) and 2,2'-bipyrimidine (bpm), [Ru(II)(η(3)-TPA)(diimine)(CH(3)CN)](2+), reacted with m-chloroperbenzoic acid to afford corresponding Ru(II)-acetonitrile complexes having an uncoordinated pyridine-N-oxide arm, [Ru(II)(η(3)-TPA-O)(diimine)(CH(3)CN)](2+), with retention of the coordination environment. Photoirradiation of the acetonitrile complexes having diimine and the η(3)-TPA with the uncoordinated pyridine-N-oxide arm afforded a mixture of [Ru(II)(TPA)(diimine)](2+), intermediate-spin (S = 1) Ru(IV)-oxo complex with uncoordinated pyridine arm, and intermediate-spin Ru(IV)-oxo complex with uncoordinated pyridine-N-oxide arm. A Ru(II) complex bearing an oxygen-bound pyridine-N-oxide as a ligand and bpm as a diimine ligand was also obtained, and its crystal structure was determined by X-ray crystallography. Femtosecond laser flash photolysis of the isolated O-coordinated Ru(II)-pyridine-N-oxide complex has been investigated to reveal the photodynamics. The Ru(IV)-oxo complex with an uncoordinated pyridine moiety was alternatively prepared by reaction of the corresponding acetonitrile complex with 2,6-dichloropyridine-N-oxide (Cl(2)py-O) to identify the Ru(IV)-oxo species. The formation of Ru(IV)-oxo complexes was concluded to proceed via intermolecular oxygen atom transfer from the uncoordinated pyridine-N-oxide to a Ru(II) center on the basis of the results of the reaction with Cl(2)py-O and the concentration dependence of the consumption of the starting Ru(II) complexes having the uncoordinated pyridine-N-oxide moiety. Oxygenation reactions of organic substrates by [Ru(II)(η(3)-TPA-O)(diimine)(CH(3)CN)](2+) were examined under irradiation (at 420 ± 5 nm) and showed selective allylic oxygenation of cyclohexene to give cyclohexen-1-ol and cyclohexen-1-one and cumene oxygenation to afford cumyl alcohol

  5. The Role of Photolabile Dermal Nitric Oxide Derivates in Ultraviolet Radiation (UVR-Induced Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph V. Suschek

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Human skin is exposed to solar ultraviolet radiation comprising UVB (280–315 nm and UVA (315–400 nm on a daily basis. Within the last two decades, the molecular and cellular response to UVA/UVB and the possible effects on human health have been investigated extensively. It is generally accepted that the mutagenic and carcinogenic properties of UVB is due to the direct interaction with DNA. On the other hand, by interaction with non-DNA chromophores as endogenous photosensitizers, UVA induces formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which play a pivotal role as mediators of UVA-induced injuries in human skin. This review gives a short overview about relevant findings concerning the molecular mechanisms underlying UVA/UVB-induced cell death. Furthermore, we will highlight the potential role of cutaneous antioxidants and photolabile nitric oxide derivates (NODs in skin physiology. UVA-induced decomposition of the NODs, like nitrite, leads not only to non-enzymatic formation of nitric oxide (NO, but also to toxic reactive nitrogen species (RNS, like peroxynitrite. Whereas under antioxidative conditions the generation of protective amounts of NO is favored, under oxidative conditions, less injurious reactive nitrogen species are generated, which may enhance UVA-induced cell death.

  6. Loranthus longiflorus protect central nervous system against oxidative damages of electromagnetic radiation on rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Nagar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The interaction of mobile phone radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation (RF-EMR with the brain is a serious concern of our society. In this study, we aimed to experiment on the anti-oxidative property of a parasitic plant Loranthus longiflorus (Loranthaceae to protect central nervous system against oxidative damages of mobile phone electromagnetic field (EMF. Materials and Methods: Healthy male albino wistar rats were exposed to RF-EMR by giving 5 min calling/5 min interval for 1 hour per day for 2 months, keeping a GSM (0.9/1.8 GHz mobile phone in silent mode (no ring tone in the cage. After 15, 30, 45, 60 days exposure, three randomly picked animals from each group were tested with using behavioural model of CNS on rats. Results and Conclusion: Loranthus longiflorus bark extract could be effective in decreasing immobility (P < 0.05 and increased locomotor activity (P < 0.05. This result indicates the protective effect of Loranthus longiflorus bark against EMF induced oxidative damage of central nervous system.

  7. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the cosmic radiations using COBE FIRAS instrument data: II. Extragalactic far infrared background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I.; Lemberg, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    Using formula to describe the average spectrum of the extragalactic far infrared background (FIRB) radiation measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument in the 0.15-2.4 THz frequency interval at mean temperature T=18.5 K, the radiative and thermodynamic properties, such as the total emissivity, total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, and pressure are calculated. The value for the total intensity received in the 0.15-2.4 THz frequency interval is equal to 13.6 nW m-2 sr-1. This value is about 19.4 % of the total intensity expected from the energy released by stellar nucleosynthesis over cosmic history. The radiative and thermodynamic functions of the extragalactic far infrared background (FIRB) radiation are calculated at redshift z=1.5.

  8. Lasing action and extraordinary reduction in long radiative lifetime of type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dots using circular photonic crystal nanocavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Kung-Shu; Chang, Shu-Wei [Research Center for Applied Sciences (RCAS), Academia Sinica, 128 Academia Rd., Sec. 2 Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University (NCTU), 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Hung, Wei-Chun; Chang, Chih-Chi; Lin, Wei-Hsun; Lin, Shih-Yen [Research Center for Applied Sciences (RCAS), Academia Sinica, 128 Academia Rd., Sec. 2 Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Shih, Min-Hsiung, E-mail: mhshih@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Research Center for Applied Sciences (RCAS), Academia Sinica, 128 Academia Rd., Sec. 2 Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University (NCTU), 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Department of Photonics, National Sun Yat-sen University (NSYSU), 70 Lienhai Rd., Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Lee, Po-Tsung [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University (NCTU), 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Chang, Yia-Chung [Research Center for Applied Sciences (RCAS), Academia Sinica, 128 Academia Rd., Sec. 2 Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University (NCTU), 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University (NCKU), No. 1, University Rd., Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2015-08-31

    We demonstrated the lasing action and remarkable reduction in long radiative lifetimes of type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dots using a circular photonic-crystal nano-cavity with high Purcell factors. The associated enhancement in carrier recombination was surprisingly high and could even surpass type-I counterparts in similar conditions. These phenomena reveal that the type-II sample exhibited extremely low nonradiative recombination so that weak radiative transitions were more dominant than expected. The results indicate that type-II nanostructures may be advantageous for applications which require controllable radiative transitions but low nonradiative depletions.

  9. Lifetime of combustion-generated environmentally persistent free radicals on Zn(II)O and other transition metal oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vejerano, Eric; Lomnicki, Slawo; Dellinger, Barry

    2012-10-26

    Previous studies indicated that Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals (EPFRs) are formed in the post-flame, cool zone of combustion. They result from the chemisorption of gas-phase products of incomplete combustion (particularly hydroxyl- and chlorine-substituted aromatics) on Cu(II)O, Fe(III)(2)O(3), and Ni(II)O domains of particulate matter (fly ash or soot particles). This study reports our detailed laboratory investigation on the lifetime of EPFRs on Zn(II)O/silica surface. Similarly, as in the case of other transition metals, chemisorption of the adsorbate on the Zn(II)O surface and subsequent transfer of electron from the adsorbate to the metal forms a surface-bound EPFR and a reduced metal ion center. The EPFRs are stabilized by their interaction with the metal oxide domain surface. The half-lives of EPFRs formed on Zn(II)O domains were the longest observed among the transition metal oxides studied and ranged from 3 to 73 days. These half-lives were an order of magnitude longer than those formed on nickel and iron oxides, and were 2 orders of magnitude longer compared to the EPFRs on copper oxide which have half-lives only on the order of hours. The longest-lived radicals on Zn(II)O correspond to the persistency in ambient air particles of almost a year. The half-life of EPFRs was found to correlate with the standard reduction potential of the associated metal.

  10. Synthesis, characterization, and crystal structure of mercury(II) complex containing new phosphine oxide salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiee, Sepideh; Kooti, Nadieh; Gable, Robert W.

    2017-02-01

    The reaction of new phosphonium-phosphine oxide salt [P(O)Ph2(CH2)2PPh2CH2C(O)C6H4NO2]Br (1) with mercury(II) iodide in a methanolic solution yielded [P(O)Ph2(CH2)2PPh2CH2C(O)C6H4NO2]2[Hg2I5Br](2). These two compounds were fully characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H, 31P, and 13C NMR spectra. Crystal and molecular structure of 2 has been determined by means of X-ray diffraction. In mercury compound, the phosphine oxide salt is found as a counter ion letting the mercury(II) ion to bound halides to all four coordination sites and to give dimermercurate(II) ions as the structure-constructing species. The neighboring [P(O)Ph2(CH2)2PPh2CH2C(O)C6H4NO2]2+cations are joined together by intramolecular Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds to give a 1-D chain structure along the crystallographic b-axis. The [Hg2I5Br]2-anions act as cross-linkers between neighbouring strands extending the supramolecular structure into 2D layers in (110) planes as well as balances the charge of the complex. The significant effects of Csbnd H⋯X (Xdbnd O, Br and I) and π⋯π aromatic interactions play a major role in the crystal packing of compound 2.

  11. Toxicity of Cu (II) to the green alga Chlorella vulgaris: a perspective of photosynthesis and oxidant stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zunwei; Song, Shufang; Wen, Yuezhong; Zou, Yuqin; Liu, Huijun

    2016-09-01

    The toxic effects of Cu (II) on the freshwater green algae Chlorella vulgaris and its chloroplast were investigated by detecting the responses of photosynthesis and oxidant stress. The results showed that Cu (II) arrested the growth of C. vulgaris and presented in a concentration- and time-dependent trend and the SRichards 2 model fitted the inhibition curve best. The chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, including qP, Y (II), ETR, F v /F m , and F v /F 0, were stimulated at low concentration of Cu (II) but declined at high concentration, indicating the photosystem II (PSII) of C. vulgaris was destroyed by Cu (II). The chloroplasts were extracted, and the Hill reaction activity (HRA) of chloroplast was significantly decreased with the increasing Cu (II) concentration under both illuminating and dark condition, and faster decline speed was observed under dark condition. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were also significantly decreased at high concentration Cu (II), companied with a large number of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. All these results indicated a severe oxidative stress on algal cells occurred as well as the effect on photosynthesis, thus inhibiting the growth of algae, which providing sights to evaluate the phytotoxicity of Cu (II).

  12. Zinc(II) oxide solubility and phase behavior in aqueous sodium phosphate solutions at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemniak, S.E.; Jones, M.E.; Combs, K.E.S.

    1990-02-01

    A platinum-lined, flowing autoclave facility is used to investigate the solubility/phase behavior of zinc(II) oxide in aqueous sodium phosphate solutions at temperatures between 290 and 560 K. ZnO solubilities are observed to increase continuously with temperature and phosphate concentration. At higher phosphate concentrations, a solid phase transformation to NaZnPO{sub 4} is observed. NaZnPO{sub 4} solubilities are retrograde with temperature. The measured solubility behavior is examined via a Zn(II) ion hydrolysis/complexing model and thermodynamic functions for the hydrolysis/complexing reaction equilibria are obtained from a least-squares analysis of the data. The existence of two new zinc(II) ion complexes is reported for the first time: Zn(OH){sub 2}(HPO{sub 4}){sup 2{minus}} and Zn(OH){sub 3}(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}){sup 2{minus}}. A summary of thermochemical properties for species in the systems ZnO-H{sub 2}O and ZnO-Na{sub 2}O-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-H{sub 2}O is also provided. 21 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Antioxidant responses of damiana (Turnera diffusa Willd to exposure to artificial ultraviolet (UV radiation in an in vitro model: part II; UV-B radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluvia de Abril Alexandra Soriano-Melgar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ultraviolet type B (UV-B radiation effects on medicinal plants have been recently investigated in the context of climate change, but the modifications generated by UV-B radiation might be used to increase the content of antioxidants, including phenolic compounds. Objective: To generate information on the effect of exposure to artificial UV-B radiation at different high-doses in the antioxidant content of damiana plants in an in vitro model. Methods: Damiana plantlets (tissue cultures in Murashige-Skoog medium were irradiated with artificial UV-B at 3 different doses (1 0.5 ± 0.1 mW cm-2 (high for 2 h daily, (2 1 ± 0,1 mW cm-2 (severe for 2 h daily, or (3 1 ± 0.1 mW cm-2 for 4 h daily during 3 weeks. The concentration of photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls a and b, carotenoids, vitamins (C and E and total phenolic compounds, the enzymatic activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1 and total peroxidases (POX, EC 1.11.1, as well as total antioxidant capacity and lipid peroxidation levels were quantified to assess the effect of high artificial UV-B radiation in the antioxidant content of in vitro damiana plants. Results: Severe and high doses of artificial UV-B radiation modified the antioxidant content by increasing the content of vitamin C and decreased the phenolic compound content, as well as modified the oxidative damage of damiana plants in an in vitro model. Conclusion: UV-B radiation modified the antioxidant content in damiana plants in an in vitro model, depending on the intensity and duration of the exposure.

  14. Oxidative effects of extremely low frequency magnetic field and radio frequency radiation on testes tissues of diabetic and healthy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzay, D; Ozer, C; Sirav, B; Canseven, A G; Seyhan, N

    2017-01-01

    With the development of technology, people are increasingly under the exposure of electromagnetic fields. Individuals with chronic diseases such as diabetes are now long-term exposed to Radio Frequency-RF radiation and extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (MFs). The purpose of this present study is to investigate oxidative effects and antioxidant parameters of ELF MFs and RF radiation on testis tissue in diabetic and healthy rats. Wistar male rats were divided into 10 groups. Intraperitoneal single dose STZ (65 mg/kg) dissolved in citrate buffer (0.1M (pH 4.5)) was injected to diabetes groups. ELF MFs and RF radiation were used as an electromagnetic exposure for 20 min/day, 5 days/week for one month. Testis tissue oxidant malondialdehyde (MDA), and antioxidants glutathione (GSH), and total nitric oxide (NOx) levels were determined. The results of ANOVA and Mann-Whitney tests were compared; p radiation resulted in an increase in testicular tissue MDA and NOX levels (p radiation practices increased the oxidative stress in testis tissue while causing a decrease in antioxidant level which was more distinctive in diabetic rats (Tab. 1, Fig. 3, Ref. 30).

  15. Microbunch preserving in-line system for an APPLE II helical radiator at the LCLS baseline

    CERN Document Server

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2011-01-01

    In a previous work we proposed a scheme for polarization control at the LCLS baseline, which exploited the microbunching from the planar undulator. After the baseline undulator, the electron beam is transported through a drift by a FODO focusing system, and through a short helical radiator. The microbunching structure can be preserved, and intense coherent radiation is emitted in the helical undulator at fundamental harmonic. The driving idea of this proposal is that the background linearly-polarized radiation from the baseline undulator is suppressed by spatial filtering. Filtering is achieved by letting radiation and electron beam through Be slits upstream of the helical radiator, where the radiation spot size is about ten times larger than the electron beam transverse size. Several changes considered in the present paper were made to improve the previous design. Slits are now placed immediately behind the helical radiator. The advantage is that the electron beam can be spoiled by the slits, and narrower sl...

  16. Effect of biofilm coatings at metal-oxide/water interfaces I: Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning and speciation at Shewanella oneidensis/metal-oxide/water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingge; Gélabert, Alexandre; Michel, F. Marc; Choi, Yongseong; Gescher, Johannes; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Eng, Peter J.; Bargar, John R.; Farges, Francois; Spormann, Alfred M.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2016-09-01

    Microbial biofilms are often present as coatings on metal-oxide surfaces in natural and industrial environments and may induce significant changes in the partitioning behavior and speciation of aqueous metal ions, which in turn can impact their transport and fate. In this study, long-period X-ray standing wave-fluorescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy was used to measure under in situ conditions the partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between multilayer Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms and highly polished, oriented single-crystal surfaces of α-Al2O3 and α-Fe2O3 as a function of metal-ion concentration and time at pH 6.0. We show that after 3-h exposure time, Pb(II) binds preferentially to the α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) surfaces at low Pb concentration ([Pb] = 10-7 M) and then increasingly partitions into the biofilm coatings at higher concentrations (10-6 to 10-4 M). In contrast, Zn(II) partitions preferentially into the biofilm coating for both surfaces at all Zn concentrations studied (10-7 to 10-4 M). In comparison, the α-Al2O3 (0 0 0 1) surface has a low affinity for both Pb(II) and Zn(II), and the biofilm coatings are the dominant sink for both ions. These findings suggest that in the presence of S. oneidensis biofilm coatings, α-Al2O3 (0 0 0 1) is the least reactive surface for Pb(II) and Zn(II) compared to α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1). They also show that Zn(II) has a lower affinity than Pb(II) for reactive sites on α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) at [Me(II)] of 10-7 M; at 10-5 M, the bulk of the metal ions partition into the biofilm coatings. At longer exposure times (20-24 h), both Pb(II) and Zn(II) increasingly partition to the metal-oxide surfaces at [Me(II)] = 10-5 M and pH 6.0, indicating possible reaction/diffusion-controlled sorption processes. Pb LIII-edge and Zn K-edge grazing-incidence extended X-ray absorption fine structure (GI-EXAFS) measurements suggest that both Pb(II) and Zn(II) ions may be

  17. Fe hydroxyphosphate precipitation and Fe(II) oxidation kinetics upon aeration of Fe(II) and phosphate-containing synthetic and natural solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Grift, B.; Behrends, T.; Osté, L. A.; Schot, P. P.; Wassen, M. J.; Griffioen, J.

    2016-08-01

    Exfiltration of anoxic Fe-rich groundwater into surface water and the concomitant oxidative precipitation of Fe are important processes controlling the transport of phosphate (PO4) from agricultural areas to aquatic systems. Here, we explored the relationship between solution composition, reaction kinetics, and the characteristics of the produced Fe hydroxyphosphate precipitates in a series of aeration experiments with anoxic synthetic water and natural groundwater. A pH stat device was used to maintain constant pH and to record the H+ production during Fe(II) oxidation in the aeration experiments in which the initial aqueous P/Fe ratios ((P/Fe)ini), oxygen concentration and pH were varied. In general, Fe(II) oxidation proceeded slower in the presence of PO4 but the decrease of the PO4 concentration during Fe(II) oxidation due to the formation of Fe hydroxyphosphates caused additional deceleration of the reaction rate. The progress of the reaction could be described using a pseudo-second-order rate law with first-order dependencies on PO4 and Fe(II) concentrations. After PO4 depletion, the Fe(II) oxidation rates increased again and the kinetics followed a pseudo-first-order rate law. The first-order rate constants after PO4 depletion, however, were lower compared to the Fe(II) oxidation in a PO4-free solution. Hence, the initially formed Fe hydroxyphosphates also affect the kinetics of continuing Fe(II) oxidation after PO4 depletion. Presence of aqueous PO4 during oxidation of Fe(II) led to the formation of Fe hydroxyphosphates. The P/Fe ratios of the precipitates ((P/Fe)ppt) and the recorded ratio of H+ production over decrease in dissolved Fe(II) did not change detectably throughout the reaction despite a changing P/Fe ratio in the solution. When (P/Fe)ini was 0.9, precipitates with a (P/Fe)ppt ratio of about 0.6 were formed. In experiments with (P/Fe)ini ratios below 0.6, the (P/Fe)ppt decreased with decreasing (P/Fe)ini and pH value. Aeration experiments with

  18. Simultaneous removal of Cd(II) and Sb(V) by Fe–Mn binary oxide: Positive effects of Cd(II) on Sb(V) adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ruiping [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Liu, Feng [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Hu, Chengzhi, E-mail: czhu@rcees.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); He, Zan [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Fe–Mn binary oxide achieves the simultaneous removal of Cd(II) and Sb(V). • Cd(II) at above 0.25 mmol/L improves Sb(V) adsorption onto FMBO. • Cd(II) improves more significant Sb(V) adsorption than Ca{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 2+}. • Sb(V) adsorption decreases whereas Cd(II) adsorption increases with elevated pH. • The increased ζ-potential and Cd(II)–Sb(V) precipitation favors Sb(V) adsorption. - Abstract: The coexistence of cadmium ion (Cd(II)) and antimonate (Sb(V)) creates the need for their simultaneous removal. This study aims to investigate the effects of positively-charged Cd(II) on the removal of negative Sb(V) ions by Fe–Mn binary oxide (FMBO) and associated mechanisms. The maximum Sb(V) adsorption density (Q{sub max,Sb(V)}) increased from 1.02 to 1.32 and 2.01 mmol/g in the presence of Cd(II) at 0.25 and 0.50 mmol/L. Cd{sup 2+} exhibited a more significant positive effect than both calcium ion (Ca{sup 2+}) and manganese ion (Mn{sup 2+}). Cd{sup 2+} showed higher affinity towards FMBO and increased its ζ-potential more significantly compared to Ca{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 2+}. The simultaneous adsorption of Sb(V) and Cd(II) onto FMBO can be achieved over a wide initial pH (pH{sub i}) range from 2 to 9, and Q{sub Sb(V)} decreases whereas Q{sub Cd(II)} increases with elevated pH{sub i}. Their combined values, as expressed by Q{sub Sb(V)+Cd(II)}, amount to about 2 mmol/g and vary slightly in the pH{sub i} range 4–9. FTIR and XPS spectra indicate the significant synergistic effect of Cd(II) on Sb(V) adsorption onto FMBO, and that little chemical valence transformation occurs. These results may be valuable for the treatment of wastewater with coexisting heavy metals such as Cd(II) and Sb(V).

  19. Zn(II)-curcumin protects against hemorheological alterations, oxidative stress and liver injury in a rat model of acute alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chuan; Mei, Xue-Ting; Zheng, Yan-Ping; Xu, Dong-Hui

    2014-03-01

    Curcumin can chelate metal ions, forming metallocomplexes. We compared the effects of Zn(II)-curcumin with curcumin against hemorheological alterations, oxidative stress and liver injury in a rat model of acute alcoholism. Oral administration of Zn(II)-curcumin dose-dependently prevented the ethanol-induced elevation of serum malondialdehyde (MDA) content and reductions in glutathione level and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Zn(II)-curcumin also inhibited ethanol-induced liver injury. Additionally, Zn(II)-curcumin dose-dependently inhibited hemorheological abnormalities, including the ethanol-induced elevation of whole blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, blood viscosity at corrected hematocrit (45%), erythrocyte aggregation index, erythrocyte rigidity index and hematocrit. Compared to curcumin at the same dose, Zn(II)-curcumin more effectively elevated SOD activity, ameliorated liver injury and improved hemorheological variables. These results suggest that Zn(II)-curcumin protected the rats from ethanol-induced liver injury and hemorheological abnormalities via the synergistic effect of curcumin and zinc.

  20. The reduction of iron oxides by volatiles in a rotary hearth furnace process: Part II. The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, I.; Fruehan, R. J.

