WorldWideScience

Sample records for radiation exposure 4th

  1. Radiation Exposure and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Updated: June 2017 Health Physics Society Specialists in Radiation Safety Radiation Exposure and Pregnancy The birth of a child ... experience. It is In addition to unavoidable background radiation, one hard to prepare yourself for the joys— ...

  2. Monitoring of radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-02-01

    The guide specifies the requirements for the monitoring of radiation exposure in instances where radiation is used. In addition to workers, the guide covers students, apprentices and visitors. The guide shall also apply to exposure from natural radiation. However, the monitoring of radiation exposure in nuclear power plants is dealt with in YVL Guide 7.10 and 7.11. The guide defines the concepts relevant to the monitoring of radiation exposure and provides guidelines for determining the necessity of monitoring and subsequently arranging such in different operations. In addition, the guide specifies the criteria for the approval and regulatory control of the dosimetric service.

  3. Radiation exposure and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labant, Amy; Silva, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Radiological exposure from nuclear power reactor accidents, transportation of nuclear waste accidents, industrial accidents, or terrorist activity may be a remote possibility, but it could happen. Nurses must be prepared to evaluate and treat pregnant women and infants who have been exposed to radiation, and to have an understanding of the health consequences of a nuclear or radiological incident. Pregnant women and infants are a special group of patients who need consideration when exposed to radiation. Initial care requires thorough assessment and decisions regarding immediate care needs. Ongoing care is based on type and extent of radiation exposure. With accurate, comprehensive information and education, nurses will be better prepared to help mitigate the effects of radiation exposure to pregnant women and infants following a radiological incident. Information about radiation, health effects of prenatal radiation exposure, assessment, patient care, and treatment of pregnant women and infants are presented.

  4. Doses from radiation exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Practical implementation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) system of protection requires the availability of appropriate methods and data. The work of Committee 2 is concerned with the development of reference data and methods for the assessment of internal and external radiation exposure of workers and members of the public. This involves the development of reference biokinetic and dosimetric models, reference anatomical models of the human body, and reference anatomical and physiological data. Following ICRP's 2007 Recommendations, Committee 2 has focused on the provision of new reference dose coefficients for external and internal exposure. As well as specifying changes to the radiation and tissue weighting factors used in the calculation of protection quantities, the 2007 Recommendations introduced the use of reference anatomical phantoms based on medical imaging data, requiring explicit sex averaging of male and female organ-equivalent doses in the calculation of effecti...

  5. Radiation exposure during intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hak, David J

    2017-06-01

    Surgeons should aim to keep radiation exposure "As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA)" during intramedullary nailing and other minimally invasive surgical procedures. This requires understanding the principles of ionizing radiation and methods for minimizing exposure risk. The main source of radiation exposure to surgical personnel during fluoroscopy is from scattered radiation. Since radiation scatter is mainly directed towards the fluoroscopy source, the best configuration during surgery to reduce radiation dose to the surgeon is to position the fluoroscopic source below the operating room table and the image collector above the table. During cross table imaging, the surgeon should stand on the side with the image collector to minimize their exposure to radiation scatter. To reduce scattered radiation the patient must be placed as close to the image collector and as far away from the x-ray tube as possible. Standing farther away from the patient can exponentially reduce radiation exposure. The hands usually have the greatest dose exposure to radiation during surgical procedures, but they are far less radiosensitive than the eyes or thyroid. To minimize exposure to the hands, a surgeon should use the hands-off technique taking fluoroscopic images only when his or her hands are farthest from the radiographic field. Lead gowns, lead thyroid shields, and lead glasses, further reduces an individual's exposure to radiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. DOE 2012 occupational radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site.

  7. DOE 2011 occupational radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past five years.

  8. DOE 2009 occupational radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Safety Analysis (HS-30) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE.* The DOE 2009 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past 5 years.

  9. DOE 2008 occupational radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Safety Analysis (HS-30) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE. The DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. This report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past 5 years.

  10. DOE 2010 occupational radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE.* The DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past 5 years.

  11. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Søren; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Espina, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    were given for carcinogenic drugs and medical radiation in the 4th edition of European Code against Cancer. It is crucial that the application of these measures relies on medical expertise and thorough benefit-risk evaluation. This also pertains to cancer-preventive drugs, and self-medication...

  12. Sarcoma risk after radiation exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berrington de Gonzalez Amy

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sarcomas were one of the first solid cancers to be linked to ionizing radiation exposure. We reviewed the current evidence on this relationship, focusing particularly on the studies that had individual estimates of radiation doses. There is clear evidence of an increased risk of both bone and soft tissue sarcomas after high-dose fractionated radiation exposure (10 + Gy in childhood, and the risk increases approximately linearly in dose, at least up to 40 Gy. There are few studies available of sarcoma after radiotherapy in adulthood for cancer, but data from cancer registries and studies of treatment for benign conditions confirm that the risk of sarcoma is also increased in this age-group after fractionated high-dose exposure. New findings from the long-term follow-up of the Japanese atomic bomb survivors suggest, for the first time, that sarcomas can be induced by acute lower-doses of radiation (

  13. DOE 2013 occupational radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    The Office of Analysis within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (EHSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2013 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past five-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information has been analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site.

  14. Psychiatric disorders after radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokai, Masahiro [Hyogo Coll. of Medicine, Nishinomiya (Japan); Soejima, Toshinori; Wang, Shangdong; Shinfuku, Naotaka

    2001-04-01

    This review focuses on the mental and psychological effects of medical radiation exposure, the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island, the Chernobyl disaster, atomic bomb explosions at Nagasaki and Hiroshima, and accidents at nuclear power plants and nuclear waste plants. Studies have shown that anxiety about the adverse effects of radiation in medicine (such as infertility, carcinogenicity, and genotoxicity) and fear for exposure has caused psychiatric disorders. Several studies on the mental health effects of the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island were conducted, and the results indicated that psychiatric distress persisted for a certain period of time, particularly in pregnant women and women who have children, even when no evidence of substantial of radiation exposure is seen clinically. The psychological consequences of the Chernobyl disaster have been investigated continuously, and various problems, e.g., acute stress reaction, neurosis, and psychosis, have been identified, although no physical damage due to the radiation or PTSD have been reported. By contrast, PTSD has been seen in survivors of the Nagasaki and Hiroshima nuclear explosions. A study in Ohio, (United States), which has a nuclear waste plant, investigated PTSD in people living near the plant and found that the symptom level was mild. In general, the most common symptoms among people with mental and psychological disorders due to radiation exposure are depression and anxiety, with many people having associated somatoform disorders, and some people complain of PTSD. Vague anxiety and fear of sequelae, regardless of the exposure dose, appears to cause such psychiatric disorders. Although it is rare for psychiatrists to see such cases of psychiatric disorders due to radiation exposure, their number may increase as psychiatric services become more widely available. (K.H.)

  15. Radiation exposure from diagnostic radiography

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    are also completely eliminated, thus leaving out beam collimation and good technique as the major potential sources of patient's over exposure6. The aim of this study was to assess the level of radiation protection practices among radiographers using x- ray beam collimation as an assessment criterion. METHODOLOGY.

  16. Radiation exposure analysis of female nuclear medicine radiation workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju Young [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering Graduate School, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hoon Hee [Dept. of Radiological Technologist, Shingu College, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    In this study, radiation workers who work in nuclear medicine department were analyzed to find the cause of differences of radiation exposure from General Characteristic, Knowledge, Recognition and Conduct, especially females working on nuclear medicine radiation, in order to pave the way for positive defense against radiation exposure. The subjects were 106 radiation workers who were divided into two groups of sixty-four males and forty-two females answered questions about their General Characteristic, Knowledge, Recognition, Conduct, and radiation exposure dose which was measured by TLD (Thermo Luminescence Dosimeter). The results of the analysis revealed that as the higher score of knowledge and conduct was shown, the radiation exposure decreased in female groups, and as the higher score of conduct was shown, the radiation exposure decreased in male groups. In the correlation analysis of female groups, the non-experienced in pregnancy showed decreasing amount of radiation exposure as the score of knowledge and conduct was higher and the experienced in pregnancy showed decreasing amount of radiation exposure as the score of recognition and conduct was higher. In the regression analysis on related factors of radiation exposure dose of nuclear medicine radiation workers, the gender caused the meaningful result and the amount of radiation exposure of female groups compared to male groups. In the regression analysis on related factors of radiation exposure dose of female groups, the factor of conduct showed a meaningful result and the amount of radiation exposure of the experienced in pregnancy was lower compared to the non-experienced. The conclusion of this study revealed that radiation exposure of female groups was lower than that of male groups. Therefore, male groups need to more actively defend themselves against radiation exposure. Among the female groups, the experienced in pregnancy who have an active defense tendency showed a lower radiation exposure. Thus

  17. Inherited susceptibility and radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, J.B. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States)

    1997-03-01

    There is continuing concern that some people in the general population may have genetic makeups that place them at particularly high risk for radiation-induced cancer. The existence of such a susceptible subpopulation would have obvious implications for the estimation of risks of radiation exposure. Although it has been long known that familial aggregations of cancer do sometimes occur, recent evidence suggests that a general genetic predisposition to cancer does not exist; most cancers occur sporadically. On the other hand, nearly 10% of the known Mendelian genetic disorders are associated with cancer. A number of these involve a familial predisposition to cancer, and some are characterized by an enhanced susceptibility to the induction of cancer by various physical and chemical carcinogens, including ionizing radiation. Such increased susceptibility will depend on several factors including the frequency of the susceptibility gene in the population and its penetrance, the strength of the predisposition, and the degree to which the cancer incidence in susceptible individuals may be increased by the carcinogen. It is now known that these cancer-predisposing genes may be responsible not only for rare familial cancer syndromes, but also for a proportion of the common cancers. Although the currently known disorders can account for only a small fraction of all cancers, they serve as models for genetic predisposition to carcinogen-induced cancer in the general population. In the present report, the author describes current knowledge of those specific disorders that are associated with an enhanced predisposition to radiation-induced cancer, and discusses how this knowledge may bear on the susceptibility to radiation-induced cancer in the general population and estimates of the risk of radiation exposure.

  18. 4th Machining Innovations Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This contributed volume contains the research results presented at the 4th Machining Innovations Conference, Hannover, September 2013. The topic of the conference are new production technologies in aerospace industry and the focus is on energy efficient machine tools as well as sustainable process planning. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  19. DEGRO`98. 4th German congress on radiation oncology, biology, physics. Book of abstracts; DEGRO`98. 4. Deutscher Kongress fuer Radioonkologie, Strahlenbiologie und Medizinische Physik. Abstractband

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1998-11-01

    The special issue contains all abstracts of the congress papers and compact information on the subjects of poster sessions and refresher courses. The themes of the technical and poster sessions are: Radiation physics of brachytherapy, CT-simulation and dosimetry, positioning and verification, 3D planning, quality assurance, irradiation planning and imaging, portal imaging; radiobiology in the context of interactions in combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy, cytokine and fibrosis, radiosensitivity and repair, apoptosis, oxygen and radiation effects; CNS; Amifostine as a protective agent in radiotherapy and chemotherapy: breast cancer; upper gastro-intestinal tract; anti-inflammation and proliferation irradiation; stereotaxy; palliative treatments; head and neck cancer, irradiation techniques; hyperthermia; rectal carcinoma; urogenital tract; malignant lymphoma; eyes and orbita; cervical and corpus carcinoma; non-cat-cell bronchial carcinoma. (MG/CB) [Deutsch] Der vorliegende Sonderband legt alle Abstracts der Tagung sowie die Inhaltsangaben der Poster-Sessions und der Refresher-Kurse vor. Die Themen der Vortraege und Poster waren wie folgt: Strahlenphysik der Brachytherapie, der CT-Simulation und Dosimetrie, der Lagerung und Verifikation, der 3D-Planung, der Qualitaetssicherung, der Bestrahlungsplanung und Bildgebung und des Portal Imagings; Strahlenbiologie in Bezug auf Interaktion von Chemo- und Radiotherapie, Zytokine und Fibrose, Strahlenempfindlichkeit und Reparatur, Apoptose, Sauerstoff und Strahlenwirkung; ZNS; Amifostin als Protektor in Radio- und Chemotherapie: Mammakarzinom; oberer Gastrointestinaltrakt; entzuendungs- und antiproliferative Bestrahlung; Stereotaxie; Palliativmedizin; Kopf-Hals-Bereich; Bestrahlungstechniken; Hyperthermie; Rektum- und Analkarzinom; Urogenitaltrakt; maligne Lymphome; Auge und Orbita; Zervix- und Korpuskarzinom; nichtkleinzelliges Bronchialkarzinom. (MG)

  20. 4th International Cryocoolers Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Patton, George; Knox, Margaret

    1987-01-01

    The Cryocoolers 4 proceedings archives the contributions of leading international experts at the 4th International Cryocooler Conference that was held in Easton, Maryland on September 25-26, 1986. About 170 people attended the conference representing 11 countries, 14 universities, 21 government laboratories and 60 industrial companies. Thirty-one papers were presented describing advancements and applications of cryocoolers in the temperature range below 80K. This year's conference was sponsored by the David Taylor Naval Ship Research and Development Center of Annapolis, Maryland, and the conference proceedings reproduced here was published by them.

  1. Acute radiation syndrome caused by accidental radiation exposure - therapeutic principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörr Harald

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fortunately radiation accidents are infrequent occurrences, but since they have the potential of large scale events like the nuclear accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima, preparatory planning of the medical management of radiation accident victims is very important. Radiation accidents can result in different types of radiation exposure for which the diagnostic and therapeutic measures, as well as the outcomes, differ. The clinical course of acute radiation syndrome depends on the absorbed radiation dose and its distribution. Multi-organ-involvement and multi-organ-failure need be taken into account. The most vulnerable organ system to radiation exposure is the hematopoietic system. In addition to hematopoietic syndrome, radiation induced damage to the skin plays an important role in diagnostics and the treatment of radiation accident victims. The most important therapeutic principles with special reference to hematopoietic syndrome and cutaneous radiation syndrome are reviewed.

  2. ECOGEN 4th Project Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Paul Henning

    included incremental benefits and costs of planting Bt-corn and HT-corn, the quality of models applied for farm level - and social welfare impacts, calculation of environmental impacts (EIQ), and implications of co-existence rules and regulations. The fourth project year was a busy and fruitful period......The general outcome of the project for the 4th year was as follows: The single species testing programme has been finalized. Generally the various pesticides do not impact the soil fauna at the recommended pesticide field application levels. Neither have the Bt toxin been demonstrated to have...... comprising all aspect of the project such as collection, analysis, integration, presentation and publication of data and results. The integrative data mining and decision support activities have resulted in novel analyses of farming system ecology and economics. Results from all WP’s have been efficiently...

  3. Radiofrequency Radiation Dosimetry Handbook. 4th Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-01

    of man. Acta Physiol Scand 64:323-331 (1965). Novak, B. , and F. W. Bentrup. Orientation- of fucus egg polarity by electric ac and dc fields. Biophysik ...Schwan, H. P. Electrical characteristics of tissues: A survey. Biophysik 1:198-208 (1963a). Schwan, H. P. Determination of biological impedances, pp

  4. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2006 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2006-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Safety Analysis (HS-30) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE. This report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored individuals associated with DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past five years.

  5. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2005 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2005-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offi ce of Corporate Safety Analysis (HS-30) within the Office of Health Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE. This report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored individuals associated with the DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past 5 years.

  6. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2007 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2007-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Safety Analysis (HS-30) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE.* The annual DOEOccupational Radiation Exposure 2007 Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and ALARA process requirements. In addition the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. This report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past five years.

  7. DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure, 2001 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2001-12-31

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its operations, including radiological, to ensure the safety and health of all DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures to levels that are “As Low As Reasonably Achievable” (ALARA). The 2001 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides a summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE, and energy research.

  8. Minimizing radiation exposure during percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T T; Preminger, G M; Lipkin, M E

    2015-12-01

    Given the recent trends in growing per capita radiation dose from medical sources, there have been increasing concerns over patient radiation exposure. Patients with kidney stones undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) are at particular risk for high radiation exposure. There exist several risk factors for increased radiation exposure during PNL which include high Body Mass Index, multiple access tracts, and increased stone burden. We herein review recent trends in radiation exposure, radiation exposure during PNL to both patients and urologists, and various approaches to reduce radiation exposure. We discuss incorporating the principles of As Low As reasonably Achievable (ALARA) into clinical practice and review imaging techniques such as ultrasound and air contrast to guide PNL access. Alternative surgical techniques and approaches to reducing radiation exposure, including retrograde intra-renal surgery, retrograde nephrostomy, endoscopic-guided PNL, and minimally invasive PNL, are also highlighted. It is important for urologists to be aware of these concepts and techniques when treating stone patients with PNL. The discussions outlined will assist urologists in providing patient counseling and high quality of care.

  9. Applied physics of external radiation exposure dosimetry and radiation protection

    CERN Document Server

    Antoni, Rodolphe

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the interaction of living matter with photons, neutrons, charged particles, electrons and ions. The authors are specialists in the field of radiation protection. The book synthesizes many years of experiments with external radiation exposure in the fields of dosimetry and radiation shielding in medical, industrial and research fields. It presents the basic physical concepts including dosimetry and offers a number of tools to be used by students, engineers and technicians to assess the radiological risk and the means to avoid them by calculating the appropriate shields. The theory of radiation interaction in matter is presented together with empirical formulas and abacus. Numerous numerical applications are treated to illustrate the different topics. The state of the art in radiation protection and dosimetry is presented in detail, especially in the field of simulation codes for external exposure to radiation, medical projects and advanced research. Moreover, important data spread in differ...

  10. Real Time Radiation Exposure And Health Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shaowen; Barzilla, Janet E.; Semones, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation from solar particle events (SPEs) poses a serious threat to future manned missions outside of low Earth orbit (LEO). Accurate characterization of the radiation environment in the inner heliosphere and timely monitoring the health risks to crew are essential steps to ensure the safety of future Mars missions. In this project we plan to develop an approach that can use the particle data from multiple satellites and perform near real-time simulations of radiation exposure and health risks for various exposure scenarios. Time-course profiles of dose rates will be calculated with HZETRN and PDOSE from the energy spectrum and compositions of the particles archived from satellites, and will be validated from recent radiation exposure measurements in space. Real-time estimation of radiation risks will be investigated using ARRBOD. This cross discipline integrated approach can improve risk mitigation by providing critical information for risk assessment and medical guidance to crew during SPEs.

  11. Ionising radiation exposure in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eleveld H; LSO

    2003-01-01

    The Dutch population is exposed to ionising radiation from various sources, both natural and man-made. This is a review of the radiation exposure for members of the public from all sources for the year 2000. The average annual effective dose per capita is estimated at 2.5 mSv, which is almost the

  12. Ultraviolet Radiation: Human Exposure and Health Risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenkate, Thomas D.

    1998-01-01

    Provides an overview of human exposure to ultraviolet radiation and associated health effects as well as risk estimates for acute and chronic conditions resulting from such exposure. Demonstrates substantial reductions in health risk that can be achieved through preventive actions. Also includes a risk assessment model for skin cancer. Contains 36…

  13. Risks and management of radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Loren G

    2013-09-01

    High-energy ionizing radiation is harmful. Low-level exposure sources include background, occupational, and medical diagnostics. Radiation disaster incidents include radioactive substance accidents and nuclear power plant accidents. Terrorism and international conflict could trigger intentional radiation disasters that include radiation dispersion devices (RDD) (a radioactive dirty bomb), deliberate exposure to industrial radioactive substances, nuclear power plant sabotage, and nuclear weapon detonation. Nuclear fissioning events such as nuclear power plant incidents and nuclear weapon detonation release radioactive fallout that include radioactive iodine 131, cesium 137, strontium 90, uranium, plutonium, and many other radioactive isotopes. An RDD dirty bomb is likely to spread only one radioactive substance, with the most likely substance being cesium 137. Cobalt 60 and strontium 90 are other RDD dirty bomb possibilities. In a radiation disaster, stable patients should be decontaminated to minimize further radiation exposure. Potassium iodide (KI) is useful for iodine 131 exposure. Prussian blue (ferric hexacyanoferrate) enhances the fecal excretion of cesium via ion exchange. Ca-DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) and Zn-DTPA form stable ionic complexes with plutonium, americium, and curium, which are excreted in the urine. Amifostine enhances chemical and enzymatic repair of damaged DNA. Acute radiation sickness ranges in severity from mild to lethal, which can be assessed by the nausea/vomiting onset/duration, complete blood cell count findings, and neurologic symptoms.

  14. Tissues may adapt to radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-08-01

    French scientists discovered radioactivity and developed vaccination, so it is perhaps appropriate that a prominent French cancer specialist should be promoting the idea of a radiation vaccination effect - or radiation adaptation, as he prefers to call it. Raymond Latarjet, of the Institut Curie in Paris, maintains that recent studies at the gene level are showing evidence that with low doses of radiation, there is time for a cell repair mechanism to take effect, and that this seems to provide some protection against subsequent exposure to high doses. He cited experiments in his laboratory in which exposure to a dose of 4 Gy (400 rad) had, predictably, produced a large number of gene mutations in a specimen, but the number of mutations was less than half that number in a specimen that had been exposed to a dose of 0.02 Gy some six hours before exposure to the 4 Gy.

  15. Adaption By Low Dose Radiation Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchel, Ron E.J.

    2015-01-01

    The procedures and dose limitations used for radiation protection in the nuclear industry are founded on the assumption that risk is directly proportional to dose, without a threshold. Based on this idea that any dose, no matter how small, will increase risk, radiation protection regulations generally attempt to reduce any exposure to ?as low as reasonably achievable? (ALARA). We know however, that these regulatory assumptions are inconsistent with the known biological effects of low doses. L...

  16. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its radiological operations to ensure the health and safety of all DOE employees including contractors and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures and releases to levels that are ``As Low As Reasonably Achievable`` (ALARA). The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1996 provides summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE and precursor agency sites, and energy research. Collective exposure at DOE has declined by 80% over the past decade due to a cessation in opportunities for exposure during the transition in DOE mission from weapons production to cleanup, deactivation and decommissioning, and changes in reporting requirements and dose calculation methodology. In 1996, the collective dose decreased by 10% from the 1995 value due to decreased doses at five of the seven highest-dose DOE sites. For 1996, these sites attributed the reduction in collective dose to the completion of several decontamination and decommissioning projects, reduced spent fuel storage activities, and effective ALARA practices. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for managers in their management of radiological safety programs and commitment of resources.

  17. A translatable predictor of human radiation exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Lucas

    Full Text Available Terrorism using radiological dirty bombs or improvised nuclear devices is recognized as a major threat to both public health and national security. In the event of a radiological or nuclear disaster, rapid and accurate biodosimetry of thousands of potentially affected individuals will be essential for effective medical management to occur. Currently, health care providers lack an accurate, high-throughput biodosimetric assay which is suitable for the triage of large numbers of radiation injury victims. Here, we describe the development of a biodosimetric assay based on the analysis of irradiated mice, ex vivo-irradiated human peripheral blood (PB and humans treated with total body irradiation (TBI. Interestingly, a gene expression profile developed via analysis of murine PB radiation response alone was inaccurate in predicting human radiation injury. In contrast, generation of a gene expression profile which incorporated data from ex vivo irradiated human PB and human TBI patients yielded an 18-gene radiation classifier which was highly accurate at predicting human radiation status and discriminating medically relevant radiation dose levels in human samples. Although the patient population was relatively small, the accuracy of this classifier in discriminating radiation dose levels in human TBI patients was not substantially confounded by gender, diagnosis or prior exposure to chemotherapy. We have further incorporated genes from this human radiation signature into a rapid and high-throughput chemical ligation-dependent probe amplification assay (CLPA which was able to discriminate radiation dose levels in a pilot study of ex vivo irradiated human blood and samples from human TBI patients. Our results illustrate the potential for translation of a human genetic signature for the diagnosis of human radiation exposure and suggest the basis for further testing of CLPA as a candidate biodosimetric assay.

  18. Radiation exposure in CT-guided interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloeckner, Roman, E-mail: Roman.Kloeckner@unimedizin-mainz.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Langenbeckstraße 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Santos, Daniel Pinto dos; Schneider, Jens [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Langenbeckstraße 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Kara, Levent [Department of Radiology, Inselspital Bern, Freiburgstraße 18, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Dueber, Christoph; Pitton, Michael B. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Langenbeckstraße 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate radiation exposure in computed tomography (CT)-guided interventions, to establish reference levels for exposure, and to discuss strategies for dose reduction. Materials and methods: We analyzed 1576 consecutive CT-guided procedures in 1284 patients performed over 4.5 years, including drainage placements; biopsies of different organs; radiofrequency and microwave ablations (RFA/MWA) of liver, bone, and lung tumors; pain blockages, and vertebroplasties. Data were analyzed with respect to scanner settings, overall radiation doses, and individual doses of planning CT series, CT intervention, and control CT series. Results: Eighy-five percent of the total radiation dose was applied during the pre- and post-interventional CT series, leaving only 15% applied by the CT-guided intervention itself. Single slice acquisition was associated with lower doses than continuous CT-fluoroscopy (37 mGy cm vs. 153 mGy cm, p < 0.001). The third quartile of radiation doses varied considerably for different interventions. The highest doses were observed in complex interventions like RFA/MWA of the liver, followed by vertebroplasty and RFA/MWA of the lung. Conclusions: This paper suggests preliminary reference levels for various intervention types and discusses strategies for dose reduction. A multicenter registry of radiation exposure including a broader spectrum of scanners and intervention types is needed to develop definitive reference levels.

  19. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1996-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health publishes the DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE/DOE contractor managers in their management of radiological safety programs and to assist them in the prioritization of resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside the DOE and hope we have succeeded in making the report more useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of collective data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  20. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1999 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1999-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Safety and Health publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE and hope we have succeeded in making the report more useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  1. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1998 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1998-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health with support from Environment Safety and Health Technical Information Services publishes the DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE/DOE contractor managers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE and hope we have succeeded in making the report more useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  2. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2004 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2004-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Performance Assessment (EH-3) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers and workers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE to make the report most useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors, as well as members of the public. DOE is defined to include the National Nuclear Security Administration sites. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  3. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1997 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1997-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health publishes the DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE/DOE contractor managers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE and hope we have succeeded in making the report more useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  4. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2000 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2000-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Safety and Health publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE in making this report most useful to them. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  5. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2002 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2002-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Performance Assessment (EH-3) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers and workers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE to make the report most useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and members of the public. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  6. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2003 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2003-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Performance Assessment (EH-3) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers and workers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE to make the report most useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and members of the public. DOE is defined to include the National Nuclear Security Administration sites. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  7. Diagnostic radiation exposure in pediatric trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Marissa A; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Nabaweesi, Rosemary; Locke, Paul; Ziegfeld, Susan; Brown, Robert

    2011-02-01

    The amount of imaging studies performed for disease diagnosis has been rapidly increasing. We examined the amount of radiation exposure that pediatric trauma patients receive because they are an at-risk population. Our hypothesis was that pediatric trauma patients are exposed to high levels of radiation during a single hospital visit. Retrospective review of children who presented to Johns Hopkins Pediatric Trauma Center from July 1, 2004, to June 30, 2005. Radiographic studies were recorded for each patient and doses were calculated to give a total effective dose of radiation. All radiographic studies that each child received during evaluation, including any associated hospital admission, were included. A total of 945 children were evaluated during the study year. A total of 719 children were included in the analysis. Mean age was 7.8 (±4.6) years. Four thousand six hundred three radiographic studies were performed; 1,457 were computed tomography (CT) studies (31.7%). Average radiation dose was 12.8 (±12) mSv. We found that while CT accounted for only 31.7% of the radiologic studies performed, it accounted for 91% of the total radiation dose. Mean dose for admitted children was 17.9 (±13.8) mSv. Mean dose for discharged children was 8.4 (±7.8) mSv (pcumulative radiation exposure can be high. In young children with relatively long life spans, the benefit of each imaging study and the cumulative radiation dose should be weighed against the long-term risks of increased exposure.

  8. Predicted Radiation Exposure from Mining at Kvanefjeld

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sven Poul; Roos, Per; Andersson, Kasper Grann

    Baseline surveys of gamma radiation and environmental radioactivity have been carried out by Greenland Minerals and Energy Ltd (GMEL) to show existing levels in the town of Narsaq and in the Kvanefjeld project area. Radiation levels in Narsaq are low but elevated in the project area due...... the presence of large uranium and thorium deposits in Kvanefjeld. These deposits are also the reason that radon in outdoor air show elevated concentrations in Narsaq and in the project area. It is recommended that future monitoring of external exposure and radon should be based on measurement techniques using...... integrating dosimeters. The Technical University of Denmark (DTU) has reviewed the impact of Kvanefjeld operations on the future workforce to estimate radiation doses to individuals. Calculations were performed with conservative assumptions that reveal the annual radiation dose to workers to be between 1...

  9. Justification of novel practices involving radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, G. [Radiation Protection Consul tant, Brighton (United Kingdom); Boal, T.; Mason, C.; Wrixon, T. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2006-07-01

    The concept of 'justification' of practices has been one of the three basic principles of radiation protection for many decades. The principle is simple in essence - that any practice involving radiation exposure should do more good than harm. There is no doubt that the many uses of radiation in the medical field and in industry generally satisfy this principle, yielding benefits that could not be achieved using other techniques; examples include CT scanning and industrial radiography. However, even in the early period after the introduction of the justification principle, there were practices for which the decision on justification was not clear and for which different decisions were made by the authorities in different countries. Many of these involved consumer products such as luminous clocks and watches, telephone dials, smoke detectors, lightning preventers and gas mantles. In most cases, these practices were relatively small scale and did not involve large exposures of either individual workers or members of the public. Decisions on justification were therefore often made by the regulator without extensive national debate. Over recent years, several practices have been proposed and undertaken that involve exposure to radiation for purposes that were generally not envisaged when the current system of radiation protection was created. Some of these practices were reviewed during a recent symposium held in Dublin, Ireland and involve, for example, the x-raying of people for theft detection purposes, for detection of weapons or contraband, for the prediction of physical development of young athletes or dancers, for age determination, for insurance purposes and in cases of suspected child abuse. It is particularly in the context of such novel practices that the need has emerged for clearer international guidance on the application of the justification principle. This paper reviews recent activities of the IAEA with respect to these issues, including the

  10. Wireless Phones Electromagnetic Field Radiation Exposure Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    A. D. Usman; W. F.W. Ahmad; M. Z.A.A. Kadir; M. Mokhtar

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: Inadequate knowledge of electromagnetic field emitted by mobile phones and increased usage at close proximity, created a lot of skepticism and speculations among end users on its safety or otherwise. Approach: In this study, near field electromagnetic field radiation measurements were conducted on different brand of mobile phones in active mode using a tri-axis isotropic probe and electric field meter. Results: The highest electromagnetic field exposure was recorded when th...

  11. DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podonsky, Glenn S. [US Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Health, Safety and Security

    2012-02-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. As an indicator of the overall amount of radiation dose received during the conduct of operations at DOE, the report includes information on collective total effective dose (TED). The TED is comprised of the effective dose (ED) from external sources, which includes neutron and photon radiation, and the internal committed effective dose (CED), which results from the intake of radioactive material into the body. The collective ED from photon exposure decreased by 23% between 2011 and 2012, while the neutron dose increased by 5%. The internal dose components of the collective TED decreased by 7%. Over the past 5-year period, 99.99% of the individuals receiving measurable TED have received doses below the 2 roentgen equivalent in man (rems) (20 millisievert [mSv]) TED administrative control level (ACL), which is well below the DOE regulatory limit of 5 rems (50 mSv) TED annually. The

  12. DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security

    2009-10-01

    A major priority of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to ensure the health, safety, and security of DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) provides the corporate-level leadership and strategic vision necessary to better coordinate and integrate health, safety, environment, security, enforcement, and independent oversight programs. One function that supports this mission is the DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program that provides collection, analysis, and dissemination of performance indicators, such as occupational radiation exposure information. This analysis supports corporate decision-making and synthesizes operational information to support continuous environment, safety, and health improvement across the DOE complex.

  13. Predictors of radiation exposure to providers during percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Wenzler

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Increased stone burden, partial or staghorn calculi, surgery and fluoroscopy duration, and absence of preexisting access were associated with high provider radiation exposure. Radiation safety awareness is essential to minimize exposure and to protect the patient and all providers from potential radiation injury.

  14. Radiation exposure from depleted uranium: The radiation bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alexandra C; Rivas, Rafael; Tesoro, Leonard; Kovalenko, Gregor; Kovaric, Nikola; Pavlovic, Peter; Brenner, David

    2017-09-15

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a radioactive heavy metal used primarily in military applications. Published data from our laboratory have demonstrated that DU exposure in vitro to immortalized human osteoblast cells (HOS) is both neoplastically transforming and genotoxic. In vivo studies have also demonstrated that DU is leukemogenic and genotoxic. DU possesses both a radiological (alpha particle) and chemical (metal) component but is generally considered a chemical biohazard. Studies have shown that alpha particle radiation does play a role in DU's toxic effects. Evidence has accumulated that non-irradiated cells in the vicinity of irradiated cells can have a response to ionization events. The purpose of this study was to determine if these "bystander effects" play a role in DU's toxic and neoplastic effects using HOS cells. We investigated the bystander responses between DU-exposed cells and non-exposed cells by co-culturing the two equal populations. Decreased cell survival and increased neoplastic transformation were observed in the non-DU exposed cells following 4 or 24h co-culture. In contrast Ni (II)- or Cr(VI)- exposed cells were unable to alter those biological effects in non-Ni(II) or non-Cr(VI) exposed co-cultured cells. Transfer experiments using medium from the DU-exposed and non-exposed co-cultured cells was able to cause adverse biological responses in cells; these results demonstrated that a factor (s) is secreted into the co-culture medium which is involved in this DU-associated bystander effect. This novel effect of DU exposure could have implications for radiation risk and for health risk assessment associated with DU exposure. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. 4th Pacific Rim Underwater Acoustics Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Wen; Cheng, Qianliu; Zhao, Hangfang

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings are a collection of 16 selected scientific papers and reviews by distinguished international experts that were presented at the 4th Pacific Rim Underwater Acoustics Conference (PRUAC), held in Hangzhou, China in October 2013. The topics discussed at the conference include internal wave observation and prediction; environmental uncertainty and coupling to sound propagation; environmental noise and ocean dynamics; dynamic modeling in acoustic fields; acoustic tomography and ocean parameter estimation; time reversal and matched field processing; underwater acoustic localization and communication as well as measurement instrumentations and platforms. These proceedings provide insights into the latest developments in underwater acoustics, promoting the exchange of ideas for the benefit of future research.

  16. 4th Generation District Heating (4GDH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik; Werner, Sven; Wiltshire, Robin

    2014-01-01

    This paper defines the concept of 4th Generation District Heating (4GDH) including the relations to District Cooling and the concepts of smart energy and smart thermal grids. The motive is to identify the future challenges of reaching a future renewable non-fossil heat supply as part...... of the implementation of overall sustainable energy systems. The basic assumption is that district heating and cooling has an important role to play in future sustainable energy systems – including 100 percent renewable energy systems – but the present generation of district heating and cooling technologies will have...

  17. Ocular ultraviolet radiation exposure of welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenkate, Thomas D

    2017-05-01

    I read with interest a recent paper in your journal by Slagor et al on the risk of cataract in relation to metal arc welding (1). The authors highlight that even though welders are exposed to substantial levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), "no studies have reported data on how much UVR welders' eyes are exposed to during a working day. Thus, we do not know whether welders are more or less exposed to UVR than outdoor workers" (1, p451). Undertaking accurate exposure assessment of UVR from welding arcs is difficult, however, two studies have reported ocular/facial UVR levels underneath welding helmets (2, 3). In the first paper, UVR levels were measured using polysulphone film dosimeters applied to the cheeks of a patient who suffered from severe facial dermatitis (2). UVR levels of four times the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) maximum permissible exposure (MPE) (4) were measured on the workers left cheek and nine times the MPE on the right cheek. The authors concluded that the workers dermatitis was likely to have been due to the UVR exposure received during welding. In the other paper, a comprehensive exposure assessment of personal UVR exposure of workers in a welding environment was reported (3). The study was conducted at a metal fabrication workshop with participants being welders, boilermakers and non-welders (eg, supervisors, fitters, machinists). Polysulphone film dosimeters were again used to measure UVR exposure of the workers, with badges worn on the clothing of workers (in the chest area), on the exterior of welding helmets, attached to 11 locations on the inside of welding helmets, and on the bridge and side-shields of safety spectacles. Dosimeters were also attached to surfaces throughout the workshop to measure ambient UVR levels. For welding subjects, mean 8-hour UVR doses within the welding helmets ranged from around 9 mJ/cm 2 (3×MPE) on the inside of the helmets to around 15 mJ/cm 2 (5×MPE) on the headband (a

  18. Cell/Tissue Culture Radiation Exposure Facility Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a Cell/Tissue Culture Radiation Exposure Facility (CTC-REF) to enable radiobiologists to investigate the real-time radiation effects on...

  19. 4th international interdisciplinary chaos symposium

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Santo; Caglar, Suleyman; Ozer, Mehmet; Chaos and complex systems

    2013-01-01

    Complexity Science and Chaos Theory are fascinating areas of scientific research with wide-ranging applications.  The interdisciplinary nature and ubiquity of complexity and chaos are features that provides scientists with a motivation to pursue general theoretical tools and frameworks. Complex systems give rise to emergent behaviors, which in turn produce novel and interesting phenomena in science, engineering, as well as in the socio-economic sciences. The aim of all Symposia on Chaos and Complex Systems (CCS) is to bring together scientists, engineers, economists and social scientists, and to discuss the latest insights and results obtained in the area of corresponding nonlinear-system complex (chaotic) behavior. Especially for the “4th International Interdisciplinary Chaos Symposium on Chaos and Complex Systems,” which took place April 29th to May 2nd, 2012 in Antalya, Turkey, the scope of the symposium had been further enlarged so as to encompass the presentation of work from circuits to econophysic...

  20. 4th International Conference on Power Transmissions

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This books contains the Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Power Transmissions, that was held in Sinaia, Romania from June 20 -23, 2012. Power Transmissions is a very complex and multi-disciplinary scientific field of Mechanical Engineering that covers the different types of transmissions (mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic) as well as all the machine elements involved, such as gears, bearings, shafts, couplings and a lot more. It concerns not only their basic theory but also their design, analysis, testing, application and maintenance. The requirements set to modern power transmissions are really tough to meet: They need to be more efficient, stronger, smaller, noiseless, easier to produce and to cost less. There is a strong demand to become easier in operation and maintenance, or even automatic and in maintenance-free. Last but not least, they should be easily recycled and respect the environment. Joint efforts of specialists from both academia and industry can significantly contribute to fulf...

  1. 4th World Conference on Soft Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasov, Ali; Yager, Ronald; Shahbazova, Shahnaz; Reformat, Marek

    2016-01-01

    This book reports on advanced theories and cutting-edge applications in the field of soft computing. The individual chapters, written by leading researchers, are based on contributions presented during the 4th World Conference on Soft Computing, held May 25-27, 2014, in Berkeley. The book covers a wealth of key topics in soft computing, focusing on both fundamental aspects and applications. The former include fuzzy mathematics, type-2 fuzzy sets, evolutionary-based optimization, aggregation and neural networks, while the latter include soft computing in data analysis, image processing, decision-making, classification, series prediction, economics, control, and modeling. By providing readers with a timely, authoritative view on the field, and by discussing thought-provoking developments and challenges, the book will foster new research directions in the diverse areas of soft computing. .

  2. 4th Conference on Microactuators and Micromechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Corves, Burkhard; Jensen, Brian; Lovasz, Erwin-Christian

    2017-01-01

    This book brings together investigations which combine theoretical and experimental results related to such systems as capsule micromechanisms, active micro catheters, nanotube vascular stents, mechanisms for micromilling, different compliant mechanisms including grippers and compliant systems with actuators and sensors, microrobots based on vibrations, tactile sensors, tooth brackets, compliant valves, and space reflectors. This volume contains twenty-two contributions from researchers from ten countries, represented at the 4th Conference on Microactuators and Micromechanisms, which was held in 2016 in Ilmenau, Germany. The aim of the conference was to provide a special opportunity for a know-how exchange and collaboration in various disciplines concerning systems pertaining to micro-technology. This Conference was organized under the patronage of IFToMM (International Federation for the Promotion of Mechanism and Machine Science). .

  3. 4th International Conference Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Yatsenko, Leonid

    2017-01-01

    This book presents some of the latest achievements in nanotechnology and nanomaterials from leading researchers in Ukraine, Europe, and beyond. It features contributions from participants in the 4th International Science and Practice Conference Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials (NANO2016) held in Lviv, Ukraine on August 24-27, 2016. The International Conference was organized jointly by the Institute of Physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv (Ukraine), University of Tartu (Estonia), University of Turin (Italy), and Pierre and Marie Curie University (France). Internationally recognized experts from a wide range of universities and research institutions share their knowledge and key results on topics ranging from nanooptics, nanoplasmonics, and interface studies to energy storage and biomedical applications. Presents cutting-edge advances in nanocomposites and carbon and silicon-based nanomaterials for a wide range of engineering and medical applications Co...

  4. Effects of high vs low-level radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, V.P.

    1983-01-01

    In order to appreciate adequately the various possible effects of radiation, particularly from high-level vs low-level radiation exposure (HLRE, vs LLRE), it is necessary to understand the substantial differences between (a) exposure as used in exposure-incidence curves, which are always initially linear and without threshold, and (b) dose as used in dose-response curves, which always have a threshold, above which the function is curvilinear with increasing slope. The differences are discussed first in terms of generally familiar nonradiation situations involving dose vs exposure, and then specifically in terms of exposure to radiation, vs a dose of radiation. Examples are given of relevant biomedical findings illustrating that, while dose can be used with HLRE, it is inappropriate and misleading the LLRE where exposure is the conceptually correct measure of the amount of radiation involved.

  5. Occupational Radiation Exposure During Endovascular Aortic Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailer, Anna M., E-mail: anni.sailer@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Schurink, Geert Willem H., E-mail: gwh.schurink@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Bol, Martine E., E-mail: m.bol@maastrichtuniversity.nl; Haan, Michiel W. de, E-mail: m.de.haan@mumc.nl; Zwam, Willem H. van, E-mail: w.van.zwam@mumc.nl; Wildberger, Joachim E., E-mail: j.wildberger@mumc.nl; Jeukens, Cécile R. L. P. N., E-mail: cecile.jeukens@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe aim of the study was to evaluate the radiation exposure to operating room personnel and to assess determinants for high personal doses during endovascular aortic repair.Materials and MethodsOccupational radiation exposure was prospectively evaluated during 22 infra-renal aortic repair procedures (EVAR), 11 thoracic aortic repair procedures (TEVAR), and 11 fenestrated or branched aortic repair procedures (FEVAR). Real-time over-lead dosimeters attached to the left breast pocket measured personal doses for the first operators (FO) and second operators (SO), radiology technicians (RT), scrub nurses (SN), anesthesiologists (AN), and non-sterile nurses (NSN). Besides protective apron and thyroid collar, no additional radiation shielding was used. Procedural dose area product (DAP), iodinated contrast volume, fluoroscopy time, patient’s body weight, and C-arm angulation were documented.ResultsAverage procedural FO dose was significantly higher during FEVAR (0.34 ± 0.28 mSv) compared to EVAR (0.11 ± 0.21 mSv) and TEVAR (0.06 ± 0.05 mSv; p = 0.003). Average personnel doses were 0.17 ± 0.21 mSv (FO), 0.042 ± 0.045 mSv (SO), 0.019 ± 0.042 mSv (RT), 0.017 ± 0.031 mSv (SN), 0.006 ± 0.007 mSv (AN), and 0.004 ± 0.009 mSv (NSN). SO and AN doses were strongly correlated with FO dose (p = 0.003 and p < 0.001). There was a significant correlation between FO dose and procedural DAP (R = 0.69, p < 0.001), iodinated contrast volume (R = 0.67, p < 0.001) and left-anterior C-arm projections >60° (p = 0.02), and a weak correlation with fluoroscopy time (R = 0.40, p = 0.049).ConclusionAverage FO dose was a factor four higher than SO dose. Predictors for high personal doses are procedural DAP, iodinated contrast volume, and left-anterior C-arm projections greater than 60°.

  6. Predictors of radiation exposure to providers during percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzler, David L.; Abbott, Joel E.; Su, Jeannie J.; Shi, William; Slater, Richard; Miller, Daniel; Siemens, Michelle J.; Sur, Roger L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Limited studies have reported on radiation risks of increased ionizing radiation exposure to medical personnel in the urologic community. Fluoroscopy is readily used in many urologic surgical procedures. The aim of this study was to determine radiation exposure to all operating room personnel during percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL), commonly performed for large renal or complex stones. Materials and Methods: We prospectively collected personnel exposure data for all PNL cases at two academic institutions. This was collected using the Instadose™ dosimeter and reported both continuously and categorically as high and low dose using a 10 mrem dose threshold, the approximate amount of radiation received from one single chest X-ray. Predictors of increased radiation exposure were determined using multivariate analysis. Results: A total of 91 PNL cases in 66 patients were reviewed. Median surgery duration and fluoroscopy time were 142 (38–368) min and 263 (19–1809) sec, respectively. Median attending urologist, urology resident, anesthesia, and nurse radiation exposure per case was 4 (0–111), 4 (0–21), 0 (0–5), and 0 (0–5) mrem, respectively. On univariate analysis, stone area, partial or staghorn calculi, surgery duration, and fluoroscopy time were associated with high attending urologist and resident radiation exposure. Preexisting access that was utilized was negatively associated with resident radiation exposure. However, on multivariate analysis, only fluoroscopy duration remained significant for attending urologist radiation exposure. Conclusion: Increased stone burden, partial or staghorn calculi, surgery and fluoroscopy duration, and absence of preexisting access were associated with high provider radiation exposure. Radiation safety awareness is essential to minimize exposure and to protect the patient and all providers from potential radiation injury. PMID:28216931

  7. A novel complete radiation protection system eliminates physician radiation exposure and leaded aprons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattal, Peter; Goldstein, James A

    2013-07-01

    Occupational health hazards associated with fluoroscopic-based procedures are well known, including a high prevalence of orthopedic problems, and those related to radiation exposure, particularly cancer and cataracts. This article reports the "first-in-man" clinical experience with a novel radiation protection system designed to eliminate radiation exposure to operators and thereby obviate the need for orthopedically burdensome leaded aprons. The Trinity Radiation Protection System consists of a combination of fixed shields, radiation drapes, and interconnecting flexible radiation resistant materials creating a complete radiation protection environment for the operators, yet maintaining full and unimpeded contact with the patient and total control of all operational elements of the catheterization equipment. This report constitutes an analysis of 19 nonrandomized cases in which operator radiation exposure data were collected (Trinity Radiation Protection System n = 10 cases versus standard shielding alone n = 9). In all cases performed with the Trinity System, there was neither any measurable significant radiation exposure in any anatomic region nor for the total case, whereas operators performing cases with standard shielding were exposed to radiation in all regions of their bodies (total per case exposure differences P radiation protection system described is the first to provide a complete radiation barrier that eliminates radiation exposure to operators, thereby obviating the need for orthopedically burdensome leaded aprons. This approach to radiation protection has promise to enhance the safety and occupational health of medical personnel in the catheterization laboratory. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Maintenance hemodialysis patients have high cumulative radiation exposure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kinsella, Sinead M

    2010-10-01

    Hemodialysis is associated with an increased risk of neoplasms which may result, at least in part, from exposure to ionizing radiation associated with frequent radiographic procedures. In order to estimate the average radiation exposure of those on hemodialysis, we conducted a retrospective study of 100 patients in a university-based dialysis unit followed for a median of 3.4 years. The number and type of radiological procedures were obtained from a central radiology database, and the cumulative effective radiation dose was calculated using standardized, procedure-specific radiation levels. The median annual radiation dose was 6.9 millisieverts (mSv) per patient-year. However, 14 patients had an annual cumulative effective radiation dose over 20 mSv, the upper averaged annual limit for occupational exposure. The median total cumulative effective radiation dose per patient over the study period was 21.7 mSv, in which 13 patients had a total cumulative effective radiation dose over 75 mSv, a value reported to be associated with a 7% increased risk of cancer-related mortality. Two-thirds of the total cumulative effective radiation dose was due to CT scanning. The average radiation exposure was significantly associated with the cause of end-stage renal disease, history of ischemic heart disease, transplant waitlist status, number of in-patient hospital days over follow-up, and death during the study period. These results highlight the substantial exposure to ionizing radiation in hemodialysis patients.

  9. DOE occupational radiation exposure. Report 1992--1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1992-1994 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities from 1992 through 1994. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. This information is analyzed and trended over time to provide a measure of the DOE`s performance in protecting its workers from radiation. Occupational radiation exposure at DOE has been decreasing over the past 5 years. In particular, doses in the higher dose ranges are decreasing, including the number of doses in excess of the DOE limits and doses in excess of the 2 rem Administrative Control Level (ACL). This is an indication of greater attention being given to protecting these individuals from radiation in the workplace.

  10. Impact of climate change on occupational exposure to solar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandi, Carlo; Borra, Massimo; Militello, Andrea; Polichetti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Occupational exposure to solar radiation may induce both acute and long-term effects on skin and eyes. Personal exposure is very difficult to assess accurately, as it depends on environmental, organisational and individual factors. The ongoing climate change interacting with stratospheric ozone dynamics may affect occupational exposure to solar radiation. In addition, tropospheric levels of environmental pollutants interacting with solar radiation may be altered by climate dynamics, so introducing another variable affecting the overall exposure to solar radiation. Given the uncertainties regarding the direction of changes in exposure to solar radiation due to climate change, compliance of outdoor workers with protective measures and a proper health surveillance are crucial. At the same time, education and training, along with the promotion of healthier lifestyles, are of paramount importance.

  11. Optimizing radiation exposure for CT localizer radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohrer, Evelyn; Schäfer, Stefan; Mäder, Ulf; Noël, Peter B; Krombach, Gabriele A; Fiebich, Martin

    2017-06-01

    The trend towards submillisievert CT scans leads to a higher dose fraction of localizer radiographs in CT examinations. The already existing technical capabilities make dose optimization of localizer radiographs worthwhile. Modern CT scanners apply automatic exposure control (AEC) based on attenuation data in such a localizer. Therefore not only this aspect but also the detectability of anatomical landmarks in the localizer for the desired CT scan range adjustment needs to be considered. The effective dose of a head, chest, and abdomen-pelvis localizer radiograph with standard factory settings and user-optimized settings was determined using Monte Carlo simulations. CT examinations of an anthropomorphic phantom were performed using multiple sets of acquisition parameters for the localizer radiograph and the AEC for the subsequent helical CT scan. Anatomical landmarks were defined to assess the image quality of the localizer. CTDIvol and effective mAs per slice of the helical CT scan were recorded to examine the impact of localizer settings on a helical CT scan. The dose of the localizer radiograph could be decreased by more than 90% while the image quality remained sufficient when selecting the lowest available settings (80kVp, 20mA, pa tube position). The tube position during localizer acquisition had a greater impact on the AEC than the reduction of tube voltage and tube current. Except for the use of a pa tube position, all changes of acquisition parameters for the localizer resulted in a decreased total radiation exposure. A dose reduction of CT localizer radiograph is necessary and possible. In the examined CT system there was no negative impact on the modulated helical CT scan when the lowest tube voltage and tube current were used for the localizer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  12. Optimizing radiation exposure for CT localizer radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohrer, Evelyn; Maeder, Ulf; Fiebich, Martin [Univ. of Applied Sciences, Giessen (Germany). Inst. of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection-IMPS; Schaefer, Stefan; Krombach, Gabriele A. [Univ. Hospital Giessen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Noel, Peter B. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2017-08-01

    The trend towards submillisievert CT scans leads to a higher dose fraction of localizer radiographs in CT examinations. The already existing technical capabilities make dose optimization of localizer radiographs worthwhile. Modern CT scanners apply automatic exposure control (AEC) based on attenuation data in such a localizer. Therefore not only this aspect but also the detectability of anatomical landmarks in the localizer for the desired CT scan range adjustment needs to be considered. The effective dose of a head, chest, and abdomen-pelvis localizer radiograph with standard factory settings and user-optimized settings was determined using Monte Carlo simulations. CT examinations of an anthropomorphic phantom were performed using multiple sets of acquisition parameters for the localizer radiograph and the AEC for the subsequent helical CT scan. Anatomical landmarks were defined to assess the image quality of the localizer. CTDI{sub vol} and effective mAs per slice of the helical CT scan were recorded to examine the impact of localizer settings on a helical CT scan. The dose of the localizer radiograph could be decreased by more than 90% while the image quality remained sufficient when selecting the lowest available settings (80 kVp, 20 mA, pa tube position). The tube position during localizer acquisition had a greater impact on the AEC than the reduction of tube voltage and tube current. Except for the use of a pa tube position, all changes of acquisition parameters for the localizer resulted in a decreased total radiation exposure. A dose reduction of CT localizer radiograph is necessary and possible. In the examined CT system there was no negative impact on the modulated helical CT scan when the lowest tube voltage and tube current were used for the localizer.

  13. Radiation exposure from musculoskeletal computerized tomographic scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Debdut; Bible, Jesse E; Bohan, Michael; Simpson, Andrew K; Whang, Peter G; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2009-08-01

    Computerized tomographic scans are routinely obtained to evaluate a number of musculoskeletal conditions. However, since computerized tomographic scans expose patients to the greatest amounts of radiation of all imaging modalities, the physician must be cognizant of the effective doses of radiation that are administered. This investigation was performed to quantify the effective doses of computerized tomographic scans that are performed for various musculoskeletal applications. The digital imaging archive of a single institution was retrospectively reviewed to identify helical computerized tomographic scans that were completed to visualize the extremities or spine. Imaging parameters were recorded for each examination, and dosimetry calculator software was used to calculate the effective dose values according to a modified protocol derived from publication SR250 of the National Radiological Protection Board of the United Kingdom. Computerized tomographic scans of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis were also collected, and the effective doses were compared with those reported by prior groups in order to validate the results of the current study. The mean effective doses for computerized tomographic scans of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis (5.27, 4.95, and 4.85 mSv, respectively) were consistent with those of previous investigations. The highest mean effective doses were recorded for studies evaluating the spine (4.36, 17.99, and 19.15 mSv for the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spines, respectively). In the upper extremity, the effective dose of a computerized tomographic scan of the shoulder (2.06 mSv) was higher than those of the elbow (0.14 mSv) and wrist (0.03 mSv). Similarly, the effective dose of a hip scan (3.09 mSv) was significantly higher than those observed with knee (0.16 mSv) and ankle (0.07 mSv) scans. Computerized tomographic scans of the axial and appendicular skeleton are associated with substantially elevated radiation exposures, but the effective dose

  14. Radiation exposure in gastroenterology: improving patient and staff protection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ho, Immanuel K H

    2014-08-01

    Medical imaging involving the use of ionizing radiation has brought enormous benefits to society and patients. In the past several decades, exposure to medical radiation has increased markedly, driven primarily by the use of computed tomography. Ionizing radiation has been linked to carcinogenesis. Whether low-dose medical radiation exposure will result in the development of malignancy is uncertain. This paper reviews the current evidence for such risk, and aims to inform the gastroenterologist of dosages of radiation associated with commonly ordered procedures and diagnostic tests in clinical practice. The use of medical radiation must always be justified and must enable patients to be exposed at the lowest reasonable dose. Recommendations provided herein for minimizing radiation exposure are based on currently available evidence and Working Party expert consensus.

  15. 4th Annual Predictive Toxicology Summit 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhanfeng

    2013-08-01

    This meeting report presents a brief summary on the 4th Annual Predictive Toxicology Summit 2012, which was held on 15 - 16 February 2012 in London. The majority of presentations came from global pharmaceutical companies, although small and medium enterprise (SME) and academic researchers were represented too. Major regulatory bodies were also present. The article highlights the summit, which was considered a good learning opportunity to catch up on the recent advances in predictive toxicology. Predictive toxicology has become more and more important due to social and economic pressure and scientific reasons. Technological developments are rapid, but there is a gulf between the technology developers and the pharmaceutical end users; hence, early engagement is desirable. Stem cell-derived cell-based assays as well as three-dimensional in vitro tissue/organ model development are within the reach now, but a lot needs to be done to optimise and validate the developed protocols and products. The field of predictive toxicology needs fundamental research of interdisciplinary nature, which requires much needed trained personnel and funding.

  16. DOE Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure_2011 pamphlet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ORAU

    2012-08-08

    This pamphlet focusses on two HSS activities that help ensure radiation exposures are accurately assessed and recorded, namely: 1) the quality and accuracy of occupational radiation exposure monitoring, and 2) the recording, reporting, analysis, and dissemination of the monitoring results. It is intended to provide a short summary of two specific HSS programs that aid in the oversight of radiation protection activities at DOE. The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is in place to ensure that radiation exposure monitoring at all DOE sites is precise and accurate, and conforms to national and international performance and quality assurance standards. The DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems (REMS) program provides for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of occupational radiation exposure information. The annual REMS report is a valuable tool for managing radiological safety programs and for developing policies to protect individuals from occupational exposure to radiation. In tandem, these programs provide DOE management and workers an assurance that occupational radiation exposures are accurately measured, analyzed, and reported.

  17. An approach to calculate and visualize intraoperative scattered radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Markus; Duwenkamp, Christopher; Dresing, Klaus; Bott, Oliver J

    2009-01-01

    During the intraoperative radiograph generation process with mobile image intensifier systems (C-arm) most of the radiation exposure for patient, surgeon and operation room personal is caused by scattered radiation. The intensity and propagation of scattered radiation depend on different parameters, e.g. the intensity of the primary radiation, and the positioning of the mobile image intensifier. Exposure through scattered radiation can be minimized when all these parameters are adjusted correctly. Because radiation is potentially dangerous and could not be perceived by any human sense the current education on correct adjustment of a C-arm is designed very theoretical. This paper presents an approach of scattered radiation calculation and visualization embedded in a computer based training system for mobile image intensifier systems called virtX. With the help of this extension the virtX training system should enrich the current radiation protection training with visual and practical training aspects.

  18. DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure November 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Analysis

    2011-11-11

    This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2010 occupational radiation dose data trended over the past 5 years, and includes instructions to submit successful ALARA projects.

  19. 4th International Conference on Research into Design

    CERN Document Server

    Prakash, Raghu V; ICoRD'13 : global product development

    2013-01-01

    This book showcases over 100 cutting-edge research papers from the 4th International Conference on Research into Design (ICoRD’13) – the largest in India in this area – written by eminent researchers from over 20 countries, on the design process, methods and tools, for supporting global product development (GPD). The special features of the book are the variety of insights into the GPD process, and the host of methods and tools at the cutting edge of all major areas of design research for its support. The main benefit of this book for researchers in engineering design and GPD are access to the latest quality research in this area; for practitioners and educators, it is exposure to an empirically validated suite of methods and tools that can be taught and practiced.

  20. Natural ionizing radiation exposure of the Spanish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Talavera, M; Matarranz, J L; Martínez, M; Salas, R; Ramos, L

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the exposure of the Spanish population to natural radiation sources. The annual average effective dose is estimated to be 1.6 mSv, taking into account contributions from cosmic radiation (18%), terrestrial gamma radiation (30%), radon and thoron inhalation (34%) and ingestion (18%). Cosmic radiation doses were calculated from town altitude data. Terrestrial gamma ray exposure outdoors were derived from the MARNA (natural gamma radiation map of Spain); indoor exposure was obtained multiplying the corresponding outdoor value by an experimentally calculated conversion factor. Radon doses were estimated from national surveys carried out throughout the country. To assess doses by ingestion, data from a detailed study on consumption habits in Spain and average radioactivity values from UNSCEAR have been considered. The variability in the exposures among individuals in the population has been explicitly taken into account in the assessment.

  1. Gene Expression Profiling of Biological Pathway Alterations by Radiation Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuei-Fang Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Though damage caused by radiation has been the focus of rigorous research, the mechanisms through which radiation exerts harmful effects on cells are complex and not well-understood. In particular, the influence of low dose radiation exposure on the regulation of genes and pathways remains unclear. In an attempt to investigate the molecular alterations induced by varying doses of radiation, a genome-wide expression analysis was conducted. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from five participants and each sample was subjected to 0.5 Gy, 1 Gy, 2.5 Gy, and 5 Gy of cobalt 60 radiation, followed by array-based expression profiling. Gene set enrichment analysis indicated that the immune system and cancer development pathways appeared to be the major affected targets by radiation exposure. Therefore, 1 Gy radioactive exposure seemed to be a critical threshold dosage. In fact, after 1 Gy radiation exposure, expression levels of several genes including FADD, TNFRSF10B, TNFRSF8, TNFRSF10A, TNFSF10, TNFSF8, CASP1, and CASP4 that are associated with carcinogenesis and metabolic disorders showed significant alterations. Our results suggest that exposure to low-dose radiation may elicit changes in metabolic and immune pathways, potentially increasing the risk of immune dysfunctions and metabolic disorders.

