WorldWideScience

Sample records for radiation defect clustering

  1. Influence of radiation induced defect clusters on silicon particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junkes, Alexandra

    2011-10-15

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) addresses some of today's most fundamental questions of particle physics, like the existence of the Higgs boson and supersymmetry. Two large general-purpose experiments (ATLAS, CMS) are installed to detect the products of high energy protonproton and nucleon-nucleon collisions. Silicon detectors are largely employed in the innermost region, the tracking area of the experiments. The proven technology and large scale availability make them the favorite choice. Within the framework of the LHC upgrade to the high-luminosity LHC, the luminosity will be increased to L=10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. In particular the pixel sensors in the innermost layers of the silicon trackers will be exposed to an extremely intense radiation field of mainly hadronic particles with fluences of up to {phi}{sub eq}=10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. The radiation induced bulk damage in silicon sensors will lead to a severe degradation of the performance during their operational time. This work focusses on the improvement of the radiation tolerance of silicon materials (Float Zone, Magnetic Czochralski, epitaxial silicon) based on the evaluation of radiation induced defects in the silicon lattice using the Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy and the Thermally Stimulated Current methods. It reveals the outstanding role of extended defects (clusters) on the degradation of sensor properties after hadron irradiation in contrast to previous works that treated effects as caused by point defects. It has been found that two cluster related defects are responsible for the main generation of leakage current, the E5 defects with a level in the band gap at E{sub C}-0.460 eV and E205a at E{sub C}-0.395 eV where E{sub C} is the energy of the edge of the conduction band. The E5 defect can be assigned to the tri-vacancy (V{sub 3}) defect. Furthermore, isochronal annealing experiments have shown that the V{sub 3} defect

  2. Influence of radiation induced defect clusters on silicon particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junkes, Alexandra

    2011-10-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) addresses some of today's most fundamental questions of particle physics, like the existence of the Higgs boson and supersymmetry. Two large general-purpose experiments (ATLAS, CMS) are installed to detect the products of high energy protonproton and nucleon-nucleon collisions. Silicon detectors are largely employed in the innermost region, the tracking area of the experiments. The proven technology and large scale availability make them the favorite choice. Within the framework of the LHC upgrade to the high-luminosity LHC, the luminosity will be increased to L=10 35 cm -2 s -1 . In particular the pixel sensors in the innermost layers of the silicon trackers will be exposed to an extremely intense radiation field of mainly hadronic particles with fluences of up to Φ eq =10 16 cm -2 . The radiation induced bulk damage in silicon sensors will lead to a severe degradation of the performance during their operational time. This work focusses on the improvement of the radiation tolerance of silicon materials (Float Zone, Magnetic Czochralski, epitaxial silicon) based on the evaluation of radiation induced defects in the silicon lattice using the Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy and the Thermally Stimulated Current methods. It reveals the outstanding role of extended defects (clusters) on the degradation of sensor properties after hadron irradiation in contrast to previous works that treated effects as caused by point defects. It has been found that two cluster related defects are responsible for the main generation of leakage current, the E5 defects with a level in the band gap at E C -0.460 eV and E205a at E C -0.395 eV where E C is the energy of the edge of the conduction band. The E5 defect can be assigned to the tri-vacancy (V 3 ) defect. Furthermore, isochronal annealing experiments have shown that the V 3 defect exhibits a bistability, as does the leakage current. In oxygen

  3. Influence of oxygen impurity atoms on defect clusters and radiation hardening in neutron-irradiated vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajaj, R.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1975-01-01

    Single crystal TEM samples and polycrystalline tensile samples of vanadium containing 60-640 wt ppm oxygen were irradiated at about 100 0 C to about 1.3 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 (E greater than 1 MeV) and post-irradiation annealed up to 800 0 C. The defect cluster density increased and the average size decreased with increasing oxygen concentration. Higher oxygen concentrations caused the radiation hardening and radiation-anneal hardening to increase. The observations are consistent with the nucleation of defect clusters by small oxygen or oxygen-point defect complexes and the trapping of oxygen at defect clusters upon post-irradiation annealing

  4. Radiation-induced segregation on defect clusters in single-phase concentrated solid-solution alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Chenyang; Yang, Taini; Jin, Ke; Gao, Ning; Xiu, Pengyuan; Zhang, Yanwen; Gao, Fei; Bei, Hongbin; Weber, William J.; Sun, Kai; Dong, Yan; Wang, Lumin

    2017-01-01

    A group of single-phase concentrated solid-solution alloys (SP-CSAs), including NiFe, NiCoFe, NiCoFeCr, as well as a high entropy alloy NiCoFeCrMn, was irradiated with 3 MeV Ni"2"+ ions at 773 K to a fluence of 5 × 10"1"6 ions/cm"2 for the study of radiation response with increasing compositional complexity. Advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to characterize the dislocation loop distribution and radiation-induced segregation (RIS) on defect clusters in the SP-CSAs. The results show that a higher fraction of faulted loops exists in the more compositionally complex alloys, which indicate that increasing compositional complexity can extend the incubation period and delay loop growth. The RIS behaviors of each element in the SP-CSAs were observed as follows: Ni and Co tend to enrich, but Cr, Fe and Mn prefer to deplete near the defect clusters. RIS level can be significantly suppressed by increasing compositional complexity due to the sluggish atom diffusion. According to molecular static (MS) simulations, “disk” like segregations may form near the faulted dislocation loops in the SP-CSAs. Segregated elements tend to distribute around the whole faulted loop as a disk rather than only around the edge of the loop.

  5. Peculiarities of radiation defect formation and annealing in n-Si due to their interaction with each other and defect clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugakov, P.F.; Lukyanitsa, V.V.

    1984-01-01

    Rearrangement processes proceeding during annealing (T/sub a/ = 50 to 500 0 C) of radiation defects in 60 Co γ-irradiated (T/sub irr/ 0 C) n-Si crystals (rho = 100 to 600 Ωcm) grown by the vacuum float-zone technique are studied. The temperature dependences of the Hall coefficient are measured. The results obtained are interpreted taking into account the interaction during annealing of vacancy-type defects (E-centres, divacancies) with each other and interstitial radiation defects (C/sub i/-C/sub s/ complexes, interstitial carbon C/sub i/). Phosphorus-two vacancies complexes, stable to T/sub a/ >= 500 0 C, are shown to be formed as a result of rearrangements and interaction of E-centres between themselves. The character of interaction of vacancy defects with interstitial ones is found to change significantly in the presence of defect clusters in the bulk of the crystal which are formed under heat treatment (T = 800 0 C, two hours) of the samples preliminary irradiated with fast neutrons (flux PHI/sub n/ = 1x10 14 to 1x10 16 cm -2 ). The peculiarities of radiation defects annealing observed in this case are explained taking into account the influence of defect clusters on the migration processes of mobile defects. Nature of radiation defects being formed at various stages of annealing is discussed. (author)

  6. Computer simulation of defect cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramoto, Eiichi [Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1996-04-01

    In order to elucidate individual element process of various defects and defect clusters of used materials under irradiation environments, interatomic potential with reliability was investigated. And for comparison with experimental results, it is often required to adopt the temperature effect and to investigate in details mechanism of one dimensional motion of micro conversion loop and so forth using the molecular dynamic (MD) method. Furthermore, temperature effect is also supposed for stable structure of defects and defect clusters, and many problems relating to alloy element are also remained. And, simulation on photon life at the defects and defect clusters thought to be important under comparison with equipment can also be supposed an improvement of effectiveness due to relation to theses products. In this paper, some topics in such flow was extracted to explain them. In particular, future important problems will be potential preparation of alloy, structure, dynamic behavior and limited temperature of intralattice atomic cluster. (G.K.)

  7. Molecular dynamics study on the interaction of a dislocation and radiation induced defect clusters in Fcc crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hideo, Kaburaki; Tomoko, Kadoyoshi; Futoshi, Shimizu; Hajime; Kimizuka; Shiro, Jitsukawa

    2003-01-01

    Irradiation of high-energy neutrons and charged particles into solids is known to cause a significant change in mechanical properties, in particular, hardening of metals. Hardening of solids arises as a result of interactions of dislocations with irradiation induced defect clusters. Molecular dynamics method combined with the visualization method has been used to elucidate these complex pinning structures in details. In particular, we have successfully observed the transient process for the formation of a super-jog from an edge dislocation and interstitial and vacancy clusters under irradiation cascade conditions. Parallel molecular dynamics programs, called as Parallel Molecular Dynamics Stencil (PMDS), have been developed in order to perform these large scale simulations for materials simulations. The contents of the program and its parallel performance are also reported. (authors)

  8. Effect of random inhomogeneities in the spatial distribution of radiation-induced defect clusters on carrier transport through the thin base of a heterojunction bipolar transistor upon neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puzanov, A. S.; Obolenskiy, S. V., E-mail: obolensk@rf.unn.ru; Kozlov, V. A. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (NNSU) (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    We analyze the electron transport through the thin base of a GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor with regard to fluctuations in the spatial distribution of defect clusters induced by irradiation with a fissionspectrum fast neutron flux. We theoretically demonstrate that the homogeneous filling of the working region with radiation-induced defect clusters causes minimum degradation of the dc gain of the heterojunction bipolar transistor.

  9. Radiation hardening: study of production velocity and post-irradiation recovery of defect clusters produced by neutron irradiation at 77 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Hector C.; Miralles, Monica T.

    1999-01-01

    This work includes three basic studies using radiation hardening of Cu single crystals irradiated at 77 K in the RA-1-reactor of CNEA: 1) The initial of a production curve of defect clusters originated during radiation until 5.2 x 10 20 n m 2 . The shape of the curve is compared with those obtained from measurement of resistivity increased (Δρ) with neutronic doses (φt) and the acceptance of the linear dependency of Δρ with Frenkel Pairs concentration (PFs); 2) The isochronal hardening recovery in the temperature interval of stage V (T > 450 K). The existence of the sub-stages Vb (∼ 550 K) and Vc (∼ 587 K), determined for the first time from hardening measurements, are shown and compared with results obtained by other techniques; 3) Isothermal recoveries performed in the temperature interval of the sub-stage Vc to determine phenomenologically the apparent activation energy of the sub-stage. The value obtained was in agreement with the energy for Cu vacancies auto diffusion. (author)

  10. Annealing and cluster formation of defects in a cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynenko, Yu.V.

    1975-01-01

    The behaviour of radiative defects after a dynamic cascade of atomic collisions caused by irradiation by neutrons or accelerated heavy ions if theoretically investigated. In investig.ation, apart from processes of vacancy recombination, cluster formation and interstitial atoms the diffusive ''spreading'' of point defects from the initial region is taken into account. Since interstitial atoms are more mobile, all the processes are divided into two stages: at the first stage only interstitial atoms diffuse, and vacancies are stationary; at the second stage vacancies are mobile, and interstitial atoms are either ''spread'' over the whole volume, or are united into stable clusters. The number of defects and clusters is calculated depending on energy of cascade, atomic number of the material and temperature

  11. Motion of Defect Clusters and Dislocations at a Crack Tip of Irradiated Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Won Jin; Kwon, Sang Chul; Kim, Whung Whoe

    2007-01-01

    Effects of defect clusters on mechanical properties of irradiated materials have not been clarified until now. Two radiation hardening models have been proposed. One is a dispersed barrier hardening mechanism based on the Orowan hardening model. This explains defect clusters as barriers to a dislocation motion. Generally the dislocation would rather shear or remove the defect clusters than make so-called Orowan loops. And the other is a cascade induced source hardening mechanism, which explains defect clusters as a Cottrell atmosphere for dislocation motions. However, the above mechanisms can not explain the microstructure of deformed material after irradiation and the phenomenon of yield softening. These mechanisms are based on an immobility of clusters. But we observed defect clusters could move into a specific crystallographic direction easily. Through 3 times of High Voltage Electron Microscope analysis, defect clusters have been observed to make one dimensional motion without applied external stress. If very small defect clusters could move under a stress gradient due to interactions between clusters, we can suggest that the clusters will move more actively when a stress gradient is applied externally. In-situ tensile test at TEM, we confirmed that kind of motion. We suggest defect clusters can move into crack tip, a stress-concentrated area due to tensile stress gradient and dislocations move out from the area by shear stress. Therefore radiation hardening can be explained agglomeration of defect clusters at stress concentrated area prohibits a generation of dislocation and make an increase of yield point

  12. Positron lifetime calculation for defects and defect clusters in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onitsuka, T.; Ohkubo, H.; Takenaka, M.; Tsukuda, N.; Kuramoto, E.

    2000-01-01

    Calculations of positron lifetime have been made for vacancy type defects in graphite and compared with experimental results. Defect structures were obtained in a model graphite lattice after including relaxation of whole lattice as determined by the molecular dynamics method, where the interatomic potential given by Pablo Andribet, Dominguez-Vazguez, Mari Carmen Perez-Martin, Alonso, Jimenez-Rodriguez [Nucl. Instrum. and Meth. 115 (1996) 501] was used. For the defect structures obtained via lattice relaxation positron lifetime was calculated under the so-called atomic superposition method. Positron lifetimes 204 and 222 ps were obtained for the graphite matrix and a single vacancy, respectively, which can be compared with the experimental results 208 and 233 ps. For planar vacancy clusters, e.g., vacancy loops, lifetime calculation was also made and indicated that lifetime increases with the number of vacancies in a cluster. This is consistent with the experimental result in the region of higher annealing temperature (above 1200 deg. C), where the increase of positron lifetime is seen, probably corresponding to the clustering of mobile vacancies

  13. Effects of in-cascade defect clustering on near-term defect evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinisch, H.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The effects of in-cascade defect clustering on the nature of the subsequent defect population are being studied using stochastic annealing simulations applied to cascades generated in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results of the simulations illustrates the strong influence of the defect configuration existing in the primary damage state on subsequent defect evolution. The large differences in mobility and stability of vacancy and interstitial defects and the rapid one-dimensional diffusion of small, glissile interstitial loops produced directly in cascades have been shown to be significant factors affecting the evolution of the defect distribution. In recent work, the effects of initial cluster sizes appear to be extremely important.

  14. Defect clustering in concentrated alloys during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, T.; Shigenaka, N.; Fuse, M.

    1992-01-01

    A rate theory based model is presented to investigate the kinetics of interstitial clustering processes in a face-centered cubic (fcc) binary alloy containing A- and B-atoms. Three types of interstitial dumbbells, AA-, BB- and AB-type dumbbells, are considered. Conversions between these interstitial dumbbells are explicitly introduced into the formulation, based on the consideration of dumbbell configurations and movements. A di- interstitial is assumed to be the nucleus of a dislocation loop. Reactions of point defect production by irradiation, mutual recombination of an interstitial and a vacancy, dislocation loop nucleation and their growth are included in the model. Parameter values are chosen based on the atom size of the alloy elements, and dislocation loop formation kinetics are investigated while varying alloy compositions. Two different types of kinetics are obtained in accordance with the dominant loop nucleus types. Conversions between interstitial dumbbells are important in the determination of the interstitial dumbbell concentration ratios, of the dominant nucleus types, and consequently, the loop formation kinetics. Dislocation loop concentration decreases with increasing undersized atom content, but dose rate and temperature dependence of loop concentration are insensitive to alloy compositions. (author)

  15. Topological defect clustering and plastic deformation mechanisms in functionalized graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Ricardo; Araujo, Joice; Chacham, Helio

    2011-03-01

    We present ab initio results suggesting that strain plays a central role in the clustering of topological defects in strained and functionalized graphene models. We apply strain onto the topological-defect graphene networks from our previous work, and obtain topological-defect clustering patterns which are in excellent agreement with recent observations in samples of reduced graphene oxide. In our models, the graphene layer, containing an initial concentration of isolated topological defects, is covered by hydrogen or hydroxyl groups. Our results also suggest a rich variety of plastic deformation mechanism in functionalized graphene systems. We acknowledge support from the Brazilian agencies: CNPq, Fapemig, and INCT-Materiais de Carbono.

  16. The spatial evaluation of neighborhood clusters of birth defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisch, J.D.

    1990-04-16

    Spatial statistics have recently been applied in epidemiology to evaluate clusters of cancer and birth defects. Their use requires a comparison population, drawn from the population at risk for disease, that may not always be readily available. In this dissertation the plausibility of using data on all birth defects, available from birth defects registries, as a surrogate for the spatial distribution of all live births in the analysis of clusters is assessed. Three spatial statistics that have been applied in epidemiologic investigations of clusters, nearest neighbor distance, average interpoint distance, and average distance to a fixed point, were evaluated by computer simulation for their properties in a unit square, and in a zip code region. Comparison of spatial distributions of live births and birth defects was performed by drawing samples of live births and birth defects from Santa Clara County, determining the street address at birth, geocoding this address and evaluating the resultant maps using various statistical techniques. The proposed method was then demonstrated on a previously confirmed cluster of oral cleft cases. All live births for the neighborhood were geocoded, as were all birth defects. Evaluation of this cluster using the nearest neighbor and average interpoint distance statistics was performed using randomization techniques with both the live births population and the birth defect population as comparison groups. 113 refs., 36 figs., 16 tabs.

  17. Implications of defect clusters formed in cascades on free defect generation and microstructural development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedersich, H.

    1992-12-01

    A large fraction of the defects produced by irradiation with energetic neutrons or heavy ions originates in cascades. Not only increased recombination of vacancy and interstitial defects but also significant clustering of like defects occur. Both processes reduce the number of point defects available for long range migration. Consequences of defect clustering in cascades will be discussed in a semi-quantitative form with the aid of calculations using a very simplified model: Quasi-steady-state distributions of immobile vacancy and/or interstitial clusters develop which, in turn, can become significant sinks for mobile defects, and, therefore reduce their lifetime. Although cluster sinks will cause segregation and, potentially, precipitation of second phases due to local changes of composition, the finite lifetime of clusters will not lead to lasting, local compositional changes. A transition from highly dense interstitial and vacancy cluster distributions to the void swelling regime occurs when the thermal evaporation of vacancies from small vacancy clusters becomes significant at higher temperatures. Unequal clustering of vacancies and interstitials leads to an imbalance of their fluxes of in the matrix and, hence, to unequal contributions to atom transport by interstitials and by vacancies even in the quasi-steady state approximation

  18. Radiation damage in silicon. Defect analysis and detector properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoenniger, F.

    2008-01-01

    Silicon microstrip and pixel detectors are vital sensor-components as particle tracking detectors for present as well as future high-energy physics (HEP) experiments. All experiments at the large Hadron Collider (LHC) are equipped with such detectors. Also for experiments after the upgrade of the LHC (the so-called Super-LHC), with its ten times higher luminosity, or the planned International Linear Collider (ILC) silicon tracking detectors are forseen. Close to the interaction region these detectors have to face harsh radiation fields with intensities above the presently tolerable level. defect engineering of the used material, e. g. oxygen enrichment of high resistivity float zone silicon and growing of thin low resistivityepitaxial layers on Czochralski silicon substrates has been established to improve the radiation hardness of silicon sensors. This thesis focuses mainly on the investigation of radiation induced defects and their differences observed in various kinds of epitaxial silicon material. Comparisons with other materials like float zone or Czochralski silicon are added. Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) and Thermally Stimulated Current (TSC) measurements have been performed after γ-, electron-, proton- and neutron-irradiation. The differenced in the formation of vacancy and interstitial related defects as well as so-called clustered regions were investigated for various types of irradiation. In addition to the well known defects VO i , C i O i , C i C s , VP or V 2 several other defect complexes have been found and investigated. Also the material dependence of the defect introduction rates and the defect annealing behavior has been studied by isothermal and isochronal annealing experiments. Especially the IO 2 defect which is an indicator for the oxygen-dimer content of the material has been investigated in detail. On the basis of radiation induced defects like the bistable donor (BD) defect and a deep acceptor, a model has been introduced to

  19. Radiation damage in silicon. Defect analysis and detector properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoenniger, F.

    2008-01-15

    Silicon microstrip and pixel detectors are vital sensor-components as particle tracking detectors for present as well as future high-energy physics (HEP) experiments. All experiments at the large Hadron Collider (LHC) are equipped with such detectors. Also for experiments after the upgrade of the LHC (the so-called Super-LHC), with its ten times higher luminosity, or the planned International Linear Collider (ILC) silicon tracking detectors are forseen. Close to the interaction region these detectors have to face harsh radiation fields with intensities above the presently tolerable level. defect engineering of the used material, e. g. oxygen enrichment of high resistivity float zone silicon and growing of thin low resistivityepitaxial layers on Czochralski silicon substrates has been established to improve the radiation hardness of silicon sensors. This thesis focuses mainly on the investigation of radiation induced defects and their differences observed in various kinds of epitaxial silicon material. Comparisons with other materials like float zone or Czochralski silicon are added. Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) and Thermally Stimulated Current (TSC) measurements have been performed after {gamma}-, electron-, proton- and neutron-irradiation. The differenced in the formation of vacancy and interstitial related defects as well as so-called clustered regions were investigated for various types of irradiation. In addition to the well known defects VO{sub i}, C{sub i}O{sub i}, C{sub i}C{sub s}, VP or V{sub 2} several other defect complexes have been found and investigated. Also the material dependence of the defect introduction rates and the defect annealing behavior has been studied by isothermal and isochronal annealing experiments. Especially the IO{sub 2} defect which is an indicator for the oxygen-dimer content of the material has been investigated in detail. On the basis of radiation induced defects like the bistable donor (BD) defect and a deep

  20. Creation of radiation defects in KCl crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lushchik, A.Ch.; Pung, L.A.; Khaldre, Yu.Yu.; Kolk, Yu.V.

    1981-01-01

    Optical and EPR methods were used to study the creation of anion and cation Frenkel defects in KCl crystals irradiated by X-ray and VUV-radiation. The decay of excitons with the creation of charged Frenkel defects (α and I centres) was detected and investigated at 4.2 K. The decay of excitons as well as the recombination of electrons with self-trapped holes leads to the creation of neutral Frenkel defects (F and H centres). The creation of Cl 3 - and Vsub(F) centres (cation vacancy is a component of these centres) by X-irradiation at 80 K proves the possibility of cation defects creation in KCl [ru

  1. Radiation defects in lithium fluoride induced by heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trautmann, C.; Schwartz, K.; Steckenreiter, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Costantini, J.M. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France). DPTA/SPMC; Toulemonde, M. [Centre Interdisciplinaire de Recherches avec les Ions Lourds (CIRIL), 14 - Caen (France)

    1998-07-01

    Single crystals of lithium fluoride were irradiated with various species of heavy ions in the energy regime between 1 and 30 MeV/u. The induced radiation damage was studied with techniques such as optical absorption spectroscopy, small-angle x-ray scattering, chemical etching and profilometry, complemented by annealing experiments. Clear evidence is given for a complex track structure and defect morphology. Single defects such as F-centers are produced in a large halo of several tens of nanometers around the ion trajectory. The defect creation in this zone is similar to that under conventional radiation. For heavy ions above a critical energy loss of 10 keV/nm, new effects occur within a very small core region of 2-4 nm in diameter. The damage in this zone is responsible for chemical etching and for a characteristic anisotropic x-ray scattering. It is assumed that in this core, complex defect aggregates (e.g., cluster of color centers, molecular anions and vacancies) are created. Their formation is only slightly influenced by the irradiation temperature and takes place even at 15 K where diffusion processes of primary defects are frozen. Furthermore, irradiation with heavy ions leads to pronounced swelling effects which can be related to an intermediate zone of around 10 nm around the ion path. (orig.) 40 refs.

  2. Direct Observation of Radiation Defects: Experiment and Interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudarev, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    Electron microscopy is arguably the only available experimental method suitable for the direct visualization of nano-scale defect structures formed under irradiation. Images of dislocation loops and point-defect clusters in crystals are usually produced using diffraction contrast methods. For relatively large defects, a combination of dynamical imaging and image contrast simulations is required for determining the nature of visible radiation defects. At the same time, density functional theory (DFT) models developed over the last decade have provided unique information about the structure of nano-scale defects produced by irradiation, including the defects that are so small that they cannot be observed in an electron microscope, and about the pathways of migration and interaction between radiation defects. DFT models, involving no experimental input parameters and being as quantitatively accurate and informative as the most advanced experimental techniques for the direct observation of defects, have created a new paradigm for the scientific investigation of radiation damage phenomena. In particular, DFT models offer new insight into the origin of temperature-dependent response of materials to irradiation, a problem of pivotal significance for applications. By combining information derived from the first-principles models for radiation defects with information derived from small-scale experimental observations it may be possible to acquire quantitative knowledge about how materials respond to irradiation and, using this knowledge, develop materials suitable for advanced applications in fission and fusion. It now appears possible to pose the question about the development of integrated fusion power plant models, combining neutron transport calculations and microscopic models for microstructural evolution of materials, for example models for ab initio prediction of helium embrittlement. Such models, based on scientific principles and quantitative data, and developed

  3. Clustering of cosmological defects at the time of formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leese, R.; Prokopec, T.

    1991-01-01

    A simple model for the formation of global monopoles is considered. It is shown that they naturally form in clusters, with monopoles adjacent to antimonopoles, and vice-versa. The strong attraction between pole and antipole causes the clusters to collapse very rapidly, leading to the annihilation of most (62% in our model) of the original defects within a time τ, where τ is of the order of the correlation length. (orig.)

  4. Kinetic and radiation processes in cluster plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, B.M.

    1996-01-01

    The analysis of processes is made for a cluster plasma which is a xenon arc plasma of a high pressure with an admixture of tungsten cluster ions. Because cluster ions emit radiation, this system is a light source which parameters are determined by various processes such as heat release and transport of charged particles in the plasma, radiative processes involving clusters, processes of cluster evaporation and attachment of atoms to it that leads to an equilibrium between clusters and vapor of their atoms, processes of cluster generation, processes of the ionization equilibrium between cluster ions and plasma electrons, transport of cluster ions in the discharge plasma in all directions. These processes govern by properties of a specific cluster plasma under consideration. (author)

  5. Photometric estimation of defect size in radiation direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuev, V.M.

    1993-01-01

    Factors, affecting accuracy of photometric estimation of defect size in radiation transmission direction, are analyzed. Experimentally obtained dependences of contrast of defect image on its size in radiation transmission direction are presented. Practical recommendations on improving accuracy of photometric estimation of defect size in radiation transmission direction, are developed

  6. Atoms, molecules, clusters and synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kui Rexi; Ju Xin

    1995-01-01

    The importance of synchrotron radiation, especially the third generation synchrotron radiation light source, in atomic, molecular and cluster physics is discussed and some views are presented on new methods which may become available for research in the above fields

  7. Vacancy defect and defect cluster energetics in ion-implanted ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yufeng; Tuomisto, F.; Svensson, B. G.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Brillson, Leonard J.

    2010-02-01

    We have used depth-resolved cathodoluminescence, positron annihilation, and surface photovoltage spectroscopies to determine the energy levels of Zn vacancies and vacancy clusters in bulk ZnO crystals. Doppler broadening-measured transformation of Zn vacancies to vacancy clusters with annealing shifts defect energies significantly lower in the ZnO band gap. Zn and corresponding O vacancy-related depth distributions provide a consistent explanation of depth-dependent resistivity and carrier-concentration changes induced by ion implantation.

  8. Point defects and defect clusters examined on the basis of some fundamental experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuppiroli, L.

    1975-01-01

    On progressing from the centre of the defect to the surface the theoretical approach to a point defect passes from electronic theories to elastic theory. Experiments by which the point defect can be observed fall into two categories. Those which detect long-range effects: measurement of dimensional variations in the sample; measurement of the mean crystal parameter variation; elastic X-ray scattering near the nodes of the reciprocal lattice (Huang scattering). Those which detect more local effects: low-temperature resistivity measurement; positron capture and annihilation; local scattering far from the reciprocal lattice nodes. Experiments involving both short and long-range effects can always be found. This is the case for example with the dechanneling of α particles by defects. Certain of the experimental methods quoted above apply also to the study of point defect clusters. These methods are illustrated by some of their most striking results which over the last twenty years have refined our knowledge of point defects and defect clusters: length and crystal parameter measurements; diffuse X-ray scattering; low-temperature resistivity measurements; ion emission microscopy; electron microscopy; elastoresistivity [fr

  9. Irradiation damage in boron carbide: point defects, clusters and helium bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoto, T.; Zuppiroli, L.