    2006-04-01

    The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composite pellets with hydrogen at 900 °C to 1000 °C was studied. Compared to hydrogen, the reduction by carbon was negligible at 900 °C and below. However, significant carbon oxidation of the iron oxide/graphite pellets by H2O generated from the reduction of Fe2O3 by H2 was observed. At higher temperatures, reduction by carbon complicates the overall reduction mechanism, with the iron oxide/graphite composite pellet found to be more reactive than the iron oxide/char composite pellet. From the scanning electron micrographs, partially reduced composite pellets showed a typical topochemical interface with an intermediate region between an oxygen-rich unreacted core and an iron-rich outer shell. To determine the possibility of reduction by volatiles, a layer of iron oxide powders was spread on top of a high volatile containing bituminous coal and heated inside a reactor using infra-red radiation. By separating the individual reactions involved for an iron oxide/coal mixture where a complex set of reactions occur simultaneously, it was possible to determine the sole effect of volatile reduction. It was found that the light reducing gases evolve initially and react with the iron oxide, with complex hydrocarbons evolving at the later stages. The volatiles caused about 20 to 50 pct reduction of the iron oxide.

  1. Composite plasma electrolytic oxidation to improve the thermal radiation performance and corrosion resistance on an Al substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Donghyun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Dahye [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Busan 46742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Junghoon [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ 07030 (United States); Kim, Yonghwan [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Busan 46742 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Wonsub, E-mail: wschung1@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Composite plasma electrolytic oxidation was performed using dispersed CuO particles in convectional PEO electrolyte. • Thermal radiation performance and corrosion resistance were examined by FT-IR spectroscopy and electrochemical methods, respectively. • Deposited copper oxide on the surface of the Al substrate was enhanced the corrosion resistance and the emissivity compared with the conventional PEO. - Abstract: A composite plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) was performed for enhancing the thermal radiation performance and corrosion resistance on an Al alloy by dispersing cupric oxide (CuO) particles in a conventional PEO electrolyte. Cu-based oxides (CuO and Cu{sub 2}O) formed by composite PEO increased the emissivity of the substrate to 0.892, and made the surface being dark color, similar to a black body, i.e., an ideal radiator. In addition, the corrosion resistance was analyzed using potentio-dynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests in 3.5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution. An optimum condition of 10 ampere per square decimeter (ASD) current density and 30 min processing time produced appropriate surface morphologies and coating thicknesses, as well as dense Cu- and Al-based oxides that constituted the coating layers.

  2. Comparative Analysis of Secretome Profiles of Manganese(II)-Oxidizing Ascomycete Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiner, Carolyn A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Zink, Erika M.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Chaput, Dominique L.; Haridas, Sajeet; Wu, Si; LaButti, Kurt; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Henrissat, Bernard; Santelli, Cara M.; Hansel, Colleen M.; Pöggeler, Stefanie

    2016-07-19

    Fungal secretomes contain a wide range of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes, including cellulases, hemicellulases, pectinases, and lignin-degrading accessory enzymes, that synergistically drive litter decomposition in the environment. While secretome studies of model organisms such as Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Aspergillus species have greatly expanded our knowledge of these enzymes, few have extended secretome characterization to environmental isolates or conducted side-by-side comparisons of diverse species. Thus, the mechanisms of carbon degradation by many ubiquitous soil fungi remain poorly understood. Here we use a combination of LC-MS/MS, genomic, and bioinformatic analyses to characterize and compare the protein composition of the secretomes of four recently isolated, cosmopolitan, Mn(II)-oxidizing Ascomycetes (Alternaria alternata SRC1lrK2f, Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a, Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a, and Paraconiothyrium sporulosum AP3s5-JAC2a). We demonstrate that the organisms produce a rich yet functionally similar suite of extracellular enzymes, with species-specific differences in secretome composition arising from unique amino acid sequences rather than overall protein function. Furthermore, we identify not only a wide range of carbohydrate-active enzymes that can directly oxidize recalcitrant carbon, but also an impressive suite of redox-active accessory enzymes that suggests a role for Fenton-based hydroxyl radical formation in indirect, non-specific lignocellulose attack. Our findings highlight the diverse oxidative capacity of these environmental isolates and enhance our understanding of the role of filamentous Ascomycetes in carbon turnover in the environment.

  3. Comparative Analysis of Secretome Profiles of Manganese(II-Oxidizing Ascomycete Fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn A Zeiner

    Full Text Available Fungal secretomes contain a wide range of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes, including cellulases, hemicellulases, pectinases, and lignin-degrading accessory enzymes, that synergistically drive litter decomposition in the environment. While secretome studies of model organisms such as Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Aspergillus species have greatly expanded our knowledge of these enzymes, few have extended secretome characterization to environmental isolates or conducted side-by-side comparisons of diverse species. Thus, the mechanisms of carbon degradation by many ubiquitous soil fungi remain poorly understood. Here we use a combination of LC-MS/MS, genomic, and bioinformatic analyses to characterize and compare the protein composition of the secretomes of four recently isolated, cosmopolitan, Mn(II-oxidizing Ascomycetes (Alternaria alternata SRC1lrK2f, Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a, Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a, and Paraconiothyrium sporulosum AP3s5-JAC2a. We demonstrate that the organisms produce a rich yet functionally similar suite of extracellular enzymes, with species-specific differences in secretome composition arising from unique amino acid sequences rather than overall protein function. Furthermore, we identify not only a wide range of carbohydrate-active enzymes that can directly oxidize recalcitrant carbon, but also an impressive suite of redox-active accessory enzymes that suggests a role for Fenton-based hydroxyl radical formation in indirect, non-specific lignocellulose attack. Our findings highlight the diverse oxidative capacity of these environmental isolates and enhance our understanding of the role of filamentous Ascomycetes in carbon turnover in the environment.

  4. Radiation damage and tritium release from Li-Zr-Si oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, H.; Bosch, P. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Dept. de Quimica (Mexico); Lopez, B.; Jimenez-Becerril, J.; Bulbulian, S. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Dept. de Quimica (Mexico)

    2002-04-01

    Li-Zr-Si mixed oxides were irradiated in a mixed radiation field in order to produce tritium through the Li{sup 6}(n, {alpha})H{sup 3} reaction. The LiZrSiO{sub 4} samples, prepared with different Li:Zr molar ratios (1, 3, 5 and 6), presented high tritium diffusion compared with other lithium ceramics like Li{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. Furthermore, their composition and structure were not modified after irradiation. It was also found that Li{sub 2}ZrSi{sub 6}O{sub 15} was damaged by irradiation, and that tritium release was moderate in this compound. (authors)

  5. Alterations of CNS structure & function by charged particle radiation & resultant oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Gregory; Chang, Polly; Favre, Cecile; Fike, John; Komarova, Natalia; Limoli, Charles; Mao, Xiao-Wen; Obenaus, Andre; Raber, Jacob; Spigelman, Igor; Soltesz, Ivan; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Stampanoni, Marco; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Wodarz, Dominik

    were complex and suggested continuous remodeling of the brain for up to 6 months. Thus we demonstrated a suite of CNS structural and functional changes after proton and iron ion exposure in the low dose regime. Based on these findings we will now test whether oxidative stress mediates the reactions of CNS to radiation exposure and what role radiation quality and dose rate play in the responses. We will use cultured neural precursor cells (mouse human) to detect changes in oxidative status and differentiation as functions of charged particle charge and velocity. These results will inform the selection of particles for many in vivo measurements that will compare wild type mice to a transgenic strain that over-expresses a human catalase gene (which inactivates hydrogen peroxide) in the mitochondrial compartment. This will explicitly test the role of reactive oxygen species in mediating the mechanisms underlying the CNS endpoints that we will measure. We will extend the electrophysiological measurements on individual nerves in hippocampal slices to characterize both inhibitory and excitatory synapses. Further, multi-electrode arrays will be used to follow correlated electrical activity in different hippocampal regions in order to understand network-level function as well as synaptic efficacy and plasticity. Controlled oxidative stress on irradiated samples will explore whether response mechanisms are shared. To link alterations in neurogenesis to performance we will explore behavioral changes mediated by the hippocampus simultaneously with measures of expression of the Arc gene in newly-born neurons. This will test whether decrements in performance correlate with loss of new cells and whether behavior properly stimulates functional integration of the new cells; the behavioral paradigm will be contextual fear conditioning. We will develop mathematical frameworks for CNS responses to radiation in order to inform risk estimates. Finally, we will couple a high

  6. Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Routes in Water Oxidation Catalysis Starting from Cu(II) Complexes with Tetraaza Macrocyclic Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevedello, Andrea; Bazzan, Irene; Dalle Carbonare, Nicola; Giuliani, Angela; Bhardwaj, Sunil; Africh, Cristina; Cepek, Cinzia; Argazzi, Roberto; Bonchio, Marcella; Caramori, Stefano; Robert, Marc; Sartorel, Andrea

    2016-04-20

    Since the first report in 2012, molecular copper complexes have been proposed as efficient electrocatalysts for water oxidation reactions, carried out in alkaline/neutral aqueous media. However, in some cases the copper species have been recognized as precursors of an active copper oxide layer, electrodeposited onto the working electrode. Therefore, the question whether copper catalysis is molecular or not is particularly relevant in the field of water oxidation. In this study, we investigate the electrochemical activity of copper(II) complexes with two tetraaza macrocyclic ligands, distinguishing heterogeneous or homogeneous processes depending on the reaction media. In an alkaline aqueous solution, and upon application of an anodic bias to working electrodes, an active copper oxide layer is observed to electrodeposit at the electrode surface. Conversely, water oxidation in neutral aqueous buffers is not associated to formation of the copper oxide layer, and could be exploited to evaluate and optimize a molecular, homogeneous catalysis.

  7. Physiology, Fe(II) oxidation, and Fe mineral formation by a marine planktonic cyanobacterium grown under ferruginous conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanner, Elizabeth; Wu, Wenfang; Hao, Likai; Wuestner, Marina; Obst, Martin; Moran, Dawn; McIlvin, Matthew; Saito, Mak; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Evidence for Fe(II) oxidation and deposition of Fe(III)-bearing minerals from anoxic or redox-stratified Precambrian oceans has received support from decades of sedimentological and geochemical investigation of Banded Iron Formations (BIF). While the exact mechanisms of Fe(II) oxidation remains equivocal, reaction with O2 in the marine water column, produced by cyanobacteria or early oxygenic phototrophs, was likely. In order to understand the role of cyanobacteria in the deposition of Fe(III) minerals to BIF, we must first know how planktonic marine cyanobacteria respond to ferruginous (anoxic and Fe(II)-rich) waters in terms of growth, Fe uptake and homeostasis, and Fe mineral formation. We therefore grew the common marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7002 in closed bottles that began anoxic, and contained Fe(II) concentrations that span the range of possible concentrations in Precambrian seawater. These results, along with cell suspension experiments, indicate that Fe(II) is likely oxidized by this strain via chemical oxidation with oxygen produced during photosynthesis, and not via any direct enzymatic or photosynthetic pathway. Imaging of the cell-mineral aggregates with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) are consistent with extracellular precipitation of Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxide minerals, but that >10% of Fe(III) sorbs to cell surfaces rather than precipitating. Proteomic experiments support the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Fe(II) toxicity to Synechococcus PCC 7002. The proteome expressed under low Fe conditions included multiple siderophore biosynthesis and siderophore and Fe transporter proteins, but most siderophores are not expressed during growth with Fe(II). These results provide a mechanistic and quantitative framework for evaluating the geochemical consequences of perhaps life’s greatest metabolic innovation, i.e. the evolution and activity of oxygenic photosynthesis, in ferruginous

  8. Rock Burst Intensity Classification Based on the Radiated Energy with Damage Intensity at Jinping II Hydropower Station, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing-Rui; Feng, Xia-Ting; Li, Qing-Peng; Luo, Ru-Zhou; Li, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    Based on the radiated energy of 133 rock bursts monitored by a microseismic technique at the Jinping II hydropower station, in Sichuan province, China, we analyzed the advantages and disadvantages of qualitative classification methods for the rock burst intensity. Then, we investigated the characteristics, magnitude, and laws of the radiated energy, as well as the relationship between the rock burst radiated energy and intensity. Then, we selected the energy as an evaluation index for the rock burst intensity classification, and proposed a new rock burst intensity quantitative classification method, which utilized the hierarchical clustering analysis technique with the complete-linkage method. Next, we created a new set of criteria for the quantitative classification of the rock burst intensity based on radiated energy and surrounding rock damage severity. The new criteria classified the rock burst intensity into five levels: extremely intense, intense, moderate, weak, and none, and the common logarithms of the radiated energy of each level were >7 lg( E/J), >4 lg( E/J) and 2 lg( E/J) and 1 lg( E/J) and <2 lg( E/J), and <1 lg( E/J), respectively. Finally, we investigated the factors influencing the classification, and verified its feasibility and applicability via several practical rock burst examples.

  9. Microbunch preserving in-line system for an APPLE II helical radiator at the LCLS baseline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL Project Team, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    In a previous work we proposed a scheme for polarization control at the LCLS baseline, which exploited the microbunching from the planar undulator. After the baseline undulator, the electron beam is transported through a drift by a FODO focusing system, and through a short helical radiator. The microbunching structure can be preserved, and intense coherent radiation is emitted in the helical undulator at fundamental harmonic. The driving idea of this proposal is that the background linearly-polarized radiation from the baseline undulator is suppressed by spatial filtering. Filtering is achieved by letting radiation and electron beam through Be slits upstream of the helical radiator, where the radiation spot size is about ten times larger than the electron beam transverse size. Several changes considered in the present paper were made to improve the previous design. Slits are now placed immediately behind the helical radiator. The advantage is that the electron beam can be spoiled by the slits, and narrower slits width can be used for spatial filtering. Due to this fundamental reason, the present setup is shorter than the previous one. The helical radiator is now placed immediately behind the SHAB undulator. It is thus sufficient to use the existing FODO focusing system of the SHAB undulator for transporting themodulated electron beam. This paper presents complete GENESIS code calculations for the new design, starting from the baseline undulator entrance up to the helical radiator exit including the modulated electron beam transport by the SHAB FODO focusing system. (orig.)

  10. Synthesis and radiation response of BCON: a graphene oxide and hexagonal boron nitride hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhimanapati, Ganesh R.; Wetherington, Maxwell; Mahabir, Shawn; Robinson, Joshua A.

    2016-06-01

    Since graphene, there has been a focus on several two-dimensional material systems (e.g. boron nitride, borocarbon nitride (BCN), transition-metal dichalcogenides) that provide an even wider array of unique chemistries and properties to explore future applications. Specifically, tailoring graphene/boron nitride heterostructures—which can theoretically retain the character of a single-atom thick sheet, withstand large physical strains, are easily functionalized, and have entirely different optical and mechanical properties compared to graphene—can provide the foundation for entirely new research avenues. In recent years, it has been shown that because of the similar crystal structure, carbon, boron, and nitrogen can co-exist as atomic sheets in a layered structure. We have developed a facile method of integrating boron nitride (hBN) and graphene oxide (GO) via chemical exfoliation which we refer to as BCON. The study of the stability of this material at different pH conditions indicates a stable and a uniform solution is achievable at pH 4-8. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy helped to identify the new bonds which indicated the formation of BCON linkage. Further, an in situ XPS technique was used to understand the chemical changes while exposing it to ionization radiation specially focusing on the C/O ratio. It was observed that even with a very low energy source, this material is highly sensitive to ionizing radiation, such as neutron, alpha and beta particles.

  11. Enhanced electrochemical oxidation of phenol by introducing ferric ions and UV radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Xuhui; WEI Lin; HONG Song; ZHU Hua; LIN An; GAN Fuxing

    2008-01-01

    The mineralization of phenol in aerated electrochemical oxidation has been investigated. The results show that a cathodic Fenton process can occur when the Ti-0.3Mo-0.8Ni alloy material is used as cathode in solution containing ferric or ferrous ions; moreover,the reinforcement of cathodic Fenton process on the total organic carbon (TOC) removal rate of phenol is quite distinct. Among the metallic ions investigated, the ferric ion is the best catalyst for the electrochemical mineralization of phenol at initial pH 2.0, and the optimal concentration range is from 50 to 200 mg/L. The favorable pH range and supporting electrolyte (Na2SO4) concentration for mineralization of phenol in solution containing ferrous ions are 1.8-2.3 and below 0.10 mol/L, respectively. UV radiation can improve the TOC removal rate of phenol, but the enhanced effect varies in different solutions. In the solution containing ferric ions, an equal sum or synergetic effect can be observed. The optimal effect of electrolysis system under UV radiation is achieved in the solution containing 50 mg/L Fe3+ with a final removal percentage of 81.3%.

  12. [Nitrate removal by a strain of nitrate-dependent Fe (II) -oxidizing bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Yu; Yang, Kai; Zhang, Qian; Ji, Bin; Chen, Dan; Sun, Yu-Chong; Tian, Jun

    2014-04-01

    A nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterial strain, named W5, was isolated from the sediment of the East Lake in Wuhan. Strain W5 was studied for its characteristics of denitrification and nitrogen removal. According to its physiological and biochemical characteristics and the analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence, strain W5 was identified as Microbacterium sp. The optimal denitrification performance can be obtained under conditions of NO3(-) -N 40 mg x L(-1), Fe2+ 500 mg x L(-1) and pH 6.8-7.0. After one week of cultivation under optimal conditions, nitrate removal percentage reached 87.0%. During the process of the culture, the nitrite nitrogen concentration was no more than 0.31 mg x L(-1) and there was no ammonia nitrogen production. It was indicated that the nitrate was mostly converted into N2. The consumption rate of Fe2+ was 95.2%.

  13. Engineering surface atomic structure of single-crystal cobalt (II) oxide nanorods for superior electrocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Tao; Yan, Dong-Yang; Jiao, Yan; Wang, Hui; Zheng, Yao; Zheng, Xueli; Mao, Jing; Du, Xi-Wen; Hu, Zhenpeng; Jaroniec, Mietek; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2016-09-21

    Engineering the surface structure at the atomic level can be used to precisely and effectively manipulate the reactivity and durability of catalysts. Here we report tuning of the atomic structure of one-dimensional single-crystal cobalt (II) oxide (CoO) nanorods by creating oxygen vacancies on pyramidal nanofacets. These CoO nanorods exhibit superior catalytic activity and durability towards oxygen reduction/evolution reactions. The combined experimental studies, microscopic and spectroscopic characterization, and density functional theory calculations reveal that the origins of the electrochemical activity of single-crystal CoO nanorods are in the oxygen vacancies that can be readily created on the oxygen-terminated {111} nanofacets, which favourably affect the electronic structure of CoO, assuring a rapid charge transfer and optimal adsorption energies for intermediates of oxygen reduction/evolution reactions. These results show that the surface atomic structure engineering is important for the fabrication of efficient and durable electrocatalysts.

  14. Engineering surface atomic structure of single-crystal cobalt (II) oxide nanorods for superior electrocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Tao; Yan, Dong-Yang; Jiao, Yan; Wang, Hui; Zheng, Yao; Zheng, Xueli; Mao, Jing; Du, Xi-Wen; Hu, Zhenpeng; Jaroniec, Mietek; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Engineering the surface structure at the atomic level can be used to precisely and effectively manipulate the reactivity and durability of catalysts. Here we report tuning of the atomic structure of one-dimensional single-crystal cobalt (II) oxide (CoO) nanorods by creating oxygen vacancies on pyramidal nanofacets. These CoO nanorods exhibit superior catalytic activity and durability towards oxygen reduction/evolution reactions. The combined experimental studies, microscopic and spectroscopic characterization, and density functional theory calculations reveal that the origins of the electrochemical activity of single-crystal CoO nanorods are in the oxygen vacancies that can be readily created on the oxygen-terminated {111} nanofacets, which favourably affect the electronic structure of CoO, assuring a rapid charge transfer and optimal adsorption energies for intermediates of oxygen reduction/evolution reactions. These results show that the surface atomic structure engineering is important for the fabrication of efficient and durable electrocatalysts. PMID:27650485

  15. Evaluation of heterogeneous photo-Fenton oxidation of Orange II using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Y H; Zhang, H; Li, Y L; Xiang, L J; Royer, S; Valange, S; Barrault, J

    2010-01-01

    A mesoporous SBA-15 doped iron oxide (Fe2O3/SBA-15) was synthesized by co-condensation, characterized and used as heterogeneous catalysts for the photo-Fenton decolorization of azo dye Orange II under UV irradiation. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to investigate operating condition effects, such as hydrogen peroxide concentration, initial pH and catalyst loadings, on the decolorization rate. UV irradiation is found to enhance the activity of the catalyst in the process. RSM analysis evidenced the influence of the initial pH value and H2O2 concentration on the dye degradation rate. The coupled UV/Fe2O3/SBA-15/H2O2 process at room temperature is revealed as a promising friendly process for wastewater treatment. Indeed, the use of a heterogeneous catalyst allows an easy active phase recycling without multi-step recovering while the heterogeneous catalyst used here exhibits high catalytic activity for the reaction considered.

  16. Facile synthesis of Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes of 2-hydroxybenzophenone: An efficient catalyst for oxidation of olefins and DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashanizadegan, Maryam; Alavijeh, Roya Karimi; Anafcheh, Maryam

    2017-10-01

    Two diketone complexes of Cu(II) and Co(II) were easily synthesized in reaction of M(CH3COO)2 with 2-Hydroxybenzophenone (bpoH). The complexes of M(bpo)2 were characterized by UV-vis, IR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The complexes are active catalysts for the oxidation of styrene using TBHP as an oxidant. Under the optimized reaction conditions, 100% conversion of styrene with 63.5% selectivity for Benzaldehyde and 36.5% for Styrene oxide were obtained by Cu(bpo)2. Also, the effect of imidazole was investigated. Results confirmed that the addition of imidazole accelerates the oxidation of styrene. Our DFT results confirmed the necessity of diffuse functions in the basis set and including an accurate treatment of the dispersion energy for obtaining the most stable structure in these systems. Therefore, the geometry optimization and the vibrational frequencies were calculated at the M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level. The scaled theoretical frequencies and the structural parameters are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. The natural charge analysis indicated that an electron is transferred from Cu(bpo)2 back to the TBHP to break the Osbnd O bond and formation of tert-butoxyl radicals. Coordination of imidazole in the axial position of the Cu(bpo)2 significantly assists in moving back of electron and increases the activity of the complex in oxidation.

  17. Role of nitric oxide in the radiation-induced bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, Vasily A

    2015-12-01

    Cells that are not irradiated but are affected by "stress signal factors" released from irradiated cells are called bystander cells. These cells, as well as directly irradiated ones, express DNA damage-related proteins and display excess DNA damage, chromosome aberrations, mutations, and malignant transformation. This phenomenon has been studied widely in the past 20 years, since its first description by Nagasawa and Little in 1992, and is known as the radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE). Several factors have been identified as playing a role in the bystander response. This review will focus on one of them, nitric oxide (NO), and its role in the stimulation and propagation of RIBE. The hydrophobic properties of NO, which permit its diffusion through the cytoplasm and plasma membranes, allow this signaling molecule to easily spread from irradiated cells to bystander cells without the involvement of gap junction intercellular communication. NO produced in irradiated tissues mediates cellular regulation through posttranslational modification of a number of regulatory proteins. The best studied of these modifications are S-nitrosylation (reversible oxidation of cysteine) and tyrosine nitration. These modifications can up- or down-regulate the functions of many proteins modulating different NO-dependent effects. These NO-dependent effects include the stimulation of genomic instability (GI) and the accumulation of DNA errors in bystander cells without direct DNA damage. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. NIKOS II--a system for noninvasive coronary angiography with synchrotron radiation (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dix, W.-R.; Graeff, W.; Heuer, J.; Engelke, K.; Jabs, H.; Kupper, W.; Stellmaschek, K. H.