  2. Decrease in radiation-induced biological effects due to prior radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Ken; Ohnishi, Takeo [Nara Medical Univ., Nara (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    We are constantly exposed to environmental radiation. ICRP recommends annual limitations of radiation exposure of 1 and 50 mSv for the general public and for radiation workers, respectively. Initially, there were doubts about different limitations between the two groups based on radiation sensitivity. Regarding the dose/effect relationship, two discrepant hypotheses are the linear no-threshold theory and non-linear with threshold theory, which form the basis of the current radiation protection programs. The radioadaptive response fully occurs near the range of natural radiation and radiation-related working area. This response is a biological defense mechanism in which low dose and low dose-rate irradiation elicits cellular resistance to the genotoxic effects of subsequent irradiation. However, its molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. This article reviews the trends in research and our recent findings on decreases in radiation-induced biological effects due to prior radiation exposure.

  3. ULTRAVIOLET PROTECTIVE COMPOUNDS AS A RESPONSE TO ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION EXPOSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Life on Earth has evolved adaptations to many environmental stresses over the epochs. One consistent stress has been exposure to ultraviolet radiation. In response to UVR organisms have adapted myriad responses; behavioral, morphological and physiological. Behaviorally, some orga...

  4. Exposure of the Spanish population to radiation from natural sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Talavera, M.; Suarez, E.; Matarranz, J.L.; Salas, R.; Ramos, L. [Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear. Justo Dorado, Madrid (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    We have assessed the exposure of the Spanish population to natural radiation sources. The annual average effective dose is estimated to be 2.38 mSv, taking into account contributions from cosmic radiation (13.8%), terrestrial gamma radiation (39%), radon and thoron inhalation (34%) and ingestion (13.2%). Cosmic radiation doses were calculated from town altitude data. Terrestrial gamma ray exposure outdoors was derived from the M.A.R.N.A. (natural gamma radiation map of Spain). Indoor gamma ray exposure was calculated by multiplying the corresponding outdoor value conversion factor, which was obtained by a linear least-squares fit of experimental measurements. Radon doses were estimated from national surveys carried out throughout the country. To assess doses by ingestion of water and foodstuffs we considered the results from a detailed study on consumption habits by age and geographical area in Spain, promoted by C.S.N., and average radioactivity values from UNSCEAR. (authors)

  5. Monitoring of radiation exposure and registration of doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The guide defines the concepts relevant to the monitoring of radiation exposure and working conditions and provides guidelines for determining the necessity of monitoring and subsequently organizing it. In addition, instructions are given for reporting doses to the Dose Register of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK). Also the procedures are described for situations leading to exceptional exposures. (10 refs., 1 tab.).

  6. Radiation exposure after heart transplantation: trends and significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Mumin; Shekhdar, Jane; Banner, Nicholas R

    2011-03-01

    Heart transplant recipients are frequently exposed to ionizing radiation from various imaging and cardiac procedures. However, radiation exposure carries various risks, including cancer. In this retrospective study, we calculated the mean cumulative radiation exposure during a 10-year period and the subsequent cancer risk after heart transplantation. The study included all patients who underwent heart transplantation from August 1998 to July 2008 at our center. We identified all plain X-ray images, computed tomography, nuclear medicine procedures, and cardiac procedures (endomyocardial biopsies, right and left heart catheterization, and coronary angiograms) each patient underwent during the follow-up period. Radiation doses from cardiac procedures were the recorded exposures, and we used reference values for plain X-ray imaging and nuclear medicine procedures. The mean radiation dose was 84 mSv during the 10-year period, and cardiac procedures represented the largest radiation dose at 43.6 mSv (52%). The 10-year cumulative dose represented an additional 1 in 290 new cancers in the healthy population. Encouragingly, there was a decreasing trend of radiation exposure during the study period, with a mean decrease of 4.3 mSv per year. Heart transplant patients are exposed to a 3.5 times greater dose of radiation per year compared with radiation from medical imaging in general population. The lifetime increase in cancer risk estimated from population studies was small. Although, there was a decreasing trend of radiation exposure during the study period, further reductions in radiation doses may be possible by the use of alternative imaging and non-imaging investigations. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Physician and nurse knowledge about patient radiation exposure in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-23

    Nov 23, 2015 ... The cumulative effects of radiation exposure over multiple diagnostic imaging methods affect the risk of cancer development in pediatric patients.[11,12]. Both the physicians and nurses underestimated the radiation dose of brain CT in this study. Adult and pediatric patients present to the ED because of ...

  8. Radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging among patients with gastrointestinal disorders.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Desmond, Alan N

    2012-03-01

    There are concerns about levels of radiation exposure among patients who undergo diagnostic imaging for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), compared with other gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. We quantified imaging studies and estimated the cumulative effective dose (CED) of radiation received by patients with organic and functional GI disorders. We also identified factors and diagnoses associated with high CEDs.

  9. Evaluation of exposure to ionizing radiation among gamma camera operators

    OpenAIRE

    Agnieszka Anna Domańska; Małgorzata Bieńkiewicz; Jerzy Olszewski

    2013-01-01

    Background: Protection of nuclear medicine unit employees from hazards of the ionizing radiation is a crucial issue of radiation protection services. We aimed to assess the severity of the occupational radiation exposure of technicians performing scintigraphic examinations at the Nuclear Medicine Department, Central Teaching Hospital of Medical University in Łódź, where thousands of different diagnostic procedures are performed yearly. Materials and Methods: In 2013 the studied diagnostic uni...

  10. Does short-term exposure to elevated levels of natural gamma radiation in Ramsar cause oxidative stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Smj; Niroomand-Rad, A; Roshan-Shomal, P; Razavi-Toosi, Smt; Mossayeb-Zadeh, M; Moghadam, M

    2014-07-01

    Ramsar, a city in northern Iran, has areas with some of the highest recorded levels of natural radiation among inhabited areas measured on the earth. To determine whether short-term exposure to extremely high levels of natural radiation induce oxidative stress. In this study, 53 Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups of 10-12 animals. Animals in the 1(st) group were kept for 7 days in an outdoor area with normal background radiation while the 2(nd) , 3(rd) , 4(th) and 5(th) groups were kept in four different outdoor areas with naturally elevated levels of gamma radiation in Ramsar. A calibrated RDS-110 survey meter, mounted on a tripod approximately 1 m above the ground, was used to measure exposure rate at each location. On days 7 and 9 blood sampling was performed to assess the serum levels of catalase (CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA). On day 8, all animals were exposed to a lethal dose of 8 Gy gamma radiations emitted by a Theratron Phoenix (Theratronics, Canada) Cobalt-60 (55 cGy/min) at Radiotherapy Department of Razi Hospital in Rasht, Iran. Findings obtained in this study indicate that high levels of natural radiation cannot induce oxidative stress. CAT and MDA levels in almost all groups were not significantly different (P = 0.69 and P = 0.05, respectively). After exposure to the lethal dose, CAT and MDA levels in all groups were not significantly different (P = 0.054 and P = 0.163, respectively). These findings indicate that short-term exposure to extremely high levels of natural radiation (up to 196 times higher than the normal background) does not induce oxidative stress.

  11. electromagnetic radiation exposure from cellular base station

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    to human health from exposure to radio frequency. (RF) electromagnetic fields ... adverse health effects such as blood brain barrier, cancer and sleep ... restrictions set by ICNIRP as shown in Table 1 [20]. Table 1: Basic restrictions between 10 and 300 GHz. Exposure characteristics. Power density (. 2. /. mW ). Occupational ...

  12. ASSESSMENT OF POPULATION AND TERRITORY REHABILITATION EFFICIENCY REGARDING RADIATION EXPOSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Volobuev

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The suggested assessment of rehabilitation measure efficiency is distinguished by the fact that integral risk interpretation is considered, which takes total radiation exposure and reduction of life standards caused by it into account. A rehabilitation measure structure in the context of radiation emergency is given. Classification of direct and mediated consequences of an emergency is given. Optimization of rehabilitation measures is carried out from the position of quality and security of life balancing. Corresponding expenses are compared to the cost of radiation exposure and its social equivalent damage. The role of an efficiency criterion is given to an integral damage minimum.

  13. Environmental radioactivity and radiation exposure in 2015; Umweltradioaktivitaet und Strahlenbelastung im Jahr 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-07-20

    The information of the German Federal Government on the environmental radioactivity and radiation exposure in 2015 covers the following issues: selected topics of radiation protection, natural radiation exposure; civilizing (artificial) radiation exposure: nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities, uranium mine recultivation, radioactive materials in industry and households, fallout from nuclear weapon testing and reactor accidents; occupational radiation exposure: exposed personnel in nuclear facilities, aviation personnel, radiation accidents; medical radiation exposure: nuclear medical diagnostics and therapy; non-ionizing radiation: electromagnetic fields, UV radiation, optical radiation.

  14. Natural and anthropogenic radiation exposure of humans in Germany; Natuerliche und zivilisatorische Strahlenexposition des Menschen in Deutschland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koelzer, Winfried

    2016-12-15

    The contribution on natural and anthropogenic radiation exposure in Germany covers the following issues: (1) natural radiation exposure: external radiation exposure - cosmic and terrestric radiation, internal radiation exposure - primordial and cosmogenic radionuclides; radiation exposure due to sola neutrinos and geo-neutrinos. (2) Anthropogenic radiation exposure: radiation exposure in medicine, radioactivity in industrial products, radiation exposure during flights, radiation exposure due to nuclear facilities, radiation exposure due to fossil energy carriers in power generation, radiation exposure due to nuclear explosions, radiation exposure due to nuclear accidents. (3) Occupational radiation exposure in Germany: radiation monitoring with personal dosimeters in medicine and industry, dose surveillance of the aviation personal, working places with increases radiation exposure by natural radiation sources.

  15. Low-dose radiation exposure and carcinogenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2012-01-01

    .... Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the dose-response relationships for cancer induction and quantitative evaluations of cancer risk following exposure to moderate to high doses of low-linear...

  16. 4th Neutron Transmutation Doping Conference

    CERN Document Server

    1984-01-01

    viii The growing use of NTD silicon outside the U. S. A. motivated an interest in having the next NTD conference in Europe. Therefore, the Third International Conference on Neutron Transmutation-Doped Silicon was organized by Jens Guldberg and held in Copenhagen, Denmark on August 27-29, 1980. The papers presented at this conference reviewed the developments which occurred during the t'A'O years since the previous conference and included papers on irradiation technology, radiation-induced defects, characteriza­ tion of NTD silicon, and the use of NTD silicon for device appli­ cations. The proceedings of this conference were edited by Jens Guldberg and published by Plenum Press in 1981. Interest in, and commercial use of, NTD silicon continued to grow after the Third NTD Conference, and research into neutron trans­ mutation doping of nonsilicon semiconductors had begun to accel­ erate. The Fourth International Transmutation Doping Conference reported in this volume includes invited papers summarizing the p...

  17. Health Impacts from Acute Radiation Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2003-09-30

    Absorbed doses above1-2 Gy (100-200 rads) received over a period of a day or less lead to one or another of the acute radiation syndromes. These are the hematopoietic syndrome, the gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome, the cerebrovascular (CV) syndrome, the pulmonary syndrome, or the cutaneous syndrome. The dose that will kill about 50% of the exposed people within 60 days with minimal medical care, LD50-60, is around 4.5 Gy (450 rads) of low-LET radiation measured free in air. The GI syndrome may not be fatal with supportive medical care and growth factors below about 10 Gy (1000 rads), but above this is likely to be fatal. Pulmonary and cutaneous syndromes may or may not be fatal, depending on many factors. The CV syndrome is invariably fatal. Lower acute doses, or protracted doses delivered over days or weeks, may lead to many other health outcomes than death. These include loss of pregnancy, cataract, impaired fertility or temporary or permanent sterility, hair loss, skin ulceration, local tissue necrosis, developmental abnormalities including mental and growth retardation in persons irradiated as children or fetuses, radiation dermatitis, and other symptoms listed in Table 2 on page 12. Children of parents irradiated prior to conception may experience heritable ill-health, that is, genetic changes from their parents. These effects are less strongly expressed than previously thought. Populations irradiated to high doses at high dose rates have increased risk of cancer incidence and mortality, taken as about 10-20% incidence and perhaps 5-10% mortality per sievert of effective dose of any radiation or per gray of whole-body absorbed dose low-LET radiation. Cancer risks for non-uniform irradiation will be less.

  18. Reduction of radiation exposure in Japanese BWR Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikawa, Yoshitake [ISOGO Nuclear Engineering Center, Yokohama (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    The reduction of occupational exposure to radiation during the annual inspection and maintenance outages of Japanese boiling water reactors (BWR) is one of the most important objectives for stable and reliable operation. It was shown that this radiation exposure is caused by radionuclides, such as Co-60, Co-58 and Mn-54 which are produced from the metal elements Co, Ni, and Fe present in the corrosion products of structural materials that had been irradiated by neutrons. Therefore, to reduce radiation sources and exposures in Japanese BWRs, attempts have been reinforced to remove corrosion products and activated corrosion products from the primary coolant system. This paper describes the progress of the application of these measures to Japanese BWRs. Most Japanese BWR-4 and BWR-5 type nuclear power plants started their commercial operations during the 1970s. With the elapse of time during operations, a problem came to the forefront, namely that occupational radiation exposure during plant outages gradually increased, which obstructed the smooth running of inspections and maintenance work. To overcome this problem, extensive studies to derive effective countermeasures for radiation exposure reduction were undertaken, based on the evaluation of the plants operation data.

  19. Radiation exposure of operator during various interventional procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, In Kyu; Chung, Jin Wook; Han, Joon Koo; Park, Jae Hyung; Kang, Wee Saing [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-02-15

    To investigate the levels of radiation exposure of an operator which may be influenced by the wearing an apron, type of procedure, duration of fluoroscopy and operator's skill during various interventional procedures. Radiation doses were measured both inside and outside the apron(0.5 mm lead equivalent) of the operator by a film badge monitoring method and the duration of fluoroscopy was measured in 96 procedures prospectively. The procedures were 30 transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE), 25 percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainages (PTBD), 16 stone removals (SR), 15 percutaneous needle aspirations (PNCA) and 10 percutaneous nephrostomies(PCN). To assess the difference of exposure by the operator's skill, the procedures of TAE and PTBD were done separately by groups of staffs and residents. Average protective effect of the apron was 72.8%. Average radiation exposure(unit: {mu} Sv/procedure was 23.3 in PTBD by residents, 10.0 in PTBD by staffs, 10.0 in SR, 8.7 in TAE by residents, 7.3 in TAE by staffs, 9.0 in PCN and 6.0 in PCNA. Average radiation exposure of residents were 1.9 times greater than those of staffs. Radiation exposure was not proportionally related to the duration of fluoroscopy, but influenced by wearing an apron, various types of procedure and operator's skills.

  20. Cumulative radiation exposure in children with cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Reilly, R

    2010-02-01

    This retrospective study calculated the cumulative radiation dose for children with cystic fibrosis (CF) attending a tertiary CF centre. Information on 77 children with a mean age of 9.5 years, a follow up time of 658 person years and 1757 studies including 1485 chest radiographs, 215 abdominal radiographs and 57 computed tomography (CT) scans, of which 51 were thoracic CT scans, were analysed. The average cumulative radiation dose was 6.2 (0.04-25) mSv per CF patient. Cumulative radiation dose increased with increasing age and number of CT scans and was greater in children who presented with meconium ileus. No correlation was identified between cumulative radiation dose and either lung function or patient microbiology cultures. Radiation carries a risk of malignancy and children are particularly susceptible. Every effort must be made to avoid unnecessary radiation exposure in these patients whose life expectancy is increasing.

  1. Occuptional radiation exposures and thyroid cancer risk among radiologic technologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Eun Kyeong; Lee, Won Jin [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Mina [Dankook University Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Young [Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Jae Kwan [National Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Young Won [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Medical radiation workers were among the earliest occupational groups exposed to external ionizing radiation due to their administration of a range of medical diagnostic procedures and accounted for 7.4 million worldwide in 2008. Ionizing radiation is the confirmed human carcinogen for most organ sites. The aims of the study is to evaluate the association between occupational practices including radiation exposure and thyroid cancer risk among radiologic technologists. We found no significant association between the risk of thyroid cancer and the majority of work practices among diagnostic radiation technologists in general. However workers performing fluoroscopy and interventional procedures showed increased risks although the lack of a clear exposure– response gradient makes it difficult to draw clear conclusions. Future studies with larger sample size and detailed work practices implementation are needed to clarify the role of occupational radiation work in thyroid cancer carcinogenesis.

  2. Occupational cosmic radiation exposure and cancer in airline cabin crew.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojo, K.

    2013-03-15

    Cosmic radiation dose rates are considerably higher at cruising altitudes of airplanes than at ground level. Previous studies have found increased risk of certain cancers among aircraft cabin crew, but the results are not consistent across different studies. Despite individual cosmic radiation exposure assessment is important for evaluating the relation between cosmic radiation exposure and cancer risk, only few previous studies have tried to develop an exposure assessment method. The evidence for adverse health effects in aircrews due to ionizing radiation is inconclusive because quantitative dose estimates have not been used. No information on possible confounders has been collected. For an occupational group with an increased risk of certain cancers it is very important to assess if the risk is related to occupational exposure. The goal of this thesis was to develop two separate retrospective exposure assessment methods for occupational exposure to cosmic radiation. The methods included the assessment based on survey on flight histories and based on company flight timetables. Another goal was to describe the cancer incidence among aircraft cabin crew with a large cohort in four Nordic countries, i.e., Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Also the contribution of occupational as well as non-occupational factors to breast and skin cancer risk among the cabin crew was studied with case-control studies. Using the survey method of cosmic radiation exposure assessment, the median annual radiation dose of Finnish airline cabin crew was 0.6 milliSievert (mSv) in the 1960s, 3.3 mSv in the 1970s, and 3.6 mSv in the 1980s. With the flight timetable method, the annual radiation dose increased with time being 0.7 mSv in the 1960 and 2.1 mSv in the 1995. With the survey method, the median career dose was 27.9 mSv and with the timetable method 20.8 mSv. These methods provide improved means for individual cosmic radiation exposure assessment compared to studies where cruder

  3. Low-dose Radiation Exposure and Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2012-01-01

    Absorption of energy from ionizing radiation by the genetic material in the cell leads to damage to DNA, which in turn leads to cell death, chromosome aberrations and gene mutations. While early or deterministic effects result from organ and tissue damage caused by cell killing, latter two are considered to be involved in the initial events that lead to the development of cancer. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the dose-2013;response relationships for cancer induction and quantitati...

  4. Cumulative radiation exposure in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Mark A; Noga, Michelle; Rutledge, Jennifer

    2015-02-01

    Certain pediatric patients undergoing surgery for the most severe forms of congenital heart disease are exposed to high doses of ionizing radiation. The amount of cumulative radiation exposure from all modalities has not yet been evaluated. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the cumulative radiation exposure in a contemporary cohort of patients with congenital heart disease undergoing single-ventricle palliation. This is a single-center, retrospective study of pediatric patients undergoing Fontan completion between May 2005 and May 2010. Radiation exposure from all procedures including cardiac catheterizations, computed tomography (CT) scans, plain film radiography, and nuclear medicine scans was evaluated. Radiation dose was calculated as the dose area product (μGy m(2)) and was measured in all cardiac catheterizations, CT scans, and other imaging modalities. Seventy patients who underwent Fontan completion at a mean age of 3.6 ± 1.5 years (range 1.4-8 years) were included in the study. Mean number of chest X-rays was 32 ± 8 (range 10-285) with a mean cumulative total exposure of 1,320 μGy m(2) (range 480-12,960) per patient. Mean number of cardiac catheterizations was 2.45 ± 1.3 (range 1-8), and mean fluoroscopy and cine angiography exposures per case were 1,103 ± 245 and 1,412 ± 273 μGy m(2) giving a mean cumulative exposure of 9,054 μGy m(2) (range 2,515-201,200) per patient for all catheterizations. Mean number of CT scans performed was 0.44 ± 0.4 (0-11), and the mean exposure was 352 μGy m(2), giving a mean cumulative total of 154 μGy m(2) (range 0-3,872) per person. A total of five lung perfusion scans were carried out. Radiation exposure in patients with congenital heart disease undergoing single-ventricle palliation is quite variable. Most of the exposure to ionizing radiation occurs during cardiac catheterization. Strategies to utilize other imaging modalities such as MRI would decrease exposure in this particular group of patients who

  5. Natural radiation indoor exposure of Italian population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochicchio, F.; Campos Venuti, G. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Mancioppi, S.; Piermattei, S. [ENEA/DISP, Rome (Italy); Risica, S. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Tommasino, L.; Torri, G. [ENEA/DISP, Rome (Italy)

    1992-07-01

    A natural radiation survey based on the choice of a statistically representative sample of 5000 dwellings began in Italy in 1989. The paper analyses the radon results obtained in 45% of the national sample. The arithmetic mean of the concentration is equal to 80 Bq/m{sup 3} and the number of dwellings exceeding 200 and 400 Bq/m{sup 3} is around 5% and 1% of the total, respectively. The concentration distribution could be described by a lognormal curve, but with a significant underestimation of the high concentration tail. (author)

  6. Cognitive, psychological and psychiatric effects of ionizing radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marazziti, D; Baroni, S; Catena-Dell'Osso, M; Schiavi, E; Ceresoli, D; Conversano, C; Dell'Osso, L; Picano, E

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exposure leads to an increased risk for cancer and, possibly, additional ill-defined non-cancer risk, including atherosclerotic, cardiovascular, cerebro-vascular and neurodegenerative effects. Studies of brain irradiation in animals and humans provide evidence of apoptosis, neuro-inflammation, loss of oligo-dendrocytes precursors and myelin sheaths, and irreversible damage to the neural stem compartment with long-term impairment of adult neurogenesis. With the present paper we aim to present a comprehensive review on brain effects of radiation exposure, with a special focus on its impact on cognitive processes and psychological functions, as well as on their possible role in the pathophysiology of different psychiatric disorders.

  7. Assessing protection against radiation exposure after prostate (125)I brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Takashi; Yorozu, Atsunori; Kikumura, Riki; Ohashi, Toshio; Shigematsu, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    To expand the radiation dose rate measurement data set by measuring radiation under various prostate (125)I brachytherapy situations. Measurements were obtained from 63 consecutive unselected patients at Tokyo Medical Center, Japan. Differences in factors during measurements, such as body postures, distances from the skin surface, and measurement directions were considered. Furthermore, shielding effects of lead-lined underwear, consisting mainly of 0.1-mm thickness of lead, were also assessed. Radiation exposure varies according to the patient's body posture, with results differing as much as approximately 40.0% in measured radiation dose rates at 30cm from the anterior skin surface. Weight, body mass index, and tissue thickness showed good correlations with measured radiation dose rates. The magnitude of radiation exposure attenuation by shielding was approximately 95.8%, similar to the attenuation ratio based on tissue measurements made in the lateral direction. The respective mean times required to reach 1mSv were 1.2, 7.6, and 65.4 days in the standing position and 0.6, 4.6, and 40.4 days in the supine position at the site of contact, and at 30 and 100cm from the anterior skin surface. This study obtained supplemental information pertaining to radiological protection and confirmed that shielding can be an effective tool for reducing exposures. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Baby on Board: Managing Occupational Radiation Exposure During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, M Victoria

    2018-03-01

    This article reviews the issue of occupational radiation exposure as a deterrent to recruitment of women into the field of interventional radiology and provides the reader with three strategies to optimize radiation protection during fluoroscopically guided procedures. These include personal protective shielding, use of ancillary shielding, and techniques that limit fluoroscopy x-ray tube output. When optimal radiation safety practices are implemented as the norm in the IR suite, very little extra needs to be done to ensure that fetal dose of a pregnant interventionalist is negligible. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. the 4th International Shrike Symposium, Chemnitz, Germany, August ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Review Advances in Shrikeology: the 4th International Shrike Symposium, Chemnitz, Germany, August 17th–18th, 2003 Biological Letters 41(2): Special Issue By Reuven Yosef, Fred E Lohrer and Pietr Tryjanowski (eds) 2004.

  10. Evaluation of medical radiation exposure in pediatric interventional radiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Valeria Coelho Costa; Navarro, Marcus Vinicius Teixeira; Oliveira, Aline da Silva Pacheco, E-mail: vccnavarro@gmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia (IFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil); Maia, Ana Figueiredo [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Aracaju, SE (Brazil); Oliveira, Adriano Dias Dourado [Sociedade Brasileira de Hemodinamica e Cardiologia Intervencionista, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    Objective: To evaluate pediatric radiation exposure in procedures of interventional radiology in two hospitals in the Bahia state, aiming at contributing to delineate the scenario at the state and national levels. The knowledge of exposure levels will allow an evaluation of the necessity of doses optimization, considering that peculiarities of radiology and pediatrics become even more significant in interventional radiology procedures which involve exposure to higher radiation doses. Materials and Methods: A total of 32 procedures were evaluated in four rooms of the two main hospitals performing pediatric interventional radiology procedures in the Bahia state. Air kerma rate and kerma-area product were evaluated in 27 interventional cardiac and 5 interventional brain procedures. Results: Maximum values for air kerma rate and kerma-area product and air kerma obtained in cardiac procedures were, respectively, 129.9 Gy.cm{sup 2} and 947.0 mGy; and, for brain procedures were 83.3 Gy.cm{sup 2} and 961.0 mGy. Conclusion: The present study results showed exposure values up to 14 times higher than those found in other foreign studies, and approximating those found for procedures in adults. Such results demonstrate excessive exposure to radiation, indicating the need for constant procedures optimization and evaluation of exposure rates. (author)

  11. Protection of DNA damage by radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Kim, In Gyu; Lee, Kang Suk; Kim, Kug Chan; Oh, Tae Jung

    1998-12-01

    The SOS response of Escherichia coli is positively regulated by RecA. To examine the effects of polyamines on The SOS response of E. Coli, we investigated the expression of recA gene in polyamine-deficient mutant and wild type carrying recA'::lacZ fusion gene. As a result, recA expression by mitomycin C is higher in wild type than that of polyamine-deficient mutant, but recA expression by UV radiation is higher in wild type than of mutant. We also found that exogenous polyamines restored the recA expression in the polyamine-deficient mutant to the wild type level. These results proposed that polyamines play an important role in mechanism of intracellular DNA protection by DNA damaging agents.

  12. Radiation Exposure of Abdominal Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailer, Anna M., E-mail: anni.sailer@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Schurink, Geert Willem H., E-mail: gwh.schurink@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Wildberger, Joachim E., E-mail: j.wildberger@mumc.nl; Graaf, Rick de, E-mail: r.de.graaf@mumc.nl; Zwam, Willem H. van, E-mail: w.van.zwam@mumc.nl; Haan, Michiel W. de, E-mail: m.de.haan@mumc.nl; Kemerink, Gerrit J., E-mail: gerrit.kemerink@mumc.nl; Jeukens, Cécile R. L. P. N., E-mail: cecile.jeukens@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate patients radiation exposure of abdominal C-arm cone beam computed tomography (CBCT).MethodsThis prospective study was approved by the institutional review board; written, informed consent was waived. Radiation exposure of abdominal CBCT was evaluated in 40 patients who underwent CBCT during endovascular interventions. Dose area product (DAP) of CBCT was documented and effective dose (ED) was estimated based on organ doses using dedicated Monte Carlo simulation software with consideration of X-ray field location and patients’ individual body weight and height. Weight-dependent ED per DAP conversion factors were calculated. CBCT radiation dose was compared to radiation dose of procedural fluoroscopy. CBCT dose-related risk for cancer was assessed.ResultsMean ED of abdominal CBCT was 4.3 mSv (95 % confidence interval [CI] 3.9; 4.8 mSv, range 1.1–7.4 mSv). ED was significantly higher in the upper than in the lower abdomen (p = 0.003) and increased with patients’ weight (r = 0.55, slope = 0.045 mSv/kg, p < 0.001). Radiation exposure of CBCT corresponded to the radiation exposure of on average 7.2 fluoroscopy minutes (95 % CI 5.5; 8.8 min) in the same region of interest. Lifetime risk of exposure related cancer death was 0.033 % or less depending on age and weight.ConclusionsMean ED of abdominal CBCT was 4.3 mSv depending on X-ray field location and body weight.

  13. Long-term effects of radiation exposure on health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Kenji; Ozasa, Kotaro; Akiba, Suminori; Niwa, Ohstura; Kodama, Kazunori; Takamura, Noboru; Zaharieva, Elena K; Kimura, Yuko; Wakeford, Richard

    2015-08-01

    Late-onset effects of exposure to ionising radiation on the human body have been identified by long-term, large-scale epidemiological studies. The cohort study of Japanese survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki (the Life Span Study) is thought to be the most reliable source of information about these health effects because of the size of the cohort, the exposure of a general population of both sexes and all ages, and the wide range of individually assessed doses. For this reason, the Life Span Study has become fundamental to risk assessment in the radiation protection system of the International Commission on Radiological Protection and other authorities. Radiation exposure increases the risk of cancer throughout life, so continued follow-up of survivors is essential. Overall, survivors have a clear radiation-related excess risk of cancer, and people exposed as children have a higher risk of radiation-induced cancer than those exposed at older ages. At high doses, and possibly at low doses, radiation might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and some other non-cancer diseases. Hereditary effects in the children of atomic bomb survivors have not been detected. The dose-response relation for cancer at low doses is assumed, for purposes of radiological protection, to be linear without a threshold, but has not been shown definitively. This outstanding issue is not only a problem when dealing appropriately with potential health effects of nuclear accidents, such as at Fukushima and Chernobyl, but is of growing concern in occupational and medical exposure. Therefore, the appropriate dose-response relation for effects of low doses of radiation needs to be established. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cancer risk estimation caused by radiation exposure during endovascular procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Y. H.; Cho, J. H.; Yun, W. S.; Park, K. H.; Kim, H. G.; Kwon, S. M.

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the radiation exposure dose of patients, as well as staff caused by fluoroscopy for C-arm-assisted vascular surgical operation and to estimate carcinogenic risk due to such exposure dose. The study was conducted in 71 patients (53 men and 18 women) who had undergone vascular surgical intervention at the division of vascular surgery in the University Hospital from November of 2011 to April of 2012. It had used a mobile C-arm device and calculated the radiation exposure dose of patient (dose-area product, DAP). Effective dose was measured by attaching optically stimulated luminescence on the radiation protectors of staff who participates in the surgery to measure the radiation exposure dose of staff during the vascular surgical operation. From the study results, DAP value of patients was 308.7 Gy cm2 in average, and the maximum value was 3085 Gy cm2. When converted to the effective dose, the resulted mean was 6.2 m Gy and the maximum effective dose was 61.7 milliSievert (mSv). The effective dose of staff was 3.85 mSv; while the radiation technician was 1.04 mSv, the nurse was 1.31 mSv. All cancer incidences of operator are corresponding to 2355 persons per 100,000 persons, which deemed 1 of 42 persons is likely to have all cancer incidences. In conclusion, the vascular surgeons should keep the radiation protection for patient, staff, and all participants in the intervention in mind as supervisor of fluoroscopy while trying to understand the effects by radiation by themselves to prevent invisible danger during the intervention and to minimize the harm.

  15. Electromagnetic Radiation Exposure from Cellular Base Station: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For cellular network Base Transceiver Station (BTS) antennas to operate as intended without adverse health effects, they must comply with Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) standards as well as safety guidelines relating to exposure of non-ionizing radiation. Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) operators ...

  16. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotring, V. E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2011-01-01

    Most administered pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver and exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. Additionally, it has been previous noted that pre-exposure to small radiation doses seems to confer protection against later and larger radiation doses. This protective power of pre-exposure has been called a priming effect or radioadaptation. This study is an effort to examine the drug metabolizing effects of radioadaptation mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses.

  17. Estimating nurses' exposures to ionizing radiation: the elusive gold standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschke, Kay; Chow, Yat; Chung, Joanna; Ratner, Pamela; Spinelli, John; Le, Nhu; Ward, Helen

    2008-02-01

    This study assessed ionizing radiation exposure in 58,125 registered nurses in British Columbia, Canada, for a cohort study of cancer morbidity and mortality. Two methods were used: (1) a survey of nurses in more than 100 acute care hospitals and health care centers; (2) and monitoring data reported to the National Dose Registry of Health Canada, considered the gold standard. The mean exposure of cohort nurses monitored during the study period from 1974 to 2000 was 0.27 milliSieverts (7028 person-years of monitoring). Of 609,809 person-years in the cohort, 554,595 (90.9%) were identified as unexposed by both exposure assessment methods. Despite crude agreement of 91% between the methods, weighted kappa for agreement beyond chance was only 0.045, and the sensitivity of the survey method to capture National Dose Registry monitored person-years was only 0.085 (specificity = 0.97). The survey missed exposures outside the acute care setting. The National Dose Registry also missed potential exposures, especially among hospital emergency department and pediatric staff nurses. It was unlikely that either method estimated nurses' true exposures to ionizing radiation with good sensitivity and specificity. The difficulty in exposure assessment likely arises because fewer than 10% of registered nurses are exposed to ionizing radiation, yet the settings in which they are exposed vary tremendously. This means that careful hazard assessment is required to ensure that monitoring is complete where exposures are probable, without incurring the excess costs and lack of specificity of including the unexposed.

  18. Radiation exposure in nuclear medicine: real-time measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sylvain, Iara [Beaujon Hospital, Clichy (France). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; E-mail: iara.sylvain@bjn.ap-hop-paris.fr; Bok, Bernard [Beaujon Hospital, Clichy (France). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; X. Bichat University, Paris (France). Biophysics Lab.; E-mail: bernard.bok@bjn.ap-hop-paris.fr

    2002-09-01

    French regulations have introduced the use of electronic dosimeters for personnel monitoring of workers. In order to evaluate the exposure from diagnostic procedures to nuclear medicine staff, individual whole-body doses were measured daily with electronic (digital) personal dosimeters during 20 consecutive weeks and correlated with the work load of each day. Personal doses remained always below 20 mu Sv/d under normal working conditions. Radiation exposure levels were highest to tech staff, nurses and stretcher-bearers. The extrapolated annual cumulative doses for all staff remained less than 10% of the maximum legal limit for exposed workers (2 mSv/yr). Electronic dosimeters are not technically justified for routine survey of staff. The high sensitivity and immediate reading of electronic semiconductor dosimeters may become very useful for exposure control under risky working conditions. It may become an important help for optimising radiation protection. (author)

  19. Reducing waste generation and radiation exposure by analytical method modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-10-01

    The primary goal of an analytical support laboratory has traditionally been to provide accurate data in a timely and cost effective fashion. Added to this goal is now the need to provide the same high quality data while generating as little waste as possible. At the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), we have modified and reengineered several methods to decrease generated waste and hence reduce radiation exposure. These method changes involved improving detection limits (which decreased the amount of sample required for analysis), decreasing reaction and analysis time, decreasing the size of experimental set-ups, recycling spent solvent and reagents, and replacing some methods. These changes had the additional benefits of reducing employee radiation exposure and exposure to hazardous chemicals. In all cases, the precision, accuracy, and detection limits were equal to or better than the replaced method. Most of the changes required little or no expenditure of funds. This paper describes these changes and discusses some of their applications.

  20. Mitigation Strategies for Acute Radiation Exposure during Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Douglas R.; Epelman, Slava

    2006-01-01

    While there are many potential risks in a Moon or Mars mission, one of the most important and unpredictable is that of crew radiation exposure. The two forms of radiation that impact a mission far from the protective environment of low-earth orbit, are solar particle events (SPE) and galactic cosmic radiation (GCR). The effects of GCR occur as a long-term cumulative dose that results increased longer-term medical risks such as malignancy and neurological degeneration. Unfortunately, relatively little has been published on the medical management of an acute SPE that could potentially endanger the mission and harm the crew. Reanalysis of the largest SPE in August 1972 revealed that the dose rate was significantly higher than previously stated in the literature. The peak dose rate was 9 cGy h(sup -1) which exceeds the low dose-rate criteria for 25 hrs (National Council on Radiation Protection) and 16 hrs (United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation). The bone marrow dose accumulated was 0.8 Gy, which exceeded the 25 and 16 hour criteria and would pose a serious medical risk. Current spacesuits would not provide shielding from the damaging effects for an SPE as large as the 1972 event, as increased shielding from 1-5 grams per square centimeters would do little to shield the bone marrow from exposure. Medical management options for an acute radiation event are discussed based on recommendations from the Department of Homeland Security, Centers for Disease Control and evidence-based scientific literature. The discussion will also consider how to define acute exposure radiation safety limits with respect to exploration-class missions, and to determine the level of care necessary for a crew that may be exposed to an SPE similar to August 1972.

  1. Does Less Invasive Spine Surgery Result in Increased Radiation Exposure? A Systematic Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yu, Elizabeth; Khan, Safdar N

    2014-01-01

    .... The risks of radiation exposure include thyroid cancer, cataracts, and lymphoma. Although imaging techniques facilitate less invasive approaches and improve intraoperative accuracy, they may increase radiation...

  2. A reassessment of Galileo radiation exposures in the Jupiter magnetosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwell, William; Townsend, Lawrence; Miller, Thomas; Campbell, Christina

    2005-01-01

    Earlier particle experiments in the 1970s on Pioneer-10 and -11 and Voyager-1 and -2 provided Jupiter flyby particle data, which were used by Divine and Garrett to develop the first Jupiter trapped radiation environment model. This model was used to establish a baseline radiation effects design limit for the Galileo onboard electronics. Recently, Garrett et al. have developed an updated Galileo Interim Radiation Environment (GIRE) model based on Galileo electron data. In this paper, we have used the GIRE model to reassess the computed radiation exposures and dose effects for Galileo. The 34-orbit 'as flown' Galileo trajectory data and the updated GIRE model were used to compute the electron and proton spectra for each of the 34 orbits. The total ionisation doses of electrons and protons have been computed based on a parametric shielding configuration, and these results are compared with previously published results.

  3. Radiation exposure to anesthesiologist and nurse in the orthopedic room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arita, Tetsuhiko; Matsuzaki, Akio [Fukuoka Univ., Chikushino (Japan). Chikusi Hospital

    1996-09-01

    We report the radiation exposure dose received by the anesthesiologist and nurse in the orthopaedic operating room, when a fluoroscopic image intensifier is in use. This study was done in 12 femoral neck fracture operations performed from January to May 1995. Radiation was monitored with the MYDOSE MINIX PDM 107 made by Aloka Co. which were attached in front and behind the nurse`s lead apron, in front of the lead apron of the anesthesiologist. The average imaging time was 9.78 min. The average radiation dose in front of the anesthesiologist is lead apron was 2.08{mu}SV, and in front and behind the nurse`s lead apron were 5.67{mu}SV, 0.08{mu}SV respectively. This study and review of the literature indicate that the operating room anesthesiologist and nurse receive a lower exposure than the orthopaedist. We can disregard the problem of radiation exposure to the anesthesiologist and nurse during an orthopaedic operation when they wear lead aprons and stand far from the patient. (author)

  4. Occupational Radiation Exposure during Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography and Usefulness of Radiation Protective Curtains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Minami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of radiation protective curtains in reducing the occupational radiation exposure of medical personnel. Methods. We studied medical staff members who had assisted in 80 consecutive therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP procedures. Use of radiation protective curtains mounted to the X-ray tube was determined randomly for each procedure, and radiation doses were measured with electronic pocket dosimeters placed outside the protective apron. Results. When protective curtains were not used, the mean radiation doses to endoscopists, first assistants, second assistants, and nurses were 340.9, 27.5, 45.3, and 33.1 µSv, respectively; doses decreased to 42.6, 4.2, 13.1, and 10.6 µSv, respectively, when protective curtains were used (P<0.01. When the patient had to be restrained during ERCP (n=8, the radiation dose to second assistants without protective curtains increased by a factor of 9.95 (P<0.01 relative to cases in which restraint was not required. Conclusions. During ERCP, not only endoscopists, but also assistants and nurses were exposed to high doses of radiation. Radiation exposure to staff members during ERCP was reduced with the use of protective curtains.

  5. Occupational exposure to microwave radiation in diathermia units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, M.A.; Ubeda, A. [Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Servicio de Investigacion-BEM, Madrid (Spain); Tellez, M.; Santa Olalla, I. [Hospital La Paz, Servicio de Radiofisica y Radioproteccion, Madrid (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    The present study summarizes preliminary data addressed to complete the present knowledge on the microwave (M.V.)-exposure doses and conditions in workers exposed chronically to relatively high, though nonthermal, levels of that non ionizing radiations (N.I.R.). The obtained data are of direct application to radiation protection in occupational media provided that: 1) help to detect and eradicate practices and situations that result in overexposure; 2) they constitute a basis for the design and development of strategies for exposure control and minimization, and 3) they represent a dosimetric support necessary to properly interpret past and future epidemiologic and experimental data on potential health effects of chronic exposures to M.W. radiation at work. The described results will be extended through additional dosimetric recordings in other hospitals. The dosimetric data will be compared to the results of questionnaires among the electro-therapists working at the units studied. The objective is to identify potential relationships between exposure doses and specific diseases or level of risk perception among the investigated professional group. (authors)

  6. Study Regarding Electromagnetic Radiation Exposure Generated By Mobile Phone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marica, Lucia; Moraru, Luminita

    2011-12-01

    Number of mobile phone users reached to 5 billion subscribers in 2010 [ABI Research, 2010]. A large number of studies illustrated the public concern about adverse effects of mobile phone radiation and possible health hazards. Position of mobile phone use in close proximity to the head leads the main radiation between the hand and the head. Many investigations studying the possible effects of mobile phone exposure, founded no measurable effects of short-term mobile phone radiation, and there was no evidence for the ability to perceive mobile phone EMF in the general population. In this study, field radiation measurements were performed on different brand and different models of mobile phones in active mode, using an EMF RF Radiation Field Strength Power Meter 1 MHz-8 GHz. The study was effectuated on both the 2G and 3G generations phones connected to the providers operating in the frequency range 450 MHz-1800 MHz. There were recorded values in outgoing call and SMS mode, incoming call and SMS mode. Results were compared with ICNIRP guidelines for exposure to general public.

  7. Cell phone radiation exposure on brain and associated biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesari, Kavindra Kumar; Siddiqui, Mohd Haris; Meena, Ramovatar; Verma, H N; Kumar, Shivendra

    2013-03-01

    Wireless technologies are ubiquitous today and the mobile phones are one of the prodigious output of this technology. Although the familiarization and dependency of mobile phones is growing at an alarming pace, the biological effects due to the exposure of radiations have become a subject of intense debate. The present evidence on mobile phone radiation exposure is based on scientific research and public policy initiative to give an overview of what is known of biological effects that occur at radiofrequency (RF)/ electromagnetic fields (EMFs) exposure. The conflict in conclusions is mainly because of difficulty in controlling the affecting parameters. Biological effects are dependent not only on the distance and size of the object (with respect to the object) but also on the environmental parameters. Health endpoints reported to be associated with RF include childhood leukemia, brain tumors, genotoxic effects, neurological effects and neurodegenerative diseases, immune system deregulation, allergic and inflammatory responses, infertility and some cardiovascular effects. Most of the reports conclude a reasonable suspicion of mobile phone risk that exists based on clear evidence of bio-effects which with prolonged exposures may reasonably be presumed to result in health impacts. The present study summarizes the public issue based on mobile phone radiation exposure and their biological effects. This review concludes that the regular and long term use of microwave devices (mobile phone, microwave oven) at domestic level can have negative impact upon biological system especially on brain. It also suggests that increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role by enhancing the effect of microwave radiations which may cause neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Prenatal radiation exposure. Dose calculation; Praenatale Strahlenexposition. Dosisermittlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharwaechter, C.; Schwartz, C.A.; Haage, P. [University Hospital Witten/Herdecke, Wuppertal (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Roeser, A. [University Hospital Witten/Herdecke, Wuppertal (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology

    2015-05-15

    The unborn child requires special protection. In this context, the indication for an X-ray examination is to be checked critically. If thereupon radiation of the lower abdomen including the uterus cannot be avoided, the examination should be postponed until the end of pregnancy or alternative examination techniques should be considered. Under certain circumstances, either accidental or in unavoidable cases after a thorough risk assessment, radiation exposure of the unborn may take place. In some of these cases an expert radiation hygiene consultation may be required. This consultation should comprise the expected risks for the unborn while not perturbing the mother or the involved medical staff. For the risk assessment in case of an in-utero X-ray exposition deterministic damages with a defined threshold dose are distinguished from stochastic damages without a definable threshold dose. The occurrence of deterministic damages depends on the dose and the developmental stage of the unborn at the time of radiation. To calculate the risks of an in-utero radiation exposure a three-stage concept is commonly applied. Depending on the amount of radiation, the radiation dose is either estimated, roughly calculated using standard tables or, in critical cases, accurately calculated based on the individual event. The complexity of the calculation thereby increases from stage to stage. An estimation based on stage one is easily feasible whereas calculations based on stages two and especially three are more complex and often necessitate execution by specialists. This article demonstrates in detail the risks for the unborn child pertaining to its developmental phase and explains the three-stage concept as an evaluation scheme. It should be noted, that all risk estimations are subject to considerable uncertainties.

  9. A real CDIO mechanical engineering project in 4th semester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Aage Birkkjær

    In the past 6 years at the mechanical engineering study at the Engineering College of Aarhus we have been practicing project work on 4th Semester in the design of energy technology systems. In my presentation, I will give a description of the project, and the thoughts behind; pedagogic-didactic a......In the past 6 years at the mechanical engineering study at the Engineering College of Aarhus we have been practicing project work on 4th Semester in the design of energy technology systems. In my presentation, I will give a description of the project, and the thoughts behind; pedagogic...

  10. Joint Force Quarterly. Issue 59, 4th Quarter 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    JFQ NO T e S 1 Carlo D’ Este, Eisenhower: A Soldier’s Life (New York: Holt and Co., 2002), 693. 2 John R. Deni, Alliance Management and...Director of DOD Force Structure brief press on QDR and Ballistic Missile Defense Review DOD (Cherie Cullen ) ndupress .ndu.edu issue 59, 4 th quarter...Iraq commander GEN Odierno  updates press on state of affairs in Iraq DOD (Cherie Cullen ) ndupress .ndu.edu issue 59, 4 th quarter 2010 / JFQ

  11. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes In Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism it is important to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. This study is an effort to examine the effects of adaptive mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses. Using procedures approved by the JSC Animal Care & Use Committee, C57 male mice were exposed to Cs-137 in groups: controls, low dose (50 mGy), high dose (6Gy) and a fourth group that received both radiation doses separated by 24 hours. Animals were anesthetized and sacrificed 4 hours after their last radiation exposure. Livers were removed immediately and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissue was homogenized, RNA extracted and purified (Absolutely RNA, Agilent). Quality of RNA samples was evaluated (Agilent Bioanalyzer 2100). Complementary DNA was prepared from high-quality RNA samples, and used to run RT-qPCR screening arrays for DNA Repair and Drug Metabolism (SuperArray, SABiosciences/Qiagen; BioRad Cfx96 qPCR System). Of 91 drug metabolism genes examined, expression of 7 was altered by at least one treatment condition. Genes that had elevated expression include those that metabolize promethazine and steroids (4-8-fold), many that reduce oxidation products, and one that reduces heavy metal exposure (greater than 200-fold). Of the 91 DNA repair and general metabolism genes examined, expression of 14 was altered by at least one treatment condition. These gene expression changes are likely homeostatic and could lead to development of new radioprotective countermeasures.

  12. Nodular goiter after occupational accidental exposure to radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisarev, M.A. [Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Human Biochemistry, Uninversity of Buenos Aires, School of Medicine, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Schnitman, M. [Center of Endocrinology and Metabolism, French Hospital C.Milstein, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-07-01

    In the present paper we present the consequences of an accidental occupational radiation exposure at a local hospital in Buenos Aires. Control at a local radiology service showed the lack of correct shielding in the X-ray equipment. The physicians and technicians (14 persons) exposed to radiation during 12 months were examined. The survey shows that: a) In 11 out of 14 radiation-exposed patients nodular goiter developed and an additional patient had diffuse goiter which means a goiter incidence of 85.7%; b) In 5 of the nodular goiter patients an increase in the size or the appearance of new nodules was observed along the follow-up period. No cancer was detected by FNA; c) Hypothyroidism was observed in 3/14 patients, and an additional patient had an abnormal TRH-TSH test, suggesting subclinical hypothyroidism; and d) Increased circulating antithyroid antibodies were found in one of the hypothyroid patients

  13. Occupational radiation Exposure at Agreement State-Licensed Materials Facilities, 1997-2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    2012-07-07

    The purpose of this report is to examine occupational radiation exposures received under Agreement State licensees. As such, this report reflects the occupational radiation exposure data contained in the Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS) database, for 1997 through 2010, from Agreement State-licensed materials facilities.

  14. RADIOFREQUENCY AND MICROWAVE RADIATION HEALTH EFFECTS AND OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Damnjanović

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, there have been considerable discussion and concern about the possible hazards of RF/MW radiation. More recently, the growth and development in personal mobile communications have focused attention on the frequencies associated with this technology. A number of studies have examined the health effects of RF/MW electromagnetic fields (EMFs, originating from occupational exposure, hobbies, or residence near the radio or television transmitters. Particularly controversial are the biophysical mechanisms by which these RF fields may affect biological systems. General health effects reviews explore possible carcinogenic, reproductive and neurological effects. Health effects by exposure source have been observed in radar traffic devices, wireless communications with cellular phones, radio transmission, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Several epidemiological surveys have suggested associations with non-specific complaints such as headache, tiredness, sleep disturbance, loss of memory, and dizziness. These findings, which echo reports of illness associated with other types of radiofrequency (RF radiation, relate not only to the use of mobile phones, but also to residence near the mobile phone base stations and other settings involving occupational exposure. The biological effects suggest that some precautions are necessary, and preventive approaches are highly recommended. Further researches are required to give more information about the effects of microwave radiation on our health, especially in occupational setting and professionally exposed workers.

  15. Assessing exposure to cosmic radiation on board aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottollier-Depois, J. F.; Chau, Q.; Bouisset, P.; Kerlau, G.; Plawinski, L.; Lebaron-Jacobs, L.

    The assessment of exposure to cosmic radiation on board aircraft is one of the preoccupations of organizations responsible for radiation protection. The cosmic radiation particle flux increases with altitude and latitude and depends on the solar activity. The radiation exposure has been estimated on several airlines using transatlantic, Siberian and transequatorial routes on board subsonic and supersonic aircraft, to illustrate the effect of these parameters: Measurements have been obtained with a tissue equivalent proportional counter using the microdosimetric technique. Data have been collected at maximum solar activity in 1991-1992 and at minimum in 1996-1998. The lowest mean dose rate measured was 3 μSv/h during a Paris-Buenos Aires flight in 1991; the highest was 6.6 μSv/h during a Paris-Tokyo flight using a Siberian route and 9.7 μ Sv/h on Concorde in 1996-1997. The mean quality factor is around 1.8. The corresponding annual effective dose, based on 700 hours of flight for subsonic aircraft and 300 hours for Concorde, can be-estimated between 2 rnSv for least-exposed routes and 5 mSv for more exposed routes.

  16. Radiation Exposure to Physicians During Interventional Pain Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Wan; Jung, Jang Hwan; Jeon, Hyun Joo; Yoon, Kyung Bong

    2010-01-01

    Background Fluoroscopy has been an integral part of modern interventional pain management. Yet fluoroscopy can be associated with risks for the patients and clinicians unless it is managed with appropriate understanding, skill and vigilance. Therefore, this study was designed to determine the amount of radiation received by a primary operator and an assistant during interventional pain procedures that involve the use of fluoroscopy Methods In order to examine the amount of radiation, the physicians were monitored by having them wear three thermoluminescent badges during each single procedure, with one under a lead apron, one under the apron collar and one on the leg during each single procedure. The data obtained from each thermoluminescent badge was reviewed from September 2008 to November 2008 and the annual radiation exposure was subsequently calculated. Results A total of 505 interventional procedures were performed with C-arm fluoroscopy during three months. The results of this study revealed that the annual radiation exposure was relatively low for both the operator and assistant. Conclusions With proper precautions, the use of fluoroscopy during interventional pain procedures is a safe practice. PMID:20552069

  17. Exposure Risks Among Children Undergoing Radiation Therapy: Considerations in the Era of Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Clayton B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Thompson, Holly M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Benedict, Stanley H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Seibert, J. Anthony [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Wong, Kenneth [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Vaughan, Andrew T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allenmchen@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Recent improvements in toxicity profiles of pediatric oncology patients are attributable, in part, to advances in the field of radiation oncology such as intensity modulated radiation (IMRT) and proton therapy (IMPT). While IMRT and IMPT deliver highly conformal dose to targeted volumes, they commonly demand the addition of 2- or 3-dimensional imaging for precise positioning—a technique known as image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). In this manuscript we address strategies to further minimize exposure risk in children by reducing effective IGRT dose. Portal X rays and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) are commonly used to verify patient position during IGRT and, because their relative radiation exposure is far less than the radiation absorbed from therapeutic treatment beams, their sometimes significant contribution to cumulative risk can be easily overlooked. Optimizing the conformality of IMRT/IMPT while simultaneously ignoring IGRT dose may result in organs at risk being exposed to a greater proportion of radiation from IGRT than from therapeutic beams. Over a treatment course, cumulative central-axis CBCT effective dose can approach or supersede the amount of radiation absorbed from a single treatment fraction, a theoretical increase of 3% to 5% in mutagenic risk. In select scenarios, this may result in the underprediction of acute and late toxicity risk (such as azoospermia, ovarian dysfunction, or increased lifetime mutagenic risk) in radiation-sensitive organs and patients. Although dependent on variables such as patient age, gender, weight, body habitus, anatomic location, and dose-toxicity thresholds, modifying IGRT use and acquisition parameters such as frequency, imaging modality, beam energy, current, voltage, rotational degree, collimation, field size, reconstruction algorithm, and documentation can reduce exposure, avoid unnecessary toxicity, and achieve doses as low as reasonably achievable, promoting a culture and practice of “gentle IGRT.”.

  18. Assessing the radiological impact of radiation exposure devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofani, Alessandro

    2011-04-01

    Radiation exposure devices (REDs) are radiological weapons obtained by concealing a strong gamma-emitting source in a place frequented by public to cause radiation injuries following the absorption of elevated radiation doses. The present work aims to assess the radiological impact of an RED by simulating its effects in both dynamical and static conditions of the covertly exposed population, with individual position and motion obtained through a Monte Carlo approach. The results indicate that in small enclosures the motion of people amplify the effects of radiation exposure with respect to the static case because it turns out in a larger number of individuals receiving doses above the threshold for the onset of deterministic effects. This behavior is mitigated in medium and large enclosures due to dose spreading over trajectories moving far away from the critical region close to the RED. The scaling laws obtained with a simple circular geometry were successfully applied to a more complex geometry like that of a stadium. The potentially large number of victims and the possibility to reiterate the attack raise the question of early detection. This can be achieved either by radiation survey or by indirectly inferring the presence of a strong radioactive source following the triage of patients with radiation sickness symptoms collected by the same hospital. In the former case careful design and operation of aerial or in situ monitoring is needed, while in the latter specific training should be given to healthcare personnel aimed to improve their discrimination and cooperation capabilities. © 2010 Society for Risk Analysis.

  19. Elastomeric Seal Performance after Terrestrial Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Christopher C.; Oravec, Heather A.; Mather, Janice L.; Taylor, Shawn C.; Dunlap, Patrick H.

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation was evaluated to determine its negative effects on the performance of elastomeric gas pressure seals. The leak rates of the silicone elastomer S0383-70 O-ring test articles were used to quantify the degradation of the seals after exposure to vacuum-ultraviolet and/or middle-to-near-ultraviolet wavelength radiation. Three groups of seals were exposed in terrestrial facilities to 115-165 nm wavelength radiation, 230-500 nm wavelength radiation, or both spectrums, for an orbital spaceflight equivalent of 125 hours. The leak rates of the silicone elastomer S0383-70 seals were quantified and compared to samples that received no radiation. Each lot contained six samples and statistical t-tests were used to determine the separate and combined influences of exposure to the two wavelength ranges. A comparison of the mean leak rates of samples exposed to 115-165 nm wavelength radiation to the control specimens showed no difference, suggesting that spectrum was not damaging. The 230-500 nm wavelength appeared to be damaging, as the mean leak rates of the specimens exposed to that range of wavelengths, and those exposed to the combined 115-165 nm and 230-500 nm spectrums, were significantly different from the leak rates of the control specimens. Most importantly, the test articles exposed to both wavelength spectrums exhibited mean leak rates two orders of magnitude larger than any other exposed specimens, which suggested that both wavelength spectrums are important when simulating the orbital environment.

  20. Improving 4th Grade Primary School Students' Reading Comprehension Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Aydin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out action research to investigate reading comprehension skills when using the SQ3R reading comprehension strategy. To that end, this strategy was used for improving the reading comprehension skills of 7 primary school 4th grade students who had problems with these skills. An action plan was prepared for 3hours a…

  1. Radiation Exposure in Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Creation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miraglia, Roberto, E-mail: rmiraglia@ismett.edu; Maruzzelli, Luigi, E-mail: lmaruzzelli@ismett.edu; Cortis, Kelvin, E-mail: kelvincortis@ismett.edu [Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Radiology Service, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Services (Italy); D’Amico, Mario, E-mail: mdamico@ismett.edu [University of Palermo, Department of Radiology (Italy); Floridia, Gaetano, E-mail: gfloridia@ismett.edu; Gallo, Giuseppe, E-mail: ggallo@ismett.edu; Tafaro, Corrado, E-mail: ctafaro@ismett.edu; Luca, Angelo, E-mail: aluca@ismett.edu [Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Radiology Service, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Services (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    PurposeTransjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation is considered as being one of the most complex procedures in abdominal interventional radiology. Our aim was twofold: quantification of TIPS-related patient radiation exposure in our center and identification of factors leading to reduced radiation exposure.Materials and methodsThree hundred and forty seven consecutive patients underwent TIPS in our center between 2007 and 2014. Three main procedure categories were identified: Group I (n = 88)—fluoroscopic-guided portal vein targeting, procedure done in an image intensifier-based angiographic system (IIDS); Group II (n = 48)—ultrasound-guided portal vein puncture, procedure done in an IIDS; and Group III (n = 211)—ultrasound-guided portal vein puncture, procedure done in a flat panel detector-based system (FPDS). Radiation exposure (dose-area product [DAP], in Gy cm{sup 2} and fluoroscopy time [FT] in minutes) was retrospectively analyzed.ResultsDAP was significantly higher in Group I (mean ± SD 360 ± 298; median 287; 75th percentile 389 Gy cm{sup 2}) as compared to Group II (217 ± 130; 178; 276 Gy cm{sup 2}; p = 0.002) and Group III (129 ± 117; 70; 150 Gy cm{sup 2}p < 0.001). The difference in DAP between Groups II and III was also significant (p < 0.001). Group I had significantly longer FT (25.78 ± 13.52 min) as compared to Group II (20.45 ± 10.87 min; p = 0.02) and Group III (19.76 ± 13.34; p < 0.001). FT was not significantly different between Groups II and III (p = 0.73).ConclusionsReal-time ultrasound-guided targeting of the portal venous system during TIPS creation results in a significantly lower radiation exposure and reduced FT. Further reduction in radiation exposure can be achieved through the use of modern angiographic units with FPDS.

  2. Ionizing Radiation Exposure and Basal Cell Carcinoma Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changzhao; Athar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    This commentary summarizes studies showing risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) development in relationship to environmental, occupational and therapeutic exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). BCC, the most common type of human cancer, is driven by the aberrant activation of hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Ptch, a tumor suppressor gene of Hh signaling pathway, and Smoothened play a key role in the development of radiation-induced BCCs in animal models. Epidemiological studies provide evidence that humans exposed to radiation as observed among the long-term, large scale cohorts of atomic bomb survivors, bone marrow transplant recipients, patients with tinea capitis and radiologic workers enhances risk of BCCs. Overall, this risk is higher in Caucasians than other races. People who were exposed early in life develop more BCCs. The enhanced IR correlation with BCC and not other common cutaneous malignancies is intriguing. The mechanism underlying these observations remains undefined. Understanding interactions between radiation-induced signaling pathways and those which drive BCC development may be important in unraveling the mechanism associated with this enhanced risk. Recent studies showed that Vismodegib, a Smoothened inhibitor, is effective in treating radiation-induced BCCs in humans, suggesting that common strategies are required for the intervention of BCCs development irrespective of their etiology. PMID:26930381

  3. Evaluation of exposure to ionizing radiation among gamma camera operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Anna Domańska

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Protection of nuclear medicine unit employees from hazards of the ionizing radiation is a crucial issue of radiation protection services. We aimed to assess the severity of the occupational radiation exposure of technicians performing scintigraphic examinations at the Nuclear Medicine Department, Central Teaching Hospital of Medical University in Łódź, where thousands of different diagnostic procedures are performed yearly. Materials and Methods: In 2013 the studied diagnostic unit has employed 10 technicians, whose exposure is permanently monitored by individual dosimetry. We analyzed retrospective data of quarterly doses in terms of Hp(10 dose equivalents over the years 2001-2010. Also annual and five-year doses were determined to relate the results to current regulations. Moreover, for a selected period of one year, we collected data on the total activity of radiopharmaceuticals used for diagnostics, to analyze potential relationship with doses recorded in technicians performing the examinations. Results: In a 10-year period under study, the highest annual dose recorded in a technician was 2 mSv, which represented 10% of the annual dose limit of 20 mSv. The highest total dose for a 5-year period was 7.1 mSv, less than 10% of a 5-year dose limit for occupational exposure. Positive linear correlation was observed between total activity of radiopharmaceuticals used for diagnostics in the period of three months and respective quarterly doses received by technicians performing examinations. Conclusions: Doses received by nuclear medicine technicians performing diagnostic procedures in compliance with principles of radiation protection are low, which is confirmed by recognizing the technicians of this unit as B category employees. Med Pr 2013;64(4:503–506

  4. [Evaluation of exposure to ionizing radiation among gamma camera operators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domańska, Agnieszka Anna; Bieńkiewicz, Malgorzata; Olszewski, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Protection of nuclear medicine unit employees from hazards of the ionizing radiation is a crucial issue of radiation protection services. We aimed to assess the severity of the occupational radiation exposure of technicians performing scintigraphic examinations at the Nuclear Medicine Department, Central Teaching Hospital of Medical University in Lódz, where thousands of different diagnostic procedures are performed yearly. In 2013 the studied diagnostic unit has employed 10 technicians, whose exposure is permanently monitored by individual dosimetry. We analyzed retrospective data of quarterly doses in terms of Hp(10) dose equivalents over the years 2001-2010. Also annual and five-year doses were determined to relate the results to current regulations. Moreover, for a selected period of one year, we collected data on the total activity of radiopharmaceuticals used for diagnostics, to analyze potential relationship with doses recorded in technicians performing the examinations. In a 10-year period under study, the highest annual dose recorded in a technician was 2 mSv, which represented 10% of the annual dose limit of 20 mSv. The highest total dose for a 5-year period was 7.1 mSv, less than 10% of a 5-year dose limit for occupational exposure. Positive linear correlation was observed between total activity of radiopharmaceuticals used for diagnostics in the period of three months and respective quarterly doses received by technicians performing examinations. Doses received by nuclear medicine technicians performing diagnostic procedures in compliance with principles of radiation protection are low, which is confirmed by recognizing the technicians of this unit as B category employees.