    1986-06-01

    Boron carbide is a refractory hard and light material of interest in nuclear technology (fission and also fusion). Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine the properties of radiation induced damage. Firstly, the production of point defects and their clustering was studied in samples irradiated by 1 MeV electron in a high voltage electron microscope at selected temperatures from 12 K to 1000 K. Secondly, conventional transmission electron microscopy was used to understand the production of helium bubbles in neutron irradiated boron carbide and their role in the generation of microcracks. Finally, the interaction between point defects and bubbles was also examined

  10. Observation and analysis of defect cluster production and interactions with dislocations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Matsukawa, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The current understanding of defect production fundamentals in neutron-irradiated face centered cubic (FCC) and body centered cubic (BCC) metals is briefly reviewed, based primarily on transmission electron microscope observations. Experimental procedures developed by Michio Kiritani and colleagues have been applied to quantify defect cluster size, density, and nature. Differences in defect accumulation behavior of irradiated BCC and FCC metals are discussed. Depending on the defect cluster obstacle strength, either the dispersed barrier hardening model or the Friedel-Kroupa-Hirsch weak barrier model can be used to describe major aspects of radiation hardening. Irradiation at low temperature can cause a change in deformation mode from dislocation cell formation at low doses to twinning or dislocation channeling at higher doses. The detailed interaction between dislocations and defect clusters helps determine the dominant deformation mode. Recent observations of the microstructure created by plastic deformation of quenched and irradiated metals are summarized, including in situ deformation results. Examples of annihilation of stacking fault tetrahedra by gliding dislocations and subsequent formation of mobile superjogs are shown

  11. Evolution of Radiation Induced Defects in SiC: A Multiscale Simulation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao

    Because of various excellent properties, SiC has been proposed for many applications in nuclear reactors including cladding layers in fuel rod, fission products container in TRISO fuel, and first wall/blanket in magnetic controlled fusion reactors. Upon exposure to high energy radiation environments, point defects and defect clusters are generated in materials in amounts significantly exceeding their equilibrium concentrations. The accumulation of defects can lead to undesired consequences such as crystalline-to-amorphous transformation1, swelling, and embrittlement, and these phenomena can adversely affect the lifetime of SiC based components in nuclear reactors. It is of great importance to understand the accumulation process of these defects in order to estimate change in properties of this material and to design components with superior ability to withstand radiation damages. Defect clusters are widely in SiC irradiated at the operation temperatures of various reactors. These clusters are believed to cause more than half of the overall swelling of irradiated SiC and can potentially lead to lowered thermal conductivity and mechanical strength. It is critical to understand the formation and growth of these clusters. Diffusion of these clusters is one importance piece to determine the growth rate of clusters; however it is unclear so far due to the challenges in simulating rare events. Using a combination of kinetic Activation Relaxation Technique with empirical potential and ab initio based climbing image nudged elastic band method, I performed an extensive search of the migration paths of the most stable carbon tri-interstitial cluster in SiC. This research reveals paths with the lowest energy barriers to migration, rotation, and dissociation of the most stable cluster. Based on these energy barriers, I concluded defect clusters are thermally immobile at temperatures lower than 1500 K and can dissociate into smaller clusters and single interstitials at

  12. Advanced defect detection algorithm using clustering in ultrasonic NDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongzhang, Rui; Gachagan, Anthony

    2016-02-01

    A range of materials used in industry exhibit scattering properties which limits ultrasonic NDE. Many algorithms have been proposed to enhance defect detection ability, such as the well-known Split Spectrum Processing (SSP) technique. Scattering noise usually cannot be fully removed and the remaining noise can be easily confused with real feature signals, hence becoming artefacts during the image interpretation stage. This paper presents an advanced algorithm to further reduce the influence of artefacts remaining in A-scan data after processing using a conventional defect detection algorithm. The raw A-scan data can be acquired from either traditional single transducer or phased array configurations. The proposed algorithm uses the concept of unsupervised machine learning to cluster segmental defect signals from pre-processed A-scans into different classes. The distinction and similarity between each class and the ensemble of randomly selected noise segments can be observed by applying a classification algorithm. Each class will then be labelled as `legitimate reflector' or `artefacts' based on this observation and the expected probability of defection (PoD) and probability of false alarm (PFA) determined. To facilitate data collection and validate the proposed algorithm, a 5MHz linear array transducer is used to collect A-scans from both austenitic steel and Inconel samples. Each pulse-echo A-scan is pre-processed using SSP and the subsequent application of the proposed clustering algorithm has provided an additional reduction to PFA while maintaining PoD for both samples compared with SSP results alone.

  13. Regularities of radiation defects build up on oxide materials surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitenbaev, M.I.; Polyakov, A.I.; Tuseev, T.

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of experimental data by radiation defects study on different oxide elements (silicon, beryllium, aluminium, rare earth elements) irradiated by the photo-, gamma-, neutron-, alpha- radiation, protons and helium ions show, that gas adsorption process on the surface centers and radiation defects build up in metal oxide correlated between themselves. These processes were described by the equivalent kinetic equations for analysis of radiation defects build up in the different metal oxides. It was revealed in the result of the analysis: number of radiation defects are droningly increasing up to limit value with the treatment temperature growth. Constant of radicals death at ionizing radiation increases as well. Amount of surface defects in different oxides defining absorbing activity of these materials looks as: silicon oxide→beryllium oxide→aluminium oxide. So it was found, that most optimal material for absorbing system preparation is silicon oxide by it power intensity and berylium oxide by it adsorption efficiency

  14. The role of point defect clusters in reactor pressure vessel embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoller, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation-induced point defect clusters (PDC) are a plausible source of matrix hardening in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels in addition to copper-rich precipitates. These PDCs can be of either interstitial or vacancy type, and could exist in either 2 or 3-D shapes, e.g. small loops, voids, or stacking fault tetrahedra. Formation and evolution of PDCs are primarily determined by displacement damage rate and irradiation temperature. There is experimental evidence that size distributions of these clusters are also influenced by impurities such as copper. A theoretical model has been developed to investigate potential role of PDCs in RPV embrittlement. The model includes a detailed description of interstitial cluster population; vacancy clusters are treated in a more approximate fashion. The model has been used to examine a broad range of irradiation and material parameters. Results indicate that magnitude of hardening increment due to these clusters can be comparable to that attributed to copper precipitates. Both interstitial and vacancy type defects contribute to this hardening, with their relative importance determined by the specific irradiation conditions

  15. Radiation pressure in super star cluster formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Benny T.-H.; Milosavljević, Miloš

    2018-05-01

    The physics of star formation at its extreme, in the nuclei of the densest and the most massive star clusters in the universe—potential massive black hole nurseries—has for decades eluded scrutiny. Spectroscopy of these systems has been scarce, whereas theoretical arguments suggest that radiation pressure on dust grains somehow inhibits star formation. Here, we harness an accelerated Monte Carlo radiation transport scheme to report a radiation hydrodynamical simulation of super star cluster formation in turbulent clouds. We find that radiation pressure reduces the global star formation efficiency by 30-35%, and the star formation rate by 15-50%, both relative to a radiation-free control run. Overall, radiation pressure does not terminate the gas supply for star formation and the final stellar mass of the most massive cluster is ˜1.3 × 106 M⊙. The limited impact as compared to in idealized theoretical models is attributed to a radiation-matter anti-correlation in the supersonically turbulent, gravitationally collapsing medium. In isolated regions outside massive clusters, where the gas distribution is less disturbed, radiation pressure is more effective in limiting star formation. The resulting stellar density at the cluster core is ≥108 M⊙ pc-3, with stellar velocity dispersion ≳ 70 km s-1. We conclude that the super star cluster nucleus is propitious to the formation of very massive stars via dynamical core collapse and stellar merging. We speculate that the very massive star may avoid the claimed catastrophic mass loss by continuing to accrete dense gas condensing from a gravitationally-confined ionized phase.

  16. Radiation hardening revisited: Role of intracascade clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, B.N.; Foreman, A.J.E.; Trinkaus, H.

    1997-01-01

    be explained in terms of conventional dispersed-barrier hardening because (a) the grown-in dislocations are not free, and (b) irradiation-induced defect clusters are not rigid indestructible Orowan obstacles. A new model called 'cascade-induced source hardening' is presented where glissile loops produced...... directly in cascades are envisaged to decorate the grown-in dislocations so that they cannot act as dislocation sources. The upper yield stress is related to the breakaway stress which is necessary to pull the dislocation away from the clusters/loops decorating it. The magnitude of the breakaway stress has...

  17. Combining DFT, Cluster Expansions, and KMC to Model Point Defects in Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modine, N. A.; Wright, A. F.; Lee, S. R.; Foiles, S. M.; Battaile, C. C.; Thomas, J. C.; van der Ven, A.

    In an alloy, defect energies are sensitive to the occupations of nearby atomic sites, which leads to a distribution of defect properties. When radiation-induced defects diffuse from their initially non-equilibrium locations, this distribution becomes time-dependent. The defects can become trapped in energetically favorable regions of the alloy leading to a diffusion rate that slows dramatically with time. Density Functional Theory (DFT) allows the accurate determination of ground state and transition state energies for a defect in a particular alloy environment but requires thousands of processing hours for each such calculation. Kinetic Monte-Carlo (KMC) can be used to model defect diffusion and the changing distribution of defect properties but requires energy evaluations for millions of local environments. We have used the Cluster Expansion (CE) formalism to ``glue'' together these seemingly incompatible methods. The occupation of each alloy site is represented by an Ising-like variable, and products of these variables are used to expand quantities of interest. Once a CE is fit to a training set of DFT energies, it allows very rapid evaluation of the energy for an arbitrary configuration, while maintaining the accuracy of the underlying DFT calculations. These energy evaluations are then used to drive our KMC simulations. We will demonstrate the application of our DFT/MC/KMC approach to model thermal and carrier-induced diffusion of intrinsic point defects in III-V alloys. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE.

  18. Point-Defect Mediated Bonding of Pt Clusters on (5,5) Carbon Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, J. G.; Lv, Y. A.; Li, X. N.

    2009-01-01

    The adhesion of various sizes of Pt clusters on the metallic (5,5) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with and without the point defect has been investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT). The calculations show that the binding energies of Pt-n (n = 1-6) clusters on the defect free CNTs are more......). The stronger orbital hybridization between the Pt atom and the carbon atom shows larger charge transfers on the defective CNTs than on the defect free CNTs, which allows the strong interaction between Pt clusters and CNTs. On the basis of DFT calculations, CNTs with point defect can be used as the catalyst...

  19. On kinetics of paramagnetic radiation defects accumulation in beryllium ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, A.I.; Ryabikin, Yu.A.; Zashkvara, O.V.; Bitenbaev, M.I.; Petykhov, Yu.V.

    1999-01-01

    Results of paramagnetic radiation defects concentration dependence study in beryllium ceramics from gamma-irradiation dose ( 60 Co) within interval 0-100 Mrem are cited. Obtained dose dependence has form of accumulation curve with saturation typical of for majority of solids (crystals, different polymers, organic substances and others) , in which under irradiation occur not only formation of paramagnetic radiation defects, but its destruction due to recombination and interaction with radiation fields. Analysis of accumulation curve by the method of distant asymptotics allows to determine that observed in gamma-irradiated beryllium ceramics double line of electron spin resonance is forming of two types of paramagnetic radiation defects. It was defined, that sum paramagnetic characteristics of beryllium ceramics within 1-100 Mrad gamma- irradiation dose field change insignificantly and define from first type of paramagnetic radiation defects

  20. Edge dislocations as sinks for sub-nanometric radiation induced defects in α-iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anento, N.; Malerba, L.; Serra, A.

    2018-01-01

    The role of edge dislocations as sinks for small radiation induced defects in bcc-Fe is investigated by means of atomistic computer simulation. In this work we investigate by Molecular Statics (T = 0K) the interaction between an immobile dislocation line and defect clusters of small sizes invisible experimentally. The study highlights in particular the anisotropy of the interaction and distinguishes between absorbed and trapped defects. When the considered defect intersects the dislocation glide plane and the distance from the dislocation line to the defect is on the range between 2 nm and 4 nm, either total or partial absorption of the cluster takes place leading to the formation of jogs. Residual defects produced during partial absorption pin the dislocation. By the calculation of stress-strain curves we have assessed the strength of those residues as obstacles for the motion of the dislocation, which is reflected on the unpinning stresses and the binding energies obtained. When the defect is outside this range, but on planes close to the dislocation glide plane, instead of absorption we have observed a capture process. Finally, with a view to introducing explicitly in kinetic Monte Carlo models a sink with the shape of a dislocation line, we have summarized our findings on a table presenting the most relevant parameters, which define the interaction of the dislocation with the defects considered.

  1. Contribution of radiation chemistry to cluster science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belloni, J.

    2006-01-01

    Nanoclusters are small objects made of a few atoms, with a size of a few nanometers at most, which constitute a state of matter, named mesoscopic, intermediary between the atom and the bulk metal. In the 70's, radiation chemistry experiments have demonstrated that metal clusters exhibited indeed, due to their very small size, specific properties distinct from the bulk metal. The properties, physical and chemical, change with the number of atoms they contain. Their optical absorption spectrum, for example, as well as their redox potential, depends on the nuclearity, and also on the environment. Radiation chemistry methods have been proven to be of high potentiality to induce small and size-monodispersed metal clusters, as nanocolloids or supported on various materials. Pulse radiolysis provides the means to study the dynamics of nucleation and growth of clusters, monoand bi-metallic, from the monomers to the stable nanoparticle and to observe directly their reactivity, especially to determine during the growth their nuclearity-dependent properties, such as the redox potential. These are of crucial importance for the understanding of the mechanism of the cluster growth itself, in the radiation-induced as well as in the chemical or photochemical reduction processes, and also of the mechanism of certain catalytic reactions. (authors)

  2. Point-Defect Mediated Bonding of Pt Clusters on (5,5) Carbon Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, J. G.; Lv, Y. A.; Li, X. N.

    2009-01-01

    The adhesion of various sizes of Pt clusters on the metallic (5,5) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with and without the point defect has been investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT). The calculations show that the binding energies of Pt-n (n = 1-6) clusters on the defect free CNTs are mo...

  3. On the performance limiting behavior of defect clusters in commercial silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B.L.; Chen, W.; Jones, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Gee, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The authors report the observation of defect clusters in high-quality, commercial silicon solar cell substrates. The nature of the defect clusters, their mechanism of formation, and precipitation of metallic impurities at the defect clusters are discussed. This defect configuration influences the device performance in a unique way--by primarily degrading the voltage-related parameters. Network modeling is used to show that, in an N/P junction device, these regions act as shunts that dissipate power generated within the cell.

  4. Kinetics of cluster-related defects in silicon sensors irradiated with monoenergetic electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, R.; Pintilie, I.; Makarenko, L. F.; Fretwurst, E.; Lindstroem, G.

    2018-04-01

    This work focuses on the kinetic mechanisms responsible for the annealing behavior of radiation cluster-related defects with impact on the electrical performance of silicon sensors. Such sensors were manufactured on high resistivity n-type standard float-zone (STFZ) and oxygen enriched float-zone (DOFZ) material and had been irradiated with mono-energetic electrons of 3.5 MeV energy and fluences of 3 × 1014 cm-2 and 6 × 1014 cm-2. After irradiation, the samples were subjected either to isochronal or isothermal heat treatments in the temperature range from 80 °C to 300 °C. The specific investigated defects are a group of three deep acceptors [H(116 K), H(140 K), and H(152 K)] with energy levels in the lower half of the band gap and a shallow donor E(30 K) with a level at 0.1 eV below the conduction band. The stability and kinetics of these defects at high temperatures are discussed on the basis of the extracted activation energies and frequency factors. The annealing of the H defects takes place similarly in both types of materials, suggesting a migration rather than a dissociation mechanism. On the contrary, the E(30 K) defect shows a very different annealing behavior, being stable in STFZ even at 300 °C, but annealing-out quickly in DOFZ material at temperatures higher than 200 °C , with a high frequency factor of the order of 1013 s-1. Such a behavior rules out a dissociation process, and the different annealing behavior is suggested to be related to a bistable behavior of the defect.

  5. Effect of dose and size on defect engineering in carbon cluster implanted silicon wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Ryosuke; Masada, Ayumi; Shigematsu, Satoshi; Kadono, Takeshi; Hirose, Ryo; Koga, Yoshihiro; Okuda, Hidehiko; Kurita, Kazunari

    2018-01-01

    Carbon-cluster-ion-implanted defects were investigated by high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy toward achieving high-performance CMOS image sensors. We revealed that implantation damage formation in the silicon wafer bulk significantly differs between carbon-cluster and monomer ions after implantation. After epitaxial growth, small and large defects were observed in the implanted region of carbon clusters. The electron diffraction pattern of both small and large defects exhibits that from bulk crystalline silicon in the implanted region. On the one hand, we assumed that the silicon carbide structure was not formed in the implanted region, and small defects formed because of the complex of carbon and interstitial silicon. On the other hand, large defects were hypothesized to originate from the recrystallization of the amorphous layer formed by high-dose carbon-cluster implantation. These defects are considered to contribute to the powerful gettering capability required for high-performance CMOS image sensors.

  6. Stability of Ptn cluster on free/defective graphene: A first-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, G.M.; Fan, X.F.; Shi, S.; Huang, H.H.; Zheng, W.T.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The single-vacancy can enhance obviously the adsorption of Pt cluster on graphene. • Pt clusters on defected graphene prefer to adopt the close-packed model, except Pt 13 . • The contact way of Pt n clusters on single-vacancy changes with the size increasing. - Abstract: With first-principles methods, we investigate the stability of isolated Pt n clusters from Sutton-Chen model and close-packed model, and their adsorption on defected graphene. The single-vacancy in graphene is found to enhance obviously the adsorption energy of Pt cluster on graphene due to the introduction of localized states near Fermi level. It is found that the close-packed model is more stable than Sutton-Chen model for the adsorption of Pt n cluster on single-vacancy graphene, except the magic number n = 13. The cluster Pt 13 may be the richest one for small Pt clusters on defected graphene due to the strong adsorption on single-vacancy. The larger cluster adsorbed on defected graphene is predicted with the close-packed crystal structure. The charge is found to transfer from the Pt atom/cluster to graphene with the charge accumulation at the interface and the charge polarization on Pt cluster. The strong interaction between Pt cluster and single vacancy can anchor effectively the Pt nanoparticles on graphene and is also expected that the new states introduced near Fermi level can enhance the catalytic characteristic of Pt cluster.

  7. Investigation of radiation defects in solids using the EXAFS method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eritsyan, G.N.

    1983-01-01

    The exafs method is proposed as a more informative, universal one to investigate the radiation defects in solids. The successful results as obtained by the author using the synchrotron radiation source are reported for the first time. The measurements were carried out in GaAsP crystals irradiated with 50 MeV electrons

  8. Combining in situ transmission electron microscopy irradiation experiments with cluster dynamics modeling to study nanoscale defect agglomeration in structural metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Donghua; Wirth, Brian D.; Li Meimei; Kirk, Marquis A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a combinatorial approach that integrates state-of-the-art transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in situ irradiation experiments and high-performance computing techniques to study irradiation defect dynamics in metals. Here, we have studied the evolution of visible defect clusters in nanometer-thick molybdenum foils under 1 MeV krypton ion irradiation at 80 °C through both cluster dynamics modeling and in situ TEM experiments. The experimental details are reported elsewhere; we focus here on the details of model construction and comparing the model with the experiments. The model incorporates continuous production of point defects and/or small clusters, and the accompanying interactions, which include clustering, recombination and loss to the surfaces that result from the diffusion of the mobile defects. To account for the strong surface effect in thin TEM foils, the model includes one-dimensional spatial dependence along the foil depth, and explicitly treats the surfaces as black sinks. The rich amount of data (cluster number density and size distribution at a variety of foil thickness, irradiation dose and dose rate) offered by the advanced in situ experiments has allowed close comparisons with computer modeling and permitted significant validation and optimization of the model in terms of both physical model construct (damage production mode, identities of mobile defects) and parameterization (diffusivities of mobile defects). The optimized model exhibits good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the in situ TEM experiments. The combinatorial approach is expected to bring a unique opportunity for the study of radiation damage in structural materials.

  9. Model of defect reactions and the influence of clustering in pulse-neutron-irradiated Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, S. M.; Cooper, P. J.; Wampler, W. R.

    2008-01-01

    Transient reactions among irradiation defects, dopants, impurities, and carriers in pulse-neutron-irradiated Si were modeled taking into account the clustering of the primal defects in recoil cascades. Continuum equations describing the diffusion, field drift, and reactions of relevant species were numerically solved for a submicrometer spherical volume, within which the starting radial distributions of defects could be varied in accord with the degree of clustering. The radial profiles corresponding to neutron irradiation were chosen through pair-correlation-function analysis of vacancy and interstitial distributions obtained from the binary-collision code MARLOWE, using a spectrum of primary recoil energies computed for a fast-burst fission reactor. Model predictions of transient behavior were compared with a variety of experimental results from irradiated bulk Si, solar cells, and bipolar-junction transistors. The influence of defect clustering during neutron bombardment was further distinguished through contrast with electron irradiation, where the primal point defects are more uniformly dispersed

  10. The fractal character of radiation defects aggregation in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akylbekov, A.; Akimbekov, E.; Baktybekov, K.; Vasil'eva, I.

    2002-01-01

    In processes of self-organization, which characterize open systems, the source of ordering is a non-equilibrium. One of the samples of ordering system is radiation-stimulated aggregation of defects in solids. In real work the analysis of criterions of ordering defects structures in solid, which is continuously irradiate at low temperature is presented. The method of cellular automata used in simulation of irradiation. It allowed us to imitate processes of defects formation and recombination. The simulation realized on the surfaces up to 1000x1000 units with initial concentration of defects C n (the power of dose) 0.1-1 %. The number of iterations N (duration of irradiation) mounted to 10 6 cycles. The single centers, which are the sources of formation aggregates, survive in the result of probabilistic nature of formation and recombination genetic pairs of defects and with strictly fixed radius of recombination (the minimum inter anionic distance). For determination the character of same type defects distribution the potential of their interaction depending of defects type and reciprocal distance is calculated. For more detailed study of processes, proceeding in cells with certain sizes of aggregates, the time dependence of potential interaction is constructed. It is shown, that on primary stage the potential is negative, then it increase and approach the saturation in positive area. The minimum of interaction potential corresponds to state of physical chaos in system. Its increasing occurs with formation of same type defects aggregates. Further transition to saturation and 'undulating' character of curves explains by formation and destruction aggregates. The data indicated that - these processes occur simultaneously in cells with different sizes. It allows us to assume that the radiation defects aggregation have a fractal nature

  11. Simulation of radiation-induced defects

    CERN Document Server

    Peltola, Timo

    2015-09-14

    Mainly due to their outstanding performance the position sensitive silicon detectors are widely used in the tracking systems of High Energy Physics experiments such as the ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb at LHC, the world's largest particle physics accelerator at CERN, Geneva. The foreseen upgrade of the LHC to its high luminosity (HL) phase (HL-LHC scheduled for 2023), will enable the use of maximal physics potential of the facility. After 10 years of operation the expected fluence will expose the tracking systems at HL-LHC to a radiation environment that is beyond the capacity of the present system design. Thus, for the required upgrade of the all-silicon central trackers extensive measurements and simulation studies for silicon sensors of different designs and materials with sufficient radiation tolerance have been initiated within the RD50 Collaboration. Supplementing measurements, simulations are in vital role for e.g. device structure optimization or predicting the electric fields and trapping in the silicon...

  12. Defective Ca2+ channel clustering in axon terminals disturbs excitability in motoneurons in spinal muscular atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Jablonka, Sibylle; Beck, Marcus; Lechner, Barbara Dorothea; Mayer, Christine; Sendtner, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a motoneuron disease for which there is currently no effective treatment. In animal models of SMA, spinal motoneurons exhibit reduced axon elongation and growth cone size. These defects correlate with reduced β-actin messenger RNA and protein levels in distal axons. We show that survival motoneuron gene (Smn)–deficient motoneurons exhibit severe defects in clustering Cav2.2 channels in axonal growth cones. These defects also correlate with a reduced f...

  13. Stability of Ptn cluster on free/defective graphene: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, G. M.; Fan, X. F.; Shi, S.; Huang, H. H.; Zheng, W. T.

    2017-01-01

    With first-principles methods, we investigate the stability of isolated Ptn clusters from Sutton-Chen model and close-packed model, and their adsorption on defected graphene. The single-vacancy in graphene is found to enhance obviously the adsorption energy of Pt cluster on graphene due to the introduction of localized states near Fermi level. It is found that the close-packed model is more stable than Sutton-Chen model for the adsorption of Ptn cluster on single-vacancy graphene, except the magic number n = 13. The cluster Pt13 may be the richest one for small Pt clusters on defected graphene due to the strong adsorption on single-vacancy. The larger cluster adsorbed on defected graphene is predicted with the close-packed crystal structure. The charge is found to transfer from the Pt atom/cluster to graphene with the charge accumulation at the interface and the charge polarization on Pt cluster. The strong interaction between Pt cluster and single vacancy can anchor effectively the Pt nanoparticles on graphene and is also expected that the new states introduced near Fermi level can enhance the catalytic characteristic of Pt cluster.

  14. Radiation defects in electron-irradiated InP crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brailovskii, E.Yu.; Karapetyan, F.K.; Megela, I.G.; Tartachnik, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    The results are presented of formation and annealing of defects in InP crystals at 1 to 50 MeV electron irradiation. The recovery of electrical properties in the range of 77 to 970 K during annealing processes is studied. Five low temperature annealing states in n-InP and the reverse annealing in p-InP are observed at 77 to 300 K. Four annealing stages at temperatures higher than 300 K are present. When the electron energy is increased more complicated thermostable defects are formed, and at 50 MeV electron energy besides of the point defect clusters are formed, which anneal at temperatures of 800 to 970 K. It is shown that the peculiarities of the Hall mobility at irradiation and annealing are caused by the scattering centres E/sub c/ - 0.2 eV. The 'limiting' position of the Fermi level in electron irradiated InP crystals is discussed. (author)

  15. Nonthermal Particles and Radiation Produced by Cluster Merger Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-10

    NONTHERMAL PARTICLES AND RADIATION PRODUCED BY CLUSTER MERGER SHOCKS Robert C. Berrington and Charles D. Dermer Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7653...of the merging cluster and is assumed to be constant as the shock propagates outward from the cluster center. In this paper , we model the cluster ...emission in the60–250 eV band for a number of clus- ters. These clusters include Virgo , Coma, Fornax, A2199, A1795, and A4059 (Lieu et al. 1996a, 1996b

  16. Modelling ionising radiation induced defect generation in bipolar oxides with gated diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnaby, H.J.; Cirba, C.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Kosier, St.; Fouillat, P.; Montagner, X.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation-induced oxide defects that degrade electrical characteristics of bipolar junction transistor (BJTs) can be measured with the use of gated diodes. The buildup of defects and their effect on device radiation response are modeled with computer simulation. (authors)

  17. Hydrogen interaction with radiation defects in p-type silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Feklisova, O V; Yakimov, E B; Weber, J

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogen interaction with radiation defects in p-type silicon has been investigated by deep-level non-stationary spectroscopy. Hydrogen is introduced into the high-energy electron-irradiated crystals under chemical etching in acid solutions at room temperature followed by the reverse-bias annealing at 380 K. It is observed that passivation of the irradiation-induced defects is accompanied by formation of novel electrically active defects with hydrogen-related profiles. Effect of hydrogen on the electrical activity of the C sub s C sub i complexes is shown for the first time. Based on the spatial distribution and passivation kinetics, possible nature of the novel complexes is analyzed. The radii for hydrogen capture by vacancies, K-centers, C sub s C sub i centers and the novel complexes are determined

  18. EPR of radiation defects in lithium-oxyfluoride glass ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedotovs, A; Rogulis, U; Sarakovskis, A; Dimitrocenko, L, E-mail: andris-f@navigator.l [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Kengaraga st. 8, LV-1063, Riga (Latvia)

    2010-11-01

    We studied oxyfluoride composites based on lithium silicate glasses with yttrium fluorides and rare-earth dopants. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has been used to obtain information about radiation induced defects in these materials. Spectra have been measured before and after X-ray irradiation at room temperature and at liquid nitrogen temperature. Fluoride crystallites within samples were created by means of thermal treatment at specific temperatures. EPR spectra of radiation induced defects in oxyfluoride glass ceramics, in which crystallites have not been yet created, show no explicit hfs interaction of fluorine nuclei. However, in glass ceramics, which already contains fluoride crystallites, the hfs characteristic to fluorine nuclei appears in the EPR spectra. EPR hyperfine structure could be explained within a model of an F-type centre in YF{sub 3} crystalline phase.