    1989-07-01

    During the last years attempts have been underway at several synchrotron radiation laboratories1-4 to employ the abrupt change of absorption at the iodine K edge (33.17 keV) to the imaging of coronary arteries. The subtraction of two images taken with photon energies just above and below the edge strongly surpresses background contrast like bone and soft tissue and allows for amplification of iodinated structure contrast. At HASYLAB, for these studies, a beamline at a bending magnet was only available until 1987. At this beamline the system NIKOS I was tested to obtain information on its essential components like monochromator and detector by in-vivo investigations of dogs. The basic feature which differs from the approaches in other laboratoriesis simultaneous registration of two stationary beams in a two-line detector without any beam switching. Based on the experience with this system during the last year all its components have been improved and changed to dimensions capable of taking a 12-cm-wide image of the human heart. At present the new system NIKOS II is under testing at the new wiggler beamline HARWI. The new monochromator comprises two pairs of a thin Si Laue case crystal and a Ge Bragg crystal, each, with inherent focussing of the beam to a horizontal line focus of about 0.5 mm height and 12 cm width. The advantage of the Laue crystals which are optimized in thickness (30 μm) for maximum reflectivity, is the low heat absorption and the full use of the white beam in the production of two monochromatic beams. The crystals are cooled in a stream of helium. Compared to the NIKOS I version5 the detector was changed in the following points: The two detection lines are enlarged to 125 mm width and the phosphor at the entrance is exchangeable to be either made of powderlike Gd2O2S:Tb or of single crystals like CdWO4 or CaF2:Eu separated by thin walls for optimum spatial resolution. The numerical aperture of the glass fiber optics guiding the light via image

  19. Radiative forcing of the direct aerosol effect from AeroCom Phase II simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhre, G.; Samset, B. H.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Feichter, J.; Ghan, S. J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Lund, M. T.; Luo, G.; Ma, X.; van Noije, T.; Penner, J. E.; Rasch, P. J.; Ruiz, A.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Wang, P.; Wang, Z.; Xu, L.; Yu, H.; Yu, F.; Yoon, J.-H.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, C.

    2013-02-01

    We report on the AeroCom Phase II direct aerosol effect (DAE) experiment where 16 detailed global aerosol models have been used to simulate the changes in the aerosol distribution over the industrial era. All 16 models have estimated the radiative forcing (RF) of the anthropogenic DAE, and have taken into account anthropogenic sulphate, black carbon (BC) and organic aerosols (OA) from fossil fuel, biofuel, and biomass burning emissions. In addition several models have simulated the DAE of anthropogenic nitrate and anthropogenic influenced secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The model simulated all-sky RF of the DAE from total anthropogenic aerosols has a range from -0.58 to -0.02 Wm-2, with a mean of -0.27 Wm-2 for the 16 models. Several models did not include nitrate or SOA and modifying the estimate by accounting for this with information from the other AeroCom models reduces the range and slightly strengthens the mean. Modifying the model estimates for missing aerosol components and for the time period 1750 to 2010 results in a mean RF for the DAE of -0.35 Wm-2. Compared to AeroCom Phase I (Schulz et al., 2006) we find very similar spreads in both total DAE and aerosol component RF. However, the RF of the total DAE is stronger negative and RF from BC from fossil fuel and biofuel emissions are stronger positive in the present study than in the previous AeroCom study. We find a tendency for models having a strong (positive) BC RF to also have strong (negative) sulphate or OA RF. This relationship leads to smaller uncertainty in the total RF of the DAE compared to the RF of the sum of the individual aerosol components. The spread in results for the individual aerosol components is substantial, and can be divided into diversities in burden, mass extinction coefficient (MEC), and normalized RF with respect to AOD. We find that these three factors give similar contributions to the spread in results.

  20. Highly efficient simultaneous ultrasonic-assisted adsorption of Pb(II), Cd(II), Ni(II) and Cu (II) ions from aqueous solutions by graphene oxide modified with 2,2'-dipyridylamine: Central composite design optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare-Dorabei, Rouholah; Ferdowsi, Somayeh Moazen; Barzin, Ahmad; Tadjarodi, Azadeh

    2016-09-01

    In present work, a graphene oxide chemically modified with 2,2'-dipyridylamine (GO-DPA), was synthesized by simple, fast and low-cost process for the simultaneous adsorption of four toxic heavy metals, Pb(II), Cd(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II), from aqueous solutions. The synthesized adsorbent was characterized by FT-IR, XRD, XPS, SEM and AFM measurements. The effects of variables such as pH solution, initial ion concentrations, adsorbent dosage and sonicating time were investigated on adsorption efficiency by rotatable central composite design. The optimum conditions, specified as 8mg of adsorbent, 20mgL(-1) of each ion at pH 5 and short time of 4min led to the achievement of a high adsorption capacities. Ultrasonic power had important role in shortening the adsorption time of ions by enhancing the dispersion of adsorbent in solution. The adsorption kinetic studies and equilibrium isotherms for evaluating the mechanism of adsorption process showed a good fit to the pseudo-second order and Langmuir model, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacities (Qm) of this adsorbent were 369.749, 257.201, 180.893 and 358.824mgg(-1) for lead, cadmium, nickel and copper ions, respectively. The removal performance of adsorbent on the real wastewater samples also showed the feasibility of adsorbent for applying in industrial purposes.

  1. AGN Obscuration Through Dusty Infrared Dominated Flows. II. Multidimensional, Radiation-Hydrodynamics Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorodnitsyn, Anton; Kallman, Tim; Bisno\\vatyiI-Kogan, Gennadyi

    2011-01-01

    We explore a detailed model in which the active galactic nucleus (AGN) obscuration results from the extinction of AGN radiation in a global ow driven by the pressure of infrared radiation on dust grains. We assume that external illumination by UV and soft X-rays of the dusty gas located at approximately 1pc away from the supermassive black hole is followed by a conversion of such radiation into IR. Using 2.5D, time-dependent radiation hydrodynamics simulations in a ux-limited di usion approximation we nd that the external illumination can support a geometrically thick obscuration via out ows driven by infrared radiation pressure in AGN with luminosities greater than 0:05 L(sub edd) and Compton optical depth, Tau(sub T) approx > & 1.

  2. Analytical Models of Exoplanetary Atmospheres. II. Radiative Transfer via the Two-Stream Approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Heng, Kevin; Lee, Jaemin

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analytical study of radiative transfer using the method of moments and include the effects of non-isotropic scattering in the coherent limit. Within this unified formalism, we derive the governing equations and solutions describing two-stream radiative transfer (which approximates the passage of radiation as a pair of outgoing and incoming fluxes), flux-limited diffusion (which describes radiative transfer in the deep interior) and solutions for the temperature-pressure profiles. Generally, the problem is mathematically under-determined unless a set of closures (Eddington coefficients) is specified. We demonstrate that the hemispheric (or hemi-isotropic) closure naturally derives from the radiative transfer equation if energy conservation is obeyed, while the Eddington closure produces spurious enhancements of both reflected light and thermal emission. We further demonstrate that traditional non-isothermal treatments of each atmospheric layer lead to unphysical contributions to the ...

  3. Protostellar Outflows and Radiative Feedback from Massive Stars. II. Feedback, Star Formation Efficiency, and Outflow Broadening

    CERN Document Server

    Kuiper, Rolf; Yorke, Harold W

    2016-01-01

    We perform two-dimensional axially symmetric radiation-hydrodynamic simulations to assess the impact of outflows and radiative force feedback from massive protostars by varying when the protostellar outflow starts, the ratio of ejection to accretion rates, and the strength of the wide angle disk wind component. The star formation efficiency, i.e. the ratio of final stellar mass to initial core mass, is dominated by radiative forces and the ratio of outflow to accretion rates. Increasing this ratio has three effects: First, the protostar grows slower with a lower luminosity at any given time, lowering radiative feedback. Second, bipolar cavities cleared by the outflow are larger, further diminishing radiative feedback on disk and core scales. Third, the higher momentum outflow sweeps up more material from the collapsing envelope, decreasing the protostar's potential mass reservoir via entrainment. The star formation efficiency varies with the ratio of ejection to accretion rates from 50% in the case of very we...

  4. Modeled black carbon radiative forcing and atmospheric lifetime in AeroCom Phase II constrained by aircraft observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, A.; Kondo, Y.; Li, S.-M.; Moteki, N.; Koike, M.; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, J. P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Penner, J. E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2014-08-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) absorbs solar radiation, and exacerbates global warming through exerting positive radiative forcing (RF). However, the contribution of BC to ongoing changes in global climate is under debate. Anthropogenic BC emissions, and the resulting distribution of BC concentration, are highly uncertain. In particular, long range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood. Here we discuss whether recent assessments may have overestimated present day BC radiative forcing in remote regions. We compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns to simulations by 13 aerosol models participating in the AeroCom Phase II intercomparision. An atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in remote ocean regions, in line with other recent studies. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in AeroCom Phase II median direct BC forcing, from fossil fuel and biofuel burning, over the industrial era. The sensitivity of modeled forcing to BC vertical profile and lifetime highlights an urgent need for further flight campaigns, close to sources and in remote regions, to provide improved quantification of BC effects for use in climate policy.

  5. Modelled black carbon radiative forcing and atmospheric lifetime in AeroCom Phase II constrained by aircraft observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, A.; Kondo, Y.; Li, S.-M.; Moteki, N.; Koike, M.; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, J. P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Penner, J. E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2014-11-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) absorbs solar radiation, and exacerbates global warming through exerting positive radiative forcing (RF). However, the contribution of BC to ongoing changes in global climate is under debate. Anthropogenic BC emissions, and the resulting distribution of BC concentration, are highly uncertain. In particular, long-range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood. Here we discuss whether recent assessments may have overestimated present-day BC radiative forcing in remote regions. We compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns to simulations by 13 aerosol models participating in the AeroCom Phase II intercomparison. An atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in remote ocean regions, in line with other recent studies. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in AeroCom Phase II median direct BC forcing, from fossil fuel and biofuel burning, over the industrial era. The sensitivity of modelled forcing to BC vertical profile and lifetime highlights an urgent need for further flight campaigns, close to sources and in remote regions, to provide improved quantification of BC effects for use in climate policy.

  6. Modeled black carbon radiative forcing and atmospheric lifetime in AeroCom Phase II constrained by aircraft observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. H. Samset

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric black carbon (BC absorbs solar radiation, and exacerbates global warming through exerting positive radiative forcing (RF. However, the contribution of BC to ongoing changes in global climate is under debate. Anthropogenic BC emissions, and the resulting distribution of BC concentration, are highly uncertain. In particular, long range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood. Here we discuss whether recent assessments may have overestimated present day BC radiative forcing in remote regions. We compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns to simulations by 13 aerosol models participating in the AeroCom Phase II intercomparision. An atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in remote ocean regions, in line with other recent studies. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in AeroCom Phase II median direct BC forcing, from fossil fuel and biofuel burning, over the industrial era. The sensitivity of modeled forcing to BC vertical profile and lifetime highlights an urgent need for further flight campaigns, close to sources and in remote regions, to provide improved quantification of BC effects for use in climate policy.

  7. Effect of ultraviolet radiation in the photo-oxidation of High Density Polyethylene and Biodegradable Polyethylene films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Romo, A.; González Mota, R.; Bernal, J. J. Soto; Frausto Reyes, C.; Rosales Candelas, I.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most widely used plastics in the world is the High density polyethylene (HDPE), it is a stable material due to its carbon-carbon bonds, causing their slow degradation; which is why we are looking for alternative ways to accelerate the degradation process of this polymer. An alternative is the addition of oxidized groups in its molecular structure, which results in the development of polymers susceptible to biodegradation (PE-BIO). In this paper, HDPE and PE-BIO films were exposed to UV-B radiation (320-280 nm) at different exposure times, 0-60 days. The effects of UV radiation in samples of HDPE and PE-BIO were characterized using infrared spectroscopy with attenuated total reflectance (ATR). The results show that the exposed materials undergo changes in their molecular structure, due to the infrared bands formed which corresponds to the photo-oxidation of HDPE and PE films when submitted to UV-B radiation.

  8. Identification and Characterization of MtoA: a Decaheme c-Type Cytochrome of the Neutrophilic Fe(II-oxidizing Bacterium Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eLiu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterium Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1 (ES-1 grows on FeCO3 or FeS at oxic-anoxic interfaces at circumneutral pH, and the ES-1-mediated Fe(II oxidation occurs extracellularly. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying ES-1’s ability to oxidize Fe(II remain unknown. Survey of the ES-1 genome for candidate genes for microbial extracellular Fe(II oxidation revealed that it contained a three-gene cluster encoding homologues of MtrA, MtrB and CymA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1 that are involved in extracellular Fe(III reduction. Homologues of MtrA and MtrB were also involved in extracellular Fe(II oxidation by Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1. To distinguish them from those found in MR-1, the identified homologues were named MtoAB and CymAES-1. Cloned mtoA partially complemented an MR-1 mutant without MtrA with regards to ferrihydrite reduction. Characterization of purified MtoA showed that it was a decaheme c-type cytochrome and oxidized soluble Fe(II. Oxidation of Fe(II by MtoA was pH- and Fe(II-complexing ligand-dependent. Under conditions tested, MtoA oxidized Fe(II from pH 7-9 with the optimal rate at pH 9. MtoA oxidized Fe(II complexed with different ligands at different rates. The reaction rates followed the order Fe(IICl2 > Fe(II-citrate > Fe(II-NTA > Fe(II-EDTA with the second-order rate constants ranging from 6.3 × 10-3 μM-1s-1 for oxidation of Fe(IICl2 to 1.0 × 10-3 μM-1s-1 for oxidation of Fe(II-EDTA. Thermodynamic modeling shows that redox reaction rates for the different Fe(II-complexes correlated with their respective estimated reaction-free energies. Collectively, these results demonstrate that MtoA is a functional Fe(II-oxidizing protein and, by working in concert with MtoB and CymAES 1, may oxidize Fe(II at the bacterial surface and transfer released electrons across the bacterial cell envelope to the quinone pool in the inner membrane during extracellular Fe(II oxidation by ES-1.

  9. Coordination functionalization of graphene oxide with tetraazamacrocyclic complexes of nickel(II): Generation of paramagnetic centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basiuk, Vladimir A., E-mail: basiuk@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Department of Chemistry,Tufts University, 62 Talbot Avenue, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Alzate-Carvajal, Natalia [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Henao-Holguín, Laura V. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Rybak-Akimova, Elena V. [Department of Chemistry,Tufts University, 62 Talbot Avenue, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Basiuk, Elena V., E-mail: elbg1111@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry,Tufts University, 62 Talbot Avenue, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • [Ni(cyclam)]{sup 2+} and [Ni(tet b)]{sup 2+} cations coordinate to carboxylic groups of GO. • The coordination takes place under basic conditions in aqueous-based medium. • The coordination results in the conversion from low-spin to high-spin Ni(II). • Functionalized GO samples were characterized by various instrumental techniques. - Abstract: We describe a novel approach to functionalization of graphene oxide (GO) which allows for a facile generation of paramagnetic centers from two diamagnetic components. Coordination attachment of [Ni(cyclam)]{sup 2+} or [Ni(tet b)]{sup 2+} tetraazamacrocyclic cations to carboxylic groups of GO takes place under basic conditions in aqueous-based reaction medium. The procedure is very straightforward and does not require high temperatures or other harsh conditions. Changing the coordination geometry of Ni(II) from square-planar tetracoordinated to pseudooctahedral hexacoordinated brings about the conversion from low-spin to high-spin state of the metal centers. Even though the content of tetraazamacrocyclic complexes in functionalized GO samples was found to be relatively low (nickel content of ca. 1 wt%, as determined by thermogravimetric analysis, elemental analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), room temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements easily detected the appearance of paramagnetic properties in GO + [Ni(cyclam)] and GO + [Ni(tet b)] nanohybrids, with effective magnetic moments of 1.95 BM and 2.2 BM for, respectively. According to density functional theory calculations, the main spin density is localized at the macrocyclic complexes, without considerable extension to graphene sheet, which suggests insignificant ferromagnetic coupling in the nanohybrids, in agreement with the results of magnetic susceptibility measurements. The coordination attachment of Ni(II) tetraazamacrocycles to GO results in considerable changes in Fourier-transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectra

  10. Methylresorcinarene: a reaction vessel to control the coordination geometry of copper(II) in pyridine N-oxide copper(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyeh, Ngong Kodiah; Puttreddy, Rakesh

    2015-06-07

    Pyridine and 2-picolinic acid N-oxides form 2 : 2 and 2 : 1 ligand : metal (L : M) discrete L2M2 and polymeric complexes with CuCl2 and Cu(NO3)2, respectively, with copper(ii) salts. The N-oxides also form 1 : 1 host-guest complexes with methylresorcinarene. In combination, the three components form a unique 2 : 2 : 1 host-ligand-metal complex. The methylresorcinarene acts as a reaction vessel/protecting group to control the coordination of copper(ii) from cis-see-saw to trans-square planar, and from octahedral to square planar coordination geometry. These processes were studied in solution and in the solid state via(1)H NMR spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction.

  11. Antihypertensive effect of gomisin A from Schisandra chinensis on angiotensin II-induced hypertension via preservation of nitric oxide bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young Park, Ji; Wook Yun, Jung; Whan Choi, Young; Ung Bae, Jin; Won Seo, Kyo; Jin Lee, Seung; Youn Park, So; Whan Hong, Ki; Kim, Chi Dae

    2012-09-01

    Gomisin A (GA) is a small molecular weight lignan present in Schisandra chinensis, and has been demonstrated to have vasodilatory activity. In the present study, we investigated the effect of GA on blood pressure (BP) in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertensive mice. C57/BL6 mice infused subcutaneously with Ang II (1 and 2 μg kg⁻¹ per min for 2 weeks) showed an increase in BP with a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) metabolites in plasma, and a negative correlation between these two parameters was demonstrated. In the thoracic aorta from Ang II-induced hypertensive mice, a decrease in vascular NO that was accompanied by a diminution of phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), as well as by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, was demonstrated. These alterations in BP, eNOS phosphorylation and ROS production in the vasculature of Ang II-treated mice were markedly and dose-dependently reversed by simultaneous administration of GA (2 and 10 μg kg⁻¹ per min). In addition, Ang II-induced ROS production in cultured vascular cells such as endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells was markedly attenuated by GA. These results suggested that GA attenuated the increase in BP via preservation of vascular NO bioavailability not only by inhibiting ROS production but also by preventing the impairment of eNOS function in the vasculature of Ang II-induced hypertensive mice.

  12. Physiology, Fe(II oxidation, and Fe mineral formation by a marine planktonic cyanobacterium grown under ferruginous conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth D. Swanner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Evidence for Fe(II oxidation and deposition of Fe(III-bearing minerals from anoxic or redox-stratified Precambrian oceans has received support from decades of sedimentological and geochemical investigation of Banded Iron Formations (BIF. While the exact mechanisms of Fe(II oxidation remains equivocal, reaction with O2 in the marine water column, produced by cyanobacteria or early oxygenic phototrophs, was likely. In order to understand the role of cyanobacteria in the deposition of Fe(III minerals to BIF, we must first know how planktonic marine cyanobacteria respond to ferruginous (anoxic and Fe(II-rich waters in terms of growth, Fe uptake and homeostasis, and Fe mineral formation. We therefore grew the common marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7002 in closed bottles that began anoxic, and contained Fe(II concentrations that span the range of possible concentrations in Precambrian seawater. These results, along with cell suspension experiments, indicate that Fe(II is likely oxidized by this strain via chemical oxidation with oxygen produced during photosynthesis, and not via any direct enzymatic or photosynthetic pathway. Imaging of the cell-mineral aggregates with scanning electron microscopy (SEM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM are consistent with extracellular precipitation of Fe(III (oxyhydroxide minerals, but that >10% of Fe(III sorbs to cell surfaces rather than precipitating. Proteomic experiments support the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS in Fe(II toxicity to Synechococcus PCC 7002. The proteome expressed under low Fe conditions included multiple siderophore biosynthesis and siderophore and Fe transporter proteins, but most siderophores are not expressed during growth with Fe(II. These results provide a mechanistic and quantitative framework for evaluating the geochemical consequences of perhaps life’s greatest metabolic innovation, i.e. the evolution and activity of oxygenic photosynthesis, in ferruginous

  13. Increased ANG II sensitivity following recovery from acute kidney injury: role of oxidant stress in skeletal muscle resistance arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Shane A; Pechman, Kimberly R; Leonard, Ellen C; Friedrich, Jessica L; Bian, Jing-Tan; Beal, Alisa G; Basile, David P

    2010-06-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) results in prolonged impairment of peripheral (i.e., nonrenal) vascular function since skeletal muscle resistance arteries derived from rats 5 wk post-I/R injury, show enhanced responses to ANG II stimulation but not other constrictors. Because vascular superoxide increases ANG II sensitivity, we hypothesized that peripheral responsiveness following recovery from AKI was attributable to vascular oxidant stress. Gracilis arteries (GA) isolated from post-I/R rats (approximately 5 wk recovery) showed significantly greater superoxide levels relative to sham-operated controls, as detected by dihydroeithidium, which was further augmented by acute ANG II stimulation in vitro. Hydrogen peroxide measured by dichlorofluorescein was not affected by ANG II. GA derived from postischemic animals manifested significantly greater constrictor responses in vitro to ANG II than GA from sham-operated controls. The addition of the superoxide scavenging reagent Tempol (10(-5) M) normalized the response to values similar to sham-operated controls. Apocynin (10(-6) M) and endothelial denudation nearly abrogated all ANG II-stimulated constrictor activity in GA from post-AKI rats, suggesting an important role for an endothelial-derived source of peripheral oxidative stress. Apocynin treatment in vivo abrogated GA oxidant stress and attenuated ANG II-induced pressor responses post-AKI. Interestingly, gene expression studies in GA vessels indicated a paradoxical reduction in NADPH oxidase subunit and AT(1)-receptor genes and no effect on several antioxidant genes. Taken together, this study demonstrates that AKI alters peripheral vascular responses by increasing oxidant stress, likely in the endothelium, via an undefined mechanism.