  5. Acute Radiation Effects Resulting from Exposure to Solar Particle Event-Like Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann; Cengel, Keith

    2012-07-01

    A major solar particle event (SPE) may place astronauts at significant risk for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS), which may be exacerbated when combined with other space flight stressors, such that the mission or crew health may be compromised. The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) Center of Acute Radiation Research (CARR) is focused on the assessment of risks of adverse biological effects related to the ARS in animal models exposed to space flight stressors combined with the types of radiation expected during an SPE. As part of this program, FDA-approved drugs that may prevent and/or mitigate ARS symptoms are being evaluated. The CARR studies are focused on the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to the types of radiation, at the appropriate energies, doses and dose-rates, present during an SPE (and standard reference radiations, gamma rays or electrons). The ARS is a phased syndrome which often includes vomiting and fatigue. Other acute adverse biologic effects of concern are the loss of hematopoietic cells, which can result in compromised bone marrow and immune cell functions. There is also concern for skin damage from high SPE radiation doses, including burns, and resulting immune system dysfunction. Using 3 separate animal model systems (ferrets, mice and pigs), the major ARS biologic endpoints being evaluated are: 1) vomiting/retching and fatigue, 2) hematologic changes (with focus on white blood cells) and immune system changes resulting from exposure to SPE radiation with and without reduced weightbearing conditions, and 3) skin injury and related immune system functions. In all of these areas of research, statistically significant adverse health effects have been observed in animals exposed to SPE-like radiation. Countermeasures for the management of ARS symptoms are being evaluated. New research findings from the past grant year will be discussed. Acknowledgements: This research is supported by the NSBRI Center of Acute

  6. Minimizing radiation exposure in minimally invasive spine surgery: lessons learned from neuroendovascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Tecle, Najib E; El Ahmadieh, Tarek Y; Patel, Biraj M; Lall, Rohan R; Bendok, Bernard R; Smith, Zachary A

    2014-04-01

    Radiation use for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes has increased in parallel with advances in minimally invasive spinal techniques and endovascular neurosurgical procedures. This change in the exposure profile of the operator and radiology personnel has raised concerns about radiation side effects and long term complications of radiation exposure. In this review, the current literature regarding risks of radiation exposure and strategies to reduce these risks are summarized. Current standards in radiation risk reduction and specific techniques that can minimize radiation exposure are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Harmonization of risk management approaches: radiation and chemical exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, P. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Radiation Safety Systems Div., Mumbai (India)

    2006-07-01

    Assessment of occupational and public risk from the environmental pollutants like chemicals, radiation, etc demands that the effects be considered not only from each individual pollutant, but from the combination of all the pollutants. An integrated risk assessment system needs to be in place to have an overall risk perspective for the benefit of policy makers and decision takers to try to achieve risk reduction in totality. The basis for risk-based radiation dose limits is derived from epidemiological studies, which provide a rich source of data largely unavailable to chemical risk assessors. In addition, use of the principle of optimization as expressed in the ALARA concept has resulted in a safety culture, which is much more than just complying with stipulated limits. The conservative hypothesis of no-threshold dose-effect relation (ICRP) is universally assumed. The end-points and the severity of different classes of pollutants and even different pollutants in a same class vary over a wide range. Hence, it is difficult to arrive at a quantitative value for the net detriment that weighs the various types of end-points and various classes of pollutants. Once the risk due to other pollutants is quantified by some acceptable methodology, it can be expressed in terms of the Risk Equivalent Radiation Dose (R.E.R.D.) for easy comparison with options involving radiation exposure. This paper is an effort to use to quantify and present the risk due to exposure to chemicals and radiation in a common scale for the purpose of easy comparison to facilitate decision taking. (authors)

  8. Saeteilyn kaeyttoe ja muu saeteilytoiminta. Vuosiraportti 1999; Radiation usage and other radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rantanen, E. [ed.

    2000-05-01

    At the end of 1999, there were 1,753 valid safety licenses in Finland for the use of radiation. In addition, there were 2,054 responsible parties for dental x-ray diagnostics. The registry of STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority listed 13,687 radiation sources and 278 radionuclide laboratories. The import of radioactive substances amounted to 7 448,000 GBq and export to 18,300 GBq. Short-lived radionuclides produced in Finland amounted to 52,500 GBq. In the year 1999 there were 10,601 workers monitored for radiation exposure at 1,187 work sites. Of these employees, 21% received an annual dose exceeding the recording level. The annual effective dose limit was not exceeded. The total dose recorded in the dose registry (sum of the individual dosemeter readings) was 4.7 Sv in 1999. During the year radon was monitored at 300 companies.

  9. Evaluation of the radiation exposure. Recommendation of the radiation protection commission; Ermittlung der Strahlenexposition. Empfehlung der Strahlenschutzkommission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldauf, Daniela (comp.)

    2014-07-01

    The recommendation of the Strahlenschutzkommission (radiation protection commission) deals with the realistic requirements for the radiation exposure assessment based on radio-ecological modeling. The recommendation is applicable for all exposure situations that can be derived from FEP (features, events processes) exposure scenarios. In this case the exposure scenario consists of natural and technical features and a set of processes and events that can influence the radiation exposure of the population. The report includes the scientific justification, the previous procedure in Germany and abroad (EURATOM, France, UK, Ukraine, USA).

  10. Reduction of radiation exposure during radiography for scoliosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, J.E.; Hoffman, A.D.; Peterson, H.A.

    1983-01-01

    To reduce the radiation exposure received by young scoliosis patients during treatment, six changes in technique were instituted: (1) a posteroanterior projection, (2) specially designed leaded acrylic filters, (3) a high-speed screen-film system, (4) a specially designed cassette-holder and grid, (5) a breast-shield, and (6) additional filtration in the x-ray tube the thyroid, breast, and abdominal areas were made on an Alderson phantom. They revealed an eightfold reduction in abdominal exposure for both the posteroanterior and the lateral radiographys. There was a twentyfold reduction in exposure to the thyroid for the posteroanterior radiography from 100 to less than five milliroentgens and for the lateral radiograph there was a 100-fold reduction from 618 to six milliroentgens. For the breasts there was a sixty-ninefold reduction from 344 to less than five milliroentgens for the posteroanterior radiography and a fifty-fivefold reduction from 277 to less than five milliroentgens for the lateral radiograph. These reductions in exposure were obtained without significant loss in the quality of the radiographs and in most instances with an improvement in the over-all quality of the radiograph due to the more uniform exposure.

  11. Occupational Radiation Exposure of Anesthesia Providers: A Summary of Key Learning Points and Resident-Led Radiation Safety Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rachel R; Kumar, Amanda H; Tanaka, Pedro; Macario, Alex

    2017-06-01

    Anesthesia providers are frequently exposed to radiation during routine patient care in the operating room and remote anesthetizing locations. Eighty-two percent of anesthesiology residents (n = 57 responders) at our institution had a "high" or "very high" concern about the level of ionizing radiation exposure, and 94% indicated interest in educational materials about radiation safety. This article highlights key learning points related to basic physical principles, effects of ionizing radiation, radiation exposure measurement, occupational dose limits, considerations during pregnancy, sources of exposure, factors affecting occupational exposure such as positioning and shielding, and monitoring. The principle source of exposure is through scattered radiation as opposed to direct exposure from the X-ray beam, with the patient serving as the primary source of scatter. As a result, maximizing the distance between the provider and the patient is of great importance to minimize occupational exposure. Our dosimeter monitoring project found that anesthesiology residents (n = 41) had low overall mean measured occupational radiation exposure. The highest deep dose equivalent value for a resident was 0.50 mSv over a 3-month period, less than 10% of the International Commission on Radiological Protection occupational limit, with the eye dose equivalent being 0.52 mSv, approximately 4% of the International Commission on Radiological Protection recommended limit. Continued education and awareness of the risks of ionizing radiation and protective strategies will reduce exposure and potential for associated sequelae.

  12. Titanium-Water Thermosyphon Gamma Radiation Exposure and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzi, James, L.A; Jaworske, Donald, A.; Goodenow, Debra, A.

    2012-01-01

    Titanium-water thermosyphons are being considered for use in heat rejection systems for fission power systems. Their proximity to the nuclear reactor will result in some gamma irradiation. Noncondensable gas formation from radiation-induced breakdown of water over time may render portions of the thermosyphon condenser inoperable. A series of developmental thermosyphons were operated at nominal operating temperature under accelerated gamma irradiation, with exposures on the same order of magnitude as that expected in 8 years of heat rejection system operation. Temperature data were obtained during exposure at three locations on each thermosyphon: evaporator, condenser, and condenser end cap. Some noncondensable gas was evident; however, thermosyphon performance was not affected because the noncondensable gas was compressed into the fill tube region at the top of the thermosyphon, away from the heat rejecting fin. The trend appeared to be an increasing amount of noncondensable gas formation with increasing gamma irradiation dose. Hydrogen is thought to be the most likely candidate for the noncondensable gas and hydrogen is known to diffuse through grain boundaries. Post-exposure evaluation of one thermosyphon in a vacuum chamber and at temperature revealed that the noncondensable gas diffused out of the thermosyphon over a relatively short period of time. Further research shows a number of experimental and theoretical examples of radiolysis occurring through gamma radiation alone in pure water.

  13. Human exposure to high natural background radiation: what can it teach us about radiation risks?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendry, Jolyon H; Sohrabi, Mehdi; Burkart, Werner [Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Simon, Steven L [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Wojcik, Andrzej [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Cardis, Elisabeth [Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Municipal Institute of Medical Research (IMIM-Hospital del Mar) and CIBER Epidemiologia y Salud Publica - CIBERESP, Barcelona (Spain); Laurier, Dominique; Tirmarche, Margot [Radiobiology and Epidemiology Department, Radiological and Human Health Division, Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Hayata, Isamu [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)], E-mail: jhendry2002uk@yahoo.com

    2009-06-01

    Natural radiation is the major source of human exposure to ionising radiation, and its largest contributing component to effective dose arises from inhalation of {sup 222}Rn and its radioactive progeny. However, despite extensive knowledge of radiation risks gained through epidemiologic investigations and mechanistic considerations, the health effects of chronic low-level radiation exposure are still poorly understood. The present paper reviews the possible contribution of studies of populations living in high natural background radiation (HNBR) areas (Guarapari, Brazil; Kerala, India; Ramsar, Iran; Yangjiang, China), including radon-prone areas, to low dose risk estimation. Much of the direct information about risk related to HNBR comes from case-control studies of radon and lung cancer, which provide convincing evidence of an association between long-term protracted radiation exposures in the general population and disease incidence. The success of these studies is mainly due to the careful organ dose reconstruction (with relatively high doses to the lung), and to the fact that large-scale collaborative studies have been conducted to maximise the statistical power and to ensure the systematic collection of information on potential confounding factors. In contrast, studies in other (non-radon) HNBR areas have provided little information, relying mainly on ecological designs and very rough effective dose categorisations. Recent steps taken in China and India to establish cohorts for follow-up and to conduct nested case-control studies may provide useful information about risks in the future, provided that careful organ dose reconstruction is possible and information is collected on potential confounding factors.

  14. Human exposure to high natural background radiation: what can it teach us about radiation risks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Jolyon H; Simon, Steven L; Wojcik, Andrzej; Sohrabi, Mehdi; Burkart, Werner; Cardis, Elisabeth; Laurier, Dominique; Tirmarche, Margot; Hayata, Isamu

    2009-06-01

    Natural radiation is the major source of human exposure to ionising radiation, and its largest contributing component to effective dose arises from inhalation of (222)Rn and its radioactive progeny. However, despite extensive knowledge of radiation risks gained through epidemiologic investigations and mechanistic considerations, the health effects of chronic low-level radiation exposure are still poorly understood. The present paper reviews the possible contribution of studies of populations living in high natural background radiation (HNBR) areas (Guarapari, Brazil; Kerala, India; Ramsar, Iran; Yangjiang, China), including radon-prone areas, to low dose risk estimation. Much of the direct information about risk related to HNBR comes from case-control studies of radon and lung cancer, which provide convincing evidence of an association between long-term protracted radiation exposures in the general population and disease incidence. The success of these studies is mainly due to the careful organ dose reconstruction (with relatively high doses to the lung), and to the fact that large-scale collaborative studies have been conducted to maximise the statistical power and to ensure the systematic collection of information on potential confounding factors. In contrast, studies in other (non-radon) HNBR areas have provided little information, relying mainly on ecological designs and very rough effective dose categorisations. Recent steps taken in China and India to establish cohorts for follow-up and to conduct nested case-control studies may provide useful information about risks in the future, provided that careful organ dose reconstruction is possible and information is collected on potential confounding factors.

  15. Human exposure to high natural background radiation: what can it teach us about radiation risks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Jolyon H; Simon, Steven L; Wojcik, Andrzej; Sohrabi, Mehdi; Burkart, Werner; Cardis, Elisabeth; Laurier, Dominique; Tirmarche, Margot; Hayata, Isamu

    2014-01-01

    Natural radiation is the major source of human exposure to ionising radiation, and its largest contributing component to effective dose arises from inhalation of 222Rn and its radioactive progeny. However, despite extensive knowledge of radiation risks gained through epidemiologic investigations and mechanistic considerations, the health effects of chronic low-level radiation exposure are still poorly understood. The present paper reviews the possible contribution of studies of populations living in high natural background radiation (HNBR) areas (Guarapari, Brazil; Kerala, India; Ramsar, Iran; Yangjiang, China), including radon-prone areas, to low dose risk estimation. Much of the direct information about risk related to HNBR comes from case–control studies of radon and lung cancer, which provide convincing evidence of an association between long-term protracted radiation exposures in the general population and disease incidence. The success of these studies is mainly due to the careful organ dose reconstruction (with relatively high doses to the lung), and to the fact that large-scale collaborative studies have been conducted to maximise the statistical power and to ensure the systematic collection of information on potential confounding factors. In contrast, studies in other (non-radon) HNBR areas have provided little information, relying mainly on ecological designs and very rough effective dose categorisations. Recent steps taken in China and India to establish cohorts for follow-up and to conduct nested case–control studies may provide useful information about risks in the future, provided that careful organ dose reconstruction is possible and information is collected on potential confounding factors. PMID:19454802

  16. 4th June: AIS and NICE/MAIL unique authentication

    CERN Multimedia

    AIS and NICE teams

    2007-01-01

    Over the past few years, the IT department has been in the process of streamlining CERN users' access to all central computing services. The long term goal is to converge on a unique computer account, which will increase computer security and simplify account maintenance. The next step of this process will occur on 4th June 2007, as of when authenticating on the AIS applications (EDH, HRT, CET, APT, ERT, CRA, Foundation, ...) and on NICE (Windows) and MAIL will be done using the same username and password. As a reminder, this account can also be used on EDMS, INDICO, CDS and SIMBA. So starting on 4th June 2007, authentication on the AIS applications must be done using your AIS username and your MAIL/NICE password. Thanks for your understanding, The AIS and NICE teams

  17. 4th June: AIS and NICE/MAIL unique authentication

    CERN Multimedia

    The AIS and NICE teams

    2007-01-01

    Over the past few years, the IT department has been in the process of streamlining CERN users' access to all central computing services. The long term goal is to converge on a unique computer account, which will increase computer security and simplify account maintenance. The next step of this process will occur on the 4th June 2007, as of when authenticating on the AIS applications (EDH, HRT, CET, APT, ERT, CRA, Foundation, ...) and on NICE (Windows) and MAIL will be done using the same username and password. As a reminder, this account can also be used on EDMS, INDICO, CDS and SIMBA. Thus starting on the 4th June 2007, authentication on the AIS applications must be done using your AIS username and your MAIL/NICE password. Thanks for your understanding, The AIS and NICE teams

  18. Radiation exposure inside reinforced concrete buildings at Nagasaki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhoades, W.A.; Childs, R.L.; Ingersoll, D.T.

    1989-05-01

    The biological effects on the residents of Hiroshima and Nagasaki due to initial-irradiation exposure during the nuclear attacks of World War II was recognized immediately as an important source of information. After the war, an extensive effort gathered data concerning the locations of individuals at the time of the attack and their subsequent medical histories. The data from personnel located in reinforced concrete buildings are particularly significant, since large groups of occupants received radiation injury without complications due to blast and thermal effects. In order to correlate the radiation dose with physiological effects, the dose to each individual must be calculated. Enough information about the construction of the buildings was available after the war to allow a radiation transport model to be constructed, but the accurate calculation of penetration into such large, thick-walled three dimensional structures was beyond the scope of computing technology until recently. Now, the availability of Cray vector computers and the development of a specially-constructed discrete ordinates transport code, TORT, have combined to allow the successful completion of such a study. This document describes the radiation transport calculations and tabulates the resulting doses by source component and individual case location. An extensive uncertainty analysis is also included. These data are to be used in another study as input to a formal statistical analysis, resulting in a new value for the LD50 dose, i.e., the dose at which the mortality risk is 50%. 55 refs., 67 figs., 70 tabs.

  19. Is Exposure to Low Radiation Levels Good For You?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroyannis, Dimitri

    1996-05-01

    Little is known about the biological effects of very low levels of ionizing radiation. We propose an experiment to compare cell response to such low radiation levels, using fast replicating yeast cells. Saccharomyces Cerevisae (SC), a type of yeast, is an eukariotic unicellular microorganism with a mean cell generation time of 90 min. Its genetic organization is similar to that of superior organisms, but at the same time is very easy to handle, with special reference to its genetic analysis. Certain CS strains are widely employed for mutagenesis studies. We propose to expose simultaneously three indentical CS cultures for a period of up to a few weeks (100s of cell generations): to natural backgroung (NB) ionizing radiation (at a ground level lab), to sub-NB level (underground) and to supra-NB level (at a high altitude). At the end of the exposure we will chemically challenge the cultured cells with methyl-methane-sulphonate (MMS), a standard chemical mutagen. Mitotic recombination frequency in the MMS exposed cultures is an index of early DNA damage induction at high survival levels (ie at very low radiation levels). This experiment can be handsomely and inexpensively accomodated in one of the existing underground laboratories.

  20. 4th International Conference on Communications, Signal Processing, and Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mu, Jiasong; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Baoju

    2016-01-01

    This book brings together papers presented at the 4th International Conference on Communications, Signal Processing, and Systems, which provides a venue to disseminate the latest developments and to discuss the interactions and links between these multidisciplinary fields. Spanning topics ranging from Communications, Signal Processing and Systems, this book is aimed at undergraduate and graduate students in Electrical Engineering, Computer Science and Mathematics, researchers and engineers from academia and industry as well as government employees (such as NSF, DOD, DOE, etc).

  1. 4th ENRI International Workshop on ATM/CNS

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book is a compilation of selected papers from the 4th ENRI International Workshop on ATM/CNS (EIWAC2015). The work focuses on novel techniques for aviation infrastructure in air traffic management (ATM) and communications, navigation, surveillance, and informatics (CNSI) domains. The contents make valuable contributions to academic researchers, engineers in the industry, and regulators of aviation authorities. As well, readers will encounter new ideas for realizing a more efficient and safer aviation system. .

  2. 4th International Plant Biomechanics Conference Proceedings (Abstracts)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank W. Telewski; Lothar H. Koehler; Frank W. Ewers

    2003-07-20

    The 4th International Plant Biomechanics Conference facilitated an interdisciplinary exchange between scientists, engineers, and educators addressing the major questions encountered in the field of Plant Biomechanics. Subjects covered by the conference include: Evolution; Ecology; Mechanoreception; Cell Walls; Genetic Modification; Applied Biomechanics of Whole Plants, Plant Products, Fibers & Composites; Fluid Dynamics; Wood & Trees; Fracture Mechanics; Xylem Pressure & Water Transport; Modeling; and Introducing Plant Biomechanics in Secondary School Education.

  3. Summary of the 4(th) Nordic Symposium on Digital Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundström, Claes; Waltersson, Marie; Persson, Anders; Treanor, Darren

    2017-01-01

    The Nordic symposium on digital pathology (NDP) was created to promote knowledge exchange across stakeholders in health care, industry, and academia. In 2016, the 4(th) NDP installment took place in Linköping, Sweden, promoting development and collaboration in digital pathology for the benefit of routine care advances. This article summarizes the symposium, gathering 170 attendees from 13 countries. This summary also contains results from a survey on integrated diagnostics aspects, in particular radiology-pathology collaboration.

  4. Summary of the 4th nordic symposium on digital pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claes Lundström

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Nordic symposium on digital pathology (NDP was created to promote knowledge exchange across stakeholders in health care, industry, and academia. In 2016, the 4th NDP installment took place in Linköping, Sweden, promoting development and collaboration in digital pathology for the benefit of routine care advances. This article summarizes the symposium, gathering 170 attendees from 13 countries. This summary also contains results from a survey on integrated diagnostics aspects, in particular radiology-pathology collaboration.

  5. Delayed effects of external radiation exposure: A brief history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.W. [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Within months of Roentgen`s discovery of X rays, severe adverse effects were reported, but not well publicized. As a result, over the next two decades, fluoroscope operators suffered lethal skin carcinomas. Later, case reports appeared concerning leukemia in radiation workers, and infants born with severe mental retardation after their mothers had been given pelvic radiotherapy early in pregnancy. Fluoroscopy and radiotherapy for benign disorders continued to be used with abandon until authoritative reports were published on the adverse effects of ionizing radiation by the U.S. NAS-NRC and the UK MRC in 1956. Meanwhile, exposure to the atomic bombs in Japan had occurred and epidemics of delayed effects began to be recognized among the survivors: cataracts, leukemia and severe mental retardation among newborn infants after intra-uterine exposure. No statistically significant excess of germ-cell genetic effects was detected by six clinical measurements, the F{sub 1} mortality, cytogenetic studies or biochemical genetic studies. Somatic cell effects were revealed by long-lasting chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes, and somatic cell mutations were found at the glycophorin A locus in erythrocytes. Molecular biology is a likely focus of new studies based on the function of the gene for ataxia telangiectasia, a disorder in which children have severe, even lethal acute radiation reactions when given conventional doses of radiotherapy for lymphoma, to which they are prone. The tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki now provide incidence data that show the extent of increases in eight common cancers and no increase in eight others. The possibility of very late effects of A-bomb exposure is suggested by recent reports of increased frequencies of hyperparathyroidism, parathyroid cancers and certain causes of death other than cancer. 88 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Biological effects of low levels of radiation exposure. [Radiation hazards to man from radioactive consumer products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casarett, G.W.

    1977-01-01

    Some general perspective is provided concerning the orders of radiation dose equivalent levels associated with exposure of human populations to ionizing radiations from consumer products. This is followed by considerations of the biological effects and risks of low levels of radiation exposure. Some consumer products emit low-LET (i.e., low linear energy transfer) radiations beyond their confines and these penetrating radiations can result virtually in whole-body irradiation, while in the case of other products the radiation to tissue consists mainly of the high-LET alpha particles which penetrate tissue only shallowly and close to the products. There are some radiation-emitting consumer products which are in such widespread use in the United States that large numbers of people are irradiated by them. Some of these products may irradiate on the order of 10/sup 6/ to 10/sup 8/ people to average annual whole-body or gonadal dose equivalents varying over a range on the order of 1 to 10 millirem (mrem). These include television receivers, time pieces with radium-containing dials, gas and aerosol detectors, and building and road construction materials. On the order of 10/sup 4/ people may be irradiated by vacuum high voltage switches to 30 mrem or from electron microscopes to 300 mrem average annual whole-body or gonadal dose equivalent. Smaller annual whole-body or gonadal dose equivalents, of the order of less than 1 microrem (..mu..rem) to 1 mrem, may be received by many people from cold cathode gas discharge tubes, airport x-ray inspection systems, time pieces with dials containing tritium or /sup 147/Pm, and other sources. Possible health hazards are discussed.

  7. [Radiation exposure and air quality aboard commercial airplanes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergau, L

    1999-10-01

    The amount of exposure to cosmic radiation during air travel is next to a number of additional factors mainly dependent on the flight level of the aircraft. Flying in an altitude of 41,000 feet equaling 12,800 meters the amount of radiation exposure is of course considerable higher than on the ground. The overall exposure of flying personnel to cosmic radiation flying about 600-700 hours per year can be estimated between 3 and 6 mSv (300-600 mrem). According to the flight hours of passengers, the radiation exposure is much lower and can be neglected for most of the travelers final judgement about the possible risks for flying personnel as far as a higher incident of malignant tumors is concerned has not jet been finally made. Talking of cabin air quality compromises have to be made and thus the well-being of the passengers can be negatively influenced. Air pressure and oxygen partial pressure correspond to an altitude of 2400 meters (8,000 feet) above sea level with possible consequences to the cardiopulmonary system. Increased level of ozone can lead to respiratory problems of the upper airways, increased carbon dioxide may cause hyperventilation. The mucous membranes of the respiratory tract are dried out due to the extremely low humidity of the cabin air. Smoking during flight results in an increase of the nicotine blood levels even in passengers sitting in the non-smoking areas. In modern aircraft the fresh-air flow cannot be regulated individually any more, this may lead to an insufficient circulation of used air in relation to fresh air and could cause the phenomena of hanging smoke. There has always been the idea that there is an increased risk for passengers for acquiring infectious diseases. However this is not the case. Modern HEPA-filter prevent an accumulation even of the smallest particles including bacteria and viruses within the recirculation flow in the cabin air. The overall risk of getting an infectious disease is significantly lower than in other

  8. Effect of real-time radiation dose feedback on pediatric interventional radiology staff radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racadio, John; Nachabe, Rami; Carelsen, Bart; Racadio, Judy; Hilvert, Nicole; Johnson, Neil; Kukreja, Kamlesh; Patel, Manish

    2014-01-01

    To measure and compare individual staff radiation dose levels during interventional radiologic (IR) procedures with and without real-time feedback to evaluate whether it has any impact on staff radiation dose. A prospective trial was performed in which individuals filling five different staff roles wore radiation dosimeters during all IR procedures during two phases: a 12-week "closed" phase (measurements recorded but display was off, so no feedback was provided) and a 17-week "open" phase (display was on and provided real-time feedback). Radiation dose rates were recorded and compared by Mann-Whitney U test. There was no significant difference in median procedure time, fluoroscopy time, or patient dose (dose-area product normalized to fluoroscopy time) between the two phases. Overall, the median staff dose was lower in the open phase (0.56 µSv/min of fluoroscopy time) than in the closed phase (3.01 µSv/min; P staff can significantly reduce radiation exposure to the primary operator, most likely by increasing staff compliance with use of radiation protection equipment and dose reduction techniques. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Medical radiation exposure and its impact on occupational practices in Korean radiologic technologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Seul Ki; Lee, Won Jin [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The use of radiology examinations in medicine has been growing worldwide. Annually an estimated 3.1 billion radiologic exams are performed. According to this expansion of medical radiation exposure, it has been hard to pay no attention to the effects of medical radiation exposures in the exposure from different types of radiation source. This study, therefore, was aimed to assess the association of medical and occupational radiation exposure in Korean radiologic technologists and evaluate necessity for its consideration in occupational studies. This study did not show the strong association between medical radiation exposure and occupational radiation exposure except several modalities with specific frequency. These results are preliminary but certainly meaningful for interpretation of epidemiologic finding, therefore, we need further evaluation specially for the repeatedly exposed imaging tests and high dose procedures that presented somewhat weak relationship in this study linked with health outcomes of radiation exposure. This study did not show the strong association between medical radiation exposure and occupational radiation exposure except several modalities with specific frequency. These results are preliminary but certainly meaningful for interpretation of epidemiologic finding, therefore, we need further evaluation specially for the repeatedly exposed imaging tests and high dose procedures that presented somewhat weak relationship in this study linked with health outcomes of radiation exposure.

  10. Assessing exposure to cosmic radiation during long-haul flights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottollier-Depois, J.F.; Chau, Q.; Bouisset, P.; Kerlau, G.; Plawinski, L.; Lebaron-Jacobs, L. [Inst. for Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2000-05-01

    The assessment of exposure to cosmic radiation on board air craft is one of the preoccupations of organizations responsible for radiation protection. Cosmic particle flux increases with altitude and latitude and depends on the solar activity. The exposure has been estimated on several airlines using transatlantic, Siberian and transequatorial routes on board subsonic and supersonic air crafts, to illustrate the effect of these parameters. Measurements have been realized with a tissue equivalent proportional counter using the microdosimetric technique. Such a system provides the absorbed dose, the ambient dose equivalent, the mean quality factor and the dose distribution as a function of lineal energy. Data have been collected at maximum solar activity in 1991-92 and at minimum in 1996-98. The lowest mean dose rate measured was 3 {mu}Sv.h{sup -1} during a Paris-Buenos Aires flight in 1991; the highest was 6.6 {mu}Sv.h{sup -1} during Paris-Tokyo flight using Siberian route and 9.7 {mu}Sv.h{sup -1} on Concorde in 1996-97. The mean quality factor is around 1.8. The corresponding annual effective dose, based on 700 hours of flight for subsonic aircraft and 300 hours for Concorde, can be estimated between 2 mSv for least-exposed routes and 5 mSv for more exposed routes. (author)

  11. Assessing exposure to cosmic radiation during long-haul flights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottollier-Depois, J F; Chau, Q; Bouisset, P; Kerlau, G; Plawinski, L; Lebaron-Jacobs, L

    2000-05-01

    The assessment of exposure to cosmic radiation on board aircraft is one of the concerns of organizations responsible for radiation protection. Cosmic-particle flux increases with altitude and latitude and depends on solar activity. To illustrate the effect of these parameters, exposure has been estimated on several airlines operating subsonic and supersonic aircraft on transatlantic, Siberian and transequatorial routes. Measurements have been made with a tissue-equivalent proportional counter using the microdosimetric technique. This type of system provides the absorbed dose, the ambient dose equivalent, the mean quality factor, and the dose distribution as a function of lineal energy. Data were collected at maximum solar activity in 1991-1992 and at minimum activity in 1996-1998. The lowest mean dose rate measured was 3 microSv h(-1) during a Paris-Buenos Aires flight in 1991. The highest rates were 6.6 microSv h(-1) during a Paris-Tokyo flight on a Siberian route and 9.7 microSv h(-1) on Concorde in 1996-1997. The mean quality factor is around 1.8. The corresponding annual effective dose, based on 700 h of flight for subsonic aircraft and 300 h for Concorde, can be estimated at between 2 mSv for the least-exposed routes and 5 mSv for the more-exposed routes.

  12. Effects in Plant Populations Resulting from Chronic Radiation Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geras' kin, Stanislav A.; Volkova, Polina Yu.; Vasiliyev, Denis V.; Dikareva, Nina S.; Oudalova, Alla A. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, 249032, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    environment activates genetic mechanisms, changing a population's resistance to exposure. However, there are ecological situations in which enhanced resistance has not evolved or has not persisted. Consequently, there are good theoretical and practical reasons for more attention being paid to the mechanisms by which populations becomes more radioresistant and to those situations where radio-adaptation appears not to be taking place. Since radio-adaptation plays an important role in response of populations on radiation exposure, this process needs to be incorporated into management programmes. To this very day, the effects of chronic exposure on living organisms and populations remain poorly explored, and represent a much needed field of research. In spite of the long history of the research, we are still far from complete understanding underlying processes in exposed populations. Neglecting field-collected data in favour of simplified short-term experiments that tend to overestimate adverse effects will obviously have detrimental effect for understanding, predicting, and mitigating consequences of the radiation impact on the environment. Much more is to be elucidated in our understanding before we will be able to give an objective and comprehensive assessment of the biological consequences of chronic, low-level radiation exposures to natural plant and animal populations. (authors)

  13. Late health effects of chronic radiation exposure of bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarmoshenko, Ilia V.; Malinovsky, Georgy P.; Konshina, Lidia G.; Zhukovsky, Michael V. [Institute of Industrial Ecology UB RAS, 620219, 20, Sophy Kovalevskoy St., Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Tuzankina, Irina A. [Institute of Immunology and Physiology UB RAS, 620049, 106, Pervomayskaya St., Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    Accidental explosion of waste storage tank at former soviet plutonium production plant 'Mayak' in 1957 resulted in emission of considerable amount of radioactive substances to the atmosphere. Atmospheric transfer and fallout caused contamination of the environment by Sr-90 and short-lived radionuclides (East-Ural Radioactive Trace, EURT). Due to consumption of contaminated food and milk some internal organs were affected to relatively high radiation exposure. Archive data of causes of deaths of rural population of EURT northern part for period 1957-2000 were used to create the Register on causes of deaths. Register records related to the settlements where initial surface contamination by Sr-90 was above and below 3.7 kBq/m2 were included to exposed (4 844 records) and unexposed (6 158 records) group respectively. Basing on the Register the analysis of cancer and non-cancer health effects of radiation exposure was conducted. By estimating proportionate mortality ratios statistically significant excess mortality due to the groups of causes of death as follow was observed in exposed population: stomach, liver and cervix cancers; group consisted only of stomach cancer; non-cancer deceases of infectious etiology. Non-significant but remarkably high risk was observed for the following groups of causes of death: bone cancer; leukemia; liver cancer; cervix cancer. Insignificant, virtually zero risk was found for: non-gastrointestinal solid cancers; colon and lung cancers; non-infectious non-cancer deceases. At the same time, considerable radiation doses were absorbed in bone (mean bone surface dose about 0.1 Gy) and colon (mean dose about 0.07 Gy). Doses absorbed in other organs and tissues were negligible and amounted less than 0.01 Gy for most tissues. It can be seen that some disagreement between observed effects and absorbed doses is revealed. Most remarkable is the high excess risks of stomach, liver and cervix cancers as well as non-cancer deceases of

  14. Radiation Exposures for DOE and DOE Contractor Employees - 1989. Twenty-second annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M. H. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Eschbach, P. A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Harty, R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Millet, W. H. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Scholes, V. A. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1992-12-01

    This report is one of a series of annual reports provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) summarizing occupational radiation exposures received by DOE and DOE contractor employees. These reports provide an overview of radiation exposures received each year and identify trends in exposures being experienced over the years.

  15. Radiation exposures for DOE contractor employees-1988. Twenty-first annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merwin, S. E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Millet, W. H. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Traub, R. J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1990-12-01

    This report is one of a series of annual reports provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) summarizing occupational radiation exposures received by DOE and DOE contractor employees. These reports provide an overview of radiation exposures received each year and identify trends in exposures being experienced over the years.

  16. Radiation exposures for DOE and DOE contractor employees, 1979. Twelfth annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    This report includes: standards for radiation protection; whole body radiation exposures by general trends, dose equivalent distributions, and average dose equivalent ratios; internal exposures; worker terminations; whole body dose equivalents greater than 5 Rem; and Appendices of distribution of annual whole body exposures by facility type, by contractor; and by DOE field organization.

  17. Radiation exposure and breast cancer: lessons from Chernobyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrodnik, Aleksandra; Hudon, Tyler W; Nadkarni, Prakash M; Chandawarkar, Rajiv Y

    2013-04-01

    The lessons learned from the Chernobyl disaster have become increasingly important after the second anniversary of the Fukushima, Japan nuclear accident. Historically, data from the Chernobyl reactor accident 27 years ago demonstrated a strong correlation with thyroid cancer, but data on the radiation effects of Chernobyl on breast cancer incidence have remained inconclusive. We reviewed the published literature on the effects of the Chernobyl disaster on breast cancer incidence, using Medline and Scopus from the time of the accident to December of 2010. Our findings indicate limited data and statistical flaws. Other confounding factors, such as discrepancies in data collection, make interpretation of the results from the published literature difficult. Re-analyzing the data reveals that the incidence of breast cancer in Chernobyl-disaster-exposed women could be higher than previously thought. We have learned little of the consequences of radiation exposure at Chernobyl except for its effects on thyroid cancer incidence. Marking the 27th year after the Chernobyl event, this report sheds light on a specific, crucial and understudied aspect of the results of radiation from a gruesome nuclear power plant disaster.

  18. Mitigation of Lung Injury after Accidental Exposure to Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, J.; Jelveh, S.; Calveley, V.; Zaidi, A.; Doctrow, S. R.; Hill, R. P.

    2011-01-01

    There is a serious need to develop effective mitigators against accidental radiation exposures. In radiation accidents, many people may receive nonuniform whole-body or partial-body irradiation. The lung is one of the more radiosensitive organs, demonstrating pneumonitis and fibrosis that are believed to develop at least partially because of radiation-induced chronic inflammation. Here we addressed the crucial questions of how damage to the lung can be mitigated and whether the response is affected by irradiation to the rest of the body. We examined the widely used dietary supplement genistein given at two dietary levels (750 or 3750 mg/kg) to Fischer rats irradiated with 12 Gy to the lung or 8 Gy to the lung + 4 Gy to the whole body excluding the head and tail (whole torso). We found that genistein had promising mitigating effects on oxidative damage, pneumonitis and fibrosis even at late times (36 weeks) when drug treatment was initiated 1 week after irradiation and stopped at 28 weeks postirradiation. The higher dose of genistein showed no greater beneficial effect. Combined lung and whole-torso irradiation caused more lung-related severe morbidity resulting in euthanasia of the animals than lung irradiation alone. PMID:22013884

  19. Intra-operative fluoroscopic radiation exposure in orthopaedic trauma theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Mustafa S; Aziz, Sheweidin; Haydar, Syed; Fleming, Simon S; Datta, Amit

    2018-01-01

    Radiation exposure from intra-operative fluoroscopy in orthopaedic trauma surgery is a common occupational hazard. References for fluoroscopy use in the operating room for commonly performed operations have not been reported adequately. This study aimed to report appropriate intra-operative fluoroscopy use in orthopaedic trauma and compare the effect of surgery type and surgeon grade on radiation exposure. Data on 849 cases over an 18-month period were analysed retrospectively. Median and 75th centile values for dose area product (DAP), screening time (ST), and number of fluoroscopy images were calculated for procedures where n > 9 (n = 808). Median DAP for dynamic hip screws for extracapsular femoral neck fractures was 668 mGy/cm2 (ST 36 s), 1040 mGy/cm2 (ST 49 s) for short proximal femoral nail, 1720 mGy/cm2 (ST 2 m 36 s) for long femoral nail for diaphyseal fractures, 25 mGy/cm2 (ST 25 s) for manipulation and Kirschner wire fixation in distal radius fractures, and 27 mGy/cm2 (ST 23 s) for volar locking plate fixation in distal radius fractures. These represented the five commonest procedures performed in the trauma operating room in our hospital. Experienced surgeons utilized less radiation in the operating room than junior surgeons (DAP 90.55 vs. 366.5 mGy/cm2, p = 0.001) and took fewer fluoroscopic images (49 vs. 66, p = 0.008) overall. This study reports reference values for common trauma operations. These can be utilized by surgeons in the operating room to raise awareness and perform clinical audits of appropriate fluoroscopy use for orthopaedic trauma, using this study as guidance for standards. We demonstrated a significant reduction in fluoroscopy usage with increasing surgeon experience.

  20. Report of the 4th European Zebrafish Principal Investigator Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Susana S; Distel, Martin; Linker, Claudia; Fior, Rita; Monteiro, Rui; Bianco, Isaac H; Portugues, Ruben; Strähle, Uwe; Saúde, Leonor

    2016-12-01

    The European Zebrafish Principal Investigator Meeting (EZPM) is an ideal forum for group leaders using this fantastic animal model not only to discuss science but also to strengthen their interactions, to push forward technological advances, and to define guidelines for the use of this fish in research. The city of Lisbon (Portugal) was voted by the European group leaders to be the setting for the 4th EZPM, and the organizing committee, composed by Leonor Saúde (iMM Lisboa, PT), Susana Lopes (CEDOC, PT), Michael Orger (Champalimaud Foundation, PT), Rui Oliveira (ISPA, PT), and António Jacinto (CEDOC, PT), was very enthusiastic to organize a productive event. The 4th EZPM took place from March 15 to 19 at Pavilhão do Conhecimento, a Science Museum and Educational Center winner of The Great Prize FAD of Arquitecture 1999 and The Society for Environmental Graphic Design Award 2011. Over 5 days, 135 group leaders (89 men and 46 women) coming from 19 different European countries and also from the United States, Turkey, Israel, Chile, and Singapore presented and discussed their recent research achievements. In addition to the scientific oral and poster presentations, the group leaders gathered in very lively community sessions on morphants versus mutants (chaired by Didier Stainier, Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research, DE), funding issues (chaired by Uwe Strahle, KIT-ITG, DE), and gender equality (chaired by Corinne Houart, KCL, United Kingdom). One of the highlights of the 4th EZPM was the guided visit to Oceanário de Lisboa, an international award-winning place that celebrates life with a stunning display of living aquatic creatures.

  1. Lifetime attributable risk for cancer from occupational radiation exposure among radiologic technologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Eun Kyeong; Lee, Won Jin [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Medical radiation workers were among the earliest occupational groups exposed to external ionizing radiation due to their administration of a range of medical diagnostic procedures. Ionizing radiation is a confirmed human carcinogen for most organ sites. This study, therefore, was aimed to estimate lifetime cancer risk from occupational exposure among radiologic technologists that has been recruited in 2012-2013. Our findings showed a small increased cancer risk in radiologic technologists from their occupational radiation exposure in Korea. However, continuous dose monitoring and strict regulation on occupational safety at the government level should be emphasized to prevent any additional health hazards from occupational radiation exposure. Our findings showed a small increased cancer risk in radiologic technologists from their occupational radiation exposure in Korea. However, continuous dose monitoring and strict regulation on occupational safety at the government level should be emphasized to prevent any additional health hazards from occupational radiation exposure.

  2. 4th International Conference on Sustainable Design and Manufacturing

    CERN Document Server

    Howlett, Robert; Setchi, Rossi; Cimatti, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    This volume includes papers presented at the 4th International Conference on Sustainable Design and Manufacturing (SDM-17) held in Bologna, Italy, in April 2017. The conference covered a wide range of topics from cutting-edge sustainable product design and service innovation, sustainable processes and technology for the manufacturing of sustainable products, sustainable manufacturing systems and enterprises, decision support for sustainability, and the study of the societal impact of sustainability including research for circular economy. Application areas are wide and varied, and the book provides an excellent overview of the latest research and development in the area of Sustainable Design and Manufacturing.

  3. 4th International conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining

    CERN Document Server

    Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining

    2012-01-01

    The volume includes a set of selected papers extended and revised from the 4th International conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining, March 1-2, 2011, Macau, Chin.   This Volume is to provide a forum for researchers, educators, engineers, and government officials involved in the general areas of knowledge discovery and data mining and learning to disseminate their latest research results and exchange views on the future research directions of these fields. 108 high-quality papers are included in the volume.

  4. Report from the 4th Workshop on Extremely Large Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Becla

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Academic and industrial users are increasingly facing the challenge of petabytes of data, but managing and analyzing such large data sets still remains a daunting task. The 4th Extremely Large Databases workshop was organized to examine the needs of communities under-represented at the past workshops facing these issues. Approaches to big data statistical analytics as well as emerging opportunities related to emerging hardware technologies were also debated. Writable extreme scale databases and the science benchmark were discussed. This paper is the final report of the discussions and activities at this workshop.

  5. 4th International Conference on Soft Computing for Problem Solving

    CERN Document Server

    Deep, Kusum; Pant, Millie; Bansal, Jagdish; Nagar, Atulya

    2015-01-01

    This two volume book is based on the research papers presented at the 4th International Conference on Soft Computing for Problem Solving (SocProS 2014) and covers a variety of topics, including mathematical modelling, image processing, optimization methods, swarm intelligence, evolutionary algorithms, fuzzy logic, neural networks, forecasting, medical and healthcare, data mining, etc. Mainly the emphasis is on Soft Computing and its applications in diverse areas. The prime objective of this book is to familiarize the reader with the latest scientific developments in various fields of Science, Engineering and Technology and is directed to the researchers and scientists engaged in various real-world applications of ‘Soft Computing’.

  6. Radiation exposures for DOE and DOE contractor employees - 1991. Twenty-fourth annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.H.; Hui, T.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Millet, W.H.; Scholes, V.A. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-11-01

    This is the 24th annual radiation exposure report published by US DOE and its predecessor agencies. This report summarizes the radiation exposures received by both employees and visitors at DOE and COE contractor facilities during 1991. Trends in radiations exposures are evaluated. The significance of the doses is addressed by comparing them to the DOE limits and by correlating the doses to health risks based on risk estimates from expert groups.

  7. A comparative analysis of exposure doses between the radiation workers in dental and general hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Nam Hee; Chung, Woon Kwan; Dong, Kyung Rae; Ju, Yong Jin; Song, Ha Jin [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Jin [Dept. of Public Health and Medicine, Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Research and investigation is required for the exposure dose of radiation workers to work in the dental hospital as increasing interest in exposure dose of the dental hospital recently accordingly, study aim to minimize radiation exposure by making a follow-up study of individual exposure doses of radiation workers, analyzing the status on individual radiation exposure management, prediction the radiation disability risk levels by radiation, and alerting the workers to the danger of radiation exposure. Especially given the changes in the dental hospital radiation safety awareness conducted the study in order to minimize radiation exposure. This study performed analyses by a comparison between general and dental hospital, comparing each occupation, with the 116,220 exposure dose data by quarter and year of 5,811 subjects at general and dental hospital across South Korea from January 1, 2008 through December 31, 2012. The following are the results obtained by analyzing average values year and quarter. In term of hospital, average doses were significantly higher in general hospitals than detal ones. In terms of job, average doses were higher in radiological technologists the other workers. Especially, they showed statistically significant differences between radiological technologists than dentists. The above-mentioned results indicate that radiation workers were exposed to radiation for the past 5 years to the extent not exceeding the dose limit (maximum 50 mSv y{sup -1}). The limitation of this study is that radiation workers before 2008 were excluded from the study. Objective evaluation standards did not apply to the work circumstance or condition of each hospital. Therefore, it is deemed necessary to work out analysis criteria that will be used as objective evaluation standard. It will be necessary to study radiation exposure in more precise ways on the basis of objective analysis standard in the future. Should try to minimize the radiation individual dose of

  8. Ionizing radiation exposure in interventional cardiology: current radiation protection practice of invasive cardiology operators in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valuckiene, Zivile; Jurenas, Martynas; Cibulskaite, Inga

    2016-09-01

    Ionizing radiation management is among the most important safety issues in interventional cardiology. Multiple radiation protection measures allow the minimization of x-ray exposure during interventional procedures. Our purpose was to assess the utilization and effectiveness of radiation protection and optimization techniques among interventional cardiologists in Lithuania. Interventional cardiologists of five cardiac centres were interviewed by anonymized questionnaire, addressing personal use of protective garments, shielding, table/detector positioning, frame rate (FR), resolution, field of view adjustment and collimation. Effective patient doses were compared between operators who work with and without x-ray optimization. Thirty one (68.9%) out of 45 Lithuanian interventional cardiologists participated in the survey. Protective aprons were universally used, but not the thyroid collars; 35.5% (n  =  11) operators use protective eyewear and 12.9% (n  =  4) wear radio-protective caps; 83.9% (n  =  26) use overhanging shields, 58.1% (n  =  18)-portable barriers; 12.9% (n  =  4)-abdominal patient's shielding; 35.5% (n  =  11) work at a high table position; 87.1% (n  =  27) keep an image intensifier/receiver close to the patient; 58.1% (n  =  18) reduce the fluoroscopy FR; 6.5% (n  =  2) reduce the fluoro image detail resolution; 83.9% (n  =  26) use a 'store fluoro' option; 41.9% (N  =  13) reduce magnification for catheter transit; 51.6% (n  =  16) limit image magnification; and 35.5% (n  =  11) use image collimation. Median effective patient doses were significantly lower with x-ray optimization techniques in both diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Many of the ionizing radiation exposure reduction tools and techniques are underused by a considerable proportion of interventional cardiology operators. The application of basic radiation protection tools and

  9. Persistent Activation of the Innate Immune Response in Adult Drosophila Following Radiation Exposure During Larval Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudmeier, Lisa J; Samudrala, Sai-Suma; Howard, Steven P; Ganetzky, Barry

    2015-09-01

    Cranial radiation therapy (CRT) is an effective treatment for pediatric central nervous system malignancies, but survivors often suffer from neurological and neurocognitive side effects that occur many years after radiation exposure. Although the biological mechanisms underlying these deleterious side effects are incompletely understood, radiation exposure triggers an acute inflammatory response that may evolve into chronic inflammation, offering one avenue of investigation. Recently, we developed a Drosophila model of the neurotoxic side effects of radiation exposure. Here we use this model to investigate the role of the innate immune system in response to radiation exposure. We show that the innate immune response and NF-ĸB target gene expression is activated in the adult Drosophila brain following radiation exposure during larval development, and that this response is sustained in adult flies weeks after radiation exposure. We also present preliminary data suggesting that innate immunity is radioprotective during Drosophila development. Together our data suggest that activation of the innate immune response may be beneficial initially for survival following radiation exposure but result in long-term deleterious consequences, with chronic inflammation leading to impaired neuronal function and viability at later stages. This work lays the foundation for future studies of how the innate immune response is triggered by radiation exposure and its role in mediating the biological responses to radiation. These studies may facilitate the development of strategies to reduce the deleterious side effects of CRT. Copyright © 2015 Sudmeier et al.

  10. Decreasing Radiation Exposure in Pediatric Trauma Related to Cervical Spine Clearance: A Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Valerie Ann; Connelly, Susan

    Quality improvement project. Reduce the amount of radiation exposure in the pediatric trauma population 5 years of age and older in relation to cervical spine clearance. The evaluation of pediatric cervical spine injuries must be accurate and timely to avoid missed injuries. The difficult clinical examination in pediatric trauma patients necessitates the use of radiologic examinations to avoid missing catastrophic injuries. However, exposure to radiation at an early age increases the pediatric patients' risk of developing cancer (R. A. ). A retrospective chart review was conducted to assess radiation exposure in pediatric patients requiring evaluation for cervical spine clearance. Surgical staff and emergency department physicians received education on the risks related to pediatric radiation exposure and information related to the institution's diagnostic trends for cervical spine clearance. An algorithm was then developed to assist with determining the necessary imaging study for cervical spine clearance. Radiation exposure was monitored following initial education and use of the algorithm to determine its effect on radiation exposure. The retrospective chart review identified cervical spine computed tomography (CT) in 34%, with an average radiation exposure of 3.5 mSv. Following education and introduction of an algorithm, 18% of patients underwent CT for cervical spine clearance with an average radiation exposure of 3.2 mSv, representing a 47% decrease in the use of CT. Staff education and the use of an algorithm show promise in the reduction of radiation exposure and provide safe, effective clearance of the cervical spine in pediatric trauma.

  11. Review of photokeratitis: Corneal response to ultraviolet radiation (UVR exposure*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L A. Moore

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of photokeratitis in response to natural solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR is prevalent in individuals participating in outdoor recreational activities in environments with high reflective surfaces, such as beach activities, water sports and snow skiing. Eye care practitioners (ECPs are frequently encouraged by manufacturers and researchers to recommend UVR-blocking eyewear in the form of sunglasses and contact lenses. However, little is known about the precise nature of the corneal tissue response in the development of photokeratitis. This paper reviews the mechanisms responsible for the development of photokeratitis. Clinical signs and symptoms of photokeratitis, UVR corneal threshold and action spectra, corneal cellular changes and ocular protection from corneal UVR exposure are discussed. The content of this article will be useful to ECPs in making appropriate recommendations when prescribing UVR-protec-tive eyewear. (S Afr Optom 2010 69(3 123-131

  12. Changes in Liver Metabolic Gene Expression after Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, C. P.; Wotring, Virginia E.

    2012-01-01

    The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand any effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments.

  13. Information by the German Federal Government. Environmental radioactivity and radiation exposure in 2012; Unterrichtung durch die Bundesregierung. Umweltradioaktivitaet und Strahlenbelastung im Jahr 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    The information by the German Federal Government on environmental radioactivity and radiation exposure in 2012 covers the following issues: Natural radiation exposure; radiation exposure due to civilization (nuclear power plants and nuclear facilities, radioactive waste storage, radioactive matter in research, engineering and medicine, nuclear accidents, nuclear weapon tests); occupational radiation exposure; medical radiation exposure; non-ionizing radiation.

  14. Assessment of health consequences of steel industry welders′ occupational exposure to ultraviolet radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Zamanian

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: This study showed that the time period of UV exposure in welders is higher than the permissible contact threshold level. Therefore, considering the outbreak of the eye and skin disorders in the welders, decreasing exposure time, reducing UV radiation level, and using personal protective equipment seem indispensable. As exposure to UV radiation can be linked to different types of skin cancer, skin aging, and cataract, welders should be advised to decrease their occupational exposures.

  15. Interrelationship between the early inflammatory response and subsequent fibrosis after radiation exposure. [X radiation, rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullrich, R.L.; Casarett, G.W.

    1977-10-01

    The mechanistic relationships between the early inflammatory response and subsequent fibrosis seen after radiation exposure were studied in rats given X-ray doses of either 2000 or 5000 rad to standardized fields of the inner thigh. The animals were further subdivided into those receiving no additional treatment and those depleted of complement with cobra-venom factor. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that two mechanisms are responsible for the increases in extravasation rate and vascular injury seen after irradiation. First, direct cytocidal damage; second, chemically mediated, possibly complement-dependent, mechanisms. In addition, these data suggest that both direct and indirect damage to the vasculature play a role in influencing the subsequent late-radiation-induced fibrosis.

  16. Application of maximum values for radiation exposure and principles for the calculation of radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The guide sets out the mathematical definitions and principles involved in the calculation of the equivalent dose and the effective dose, and the instructions concerning the application of the maximum values of these quantities. further, for monitoring the dose caused by internal radiation, the guide defines the limits derived from annual dose limits (the Annual Limit on Intake and the Derived Air Concentration). Finally, the guide defines the operational quantities to be used in estimating the equivalent dose and the effective dose, and also sets out the definitions of some other quantities and concepts to be used in monitoring radiation exposure. The guide does not include the calculation of patient doses carried out for the purposes of quality assurance.

  17. Monitoring of increased natural occuring radiation exposure; Arbeitsplatzueberwachung bei erhoehter natuerlicher Strahlenexposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guhr, Andreas [ALTRAC Radon-Messtechnik, Berlin (Germany); Leissring, Nick [Bergtechnisches Ingenieurbuero GEOPRAX, Chemnitz (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The radiation exposure due to natural occurring sources is a special challenge for the health and safety protection at workplaces. The monitoring of the radon exposure of employees in mines, radon-spa and in water works is regulated by prescription of radiation protection. The relevant compounds of the radiation exposure are the inhalation of radon and radon daughter products; terrestrial irradiation; ingestion of radioactive contaminated materials and the inhalation of contaminated dust. The monitoring of the radiation workers is realized essentially by measurements by radiation safety officer of the performing company, by an external engineering firm as well as by control measurements of experts of local authorities. The experiences in the practice have shown that in the field of operational radiation protection only a combination of personal- and operational dosimetry is suitable to avoid health hazards by work in fields with increased natural occurring radiation exposures.

  18. Radiation exposure in nuclear medicine: real-time measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iara Sylvain

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available French regulations have introduced the use of electronic dosimeters for personal monitoring of workers. In order to evaluate the exposure from diagnostic procedures to nuclear medicine staff, individual whole-body doses were measured daily with electronic (digital personal dosimeters during 20 consecutive weeks and correlated with the work load of each day. Personal doses remained always below 20 µSv/d under normal working conditions. Radiation exposure levels were highest to tech staff, nurses and stretcher-bearers. The extrapolated annual cumulative doses for all staff remained less than 10 % of the maximum legal limit for exposed workers (2 mSv/yr. Electronic dosimeters are not technically justified for routine survey of staff. The high sensitivity and immediate reading of electronic semiconductor dosimeters may become very useful for exposure control under risky working conditions. It may become an important help for optimising radiation protection.A legislação francesa introduziu o uso de dosímetros eletrônicos para monitoração da exposição do trabalhador. Afim de avaliar a exposição do trabalhador proveniente de exames diagnósticos em medicina nuclear, doses individuais do corpo inteiro foram medidas diariamente com dosímetros eletrônicos (digitais durante 20 semanas consecutivas e correlatas com as atividades de trabalho de cada dia. As doses foram sempre inferiores à 20 µSv por dia em condições normais de trabalho. Os níveis de exposição de radiação mais elevados foram para os enfermeiros, manipuladores e maqueiros. A extrapolação da dose anual para todos os trabalhadores foi menos que 10 % do limite máximo legal para os trabalhadores expostos (2 mSv/ano. Dosímetros eletrônicos não são tecnicamente justificados para a o controle de rotina da exposição dos trabalhadores, mas a alta sensibilidade e a leitura imediata desses dosímetros podem vir a serem muito úteis para o controle da exposição em condi

  19. The Epilepsy Foundation's 4th Biennial Epilepsy Pipeline Update Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Jacqueline A; Schachter, Steven C; Sirven, Joseph; Porter, Roger

    2015-05-01

    On June 5 and 6, 2014, the Epilepsy Foundation held its 4th Biennial Epilepsy Pipeline Update Conference, an initiative of the Epilepsy Therapy Project, which showcased the most promising epilepsy innovations from health-care companies and academic laboratories dedicated to pioneering and advancing drugs, biologics, technologies, devices, and diagnostics for epilepsy. Speakers and attendees included emerging biotech and medical technology companies, major pharmaceutical and device companies, as well as investigators and innovators at the cutting-edge of epilepsy. The program included panel discussions on collaboration between small and large companies, how to get products in need of funding to the marketplace, who is currently funding epilepsy and CNS innovation, and how the NIH facilitates early-stage drug development. Finally, the conference featured the third annual "Shark Tank" competition. The presentations are summarized in this paper, which is followed by a compilation of the meeting poster abstracts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 4th International Conference on Frontiers in Global Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Pardalos, Panos

    2004-01-01

    Global Optimization has emerged as one of the most exciting new areas of mathematical programming. Global optimization has received a wide attraction from many fields in the past few years, due to the success of new algorithms for addressing previously intractable problems from diverse areas such as computational chemistry and biology, biomedicine, structural optimization, computer sciences, operations research, economics, and engineering design and control. This book contains refereed invited papers submitted at the 4th international confer­ ence on Frontiers in Global Optimization held at Santorini, Greece during June 8-12, 2003. Santorini is one of the few sites of Greece, with wild beauty created by the explosion of a volcano which is in the middle of the gulf of the island. The mystic landscape with its numerous mult-extrema, was an inspiring location particularly for researchers working on global optimization. The three previous conferences on "Recent Advances in Global Opti­ mization", "State-of-the-...

  1. 4th International Conference on Dynamics in Logistics

    CERN Document Server

    Pannek, Jürgen; Thoben, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    This contributed volume brings together research papers presented at the 4th International Conference on Dynamics in Logistics, held in Bremen, Germany in February 2014. The conference focused on the identification, analysis and description of the dynamics of logistics processes and networks. Topics covered range from the modeling and planning of processes, to innovative methods like autonomous control and knowledge management, to the latest technologies provided by radio frequency identification, mobile communication, and networking. The growing dynamic poses wholly new challenges: logistics processes and networks must be(come) able to rapidly and flexibly adapt to constantly changing conditions. The book primarily addresses the needs of researchers and practitioners from the field of logistics, but will also be beneficial for graduate students.