  19. EPR of radiation defects in lithium-oxyfluoride glass ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotovs, A.; Rogulis, U.; Sarakovskis, A.; Dimitrocenko, L.

    2010-11-01

    We studied oxyfluoride composites based on lithium silicate glasses with yttrium fluorides and rare-earth dopants. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has been used to obtain information about radiation induced defects in these materials. Spectra have been measured before and after X-ray irradiation at room temperature and at liquid nitrogen temperature. Fluoride crystallites within samples were created by means of thermal treatment at specific temperatures. EPR spectra of radiation induced defects in oxyfluoride glass ceramics, in which crystallites have not been yet created, show no explicit hfs interaction of fluorine nuclei. However, in glass ceramics, which already contains fluoride crystallites, the hfs characteristic to fluorine nuclei appears in the EPR spectra. EPR hyperfine structure could be explained within a model of an F-type centre in YF3 crystalline phase.

  20. Structural defects in monocrystalline silicon: from radiation ones to growing and technological

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimenko, N.N.; Pavlyuchenko, M.N.; Dzhamanbalin, K.K.

    2001-01-01

    The systematical review of properties and conditions of radiation structures in monocrystalline silicon including own defects (elementary and complex, disordered fields) as well as defect-impurity formations is presented. The most typical examples of principle effects influence of known defects on radiation-induced processes (phase transformations, diffusion and heteration and others are considered. Experimental facts and models of silicon radiation amorphization have been analyzed in comparison of state of the radiation amorphization radiation problem of metals and alloys. The up-to-date status of the problem of the radiation defects physics are discussed, including end-of-range -, n+-, rod-like- defects. The phenomenon self-organization in crystals with defects has been considered. The examples of directed using radiation defects merged in independent trend - defects engineering - are given

  1. Effect of radiation pressure in the cores of globular clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angeletti, L; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R; Giannone

    1981-10-01

    The possible effects of a presence of a dust cloud in the cores of globular clusters was investigated. Two cluster models were considered together with various models of clouds. The problem of radiation transfer was solved under some simplifying assumptions. Owing to a differential absorption of the star light in the cloud, radiation pressure turned out be inward-directed in some cloud models. This fact may lead to a confinement of some dust in the central regions of globular clusters.

  2. Positron Annihilation Study of Radiation Defects in Zinc Oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Takenaka, Minoru; Kuramoto, Eiichi

    1992-01-01

    Positron annihilation studies have been carried out to clarify the radiation induced defects in ZnO single crystals. Vapor-grown ZnO crystals were irradiated at 77 K with 28 MeV electrons. Before irradiation as-grown specimens showed the mean positron lifetime in the range of 160-195 ps. Electron irradiation increased the mean positron lifetime up to 205-210 ps.This long-lifetime disappeared until 473 K during successive isochronal annealing steps. The radiation-induced coloration was anneale...

  3. Dynamics of simple defect clusters in alkaline earth fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haridasan, T.M.; Sekar, P.

    1988-08-01

    The effect of isolated F - vacancies and interstitials on the Dobye Waller Factors of their neighbours is studied. The perturbation due to the introduction of the defect is calculated using the scattering theory. The critical jump amplitude in the diffusion process is fitted to reproduce the experimental migration energy. The diffusion coefficient for the vacancy mechanism is estimated to be larger than that for the interstitialcy mechanism in the superionic region. (author). 21 refs, 8 figs, 2 tabs

  4. Defect in radiation signal transduction in ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavin, M.F.

    1994-01-01

    Exposure of mammalian cells to ionizing radiation causes a delay in progression through the cycle at several checkpoints. Cells from patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) ignore these checkpoint controls postirradiation. The tumour suppressor gene product p53 plays a key role at the G 1 /S checkpoint preventing the progression of cells into S phase. The induction of p53 by radiation is reduced and/or delayed in A-T cells, which appears to account for the failure of delay at the G 1 /S checkpoint. We have investigated further this defect in radiation signal transduction in A-T. While the p53 response was defective after radiation, agents that interfered with cell cycle progression such as mimosine, aphidicolin and deprivation of serum led to a normal p53 response in A-T cells. None of these agents caused breaks in DNA, as determined by pulse-field gel electrophoresis, in order to elicit the response. Since this pathway is mediated by protein kinases, we investigated the activity of several of these enzymes in control and A-T cells. Ca +2 -dependent and -independent protein kinase C activities were increased by radiation to the same extent in the two cell types, a variety of serine/threonine protein kinase activities were approximately the same and anti-tyrosine antibodies failed to reveal any differences in protein phosphorylation between A-T and control cells. (author)

  5. Features of accumulation of radiation defects in metal with impurity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskakov, B.M.

    2002-01-01

    The processes of accumulation and annealing of radiation defects in solids are being studied for the last fifty years quite intensively. Many regularities of these processes are fixed, but there are more unsolved problems. The computer simulation is one of the effective tools in finding the mechanisms of accumulation and annealing of radiation defects in solids. The numerical solution of the system of the differential equations by means of computers describing kinetics of accumulation of radiation point defects in metals with impurity, has allowed to receive a number of new outcomes. It was revealed, that a determinative factor influential in concentration of point defects (vacancies and interstitial atoms), formed during an exposure of metal, is the correlation a speed of Frenkel twins recombination, the capture of defects by impurity atoms and absorption of defects by other drainage, for example by dislocations. If the speed of capture of interstitial atoms by impurity atoms for two - three order is lower than the recombination speed of Frenkel twins and on two - three order exceeds the speed of capture of vacancies by impurity atoms, the concentration of interstitial atoms within the first seconds of an exposure passes through a maximum, then quickly decreases in some times and after that starts slowly to grow. The change of concentration of interstitial atoms in an initial period of an exposure does not influence on the change of a vacancy concentration. Within the whole period of an exposure, during which the concentration of interstitial atoms achieves a maximum and then is reduced, the vacancy concentration is steadily enlarged. However subsequent sluggish rise of concentration of interstitial atoms during an exposure is followed by the decrease of the vacancy concentration. The most remarkable feature of the kinetics of accumulation of interstitial atoms in metals with impurity is the presence of two extremum on curve dependence of interstitial atoms on a

  6. Progress on clustered DNA damage in radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Li'na; Zhang Hong; Di Cuixia; Zhang Qiuning; Wang Xiaohu

    2012-01-01

    Clustered DNA damage which caused by high LET heavy ion radiation can lead to mutation, tumorigenesis and apoptosis. Promoting apoptosis of cancer cells is always the basis of cancer treatment. Clustered DNA damage has been the hot topic in radiobiology. The detect method is diversity, but there is not a detail and complete protocol to analyze clustered DNA damage. In order to provide reference for clustered DNA damage in the radiotherapy study, the clustered DNA damage characteristics, the latest progresses on clustered DNA damage and the detecting methods are reviewed and discussed in detail in this paper. (authors)

  7. Estimation of radiation hardening in ferritic steels using the cluster dynamics models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jun Hyun; Kim, Whung Whoe; Hong, Jun Hwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Evolution of microstructure under irradiation brings about the mechanical property changes of materials, of which the major concern is radiation hardening in this work. Radiation hardening is generally expressed in terms of an increase in yield strength as a function of radiation dose and temperature. Cluster dynamics model for radiation hardening has been developed to describe the evolution of point defects clusters (PDCs) and copperrich precipitates (CRPs). While the mathematical models developed by Stoller focus on the evolution of PDCs in ferritic steels under neutron irradiation, we slightly modify the model by including the CRP growth and estimate the magnitude of hardening induced by PDC and CRP. The model is then used to calculate the changes in yield strength of RPV steels. The calculation results are compared to measured yield strength values, obtained from surveillance testing of PWR vessel steels in France.

  8. Interaction of point intrinsic defects in n-type indium phosphide with acceptor clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitovskij, N.A.; Lagunova, T.S.; Rakhimov, O.

    1984-01-01

    The rates of implanting defects of donor- and acceptor type stable at room temperature in n-InP during gamma irradiation are found to vary versus the compensating impurity type. Zinc atoms interact with defects most actively. Irradiation also brings about the growth of acceptor clusters, this growth being most markedly expressed in InP . The presence of an additional mechanism of charge-carriers scattering associated with the existence of clusters of compensating centres is verified, the temperature dependence of the effectiveness of this mechanism μ approximately Tsup(-1.2) is found

  9. The effects of self-interstitial clusters on cascade defect evolution beyond the primary damage state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinisch, H.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The intracascade evolution of the defect distributions of cascades in copper is investigated using stochastic annealing simulations applied to cascades generated with molecular dynamics (MD). The temperature and energy dependencies of annihilation, clustering and free defect production are determined for individual cascades. The annealing simulation results illustrate the strong influence on intracascade evolution of the defect configuration existing in the primary damage state. Another factor significantly affecting the evolution of the defect distribution is the rapid one-dimensional diffusion of small, glissile interstitial loops produced directly in cascades. This phenomenon introduces a cascade energy dependence of defect evolution that is apparent only beyond the primary damage state, amplifying the need for further study of the annealing phase of cascade evolution and for performing many more MD cascade simulations at higher energies.

  10. The effects of self-interstitial clusters on cascade defect evolution beyond the primary damage state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.

    1997-01-01

    The intracascade evolution of the defect distributions of cascades in copper is investigated using stochastic annealing simulations applied to cascades generated with molecular dynamics (MD). The temperature and energy dependencies of annihilation, clustering and free defect production are determined for individual cascades. The annealing simulation results illustrate the strong influence on intracascade evolution of the defect configuration existing in the primary damage state. Another factor significantly affecting the evolution of the defect distribution is the rapid one-dimensional diffusion of small, glissile interstitial loops produced directly in cascades. This phenomenon introduces a cascade energy dependence of defect evolution that is apparent only beyond the primary damage state, amplifying the need for further study of the annealing phase of cascade evolution and for performing many more MD cascade simulations at higher energies

  11. Radiation induced defect flux behaviors at zirconium based component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sang Il; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kwon, Jun Hyun; Lee, Gyeong Geun

    2013-01-01

    In commercial reactor core, structure materials are located in high temperature and high pressure environment. Therefore, main concern of structure materials is corrosion and mechanical properties change than radiation effects on materials. However, radiation effects on materials become more important phenomena because research reactor condition is different from commercial reactor. The temperature is lower than 100 .deg. C and radiation dose is much higher than that of commercial reactor. Among the radiation effect on zirconium based metal, radiation induced growth (RIG), known as volume conservative distortion, is one of the most important phenomena. Recently, theoretical RIG modeling based on radiation damage theory (RDT) and balance equation are developed. However, these growth modeling have limited framework of single crystal and high temperature. To model theoretical RIG in research reactor, qualitative mechanism must be set up. Therefore, this paper intent is establishing defect flux mechanism of zirconium base metal in research reactor for RIG modeling. After than theoretical RIG work will be expanded to research reactor condition

  12. Radiation defects in electron-irradiated InP crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brailovskii, E.Yu.; Karapetyan, F.K.; Megela, I.G.; Tartachnik, V.P. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Yadernykh Issledovanij)

    1982-06-16

    The results are presented of formation and annealing of defects in InP crystals at 1 to 50 MeV electron irradiation. The recovery of electrical properties in the range of 77 to 970 K during annealing processes is studied. Five low temperature annealing states in n-InP and the reverse annealing in p-InP are observed at 77 to 300 K. Four annealing stages at temperatures higher than 300 K are present. When the electron energy is increased more complicated thermostable defects are formed, and at 50 MeV electron energy besides of the point defect clusters are formed, which anneal at temperatures of 800 to 970 K. It is shown that the peculiarities of the Hall mobility at irradiation and annealing are caused by the scattering centres E/sub c/ - 0.2 eV. The 'limiting' position of the Fermi level in electron irradiated InP crystals is discussed.

  13. Interaction of alpha radiation with thermally-induced defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Akbar; Majid, Abdul

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of radiation-induced defects created by energetic alpha particles and thermally-induced defects in silicon has been studied using a Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) technique. Two thermally-induced defects at energy positions E c -0.48 eV and E c -0.25 eV and three radiation-induced defects E2, E3 and E5 have been observed. The concentration of both of the thermally-induced defects has been observed to increase on irradiation. It has been noted that production rates of the radiation-induced defects are suppressed in the presence of thermally-induced defects. A significant difference in annealing characteristics of thermally-induced defects in the presence of radiation-induced defects has been observed compared to the characteristics measured in pre-irradiated samples

  14. Radiation defects in Te-implanted germanium. Electron microscopy and computer simulation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalitzova, M.G.; Karpuzov, D.S.; Pashov, N.K.

    1985-01-01

    Direct observation of radiation damage induced by heavy ion implantation in crystalline germanium by means of high-resolution electron microscopy is reported. The dark-field lattice imaging mode is used, under conditions suitable for object-like imaging. Conventional TEM is used for estimating the efficiency of creating visibly damaged regions. Heavy ion damage clusters with three types of inner structure are observed: with near-perfect crystalline cores, and with metastable and stable amorphous cores. The MARLOWE computer code is used to simulate the atomic collision cascades and to obtain the lateral spread distributions of point defects created. A comparison of high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) with computer simulation results shows encouraging agreement for the average cluster dimensions and for the lateral spread of vacancies and interstitials. (author)

  15. Polymers under ionizing radiation: the study of energy transfers to radiation induced defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced defects created in polymers submitted to ionizing radiations, under inert atmosphere, present the same trend as a function of the dose. When the absorbed dose increases, their concentrations increase then level off. This behavior can be assigned to energy transfers from the polymer to the previously created macromolecular defects; the latter acting as energy sinks. During this thesis, we aimed to specify the influence of a given defect, namely the trans-vinylene, in the behavior of polyethylene under ionizing radiations. For this purpose, we proposed a new methodology based on the specific insertion, at various concentrations, of trans-vinylene groups in the polyethylene backbone through chemical synthesis. This enables to get rid of the variety of created defects on one hand and on the simultaneity of their creation on the other hand. Modified polyethylenes, containing solely trans-vinylene as odd groups, were irradiated under inert atmosphere, using either low LET beams (gamma, beta) or high LET beams (swift heavy ions). During irradiations, both macromolecular defects and H 2 emission were quantified. According to experimental results, among all defects, the influence of the trans-vinylene on the behavior of polyethylene is predominant. (author) [fr

  16. Electron irradiation effects and recovery of defect clusters in TiC through high voltage electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iseki, Michio; Kirihara, Tomoo; Ushijima, Susumu; Ohashi, Hideki.

    1984-01-01

    Titanium carbide(TiCsub(0.8)) prepared by plasma-jet melting was irradiated to an electron dose less than 6x10 26 e/m 2 from room temperature to 800 0 C. The number density and average size of the defect clusters formed at irradiation temperatures below 400 0 C were less than those formed above 600 0 C. Since TiCsub(0.8) has an order structure of carbon below around 600 0 C, the ordered phase is more resistant to radiation than the disordered one in higher temperatures. The clusters decrease in number density and develop to dislocation loops during post irradiation annealing above 1,000 0 C. The burgers vector of the loops was determined as a/2 . There were two temperature region for the recovery of the defect clusters. It is conceivable that the first one appeared in the temperature region around 600 0 C caused by migration of carbon vacancies, and the second one appeared above 1,000 0 C by migration of titanium vacancies. (author)

  17. Practical prototype of a cluster-counting transition radiation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabjan, C W; Willis, W [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland); Gavrilenko, I; Maiburov, S; Shmeleva, A; Vasiliev, P [AN SSSR, Moscow. Fizicheskij Inst.; Chernyatin, V; Dolgoshein, B; Kantserov, V; Nevski, P [Moskovskij Inzhenerno-Fizicheskij Inst. (USSR)

    1981-06-15

    A transition radiation detector using a method of cluster counting measurements has been tested. The performance is considerably better than with the usual method of total charge measurements, as well as offering advantages in simplicity of construction and operation.

  18. A study of defect cluster formation in vanadium by heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekimura, Naoto; Shirao, Yasuyuki; Morishita, Kazunori [Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Formation of defect clusters in thin foils of vanadium was investigated by heavy ion irradiation. In the very thin region of the specimens less than 20 nm, vacancy clusters were formed under gold ion irradiation, while very few clusters were detected in the specimens irradiated with 200 and 400 keV self-ions up to 1 x 10{sup 16} ions/m{sup 2}. The density of vacancy clusters were found to be strongly dependent on ion energy. Only above the critical value of kinetic energy transfer density in vanadium, vacancy clusters are considered to be formed in the cascade damage from which interstitials can escape to the specimen surface in the very thin region. (author)

  19. Laser radiation effect on radiation-induced defects in heavy ion tracks in dielectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, A.N.; Zhiryakov, B.M.; Kushin, V.V.; Lyapidevskij, V.K.; Khokhlov, N.B.

    1988-01-01

    Possibility of laser radiation resonance effect on radiation-induced defects in heavy ion tracks in dielectric materials is investigated. Absorption spectra in infrared, visible and ultraviolet ranges for cellulose nitrate samples irradiated by 6 MeV/nucleon 58 Ni ions and reactor gamma radiation are measured. Absorption spectra for irradiated and reference samples are presented. Two absorption bands λ 1 =0.33 μm (E 1 =3.9 eV) and λ 2 =0.72 μm (E 2 =1.7 eV) are detected. Etching rate decrease in a track under laser radiation effect is noticed. 3 refs.; 1 fig

  20. Small interstitial clusters as opposite defect recombinators in decomposing solid solutions under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, A.N.; Trushin, Yu.V.

    1988-01-01

    An attempt was made to make allowance for the role of binary and ternary interstitials in the kinetics of radiation point defects both in the presence and in the absence of coherent preseparation. It is shown that in solid solutions, decomposing under irradiation, recombination with binary and ternary interstitials proceeds more quickly than directly, and this difference is more pronounced (from 2 up to 20 time growth) due to defect flow for preseparation at the stage of coherent preseparation formation

  1. Stability and mobility of defect clusters and dislocation loops in metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osetsky, Y.N.; Bacon, D.J.; Serra, A.

    2000-01-01

    has been observed in the computer simulation of small vacancy loops in alpha-Fe. In the present paper we summarise results obtained by molecular dynamics simulations of defect clusters and small dislocation loops in alpha-Fe(bcc) and Cu(fcc). The structure and stability of vacancy and interstitial......According to the production bias model, glissile defect clusters and small dislocation loops play an important role in the microstructural evolution during irradiation under cascade damage conditions. The atomic scale computer simulations carried out in recent years have clarified many questions...... loops are reviewed, and the dynamics of glissile clusters assessed. The relevance and importance of these results in establishing a better understanding of the observed differences in the damage accumulation behaviour between bcc and fee metals irradiated under cascade damage conditions are pointed out...

  2. Radiation induced segregation and point defects in binary copper alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    Considerable progress, both theoretical and experimental, has been made in establishing and understanding the influence of factors such as temperature, time, displacement rate dependence and the effect of initial solute misfit on radiation induced solute diffusion and segregation. During irradiation, the composition of the alloy changes locally, due to defect flux driven non-equilibrium segregation near sinks such as voids, external surfaces and grain boundaries. This change in composition could influence properties and phenomena such as ductility, corrosion resistance, stress corrosion cracking, sputtering and blistering of materials used in thermo-nuclear reactors. In this work, the effect of 1 MeV electron irradiation on the initiation and development of segregation and defect diffusion in binary copper alloys has been studied in situ, with the aid of a high voltage electron microscope. The binary copper alloys had Be, Pt and Sn as alloying elements which had atomic radii less than, similar and greater than that of copper, respectively. It has been observed that in a wide irradiation temperature range, stabilization and growth of dislocation loops took place in Cu-Sn and Cu-Pt alloys. Whereas in the Cu-Be alloy, radiation induced precipitates formed and transformed to the stable γ phase. (Author) [pt

  3. The impact of mobile point defect clusters in a kinetic model of pressure vessel embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoller, R.E.

    1998-05-01

    The results of recent molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades in iron indicate that small interstitial clusters may have a very low activation energy for migration, and that their migration is 1-dimensional, rather than 3-dimensional. The mobility of these clusters can have a significant impact on the predictions of radiation damage models, particularly at the relatively low temperatures typical of commercial, light water reactor pressure vessels (RPV) and other out-of-core components. A previously-developed kinetic model used to investigate RPV embrittlement has been modified to permit an evaluation of the mobile interstitial clusters. Sink strengths appropriate to both 1- and 3-dimensional motion of the clusters were evaluated. High cluster mobility leads to a reduction in the amount of predicted embrittlement due to interstitial clusters since they are lost to sinks rather than building up in the microstructure. The sensitivity of the predictions to displacement rate also increases. The magnitude of this effect is somewhat reduced if the migration is 1-dimensional since the corresponding sink strengths are lower than those for 3-dimensional diffusion. The cluster mobility can also affect the evolution of copper-rich precipitates in the model since the radiation-enhanced diffusion coefficient increases due to the lower interstitial cluster sink strength. The overall impact of the modifications to the model is discussed in terms of the major irradiation variables and material parameter uncertainties

  4. Electric field deformation in diamond sensors induced by radiation defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassel, Florian; Boer, Wim de; Boegelspacher, Felix; Dierlamm, Alexander; Mueller, Thomas; Steck, Pia [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik (IEKP), Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT) (Germany); Dabrowski, Anne; Guthoff, Moritz [CERN (Switzerland)

    2016-07-01

    The BCML system is a beam monitoring device in the CMS experiment at the LHC. As detectors 32 poly-crystalline CVD diamond sensors are positioned in a ring around the beam pipe at a distance of ±1.8 m and ±14.4 m from the interaction point. The radiation hardness of the diamond sensors in terms of measured signal during operation was significantly lower than expected from laboratory measurements. At high particle rates, such as those occurring during the operation of the LHC, a significant fraction of the defects act as traps for charge carriers. This space charge modifies the electrical field in the sensor bulk leading to a reduction of the charge collection efficiency (CCE). A diamond irradiation campaign was started to investigate the rate dependent electrical field deformation with respect to the radiation damage. Besides the electrical field measurements via the Transient Current Technique, the CCE was measured. The experimental results were used to create an effective trap model that takes the radiation damage into account. Using this trap model the rate dependent electrical field deformation and the CCE were simulated with the software ''SILVACO TCAD''. This talk compares the experimental measurement results with the simulations.

  5. The formation of radiation defects in monohydrate of lithium sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahytzhan, A.B.; Zhussupov, A.A.; Kim, L.M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The crystals of lithium sulfate are monohydrate. At heating it pass waterless form. This crystals are represented the convenient for study of the crystal water influence on the radiation-induced processes. After irradiation in Li 2 SO 4 · H 2 O it was established the radicals SO 3 - and SO 4 - by the EPR method. The similar radiation induced centres are characteristic for the all sulphates. We established that at after irradiation by X-rays monohydrate sulphate lithium have not the absorption bands in a range 200-800 nm. It complicates study of the given systems. The dominant peak of recombination luminescence (TL) has a maximum in area 100 K. On its high-temperature wing there is 'shoulder' showing of more high-temperature and weak luminescence. At higher temperatures some very weak of TL peaks are observed. The dehydration of the samples does not essential influence for this weak TL. Because we have concentrated the basic attention only on low temperature peaks of recombination luminescence. The TL peak of a luminescence with a maximum at 100 K as a result of thermo treatment has disappeared. Dominant emission became the TL peak with a maximum at 130 K. It is necessary to note, that after dehydration the radiative sensitivity of sulphate lithium sharply has increased. Our rough estimation for this change give value almost two orders. In monohydrate the maximum of TL peak is observed at 130 K radiation by UV. This peak can be divided into two peaks with maximums at 100 K and 130 K. At an irradiation dehydrated samples by ultraviolet light the TL peaks are not observed. The given results allow connecting a luminescence at 100 K with disintegration of defects in the subsystem of crystal water. The products radiolysis of water molecules essential influence on recombination processes in sulphate subsystem. The one hand they suppress them, with another - there is a new channel of disintegration complex anions. It is established that photoconductivity of the

  6. Radiation induced defects and thermoluminescence mechanism in aluminum oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atobe, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Awata, T. [Naruto Univ. of Education, Tokushima (Japan); Okada, M. [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst; Nakagawa, M. [Kagawa Univ., Faculty of Education, Takamatsu, Kagawa (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    The thermoluminescence of the irradiated aluminum oxides were measured to study the radiation induced defects and their behaviors. Neutron and {gamma}-ray irradiation were performed for a shingle crystal of the high purity aluminum oxide. The thermoluminescence glow curve and its activation energy were measured. The spectroscopy measurement on the thermoluminescence and the absorption are also carried out. The observed 430 and 340 nm peaks are discussed relating to the F{sup +} and F centers, respectively. Activation state of the F center transits to 3P state through 1P state by emitting phonons. Trapped electron on 3P state emits phonon of 2.9 eV (430 nm) during transition to the ground state. The above reaction can be written by the equation. F{sup +} + e {yields} (F){sup *} {yields} F + h{nu}(2.9 eV, 470 nm). (Katsuta, H.)

  7. Radiation effects and defects in lithium borate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikov, Igor N.; Poryvay, Nikita E.; Pustovarov, Vladimir A.

    2010-11-01

    The paper presents the results of a study of the formation and decay of lattice defects in wide band-gap optical crystals of LiB3O5 (LBO), Li2B4O7 (LTB) and Li6Gd(BO3)3 (LGBO) with a sublattice of mobile lithium cations. By means of thermoluminescence techniques, and luminescent and absorption optical spectroscopy with a nanosecond time resolution under excitation with an electron beam, it was revealed that the optical absorption in these crystals in the visible and ultraviolet spectral ranges is produced by optical hole-transitions from the local defect level to the valence band states. The valence band density of the states determines mainly the optical absorption spectral profile, and the relaxation kinetics is rated by the interdefect non-radiative tunnel recombination between the trapped-hole center and the Li0 trapped-electron centers. At 290 K, the Li0 centers are subject to thermally stimulated migration. Based on experimental results, the overall picture of thermally stimulated recombination processes with the participation of shallow traps was established for these crystals.

  8. Radiation effects and defects in lithium borate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogorodnikov, Igor N; Poryvay, Nikita E; Pustovarov, Vladimir A, E-mail: igor.ogorodnikov@bk.ru [Ural Federal University, Mira Street, 19, Ekaterinburg 620002 (Russian Federation)

    2010-11-15

    The paper presents the results of a study of the formation and decay of lattice defects in wide band-gap optical crystals of LiB{sub 3}O{sub 5} (LBO), Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} (LTB) and Li{sub 6}Gd(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} (LGBO) with a sublattice of mobile lithium cations. By means of thermoluminescence techniques, and luminescent and absorption optical spectroscopy with a nanosecond time resolution under excitation with an electron beam, it was revealed that the optical absorption in these crystals in the visible and ultraviolet spectral ranges is produced by optical hole-transitions from the local defect level to the valence band states. The valence band density of the states determines mainly the optical absorption spectral profile, and the relaxation kinetics is rated by the interdefect non-radiative tunnel recombination between the trapped-hole center and the Li{sup 0} trapped-electron centers. At 290 K, the Li{sup 0} centers are subject to thermally stimulated migration. Based on experimental results, the overall picture of thermally stimulated recombination processes with the participation of shallow traps was established for these crystals.