  14. Electronic Structure and Oxidation State Changes in the Mn (4) Ca Cluster of Photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Messinger, J.; Bergmann, U.; Glatzel, P.; Yachandra, V.K.; /SLAC

    2012-08-17

    Oxygen-evolving complex (Mn{sub 4}Ca cluster) of Photosystem II cycles through five intermediate states (S{sub i}-states, i = 0-4) before a molecule of dioxygen is released. During the S-state transitions, electrons are extracted from the OEC, either from Mn or alternatively from a Mn ligand. The oxidation state of Mn is widely accepted as Mn{sub 4}(III{sub 2},IV{sub 2}) and Mn{sub 4}(III,IV{sub 3}) for S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} states, while it is still controversial for the S{sub 0} and S{sub 3} states. We used resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) to study the electronic structure of Mn{sub 4}Ca complex in the OEC. The RIXS data yield two-dimensional plots that provide a significant advantage by obtaining both K-edge pre-edge and L-edge-like spectra (metal spin state) simultaneously. We have collected data from PSII samples in the each of the S-states and compared them with data from various inorganic Mn complexes. The spectral changes in the Mn 1s2p{sub 3/2} RIXS spectra between the S-states were compared to those of the oxides of Mn and coordination complexes. The results indicate strong covalency for the electronic configuration in the OEC, and we conclude that the electron is transferred from a strongly delocalized orbital, compared to those in Mn oxides or coordination complexes. The magnitude for the S{sub 0} to S{sub 1}, and S{sub 1} to S{sub 2} transitions is twice as large as that during the S{sub 2} to S{sub 3} transition, indicating that the electron for this transition is extracted from a highly delocalized orbital with little change in charge density at the Mn atoms.

  15. Neurobehavioural Changes and Brain Oxidative Stress Induced by Acute Exposure to GSM900 Mobile Phone Radiations in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirwane, Abhijit; Sridhar, Vinay; Majumdar, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    The impact of mobile phone (MP) radiation on the brain is of specific interest to the scientific community and warrants investigations, as MP is held close to the head. Studies on humans and rodents revealed hazards MP radiation associated such as brain tumors, impairment in cognition, hearing etc. Melatonin (MT) is an important modulator of CNS functioning and is a neural antioxidant hormone. Zebrafish has emerged as a popular model organism for CNS studies. Herein, we evaluated the impact of GSM900MP (GSM900MP) radiation exposure daily for 1 hr for 14 days with the SAR of 1.34W/Kg on neurobehavioral and oxidative stress parameters in zebrafish. Our study revealed that, GSM900MP radiation exposure, significantly decreased time spent near social stimulus zone and increased total distance travelled, in social interaction test. In the novel tank dive test, the GSM900MP radiation exposure elicited anxiety as revealed by significantly increased time spent in bottom half; freezing bouts and duration and decreased distance travelled, average velocity, and number of entries to upper half of the tank. Exposed zebrafish spent less time in the novel arm of the Y-Maze, corroborating significant impairment in learning as compared to the control group. Exposure decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) activities whereas, increased levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) was encountered showing compromised antioxidant defense. Treatment with MT significantly reversed the above neurobehavioral and oxidative derangements induced by GSM900MP radiation exposure. This study traced GSM900MP radiation exposure induced neurobehavioral aberrations and alterations in brain oxidative status. Furthermore, MT proved to be a promising therapeutic candidate in ameliorating such outcomes in zebrafish. PMID:27123163

  16. A ruthenium(II) complex as turn-on Cu(II) luminescent sensor based on oxidative cyclization mechanism and its application in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunfei; Liu, Zonglun; Yang, Kui; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Yongqian; Li, Hongjuan; Wang, Chaoxia; Lu, Aiping; Sun, Shiguo

    2015-02-01

    Copper ions play a vital role in a variety of fundamental physiological processes not only in human beings and plants, but also for extensive insects and microorganisms. In this paper, a novel water-soluble ruthenium(II) complex as a turn-on copper(II) ions luminescent sensor based on o-(phenylazo)aniline was designed and synthesized. The azo group would undergo a specific oxidative cyclization reaction with copper(II) ions and turn into high luminescent benzotriazole, triggering significant luminescent increasements which were linear to the concentrations of copper(II) ions. The sensor distinguished by its high sensitivity (over 80-fold luminescent switch-on response), good selectivity (the changes of the emission intensity in the presence of other metal ions or amino acids were negligible) and low detection limit (4.42 nM) in water. Moreover, the copper(II) luminescent sensor exhibited good photostability under light irradiation. Furthermore, the applicability of the proposed sensor in biological samples assay was also studied and imaged copper(II) ions in living pea aphids successfully.

  17. Selective copper(II acetate and potassium iodide catalyzed oxidation of aminals to dihydroquinazoline and quinazolinone alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T. Richers

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Copper(II acetate/acetic acid/O2 and potassium iodide/tert-butylhydroperoxide systems are shown to affect the selective oxidation of ring-fused aminals to dihydroquinazolines and quinazolinones, respectively. These methods enable the facile preparation of a number of quinazoline alkaloid natural products and their analogues.

  18. An unexpected copper(II)-catalyzed three-component reaction of quinazoline 3-oxide, alkylidenecyclopropane, and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yuanyuan; Zheng, Danqing; Wu, Jie

    2014-08-21

    An unexpected copper(II)-catalyzed three-component reaction of quinazoline-3-oxide, alkylidenecyclopropane and water under mild conditions is reported. This transformation including [3+2] cycloaddition and intramolecular rearrangement leads to N-(2-(5-oxa-6-azaspiro[2.4]hept-6-en-7-yl)phenyl)formamides in good yields.

  19. Abiotic process for Fe(II) oxidation and green rust mineralization driven by a heterotrophic nitrate reducing bacteria (Klebsiella mobilis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etique, Marjorie; Jorand, Frédéric P A; Zegeye, Asfaw; Grégoire, Brian; Despas, Christelle; Ruby, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Green rusts (GRs) are mixed Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxides with a high reactivity toward organic and inorganic pollutants. GRs can be produced from ferric reducing or ferrous oxidizing bacterial activities. In this study, we investigated the capability of Klebsiella mobilis to produce iron minerals in the presence of nitrate and ferrous iron. This bacterium is well-known to reduce nitrate using an organic carbon source as electron donor but is unable to enzymatically oxidize Fe(II) species. During incubation, GR formation occurred as a secondary iron mineral precipitating on cell surfaces, resulting from Fe(II) oxidation by nitrite produced via bacterial respiration of nitrate. For the first time, we demonstrate GR formation by indirect microbial oxidation of Fe(II) (i.e., a combination of biotic/abiotic processes). These results therefore suggest that nitrate-reducing bacteria can potentially contribute to the formation of GR in natural environments. In addition, the chemical reduction of nitrite to ammonium by GR is observed, which gradually turns the GR into the end-product goethite. The nitrogen mass-balance clearly demonstrates that the total amount of ammonium produced corresponds to the quantity of bioreduced nitrate. These findings demonstrate how the activity of nitrate-reducing bacteria in ferrous environments may provide a direct link between the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen and iron.

  20. Cobalt(II) supported on ethylenediamine-functionalized nanocellulose as an efficient catalyst for room temperature aerobic oxidation of alcohols

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ahmad Shaabani; Sajjad Keshipour; Mona Hamidzad; Mozhdeh Seyyedhamzeh

    2014-01-01

    Ethylenediamine-functionalized nanocellulose complexed with cobalt(II) was found to be a highly efficient heterogeneous catalyst for the room temperature aerobic oxidation of various types of primary and secondary benzylic alcohols into their corresponding aldehydes and ketones, respectively. The catalyst showed no significant loss of efficiency after five reaction cycles.

  1. Influence of organics and silica on Fe(II) oxidation rates and cell-mineral aggregate formation by the green-sulfur Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium Chlorobium ferrooxidans KoFox - Implications for Fe(II) oxidation in ancient oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauger, Tina; Byrne, James M.; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Obst, Martin; Crowe, Sean; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Most studies on microbial phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation (photoferrotrophy) have focused on purple bacteria, but recent evidence points to the importance of green-sulfur bacteria (GSB). Their recovery from modern ferruginous environments suggests that these photoferrotrophs can offer insights into how their ancient counterparts grew in Archean oceans at the time of banded iron formation (BIF) deposition. It is unknown, however, how Fe(II) oxidation rates, cell-mineral aggregate formation, and Fe-mineralogy vary under environmental conditions reminiscent of the geological past. To address this, we studied the Fe(II)-oxidizer Chlorobium ferrooxidans KoFox, a GSB living in co-culture with the heterotrophic Geospirillum strain KoFum. We investigated the mineralogy of Fe(III) metabolic products at low/high light intensity, and in the presence of dissolved silica and/or fumarate. Silica and fumarate influenced the crystallinity and particle size of the produced Fe(III) minerals. The presence of silica also enhanced Fe(II) oxidation rates, especially at high light intensities, potentially by lowering Fe(II)-toxicity to the cells. Electron microscopic imaging showed no encrustation of either KoFox or KoFum cells with Fe(III)-minerals, though weak associations were observed suggesting co-sedimentation of Fe(III) with at least some biomass via these aggregates, which could support diagenetic Fe(III)-reduction. Given that GSB are presumably one of the most ancient photosynthetic organisms, and pre-date cyanobacteria, our findings, on the one hand, strengthen arguments for photoferrotrophic activity as a likely mechanism for BIF deposition on a predominantly anoxic early Earth, but, on the other hand, also suggest that preservation of remnants of Fe(II)-oxidizing GSB as microfossils in the rock record is unlikely.

  2. Nitrite to nitric oxide interconversion by heme FeII complex assisted by [CuI(tmpa)]+

    KAUST Repository

    Turias, Francesc

    2015-09-09

    The present computational study complements the recent experimental efforts by Karlin and coworkers to describe the interconversion of nitrite to nitric oxide by means of an iron porphyrin complex together with a Cu chemical system, i.e., the iron(II) complex (F8TPP)FeII [F8TPP = tetrakis(2,6-difluorophenyl)porphyrinate(2−)] and a preformed copper(II)–nitrito complex [(tmpa)CuII(NO2)][B(C6F5)4] [tmpa = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine], being the latter an oxidized species of [(tmpa)CuI(MeCN)]+. By DFT calculations, we unravel how the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide takes place through a μ-oxo heme-FeIII–O–CuII complex, following a mimetic path as in the cytochrome c oxidase. Mayer bond order (MBO) and energy decomposition analyses are used to analyze the bonding strength of such nitro derivatives to either copper or iron. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media New York

  3. Cyclotron Line Features from Near-Critical Fields II on the Effect of Anisotropic Radiation Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Araya-Gochez, R A; Araya-Gochez, Rafael A.; Harding, Alice K.

    2000-01-01

    We assess the impact of radiation anisotropy on the line shapes that result from relativistic magnetic Compton scattering in the low-density/high-field regime. A Monte Carlo implementation of radiation transport allows for spatial diffusion of photons in arbitrary geometries and accounts for relativistic angular redistribution. The cross section includes natural line widths and photon "spawning" from up to fourth harmonic photons. In our first paper we noted that even if the photon injection is isotropic a strongly anisotropic radiation field rapidly ensues. We now investigate the angular distribution of cyclotron spectra emerging from an internally irradiated magnetized plasma with a prescribed global geometry (either cylindrical or plane parallel) and the effects of anisotropic photon injection on the line shapes. Varying the input angular distribution permits a better understanding of the line formation process in more realistic scenarios where the radiative mechanisms are influenced by the intrinsic aniso...

  4. Atmospheric circulation of tidally locked exoplanets II: dual-band radiative transfer and convective adjustment

    CERN Document Server

    Heng, Kevin; Phillipps, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    Improving upon our purely dynamical work, we present three-dimensional simulations of the atmospheric circulation on Earth-like (exo)planets and hot Jupiters using the GFDL-Princeton Flexible Modeling System (FMS). As the first steps away from the purely dynamical benchmarks of Heng, Menou & Phillipps (2011), we add dual-band radiative transfer and dry convective adjustment schemes to our computational setup. Our treatment of radiative transfer assumes stellar irradiation to peak at a wavelength shorter than and distinct from that at which the exoplanet re-emits radiation ("shortwave" versus "longwave"), and also uses a two-stream approximation. Convection is mimicked by adjusting unstable lapse rates to the dry adiabat. The bottom of the atmosphere is bounded by an uniform slab with a finite thermal inertia. For our hot Jupiter models, we include an analytical formalism for calculating temperature-pressure profiles, in radiative equilibrium, which accounts for the effect of collision-induced absorption v...

  5. Theory for planetary exospheres: II. Radiation pressure effect on exospheric density profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Beth, Arnaud; Toublanc, Dominique; Dandouras, Iannis; Mazelle, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The planetary exospheres are poorly known in their outer parts, since the neutral densities are low compared with the instruments detection capabilities. The exospheric models are thus often the main source of information at such high altitudes. We present a new way to take into account analytically the additional effect of the radiation pressure on planetary exospheres. In a series of papers, we present with an Hamiltonian approach the effect of the radiation pressure on dynamical trajectories, density profiles and escaping thermal flux. Our work is a generalization of the study by Bishop and Chamberlain (1989). In this second part of our work, we present here the density profiles of atomic Hydrogen in planetary exospheres subject to the radiation pressure. We first provide the altitude profiles of ballistic particles (the dominant exospheric population in most cases), which exhibit strong asymmetries that explain the known geotail phenomenon at Earth. The radiation pressure strongly enhances the densities c...

  6. Viscous boundary layers of radiation-dominated, relativistic jets. II. The free-streaming jet model

    CERN Document Server

    Coughlin, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the interaction of a radiation-dominated jet and its surroundings using the equations of radiation hydrodynamics in the viscous limit. In a previous paper we considered the two-stream scenario, which treats the jet and its surroundings as distinct media interacting through radiation viscous forces. Here we present an alternative boundary layer model, known as the free-streaming jet model -- where a narrow stream of fluid is injected into a static medium -- and present solutions where the flow is ultrarelativistic and the boundary layer is dominated by radiation. It is shown that these jets entrain material from their surroundings and that their cores have a lower density of scatterers and a harder spectrum of photons, leading to observational consequences for lines of sight that look "down the barrel of the jet." These jetted outflow models may be applicable to the jets produced during long gamma-ray bursts and super-Eddington phases of tidal disruption events.

  7. The removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams using an aqueous metal sulfate absorbent : Part II. the regeneration of copper sulfide to copper oxide - An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Maat, H.; Hogendoorn, J. A.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2005-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities for a selective and efficient method to convert copper(II) sulfide (CuS) into copper(II) oxide (CuO). The oxidation of copper sulfide has been studied experimentally using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at temperatures ranging from 450 to 75

  8. The removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams using an aqueous metal sulfate absorbent : Part II. the regeneration of copper sulfide to copper oxide - An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Maat, H.; Hogendoorn, J. A.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2005-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities for a selective and efficient method to convert copper(II) sulfide (CuS) into copper(II) oxide (CuO). The oxidation of copper sulfide has been studied experimentally using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at temperatures ranging from 450 to

  9. Dose to level I and II axillary lymph nodes and lung by tangential field radiation in patients undergoing postmastectomy radiation with tissue expander reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russo James K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To define the dosimetric coverage of level I/II axillary volumes and the lung volume irradiated in postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT following tissue expander placement. Methods and Materials Twenty-three patients were identified who had undergone postmastectomy radiotherapy with tangent only fields. All patients had pre-radiation tissue expander placement and expansion. Thirteen patients had bilateral expander reconstruction. The level I/II axillary volumes were contoured using the RTOG contouring atlas. The patient-specific variables of expander volume, superior-to-inferior location of expander, distance between expanders, expander angle and axillary volume were analyzed to determine their relationship to the axillary volume and lung volume dose. Results The mean coverage of the level I/II axillary volume by the 95% isodose line (VD95% was 23.9% (range 0.3 - 65.4%. The mean Ipsilateral Lung VD50% was 8.8% (2.2-20.9. Ipsilateral and contralateral expander volume correlated to Axillary VD95% in patients with bilateral reconstruction (p = 0.01 and 0.006, respectively but not those with ipsilateral only reconstruction (p = 0.60. Ipsilateral Lung VD50% correlated with angle of the expander from midline (p = 0.05. Conclusions In patients undergoing PMRT with tissue expanders, incidental doses delivered by tangents to the axilla, as defined by the RTOG contouring atlas, do not provide adequate coverage. The posterior-superior region of level I and II is the region most commonly underdosed. Axillary volume coverage increased with increasing expander volumes in patients with bilateral reconstruction. Lung dose increased with increasing expander angle from midline. This information should be considered both when placing expanders and when designing PMRT tangent only treatment plans by contouring and targeting the axilla volume when axillary treatment is indicated.

  10. Dose to level I and II axillary lymph nodes and lung by tangential field radiation in patients undergoing postmastectomy radiation with tissue expander reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background To define the dosimetric coverage of level I/II axillary volumes and the lung volume irradiated in postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) following tissue expander placement. Methods and Materials Twenty-three patients were identified who had undergone postmastectomy radiotherapy with tangent only fields. All patients had pre-radiation tissue expander placement and expansion. Thirteen patients had bilateral expander reconstruction. The level I/II axillary volumes were contoured using the RTOG contouring atlas. The patient-specific variables of expander volume, superior-to-inferior location of expander, distance between expanders, expander angle and axillary volume were analyzed to determine their relationship to the axillary volume and lung volume dose. Results The mean coverage of the level I/II axillary volume by the 95% isodose line (VD95%) was 23.9% (range 0.3 - 65.4%). The mean Ipsilateral Lung VD50% was 8.8% (2.2-20.9). Ipsilateral and contralateral expander volume correlated to Axillary VD95% in patients with bilateral reconstruction (p = 0.01 and 0.006, respectively) but not those with ipsilateral only reconstruction (p = 0.60). Ipsilateral Lung VD50% correlated with angle of the expander from midline (p = 0.05). Conclusions In patients undergoing PMRT with tissue expanders, incidental doses delivered by tangents to the axilla, as defined by the RTOG contouring atlas, do not provide adequate coverage. The posterior-superior region of level I and II is the region most commonly underdosed. Axillary volume coverage increased with increasing expander volumes in patients with bilateral reconstruction. Lung dose increased with increasing expander angle from midline. This information should be considered both when placing expanders and when designing PMRT tangent only treatment plans by contouring and targeting the axilla volume when axillary treatment is indicated. PMID:22204504

  11. Recent progress in the development of large area silica aerogel for use as RICH radiator in the Belle II experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tabata, Makoto; Kawai, Hideyuki; Nishida, Shohei; Sumiyoshi, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    We report recent progress in the development of large-area hydrophobic silica aerogels for use as radiators in the aerogel-based ring-imaging Cherenkov (A-RICH) counter to be installed in the forward end cap of the Belle II detector, which is currently being upgraded at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Japan. The production of approximately 450 aerogel tiles with refractive indices of either 1.045 or 1.055 was completed in May, 2014, and the tiles are now undergoing optical characterization. Installation of the aerogels was tested by installing them into a partial mock-up of the support structure.

  12. Dose-Response Relationship between Radiation Dose and Loco-regional Control in Patients with Stage II-III Esophageal Cancer Treated with Definitive Chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Suh, Yang-Gun; Lee, Yong Chan; Lee, Sang Kil; Shin, Sung Kwan; Cho, Byung Chul; Lee, Chang Geol

    2017-07-01

    The correlation between radiation dose and loco-regional control (LRC) was evaluated in patients with stage II-III esophageal cancer treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Medical records of 236 stage II-III esophageal cancer patients treated with definitive CRT at Yonsei Cancer Center between 1994 and 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Among these, 120 received a radiation dose of 60 Gy) is associated with increased LRC, PFS, and OS in patients with stage II-III esophageal cancer treated with definitive CRT.

  13. Investigations in silicate glasses. I. Radiation damage. II. Optical nonlinearity. [Gamma rays and electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, M.J.

    1976-11-15

    The investigation of two poorly understood but technologically important physical properties of silicate glasses and related materials is described. The use of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance to investigate the nature of radiation-induced damage in glasses exposed to a variety of high-energy radiation sources is discussed first. Second, the measurement of the nonlinear index of refraction coefficient in a variety of optical materials related to the design of high-power laser systems is described. The radiation damage investigations rely heavily on the comparison of experimental results for different experimental situations. The comparison of EPR lineshapes, absolute spin densities and power saturation behavior is used to probe a variety of microscopic and macroscopic aspects of radiation damage in glasses. Comparison of radiation damage associated with exposure to gamma rays and fast neutrons (and combinations thereof) are interpreted in terms of the microscopic damage mechanisms which are expected to be associated with the specific radiations. Comparison of radiation damage behavior in different types of glasses is also interpreted in terms of the behavior expected for the specific materials. The body of data which is generated is found to be internally self-consistent and is also generally consistent with the radiation damage behavior expected for specific situations. A new and versatile technique for measuring the nonlinear index of refraction coefficient, n/sub 2/, in optical materials is described. The technique utilizes a 1 ns pulsed neodymium-glass laser system and time-resolved interferometry to determine the ratio of the coefficient n/sub 2/ of sample materials to the n/sub 2/ of CS/sub 2/. This method avoids some of the complications associated with performing absolute measurements of n/sub 2/ and allows the use of a relatively simple experimental technique. The measurements determine the nonlinear index ratios of the samples with an accuracy of about

  14. Selective adsorption of Hg(II) by γ-radiation synthesized silica-graft-vinyl imidazole adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Chen, Zhimin; Ge, Mengyi; Xu, Ling; Zhai, Maolin

    2013-01-15

    Silica-based adsorbent was prepared by γ-radiation induced grafting of vinyl imidazole (VIM) onto the silanized silica, which was silanized by chlorotrimethylsilane (TMCS). The effects of monomer concentration and absorbed dose on the grafting yield were investigated to optimize the reaction conditions. Thermodynamic analysis, FTIR analysis and XPS spectra manifested that VIM was successfully grafted onto the silica surface. The SS-g-VIM adsorbent had excellent selectivity for Hg(II) adsorption in mixture divalent cationic metal solution and a high adsorption capacity of Hg(II). The theoretical maximum adsorption capacity was calculated to be 355.9 mg g(-1) (1.774 mmol g(-1)) in HgCl(2)/HNO(3) solution at pH 5 at room temperature. The adsorption kinetics and adsorption isotherm were investigated. It was found that the Langmuir isotherm model fitted well with the adsorption process and the adsorption of Hg(II) onto SS-g-VIM adsorbent could be considered as a spontaneous, endothermic and chemical sorption process. The comprehensive results suggested that SS-g-VIM adsorbent has potential application for the removal of Hg(II) from wastewater.