  2. 4th International Conference on Applied Computing and Information Technology

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This edited book presents scientific results of the 4th International Conference on Applied Computing and Information Technology (ACIT 2016) which was held on December 12–14, 2016 in Las Vegas, USA. The aim of this conference was to bring together researchers and scientists, businessmen and entrepreneurs, teachers, engineers, computer users, and students to discuss the numerous fields of computer science and to share their experiences and exchange new ideas and information in a meaningful way. The aim of this conference was also to bring out the research results about all aspects (theory, applications and tools) of computer and information science, and to discuss the practical challenges encountered along the way and the solutions adopted to solve them. The conference organizers selected the best papers from those papers accepted for presentation at the conference. The papers were chosen based on review scores submitted by members of the Program Committee, and underwent further rigorous rounds of review. Th...

  3. 4th International Conference on Computer Engineering and Networks

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book aims to examine innovation in the fields of computer engineering and networking. The book covers important emerging topics in computer engineering and networking, and it will help researchers and engineers improve their knowledge of state-of-art in related areas. The book presents papers from the 4th International Conference on Computer Engineering and Networks (CENet2014) held July 19-20, 2014 in Shanghai, China.  ·       Covers emerging topics for computer engineering and networking ·       Discusses how to improve productivity by using the latest advanced technologies ·       Examines innovation in the fields of computer engineering and networking  

  4. 4th Workshop on Combinations of Intelligent Methods and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Palade, Vasile; Prentzas, Jim

    2016-01-01

    This volume includes extended and revised versions of the papers presented at the 4th Workshop on “Combinations of Intelligent Methods and Applications” (CIMA 2014) which was intended to become a forum for exchanging experience and ideas among researchers and practitioners dealing with combinations of different intelligent methods in Artificial Intelligence. The aim is to create integrated or hybrid methods that benefit from each of their components. Some of the existing presented efforts combine soft computing methods (fuzzy logic, neural networks and genetic algorithms). Another stream of efforts integrates case-based reasoning or machine learning with soft-computing methods. Some of the combinations have been more widely explored, like neuro-symbolic methods, neuro-fuzzy methods and methods combining rule-based and case-based reasoning. CIMA 2014 was held in conjunction with the 26th IEEE International Conference on Tools with Artificial Intelligence (ICTAI 2014). .

  5. 4th International Conference on Robot Intelligence Technology and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Karray, Fakhri; Jo, Jun; Sincak, Peter; Myung, Hyun

    2017-01-01

    This book covers all aspects of robot intelligence from perception at sensor level and reasoning at cognitive level to behavior planning at execution level for each low level segment of the machine. It also presents the technologies for cognitive reasoning, social interaction with humans, behavior generation, ability to cooperate with other robots, ambience awareness, and an artificial genome that can be passed on to other robots. These technologies are to materialize cognitive intelligence, social intelligence, behavioral intelligence, collective intelligence, ambient intelligence and genetic intelligence. The book aims at serving researchers and practitioners with a timely dissemination of the recent progress on robot intelligence technology and its applications, based on a collection of papers presented at the 4th International Conference on Robot Intelligence Technology and Applications (RiTA), held in Bucheon, Korea, December 14 - 16, 2015. For better readability, this edition has the total of 49 article...

  6. 4th International Conference in Software Engineering for Defence Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sillitti, Alberto; Succi, Giancarlo; Messina, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    This book presents high-quality original contributions on new software engineering models, approaches, methods, and tools and their evaluation in the context of defence and security applications. In addition, important business and economic aspects are discussed, with a particular focus on cost/benefit analysis, new business models, organizational evolution, and business intelligence systems. The contents are based on presentations delivered at SEDA 2015, the 4th International Conference in Software Engineering for Defence Applications, which was held in Rome, Italy, in May 2015. This conference series represents a targeted response to the growing need for research that reports and debates the practical implications of software engineering within the defence environment and also for software performance evaluation in real settings through controlled experiments as well as case and field studies. The book will appeal to all with an interest in modeling, managing, and implementing defence-related software devel...

  7. 4th International Conference on Structural Nonlinear Dynamics and Diagnosis

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    This book presents contributions on the most active lines of recent advanced research in the field of nonlinear mechanics and physics selected from the 4th International Conference on Structural Nonlinear Dynamics and Diagnosis. It includes fifteen chapters by outstanding scientists, covering various aspects of applications, including road tanker dynamics and stability, simulation of abrasive wear, energy harvesting, modeling and analysis of flexoelectric nanoactuator, periodic Fermi–Pasta–Ulam problems, nonlinear stability in Hamiltonian systems, nonlinear dynamics of rotating composites, nonlinear vibrations of a shallow arch, extreme pulse dynamics in mode-locked lasers, localized structures in a photonic crystal fiber resonator, nonlinear stochastic dynamics, linearization of nonlinear resonances, treatment of a linear delay differential equation, and fractional nonlinear damping. It appeals to a wide range of experts in the field of structural nonlinear dynamics and offers researchers and engineers a...

  8. 4th International Conference on Sustainable Automotive Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Wellnitz, Jörg; Leary, Martin; Koopmans, Lucien

    2012-01-01

    The book on Sustainable Automotive Technologies aims to draw special attention to the research and practice focused on new technologies and approaches capable of meeting the challenges to sustainable mobility. In particular, the book features incremental and radical technical advancements that are able to meet social, economic and environmental targets in both local and global contexts. These include original solutions to the problems of pollution and congestion, vehicle and public safety, sustainable vehicle design and manufacture, new structures and materials, new power-train technologies and vehicle concepts. In addition to vehicle technologies, the book is also concerned with the broader systemic issues such as sustainable supply chain systems, integrated logistics and telematics, and end-of-life vehicle management. It captures selected peer reviewed papers accepted for presentation at the 4th International Conference on Sustainable Automotive Technologies, ICSAT2012, held at the RMIT, Melbourne, Australi...

  9. Coding Theory and Applications : 4th International Castle Meeting

    CERN Document Server

    Malonek, Paula; Vettori, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The topics covered in this book, written by researchers at the forefront of their field, represent some of the most relevant research areas in modern coding theory: codes and combinatorial structures, algebraic geometric codes, group codes, quantum codes, convolutional codes, network coding and cryptography. The book includes a survey paper on the interconnections of coding theory with constrained systems, written by an invited speaker, as well as 37 cutting-edge research communications presented at the 4th International Castle Meeting on Coding Theory and Applications (4ICMCTA), held at the Castle of Palmela in September 2014. The event’s scientific program consisted of four invited talks and 39 regular talks by authors from 24 different countries. This conference provided an ideal opportunity for communicating new results, exchanging ideas, strengthening international cooperation, and introducing young researchers into the coding theory community.

  10. 2015 4th China Academic Conference on Printing and Packaging

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Min; Yang, Li; Ouyang, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    This book includes a selection of reviewed papers presented at the 2015, 4th China Academic Conference on Printing and Packaging, which was held on October 22-24, 2015 in Hangzhou, China. The conference was jointly organized by the China Academy of Printing Technology, Beijing Institute of Graphic Communication, and Hangzhou Dianzi University. With 3 keynote talks and 200 presented papers on graphic communications, packaging technologies and materials, the conference attracted more than 400 scientists.  These proceedings cover the recent research outcomes on color science and technology, image-processing technology, digital-media technology, printing-engineering technology, packaging-engineering technology etc. They will be of interest to university researchers, R&D engineers and graduate students in graphic communications, packaging, color science, image science, materials science, computer science, digital media and network technology fields.

  11. Radiation Exposure in X-Ray and CT Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams What ... page for more information. top of page Measuring radiation dosage The scientific unit of measurement for radiation ...

  12. Cytokine and chemokine responses after exposure to ionizing radiation: Implications for the astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiakis, Evagelia C.; Baulch, Janet E.; Morgan, William F.

    For individuals traveling in space, exposure to space radiation is unavoidable. Since adequate shielding against radiation exposure is not practical, other strategies for protecting the astronauts must be developed. Radiation is also an important therapeutic and diagnostic tool, and evidence from the clinical and experimental settings now shows a firm connection between radiation exposure and changes in cytokine and chemokine levels. These small proteins can be pro- or anti-inflammatory in nature and the balance between those two effects can be altered easily because of exogenous stresses such as radiation. The challenge to identify a common perpetrator, however, lies in the fact that the cytokines that are produced vary based on radiation dose, type of radiation, and the cell types that are exposed. Based on current knowledge, special treatments have successfully been designed by implementing administration of proteins, antibodies, and drugs that counteract some of the harmful effects of radiation. Although these treatments show promising results in animal studies, it has been difficult to transfer those practices to the human situation. Further understanding of the mechanisms by which cytokines are triggered through radiation exposure and how those proteins interact with one another may permit the generation of novel strategies for radiation protection from the damaging effects of radiation. Here, we review evidence for the connection between cytokines and the radiation response and speculate on strategies by which modulating cytokine responses may protect astronauts against the detrimental effects of ionizing radiations.

  13. Mapping the exposure of the Brazilian population to natural background radiation - cosmic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochedo, Elaine R.R., E-mail: elaine@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (lRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Salles, Krause C.S.; Prado, Nadya M.C., E-mail: krausesalles@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: nadya@ime.ib.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The main objective of this work is to statically and graphically describe the exposure of the Brazilian population to natural background radiation. in this stage, doses due to cosmic rays is being assessed based on sea level dose rates, corrected by latitude and altitude, according to the model recommended by UNSCEAR. In this work, the doses were estimated for ali Brazilian municipalities with more than 100.000 inhabitants. The 253 municipalities selected for this study include about 52% of the Brazilian population. Average dose rate was estimated to be about 50 n Sv/h with a variation coefficient of 31%. The estimated doses have shown a strong influence of altitude on dose rates, with a correlation coefficient of 0,998 for ao exponential fit. This result confirms previous studies that show a large effect of the altitude 00 exposure from cosmic radiation. Considering the same occupation and shielding conditions used by UNSCEAR as global averages, average annual dose was estimated to be 0,37 (0,24 - 0,76) mSv/y, very close to UNSCEAR worldwide average of 0,38 (0,3 - 1,0) mSv/y. (author)

  14. Dermatopathology effects of simulated solar particle event radiation exposure in the porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzari, Jenine K; Diffenderfer, Eric S; Hagan, Sarah; Billings, Paul C; Gridley, Daila S; Seykora, John T; Kennedy, Ann R; Cengel, Keith A

    2015-07-01

    The space environment exposes astronauts to risks of acute and chronic exposure to ionizing radiation. Of particular concern is possible exposure to ionizing radiation from a solar particle event (SPE). During an SPE, magnetic disturbances in specific regions of the Sun result in the release of intense bursts of ionizing radiation, primarily consisting of protons that have a highly variable energy spectrum. Thus, SPE events can lead to significant total body radiation exposures to astronauts in space vehicles and especially while performing extravehicular activities. Simulated energy profiles suggest that SPE radiation exposures are likely to be highest in the skin. In the current report, we have used our established miniature pig model system to evaluate the skin toxicity of simulated SPE radiation exposures that closely resemble the energy and fluence profile of the September, 1989 SPE using either conventional radiation (electrons) or proton simulated SPE radiation. Exposure of animals to electron or proton radiation led to dose-dependent increases in epidermal pigmentation, the presence of necrotic keratinocytes at the dermal-epidermal boundary and pigment incontinence, manifested by the presence of melanophages in the derm is upon histological examination. We also observed epidermal hyperplasia and a reduction in vascular density at 30 days following exposure to electron or proton simulated SPE radiation. These results suggest that the doses of electron or proton simulated SPE radiation results in significant skin toxicity that is quantitatively and qualitatively similar. Radiation-induced skin damage is often one of the first clinical signs of both acute and non-acute radiation injury where infection may occur, if not treated. In this report, histopathology analyses of acute radiation-induced skin injury are discussed. Copyright © 2015 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hand and body radiation exposure with the use of mini C-arm fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuohy, Christopher J; Weikert, Douglas R; Watson, Jeffry T; Lee, Donald H

    2011-04-01

    To determine whole body and hand radiation exposure to the hand surgeon wearing a lead apron during routine intraoperative use of the mini C-arm fluoroscope. Four surgeons (3 hand attending surgeons and 1 hand fellow) monitored their radiation exposure for a total of 200 consecutive cases (50 cases per surgeon) requiring mini C-arm fluoroscopy. Each surgeon measured radiation exposure with a badge dosimeter placed on the outside breast pocket of the lead apron (external whole body exposure), a second badge dosimeter under the lead apron (shielded whole body exposure), and a ring dosimeter (hand exposure). Completed records were noted in 198 cases, with an average fluoroscopy time of 133.52 seconds and average cumulative dose of 19,260 rem-cm(2) per case. The total measured radiation exposures for the (1) external whole body exposure dosimeters were 16 mrem (for shallow depth), 7 mrem (for eye depth), and less than 1 mrem (for deep depth); (2) shielded whole body badge dosimeters recorded less than 1 mrem; and (3) ring dosimeters totaled 170 mrem. The total radial exposure for 4 ring dosimeters that had registered a threshold of 30 mrem or more of radiation exposure was 170 mrem at the skin level, for an average of 42.5 mrem per dosimeter ring or 6.3 mrem per case. This study of whole body and hand radiation exposure from the mini C-arm includes the largest number of surgical cases in the published literature. The measured whole body and hand radiation exposure received by the hand surgeon from the mini C-arm represents a minimal risk of radiation, based on the current National Council on Radiation Protection and Management standards of annual dose limits (5,000 mrem per year for whole body and 50,000 mrem per year to the extremities). Copyright © 2011 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Polonium in cigarette smoke and radiation exposure of lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fernando P.; Oliveira, João M.

    2006-01-01

    Polonium (210Po), the most volatile of naturally-occurring radionuclides in plants, was analysed in three common brands of cigarettes produced in Portugal. The analyses were carried out on the unburned tobacco contained in cigarettes, on the ashes and butts of smoked cigarettes and on the mainstream smoke. 210Po in tobacco displays concentrations ranging from 3 to 37 mBq g-1, depending upon the cigarette brand. The 210Po activity remaining in the solid residue of a smoked cigarette varied from 0.3 to 4.9 mBq per cigarette, and the 210Po in the inhaled smoke varied from 2.6 to 28.9 mBq. In all brands of cigarettes tested, a large fraction of the 210Po content is not inhaled by the smoker and it is released into the atmosphere. Part of it may be inhaled by passive smokers. Depending upon the commercial brand and upon the presence or absence of a filter in the cigarette, 5 to 37 % of the 210Po in the cigarette can be inhaled by the smoker. Taking into account the average 210Po in surface air, the smoker of one pack of twenty cigarettes per day may inhale 50 times 210Po than a non smoker. Cigarette smoke contributes with 1.5 % to the daily rate of 210Po absorption into the blood, 0.39 Bq d-1, and, after systemic circulation it gives rise to a whole body radiation dose in the same proportion. However, in the smoker the deposition of 210Po in the lungs is much more elevated than normal and may originate an enhanced radiation exposure. Estimated dose to the lungs is presented and radiobiological effects of cigarette smoke are discussed.

  17. Human behaviour towards climatic change during the 4th millennium BC in the Swiss Alpine forelands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karg, Sabine

    Human behaviour towards climatic change during the 4th millennium BC in the Swiss Alpine forelands.......Human behaviour towards climatic change during the 4th millennium BC in the Swiss Alpine forelands....

  18. Radiation exposure on flights; Strahlenexposition beim Fliegen. Ein Fall fuer den Strahlenschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blettner, Maria [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Biometrie, Epidemiologie und Informatik (IMBEI); Boehm, Theresia; Eberbach, Frieder [Vereinigung Cockpit e.V. Main Airport Center (MAC), Frankfurt (Germany). AG Strahlenschutz; Bottollier-Depois, Jean-Francois [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Clairand, Isabelle; Huet, Christelle [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry Lab.; Frasch, Gerhard [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim/Neuherberg (Germany). Beruflicher Strahlenschutz und Strahlenschutzregister; Hammer, Ga el P. [Laboratoire National de Sante E.P., Dudelange (Luxembourg). Registre Morphologique des Tumeurs; Mares, Vladimir; Ruehm, Werner [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen Deutsches Forschungszentrum fuer Gesundheit und Umwelt GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany); Voelkle, Hansruedi [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland). Physikdept.

    2014-09-01

    Extend and effects of radiation doses occuring during flights are treated under various aspects. Part of them are, in the first line, radiation exposure of the flying staff and the results of epidemiologic studies regarding the health consequences, as well as aspects of practical radiation protection for the flying staff. Computer programs for dose calculation on flights round off the theme. (orig.)

  19. Effects of exposure to different types of radiation on behaviors mediated by peripheral or central systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Erat, S.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of exposure to ionizing radiation on behavior may result from effects on peripheral or on central systems. For behavioral endpoints that are mediated by peripheral systems (e.g., radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion or vomiting), the behavioral effects of exposure to heavy particles (56Fe, 600 MeV/n) are qualitatively similar to the effects of exposure to gamma radiation (60Co) and to fission spectrum neutrons. For these endpoints, the only differences between the different types of radiation are in terms of relative behavioral effectiveness. For behavioral endpoints that are mediated by central systems (e.g., amphetamine-induced taste aversion learning), the effects of exposure to 56Fe particles are not seen following exposure to lower LET gamma rays or fission spectrum neutrons. These results indicate that the effects of exposure to heavy particles on behavioral endpoints cannot necessarily be extrapolated from studies using gamma rays, but require the use of heavy particles.

  20. PREFACE: 4th International Symposium on Functional Materials (ISFM2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shu; Sekino, Tohru; Tanaka, Shun-ichiro; Sato, Tsugio; Lu, Li; Xue, Dongfeng

    2012-01-01

    The 4th International Symposium on Functional Materials (ISFM2011) was held in Sendai, Japan, on 2-6 August 2011. This Special Issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS) consists of partial manuscripts which were presented at ISFM2011. Advanced materials have experienced a dramatic increase in demand for research, development and applications. The aim of the International Symposium on Functional Materials (ISFM) was to provide an overview of the present status with historical background and to foresee future trends in the field of functional materials. The 4th symposium, ISFM 2011, covered a wide variety of topics within state-of-the-art advanced materials science and technology, and focused especially on four major categories including: Environmental Materials, Electronic Materials, Energy Materials and Biomedical Materials. As you know, a massive earthquake and the Tsunami that followed occurred near the Tohoku region on 11 March 2011. After the earthquake, although there were many difficulties in continuing to organize the symposium, we received warm encouragement from many researchers and societies, especially from the members of the International Advisory Committee and Organizing Committee, so that ISFM2011 could be held on schedule. We are honored that ISFM2011 was the first formal international academic conference held in the Tohoku area of Japan after the 11 March earthquake. About 140 participants from 14 countries took part in the ISFM2011 symposium, which included five plenary talks by world-leading scientists, 32 invited talks, and many oral and poster presentations. We are delighted to see that many researchers are interested in the synthesis and the properties as well as the applications of functional materials. Many fruitful and exciting research achievements were presented in the symposium. We believe that this symposium provided a good chance for scientists to communicate and exchange opinions with each other. We would also like to

  1. 77 FR 35619 - Safety Zone; Old Fashion 4th July Fireworks, Presque Isle Bay, Erie, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Old Fashion 4th July Fireworks, Presque... vessels from a portion of Presque Isle Bay during the Old Fashion 4th July Fireworks display. This... temporary safety zone is necessary to ensure the safety of spectators and vessels during the Old Fashion 4th...

  2. 76 FR 37649 - Safety Zone; Northern California Annual Fireworks Events, July 4th Fireworks Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Northern California Annual Fireworks Events, July 4th Fireworks Display AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard will enforce safety zone for the annual July 4th Fireworks Display (Tahoe City 4th of July...

  3. Functional status of liverin conditions of radiation and chemical exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Severynovs’ka

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic influences of low-intensity X-rays in doses of 0.15 and 0.25 Gr and mix of heavy metals salts in a dose of 2 EPC (extreme permissible concentrations for each metal, as a single factor or as a combination of factors, on the state of pro-/antioxidative system in a rat liver have been studied. Analysis of the data concerning combined influences allows to conclude that effects under these doses have some differences: a splash of processes of lipid peroxidation are observed in both causes, but under the lower dose an additivity takes place, and under the dose of 0.25 Gr a synergism of the agent effects in relation to the development of peroxidative reactions is registered. The results testify that technogenic contamination of water with heavy metals worsens the action of radiation factor, specifically, eliminates a hormetic splash of antioxidative activity at 0.15 Gr. Biochemical indexes of the liver activity, as a central organ of a general metabolism, and a structure of morbidity have been studied in liquidators of the Chernobyl accident from industrial Prydnieprovie region. Disturbances of liver functions have been shown, especially in persons obtained the exposure dose about 0.25 Gr. A comparison of these results and data of tests with laboratory animals reveals their mutual accordance and supports a relevancy of extrapolation of data of model experiments on a person health state, which undergone a similar influence.

  4. Testicular function of rats following exposure to microwave radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebovitz, R.M.; Johnson, L.

    1983-01-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed for 6 h per day for nine days to pulse-modulated microwave radiation (1.3 GHz, at 1-microseconds pulse width, 600 pulses per second). Exposures were carried out in cylindrical waveguide sections at a mean dose rate of 6.3 mW/g; sham controls were treated similarly and received no irradiation. At time periods corresponding to 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 cycles of the seminiferous epithelium, groups of four sham-irradiated and four irradiated rats were killed and the testes removed for analysis. Net mass of the testes, epididymides, and seminal vesicles; daily sperm production (DSP) per testis and per gram of testis; sperm morphology; and the number of epididymal sperm were determined. There were no statistically significant differences between the sham-irradiated and irradiated groups with respect to any measured variable. In a group of seven surrogate animals of similar body mass, the dose rate of 6.3 mW/g caused a net change in body temperature (via rectal probe) of 1.5 degrees C.

  5. MicroRNA Expression Profiling Altered by Variant Dosage of Radiation Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuei-Fang Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Various biological effects are associated with radiation exposure. Irradiated cells may elevate the risk for genetic instability, mutation, and cancer under low levels of radiation exposure, in addition to being able to extend the postradiation side effects in normal tissues. Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE is the focus of rigorous research as it may promote the development of cancer even at low radiation doses. Alterations in the DNA sequence could not explain these biological effects of radiation and it is thought that epigenetics factors may be involved. Indeed, some microRNAs (or miRNAs have been found to correlate radiation-induced damages and may be potential biomarkers for the various biological effects caused by different levels of radiation exposure. However, the regulatory role that miRNA plays in this aspect remains elusive. In this study, we profiled the expression changes in miRNA under fractionated radiation exposure in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. By utilizing publicly available microRNA knowledge bases and performing cross validations with our previous gene expression profiling under the same radiation condition, we identified various miRNA-gene interactions specific to different doses of radiation treatment, providing new insights for the molecular underpinnings of radiation injury.

  6. Modelling of Technological Solutions to 4th Generation DH Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vigants Edgars

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Flue gas evaporation and condensing processes are investigated in a direct contact heat exchanger - condensing unit, which is installed after a furnace. By using equations describing processes of heat and mass transfer, as well as correlation coherences for determining wet gas parameters, a model is formed to create a no-filling, direct contact heat exchanger. Results of heating equipment modelling and experimental research on the gas condensing unit show, that the capacity of the heat exchanger increases, when return temperature of the district heating network decreases. In order to explain these alterations in capacity, the character of the changes in water vapour partial pressure, in the propelling force of mass transfer, in gas and water temperatures and in the determining parameters of heat transfer are used in this article. The positive impact on the direct contact heat exchanger by the decreased district heating (DH network return temperature shows that introduction of the 4th generation DH system increases the energy efficiency of the heat exchanger. In order to make an assessment, the methodology suggested in the paper can be used in each particular situation.

  7. 4th annual Safety Day: full of colour!

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    On Thursday 10 April, more than 240 people took part in the 4th annual Safety Day, organised on the occasion of the World Day for Safety and Health at Work. The HSE Unit, in partnership with the Fire Brigade (GS/FB) and the TE and BE Departments, organised various stands and activities connected with this year’s theme, chosen by the International Labour Organization: "Safety and health in the use of chemicals at work”.   The stands, set up at lunchtime in all three of CERN’s restaurants as well as in the entrance hall of Building 500, were designed to: Remind visitors of the need to use personal protective equipment appropriate to the chemicals they are using; Make visitors aware of the potential environmental impact of using chemicals; Encourage visitors to always read the labels and safety data sheets of dangerous chemicals and everyday domestic products; Inform visitors that a safety training course called “Chemical Risk Awareness&r...

  8. The 4th Concept Detector for the ILC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzacane, A.

    2010-05-01

    The 4th Concept Detector is designed for high precision measurements of Physics processes accessible at ILC. It consists of four basic subsystems: a pixel vertex detector for high precision vertex definitions, impact parameter tagging and near-beam occupancy reduction; a cluster-counting low-mass drift chamber for robust pattern recognition with over 100 three-dimensional space-points each with about 55 μm resolution, 3.5% specific ionization measurement; a high precision dual-readout fiber calorimeter, complemented with an EM dual-readout crystal calorimeter, both with time-history readout, for the energy measurement of hadrons, jets, electrons, photons, missing momentum, and the tagging of muons; and, an iron-free dual-solenoid to return the flux and provide a second field region for the inverse direction bending of muons in a gas volume to achieve high acceptance and good muon momentum resolution. All four subsystems separately achieve the important scientific goal to be 2-to-10 times better than the already excellent LEP detectors, Aleph, Delphi, L3, and Opal. All four sub-detector will be described along with their performance and Physics capabilities obtained with full simulation studies.

  9. 4th French-German Conference on Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Zowe, Jochem; Hiriart-Urruty, Jean-Baptiste; Lemarechal, Claude

    1988-01-01

    This volume contains a collection of 23 papers presented at the 4th French-German Conference on Optimization, hold at Irsee, April 21 - 26, 1986. The conference was aUended by ninety scientists: about one third from France, from Germany and from third countries each. They all contributed to a highly interesting and stimulating meeting. The scientifique program consisted of four survey lectures of a more tutorical character and of 61 contributed papers covering almost all areas of optimization. In addition two informal evening sessions and a plenary discussion on further developments of optimization theory were organized. One of the main aims of the organizers was to indicate and to stress the increasing importance of optimization methods for almost all areas of science and for a fast growing number of industry branches. We hope that the conference approached this goal in a certain degree and managed to continue fruitful discussions between -theory­ and -applications-. Equally important to the official contri...

  10. The 4th international colloquium on process simulation. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokilaakso, A. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgy

    1997-12-31

    The papers collected in this volume were presented at the 4th Colloquium on Process Simulation held at Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo, Finland, June 11-13, 1997. In the more developed industrial nations, the processes for producing chemicals, energy, and materials encounter environmental concern and laws which challenge engineers to develop the processes towards more efficient, economical and safe operation. This necessitates more thorough understanding of the processes and phenomena involved. Formerly, the development of the processes was largely based on trial and error, whereas today, the development of computer performance together with the diversification of modelling software enables simulation of the processes. The increased capacity and possibilities for modelling the processes brought by the improved hardware and software, have generated a strong demand for more accurate mathematical descriptions of the processes. Especially, the coupling of computational fluid dynamics and chemical kinetics, combustion, and thermodynamics is of current interest in process oriented technology. This colloquium attempts to give examples of modelling efforts in operation in different universities, research institutes and companies. Furthermore, the aim of this colloquium is to offer an annual opportunity to the researchers to come together and discuss their common problems and the state of their investigations

  11. Review: Weak radiofrequency radiation exposure from mobile phone radiation on plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halgamuge, Malka N

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article was to explore the hypothesis that non-thermal, weak, radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) have an effect on living plants. In this study, we performed an analysis of the data extracted from the 45 peer-reviewed scientific publications (1996-2016) describing 169 experimental observations to detect the physiological and morphological changes in plants due to the non-thermal RF-EMF effects from mobile phone radiation. Twenty-nine different species of plants were considered in this work. Our analysis demonstrates that the data from a substantial amount of the studies on RF-EMFs from mobile phones show physiological and/or morphological effects (89.9%, p EMFs. Our findings also suggest that plants seem to be more responsive to certain frequencies, especially the frequencies between (i) 800 and 1500 MHz (p EMFs on plants to date observed the significant trend of radiofrequency radiation influence on plants. Hence, this study provides new evidence supporting our hypothesis. Nonetheless, this endorses the need for more experiments to observe the effects of RF-EMFs, especially for the longer exposure durations, using the whole organisms. The above observation agrees with our earlier study, in that it supported that it is not a well-grounded method to characterize biological effects without considering the exposure duration. Nevertheless, none of these findings can be directly associated with human; however, on the other hand, this cannot be excluded, as it can impact the human welfare and health, either directly or indirectly, due to their complexity and varied effects (calcium metabolism, stress proteins, etc.). This study should be useful as a reference for researchers conducting epidemiological studies and the long-term experiments, using whole organisms, to observe the effects of RF-EMFs.

  12. Radiation exposure during chest X-ray examinations in a premature intensive care unit: phantom studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duetting, T.; Foerste, B.; Darge, K.; Troeger, J. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Paediatric Radiology; Knoch, T. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Central Radiation Protection

    1999-03-01

    Background. There are few reports on the radiation dose received by infants, their family and radiographers exposed to scatter radiation in a premature baby intensive care unit. Objective. To evaluate the degree of radiation exposure from diagnostic X-ray examinations with mobile X-ray machines in a premature intensive care unit. Materials and methods. The radiation exposure of an adjacent newborn, the radiographer and other persons in the room was simulated using phantoms during X-ray examination of the chest using vertical and horizontal beams. Results. Most of the measured doses were below the registration limit of the measuring apparatus and had to be extrapolated by multiple exposures. Without exception, the maximal doses were significantly lower than the permitted limit for persons not professionally exposed to X-rays. Conclusions. Recommendations to avoid unnecessary radiation exposure are given. (orig.) With 2 figs., 3 tabs., 10 refs.

  13. Testicular cancer risk associated with occupational radiation exposure: a systematic literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousif, Lamya; Blettner, Maria; Hammer, Gael P; Zeeb, Hajo, E-mail: yousif@imbei.uni-mainz.d [Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics (IMBEI), University Medical Center, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Obere Zahlbacher Strasse 69, 55131 Mainz (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    Testicular cancer is a rare disease, affecting mainly young men aged 15-49. There have been some recent reports that it might be associated with radiation exposure. We have systematically reviewed this topic. English-language articles published between 1990 and 2008 studying the relationship between occupational radiation exposure and testicular cancer were included. Risk of bias was assessed using a modified version of the EPHPP checklist. For ionising radiation we subdivided study populations into occupational groups. No pooled analysis was performed due to the heterogeneity of studies. Seven case-control and 30 cohort studies were included in the review. For radiation workers, one incidence study showed a significant increase and four showed no effect. Eight mortality studies did not indicate an effect while four showed a non-significant increase. Incidence among persons with military exposure was not increased in two studies and non-significantly increased in another two. Among aircrew studies, one showed no effect against five with slight increases. Medical exposure studies showed no increases. For EMF exposure, three studies showed no effect, two reported a significant and four a non-significant increase in incidence. Overall, there was very limited evidence for associations between occupational ionising radiation and testicular cancer, while there were some positive associations for EMF. Testicular cancer mortality is generally low and was not associated with radiation. New incidence studies are recommended to investigate the association between radiation exposure and testicular cancer where exposure is better specified and individually estimated. (review)

  14. Testicular cancer risk associated with occupational radiation exposure: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Lamya; Blettner, Maria; Hammer, Gaël P; Zeeb, Hajo

    2010-09-01

    Testicular cancer is a rare disease, affecting mainly young men aged 15-49. There have been some recent reports that it might be associated with radiation exposure. We have systematically reviewed this topic. English-language articles published between 1990 and 2008 studying the relationship between occupational radiation exposure and testicular cancer were included. Risk of bias was assessed using a modified version of the EPHPP checklist. For ionising radiation we subdivided study populations into occupational groups. No pooled analysis was performed due to the heterogeneity of studies. Seven case-control and 30 cohort studies were included in the review. For radiation workers, one incidence study showed a significant increase and four showed no effect. Eight mortality studies did not indicate an effect while four showed a non-significant increase. Incidence among persons with military exposure was not increased in two studies and non-significantly increased in another two. Among aircrew studies, one showed no effect against five with slight increases. Medical exposure studies showed no increases. For EMF exposure, three studies showed no effect, two reported a significant and four a non-significant increase in incidence. Overall, there was very limited evidence for associations between occupational ionising radiation and testicular cancer, while there were some positive associations for EMF. Testicular cancer mortality is generally low and was not associated with radiation. New incidence studies are recommended to investigate the association between radiation exposure and testicular cancer where exposure is better specified and individually estimated.

  15. Influence of chemical inhibitors on cell recovery after exposure to different LET radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evstratova, Ekaterina S.; Petin, Vladislav G. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Kim, Jin Kyu; KIm, Jin Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Chemical radiosensitizers are often used to increase cell radiosensitivity. It is known that the ability of chemical drugs to increase cell radiosensitivity is related with inhibition of cell recovery from damage induced by ionizing radiation. However, there are little comparative investigations of cell sensitivity modification after exposure to radiation with high linear energy transfer (LET). Therefore, we studied the anticancer drugs cisplatin and endoxan and their impact on the ability of yeast cells to recover after cell exposure to radiations with different LET. The ability of cell recovery from radiation damage was less effective after exposure to high-LET radiation, when cells were irradiated without drug, with the increase in cisplatin concentration resulting in the disappearance of this difference. The increase of cisplatin concentration results in progressive increase in the fraction of irreversible damage independently of radiation quality.

  16. Pre-Exposure Gene Expression in Baboons with and without Pancytopenia after Radiation Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Port

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Radiosensitivity differs in humans and likely among primates. The reasons are not well known. We examined pre-exposure gene expression in baboons (n = 17 who developed haematologic acute radiation syndrome (HARS without pancytopenia or a more aggravated HARS with pancytopenia after irradiation. We evaluated gene expression in a two stage study design where stage I comprised a whole genome screen for messenger RNAs (mRNA (microarray and detection of 667 microRNAs (miRNA (real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR platform. Twenty candidate mRNAs and nine miRNAs were selected for validation in stage II (qRT-PCR. None of the mRNA species could be confirmed during the validation step, but six of the nine selected candidate miRNA remained significantly different during validation. In particular, miR-425-5p (receiver operating characteristic = 0.98; p = 0.0003 showed nearly complete discrimination between HARS groups with and without pancytopenia. Target gene searches of miR-425-5p identified new potential mRNAs and associated biological processes linked with radiosensitivity. We found that one miRNA species examined in pre-exposure blood samples was associated with HARS characterized by pancytopenia and identified new target mRNAs that might reflect differences in radiosensitivity of irradiated normal tissue.

  17. NASA Space Radiation Protection Strategies: Risk Assessment and Permissible Exposure Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, J. L.; Patel, Z. S.; Simonsen, L. C.

    2017-01-01

    Permissible exposure limits (PELs) for short-term and career astronaut exposures to space radiation have been set and approved by NASA with the goal of protecting astronauts against health risks associated with ionizing radiation exposure. Short term PELs are intended to prevent clinically significant deterministic health effects, including performance decrements, which could threaten astronaut health and jeopardize mission success. Career PELs are implemented to control late occurring health effects, including a 3% risk of exposure induced death (REID) from cancer, and dose limits are used to prevent cardiovascular and central nervous system diseases. For radiation protection, meeting the cancer PEL is currently the design driver for galactic cosmic ray and solar particle event shielding, mission duration, and crew certification (e.g., 1-year ISS missions). The risk of cancer development is the largest known long-term health consequence following radiation exposure, and current estimates for long-term health risks due to cardiovascular diseases are approximately 30% to 40% of the cancer risk for exposures above an estimated threshold (Deep Space one-year and Mars missions). Large uncertainties currently exist in estimating the health risks of space radiation exposure. Improved understanding through radiobiology and physics research allows increased accuracy in risk estimation and is essential for ensuring astronaut health as well as for controlling mission costs, optimization of mission operations, vehicle design, and countermeasure assessment. We will review the Space Radiation Program Element's research strategies to increase accuracy in risk models and to inform development and validation of the permissible exposure limits.

  18. Occupational hazard: radiation exposure for the urologist: developing a reference standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Seth A.; Rangarajan, Sriram S.; Chen, Tony; Palazzi, Kerrin L.; Langford, J. Scott; Sur, Roger L., E-mail: rlsur@ucsd.edu [Department of Surgery and Division of Urology, U C San Diego Health Science System, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Introduction: to date, there is a paucity of literature offering practicing urologists a reference for the amount of radiation exposure received while surgically managing urolithiasis. This study examines the cumulative radiation exposure of an urologist over 9 months. Materials and methods: We present a case series of fluoroscopic exposures of an experienced stone surgeon operating at an academic comprehensive stone center between April and December 2011. Radiation exposure measurements were determined by a thermoluminescent dosimeter worn on the outside of the surgeon's thyroid shield. Estimations of radiation exposure (mrem) per month were charted with fluoroscopy times, using scatter plots to estimate Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. Results: the total 9-month radiation exposure was 87 mrems for deep dose equivalent (DDE), 293 mrem for lens dose equivalent (LDE), and 282 mrem for shallow dose equivalent (SDE). Total fluoroscopy time was 252.44 minutes for 64 ureteroscopies (URSs), 29 percutaneous nephrolithtomies (PNLs), 20 cystoscopies with ureteral stent placements, 9 shock wave ithotripsies (SWLs), 9 retrograde pyelograms (RPGs), 2 endoureterotomies, and 1 ureteral balloon dilation. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients examining the association between fluoroscopy time and radiation exposure were not significant for DDE (p = 0.6, Spearman's rho = 0.2), LDE (p = 0.6, Spearman's rho = 0.2), or SDE (p = 0.6, Spearman's rho = 0.2). Conclusions: Over a 9-month period, total radiation exposures were well below annual accepted limits (DDE 5000 mrem, LDE 15,000 mrem and SDE 50,000 mrem). Although fluoroscopy time did not correlate with radiation exposure, future prospective studies can account for co-variates such as patient obesity and urologist distance from radiation source. (author)

  19. Radiation exposure in endovascular repair of abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monastiriotis, Spyridon; Comito, Matthew; Labropoulos, Nicos

    2015-09-01

    Endovascular aortic repair has become increasingly popular the last years for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) and thoracic aortic aneurysms. EVAR is less invasive compared with the classic open approach, related to a decreased immediate postoperative morbidity and mortality. Those beneficial characteristics of EVAR do not come without a cost, since EVAR requires that the patient will be exposed to a significant amount of radiation during preoperative planning, graft placement, and consecutive follow-up. This systematic review examines the periprocedural radiation exposure to patients and staff as well as ways to ameliorate it. A systematic literature search was conducted using the MEDLINE electronic database. All articles reporting radiation exposure to alive humans during EVAR were eligible for review. Only studies publishing numerical data regarding radiation exposure were included in the Results section. Other relevant articles were used for further discussion. Twenty-four studies, both prospective and retrospective in nature, were included. These studies revealed that the radiation exposure depends on the specific type of procedure, with more complex procedures carrying greater radiation burden. Variations in the positioning and operating of the fluoroscopic unit may significantly alter radiation dose to both patients and staff. There was an apparent lack of education among vascular specialists and trainees in terms of radiation safety awareness. At follow-up, a significant number of patients needed additional procedures, and all required radiographic imaging, further increasing the radiation exposure to alarming levels. Every effort should be made to decrease radiation exposure related to endovascular aortic procedures. Attempts must be directed towards maximizing the operator's awareness, welcoming new imaging technology emitting less radiation, and shifting to follow-up strategies that require minimal or no radiation. Copyright © 2015

  20. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Diet and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norat, Teresa; Scoccianti, Chiara; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Anderson, Annie; Berrino, Franco; Cecchini, Michele; Espina, Carolina; Key, Tim; Leitzmann, Michael; Powers, Hilary; Wiseman, Martin; Romieu, Isabelle

    2015-12-01

    Lifestyle factors, including diet, have long been recognised as potentially important determinants of cancer risk. In addition to the significant role diet plays in affecting body fatness, a risk factor for several cancers, experimental studies have indicated that diet may influence the cancer process in several ways. Prospective studies have shown that dietary patterns characterised by higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, and whole-grain foods, and lower intakes of red and processed meats and salt, are related to reduced risks of death and cancer, and that a healthy diet can improve overall survival after diagnosis of breast and colorectal cancers. There is evidence that high intakes of fruit and vegetables may reduce the risk of cancers of the aerodigestive tract, and the evidence that dietary fibre protects against colorectal cancer is convincing. Red and processed meats increase the risk of colorectal cancer. Diets rich in high-calorie foods, such as fatty and sugary foods, may lead to increased calorie intake, thereby promoting obesity and leading to an increased risk of cancer. There is some evidence that sugary drinks are related to an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Taking this evidence into account, the 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer recommends that people have a healthy diet to reduce their risk of cancer: they should eat plenty of whole grains, pulses, vegetables and fruits; limit high-calorie foods (foods high in sugar or fat); avoid sugary drinks and processed meat; and limit red meat and foods high in salt. Copyright © 2015 International Agency for Research on Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reaction of fresh water zooplankton community to chronic radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osipov, D.; Pryakhin, E. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine - URCRM (Russian Federation); Ivanov, I. [FSUE Mayak PA (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    The characteristic features of ecological community as a whole and cenosis of zooplankton organisms as part of it determine the intensity of the processes of self-purification of water and the formation of a particular body of water. Identifying features of the structure and composition of the zooplankton community of aquatic ecosystems exposed to different levels of radiation exposure, it is necessary to identify patterns of changes in zooplankton and hydro-biocenosis as a whole. Industrial reservoirs, the storage of liquid low-level radioactive waste 'Mayak' for decades, have high radiation load. A large range of levels of radioactive contamination (total volume beta-activity in water varies from 2.2x10{sup 3} to 2.3x10{sup 7} Bq/l, total volume alpha-activity - from 2.6x10{sup -1} to 3.1x10{sup 3} Bq/l) provides a unique opportunity to study ecosystems in a number of reservoirs with increasing impact of radiation factor. We studied five reservoirs that were used as the storage of low-and intermediate-level liquid radioactive waste pond and one comparison water body. In parallel with zooplankton sampling water samples were collected for hydro-chemical analysis. 41 indicators were analysed in order to assess the water chemistry. To determine the content of radionuclides in the various components of the ecosystem samples were collected from water, bottom sediments and plankton. Sampling of zooplankton for the quantitative analysis was performed using the method of weighted average auto bathometer. Apshteyn's plankton net of the surface horizon was used for qualitative analysis of the species composition of zooplankton. Software package ERICA Assessment Tool 2012 was used for the calculation of the absorbed dose rate. Species diversity and biomass of zooplankton, the share of rotifers in the number of species, abundance and biomass decrease with the increase of the absorbed dose rate and salinity. The number of species in a sample decreases with the

  2. Radiation exposure of the lung after endolymphatic radionuclide therapy (ELRT) of melanomas of the inferior extremities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, R.P.; Peters, P.E.

    1985-01-01

    The authors present 230 patients submitted to postoperative intralymphatic radiotherapy (ELRT) with radioactive Lipiodol UF because of a malignant melanoma of the inferior extremity. The incidence and volume of a possible invasion of the contrast medium into the lung and the resulting radiation exposure is indicated. Even if very low quantities of the contrast medium (3.5 ml and 7.0 ml, respectively) are used, only 22% of the cases show no pulmonary activity at all. Those patients who underwent bipedal ELRT showed more frequently higher radiation exposure. A correlation between lymph node weight and radiation exposure of the lung could not be demonstrated.

  3. Computer subroutines for estimation of human exposure to radiation in low Earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Computer subroutines to calculate human exposure to trapped radiations in low Earth orbit (LEO) on the basis of a simple approximation of the human geometry by spherical shell shields of varying thickness are presented and detailed. The subroutines calculate the dose to critical body organs and the fraction of exposure limit reached as a function of altitude of orbit, degree of inclination, shield thickness, and days in mission. Exposure rates are compared with current exposure limits.

  4. Radiation exposure and reduction in the operating room: Perspectives and future directions in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narain, Ankur S; Hijji, Fady Y; Yom, Kelly H; Kudaravalli, Krishna T; Haws, Brittany E; Singh, Kern

    2017-07-18

    Intraoperative imaging is vital for accurate placement of instrumentation in spine surgery. However, the use of biplanar fluoroscopy and other intraoperative imaging modalities is associated with the risk of significant radiation exposure in the patient, surgeon, and surgical staff. Radiation exposure in the form of ionizing radiation can lead to cellular damage via the induction of DNA lesions and the production of reactive oxygen species. These effects often result in cell death or genomic instability, leading to various radiation-associated pathologies including an increased risk of malignancy. In attempts to reduce radiation-associated health risks, radiation safety has become an important topic in the medical field. All practitioners, regardless of practice setting, can practice radiation safety techniques including shielding and distance to reduce radiation exposure. Additionally, optimization of fluoroscopic settings and techniques can be used as an effective method of radiation dose reduction. New imaging modalities and spinal navigation systems have also been developed in an effort to replace conventional fluoroscopy and reduce radiation doses. These modalities include Isocentric Three-Dimensional C-Arms, O-Arms, and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging. While this influx of new technology has advanced radiation safety within the field of spine surgery, more work is still required to overcome specific limitations involving increased costs and inadequate training.

  5. Radiation exposure to the patient and operating room personnel during percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Geeta; Kumar, Pratik; Wadhwa, Pankaj; Aron, Monish; Gupta, Narmada P; Dogra, Prem N

    2006-01-01

    The increased use of fluoroscopy during percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) places the urologist and operating room personnel at an occupational risk for measurable radiation exposure. We evaluated the degree of radiation exposure received by the patient and operating room personnel at our endourology facility during PCNL. The incident radiation dose to the patient and the urologist during 50 consecutive PCNL procedures was monitored using lithium fluoride thermo-luminescent dosimeter chips (TLD chips). A hand held radiation survey meter was used to measure the radiation in air at different positions occupied by various operating room personnel. The approximate distances of the various personnel from the X-ray tube were also measured. PCNL was performed upon 35 males and 15 females. The average time for the procedure was 75 minutes (range: 30-150 min). The mean fluoroscopy screening time during the procedure was 6.04 min (range 1.8-12.16 min) with a mean fluoroscopy tube potential of 68 kVp and a mean tube current of 2.76 mA. The mean radiation exposure dose to the patient was 0.56 mSv (SD +/- 0.35), while the mean incident radiation exposure to the finger of the urologist was 0.28 mSv (SD +/- 0.13). The various operating room personnel are within safe radiation dose limits during PCNL. Efficient fluoroscopy further reduces the radiation scatter. All occupational personnel should 'achieve as low as reasonably achievable' dose by adhering to good practices.

  6. Cell/Tissue Culture Radiation Exposure Facility Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the development of automated systems to improve radiobiology research capabilities at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National...

  7. Impact of robotics and a suspended lead suit on physician radiation exposure during percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madder, Ryan D; VanOosterhout, Stacie; Mulder, Abbey; Elmore, Matthew; Campbell, Jessica; Borgman, Andrew; Parker, Jessica; Wohns, David

    Reports of left-sided brain malignancies among interventional cardiologists have heightened concerns regarding physician radiation exposure. This study evaluated the impact of a suspended lead suit and robotic system on physician radiation exposure during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Real-time radiation exposure data were prospectively collected from dosimeters worn by operating physicians at the head- and chest-level during consecutive PCI cases. Exposures were compared in three study groups: 1) manual PCI performed with traditional lead apparel; 2) manual PCI performed using suspended lead; and 3) robotic PCI performed in combination with suspended lead. Among 336 cases (86.6% manual, 13.4% robotic) performed over 30weeks, use of suspended lead during manual PCI was associated with significantly less radiation exposure to the chest and head of operating physicians than traditional lead apparel (chest: 0.0 [0.1] μSv vs 0.4 [4.0] μSv, probotic PCI performed in combination with suspended lead was 0.0 [0.0] μSv, which was significantly less chest exposure than manual PCI performed with traditional lead (probotic PCI the median head-level exposure was 0.1 [0.2] μSv, which was 99.3% less than manual PCI performed with traditional lead (probotics were observed to result in significantly less radiation exposure to the chest and head of operating physicians during PCI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The effects of Fhit on tumorigenesis after multi-exposure to low-dose radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoyan; Lu, Lin; Wen, Siyuan; Wang, Ya

    2009-01-01

    Low-dose (≤ 0.1 Gy) radiation could reduce high-dose induced damage including tumorigenesis. However, it remains unclear whether multi-exposure to low-dose radiation at a high dose rate has any risk for increasing tumorigenesis, and whether Fhit plays any role in the process. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of multi-exposure to low-dose radiation at a high dose rate on tumorigenesis, and the role of Fhit in it. We irradiated Fhit+/+ and Fhit-/- mice with 1 Gy/1 or 0.1 Gy × 10 exposures at a dose rate of 1 Gy/min, sacrificed the mice at 1.5 years after radiation and observed multi-organ tumorigenesis. The results showed that although the spontaneous tumorigenesis in these mice was relatively high, 1 Gy/1-exposure dramatically increased the tumorigenesis including lung and liver tumor. Fhit-/- mice showed more tumorigenesis than Fhit+/+ mice after 1 Gy/1-exposure. However, 0.1 Gy × 10 exposures did not increase tumorigenesis, and there was no statistical difference in tumorigenesis between Fhit+/+ mice and Fhit-/- mice following 0.1 Gy × 10 exposures. Our results suggest that 0.1 Gy, even after multiple exposures, does not increase tumorigenesis, and Fhit could prevent high-dose radiation-induced tumors but has no effect in a low-dose environment. PMID:20057978

  9. Evaluation of the cloudy sky solar UVA radiation exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, A V; Downs, N; Turner, J

    2014-09-05

    The influence of cloud on the solar UVA (320-400 nm) exposures over five minute periods on a horizontal plane has been investigated. The first approach used cloud modification factors that were evaluated using the influence of clouds on the global solar exposures (310-2800 nm) and a model developed to apply these to the clear sky UVA exposures to allow calculation of the five minute UVA exposures for any cloud conditions. The second approach established a relationship between the UVA and the global solar exposures. The models were developed using the first six months of data in 2012 for SZA less than or equal to 70° and were applied and evaluated for the exposures in the second half of 2012. This comparison of the modelled exposures for all cloud conditions to the measured data provided an R(2) of 0.8 for the cloud modification model, compared to an R(2) of 0.7 for the UVA/global model. The cloud modification model provided 73% of the five minute exposures within 20% of the measured UVA exposures. This was improved to 89% of the exposures within 20% of the measured UVA exposures for the cases of cloud with the sun not obscured. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Medical exposure to ionising radiation and the risk of brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blettner, Maria; Schlehofer, Brigitte; Samkange-Zeeb, Florence

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of exposure to low doses of ionising radiation in the aetiology of brain tumours has yet to be clarified. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between medically or occupationally related exposure to ionising radiation and brain tumours. METHODS: We...... used self-reported medical and occupational data collected during the German part of a multinational case-control study on mobile phone use and the risk of brain tumours (Interphone study) for the analyses. RESULTS: For any exposure to medical ionising radiation we found odds ratios (ORs) of 0.63 (95...... regions. CONCLUSION: We did not find any significant increased risk of brain tumours for exposure to medical ionising radiation....

  11. Radiation Exposure and Hand Dominance Using Mini C-Arm Fluoroscopy in Hand Surgery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fuller, Corey B; Wongworawat, Montri D; Riedel, Barth B

    2016-01-01

    .... This study seeks to determine whether a hand surgeon receives a different amount of radiation exposure to their hands based on hand dominance and then accounting for this, provide a more accurate...

  12. Effect of Radiation Exposure on the Retention of Commercial NAND Flash Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, Timothy R.; Chen, D.; Friendlich, M.; Carts, M. A.; Seidleck, C. M.; LaBel, K. A.

    2011-01-01

    We have compared the data retention of irradiated commercial NAND flash memories with that of unirradiated controls. Under some circumstanc es, radiation exposure has a significant effect on the retention of f lash memories.

  13. Injury of the blood-testies barrier after low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Young Hoon; Bae Min Ji; Lee, Chang Geun; Yang, Kwang Mo; Jur, Kyu; Kim, Jong Sun [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportionally with the dose and dose rate. Little is known concerning the relationships between harmful effects and accumulated dose, which is derived from continuous low-dose rate radiation exposure. Recent our studies show that low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure (3.49 mGy/h) causes adverse effects in the testis at a dose of 2 Gy (6 mGy/h). However, the mechanism of the low-dose-rate 2 Gy irradiation induced testicular injury remains unclear. The present results indicate that low-dose rate chronic radiation might affect the BTB permeability, possibly by decreasing levels of ZO-1, Occludin-1, and NPC-2. Furthermore, our results suggest that there is a risk of male infertility through BTB impairment even with low-dose-rate radiation if exposure is continuous.

  14. Late health effects of radiation exposure: new statistical, epidemiological, and biological approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Peter; Stram, Daniel O

    2013-08-01

    The 2012 Conference on Radiation and Health in Kennebunkport, Maine, USA, brought together epidemiologists, statisticians, basic scientists, and clinical scientists interested in the health effects of radiation exposure due to medical, diagnostic, occupational, and non-medical sources, to review the current status of epidemiologic and clinical research on radiation exposure in relation to risk of breast, thyroid cancer, and leukemia, cardiopulmonary events, and other late effects. Topics discussed included synergy between radiation exposure and genetic background; late effects of radiation therapy in childhood cancer survivors and several other medically exposed cohorts; leukemia risk seen in Russian and Chernobyl studies, and leukemia risk from computed tomography scans in childhood. This report summarizes the presentations at the meeting and discusses their significance in light of earlier studies and of other ongoing research.

  15. Assessment of exposure to ionizing radiation at selected mining ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigated the levels of ionizing radiation at selected mining sites in Nasarawa State, Nigeria. Inspector alert nuclear radiation meter (S.E. International, USA SN: 35440) was used for these assessments. The meter was held at the abdominal level (about 1 m above ground level) and readings were taken in ...

  16. Physician and nurse knowledge about patient radiation exposure in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Imaging methods that use ionizing radiation in emergency departments (EDs) have increased with advances in radiological diagnostic methods. Physician and nurse awareness of the radiation dose in the ED and the associated cancer risks to which the patients are exposed were surveyed with a ...

  17. The assessment of electromagnetic field radiation exposure for mobile phone users

    OpenAIRE

    Buckus Raimondas; Strukcinskiene Birute; Raistenskis Juozas

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim. During recent years, the widespread use of mobile phones has resulted in increased human exposure to electromagnetic field radiation and to health risks. Increased usage of mobile phones at the close proximity raises questions and doubts in safety of mobile phone users. The aim of the study was to assess an electromagnetic field radiation exposure for mobile phone users by measuring electromagnetic field strength in different settings at the...

  18. Assessment of radiation exposure of nuclear medicine staff using personal TLD dosimeters and charcoal detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, F.; Garcia-Talavera, M.; Pardo, R.; Deban, L. [Valladolid Univ., Dept. de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias (Spain); Garcia-Talavera, P.; Singi, G.M.; Martin, E. [Hospital Clinico Univ., Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Salamanca (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    Although the main concern regarding exposure to ionizing radiation for nuclear medicine workers is external radiation, inhalation of radionuclides can significantly contribute to the imparted doses. We propose a new approach to assess exposure to inhalation of {sup 131}I based on passive monitoring using activated charcoal detectors. We compared the inhalation doses to the staff of a nuclear medicine department, based on the measurements derived from charcoal detectors placed at various locations, and the external doses monitored using personal TLD dosimeters. (authors)

  19. Auditory brainstem response changes during exposure to GSM-900 radiation: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaprana, Antigoni E; Chimona, Theognosia S; Papadakis, Chariton E; Velegrakis, Stylianos G; Vardiambasis, Ioannis O; Adamidis, Georgios; Velegrakis, George A

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the possible electrophysiological time-related changes in auditory pathway during mobile phone electromagnetic field exposure. Thirty healthy rabbits were enrolled in an experimental study of exposure to GSM-900 radiation for 60 min and auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were recorded at regular time-intervals during exposure. The study subjects were radiated via an adjustable power and frequency radio transmitter for GSM-900 mobile phone emission simulation, designed and manufactured according to the needs of the experiment. The mean absolute latency of waves III-V showed a statistically significant delay (p < 0.05) after 60, 45 and 15 min of exposure to electromagnetic radiation of 900 MHz, respectively. Interwave latency I-III was found to be prolonged after 60 min of radiation exposure in correspondence to wave III absolute latency delay. Interwave latencies I-V and III-V were found with a statistically significant delay (p < 0.05) after 30 min of radiation. No statistically significant delay was found for the same ABR parameters in recordings from the ear contralateral to the radiation source at 60 min radiation exposure compared with baseline ABR. The ABR measurements returned to baseline recordings 24 h after the exposure to electromagnetic radiation of 900 MHz. The prolongation of interval latencies I-V and III-V indicates that exposure to electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phone can affect the normal electrophysiological activity of the auditory system, and these findings fit the pattern of general responses to a stressor. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Detection of Radiation-Exposure Biomarkers by Differential Mobility Prefiltered Mass Spectrometry (DMS-MS)

    OpenAIRE

    Coy, Stephen L.; Krylov, Evgeny V.; Schneider, Bradley B.; Covey, Thomas R.; Brenner, David J.; Tyburski, John B.; Patterson, Andrew D.; Krausz, Kris W.; Fornace, Albert J.; Nazarov, Erkinjon G.

    2010-01-01

    Technology to enable rapid screening for radiation exposure has been identified as an important need, and, as a part of a NIH / NIAD effort in this direction, metabolomic biomarkers for radiation exposure have been identified in a recent series of papers. To reduce the time necessary to detect and measure these biomarkers, differential mobility spectrometry – mass spectrometry (DMS-MS) systems have been developed and tested. Differential mobility ion filters preselect specific ions and also s...

  1. Spatial Positioning of RET and H4 Following Radiation Exposure Leads to Tumor Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri E. Nikiforov

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to ionizing radiation is a well-known risk factor for a number of human cancers, including leukemia, thyroid cancer, soft tissue sarcomas, and many others. Although it has been known for a long time that radiation exposure to the cell results in extensive DNA damage, including double strand DNA breaks, the exact mechanisms of radiation-induced carcinogenesis remain unknown. Recently, a large increase in incidence of thyroid cancer was observed in children exposed to radiation after the Chernobyl nuclear accident [1]. A high prevalence of chromosomal rearrangements involving the RET gene was found among these radiation-induced thyroid tumors [2,3]. As a result of such rearrangement, a portion of the RET gene is fused with another gene, typically with the H4 or ELE1. However, since the DNA targets of ionizing radiation are randomly distributed throughout the cell nucleus, the reason for predilection for the RET rearrangements in thyroid cells was unclear.

  2. An assessment of the potential radiation exposure from residual radioactivity in scrap metal for recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Yoon; Lee, Kun Jai [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    With current waste monitoring technology it is reasonable to assume that much of the material designated as low level waste (LLW), generated within nuclear facilities, is in fact uncontaminated. This may include operational wastes, metal and rubble, office waste and discrete items from decommissioning or decontamination operations. Materials that contain only trivial quantities of radionuclides could realistically be exempted or released from regulatory control for recycle or reuse. A criterion for uncontrolled disposal of low-level radioactive contaminated waste is that the radiation exposure of the public and of each individual caused by this disposal is so low that radiation protection measures need not be taken. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) suggests an annual effective doses of 10 {mu} Sv as a limit for the individual radiation dose. In 1990, new recommendation on radiation protection standards was developed by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to take into account new biological information related to the detriment associated with radiation exposure. Adoption of these recommendations necessitated a revision of the Commission`s secondary limits contained in Publication 30, Parts 1 {approx} 4. This study summarized the potential radiation exposure from valuable scrap metal considered to uncontrolled recycle by new ICRP recommendations. Potential exposure pathways to people following were analyzed and relevant models developed. Finally, concentrations leading to an individual dose of 10 {mu} Sv/yr were calculated for 14 key radionuclides. These potential radiation exposures are compared with the results of an IAEA study. 12 refs., 6 tabs., figs.

  3. Short-duration exposure to 2.45 GHz microwave radiation induces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OBEMBE

    Key words: 2.45 GHz microwave radiation, histopathology, DNA single strand break, ovary, testis. INTRODUCTION. Microwave (MW) radiation .... single strand break (SSB) in ovary and testis of the animals after exposure to 2.39 Wkg-1 MW .... intrinsic (quantum) energy is too low to dislodge an electron from a molecule but ...

  4. 38 CFR 1.17 - Evaluation of studies relating to health effects of radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Evaluation of studies relating to health effects of radiation exposure. 1.17 Section 1.17 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Program Evaluation § 1.17 Evaluation of studies relating to health effects of radiation...

  5. Vom work Book Journal 2011, 2010 4th Edition PDF

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    INTRODUCTION. Dog remains the most important agent of transmission of rabies to humans in Africa and. Asia (Warrell and Warrell 1988; CDC, 2009;. Benka, 2009). The administration of human rabies immunoglobulin (HRIG) combined with post exposure vaccination can neutralize the virus before it invades the nervous ...

  6. Primary water chemistry improvement for radiation exposure reduction at Japanese PWR Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishizawa, Eiichi [Omiya Technical Institute, Saitama-ken (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    Radiation exposure during the refueling outages at Japanese Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Plants has been gradually decreased through continuous efforts keeping the radiation dose rates at relatively low level. The improvement of primary water chemistry in respect to reduction of the radiation sources appears as one of the most important contributions to the achieved results and can be classified by the plant operation conditions as follows

  7. Proteomic Analysis of Low Dose Arsenic and Ionizing Radiation Exposure on Keratinocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Berglund, Susanne R.; Santana, Alison R.; Li, Dan; Rice, Robert H.; Rocke, David M; Goldberg, Zelanna

    2009-01-01

    Human exposure to arsenic and ionizing radiation occur environmentally at low levels. While the human health effects of arsenic and ionizing radiation have been examined separately, there is little information regarding their combined effects at doses approaching environmental levels. Arsenic toxicity may be affected by concurrent ionizing radiation especially given their known individual carcinogenic actions at higher doses. We found that keratinocytes responded to either low dose arsenic an...