  9. Study of defects in radiation tolerant semiconductor SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Hisayoshi; Kawasuso, Atsuo; Ohshima, Takeshi; Yoshikawa, Masahito; Nashiyama, Isamu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Okumura, Hajime; Yoshida, Sadafumi

    1997-03-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) was used to study defects introduced in n-type 6H-SiC by 3 MeV electron irradiation. Two ESR signals labeled A and B related to radiation induced defects were observed. An ESR signal B can be explained by a fine interaction with an effective spin S=1. The g and D tensors of the signal B were found to be axially symmetric along the c-axis. The principal values of the g were obtained to be g parallel = 2.003 and g perpendicular = 2.008, and the absolute value of the D was 3.96x10{sup -2} cm{sup -1} at 100 K for this signal. It was also found that the value |D| decreased with increasing temperature. Isochronal annealing showed that the A and B centers have annealing stages of {approx_equal}200degC and {approx_equal}800degC, respectively. Tentative structural models are discussed for these ESR centers. (author)

  10. Point Defect Properties of Cd(Zn)Te and TlBr for Room-Temperature Gamma Radiation Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lordi, Vincenzo

    2013-03-01

    The effects of various crystal defects in CdTe, Cd1-xZnxTe (CZT), and TlBr are critical for their performance as room-temperature gamma radiation detectors. We use predictive first principles theoretical methods to provide fundamental, atomic scale understanding of the defect properties of these materials to enable design of optimal growth and processing conditions, such as doping, annealing, and stoichiometry. Several recent cases will be reviewed, including (i) accurate calculations of the thermodynamic and electronic properties of native point defects and point defect complexes in CdTe and CZT; (ii) the effects of Zn alloying on the native point defect properties of CZT; (iii) point defect diffusion and binding related to Te clustering in Cd(Zn)Te; (iv) the profound effect of native point defects--principally vacancies--on the intrinsic material properties of TlBr, particularly electronic and ionic conductivity; (v) tailored doping of TlBr to independently control the electronic and ionic conductivity; and (vi) the effects of metal impurities on the electronic properties and device performance of TlBr detectors. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 with support from the National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Nonproliferation and Verification Research and Development NA-22.

  11. Radiation clusters formation and evolution in FCC metals at low-temperature neutron irradiation up to small damage fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, A.V.; Shcherbakov, E.N.; Asiptsov, O.I.; Skryabin, L.A.; Portnykh, I.A.

    2006-01-01

    Methods of transmission electron microscopy and precision size measurements are used to study the formation of radiation-induced clusters in FCC metals (Ni, Pt, austenitic steels EhI-844, ChS-68) irradiated with fast neutron (E>0.1 MeV) fluences from 7 x 10 21 up to 3.5 x 10 22 m -2 at a temperature of 310 K. Using statistical thermodynamic methods the process of radiation clusters formation and evolution is described quantitatively. The change in the concentration of point defects under irradiation as well as size variations of irradiated specimens on annealing are calculated [ru

  12. Luminescence Properties of Surface Radiation-Induced Defects in Lithium Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitovich, A. P.; Kalinov, V. S.; Martynovich, E. F.; Novikov, A. N.; Runets, L. P.; Stupak, A. P.

    2013-11-01

    Luminescence and luminescence excitation spectra are recorded for surface radiation-induced defects in lithium fluoride at temperatures of 77 and 293 K. The presence of three bands with relatively small intensity differences is a distinctive feature of the excitation spectrum. These bands are found to belong to the same type of defects. The positions of the peaks and the widths of the absorption and luminescence bands for these defects are determined. The luminescence decay time is measured. All the measured characteristics of these surface defects differ from those of previously known defects induced by radiation in the bulk of the crystals. It is found that the luminescence of surface defects in an ensemble of nanocrystals with different orientations is not polarized. The number of anion vacancies in the surface defects is estimated using the polarization measurements. It is shown that radiative scattering distorts the intensity ratios of the luminescence excitation bands located in different spectral regions.

  13. Defect production and formation of helium-vacancy clusters due to cascades in α-iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, L.; Zu, X.T.; Xiao, H.Y.; Gao, F.; Heinisch, H.L.; Kurtz, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Displacement cascades are simulated by molecular dynamics methods in α-Fe containing different concentrations of substitutional He atoms. Primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies, E p , from 0.5 to 5 keV are considered at the irradiation temperature of 100 K. The concentration of He in Fe varies from 1 to 5 at%, and the results are compared with the simulations performed in pure α-Fe. We find that the total number of point defects increases with increasing He concentration. The present studies reveal the formation and the configurations of He-vacancy clusters in the cascades of α-Fe. Furthermore, the production efficiency of He-vacancy clusters increases with increasing He concentration and PKA energy. The nucleation mechanisms of He-vacancy clusters in displacement cascades are discussed in detail

  14. Radiative width of molecular-cluster states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhassid, Y.; Gai, M.; Bertsch, G.F.

    1982-01-01

    Molecular states are characterized by enhanced electromagnetic deexcitations of many different multipolarities. The expected enhancement of E1, E2, and E3 transitions is examined by deriving molecular sum rules for radiative deexcitation widths and via a dimensionality approach. The enhancement of the E1 transitions is the most striking

  15. Low-temperature annealing of radiation defects in electron-irradiated gallium phosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, A.A.; Megela, I.G.; Buturlakin, A.P.; Goyer, D.B.

    1990-01-01

    The isochronal annealing of radiation defects in high-energy electron irradiated n-GaP monocrystals within the 77 to 300 K range has been investigated by optical and electrical techniques. The changes in conductance and charge carrier mobility as functions of annealing temperature as well as the variation of optical absorption spectra of GaP under irradiation and annealing provide evidence that most of radiation defects are likely secondary complexes of defects

  16. Fen (n=1–6) clusters chemisorbed on vacancy defects in graphene: Stability, spin-dipole moment, and magnetic anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Haldar, Soumyajyoti; Pujari, Bhalchandra S.; Bhandary, Sumanta; Cossu, Fabrizio; Eriksson, Olle; Kanhere, Dilip G.; Sanyal, Biplab

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we have studied the chemical and magnetic interactions of Fen (n=1–6) clusters with vacancy defects (monovacancy to correlated vacancies with six missing C atoms) in a graphene sheet by ab initio density functional calculations

  17. Influence of radiation defects on tritium release parameters from Li2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grishmanov, V.; Tanaka, S.; Yoneoka, T.

    1998-01-01

    The study of the influence of radiation defects on tritium release behavior from polycrystalline Li 2 O was performed by simultaneous measurements of the luminescence emission and tritium release. It was found that the radiation defects in Li 2 O introduced by electron irradiation cause the retention of tritium. It is thought that the tritium recovery is affected by the formation of a Li-T bond, which is tolerant of high temperatures. The retardation of tritium decreases with increasing absorbed dose in the dose range from 50 to 140 MGy. The aggregation of radiation defects at high irradiation doses is considered to be responsible for the decrease of the interaction of tritium with radiation defects. The mechanism of the interaction of radiation defects with tritium is discussed. (orig.)

  18. Influence of pretreatment temperature cycling on the radiating defect formation in silicon doped by samarium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdurakhmanov, K.P.; Nazyrov, D.E.

    2006-01-01

    of radiation imperfections and the diminution of a lifetime of minority carriers of a charge is much less, in 3-4 μs, than in control (not doped REE) samples. The influence of heat treatments and effectiveness of introduction of radiation defects (RD) is explained by properties of samarium, as getter, formation of clusters and sinks RD, and modification of states of rigid solutions silicon - oxygen and silicon - carbon. (author)

  19. The investigation of radiation induced defects in MgO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puetz, M.

    1990-05-01

    In this paper Frenkel defects were induced in MgO by 3 MeV electrons at low temperature. These defects were investigated by measurements of the optical absorption, by investigating the lattice parameters and Huang diffuse scattering. (WL)

  20. Simulating nonthermal radiation from cluster radio galaxies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tregillis, I. L. (Ian L.); Jones, T. W. (Thomas Walter); Ryu, Dongsu

    2004-01-01

    We present results from an extensive synthetic observation analysis of numerically-simulated radio galaxy (RG) jets. This analysis is based on the first three-dimensional simulations to treat cosmic ray acceleration and transport self-consistently within a magnetohydrodynamical calculation. We use standard observational techniques to calculate both minimum-energy and inverse-Compton field values for our simulated objects. The latter technique provides meaningful information about the field. Minimum-energy calculations retrieve reasonable field estimates in regions physically close to the minimum-energy partitioning, though the technique is highly susceptible to deviations from the underlying assumptions. We also study the reliability of published rotation measure analysis techniques. We find that gradient alignment statistics accurately reflect the physical situation, and can uncover otherwise hidden information about the source. Furthermore, correlations between rotation measure (RM) and position angle (PA) can be significant even when the RM is completely dominated by an external cluster medium.

  1. Investigation of anisotropy in EPR spectra of radiation defects in irradiated beryllium ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, A.I.; Ryabikin, Yu.A.; Zashkvara, O. V.; Bitenbaev, M.I.; Petukhov, Yu. V.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In this work results of analysis of anisotropy and hyperfine structure in EPR spectra of paramagnetic defects in irradiated samples of beryllium ceramics are presented. To explain peculiarities in a shape and parameters of the EPR spectrum hyperfine structure in beryllium ceramics, we have analyzed several versions of model representations for the radiation-induced paramagnetic defects uniformly distributed in a sample as well as for cluster defects which hyperfine structure is determined by interactions between electrons and nuclei of impurity atoms (S=1/2) and which are characterized by anisotropy in the g factors. Calculations of a shape of the uniformly widened EPR spectra are carried out by the model of random interactions between electron spins. The EPR spectra, widened at the expense of anisotropy in the g factors, are calculated by the following equation: g(Δ)=[2(ω-ω 0 )+α] -1/2 , where ω 0 =γH 0 , α is the quantify proportional to the anisotropy shift. To describe wings of spectral lines, where the equation doesn't work, we use the Gaussian function. To determine the frequency of precession of electron spins packages with local concentration N loc , the following expression is used: ω=ω 0 +1/2α(3cos 2 θ-1), where θ is an angle between the symmetry axis and the direction of the external magnetic field. It is shown that the best agreement between the calculated and experimental EPR spectra is observed with the following computational model: paramagnetic radiation defects are distributed uniformly over a ceramics sample, and the g factors of its EPR spectra have the anisotropy typical for dipole-dipole interaction in powder samples. By results of the data we obtained, it's clear that in future we'll need in more detailed information than that published in scientific journals about formation of the paramagnetic defect EPR spectra structure in beryllium oxides and ceramics at the expense of resonance line hyperfine splitting on atoms of

  2. Investigation of anisotropy in EPR spectra of radiation defects in irradiated beryllium ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyakov, A I; Ryabikin, Yu A; Zashkvara, O V; Bitenbaev, M I; Petukhov, Yu V [Inst. of Physics and Technology, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2004-07-01

    Full text: In this work results of analysis of anisotropy and hyperfine structure in EPR spectra of paramagnetic defects in irradiated samples of beryllium ceramics are presented. To explain peculiarities in a shape and parameters of the EPR spectrum hyperfine structure in beryllium ceramics, we have analyzed several versions of model representations for the radiation-induced paramagnetic defects uniformly distributed in a sample as well as for cluster defects which hyperfine structure is determined by interactions between electrons and nuclei of impurity atoms (S=1/2) and which are characterized by anisotropy in the g factors. Calculations of a shape of the uniformly widened EPR spectra are carried out by the model of random interactions between electron spins. The EPR spectra, widened at the expense of anisotropy in the g factors, are calculated by the following equation: g({delta})=[2({omega}-{omega}{sub 0})+{alpha}]{sup -1/2}, where {omega}{sub 0}={gamma}H{sub 0}, {alpha} is the quantify proportional to the anisotropy shift. To describe wings of spectral lines, where the equation doesn't work, we use the Gaussian function. To determine the frequency of precession of electron spins packages with local concentration N{sub loc}, the following expression is used: {omega}={omega}{sub 0}+1/2{alpha}(3cos{sup 2}{theta}-1), where {theta} is an angle between the symmetry axis and the direction of the external magnetic field. It is shown that the best agreement between the calculated and experimental EPR spectra is observed with the following computational model: paramagnetic radiation defects are distributed uniformly over a ceramics sample, and the g factors of its EPR spectra have the anisotropy typical for dipole-dipole interaction in powder samples. By results of the data we obtained, it's clear that in future we'll need in more detailed information than that published in scientific journals about formation of the paramagnetic defect EPR spectra structure in

  3. Stability of Pt{sub n} cluster on free/defective graphene: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, G.M. [College of Physics, Changchun Normal University, Changchun 130032 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials of MOE, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Fan, X.F., E-mail: xffan@jlu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials of MOE, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Shi, S.; Huang, H.H. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials of MOE, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Zheng, W.T., E-mail: wtzheng@jlu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials of MOE, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • The single-vacancy can enhance obviously the adsorption of Pt cluster on graphene. • Pt clusters on defected graphene prefer to adopt the close-packed model, except Pt{sub 13}. • The contact way of Pt{sub n} clusters on single-vacancy changes with the size increasing. - Abstract: With first-principles methods, we investigate the stability of isolated Pt{sub n} clusters from Sutton-Chen model and close-packed model, and their adsorption on defected graphene. The single-vacancy in graphene is found to enhance obviously the adsorption energy of Pt cluster on graphene due to the introduction of localized states near Fermi level. It is found that the close-packed model is more stable than Sutton-Chen model for the adsorption of Pt{sub n} cluster on single-vacancy graphene, except the magic number n = 13. The cluster Pt{sub 13} may be the richest one for small Pt clusters on defected graphene due to the strong adsorption on single-vacancy. The larger cluster adsorbed on defected graphene is predicted with the close-packed crystal structure. The charge is found to transfer from the Pt atom/cluster to graphene with the charge accumulation at the interface and the charge polarization on Pt cluster. The strong interaction between Pt cluster and single vacancy can anchor effectively the Pt nanoparticles on graphene and is also expected that the new states introduced near Fermi level can enhance the catalytic characteristic of Pt cluster.

  4. The semiconductor doping with radiation defects via proton and alpha-particle irradiation. Review

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlov, V A

    2001-01-01

    Paper presents an analytical review devoted to semiconductor doping with radiation defects resulted from irradiation by light ions, in particular, by protons and alpha-particles. One studies formation of radiation defects in silicon, gallium arsenide and indium phosphide under light ion irradiation. One analyzes effect of proton and alpha-particle irradiation on electric conductivity of the above-listed semiconducting materials. Semiconductor doping with radiation defects under light ion irradiation enables to control their electrophysical properties and to design high-speed opto-, micro- and nanoelectronic devices on their basis

  5. Effect of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber gain behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallares, A.; Brom, J.M.; Bergdolt, A.M.; Coffin, J.; Eberle, H.; Sigward, M.H.; Fontaine, J.C.; Barthe, S.; Schunck, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify the influence of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber (MSGC) gain behaviour. The first part of this paper focuses on radiation effects on a typical MSGC substrate: Desag D263 glass. Defect generation was studied for Desag D263 with pure silica (Suprasil 1) as a reference. We studied the evolution of defect concentration with respect to accumulated doses up to 480 kGy. Annealing studies of defects in Desag D263 were also performed. In the second part, the radiation sensitivity of Desag D263 glass has been linked to the behaviour of the detector under irradiation. Comparative gain measurements were taken before and after substrate irradiation at 10 and 80 kGy the minimal dose received during LHC operation and the dose for which defect density is maximum (respectively). (orig.)

  6. Effect of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber gain behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallares, A.; Brom, J.M.; Bergdolt, A.M.; Coffin, J.; Eberle, H.; Sigward, M.H. [Institute de Recherches Subatomiques, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Fontaine, J.C. [Universite de Haute Alsace, GRPHE, 61 rue Albert Camus, 68093 Mulhouse Cedex (France); Barthe, S.; Schunck, J.P. [Laboratoire PHASE (UPR 292 du CNRS), 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    1998-08-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify the influence of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber (MSGC) gain behaviour. The first part of this paper focuses on radiation effects on a typical MSGC substrate: Desag D263 glass. Defect generation was studied for Desag D263 with pure silica (Suprasil 1) as a reference. We studied the evolution of defect concentration with respect to accumulated doses up to 480 kGy. Annealing studies of defects in Desag D263 were also performed. In the second part, the radiation sensitivity of Desag D263 glass has been linked to the behaviour of the detector under irradiation. Comparative gain measurements were taken before and after substrate irradiation at 10 and 80 kGy the minimal dose received during LHC operation and the dose for which defect density is maximum (respectively). (orig.) 26 refs.

  7. Contribution of radiation chemistry to the study of metal clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloni, J

    1998-11-01

    Radiation chemistry dates from the discovery of radioactivity one century ago by H. Becquerel and P. and M. Curie. The complex phenomena induced by ionizing radiation have been explained progressively. At present, the methodology of radiation chemistry, particularly in the pulsed mode, provides a powerful means to study not only the early processes after the energy absorption, but more generally a broad diversity of chemical and biochemical reaction mechanisms. Among them, the new area of metal cluster chemistry illustrates how radiation chemistry contributed to this field in suggesting fruitful original concepts, in guiding and controlling specific syntheses, and in the detailed elaboration of the mechanisms of complex and long-unsolved processes, such as the dynamics of nucleation, electron transfer catalysis and photographic development.

  8. Toward a comprehensive theory of radiation-induced swelling and creep - the point defect concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, L.K.; Yoo, M.H.

    1979-01-01

    The theory of void swelling and irradiation creep is now fairly comprehensive. A unifying concept on which most of this understanding rests is that of the rate theory point defect concentrations. Several basic aspects of this unifying conept are reviewed. These relate to local fluctuations in point defect concentrations produced by cascades, the effects of thermal and radiation-produced divacancies, and the effects of point defect trapping

  9. Investigation of radiation defects in InSb formed by charged high energy nuclear particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikhlij, G.A.; Karpenko, A.Ya.; Litovchenko, P.G.; Tarabrova, L.I.; Groza, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    A possibility of creation of high concentrations of radiation defects in the bulk of InSb samples by 47 MeV protons and 80 MeV alpha particles is considered. Dose dependences of electroconductivity, optical absorption spectra as well as temperature and field relations of galvanomagnetic properties of samples with defects are investigated. Annealing stages and electrical properties of defects annealed at these stages are determined. 17 refs.; 7 figs

  10. Stabilization of primary mobile radiation defects in MgF{sub 2} crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisitsyn, V.M. [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, pr. Lenina 30, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Lisitsyna, L.A. [State University of Architecture and Building, pl. Solyanaya 2, Tomsk 634003 (Russian Federation); Popov, A.I., E-mail: popov@ill.fr [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, 8 Kengaraga Str., LV-1063 Riga (Latvia); Kotomin, E.A. [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, 8 Kengaraga Str., LV-1063 Riga (Latvia); Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Abuova, F.U.; Akilbekov, A. [L.N. Gumilyov Eurasian National University, 3 Munaitpasova Str., Astana (Kazakhstan); Maier, J. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2016-05-01

    Non-radiative decay of the electronic excitations (excitons) into point defects (F–H pairs of Frenkel defects) is main radiation damage mechanism in many ionic (halide) solids. Typical time scale of the relaxation of the electronic excitation into a primary, short-lived defect pair is about 1–50 ps with the quantum yield up to 0.2–0.8. However, only a small fraction of these primary defects are spatially separated and survive after transformation into stable, long-lived defects. The survival probability (or stable defect accumulation efficiency) can differ by orders of magnitude, dependent on the material type; e.g. ∼10% in alkali halides with f.c.c. or b.c.c. structure, 0.1% in rutile MgF{sub 2} and <0.001% in fluorides MeF{sub 2} (Me: Ca, Sr, Ba). The key factor determining accumulation of stable radiation defects is stabilization of primary defects, first of all, highly mobile hole H centers, through their transformation into more complex immobile defects. In this talk, we present the results of theoretical calculations of the migration energies of the F and H centers in poorely studied MgF{sub 2} crystals with a focus on the H center stabilization in the form of the interstitial F{sub 2} molecules which is supported by presented experimental data.

  11. Si clusters/defective graphene composites as Li-ion batteries anode materials: A density functional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Meng; Liu, Yue-Jie; Zhao, Jing-xiang; Wang, Xiao-guang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the interaction between Si clusters with pristine and defective graphene. • We find that the binding strength of Si clusters on graphene can be enhanced to different degrees after introducing various defects. • It is found that both graphene and Si cluster in the Si/graphene composites can preserve their Li uptake ability. - Abstract: Recently, the Si/graphene hybrid composites have attracted considerable attention due to their potential application for Li-ion batteries. How to effectively anchor Si clusters to graphene substrates to ensure their stability is an important factor to determine their performance for Li-ion batteries. In the present work, we have performed comprehensive density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate the geometric structures, stability, and electronic properties of the deposited Si clusters on defective graphenes as well as their potential applications for Li-ion batteries. The results indicate that the interfacial bonding between these Si clusters with the pristine graphene is quietly weak with a small adsorption energy (<−0.21 eV). Due to the presence of vacancy site, the binding strength of Si clusters on defective graphene is much stronger than that of pristine one, accompanying with a certain amount of charge transfer from Si clusters to graphene substrates. Moreover, the ability of Si/graphene hybrids for Li uptake is studied by calculating the adsorption of Li atoms. We find that both graphenes and Si clusters in the Si/graphene composites preserve their Li uptake ability, indicating that graphenes not only server as buffer materials for accommodating the expansion of Si cluster, but also provide additional intercalation sites for Li

  12. Radiation defects in lithium salts of normal oxyacids of the sixth B subgroup elements. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurilenko, L.N.; Saunin, E.I.; Gromov, V.V.

    1984-05-01

    EPR and thermoluminescence methods are used to investigate radiation defects in the series of compounds Li/sub 2/ElO/sub 4/(El=W, Mo, Cr) belonging to the structural type of phenacite. The example of polycrystalline Li/sub 2/WO/sub 4/ of hexagonal modification is used to show that three-axis anisotropic signal (g/sub 1/=1.997, g/sub 2/=2.007, g/sub 3/=2.023) observed after effect of ..gamma..-quanta and completely disappearing at 570 K is conditioned by preliminary localization of the hole on oxygen of octahedral mononuclear groupings of admixture cubic phases, i.e. defects of WO/sub 6//sup 5 -/ type. Li/sub 2/WO/sub 4/ of cubic modification is the main impurity. Thermal stability of WO/sub 6//sup 5 -/ defects is much higher than stability of proper tetrahedral hole centres. Mo admixture does not make a noticeable contribution to the stabilization of high-temperature hole centres in Li/sub 2/WO/sub 4/ simultaneously changing localization conditions for electrons and holes in the range of low temperatures. It is shown that Li/sub 2/MoO/sub 4/ and Li/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/ radiolysis occurs analogously to Li/sub 2/WO/sub 4/ radiolysis, but stabilization conditions of defects observed are different. It is found that thermal stability of hole paramagnetic centres of the ElO/sub 6//sup 5 -/ type correlates with ..delta..H/sub 298//sup 0/ values formation heat of compounds studied, and energy characteristics of electron paramagnetic centres of the ElO/sub 4//sup 3 -/ type change according to the values of ionization potential of El/sup 5 +/ ions.

  13. Assessment of structures and stabilities of defect clusters and surface energies predicted by nine interatomic potentials for UO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taller, Stephen A. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Bai, Xian-Ming, E-mail: xianming.bai@inl.gov [Fuels Modeling and Simulation Department, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    The irradiation in nuclear reactors creates many point defects and defect clusters in uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) and their evolution severely degrades the thermal and mechanical properties of the nuclear fuels. Previously many empirical interatomic potentials have been developed for modeling defect production and evolution in UO{sub 2}. However, the properties of defect clusters and extended defects are usually not fitted into these potentials. In this work nine interatomic potentials for UO{sub 2} are examined by using molecular statics and molecular dynamics to assess their applicability in predicting the properties of various types of defect clusters in UO{sub 2}. The binding energies and structures for these defect clusters have been evaluated for each potential. In addition, the surface energies of voids of different radii and (1 1 0) flat surfaces predicted by these potentials are also evaluated. It is found that both good agreement and significant discrepancies exist for these potentials in predicting these properties. For oxygen interstitial clusters, these potentials predict significantly different defect cluster structures and stabilities; For defect clusters consisting of both uranium and oxygen defects, the prediction is in better agreement; The surface energies predicted by these potentials have significant discrepancies, and some of them are much higher than the experimentally measured values. The results from this work can provide insight on interpreting the outcome of atomistic modeling of defect production using these potentials and may provide guidelines for choosing appropriate potential models to study problems of interest in UO{sub 2}.

  14. Dependence of radiation damage accumulation in iron on underlying models of displacement cascades and subsequent defect migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souidi, A.; Becquart, C.S.; Domain, C.; Terentyev, D.; Malerba, L.; Calder, A.F.; Bacon, D.J.; Stoller, R.E.; Osetsky, Yu. N.; Hou, M.

    2006-01-01

    Groups of displacement cascades calculated independently with different simulation models and computer codes are compared on a statistical basis. The parameters used for this comparison are the number of Frenkel pairs (FP) produced, the percentages of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) in clusters, the spatial extent and the aspect ratio of the vacancies and the SIAs formed in each cascade. One group of cascades was generated in the binary collision approximation (BCA) and all others by full molecular dynamics (MD). The MD results differ primarily due to the empirical interatomic potentials used and, to some extent, in code strategies. Cascades were generated in simulation boxes at different initial equilibrium temperatures. Only modest differences in the predicted numbers of FP are observed, but the other cascade parameters may differ by more than 100%. The consequences of these differences on long-term cluster growth in a radiation environment are examined by means of object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations. These were repeated with three different parameterizations of SIA and SIA cluster mobility. The differences encompassed low to high mobility, one- and three-dimensional migration of clusters, and complete immobility of large clusters. The OKMC evolution was followed until 0.1 dpa was reached. With the range of OKMC parameters used, cluster populations after 0.1 dpa differ by orders of magnitude. Using the groups of cascades from different sources induced no difference larger than a factor of 2 in the OKMC results. No correlation could be identified between the cascade parameters considered and the number densities of vacancies and SIAs predicted by OKMC to cluster in the long term. However, use of random point defect distributions instead of those obtained for displacement cascades as input for the OKMC modeling led to significantly different results. It is therefore suggested that although the displacement cascade characteristics considered

  15. Temperature dependence of radiation induced defect creation in a-SiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devine, R.A.B.; Grouillet, A.; Berlivet, J.Y.

    1988-01-01

    The efficiency of oxygen vacancy defect creation in samples of amorphous SiO 2 subjected to ultraviolet laser or ionizing particle radiation (energetic H + ions) has been measured as a function of sample temperature during irradiation. For the case of laser radiation (E photon ≅ 5 eV) we find that vacancy centers are only created when the irradiation temperature is above 150 K. The efficiency of peroxy radical defect creation observed after post irradiation annealing is consistent with the behaviour of the oxygen vacancy creation efficiency. In samples with energetic protons, the opposite behaviour is observed and one finds that defect creation is enhanced as the implantation temperature is lowered. Possible physical mechanisms controlling the defect creation efficiency as a function of sample temperature and radiation are discussed. (orig.)

  16. Radiation damage and defect behavior in ion-implanted, lithium counterdoped silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, I.; Mehta, S.; Swartz, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    Boron doped silicon n+p solar cells were counterdoped with lithium by ion implantation and the resuitant n+p cells irradiated by 1 MeV electrons. The function of fluence and a Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) was studied to correlate defect behavior with cell performance. It was found that the lithium counterdoped cells exhibited significantly increased radiation resistance when compared to boron doped control cells. It is concluded that the annealing behavior is controlled by dissociation and recombination of defects. The DLTS studies show that counterdoping with lithium eliminates at least three deep level defects and results in three new defects. It is speculated that the increased radiation resistance of the counterdoped cells is due primarily to the interaction of lithium with oxygen, single vacanies and divacancies and that the lithium-oxygen interaction is the most effective in contributing to the increased radiation resistance.

  17. Formation mechanism of solute clusters under neutron irradiation in ferritic model alloys and in a reactor pressure vessel steel: clusters of defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meslin-Chiffon, E.