  15. Experimental and Computational Evidence for the Reduction Mechanisms of Aromatic N-oxides by Aqueous Fe(II)-Tiron Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiling; Dong, Hao; Zhang, Huichun

    2016-01-05

    A combined experimental-theoretical approach was taken to elucidate the reduction mechanisms of five representative aromatic N-oxides (ANOs) by Fe(II)-tiron complex and to identify the rate-limiting step. Based on the possible types of complexes formed with the reductant, three groups of ANOs were studied: type I refers to those forming 5-membered ring complexes through the N and O atoms on the side chain; type II refers to those forming 6-membered ring complexes through the N-oxide O atom and the O atom on the side chain; and type III refers to complexation through the N-oxide O atom only. Density functional theory calculations suggested that the elementary reactions, including protonation, N-O bond cleavage, and the second electron transfer processes, are barrierless, indicating that the first electron transfer is rate-limiting. Consistent with the theoretical results, the experimental solvent isotope effect, KIEH, for the reduction of quinoline N-oxide (a type III ANO) was obtained to be 1.072 ± 0.025, suggesting protonation was not involved in the rate-limiting step. The measured nitrogen kinetic isotope effect, KIEN, for the reduction of pyridine N-oxide (a type III ANO) (1.022 ± 0.006) is in good agreement with the calculated KIEN for its first electron transfer (1.011-1.028), confirming that the first electron transfer is rate-limiting. Electrochemical cell experiments demonstrated that the electron transfer process can be facilitated significantly by type I complexation with FeL2(6-) (1:2 Fe(II)-tiron complex), to some extent by type II complexation with free Fe(II), but not by weak type III complexation.

  16. Radiation thermo-chemical models of protoplanetary disks. II. Line diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, I.; Tilling, I.; Woitke, P.; Thi, W.-F.; Hogerheijde, M.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: In this paper, we explore the diagnostic power of the far-IR fine-structure lines of [Oi] 63.2 μm, 145.5 μm, [Cii] 157.7 μm, as well as the radio and sub-mm lines of CO J=1-0, 2-1 and 3-2 in application to disks around Herbig Ae stars. We aim at understanding where the lines originate from, how the line formation process is affected by density, temperature and chemical abundance in the disk, and to what extent non-LTE effects are important. The ultimate aim is to provide a robust way to determine the gas mass of protoplanetary disks from line observations. Methods: We use the recently developed disk code ProDiMo to calculate the physico-chemical structure of protoplanetary disks and apply the Monte-Carlo line radiative transfer code Ratran to predict observable line profiles and fluxes. We consider a series of Herbig Ae type disk models ranging from 10-6 M_⊙ to 2.2 × 10-2 M_⊙ (between 0.5 and 700 AU) to discuss the dependency of the line fluxes and ratios on disk mass for otherwise fixed disk parameters. This paper prepares for a more thorough multi-parameter analysis related to the Herschel open time key program Gasps. Results: We find the [Cii] 157.7 μm line to originate in LTE from the surface layers of the disk, where The total emission is dominated by surface area and hence depends strongly on disk outer radius. The [Oi] lines can be very bright (>10-16 W/m2) and form in slightly deeper and closer regions under non-LTE conditions. For low-mass models, the [Oi] lines come preferentially from the central regions of the disk, and the peak separation widens. The high-excitation [Oi] 145.5 μm line, which has a larger critical density, decreases more rapidly with disk mass than the 63.2 μm line. Therefore, the [Oi] 63.2 μm/145.5 μm ratio is a promising disk mass indicator, especially as it is independent of disk outer radius for R_out>200 AU. CO is abundant only in deeper layers AV ⪆ 0.05. For too low disk masses (M_disk⪉10-4~M_⊙) the dust

  17. Radiation containment at a 1 MW high energy electron accelerator: Status of LCLS-II radiation physics design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, M. Santana; Blaha, J.; Guetg, M. W.; Li, Z.; Liu, J. C.; Mao, S. X.; Nicolas, L.; Rokni, S. H.; Xiao, S.; Ge, L.

    2017-09-01

    LCLS-II will add a 4 GeV, 1 MHz, SCRF electron accelerator in the first 700 meters of the SLAC 2-mile Linac, as well as adjustable gap polarized undulators in the down-beam electron lines, to produce tunable, fully coherent X-rays in programmable bunch patterns. This facility will work in unison with the existing Linac Coherent Light Source, which uses the legacy copper cavities in the last third of the linac to deliver electrons between 2 and 17 GeV to an undulator line. The upgrade plan includes new beam lines, five stages of state of the art collimation that shall clean the high-power beam well up-beam of the radio-sensitive undulators, and new electron and photon beam dumps. This paper describes the challenges encountered to define efficient measures to protect machine, personnel, public and the environment from the potentially destructive power of the beam, while maximizing the reuse of existing components and infrastructure, and allowing for complex operational modes.

  18. Physiological characterization of a halotolerant anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing green-sulfur bacterium isolated from a marine sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Katja; Niemeyer, Annika; Nikeleit, Verena; Halama, Maximilian; Byrne, James M; Kappler, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    Anoxygenic photoautotrophic bacteria which use light energy and electrons from Fe(II) for growth, so-called photoferrotrophs, are suggested to have been amongst the first phototrophic microorganisms on Earth and to have contributed to the deposition of sedimentary iron mineral deposits, i.e. banded iron formations. To date only two isolates of marine photoferrotrophic bacteria exist, both of which are closely related purple non-sulfur bacteria. Here we present a novel green-sulfur photoautotrophic Fe(II) oxidizer isolated from a marine coastal sediment, Chlorobium sp. strain N1, which is closely related to the freshwater green-sulfur bacterium Chlorobium luteolum DSM273 that is incapable of Fe(II) oxidation. Besides Fe(II), our isolated strain grew phototrophically with other inorganic and organic substrates such as sulfide, hydrogen, lactate or yeast extract. Highest Fe(II) oxidation rates were measured at pH 7.0-7.3, the temperature optimum was 25°C. Mössbauer spectroscopy identified ferrihydrite as the main Fe(III) mineral and fluorescence and helium-ion microscopy revealed cell-mineral aggregates without obvious cell encrustation. In summary, our study showed that the new isolate is physiologically adapted to the conditions of its natural habitat but also to conditions as proposed for early Earth and is thus a suitable model organism for further studies addressing phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation on early Earth. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Radioprotective effect of geraniin via the inhibition of apoptosis triggered by γ-radiation-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Lee, In Kyung; Zhang, Rui; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Kim, Sang Young; Shin, Taekyun; Kim, Bum Joon; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2011-04-01

    The radioprotective effect of geraniin, a tannin compound isolated from Nymphaea tetragona Georgi var. (Nymphaeaceae), against γ-radiation-induced damage was investigated in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79-4) cells. Geraniin recovered cell viability detected by MTT test and colony formation assay, which was compromised by γ-radiation, and reduced the γ-radiation-induced apoptosis by the inhibition of loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Geraniin protected cellular components (lipid membrane, cellular protein, and DNA) damaged by γ-radiation, which was detected by lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl formation, and comet assay. Geraniin significantly reduced the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species generated by γ-radiation, which was detected using spectrofluorometer, flow cytometer, and confocal microscope after 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate staining. Geraniin normalized the superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, which were decreased by γ-radiation. These results suggest that geraniin protects cells against radiation-induced oxidative stress via enhancing of antioxidant enzyme activities and attenuating of cellular damage.

  20. [Reduction of nitrobenzene by iron oxides bound Fe(II) system at different pH values].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Fu-Bo; Xie, Li; Li, Jun; Zhou, Qi

    2009-07-15

    Batch tests were conducted to investigate the reductive transformation of nitrobenzene by goethite, hematite, magnetite and steel converter slag bound Fe(II) system. And the reduction mechanism was explored at different pH values. Experimental results showed that hematite, magnetite and steel converter slag could adsorb Fe(II) on surfaces and form iron oxides bound Fe(II) system at pH from 6.5 to 7.0. The systems had strong reductive capacity and could reduce nitrobenzene to aniline. The reduction efficiency of nitrobenzene in surface bound Fe(II) system followed the sequence of magnetite, hematite and steel converter slag from high to low. The reduction efficiency of hematite and magnetite system increased with pH increasing. While it was almost pH independent in steel converter slag system. Although goethite adsorbed most of Fe(II) in solution, the adsorbed Fe(II) had no reductive activity for nitrobenzene. At pH 6.0, small amount of Fe(II) was adsorbed on magnetite and hematite and the systems did not show reductive activity for nitrobenzene. However, steel converter slag could adsorb Fe(II) at pH 6.0 and reduction efficiency almost equaled to the value at pH 7.0. When pH was above 7.5, dissolved Fe(II) could be converted to Fe(OH)2 and the newly formed Fe(OH)2 became the main redactor in the system. Under alkali condition, the presence of iron oxides inhibited the reduction capacity of system.

  1. Preventive effect of gomisin J from Schisandra chinensis on angiotensin II-induced hypertension via an increased nitric oxide bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Byeong Hyeok; Lee, Seung Jin; Choi, Young Whan; Park, So Youn; Kim, Chi Dae

    2015-03-01

    Gomisin J (GJ) is a small molecular weight lignan found in Schisandra chinensis and has been demonstrated to have vasodilatory activity. In this study, the authors investigated the effect of GJ on blood pressure (BP) in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertensive mice. In addition, we determined the relative potencies of gomisin A (GA) and GJ with respect to vasodilatory activity and antihypertensive effects. C57/BL6 mice infused s.c. with Ang II (2 μg kg(-1) min(-1) for 2 weeks) showed an increase in BP and a decrease in plasma nitric oxide (NO) metabolites. In the thoracic aortas of Ang II-induced hypertensive mice, a decrease in vascular NO was accompanied by an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Furthermore, these alterations in BP, plasma concentrations of NO metabolites and in the vascular productions of NO and ROS in Ang II-treated mice were reversed by the co-administration of GJ (1 and 3 μg kg(-1) min(-1)). In in vitro studies, Ang II decreased the cellular concentration of NO, which was accompanied by a reduction in phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and an increase in ROS production. These eNOS phosphorylation and ROS production changes in Ang II-treated cells were also reversed by GJ pretreatment (0-3 μg ml(-1)). Interestingly, the vasodilatory and antihypertensive effects of GJ were more prominent than those of GA. Collectively, an increase in BP in mice treated with Ang II was markedly attenuated by GJ, which was attributed to the preservations of vascular NO bioavailability and eNOS function, and to the inhibition of ROS production in Ang II-induced hypertensive mice.

  2. Preparation of graphene oxide/chitosan/FeOOH nanocomposite for the removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheshmani, Shabnam; Akhundi Nematzadeh, Mehrnaz; Shokrollahzadeh, Soheila; Ashori, Alireza

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, a graphene oxide/chitosan/FeOOH (GO/Ch/FeOOH) nanostructured composite was prepared and used as an adsorbent for the removal of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution. The nanocomposite was characterized by FT-IR, XRD, and SEM techniques. Several important parameters influencing the adsorption of Pb(II) ions such as pH (3-7), temperature (25-80 °C), shaking speed (150-800 rpm), contact time (10-70 min), and sorbent mass (10-100 mg) were studied. The results showed that, benefiting from the surface property of graphene oxide, the abundant amino and hydroxyl functional groups of chitosan, the adsorbent provides adequate and versatile adsorption for the Pb(II) ions under investigation. The batch adsorption experiments showed that the adsorption of the Pb(II) is considerably dependent on pH of milieu, amount of adsorbent, and contact time. The Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption models were used for the mathematical description of adsorption equilibrium and isotherm constants. Both models were applicable for the description of Pb(II) adsorption isotherm in the concentration range studied. However, Langmuir model showed higher correlation coefficient (R(2)) than Freundlich model. The study suggests that the GO/Ch/FeOOH is a promising nano adsorbent for the removal of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution.

  3. Mobile phone radiation inhibits Vigna radiata (mung bean) root growth by inducing oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ved Parkash; Singh, Harminder Pal; Kohli, Ravinder Kumar; Batish, Daizy Rani

    2009-10-15

    During the last couple of decades, there has been a tremendous increase in the use of cell phones. It has significantly added to the rapidly increasing EMF smog, an unprecedented type of pollution consisting of radiation in the environment, thereby prompting the scientists to study the effects on humans. However, not many studies have been conducted to explore the effects of cell phone EMFr on growth and biochemical changes in plants. We investigated whether EMFr from cell phones inhibit growth of Vigna radiata (mung bean) through induction of conventional stress responses. Effects of cell phone EMFr (power density: 8.55 microW cm(-2); 900 MHz band width; for 1/2, 1, 2, and 4 h) were determined by measuring the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in terms of malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) content, root oxidizability and changes in levels of antioxidant enzymes. Our results showed that cell phone EMFr significantly inhibited the germination (at > or =2 h), and radicle and plumule growths (> or =1 h) in mung bean in a time-dependent manner. Further, cell phone EMFr enhanced MDA content (indicating lipid peroxidation), and increased H(2)O(2) accumulation and root oxidizability in mung bean roots, thereby inducing oxidative stress and cellular damage. In response to EMFr, there was a significant upregulation in the activities of scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutases, ascorbate peroxidases, guaiacol peroxidases, catalases and glutathione reductases, in mung bean roots. The study concluded that cell phone EMFr inhibit root growth of mung bean by inducing ROS-generated oxidative stress despite increased activities of antioxidant enzymes.

  4. Mobile phone radiation inhibits Vigna radiata (mung bean) root growth by inducing oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Ved Parkash [Department of Environment and Vocational Studies, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Department of Zoology, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Singh, Harminder Pal, E-mail: hpsingh_01@yahoo.com [Department of Environment and Vocational Studies, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Kohli, Ravinder Kumar; Batish, Daizy Rani [Department of Botany, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India)

    2009-10-15

    During the last couple of decades, there has been a tremendous increase in the use of cell phones. It has significantly added to the rapidly increasing EMF smog, an unprecedented type of pollution consisting of radiation in the environment, thereby prompting the scientists to study the effects on humans. However, not many studies have been conducted to explore the effects of cell phone EMFr on growth and biochemical changes in plants. We investigated whether EMFr from cell phones inhibit growth of Vigna radiata (mung bean) through induction of conventional stress responses. Effects of cell phone EMFr (power density: 8.55 {mu}W cm{sup -2}; 900 MHz band width; for 1/2, 1, 2, and 4 h) were determined by measuring the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in terms of malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) content, root oxidizability and changes in levels of antioxidant enzymes. Our results showed that cell phone EMFr significantly inhibited the germination (at {>=}2 h), and radicle and plumule growths ({>=}1 h) in mung bean in a time-dependent manner. Further, cell phone EMFr enhanced MDA content (indicating lipid peroxidation), and increased H{sub 2}O{sub 2} accumulation and root oxidizability in mung bean roots, thereby inducing oxidative stress and cellular damage. In response to EMFr, there was a significant upregulation in the activities of scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutases, ascorbate peroxidases, guaiacol peroxidases, catalases and glutathione reductases, in mung bean roots. The study concluded that cell phone EMFr inhibit root growth of mung bean by inducing ROS-generated oxidative stress despite increased activities of antioxidant enzymes.

  5. Combined effects of Fe(II) and oxidizing radiolysis products on UO2 and PuO2 dissolution in a system containing solid UO2 and PuO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amme, Marcus; Pehrman, Reijo; Deutsch, Rudolf; Roth, Olivia; Jonsson, Mats

    2012-11-01

    The stability of UO2 spent nuclear fuel in an oxygen-free geological repository depends on the absence of oxidizing reaction partners in the near field. This work investigates the reactions between the products of water radiolysis by alpha radiation and Fe(II) an the effect on UO2 dissolution. Solid 238PuO2 powder and UO2 pellet were allowed to react in Fe(II) solution in oxygen-free batch reactor tests and kinetics of the subsequent redox reactions were measured. Depending on the concentration of Fe(II) (tests with 10-5 and 10-4 mol L-1 were made), the induced redox reactions took place between 20 and 400 h. Dissolved uranium concentrations went first through a minimum caused by reduction, followed by a maximum caused by radiolytic oxidation, and eventually reached another minimum, probably due to sorption on precipitated Fe(III). Plutonium concentrations were decreasing steadily after going through a maximum about 70 h from the start of the experiments. The results show that in the presence of the strong alpha-radiolytic field induced by the presence of solid 238Pu, the behavior of the system is largely governed by Fe(II) as it controls the H2O2 concentration, reduces U(VI) in solution and drives the Fenton reaction leading to the oxidation of Pu(IV).

  6. Comparison of gamma- and beta radiation stress responses on anti-oxidative defense system and DNA modifications in Lemna minor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hoeck, Arne [SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200 2400 Mol (Belgium); University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Horemans, Nele; Van Hees, May; Nauts, Robin; Vandenhove, Hildegarde [SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200 2400 Mol (Belgium); Knapen, Dries; Blust, Ronny [University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    frond have been implemented in a dosimetric model derived from ERICA tool. This enabled a reliable comparison of dose-dependent endpoints between gamma- and beta radiation. Dose rates varied from 15 and 1500 mGy/hr, and 19 from 19000 μGy/hr for gamma- and beta radiation respectively. The classic growth related endpoints, like biomass and frond area, were measured and compared with biochemical and molecular endpoints. Therefore, DNA modifications were analyzed to evaluate biological DNA damage and ROS accumulation in plants together with activities of anti-oxidative enzymes to evaluate oxidative stress response. A dose-response curve with 60 percent growth inhibition was determined for gamma radiation and morphological growth effects in root system were observed for beta radiation. Preliminary results showed similar responses in peroxidase activities between both radiation types. These results and ongoing investigations will help to unravel the differences and similarities in response mechanisms for various radiation types in plant systems. As multiple levels in biological organisation of the organism were considered, and also different dose rates taken into account, this approach allows a better understanding the toxic mode of action of radiation stress in higher plants. This research was supported by the European Commission Contract Fission-2010-3.5.1-269672 to Strategy for Allied Radioecology (www.star-radioecology.org) and a project of the Fund for Scientific Research (FWO-Vlaanderen, G.A040.11N) (authors)

  7. Influence of UV-A radiation on oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes in Mythimna separata (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Arif; Rashid, Muhammad Adnan; Huang, Qiu Ying; Lei, Chao-Liang

    2017-03-01

    Abiotic stress factors, including ultraviolet (UV) radiation, significantly affect insect life. UV-A radiation (320-400 nm) has been widely used for insect control since it increases the production of ROS and causes oxidative cell damage. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of UV-A irradiation on an important pest in China, the ear-cutting caterpillar, Mythimna separata (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). We exposed 3-day-old M. separata adults to UV-A radiation for different periods of time (0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min) and evaluated the resulting total antioxidant capacity and the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase, and glutathione-S-transferase. The total antioxidant capacity significantly increased after exposure to UV-A radiation for 60 min but decreased after 90 and 120 min of exposure, compared with the control. The antioxidant activity of glutathione-S-transferase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase increased after 60-min exposure, and it was decreased at the longest exposure period 120 min. The longest exposure time period relatively activates the xenobiotic detoxifying enzymes like glutathione-S-transferase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase enzymes. The longest duration of UV-A radiation may cooperate with pesticide detoxification mechanism in insects, making them more susceptible to insecticides. Our results demonstrated that UV irradiation causes oxidative stress, affects the activity of antioxidant enzymes, and disturbs the physiology of M. separata adults.

  8. Microwave radiation (2.45 GHz)-induced oxidative stress: Whole-body exposure effect on histopathology of Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Parul; Verma, H N; Sisodia, Rashmi; Kesari, Kavindra Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Man-made microwave and radiofrequency (RF) radiation technologies have been steadily increasing with the growing demand of electronic appliances such as microwave oven and cell phones. These appliances affect biological systems by increasing free radicals, thus leading to oxidative damage. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of 2.45 GHz microwave radiation on histology and the level of lipid peroxide (LPO) in Wistar rats. Sixty-day-old male Wistar rats with 180 ± 10 g body weight were used for this study. Animals were divided into two groups: sham exposed (control) and microwave exposed. These animals were exposed for 2 h a day for 35 d to 2.45 GHz microwave radiation (power density, 0.2 mW/cm(2)). The whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR) was estimated to be 0.14 W/kg. After completion of the exposure period, rats were sacrificed, and brain, liver, kidney, testis and spleen were stored/preserved for determination of LPO and histological parameters. Significantly high level of LPO was observed in the liver (p microwave radiation. Also histological changes were observed in the brain, liver, testis, kidney and spleen after whole-body microwave exposure, compared to the control group. Based on the results obtained in this study, we conclude that exposure to microwave radiation 2 h a day for 35 d can potentially cause histopathology and oxidative changes in Wistar rats. These results indicate possible implications of such exposure on human health.

  9. Uptake and Release of Cerium During Fe-Oxide Formation and Transformation in Fe(II) Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedel, Sorin; Dideriksen, Knud; Christiansen, Bo C.

    2010-01-01

    Fe-oxides are ubiquitous in soils and sediments and form during Fe(0) corrosion. Depending on redox conditions and solution composition, Fe-oxides such as ferrihydrite, goethite, magnetite, and green rust (GR) may form. These phases typically have high surface area and large affinity for adsorption...... of trace components. Further, Fe(II)-Fe(III) (hydr)oxides are redox active. Cerium, a member of the lanthanide family, can be used as an analogue for the tri- and tetra-valent actinides found in radioactive waste, expected to be stored in subsurface repositories. In experiments with ferrihydrite, Ce......(III) release. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed Ce(III) adsorbed on magnetite. When Fe-oxides were synthesized by air oxidation of Fe(II) solutions at pH 7, GR(Na,SO4) played a catalytic role in the oxidation of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) by O-2, removing more than 90% of the dissolved Ce. Transmission electron...

  10. Protective effect of polysaccharide-protein complex from a polypore mushroom, Phellinus rimosus against radiation-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jini; Panicker, Sudheesh Narayana; Janardhanan, Kainoor Krishnankutty

    2012-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces severe oxidative stress in the body resulting an imbalance in prooxidant and antioxidant status in the cell. The aim of the present study is to investigate the protective effect of polysaccharide protein complex (PPC-Pr) isolated from the mushroom Phellinus rimosus against the oxidative stress induced by gamma radiation. PPC-Pr complex was isolated from the aqueous extracts of P. rimosus. The complex was administered to Swiss albino mice at a concentration of 5 and 10 mg/kg body weight intraperitoneally for 5 days consecutively and exposed to 4 Gy of gamma irradiation. Animals were sacrificed 1 day after irradiation and the antioxidant parameters such as glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase as well as lipid peroxidation were evaluated in both liver and brain tissues to evaluate oxidative stress. Amifostine, a standard radioprotective agent, was used as a positive control. In vitro DNA damage was assessed using the comet assay. Survival studies were also carried out to determine the protective role of PPC-Pr against radiation-induced delayed oxidative stress. PPC-Pr treatment enhanced the declined levels of antioxidants and comet parameters to a significant level, indicating its antioxidant as well as DNA protecting potential. Significant increase in the survival rate of animals was also observed in irradiated animals treated with PPC-Pr complex. The results were comparable to the standard drug amifostine. The results indicate profound effects of PPC-Pr against radiation-induced oxidative stress. The findings suggest potential therapeutic use of PPC-Pr in radiotherapy.

  11. Status of the Development of Low Cost Radiator for Surface Fission Power - II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarau, Calin; Maxwell, Taylor; Anderson, William G.; Wagner, Corey; Wrosch, Matthew; Briggs, Maxwell H.