  8. Urban Infrasound Observations - Examples from July 4th 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, S.; Hayward, C.; Golden, P.; McKenna, M.; Simpson, C.

    2012-12-01

    , the Heroy Building Rooftop Array, is a two-element 30m line on a single rooftop. Large-scale fireworks displays in Dallas on 4 July 2012 provided an opportunity to identify and characterize known signals in an urban setting. The identified events were associated with one of these fireworks displays about 2 km from the arrays. Signals from these sources were used to tune processing parameters for an automatic coherent detection process, Progressive Multichannel Correlation Method (PMCC). PMCC was then used to scan the data for all possible firework sources in the urban environment and determine temporal, back azimuth, apparent velocity, and frequency information about the sources. The signal frequencies seen were 10-80 Hz and documented the details of the nearly 30 minute firework show. The resulting PMCC analysis showed potential to effectively identify other, lower frequency sources in the urban environment. These data were also is used to characterize the noise environment. Significant roof-to-roof noise differences may be related to the building configurations and mechanical equipment, as well as the interactions of the winds with the structures. During the evening of July 4th , additional ground deployed infrasound gauges provided a comparison of free surface and rooftop measurements. Permission to publish was granted by Director, Geotechnical and Structures Laboratory.

  9. 4th international renewable energy storage conference (IRES 2009)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    Within the 4th International Renewable Energy Storage Conference of The European Association for Renewable Energy (Bonn, Federal Republic of Germany) and The World Council for Renewable Energy (Bonn, Federal Republic of Germany) between 24th and 25 November, 2009, in Berlin (Federal Republic of Germany), the following lectures were held: (1) The World Wind Energy Association (A. Kane); (2) The contribution of wind power to the energy supply of tomorrow (H. Albers); (3) Intelligent energy systems for the integration of renewable energies (A.-C. Agricola); (4) 100% Renewable energies: From fossil baseload plants to renewable plants for basic supply (M. Willenbacher); (5) High-performance Li-ion technology for stationary and mobile applications (A. Gutsch); (6) Energy storage in geological underground - Competition of use at storage formations (L. Dietrich); (7) E-mobility concepts for model region ''Rhein-Ruhr'' in North Rhine Westphalia (G.-U. Funk); (8) Photovoltaic energy storage for a better energy management in residential buildings (S. Pincemin); (9) Self-consuming photovoltaic energy in Germany - Impact on energy flows, business cases, and the distribution grid (M. Braun); (10) Local energy systems -optimized for local consumption of self-produced electricity (B. Wille-Haussmann); (11) Assessing the economics of distributed storage systems at the end consumer level (K.-H. Ahlert); (12) A new transportation system for heat on a wide temperature range (S. Gschwander); (13) Latent heat storage media for cooling applications (C. Doetsch); (14) Numerical and experimental analysis of latent heat storage systems for mobile application (F. Roesler); (15) CO{sub 2}-free heat supply from waste heat (H.-W. Etzkorn); (16) Stationary Li-Ion-technology applications for dispatchable power (C. Kolligs); (17) Redox-flow batteries - Electric storage systems for renewable energy (T. Smolinka); (18) Energy storage by means of flywheels (H. Kielsein); (19

  10. Communicating the harmful effects of radiation exposure from medical imaging: malpractice considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Leonard

    2011-11-01

    Concerns about possible harmful effects of exposure to radiation arising from diagnostic radiologic procedures have existed in both the scientific and lay communities for many decades. There is, however, no question that the degree of concern over the past years has escalated to the "anxiety" if not the "fear" level. Potential exposure to radiation is not a new issue, but it is certainly a "hot" issue. Americans were exposed to more than six times as much ionizing radiation from diagnostic medical procedures in 2006 than they were in early 1980s. To what extent this increased exposure elevates the risk of genetic mutations and/or development of cancer is not known with any degree of certainty. The available data are subject to varying interpretations, often debatable and thus controversial. What should be communicated to the public? The medical and scientific communities must encourage public attention and discussion regarding radiologic imaging and associated radiation exposure. They must talk to the public sensibly about the uncertainty regarding the hazards of radiation exposure. Exposure to imaging involving radiation and the hazards related to such exposure has myriad medical/legal ramifications. There has never been a successful medical malpractice lawsuit that alleged development of cancer or genetic defects resulting from diagnostic x-ray examinations. However, there have been and continue to be lawsuits filed alleging soft tissue injury resulting from overexposure to diagnostic radiologic equipment and cancer caused by overexposure to radiation oncology equipment. It is quite likely that lawsuits alleging development of cancer arising from diagnostic imaging using standard levels of ionizing radiation will be forthcoming. How the courts will deal with these remains to be determined.

  11. Exposure of luminous marine bacteria to low-dose gamma-radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryasheva, N S; Petrova, A S; Dementyev, D V; Bondar, A A

    2017-04-01

    The study addresses biological effects of low-dose gamma-radiation. Radioactive 137Cs-containing particles were used as model sources of gamma-radiation. Luminous marine bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum was used as a bioassay with the bioluminescent intensity as the physiological parameter tested. To investigate the sensitivity of the bacteria to the low-dose gamma-radiation exposure (≤250 mGy), the irradiation conditions were varied as follows: bioluminescence intensity was measured at 5, 10, and 20°С for 175, 100, and 47 h, respectively, at different dose rates (up to 4100 μGy/h). There was no noticeable effect of gamma-radiation at 5 and 10°С, while the 20°С exposure revealed authentic bioluminescence inhibition. The 20°С results of gamma-radiation exposure were compared to those for low-dose alpha- and beta-radiation exposures studied previously under comparable experimental conditions. In contrast to ionizing radiation of alpha and beta types, gamma-emission did not initiate bacterial bioluminescence activation (adaptive response). As with alpha- and beta-radiation, gamma-emission did not demonstrate monotonic dose-effect dependencies; the bioluminescence inhibition efficiency was found to be related to the exposure time, while no dose rate dependence was found. The sequence analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene did not reveal a mutagenic effect of low-dose gamma radiation. The exposure time that caused 50% bioluminescence inhibition was suggested as a test parameter for radiotoxicity evaluation under conditions of chronic low-dose gamma irradiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiation Exposure to the Hand of a Spinal Interventionalist during Fluoroscopically Guided Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Kazuta; Ikuma, Hisanori; Tokashiki, Takuya; Maehara, Takashi; Nagamachi, Akihiro; Takata, Yoichiro; Sakai, Toshinori; Higashino, Kosaku; Sairyo, Koichi

    2017-02-01

    Prospective study. During fluoroscopically guided spinal procedure, the hands of spinal surgeons are placed close to the field of radiation and may be exposed to ionizing radiation. This study directly measured the radiation exposure to the hand of a spinal interventionalist during fluoroscopically guided procedures. Fluoroscopically guided spinal procedures have been reported to be a cause for concern due to the radiation exposure to which their operators are exposed. This prospective study evaluated the radiation exposure of the hand of one spinal interventionalist during 52 consecutive fluoroscopic spinal procedures over a 3-month period. The interventionalist wore three real-time dosimeters secured to the right forearm, under the lead apron over the chest, and outside the lead apron over the chest. Additionally, one radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeter was placed under the lead apron over the left chest and one ring radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeter was worn on the right thumb. The duration of exposure and radiation dose were measured for each procedure. The average radiation exposure dose per procedure was 14.9 µSv, 125.6 µSv, and 200.1 µSv, inside the lead apron over the chest, outside the lead apron over the chest, and on the right forearm, respectively. Over the 3-month period, the protected radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeter over the left chest recorded less than the minimum reportable dose, whereas the radiophotoluminescence glass ring dosimeter recorded 368 mSv for the thumb. Our findings indicated that the cumulative radiation dose measured at the dominant hand may exceed the annual dose limit specified by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Spinal interventionalists should take special care to limit the duration of fluoroscopy and radiation exposure.

  13. Fluoroscopic Radiation Exposure in Spinal Surgery: In Vivo Evaluation for Operating Room Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulconrey, Daniel S

    2016-08-01

    Prospective in vivo investigation of fluoroscopic radiation exposure during spinal surgery. To quantify the total amount of radiation dosage and identify techniques to maintain safe levels of fluoroscopic exposure in the operating room. No previous study has performed an in vivo examination of fluoroscopic radiation exposure to the spinal surgeon and operating room personnel. Previous similar studies were in vitro, used older versions of fluoroscopy, and increased fluoro times associated with pedicle screw placement. Thirty-five surgeries were evaluated in 18 males and 17 females (mean age 52.4 y; range, 26.0-79.4). Surgeries included 37 lumbar levels fused, 45 lumbar decompressions, 8 anterior cervical fusions, and 19 transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion procedures. Spinal instrumentation was implemented in all fusion procedures (104 lumbar pedicle screws, 14 iliac, 22 anterior cervical). Radiation dosimetry was obtained through unprotected badges placed on surgeon's chest, first assistant chest, cranial and caudal end of operating table. Total fluoroscopic time was 37.01 minutes. Mean fluoroscopic time with lumbar spine instrumentation was greater than decompression alone (1.74 vs. 0.22 min). Total fluoroscopic radiation exposure was obtained for surgeon (1225 mrem), first assistant (369 mrem), cranial table (92 mrem), and caudal table (150 mrem). Mean dose/min (mrem/min) was calculated for surgeon (33.1), first assistant (9.97), cranial table (2.48), and caudal table (4.05). To remain below the maximum yearly permissible level of radiation, the estimated total number of minutes for the surgeon would be 453. The results of this in vivo study indicate fluoroscopic dosage to the spine surgeon remains below the annual maximum limit of radiation exposure. Increasing distance from radiation source led to a significantly diminished in vivo dosimetry reading. Monitoring fluoroscopic time and maintaining a distance from the beam source, radiation exposure to the spine

  14. Determinants of personal ultraviolet-radiation exposure doses on a sun holiday

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, B; Thieden, E; Philipsen, P A

    2013-01-01

    A great number of journeys to sunny destinations are sold to the Danish population every year. We suspect that this travel considerably increases personal annual ultraviolet-radiation (UVR) exposure doses. This is important because such exposure is the main cause of skin cancer, and studies have ...

  15. An Overview of NASA's Risk of Cardiovascular Disease from Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Zarana S.; Huff, Janice L.; Simonsen, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    The association between high doses of radiation exposure and cardiovascular damage is well established. Patients that have undergone radiotherapy for primary cancers of the head and neck and mediastinal regions have shown increased risk of heart and vascular damage and long-term development of radiation-induced heart disease [1]. In addition, recent meta-analyses of epidemiological data from atomic bomb survivors and nuclear industry workers has also shown that acute and chronic radiation exposures is strongly correlated with an increased risk of circulatory disease at doses above 0.5 Sv [2]. However, these analyses are confounded for lower doses by lifestyle factors, such as drinking, smoking, and obesity. The types of radiation found in the space environment are significantly more damaging than those found on Earth and include galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), solar particle events (SPEs), and trapped protons and electrons. In addition to the low-LET data, only a few studies have examined the effects of heavy ion radiation on atherosclerosis, and at lower, space-relevant doses, the association between exposure and cardiovascular pathology is more varied and unclear. Understanding the qualitative differences in biological responses produced by GCR compared to Earth-based radiation is a major focus of space radiation research and is imperative for accurate risk assessment for long duration space missions. Other knowledge gaps for the risk of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease include the existence of a dose threshold, low dose rate effects, and potential synergies with other spaceflight stressors. The Space Radiation Program Element within NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is managing the research and risk mitigation strategies for these knowledge gaps. In this presentation, we will review the evidence and present an overview of the HRP Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Other Degenerative Tissue Effects from Radiation Exposure.

  16. External radiation dose and cancer mortality among French nuclear workers. Considering potential confounding by internal radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, L.; Laurent, O.; Samson, E.; Caer-Lorho, S.; Laurier, D.; Leuraud, K. [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay aux Roses (France). Ionizing Radiation Epidemiology Lab.; Laroche, P. [AREVA, Paris (France); Le Guen, B. [EDF, Saint Denis (France)

    2016-11-15

    French nuclear workers have detailed records of their occupational exposure to external radiation that have been used to examine associations with subsequent cancer mortality. However, some workers were also exposed to internal contamination by radionuclides. This study aims to assess the potential for bias due to confounding by internal contamination of estimates of associations between external radiation exposure and cancer mortality. A cohort of 59,004 workers employed for at least 1 year between 1950 and 1994 by CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique), AREVA NC, or EDF (Electricite de France) and badge-monitored for external radiation exposure were followed through 2004 to assess vital status and cause of death. A flag based on a workstation-exposure matrix defined four levels of potential for internal contamination. Standardized mortality ratios were assessed for each level of the internal contamination indicator. Poisson regression was used to quantify associations between external radiation exposure and cancer mortality, adjusting for potential internal contamination. For solid cancer, the mortality deficit tended to decrease as the levels of potential for internal contamination increased. For solid cancer and leukemia excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia, adjusting the dose-response analysis on the internal contamination indicator did not markedly change the excess relative risk per Sievert of external radiation dose. This study suggests that in this cohort, neglecting information on internal dosimetry while studying the association between external dose and cancer mortality does not generate a substantial bias. To investigate more specifically the health effects of internal contamination, an effort is underway to estimate organ doses due to internal contamination.

  17. Outdoor work and solar radiation exposure: Evaluation method for epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modenese, Alberto; Bisegna, Fabio; Borra, Massimo; Grandi, Carlo; Gugliermetti, Franco; Militello, Andrea; Gobba, Fabriziomaria

    The health risk related to an excessive exposure to solar radiation (SR) is well known. The Sun represents the main exposure source for all the frequency bands of optical radiation, that is the part of the electromagnetic spectrum ranging between 100 nm and 1 mm, including infrared (IR), ultraviolet (UV) and visible radiation. According to recent studies, outdoor workers have a relevant exposure to SR but few studies available in scientific literature have attempted to retrace a detailed history of individual exposure. We propose a new method for the evaluation of SR cumulative exposure both during work and leisure time, integrating subjective and objective data. The former is collected by means of an interviewer administrated questionnaire. The latter is available through the Internet databases for many geographical regions and through individual exposure measurements. The data is integrated into a mathematical algorithm, in order to obtain an esteem of the individual total amount of SR the subjects have been exposed to during their lives. The questionnaire has been tested for 58 voluntary subjects. Environmental exposure data through online databases has been collected for 3 different places in Italy in 2012. Individual exposure by electronic UV dosimeter has been measured in 6 fishermen. A mathematical algorithm integrating subjective and objective data has been elaborated. The method proposed may be used in epidemiological studies to evaluate specific correlations with biological effects of SR and to weigh the role of the personal and environmental factors that may increase or reduce SR exposure. Med Pr 2016;67(5):577-587.

  18. Impact of robotics and a suspended lead suit on physician radiation exposure during percutaneous coronary intervention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madder, Ryan D., E-mail: ryan.madder@spectrumhealth.org; VanOosterhout, Stacie; Mulder, Abbey; Elmore, Matthew; Campbell, Jessica; Borgman, Andrew; Parker, Jessica; Wohns, David

    2017-04-15

    Background: Reports of left-sided brain malignancies among interventional cardiologists have heightened concerns regarding physician radiation exposure. This study evaluated the impact of a suspended lead suit and robotic system on physician radiation exposure during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods: Real-time radiation exposure data were prospectively collected from dosimeters worn by operating physicians at the head- and chest-level during consecutive PCI cases. Exposures were compared in three study groups: 1) manual PCI performed with traditional lead apparel; 2) manual PCI performed using suspended lead; and 3) robotic PCI performed in combination with suspended lead. Results: Among 336 cases (86.6% manual, 13.4% robotic) performed over 30 weeks, use of suspended lead during manual PCI was associated with significantly less radiation exposure to the chest and head of operating physicians than traditional lead apparel (chest: 0.0 [0.1] μSv vs 0.4 [4.0] μSv, p < 0.001; head: 0.5 [1.9] μSv vs 14.9 [51.5] μSv, p < 0.001). Chest-level radiation exposure during robotic PCI performed in combination with suspended lead was 0.0 [0.0] μSv, which was significantly less chest exposure than manual PCI performed with traditional lead (p < 0.001) or suspended lead (p = 0.046). In robotic PCI the median head-level exposure was 0.1 [0.2] μSv, which was 99.3% less than manual PCI performed with traditional lead (p < 0.001) and 80.0% less than manual PCI performed with suspended lead (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Utilization of suspended lead and robotics were observed to result in significantly less radiation exposure to the chest and head of operating physicians during PCI. - Highlights: • Use of suspended lead during manual PCI reduced cranial radiation among operators by 97%. • Robotic PCI reduced cranial radiation among operators by 99%. • Suspended lead and robotics together achieved the lowest levels of radiation exposure.

  19. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation: II. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects in vivo, clastogenic factors and transgenerational effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this review is to summarize the evidence for non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation in vivo. Currently, human health risks associated with radiation exposures are based primarily on the assumption that the detrimental effects of radiation occur in irradiated cells. Over the years a number of non-targeted effects of radiation exposure in vivo have been described that challenge this concept. These include radiation-induced genomic instability, bystander effects, clastogenic factors produced in plasma from irradiated individuals that can cause chromosomal damage when cultured with nonirradiated cells, and transgenerational effects of parental irradiation that can manifest in the progeny. These effects pose new challenges to evaluating the risk(s) associated with radiation exposure and understanding radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  20. 75 FR 35649 - Safety Zone; Northern California Annual Fireworks Events, July 4th Fireworks Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Northern California Annual Fireworks Events, July 4th Fireworks Display AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard will enforce the Tahoe City 4th of July Fireworks Display safety zone, from 9 a.m. through 10 p.m...

  1. 75 FR 34636 - Safety Zone; Jameson Beach 4th of July Fireworks Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Jameson Beach 4th of July Fireworks Display... temporary safety zone in the navigable waters of Lake Tahoe, for the Jameson Beach 4th of July Fireworks... issued to establish a temporary restricted area in Lake Tahoe, in the vicinity of Jameson Beach at South...

  2. The Effects of Cooperative Learning Strategies on Vocabulary Skills of 4th Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilen, Didem; Tavil, Zekiye Müge

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the effects of cooperative learning strategies on the vocabulary skills of 4th grade students. The study was also designed to ascertain the attitudes of the students in the experimental group towards cooperative learning. Out of 96 4th grade students enrolled in the private school where the study took…

  3. Science Content Courses: Workshop in Food Chemistry for 4th Grade School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyapechara, S.; Dong, F. M.

    2004-01-01

    A science content course in food chemistry was offered as a 4-day summer workshop from 1999 to 2001 to 4th grade school teachers in the Seattle School District. The objectives of the workshop were to increase the teachers' knowledge of food science, to perform simple experiments that could be used in the 4th grade classroom, and to help the…

  4. Natural Sources of Radiation Exposure and the Teaching of Radioecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos, R. M.; Veiga, R.; Carvalho, C.; Sanches, N.; Estellita, L.; Zanuto, P.; Queiroz, E.; Macario, K.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed an experimental activity that introduces concepts of the natural ionizing radiation and its interaction with our contemporary environment that can be used with students from secondary to college level. The experiment is based on the use of traditional and cheap portable Geiger-Muller detectors as survey meters for "in situ"…

  5. Molecular targets for radioprotection by low dose radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Hang Rhan; Lee, Yoon Jin; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Su Jae; Bae, Sang woo; Lee, Yun Sil [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Adaptive response is a reduced effect from a higher challenging dose of a stressor after a smaller inducing dose had been applied a few hrs earlier. Radiation induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) cells did not show such an adaptive response, i.e. a reduced effect from a higher challenging dose (2 Gy) of a radiation after a priming dose (1 cGy) had been applied 4 or 7 hrs earlier, but its thermoresistant clone (TR) did. Since inducible HSP70 and HSP25 expressions were different between these two cell lines, the role of inducible HSP70 and HSP25 in adaptive response was examined. When inducible hsp70 or hsp25 genes were transfected to RIF cells, radioresistance in clonogenic survival and reduction of apoptosis was detected. The adaptive response was also acquired in these two cell lines, and inducible hsp70 transfectant showed more pronounced adaptive response than hsp25 transfectant. From these results, inducible HSP70 and HSP25 are at least partly responsible for the induction of adaptive response in these cells. Moreover, when inducible HSP70 or HSP25 genes were transfected to RIF cells, coregulation of each gene was detected and heat shock factor (HSF) was found to be responsible for these phenomena. In continuation of our earlier study on the involvement of heat shock protein (HSP) 25 and HSP70 in the induction of adaptive response, we have now examined the involvement of these proteins in the induction of the adaptive response, using an animal model system. C57BL6 mice were irradiated with 5 cGy of gamma radiation 3 times for a week (total of 15cGy) and a high challenge dose (6Gy) was given on the day following the last low dose irradiation. Survival rate of the low dose pre-irradiated mice was increased to 30%. Moreover, high dose-mediated induction of apoptosis was also reduced by low dose pre-irradiation. To elucidate any link existing between HSP and induction of the adaptive response, reverse transcriptase (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis was performed

  6. External and internal exposure to natural radiations inside ancient Egyptian tombs in Saqqara

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abo-Elmagd, M. [National Institute for Standard, Radiation Measurements Department, P.O. Box 136 Giza code no. 12211 (Egypt)]. E-mail: abo_elmgd@hotmail.com; Metwally, S.M. [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ain Shams University, P.O. Box 11566, Cairo (Egypt); Elmongy, S.A. [Atomic Energy Authority, Nuclear Safety, Cairo (Egypt); Salama, E. [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ain Shams University, P.O. Box 11566, Cairo (Egypt); El-Fiki, S.A. [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ain Shams University, P.O. Box 11566, Cairo (Egypt)

    2006-02-15

    Some ancient Egyptian tombs in Saqqara are closed for visit to undergo fixation processes. The workers inside these tombs exposed to natural radiations from natural Gamma emitters (external exposure) and inhale unknown radon doses (internal exposure) for long periods. The external exposure in all studied tombs is lower than the maximum recommended action level. The internal exposure in terms of annual effective dose in the south tomb is equal to 28.83mSv/year which highly exceed the recommended level (3-10mSv/year). In this tomb, the external exposure is equal to 21.43{mu}Sv/year. This reflects the hazards of radon over the other natural radiations in the closed area. Among the workers inside the studied tombs, the expected morality is equal to 0.0033%, 0.0199% and 0.0724% for the south entrance of Zoser pyramid, the Serapeum tomb, and the south tomb respectively. ctively.

  7. Contact lenses and acute exposure to ultraviolet radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, A P; Dumbleton, K A; Chou, B R

    1989-06-01

    The eyes of twenty-three pigmented rabbits (weight approximately 2kg) were irradiated with a single dose of UVB (285 to 315 nm total bandpass at approximately 450 muW.cm-2 irradiance) for exposure times of 22s to 1680s. One group wore UV-transmitting soft contact lenses during exposure of one eye with the fellow eye serving as a control while another group wore a UV-absorbing lens on each eye with only one eye irradiated. UV-transmitting contact lenses did not affect the clinical response to UV exposure whereas the UV-absorbing contact lenses protected the corneas as could have been predicted by consideration of the absorption characteristics of the lenses at the experimental waveband. In no case was there any evidence of adhesion between the contact lens and the corneal epithelium.

  8. Radiation Exposure to Staff in Intensive Care Unit with Portable CT Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichao Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bedside radiological procedures pose a risk of radiation exposure to ICU staff. The perception of risk may increase the degree of caution among the health care staff and raise new barriers preventing patients from obtaining prompt care. Objective. The aim of this study was to estimate the annual cumulative radiation dose to individual ICU staff. Methods. In this prospective study, forty subjects were required to wear thermoluminescent dosimeter badges during their working hours. The badges were analyzed to determine the exposure after 3 months. Results. A total of 802 radiological procedures were completed at bedside during the study period. The estimated annual dosage to doctors and nurses on average was 0.99 mSv and 0.88 mSv (p<0.001, respectively. Residents were subjected to the highest radiation exposure (1.04 mSv per year, p=0.002. The radiation dose was correlated with day shift working hours (r=0.426; p=0.006 and length of service (r=-0.403; p<0.01. Conclusions. With standard precautions, bedside radiological procedures—including portable CT scans—do not expose ICU staff to high dose of ionizing radiation. The level of radiation exposure is related to the daytime working hours and length of service.

  9. Risk equivalent of exposure versus dose of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, V.P.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes a risk analysis study of low-dose irradiation and the resulting biological effects on a cell. The author describes fundamental differences between the effects of high-level exposure (HLE) and low-level exposure (LLE). He stresses that the concept of absorbed dose to an organ is not a dose but a level of effect produced by a particular number of particles. He discusses the confusion between a linear-proportional representation of dose limits and a threshold-curvilinear representation, suggesting that a LLE is a composite of both systems. (TEM)

  10. 4th report from the LHC performance workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    Bulletin's correspondent from Chamonix

    2012-01-01

    On a relatively warm Thursday morning in Chamonix (-7 Celsius) the workshop looked at what things would be like after the upcoming long shutdown (LS1 -  2013/14). A large number of re-training  quenches of the LHC dipoles will be required in order to reach the nominal energy of 7 TeV so the beam energy in the first years after LS1 is expected to be around 6.5 TeV. The planned injector upgrades will not have been deployed at this stage, but the injector performance still looks capable of supplying sufficient beam quality to enable the LHC to reach the design luminosity of 1x1034 cm-2s-1.   A lot has been learned operating at 3.5 TeV over the last couple of years and many improvements have been made in the magnet powering and protection systems. The prospects for post-LS1 machine availability are encouraging. Potential limitations to post-LS1 performance (quenches, radiation to electronics, UFOs) were also considered. The evening was spent considering the more dim and distant fut...

  11. Radiation exposure in the young level 1 trauma patient: a retrospective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Michael B; Bellaire, Laura L; Moore, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has become an increasingly popular and powerful tool for clinicians managing trauma patients with life-threatening injuries, but the ramifications of increasing radiation burden on individual patients are not insignificant. This study examines a continuous series of 337 patients less than 40 years old admitted to a level 1 trauma center during a 4-month period. Primary outcome measures included number of scans; effective dose of radiation from radiographs and CT scans, respectively; and total effective dose from both sources over patients' hospital stays. Several variables, including hospital length of stay, initial Glasgow Coma Scale score, and Injury Severity Score, correlated with greater radiation exposure. Blunt trauma victims were more prone to higher doses than those with penetrating or combined penetrating and blunt trauma. Location and mechanism of injury were also found to correlate with radiation exposure. Trauma patients as a group are exposed to high levels of radiation from X-rays and CT scans, and CT scans contribute a very high proportion (91.3% ± 11.7%) of that radiation. Certain subgroups of patients are at a particularly high risk of exposure, and greater attention to cumulative radiation dose should be paid to patients with the above mentioned risk factors.

  12. In vitro study of patient's and physician's radiation exposure in the performance of epiduroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiya, Kaori; Igarashi, Takashi; Suzuki, Hideo; Hirabayashi, Yoshihiro; Waechter, Jason; Seo, Norimasa

    2008-01-01

    Epiduroscopy is a minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic technique, useful in the management of patients with back and leg pain. However, the dose of radiation exposure by fluoroscopy during epiduroscopy is not known. The endpoint of our study was to evaluate the amount of radiation exposure for patients and health care workers during epiduroscopy. First, we measured the radiation dose during a 10-minute fluoroscopy exposure in humanoid models, which substituted for the patient and the physician. Second, we measured the duration of fluoroscopy during our clinical epiduroscopy in 14 patients and observed for radiation injury in these patients. In the humanoid models, the patient model skin exposure dose over a 10-minute period was measured as 238 mGy. The physician's exposure dose for 10 minutes was measured as 0.67 mGy outside the lead apron and 0.0084 mGy inside the lead apron. For the clinical epiduroscopic procedures, the average duration of fluoroscopy was 9 minutes and 26 seconds. No skin injuries in the patients were observed at a 1-month postprocedure assessment. The radiological dosages in the patient humanoid model were less than the threshold doses that could lead to organ injuries for 1 epiduroscopic procedure. However, care should be taken for cumulative exposures in repeated procedures.

  13. Outdoor Exposure to Solar Ultraviolet Radiation and Legislation in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Abel A

    2016-06-01

    The total ozone column of 265 ± 11 Dobson Units in the tropical-equatorial zones and 283 ± 16 Dobson Units in the subtropics of Brazil are among the lowest on Earth, and as a result, the prevalence of skin cancer due to solar ultraviolet radiation is among the highest. Daily erythemal doses in Brazil can be over 7,500 J m. Erythemal dose rates on cloudless days of winter and summer are typically about 0.147 W m and 0.332 W m, respectively. However, radiation enhancement events yielded by clouds have been reported with erythemal dose rates of 0.486 W m. Daily doses of the diffuse component of erythemal radiation have been determined with values of 5,053 J m and diffuse erythemal dose rates of 0.312 W m. Unfortunately, Brazilians still behave in ways that lead to overexposure to the sun. The annual personal ultraviolet radiation ambient dose among Brazilian youths can be about 5.3%. Skin cancer in Brazil is prevalent, with annual rates of 31.6% (non-melanoma) and 1.0% (melanoma). Governmental and non-governmental initiatives have been taken to increase public awareness of photoprotection behaviors. Resolution #56 by the Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária has banned tanning devices in Brazil. In addition, Projects of Law (PL), like PL 3730/2004, propose that the Sistema Único de Saúde should distribute sunscreen to members of the public, while PL 4027/2012 proposes that employers should provide outdoor workers with sunscreen during professional outdoor activities. Similar laws have already been passed in some municipalities. These are presented and discussed in this study.

  14. Non linear processes modulated by low doses of radiation exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Luca; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Alloni, Daniele; Babini, Gabriele; Morini, Jacopo; Baiocco, Giorgio

    The perturbation induced by radiation impinging on biological targets can stimulate the activation of several different pathways, spanning from the DNA damage processing to intra/extra -cellular signalling. In the mechanistic investigation of radiobiological damage this complex “system” response (e.g. omics, signalling networks, micro-environmental modifications, etc.) has to be taken into account, shifting from a focus on the DNA molecule solely to a systemic/collective view. An additional complication comes from the finding that the individual response of each of the involved processes is often not linear as a function of the dose. In this context, a systems biology approach to investigate the effects of low dose irradiations on intra/extra-cellular signalling will be presented, where low doses of radiation act as a mild perturbation of a robustly interconnected network. Results obtained through a multi-level investigation of both DNA damage repair processes (e.g. gamma-H2AX response) and of the activation kinetics for intra/extra cellular signalling pathways (e.g. NFkB activation) show that the overall cell response is dominated by non-linear processes - such as negative feedbacks - leading to possible non equilibrium steady states and to a poor signal-to-noise ratio. Together with experimental data of radiation perturbed pathways, different modelling approaches will be also discussed.

  15. Calculation of Changes in RadiationExposure due to Prostate Displacement inPermanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Siavashpour

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Limited studies are available on the calculation of radiation exposure and its associated risks for people in contact with patients who have been treated with permanent prostate brachytherapy. In this study the changes in the radiation exposure were calculated in different stages of the bladder fullness in prostate seed brachytherapy.Methods:Magnetic resonance images of three patients with full and empty bladders and different prostate sizes (32-71 mL; mean 54.6 mL were used for Monte-Carlo dose calculations. Dose rate to skin for each patient was calculated using MCNP4c, MCNPX.Results:There were no significant differences between dose distribution in the skin relative to the changes in the prostate position due to bladder filling (P=0.05.Conclusion:Our results showed a negligible change in radiation exposure around the patient due to prostate displacement after bladder filling.

  16. Effects of fetal microwave radiation exposure on offspring behavior in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanchun; Li, Zhihui; Gao, Yan; Zhang, Chenggang

    2015-01-01

    The recent rapid development of electronic communication techniques is resulting in a marked increase in exposure of humans to electromagnetic fields (EMFs). This has raised public concerns about the health hazards of long-term environmental EMF exposure for fetuses and children. Some studies have suggested EMF exposure in children could induce nervous system disorders. However, gender-dependent effects of microwave radiation exposure on cognitive dysfunction have not previously been reported. Here we investigated whether in utero exposure to 9.417-GHz microwave throughout gestation (Days 3.5–18) affected behavior, using the open field test (OFT), elevated-plus maze (EPM), tail suspension test (TST), forced swimming test (FST) and Morris water maze (MWM). We found that mice showed less movement in the center of an open field (using the OFT) and in an open arm (using the EPM) after in utero exposure to 9.417-GHz radiation, which suggested that the mice had increased anxiety-related behavior. Mice demonstrated reduced immobility in TST and FST after in utero exposure to 9.417-GHz radiation, which suggested that the mice had decreased depression-related behavior. From the MWM test, we observed that male offspring demonstrated decreased learning and memory, while females were not affected in learning and memory, which suggested that microwaves had gender-dependent effects. In summary, we have provided the first experimental evidence of microwaves inducing gender-dependent effects. PMID:25359903

  17. Methods for reducing patient radiation exposure during proton therapy for eye disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor A. Bakaev

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper is dedicated to techniques for reduction of background radiation in the room for conducting proton eye radiotherapy. The necessity of this reduction stems from the health risk of low-dose effect on the personnel and patients. We have touched the aspects of background reduction both at the cost of secondary particles, produced in beam-forming systems, and the dose reduction for the patient's healthy tissue (when carrying out beam therapy owing to correct assessment of the biological effects of protons with energies up to 60MeV. The obtained calculation results prove that an increase in the proton beam diameter provides the possibility of reducing the background radiation by more than a factor of three in the room and of correspondingly decreasing the body's radiation exposure. It is necessary to take correct account of RBE to reduce the radiation exposure of adjacent organs.

  18. How cytogenetical methods help victims prove radiation exposure and claim right for social support: NCERM experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksanin, S., E-mail: Aleksanin@arcerm.spb.ru [Nikiforov Russian Center of Emergency and Radiation Medicine EMERCOM of Russia, (NRCERM) ul. Akademika Lebedeva 4/2, 194044 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Slozina, N., E-mail: NataliaSlozina@peterlink.ru [Nikiforov Russian Center of Emergency and Radiation Medicine EMERCOM of Russia, (NRCERM) ul. Akademika Lebedeva 4/2, 194044 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Neronova, E.; Smoliakov, E. [Nikiforov Russian Center of Emergency and Radiation Medicine EMERCOM of Russia, (NRCERM) ul. Akademika Lebedeva 4/2, 194044 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-15

    Russian citizens who were irradiated because of radiation disasters, nuclear weapons testing and some other sources have a right to some social support and financial compensation. In order to get this compensation people have to prove that they were irradiated. As it is, not all victims for a variety of reasons have formal documents. Thus they apply for cytogenetic investigation to prove irradiation months, years and even decades after irradiation. Since 1992 the cytogenetic investigations related to radiation exposure were performed in NRCERM for more than 700 people. At the beginning of this investigation FISH method was not certified as a biodosimenty test in Russia. Only dicentric analysis was approved as a proof of irradiation. It is known that the rate of dicentrics decrease in time, but the residual level of cytogenetical markers could be revealed a long time after a radiation accident. Thus the dicentric analysis was performed for the people who applied for biological indication of radiation exposure at that time. Rates of dicentrics exceeding control levels were revealed in half the people who applied for radiation conformation. Now FISH method is certified in Russia and both cytogenetic tests of biodosimetry (dicentrics and FISH) are available for all comers. Increased levels of translocations were found in 8 cases (the dose rate from 0.16 to 0.64 Gy). On the basis of the results of cytogenetic tests official documents were supplied to these people and they were entitled to apply for radiation exposure compensation. Thus cytogenetic tests are very effective and in some cases the only possible way for the victims to prove irradiation exposure and to apply for radiation exposure compensation a long time after an accident.

  19. Concern over radiation exposure and psychological distress among rescue workers following the Great East Japan Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuoka Yutaka

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On March 11, 2011, the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami that followed caused severe damage along Japans northeastern coastline and to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. To date, there are few reports specifically examining psychological distress in rescue workers in Japan. Moreover, it is unclear to what extent concern over radiation exposure has caused psychological distress to such workers deployed in the disaster area. Methods One month after the disaster, 424 of 1816 (24% disaster medical assistance team workers deployed to the disaster area were assessed. Concern over radiation exposure was evaluated by a single self-reported question. General psychological distress was assessed with the Kessler 6 scale (K6, depressive symptoms with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D, fear and sense of helplessness with the Peritraumatic Distress Inventory (PDI, and posttraumatic stress symptoms with the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R. Results Radiation exposure was a concern for 39 (9.2% respondents. Concern over radiation exposure was significantly associated with higher scores on the K6, CES-D, PDI, and IES-R. After controlling for age, occupation, disaster operation experience, duration of time spent watching earthquake news, and past history of psychiatric illness, these associations remained significant in men, but did not remain significant in women for the CES-D and PDI scores. Conclusion The findings suggest that concern over radiation exposure was strongly associated with psychological distress. Reliable, accurate information on radiation exposure might reduce deployment-related distress in disaster rescue workers.

  20. Radiation exposure to the physician performing fluoroscopically guided caudal epidural steroid injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botwin, K P; Freeman, E D; Gruber, R D; Torres-Rames, F M; Bouchtas, C G; Sanelli, J T; Hanna, A F

    2001-10-01

    This study was designed to investigate radiation exposure to a physician performing fluoroscopically guided caudal epidural steroid injections. The prospective study design included 100 consecutive fluoroscopically guided caudal epidural steroid injections performed on patients with radiculitis from either herniated nucleus pulposus or lumbar spinal stenosis. Radiation exposure was monitored with the assistance of a radiological technologist (RT) who allocated four dosimetry badges to all physicians performing fluoroscopically guided caudal epidural steroid injections on consecutive patients being treated for radicular pain. The badges were placed on the ring finger, glasses and both the inside and outside of the lead apron worn by the physician. In addition, the RTs also wore a marked badge outside his/her lead apron. A control badge was placed 67 inches away from the fluoroscopy table, and a second control badge was located in a desk over 500 feet away from the procedure, to monitor ambient radiation. The average fluoroscopy time per procedure was 12.55 seconds. The average/cumulative exposure per procedure was 4.10/410 mREM at the "ring" badge, 2.47/247 mREM at the "glasses" badge, 3.98 /398 mREM at the "outside apron" badge and 0.15/15 mREM at the "inside" apron; no radiation was detectable at the "outside room" control badge. The RT's average exposure during these procedures was below the limit of detectability. Radiation exposure to the physician needs to be considered and minimized in the performance of spinal interventional procedures. Our study demonstrates that radiation exposure to the physician performing fluoroscopically guided caudal epidural steroid injections is well within safety limits when he/she adheres to proper technique.

  1. Exposure to low dose ionising radiation: Molecular and clinical consequences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, Lynn M

    2014-07-10

    This review article provides a comprehensive overview of the experimental data detailing the incidence, mechanism and significance of low dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS). Important discoveries gained from past and present studies are mapped and highlighted to illustrate the pathway to our current understanding of HRS and the impact of HRS on the cellular response to radiation in mammalian cells. Particular attention is paid to the balance of evidence suggesting a role for DNA repair processes in the response, evidence suggesting a role for the cell cycle checkpoint processes, and evidence investigating the clinical implications\\/relevance of the effect.

  2. Exposure to mobile phone radiation opens new horizons in Alzheimer's disease treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Sar; Shojaei-Fard, Mb; Haghani, M; Shokrpour, N; Mortazavi, Smj

    2013-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease, the most common type of dementia and a progressive neurodegenerative disease, occurs when the nerve cells in the brain die. Although there are medications that can help delay the development of Alzheimer's disease, there is currently no cure for this disease. Exposure to ionizing and non-ionizing radiation may cause adverse health effects such as cancer.  Looking at the other side of the coin, there are reports indicating stimulatory or beneficial effects after exposure to cell phone radiofrequency radiation. Mortazavi et al. have previously reported some beneficial cognitive effects such as decreased reaction time after human short-term exposure to cell phone radiation or occupational exposure to radar microwave radiation. On the other hand, some recent reports have indicated that RF radiation may have a role in protecting against cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease. Although the majority of these data come from animal studies that cannot be easily extrapolated to humans, it can be concluded that this memory enhancing approach may open new horizons in treatment of cognitive impairment in Alzheimer disease.

  3. Exposure to Mobile Phone Radiation Opens New Horizons in Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortazavi SAR

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease, the most common type of dementia and a progressive neurodegenerative disease, occurs when the nerve cells in the brain die. Although there are medications that can help delay the development of Alzheimer’s disease, there is currently no cure for this disease. Exposure to ionizing and non-ionizing radiation may cause adverse health effects such as cancer. Looking at the other side of the coin, there are reports indicating stimulatory or benefcial effects after exposure to cell phone radiofrequency radiation. Mortazavi et al. have previously reported some benefcial cognitive effects such as decreased reaction time after human short-term exposure to cell phone radiation or occupational exposure to radar microwave radiation. On the other hand, some recent reports have indicated that RF radiation may have a role in protecting against cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease. Although the majority of these data come from animal studies that cannot be easily extrapolated to humans, it can be concluded that this memory enhancing approach may open new horizons in treatment of cognitive impairment in Alzheimer disease.

  4. Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects: Evidence for an Adaptive Response to Low Dose Exposures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews our current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the induction of bystander effects by low dose, low-LET ionizing radiation and discusses how they may be related to observed adaptive responses or other protective effects of low dose exposures. Bystander effects appear to be the result of a generalized stress response in tissues or cells. The signals may be produced by all exposed cells, but the response appears to require a quorum in order to be expressed. The major response involving low LET radiation exposure discussed in the existing literature is a death response. This has many characteristics of apoptosis but is p53 independent. While a death response might appear to be adverse, the position is argued in this paper that it is in fact protective and removes damaged cells from the population. Since many cell populations carry damaged cells without being exposed to radiation, so called “background damage”, it is possible that low doses exposures cause removal of cells damaged by agents other than the test dose of radiation. This mechanism would lead to the production of “U-shaped” dose response curves. In this scenario, the level of “adaptive” or beneficial response will be related to the background damage carried by the cell population. This model may be important when attempting to predict the consequences of mixed exposures involving radiation and other environmental stressors. PMID:18648593

  5. Eleventh annual report of radiation exposures for DOE and DOE contractor employees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    In 1968, the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) established a program for reporting certain occupationa radiation exposure information to a central radiation records repository maintained at the Union Carbide Computing Technology Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Annual summaries (WASH-1350-R1 through WASH-1350-R6) were reported for the years 1968-1973 and included data on AEC contracter employees as well as employees of companies in the private sector licensed by the AEC. In January 1975, the operational functions of the AEC, including the maintenance of records on the occupational radiation exposure on contractor employees, were transferred to the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the AEC's regulatory functions, including the reporting of information on the occupational radiation exposure of licenses, were transferred to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Previous AEC licenses then reported to NRC while the contractors reported to ERDA. On October 1, 1977, the Department of Energy (DOE) was formed and assumed the responsibilities of ERDA. This report contains the 1978 radiation exposure data for DOE and DOE contractors.

  6. Registration and monitoring of radiation exposure from radiological imaging; Erfassung und Monitoring der radiologischen Strahlenexposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungmann, F.; Pinto dos Santos, D.; Hempel, J.; Dueber, C.; Mildenberger, P. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Universitaetsmedizin, Mainz (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Strategies for reducing radiation exposure are an important part of optimizing medical imaging and therefore a relevant quality factor in radiology. Regarding the medical radiation exposure, computed tomography has a special relevance. The use of the integrating the healthcare enterprise (IHE) radiation exposure monitoring (REM) profile is the upcoming standard for organizing and collecting exposure data in radiology. Currently most installed base devices do not support this profile generating the required digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM) dose structured reporting (SR). For this reason different solutions had been developed to register dose exposure measurements without having the dose SR object. Registration and analysis of dose-related parameters is required for constantly optimizing examination protocols, especially computed tomography (CT) examinations based on the latest research results in order to minimize the individual radiation dose exposure from medical imaging according to the principle as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). (orig.) [German] Die Optimierung moderner bildgebender Untersuchungsverfahren beruecksichtigt u. a. den Einsatz von Verfahren zur Dosisoptimierung bzw. Dosisreduktion und stellt damit einen wichtigen Qualitaetsfaktor dar. Innerhalb der medizinisch bedingten Strahlenexposition ist hierbei die Computertomographie von besonderer Bedeutung. Das IHE-REM-Profil (IHE: Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise, REM: ''radiation exposure monitoring'') ist der international akzeptierte Ansatz zur Dokumentation, Speicherung und Auswertung von dosisrelevanten Parametern. Das von IHE-REM-Profil verwendete DICOM Dose SR wird von vielen aktuell betriebenen Geraeten nicht erzeugt. Aus diesem Grund wurden verschiedene Softwareloesungen entwickelt, die zur Erfassung dosisrelevanter Werte nicht unmittelbar ein Dose SR benoetigen. Ziel der Erfassung von dosisrelevanten Parametern ist es, einen Ueberblick ueber die

  7. Exposure to laser radiation for creation of metal materials nanoporous structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murzin, Serguei P.

    2013-06-01

    Exposure to laser radiation for creation of nanoporous structures in the Cu-Zn alloy was investigated. It was established that exposure to laser pulse-periodic radiation with pulse repetition rate up to 5000 Hz makes it possible to form a nanoporous structure in the near-surface layer. The conditions of increase of area depth of such structures formation up to 40-45 μm were ascertained. The temperature and speed conditions which provide predominant channel-type nanopores formation with width of about 100 nm forming a nanoporous net were determined. This patented technology is a perspective for production of catalysts and microfiltration membranes.

  8. Analysis of changed bio-signal to radiation exposure of nuclear medicine worker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hwun Jae; Lee, Sang Bock [Nambu Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    In this paper, we are evaluated about bio-signal between general workers and nuclear medicine workers which is more radiation exposure relatively. In order to reciprocal evaluated two group, we experimented nuclear medicine workers in Chung-Buk National University Hospital at department of nuclear medicine and worker in Chon-Nam National University Hospital at CT room, general radiographic room, medical recording room, receipt room, general office room. Used of experimental equipments as follows, for a level of radiation measurement by pocket dosimeter which made by Arrow-Tech company, for heart rate and blood pressure measurement by TONOPORT V which made by GE medical systems company, for heat flux and skin temperature and energy expenditure measurement by Armband senseware 2000 which made by Bodymedia company. Result of experiment obtains as follows : 1) Individual radiation exposure is recorded 3.05 uSv at department of nuclear medicine and order as follows CT room, general radiograpic room, medical recording room, receipt room, general office room. Department of nuclear medicine more 1.5 times than other places. 2) Radiation accumulated dose is not related to Heat flux, Skin temperature, Energy expenditure. 3) Blood pressure is recorded equal to nuclear medical workers, general officer, general people about systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure. Compared to blood pressure between nuclear medical works which is more radiation exposure and other workers was not changed. Consequently, more radiation exposed workers at nuclear medicine field doesn't have hazard.

  9. Radiation Exposure and Health Effects – is it Time to Reassess the Real Consequences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, G.A.; Symonds, P.

    2017-01-01

    Our acceptance of exposure to radiation is somewhat schizophrenic. We accept that the use of high doses of radiation is still one of the most valuable weapons in our fight against cancer, and believe that bathing in radioactive spas is beneficial. On the other hand, as a species, we are fearful of exposure to man-made radiation as a result of accidents related to power generation, even though we understand that the doses are orders of magnitude lower than those we use everyday in medicine. The 70th anniversary of the detonation of the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki was marked in 2015. The 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident will be marked in April 2016. March 2016 also sees the fifth anniversary of the accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant. Perhaps now is an opportune time to assess whether we are right to be fearful of the effects of low doses of radiation, or whether actions taken because of our fear of radiation actually cause a greater detriment to health than the direct effect of radiation exposure. PMID:26880062

  10. Current Evidence for Developmental, Structural, and Functional Brain Defects following Prenatal Radiation Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine Verreet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation is omnipresent. We are continuously exposed to natural (e.g., radon and cosmic and man-made radiation sources, including those from industry but especially from the medical sector. The increasing use of medical radiation modalities, in particular those employing low-dose radiation such as CT scans, raises concerns regarding the effects of cumulative exposure doses and the inappropriate utilization of these imaging techniques. One of the major goals in the radioprotection field is to better understand the potential health risk posed to the unborn child after radiation exposure to the pregnant mother, of which the first convincing evidence came from epidemiological studies on in utero exposed atomic bomb survivors. In the following years, animal models have proven to be an essential tool to further characterize brain developmental defects and consequent functional deficits. However, the identification of a possible dose threshold is far from complete and a sound link between early defects and persistent anomalies has not yet been established. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge on brain developmental and persistent defects resulting from in utero radiation exposure and addresses the many questions that still remain to be answered.

  11. Increased radiation dose at mammography due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimme-Smith, C; Bassett, L W; Gold, R H; Chow, S

    1991-02-01

    Four single-emulsion films introduced over the past 2 years--Du Pont Microvision, Fuji MiMa, Konica CM, and Eastman Kodak OM--were compared with Eastman Kodak OM SO-177 (Min-RE) film to evaluate their varying effects on mean glandular dose of reciprocity law failure due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening as a result of increased radiation exposure to improve penetration of glandular tissue. Exposures over 1.3 seconds led to increased radiation doses of 20%-30%. Delays in processing of 6 hours decreased processing speed by 11%-32% for all films except Du Pont Microvision. Optical density increases of 0.40 required 20%-30% more skin exposure for all five films. Optimal viewing densities were also evaluated and found to be different for each of the five films. Mammographers need to be aware of these differences in mammographic films to achieve maximum contrast at mammography.

  12. Increased radiation dose at mammography due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimme-Smith, C.; Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Chow, S. (UCLA Medical Center (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Four single-emulsion films introduced over the past 2 years--Du Pont Microvision, Fuji MiMa, Konica CM, and Eastman Kodak OM--were compared with Eastman Kodak OM SO-177 (Min-RE) film to evaluate their varying effects on mean glandular dose of reciprocity law failure due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening as a result of increased radiation exposure to improve penetration of glandular tissue. Exposures over 1.3 seconds led to increased radiation doses of 20%-30%. Delays in processing of 6 hours decreased processing speed by 11%-32% for all films except Du Pont Microvision. Optical density increases of 0.40 required 20%-30% more skin exposure for all five films. Optimal viewing densities were also evaluated and found to be different for each of the five films. Mammographers need to be aware of these differences in mammographic films to achieve maximum contrast at mammography.

  13. Occupational exposure to solar radiation in Australia: who is exposed and what protection do they use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Renee N; Glass, Deborah C; Peters, Susan; Reid, Alison; Benke, Geza; Driscoll, Timothy R; Fritschi, Lin

    2014-02-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure is widely recognised as a leading cause of skin cancer, with outdoor workers being particularly at risk. Little is known on a national level about how many workers are exposed to solar radiation, the circumstances in which they are exposed, or their use of protective measures. The Australian Work Exposures Study (AWES) was a cross-sectional telephone survey of 5,023 Australian workers aged 18 to 65. A subset of 1,113 respondents who indicated they worked outdoors was asked about their exposure to solar radiation in terms of the amount of time they spent working outdoors, their working location and their use of sun protective measures. A total of 1,100 respondents (22% overall) were assessed as being exposed to solar radiation at work. Exposure was more likely among males and those residing in lower socioeconomic and regional areas. Sun protection was used by 95% of the respondents, although the level of protection varied among workers, with only 8.7% classified as fully protected. This study provides valuable information regarding solar exposure that has not previously been available. The results of this study will inform strategies for risk reduction. © 2014 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2014 Public Health Association of Australia.

  14. Occupational radiation exposure history of Idaho Field Office Operations at the INEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horan, J.R.; Braun, J.B.

    1993-10-01

    An extensive review has been made of the occupational radiation exposure records of workers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) over the period of 1951 through 1990. The focus has been on workers employed by contractors and employees of the Idaho Field Operations Office (ID) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) and does not include the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF), the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), or other operations field offices at the INEL. The radiation protection guides have decreased from 15 rem/year to 5 rem/year in 1990 for whole body penetrating radiation exposure. During these 40 years of nuclear operations (in excess of 200,000 man-years of work), a total of twelve individuals involved in four accidents exceeded the annual guidelines for exposure; nine of these exposures were received during life saving efforts on January 3, 1961 following the SL-1 reactor accident which killed three military personnel. These exposures ranged from 8 to 27 rem. Only one individual has exceeded the annual whole body penetrating radiation protection guidelines in the last 29 years.

  15. Radiation exposures for DOE and DOE contractor employees, 1990. Twenty-third annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.H.; Hui, T.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Millet, W.H.; Scholes, V.A. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This is the 23rd in a series of annual radiation exposure reports published by the Department of Energy (DOE) or its predecessors. This report summarizes the radiation exposures received by both employees and visitors at DOE and DOE contractor facilities during 1990. Trends in radiation exposures are evaluated by comparing the doses received in 1990 to those received in previous years. The significance of the doses is addressed by comparing them to the DOE limits and by correlating the doses to health risks based on risk estimated from expert groups. This report is the third that is based on detailed exposure data for each individual monitored at a DOE facility. Prior to 1988, only summarized data from each facility were available. This report contains information on different types of radiation doses, including total effective, internal, penetrating, shallow, neutron, and extremity doses. It also contains analysis of exposures by age, sex, and occupation of the exposed individuals. This report also continues the precedent established in the Twenty-First (1988) Annual Report by conducting a detailed, one-time review and analysis of a particular topic of interest. The special topic for this report is a comparison of total effective, internal, and extremity dose equivalent values against penetrating dose equivalent values.

  16. Comparison of a suspended radiation protection system versus standard lead apron for radiation exposure of a simulated interventionalist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marichal, Daniel A; Anwar, Temoor; Kirsch, David; Clements, Jessica; Carlson, Luke; Savage, Clare; Rees, Chet R

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the radiation protective characteristics of a system designed to enhance operator protection while eliminating weight to the body and allowing freedom of motion. Radiation doses to a mock interventionalist were measured with calibrated dosimeters in a clinical interventional suite. A standard lead apron (SLA; Pb equivalent, 0.5 mm) was compared with a suspended radiation protection system (ZeroGravity; Zgrav) that shields from the top of the head to the calves (except the right arm and left forearm) with a complex overhead motion system that eliminates weight on the operator and allows freedom of motion. Zgrav included a suspended lead apron with increased lead equivalency, greater length, proximal left arm and shoulder coverage, and a wraparound face shield of 0.5 mm Pb equivalency. A 26-cm-thick Lucite stack (ie, mock patient) created scatter during 10 controlled angiography sequences of 120 exposures each. Parameters included a field of view of 40 cm, table height of 94 cm, 124 cm from the tube to image intensifier, 50 cm from the image center to operator, 66 kVp, and 466-470 mA. Under identical conditions, average doses (SLA vs Zgrav) were 264 versus 3.4 (ratio, 78) to left axilla (P lead apron, the Zgrav system provided a 16-78-fold decrease in radiation exposure for a mock interventionalist in a simulated clinical setting. Copyright © 2011 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiation exposure to the surgeon during percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yong; Kim, Chang-Ho; Lee, June Ho; Lee, Sang-Ho; Kim, Jin-Sung

    2013-04-01

    A prospective study. The purpose of this study was to determine the radiation dose to which the surgeons are exposed during percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) and to calculate the allowable number of cases per year. Transforaminal PELD is a minimally invasive technique for soft disc herniation. Minimal invasiveness can be achieved through the use of fluoroscopy and endoscopy. The radiation dose to the surgeon during PELD is unknown. The occupational radiation dose absorbed by 3 spinal surgeons performing 30 consecutive PELDs (33 levels) during a 3-month period was evaluated. Transforaminal PELDs were performed according to the standard technique. The radiation exposure of the neck, chest, arm, and both hands of the surgeons was measured. Occupational exposure guidelines of National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements were used to calculate the allowable number of procedures per year. The mean operation time was 49.8 minutes, and the mean fluoroscopy time was 2.5 minutes. No significant correlations were found between operation time and fluoroscopy time. The calculated radiation doses per operated level were as follows: neck, 0.0785 mSv; chest, 0.1718 mSv; right upper arm, 0.0461 mSv; left ring finger, 0.7318 mSv; and right ring finger, 0.6694 mSv. The protective effects of a lead collar and lead apron were demonstrated by the reduction of the radiation dose by 96.9% and 94.2%, respectively. Therefore, with regard to whole-body radiation, 5379 operations can be performed per year using a lead apron, whereas only 291 operations can be performed without using a lead apron. Moreover, 1910 operations can be performed within the occupational exposure limit for the eyes (150 mSv), and 683 operations can be performed within the occupational exposure limit for the hands (500 mSv). Without radiation shielding, a surgeon performing 291 PELDs annually would be exposed to the maximum allowable radiation dose. Given the measurable lifetime radiation

  18. Processing of thermoset prepreg laminate via exposure to microwave radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulauskas, F.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Meek, T.T. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1994-06-01

    Studies of microwave-assisted curing of neat resins (epoxy) and unidirectional glass and carbon fiber laminates have shown that a substantial reduction in the curing time was obtained. This may be explained by the penetration of microwave energy directly and throughout the laminate with enhancement of the kinetics of the chemical reaction. Results of this work indicate that the microwave assisted curing of glass fiber laminates also shows a substantial reduction of the required curing time. Microwave radiation of 2.45 GHz has been demonstrated to be an acceptable method to cure unidirectional carbon fiber laminates. Also, effective curing of crossply (0/90) laminates through this method was observed when proper rotation of the parts accompanied the curing process. This is in accordance with previous work. Multidirectional carbon fiber/epoxy laminates demonstrate a lack of coupling during the curing process. A direct curing of these laminates was not possible by microwave radiation with the experimental approach used, in agreement with previous work. Nevertheless, a moderate reduction in the curing time of these thin laminates was observed due to hybrid curing.

  19. Exposure to low dose of gamma radiation enhances the excision repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, K.; Verma, N.C. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1998-08-01

    The effect of low doses of ionizing and nonionizing radiation on the radiation response of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae toward ionizing and nonionizing radiation was studied. The wild-type strain D273-10B on exposure to 54 Gy gamma radiation (resulting in about 10% cell killing) showed enhanced resistance to subsequent exposure to UV radiation. This induced UV resistance increased with the incubation time between the initial gamma radiation stress and the UV irradiation. Exposure to low doses of UV light on the other hand showed no change in gamma or UV radiation response of this strain. The strains carrying a mutation at rad52 behaved in a way similar to the wild type, but with slightly reduced induced response. In contrast to this, the rad3 mutants, defective in excision repair, showed no induced UV resistance. Removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in wild-type yeast DNA after UV irradiation was examined by analyzing the sites recognized by UV endonuclease from Micrococcus luteus. The samples that were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation before UV irradiation were able to repair the pyrimidine dimers more efficiently than the samples in which low gamma irradiation was omitted. The nature of enhanced repair was studied by scoring the frequency of induced gene conversion and reverse mutation at trp and ilv loci respectively in strain D7, which showed similar enhanced UV resistance induced by low-dose gamma irradiation. The induced repair was found to be essentially error-free. These results suggest that irradiation of strain D273-10B with low doses of gamma radiation enhances its capability for excision repair of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers. (author)

  20. Physics Computing '92: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Robert A.; Nadrchal, Jaroslav

    1993-04-01

    * Ordered Particle Simulations for Serial and MIMD Parallel Computers * "NOLP" -- Program Package for Laser Plasma Nonlinear Optics * Algorithms to Solve Nonlinear Least Square Problems * Distribution of Hydrogen Atoms in Pd-H Computed by Molecular Dynamics * A Ray Tracing of Optical System for Protein Crystallography Beamline at Storage Ring-SIBERIA-2 * Vibrational Properties of a Pseudobinary Linear Chain with Correlated Substitutional Disorder * Application of the Software Package Mathematica in Generalized Master Equation Method * Linelist: An Interactive Program for Analysing Beam-foil Spectra * GROMACS: A Parallel Computer for Molecular Dynamics Simulations * GROMACS Method of Virial Calculation Using a Single Sum * The Interactive Program for the Solution of the Laplace Equation with the Elimination of Singularities for Boundary Functions * Random-Number Generators: Testing Procedures and Comparison of RNG Algorithms * Micro-TOPIC: A Tokamak Plasma Impurities Code * Rotational Molecular Scattering Calculations * Orthonormal Polynomial Method for Calibrating of Cryogenic Temperature Sensors * Frame-based System Representing Basis of Physics * The Role of Massively Data-parallel Computers in Large Scale Molecular Dynamics Simulations * Short-range Molecular Dynamics on a Network of Processors and Workstations * An Algorithm for Higher-order Perturbation Theory in Radiative Transfer Computations * Hydrostochastics: The Master Equation Formulation of Fluid Dynamics * HPP Lattice Gas on Transputers and Networked Workstations * Study on the Hysteresis Cycle Simulation Using Modeling with Different Functions on Intervals * Refined Pruning Techniques for Feed-forward Neural Networks * Random Walk Simulation of the Motion of Transient Charges in Photoconductors * The Optical Hysteresis in Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon * Diffusion Monte Carlo Analysis of Modern Interatomic Potentials for He * A Parallel Strategy for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Polar Liquids on

  1. Radiation Exposure and Mortality from Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer in Early NASA Astronauts: Space for Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgart, S. R.; Little, M. P.; Campbell, L. J.; Milder, C. M.; Shavers, M. R.; Huff, J. L.; Patel, Z. S.