    2007-11-01

    The embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under irradiation is partly due to the formation of point defects (PD) and solute clusters. The aim of this work was to gain more insight into the formation mechanisms of solute clusters in low copper ([Cu] = 0.1 wt%) FeCu and FeCuMnNi model alloys, in a copper free FeMnNi model alloy and in a low copper French RPV steel (16MND5). These materials were neutron-irradiated around 300 C in a test reactor. Solute clusters were characterized by tomographic atom probe whereas PD clusters were simulated with a rate theory numerical code calibrated under cascade damage conditions using transmission electron microscopy analysis. The confrontation between experiments and simulation reveals that a heterogeneous irradiation-induced solute precipitation/segregation probably occurs on PD clusters. (author)

  18. Low-dose ionizing radiation alleviates Aβ42-induced defective phenotypes in Drosophila Alzheimer's disease models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, SooJin; Jeong, Hae Min; Nam, Seon Young

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by amyloid plaques, progressive neuronal loss, and gradual deterioration of memory. Amyloid imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have been developed and approved for clinical use in the evaluation of suspected neurodegenerative disease, including AD. Particularly, previous studies involving low-dose ionizing radiation on Aβ 42-treated mouse hippocampal neurons have suggested a potential role for low-dose ionizing radiation in the treatment of AD. However, associated in vivo studies involving the therapy effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on AD are still insufficient. As a powerful cell biological system, Drosophila AD models have been generated and established a useful model organism for study on the etiology of human AD. In this study, we investigated the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on Drosophila AD models. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation.

  19. Monte-Carlo simulation of defect-cluster nucleation in metals during irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakasuji, Toshiki, E-mail: t-nakasuji@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Morishita, Kazunori [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Ruan, Xiaoyong [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Monte-Carlo simulations were performed to investigate the nucleation process of copper-vacancy clusters in Fe. • Nucleation paths were obtained as a function of temperature and the damage rate. - Abstract: A multiscale modeling approach was applied to investigate the nucleation process of CRPs (copper rich precipitates, i.e., copper-vacancy clusters) in α-Fe containing 1 at.% Cu during irradiation. Monte-Carlo simulations were performed to investigate the nucleation process, with the rate theory equation analysis to evaluate the concentration of displacement defects, along with the molecular dynamics technique to know CRP thermal stabilities in advance. Our MC simulations showed that there is long incubation period at first, followed by a rapid growth of CRPs. The incubation period depends on irradiation conditions such as the damage rate and temperature. CRP’s composition during nucleation varies with time. The copper content of CRPs shows relatively rich at first, and then becomes poorer as the precipitate size increases. A widely-accepted model of CRP nucleation process is finally proposed.

  20. Monte-Carlo simulation of defect-cluster nucleation in metals during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakasuji, Toshiki; Morishita, Kazunori; Ruan, Xiaoyong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Monte-Carlo simulations were performed to investigate the nucleation process of copper-vacancy clusters in Fe. • Nucleation paths were obtained as a function of temperature and the damage rate. - Abstract: A multiscale modeling approach was applied to investigate the nucleation process of CRPs (copper rich precipitates, i.e., copper-vacancy clusters) in α-Fe containing 1 at.% Cu during irradiation. Monte-Carlo simulations were performed to investigate the nucleation process, with the rate theory equation analysis to evaluate the concentration of displacement defects, along with the molecular dynamics technique to know CRP thermal stabilities in advance. Our MC simulations showed that there is long incubation period at first, followed by a rapid growth of CRPs. The incubation period depends on irradiation conditions such as the damage rate and temperature. CRP’s composition during nucleation varies with time. The copper content of CRPs shows relatively rich at first, and then becomes poorer as the precipitate size increases. A widely-accepted model of CRP nucleation process is finally proposed.

  1. Sodium-water clusters and their role in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhar, S.; Kestner, N.R.

    1988-01-01

    Studies of sodium-water clusters are presented which could serve as models for the recently suggested intermediate species in the radiation chemistry of water. The ionization potentials and the lower excited states of sodium with n-water molecules are calculated by ab initio quantum chemistry methods. The ionization potential calculated at the SCF level for the water monomer is 4.10 eV, which becomes 4.34 at the MP2 correlation level. The experimental value is 4.379 ± 0.002 eV. Structural data is presented for the lower members of the sodium with n-water clusters. In addition the Hartree-Fock calculations indicate that there should be some strong charge transfer to solvent transitions at higher energies. (author)

  2. Clustered DNA damages induced in human hematopoietic cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Bennett, Paula V.; Cintron-Torres, Nela; Hada, Megumi; Trunk, John; Monteleone, Denise; Sutherland, John C.; Laval, Jacques; Stanislaus, Marisha; Gewirtz, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces clusters of DNA damages--oxidized bases, abasic sites and strand breaks--on opposing strands within a few helical turns. Such damages have been postulated to be difficult to repair, as are double strand breaks (one type of cluster). We have shown that low doses of low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induce such damage clusters in human cells. In human cells, DSB are about 30% of the total of complex damages, and the levels of DSBs and oxidized pyrimidine clusters are similar. The dose responses for cluster induction in cells can be described by a linear relationship, implying that even low doses of ionizing radiation can produce clustered damages. Studies are in progress to determine whether clusters can be produced by mechanisms other than ionizing radiation, as well as the levels of various cluster types formed by low and high LET radiation.

  3. Defect complexes and thermoluminescence in lithium fluoride. [X radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeever, S.W.S. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1984-01-01

    X-ray induced luminescence measurements indicate that the emission wavelength is dependent upon the aggregation state of Mg within the LiF lattice. This suggests a close association between Mg and Ti within a defect complex. Pulse annealing measurements indicate that peak 5 may be due to the dissociation of trimers, followed by charge release.

  4. Ferromagnetism and suppression of metallic clusters in Fe implanted ZnO -- a phenomenon related to defects?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenholz, Elke; Zhou, S.; Potzger, K.; Talut, G.; Reuther, H.; Kuepper, K.; Grenzer, J.; Xu, Q.; Mucklich, A.; Helm, M.; Fassbender, J.; Arenholz, E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated ZnO(0001) single crystals annealed in high vacuum with respect to their magnetic properties and cluster formation tendency after implant-doping with Fe. While metallic Fe cluster formation is suppressed, no evidence for the relevance of the Fe magnetic moment to the observed ferromagnetism was found. The latter along with the cluster suppression is discussed with respect to defects in the ZnO host matrix, since the crystalline quality of the substrates was lowered due to the preparation as observed by x-ray diffraction

  5. Ferromagnetism and suppression of metallic clusters in Fe implanted ZnO: a phenomenon related to defects?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Shengqiang; Potzger, K; Talut, G; Reuther, H; Kuepper, K; Grenzer, J; Xu Qingyu; Muecklich, A; Helm, M; Fassbender, J; Arenholz, E

    2008-01-01

    We investigated ZnO(0 0 0 1) single crystals annealed in high vacuum with respect to their magnetic properties and cluster formation tendency after implant-doping with Fe. While metallic Fe cluster formation is suppressed, no evidence for the relevance of the Fe magnetic moment to the observed ferromagnetism was found. The latter along with the cluster suppression is discussed with respect to defects in the ZnO host matrix, since the crystalline quality of the substrates was lowered due to the preparation as observed by x-ray diffraction

  6. Vacancy defects in electron-irradiated ZnO studied by Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z. Q.; Betsuyaku, K.; Kawasuso, A.

    2008-03-01

    Vacancy defects in ZnO induced by electron irradiation were characterized by the Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation measurements together with the local density approximation calculations. Zinc vacancies (VZn) are responsible for positron trapping in the as-irradiated state. These are annealed out below 200°C . The further annealing at 400°C results in the formation of secondary defects attributed to the complexes composed of zinc vacancies and zinc antisites (VZn-ZnO) .

  7. Defective functional connectivity between posterior hypothalamus and regions of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction in chronic cluster headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Stefania; Nigri, Anna; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia; Brivio, Luca; Proietti Cecchini, Alberto; Verri, Mattia; Chiapparini, Luisa; Leone, Massimo

    2018-01-01

    Objective We tested the hypothesis of a defective functional connectivity between the posterior hypothalamus and diencephalic-mesencephalic regions in chronic cluster headache based on: a) clinical and neuro-endocrinological findings in cluster headache patients; b) neuroimaging findings during cluster headache attacks; c) neuroimaging findings in drug-refractory chronic cluster headache patients improved after successful deep brain stimulation. Methods Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging, associated with a seed-based approach, was employed to investigate the functional connectivity of the posterior hypothalamus in chronic cluster headache patients (n = 17) compared to age and sex-matched healthy subjects (n = 16). Random-effect analyses were performed to study differences between patients and controls in ipsilateral and contralateral-to-the-pain posterior hypothalamus functional connectivity. Results Cluster headache patients showed an increased functional connectivity between the ipsilateral posterior hypothalamus and a number of diencephalic-mesencephalic structures, comprising ventral tegmental area, dorsal nuclei of raphe, and bilateral substantia nigra, sub-thalamic nucleus, and red nucleus ( p cluster headache patients mainly involves structures that are part of (i.e. ventral tegmental area, substantia nigra) or modulate (dorsal nuclei of raphe, sub-thalamic nucleus) the midbrain dopaminergic systems. The midbrain dopaminergic systems could play a role in cluster headache pathophysiology and in particular in the chronicization process. Future studies are needed to better clarify if this finding is specific to cluster headache or if it represents an unspecific response to chronic pain.

  8. Radiation-induced defects in As-Sb-S glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balitska, V; Shpotyuk, Ya; Filipecki, J; Shpotyuk, O

    2010-01-01

    Defect-related instability was studied in γ-irradiated (As 2 S 3 ) 1-x (Sb 2 S 3 ) x glasses (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3) using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy treated within high-measurement statistics. The observed decrease in average positron lifetime in the studied glasses is explained as a renovation of destroyed covalent chemical bonds after irradiation. This process is governed by monomolecular relaxation kinetics, being described in the framework of universal configuration-coordinate model.

  9. Radiation-induced defects in As-Sb-S glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balitska, V; Shpotyuk, Ya; Filipecki, J; Shpotyuk, O, E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua

    2010-11-15

    Defect-related instability was studied in {gamma}-irradiated (As{sub 2}S{sub 3}){sub 1-x}(Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}){sub x} glasses (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3) using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy treated within high-measurement statistics. The observed decrease in average positron lifetime in the studied glasses is explained as a renovation of destroyed covalent chemical bonds after irradiation. This process is governed by monomolecular relaxation kinetics, being described in the framework of universal configuration-coordinate model.

  10. Measurement of the energy stored in alkalihalogenids by radiation defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrey, P.

    1976-01-01

    The energy stored in alkali-halogen crystals after X-ray irradiation is studied at 11 K. Using a heat flux calorimeter designed especially for this experiment, single crystals are irradiated and the energy release is recorded as the temperature is increased proportional to time from 10 K to 50 K. The energy release spectra are compared with relevant optical measurements and thus a relation between energy release and tempering of point defects is established. The energy release peaks can be assigned definitly to tempering stages of the Frenkel pairs. For explanation a simple model is proposed. (orig./HPOE) [de

  11. Radiation defects produced by neutron irradiation in germanium single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuoka, Noboru; Honda, Makoto; Atobe, Kozo; Yamaji, Hiromichi; Ide, Mutsutoshi; Okada, Moritami.

    1992-01-01

    The nature of defects produced in germanium single crystals by neutron irradiation at 25 K was studied by measuring the electrical resistivity. It was found that two levels located at E c -0.06 eV and E c -0.13 eV were introduced in an arsenic-doped sample. Electron traps at E c -0.10eV were observed in an indium-doped sample. The change in electrical resistivity during irradiation was also studied. (author)

  12. Doping of semiconductors using radiation defects produced by irradiation with protons and alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, V.A.; Kozlovski, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    One of the modern methods for modifying semiconductors using beams of protons and alpha particles is analyzed; this modification is accomplished by the controlled introduction of radiation defects into the semiconductor. It is shown that doping semiconductors with radiation defects produced by irradiation with light ions opens up fresh opportunities for controlling the properties of semiconducting materials and for the development of new devices designed for optoelectronics, microelectronics, and nanoelectronics based on these materials; these devices differ favorably from those obtained by conventional doping methods, i.e., by diffusion, epitaxy, and ion implantation

  13. Vacancy defects and defect clusters in alkali metal ion-doped MgO nanocrystallites studied by positron annihilation and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellaiyan, S.; Uedono, A. [University of Tsukuba, Division of Applied Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sivaji, K.; Janet Priscilla, S. [University of Madras, Department of Nuclear Physics, Chennai (India); Sivasankari, J. [Anna University, Department of Physics, Chennai (India); Selvalakshmi, T. [National Institute of Technology, Nanomaterials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Tiruchirappalli (India)

    2016-10-15

    Pure and alkali metal ion (Li, Na, and K)-doped MgO nanocrystallites synthesized by solution combustion technique have been studied by positron lifetime and Doppler broadening spectroscopy methods. Positron lifetime analysis exhibits four characteristic lifetime components for all the samples. Doping reduces the Mg vacancy after annealing to 800 C. It was observed that Li ion migrates to the vacancy site to recover Mg vacancy-type defects, reducing cluster vacancies and micropores. For Na- and K-doped MgO, the aforementioned defects are reduced and immobile at 800 C. Coincidence Doppler broadening studies show the positron trapping sites as vacancy clusters. The decrease in the S parameter is due to the particle growth and reduction in the defect concentration at 800 C. Photoluminescence study shows an emission peak at 445 nm and 498 nm, associated with F{sub 2} {sup 2+} and recombination of higher-order vacancy complexes. Further, annealing process is likely to dissociate F{sub 2} {sup 2+} to F{sup +} and this F{sup +} is converted into F centers at 416 nm. (orig.)

  14. Vacancy defects and defect clusters in alkali metal ion-doped MgO nanocrystallites studied by positron annihilation and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellaiyan, S.; Uedono, A.; Sivaji, K.; Janet Priscilla, S.; Sivasankari, J.; Selvalakshmi, T.

    2016-10-01

    Pure and alkali metal ion (Li, Na, and K)-doped MgO nanocrystallites synthesized by solution combustion technique have been studied by positron lifetime and Doppler broadening spectroscopy methods. Positron lifetime analysis exhibits four characteristic lifetime components for all the samples. Doping reduces the Mg vacancy after annealing to 800 °C. It was observed that Li ion migrates to the vacancy site to recover Mg vacancy-type defects, reducing cluster vacancies and micropores. For Na- and K-doped MgO, the aforementioned defects are reduced and immobile at 800 °C. Coincidence Doppler broadening studies show the positron trapping sites as vacancy clusters. The decrease in the S parameter is due to the particle growth and reduction in the defect concentration at 800 °C. Photoluminescence study shows an emission peak at 445 nm and 498 nm, associated with F2 2+ and recombination of higher-order vacancy complexes. Further, annealing process is likely to dissociate F2 2+ to F+ and this F+ is converted into F centers at 416 nm.

  15. Vacancy defects and defect clusters in alkali metal ion-doped MgO nanocrystallites studied by positron annihilation and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellaiyan, S.; Uedono, A.; Sivaji, K.; Janet Priscilla, S.; Sivasankari, J.; Selvalakshmi, T.

    2016-01-01

    Pure and alkali metal ion (Li, Na, and K)-doped MgO nanocrystallites synthesized by solution combustion technique have been studied by positron lifetime and Doppler broadening spectroscopy methods. Positron lifetime analysis exhibits four characteristic lifetime components for all the samples. Doping reduces the Mg vacancy after annealing to 800 C. It was observed that Li ion migrates to the vacancy site to recover Mg vacancy-type defects, reducing cluster vacancies and micropores. For Na- and K-doped MgO, the aforementioned defects are reduced and immobile at 800 C. Coincidence Doppler broadening studies show the positron trapping sites as vacancy clusters. The decrease in the S parameter is due to the particle growth and reduction in the defect concentration at 800 C. Photoluminescence study shows an emission peak at 445 nm and 498 nm, associated with F_2 "2"+ and recombination of higher-order vacancy complexes. Further, annealing process is likely to dissociate F_2 "2"+ to F"+ and this F"+ is converted into F centers at 416 nm. (orig.)

  16. Enhanced Magnetization of Cobalt Defect Clusters Embedded in TiO2-δ Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortie, David L; Khaydukov, Yury; Keller, Thomas; Sprouster, David J; Hughes, Jacob S; Sullivan, James P; Wang, Xiaolin L; Le Brun, Anton P; Bertinshaw, Joel; Callori, Sara J; Aughterson, Robert; James, Michael; Evans, Peter J; Triani, Gerry; Klose, Frank

    2017-03-15

    High magnetizations are desirable for spintronic devices that operate by manipulating electronic states using built-in magnetic fields. However, the magnetic moment in promising dilute magnetic oxide nanocomposites is very low, typically corresponding to only fractions of a Bohr magneton for each dopant atom. In this study, we report a large magnetization formed by ion implantation of Co into amorphous TiO 2-δ films, producing an inhomogeneous magnetic moment, with certain regions producing over 2.5 μ B per Co, depending on the local dopant concentration. Polarized neutron reflectometry was used to depth-profile the magnetization in the Co:TiO 2-δ nanocomposites, thus confirming the pivotal role of the cobalt dopant profile inside the titania layer. X-ray photoemission spectra demonstrate the dominant electronic state of the implanted species is Co 0 , with a minor fraction of Co 2+ . The detected magnetizations have seldom been reported before and lie near the upper limit set by Hund's rules for Co 0 , which is unusual because the transition metal's magnetic moment is usually reduced in a symmetric 3D crystal-field environment. Low-energy positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy indicates that defect structures within the titania layer are strongly modified by the implanted Co. We propose that a clustering motif is promoted by the affinity of the positively charged implanted species to occupy microvoids native to the amorphous host. This provides a seed for subsequent doping and nucleation of nanoclusters within an unusual local environment.

  17. Radiation defects in SrB4O7:Eu2+ crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavetskiy, R.P.; Dolzhenkova, E.F.; Tolmachev, A.V.; Parkhomenko, S.V.; Baumer, V.N.; Prosvirnin, A.L.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation-induced defects in SrB 4 O 7 :Eu 2+ (0.033 at.%) single crystal irradiated with γ and X-ray quanta has been studied. The induced optical absorption in the 400-700 nm region has been ascribed to F + centers. The Eu 2+ ions have been shown to act simultaneously as traps and as radiative recombination centers of charge carriers. Basing on the thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL), optical absorption and photoluminescence studies of SrB 4 O 7 :Eu 2+ crystals, a TSL mechanism has been proposed associated with the decay of F + centers being in non-equivalent crystallographic positions followed by radiative recombination of charge carriers on europium ions. Various positions of localization of the radiation-induced defects in the SrB 4 O 7 crystal structure have been discussed

  18. Modeling electronic defects in La2CuO4 and LiCl using embedded quantum cluster methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, R.W.; Shluger, A.L.; Baetzold, R.; Catlow, C.R.A.

    1991-01-01

    By exploiting recent developments in computer simulation methods the authors modeled the behavior of hole states in La 2 CuO 4 and excited state defects such as the exciton in LiCl. The authors methodology employs a Hartree-Fock cluster embedded in a classical surround. Although the method is discussed with respect to the hole and exciton defects in particular, the scope of the talk includes other material problems currently being investigated by this method. Thus, the types of problems for which the method are appropriate are illustrated and the present limitations are discussed

  19. Regularities of radiation defects build up on oxide materials surface; Zakonomernosti nakopleniya radiatsionnykh defektov na poverkhnosti oksidnykh materialov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitenbaev, M I; Polyakov, A I [Fiziko-Tekhnicheskij Inst., Almaty (Kazakhstan); Tuseev, T [Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2005-07-01

    Analysis of experimental data by radiation defects study on different oxide elements (silicon, beryllium, aluminium, rare earth elements) irradiated by the photo-, gamma-, neutron-, alpha- radiation, protons and helium ions show, that gas adsorption process on the surface centers and radiation defects build up in metal oxide correlated between themselves. These processes were described by the equivalent kinetic equations for analysis of radiation defects build up in the different metal oxides. It was revealed in the result of the analysis: number of radiation defects are droningly increasing up to limit value with the treatment temperature growth. Constant of radicals death at ionizing radiation increases as well. Amount of surface defects in different oxides defining absorbing activity of these materials looks as: silicon oxide{yields}beryllium oxide{yields}aluminium oxide. So it was found, that most optimal material for absorbing system preparation is silicon oxide by it power intensity and berylium oxide by it adsorption efficiency.

  20. Electron paramagnetic resonance study on the ionizing radiation induced defects of the tooth enamel hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Liana Macedo de

    1995-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite is the main constituent of calcified tissues. Defects induced by ionizing radiations in this biomineral can present high stability and then, these are used as biological markers in radiological accidents, irradiated food identifying and geological and archaeological dating. In this work, paramagnetic centers induced on the enamel of the teeth by environmental ionizing radiation, are investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Decay thermal kinetic presents high complexity and shows the formation of different electron ligation energy centers and structures

  1. Current Evidence for Developmental, Structural, and Functional Brain Defects following Prenatal Radiation Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine Verreet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation is omnipresent. We are continuously exposed to natural (e.g., radon and cosmic and man-made radiation sources, including those from industry but especially from the medical sector. The increasing use of medical radiation modalities, in particular those employing low-dose radiation such as CT scans, raises concerns regarding the effects of cumulative exposure doses and the inappropriate utilization of these imaging techniques. One of the major goals in the radioprotection field is to better understand the potential health risk posed to the unborn child after radiation exposure to the pregnant mother, of which the first convincing evidence came from epidemiological studies on in utero exposed atomic bomb survivors. In the following years, animal models have proven to be an essential tool to further characterize brain developmental defects and consequent functional deficits. However, the identification of a possible dose threshold is far from complete and a sound link between early defects and persistent anomalies has not yet been established. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge on brain developmental and persistent defects resulting from in utero radiation exposure and addresses the many questions that still remain to be answered.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation on the formation and annihilation behaviors of radiation defects in Li2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takuji Oda; Satoru Tanaka; Yasuhisa Oya

    2006-01-01

    The influence of radiation defects is one of the main factors that determine tritium release behavior from blanket breeding materials in fusion reactors. Classical molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is a powerful technique to investigate the radiation damage processes, because it can provide atomic-scale information on the defects. In this study, we conducted radiation simulation for Li 2 O using MD and analyzed formation and annihilation behaviors of radiation defects, as a fundamental research for radiation response of Li-containing oxides. Buckingham type two-body potential model was used. In order to remove the unphysical impulsive force at short inter-ionic distances in Buckingham model, each potential function was connected to that of the ZBL potential models at around 0.8 A. NEV ensemble was employed with the initial simulation temperature of 0 K. 10 x 10 x 10 supercell consisting of 4000 Li 2 O was used as a unit cell under 3D periodic boundary conditions. Radiation simulation was initiated by introducing an energy of a certain direction to an ion, as a displacement energy. The lowest displacement energy by which a defect was created and survived beyond 5 ps was regarded as the threshold energy. 42 and 21 displacement directions were surveyed for Li and O, respectively, based on the symmetry of the Li 2 O crystal. In both Li and O defect formations, [100] displacement shows significantly lower threshold energy than [111] displacement. Li defects were easily created than O defects almost in all directions. In fact, the average threshold energy except [111] displacement, which possesses extremely high threshold energy, was 21 eV for Li and 49 eV for O. In some cases, no defect could survive beyond 5 ps even by higher displacement energies than the threshold energy, due to the self-annealing effect. The self-annealing completed basically within 1 ps after introduction of displacement energy. At around this time, velocity distribution of all ions in the system

  3. Radiation-induced defect production in MgF2-Co crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuritdinov, I.; Turdanov, K.; Mirinoyatova, N.M.; Rejterov, V.M.

    1996-01-01

    Impact of Co-admixture on structural radiation defects formation in the MgF 2 crystals is studied. It is found that the Co admixture facilitates the probability of generating the F- and m-type centers of radiation defects as well as creation of the F- and M-centers, perturbed by admixtures. The availability of structural defects leads in its turn to the admixture ions perturbation. It is reflected in the removal of prohibition on spin-prohibited transitions of the Co 2 + ions. It is assumed that creation of the M-centers is the main cause for removal of the prohibition on the spin-prohibited transitions. 8 refs., 4 figs

  4. TEM study of radiation induced defects in baffle-former-barrel assembly from decommissioned NPP Greifswald

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srba, O.; Michalicka, J.; Keilova, E.; Kocik, K.

    2013-06-01

    A complex transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of reactor vessel internal (RVI) materials from the baffle-former-barrel assembly from NPP Greifswald (VVER 440), Unit 1 decommissioned after 15 service cycles has been undertaken. All parts of the baffle-former-barrel assembly are made from Ti-stabilized austenitic stainless steel 08Ch18N10T. The materials were exposed to different dose of neutron radiation (2.4 - 11.4 dpa) at temperatures 267 - 398 deg. C depending on position in the core. Three types of radiation induced defects were identified and quantified, namely: dislocations, cavities (voids) and fine-scaled precipitated particles of Ni-Si rich phases. Black-dot type defects were observed too. Operation conditions are around ≅ 300 deg. C that is why we have observed defect typical for both low and high regions of irradiation temperatures. (authors)

  5. Annealing of radiation-induced defects in silicon in a simplified phenomenological model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazanu, S.; Lazanu, I.

    2001-01-01

    The concentration of primary radiation-induced defects has been previously estimated considering both the explicit mechanisms of the primary interaction between the incoming particle and the nuclei of the semiconductor lattice, and the recoil energy partition between ionisation and displacements, in the frame of the Lindhard theory. The primary displacement defects are vacancies and interstitials that are essentially unstable in silicon. They interact via migration, recombination, annihilation or produce other defects. In the present work, the time evolution of the concentration of defects induced by pions in medium and high resistivity silicon for detectors is modelled, after irradiation. In some approximations, the differential equations representing the time evolution processes could be decoupled. The theoretical equations so obtained are solved analytically in some particular cases, with one free parameter, for a wide range of particle fluences and/or for a wide energy range of incident particles, for different temperatures; the corresponding stationary solutions are also presented

  6. Characterization of defects and microstructures by neutrons and synchrotron radiations topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baruchel, J.

    1993-01-01

    Neutrons and synchrotron radiation topography are complementary for defects study, for domains or phases coexistence in magnetic or high absorbing crystals, or crystals not supporting intense X irradiation. Applications to CuGe, NiAl, CuAl, FeSi binary alloys are shortly presented. (A.B.). 8 refs, 1 fig

  7. Formation and properties of radiation-induced defects and radiolysis products in lithium orthosilicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiliks, J.E.; Kizane, G.K.; Supe, A.A.; Abramenkovs, A.A.; Tiliks, J.J. (Latvian Univ., Riga (Latvia)); Vasiljev, V.G. (Acad. A.A. Bochvar Inst. of Inorganic Materials, Moscow (USSR))

    1991-12-01

    Formation and properties of radiation-induced defects and radiolysis products in polycrystalline powders and ceramic pellets of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} were studied under the effect of various types of ionizing irradiation ({gamma} quants, accelerated electrons, reactor irradiation), humidity, temperature, impurities in the samples, etc. The content of radiation defects and radiolysis products poorly depends on irradiation type, dose rate, admixture elements. The concentration of defects highly depends on the temperature of irradiation, humidity, granural size. Empirical dependence of radiolysis degree {alpha} on the dose was found: {alpha}=5x10{sup -2}xD{sup 0.5} for {gamma} and electron irradiation (T{sub rad}=300-350 K) and {alpha}=5x10{sup -3}xD{sup 0.5} for reactor radiation (T{sub rad}=700-800 K); {alpha} - matrix dissociation degree (in %); D - dose (in MGy). Colloidal lithium and silicon, lithium and silicon oxides, and O{sub 2} are the final products of radiolysis. Radiation-induced defects change tritium thermo-extraction parameters, deteriorate mechanical, thermo-physical and electric properties of ceramics. (orig.).

  8. Electron-spin-resonance study of radiation-induced paramagnetic defects in oxides grown on (100) silicon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.Y.; Lenahan, P.M.