    2016-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing fission power system technology for future Lunar and Martian surface power applications. The systems are envisioned in the 10 to 100kWe range and have an anticipated design life of 8 to 15 years with no maintenance. NASA GRC is currently setting up a 55 kWe non-nuclear system ground test in thermal-vacuum to validate technologies required to transfer reactor heat, convert the heat into electricity, reject waste heat, process the electrical output, and demonstrate overall system performance. The paper reports on the development of the heat pipe radiator to reject the waste heat from the Stirling convertors. Reducing the radiator mass, size, and cost is essential to the success of the program. To meet these goals, Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) and Vanguard Space Technologies, Inc. (VST) are developing a single facesheet radiator with heat pipes directly bonded to the facesheet. The facesheet material is a graphite fiber reinforced composite (GFRC) and the heat pipes are titanium/water Variable Conductance Heat Pipes (VCHPs). By directly bonding a single facesheet to the heat pipes, several heavy and expensive components can be eliminated from the traditional radiator design such as, POCO"TM" foam saddles, aluminum honeycomb, and a second facesheet. As mentioned in previous papers by the authors, the final design of the waste heat radiator is described as being modular with independent GFRC panels for each heat pipe. The present paper reports on test results for a single radiator module as well as a radiator cluster consisting of eight integral modules. These tests were carried out in both ambient and vacuum conditions. While the vacuum testing of the single radiator module was performed in the ACT's vacuum chamber, the vacuum testing of the eight heat pipe radiator cluster took place in NASA GRC's vacuum chamber to accommodate the larger size of the cluster. The results for both articles show good agreement

  12. Role of the oxidized secondary acceptor QB of photosystem II in the delayed 'afterglow' chlorophyll luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducruet, Jean-Marc; Roman, Miruna; Ortega, Jose Maria; Janda, Tibor

    2005-06-01

    Leaf discs of dark-adapted tobacco plants were excited by 2 flashes and kept in darkness at 20 degrees C for various time periods, then thermoluminescence emission was recorded without freezing the sample. The B band at 30 degrees C decreased with a half-time t1/2 approximately 1 min and the AG band at 45 degrees C with a t1/2 approximately 5 min. This corresponds to the decay kinetics of S2/3 in PS II centres in the state S2/3 QB - (B band) or S2/3 QB. Assuming that the 45 degrees C band is an 'afterglow' emission originating from those centres with an oxidized QB on which an electron is back-transferred from stroma reductants through a pathway induced by warming, the theoretical ratio of the B and AG band was compared to that measured experimentally. After 2 or 3 flashes producing mainly S3, the intensity of AG band encompassed several fold that of the B band, because recombining S3 recreated S2 QB AG-emitting centres. In order to confirm that the AG band is governed by the heat-induced activation of a dark QB-reducing pathway rather than by PS II charge recombination, the AG emission was characterized in triazine-resistant Chenopodium album weed biotypes. In these mutants where the QB pocket is altered, the B band is strongly downshifted to 18 degrees C, compared to 32 degrees C in the wild type, whereas the AG band is only downshifted by 3 or 4 degrees C, demonstrating that S2/3 QB - is not the limiting step of the AG emission.

  13. Interaction of TNF with angiotensin II contributes to mitochondrial oxidative stress and cardiac damage in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nithya Mariappan

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF and angiotensin II (ANGII induce oxidative stress contribute to cardiovascular disease progression. Here, we examined whether an interaction between TNF and ANGII contributes to altered cardiac mitochondrial biogenesis and ATP production to cause cardiac damage in rats. Rats received intraperitoneal injections of TNF (30 µg/kg, TNF + losartan (LOS, 1 mg/kg, or vehicle for 5 days. Left ventricular (LV function was measured using echocardiography. Rats were sacrificed and LV tissues removed for gene expression, electron paramagnetic resonance and mitochondrial assays. TNF administration significantly increased expression of the NADPH oxidase subunit, gp91phox, and the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT-1R and decreased eNOS in the LV of rats. Rats that received TNF only had increased production rates of superoxide, peroxynitrite and total reactive oxygen species (ROS in the cytosol and increased production rates of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in mitochondria. Decreased activities of mitochondrial complexes I, II, and III and mitochondrial genes were observed in rats given TNF. In addition, TNF administration also resulted in a decrease in fractional shortening and an increase in Tei index, suggesting diastolic dysfunction. TNF administration with concomitant LOS treatment attenuated mitochondrial damage, restored cardiac function, and decreased expression of AT1-R and NADPH oxidase subunits. Mitochondrial biogenesis and function is severely impaired by TNF as evidenced by downregulation of mitochondrial genes and increased free radical production, and may contribute to cardiac damage. These defects are independent of the downregulation of mitochondrial gene expression, suggesting novel mechanisms for mitochondrial dysfunction in rats given TNF.

  14. Immunostimulated Arginase II Expression in Intestinal Epithelial Cells Reduces Nitric Oxide Production and Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera, Maria M; Nuthakki, Sushma; Cui, Hongmei; Jin, Yi; Liu, Yusen; Nelin, Leif D

    2017-01-01

    Increased production of nitric oxide (NO) and subsequent local cytotoxicity to mucosal epithelial cells has been proposed as a putative mechanism involved in the development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) metabolize L-arginine to either nitric oxide (NO) by NO synthase (NOS) or to L-ornithine and urea by arginase. L-ornithine is the first step in polyamine synthesis important for cell proliferation, while NO production can lead to apoptosis. We hypothesized that in IECs immunostimulation increases both NOS and arginase expression, and that arginase activity mitigates NO production and apoptosis. Rat intestinal epithelial cells (rIEC-6) were immunostimulated by either incubation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alone for 24 h or by incubation with conditioned media (CM) for 24 h. CM was obtained from RAW 264.7 cells (a macrophage cell line) treated with LPS (E. coli 0127:B8; 1 μg/ml) for 4 h. The rIEC-6 stimulated with LPS or with CM had significantly higher levels of inducible NOS (iNOS) protein, NO production, and arginase II protein than did the control cells. Direct LPS stimulation of rIEC-6 produced a less robust increase in iNOS expression and NO (represented as nitrite percent of control) than did CM stimulation. Inhibition of arginase using N(ω) hydroxyl-L-arginine (NOHA) further increased stimulated NO production in rIEC-6. Viable cell numbers were significantly lower in CM stimulated cells after 24 h than in controls, and inhibition of arginase activity with NOHA resulted in a further significant decrease in viable cell numbers. We conclude that immunostimulated arginase expression of rIEC-6 cells tempers cytokine-induced iNOS-derived NO production and apoptosis.

  15. Immunostimulated Arginase II Expression in Intestinal Epithelial Cells Reduces Nitric Oxide Production and Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera, Maria M.; Nuthakki, Sushma; Cui, Hongmei; Jin, Yi; Liu, Yusen; Nelin, Leif D.

    2017-01-01

    Increased production of nitric oxide (NO) and subsequent local cytotoxicity to mucosal epithelial cells has been proposed as a putative mechanism involved in the development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) metabolize L-arginine to either nitric oxide (NO) by NO synthase (NOS) or to L-ornithine and urea by arginase. L-ornithine is the first step in polyamine synthesis important for cell proliferation, while NO production can lead to apoptosis. We hypothesized that in IECs immunostimulation increases both NOS and arginase expression, and that arginase activity mitigates NO production and apoptosis. Rat intestinal epithelial cells (rIEC-6) were immunostimulated by either incubation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alone for 24 h or by incubation with conditioned media (CM) for 24 h. CM was obtained from RAW 264.7 cells (a macrophage cell line) treated with LPS (E. coli 0127:B8; 1 μg/ml) for 4 h. The rIEC-6 stimulated with LPS or with CM had significantly higher levels of inducible NOS (iNOS) protein, NO production, and arginase II protein than did the control cells. Direct LPS stimulation of rIEC-6 produced a less robust increase in iNOS expression and NO (represented as nitrite percent of control) than did CM stimulation. Inhibition of arginase using Nω hydroxyl-L-arginine (NOHA) further increased stimulated NO production in rIEC-6. Viable cell numbers were significantly lower in CM stimulated cells after 24 h than in controls, and inhibition of arginase activity with NOHA resulted in a further significant decrease in viable cell numbers. We conclude that immunostimulated arginase expression of rIEC-6 cells tempers cytokine-induced iNOS-derived NO production and apoptosis.

  16. Distribution of manganese species in an oxidative dimerization reaction of a bis-terpyridine mononuclear manganese (II) complex and their heterogeneous water oxidation activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kosuke; Sato, Taisei; Yamazaki, Hirosato; Yagi, Masayuki

    2015-11-01

    Heterogeneous water oxidation catalyses were studied as a synthetic model of oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in photosynthesis using mica adsorbing various manganese species. Distribution of manganese species formed in the oxidative dimerization reaction of [Mn(II)(terpy)2](2+) (terpy=2,2':6',2″-terpyridine) (1') with various oxidants in water was revealed. 1' was stoichiometrically oxidized to form di-μ-oxo dinuclear manganese complex, [(OH2)(terpy)Mn(III)(μ-O)2Mn(IV)(terpy)(OH2)](3+) (1) by KMnO4 as an oxidant. When Oxone and Ce(IV) oxidants were used, the further oxidation of 1 to [(OH2)(terpy)Mn(IV)(μ-O)2Mn(IV)(terpy)(OH2)](4+) (2) was observed after the oxidative dimerization reaction of 1'. The mica adsorbates with various composition of 1', 1 and 2 were prepared by adding mica suspension to the various oxidant-treated solutions followed by filtration. The heterogeneous water oxidation catalysis by the mica adsorbates was examined using a Ce(IV) oxidant. The observed catalytic activity of the mica adsorbates corresponded to a content of 1 (1ads) adsorbed on mica for KMnO4- and Oxone-treated systems, indicating that 1' (1'ads) and 2 (2ads) adsorbed on mica do not work for the catalysis. The kinetic analysis suggested that 1ads works for the catalysis through cooperation with adjacent 1ads or 2ads, meaning that 2ads assists the cooperative catalysis by 1ads though 2ads is not able to work for the catalysis alone. For the Ce(IV)-treated system, O2 evolution was hardly observed although the sufficient amount of 1ads was contained in the mica adsorbates. This was explained by the impeded penetration of Ce(IV) ions (as an oxidant for water oxidation) into mica by Ce(3+) cations (generated in oxidative dimerization of 1') co-adsorbed with 1ads.

  17. Orbital stability zones about asteroids. II - The destabilizing effects of eccentric orbits and of solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.; Burns, Joseph A.

    1992-03-01

    Recently, Hamilton and Burns (1991) characterized the size and shape of a stability zone around an asteroid on a circular heliocentric orbit within which asteroid material could remain bound for an extended period of time. The present paper considers two additional effects: the asteroid's nonzero heliocentric eccentricity and solar radiation pressure. Results of numerical analyses show that, for an asteroid on an eccentric orbit, the stability zone scales roughly as the size of the Hill sphere calculated at the asteroid's pericenter. It was also found that solar radiation pressure is a very efficient mechanism for removing small (on the order of 0.1 mm) particles from circular asteroidal zone. Particles larger than a few centimeters are only slightly affected by radiation pressure. The results are applied to the Gaspra 951 asteroid.

  18. Line Emission from Radiation-Pressurized HII Region II: Dynamics and Population Synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Verdolini, Silvia; Krumholz, Mark R; Matzner, Christopher D; Tielens, Alexander G G M

    2013-01-01

    Optical and infrared emission lines from HII regions are an important diagnostic used to study galaxies, but interpretation of these lines requires significant modeling of both the internal structure and dynamical evolution of the emitting regions. Most of the models in common use today assume that HII region dynamics are dominated by the expansion of stellar wind bubbles, and have neglected the contribution of radiation pressure to the dynamics, and in some cases also to the internal structure. However, recent observations of nearby galaxies suggest that neither assumption is justified, motivating us to revisit the question of how HII region line emission depends on the physics of winds and radiation pressure. In a companion paper we construct models of single HII regions including and excluding radiation pressure and winds, and in this paper we describe a population synthesis code that uses these models to simulate galactic collections of HII regions with varying physical parameters. We show that the choice...

  19. A Phase II Study of Submandibular Gland Transfer Prior to Radiation for Prevention of Radiation-induced Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Cancer (RTOG 0244)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, Naresh, E-mail: naresh.jha@albertahealthservices.ca [University of Alberta, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Harris, Jonathan [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Seikaly, Hadi [University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Jacobs, John R. [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan (United States); McEwan, A.J.B. [University of Alberta, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Robbins, K. Thomas [St. John' s Hospital Cancer Institute, Springfield, Illinois (United States); Grecula, John [Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Sharma, Anand K. [Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Ang, K. Kian [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: We report the results of a phase II study to determine the reproducibility of a submandibular salivary gland transfer (SGT) surgical technique for prevention of radiation (XRT)-induced xerostomia in a multi-institutional setting and to assess severity of xerostomia. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had surgery for primary, neck dissection, and SGT, followed by XRT, during which the transferred salivary gland was shielded. Intensity modulated radiation therapy, amifostine, and pilocarpine were not allowed, but postoperative chemotherapy was allowed. Each operation was reviewed by 2 reviewers and radiation by 1 reviewer. If 13 or more (of 43) were 'not per protocol,' then the technique would be considered not reproducible as per study design. The secondary endpoint was the rate of acute xerostomia, grade 2 or higher, and a rate of {<=}51% was acceptable. Results: Forty-four of the total 49 patients were analyzable: male (81.8%), oropharynx (63.6%), stage IV (61.4%), median age 56.5 years. SGT was 'per protocol' or within acceptable variation in 34 patients (77.3%) and XRT in 79.5%. Nine patients (20.9%) developed grade 2 acute xerostomia; 2 had grade 0-1 xerostomia (4.7%) but started on amifostine/pilocarpine. Treatment for these 11 patients (25.6%) was considered a failure for the xerostomia endpoint. Thirteen patients died; median follow-up for 31 surviving patients was 2.9 years. Two-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 76.4% and 71.7%, respectively. Conclusions: The technique of submandibular SGT is reproducible in a multicenter setting. Seventy-four percent of patients were prevented from XRT-induced acute xerostomia.

  20. Pathophysiology of cell phone radiation: oxidative stress and carcinogenesis with focus on male reproductive system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesari Kavindra K

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hazardous health effects stemming from exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic waves (RF-EMW emitted from cell phones have been reported in the literature. However, the cellular target of RF-EMW is still controversial. This review identifies the plasma membrane as a target of RF-EMW. In addition, the effects of RF-EMW on plasma membrane structures (i.e. NADH oxidase, phosphatidylserine, ornithine decarboxylase and voltage-gated calcium channels are discussed. We explore the disturbance in reactive oxygen species (ROS metabolism caused by RF-EMW and delineate NADH oxidase mediated ROS formation as playing a central role in oxidative stress (OS due to cell phone radiation (with a focus on the male reproductive system. This review also addresses: 1 the controversial effects of RF-EMW on mammalian cells and sperm DNA as well as its effect on apoptosis, 2 epidemiological, in vivo animal and in vitro studies on the effect of RF-EMW on male reproductive system, and 3 finally, exposure assessment and dosimetry by computational biomodeling.

  1. Thermoelectric Oxide Modules (TOMs for the Direct Conversion of Simulated Solar Radiation into Electrical Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Tomeš

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The direct conversion of concentrated high temperature solar heat into electrical energy was demonstrated with a series of four–leg thermoelectric oxide modules (TOM. These temperature stable modules were not yet optimized for high efficiency conversion, but served as proof-of-principle for high temperature conversion. They were constructed by connecting two p- (La1.98Sr0.02CuO4 and two n-type (CaMn0.98Nb0.02O3 thermoelements electrically in series and thermally in parallel. The temperature gradient ΔT was applied by a High–Flux Solar Simulator source (HFSS which generates a spectrum similar to solar radiation. The influence of the graphite layer coated on the hot side of the Al2O3 substrate compared to the uncoated surface on ΔT, Pmax and η was studied in detail. The measurements show an almost linear temperature profile along the thermoelectric legs. The maximum output power of 88.8 mW was reached for a TOM with leg length of 5 mm at ΔT = 622 K. The highest conversion efficiency η was found for a heat flux of 4–8 W cm-2 and the dependence of η on the leg length was investigated.

  2. Pathophysiology of cell phone radiation: oxidative stress and carcinogenesis with focus on male reproductive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Nisarg R; Kesari, Kavindra K; Agarwal, Ashok

    2009-10-22

    Hazardous health effects stemming from exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic waves (RF-EMW) emitted from cell phones have been reported in the literature. However, the cellular target of RF-EMW is still controversial. This review identifies the plasma membrane as a target of RF-EMW. In addition, the effects of RF-EMW on plasma membrane structures (i.e. NADH oxidase, phosphatidylserine, ornithine decarboxylase) and voltage-gated calcium channels are discussed. We explore the disturbance in reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism caused by RF-EMW and delineate NADH oxidase mediated ROS formation as playing a central role in oxidative stress (OS) due to cell phone radiation (with a focus on the male reproductive system). This review also addresses: 1) the controversial effects of RF-EMW on mammalian cells and sperm DNA as well as its effect on apoptosis, 2) epidemiological, in vivo animal and in vitro studies on the effect of RF-EMW on male reproductive system, and 3) finally, exposure assessment and dosimetry by computational biomodeling.

  3. EXAFS study of mercury(II) sorption to Fe- and Al-(hydr)oxides - II. Effects of chloride and sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C.S.; Rytuba, J.J.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2004-01-01

    Common complexing ligands such as chloride and sulfate can significantly impact the sorption of Hg(II) to particle surfaces in aqueous environmental systems. To examine the effects of these ligands on Hg(II) sorption to mineral sorbents, macroscopic Hg(II) uptake measurements were conducted at pH 6 and [Hg]i=0.5 mM on goethite (??-FeOOH), ??-alumina (??-Al2O3), and bayerite (??-Al(OH)3) in the presence of chloride or sulfate, and the sorption products were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The presence of chloride resulted in reduced uptake of Hg(II) on all three substrates over the Cl- concentration ([Cl-]) range 10-5 to 10-2 M, lowering Hg surface coverages on goethite, ??-alumina, and bayerite from 0.42 to 0.07 ??mol/m2, 0.06 to 0.006 ??mol/m2, and 0.55 to 0.39 ??mol/m2 ([Cl -]=10-5 to 10-3 M only), respectively. This reduction in Hg(II) uptake is primarily a result of the formation of stable, nonsorbing aqueous HgCl2 complexes in solution, limiting the amount of free Hg(II) available to sorb. At higher [Cl-] beam reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(I) was observed, resulting in the possible formation of aqueous Hg2Cl2 species and the precipitation of calomel, Hg 2Cl2(s). The presence of sulfate caused enhanced Hg(II) uptake over the sulfate concentration ([SO42-]) range 10-5 to 0.9 M, increasing Hg surface coverages on goethite, ??-alumina, and bayerite from 0.39 to 0.45 ??mol/m2, 0.11 to 0.38 ??mol/m2, and 0.36 to 3.33 ??mol/m2, respectively. This effect is likely due to the direct sorption or accumulation of sulfate ions at the substrate interface, effectively reducing the positive surface charge that electrostatically inhibits Hg(II) sorption. Spectroscopic evidence for ternary surface complexation was observed in isolated cases, specifically in the Hg-goethite-sulfate system at high [SO42-] and in the Hg-goethite-chloride system. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Surface adsorption and self-assembly of Cu(II) ions on TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Oksman, Kristiina; Mathew, Aji P

    2016-02-15

    TEMPO-mediated oxidized cellulose nanofibers (TOCNFs) have shown potential in the bioremediation of metal ions from contaminated water due to their interaction with positively charged metal ions via electrostatic interactions involving surface carboxyl groups. Copper is one of the most common pollutants in industrial effluents and is thus the target metal in the current study. The specific surface adsorption of Cu(II) was similar for TOCNFs with different degrees of functionalization and directly impacted the zeta potential. SEM imaging of the TOCNF after Cu(II) adsorption revealed interesting nanostructured clusters that were attributable to Cu(II) ions first being adsorbed by carboxylate groups on the TOCNF and subsequently being reduced and self-assembled to Cu(0) nanoparticles (NPs) or copper oxide NPs by microprecipitation. TOCNF turned superhydrophilic and resulted in faster water filtration after copper adsorption due to the stronger polarity of the copper ions or the self-assembled Cu(0) NPs creating voids or highly water-permeable channels at the interface between the interconnected TEMPO-oxidized nanofibers. Thus, the adsorption of Cu(II) ions and self-assembly into the Cu NPs on TOCNF favors a faster water purification process and provides a viable route to reuse/recycle TOCNFs studded with Cu nanoparticles as biocidal materials.

  5. (Pro)renin receptor mediates both angiotensin II-dependent and -independent oxidative stress in neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hua; Li, Wencheng; Seth, Dale M; Nair, Anand R; Francis, Joseph; Feng, Yumei

    2013-01-01

    The binding of renin or prorenin to the (pro)renin receptor (PRR) promotes angiotensin (Ang) II formation and mediates Ang II-independent signaling pathways. In the central nervous system (CNS), Ang II regulates blood pressure via inducing oxidative stress; however, the role of PRR-mediated Ang II-independent signaling pathways in oxidative stress in the CNS remains undefined. To address this question, Neuro-2A cells were infected with control virus or an adeno-associated virus encoding the human PRR. Human PRR over-expression alone increased ROS levels, NADPH oxidase activity, as well as NADPH oxidase (NOX) isoforms 2 and 4 mRNA expression levels and these effects were not blocked by losartan. Moreover, the increase in NOX 2 and NOX 4 mRNA levels, NADPH oxidase activity, and ROS levels induced by PRR over-expression was prevented by mitogen activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (MAPK/ERK1/2) inhibition, and phosphoinositide 3 kinase/Akt (IP3/Akt) inhibition, indicating that PRR regulates NOX activity and ROS formation in neuro-2A cells through Ang II-independent ERK1/2 and IP3/Akt activation. Interestingly, at a concentration of 2 nM or higher, prorenin promoted Ang II formation, and thus further increased the ROS levels in cultured Neuro-2A cells via PRR. In conclusion, human PRR over-expression induced ROS production through both angiotensin II-dependent and -independent mechanisms. We showed that PRR-mediated angiotensin II-independent ROS formation is associated with activation of the MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI3/Akt signaling pathways and up-regulation of mRNA level of NOX 2 and NOX4 isoforms in neuronal cells.

  6. Oxidation of a dinuclear manganese(II) complex to an oxide-bridged dimanganese(IV) complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lennartson, A.; McKenzie, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    Bismu-2-[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino]acetatobis[diaquamanganese(II)] bis(trifluoromethanesulfonate) monohydrate, [Mn-2(C14H14N3O2)(2)(H2O)(4)](CF3O3S)(2)center dot H2O, (I), and bismu-3-[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl) amino] propionato bis[aquamanganese(II)] bis(trifluoromethanesulfonate) dihydrate, [M...