    2018-01-01

    Of the many possible health challenges posed during extended exploratory missions to space, the effects of space radiation on cardiovascular disease and cancer are of particular concern. There are unique challenges to estimating those radiation risks; care and appropriate and rigorous methodology should be applied when considering small cohorts such as the NASA astronaut population. The objective of this work was to establish whether there is evidence for excess cardiovascular disease or cancer mortality in an early NASA astronaut cohort and determine if a correlation exists between space radiation exposure and mortality.

  2. Intercellular Communication of Tumor Cells and Immune Cells after Exposure to Different Ionizing Radiation Qualities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Diegeler

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation can affect the immune system in many ways. Depending on the situation, the whole body or parts of the body can be acutely or chronically exposed to different radiation qualities. In tumor radiotherapy, a fractionated exposure of the tumor (and surrounding tissues is applied to kill the tumor cells. Currently, mostly photons, and also electrons, neutrons, protons, and heavier particles such as carbon ions, are used in radiotherapy. Tumor elimination can be supported by an effective immune response. In recent years, much progress has been achieved in the understanding of basic interactions between the irradiated tumor and the immune system. Here, direct and indirect effects of radiation on immune cells have to be considered. Lymphocytes for example are known to be highly radiosensitive. One important factor in indirect interactions is the radiation-induced bystander effect which can be initiated in unexposed cells by expression of cytokines of the irradiated cells and by direct exchange of molecules via gap junctions. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the indirect effects observed after exposure to different radiation qualities. The different immune cell populations important for the tumor immune response are natural killer cells, dendritic cells, and CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells. In vitro and in vivo studies have revealed the modulation of their functions due to ionizing radiation exposure of tumor cells. After radiation exposure, cytokines are produced by exposed tumor and immune cells and a modulated expression profile has also been observed in bystander immune cells. Release of damage-associated molecular patterns by irradiated tumor cells is another factor in immune activation. In conclusion, both immune-activating and -suppressing effects can occur. Enhancing or inhibiting these effects, respectively, could contribute to modified tumor cell killing after radiotherapy.

  3. Real-Time Aircraft Cosmic Ray Radiation Exposure Predictions from the NAIRAS Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, C. J.; Tobiska, W.; Kress, B. T.; Xu, X.

    2012-12-01

    The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) is a prototype operational model for predicting commercial aircraft radiation exposure from galactic and solar cosmic rays. NAIRAS predictions are currently streaming live from the project's public website, and the exposure rate nowcast is also available on the SpaceWx smartphone app for iPhone, IPad, and Android. Cosmic rays are the primary source of human exposure to high linear energy transfer radiation at aircraft altitudes, which increases the risk of cancer and other adverse health effects. Thus, the NAIRAS model addresses an important national need with broad societal, public health and economic benefits. There is also interest in extending NAIRAS to the LEO environment to address radiation hazard issues for the emerging commercial spaceflight industry. The processes responsible for the variability in the solar wind, interplanetary magnetic field, solar energetic particle spectrum, and the dynamical response of the magnetosphere to these space environment inputs, strongly influence the composition and energy distribution of the atmospheric ionizing radiation field. Real-time observations are required at a variety of locations within the geospace environment. The NAIRAS model is driven by real-time input data from ground-, atmospheric-, and space-based platforms. During the development of the NAIRAS model, new science questions and observational data gaps were identified that must be addressed in order to obtain a more reliable and robust operational model of atmospheric radiation exposure. The focus of this talk is to present the current capabilities of the NAIRAS model, discuss future developments in aviation radiation modeling and instrumentation, and propose strategies and methodologies of bridging known gaps in current modeling and observational capabilities.

  4. Retrospective study of cumulative diagnostic radiation exposure during childhood in patients with spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smookler, Gregory; Deavenport-Saman, Alexis

    2015-10-01

    The Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation Committee of the National Academy of Sciences in 2005 and other expert panels have warned that risk of cancer increases with higher doses of radiation. Children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus have far greater exposure to radiation than the average person, starting almost directly after birth and continuing throughout their lifetimes. The purpose of this study was to estimate the amount of ionizing radiation that patients with spina bifida and hydrocephalus are exposed to during childhood from diagnostic imaging. Thirty patients, ages 18 years or older, with spina bifida and hydrocephalus were randomly selected from a spina bifida clinic and their radiology records were reviewed. Descriptive analyses were conducted. The total radiation exposure was then calculated for the study group, and the mean effective dose per patient was determined. In the study group, during their first 18 years, each patient had a mean of 55.1 studies and a median of 45 radiologic studies, a mean of 9.6 brain CT scans, and a mean cumulative effective dose of 81.9 mSv (2.6 mSv/patient/year over 18 years) and a median cumulative effective dose of 77.2 mSV of accumulated radiation exposure (4.5 mSv/patient/year over 18 years). Clinicians should recognize that increased radiation exposure puts patients with spina bifida and hydrocephalus at higher risk for cancer. The population of children and adults with spina bifida and hydrocephalus should be surveyed for incidence of cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. TID Test Results for 4th Generation iPad(TradeMark)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guertin, S. M.; Allen, G. R.; McClure, S. S.; LaBel, K. A.

    2013-01-01

    TID testing of 4th generation iPads is reported. Of iPad subsystems, results indicate that the charging circuitry and display drivers fail at lowest TID levels. Details of construction are investigated for additional testing of components.

  6. Outcomes of 4th CONTECSI – International Conference on Information Systems and Technology Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Luiz Riccio

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available RESULTS OF 4th CONTECSI – INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT from 30 May to 1st June 2007 at TECSI/EAC/FEA/USP, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil

  7. Diagnosis of partial body radiation exposure in mice using peripheral blood gene expression profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Meadows

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In the event of a terrorist-mediated attack in the United States using radiological or improvised nuclear weapons, it is expected that hundreds of thousands of people could be exposed to life-threatening levels of ionizing radiation. We have recently shown that genome-wide expression analysis of the peripheral blood (PB can generate gene expression profiles that can predict radiation exposure and distinguish the dose level of exposure following total body irradiation (TBI. However, in the event a radiation-mass casualty scenario, many victims will have heterogeneous exposure due to partial shielding and it is unknown whether PB gene expression profiles would be useful in predicting the status of partially irradiated individuals. Here, we identified gene expression profiles in the PB that were characteristic of anterior hemibody-, posterior hemibody- and single limb-irradiation at 0.5 Gy, 2 Gy and 10 Gy in C57Bl6 mice. These PB signatures predicted the radiation status of partially irradiated mice with a high level of accuracy (range 79-100% compared to non-irradiated mice. Interestingly, PB signatures of partial body irradiation were poorly predictive of radiation status by site of injury (range 16-43%, suggesting that the PB molecular response to partial body irradiation was anatomic site specific. Importantly, PB gene signatures generated from TBI-treated mice failed completely to predict the radiation status of partially irradiated animals or non-irradiated controls. These data demonstrate that partial body irradiation, even to a single limb, generates a characteristic PB signature of radiation injury and thus may necessitate the use of multiple signatures, both partial body and total body, to accurately assess the status of an individual exposed to radiation.

  8. Radiation exposure and radioprotection of physicians, technologists and nurses during their contact with patients who are or were subjected to studies with ionizing radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Charilaos Koutis; Athanasios Kotsalos; Eirini Kotsalou

    2013-01-01

    The applications of emission x- g- and b- rays in Medicine give solution to everyday diagnostic and therapeutic problems, but expose the Medical staff in radiation risk and its consequences. Aim: The purpose of this article was the review of literature relating to the risk of radiation exposure and radiation protection instructions for doctors, technologists and nurses during their contact with patients who have or had performed studies using ionizing radiation. Method and Material: The metho...

  9. Elodea nuttallii exposure to mercury exposure under enhanced ultraviolet radiation: Effects on bioaccumulation, transcriptome, pigment content and oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regier, Nicole; Beauvais-Flück, Rebecca; Slaveykova, Vera I.; Cosio, Claudia, E-mail: Claudia.Cosio@unige.ch

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Exposure to UV radiation does not result in co-tolerance to Hg in Elodea nuttallii. • UV radiation increased the stress response to Hg at the transcriptome level. • UV + Hg dysregulated genes of energy and lipid metabolism, nutrition and redox homeostasis. • UV + Hg treatment decreases Hg accumulation in E. nuttallii shoots. • Hg accumulation depends on UV effects on plant metabolism and Hg bioavailability. - Abstract: The hypothesis that increased UV radiation result in co-tolerance to Hg toxicity in aquatic plants was studied at the physiological and transcriptomic level in Elodea nuttallii. At the transcriptomic level, combined exposure to UV + Hg enhanced the stress response in comparison with single treatments, affecting the expression level of transcripts involved in energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, nutrition, and redox homeostasis. Single and combined UV and Hg treatments dysregulated different genes but with similar functions, suggesting a fine regulation of the plant to stresses triggered by Hg, UV and their combination but lack of co-tolerance. At the physiological level, UV + Hg treatment reduced chlorophyll content and depleted antioxidative compounds such as anthocyanin and GSH/GSSG in E. nuttallii. Nonetheless, combined exposure to UV + Hg resulted in about 30% reduction of Hg accumulation into shoots vs exposure to Hg alone, which was congruent with the level of expression of several transporter genes, as well as the UV effect on Hg bioavailability in water. The findings of the present work underlined the importance of performing experimentation under environmentally realistic conditions and to consider the interplay between contaminants and environmental variables such as light that might have confounding effects to better understand and anticipate the effects of multiple stressors in aquatic environment.

  10. Methods of evaluating human exposure to electromagnetic fields radiated from operating base stations in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung Chan; Choi, Hyung-Do; Park, Seong-Ook

    2008-10-01

    This article presents measurement methods used to determine the human exposure to electromagnetic fields radiated from operating base stations. In Korea, when evaluating the human exposure to electromagnetic fields from operating base stations, the measurement procedure is different between the following cases: in situ measurement and electromagnetic environment measurement. When performing an in situ measurement, compliance with human exposure limits is determined by the spatially averaged field value obtained within the space occupied by humans at one arbitrary position, but when performing an electromagnetic environment measurement, it is determined by the maximum value at the highest field position selected from several places.

  11. Assessment of health consequences of occupational exposure to ultraviolet radiation in steel industry welders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Asmand

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion: Duration of ultraviolet rays in welders was above the threshold limit of the contact in Iran. Considering the prevalence of eye and skin disorders in welders, reducing the duration of exposure to ultraviolet radiation control and the use of proper personal protective equipment is necessary.

  12. [Paternal exposure to occupational electromagnetic radiation and sex ratio of the offspring: a meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Shu-Hui; Liu, Yi-Ting; Liu, Yang

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the association between paternal exposure to occupational electromagnetic radiation and the sex ratio of the offspring. We searched various databases, including PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, OVID, Bioscience Information Service (BIOSIS), China National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals and Wanfang Database, for the literature relevant to the association of paternal exposure to occupational electromagnetic radiation with the sex ratio of the offspring. We conducted a meta-analysis on their correlation using Stata 11.0. There was no statistically significant difference in the sex ratio between the offspring with paternal exposure to occupational electromagnetic radiation and those without (pooled OR = 1.00 [95% CI: 0.95 -1.05], P = 0.875). Subgroup analysis of both case-control and cohort studies revealed no significant difference (pooled OR = 1.03 [95% CI: 0.99 -1.08], P = 0.104 and pooled OR = 0.98 [95% CI: 0.99 -1.08], P = 0.186, respectively). Paternal exposure to occupational electromagnetic radiation is not correlated with the sex ratio of the offspring.

  13. Long-term correlation of the electrocorticogram as a bioindicator of brain exposure to ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A.A. Aguiar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the effects of radiation and its possible influence on the nervous system are of great clinical interest. However, there have been few electrophysiological studies on brain activity after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR. A new methodological approach regarding the assessment of the possible effects of IR on brain activity is the use of linear and nonlinear mathematical methods in the analysis of complex time series, such as brain oscillations measured using the electrocorticogram (ECoG. The objective of this study was to use linear and nonlinear mathematical methods as biomarkers of gamma radiation regarding cortical electrical activity. Adult Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups: 1 control and 2 irradiated groups, evaluated at 24 h (IR24 and 90 days (IR90 after exposure to 18 Gy of gamma radiation from a cobalt-60 radiotherapy source. The ECoG was analyzed using power spectrum methods for the calculation of the power of delta, theta, alpha and beta rhythms and by means of the α-exponent of the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA. Using both mathematical methods it was possible to identify changes in the ECoG, and to identify significant changes in the pattern of the recording at 24 h after irradiation. Some of these changes were persistent at 90 days after exposure to IR. In particular, the theta wave using the two methods showed higher sensitivity than other waves, suggesting that it is a possible biomarker of exposure to IR.

  14. Radiation exposure dose and health management history during 50 years of x-ray working

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, T. (Hashimura Daini Hospital, Osaka (Japan))

    1981-01-01

    My X-ray working history has become 50 years at the end of April, 1980. At this chance, the following data were summarized; the case numbers of X-ray photographs (517,132 cases), total amounts of radiation exposure dose (66.85 roentgen) and the results of blood test, which were experienced during past 50 years. The amounts of exposure dose during 35 years till 1965 were measured using my own method, which measured the film blackening as 30 milli-roentgen per week by certain standard method. After 1966 till 1980, the exposure dose were recorded using that of the film-badge service of Nippon Hoan Yohin Kyokai. The total amounts of exposure dose during 50 years were about 1/4 of D = 5 (N - 18). The results of blood test during last 27 years were found to be normal values. Then, it is happy to say that my body has been protected completely, from radiation hazard as a result of taking radiation protection and checking blood test always at my daily radiation works. The data of my own experiences during 50 years are summarized and reported in this paper.

  15. Low-Dose Radiation Exposure and Atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitchel, R. E. J.; Hasu, M.; Bugden, M.; Wyatt, H.; Little, M. P.; Gola, A.; Hildebrandt, G.; Priest, N. D.; Whitman, S. C.

    The hypothesis that single low-dose exposures (0.025-0.5 Gy) to low-LET radiation given at either high (about 150 mGy/min) or low (1 mGy/min) dose rate would promote aortic atherosclerosis was tested in female C57BL/6J mice genetically predisposed to this disease (ApoE(-/-)). Mice were exposed

  16. Long-term correlation of the electrocorticogram as a bioindicator of brain exposure to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, L A A; Silva, I M S; Fernandes, T S; Nogueira, R A

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the effects of radiation and its possible influence on the nervous system are of great clinical interest. However, there have been few electrophysiological studies on brain activity after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). A new methodological approach regarding the assessment of the possible effects of IR on brain activity is the use of linear and nonlinear mathematical methods in the analysis of complex time series, such as brain oscillations measured using the electrocorticogram (ECoG). The objective of this study was to use linear and nonlinear mathematical methods as biomarkers of gamma radiation regarding cortical electrical activity. Adult Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups: 1 control and 2 irradiated groups, evaluated at 24 h (IR24) and 90 days (IR90) after exposure to 18 Gy of gamma radiation from a cobalt-60 radiotherapy source. The ECoG was analyzed using power spectrum methods for the calculation of the power of delta, theta, alpha and beta rhythms and by means of the α-exponent of the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). Using both mathematical methods it was possible to identify changes in the ECoG, and to identify significant changes in the pattern of the recording at 24 h after irradiation. Some of these changes were persistent at 90 days after exposure to IR. In particular, the theta wave using the two methods showed higher sensitivity than other waves, suggesting that it is a possible biomarker of exposure to IR.

  17. Cosmic radiation exposure of aircraft crew: compilation of measured and calculated data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lindborg, L.; Bartlett, D.; Beck, P.; McAulay, I.; Schnuer, K.; Schraube, H.; Spurný, František

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 110, 1-4 (2004), s. 417-422 ISSN 0144-8420 Grant - others:EC project(XE) FIGM-CT2000-00068 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : cosmic radiation exposure * aircraft crew * measurement Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.617, year: 2003

  18. 38 CFR 3.311 - Claims based on exposure to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Ovarian cancer; (xix) Parathyroid adenoma; (xx) Tumors of the brain and central nervous system; (xxi... veteran's age, gender, and pertinent family history; (iv) The veteran's history of exposure to known... ionizing radiation, of the specific pathology; (3) The veteran's gender and pertinent family history; (4...

  19. Ultraviolet radiation after exposure to a low-fluence IPL home-use device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen-Petersen, Daniel; Erlendsson, Andres M; Nash, J F

    2015-01-01

    The prevailing advice is to avoid sun exposure after intense pulsed light (IPL) hair removal. However, no systematic evaluation of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) after IPL hair removal exits. Therefore, we investigated the occurrence of side effects in subjects receiving solar-simulated UVR after...

  20. Long-term correlation of the electrocorticogram as a bioindicator of brain exposure to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, L.A.A.; Nogueira, R.A. [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco (UFRPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Morfologia e Fisiologia Animal. Lab. de Biofisica Teorico-Experimental e Computacional; Silva, I.M.S.; Fernandes, T.S., E-mail: ran.pe@terra.com.br [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco (UFRPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Biofisica e Radiobiologia

    2015-10-15

    Understanding the effects of radiation and its possible influence on the nervous system are of great clinical interest. However, there have been few electrophysiological studies on brain activity after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). A new methodological approach regarding the assessment of the possible effects of IR on brain activity is the use of linear and nonlinear mathematical methods in the analysis of complex time series, such as brain oscillations measured using the electrocorticogram (ECoG). The objective of this study was to use linear and nonlinear mathematical methods as biomarkers of gamma radiation regarding cortical electrical activity. Adult Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups: 1 control and 2 irradiated groups, evaluated at 24 h (IR24) and 90 days (IR90) after exposure to 18 Gy of gamma radiation from a cobalt-60 radiotherapy source. The ECoG was analyzed using power spectrum methods for the calculation of the power of delta, theta, alpha and beta rhythms and by means of the a-exponent of the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). Using both mathematical methods it was possible to identify changes in the ECoG, and to identify significant changes in the pattern of the recording at 24 h after irradiation. Some of these changes were persistent at 90 days after exposure to IR. In particular, the theta wave using the two methods showed higher sensitivity than other waves, suggesting that it is a possible biomarker of exposure to IR. (author)

  1. UV-B radiation and photosynthetic irradiance acclimate eggplant for outdoor exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, J. G.; Mitchell, C. A.; Mitchell, G. A.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment of greenhouse-grown eggplant (Solanum melongena L. var. esculentum Nees. 'Burpee's Black Beauty') seedlings with supplemental photosynthetically active radiation from cool-white fluorescent lamps increased growth of plants subsequently transferred outdoors relative to growth of plants that received no supplemental radiation or were shaded to 45% of solar irradiation in the greenhouse before transfer outdoors. Eggplant seedlings transferred outdoors were placed under plastic tarps either to provide relative protection from solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation (280-315 nm) using Mylar film or to allow exposure to UV-B using cellulose acetate. Protection of seedlings from UV-B radiation resulted in greater leaf expansion than for UV-B-exposed seedlings, but no change in leaf or shoot dry weight occurred after 9 days of treatment. Specific leaf weight increased in response to UV-B exposure outdoors. Exposure of eggplant to UV-B radiation from fluorescent sunlamps in the greenhouse also decreased leaf expansion and leaf and shoot dry weight gain after 5 days of treatment. However, there were no differences in leaf or shoot dry weight relative to control plants after 12 days of UV-B treatment, indicating that UV-B treated plants had acclimated to the treatment and actually had caught up with non-UV-B-irradiated plants in terms of growth.

  2. Animal Models for Medical Countermeasures to Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jacqueline P.; Brown, Stephen L.; Georges, George E.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Hill, Richard P.; Huser, Amy K.; Kirsch, David G.; MacVittie, Thomas J.; Mason, Kathy A.; Medhora, Meetha M.; Moulder, John E.; Okunieff, Paul; Otterson, Mary F.; Robbins, Michael E.; Smathers, James B.; McBride, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Since September 11, 2001, there has been the recognition of a plausible threat from acts of terrorism, including radiological or nuclear attacks. A network of Centers for Medical Countermeasures against Radiation (CMCRs) has been established across the U.S.; one of the missions of this network is to identify and develop mitigating agents that can be used to treat the civilian population after a radiological event. The development of such agents requires comparison of data from many sources and accumulation of information consistent with the “Animal Rule” from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Given the necessity for a consensus on appropriate animal model use across the network to allow for comparative studies to be performed across institutions, and to identify pivotal studies and facilitate FDA approval, in early 2008, investigators from each of the CMCRs organized and met for an Animal Models Workshop. Working groups deliberated and discussed the wide range of animal models available for assessing agent efficacy in a number of relevant tissues and organs, including the immune and hematopoietic systems, gastrointestinal tract, lung, kidney and skin. Discussions covered the most appropriate species and strains available as well as other factors that may affect differential findings between groups and institutions. This report provides the workshop findings. PMID:20334528

  3. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation: I. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    A long-standing dogma in the radiation sciences is that energy from radiation must be deposited in the cell nucleus to elicit a biological effect. A number of non-targeted, delayed effects of ionizing radiation have been described that challenge this dogma and pose new challenges to evaluating potential hazards associated with radiation exposure. These effects include induced genomic instability and non-targeted bystander effects. The in vitro evidence for non-targeted effects in radiation biology will be reviewed, but the question as to how one extrapolates from these in vitro observations to the risk of radiation-induced adverse health effects such as cancer remains open.

  4. Reduction in operator radiation exposure during transradial catheterization and intervention using a simple lead drape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqtidar, Ali F; Jeon, Cathy; Rothman, Richard; Snead, Randall; Pyne, Christopher T

    2013-03-01

    Transradial access for cardiac catheterization and intervention is a recognized method for reducing complications and improving patient comfort. However, there are concerns over possible increased operator radiation exposure. We tested the hypothesis that a simple lead drape would reduce operator exposure in transradial procedures. Patients undergoing either diagnostic or interventional procedures using transradial access were assigned in an alternating manner to the use of a 0.5-mm lead apron across the patient's abdomen in addition to standard operator protection. Patients were divided into 4 groups: (left enhanced shielding vs left standard shielding; right enhanced shielding vs right standard shielding). Dosimeters were taped to the primary and secondary operators' left wrist and outside the thyroid guard. The operator exposure was measured for each site on every case in centigray. In standard shielded patients, there was no increase in operator exposure between the left and right approach patients at any measurement site. Measured exposure was reduced with enhanced shielding at all dosimeter sites except the secondary operator's collar (both left and right) and the primary operator's collar from the right. There was no significant difference in fluoroscopy, air kerma, or dose area product between standard and enhanced shielded patients. The use of a lead drape reduces the rate of operator radiation exposure at multiple measurement sites. Use of the left radial approach was not associated with an increase in operator exposure compared with the right radial approach. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Exposure of airline pilots and cabin crew to cosmic radiation during flight--what's the fuss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, M K

    2001-09-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) had in 1990 recommended that civilian aircrew be classified as being occupationally exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation, in view of their increased exposure to cosmic rays at altitude. In 2000, the European Union had gone ahead with legislation which requires all European airlines to monitor cosmic radiation levels during flight and to inform aircrew of the possible health risks. However, the evidence for a causal link between cosmic radiation exposure and health risks remains elusive despite recent findings of increased cancer incidence among airline pilots and cabin crew. The inconclusiveness of the evidence notwithstanding, there are compelling reasons for adopting a prudent and precautionary stance.

  6. Dynamic friction and wear of a solid film lubricant during radiation exposure in a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of nuclear reactor radiation on the performance of a solid film lubricant was studied. The film consisted of molybdenum disulfide and graphite in a sodium silicate binder. Radiation levels of fast neutrons (E or = 1 MeV) were fluxed up to 3.5 times 10 to the 12th power n/sq cm-sec (intensity) and fluences up to 2 times 10 to the 18th power n/sq cm (total exposure). Coating wear lives were much shorter and friction coefficients higher in a high flux region of the reactor than in a low flux region. The amount of total exposure did not affect lubrication behavior as severely as the radiation intensity during sliding.

  7. Effects of Litter Exposure to UV Radiation on Subsequent Microbial Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.; Scarlett, R. D.; King, J. Y.

    2013-12-01

    In arid ecosystems, photodegradation has recently been identified as a key process in ecosystem carbon cycling. Photodegradation directly contributes to organic matter decomposition through photochemical mineralization. However, it remains unclear how photodegradation interacts with biotic decomposition processes. It is commonly thought that photodegradation can facilitate subsequent microbial decomposition, as it can preferentially decompose lignin, a recalcitrant substrate in microbial decomposition. We hypothesized that ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure would increase the biodegradability of plant litter and that this effect would be greater with longer radiation exposure. In the field at the University of California's Sedgwick Reserve in Santa Ynez, CA, Bromus diandrus litter samples were exposed to two levels of UV radiation using screens: 'UV pass' (transmitting > 81% of UV radiation) and 'UV block' (transmitting carbon and nitrogen content, fiber fractions, water extractable carbon and nitrogen, and biodegradability. We evaluated the biodegradability of litter using a 30-day laboratory incubation experiment. Litter samples were incubated in the dark in sealed glass microcosms with soil inoculum. The CO2 accumulation in each microcosm headspace was measured every 1-2 days to assess microbial respiration rate. In contrast to our hypothesis, litter exposed under UV block conditions had 28% higher cumulative CO2 production than litter from UV pass when the length of exposure was 2.5 months (P = 0.02, n = 4). Litter from the UV block treatment also tended to show higher cumulative CO2 production than litter from UV pass when the exposure lasted for 4 months (P = 0.10, n = 4). For samples with longer exposure times (6 and 12 months), there was no difference in CO2 production between UV pass and UV block treatments. Litter lignin concentration was not affected by UV treatments, regardless of the length of UV exposure. Interestingly, there was a strong correlation

  8. Multiple procedures and cumulative individual radiation exposure in interventional cardiology: A long-term retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weltermann, Birgitta M.; Rock, Thomas; Berndt, Peter; Viehmann, Anja; Reinders, Sabrina; Gesenhues, Stefan [University of Duisburg-Essen, Institute for General Medicine, University Hospital, Essen (Germany); Brix, Gunnar; Schegerer, Alexander [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Department of Radiation Protection and Health, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Various studies address discrepancies between guideline recommendations for coronary angiographies and clinical practice. While the issue of the appropriateness of recurrent angiographies was studied focusing on the role of the cardiologist, little is known about individual patients' histories and the associated radiation exposures. We analyzed all patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) in an academic teaching practice who underwent at least one angiography with or without intervention between 2004 and 2009. All performed angiographies in these patients were analyzed and rated by three physicians for appropriateness levels according to cardiology guidelines. Typical exposure data from the medical literature were used to estimate individual radiation exposure. In the cohort of 147 patients, a total of 441 procedures were analyzed: between 1981 and 2009, three procedures were performed per patient (range 1-19) on average. Appropriateness ratings were 'high/intermediate' in 71 %, 'low/no' in 27.6 % and data were insufficient for ratings in 1.4 %. Procedures with 'low/no' ratings were associated with potentially avoidable exposures of up to 186 mSv for single patients. Using retrospective data, we exemplify the potential benefit of guideline adherence to decrease patients' radiation exposures. (orig.)

  9. Weekend personal ultraviolet radiation exposure in four cities in Australia: influence of temperature, humidity and ambient ultraviolet radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Fan; Harrison, Simone; Nowak, Madeleine; Kimlin, Michael; Van der Mei, Ingrid; Neale, Rachel E; Sinclair, Craig; Lucas, Robyn M

    2015-02-01

    To examine the effects of meteorological factors on weekend sun exposure behaviours and personal received dose of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) in Australian adults. Australian adults (n=1002) living in Townsville (19°S, 146°E), Brisbane (27°S, 153°E), Canberra (35°S, 149°E) and Hobart (43°S, 147°E) were recruited between 2009 and 2010. Data on sun exposure behaviours were collected by daily sun exposure dairies; personal UVR exposure was measured with a polysulphone dosimeter. Meteorological data were obtained from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology; ambient UVR levels were estimated using the Ozone Monitoring Instrument data. Higher daily maximum temperatures were associated with reduced likelihood of wearing a long-sleeved shirt or wearing long trousers in Canberra and Hobart, and higher clothing-adjusted UVR dose in Canberra. Higher daily humidity was associated with less time spent outdoors in Canberra. Higher ambient UVR level was related to a greater clothing-adjusted personal UVR dose in Hobart and a greater likelihood of using sunscreen in Townsville. The current findings enhance our understanding of the impact of weather conditions on the population's sun exposure behaviours. This information will allow us to refine current predictive models for UVR-related diseases, and guide future health service and health promotion needs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Man-made radionuclides in the environment and resulting radiation exposures; Anthropogene Radionuklide in der Umwelt und daraus resultierende Strahlenexpositionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, R. [Leibniz Univ. Hannover (Germany). Zentrum fuer Strahlenschutz und Radiooekologie

    2009-07-01

    This contribution gives a survey about the sources of man-made environmental radioactivity and quantifies some of the resulting radiation exposures. The relevance of the different radionuclides with respect to the radiation exposures is discussed. Finally, the question of the effects of small doses is addressed. (orig.)

  11. Molecular effects of 1-naphthyl-methylcarbamate and solar radiation exposures on human melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrucio, Bianca; Tiago, Manoela; Fannin, Richard D; Liu, Liwen; Gerrish, Kevin; Maria-Engler, Silvya Stuchi; Paules, Richard S; Barros, Silvia Berlanga de Moraes

    2017-02-01

    Carbaryl (1-naphthyl-methylcarbamate), a broad-spectrum insecticide, has recently been associated with the development of cutaneous melanoma in an epidemiological cohort study with U.S. farm workers also exposed to ultraviolet radiation, the main etiologic factor for skin carcinogenesis. We hypothesized that carbaryl exposure may increase deleterious effects of UV solar radiation on skin melanocytes. This study aimed to characterize human melanocytes after individual or combined exposure to carbaryl (100μM) and solar radiation (375mJ/cm 2 ). In a microarray analysis, carbaryl, but not solar radiation, induced an oxidative stress response, evidenced by the upregulation of antioxidant genes, such as Hemeoxygenase-1 (HMOX1), and downregulation of Microphtalmia-associated Transcription Factor (MITF), the main regulator of melanocytic activity; results were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Carbaryl and solar radiation induced a gene response suggestive of DNA damage and cell cycle alteration. The expression of CDKN1A, BRCA1/2 and MDM2 genes was notably more intense in the combined treatment group, in a synergistic manner. Flow cytometry assays demonstrated S-phase cell cycle arrest, reduced apoptosis levels and faster induction of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) lesions in carbaryl treated groups. Our data suggests that carbaryl is genotoxic to human melanocytes, especially when associated with solar radiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    2009-12-01

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2008 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories1 of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no low-level waste disposal facilities in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report.

  13. Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation from computed tomography imaging in Nova Scotia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Mark; Otley, Anthony; Dummer, Trevor; Cui, Yunsong; Schmidt, Matthias H; Parker, Louise

    2015-10-01

    Examining radiation dose in the paediatric population is particularly important due to the vulnerability of paediatric patients (increased radiosensitive tissues and postexposure life-years) and risk for future radiogenic malignancy. To evaluate trends in paediatric computed tomography (CT) use and ionizing radiation exposure using population-based data from Nova Scotia. A retrospective, population-based cohort study of CT use in patients Nova Scotia. CT examination data were retrieved from a provincial imaging repository. Trends in CT use were described, and both annual and cumulative effective dose exposures were calculated. In total, 29,452 CT events, involving up to 22,867 individuals were retrieved. Overall annual paediatric CT examination rates remained static (range 17.4 to 18.8 per 1000 per year). However, use in children 50% (P50 mSv), and rates in individuals >15 years of age steadily increased, suggesting further exposure reduction efforts are necessary.

  14. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation from the perspective of nursing professionals in hemodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Martins Gallo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify the security measures taken and the control of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation in units of hemodynamic, from the perspective of nursing, this quantitative descriptive study was developed during January and February, 2011. A check-list of binary responses (yes / no was made based on the legislation and updated literature and it was applied in four hospitals in the northern region of Paraná State. The analysis of the data showed that 29 employees have knowledge about occupational exposure and apply barrier methods effectively to minimize doses of ionizing radiation. The data also showed that employees are participating in ongoing updating on the subject, and that they claim that this participation has a positive effect so that the occupational exposure occurs consciously, and also, the workers did not refuse to participate in any action facing their individual protection.

  15. Predictive Modeling of Terrestrial Radiation Exposure from Geologic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malchow, Russell L. [National Security Technologies, LLC; Haber, Daniel University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Burnley, Pamela [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Marsac, Kara [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Hausrath, Elisabeth [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Adcock, Christopher [University of Nevada, Las Vegas

    2015-01-01

    Aerial gamma ray surveys are important for those working in nuclear security and industry for determining locations of both anthropogenic radiological sources and natural occurrences of radionuclides. During an aerial gamma ray survey, a low flying aircraft, such as a helicopter, flies in a linear pattern across the survey area while measuring the gamma emissions with a sodium iodide (NaI) detector. Currently, if a gamma ray survey is being flown in an area, the only way to correct for geologic sources of gamma rays is to have flown the area previously. This is prohibitively expensive and would require complete national coverage. This project’s goal is to model the geologic contribution to radiological backgrounds using published geochemical data, GIS software, remote sensing, calculations, and modeling software. K, U and Th are the three major gamma emitters in geologic material. U and Th are assumed to be in secular equilibrium with their daughter isotopes. If K, U, and Th abundance values are known for a given geologic unit the expected gamma ray exposure rate can be calculated using the Grasty equation or by modeling software. Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport software (MCNP), developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, is modeling software designed to simulate particles and their interactions with matter. Using this software, models have been created that represent various lithologies. These simulations randomly generate gamma ray photons at energy levels expected from natural radiologic sources. The photons take a random path through the simulated geologic media and deposit their energy at the end of their track. A series of nested spheres have been created and filled with simulated atmosphere to record energy deposition. Energies deposited are binned in the same manner as the NaI detectors used during an aerial survey. These models are used in place of the simplistic Grasty equation as they take into account absorption properties of the lithology which the

  16. Evidence Report: Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Other Degenerative Tissue Effects from Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Zarana; Huff, Janice; Saha, Janapriya; Wang, Minli; Blattnig, Steve; Wu, Honglu; Cucinotta, Francis

    2015-01-01

    Occupational radiation exposure from the space environment may result in non-cancer or non-CNS degenerative tissue diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, cataracts, and respiratory or digestive diseases. However, the magnitude of influence and mechanisms of action of radiation leading to these diseases are not well characterized. Radiation and synergistic effects of radiation cause DNA damage, persistent oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and accelerated tissue aging and degeneration, which may lead to acute or chronic disease of susceptible organ tissues. In particular, cardiovascular pathologies such as atherosclerosis are of major concern following gamma-ray exposure. This provides evidence for possible degenerative tissue effects following exposures to ionizing radiation in the form of the GCR or SPEs expected during long-duration spaceflight. However, the existence of low dose thresholds and dose-rate and radiation quality effects, as well as mechanisms and major risk pathways, are not well-characterized. Degenerative disease risks are difficult to assess because multiple factors, including radiation, are believed to play a role in the etiology of the diseases. As additional evidence is pointing to lower, space-relevant thresholds for these degenerative effects, particularly for cardiovascular disease, additional research with cell and animal studies is required to quantify the magnitude of this risk, understand mechanisms, and determine if additional protection strategies are required.The NASA PEL (Permissive Exposure Limit)s for cataract and cardiovascular risks are based on existing human epidemiology data. Although animal and clinical astronaut data show a significant increase in cataracts following exposure and a reassessment of atomic bomb (A-bomb) data suggests an increase in cardiovascular disease from radiation exposure, additional research is required to fully understand and quantify these adverse outcomes at lower doses (less than 0.5 gray

  17. Risk of whole body radiation exposure and protective measures in fluoroscopically guided interventional techniques: a prospective evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivera Jose

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluoroscopic guidance is frequently utilized in interventional pain management. The major purpose of fluoroscopy is correct needle placement to ensure target specificity and accurate delivery of the injectate. Radiation exposure may be associated with risks to physician, patient and personnel. While there have been many studies evaluating the risk of radiation exposure and techniques to reduce this risk in the upper part of the body, the literature is scant in evaluating the risk of radiation exposure in the lower part of the body. Methods Radiation exposure risk to the physician was evaluated in 1156 patients undergoing interventional procedures under fluoroscopy by 3 physicians. Monitoring of scattered radiation exposure in the upper and lower body, inside and outside the lead apron was carried out. Results The average exposure per procedure was 12.0 ± 9.8 seconds, 9.0 ± 0.37 seconds, and 7.5 ± 1.27 seconds in Groups I, II, and III respectively. Scatter radiation exposure ranged from a low of 3.7 ± 0.29 seconds for caudal/interlaminar epidurals to 61.0 ± 9.0 seconds for discography. Inside the apron, over the thyroid collar on the neck, the scatter radiation exposure was 68 mREM in Group I consisting of 201 patients who had a total of 330 procedures with an average of 0.2060 mREM per procedure and 25 mREM in Group II consisting of 446 patients who had a total of 662 procedures with average of 0.0378 mREM per procedure. The scatter radiation exposure was 0 mREM in Group III consisting of 509 patients who had a total 827 procedures. Increased levels of exposures were observed in Groups I and II compared to Group III, and Group I compared to Group II. Groin exposure showed 0 mREM exposure in Groups I and II and 15 mREM in Group III. Scatter radiation exposure for groin outside the apron in Group I was 1260 mREM and per procedure was 3.8182 mREM. In Group II the scatter radiation exposure was 400 mREM and with 0.6042 m

  18. Systematically frameshifting by deletion of every 4th or 4th and 5th nucleotides during mitochondrial transcription: RNA self-hybridization regulates delRNA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    In mitochondria, secondary structures punctuate post-transcriptional RNA processing. Recently described transcripts match the human mitogenome after systematic deletions of every 4th, respectively every 4th and 5th nucleotides, called delRNAs. Here I explore predicted stem-loop hairpin formation by delRNAs, and their associations with delRNA transcription and detected peptides matching their translation. Despite missing 25, respectively 40% of the nucleotides in the original sequence, del-transformed sequences form significantly more secondary structures than corresponding randomly shuffled sequences, indicating biological function, independently of, and in combination with, previously detected delRNA and thereof translated peptides. Self-hybridization decreases delRNA abundances, indicating downregulation. Systematic deletions of the human mitogenome reveal new, unsuspected coding and structural informations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Public Exposure from Indoor Radiofrequency Radiation in the City of Hebron, West Bank-Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahham, Adnan; Sharabati, Afefeh; ALMasri, Hussien

    2015-08-01

    This work presents the results of measured indoor exposure levels to radiofrequency (RF) radiation emitting sources in one of the major cities in the West Bank-the city of Hebron. Investigated RF emitters include FM, TV broadcasting stations, mobile telephony base stations, cordless phones [Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications (DECT)], and wireless local area networks (WLAN). Measurements of power density were conducted in 343 locations representing different site categories in the city. The maximum total power density found at any location was about 2.3 × 10 W m with a corresponding exposure quotient of about 0.01. This value is well below unity, indicating compliance with the guidelines of the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). The average total exposure from all RF sources was 0.08 × 10 W m. The relative contributions from different sources to the total exposure in terms of exposure quotient were evaluated and found to be 46% from FM radio, 26% from GSM900, 15% from DECT phones, 9% from WLAN, 3% from unknown sources, and 1% from TV broadcasting. RF sources located outdoors contribute about 73% to the population exposure indoors.

  20. Radiation exposure of contrast-enhanced spectral mammography compared with full-field digital mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeukens, Cécile R L P N; Lalji, Ulrich C; Meijer, Eduard; Bakija, Betina; Theunissen, Robin; Wildberger, Joachim E; Lobbes, Marc B I

    2014-10-01

    Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) shows promising initial results but comes at the cost of increased dose as compared with full-field digital mammography (FFDM). We aimed to quantitatively assess the dose increase of CESM in comparison with FFDM. Radiation exposure-related data (such as kilovoltage, compressed breast thickness, glandularity, entrance skin air kerma (ESAK), and average glandular dose (AGD) were retrieved for 47 CESM and 715 FFDM patients. All examinations were performed on 1 mammography unit. Radiation dose values reported by the unit were validated by phantom measurements. Descriptive statistics of the patient data were generated using a statistical software package. Dose values reported by the mammography unit were in good qualitative agreement with those of phantom measurements. Mean ESAK was 10.5 mGy for a CESM exposure and 7.46 mGy for an FFDM exposure. Mean AGD for a CESM exposure was 2.80 mGy and 1.55 mGy for an FFDM exposure. Compared with our institutional FFDM, the AGD of a single CESM exposure is increased by 1.25 mGy (+81%), whereas ESAK is increased by 3.07 mGy (+41%). Dose values of both techniques meet the recommendations for maximum dose in mammography.

  1. Health effects assessment of staff involved in medical practices of radiation exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, I.A.; Lacob, O. [Institute of Public Health Iasi, Radiation Hygiene Lab. (Romania); Roman, I.; Havarneanu, D. [Institute of Public Health Iasi, Occupational Medicine Dept. (Romania)

    2006-07-01

    This study aimed, starting from new national recommendation appearance, to detect health effects of medical staff from six counties of Moldavia region involved in radiation practices and to create a national register data for radiation-induce cancer. Staff involved in medical ionizing radiation uses in Romania - health care level I are monitored on recent new recommendations for three years. The micro nuclei high levels and morphological lymphocytes changes vs. clinical diagnostic can be considered as early possible malignant signs. The micro nuclei test, although unspecific, as a new exam in our legislation can bring useful information on staff exposure and provides a guidance to occupational physician in making his medical recommendations. This cytogenetic test does not seem to correlate with smoking habit or length of exposure. Micro nuclei test both in oral mucous epithelial cells and peripheral culture lymphocytes can be considered of much specificity and correlates with a recent acute exposure level. The conclusions of individual health status surveillance and assessment of personal dose equivalent are very useful data for recording in the radiation cancer-induced register.

  2. Exposure of the surgical team to ionizing radiation during orthopedic surgical procedures☆☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palácio, Evandro Pereira; Ribeiro, André Araújo; Gavassi, Bruno Moreira; Di Stasi, Gabriel Guimarães; Galbiatti, José Antônio; Junior, Alcides Durigam; Mizobuchi, Roberto Ryuiti

    2014-01-01

    Objective the aim of this study was to assess the degree of exposure of the orthopedic surgical team to fluoroscopic ionizing radiation. Methods the ionizing radiation to which the orthopedic surgical team (R1, R2 and R3) was exposed was assayed using thermoluminescent dosimeters that were distributed in target anatomical regions (regions with and without protection using a lead apron). This was done during 45 hip osteosynthesis procedures to treat transtrochanteric fractures that were classified as 31-A2.1 (AO). Results the radioactive dose received by R3 was 6.33 mSv, R2 4.51 mSv and R3 1.99 mSv (p = 0.33). The thyroid region received 0.86 mSv of radiation, the thoracic region 1.24 mSv and the gonadal region 2.15 mSv (p = 0.25). There was no record of radiation at the dosimeters located below the biosafety protectors or on the team members’ backs. Conclusions the members of the surgical team who were located closest to the fluoroscope received greater radiation doses than those located further away. The anatomical regions located below the waistline were the ones that received most ionizing radiation. These results emphasize the importance of using biosafety devices, since these are effective in preventing radiation from reaching the vital organs of the medical team. PMID:26229805

  3. Exposure of the surgical team to ionizing radiation during orthopedic surgical procedures,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Pereira Palácio

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: the aim of this study was to assess the degree of exposure of the orthopedic surgical team to fluoroscopic ionizing radiation.METHODS: the ionizing radiation to which the orthopedic surgical team (R1, R2 and R3 was exposed was assayed using thermoluminescent dosimeters that were distributed in target anatomical regions (regions with and without protection using a lead apron. This was done during 45 hip osteosynthesis procedures to treat transtrochanteric fractures that were classified as 31-A2.1 (AO.RESULTS: the radioactive dose received by R3 was 6.33 mSv, R2 4.51 mSv and R3 1.99 mSv (p = 0.33. The thyroid region received 0.86 mSv of radiation, the thoracic region 1.24 mSv and the gonadal region 2.15 mSv (p = 0.25. There was no record of radiation at the dosimeters located below the biosafety protectors or on the team members' backs.CONCLUSIONS: the members of the surgical team who were located closest to the fluoroscope received greater radiation doses than those located further away. The anatomical regions located below the waistline were the ones that received most ionizing radiation. These results emphasize the importance of using biosafety devices, since these are effective in preventing radiation from reaching the vital organs of the medical team.

  4. Increased Artemis levels confer radioresistance to both high and low LET radiation exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridharan Deepa M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemis has a defined role in V(DJ recombination and has been implicated in the repair of radiation induced double-strand breaks. However the exact function(s of Artemis in DNA repair and its preferred substrate(s in vivo remain undefined. Our previous work suggests that Artemis is important for the repair of complex DNA damage like that inflicted by high Linear Energy Transfer (LET radiation. To establish the contribution of Artemis in repairing DNA damage caused by various radiation qualities, we evaluated the effect of over-expressing Artemis on cell survival, DNA repair, and cell cycle arrest after exposure to high and low LET radiation. Results Our data reveal that Artemis over-expression confers marked radioprotection against both types of radiation, although the radioprotective effect was greater following high LET radiation. Inhibitor studies reveal that the radioprotection imparted by Artemis is primarily dependent on DNA-PK activity, and to a lesser extent on ATM kinase activity. Together, these data suggest a DNA-PK dependent role for Artemis in the repair of complex DNA damage. Conclusions These findings indicate that Artemis levels significantly influence radiation toxicity in human cells and suggest that Artemis inhibition could be a practical target for adjuvant cancer therapies.

  5. Cognitive effects of radiation emitted by cellular phones: the influence of exposure side and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Roy; Eliyahu, Ilan; Hareuveny, Ronen; Margaliot, Menachem; Meiran, Nachshon

    2009-04-01

    This study examined the time dependence effects of exposure to radiofrequency radiation (RFR) emitted by standard GSM cellular phones on the cognitive functions of humans. A total of 48 healthy right-handed male subjects performed a spatial working memory task (that required either a left-hand or a right-hand response) while being exposed to one of two GSM phones placed at both sides of the head. The subjects were randomly divided into three groups. Each group was exposed to one of three exposure conditions: left-side of the head, right-side, or sham-exposure. The experiment consisted of 12 blocks of trials. Response times (RTs) and accuracy of the responses were recorded. It was found that the average RT of the right-hand responses under left-side exposure condition was significantly longer than those of the right-side and sham-exposure groups averaged together during the first two time blocks. These results confirmed the existence of an effect of exposure on RT, as well as the fact that exposure duration (together with the responding hand and the side of exposure) may play an important role in producing detectable RFR effects on performance. Differences in these parameters might be the reason for the failure of certain studies to detect or replicate RFR effects. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Estimation of radiation exposure from lung cancer screening program with low-dose computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Yeon; Jun, Jae Kwan [Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, National Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated that screening with Low-dose Computed Tomography (LDCT) screening reduced lung cancer mortality in a high-risk population. Recently, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) gave a B recommendation for annual LDCT screening for individuals at high-risk. With the promising results, Korea developed lung cancer screening guideline and is planning a pilot study for implementation of national lung cancer screening. With widespread adoption of lung cancer screening with LDCT, there are concerns about harms of screening, including high false-positive rates and radiation exposure. Over the 3 rounds of screening in the NLST, 96.4% of positive results were false-positives. Although the initial screening is performed at low dose, subsequent diagnostic examinations following positive results additively contribute to patient's lifetime exposure. As with implementing a large-scale screening program, there is a lack of established risk assessment about the effect of radiation exposure from long-term screening program. Thus, the purpose of this study was to estimate cumulative radiation exposure of annual LDCT lung cancer screening program over 20-year period.

  7. Transapical aortic valve implantation: learning curve with reduced operating time and radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ancona, Giuseppe; Pasic, Miralem; Unbehaun, Axel; Dreysse, Stephan; Drews, Thorsten; Buz, Semih; Kukucka, Marian; Mladenow, Alexander; Hetzer, Roland; Seifert, Burkhardt

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether, and in which terms, the cumulative institutional experience in the field of transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) might impact upon operative time and radiation exposure. This was a retrospective, single-center, observational cohort study of prospectively collected data from all 500 consecutive high-risk patients undergoing transapical TAVI at our institution between April 2008 and December 2011. Differences during the study period in baseline characteristics, procedural and post-procedural variables, and survival were analyzed. Nonparametric correlation and linear regression analyses were used to identify changes in operative time, contrast agent use, and radiation exposure according to institutional cumulative experience. Median operating time was 90 minutes (interquartile range 75-115 min) and fluoroscopy time was 6.7 minutes (4.8-10.3 min). Combined planned percutaneous coronary intervention was performed in 57 (11.4%) patients. There was a significant correlation between operating time, fluoroscopy time, and institutional experience. A 5% reduction in operating time (95% CI 3% to 8%, p exposure time (95% CI 12% to 18%, p operating time and radiation exposure are contained and reduced over the entire observation time in 500 consecutive patients. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Eye lens radiation exposure and repeated head CT scans: A problem to keep in mind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, Morgane; Jacob, Sophie [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, IRSN/DRPH/SRBE/Laboratoire d' Epidemiologie, BP 17, 92 262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Roger, Gilles [Otolaryngology Department, Trousseau Hospital, Paris (France); Pelosse, Beatrice [Ophthalmology Department, Trousseau Hospital, Paris (France); Laurier, Dominique [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, IRSN/DRPH/SRBE/Laboratoire d' Epidemiologie, BP 17, 92 262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Le Pointe, Hubert Ducou [Radiology Department, Trousseau Hospital, Paris (France); Bernier, Marie-Odile, E-mail: marie-odile.bernier@irsn.fr [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, IRSN/DRPH/SRBE/Laboratoire d' Epidemiologie, BP 17, 92 262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2012-08-15

    Objectives: The deterministic character of radiation-induced cataract is being called into question, raising the possibility of a risk in patients, especially children, exposed to ionizing radiation in case of repeated head CT-scans. This study aims to estimate the eye lens doses of a pediatric population exposed to repeated head CTs and to assess the feasibility of an epidemiological study. Methods: Children treated for a cholesteatoma, who had had at least one CT-scan of the middle ear before their tenth birthday, were included. Radiation exposure has been assessed from medical records and telephone interviews. Results: Out of the 39 subjects contacted, 32 accepted to participate. A total of 76 CT-scans were retrieved from medical records. At the time of the interview (mean age: 16 years), the mean number of CT per child was 3. Cumulative mean effective and eye lens doses were 1.7 mSv and 168 mGy, respectively. Conclusion: A relatively high lens radiation dose was observed in children exposed to repeated CT-scans. Due to that exposure and despite the difficulties met when trying to reach patients' families, a large scale epidemiological study should be performed in order to assess the risk of radiation-induced cataracts associated with repeated head CT.

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Retain Their Defining Stem Cell Characteristics After Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolay, Nils H., E-mail: n.nicolay@dkfz.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Molecular and Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Sommer, Eva; Lopez, Ramon; Wirkner, Ute [Department of Molecular and Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Trinh, Thuy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Molecular and Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Sisombath, Sonevisay [Department of Molecular and Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Ho, Anthony D.; Saffrich, Rainer [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Huber, Peter E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Molecular and Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability to migrate to lesion sites and undergo differentiation into functional tissues. Although this function may be important for tissue regeneration after radiation therapy, the influence of ionizing radiation (IR) on cellular survival and the functional aspects of differentiation and stem cell characteristics of MSCs have remained largely unknown. Methods and Materials: Radiation sensitivity of human primary MSCs from healthy volunteers and primary human fibroblast cells was examined, and cellular morphology, cell cycle effects, apoptosis, and differentiation potential after exposure to IR were assessed. Stem cell gene expression patterns after exposure to IR were studied using gene arrays. Results: MSCs were not more radiosensitive than human primary fibroblasts, whereas there were considerable differences regarding radiation sensitivity within individual MSCs. Cellular morphology, cytoskeletal architecture, and cell motility were not markedly altered by IR. Even after high radiation doses up to 10 Gy, MSCs maintained their differentiation potential. Compared to primary fibroblast cells, MSCs did not show an increase in irradiation-induced apoptosis. Gene expression analyses revealed an upregulation of various genes involved in DNA damage response and DNA repair, but expression of established MSC surface markers appeared only marginally influenced by IR. Conclusions: These data suggest that human MSCs are not more radiosensitive than differentiated primary fibroblasts. In addition, upon photon irradiation, MSCs were able to retain their defining stem cell characteristics both on a functional level and regarding stem cell marker expression.

  10. Mortality associated with chronic external radiation exposure in the French combined cohort of nuclear workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz-Flamant, C; Laurent, O; Samson, E; Caër-Lorho, S; Acker, A; Hubert, D; Richardson, D B; Laurier, D

    2013-09-01

    The long-term effects of protracted low level ionising radiation exposure are investigated in a combined analysis of French nuclear workers employed by the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA), AREVA Nuclear Cycle (AREVA NC) and Electricité de France (EDF). Associations between cumulative external radiation dose and mortality due to solid cancers, leukaemia and circulatory disease were examined. All workers hired by CEA, AREVA NC and EDF between 1950 and 1994 who were employed for at least 1 year, badge-monitored for radiation exposure and alive on 1 January 1968 were included. Individual data of annual exposure to penetrating photons (X-rays and gamma rays) were reconstructed for each worker. Estimates of radiation dose-mortality associations were obtained using a linear excess relative risk (ERR) Poisson regression model. Among the 59 021 nuclear workers, 2312 died of solid cancer, 78 of leukaemia and 1468 of circulatory diseases during the 1968-2004 period. Approximately 72% of the cohort had a non-zero cumulative radiation dose estimate, with a mean cumulative dose of 22.5 mSv. Positive but non-significant ERR/Sv were observed for all solid cancers, leukaemia excluding chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), ischaemic heart diseases and cerebrovascular diseases. A significant ERR/Sv was found for myeloid leukaemia. This is the first combined analysis of major French cohorts of nuclear workers. Results were consistent with risks estimated in other nuclear worker cohorts and illustrate the potential of a further joint international study to yield direct risk estimates in support to radiation protection standards.

  11. [Current problems of estimation of genetic risk of human exposure to radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, V A

    2000-01-01

    The methodology of assessing the genetic risk of radiation exposure is based on the concept of "hitting the target" in development of which N.V. Timofeeff-Ressovsky has played and important role. To predict genetic risk posed by irradiation, the UN Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) has worked out direct and indirect methods of assessment, extrapolational, integral and populational criteria of risk analysis that together permit calculating the risk from human exposure on the basis of data obtained for mice. Laboratory mice are the main objects in studying radiation mutagenesis due to the fact that the data on the frequency of radiation-induced human mutations are rather scarce. The method of doubling dose based on the determination of a dose doubling the level of natural mutational process in humans is the main one used to predict the genetic risk. The evolution of views about the genetics risk of human exposure to radiation for last 40 years is considered. Till 1972 the main model for assessing the genetic risk was the "human/mouse" model (the use of data on the spontaneous human variability and data on the frequency of induced mutations in mice). In the period form 1972 till 1994 the "mouse/mouse" model was intensively elaborated in many laboratories. This model was also used in this period by UNSCEAR experts to analyze the genetic risk from human irradiation. Recent achievements associated with the study of the molecular nature of many hereditary human diseases as well as the criticism of number fundamental principles of the "mouse/mouse" model for estimating the genetic risk on a new basis. The estimates of risk for the different classes of genetic diseases have been obtained using the doubling-dose method. The estimate of doubling dose used in the calculations is 1 Gy for low dose/chronic low-LET radiation conditions.

  12. Set up and operation for medical radiation exposure quality control system of health promotion center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Su; Kim, Jung Min [Korea University,Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hae Kyoung [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    In this study, standard model of medical radiation dosage quality control system will be suggested and the useful of this system in clinical field will be reviewed. Radiation dosage information of modalities are gathered from digital imaging and communications in medicine(DICOM) standard data(such as DICOM dose SR and DICOM header) and stored in database. One CT scan, two digital radiography modalities and two mammography modalities in one health promotion center in Seoul are used to derive clinical data for one month. After 1 months research with 703 CT scans, the study shows CT 357.9 mGy·cm in abdomen and pelvic CT, 572.4 mGy·cm in brain without CT, 55.9 mGy·cm in calcium score/heart CT, screening CT at 54 mGy·cm in chest screening CT(low dose screening CT scan), 284.99 mGy·cm in C-spine CT and 341.85 mGy·cm in L-spine CT as health promotion center reference level of each exam. And with 1955 digital radiography cases, it shows 274.0 mGy·cm{sup 2} and for mammography 6.09 mGy is shown based on 536 cases. The use of medical radiation shall comply with the principles of justification and optimization. This quality management of medical radiation exposure must be performed in order to follow the principle. And the procedure to reduce the radiation exposure of patients and staff can be achieved through this. The results of this study can be applied as a useful tool to perform the quality control of medical radiation exposure.

  13. Impact of electromagnetic radiation exposure during pregnancy on embryonic skeletal development in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali SAEED H Alchalabi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the teratogenic effect of mobile phone radiation exposure during pregnancy on embryonic skeletal development at the common used mobile phone frequency in our environment. Methods: Sixty female Sprague-Dawley rats were distributed into three experiment groups; control and two exposed groups (1 h/day, 2 h/day exposure groups (n=20/ each group and exposed to whole body radiation during gestation period from day 1- day 20. Electromagnetic radiofrequency signal generator was used to generate 1 800 MHz GSM-like signals at specific absorption rate value 0.974 W/kg. Animals were exposed during experiment in an especial designed Plexiglas box (60 cm × 40 cm × 30 cm. At the end of exposure duration at day 20 of pregnancy animals were sacrificed and foetuses were removed, washed with normal saline and processed to Alizarin red and Alcian blue stain. Skeleton specimens were examined under a stereo microscope and skeleton's snaps were being carefully captured by built in camera fixed on the stereo microscope. Results: Intrauterine exposure to electromagnetic radiation lead to variation in degree of ossification, mineralization, formation of certain parts of the skeleton majorly in head and lesser in other parts. Deformity and absence of formation of certain bones in the head, ribs, and coccygeal vertebrae were recorded in skeleton of foetuses from exposed dams compare to control group. Conclusions: The electromagnetic radiation exposure during pregnancy alter the processes of bone mineralization and the intensity of bone turnover processes, and thus impact embryonic skeleton formation and development directly.

  14. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants. Quarterly report, 4th quarter 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tossavainen, K. [ed.

    1999-05-01

    Quarterly reports on the operation of Finnish NPPs describe events and observations relating to nuclear and radiation safety that the Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) considers safety significant. Safety improvements at the plants are also described. The report includes a summary of the radiation safety of plant personnel and the environment and tabulated data on the plants` production and load factors. All Finnish NPP units were in power operation for the fourth quarter of 1998, with the exception of the post-outage start-up phase of Loviisa 2 at the beginning of the quarter. In this quarter, the load factor average of the four plant units was 99.2%. One of this quarter`s events was classified Level 1 on the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES). It occurred at Olkiluoto 1 where the oxygen concentration of the containment slightly exceeded the allowable limit for four days. The other events in this quarter had no bearing on nuclear or radiation safety. Occupational doses and radioactive releases off-site were well below authorised limits. Radioactive substances were measurable in samples collected around the plant in such quantities only as have no bearing on the radiation exposure of the population. (orig.)