    1988-01-01

    We have used electron-spin resonance to investigate radiation-induced point defects in Si/SiO 2 structures with (100) silicon substrates. We find that the radiation-induced point defects are quite similar to defects generated in Si/SiO 2 structures grown on (111) silicon substrates. In both cases, an oxygen-deficient silicon center, the E' defect, appears to be responsible for trapped positive charge. In both cases trivalent silicon (P/sub b/ centers) defects are primarily responsible for radiation-induced interface states. In earlier electron-spin-resonance studies of unirradiated (100) substrate capacitors two types of P/sub b/ centers were observed; in oxides prepared in three different ways only one of these centers, the P/sub b/ 0 defect, is generated in large numbers by ionizing radiation

  9. Near-field radiative heat transfer between clusters of dielectric nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, J.; Zhao, J.M.; Liu, L.H.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we explore the near-field radiative heat transfer between two clusters of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles using the many-body radiative heat transfer theory. The effects of fractal dimension of clusters, many-body interaction between nanoparticles and relative orientation of clusters on the thermal conductance are studied. Meanwhile, the applicability of the equivalent volume spheres (EVS) approximation for near-field radiative heat transfer between clusters is examined. It is observed that the thermal conductance is larger for clusters with larger fractal dimension, which is more significant in the near-field. The thermal conductance of EVS resembles that of the clusters, but EVS overestimates the conductance of clusters, especially in the near-field. Compared to the case of two nanoparticles, the conductance of nanoparticle clusters decays much slower with increasing distance in the near-field, but shares similar dependence on the distance in the far-field. The thermal conductance of SiC nanoparticle clusters is inhibited by the many-body interaction when surface phonon polariton is supported but enhanced at frequencies close to the resonance frequency. The total thermal conductance is decreased due to many-body interaction among particles in the cluster. The relative orientation between the clusters is also an important factor in the near-field, especially for clusters with lower fractal dimension. - Highlights: • Near-field radiative heat transfer between clusters of nanoparticles is studied. • The many-body radiative heat transfer theory is applied for rigorous analysis. • The accuracy of equivalent volume spheres approximation is examined. • Clusters with larger fractal dimension have larger radiative thermal conductance. • Many-body interaction inhibits the total radiative thermal conductance.

  10. Enhanced Magnetization of Cobalt Defect Clusters Embedded in TiO_2_-_δ Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortie, David L.; Khaydukov, Yury; Max Planck Society, Garching

    2017-01-01

    High magnetizations are desirable for spintronic devices that operate by manipulating electronic states using built-in magnetic fields. However, the magnetic moment in promising dilute magnetic oxide nanocomposites is very low, typically corresponding to only fractions of a Bohr magneton for each dopant atom. In this study, we report a large magnetization formed by ion implantation of Co into amorphous TiO_2_-_δ films, producing an inhomogeneous magnetic moment, with certain regions producing over 2.5 μ_B per Co, depending on the local dopant concentration. Polarized neutron reflectometry was used to depth-profile the magnetization in the Co:TiO_2_-_δ nanocomposites, thus confirming the pivotal role of the cobalt dopant profile inside the titania layer. X-ray photoemission spectra demonstrate the dominant electronic state of the implanted species is Co"0, with a minor fraction of Co"2"+. The detected magnetizations have seldom been reported before and lie near the upper limit set by Hund’s rules for Co"0, which is unusual because the transition metal’s magnetic moment is usually reduced in a symmetric 3D crystal-field environment. Low-energy positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy indicates that defect structures within the titania layer are strongly modified by the implanted Co. We propose that a clustering motif is promoted by the affinity of the positively charged implanted species to occupy microvoids native to the amorphous host. This provides a seed for subsequent doping and nucleation of nanoclusters within an unusual local environment.

  11. Radiation-induced defect-formation in lithium hydride and deuteride monocrystals. [Electron and X-ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pustovarov, V.A.; Betenekova, T.A.; Zav' yalov, N.A.; Cholakh, S.O. (Ural' skij Politekhnicheskij Inst., Sverdlovsk (USSR))

    1983-08-01

    Methods of stationary and pulse absorption spectroscopy were used to investigate into processes of formation and decay of radiation defects in cubic LiH and LiD crystals. F- and V-centers form at low temperatures during crystal irradiation by photons, creating excitons selectively, accelerator electrons, X-ray radiation. Analysis of possible mechanisms of defect formation shows that radiation defect formation in LiH is based on radiationless exciton decay. It is shown that efficiency of F- and V-centers generation in pure and impure crystals in 80-298 K range is the same. Exciton decay with formation of Frenkel radiation defects in pure LiH and LiD crystals takes place, probably, in regular crystal lattice points. Process of radiation defect formation as a result of near activator exciton decay takes place in impure LiH-Na, LiD-Na crystals.

  12. Adaptive repair induced by small doses of γ radiation in repair-defective human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zasukhina, G.D.; L'vova, G.N.; Vasil'eva, I.M.; Sinel'shchikova, T.A.; Semyachkina, A.N.

    1993-01-01

    Adaptive repair induced by small doses of gamma radiation was studied in repair-defective xeroderma pigmentosum, gout, and homocystinuria cells. The adaptation of cells induced by small doses of radiation was estimated after subsequent exposure to gamma radiation, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide, and N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine by three methods: (1) by the reduction in DNA breaks; (2) by induction of resistant DNA synthesis; and (3) by increased reactivation of vaccinia virus. The three cell types in response to the three different mutagens revealed differences in the mechanism of cell defense in excision repair, in the adaptive response, and in Weigl reactivation

  13. Electron radiation damage of metals and nature of point defects by high voltage electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiritani, M.

    1975-01-01

    The formation of point defect clusters by electron irradiation in a variety of metals (Al, Au, Cu, Fe, Ni, Mo, Pt, W) in a wide range of temperatures 10 to 1000 0 K are observed. A unified explanation is given for their nucleation and growth from the viewpoint of the migration and interaction of point defects. The effect of free surfaces and other permanent sinks are examined. Analysis of the systematic variation of the nucleation of interstitial clustered defects lead to confirm the free migration of interstitials with fairly small activation energies. Their apparent values obtained from the impurity sensitive nucleation at medium temperatures are 0.08 (Al), 0.19 (Au), 0.26 (Fe), 0.18 (Mo) and 0.21 eV (W), and their values obtained from low temperature irradiation are 0.03 (Al), 0.04 (Au) and 0.05 eV (Mo). The trapping of interstitials by foreign atoms and heterogeneous effects on nucleation of interstitial clusters are discussed

  14. Radiation induced deep level defects in bipolar junction transistors under various bias conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chaoming; Yang, Jianqun; Li, Xingji; Ma, Guoliang; Xiao, Liyi; Bollmann, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar junction transistor (BJT) is sensitive to ionization and displacement radiation effects in space. In this paper, 35 MeV Si ions were used as irradiation source to research the radiation damage on NPN and PNP bipolar transistors. The changing of electrical parameters of transistors was in situ measured with increasing irradiation fluence of 35 MeV Si ions. Using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), defects in the bipolar junction transistors under various bias conditions are measured after irradiation. Based on the in situ electrical measurement and DLTS spectra, it is clearly that the bias conditions can affect the concentration of deep level defects, and the radiation damage induced by heavy ions.

  15. Implantation of keV-energy argon clusters and radiation damage in diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir; Samela, Juha; Nordlund, Kai

    2012-01-01

    We show that for impacting argon clusters, both mean projected ranges of the constituents and depths of radiation damage in diamond scale linearly with momentum. The same dependence was earlier found for keV-energy cluster implantation in graphite, thus suggesting the universality of this scaling...... law. For diamond, a good agreement for the value of displacement energy for the case of cluster impact is found by comparing the calculated target sputtering and experimentally measured depth of radiation damage....

  16. Characterization of GaSb/InAs type II infrared detectors at very long wavelengths: carrier scattering at defect clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchin, M. R.; Jaros, M.

    2003-06-01

    We report a systematic study into carrier scattering by isovalent defects within GaSb/InAs superlattices. The heterostructure system which we investigate has attracted recent interest as the active region of a photodetector for very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) (⩾12 μm) radiation. To achieve our objective, we employed models of the electronic band structure and scattering cross-section. We considered isolated, substitutional defects at each atom site throughout the unit cell in turn and found that the scattering magnitude generally follows the carrier envelope function, being greatest where the overlap of charge with the defect is highest. We scrutinized the contribution of lattice relaxation around defects to the overall scattering, by comparing calculations where this effect was, in turn, included and excluded. We identified some anomalous contributions of relaxation to both qualitative and quantitative features of the cross-section. Physical mechanisms to explain these effects must be arrived at in order to attain satisfactory characterization of these materials, highlighting the need for both microscopic models and further research. Additional modelling of islands of such defects indicated that the cross-section is proportional to the square of the number of constituent atoms, for both carrier types (holes and electrons) and each defect type. This article demonstrates important links between key growth issues and the dynamical properties of these novel semiconductor devices.

  17. Fen (n=1–6) clusters chemisorbed on vacancy defects in graphene: Stability, spin-dipole moment, and magnetic anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Haldar, Soumyajyoti

    2014-05-09

    In this work, we have studied the chemical and magnetic interactions of Fen (n=1–6) clusters with vacancy defects (monovacancy to correlated vacancies with six missing C atoms) in a graphene sheet by ab initio density functional calculations combined with Hubbard U corrections for correlated Fe-d electrons. It is found that the vacancy formation energies are lowered in the presence of Fe, indicating an easier destruction of the graphene sheet. Due to strong chemical interactions between Fe clusters and vacancies, a complex distribution of magnetic moments appear on the distorted Fe clusters which results in reduced averaged magnetic moments compared to the free clusters. In addition to that, we have calculated spin-dipole moments and magnetic anisotropy energies. The calculated spin-dipole moments arising from anisotropic spin density distributions vary between positive and negative values, yielding increased or decreased effective moments. Depending on the cluster geometry, the easy axis of magnetization of the Fe clusters shows in-plane or out-of-plane behavior.

  18. Radiation-induced defects formation in Bi-containing vitreous chalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Vakiv, M.; Balitska, V.; Kovalskiy, A.

    1997-01-01

    Processes of formation and annihilation of coordination defects in As 2 Se 3 Bi y and (As 2 Se 3 )(Bi 2 Se 3 ) y amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors induced by influence of Co 60 gamma-irradiation are investigated by photoelectric spectroscopy method. It is obtained that radiation-induced changes of photoelectrical properties on bioconcentration of As 2 Se 3 Bi y glasses are characterized by anomalous concentration dependence. The nature of this effect is associated with diamagnetic coordination defects formation. (author). 19 refs, 3 figs

  19. Radiation-induced defects formation in Bi-containing vitreous chalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Vakiv, M.; Balitska, V.; Kovalskiy, A. [Institute of Materials, Lvov (Ukraine)

    1997-12-01

    Processes of formation and annihilation of coordination defects in As{sub 2}Se{sub 3}Bi{sub y} and (As{sub 2}Se{sub 3})(Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}){sub y} amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors induced by influence of Co{sup 60} gamma-irradiation are investigated by photoelectric spectroscopy method. It is obtained that radiation-induced changes of photoelectrical properties on bioconcentration of As{sub 2}Se{sub 3}Bi{sub y} glasses are characterized by anomalous concentration dependence. The nature of this effect is associated with diamagnetic coordination defects formation. (author). 19 refs, 3 figs.

  20. Nature of oxygen donors and radiation defects in oxygen-doped germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuoka, Noboru; Atobe, Kozo; Honda, Makoto; Matsuda, Koji.

    1991-01-01

    The nature of oxygen donors and radiation defects in oxygen-doped germanium were studied through measurements of the infrared absorption spectrum, deep level transient spectroscopy spectrum and carrier concentration. It is revealed that a new donor is not formed in oxygen-doped germanium. An A-center (interstitial oxygen-vacancy pair) forms a complex with a thermal donor in its annealing stage at 60degC-140degC. The introduction rate of defects by 1.5 MeV electron irradiation was enhanced in thermal-donor-doped samples. (author)

  1. Use of EMW radiation in the building industry at defects in buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobotka Jindřich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses theory and application of microwave radiation and experimental optimization of microwave radiation to eliminate moisture content in wood elements. It will be appreciated that the rising moisture leaking into the structure, resulting in defects and structures of the buildings themselves. Owing to its properties, microwave radiation has been used in the construction industry in modern times, in particular to dry wet masonry of buildings. Effects of electromagnetic radiation on building structures lead to relatively sharp decreases in moisture content from damp building structures or elements. The influence of electromagnetic radiation on building structures lead to oscillation of water molecules contained in the material, which cause a phase transformation of water into vapour. Consequently, the vapour evaporates from the moist material, thereby drying the element exposed to radiation. The article describes experiments carried out at the Faculty of Civil Engineering of the Faculty of Technology in Brno that demonstrate successful decrease of water content in building materials using microwave radiation. First, the understanding of microwave radiation will be discussed. Following an analysis of research results an optimum intensity of microwave radiation sources as well as the necessary length of the irradiation of microwave radiation have been determined with respect to the particular type of building material and the success rate of elimination of moisture.

  2. Hall effect measurements of Frenkel defect clustering in aluminium during high-dose reactor irradiation at 4.6 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boening, K.; Mauer, W.; Pfaendner, K.; Rosner, P.

    1976-01-01

    The low-field Hall coefficient R 0 of irradiated aluminium at 4.6 K is independent of the Frenkel defect (FD) concentration, however sensitively dependent of their configuration. Since measurement of R 0 is not too difficult, rather extensive investigations of FD clustering during irradiation can be performed, but only qualitative interpretations are possible. Several pure Al samples have been irradiated with reactor neutrons at 4.6 K up to very high doses phit resp. resistivity increments Δrho 0 (maximum 91% of extrapolated saturation value Δrho 0 sup(sat) approximately 980 nΩcm). The main results are 1.FD clustering within a single displacement cascade is not a very strong effect in Al, since the R 0 values are essentially the same after reactor and after electron irradiation. Rough cascade averages are: volume Vsub(c) approximately 2.1 x 10 5 at.vol. and FD concentration csub(c) approximately 1100 ppm. 2. There is practically no dose-dependent FD clustering up to Δrho 0 approximately 350 nΩcm, since R 0 remains essentially constant there. It follows that dose-dependent FD clustering can only occur for high-order overlap of cascade volumes. The differential dose curve dΔrho 0 /dphit is perfectly linear in Δrho 0 as long as R 0 = const. 3. For Δrho 0 > 350 nΩcm FD clustering becomes increasingly important and R 0 changes strongly. Surprisingly dR 0 /dphit approximately const whence there is a constant rate of cluster size increase in spite of the vanishing rate of FD production, evidence of the continuous regrouping of the lattice and its defects. (author)

  3. Radiation defect distribution in silicon irradiated with 600 keV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazdra, P.; Dorschner, H.

    2003-01-01

    Low-doped n-type float zone silicon was irradiated with 600 keV electrons to fluences from 2x10 13 to 1x10 15 cm -2 . Radiation defects, their introduction rates and full-depth profiles were measured by two complementary methods - the capacitance deep level spectroscopy and the high-voltage current transient spectroscopy. Results show that, in the vicinity of the anode junction, the profile of vacancy-related defect centers is strongly influenced by electric field and an excessive generation of vacancies. In the bulk, the slope of the profile can be derived from the distribution of absorbed dose taking into the account the threshold energy necessary for Frenkel pair formation and the dependency of the defect introduction rate on electron energy

  4. On kinetics of paramagnetic radiation defects accumulation in beryllium ceramics; O kinetike nakopleniya paramagnitnykh radiatsionnykh defektov v berillievykh keramikakh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyakov, A I; Ryabikin, Yu A; Zashkvara, O V; Bitenbaev, M I; Petykhov, Yu V [Fiziko-Tekhnicheskij Inst., Almaty (Kazakhstan); Inst. Atomnoj Ehnergii, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan)

    1999-07-01

    Results of paramagnetic radiation defects concentration dependence study in beryllium ceramics from gamma-irradiation dose ({sup 60}Co) within interval 0-100 Mrem are cited. Obtained dose dependence has form of accumulation curve with saturation typical of for majority of solids (crystals, different polymers, organic substances and others) , in which under irradiation occur not only formation of paramagnetic radiation defects, but its destruction due to recombination and interaction with radiation fields. Analysis of accumulation curve by the method of distant asymptotics allows to determine that observed in gamma-irradiated beryllium ceramics double line of electron spin resonance is forming of two types of paramagnetic radiation defects. It was defined, that sum paramagnetic characteristics of beryllium ceramics within 1-100 Mrad gamma- irradiation dose field change insignificantly and define from first type of paramagnetic radiation defects.

  5. Recombination of charge carriers on radiation-induced defects in silicon doped by transition metals impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakevich, L A

    2003-01-01

    It has been studied the peculiarities of recombination of nonequilibrium charge carriers on radiation-induced defects in received according to Czochralski method p-silicon (p approx 3 - 20 Ohm centre dot cm), doped by one of the impurities of transition metals of the IV-th group of periodic table (titanium, zirconium, hafnium). Experimental results are obtained out of the analysis of temperature and injection dependence of the life time of charge carriers. The results are explained taking into consideration the influences of elastic stress fields created by the aggregates of transition metals atoms on space distribution over the crystal of oxygen and carbon background impurities as well as on the migration of movable radiation-induced defects during irradiation. (authors).

  6. Study of radiation defects in semiconductors by means of positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause-Rehberg, R.; Bondarenko, V.; Redmann, F.

    2003-01-01

    In a nuclear environment, a strong degradation of important properties is observed for many materials which are otherwise very reliable. This is especially valid for silicon, the most important semiconductor. In the presented paper, two examples for the study of lattice defects in silicon by means of positron annihilation will be given. Firstly, the degradation of silicon detectors used for the particle detection in high-luminosity collider experiments starts to limit the lifetime of the whole experiment. An annealing experiment on n-irradiated Si will be presented. Beside the destructive effect of high-radiation conditions, such radiation-induced defects can have a beneficial result. This will be demonstrated for the creation of new gettering zones by high-energy self-implantation of silicon. (author)

  7. Peculiarities of approximation for reactor neutron energy spectra during computerized simulation of radiation defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupchishin, A.A.; Kupchishin, A.I.; Stusik, G.; Omarbekova, Zh.

    2001-01-01

    Peculiarities of approximation for reactor neutron energy spectra during radiation defects computerized simulation were discussed. Approximation of neutron spectra N(E) was carried out by N(E)=α·exp(-β·E)·sh(γ·E) formula (1), where α, β, γ - approximation coefficients. In the capacity of operating reactor data experimental data on 235 U and 239 Pu were applied. The algorithm was designed, and acting soft ware for spectra parameters calculation was developed. The following values of approximation parameters were obtained: α=80.8; β=0.935;γ=2.04 (for uranium and plutonium these coefficients are less distinguishing). Then with use of formula 1 and α, β, γ coefficients the approximation curves were constructed. These curves satisfactorily describe existing experimental data and allowing to use its for radiation defects simulation in the reactor materials

  8. Deterministic Role of Collision Cascade Density in Radiation Defect Dynamics in Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, J. B.; Aji, L. B. Bayu; Shao, L.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2018-05-01

    The formation of stable radiation damage in solids often proceeds via complex dynamic annealing (DA) processes, involving point defect migration and interaction. The dependence of DA on irradiation conditions remains poorly understood even for Si. Here, we use a pulsed ion beam method to study defect interaction dynamics in Si bombarded in the temperature range from ˜-30 ° C to 210 °C with ions in a wide range of masses, from Ne to Xe, creating collision cascades with different densities. We demonstrate that the complexity of the influence of irradiation conditions on defect dynamics can be reduced to a deterministic effect of a single parameter, the average cascade density, calculated by taking into account the fractal nature of collision cascades. For each ion species, the DA rate exhibits two well-defined Arrhenius regions where different DA mechanisms dominate. These two regions intersect at a critical temperature, which depends linearly on the cascade density. The low-temperature DA regime is characterized by an activation energy of ˜0.1 eV , independent of the cascade density. The high-temperature regime, however, exhibits a change in the dominant DA process for cascade densities above ˜0.04 at.%, evidenced by an increase in the activation energy. These results clearly demonstrate a crucial role of the collision cascade density and can be used to predict radiation defect dynamics in Si.

  9. Vibration impact acoustic emission technique for identification and analysis of defects in carbon steel tubes: Part B Cluster analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halim, Zakiah Abd [Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka (Malaysia); Jamaludin, Nordin; Junaidi, Syarif [Faculty of Engineering and Built, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi (Malaysia); Yahya, Syed Yusainee Syed [Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam (Malaysia)

    2015-04-15

    Current steel tubes inspection techniques are invasive, and the interpretation and evaluation of inspection results are manually done by skilled personnel. Part A of this work details the methodology involved in the newly developed non-invasive, non-destructive tube inspection technique based on the integration of vibration impact (VI) and acoustic emission (AE) systems known as the vibration impact acoustic emission (VIAE) technique. AE signals have been introduced into a series of ASTM A179 seamless steel tubes using the impact hammer. Specifically, a good steel tube as the reference tube and four steel tubes with through-hole artificial defect at different locations were used in this study. The AEs propagation was captured using a high frequency sensor of AE systems. The present study explores the cluster analysis approach based on autoregressive (AR) coefficients to automatically interpret the AE signals. The results from the cluster analysis were graphically illustrated using a dendrogram that demonstrated the arrangement of the natural clusters of AE signals. The AR algorithm appears to be the more effective method in classifying the AE signals into natural groups. This approach has successfully classified AE signals for quick and confident interpretation of defects in carbon steel tubes.

  10. Vibration impact acoustic emission technique for identification and analysis of defects in carbon steel tubes: Part B Cluster analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halim, Zakiah Abd; Jamaludin, Nordin; Junaidi, Syarif; Yahya, Syed Yusainee Syed

    2015-01-01

    Current steel tubes inspection techniques are invasive, and the interpretation and evaluation of inspection results are manually done by skilled personnel. Part A of this work details the methodology involved in the newly developed non-invasive, non-destructive tube inspection technique based on the integration of vibration impact (VI) and acoustic emission (AE) systems known as the vibration impact acoustic emission (VIAE) technique. AE signals have been introduced into a series of ASTM A179 seamless steel tubes using the impact hammer. Specifically, a good steel tube as the reference tube and four steel tubes with through-hole artificial defect at different locations were used in this study. The AEs propagation was captured using a high frequency sensor of AE systems. The present study explores the cluster analysis approach based on autoregressive (AR) coefficients to automatically interpret the AE signals. The results from the cluster analysis were graphically illustrated using a dendrogram that demonstrated the arrangement of the natural clusters of AE signals. The AR algorithm appears to be the more effective method in classifying the AE signals into natural groups. This approach has successfully classified AE signals for quick and confident interpretation of defects in carbon steel tubes.

  11. Characterization of radiation-induced defects in ZnO probed by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, S.; Puff, W.; Balogh, A.G.; Mascher, P.

    2001-01-01

    In this study we discuss the microstructural changes after electron and proton irradiation and the thermal evolution of the radiation induced defects during isochronal annealing of single crystals irradiated either with 3 MeV protons or with 1 or 2 MeV electrons, respectively. The investigations were performed with positron lifetime and Doppler-broadening measurements. The differently grown ZnO single crystals show positron bulk lifetimes in the range of 159-173 ps. (orig.)

  12. Radiation-induced defects in chalcogenide glasses characterized by combined optical spectroscopy, XPS and PALS methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Kovalskiy, A.; Jain, H.; Golovchak, R.; Zurawska, A.

    2007-01-01

    Temperature-dependent optical absorption spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetimes spectroscopy are utilized to understand radiation-induced changes in Ge-Sb-S chalcogenide glasses. Theoretically predicted topological scheme of γ-induced coordination defect formation in stoichiometric Ge 23.5 Sb 11.8 S 64.7 glass composition is supported by these measurements. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Simulation of the accumulation kinetics for radiation point defects in a metals with impurity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskakov, B.M.; Nurova, A.B.

    2001-01-01

    In the work a kinetics of vacancies (V) and interstitial atoms (IA) accumulation for cases when the V and IA are recombining with each other, absorbing by drain and capturing by impurity atoms has been simulated. The differential equations system numerical solution was carried out by the Runge-Kutta method. The dynamical equilibrium time achievement for the point radiation defects accumulation process in the metal with impurity is considered

  14. Characterization of radiation-induced defects in ZnO probed by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, S.; Puff, W. [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Technische Physik; Balogh, A.G. [Technische Hochschule Darmstadt (Germany). FB Materialwissenschaft; Mascher, P. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Dept. of Engineering Physics

    2001-07-01

    In this study we discuss the microstructural changes after electron and proton irradiation and the thermal evolution of the radiation induced defects during isochronal annealing of single crystals irradiated either with 3 MeV protons or with 1 or 2 MeV electrons, respectively. The investigations were performed with positron lifetime and Doppler-broadening measurements. The differently grown ZnO single crystals show positron bulk lifetimes in the range of 159-173 ps. (orig.)

  15. Radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation from cell phone causes defective testicular function in male Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyewopo, A O; Olaniyi, S K; Oyewopo, C I; Jimoh, A T

    2017-12-01

    Cell phones have become an integral part of everyday life. As cell phone usage has become more widespread, concerns have increased regarding the harmful effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation from these devices. The current study was undertaken to investigate the effects of the emitted radiation by cell phones on testicular histomorphometry and biochemical analyses. Adult male Wistar rats weighing 180-200 g were randomly allotted to control, group A (switched off mode exposure), group B (1-hr exposure), group C (2-hr exposure) and group D (3-hr exposure). The animals were exposed to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation of cell phone for a period of 28 days. Histomorphometry, biochemical and histological investigations were carried out. The histomorphometric parameters showed no significant change (p electromagnetic radiation of cell phone leads to defective testicular function that is associated with increased oxidative stress and decreased gonadotropic hormonal profile. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Development of defects in the structure of PIN dosimetry diodes exposed to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopko, V. [Hospital Na Bulovce, Department of Radiological Physics, Budinova 2, CZ-18081 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, CZ 12800 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Sopko, B., E-mail: bruno.sopko@cern.ch [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 4, CZ 16000 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Production Technology and Management, J. E. Purkyně Univerzity in Ústí nad Labem, Na Okraji 1001, 400 01 Ústí nad Labem (Czech Republic); Chren, D. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 4, CZ 16000 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Dammer, J. [Hospital Na Bulovce, Department of Radiological Physics, Budinova 2, CZ-18081 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, CZ 12800 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Charles University in Prague, First Faculty of Medicine, Salmovská 1,CZ-12000 Prague 2 (Czech Republic)

    2013-12-01

    Studies of radiation induced defects continue to be relevant as they find an ever greater application due to the increasing radiation doses to which semiconductor detectors are exposed. Efforts of figuring out the changes due to high radiation doses provide the fundamental motivation for this type of experiments. The PIN diode is described, and a developmental disorder caused thereto by 60Co source gamma quanta ranging from 100 kGy to 1 MGy. The calibration curve shows the effect of disturbances on the volt-ampere characteristics as a function of the dose of gamma radiation. The results are compared with earlier published data. Highlights: •We have studied Si PIN diode dosimeters irradiated by gamma. •We measured DLTS spectra and calculated energy traps caused by gamma irradiation. •Increasing dose caused creation of new traps and disappearance of others.

  17. Synergistic effects of interstitial impurities and radiation defects on mechanical characteristics of ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charit, I.; Seok, C.S.; Murty, K.L.

    2007-01-01

    Ferritic steels are generally used in pressure vessels and various reactor support structures in light water reactors. They are known to exhibit radiation embrittlement in terms of decreased toughness and increased ductile-brittle transition temperature as a result of exposure to neutron radiation. The superimposed effects of strain aging due to interstitial impurity atoms on radiation embrittlement were considered first by Wechsler, Hall and others. Here we summarize some of our efforts on the investigation of synergistic effects between interstitial impurity atoms (IIAs) and radiation-induced point defects, which result in interesting effects at appropriate temperature and strain rate conditions. Two materials, a mild steel and a pressure vessel steel (A516 Gr.70), are evaluated using tensile and three-point bend tests

  18. Radiation defect formation in two-barrier structures based on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madatov, R.S.; Abbasov, F.P.; Mustafayev, Yu.M.