  7. Hydroxo-bridged dicopper(II,III) and -(III,III) complexes: models for putative intermediates in oxidation catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvagar, Mohammad Reza; Solntsev, Pavlo V; Lim, Hyeongtaek; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O; Solomon, Edward I; Cramer, Christopher J; Tolman, William B

    2014-05-21

    A macrocyclic ligand (L(4-)) comprising two pyridine(dicarboxamide) donors was used to target reactive copper species relevant to proposed intermediates in catalytic hydrocarbon oxidations by particulate methane monooxygenase and heterogeneous zeolite systems. Treatment of LH4 with base and Cu(OAc)2·H2O yielded (Me4N)2[L2Cu4(μ4-O)] (1) or (Me4N)[LCu2(μ-OH)] (2), depending on conditions. Complex 2 was found to undergo two reversible 1-electron oxidations via cyclic voltammetry and low-temperature chemical reactions. On the basis of spectroscopy and theory, the oxidation products were identified as novel hydroxo-bridged mixed-valent Cu(II)Cu(III) and symmetric Cu(III)2 species, respectively, that provide the first precedence for such moieties as oxidation catalysis intermediates.

  8. Uptake and Release of Cerium During Fe-Oxide Formation and Transformation in Fe(II) Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedel, Sorin; Dideriksen, Knud; Christiansen, Bo C.

    2010-01-01

    microscopy revealed that it formed discrete nanocrystals of CeO2(s). These results demonstrate that Fe-oxide interaction with radionuclides is likely to depend strongly on the local redox conditions. By analogy with Ce, the trivalent actinides are not expected to be sequestered by preformed GR in anoxic......Fe-oxides are ubiquitous in soils and sediments and form during Fe(0) corrosion. Depending on redox conditions and solution composition, Fe-oxides such as ferrihydrite, goethite, magnetite, and green rust (GR) may form. These phases typically have high surface area and large affinity for adsorption...... of trace components. Further, Fe(II)-Fe(III) (hydr)oxides are redox active. Cerium, a member of the lanthanide family, can be used as an analogue for the tri- and tetra-valent actinides found in radioactive waste, expected to be stored in subsurface repositories. In experiments with ferrihydrite, Ce...

  9. A phase II study of concomitant boost radiation plus concurrent weekly cisplatin for locally advanced unresectable head and neck carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, José Antonio; Rueda, Antonio; de Pasos, Antonio Sacchetti; Contreras, Jorge; Cobo, Manuel; Moreno, Paloma; Benavides, Manuel; Villanueva, Asunción; Alba, Emilio

    2006-04-01

    This phase II study evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of weekly cisplatin along with concomitant boost accelerated radiation regimen in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck carcinoma. A total of 94 patients (median age, 58 years) with UICC stage III (n = 19) and IV (n = 75) cancer of the oropharynx, larynx, hypopharynx and oral cavity were included. Patients received radiotherapy with a concomitant boost scheme (1.8 Gy on days 1-40 and 1.5 Gy boost on days 25-40 with a total dose of 72 Gy) and concurrent cisplatin, 40 mg/m(2) weekly, for the first 4 weeks. Most patients (95%) received both radiation and chemotherapy according to protocol. Toxicity was manageable with grade III mucositis and pharyngeal-oesophageal toxicity in 85 and 50% of patients, respectively. Haematological toxicity was mild. Four patients (4%) died due to complications. With a median follow of 41 months, median overall survival and time to progression were 27 and 25 months, respectively. The estimated overall survival at 4 years was 41%. Concomitant boost accelerated radiation plus concurrent weekly cisplatin is a feasible schedule in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck carcinoma, with acceptable toxicity and survival data.

  10. Coupling of Fe(II) oxidation in illite with nitrate reduction and its role in clay mineral transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Linduo; Dong, Hailiang; Edelmann, Richard E.; Zeng, Qiang; Agrawal, Abinash

    2017-03-01

    In pedogenic and diagenetic processes, clay minerals transform from pre-existing phases to other clay minerals via intermediate interstratified clays. Temperature, pressure, chemical composition of fluids, and time are traditionally considered to be the important geological variables for clay mineral transformations. Nearly ten years ago, the role of microbes was recognized for the first time, where microbial reduction of structural Fe(III) in smectite resulted in formation of illite under ambient conditions within two weeks. However, the opposite process, the oxidation of structural Fe(II) in illite has not been studied and it remains unclear whether or not this process would result in the back reaction, e.g., from illite to smectite. The overall objective of this study was to investigate biological oxidation of structural Fe(II) in illite coupled with nitrate reduction and the effect of this process on clay mineral transformation. Laboratory incubations were set up, where structural Fe(II) in illite served as electron donor, nitrate as electron acceptor, and Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strain 2002 as mediator. Solution chemistry and gas composition were monitored over time. Mineralogical transformation resulting from bio-oxidation was characterized with X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Our results demonstrated that strain 2002 was able to couple oxidation of structural Fe(II) in illite with reduction of nitrate to N2 with nitrite as a transient intermediate. This oxidation reaction resulted in transformation of illite to smectite and ultimately to kaolinite (illite → smectite → kaolinite transformations). This study illustrates the importance of Fe redox process in mediating the smectite-illite mineral cycle with important implications for Fe redox cycling and mineral evolution in surficial earth environments.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of different zinc(II) oxide nano-structures from two new zinc(II)-Quinoxaline coordination polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaei, Fatemeh; Bigdeli, Fahime; Morsali, Ali; Joo, Sang Woo; Bruno, Giuseppe; Rudbari, Hadi Amiri

    2015-09-01

    Two new zinc(II) coordination polymers, [Zn(Quinoxaline)(NO3)2(H2O)2]nṡQuinoxaline·H2O (1) and [Zn(Quinoxaline)2(Br)2]n (2), Quinoxaline = Benzopyrazine, have been synthesized and characterized by IR spectroscopy. Compounds 1 and 2 were structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction and are one-dimensional coordination polymers with coordination environment of octahedral and tetrahedral respectively. Nanostructures of zinc(II) oxide were obtained by thermolyses of compound 1 in oleic acid, calcination of compound 1 at 500 °C under air atmosphere and sol-gel processes. Also, nanopowders of zinc(II) oxide were obtained by calcination of compound 2 at 450 and 550 °C. The nanomaterials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The thermal stability of compounds 1 and 2 both their bulk were studied by thermo-gravimetric (TGA) and differential thermal analyses (DTA). This study demonstrates the coordination polymers may be suitable precursors for the preparation of nanoscale materials.

  12. Oscillatory oxidation of Mn(II) ions by hexacyanoferrates(III) and bistability in the reductions of MnO 2 by hexacyanoferrates(II) in a CSTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olexová, Anna; Melicherčík, Milan; Treindl, L'udovít

    1997-04-01

    A new transition metal oscillator based on the oxidation of Mn 2+ ions by Fe(CN) 3-6 ions in a CSTR has been found. As well as the oscillations of the absorbance of the Mn(IV) species, pH-oscillations have been observed. In the reduction of manganese dioxide by Fe(CN) 4-6 ions a kinetic bistability has been described. A skeleton mechanism described recently for Mn(II)H 2O 2 and Mn(II)Br 2 oscillators has been applied here and further developed by the idea of the catalytic activity of colloidal particles and of the assistance of the pH-value change of both main processes, i.e. of the Mn(II) oxidation by Fe(CN) 3-6 ions and of the Mn(IV) reduction by Fe(CN) 4-6 ions. This appears to be the first case where both sides of a reversible reaction are autocatalytic.

  13. Elimination of manganese(II,III) oxidation in Pseudomonas putida GB-1 by a double knockout of two putative multicopper oxidase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geszvain, Kati; McCarthy, James K; Tebo, Bradley M

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial manganese(II) oxidation impacts the redox cycling of Mn, other elements, and compounds in the environment; therefore, it is important to understand the mechanisms of and enzymes responsible for Mn(II) oxidation. In several Mn(II)-oxidizing organisms, the identified Mn(II) oxidase belongs to either the multicopper oxidase (MCO) or the heme peroxidase family of proteins. However, the identity of the oxidase in Pseudomonas putida GB-1 has long remained unknown. To identify the P. putida GB-1 oxidase, we searched its genome and found several homologues of known or suspected Mn(II) oxidase-encoding genes (mnxG, mofA, moxA, and mopA). To narrow this list, we assumed that the Mn(II) oxidase gene would be conserved among Mn(II)-oxidizing pseudomonads but not in nonoxidizers and performed a genome comparison to 11 Pseudomonas species. We further assumed that the oxidase gene would be regulated by MnxR, a transcription factor required for Mn(II) oxidation. Two loci met all these criteria: PputGB1_2447, which encodes an MCO homologous to MnxG, and PputGB1_2665, which encodes an MCO with very low homology to MofA. In-frame deletions of each locus resulted in strains that retained some ability to oxidize Mn(II) or Mn(III); loss of oxidation was attained only upon deletion of both genes. These results suggest that PputGB1_2447 and PputGB1_2665 encode two MCOs that are independently capable of oxidizing both Mn(II) and Mn(III). The purpose of this redundancy is unclear; however, differences in oxidation phenotype for the single mutants suggest specialization in function for the two enzymes.

  14. DMS atmospheric concentrations and sulphate aerosol indirect radiative forcing: a sensitivity study to the DMS source representation and oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Boucher

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The global sulphur cycle has been simulated using a general circulation model with a focus on the source and oxidation of atmospheric dimethylsulphide (DMS. The sensitivity of atmospheric DMS to the oceanic DMS climatology, the parameterisation of the sea-air transfer and to the oxidant fields have been studied. The importance of additional oxidation pathways (by O3 in the gas- and aqueous-phases and by BrO in the gas phase not incorporated in global models has also been evaluated. While three different climatologies of the oceanic DMS concentration produce rather similar global DMS fluxes to the atmosphere at 24-27 Tg S yr -1, there are large differences in the spatial and seasonal distribution. The relative contributions of OH and NO3 radicals to DMS oxidation depends critically on which oxidant fields are prescribed in the model. Oxidation by O3 appears to be significant at high latitudes in both hemispheres. Oxidation by BrO could be significant even for BrO concentrations at sub-pptv levels in the marine boundary layer. The impact of such refinements on the DMS chemistry onto the indirect radiative forcing by anthropogenic sulphate aerosols is also discussed.

  15. Effect of interactions between nitric oxide and angiotensin II on pressure diuresis and natriuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, M I; García-Salom, M; Tornel, J; De Gasparo, M; Fenoy, F J

    1997-11-01

    The present study examined the effect of an angiotensin II AT1 or AT2 receptor antagonist on the impairment of the pressure diuresis and natriuresis response produced by nitric oxide (NO) synthesis blockade. N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 37 nmol.kg-1.min-1) lowered renal blood flow and reduced the slopes of the pressure diuresis and natriuresis responses by 44 and 40%, respectively. Blockade of AT1 receptors with valsartan increased slightly sodium and water excretion at low renal perfusion pressure (RPP). Blockade of AT2 receptors with PD-123319 had no effect on renal function. The administration of valsartan or PD-123319 to rats given L-NAME had no effect on the renal vasoconstriction induced by NO synthesis blockade. In addition, in rats given L-NAME, valsartan elevated baseline excretory values at all RPP studied, but it had no effect on the sensitivity of the pressure diuresis and natriuresis response. However, the administration of PD-123319 to L-NAME-pretreated rats shifted the slopes of the pressure diuresis and natriuresis responses toward control values, indicating that the impairment produced by NO synthesis blockade on pressure diuresis is dependent on the activation of AT2 angiotensin receptors.

  16. Aroylhydrazone Cu(II Complexes in keto Form: Structural Characterization and Catalytic Activity towards Cyclohexane Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manas Sutradhar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of the Schiff base (3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzylidene-2-hydroxybenzohydrazide (H3L with a copper(II salt of a base of a strong acid, i.e., nitrate, chloride or sulphate, yielded the mononuclear complexes [Cu(H2L(NO3(H2O] (1, [Cu(H2LCl]·2MeOH (2 and the binuclear complex [{Cu(H2L}2(µ-SO4]·2MeOH (3, respectively, with H2L− in the keto form. Compounds 1–3 were characterized by elemental analysis, Infrared (IR spectroscopy, Electrospray Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS and single crystal X-ray crystallography. All compounds act as efficient catalysts towards the peroxidative oxidation of cyclohexane to cyclohexyl hydroperoxide, cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone, under mild conditions. In the presence of an acid promoter, overall yields (based on the alkane up to 25% and a turnover number (TON of 250 (TOF of 42 h−1 after 6 h, were achieved.

  17. A kinetic study of copper(II) oxide powder reduction with hydrogen, based on thermogravimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jelic, Dijana [Faculty of Medicine, Departmet of Pharmacy - Chair of Physical Chemistry, University of Banja Luka, Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Tomic-Tucakovic, Biljana [Institute of General and Physical Chemistry, Studentski trg 12, 11158 Belgrade (Serbia); Mentus, Slavko, E-mail: slavko@ffh.bg.ac.rs [University of Belgrade, Faculty of Physical Chemistry, Studentski trg 12, 11185 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2011-07-10

    Highlights: {yields} The reduction of CuO by hydrogen was studied by thermogravimetry. {yields} The particle size of the samples varied inside the submicron range. {yields} The experimental data were fitted by means of a nucleation-growth model. {yields} The particle size influenced the kinetic parameters but not the reaction model. - Abstract: The reduction of powdery copper(II) oxide was carried out in a stream of gaseous mixture 25% H{sub 2} + Ar, and followed by thermogravimetry. The two samples of different history were studied: the commercial one, and that synthesized by citrate gel combustion method. The characterization of the starting materials, based on X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy, indicated equal crystal structure, but different particle size and morphology. The particle size and shape of the metallic particles obtained upon the reduction were observed by means of electron microscope. By a nonlinear regression analysis by means of a software Kinetics05, the experimental data were fitted with the nucleation-growth kinetic model, and the corresponding kinetic parameters were determined.

  18. Inhibition effects in the partial oxidation of cyclohexane on polymer supported Co(II catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAJA ODOVIC

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Polymer supported catalysts with different contents of metal ions where synthesized by wet impregnation of the degassed support from ethanolic solutions of cobalt(II nitrate. Amacroreticular copolymer of poly-4-vinylpyridine with divinylbenzene was used as the support. The prepared catalysts were tested in the partial oxidation of cyclohexane to cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone. Activity tests were performed in a stainless steel, laboratory scale, stirred autoclave, in the semi batch regime under isothermal and non-isothermal conditions. Isothermal experiments where performed at 170 °C for 120 min. In the non-isothermal conditions. isothermal experiments where performed at 170 °C for 120 min. In the non-isothermal experiments, a constant heating rate of 0.3 degree/min was used in the range between 110 °C and 170 °C. Non-linear, least-squares analysis with the simplex optimization method and numerical simulation of the reaction model in each iterative step was used for the kinetic characterization of the process in a non-stationary, semi-batch regime. Apparent rate constants were obtained as an invariant measure of the catalytic system. Anon-linear effect of the content of metal ions on the reaction rate and on the ratio of the yield of the products was observed, which is attributed to a complex interactions between the reaction medium and the heterogeneous catalyst, including a catalyst-inhibition effect.

  19. Applicability of anaerobic nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation to microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongbo; Carlson, Han K; Coates, John D

    2013-08-06

    Microbial processes that produce solid-phase minerals could be judiciously applied to modify rock porosity with subsequent alteration and improvement of floodwater sweep in petroleum reservoirs. However, there has been little investigation of the application of this to enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Here, we investigate a unique approach of altering reservoir petrology through the biogenesis of authigenic rock minerals. This process is mediated by anaerobic chemolithotrophic nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms that precipitate iron minerals from the metabolism of soluble ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) coupled to the reduction of nitrate. This mineral biogenesis can result in pore restriction and reduced pore throat diameter. Advantageously and unlike biomass plugs, these biominerals are not susceptible to pressure or thermal degradation. Furthermore, they do not require continual substrate addition for maintenance. Our studies demonstrate that the biogenesis of insoluble iron minerals in packed-bed columns results in effective hydrology alteration and homogenization of heterogeneous flowpaths upon stimulated microbial Fe(2+) biooxidation. We also demonstrate almost 100% improvement in oil recovery from hydrocarbon-saturated packed-bed columns as a result of this metabolism. These studies represent a novel departure from traditional microbial EOR approaches and indicate the potential for nitrate-dependent Fe(2+) biooxidation to improve volumetric sweep efficiency and enhance both the quality and quantity of oil recovered.

  20. Effect of ligand denticity on the nitric oxide reactivity of cobalt(ii) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Hemanta; Ghosh, Somnath; Saha, Soumen; Gogoi, Kuldeep; Mondal, Biplab

    2016-07-05

    The activation of nitric oxide (NO) by transition metal complexes has attracted a wide range of research activity. To study the role of ligand denticity on the NO reactivity of Co(ii) complexes, three complexes (, and ) were prepared with ligands , and [ = N(1),N(2)-bis(2,4,6-trimethylbenzyl)ethane-1,2-diamine; = N(1)-(2,4,6-trimethylbenzyl)-N(2)-(2-((2,4,6-trimethylbenzyl)amino)ethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine] and = N(1)-(2,4,6-trimethylbenzyl)-N(2),N(2)-bis(2-((2,4,6-trimethylbenzyl)amino)ethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine], respectively. The complexes differ from each other in terms of denticity and flexibility of the ligand frameworks. In degassed methanol solution, they were exposed to NO gas and their reactivity was studied using various spectroscopic techniques. In the case of complex with a bidentate ligand, reductive nitrosylation of the metal ion with concomitant dinitrosation of the ligand framework was observed. Complex with a tridentate ligand did not undergo reductive nitrosylation; rather, the formation of [Co(III)(NO(-))] was observed. The nitrosyl complexes were isolated and structurally characterized. On the other hand, complex with a tetradentate tripodal ligand did not react with NO. This can be attributed to the geometry of the complex as well as due to the accessibility of the corresponding redox potential.

  1. Hydrolysis of bis(dimethylamido)tin to tin (II) oxyhydroxide and its selective transformation into tin (II) or tin (IV) oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Khanderi, Jayaprakash

    2015-03-01

    Sn6O4(OH)4, a hydrolysis product of Sn(NMe2)2, is transformed to tin (II) or tin (IV) oxide by solid and solution phase processing. Tin (II) oxide is formed by heating Sn6O4(OH)4 at ≤200 °C in air or under inert atmosphere. Tin (IV) oxide nanoparticles are formed in the presence of a carboxylic acid and base in air at room temperature. IR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetry (coupled with infrared spectroscopy), powder X-ray diffraction, high temperature X-ray diffraction, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy are used for the characterization of Sn6O4(OH)4 and the investigation of its selective decomposition into SnO or SnO2. Spectroscopic and X-ray diffraction results indicate that SnO is formed by the removal of water from crystalline Sn6O4(OH)4. SEM shows octahedral morphology of the Sn6O4(OH)4, SnO and SnO2 with particle size from 400 nm-2 μm during solid state conversion. Solution phase transformation of Sn6O4(OH)4 to SnO2 occurs in the presence of potassium glutarate and oxygen. SnO2 particles are 15-20 nm in size.

  2. Anoxic and Oxic Oxidation of Rocks Containing Fe(II)Mg-Silicates and Fe(II)-Monosulfides as Source of Fe(III)-Minerals and Hydrogen. Geobiotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2017-03-01

    In this article, anoxic and oxic hydrolyses of rocks containing Fe (II) Mg-silicates and Fe (II)-monosulfides are analyzed at 25 °C and 250-350 °C. A table of the products is drawn. It is shown that magnetite and hydrogen can be produced during low-temperature (25 °C) anoxic hydrolysis/oxidation of ferrous silicates and during high-temperature (250 °C) anoxic hydrolysis/oxidation of ferrous monosulfides. The high-T (350 °C) anoxic hydrolysis of ferrous silicates leads mainly to ferric oxides/hydroxides such as the hydroxide ferric trihydroxide, the oxide hydroxide goethite/lepidocrocite and the oxide hematite, and to Fe(III)-phyllosilicates. Magnetite is not a primary product. While the low-T (25 °C) anoxic hydrolysis of ferrous monosulfides leads to pyrite. Thermodynamic functions are calculated for elementary reactions of hydrolysis and carbonation of olivine and pyroxene and E-pH diagrams are analyzed. It is shown that the hydrolysis of the iron endmember is endothermic and can proceed within the exothermic hydrolysis of the magnesium endmember and also within the exothermic reactions of carbonations. The distinction between three products of the iron hydrolysis, magnetite, goethite and hematite is determined with E-pH diagrams. The hydrolysis/oxidation of the sulfides mackinawite/troilite/pyrrhotite is highly endothermic but can proceed within the heat produced by the exothermic hydrolyses and carbonations of ferromagnesian silicates and also by other sources such as magma, hydrothermal sources, impacts. These theoretical results are confirmed by the products observed in several related laboratory experiments. The case of radiolyzed water is studied. It is shown that magnetite and ferric oxides/hydroxides such as ferric trihydroxide, goethite/lepidocrocite and hematite are formed in oxic hydrolysis of ferromagnesian silicates at 25 °C and 350 °C. Oxic oxidation of ferrous monosulfides at 25 °C leads mainly to pyrite and ferric oxides/hydroxides such as

  3. Theory for planetary exospheres: II. Radiation pressure effect on exospheric density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beth, A.; Garnier, P.; Toublanc, D.; Dandouras, I.; Mazelle, C.

    2016-03-01

    The planetary exospheres are poorly known in their outer parts, since the neutral densities are low compared with the instruments detection capabilities. The exospheric models are thus often the main source of information at such high altitudes. We present a new way to take into account analytically the additional effect of the radiation pressure on planetary exospheres. In a series of papers, we present with an Hamiltonian approach the effect of the radiation pressure on dynamical trajectories, density profiles and escaping thermal flux. Our work is a generalization of the study by Bishop and Chamberlain (1989). In this second part of our work, we present here the density profiles of atomic Hydrogen in planetary exospheres subject to the radiation pressure. We first provide the altitude profiles of ballistic particles (the dominant exospheric population in most cases), which exhibit strong asymmetries that explain the known geotail phenomenon at Earth. The radiation pressure strongly enhances the densities compared with the pure gravity case (i.e. the Chamberlain profiles), in particular at noon and midnight. We finally show the existence of an exopause that appears naturally as the external limit for bounded particles, above which all particles are escaping.

  4. The mechanism of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide: II. Kinetics and mechanism of hydrogen sulfide oxidation catalyzed by sulfur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijns, M.; Derks, F.; Verloop, A.; Mars, P.

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide by molecular oxygen have been studied in the temperature range 20–250 °C. The primary reaction product is sulfur which may undergo further oxidation to SO2 at temperatures above 200 °C. From the kinetics of this autocatalytic reaction we

  5. The new 1.5 GeV storage ring for synchrotron radiation: MAX II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Å.; Eriksson, M.; Lindgren, L.-J.; Röjsel, P.; Werin, S.