  15. Human epidermal keratinocytes death and expression of protein markers of apoptosis after ionizing radiation exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Wong

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Knowledge of the pathophysiology of the irradiated skin is important to understand the tolerance and cosmetic response of the human skin to radiation. There are limited studies on the effect of radiotherapy dosage and fraction size in inducing apoptotic cell death in human skin. The expression of apoptotic biomarkers within a controlled population in different fractionation schemes has also never been studied. This study aims to investigate radiation induced apoptotic cell death in human skin cells after fractionated radiation exposure and the expression of unique biomarkers that reflect cell death or biology using multiplexed immunoassays.Methods: Breast skin biopsies were obtained from a single individual and divided into small pieces. Each piece was irradiated under different radiotherapy treatment fractionation schedules to a total dose of 50Gy. The irradiated skin tissues were analysed using Tunnel, immunohistochemistry and Western blot assays for expression of apoptotic keratinocytes and biomarkers (p53, p21, and PCNA. Haematoxylin and eosin (H&E immunostaining was performed to study the morphological changes in the skin cells. Results: Radiation is mostly absorbed by the epidermal layers and observed to damage the epidermal keratinocytes leading to the activation of apoptotic proteins. Apoptotic proteins (p53, p21 and PCNA were confirmed to be up-regulated in radiation exposed skin cells as compared to normal skin cells with no radiation. There is strong correlation of apoptotic protein expressions with increased radiation dosage and dose fractionation. Statistical analysis with ANOVA revealed a significant increase of PCNA and p21 expression with increased radiation dosage and dose fractionation (p < 0.05. Immunohistochemically, 14 % (range 10.71% to 17.29% of the keratinocytes were positive for PCNA and 22.5% (range 18.28% to 27.2% for p21 after 2Gy of irradiation.  The most widespread, intense and uniform staining for PCNA

  16. The REPAIR Project: Examining the Biological Impacts of Sub-Background Radiation Exposure within SNOLAB, a Deep Underground Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thome, Christopher; Tharmalingam, Sujeenthar; Pirkkanen, Jake; Zarnke, Andrew; Laframboise, Taylor; Boreham, Douglas R

    2017-10-01

    Considerable attention has been given to understanding the biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure at levels slightly above background. However, relatively few studies have been performed to examine the inverse, where natural background radiation is removed. The limited available data suggest that organisms exposed to sub-background radiation environments undergo reduced growth and an impaired capacity to repair genetic damage. Shielding from background radiation is inherently difficult due to high-energy cosmic radiation. SNOLAB, located in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, is a unique facility for examining the effects of sub-background radiation exposure. Originally constructed for astroparticle physics research, the laboratory is located within an active nickel mine at a depth of over 2,000 m. The rock overburden provides shielding equivalent to 6,000 m of water, thereby almost completely eliminating cosmic radiation. Additional features of the facility help to reduce radiological contamination from the surrounding rock. We are currently establishing a biological research program within SNOLAB: Researching the Effects of the Presence and Absence of Ionizing Radiation (REPAIR project). We hypothesize that natural background radiation is essential for life and maintains genomic stability, and that prolonged exposure to sub-background radiation environments will be detrimental to biological systems. Using a combination of whole organism and cell culture model systems, the effects of exposure to a sub-background environment will be examined on growth and development, as well as markers of genomic damage, DNA repair capacity and oxidative stress. The results of this research will provide further insight into the biological effects of low-dose radiation exposure as well as elucidate some of the processes that may drive evolution and selection in living systems. This Radiation Research focus issue contains reviews and original articles, which relate to the

  17. Survey on low-dose medical radiation exposure in occupational workers: the effect on hematological change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, J. K.; Cho, S. M.; Cho, J. H.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.; Lee, J. W.

    2013-03-01

    This study examined the changes in the hematological index caused by low-dose medical radiation exposure in workers in a medical radiation-exposed environment. The cumulative dose was obtained using thermoluminescent dosimeters over a 9-year period, and the changes in hematological index count (red blood cells (RBCs), hemoglobin, platelets, white blood cells (WBCs), monocytes, lymphocytes, neutrophils, basophils, and eosinophils) were examined in both the occupational workers and controls. In total, 370 occupational workers and 335 controls were compared. The analysis led to the following observations: (1) The average cumulative dose in males and females was 9.65±15.2 and 4.82±5.55 mSv, respectively. (2) In both males and females, there was a very low correlation between the occupation period and the cumulative dose (r<±0.25). (3) When the occupation period was longer, the WBC counts both decreased and increased in the male workers and the RBC counts were lower in the workers than in the control group (p<0.05). In females, the WBC counts both decreased and increased in the workers and the eosinophil counts were lower in the workers than in the control group (p<0.01). (4) When the cumulative dose was large, the lymphocyte counts decreased in male workers and the platelet count was lower in the workers than in the control group (p<0.05). In females, the lymphocyte count and RBC count were lower in the workers than in the control group (p<0.05). Abnormal distributions of some blood indices were observed in the occupational radiation workers compared with the controls. Attempts were made to limit radiation exposure to personnel, but the employees did not always follow the preset rules. Actually, the adverse effects of low-level radiation were attributed to probability. Overall, workers should obey the radiation protection regulations provided by the government and a national system of radiation protection is needed.

  18. Effect of Exposure to Non-ionizing Radiation (Electromagnetic Fields on Human System: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Rubya Souza C and acirc;mara

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The indiscriminate presence of radio base stations, which emit non-ionizing radiation (NIR, as well as the frequent use of mobile phones, can cause increased susceptibility of populations to the emergence of diseases such as cancers of the head and neck, biochemical, hematopoietic and hepatic changes, among others. Exposure to physical contamination, including NIR, has been implicated in numerous diseases, raising concerns about the widespread sources of exposure to this type of radiation. This paper reviews studies that have assessed associations between likely exposure to electromagnetic fields, such as radiofrequency transmissions, and many kinds of human diseases including cancer, as well as alerts to the current knowledge on the association between environmental exposure to NIR and the risk of development of adverse human health effects. This way, there appears to be an urgent need to reconsider exposure limits for low frequency and static magnetic fields, based on combined experimental and epidemiological research. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2014; 2(4.000: 187-190

  19. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Induced Radiation Sensitization Effects on Human Cancer Cells after Photon and Hadron Radiation Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariungerel Gerelchuluun

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA is a histone deacetylase inhibitor, which has been widely utilized throughout the cancer research field. SAHA-induced radiosensitization in normal human fibroblasts AG1522 and lung carcinoma cells A549 were evaluated with a combination of γ-rays, proton, and carbon ion exposure. Growth delay was observed in both cell lines during SAHA treatment; 2 μM SAHA treatment decreased clonogenicity and induced cell cycle block in G1 phase but 0.2 μM SAHA treatment did not show either of them. Low LET (Linear Energy Transfer irradiated A549 cells showed radiosensitization effects on cell killing in cycling and G1 phase with 0.2 or 2 μM SAHA pretreatment. In contrast, minimal sensitization was observed in normal human cells after low and high LET radiation exposure. The potentially lethal damage repair was not affected by SAHA treatment. SAHA treatment reduced the rate of γ-H2AX foci disappearance and suppressed RAD51 and RPA (Replication Protein A focus formation. Suppression of DNA double strand break repair by SAHA did not result in the differences of SAHA-induced radiosensitization between human cancer cells and normal cells. In conclusion, our results suggest SAHA treatment will sensitize cancer cells to low and high LET radiation with minimum effects to normal cells.

  20. Radiation exposure to the orbiting lunar station and lunar surface related to reusable nuclear shuttle operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, P. I.

    1972-01-01

    The radiation environment created by the Reusable Nuclear Vehicle (RNS) in performing its normal mission functions while in the lunar vicinity and the impact of that environment on the Orbiting Lunar Station (OLS) and/or the lunar surface are examined. Lunar surface exposures from the operating reactor were evaluated for both the arrival and departure burns and while there is little probability that manned bases would lie along the paths in which measurable exposures would be recorded, the analyses do indicate the need to consider this possibility in planning such operations. Conclusions supported by the analyses and recommended operational constraints for the RNS are presented.

  1. Effective optimization of medical exposure: co-operation between radiation users and authorities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkkinen, R.; Jarvinen, H. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority STUK, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    For the optimization of medical exposure in special radiological practices like in paediatric radiology, orthopaedics and cardiology, the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (S.T.U.K.) in Finland has used a six step model to achieve the aims of the Medical Exposure Directive (97/43/EURATOM). The basis is to introduce the regulation and to meet the needs of the users for education and training. The aim is to educate some specialists to distribute information and good practices among their own professional groups. S.T.U.K. makes continuous verification on site visits and improves the process. (authors)

  2. Surface characterization of gallium nitride modified with peptides before and after exposure to ionizing radiation in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Nora G; Nolan, Michael W; Paskova, Tania; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2014-12-30

    An aqueous surface modification of gallium nitride was employed to attach biomolecules to the surface. The modification was a simple two-step process using a single linker molecule and mild temperatures. The presence of the peptide on the surface was confirmed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Subsequently, the samples were placed in water baths and exposed to ionizing radiation to examine the effects of the radiation on the material in an environment similar to the body. Surface analysis confirmed degradation of the surface of GaN after radiation exposure in water; however, the peptide molecules successfully remained on the surface following exposure to ionizing radiation. We hypothesize that during radiation exposure of the samples, the radiolysis of water produces peroxide and other reactive species on the sample surface. Peroxide exposure promotes the formation of a more stable layer of gallium oxyhydroxide which passivates the surface better than other oxide species.

  3. High Dietary Iron and Radiation Exposure Increase Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Blood and Liver of Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Theriot, Corey A.; Wu, Honglu; Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exposure and increased iron (Fe) status independently cause oxidative damage that can result in protein, lipid, and DNA oxidation. During space flight astronauts are exposed to both increased radiation and increased Fe stores. Increased body Fe results from a decrease in red blood cell mass and the typically high Fe content of the food system. In this study we investigated the combined effects of radiation exposure (0.375 Gy of Cs-137 every other day for 16 days for a total of 3 Gy) and high dietary Fe (650 mg Fe/kg diet compared to 45 mg Fe/kg for controls) in Sprague-Dawley rats (n=8/group). Liver and serum Fe were significantly increased in the high dietary Fe groups. Likewise, radiation treatment increased serum ferritin and Fe concentrations. These data indicate that total body Fe stores increase with both radiation exposure and excess dietary Fe. Hematocrit decreased in the group exposed to radiation, providing a possible mechanism for the shift in Fe indices after radiation exposure. Markers of oxidative stress were also affected by both radiation and high dietary Fe, evidenced by increased liver glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and serum catalase as well as decreased serum GPX. We thus found preliminary indications of synergistic effects of radiation exposure and increased dietary Fe, warranting further study. This study was funded by the NASA Human Research Project.

  4. Long-term exposure to electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones and Wi-Fi devices decreases plasma prolactin, progesterone, and estrogen levels but increases uterine oxidative stress in pregnant rats and their offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksel, Murat; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Özkaya, Mehmet Okan

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the effects of mobile phone (900 and 1800 MHz)- and Wi-Fi (2450 MHz)-induced electromagnetic radiation (EMR) exposure on uterine oxidative stress and plasma hormone levels in pregnant rats and their offspring. Thirty-two rats and their forty newborn offspring were divided into the following four groups according to the type of EMR exposure they were subjected to: the control, 900, 1800, and 2450 MHz groups. Each experimental group was exposed to EMR for 60 min/day during the pregnancy and growth periods. The pregnant rats were allowed to stand for four generations (total 52 weeks) before, plasma and uterine samples were obtained. During the 4th, 5th, and 6th weeks of the experiment, plasma and uterine samples were also obtained from the developing rats. Although uterine lipid peroxidation increased in the EMR groups, uterine glutathione peroxidase activity (4th and 5th weeks) and plasma prolactin levels (6th week) in developing rats decreased in these groups. In the maternal rats, the plasma prolactin, estrogen, and progesterone levels decreased in the EMR groups, while the plasma total oxidant status, and body temperatures increased. There were no changes in the levels of reduced glutathione, total antioxidants, or vitamins A, C, and E in the uterine and plasma samples of maternal rats. In conclusion, although EMR exposure decreased the prolactin, estrogen, and progesterone levels in the plasma of maternal rats and their offspring, EMR-induced oxidative stress in the uteri of maternal rats increased during the development of offspring. Mobile phone- and Wi-Fi-induced EMR may be one cause of increased oxidative uterine injury in growing rats and decreased hormone levels in maternal rats. TRPV1 cation channels are the possible molecular pathways responsible for changes in the hormone, oxidative stress, and body temperature levels in the uterus of maternal rats following a year-long exposure to electromagnetic radiation exposure from mobile phones and

  5. Are the surgeons safe during UV-A radiation exposure in collagen cross-linking procedure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Rashmi; Shetty, Rohit; Mahendradas, Padmamalini; Shetty, Bhujang K

    2012-02-01

    To quantify the effect of scattered UV-A radiation used in the collagen cross-linking (CXL) procedure and the amount of radiation reaching the surgeon and the surrounding area and to estimate the dampening effect by various protective devices. In this case series, 3 patients [aged 25-30 (±2.5) years] with keratoconus underwent a CXL procedure with UV-A light and riboflavin. Irradiance was measured using a spectrometer (Model USB2000; Ocean Optics, Inc) for various distances from the source, at various angles, and for different durations of radiation. The spectrometer was also used to measure the dampening effect produced by gown, latex gloves, and UV-protective glasses. Maximum UV-A radiation (1.4 × 10(-9) mW/cm(2)) was measured at 2 cm from the limbus, when the probe was held at a 45-degree angle to the floor. UV-A radiation reaching the surgeon's eye and the abdomen was 3.403 × 10(-11) and 2.36 × 10(-11) mW/cm(2), respectively. Gown, latex gloves, and UV-protective glasses showed dampening effects of 99.58%, 95.01%, and 99.73%, respectively. CXL appears to be a safe procedure with respect to UV-A radiation exposure to the surgeon. Further safety can be ensured by UV-protective devices.

  6. Reduction of radiation exposure in angiography; Reduzierung der Strahlenexposition in der Angiographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhof, K. [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany). Bereich Medizinische Technik

    1995-11-01

    Interventional procedures in angiography result in an increased radiation exposure for the physician, medical personal, and the patient longer fluoroscopic times and of images as compared with pure diagnostic examinations. Damages like epilation and erythema are potential effects. Measures are proposed in this paper to reduce the radiation exposure. There are technical means and possibilities in the application technique. Quality checks and remote diagnosis support these measures in addition by assuring a continuous image quality. (orig.) [Deutsch] Interventionale Massnahmen in der Angiographie bringen durch laengere Durchleuchtungszeiten und durch eine groessere Anzahl von Aufnahmen eine erhoehte Strahlenexposition fuer Arzt, medizinisches Personal und Patient mit sich, verglichen mit rein diagnostischer Fragestellung. Gewebeschaedigungen wie Hautroetungen und Haarausfall bei Patienten sind durchaus im Bereich der Moeglichkeiten. In diesem Beitrag sind die Moeglichkeiten aufgefuehrt, die zur Reduktion der Strahlenexposition beitragen. Diese liegen einmal in der Geraetetechnik, zum anderen in der Untersuchungstechnik. Qualitaetskontrollen und Ferndiagnose unterstuetzen zusaetzlich diese Massnahmen durch Sicherung einer gleichbleibenden Bildqualitaet. (orig.)

  7. Exposure to electromagnetic fields (non-ionizing radiation) and its relationship with childhood leukemia: A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvente, I.; Fernandez, M.F. [Laboratory of Medical Investigations, San Cecilio University Hospital, CIBER de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain); Department of Radiology, University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Villalba, J. [Department of Radiology, University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Olea, N. [Laboratory of Medical Investigations, San Cecilio University Hospital, CIBER de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain); Department of Radiology, University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Nunez, M.I., E-mail: isabeln@ugr.es [Department of Radiology, University of Granada, Granada (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    Childhood exposure to physical contamination, including non-ionizing radiation, has been implicated in numerous diseases, raising concerns about the widespread and increasing sources of exposure to this type of radiation. The primary objective of this review was to analyze the current state of knowledge on the association between environmental exposure to non-ionizing radiation and the risk of childhood leukemia. Scientific publications between 1979 and 2008 that include examination of this association have been reviewed using the MEDLINE/PubMed database. Studies to date have not convincingly confirmed or ruled out an association between non-ionizing radiation and the risk of childhood leukemia. Discrepancies among the conclusions of the studies may also be influenced by confounding factors, selection bias, and misclassification. Childhood defects can result from genetic or epigenetic damage and from effects on the embryo or fetus, which may both be related to environmental exposure of the parent before conception or during the pregnancy. It is therefore critical for researchers to define a priori the type and 'window' of exposure to be assessed. Methodological problems to be solved include the proper diagnostic classification of individuals and the estimated exposure to non-ionizing radiation, which may act through various mechanisms of action. There appears to be an urgent need to reconsider exposure limits for low frequency and static magnetic fields, based on combined experimental and epidemiological research into the relationship between exposure to non-ionizing radiation and adverse human health effects.

  8. Evaluation of Radiation Dose Exposure for Silicon Pixel Detectors in ALICE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Morando, M; CERN. Geneva

    1996-01-01

    An estimation of radiation dose exposure expected for the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of ALICE experiment at the future LHC collider is presented. In particular, the two innermost layers of the silicon ITS, located at radial distances of 3.9 and 7.6cm are based on hybrid silicon pixel detectors. A possible scenario for the first ten years operation is presented assuming a data taking with beams of lead, calcium and proton.

  9. Analysis of Policy and Doctrine Supporting the Management of Operational Exposures to Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Health Protection program, and basic concepts of decontamination for patient movement.19 Field Manual (FM) 3-11 states “ Radiological hazards are an...Defense Planning & Response Project,” for the Joint Staff, Joint Requirements Office (JRO) for Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN...on the medical management of radiological or nuclear casualties and operational exposure to ionizing radiation.”1 This document includes a review of

  10. 47 CFR 2.1093 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure evaluation: portable devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... device is defined as a transmitting device designed to be used so that the radiating structure(s) of the device is/are within 20 centimeters of the body of the user. (c) Portable devices that operate in the... to Human Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields, 3 kHz to 300 GHz,” ANSI/IEEE C95.1-1992...

  11. Determination of the radiation exposure of a patient in mammography; Potilaan saeteilyaltistuksen maeaerittaeminen mammografiassa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toroi, P.; Jaervinen, H.; Koenoenen, N.; Parviainen, T.; Pirinen, M.; Tapiovaara, M.; Tenkanen-Rautakoski, P.

    2011-07-01

    This report describes the measurement and calculation methods for determining the patient's radiation exposure from mammography. The method for measuring the incident air kerma is described and the use of suitable dosimeters are presented in the measurement guidelines. The entrance surface dose (ESD) and the mean glandular dose (MGD) can be calculated from the incident air kerma using the factors given in appendixes. (orig.)

  12. Exposure of the French paediatric population to ionising radiation from diagnostic medical procedures in 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etard, Cecile; Aubert, Bernard [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Medical Expertise Unit, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Mezzarobba, Myriam [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Laboratory of Epidemiology, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Bernier, Marie-Odile [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Laboratory of Epidemiology, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN/PRP-HOM/SRBE/LEPID, Laboratoire d' Epidemiologie, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2014-12-15

    Medical examination is the main source of artificial radiation exposure. Because children present an increased sensitivity to ionising radiation, radiology practices at a national level in paediatrics should be monitored. This study describes the ionising radiation exposure from diagnostic medical examinations of the French paediatric population in 2010. Data on frequency of examinations were provided by the French National Health Insurance through a representative sample including 107,627 children ages 0-15 years. Effective doses for each type of procedure were obtained from the published French literature. Median and mean effective doses were calculated for the studied population. About a third of the children were exposed to at least one examination using ionising radiation in 2010. Conventional radiology, dental exams, CT scans and nuclear medicine and interventional radiology represent respectively 55.3%, 42.3%, 2.1% and 0.3% of the procedures. Children 10-15 years old and babies from birth to 1 year are the most exposed populations, with respectively 1,098 and 734 examinations per 1,000 children per year. Before 1 year of age, chest and pelvis radiographs are the most common imaging tests, 54% and 32%, respectively. Only 1% of the studied population is exposed to CT scan, with 62% of these children exposed to a head-and-neck procedure. The annual median and mean effective doses were respectively 0.03 mSv and 0.7 mSv for the exposed children. This study gives updated reference data on French paediatric exposure to medical ionising radiation that can be used for public health or epidemiological purposes. Paediatric diagnostic use appears much lower than that of the whole French population as estimated in a previous study. (orig.)

  13. Residential Exposure to Natural Background Radiation and Risk of Childhood Acute Leukemia in France, 1990-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoury, Claire; Marquant, Fabienne; Ielsch, Géraldine; Goujon, Stéphanie; Debayle, Christophe; Faure, Laure; Coste, Astrid; Laurent, Olivier; Guillevic, Jérôme; Laurier, Dominique; Hémon, Denis; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2017-04-01

    Exposures to high-dose ionizing radiation and high-dose rate ionizing radiation are established risk factors for childhood acute leukemia (AL). The risk of AL following exposure to lower doses due to natural background radiation (NBR) has yet to be conclusively determined. AL cases diagnosed over 1990-2009 (9,056 cases) were identified and their municipality of residence at diagnosis collected by the National Registry of Childhood Cancers. The Geocap study, which included the 2,763 cases in 2002-2007 and 30,000 population controls, was used for complementary analyses. NBR exposures were modeled on a fine scale (36,326 municipalities) based on measurement campaigns and geological data. The power to detect an association between AL and dose to the red bone marrow (RBM) fitting UNSCEAR (United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation) predictions was 92%, 45% and 99% for exposure to natural gamma radiation, radon and total radiation, respectively. AL risk, irrespective of subtype and age group, was not associated with the exposure of municipalities to radon or gamma radiation in terms of yearly exposure at age reached, cumulative exposure or RBM dose. There was no confounding effect of census-based socio-demographic indicators, or environmental factors (road traffic, high voltage power lines, vicinity of nuclear plants) related to AL in the Geocap study. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that residential exposure to NBR increases the risk of AL, despite the large size of the study, fine scale exposure estimates and wide range of exposures over France. However, our results at the time of diagnosis do not rule out a slight association with gamma radiation at the time of birth, which would be more in line with the recent findings in the UK and Switzerland.

  14. Diet as a factor in behavioral radiation protection following exposure to heavy particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Bernard M.; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Joseph, James; Todd, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Major risks associated with radiation exposures on deep space missions include carcinogenesis due to heavy-particle exposure of cancer-prone tissues and performance decrements due to neurological damage produced by heavy particles. Because exposure to heavy particles can cause oxidative stress, it is possible that antioxidants can be used to mitigate these risks (and possibly some health risks of microgravity). To assess the capacity of antioxidant diets to mitigate the effects of exposure to heavy particles, rats were maintained on antioxidant diets containing 2% blueberry or strawberry extract or a control diet for 8 weeks prior to exposure to 1.5 or 2.0 Gy of accelerated iron particles at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Following irradiation rats were tested on a series of behavioral tasks: amphetamine-induced taste aversion learning, operant responding and spatial learning and memory. The results indicated that the performance of the irradiated rats maintained on the antioxidant diets was, in general, significantly better than that of the control animals, although the effectiveness of the diets ameliorating the radiation-induced deterioration in performance varied as a function of both the specific diet and the specific endpoint. In addition, animals fed antioxidant diets prior to exposure showed reduced heavy particle-induced tumorigenesis one year after exposure compared to the animals fed the control diet. These results suggest that antioxidant diets have the potential to serve as part of a system designed to provide protection to astronauts against the effects of heavy particles on exploratory missions outside the magnetic field of the earth.

  15. Eye Safety Related to Near Infrared Radiation Exposure to Biometric Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Kourkoumelis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biometrics has become an emerging field of technology due to its intrinsic security features concerning the identification of individuals by means of measurable biological characteristics. Two of the most promising biometric modalities are iris and retina recognition, which primarily use nonionizing radiation in the infrared region. Illumination of the eye is achieved by infrared light emitting diodes (LEDs. Even if few LED sources are capable of causing direct eye damage as they emit incoherent light, there is a growing concern about the possible use of LED arrays that might pose a potential threat. Exposure to intense coherent infrared radiation has been proven to have significant effects on living tissues. The purpose of this study is to explore the biological effects arising from exposing the eye to near infrared radiation with reference to international legislation.

  16. Implications of the new radiation exposure limits on Space Station Freedom crews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, M.; Nachtwey, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Levels of acceptable risk of radiation exposure for SSF crews have been studied. Since the cancer risk per dose equivalent has increased over the last decade, new dose-equivalent limits have been recommended. An astronaut may not receive more than a depth-dose equivalent of 50 rem/year. It is found that a 180-day stay aboard Freedom could result in a worst case depth-dose of 30 rem, and a 180-day mission in a nominally shielded spacecraft in a constant atmospheric density orbit with a varying altitude could result in a depth-dose equivalent of 10 rem. This is twice the annual allowable dose-equivalent for terrestrial radiation workers. It is noted that the present understanding of the biological effectiveness of high-LET radiation is not adequate for accurate health risk assessments and that further research is necessary.

  17. Whack-A-Mole Model: Towards unified description of biological effect caused by radiation-exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Manabe, Yuichiro; Tsunoyama, Yuichi; Nakajima, Hiroo; Nakamura, Issei; Bando, Masako

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel model to estimate biological effects caused by artificial radiation exposure, Whack-a-mole (WAM) model. It is important to take account of the recovery effects during the time course of the cellular reactions. The inclusion of the dose-rate dependence is essential in the risk estimation of low dose radiation, while nearly all the existing theoretical models relies on the total dose dependence only. By analyzing the experimental data of the relation between the radiation dose and the induced mutation frequency of 5 organisms, mouse, drosophila, chrysanthemum, maize and tradescantia, we found that all the data can be reproduced by WAM model. Most remarkably, a scaling function, which is derived from WAM model, consistently accounts for the observed mutation frequencies of 5 organisms. This is the first rationale to account for the dose rate dependence as well as to give a unified understanding of a general feature of organisms.

  18. Solid variant of papillary carcinoma thyroid in a child with no history of radiation exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Nishikant; Ramya, Soundararajan; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Durgapal, Prashant

    2011-01-01

    Solid variant is a rare and poorly characterized variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and comprises approximately 3% of PTCs. It is more common in children and has high propensity for extrathyroidal metastasis. It is seen in higher proportion in post-radiation PTCs and has been seen in more than one-third of post Chernobyl radiation induced PTCs in some studies. It usually presents with differential diagnosis of poorly differentiated carcinoma versus anaplastic versus medullary thyroid carcinoma versus metastasis from extrathyroidal malignancy on fine needle aspiration cytology. This report describes a case of solid variant of PTC in a child who had no history of radiation exposure and shows the importance to be given to histopathology when the pre-operative diagnosis is not clear. PMID:23559717

  19. Assessing risks from occupational exposure to low-level radiation: The statistician's role

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1989-06-01

    Currently, several epidemiological studies of workers who have been exposed occupationally to radiation are being conducted. These include workers in the United States, Great Britain, and Canada, involved in the production of both defense materials and nuclear power. A major reason for conducting these studies is to evaluate possible adverse health effects that may have resulted because of the radiation exposure received. The general subject of health effects resulting from low levels of radiation, including these worker studies, has attracted the attention of various news media, and has been the subject of considerable controversy. These studies provide a good illustration of certain other aspects of the statistician's role; namely, communication and adequate subject matter knowledge. A competent technical job is not sufficient if these other aspects are not fulfilled.

  20. Influence of various factors on individual radiation exposure from the chernobyl disaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondar Alexandra

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The explosion at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant was one of the greatest known nuclear disasters of the 20th century. To reduce individual exposure to ionizing radiation the Soviet Union government introduced a number of counter-measures. This article presents a description of how historical events conspired to disrupt these efforts and affect residents in exposed areas. Methods This study employed an extensive review of data on radionuclide deposition, contamination patterns and lifestyle characteristics. Data were obtained from the Ukraine Ministry of Health and the Ukraine Research Center for Radiation Medicine. Results Data are presented on annual contamination rates in selected locales as well as data on local food consumption patterns. Historical factors including economic and political circumstances are also highlighted. Results show the diminution of individual doses between 1987 and 1991 and then an increase between 1991 and 1994 and the relationship between this increase and changes in the lifestyle of the local population. Conclusion A number of factors played direct and indirect roles in contributing to the populace's cumulative radiation exposure. Future post-contamination studies need to consider these factors when estimating individual exposures.

  1. Chromosome Damage Caused by Accidental Chronic Whole-Body Gamma Radiation Exposure in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Ulsh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In February 2000, a radiation incident involving a medical 60Co source occurred in a metal scrapyard in Thailand. Several individuals were suspected to have received chronic or fractionated exposures ranging from a few mGy to a several Gy. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization to paint chromosomes, we determined the frequencies of chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 13 people who entered the scrapyard, 3 people who involved in recovering the source, and 9 nearby residents. Aberration frequencies greater than controls were observed in 13 of the donors at 3 months postexposure. The predominant form of aberration observed was simple, complete, symmetrical translocations. An approximate 50% decrease in these aberrations and in total color junctions was observed in 7 donors resampled at 16 months postexposure. Although high, acute exposures are known to have detrimental effects, the biological consequences of chronic, low dose-rate radiation exposures are unclear. Thirteen of the donors had elevated aberration frequencies, and 6 also had symptoms of acute radiation syndrome. If there are any long-term health consequences of this incident, it will most likely occur among this group of individuals. The consequences for the remaining donors, who presumably received lower total doses delivered at lower dose rates, are less clear.

  2. Children's exposure to diagnostic medical radiation and cancer risk: epidemiologic and dosimetric considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linet, Martha S.; Rajaraman, Preetha [National Cancer Institute, Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kim, Kwang pyo [National Cancer Institute, Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kyung Hee University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi (Korea)

    2009-02-15

    While the etiology of most childhood cancers is largely unknown, epidemiologic studies have consistently found an association between exposure to medical radiation during pregnancy and risk of childhood cancer in offspring. The relation between early life diagnostic radiation exposure and occurrence of pediatric cancer risks is less clear. This review summarizes current and historical estimated doses for common diagnostic radiologic procedures as well as the epidemiologic literature on the role of maternal prenatal, children's postnatal and parental preconception diagnostic radiologic procedures on subsequent risk of childhood malignancies. Risk estimates are presented according to factors such as the year of birth of the child, trimester and medical indication for the procedure, and the number of films taken. The paper also discusses limitations of the methods employed in epidemiologic studies to assess pediatric cancer risks, the effects on clinical practice of the results reported from the epidemiologic studies, and clinical and public health policy implications of the findings. Gaps in understanding and additional research needs are identified. Important research priorities include nationwide surveys to estimate fetal and childhood radiation doses from common diagnostic procedures, and epidemiologic studies to quantify pediatric and lifetime cancer risks from prenatal and early childhood exposures to diagnostic radiography, CT, and fluoroscopically guided procedures. (orig.)

  3. Exposure of the mouse perinatal testis to radiation leads to hypospermia at sexual maturity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forand, A.; Messiaen, S.; Habert, R.; Bernardino-Sgherri, J. [Laboratory of Differentiation and Radiobiology of the Gonads, CEA, DSV, iRCM, SCSR, Fontenay aux Roses F-92265 (France); Unit of Gametogenesis and Genotoxicity, Universite Paris 7 Denis Diderot, Fontenay aux Roses F-92265 (France); INSERM, U566, Fontenay aux Roses F-92265 (France)

    2009-07-01

    The first round of mouse spermatogenesis begins from 3 to 4 days after birth through differentiation of gonocytes into spermatogonial-stem cells and type A spermatogonia. Consequently, this step of differentiation may determine generation of the original population of stem cells and the fertility potential of the adult mouse. We aimed to determine the effect of perinatal exposure to ionizing radiation on the testis at the end of the first wave of spermatogenesis and at sexual maturity. Our results show that, radiation sensitivity of the testis substantially decreases from late foetal life to the end of the first week after birth. In addition, partial or full recovery from radiation induced testicular weight loss occurred between the first round of spermatogenesis and sexual maturity, and this was associated with the stimulation of spermatogonial proliferation. Exposure of mice at 17.5 days after conception or at 1 day after birth to {gamma}-rays decreased the sperm counts at sexual maturity, while exposure of 8 day-old mice had no effect. This suggests that irradiation of late foetal or early neonatal testes has a direct impact on the generation of the neonatal spermatogonial-stem cell pool. (authors)

  4. Factors affecting radiation exposure during lumber epidural steroid injection: A prospective study in 759 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Young; Lee, Joon Woo; Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Guen Young; Ahn, Joong Mo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Joon Ho [Dept. of Rehabilitation, National Rehabilitation Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To estimate and compare radiation exposure and intervention time during lumbar epidural steroid injection (ESI) 1) under different practitioners and methods with continuous fluoroscopic monitoring, and 2) under one practitioner with different methods and monitoring. We consecutively recruited 804 patients who underwent lumbar ESI and 759 patients who underwent 922 interventions were included for analysis in this investigation. Three different practitioners (a senior faculty member, junior faculty member, trainee) performed lumbar ESI using different methods (caudal, interlaminar, transforaminal). The senior faculty member performed lumbar ESI under two different methods of fluoroscopic monitoring (continuous [CM] and intermittent monitoring [IM]). The dose area product (DAP) fluoroscopy time, and intervention time during lumbar ESI were compared for 1) ESI methods and practitioners under CM, and 2) ESI methods and monitoring. With CM, interaction between the effects of the practitioner and the intervention on DAP was significant (p < 0.001), but not fluoroscopy time (p = 0.672) or intervention time (p = 0.852). The significant main effects included the practitioner and intervention on DAP, fluoroscopy time, and intervention time with CM (p < 0.001). DAPs and fluoroscopy time for caudal, interlaminar, and transforaminal ESI were higher with CM than with IM (p < 0.001). Intervention time did not differ between CM and IM. Radiation exposure is dependent on the practitioners and methods and within the established safety limits during lumbar ESIs under CM. With an experienced practitioner, IM leads to less radiation exposure than CM.

  5. Influence of various factors on individual radiation exposure from the Chernobyl disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamostian, Pavlo; Moysich, Kirsten B; Mahoney, Martin C; McCarthy, Philip; Bondar, Alexandra; Noschenko, Andrey G; Michalek, Arthur M

    2002-10-29

    The explosion at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant was one of the greatest known nuclear disasters of the 20th century. To reduce individual exposure to ionizing radiation the Soviet Union government introduced a number of counter-measures. This article presents a description of how historical events conspired to disrupt these efforts and affect residents in exposed areas. This study employed an extensive review of data on radionuclide deposition, contamination patterns and lifestyle characteristics. Data were obtained from the Ukraine Ministry of Health and the Ukraine Research Center for Radiation Medicine. Data are presented on annual contamination rates in selected locales as well as data on local food consumption patterns. Historical factors including economic and political circumstances are also highlighted. Results show the diminution of individual doses between 1987 and 1991 and then an increase between 1991 and 1994 and the relationship between this increase and changes in the lifestyle of the local population. A number of factors played direct and indirect roles in contributing to the populace's cumulative radiation exposure. Future post-contamination studies need to consider these factors when estimating individual exposures.

  6. STUDIES CONCERNING THE EFFECT OF GAMMA RADIATION AND MAGNETIC FIELD EXPOSURE ON GLADIOLUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M CANTOR

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Gladiolus (Gladiolus sp. is one of the most floral species cultivated over in the world and in Romania. There are many studies concerning the effect of gamma radiation on ornamental plants but little is known about the synergetic effect of gamma radiation and exposure to magnetic fields on Gladiolus. In our investigation we have tested the effect of gamma irradiation and magnetic field exposure of gladiolus corms and cormels of the cultivars: Her Majesty, Applause and Speranţa. The corms and cormels were irradiated for 72 hrs with 137 Cs gamma source on cylindrical exposure geometry. At medium dose of 1 Gy has been accumulated for each corm and cormel. For each variety we used 10 corms and 30 cormels in five variants. The comportment of various varieties was evaluated by recording the following characteristics: length of roots and growth tip. Significant effect was obtained at the variants which was irradiated with 1 Gy gamma radiation and 3 Gauss magnetic fields.

  7. Radiation exposure to operating theatre personnel during fluoroscopic-assisted orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhi, A M; Masbah, O; Shukur, M H; Shahril, Y; Taiman, K

    2006-02-01

    Orthopaedic procedures especially dynamic hip screw (DHS) fixation, interlocking nailing (ILN) of the tibia and femur require fluoroscopic assistance. Frequent exposure to radiation is a major concern to members of the orthopaedic surgical team. This study was undertaken to measure shallow (skin) dose to the operating team personnel and deep (whole body) dose to the surgeon during such procedures in view to provide guidelines to the operating team members regarding the number of procedures allowable for them to perform or assist annually. Skin dose for the operating personnel and whole body dose for the operating surgeon during 25 procedures; ten cases of DHS, seven and six cases of ILN of the tibia and femur respectively, was measured using Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) chips. The shallow radiation dose for theatre personnel ranged from 0.19 mSy to 0.61 per case while the deep dose for the surgeon was 0.28, 0.55 and 0.81 mSy for seven cases of tibial ILN, ten cases of DHS and six cases of femur ILN respectively. The surgeon has the highest radiation exposure than other theatre personnel and the whole body exposure for DHS was higher than that of for ILN. However, the estimated cumulative dose was still far below the permissible annual dose limit.

  8. Early and Late Damages in Chromosome 3 of Human Lymphocytes After Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Mangala, Lingegowda; Zhang, Ye; Kahdim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    Tumor formation in humans or animals is a multi-step process. An early stage of cancer development is believed to be genomic instability (GI) which accelerates the mutation rate in the descendants of the cells surviving radiation exposure. GI is defined as elevated or persistent genetic damages occurring many generations after the cells are exposed. While early studies have demonstrated radiation-induced GI in several cell types as detected in endpoints such as mutation, apoptosis and damages in chromosomes, the dependence of GI on the quality of radiation remains uncertain. To investigate GI in human lymphocytes induced by both low- and high-LET radiation, we initially exposed white blood cells collected from healthy subjects to gamma rays in vitro, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis post irradiation and at several intervals during the culture period. Among a number of biological endpoints planned for the project, the multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) allows identification of inversions that were expected to be stable. We present here early and late chromosome aberrations detected with mBAND in chromosome 3 after gamma exposure. Comparison of chromosome damages in between human lymphocytes and human epithelial cells is also discussed

  9. Cosmic radiation and airline pilots. Exposure patterns of Norwegian pilots flying aircraft not used by SAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tveten, U.

    1997-05-01

    The work which is presented in this report is part of a Norwegian epidemiological project, carried out in cooperation between Institutt for Energiteknikk (IFE), the Norwegian Cancer Registry (NCR) and the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA). The project has been partially financed by the Norwegian Research Council. Originating from the Norwegian project, a number of similar projects have been started or are in the planning stage in a number of European countries. The present report lays the ground for estimation of individual exposure histories to cosmic radiation of pilots flying a great diversity of different aircrafts. Aircrafts that appear in the time-tables of the Scandinavian Airline System (SAS) have been treated in an earlier report. The results presented in this report (radiation doserates for the different types of aircrafts in the different years) will, in a later stage of the project be utilized to estimate the individual radiation exposure histories. The major sources of information used as basis for the work in this report is information provided by several active pilots, members of the Pilots Associations, along with calculations performed using US Federal Aviation Administration`s computer code CARI-3N. 2 refs.

  10. Cosmic radiation and airline pilots. Exposure patterns of Norwegian SAS-pilots 1960 to 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tveten, U.

    1997-02-01

    The work which is presented in this report is part of a Norwegian epidemiological project, carried out in cooperation between Institutt for Energiteknikk (IFE), the Norwegian Cancer Registry (NCR) and the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA). The project has been partially financed by the Norwegian Research Council. Originating from the Norwegian project, a number of similar projects have been started or are in the planning stage in a number of European countries. The present report lays the ground for estimation of individual exposure histories to cosmic radiation of pilots employed by the Scandinavian Airline System (SAS). The results presented in this report (radiation doserates for the different types of aircraft in the different years) will, in a later stage of the project, be utilized to estimate the individual radiation exposure histories. The major sources of information used as basis for this work is the collection of old SAS time tables found in the SAS Museum at Fornebu Airport in Oslo, and information provided by members of the Pilots Associations.

  11. Investigations of aircrews exposure to cosmic radiation - results, conclusions and suggestions

    CERN Document Server

    Bilski, P; Horwacik, T; Marczewska, B; Ochab, E; Olko, P

    2002-01-01

    In frame of a research project undertaken in collaboration with Polish airlines LOT, analysis of aircrews exposure to cosmic radiation has been performed. The applied methods included measurements of radiation doses with thermoluminescent detectors (MTS-N, MCP-N) and track detectors (CR-39) and also calculations of route doses with the CARI computer code. The obtained results indicate that aircrews of nearly all airplanes, with exception of these flying only on ATR aircraft, exceed regularly or may exceed in some conditions, effective doses of 1 mSv. In case of Boeing-767 aircrews such exceeding occurs always, independently of solar activity. Investigations revealed, that during these periods of the solar cycle, when intensity of cosmic radiation is high, exceeding of 6 mSv level is also possible. These results indicate, that according to Polish and European regulations it is necessary for airlines to provide regular estimations of radiation exposure of aircrews. Basing on the obtained results a system for pe...

  12. Radiation exposure to eye lens and operator hands during endovascular procedures in hybrid operating rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attigah, Nicolas; Oikonomou, Kyriakos; Hinz, Ulf; Knoch, Thomas; Demirel, Serdar; Verhoeven, Eric; Böckler, Dittmar

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation exposure of vascular surgeons' eye lens and fingers during complex endovascular procedures in modern hybrid operating rooms. Prospective, nonrandomized multicenter study design. One hundred seventy-one consecutive patients (138 male; median age, 72.5 years [interquartile range, 65-77 years]) underwent an endovascular procedure in a hybrid operating room between March 2012 and July 2013 in two vascular centers. The dose-area product (DAP), fluoroscopy time, operating time, and amount of contrast dye were registered prospectively. For radiation dose recordings, single-use dosimeters were attached at eye level and to the ring finger of the hand next to the radiation field of the operator for each endovascular procedure. Dose recordings were evaluated by an independent institution. Before the study, precursory investigations were obtained to simulate the radiation dose to eye lens and fingers with an Alderson phantome (RSD, Long Beach, Calif). Interventions were classified into six treatment categories: endovascular repair of infrarenal abdominal aneurysm (n = 65), thoracic endovascular aortic repair (n = 32), branched endovascular aortic repair for thoracoabdominal aneurysms (n = 17), fenestrated endovascular aortic repair for complex abdominal aortic aneurysm, (n = 25), iliac branched device (n = 8), and peripheral interventions (n = 24). There was a significant correlation in DAP between both lens (P exposure to the eyes can be obtained. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Does Ad Hoc Coronary Intervention Reduce Radiation Exposure? – Analysis of 568 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truffa, Márcio A. M., E-mail: marciotruffa@yahoo.com.br; Alves, Gustavo M.P.; Bernardi, Fernando; Esteves Filho, Antonio; Ribeiro, Expedito; Galon, Micheli Z.; Spadaro, André; Kajita, Luiz J.; Arrieta, Raul; Lemos, Pedro A. [Instituto do Coração - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    Advantages and disadvantages of ad hoc percutaneous coronary intervention have been described. However little is known about the radiation exposure of that procedure as compared with the staged intervention. To compare the radiation dose of the ad hoc percutaneous coronary intervention with that of the staged procedure The dose-area product and total Kerma were measured, and the doses of the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were added. In addition, total fluoroscopic time and number of acquisitions were evaluated. A total of 568 consecutive patients were treated with ad hoc percutaneous coronary intervention (n = 320) or staged percutaneous coronary intervention (n = 248). On admission, the ad hoc group had less hypertension (74.1% vs 81.9%; p = 0.035), dyslipidemia (57.8% vs. 67.7%; p = 0.02) and three-vessel disease (38.8% vs. 50.4%; p = 0.015). The ad hoc group was exposed to significantly lower radiation doses, even after baseline characteristic adjustment between both groups. The ad hoc group was exposed to a total dose-area product of 119.7 ± 70.7 Gycm{sup 2}, while the staged group, to 139.2 ± 75.3 Gycm{sup 2} (p < 0.001). Ad hoc percutaneous coronary intervention reduced radiation exposure as compared with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures performed at two separate times.

  14. Early exposure to ultraviolet-B radiation decreases immune function later in life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccato, Emma; Cramp, Rebecca L; Seebacher, Frank; Franklin, Craig E

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians have declined dramatically worldwide. Many of these declines are occurring in areas where no obvious anthropogenic stressors are present. It is proposed that in these areas, environmental factors such as elevated solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation could be responsible. Ultraviolet-B levels have increased in many parts of the world as a consequence of the anthropogenic destruction of the ozone layer. Amphibian tadpoles are particularly sensitive to the damaging effects of UV-B radiation, with exposure disrupting growth and fitness in many species. Given that UV-B can disrupt immune function in other animals, we tested the hypothesis that early UV-B exposure suppresses the immune responses of amphibian tadpoles and subsequent juvenile frogs. We exposed Limnodynastes peronii tadpoles to sublethal levels of UV-B radiation for 6 weeks after hatching, then examined indices of immune function in both the tadpoles and the subsequent metamorphs. There was no significant effect of UV-B on tadpole leucocyte counts or on their response to an acute antigen (phytohaemagglutinin) challenge. However, early UV-B exposure resulted in a significant reduction in both metamorph leucocyte abundance and their response to an acute phytohaemagglutinin challenge. These data demonstrate that early UV-B exposure can have carry-over effects on later life-history traits even if the applied stressor has no immediately discernible effect. These findings have important implications for our understanding of the effects of UV-B exposure on amphibian health and susceptibility to diseases such as chytridiomycosis.

  15. Cumulative ionizing radiation exposure in patients with end stage kidney disease: a 6-year retrospective analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coyle, Joe

    2011-08-13

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify cumulative exposure to ionizing radiation in patients with end stage kidney disease (ESKD). To investigate factors which may be independently associated with risk of high cumulative effective dose (CED). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study had local institutional review board ethical approval. We conducted a retrospective study of 394 period prevalent ESKD patients attending a single tertiary referral centre between 2004 and 2009. Patient demographics were obtained from case records. Details of radiological investigations were obtained from the institutional radiology computerized database. CED was calculated using standard procedure specific radiation levels. High exposure was defined as CED > 50 mSv, an exposure which has been reported to increase cancer mortality by 5%. Data were compared using Pearson χ(2) and Mann-Whitney U test or Kruskal-Wallis tests. RESULTS: 394 patients were followed for a median of 4 years (1518 patient years follow-up). Of these 63% were male. Seventeen percent of patients had a CED of >50 mSv. Computed tomography (CT) accounted for 9% of total radiological studies\\/procedures while contributing 61.4% of total study dose. Median cumulative dose and median dose per patient year were significantly higher in the hemodialysis (HD) group (15.13 and 5.79 mSv, respectively) compared to the post-transplant group (2.9 and 0.52 mSv, respectively) (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: ESKD patients are at risk of cumulative exposure to significant levels of diagnostic radiation. The majority of this exposure is imparted as a result of CT examinations to patients in the HD group.

  16. Exposure to Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation from Medical Imaging Procedures in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazel, Reza; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Wang, Yongfei; Ross, Joseph S.; Chen, Jersey; Ting, Henry H.; Shah, Nilay D.; Nasir, Khurram; Einstein, Andrew J.; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Growing use of imaging procedures in the United States has raised concerns about exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation in the general population. Methods We identified 952,420 non-elderly adults in 5 healthcare markets across the United States between July 1, 2005 and December 31, 2007. Utilization data were used to determine cumulative effective doses of radiation from imaging procedures in millisieverts (mSv) and to calculate population-based rates of “moderate” (>3 to 20 mSv per year), “high” (>20 to 50 mSv per year) and “very-high” (>50 mSv per year) doses. Results During the study period, 655,613 (68.8%) individuals underwent at least 1 imaging procedure associated with radiation exposure. The mean effective dose from imaging procedures was 2.4 mSv per person per year (std dev, 6.0 mSv); however, a wide distribution was noted with a median effective dose of 0.1 mSv per person per year (interquartile range, 0.0 to 1.7). Overall, the annual rate for moderate effective doses in the study population was 193.8 per 1000 enrollees, while high and very-high doses occurred at annual rates of 18.6 per 1000 enrollees and 1.9 per 1000 enrollees, respectively. In general, effective doses of radiation from imaging procedures increased with advancing age and were higher in women. Computed tomography and nuclear medicine scans accounted for 75.4% of the total effective dose and 81.8% occurred in non-hospitalized settings. Conclusions Imaging procedures are an important source of ionizing radiation in the United States and can lead to high radiation doses in patients. PMID:19710483

  17. Gamma-H2AX-based dose estimation for whole and partial body radiation exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Horn

    Full Text Available Most human exposures to ionising radiation are partial body exposures. However, to date only limited tools are available for rapid and accurate estimation of the dose distribution and the extent of the body spared from the exposure. These parameters are of great importance for emergency triage and clinical management of exposed individuals. Here, measurements of γ-H2AX immunofluorescence by microscopy and flow cytometry were compared as rapid biodosimetric tools for whole and partial body exposures. Ex vivo uniformly X-irradiated blood lymphocytes from one donor were used to generate a universal biexponential calibration function for γ-H2AX foci/intensity yields per unit dose for time points up to 96 hours post exposure. Foci--but not intensity--levels remained significantly above background for 96 hours for doses of 0.5 Gy or more. Foci-based dose estimates for ex vivo X-irradiated blood samples from 13 volunteers were in excellent agreement with the actual dose delivered to the targeted samples. Flow cytometric dose estimates for X-irradiated blood samples from 8 volunteers were in excellent agreement with the actual dose delivered at 1 hour post exposure but less so at 24 hours post exposure. In partial body exposures, simulated by mixing ex vivo irradiated and unirradiated lymphocytes, foci/intensity distributions were significantly over-dispersed compared to uniformly irradiated lymphocytes. For both methods and in all cases the estimated fraction of irradiated lymphocytes and dose to that fraction, calculated using the zero contaminated Poisson test and γ-H2AX calibration function, were in good agreement with the actual mixing ratios and doses delivered to the samples. In conclusion, γ-H2AX analysis of irradiated lymphocytes enables rapid and accurate assessment of whole body doses while dispersion analysis of foci or intensity distributions helps determine partial body doses and the irradiated fraction size in cases of partial body

  18. A genotoxic analysis of the hematopoietic system after mobile phone type radiation exposure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gaurav; McIntosh, Robert L; Anderson, Vitas; McKenzie, Ray J; Wood, Andrew W

    2015-08-01

    In our earlier study we reported that 900 MHz continuous wave (CW) radiofrequency radiation (RFR) exposure (2 W/kg specific absorption rate [SAR]) had no significant effect on the hematopoietic system of rats. In this paper we extend the scope of the previous study by testing for possible effects at: (i) different SAR levels; (ii) both 900 and 1800 MHz, and; (iii) both CW and pulse modulated (PM) RFR. Excised long bones from rats were placed in medium and RFR exposed in (i) a Transverse Electromagnetic (TEM) cell or (ii) a waveguide. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical analyses were used to estimate forward power needed to produce nominal SAR levels of 2/10 and 2.5/12.4 W/kg in the bone marrow. After exposure, the lymphoblasts were extracted and assayed for proliferation rate, and genotoxicity. Our data did not indicate any significant change in these end points for any combination of CW/PM exposure at 900/1800 MHz at SAR levels of nominally 2/10 W/kg or 2.5/12.4 W/kg. No significant changes were observed in the hematopoietic system of rats after the exposure of CW/PM wave 900 MHz/1800 MHz RF radiations at different SAR values.

  19. Late skin damage in rabbits and monkeys after exposure to particulate radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergtold, D. S.; Cox, A. B.; Lett, J. T.; Su, C. M.

    Skin biopsies were taken from the central regions of the ears of New Zealand white rabbits following localized exposure of one ear of each rabbit to 530 MeV/amu Ar or 365 MeV/amu Ne ions. The unirradiated ears served as controls. Biopsies were taken also from the chests and inner thighs of rhesus monkeys after whole-body exposure to 32 MeV protons and from unirradiated control animals. The linear energy transfers (LET∞'s) for the radiations were 90 +/- 5, 35 +/- 3, and ~1.2 keV/μm, respectively. In the rabbit studies, explants were removed with a 2 mm diameter dermal punch at post-irradiation times up to five years after exposure. Similar volumes of monkey tissue were taken from skin samples excised surgically 16-18 years following proton irradiation. Fibroblast cultures were initiated from the explants and were propagated in vitro until terminal senescence (cessation of cell division) occurred. Cultures from irradiated tissue exhibited decreases in doubling potential that were dependent on radiation dose and LET∞ and seemed to reflect damage to stem cell populations. The implications of these results for astronauts exposed to heavy ions and/or protons in space include possible manifestations of residual effects in the skin many years after exposure (e.g. unsatisfactory responses to trauma or surgery).

  20. Cognitive impairment in rats after long-term exposure to GSM-900 mobile phone radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittby, Henrietta; Grafström, Gustav; Tian, Dong Ping; Malmgren, Lars; Brun, Arne; Persson, Bertil R R; Salford, Leif G; Eberhardt, Jacob

    2008-04-01

    Considering the frequent use of mobile phones, we have directed attention to possible implications on cognitive functions. In this study we investigated in a rat model the long-term effects of protracted exposure to Global System for Mobile Communication-900 MHz (GSM-900) radiation. Out of a total of 56 rats, 32 were exposed for 2 h each week for 55 weeks to radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation at different SAR levels (0.6 and 60 mW/kg at the initiation of the experimental period) emitted by a (GSM-900) test phone. Sixteen animals were sham exposed and eight animals were cage controls, which never left the animal house. After this protracted exposure, GSM-900 exposed rats were compared to sham exposed controls. Effects on exploratory behaviour were evaluated in the open-field test, in which no difference was seen. Effects on cognitive functions were evaluated in the episodic-like memory test. In our study, GSM exposed rats had impaired memory for objects and their temporal order of presentation, compared to sham exposed controls (P = 0.02). Detecting the place in which an object was presented was not affected by GSM exposure. Our results suggest significantly reduced memory functions in rats after GSM microwave exposure (P = 0.02). (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Vision 20/20: increased image resolution versus reduced radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritman, Erik L

    2008-06-01

    This is a review of methods, currently and potentially, available for significantly reducing x-ray exposure in medical x-ray imaging. It is stimulated by the radiation exposure implications of the growing use of helical scanning, multislice, x-ray computed tomography for screening, such as for coronary artery atherosclerosis and cancer of the colon and lungs. Screening requires high-throughput imaging with high spatial and contrast resolution to meet the need for high sensitivity and specificity of detection and classification of specific imaged features. To achieve this goal beyond what is currently available with x-ray imaging methods requires increased x-ray exposure, which increases the risk of tissue damage and ultimately cancer development. These consequences limit the utility of current x-ray imaging in screening of at-risk subjects who have not yet developed the clinical symptoms of disease. Current methods for reducing x-ray exposure in x-ray imaging, mostly achieved by increasing sensitivity and specificity of the x-ray detection process, may still have potential for an up-to-tenfold decrease. This could be sufficient for doubling the spatial resolution of x-ray CT while maintaining the current x-ray exposure levels. However, a spatial resolution four times what is currently available might be needed to adequately meet the needs for screening. Consequently, for the proposed need to increase spatial resolution, an additional order of magnitude of reduction of x-ray exposure would be needed just to keep the radiation exposure at current levels. This is conceivably achievable if refraction, rather than the currently used attenuation, of x rays is used to generate the images. Existing methods that have potential for imaging the consequences of refracted x ray in a clinical setting are (1) by imaging the edge enhancement that occurs at the interfaces between adjacent tissues of different refractive indices, or (2) by imaging the changes in interference

  2. Youth solar ultraviolet radiation exposure, concurrent activities and sun-protective practices: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, C Y; Reeder, A I

    2005-01-01

    To assist standardization of procedures, facilitate comparisons, and help guide research efforts to optimally inform development of appropriately targeted interventions, there is a need to review methods used to quantify child and adolescent solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposure, related outdoor activities and sun-protective practices. This holistic approach is essential for comprehensive research that will provide all-inclusive, informative and meaningful messages for preventive measures of harmful UV exposure. Two databases were searched and 29 studies were retrieved, and these studies report measurement or assessment techniques documenting UV exposure patterns and related outdoor activities. Polysulfone film badges were the main measurement instrument used in 10 studies, with questionnaire, survey data, observation, a model, electronic dosimeters, biological dosimeters, colorimeter and UV colouring labels used in the remaining studies. Methods used to record activities included self-report, parental report, a logbook and observation. Measurement duration and unit of UV exposure varied in most studies, but a method common to 15 studies was measured UV exposure as a percentage of ambient UV. The studies reviewed do not provide sufficient information for the development and evaluation of targeted youth sun protection programs. Studies are required which document precise UV exposure, concurrent activities and sun protection usage for children and adolescents.

  3. Occupational exposure to ultraviolet radiation and risk of non-melanoma skin cancer in a multinational European study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Surdu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies suggest that ambient sunlight plays an important role in the pathogenesis of non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC. However, there is ongoing controversy regarding the relevance of occupational exposure to natural and artificial ultraviolet radiation (UV radiation. OBJECTIVES: We investigated potential associations between natural and artificial UV radiation exposure at work with NMSC in a case-control study conducted in Hungary, Romania, and Slovakia. METHODS: Occupational exposures were classified by expert assessment for 527 controls and 618 NMSC cases (515 basal cell carcinoma, BCC. Covariate information was collected via interview and multiple logistic regression models were used to assess associations between UV exposure and NMSC. RESULTS: Lifetime prevalence of occupational exposure in the participants was 13% for natural UV radiation and 7% for artificial UV radiation. Significant negative associations between occupational exposure to natural UV radiation and NMSC were detected for all who had ever been exposed (odds ratio (OR 0.47, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.27-0.80; similar results were detected using a semi-quantitative metric of cumulative exposure. The effects were modified by skin complexion, with significantly decreased risks of BCC among participants with light skin complexion. No associations were observed in relation to occupational artificial UV radiation exposure. CONCLUSIONS: The protective effect of occupational exposure to natural UV radiation was unexpected, but limited to light-skinned people, suggesting adequate sun-protection behaviors. Further investigations focusing on variations in the individual genetic susceptibility and potential interactions with environmental and other relevant factors are planned.

  4. Organism/Organic Exposure to Orbital Stresses (OOREOS) Satellite: Radiation Exposure in LEO and Supporting Laboratory Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioda, Andrew Lige; Cook, Amanda Marie; Quinn, Richard C.; Elsaesser, Andreas; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Ricca,Alessandra; Jones, Nykola C.; Hoffman, Soren; Ricco,Antonio

    2014-01-01

    We will present the results from the exposure of the metalloporphyrin iron tetraphenylporphyrin chloride (FeTPPCI), anthraufin (C(sub 14)H(sub 8)(O sub 4) (Anth) and Isoviolanthrene (C(sub 34H sub 18) (IVA) to the outher space environment, measured in situ aboard the Organism/Organic Exposure to Orbital Stresses nanosatellite. The compounds were exposed for a period of 17 months (3700 hours of direct solar exposure) including broad-spectrum solar radiation (approx. 122 nm to the near infrared). The organic films are enclosed in hermetically sealed sample cells that contain one of four astrobiologically relevant microenvironments. Transmission spectra (200-1000 nm) were recorded for each film, at first daily and subsequently every 15 days, along with a solar spectrum and the dark response of the detector array. In addition to analysis via UV-Vis spectroscopy, the laboratory controls were also monitored via infrared and far-UV spectroscopy. The results presented will include the finding that the FeTPPCI and IVA organic films in contact with a humid headspace gas (0.8-2.3%) exhibit faster degradation times, upon irradiation, in comparison with identical films under dry headspaces gases, whereas the Anth thin film exhibited a higher degree of photostability. In the companion laboratory experiments, simulated solar exposure of FeTPI films in contact with either Ar or CO(sub -2):O(sub -2):Ar (10:0.01:1000) headspace gas results in growth of a band in the films infrared spectra at 1961 cm(sup 1). Our assignment of this new spectral feature and the corresponding rational will be presented. The relevance of O/OREOS findings to planetary science, biomarker research, and the photostability of organic materials in astrobiologically relevant environments will also be discussed.

  5. Intraoperative fluoroscopy, portable X-ray, and CT: patient and operating room personnel radiation exposure in spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Elisha M; Monazzam, Shafagh M; Kim, Kee D; Seibert, J Anthony; Klineberg, Eric O

    2014-12-01

    Intraoperative imaging is essential in spinal surgery to both determine the correct level and place implants safely. Surgeons have a variety of options: C-arm fluoroscopy (C-arm), portable X-ray (XR) radiography, and portable cone-beam computed tomography (O-arm). Although these modalities have their respective advantages and disadvantages, direct comparison of radiation exposure to either the patient or the operating room (OR) staff has not been made. To determine the amount of radiation exposure to patients and OR staff during spine surgery with C-arm, XR, and O-arm. An experimental model to assess radiation exposure to OR staff and phantom patient during spine surgery. A plastic phantom was created to emulate patient volume and absorption scattering characteristics of a typical sized adult abdominal volume. Radiation exposure was measured with ion chamber dosimeters to determine entrance phantom and scatter exposures at common positions occupied by OR staff for C-arm, XR, and O-arm in typical image acquisition during spinal surgery. Single lateral (LAT)/posterior-anterior entrance patient radiation exposure for C-arm was on average 116/102 mR, single-exposure XR for LAT/anterior-posterior (AP) was 3,435/2,160 mR, and single-exposure O-arm for LAT/AP was 4,360/5,220 mR. O-arm surface exposure LAT/AP was equivalent to 38/41 C-arm and 1.5/2.4 XR exposures. The surgeon and surgeon assistant had higher levels of scatter radiation for C-arm, followed by O-arm and XR. For the LAT C-arm acquisition, a 7.7-fold increase in radiation exposure was measured on the X-ray tube side compared with the detector side. The anesthesiologist scatter radiation level for a single acquisition was highest for O-arm, followed by XR and C-arm. The radiologic technologist scatter radiation level was highest for XR, followed by O-arm and fluoroscopy. Overall radiation exposure to OR staff was less than 4.4 mR for a single acquisition in all modalities. Assessment of radiation risk to the

  6. Effects of radiation exposure on plant populations and radiation protection of the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geras' kin, St.A.; Dikarev, V.G.; Oudalova, A.A.; Vasiliev, D.V.; Dikareva, N.S.; Baykova, T.A. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Evseeva, T.I. [Institute of Biology, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Div. RAS, Syktyvkar (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    The results of long-term field experiments in the 30-km Chernobyl NPP zone, In the vicinity of the radioactive wastes storage facility (Leningrad Region), at radium production industry storage cell (the Komi Republic), and in Bryansk Region affected by the ChNPP accident that have been carried out on different species of wild and agricultural plants are discussed. These findings indicate that plant populations growing in areas with relatively low levels of pollution are characterized by the increased level of both cytogenetic disturbances and genetic diversity. The chronic low-dose exposure appears to be an ecological factor creating preconditions for possible changes in the genetic structure of a population. These processes have a genetic basis; therefore, an understanding changes at the genetic level should help in an identifying more complex changes at higher levels. The presented findings add to filling an important gap in our knowledge on remote effects in plant populations and ecosystems from man-made impact. (author)

  7. Multistage Carcinogenesis Modelling of Low and Protracted Radiation Exposure for Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugmans, M. J. P.; Bijwaard, H.