    2013-01-01

    It was developed a silicon-based photodetector with high integral sensitivity in low-wave spectrum. It was investigated the effect of gamma radiation on the mechanism of current transport in the structure of Schottky barrier type and in transitions. It is shown that the double-barrier structures can improve the photovoltaic parameters of conventional detectors. For the first time it was obtained and studied the characteristics of two-barrier structures created on the same plane. The advantages over conventional structures are shown. The annealing point is changing the structure of radiation defects and leads to their disappearance

  19. Relationship between optical coherence tomography sector peripapillary angioflow-density and Octopus visual field cluster mean defect values.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Holló

    Full Text Available To compare the relationship of Octopus perimeter cluster mean-defect (cluster MD values with the spatially corresponding optical coherence tomography (OCT sector peripapillary angioflow vessel-density (PAFD and sector retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT values.High quality PAFD and RNFLT images acquired on the same day with the Angiovue/RTVue-XR Avanti OCT (Optovue Inc., Fremont, USA on 1 eye of 27 stable early-to-moderate glaucoma, 22 medically controlled ocular hypertensive and 13 healthy participants were analyzed. Octopus G2 normal visual field test was made within 3 months from the imaging.Total peripapillary PAFD and RNFLT showed similar strong positive correlation with global mean sensitivity (r-values: 0.6710 and 0.6088, P<0.0001, and similar (P = 0.9614 strong negative correlation (r-values: -0.4462 and -0.4412, P≤0.004 with global MD. Both inferotemporal and superotemporal sector PAFD were significantly (≤0.039 lower in glaucoma than in the other groups. No significant difference between the corresponding inferotemporal and superotemporal parameters was seen. The coefficient of determination (R2 calculated for the relationship between inferotemporal sector PAFD and superotemporal cluster MD (0.5141, P<0.0001 was significantly greater than that between inferotemporal sector RNFLT and superotemporal cluster MD (0.2546, P = 0.0001. The R2 values calculated for the relationships between superotemporal sector PAFD and RNFLT, and inferotemporal cluster MD were similar (0.3747 and 0.4037, respectively, P<0.0001.In the current population the relationship between inferotemporal sector PAFD and superotemporal cluster MD was strong. It was stronger than that between inferotemporal sector RNFLT and superotemporal cluster MD. Further investigations are necessary to clarify if our results are valid for other populations and can be usefully applied for glaucoma research.

  20. Study of interaction among silicon, lithium, oxygen and radiation-induced defects for radiation-hardened solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, P. A.

    1973-01-01

    In order to improve reliability and the useful lifetime of solar cell arrays for space use, a program was undertaken to develop radiation-hardened lithium-doped silicon solar cells. These cells were shown to be significantly more resistant to degradation by ionized particles than the presently used n-p nonlithium-doped silicon solar cells. The results of various analyses performed to develop a more complete understanding of the physics of the interaction among lithium, silicon, oxygen, and radiation-induced defects are presented. A discussion is given of those portions of the previous model of radiation damage annealing which were found to be in error and those portions which were upheld by these extensive investigations.

  1. Proteomic-based detection of a protein cluster dysregulated during cardiovascular development identifies biomarkers of congenital heart defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali K Nath

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular development is vital for embryonic survival and growth. Early gestation embryo loss or malformation has been linked to yolk sac vasculopathy and congenital heart defects (CHDs. However, the molecular pathways that underlie these structural defects in humans remain largely unknown hindering the development of molecular-based diagnostic tools and novel therapies.Murine embryos were exposed to high glucose, a condition known to induce cardiovascular defects in both animal models and humans. We further employed a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify proteins differentially expressed in embryos with defects from those with normal cardiovascular development. The proteins detected by mass spectrometry (WNT16, ST14, Pcsk1, Jumonji, Morca2a, TRPC5, and others were validated by Western blotting and immunoflorescent staining of the yolk sac and heart. The proteins within the proteomic dataset clustered to adhesion/migration, differentiation, transport, and insulin signaling pathways. A functional role for several proteins (WNT16, ADAM15 and NOGO-A/B was demonstrated in an ex vivo model of heart development. Additionally, a successful application of a cluster of protein biomarkers (WNT16, ST14 and Pcsk1 as a prenatal screen for CHDs was confirmed in a study of human amniotic fluid (AF samples from women carrying normal fetuses and those with CHDs.The novel finding that WNT16, ST14 and Pcsk1 protein levels increase in fetuses with CHDs suggests that these proteins may play a role in the etiology of human CHDs. The information gained through this bed-side to bench translational approach contributes to a more complete understanding of the protein pathways dysregulated during cardiovascular development and provides novel avenues for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions, beneficial to fetuses at risk for CHDs.

  2. Alteration of cellular radiation response as a consequence of defective DNA mismatch repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weese, Theodore L. de; Bucci, Jennifer M.; Larrier, Nicole A.; Cutler, Richard G.; Riele, Hein te; Nelson, William G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: A number of genes have been implicated in the response of mammalian cells to ionizing radiation. Among these include the genes P53 and P21. Disruption of these genes can alter the predicted cellular behavior following radiation-induced DNA damage. Similarly, cells defective in mismatch repair are known to be tolerant to the lethal effects of alkylating agents. We hypothesized that mammalian cells which are defective in mismatch repair and tolerant to alkylating DNA damage might also be tolerant to the effects of oxidative DNA damage inflicted by ionizing radiation. Materials and Methods: Mouse embryonic stem cells homozygous for disrupted Msh2 alleles (Msh2-/-), heterozygous for a disrupted Msh2 allele (Msh2+/-) or intact cells (Msh2+/+) were exposed to both acute dose (1 Gy/min) and low dose rate (LDR) radiation (0.004 Gy/min) and cell survival was determined by clonogenic assay. Apoptosis induced by LDR was assessed by a terminal transferase assay. Immunoblot analysis was performed in order to evaluate induction of the polypeptides p53 and p21. Another measure of radiation damage tolerance may be accumulation of oxidative DNA species. Therefore, we monitored levels of 8-hydroxyguanine (8-OHG) and 8-hydroxyadenine (8-OHA) by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry with selected ion monitoring (GC-MS/SIM). Results: Cells containing either one or two disrupted Msh2 alleles (Msh2+/-, Msh2-/-) were found to be less sensitive to LDR than cells containing a complete complement of Msh2 alleles (Msh2+/+). Interestingly, all three cell lines had a nearly identical radiosensitivity to acute dose ionizing radiation despite differences in mismatch repair capacity. Apoptosis after LDR also varied between cells, with the Msh2+/+ cells exhibiting higher levels of apoptosis as compared to either the Msh2+/- or Msh2-/- cell lines. In addition, GC-MS/SIM revealed the Msh2+/- and Msh2-/- cell lines to have an approximately ten fold greater accumulation of the

  3. Process of defect formation in alkaline halogenides contaminated with Eu2+ induced by non ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedroza M, M.; Melendrez, R.; Barboza F, M.; Castaneda, B.

    2004-01-01

    The creation of defects in polluted alkaline halogenides with divalent impurities exposed to ionizing radiation is explained by means of the creation of auto trapped excitons (STE), which can be formed by means of the excitement of the halogen ion or through the trapping of electrons in centers V K taken place during the process of ionization of the halogen ion. The luminescent recombination of the exciton auto trapped produces a characteristic exciton luminescence and the recombination non radiative causes the formation of the Frenkel type defects, even of centers F - H. Experimentally has been demonstrated that the same type of glasses, exposed to radiation non ionizing of the type UV of around 230 nm, they produce defects similar Frenkel. The situation is interesting all time that photons of 230 nm (5.3 eV) they cannot create excitons directly since they are in an energy level of approximately 2.4 inferior eV to the necessary energy for the production of the same ones. In order to investigating the type of process of creation of defects with UV light energy below the energy of the band prohibited in polluted alkaline halogenides with Eu 2+ , mainly looking for experimental information that allows to explain the creation of defects taken place by the radiation non ionizing, one carries out the present work. It was found that, independently of the energy of the radiation used for the excitement, the emission comes from the transition 4f 6 5d(t 2g )-4f 7 ( 8 S 7/2 ) of the ion Eu 2+ characterized by a wide band centered in 420 nm and an additional component in 460 nm of possibly intrinsic origin. It was determined that so much the F centers and F z participate in the thermoluminescent processes and of optically stimulated luminescence, achieving to identify those peaks of Tl strictly associated to the F centers (peak in 470 K for the KCl: Eu 2+ ) and F z (peak in 370 K). Also, by means of a process of selective photo stimulation evidence was obtained that the F

  4. Study of grown-in and radiation-induced defects in indium phosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaban, E.H.

    1986-01-01

    This research is focused on (1) conducting detailed theoretical and experimental study of grown-in and radiation-induced defects in liquid encapsulated Czohralski (LEC) grown, Zn-doped P-type indium phosphide (InP), (2) identifying the physical origin of the defects detected using Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) method, and (3) and developing a second-order model to interpret the presence of nonexponential capacitance transients in DLTS method. Analysis of grown-in and radiation-induced defects in P-type InP is undertaken. The main research results are summarized as follows: (1) DLTS analysis of grown-in defects in liquid LEC-grown, Zn-doped, P-type InP is made in this study. A single-hole trap of E/sub v/ + 0.52 eV is detected with a trap density of 1.8 x 10 15 cm -3 . The physical origin of this hole trap is attributed to a phosphorus vacancy or phosphorus interstitial-related defect. (2) One-MeV electron-irradiated P-type InP introduced two new hole traps, namely E/sub v/ + 0.34 and E/sub v/ + 0.58 eV with introduction rates (dN/sub T/d phi) of 0.4 and 1.2 per electron-cm, respectively. (3) A theoretical model is developed to interpret nonexponential capacitance transients in a deep-level transient spectroscopy method when the capture process competes with the dominant thermal-emission process

  5. Radiation enhanced copper clustering processes in Fe-Cu alloys during electron and ion irradiations as measured by electrical resistivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, S.; Chimi, Y.; Bagiyono; Tobita, T.; Ishikawa, N.; Suzuki, M.; Iwase, A.

    2003-01-01

    To study the mechanism of radiation-enhanced clustering of copper atoms in Fe-Cu alloys, in situ electrical resistivity measurements are performed during irradiation with 100 MeV carbon ions and with 2 MeV electrons at 300 K. Two kinds of highly pure Fe-Cu alloys with Cu content of 0.02 and 0.6 wt% are used. The results are summarized as follows: - Although there is a steep initial resistivity increase below about 10 μdpa, the resistivity steadily decreases after this initial transient in Fe-0.6wt%Cu alloy, while in Fe-0.02wt%Cu alloy, the resistivity either decreases slowly or stays almost constant. The rate of change in resistivity depends on copper concentration. - The rate of change in resistivity per dpa is larger for electron irradiation than for ion irradiation. - Change in dose rate from 10 -8 to 10 -9 dpa/s slightly enhances the rate of resistivity change per dpa. The decrease in resistivity with dose is considered to be due to clustering or precipitation of copper atoms. The initial abrupt increase in resistivity is too large to be accounted for by initial introduction of point defects before copper clustering. Tentatively the phenomenon is explained as due to the formation of embryos of copper precipitates with a large strain field around them. Quantitative evaluation of the results using resistivity contribution of a unit concentration of Frenkel pairs and that of copper atoms gives an important conclusion that more than one copper atom are removed from solid solution by one Frenkel pair. The clustering efficiency is surprisingly high in the present case compared with the ordinary radiation-induced or radiation-enhanced precipitation processes

  6. Investigation of γ-radiation defect formation at the Si-SiO2 interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaynabidinov, S.; Yulchiev, Sh.; Aliev, R.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In work the results of an experimental research of process radiating defects formation on border are submitted undressed Si-SiO 2 at γ-radiation of the silicon MOS structures. As against similar researches the basic attention is given on the analysis of generation-recombination characteristics of structures, that allowed to establish character of the defects formation both on border undressed Si-SiO 2 , and in about border of Si. In experiments the structures received by thermal oxidation at T=1000 deg. C in environment of dry oxygen n-Si substrates with specific resistance ρ=0.3 Ω·cm are used. The thickness of oxygen layer made ∼0.1 μm. The test MOS-structures with an aluminium electrode and area ∼0.01 cm 2 irradiated with γ-quanta from the 60 Co source by a dose of 10 6 rad. The choice of a dose of an radiation is caused by that at such dose the essential increase of concentration of superficial defects is observed, and at the same time there are no significant changes of parameters of a substrate because of formation of point defects in volume of silicon. The generation characteristics of structures such, as speed of superficial generation s and time of life τ g of carriers of a charge in about surface before and after an radiation defined by a method isothermal relaxation of nonequilibrium high-frequency capacity. The relaxation of nonequilibrium capacity registered at submission on translating structure in a condition of deeper inversion. Such mode of measurement allows to neglect the contribution which is brought in recharged of superficial condition in superficial generation currents. Are received relaxation dependence of structures before and after an radiation, and also spectra of distribution of density of superficial condition on width of the forbidden zone Si dN ss /dE. The increase at 12-15 of time of concentration of superficial condition with E=E c -(0.18±0.03) eV in the irradiated structures is established. Such condition is

  7. Anisotropy: an estimable alloy in the study of point defect clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, C.; Quere, Y.

    1986-09-01

    Crystal anisotropy forces vacancies and interstitials, in irradiated uranium, to cluster into two distinct families of dislocation loops. A consequence of this fortunate circumstance, the irradiation ''growth'', is easily observed by length measurements performed under neutron irradiation at ≅ 30-40 K. These experiments are analysed in a way which allows to detect two distinct modes of clustering for interstitials and vacancies. The same analysis is applied to previous experiments performed at ≅ 4K [1-2

  8. Delayed repair of radiation induced clustered DNA damage: Friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, Laura J.; O’Neill, Peter; Lomax, Martine E.

    2011-01-01

    A signature of ionizing radiation exposure is the induction of DNA clustered damaged sites, defined as two or more lesions within one to two helical turns of DNA by passage of a single radiation track. Clustered damage is made up of double strand breaks (DSB) with associated base lesions or abasic (AP) sites, and non-DSB clusters comprised of base lesions, AP sites and single strand breaks. This review will concentrate on the experimental findings of the processing of non-DSB clustered damaged sites. It has been shown that non-DSB clustered damaged sites compromise the base excision repair pathway leading to the lifetime extension of the lesions within the cluster, compared to isolated lesions, thus the likelihood that the lesions persist to replication and induce mutation is increased. In addition certain non-DSB clustered damaged sites are processed within the cell to form additional DSB. The use of E. coli to demonstrate that clustering of DNA lesions is the major cause of the detrimental consequences of ionizing radiation is also discussed. The delayed repair of non-DSB clustered damaged sites in humans can be seen as a “friend”, leading to cell killing in tumour cells or as a “foe”, resulting in the formation of mutations and genetic instability in normal tissue. PMID:21130102

  9. Delayed repair of radiation induced clustered DNA damage: Friend or foe?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eccles, Laura J.; O'Neill, Peter; Lomax, Martine E.

    2011-01-01

    A signature of ionizing radiation exposure is the induction of DNA clustered damaged sites, defined as two or more lesions within one to two helical turns of DNA by passage of a single radiation track. Clustered damage is made up of double strand breaks (DSB) with associated base lesions or abasic (AP) sites, and non-DSB clusters comprised of base lesions, AP sites and single strand breaks. This review will concentrate on the experimental findings of the processing of non-DSB clustered damaged sites. It has been shown that non-DSB clustered damaged sites compromise the base excision repair pathway leading to the lifetime extension of the lesions within the cluster, compared to isolated lesions, thus the likelihood that the lesions persist to replication and induce mutation is increased. In addition certain non-DSB clustered damaged sites are processed within the cell to form additional DSB. The use of E. coli to demonstrate that clustering of DNA lesions is the major cause of the detrimental consequences of ionizing radiation is also discussed. The delayed repair of non-DSB clustered damaged sites in humans can be seen as a 'friend', leading to cell killing in tumour cells or as a 'foe', resulting in the formation of mutations and genetic instability in normal tissue.

  10. Influence of rare earth elements on radiation defect formation in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazyrov, D.E.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: It is known that efficiency of form and kinetics annealing of radiation defects influence greatly presence of initial in controlling electrically active or inactive impurities, their concentration and position in a lattice of a semiconductor. From this point of view of impurities of group of rare earths elements (REE) are of great interest, they interact with primary radiation defects creating electrically passive complexes such as . Thus they increase radiation stability of silicon. The purpose of the given work was the investigation of effect of irradiation by γ-quanta 60 Co properties of silicon doped REE-by samarium, gadolinium and erbium. The doping of silicon was carried out by growth process. Concentration of REE - samarium, gadolinium and erbium in silicon according to neutron-activation analysis equaled 10 14 /5·10 18 cm 2 . Silicon doped by phosphorus - 15/50 Ωcm were used as control samples. The results of investigations were obtained from DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) measurements, Hall effect and electrical measurements on definition of a resistivity, lifetime of minority carriers of a charge and optically active of concentrations of oxygen and carbon. The optical recharge by the infrared light emitting diode (P=10 mV, λ=0,95 μm) was used for investigation of deep levels (DL) situated in lower half of band gap. In control samples irradiated by the γ-quanta 60 Co with a dose 10 16 / 5·10 18 cm -2 formation DL was found in band, the parameters of which are well-known: A-, E-centers etc. Depending on a dose of an effect of irradiate in an energy spectrum of radiation defects in Si of essential changes, except for concentration is not observed. The deep levels concentration the E c -0,17 eV and E c -0,4 eV in Si is essentially reduced with respect control samples. The comparison the dose of associations of observable levels in irradiated n-Si with similar associations in control samples shows, that a velocity of introduction

  11. Electron scattering in large water clusters from photoelectron imaging with high harmonic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartmann, Thomas E; Hartweg, Sebastian; Ban, Loren; Chasovskikh, Egor; Yoder, Bruce L; Signorell, Ruth

    2018-06-06

    Low-energy electron scattering in water clusters (H2O)n with average cluster sizes of n < 700 is investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using high harmonic radiation at photon energies of 14.0, 20.3, and 26.5 eV for ionization from the three outermost valence orbitals. The measurements probe the evolution of the photoelectron anisotropy parameter β as a function of cluster size. A remarkably steep decrease of β with increasing cluster size is observed, which for the largest clusters reaches liquid bulk values. Detailed electron scattering calculations reveal that neither gas nor condensed phase scattering can explain the cluster data. Qualitative agreement between experiment and simulations is obtained with scattering calculations that treat cluster scattering as an intermediate case between gas and condensed phase scattering.

  12. Diffusion and aggregation of subsurface radiation defects in lithium fluoride nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitovich, A. P.; Kalinov, V. S.; Martynovich, E. F.; Stupak, A. P.; Runets, L. P.

    2015-09-01

    Lithium fluoride nanocrystals were irradiated by gamma rays at a temperature below the temperature corresponding to the mobility of anion vacancies. The kinetics of the aggregation of radiation-induced defects in subsurface layers of nanocrystals during annealing after irradiation was elucidated. The processes that could be used to determine the activation energy of the diffusion of anion vacancies were revealed. The value of this energy in subsurface layers was obtained. For subsurface layers, the concentrations ratio of vacancies and defects consisting of one vacancy and two electrons was found. The factors responsible for the differences in the values of the activation energies and concentration ratios in subsurface layers and in the bulk of the crystals were discussed.

  13. Health status of grandchildren of subjects occupationally exposed to chronic radiation. Communication 4. Congenital developmental defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrushkina, N.P.; Musatkova, O.B.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the incidence and structure of cogenital developmental defects in the grandchildren of subjects occupationally exposed to chronic external gamma-irradiation. For 830 children only grandfather was exposed, for 259 only grandmother, and for 468 grandfather and grandmother. The mean equivalent doses for gonads by the moment of conception of future parents of the cohort examined ranged from 17.3 to 145.3 sSv. The incidence and structure of congenital developmental defects in 1557 grandchildren of occupationally exposed subjects differed from that in controls. Multifactorial analysis failed to establish the effect of grandparents' and parents' exposure on the development of diseases in the progeny. Factors other than radiation proved to be significant. 13 refs.; 1 tab

  14. Influence of radiation defects on electrical losses in silicon diodes irradiated with electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poklonski, N. A.; Gorbachuk, N. I.; Shpakovski, S. V.; Lastovskii, S. B.; Wieck, A.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon diodes with a p + -n junction irradiated with 3.5-MeV electrons (the fluence ranged from 10 15 to 4 x 10 16 cm -2 ) have been studied. It is established that the dependence of the tangent of the angle of electrical losses tanδ on the frequency f of alternating current in the range f = 10 2 -10 6 Hz is a nonmonotonic function with two extrema: a minimum and a maximum. Transformation of the dependences tanδ(f) as the electron fluence and annealing temperature are increased is caused by a variation in the resistance of n-Si (the base region of the diodes) as a result of accumulation (as the fluence is increased) or disappearance and reconfiguration (in the course of annealing) of radiation defects. The role of time lag of the defect recharging in the formation of tanδ(f) is insignificant.

  15. Radiation-induced segregation: A microchemical gauge to quantify fundamental defect parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonen, E.P.; Bruemmer, S.M.

    1994-12-01

    Defect Kinetic are evaluated for austenitic stainless alloys by comparing model predictions to measured responses for radiation-induced grain boundary segregation. Heavy-ions, neutrons and proton irradiations having substantial statistical bases are examined. The combined modeling and measurement approach is shown to be useful for quantifying fundamental defect parameters. The mechanism evaluation indicates vacancy, migration energies of 1.15 eV or less and a vacancy formation energy at grain boundaries of 1.5 eV. Damage efficiencies of about 0.03 were established for heavy-ions and for light-water reactor neutrons. Inferred proton damage efficiencies were about 0.15. Segregation measured in an advanced gas-cooled reactor component was much greater than expected using the above parameters

  16. Electron radiation defects in TaCsub(1-x) and TiCsub(0.97)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morillo, J.; Novion, C.H. de; Dural, J.

    1981-08-01

    The electrical resistivity changes of TaCsub(0.99) and TaCsub(0.80) have been measured at 21 K during irradiation with electrons of incident energies ranging from 2.5 to 0.25 MeV: a non-zero production rate is observed, even at the lowest energies. The recovery of defects was followed up to 400 K for TaCsub(0.99) and TiCsub(0.97) irradiated with 2.25 MeV electrons and up to 160 K for TaCsub(0.80) irradiated with 0.75 MeV electrons. The results are compared to fast neutron radiation damage data. For TiCsub(0.97) and TaCsub(0.99), the contributions of the different defects to the production rates and recovery spectra are tentatively separated, and a rough estimate of Frenkel pair resistivities is given

  17. Study of a radiation point defects ensemble in thin GaAs layers implanted by Be+ and Se+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbachev, K.D.; Bublik, V.T.; Kuripyatnik, A.V.; Yurchuk, S.Yu.

    2001-01-01

    The behaviour of a radiation point defects ensemble in SI-GaAs(100) wafers implanted by Be + (a dose of 1x10 14 at/cm 2 , an energy of 50 and 150 keV) and Se + (a dose of 5x10 14 at/cm 2 , an energy of 150, 180 and 240 keV) ions are studied by a triple-crystal diffractometry method. The strain profile and a number of residual radiation point defects are shown to be determined by defects annihilation, their sink to the surface and rechanneling during the implantation [ru

  18. Three-dimensional cluster formation and structure in heterogeneous dose distribution of intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ming; Wei, Jie; Narayanasamy, Ganesh; Yuan, Yading; Lo, Yeh-Chi; Peñagarícano, José A

    2018-05-01

    To investigate three-dimensional cluster structure and its correlation to clinical endpoint in heterogeneous dose distributions from intensity modulated radiation therapy. Twenty-five clinical plans from twenty-one head and neck (HN) patients were used for a phenomenological study of the cluster structure formed from the dose distributions of organs at risks (OARs) close to the planning target volumes (PTVs). Initially, OAR clusters were searched to examine the pattern consistence among ten HN patients and five clinically similar plans from another HN patient. Second, clusters of the esophagus from another ten HN patients were scrutinized to correlate their sizes to radiobiological parameters. Finally, an extensive Monte Carlo (MC) procedure was implemented to gain deeper insights into the behavioral properties of the cluster formation. Clinical studies showed that OAR clusters had drastic differences despite similar PTV coverage among different patients, and the radiobiological parameters failed to positively correlate with the cluster sizes. MC study demonstrated the inverse relationship between the cluster size and the cluster connectivity, and the nonlinear changes in cluster size with dose thresholds. In addition, the clusters were insensitive to the shape of OARs. The results demonstrated that the cluster size could serve as an insightful index of normal tissue damage. The clinical outcome of the same dose-volume might be potentially different. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Microstructural evolution of radiation induced defects in ZnO during isochronal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, S.; Puff, W.; Balogh, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    In this study the authors discuss the microstructural changes after electron and proton irradiation and the thermal evolution of the radiation induced defects during isochronal annealing. The nominally undoped samples were irradiated either with 3 MeV protons to a fluence of 1.2 x 10 18 p/cm 2 or with 1 MeV electrons to a fluence of 1 x 10 18 e/cm 2 . The investigation was performed with positron lifetime and Doppler-Broadening measurements. The measurements were done at room temperature and in some cases down to 10 K to investigate the thermal dependence of the trapping characteristics of the positrons

  20. Electric field effects on radiation defects annealing in p-InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibille, A.

    1983-01-01

    Annealing experiments have been performed on electron irradiated Schottky diodes on p-InP. They show a strong influence of the applied reverse bias during annealing on the recovery of the free holes concentration, as well as on the disappearance of the dominant radiation induced hole traps detected by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). Compensating defects are observed to drift under the action of the electric field and accumulate at the edge of the depleted zone, while the main hole traps created by the irradiation anneal faster when empty of holes or subjected to an electric field. (author)

  1. Radiation-induced defects in chalcogenide glasses characterized by combined optical spectroscopy, XPS and PALS methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O. [Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15 al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa 42201 (Poland); Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' ' Carat' ' , 202, Stryjska str., 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Kovalskiy, A.; Jain, H. [Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Golovchak, R. [Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' ' Carat' ' , 202, Stryjska str., 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Zurawska, A. [Opole University of Technology, 75, Ozimska str., Opole 45370 (Poland)

    2007-03-15

    Temperature-dependent optical absorption spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetimes spectroscopy are utilized to understand radiation-induced changes in Ge-Sb-S chalcogenide glasses. Theoretically predicted topological scheme of {gamma}-induced coordination defect formation in stoichiometric Ge{sub 23.5}Sb{sub 11.8}S{sub 64.7} glass composition is supported by these measurements. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Complex of GRAD programs for analytical calculation of radiation defects generation in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suvorov, A.L.; Zabolotnyj, V.T.; Babaev, V.P.

    1989-01-01

    Complex of programms for analytical calculation of generation of radiation defects (GRAD) in solids, and also of their recombination during cascade area relaxation and postradiation annealing, of mass removing by atomic collisions in volume (mixing) and through the surface (sputtering), of structure - phase state and property changes is suggested. The complex volume is less than 10 KBytes and it may be realized by computer of any type. Satisfactional agreement with more wide range of experimental data in comparison with tradition models is obtained. 27 refs.; 2 figs

  3. Incidence of neural tube defects in the natural radiation coastal areas of Kerala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaikrishan, G.; Sudheer, K.R.; Andrews, V.J.; Koya, P.K.M.; Cheriyan, V.D.; Seshadri, M.

    2010-01-01

    All consecutive births in selected government hospitals in and around the high level natural background radiation areas (HLNRA) of Kerala were monitored for congenital malformations observable at birth since 1995. The HLNR area, a coastal strip of land about 55 km in length and 0.5 km in breadth from Purakkad in the north in Alleppey district to Sakthikulangara in the south of Quilon district, stands out among the most prominent background radiation areas of the world. Natural deposit of monazite sand, containing Thorium (8-10%), Uranium (0.3%) and corresponding decay products, is the source of elevated background radiation, ranging from < 1 to 45 mGy/year. Wide variation in dose, due to the patchy and non-uniform distribution of Monazite sand, enables in built controls. High population density, limited migration, ethnic diversity, good literacy, health awareness, institutionalized births and acceptance of small family norm are some of the key features of the population. Areas with a mean radiation dose of more than 1.5 mGy/year were treated as HLNR areas and areas with a dose level of 1.5 mGy/year or less were treated as normal level radiation (NLNR) areas. The study carried out since 1995 does not seem to implicate HLNR in the incidence of neural tube defects among newborns

  4. Low-dose ionizing radiation alleviates Aβ42-induced defective phenotypes in Drosophila Alzheimer's disease models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, SooJin; Jeong, Hae Min; Nam, Seon Young [Low-dose Radiation Research Team, Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by amyloid plaques, progressive neuronal loss, and gradual deterioration of memory. Amyloid imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have been developed and approved for clinical use in the evaluation of suspected neurodegenerative disease, including AD. Particularly, previous studies involving low-dose ionizing radiation on Aβ 42-treated mouse hippocampal neurons have suggested a potential role for low-dose ionizing radiation in the treatment of AD. However, associated in vivo studies involving the therapy effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on AD are still insufficient. As a powerful cell biological system, Drosophila AD models have been generated and established a useful model organism for study on the etiology of human AD. In this study, we investigated the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on Drosophila AD models. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation.