    1995-02-01

    The MAX laboratory at Lund University, Sweden, today operates an accelerator system consisting of a 100 MeV racetrack microtron and a 550 MeV storage ring (MAX I). At the moment (July 1994) a new storage ring MAX II is near completion and will start first injections within 2 months. This work gives an overview of the MAX II project including the first beamlines and a description of the accelerator system. MAX II is a 1.5 GeV third generation light source optimized for the VUV and soft-x-ray region. It consists of a ten cell double bend achromat lattice forming the 90 m circumference ring. Injection is done at 500 MeV from the existing storage ring MAX I, and ramping up to full energy will take place in MAX II. The straight sections have a length of 3.2 m and eight sections are free to house insertion devices. At start up the ring will be equipped with one 7.5 T superconducting wiggler and one 1.8 T multipole wiggler. Two more undulators are ordered and under construction. To be able to achieve the project a few shortcuts have been made in the design of the storage ring: (1) Nonzero dispersion is allowed in the straight sections, (2) chromaticity correction is built into the quadrupole magnets, and (3) the length of the straight sections is limited to 3.2 m. The project is progressing on time. Extraction of an electron beam from the MAX I storage ring has been achieved and has successfully been transported into the MAX II building. The MAX II ring is under assembly with most of the sections already mounted. First injection is planned to take place in August 1994.

  6. The effects of exposure of {sup 60}Co on the oxidant/antioxidant status among radiation victims

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demir, Mustafa E-mail: mmdemir@e-kolay.net; Konukoglu, Dildar; Kabasakal, Levent; Yelke, Hakan Kadir; Ergen, Kadir; Ahmed, Sabbir

    2002-07-01

    This retrospective study has been performed with radiation victims who were accidentally exposed to a {sup 60}Co source and its release into the environment. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of elevated radiation exposures on plasma level, on erythrocyte thio barbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) level and on erythrocyte glutathione (GSH) levels. Patients were treated in different hospitals with different symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, dizziness, along with severe anemia in some patients. Blood samples were collected 3-5 days following the radiation accident. Increases in plasma (6.25{+-}0.90 nmol ml{sup -1}) and erythrocyte TBARS levels (330.5{+-}30.5 {mu}mol gHb{sup -1}) were found in comparison to a healthy group (3.72{+-}0.68 nmol ml{sup -1} and 150.7{+-}20.5 {mu}mol gHb{sup -1}, respectively) at a significant level (p<0.001). Erythrocyte GSH levels (5.2{+-}0.30 {mu}mol gHb{sup -1}) were found to be decreased among the victims (healthy group: 10.2{+-}0.7 {mu}mol gHb{sup -1}) at the same significance level (p<0.001). These observations confirm a significant change induced by radiation in the oxidant/antioxidant status among the victims. It is suggested here that antioxidant supplementation therapy might be effective in preventing the harmful effects of {sup 60}Co radiation among radiation victims.

  7. 2-D Radiative Transfer in Protostellar Envelopes: II. An Evolutionary Sequence

    OpenAIRE

    Whitney, Barbara A.; Wood, Kenneth; Bjorkman, J. E.; Cohen, Martin

    2003-01-01

    We present model spectral energy distributions, colors, polarization, and images for an evolutionary sequence of a low-mass protostar from the early collapse stage (Class 0) to the remnant disk stage (Class III). We find a substantial overlap in colors and SEDs between protostars embedded in envelopes (Class 0-I) and T Tauri disks (Class II), especially at mid-IR wavelengths. Edge-on Class I-II sources show double-peaked spectral energy distributions, with a short-wavelength hump due to scatt...

  8. Distribution of Heating from Untrapped HOM Radiation in the LCLS-II Cryomodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bane, Karl [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nantista, Christopher [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Adolphsen, Chris [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Raubenheimer, Tor [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Saini, Arun [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Solyak, Nikolay [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Yakovlev, Vyacheslav [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-02-17

    The superconducting cavities in the CW linacs of LCLS-II will operate at 2 K, where cooling is very expensive. One source of heat is presented by the higher order mode (HOM) power deposited by the beam. Due to the very short bunch length, especially in the L3 region, the LCLS-II beam spectrum extends into the terahertz range. Ceramic absorbers, at 70 K between cryomodules, are meant to absorb much of this power. In this report we perform two kinds of calculations to estimate the effectiveness of the absorbers and the fractional power that remains to be removed at 2 K

  9. CATALYTIC WET PEROXIDE OXIDATION OF HYDROQUINONE WITH Co(II)/ACTIVE CARBON CATALYST LOADED IN STATIC BED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Catalysts based on Co(II) supported on active carbon were prepared and loaded in static bed. The hydroquinone would be degraded completely after treated by Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation method with Co(II)/active carbon catalyst. After activate treatment, the active carbon was immerged in cobaltous nitrate solution, then put into a drying oven, Co(II) could be loaded on the micro-surface of carbon. Taking the static bed as the equipment, the absorption of active carbon and catalysis of Co(II) was used to reduce activation energy of hydroquinone. Thus hydroquinone could be drastically degraded and the effluent can be drained under the standard. Referring to Fenton reaction mechanism, experiment had been done to study the heterogeneous catalyzed oxidation mechanism of Co(II). The degradation rate of hydroquinone effluent could be achieved to 92% when treated in four columns at H2O2 concentration 10%, reaction temperature 40℃ , pH 5 and reaction time 2.5h.

  10. Pyroprocessing of Oxidized Sodium-Bonded Fast Reactor Fuel -- an Experimental Study of Treatment Options for Degraded EBR-II Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. D. Herrmann; L. A. Wurth; N. J. Gese

    2013-09-01

    An experimental study was conducted to assess pyrochemical treatment options for degraded EBR-II fuel. As oxidized material, the degraded fuel would need to be converted back to metal to enable electrorefining within an existing electrometallurgical treatment process. A lithium-based electrolytic reduction process was studied to assess the efficacy of converting oxide materials to metal with a particular focus on the impact of zirconium oxide and sodium oxide on this process. Bench-scale electrolytic reduction experiments were performed in LiCl-Li2O at 650 °C with combinations of manganese oxide (used as a surrogate for uranium oxide), zirconium oxide, and sodium oxide. The experimental study illustrated how zirconium oxide and sodium oxide present different challenges to a lithium-based electrolytic reduction system for conversion of select metal oxides to metal.

  11. Results of simultaneous combination therapy with radiation and chemotherapeutics in stage I. II non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Yutaka

    1989-01-01

    From October 1973 through August 1986, 100 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients (Male 61, Female 39, Mean age 56 yr) were treated in our department. Diffuse large cell type was the most predominant histologic type (63 patients). There were 29 Stage I, 45 Stage II, 14 Stage III and 12 Stage IV patients. Since Aug. 1981, simultaneous therapy combinations involving radiation and chemotherapeutic techniques in Stage I,II patients were used. Complication such as leucopenia, mucositis and fever were encounterd occasionally, but the therapy was completed when the administration of drugs had been stopped for a few weeks. Treatment results of combination therapy were quite excellent compared to previous ones; 5 year survival was 100% vs 67% in Stage I (not significant) and 92% vs 44% in Stage II (p<0.01). As for radiologic examination for staging, it was concluded that CT-scans, lymphography, /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy and GI study are indispensable, bone scintigraphy is desirable and liver-spleen scitigraphy is not necessary.

  12. Current status and future prospective of advanced radiation resistant oxide dispersion strengthened steel (ARROS) development for nuclear reactor system applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Kyu; Noh, Sang Hoon; Kang, Suk Hoon; Park, Jin Ju; Jin, Hyun Ju; Lee, Min Ku; Jang, Jin Sugn; Rhee, Chang Kyu [Nuclear Materials Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    As one of the Gen-IV nuclear energy systems, a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) is being developed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. As a long-term national research project, advanced radiation resistant oxide dispersion strengthened steel (ARROS) is being developed as an in-core fuel cladding tube material for a SFR in the future. In this paper, the current status of ARROS development is reviewed and its future prospective is discussed.

  13. Total dose radiation response of modified commercial silicon-on-insulator materials with nitrogen implanted buried oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zhong-Shan; Liu Zhong-Li; Yu Fang; Li Ning

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen ions of various doses are implanted into the buried oxide (BOX) of commercial silicon-on-insulator (SOI)materials,and subsequent annealings are carried out at various temperatures.The total dose radiation responses of the nitrogen-implanted SOI wafers are characterized by the high frequency capacitance-voltage (C-V) technique after irradiation using a Co-60 source.It is found that there exist relatively complex relationships between the radiation hardness of the nitrogen implanted BOX and the nitrogen implantation dose at different irradiation doses.Fhe experimental results also suggest that a lower dose nitrogen implantation and a higher post-implantation annealing temperature are suitable for improving the radiation hardness of SOI wafer.Based on the measured C-V data,secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS),and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy,the total dose responses of the nitrogen-implanted SOI wafers are discussed.

  14. Radiation exposure in the remote period after the Chernobyl accident caused oxidative stress and genetic effects in Scots pine populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, Polina Yu.; Geras'Kin, Stanislav A.; Kazakova, Elizaveta A.

    2017-02-01

    Even 30 years after the Chernobyl accident, biological effects of irradiation are observed in the chronically exposed Scots pine populations. Chronic radiation exposure at dose rates above 50 mGy•yr-1 caused oxidative stress and led to the increase of antioxidants concentrations in these populations. Genetic variability was examined for 6 enzymes and 14 enzymatic loci of 6 Scots pine populations. Dose rates over 10 mGy•yr-1 caused the increased frequency of mutations and changes in genetic structure of Scots pine populations. However, the same dose rates had no effect on enzymatic activities. The results indicate that even relatively low dose rates of radiation can be considered as an ecological factor which should be taken into account for ecological management and radiation protection of biota species.

  15. Exposure to radiofrequency radiation induces oxidative stress in duckweed Lemna minor L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkalec, Mirta [Department of Botany, Division of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Rooseveltov trg 6, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)], E-mail: mtkalec@zg.biol.pmf.hr; Malaric, Kresimir [Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, University of Zagreb, Unska 3, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Pevalek-Kozlina, Branka [Department of Botany, Division of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Rooseveltov trg 6, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2007-12-15

    Widespread use of radiofrequency radiation emitting devices increased the exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) from 300 MHz to 300 GHz. Various biological effects of exposure to these fields have been documented so far, but very little work has been carried out on plants. The aim of the present work was to investigate the physiological responses of the plant Lemna minor after exposure to radiofrequency EMFs, and in particular, to clarify the possible role of oxidative stress in the observed effects. Duckweed was exposed for 2 h to EMFs of 400 and 900 MHz at field strengths of 10, 23, 41 and 120 V m{sup -1}. The effect of a longer exposure time (4 h) and modulation was also investigated. After exposure, parameters of oxidative stress, such as lipid peroxidation, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} content, activities and isoenzyme pattern of antioxidative enzymes as well as HSP70 expression were evaluated. At 400 MHz, lipid peroxidation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} content were significantly enhanced in duckweed exposed to EMFs of 23 and 120 V m{sup -1} while other exposure treatments did not have an effect. Compared to the controls, the activities of antioxidative enzymes showed different behaviour: catalase (CAT) activity increased after most exposure treatments while pyrogallol (PPX) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities were not changed. Exceptions were reduced PPX and APX activity after longer exposure at 23 V m{sup -1} and increased PPX activity after exposures at 10 and 120 V m{sup -1}. By contrast, at 900 MHz almost all exposure treatments significantly increased level of lipid peroxidation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} content but mostly decreased PPX activity and did not affect CAT activity. Exceptions were exposures to a modulated field and to the field of 120 V m{sup -1} which increased PPX and CAT activity. At this frequency APX activity was significantly decreased after exposure at 10 V m{sup -1} and longer exposure at 23 V m{sup -1} but it increased after a shorter exposure at

  16. Gamma radiation induces growth retardation, impaired egg production, and oxidative stress in the marine copepod Paracyclopina nana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Eun-Ji; Lee, Jae-Seong, E-mail: jslee2@skku.edu

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Mortality was increased with a dose dependent manner in ovigerous females of Paracyclopina nana. • Developmental impairments were observed in gamma irradiated nauplii. • Ovigerous females exposed to more than 50 Gy could not have normal two bilateral egg sacs. • Oxidative levels increased with antioxidant enzyme activities in the gamma irradiated P. nana. • The molecular indices (antioxidant enzymes and heat shock protein) were also increased. - Abstract: Accidental nuclear radioisotope release into the ocean from nuclear power plants is of concern due to ecological and health risks. In this study, we used the marine copepod Paracyclopina nana to examine the effects of radioisotopes on marine organisms upon gamma radiation, and to measure the effects on growth and fecundity, which affect population and community structure. Upon gamma radiation, mortality (LD50 – 96 h = 172 Gy) in P. nana was significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner in ovigerous P. nana females. For developmental impairment of gamma-irradiated nauplii, we observed growth retardation; in over 30 Gy-irradiated groups, offspring did not grow to adults. Particularly, over 50 Gy-irradiated ovigerous P. nana females did not have normal bilateral egg sacs, and their offspring did not develop normally to adulthood. Additionally, at over 30 Gy, we found dose-dependent increases in oxidative levels with elevated antioxidant enzyme activities and DNA repair activities. These findings indicate that gamma radiation can induce oxidative stress and DNA damage with growth retardation and impaired reproduction.

  17. No late effect of ionizing radiation on the aging-related oxidative changes in the mouse brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Beom Su; Kim, Seol Wha; Jung, U Hee; Jo, Sung Kee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    Radiation-induced late injury to normal tissue is a primary area of radiation biology research. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether the late effect of the ionizing radiation appears as an age-related oxidative status in the brain. Three groups of 4-month old C57BL/6 mice that were exposed to {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays at a single dose (5 Gy) or fractionated doses (1 Gy x 5 times, or 0,2 Gy x 25 times) at 2 months old were investigated for the oxidative status of their brains with both young (2-month) and old (24-month) mice. A significant (poxidative level in the {gamma}-ray irradiated mice brains.

  18. The effect of Ca2+ ions and ionic strength on Mn(II) oxidation by spores of the marine Bacillus sp. SG-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2013-01-01

    Manganese(IV) oxides, believed to form primarily through microbial activities, are extremely important mineral phases in marine environments where they scavenge a variety of trace elements and thereby control their distributions. The presence of various ions common in seawater are known to influence Mn oxide mineralogy yet little is known about the effect of these ions on the kinetics of bacterial Mn(II) oxidation and Mn oxide formation. We examined factors affecting bacterial Mn(II) oxidation by spores of the marine Bacillus sp. strain SG-1 in natural and artificial seawater of varying ionic conditions. Ca2+ concentration dramatically affected Mn(II) oxidation, while Mg2+, Sr2+, K+, Na+ and NO3- ions had no effect. The rate of Mn(II) oxidation at 10 mM Ca2+ (seawater composition) was four or five times that without Ca2+. The relationship between Ca2+ content and oxidation rate demonstrates that the equilibrium constant is small (on the order of 0.1) and the binding coefficient is 0.5. The pH optimum for Mn(II) oxidation changed depending on the amount of Ca2+ present, suggesting that Ca2+ exerts a direct effect on the enzyme perhaps as a stabilizing bridge between polypeptide components. We also examined the effect of varying concentrations of NaCl or KNO3 (0-2000 mM) on the kinetics of Mn(II) oxidation in solutions containing 10 mM Ca2+. Mn(II) oxidation was unaffected by changes in ionic strength (I) below 0.2, but it was inhibited by increasing salt concentrations above this value. Our results suggest that the critical coagulation concentration is around 200 mM of salt (I = ca. 0.2), and that the ionic strength of seawater (I > 0.2) accelerates the precipitation of Mn oxides around the spores. Under these conditions, the aggregation of Mn oxides reduces the supply of dissolved O2 and/or Mn2+ and inhibits the Mn(II) → Mn(III) step controlling the enzymatic oxidation of Mn(II). Our results suggest that the hardness and ionic strength of the aquatic environment

  19. Point-source idealization in classical field theories. II. Mechanical energy losses from electromagnetic radiation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kates, Ronald E.; Rosenblum, Arnold

    1982-05-01

    This paper compares the mechanical energy losses due to electromagnetic radiation reaction on a two-particle, slow-motion system, as calculated from (1) the method of matched asymptotic expansions and (2) the Lorentz-Dirac equation, which assumes point sources. The matching derivation of the preceding paper avoided the assumption of a δ-function source by using Reissner-Nordström matching zones. Despite the differing mathematical assumptions of the two methods, their results are in agreement with each other and with the electromagnetic-field energy losses calculated by the evaluation of flux integrals. Our purpose is eventually to analyze Rosenblum's use of point sources as a possible cause of disagreement between the analogous calculations of gravitational radiation on a slow-motion system of two bodies. We begin with the simpler electromagnetic problem.

  20. Active control of sound transmission/radiation from elastic plates by vibration inputs. II - Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, V. L.; Fuller, C. R.; Silcox, R. J.; Brown, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Actively controlled harmonic force inputs were applied experimentally to reduce the sound transmitted through an elastic circular plate. The control implementation used a time domain least mean square adaptive algorithm with two error sensors. The control forces were applied directly to the plate by point force vibration inputs, while the error information and performance were measured in the radiated acoustic field by microphones. Test cases were also performed in which the error sensors were accelerometers mounted on the plate. When accelerometers were used as error sensors, the controller performance was degraded; leading to the conclusion that minimizing plate motion does not necessarily lead to an associated decrease in radiated sound levels. In contrast, the results show excellent attenuation of the transmitted sound field when microphone error sensors were used. This result was consistent over a range of frequencies. In addition, the experimental results are compared to previously derived analytical results and the effect of using a point or global minimization scheme is discussed.

  1. Self-organization of cosmic radiation pressure instability. II - One-dimensional simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Craig J.; Woods, Jorden

    1992-01-01

    The clustering of statistically uniform discrete absorbing particles moving solely under the influence of radiation pressure from uniformly distributed emitters is studied in a simple one-dimensional model. Radiation pressure tends to amplify statistical clustering in the absorbers; the absorbing material is swept into empty bubbles, the biggest bubbles grow bigger almost as they would in a uniform medium, and the smaller ones get crushed and disappear. Numerical simulations of a one-dimensional system are used to support the conjecture that the system is self-organizing. Simple statistics indicate that a wide range of initial conditions produce structure approaching the same self-similar statistical distribution, whose scaling properties follow those of the attractor solution for an isolated bubble. The importance of the process for large-scale structuring of the interstellar medium is briefly discussed.

  2. Dwarf galaxies with ionizing radiation feedback. II. Spatially resolved star formation relation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji-hoon; Krumholz, Mark R.; Wise, John H.; Turk, Matthew J.; Goldbaum, Nathan J.; Abel, Tom

    2013-11-15

    AWe investigate the spatially resolved star formation relation using a galactic disk formed in a comprehensive high-resolution (3.8 pc) simulation. Our new implementation of stellar feedback includes ionizing radiation as well as supernova explosions, and we handle ionizing radiation by solving the radiative transfer equation rather than by a subgrid model. Photoheating by stellar radiation stabilizes gas against Jeans fragmentation, reducing the star formation rate (SFR). Because we have self-consistently calculated the location of ionized gas, we are able to make simulated, spatially resolved observations of star formation tracers, such as Hα emission. We can also observe how stellar feedback manifests itself in the correlation between ionized and molecular gas. Applying our techniques to the disk in a galactic halo of 2.3 × 1011 M , we find that the correlation between SFR density (estimated from mock Hα emission) and H2 density shows large scatter, especially at high resolutions of ≲ 75 pc that are comparable to the size of giant molecular clouds (GMCs). This is because an aperture of GMC size captures only particular stages of GMC evolution and because Hα traces hot gas around star-forming regions and is displaced from the H2 peaks themselves. By examining the evolving environment around star clusters, we speculate that the breakdown of the traditional star formation laws of the Kennicutt-Schmidt type at small scales is further aided by a combination of stars drifting from their birthplaces and molecular clouds being dispersed via stellar feedback.

  3. Late Reheating of the IGM by Quasars: A Radiation Hydrodynamical Simulation of Helium II Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Paschos, Pascal; Bordner, James O; Harkness, Robert

    2007-01-01

    We study the ionization and thermal evolution of the intergalactic medium during the epoch of \\heii reionization by means of radiation hydrodynamical cosmological simulations. We post-process baryonic density fields from a standard optically-thin IGM simulation with a homogeneous galaxy-dominated UV background (UVB) which reionizes \\hi and \\hei at z=6.5 but does not have any contribution to the ionization of \\heii. Quasars with luminosities proportional to the mass of the host halos are then introduced as point sources throughout the 100 Mpc simulation volume consistent with the Pei luminosity function. We evolve the spatial distribution of the \\heii ionizing radiation field using a time-implicit variable tensor Eddington factor radiative transfer scheme. Simultaneously, we also solve for the local ionization of \\heii to \\heii and the associated photoheating of the gas. We find that the percolation of the \\heiii regions is essentially complete by z=2.5. When comparing to a self-consistent optically thin simul...

  4. Advances in 4D radiation therapy for managing respiration: part II - 4D treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosu, Mihaela; Hugo, Geoffrey D

    2012-12-01

    The development of 4D CT imaging technology made possible the creation of patient models that are reflective of respiration-induced anatomical changes by adding a temporal dimension to the conventional 3D, spatial-only, patient description. This had opened a new venue for treatment planning and radiation delivery, aimed at creating a comprehensive 4D radiation therapy process for moving targets. Unlike other breathing motion compensation strategies (e.g. breath-hold and gating techniques), 4D radiotherapy assumes treatment delivery over the entire respiratory cycle - an added bonus for both patient comfort and treatment time efficiency. The time-dependent positional and volumetric information holds the promise for optimal, highly conformal, radiotherapy for targets experiencing movements caused by respiration, with potentially elevated dose prescriptions and therefore higher cure rates, while avoiding the uninvolved nearby structures. In this paper, the current state of the 4D treatment planning is reviewed, from theory to the established practical routine. While the fundamental principles of 4D radiotherapy are well defined, the development of a complete, robust and clinically feasible process still remains a challenge, imposed by limitations in the available treatment planning and radiation delivery systems. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  5. Advances in 4D Radiation Therapy for Managing Respiration: Part II – 4D Treatment Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosu, Mihaela; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    The development of 4D CT imaging technology made possible the creation of patient models that are reflective of respiration-induced anatomical changes by adding a temporal dimension to the conventional 3D, spatial-only, patient description. This had opened a new venue for treatment planning and radiation delivery, aimed at creating a comprehensive 4D radiation therapy process for moving targets. Unlike other breathing motion compensation strategies (e.g. breath-hold and gating techniques), 4D radiotherapy assumes treatment delivery over the entire respiratory cycle – an added bonus for both patient comfort and treatment time efficiency. The time-dependent positional and volumetric information holds the promise for optimal, highly conformal, radiotherapy for targets experiencing movements caused by respiration, with potentially elevated dose prescriptions and therefore higher cure rates, while avoiding the uninvolved nearby structures. In this paper, the current state of the 4D treatment planning is reviewed, from theory to the established practical routine. While the fundamental principles of 4D radiotherapy are well defined, the development of a complete, robust and clinically feasible process still remains a challenge, imposed by limitations in the available treatment planning and radiation delivery systems. PMID:22796324

  6. Simulations of protostellar collapse using multigroup radiation hydrodynamics. II. The second collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Vaytet, N; Audit, E; Commercon, B; Masson, J; Ferguson, J; Delahaye, F

    2013-01-01

    Star formation begins with the gravitational collapse of a dense core inside a molecular cloud. As the collapse progresses, the centre of the core begins to heat up as it becomes optically thick. The temperature and density in the centre eventually reach high enough values where fusion reactions can ignite; the protostar is born. This se