    Exposure to cosmic radiation in space poses an increased risk for radiation-induced cancer later in life. Modelling is essential to quantify these excess risks from low and protracted exposures to a mixture of radiation types, since they cannot be determined directly in epidemiological studies. Multistage carcinogenesis models provide a mechanistic basis for the extrapolation of epidemiological data to the regime that is relevant for radiation protection. In recent years, we have exploited the well-known two-mutation carcinogenesis model to bridge the gap between radiobiology and epidemiology. We have fitted this model to a number of animal and epidemiological data sets, using dose-response relationships for the mutational steps that are well established in cellular radiobiology. The methodology and implications for radiation risks are illustrated with analyses of two radiation-induced tumours: bone cancer from internal (high-LET and low-LET) emitters and lung cancer after radon exposure. For the risks of bone-seeking radionuclides (Ra-226, Sr-90, Pu-239), model fits to beagle data show that the dose-effect relationship for bone cancer at low intakes is linear-quadratic. This is due to a combination of equally strong linear dose-effects in the two subsequent mutational steps in the model. This supra-linear dose-effect relationship is also found in a model analysis of bone cancer in radium dial painters. This implies that at low intakes the risks from bone seekers are significantly lower than estimated from a linear extrapolation from high doses. Model analyses of radon-exposed rats and uranium miners show that lung-cancer induction is dominated by a linear radiation effect in the first mutational step. For two miner cohorts with significantly different lung cancer baselines a uniform description of the effect of radon is obtained in a joint analysis. This demonstrates the possibility to model risk transfer across populations. In addition to biologically based risk

  8. Project Management and sustainability - review of the 4th IPMA Research Conference 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helgi Thor Ingason

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The 4th IPMA research conference was held on Project Management and Sustainability in Reykjavik, Iceland from September 14th - 16th 2016. In this article, we give a general outline of the structure of the conference, the main findings and what they mean for the project management community.

  9. 33 CFR 165.166 - Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th Fireworks, East River, NY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Fireworks, East River, NY. 165.166 Section 165.166 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... § 165.166 Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th Fireworks, East River, NY. (a) Regulated area. The following area...) in length, carrying persons for the purpose of viewing the fireworks, may take position in an area...

  10. Assessment of an Engineering Technology Outreach Program for 4th-7th Grade Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Elizabeth M.; Christman, Jeanne; Garrick, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a workshop led by female Engineering Technology students, with support from female faculty, to provide an introduction to Engineering Technology to 4th-7th grade girls through a series of interactive laboratory experiments. This outreach program was developed to improve attitudes towards science and engineering in middle…

  11. Improving the Attitudes of 4th Graders toward Older People through a Multidimensional Intergenerational Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynott, Patricia P.; Merola, Pamela R.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an intergenerational program on children's attitudes toward older people. Four 4th grade classes, one each during the years 2002 through 2005, participated in the study. The elders and school children engaged in meaningful activities over a 5 month period, including the performance of a play…

  12. Overweight and obesity in six-year-old children in 4th and 5th ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Weight status at age six years has been identified as an important predictor of overweight and obesity in adolescence, which, in turn, tracks into adulthood, increasing the risk of future metabolic diseases. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of overweight and obesity in six-year-old children in 4th and 5th ...

  13. “The Arabs” in the ecclesiastical historians of the 4th/5th centuries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Historical inquiry into the origin and history of “the Arabs” has long been a part of Western Orientalist literature. However, Christian scholars from the 7th century onward sought to understand the rise of Islam from within a Biblical framework. This article looks at how the early church historians of the 4th and 5th centuries ...

  14. Comparison of HIV-1 viral loads, CD4-Th2-lymphocytes and effects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparison of HIV-1 viral loads, CD4-Th2-lymphocytes and effects of praziquantel treatment among adults infected or uninfected with Schistosoma mansoni in fishing villages of ... Single stool samples were examined for S. mansoni eggs using Kato Katz technique at 6-month follow-up and 12 weeks after treatment.

  15. Time use of Hellene 3rd and 4th graders during a school day

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleioras, Georgios

    2010-01-01

    Using data from the time diaries of 164 Hellene 3rd and 4th graders interviewed in their homes in March 2007, individual differences in time-use patterns were investigated. The participants rested for 9 hours 10 minutes, and spent 57.0%, 21.7%, and 5.0% of their waking time on school-related

  16. Radiation exposure and mortality risk from CT and PET imaging of patients with malignant lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nievelstein, R.A.J.; Kwee, T.C.; Beek, F.J.A.; Mali, W.P.T.M. [University Medical Center, Department of Radiology (E 01.132), Utrecht (Netherlands); Quarles van Ufford, H.M.E. [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Radiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Bierings, M.B. [University Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Ludwig, I. [University Medical Center, Department of Hematology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Klerk, J.M.H. de [Meander Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Bruin, P.W. de; Geleijns, J. [University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2012-09-15

    To quantify radiation exposure and mortality risk from computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) in patients with malignant lymphoma (Hodgkin's disease [HD] or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma [NHL]). First, organ doses were assessed for a typical diagnostic work-up in children with HD and adults with NHL. Subsequently, life tables were constructed for assessment of radiation risks, also taking into account the disease-related mortality. In children with HD, cumulative effective dose from medical imaging ranged from 66 mSv (newborn) to 113 mSv (15 years old). In adults with NHL the cumulative effective dose from medical imaging was 97 mSv. Average fractions of radiation-induced deaths for children with HD [without correction for disease-related mortality in brackets] were 0.4% [0.6%] for boys and 0.7% [1.1%] for girls, and for adults with NHL 0.07% [0.28%] for men and 0.09% [0.37%] for women. Taking into account the disease-related reduction in life expectancy of patients with malignant lymphoma results in a higher overall mortality but substantial lower incidence of radiation induced deaths. The modest radiation risk that results from imaging with CT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET can be considered as justified, but imaging should be performed with care, especially in children. (orig.)

  17. Adaption By Low Dose Radiation Exposure: A Look at Scope and Limitations for Radioprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchel, Ron E J

    2015-01-01

    The procedures and dose limitations used for radiation protection in the nuclear industry are founded on the assumption that risk is directly proportional to dose, without a threshold. Based on this idea that any dose, no matter how small, will increase risk, radiation protection regulations generally attempt to reduce any exposure to "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA). We know however, that these regulatory assumptions are inconsistent with the known biological effects of low doses. Low doses induce protective effects, and these adaptive responses are part of a general response to low stress. Adaptive responses have been tightly conserved during evolution, from single celled organisms up to humans, indicating their importance. Here we examine cellular and animal studies that show the influence of radiation induced protective effects on diverse diseases, and examine the radiation dose range that is effective for different tissues in the same animal. The concept of a dose window, with upper and lower effective doses, as well as the effect of multiple stressors and the influence of genetics will also be examined. The effect of the biological variables on low dose responses will be considered from the point of view of the limitations they may impose on any revised radiation protection regulations.

  18. Guide to reducing radiation exposure to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathren, R.L.

    1980-04-01

    This document is designed to provide DOE contractor personnel with general guidance regarding programs and techniques to reduce radiation exposures to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Thus it is directed towards a broad audience, and should have special relevance and interest for operating management as well as radiation protection personnel. It is well recognized that each contractor has needs specific and critical to its radiation protection program. Hence no single set of specific and detailed criteria can be set down as a prescription for achieving the ALARA goal. Rather, general guidance in the form of broad principles is given in order to acquaint management with ALARA needs and concepts. The purpose is to encourage maximum management support of the technical personnel responsible for carrying out day-to-day radiation protection activities. Although primarily written for management, this document also contains technical guidance of potential value to those directly involved in radiation protection activities. Again it should be stressed that what is provided is guidance, and is therefore not mandatory.

  19. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of dental enamel for retrospective assessment of radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukihara, E.G. [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States)], E-mail: eduardo.yukihara@okstate.edu; Mittani, J.; McKeever, S.W.S. [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Simon, S.L. [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-7238 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    This paper briefly reviews the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) properties of dental enamel and discusses the potential and challenges of OSL for filling the technology gap in biodosimetry required for medical triage following a radiological/nuclear accident or terrorist event. The OSL technique uses light to stimulate a radiation-induced luminescence signal from materials previously exposed to ionizing radiation. This luminescence originates from radiation-induced defects in insulating crystals and is proportional to the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation. In our research conducted to date, we focused on fundamental investigations of the OSL properties of dental enamel using extracted teeth and tabletop OSL readers. The objective was to obtain information to support the development of the necessary instrumentation for retrospective dosimetry using dental enamel in laboratory, or for in situ and non-invasive accident dosimetry using dental enamel in emergency triage. An OSL signal from human dental enamel was detected using blue, green, or IR stimulation. Blue/green stimulation associated with UV emission detection seems to be the most appropriate combination in the sense that there is no signal from un-irradiated samples and the shape of the OSL decay is clear. Improvements in the minimum detection level were achieved by incorporating an ellipsoidal mirror in the OSL system to maximize light collection. Other possibilities to improve the sensitivity and research steps necessary to establish the feasibility of the technique for retrospective assessment of radiation exposure are also discussed.

  20. Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) of dental enamel for retrospective assessment of radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukihara, E G; Mittani, J; McKeever, S W S; Simon, S L

    2007-07-01

    This paper briefly reviews the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) properties of dental enamel and discusses the potential and challenges of OSL for filling the technology gap in biodosimetry required for medical triage following a radiological/nuclear accident or terrorist event. The OSL technique uses light to stimulate a radiation-induced luminescence signal from materials previously exposed to ionizing radiation. This luminescence originates from radiation-induced defects in insulating crystals and is proportional to the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation. In our research conducted to date, we focused on fundamental investigations of the OSL properties of dental enamel using extracted teeth and tabletop OSL readers. The objective was to obtain information to support the development of the necessary instrumentation for retrospective dosimetry using dental enamel in laboratory, or for in situ and non-invasive accident dosimetry using dental enamel in emergency triage. An OSL signal from human dental enamel was detected using blue, green, or IR stimulation. Blue/green stimulation associated with UV emission detection seems to be the most appropriate combination in the sense that there is no signal from un-irradiated samples and the shape of the OSL decay is clear. Improvements in the minimum detection level were achieved by incorporating an ellipsoidal mirror in the OSL system to maximize light collection. Other possibilities to improve the sensitivity and research steps necessary to establish the feasibility of the technique for retrospective assessment of radiation exposure are also discussed.

  1. Modeling Dexterity Development in 2nd-4th-grade Boys by Means of Active Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Марченко

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to optimize the mode of using game for dexterity development in the 2nd-4th-grade boys. Materials & methods: to conduct the experiment, there were eight test groups (n=48 formed in each class. The total number of such test groups was 24. The research relied on the following methods: theoretical analysis and collation of scientific and methodological literature; pedagogical testing; methods of mathematical experiment planning (complete factorial experiment 23; modeling method. Results: the research has determined that to develop dexterity, the 2nd-4th-grade boys need to participate in up to five games. The number of repetitions for the 2nd-3rd-graders is two, and for the 4th-graders – three, with 30–40-second rest intervals. The 2nd-4th-grade boys showed effective development during 40 classes, and the 3rd-grade boys – during 20 classes. After that, we recommend to use other means. The game duration varies from one to two minutes. Conclusions: the analysis of the scientific and methodological literature has revealed that the level of motor readiness, dexterity being one of its main components, largely determines the state of children’s physical and mental health. The research has found that the natural development of coordination abilities in boys aged between 7 and 10 is 22.5–80.0% (56.2% on average. Game actions play a particular role in dexterity development in junior schoolers. The 23 complete factorial experiment made it possible to study the multi-factorial structure of game load for the 2nd-4th-graders; to specify the relations between factors for their use during dexterity development in the 2nd-4th-grade boys in physical education classes. They can serve as an objective tool for the educational process optimization. The given regression equations are models that can be used to determine the optimal game means ratio in the academic process of the 2nd-4th-graders.

  2. Exposure of Finnish population to solar UV radiation and consequent carcinogenic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huurto, L.; Jansen, C. [Turku Univ. Hospital, Turku (Finland); Jokela, K. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Depletion of stratospheric ozone increases irradiance of terrestrial ultraviolet (UV) radiation at short wavelengths, which may be harmful to the human health. To understand quantitatively the risks caused by increasing UV radiation to the Finnish population, the actual UV exposure of the population has to be assessed. It was shown that the snow reflection increases the UV exposure to the face and eyes particularly in the northern Finland. In 1993 exceptionally low ozone levels persisted up to the end of May, which resulted in a theoretical increase in the annual UV dose ranging from 8 % to 13 % in Finland. The maximal increase in the measured erythemally effective dose rate was 34 % on 23 April, when compared with the theoretical normal value. During this study exposure models have been developed. The models have been combined them with Green`s radiation transfer model to estimate annual facial UV doses received by different groups of Finnish population. Also, an updated estimate for increase in skin cancer incidence due to the ozone depletion is presented. It is estimated that the maximal increase in UV doses caused by the depletion of the stratospheric ozone will be 12 % in the first years of the next century in Finland. This may result in increase in skin carcinomas by 20-30 % if the people do not improve their protection against solar UV radiation. At the moment the annual facial UV dose of the Finnish indoor worker varies from 3 % to 6 % of the annual ambient dose. In the worst case an outdoor worker may receive even 16% of the annual ambient dose. However, the doses received by indoor workers during vacation to an untanned skin may be more harmful due to the increased risk of malignant melanoma.

  3. Establishment of exposure dose assessment laboratory in National Radiation Emergency Medical Center (NREMC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jae Ryong; Ha, Wi Ho; Yoon, Seok Won; Han, Eun Ae; Lee, Seung Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    As unclear industry grown, 432 of the nuclear power plants are operating and 52 of NPPs are under construction currently. Increasing use of radiation or radioisotopes in the field of industry, medical purpose and research such as non-destructive examination, computed tomography and x-ray, etc. constantly. With use of nuclear or radiation has incidence possibility for example the Fukushima NPP incident, the Goiania accident and the Chernobyl Nuclear accident. Also the risk of terror by radioactive material such as Radiological Dispersal Device(RDD) etc. In Korea, since the 'Law on protection of nuclear facilities and countermeasure for radioactive preparedness was enacted in 2003, the Korean institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences(KIRAMS) was established for the radiation emergency medical response in radiological disaster due to nuclear accident, radioactive terror and so on. Especially National Radiation Emergency Medical Center(NREMC) has the duty that is protect citizens from nuclear, radiological accidents or radiological terrors through the emergency medical preparedness. The NREMC was established by the 39-article law on physical protection of nuclear material and facilities and measures for radiological emergencies. Dose assessment or contamination survey should be performed which provide the radiological information for medical response. For this reason, the NREMC establish and re-organized dose assessment system based on the existing dose assessment system of the NREMC recently. The exposure dose could be measured by physical and biological method. With these two methods, we can have conservative dose assessment result. Therefore the NREMC established the exposure dose assessment laboratory which was re-organized laboratory space and introduced specialized equipment for dose assessment. This paper will report the establishment and operation of exposure dose assessment laboratory for radiological emergency response and discuss how to enhance

  4. Occupational radiation exposure in Germany in 2013-2014. Report of the radiation protection register; Die berufliche Strahlenexposition in Deutschland 2013-2014. Bericht des Strahlenschutzregisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frasch, Gerhard; Kammerer, Lothar; Karofsky, Ralf; Mordek, Else; Schlosser, Andrea; Spiesl, Josef

    2015-10-15

    In Germany, persons who are occupationally exposed to ionising radiation are monitored by several official dosimetry services that transmit the dose records about individual radiation monitoring to the Radiation Protection Register of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS). The purpose of the Radiation Protection Register is to supervise the keeping of the dose limits and to monitor the compliance with the radiation protection principle ''Optimisation'' by performing detailed annual statistical analyses of the monitored persons and their radiation exposure. The annual report of the Radiation Protection Register provides information about status and development of occupational radiation exposure in Germany. In 2014, about 358,000 workers were monitored with dosemeters for occupational radiation exposure. The number increased continuously by totally 5 % into the past five years. 15 % of the monitored persons received measurable personal doses. The average annual dose of these exposed workers was 0.50 mSv corresponding to less than 3 % of the annual dose limit of 20 mSv for radiation workers. In total, two persons exceeded the annual dose limit of 20 mSv, i.e. less than one case per 100,000 monitored persons. The collective dose of the monitored persons decreased to 26.0 Person-Sv, the lowest value since the last fifty years of occupational dose monitoring. 45 airlines calculated the route doses of 39,500 aircraft crew members by using certified computer pro-grammes for dose calculation and sent the accumulated monthly doses via the Federal Office for Civil Aviation (''Luftfahrt-Bundesamt, LBA'') to the BfS. The collective dose of the aircraft crew personnel is 74.8 person-Sv, and thus significantly higher than the total collective dose of the workers monitored with personal dosemeters. The annual average dose of aircraft crew personnel was 1.89 mSv in 2014. In 2014, about 58,500 outside-workers were in possession of

  5. Occupational radiation exposure in Germany in 2012. Report of the radiation protection register; Die berufliche Strahlenexposition in Deutschland 2012. Bericht des Strahlenschutzregisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frasch, Gerhard; Kammerer, Lothar; Karofsky, Ralf; Mordek, Else; Schlosser, Andrea; Spiesl, Josef

    2014-04-15

    In Germany, persons who are occupationally exposed to ionising radiation are monitored by several official dosimetry services that transmit the dose records about individual radiation monitoring to the Radiation Protection Register of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS). The purpose of the Radiation Protection Register is to supervise the keeping of the dose limits and to monitor the compliance with the radiation protection principle ''Optimisation'' by performing detailed annual statistical analyses of the monitored persons and their radiation exposure. The annual report of the Radiation Protection Register provides information about status and development of occupational radiation exposure in Germany. In 2012, about 350,000 workers were monitored with dosemeters for occupational radiation exposure. The number increased continuously by totally 10 % into the past five years. 19 % of the monitored persons received measurable personal doses. The average annual dose of these exposed workers was 0.52 mSv corresponding to 2.6 % of the annual dose limit of 20 mSv for radiation workers. In total, 2 persons exceeded the annual dose limit of 20 mSv, i.e. less than one case per 100,000 monitored persons. The collective dose of the monitored persons decreased to 27.9 Person-Sv, the lowest value since the last fifty years of occupational dose monitoring. 45 airlines calculated the route doses of 40,000 aircraft crew members by using certified computer programmes for dose calculation and sent the accumulated monthly doses via the Federal Office for Civil Aviation (''Luftfahrt-Bundesamt, LBA'') to the BfS. The collective dose of the aircraft crew personnel is 78.5 person- Sv, and thus significantly higher than the total collective dose of the workers monitored with personal dosemeters. The annual average dose of aircraft crew personnel was 1.96 mSv and decreased compared to 2011 (2.12 mSv) due to solar cycle. In 2012, about

  6. Radiation exposure exerts its adverse effects on sperm maturation through estrogen-induced hypothalamohypophyseal axis inhibition in rats

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Makinta, MJ

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Irradiation has adverse effects on reproductive aspects such as spermatogenic cell population and cell malformation, leading to reduced sperm count and non-viable spermatozoa. This has overshadowed possible effects of radiation exposure...

  7. Occupational exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation and the risk of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Cheryl E; Demers, Paul A; Kalia, Sunil; Hystad, Perry; Villeneuve, Paul J; Nicol, Anne-Marie; Kreiger, Nancy; Koehoorn, Mieke W

    2016-11-01

    Preventable risk factors for prostate cancer are poorly understood; sun exposure is a possible protective factor. The goal of this study was to investigate prostate cancer risk in outdoor workers, a population with high sun exposure. Prostate cancer cases and controls from a large study (conducted between 1994 and 1997) were used for this analysis. A job exposure matrix (JEM) was used to assign solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) at work as moderate (2 to solar UVR exposure and the odds of prostate cancer. A total of 1638 cases and 1697 controls were included. Men of Indian and Asian descent had reduced odds of prostate cancer (ORs 0.17 (0.08 to 0.35) and 0.25 (0.15 to 0.41), respectively) compared with Caucasian men, as did single men (OR 0.76 (0.58 to 0.98)) compared with married men. Overall, no statistically significant associations were observed between sun exposure and prostate cancer with 1 exception. In the satellite-enhanced JEM that considered exposure in high category jobs only, prostate cancer odds in the highest quartile of cumulative exposure was decreased compared with unexposed men (OR 0.68 (0.51 to 0.92)). This study found limited evidence for an association with prostate cancer, with the exception of 1 statistically significant finding of a decreased risk among workers with the longest term and highest sun exposure. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Chromosome aberrations in workers with exposure to α-particle radiation from internal deposits of plutonium: expectations from in vitro studies and comparisons with workers with predominantly external γ-radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curwen, Gillian B.; Tawn, E.J. [The University of Manchester, Centre for Integrated Genomic Medical Research (CIGMR), School of Population Health, Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, Manchester (United Kingdom); Sotnik, Natalia V.; Azizova, Tamara V. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region 456780 (Russian Federation); Cadwell, Kevin K. [Medical School, Newcastle University, Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Hill, Mark A. [University of Oxford, CRUK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratories, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-15

    mFISH analysis of chromosome aberration profiles of 47 and 144 h lymphocyte cultures following exposure to 193 mGy α-particle radiation confirmed that the frequency of stable aberrant cells and stable cells carrying translocations remains constant through repeated cell divisions. Age-specific rates and in vitro dose-response curves were used to derive expected translocation yields in nine workers from the Mayak nuclear facility in Russia. Five had external exposure to γ-radiation, two of whom also had exposure to neutrons, and four had external exposure to γ-radiation and internal exposure to α-particle radiation from incorporated plutonium. Doubts over the appropriateness of the dose response used to estimate translocations from the neutron component made interpretation difficult in two of the workers with external exposure, but the other three had translocation yields broadly in line with expectations. Three of the four plutonium workers had translocation yields in line with expectations, thus supporting the application of the recently derived in vitro α-particle dose response for translocations in stable cells. Overall this report demonstrates that with adequate reference in vitro dose-response curves, translocation yield has the potential to be a useful tool in the validation of red bone marrow doses resulting from mixed exposure to external and internal radiation. (orig.)

  9. Radiation Exposure to Premature Infants in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olgar, Turan; Bor, Dogan [Ankara University, Ankara (Turkmenistan); Onal, Esra; Okumus, Nurullah; Atalay, Yildiz; Turkyilmaz, Canan; Ergenekon, Ebru; Koc, Esin [Gazi University, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2008-10-15

    The aim of this work was to determine the radiation dose received by infants from radiographic exposure and the contribution from scatter radiation due to radiographic exposure of other infants in the same room. We retrospectively evaluated the entrance skin doses (ESDs) and effective doses of 23 infants with a gestational age as low as 28 weeks. ESDs were determined from tube output measurements (ESD{sub TO}) (n = 23) and from the use of thermoluminescent dosimetry (ESD{sub TLD}) (n = 16). Scattered radiation was evaluated using a 5 cm Perspex phantom. Effective doses were estimated from ESD{sub TO} by Monte Carlo computed software and radiation risks were estimated from the effective dose. ESD{sub TO} and ESD{sub TLD} were correlated using linear regression analysis. The mean ESD{sub TO} for the chest and abdomen were 67 muGy and 65 muGy per procedure, respectively. The mean ESD{sub TLD} per radiograph was 70 muGy. The measured scattered radiation range at a 2 m distance from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) was (11-17 muGy) per radiograph. Mean effective doses were 16 and 27 muSv per procedure for the chest and abdomen, respectively. ESD{sub TLD} was well correlated with ESD{sub TO} obtained from the total chest and abdomen radiographs for each infant (R2 = 0.86). The radiation risks for childhood cancer estimated from the effective dose were 0.4 x 10{sup -6} to 2 x 10{sup -6} and 0.6 x 10{sup -6} to 2.9 x 10{sup -6} for chest and abdomen radiographs, respectively. The results of our study show that neonates received acceptable doses from common radiological examinations. Although the contribution of scatter radiation to the neonatal dose is low, considering the sensitivity of the neonates to radiation, further protective action was performed by increasing the distance of the infants from each other

  10. Cosmic radiation and airline pilots: Exposure pattern as a function of aircraft type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tveten, U.; Haldorsen, T.; Reitan, J

    2000-07-01

    The project presented here has been carried out as part of an epidemiological project on Norwegian aircraft personnel, entitled 'Exposure to low level ionising radiation and incidence of cancer in airline pilots and crew'. The purpose of the main project is to determine if there may be a relationship between exposure to cosmic radiation at aircraft cruising altitudes and the incidence of cancer. The methodology used as basis for estimating the radiation exposures is presented. The information used as basis for the dose estimations comes from a variety of sources: the files at the Personnel Licensing Section and the Aviation Medical Section of Norwegian Aviation Administration, the route tables of Scandinavian Airlines System (SAS), large amounts of expert information contributed by members of the Pilot's Associations in Norway and a couple of non-Norwegian pilots and from other members of the staff of SAS and other airlines. The estimation for each pilot was based on individual information of annual block hours and an estimated doserate for each type of aircraft. The latter was estimated as a weighted average of CARI-estimated doses on a selection of routes flown by the airplanes in the different time periods. The project includes all pilots that have been licensed in Norway since 1946. These pilots have been flying a large variety of different types of aircraft and routes. The cosmic radiation intensity is a function of altitude in the atmosphere and, less markedly, of geographical latitude and of the intensity of the radiation from the sun (quantified as the heliocentric potential). Different types of aircraft fly at different altitudes and are used for different purposes (passenger traffic, cargo, air photography, preparation of maps etc) and used on different routes. The end results of the project described in this article are radiation exposures per block hour for each type of aircraft, and for each individual year (the differences between years

  11. Legislating for occupational exposure to sources of natural radiation- the UK approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higham, N.; Walker, S.; Thomas, G.

    2004-07-01

    Title VII of EC Directive 96/29/Euratom (the 1996 BSS Directive) for the first time requires Member States to take action in relation to work activities within which the presence of natural radiation sources leads to a significant increase in the exposure of workers or members of the public which cannot be disregarded from the radiation protection point of view. The UK in fact has had legal requirements relating to occupational exposure to natural radiation sources since 1985, in the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985, made to implement the bulk of the provisions of the previous BSS Directive (80/836/Euratom, as amended by 84/467/Euratom). The Ionising Radiations Regulations 1999, that implement the worker protection requirements of the 1996 Euratom BSS Directive, include similar provisions. The definition of radioactive substance includes any substance which contains one or more radionuclides whose activity cannot be disregarded for the purposes of radiation protection. This means that some low specific activity ores and sands fall within this definition and are therefore subject to relevant requirements of the Regulations. Further advice is given on circumstances in which this may apply. Radon is covered more explicitly by applying the regulations to any work carried out in an atmosphere containing radon 222 gas at a concentration in air, averaged over any 24 hour period, exceeding 400 Bq m-3 except where the concentration of the short-lived daughters of radon 222 in air averaged over any 8 hour working period does not exceed 6.24 x 10-7Jm-3. The Health and Safety Executive pursues a policy of raising awareness of the potential for exposure to radon in the workplace and targeting those employers likely to have a radon problem (based on the use of existing information on homes). The regulatory approach has been to seek remedial building measures so that the workplace is removed from control. HSE is able to offer advice about getting their workplace tested and

  12. Radiation exposure of ventilated trauma patients in intensive care: a retrospective study comparing two time periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Micaela V; Barron, Rochelle A; Knobloch, Tom A; Pandey, Umesh; Twyford, Catherine; Freebairn, Ross C

    2012-08-01

    To describe the cumulative effective dose of radiation that was received during the initial Emergency Department assessment and ICU stay of patients admitted with trauma, who required mechanical ventilation, during two time periods. A retrospective analysis of radiological and clinical data, set in a regional nonurban ICU. Two cohorts (starting 1 January 2004 and 1 January 2009), each comprising 45 adult patients admitted with trauma who were mechanically ventilated in intensive care, were studied. Frequency and type of radiological examinations, demographic information, and clinical data were collated from the radiological database, hospital admission record and Australian Outcomes Research Tool for Intensive Care database. Cumulative effective doses were calculated and expressed as a total dose and average daily dose for each cohort. The median cumulative effective dose per patient (in milliSieverts) increased from 34.59 [interquartile range (IQR) 9.08-43.91] in 2004 to 40.51 (IQR 22.01-48.87) in 2009, P=0.045. An increased number of computed tomography examinations per patient was also observed over the same interval from an average of 2.11 (median 2, IQR 1-3) in 2004 to an average of 2.62 (2, 2-4) in 2009, P=0.046. The radiation exposure of mechanically ventilated trauma patients in intensive care has increased over time. Radiation exposure should be prospectively monitored and staff should be aware of the increased risk resulting from this change in practice.

  13. Modeling the survivability of brucella to exposure of Ultraviolet radiation and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, R.

    Accumulated summation of daily Ultra Violet-B (UV-B = 290? to 320 ? ) data? from The USDA Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring Program show good correlation (R^2 = 77%) with daily temperature data during the five month period from February through June, 1998. Exposure of disease organisms, such as brucella to the effects of accumulated UV-B radiation, can be modeled for a 5 month period from February through June, 1998. Estimates of a lethal dosage for brucell of UV-B in the environment is dependent on minimum/maximum temperature and Solar Zenith Angle for the time period. The accumulated increase in temperature over this period also effects the decomposition of an aborted fetus containing brucella. Decomposition begins at some minimum daily temperature at 27 to 30 degrees C and peaks at 39 to 40C. It is useful to view the summation of temperature as a threshold for other bacteria growth, so that accumulated temperature greater than some value causes decomposition through competition with other bacteria and brucella die from the accumulated effects of UV-B, temperature and organism competition. Results of a study (Cook 1998) to determine survivability of brucellosis in the environment through exposure of aborted bovine fetuses show no one cause can be attributed to death of the disease agent. The combination of daily increase in temperature and accumulated UV-B radiation reveal an inverse correlation to survivability data and can be modeled as an indicator of brucella survivability in the environment in arid regions.

  14. Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Exposure, Oxidative Stress and Epigenetic Programing of Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharmalingam, Sujeenthar; Sreetharan, Shayenthiran; Kulesza, Adomas V; Boreham, Douglas R; Tai, T C

    2017-10-01

    Ionizing radiation exposure from medical diagnostic imaging has greatly increased over the last few decades. Approximately 80% of patients who undergo medical imaging are exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR). Although there is widespread consensus regarding the harmful effects of high doses of radiation, the biological effects of low-linear energy transfer (LET) LDIR is not well understood. LDIR is known to promote oxidative stress, however, these levels may not be large enough to result in genomic mutations. There is emerging evidence that oxidative stress causes heritable modifications via epigenetic mechanisms (DNA methylation, histone modification, noncoding RNA regulation). These epigenetic modifications result in permanent cellular transformations without altering the underlying DNA nucleotide sequence. This review summarizes the major concepts in the field of epigenetics with a focus on the effects of low-LET LDIR (stress on epigenetic gene modification. In this review, we show evidence that suggests that LDIR-induced oxidative stress provides a mechanistic link between LDIR and epigenetic gene regulation. We also discuss the potential implication of LDIR exposure during pregnancy where intrauterine fetal development is highly susceptible to oxidative stress-induced epigenetic programing.

  15. Late skin damage in rabbits and monkeys after exposure to particulate radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergtold, D. S.; Cox, A. B.; Lett, J. T.; Su, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Preliminary results are reported of experiments on the late effects of exposure to particulate radiations on stem cell populations. Skin biopsies were taken from the ears of rabbits irradiated 2-5 years previously with 530 MeV/amu Ar ions (LET 90 keV/micron), or 365 MeV/amu Ne ions (LET 35 keV micron), and from the chests and inner thighs of rhesus monkeys irradiated 16-18 years previously with 32-MeV protons (LET about 1.2 keV/micron). Skin fibroblast cultures obtained from the biopsy samples in rabbits were observed to undergo dose-dependent decreases in in vitro life span, with estimated survival curves showing the effects of Ar-ion irradiation to be more severe than those of Ne-ion irradiation. In addition, the healing of the biopsy wound was observed to become slower as radiation dose increased. In the monkey, radiation reduced the average number of fibroblasts at the time of cessation of growth in culture. Results thus demonstrate the capacity of skin sampling to reveal stem cell destruction, and have important implications for astronauts and other persons at risk of particle exposure with regard to healing responses to trauma or surgery.

  16. Patient radiation exposure in uterine artery embolization of leiomyomata: calculation of organ doses and effective dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, S.; Strecker, E.P. [Department of Radiology, Diakonissenkrankenhaus, Diakonissenstrasse 28, 76199, Karlsruhe (Germany); Schultz, F.W.; Zoetelief, J. [Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Medical Physics, Delft University of Technology, 2629 JB, Delft (Netherlands)

    2004-05-01

    The goal of this study was estimation of patient effective dose from uterine artery embolization of leiomyomata. Parameters and data relevant to patient dose were recorded for 33 consecutive procedures. Using Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport, organ and effective doses were calculated in detail for a subset of five procedures, to estimate the effective dose for all procedures. Mean dose area product was 59.9, median 23.4, and range 8.8-317.5 Gycm{sup 2}. Mean absorbed ovarian dose was calculated as 51 mGy in the five procedures. Using the dose conversion factor estimated from the Monte Carlo simulation for all procedures a mean estimated effective dose of 34 mSv (median 13 mSv, range 5-182 mSv) results, with a tendency to lower values regarding the succession of the procedures. Patients' radiation exposure level is up to twice of that of an abdominal CT examination. Angiographic equipment related dose-reducing features and radiographic technique essentially influence organ doses and effective dose. Consistent application of dose-reducing techniques and awareness of radiation exposure justifies uterine artery embolization as a therapeutic option for the treatment of uterine fibroids. (orig.)

  17. Radiation Exposure from Diagnostic Imaging in a Cohort of Pediatric Transplant Recipients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Seal

    Full Text Available Recipients of solid organ transplants (SOT have extensive diagnostic imaging (DI. The purpose of this study was to quantify this exposure. Children from northern Alberta with SOTs at Stollery Children's Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta January 1, 2006, to July 31, 2012, were included. Effective doses of radiation were estimated using published norms for DI performed post-transplant up to October 16, 2014. The 54 eligible children had 6215 DI studies (5628 plain films, 293 computerized tomography (CT scans, 149 positron emission topography (PET -CT scans, 47 nuclear medicine scans and 98 cardiac catheterizations. Children less than 5 years of age underwent more DI studies than did older children (median (IQR 140 (66-210 vs 49 (19-105, p = 0.010. Children with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (N = 8 had more CT scans (median (IQR 13 (5.5-36 vs 1 (0-5, p100 mSv. In conclusion, a significant proportion of pediatric transplant recipients have sufficient radiation exposure post-transplant for DI to be at potential risk for radiation-induced malignancies.

  18. Online educative activities for solar ultraviolet radiation based on measurements of cloud amount and solar exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, A V; Downs, N; Turner, J; Amar, A

    2016-09-01

    A set of online activities for children and the community that are based on an integrated real-time solar UV and cloud measurement system are described. These activities use the functionality of the internet to provide an educative tool for school children and the public on the influence of cloud and the angle of the sun above the horizon on the global erythemal UV or sunburning UV, the diffuse erythemal UV, the global UVA (320-400nm) and the vitamin D effective UV. Additionally, the units of UV exposure and UV irradiance are investigated, along with the meaning and calculation of the UV index (UVI). This research will help ensure that children and the general public are better informed about sun safety by improving their personal understanding of the daily and the atmospheric factors that influence solar UV radiation and the solar UV exposures of the various wavebands in the natural environment. The activities may correct common misconceptions of children and the public about UV irradiances and exposure, utilising the widespread reach of the internet to increase the public's awareness of the factors influencing UV irradiances and exposures in order to provide clear information for minimizing UV exposure, while maintaining healthy, outdoor lifestyles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of dental X-ray apparatus in terms of patient exposure to ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Olszewski

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of X-ray in dental procedures causes exposure of the patient to ionizing radiation. This exposure depends primarily on the parameters used in tooth examination. The aim of the study was to determine the patients exposure and to assess the technical condition of X-ray tubes. Material and Methods: Seventeen hundred dental offices were covered by the questionnaire survey and 740 questionnaires were sent back. Direct measurements were performed in 100 units by using the thermoluminescent detectors and X-ray films. Results: The results showed that the most commonly used exposure time is 0.22±0.16 s. The average entrance dose for the parameters used most commonly by dentists is 1.7±1.4 mGy. The average efficiency of X-ray tube estimated on the basis of exposures is 46.5±23.7 μGy/mAs. Conclusions: The study results indicate that the vast majority of X-ray tubes meet the requirements specified in the binding regulations. Med Pr 2017;67(4:491–496

  20. [Evaluation of dental X-ray apparatus in terms of patient exposure to ionizing radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, Jerzy; Wrzesień, Małgorzata

    2017-06-27

    The use of X-ray in dental procedures causes exposure of the patient to ionizing radiation. This exposure depends primarily on the parameters used in tooth examination. The aim of the study was to determine the patients exposure and to assess the technical condition of X-ray tubes. Seventeen hundred dental offices were covered by the questionnaire survey and 740 questionnaires were sent back. Direct measurements were performed in 100 units by using the thermoluminescent detectors and X-ray films. The results showed that the most commonly used exposure time is 0.22±0.16 s. The average entrance dose for the parameters used most commonly by dentists is 1.7±1.4 mGy. The average efficiency of X-ray tube estimated on the basis of exposures is 46.5±23.7 μGy/mAs. The study results indicate that the vast majority of X-ray tubes meet the requirements specified in the binding regulations. Med Pr 2017;67(4):491-496.

  1. Exposure to radiofrequency radiation induces oxidative stress in duckweed Lemna minor L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkalec, Mirta [Department of Botany, Division of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Rooseveltov trg 6, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)], E-mail: mtkalec@zg.biol.pmf.hr; Malaric, Kresimir [Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, University of Zagreb, Unska 3, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Pevalek-Kozlina, Branka [Department of Botany, Division of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Rooseveltov trg 6, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2007-12-15

    Widespread use of radiofrequency radiation emitting devices increased the exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) from 300 MHz to 300 GHz. Various biological effects of exposure to these fields have been documented so far, but very little work has been carried out on plants. The aim of the present work was to investigate the physiological responses of the plant Lemna minor after exposure to radiofrequency EMFs, and in particular, to clarify the possible role of oxidative stress in the observed effects. Duckweed was exposed for 2 h to EMFs of 400 and 900 MHz at field strengths of 10, 23, 41 and 120 V m{sup -1}. The effect of a longer exposure time (4 h) and modulation was also investigated. After exposure, parameters of oxidative stress, such as lipid peroxidation, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} content, activities and isoenzyme pattern of antioxidative enzymes as well as HSP70 expression were evaluated. At 400 MHz, lipid peroxidation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} content were significantly enhanced in duckweed exposed to EMFs of 23 and 120 V m{sup -1} while other exposure treatments did not have an effect. Compared to the controls, the activities of antioxidative enzymes showed different behaviour: catalase (CAT) activity increased after most exposure treatments while pyrogallol (PPX) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities were not changed. Exceptions were reduced PPX and APX activity after longer exposure at 23 V m{sup -1} and increased PPX activity after exposures at 10 and 120 V m{sup -1}. By contrast, at 900 MHz almost all exposure treatments significantly increased level of lipid peroxidation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} content but mostly decreased PPX activity and did not affect CAT activity. Exceptions were exposures to a modulated field and to the field of 120 V m{sup -1} which increased PPX and CAT activity. At this frequency APX activity was significantly decreased after exposure at 10 V m{sup -1} and longer exposure at 23 V m{sup -1} but it increased after a shorter exposure at

  2. Radiation-induced bystander effects in the Atlantic salmon (salmo salar L.) following mixed exposure to copper and aluminum combined with low-dose gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin B. [McMaster University, Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences Department, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Aas (Norway); Smith, Richard W. [McMaster University, Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences Department, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Heier, Lene Soerlie; Teien, Hans-Christian; Land, Ole Christian; Oughton, Deborah; Salbu, Brit [Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Aas (Norway)

    2014-03-15

    Very little is known about the combined effects of low doses of heavy metals and radiation. However, such ''multiple stressor'' exposure is the reality in the environment. In the work reported in this paper, fish were exposed to cobalt 60 gamma irradiation with or without copper or aluminum in the water. Doses of radiation ranged from 4 to 75 mGy delivered over 48 or 6 h. Copper doses ranged from 10 to 80 μg/L for the same time period. The aluminum dose was 250 μg/L. Gills and skin were removed from the fish after exposure and explanted in tissue culture flasks for investigation of bystander effects of the exposures using a stress signal reporter assay, which has been demonstrated to be a sensitive indicator of homeostatic perturbations in cells. The results show complex synergistic interactions of radiation and copper. Gills on the whole produce more toxic bystander signals than skin, but the additivity scores show highly variable results which depend on dose and time of exposure. The impacts of low doses of copper and low doses of radiation are greater than additive, medium levels of copper alone have a similar level of effect of bystander signal toxicity to the low dose. The addition of radiation stress, however, produces clear protective effects in the reporters treated with skin-derived medium. Gill-derived medium from the same fish did not show protective effects. Radiation exposure in the presence of 80 μg/L led to highly variable results, which due to animal variation were not significantly different from the effect of copper alone. The results are stressor type, stressor concentration and time dependent. Clearly co-exposure to radiation and heavy metals does not always lead to simple additive effects. (orig.)

  3. Dynamics of the transcriptome response of cultured human embryonic stem cells to ionizing radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, Mykyta V., E-mail: sokolovm@mail.nih.gov [Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Panyutin, Irina V., E-mail: ipanyutinv@mail.nih.gov [Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Panyutin, Igor G., E-mail: igorp@helix.nih.gov [Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Neumann, Ronald D., E-mail: rneumann@mail.nih.gov [Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2011-05-10

    One of the key consequences of exposure of human cells to genotoxic agents is the activation of DNA damage responses (DDR). While the mechanisms underpinning DDR in fully differentiated somatic human cells have been studied extensively, molecular signaling events and pathways involved in DDR in pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESC) remain largely unexplored. We studied changes in the human genome-wide transcriptome of H9 hESC line following exposures to 1 Gy of gamma-radiation at 2 h and 16 h post-irradiation. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to verify the expression data for a subset of genes. In parallel, the cell growth, DDR kinetics, and expression of pluripotency markers in irradiated hESC were monitored. The changes in gene expression in hESC after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) are substantially different from those observed in somatic human cell lines. Gene expression patterns at 2 h post-IR showed almost an exclusively p53-dependent, predominantly pro-apoptotic, signature with a total of only 30 up-regulated genes. In contrast, the gene expression patterns at 16 h post-IR showed 354 differentially expressed genes, mostly involved in pro-survival pathways, such as increased expression of metallothioneins, ubiquitin cycle, and general metabolism signaling. Cell growth data paralleled trends in gene expression changes. DDR in hESC followed the kinetics reported for human somatic differentiated cells. The expression of pluripotency markers characteristic of undifferentiated hESC was not affected by exposure to IR during the time course of our analysis. Our data on dynamics of transcriptome response of irradiated hESCs may provide a valuable tool to screen for markers of IR exposure of human cells in their most naive state; thus unmasking the key elements of DDR; at the same time, avoiding the complexity of interpreting distinct cell type-dependent genotoxic stress responses of terminally differentiated cells.

  4. Characterization of radiation exposure in early-onset scoliosis patients treated with the vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Tyler A; Astur Neto, Nelson; Kelly, Derek M; Warner, William C; Sawyer, Jeffrey R

    2014-03-01

    The evaluation and treatment of patients with early-onset scoliosis requires multiple imaging studies and involves potential exposure to high cumulative lifetime doses of ionizing radiation. The Vertical Expandable Prosthetic Titanium Rib (VEPTR) used in the treatment of early-onset scoliosis requires numerous lengthening procedures and frequent radiographic follow-up. The purpose of this study was to quantify the ionizing radiation exposure in pediatric patients undergoing VEPTR treatment and to identify factors that place patients with early-onset scoliosis at greater risk of radiation exposure. Data were collected by retrospective review of the records of all patients with early-onset scoliosis who were treated with a VEPTR over a 4-year period (2007 to 2010). Diagnostic radiographs, computed tomography, intraoperative fluoroscopy, and nuclear medicine studies were identified and analyzed for ionizing radiation exposure. Total radiation exposure was determined and compared for risk factors such as etiology (eg, neuromuscular or congenital) and surgeon experience. In addition, radiographic studies directly related and unrelated to scoliosis treatment were compared. Twenty-four patients had 121 surgical procedures (mean 5.0/patients) and 962 imaging studies (mean 40/patients). The mean estimated cumulative radiation dose per patient during follow-up was 86.7 mSv (range, 42.6 to 174.9 mSv) with a mean dose per year of 34 mSv (range, 22.9 to 47.1 mSv). Patients with congenital scoliosis received greater mean amounts of radiation (35.2 mSv) than patients with neuromuscular scoliosis (31.9 mSv). Patients treated within the first 2 years of the study period had higher radiation exposure (42.4 mSv) compared with patients treated in the last 2 years (24.9 mSv) (PVEPTR treatment for early-onset scoliosis. There are differences in the amount and sources of radiation exposure between patients with early-onset scoliosis secondary to congenital and neuromuscular causes

  5. SU-E-T-260: Radiation Exposure Estimation for 131Cs Prostate Implant Patient Release Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M; Du, W; Frank, S; Pugh, T; Bruno, T; Kudchadker, R

    2012-06-01

    Due to the short half-life and high energy of Cesium-131 (131Cs), the exposure rate outside the patient could potentially increase radiation exposure to hospital staff and exceed the maximum patient release exposure rate limit. A calculation technique has been developed to estimate the exposure rate at 1 meter from the patient, for prostate patients receiving 131Cs implants. In our calculation for each patient, all 131Cs sources were treated as one single source, and the point on the prostate with the shortest distance to skin surface was selected as the effective source position. Attenuation inside the patient was calculated based on the attenuation coefficient of 30 keV photons in water, assuming homogeneous patient density. This calculation technique was evaluated on our first 25 131Cs implant patients. For comparison, the exposure rate at approximately 1 meter inferior to patient perineum was measured prior to patient release using the Inovision 451P-RYR survey meter. The distance from the edge of the prostate to skin surface along the inferior direction was the shortest in all 25 patients. The mean of the calculated exposure rates at 1 meter from skin surface was 0.53 mR/hr, 0.53 mR/hr, 0.04 mR/hr, 0.04 mR/hr and 1.5 mR/hr along the anterior, posterior, left, right and inferior directions, respectively. The mean of the measured exposure rate at 1 meter inferior to patient perineum was 1.1 mR/hr. The mean ratio of the measured versus calculated exposure rate was 0.74 (standard deviation = 0.23). Our calculation technique is useful in determining in advance whether a patient may require hospitalization after his implant. The exposure rate at 1 meter inferior to patient perineum is a good indicator for determining whether the exposure rate along any direction might exceed the maximum allowed patient release exposure rate of 6 mR/hr. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  6. The UNSCEAR data base on global radiation exposure estimation; Die UNSCEAR-Datensammlung zur Schaetzung der globalen Strahlenexposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannoun, Ferid [UNSCEAR Wien (Austria)

    2017-10-01

    Due to nuclear weapon tests at the beginning of the 1950ies public concerns were raised concerning effects of radioactivity on air, water and food. The general assembly of the United Nations established in 1955 the scientific committee on the effects of atomic radiation (UNSCEAR). The scientific committee was supposed to compile information on worldwide radiation exposures and the effects of ionizing radiation on health and environment.

  7. Male reproductive health under threat: Short term exposure to radiofrequency radiations emitted by common mobile jammers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SMJ Mortazavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Modern life prompted man to increasingly generate, transmit and use electricity that leads to exposure to different levels of electromagnetic fields (EMFs. Substantial evidence indicates that exposure to common sources of EMF such as mobile phones, laptops or wireless internet-connected laptops decreases human semen quality. In some countries, mobile jammers are occasionally used in offices, shrines, conference rooms and cinemas to block the signal. Aims: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the effect of short term exposure of human sperm samples to radiofrequency (RF radiations emitted by common mobile jammers. Subjects and Methods: Fresh semen samples were collected by masturbation from 30 healthy donors who had referred to Infertility Treatment Center at the Mother and Child Hospital with their wives. Female problem was diagnosed as the reason for infertility in these couples. Statistical Analysis: T-test and analysis of variance were used to show statistical significance. Results: The motility of sperm samples exposed to jammer RF radiation for 2 or 4 h were significantly lower than those of sham-exposed samples. These findings lead us to the conclusion that mobile jammers may significantly decrease sperm motility and the couples′ chances of conception. Conclusion: Based on these results, it can be suggested that in countries that have not banned mobile jammer use, legislations should be urgently passed to restrict the use of these signal blocking devices in public or private places.

  8. Exposure to non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation from mobile telephony and the association with psychiatric symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Denize Francisca da; Barros, Warley Rocha; Almeida, Maria da Conceição Chagas de; Rêgo, Marco Antônio Vasconcelos

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between exposure to non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation from mobile phone base stations and psychiatric symptoms. In a cross-sectional study in Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil, 440 individuals were interviewed. Psychiatric complaints and diagnoses were the dependent variables and distance from the individual's residence to the base station was considered the main independent variable. Hierarchical logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess confounding. An association was observed between psychiatric symptoms and residential proximity to the base station and different forms of mobile phone use (making calls with weak signal coverage, keeping the mobile phone close to the body, having two or more chips, and never turning off the phone while sleeping), and with the use of other electronic devices. The study concluded that exposure to electromagnetic radiation from mobile phone base stations and other electronic devices was associated with psychiatric symptoms, independently of gender, schooling, and smoking status. The adoption of precautionary measures to reduce such exposure is recommended.

  9. Histopathological examinations of rat brains after long-term exposure to GSM-900 mobile phone radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafström, Gustav; Nittby, Henrietta; Brun, Arne; Malmgren, Lars; Persson, Bertil R R; Salford, Leif G; Eberhardt, Jacob

    2008-11-25

    In order to mimic the real life situation, with often life-long exposure to the electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones, we have investigated in a rat model the effects of repeated exposures under a long period to Global System for Mobile Communication-900 MHz (GSM-900) radiation. Out of a total of 56 rats, 32 were exposed once weekly in a 2-h period, for totally 55 weeks, at different average whole-body specific absorption rates (SAR) (of in average 0.6 and 60 mW/kg at the initiation of the experimental period). The animals were exposed in a transverse electromagnetic transmission line chamber (TEM-cell) to radiation emitted by a GSM-900 test phone. Sixteen animals were sham exposed and eight animals were cage controls, which never left the animal house. After behavioural tests, 5-7 weeks after the last exposure, the brains were evaluated for histopathological alterations such as albumin extravasation, dark neurons, lipofuscin aggregation and signs of cytoskeletal and neuritic neuronal changes of the type seen in human ageing. In this study, no significant alteration of any these histopathological parameters was found, when comparing the GSM exposed animals to the sham exposed controls.

  10. Analysis of rat testicular proteome following 30-day exposure to 900 MHz electromagnetic field radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehrimanesh, Masood; Kazemipour, Nasrin; Saeb, Mehdi; Nazifi, Saeed

    2014-12-01

    The use of electromagnetic field (EMF) generating apparatuses such as cell phones is increasing, and has caused an interest in the investigations of its effects on human health. We analyzed proteome in preparations from the whole testis in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats that were exposed to 900 MHz EMF radiation for 1, 2, or 4 h/day for 30 consecutive days, simulating a range of possible human cell phone use. Subjects were sacrificed immediately after the end of the experiment and testes fractions were solubilized and separated via high-resolution 2D electrophoresis, and gel patterns were scanned, digitized, and processed. Thirteen proteins, which were found only in sham or in exposure groups, were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. Among them, heat shock proteins, superoxide dismutase, peroxiredoxin-1, and other proteins related to misfolding of proteins and/or stress were identified. These results demonstrate significant effects of radio frequency modulated EMFs exposure on proteome, particularly in protein species in the rodent testis, and suggest that a 30-day exposure to EMF radiation induces nonthermal stress in testicular tissue. The functional implication of the identified proteins was discussed. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Radiation exposure from CT in early childhood: a French large-scale multicentre study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, M-O; Rehel, J-L; Brisse, H J; Wu-Zhou, X; Caer-Lorho, S; Jacob, S; Chateil, J F; Aubert, B; Laurier, D

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The increasing use of CT scans in the paediatric population raises the question of a possible health impact of ionising radiation exposure associated with CT scans. The aim of this study was to describe the pattern of CT use in early childhood. Methods In 14 major French paediatric radiology departments, children undergoing at least 1 CT scan before age 5, between 2000 and 2006, were included. For each examination, absorbed organ doses were calculated. Results 43% of the 27 362 children in the cohort were aged less than 1 year during their first exposure, with 9% being aged less than 1 month. The mean number of examinations per child was 1.6 (range 1–43). The examinations included: head in 63% of the cases, chest in 21%, abdomen and pelvis in 8% and others in 8%. Brain and eye lenses received the highest cumulative doses from head examinations, with mean organ dose values of 22 mGy (maximum 1107 mGy) and 26 mGy (maximum 1392 mGy), respectively. The mean cumulative effective dose was 3.2 mSv (range 0.1–189 mSv). Conclusion CT scan exposure in childhood is responsible for relatively high doses to radiosensitive organs. The rather large dose range according to the protocols used requires their optimisation. The cohort follow-up will study the risk of long-term radiation-induced cancer. PMID:22190749

  12. Occupational radiation exposure in Germany in 2011. Report of the radiation protection register; Die berufliche Strahlenexposition in Deutschland 2011. Bericht des Strahlenschutzregisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frasch, Gerhard; Kammerer, Lothar; Karofsky, Ralf; Mordek, Else; Schlosser, Andrea; Spiesl, Josef

    2013-04-15

    In Germany, persons who are occupationally exposed to ionising radiation are monitored by several official dosimetry services that transmit the dose records about individual radiation monitoring to the Radiation Protection Register of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS). The purpose of the Radiation Protection Register is to supervise the keeping of the dose limits and to monitor the compliance with the radiation protection principle ''Optimisation'' by performing detailed annual statistical analyses of the monitored persons and their radiation exposure. The annual report of the Radiation Protection Register provides information about status and development of occupational radiation exposure in Germany. In 2011, about 350,000 workers were monitored with dosemeters for occupational radiation exposure. The number increased during the past five years continuously by 10 %. Only 19 % of the monitored persons received measurable personal doses. The average annual dose of these exposed workers was 0.58 mSv corresponding to 3 % of the annual dose limit of 20 mSv for radiation workers. In total, 7 persons exceeded the annual dose limit of 20 mSv, i.e. two cases per 100,000 monitored persons. The collective dose of the monitored persons decreased to 38.5 Person-Sv, the lowest value since the last fifty years of occupational dose monitoring. In 2010, 45 airlines calculated the route doses of 39,000 members of the aircraft crew personnel by using certified computer programmes for dose calculation and sent the accumulated monthly doses via the Federal Office for Civil Aviation (''Luftfahrt-Bundesamt, LBA'') to the BfS. The collective dose of the aircraft crew personnel is 83 person-Sv, and thus significantly higher than the total collective dose of the workers monitored with personal dosemeters (38.5 person-Sv). The annual average dose of aircraft crew personnel was 2.12 mSv and decreased compared to 2010 (2,30 mSv). In 2011

  13. Natural background radiation induces cytogenetic radioadaptive response more effectively than occupational exposure in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfared, A. Shabestani; Mozdarani, H.; Amiri, M.

    2003-01-01

    Ramsar, a city in the northern Iran, has the highest level of natural background radiation in the world. It has been clearly shown that low doses of ionising radiation can induce resistance to subsequent higher exposures. This phenomenon is termed radioadaptive response. We have compared induction of cytogenetic radioadaptive response by High Natural Background Radiation (HNBR) in Ramsar and X-ray occupational exposure as conditioning doses in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. 30 healthy control individuals, living in Ramsar but in normal background radiation areas, 15 healthy individuals from Talesh Mahalleh, a region with extraordinary high level of background radiation, and 7 X-ray radiographers working in Ramsar hospital located in normal natural background ionising radiation area were evaluated. Peripheral blood samples were prepared and exposed to challenge dose of 0 and 2 Gy. Lymphocytes were scored using analysis of metaphase, for the presence of chromosomal aberrations. An adaptive response was observed in HNBR and radiation workers groups in comparison with sham controls. A significant increase in adaptive response was observed in the HNBR group if compared with the occupationally exposed group. These findings indicate that both natural background radiation and occupational exposure could induce cytogenetic radioadaptive response and it is more significant regarding to natural background ionising radiation.

  14. Monitoring of radiation exposure. Annual report 2000; Saeteilyn kaeyttoe ja muu saeteilytoiminta. Vuosiraportti 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rantanen, E. [ed.

    2001-03-01

    At the end of 2000, there were 1,779 valid safety licenses in Finland for the use of radiation. In addition, there were 2,038 responsible parties for dental x-ray diagnostics. The registry Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) listed 13,754 radiation sources and 270 radionuclide laboratories. In the year 2000 360 inspections were made concerning the safety licences and 53 concerning dental x-ray diagnostics. The import of radioactive substances amounted to 175,836 GBq and export to 74,420 GBq. Short-lived radionuclides produced in Finland amounted to 55,527 GBq. In the year 2000 there were 10,846 workers monitored for radiation exposure at 1,171 work sites. Of these employees, 27% received an annual dose exceeding the recording level. The annual effective dose limit was not exceeded. The total dose recorded in the dose registry(sum of the individual dosemeter readings) was 6.5 Sv in 2000.

  15. Estimation of radiofrequency power leakage from microwave ovens for dosimetric assessment at nonionizing radiation exposure levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Iturri, Peio; de Miguel-Bilbao, Silvia; Aguirre, Erik; Azpilicueta, Leire; Falcone, Francisco; Ramos, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    The electromagnetic field leakage levels of nonionizing radiation from a microwave oven have been estimated within a complex indoor scenario. By employing a hybrid simulation technique, based on coupling full wave simulation with an in-house developed deterministic 3D ray launching code, estimations of the observed electric field values can be obtained for the complete indoor scenario. The microwave oven can be modeled as a time- and frequency-dependent radiating source, in which leakage, basically from the microwave oven door, is propagated along the complete indoor scenario interacting with all of the elements present in it. This method can be of aid in order to assess the impact of such devices on expected exposure levels, allowing adequate minimization strategies such as optimal location to be applied.

  16. Estimation of Radiofrequency Power Leakage from Microwave Ovens for Dosimetric Assessment at Nonionizing Radiation Exposure Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peio Lopez-Iturri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The electromagnetic field leakage levels of nonionizing radiation from a microwave oven have been estimated within a complex indoor scenario. By employing a hybrid simulation technique, based on coupling full wave simulation with an in-house developed deterministic 3D ray launching code, estimations of the observed electric field values can be obtained for the complete indoor scenario. The microwave oven can be modeled as a time- and frequency-dependent radiating source, in which leakage, basically from the microwave oven door, is propagated along the complete indoor scenario interacting with all of the elements present in it. This method can be of aid in order to assess the impact of such devices on expected exposure levels, allowing adequate minimization strategies such as optimal location to be applied.

  17. A study on exposure dose from injection work and elution work for radiation workers and frequent workers in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Yong Jin; Chung, Woon Kwan [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Kyung Rae [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Jin; Kwak, Jong Gil [Dept. of Public Health and Medicine, Dongshin University Graduate School, Naju (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jae Kwang [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Compared to other occupations, there is a greater risk of exposure to radiation due to the use of radioisotopes in nuclear medicine for diagnostic evaluations and therapy. To consider ways to reduce exposure dose for those in nuclear medicine involved in injection work and elution work among radiation workers as well as for sanitation workers and trainees among frequent workers an investigation into exposure dose and situational analysis from changes in yearly exposure dose evaluations, changes in work environment and changes in forms of inspection were conducted. Exposure dose measurements were taken by using EPD MK2 worn during working hours for one injection worker, one elution worker, two sanitation workers, and one trainee at a general hospital in the Seoul area for three days from July 18th to 20th 2016. Radiation from radioisotopes which are a part of nuclear medicine can significantly affect not only radiation workers who deal with radioisotopes directly but also frequency works as well. According to this study the annual dose limit for elution workers and injection workers were considered safe as the amount of exposure was not large enough to have a signifcant effect. The limits of this study consist in the duration of this study and the quantity of participants. Also there was a limitation of the measurement device involving accumulated exposure, where the EPD MK2 cannot check the changes in exposure according to a particular activity.

  18. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants. Quarterly report, 4th quarter 1997