  5. Interaction between radiation-induced defects and lithium impurity atoms in germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'eva, E.D.; Daluda, Yu.N.; Emtsev, V.V.; Kervalishvili, P.D.; Mashovets, T.V.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of gamma radiation on germanium doped with lithium in the course of extraction from a melt was studied. 60 Co γ-ray irradiation with the 6.2x10 12 cm -2 x1 -1 intensity was performed at 300 K. The temperature dependences of conductivity and Hall effect was studied in the 4.2-300 K range. It was shown that using this alloying technique lithium atoms in germanium were in a ''free'' state. It was found that on irradiation the lithium atom concentration decreases as a result of production of electrically inactive complexes with participation of lithium atoms. Besides this principal process secondary ones are observed: production of radiation donor-defects with the ionization energy Esub(c) of 80 MeV and compensating acceptors

  6. Annealing study on radiation-induced defects in 6H-SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinheiro, M.V.B.; Lingner, T.; Caudepon, F.; Greulich-Weber, S.; Spaeth, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of a systematic isochronal annealing investigation of vacancy-related defects in electron-irradiated n-type 6H-SiC:N. A series of 10 samples cut from a commercial wafer and annealed up to 1200 C after electron-irradiation (1.5 x 10 18 cm -3 ) was characterized with photoluminescence (PL), Magnetic circular dichroism of the absorption (MCDA) and conventional electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Apart from less stable triplet-related defects which vanished between 150 C and 300 C, the thermal behavior of three radiation-induced defects was studied: the silicon vacancy (V Si ), the carbon-antisite-carbon-vacancy pair (C Si -V C ) and the D1 center. Their annealing behavior showed that the destruction of the isolated V Si between 750 C and 900 C is followed by the formation of thermally more stable C Si -V C pairs, a result that has been theoretically predicted recently. By further heating the samples the C Si -V C pairs are annealed out between 900 C and 1050 C and were followed by an increase in the D1 center concentration. (orig.)

  7. Defects of a mammography quality control phantom visualized by synchrotron radiation imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Keiko; Fukuda, Mamoru; Ehara, Norishige; Miyamoto, Keiko; Kanemaki, Yoshihide; Ogata, Haruki; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2002-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) imaging of an RMI 156 mammography quality control phantom, serial number 156-15330, revealed some defects which degraded the visibility of calcification specks. SR imaging was performed at SPring-8, in Harima, Japan by using a monochromatic energy of 20 keV with a field-of-view of 24 X 24 mm. Different kinds of images were obtained by changing sample-to-detector distances; absorption images and refraction-enhanced images. Specks were embedded in a wax matrix and were imaged as black in an absorption image. In a refraction-enhanced image, they were imaged as a black region with white margins. Foreign objects with opposite contrast were detected near, or overlapped with, some specks. As they were depicted as white in the absorption image and as white with a black margin in the refraction-enhanced image, it seemed that they had low X-ray attenuation and a low refraction index compared with the surrounding wax. They might presumable be air bubbles. Visibility of specks in an absorption image was seriously interfered with when those object(s) overlapped with specks. This kind of defect may cause a difficulty in meeting quality assurance specifications when a facility inadvertently purchases defective phantoms. (author)

  8. nIFTy galaxy cluster simulations II: radiative models

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sembolini, F

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Valerio 2, I-34127 Trieste, Italy 12Physics Department, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town 7535, Sotuh Africa 13Physics Department, University of Western Cape, Bellville, Cape Town 7535, South Africa 14South African Astronomical Observatory, PO Box...IFTy cluster comparison project (Sembolini et al., 2015): a study of the latest state-of- the-art hydrodynamical codes using simulated galaxy clusters as a testbed for theories of galaxy formation. Simulations are indis- pensable tools in the interpretation...

  9. Characterization of Radiation-Induced Clustering using Atom Probe Tomography in Nuclear Structural Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gyeong Geun; Lim, Sang Yeob; Chang, Kun Ok; Ha, Jin Hyung; Kwon, Jun Hyun [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The degradations include the change in mechanical properties, which are related to the microstructure evolution caused by irradiation. The most widely used tool for the imaging irradiated microstructure is transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The composition of irradiation defects can be analyzed using X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) equipped in the TEM. However, composition characterization of the nano-sized irradiation defects in the matrix is limited due to the beam broadening of TEM and the overlapping of the probed volume during EDS analysis. Recently, Atom probe tomography (APT) has been introduced to the characterization of irradiation defects. APT provides sub-nano scale position of atoms and the chemical composition of a selected volume. SS316 irradiated with Fe ions at above 300 .deg. C caused significant clustering and segregation of Si and Ni at defect sinks. The neutron irradiated low alloy steel showed similar clustering of Ni and Si. The approach of using APT was demonstrated to be well suited for discovering the structure of irradiation defects and performing quantitative analysis in nuclear materials irradiated at high temperature.

  10. Processing of radiation-induced clustered DNA damage generates DSB in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulston, M.K.; De Lara, C.M.; Davis, E.L.; Jenner, T.J.; O'Neill, P.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Clustered DNA damage sites, in which two or more lesions are formed within a few helical turns of the DNA after passage of a single radiation track, are signatures of DNA modifications induced by ionizing radiation in mammalian cell. With 60 Co-radiation, the abundance of clustered DNA damage induced in CHO cells is ∼4x that of prompt double strand breaks (DSB) determined by PFGE. Less is known about the processing of non-DSB clustered DNA damage induced in cells. To optimize observation of any additional DSB formed during processing of DNA damage at 37 deg C, xrs-5 cells deficient in non-homologous end joining were used. Surprisingly, ∼30% of the DSB induced by irradiation at 37 deg C are rejoined within 4 minutes in both mutant and wild type cells. No significant mis-repair of these apparent DSB was observed. It is suggested that a class of non-DSB clustered DNA damage is formed which repair correctly within 4 min but, if 'trapped' prior to repair, are converted into DSB during the lysis procedure of PFGE. However at longer times, a proportion of non-DSB clustered DNA damage sites induced by γ-radiation are converted into DSB within ∼30 min following post-irradiation incubation at 37 deg C. The corresponding formation of additional DSB was not apparent in wild type CHO cells. From these observations, it is estimated that only ∼10% of the total yield of non DSB clustered DNA damage sites are converted into DSB through cellular processing. The biological consequences that the majority of non-DSB clustered DNA damage sites are not converted into DSBs may be significant even at low doses, since a finite chance exists of these clusters being formed in a cell by a single radiation track

  11. Non-stoichiometry defects and radiation hardness of lead tungstate crystals PbWO sub 4

    CERN Document Server

    Devitsin, E G; Potashov, S Yu; Terkulov, A R; Nefedov, V A; Polyansky, E V; Zadneprovski, B I; Kjellberg, P; Korbel, V

    2002-01-01

    It has been stated many times that the formation of radiation infringements in PbWO sub 4 is to a big extent stipulated by the non-stoichiometry defects of the crystals, arising in the process of their growth and annealing. To refine the idea of characteristics of the non-stoichiometry defects and their effect on the radiation hardness of PbWO sub 4 , the current study is aimed at the melt composition infringements during its evaporation and at optical transmission of crystals obtained in these conditions after their irradiation ( sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs source). In the optical transmission measurements along with traditional techniques a method 'in situ' was used, which provided the measurements in fixed points of the spectrum (380, 470 and 535 nm) directly in the process of the irradiation. X-ray phase and fluorescence analysis of condensation products of vapours over PbWO sub 4 melt has found PbWO sub 4 phase in their content as well as compounds rich in lead PbO, Pb sub 2 WO sub 5 with overall ratio Pb/W (3....

  12. Non-stoichiometry Defects and Radiation Hardness of Lead Tungstate Crystals PbWO4

    CERN Document Server

    Devitsin, E G; Kozlov, V A; Nefedov, L; Polyansky, E V; Potashov, S Yu; Terkulov, A R; Zadneprovski, B I

    2001-01-01

    It has been stated many times that the formation of radiation infringements in PbWO4 is to big extent stipulated by non-stoichiometry defects of the crystals, arising in the process of their growth and annealing. To refine the idea of characteristics of non-stoichiometry defects and their effect on the radiation hardness of PbWO4 the current study is aimed at the melt composition infringements during its evaporation and at optical transmission of crystals obtained in these conditions after their irradiation (137Cs source). In the optical transmission measurements along with traditional techniques a method "in situ" was used, which provided the measurements in fixed points of the spectrum (380, 470 and 535 nm) directly in the process of the irradiation. X-ray phase and fluorescence analysis of condensation products of vapours over PbWO4 melt has found PbWO4 phase in their content as well as compounds rich in lead, PbO, Pb2WO5, with overall ratio Pb/W = 3.2. Correspondingly the lack of lead and variations in th...

  13. Tritium release kinetics of Li{sub 2}O with radiation defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishmanov, V; Tanaka, Satoru [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1998-03-01

    The study of an influence of radiation defects on tritium release behavior from polycrystalline Li{sub 2}O was performed by the in-pile and out-of-pile tritium release experiments. The samples were pre-irradiated by accelerated electrons to various absorbed doses up to 140 MGy and then exposed to the fluence of 10{sup 17} thermal neutrons/m{sup 2}. The radiation defects introduced by electron irradiation in Li{sub 2}O cause the retention of tritium. The linear temperature increase of the electron-irradiated samples disclosed two tritium release peaks: first starts at {approx}600 K with the maximum at {approx}800 K and second appears at {approx}950 K with the maximum at {approx}1200 K. It is thought that the tritium release at high temperatures (> 950 K) is due to the thermal decomposition of LiT. In order to further investigated the formation of lithium hydrides, the diffuse-reflectance Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopy was applied. The Li{sub 2}O powder was irradiated by electron accelerator under D{sub 2} containing atmosphere (N{sub 2} + 10% D{sub 2}). An absorption band specific to the Li{sub 2}O was observed at 668 cm{sup -1} and attributed to the Li-D stretching vibration. (author)

  14. Motion control in double-walled carbon nanotube systems using a Stone-Thrower-Wales defect cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ping; Zhang Yongwei

    2010-01-01

    The ability to control the motion of a single molecule will have an important impact in nano-mechanical systems. Multi-walled carbon nanotube systems, which have extremely low intertube friction and strong motion confinement, can form the basis for mechanically based motion control. We devise two molecular motion control units based on double-walled carbon nanotubes embedded with a Stone-Thrower-Wales defect cluster, and perform molecular dynamics simulations to determine the characteristics of these two control units. We show that one of the molecular control units is able to perform a logic operation on one logic input and produce three logic outputs, while the other is able to produce two logic outputs. Potential applications of the motion control units include molecular switches, shuttles and mechanically based logic devices.

  15. Description of radiation damage in diamond sensors using an effective defect model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassel, Florian [Institute for Experimental Nuclear Physics (IEKP), KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); CERN, Meyrin (Switzerland); Guthoff, Moritz; Dabrowski, Anne [CERN, Meyrin (Switzerland); Boer, Wim de [Institute for Experimental Nuclear Physics (IEKP), KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    The Beam Condition Monitoring Leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the CMS experiment at the LHC consisting of 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors. The BCML sensors, located in rings around the beam, are exposed to high particle rates originating from the colliding beams. These particles cause lattice defects, which act as traps for the ionized charge carrier leading to a reduced charge collection efficiency (CCE). The radiation induced CCE degradation was, however, much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements. Measurement and simulations presented in this paper show that this discrepancy is related to the rate of incident particles. At high particle rates, the trapping rate of the ionization is strongly increased compared to the detrapping rate leading to an increased build-up of space charge. This space charge locally reduces the internal electric field increasing the trapping rate and hence reducing the CCE even further. In order to connect these macroscopic measurements with the microscopic defects acting as traps for the ionization charge, the TCAD simulation program SILVACO was used. It allows to introduce the defects as effective donor and acceptor levels, and can calculate the electric field from Transient Current Technique (TCT) signals and CCE as a function of the effective trap properties, like density, energy level, and trapping cross section. After each irradiation step, these properties were fitted to the data on the electric field from the TCT signals and CCE. Two effective acceptor and donor levels were needed to fit the data after each step. It turned out that the energy levels and cross sections could be kept constant and the trap density was proportional to the cumulative fluence of the irradiation steps. The highly non-linear rate dependent diamond polarization and the resulting signal loss can be simulated using this effective defect model and is in agreement with the measurement results

  16. Description of radiation damage in diamond sensors using an effective defect model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassel, Florian; Guthoff, Moritz; Dabrowski, Anne; Boer, Wim de

    2017-01-01

    The Beam Condition Monitoring Leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the CMS experiment at the LHC consisting of 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors. The BCML sensors, located in rings around the beam, are exposed to high particle rates originating from the colliding beams. These particles cause lattice defects, which act as traps for the ionized charge carrier leading to a reduced charge collection efficiency (CCE). The radiation induced CCE degradation was, however, much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements. Measurement and simulations presented in this paper show that this discrepancy is related to the rate of incident particles. At high particle rates, the trapping rate of the ionization is strongly increased compared to the detrapping rate leading to an increased build-up of space charge. This space charge locally reduces the internal electric field increasing the trapping rate and hence reducing the CCE even further. In order to connect these macroscopic measurements with the microscopic defects acting as traps for the ionization charge, the TCAD simulation program SILVACO was used. It allows to introduce the defects as effective donor and acceptor levels, and can calculate the electric field from Transient Current Technique (TCT) signals and CCE as a function of the effective trap properties, like density, energy level, and trapping cross section. After each irradiation step, these properties were fitted to the data on the electric field from the TCT signals and CCE. Two effective acceptor and donor levels were needed to fit the data after each step. It turned out that the energy levels and cross sections could be kept constant and the trap density was proportional to the cumulative fluence of the irradiation steps. The highly non-linear rate dependent diamond polarization and the resulting signal loss can be simulated using this effective defect model and is in agreement with the measurement results

  17. Effect of potential barrier growth of auto-localized excitons decay on radiation defects in AHC at low lattice symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shunkeev, K.; Sagimbaeva, Sh.; Shunkeev, S.

    2007-01-01

    Effect of auto-localized excitons (ALE) luminescence strengthening is conditioned by two mechanisms: either decrease of potential barrier divided of quasi-free states and auto-localized states or decrease of emission-less channel effectiveness of exciton decay on primary radiation defects. In considered range (80 K) all excitons are only in auto-localized state. Therefore a realization of the first mechanism is improbable, For instant, in KI crystal at 80-100 K luminescence of free exciton is completely putting out, and ALE luminescence has maximal intensity. It is known that in the temperature range when ALE luminescence putting out is beginning an effectiveness of radiation defects is beginning to grow. This effect is related with predominating at that time emission-less exciton decay on radiation defects (F-H pairs). Experimentally by luminescence spectroscopy method activation energy of temperature putting out of ALE in AHC under uniaxial deformation. It is revealed, that increase of activation energy value has observed in a number of crystals: KBr→NaCl→KI→Na Br→CsBr→RbI. It is concluded, that effect of ALE intensity building-up and decrease of effectiveness of radiation defect formation are interpreted by growth of potential barrier of ALE decay into radiation defects under low symmetry of AHC lattice of low-temperature uniaxial deformation

  18. Cluster modeling of solid state defects and adsorbates: Beyond the Hartree-Fock level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    The use of finite clusters of atoms to represent the physically interesting portion of a condensed matter system has been an accepted technique for the past two decades. Physical systems have been studied in this way using both density functional and Hartree-Fock methodologies, as well as a variety of empirical or semiempirical techniques. In this article, the author concentrates on the Hartree-Fock based methods. The attempt here is to construct a theoretical basis for the inclusion of correlation corrections in such an approach, as well as a strategy by which the limits of a finite cluster may be transcended in such a study. The initial appeal will be to a modeling approach, but methods to convert the model to a self-contained theory will be described. It will be seen for the case of diffusion of large ions in solids that such an approach is quite useful. A further study of the case of adsorption of rare gas atoms on simple metals will demonstrate the value of inclusion of electron correlation

  19. Long term simulation of point defect cluster size distributions from atomic displacement cascades in Fe70Cr20Ni10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souidi, A.; Hou, M.; Becquart, C.S.; Domain, C.; De Backer, A.

    2015-01-01

    We have used an Object Kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) model to simulate the long term evolution of the primary damage in Fe 70 Cr 20 Ni 10 alloys. The mean number of Frenkel pairs created by different Primary Knocked on Atoms (PKA) was estimated by Molecular Dynamics using a ternary EAM potential developed in the framework of the PERFORM-60 European project. This number was then used to obtain the vacancy–interstitial recombination distance required in the calculation of displacement cascades in the Binary Collision Approximation (BCA) with code MARLOWE (Robinson, 1989). The BCA cascades have been generated in the 10–100 keV range with the MARLOWE code and two different screened Coulomb potentials, namely, the Molière approximation to the Thomas–Fermi potential and the so-called “Universal” potential by Ziegler, Biersack and Littmark (ZBL). These cascades have been used as input to the OKMC code LAKIMOCA (Domain et al., 2004), with a set of parameters for describing the mobility of point defect clusters based on ab initio calculations and experimental data. The cluster size distributions have been estimated for irradiation doses of 0.1 and 1 dpa, and a dose rate of 10 −7 dpa/s at 600 K. We demonstrate that, like in the case of BCC iron, cluster size distributions in the long term are independent of the cascade energy and that the recursive cascade model suggested for BCC iron in Souidi et al. (2011) also applies to FCC Fe 70 Cr 20 Ni 10. The results also show that the influence of the BCA potential is sizeable but the qualitative correspondence in the predicted long term evolution is excellent

  20. The yield, processing, and biological consequences of clustered DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikazono, Naoya; Noguchi, Miho; Fujii, Kentaro; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yokoya, Akinari

    2009-01-01

    After living cells are exposed to ionizing radiation, a variety of chemical modifications of DNA are induced either directly by ionization of DNA or indirectly through interactions with water-derived radicals. The DNA lesions include single strand breaks (SSB), base lesions, sugar damage, and apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (AP sites). Clustered DNA damage, which is defined as two or more of such lesions within one to two helical turns of DNA induced by a single radiation track, is considered to be a unique feature of ionizing radiation. A double strand break (DSB) is a type of clustered DNA damage, in which single strand breaks are formed on opposite strands in close proximity. Formation and repair of DSBs have been studied in great detail over the years as they have been linked to important biological endpoints, such as cell death, loss of genetic material, chromosome aberration. Although non-DSB clustered DNA damage has received less attention, there is growing evidence of its biological significance. This review focuses on the current understanding of (1) the yield of non-DSB clustered damage induced by ionizing radiation (2) the processing, and (3) biological consequences of non-DSB clustered DNA damage. (author)

  1. Study of point defect clustering in electron and ion irradiated zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellio, C.; Boulanger, L.

    1986-09-01

    Dislocation loops created by 500 keV Zr + ions and 1 MeV electrons in zirconium have a/3 type Burgers vectors, and in ion irradiated samples, loops lie preferentially on planes close to (1010). From in-situ observations of loop growth under 1 MeV electron irradiation in zirconium and dilute Zr (Nb,O) alloys, a strong increase of the vacancy migration energy with oxygen concentration was observed, from 0.72 eV for pure zirconium to 1.7 eV for Zr and Zr-1% Nb doped with 1800 ppm weight oxygen, indicating large trapping of vacancies by O single interstitials or clusters

  2. Chromosomal Aberrations in DNA Repair Defective Cell Lines: Comparisons of Dose Rate and Radiation Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, K. A.; Hada, M.; Patel, Z.; Huff, J.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosome aberration yields were assessed in DNA double-strand break repair (DSB) deficient cells after acute doses of gamma-rays or high-LET iron nuclei, or low dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma-rays. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase, DNA-PK activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post-irradiation and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma radiation induced higher yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both chromosome exchange types were significantly higher for the ATM and NBS defective lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges in the NBS cells. Large increases in the quadratic dose response terms indicate the important roles of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications that facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize aberration formation. Differences in the response of AT and NBS deficient cells at lower doses suggests important questions about the applicability of observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low dose exposures. For all iron nuclei irradiated cells, regression models preferred purely linear and quadratic dose responses for simple and complex exchanges, respectively. All the DNA repair defective cell lines had lower Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values than normal cells, the lowest being for the DNA-PK-deficient cells, which was near unity. To further

  3. Hot gas in clusters of galaxies, cosmic microwave background radiation and cosmology

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    Presence of the hot (kTe ~ 3 - 10 KeV) rarefied gas in the clusters of galaxies (most massive gravitationally bound objects in the Universe) leads to the appearance of  "shadows"  in the angular distribution of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Radiation and permits to measure the peculiar velocities of these clusters relative to the unique coordinate frame where CMB is isotropic. I plan to describe the physics leading to these observational effects. Planck spacecraft, ground based South Pole and Atacama Cosmology Telescopes discovered recently more than two thousand of unknown before Clusters of Galaxies at high redshifts detecting these "shadows" and traces of kinematic effect, demonstrating the correlation of the hot gas velocities with mass concentrations on large scales. Giant ALMA interferometer in Atacama desert resolved recently strong shocks between merging clusters of galaxies. Newly discovered clusters of galaxies permit to study the rate of growth of the large scale structur...

  4. Optical spectroscopy and microscopy of radiation-induced light-emitting point defects in lithium fluoride crystals and films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montereali, R. M.; Bonfigli, F.; Menchini, F.; Vincenti, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    Broad-band light-emitting radiation-induced F2 and F3+ electronic point defects, which are stable and laser-active at room temperature in lithium fluoride crystals and films, are used in dosimeters, tuneable color-center lasers, broad-band miniaturized light sources and novel radiation imaging detectors. A brief review of their photoemission properties is presented, and their behavior at liquid nitrogen temperatures is discussed. Some experimental data from optical spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy of these radiation-induced point defects in LiF crystals and thin films are used to obtain information about the coloration curves, the efficiency of point defect formation, the effects of photo-bleaching processes, etc. Control of the local formation, stabilization, and transformation of radiation-induced light-emitting defect centers is crucial for the development of optically active micro-components and nanostructures. Some of the advantages of low temperature measurements for novel confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy techniques, widely used for spatial mapping of these point defects through the optical reading of their visible photoluminescence, are highlighted.

  5. Radiation-induced defects in Czochralski-grown silicon containing carbon and germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Londos, C A; Andrianakis, A; Emtsev, V V; Ohyama, H

    2009-01-01

    Formation processes of vacancy-oxygen (VO) and carbon interstitial-oxygen interstitial (C i O i ) complexes in electron-irradiated Czochralski-grown Si crystals (Cz–Si), also doped with Ge, are investigated. IR spectroscopy measurements are employed to monitor the production of these defects. In Cz–Si with carbon concentrations [C s ] up to 1 × 10 17 cm −3 and Ge concentrations [Ge] up to 1 × 10 20 cm −3 the production rate of VO defects as well as the rate of oxygen loss show a slight growth of about 10% with the increasing Ge concentration. At high concentrations of carbon [C s ] around 2 × 10 17 cm −3 the production rate of VO defects is getting larger by ∼40% in Cz–Si:Ge at Ge concentrations around 1 × 10 19 cm −3 and then at [Ge] ≈ 2 × 10 20 cm −3 this enlargement drops to ∼13%, thus approaching the values characteristic of lesser concentrations of carbon. A similar behavior against Ge concentration displays the production rate of C i O i complexes. The same trend is also observed for the rate of carbon loss, whereas the trend for the rate of oxygen loss is opposite. The behavior of Ge atoms is different at low and high concentrations of this isoelectronic impurity in Cz–Si. At low concentrations most isolated Ge atoms serve as temporary traps for vacancies preventing them from indirect annihilation with self-interstitials. At high concentrations Ge atoms are prone to form clusters. The latter ones are traps for vacancies and self-interstitials due to the strain fields, increasing the importance of indirect annihilation of intrinsic point defects. Such a model allows one to give a plausible explanation for the obtained results. A new band at 994 cm −1 seen only in irradiated Ge-doped Cz–Si is also studied. Interestingly, its annealing behavior was found to be very similar to that of VO complexes

  6. Study on radiation-induced defects in germanium monocrystals by the X-ray diffusive scattering method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinenko, I.A.; Perelygina, E.A.; Chudinova, S.A.; Shivrin, O.N.

    1979-01-01

    The method of X-ray diffusion scattering was used to study the defective structure of germanium monocrystals exposed to 750 keV proton irradiation with 3.8x10 16 -4.6x10 17 cm -2 doses and subjected to the subsequent annealing at temperatures up to 450 deg C. Detected in the crystals were the complex radiation induced structure characterized with oriented vacancy complexes and results from the both effects: irradiation and annealing. Radiation defect sizes in the section (hhO) have been determined. With increasing the annealing temperature the structure reconstruction resulting in the complex dissociation is observed

  7. Peculiarities of the point radiation defects accumulation in the fine- and ultra-disperse metallic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, B.A.; Zajkin, Yu.A.; Potapov, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    Fine-dispersive powders are a samples of solid systems. In which under irradiation the particle surface layers defect structure changes and has mostly an effect on structural transformations. Theoretical calculations and experimental data show, that the increased interstitials atoms concentration near particles surface during irradiation by either electrons or gamma quanta with energy about 1 MeV give rise to intensive pores healing. At the same time as the dense surface layer formation the pores healing leads to the brachiate borders system formation. The borders serve as pathways for accelerated diffusion. Sintering process and a metal recrystallization are stimulating as well. Both processes lead to the ordered super-structure formation which contributes the additional contribution in an improvement of the mechanical properties of a metal. A liner sizes of the ordered net depend on both the powder sizes and the irradiation conditions. The especial interest present a conditions for such superstructure formation (when the particle sizes are becoming so small (∼1 μm), that effect has being resulted on a defect-formation in the whole volume of a powder particle). In the considered case the point radiation defects accumulation kinetics in the metallic particle is analyzed on the ground of the equation system for atomic concentrations both interstitial atoms and vacancies. The numerical solution of this equation system shows, that particles sizes decline leads to considerable micro-pores healing increase and improvement of conditions for net strengthening. In dependence on irradiation conditions (temperature, dose and dose rate) the forming super-structure could have micro- and nano-sizes

  8. A-centres build-up kinetics in the conductive matrix of pulled n-type silicon with calculation of their recharges at defect clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgolenko, A.P.; Fishchuk, I.I.

    1981-01-01

    Pulled n-Si samples with rho approximately 40 Ωcm are investigated after irradiation with different doses of fast-pile neutrons. It is known that the simple defects are created not only in the conductive matrix but also in the region of the space charge of defect clusters. Then the charge state, for example, of A-centres in the region of the space charge is defined by both, the temperature and the value of the electrostatical potential. If this circumstance is not taken into account the calculation of the conductive volume is not precise enough. In the present paper the temperature dependence of the volume fraction is calculated, in which the space charge of defect clusters occurs, taking into account the recharges of A-centres in the region of the space charge. Using the expression obtained the A-centres build-up kinetics in the conductive matrix of pulled n-type silicon is calculated. (author)

  9. Computer simulation of the interaction between an extended dislocation and radiation defects in the fcc lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramoto, E.; Nakamura, Y.; Tsutsumi, T.

    1993-01-01

    The interaction between an extended dislocation and a radiation-induced defect, especially, a self-interstitial atom (SIA), has been investigated in the model fcc lattice by computer simulation technique. An SIA was absorbed into the core of one of the two partial dislocations of the extended screw dislocation as a crowdion which extends along the dislocation line. Under the applied shear stress this crowdion acted as a pinning point, resulting in irradiation hardening. On the other hand, an SIA was absorbed at the jog site of the extended edge dislocation (at one of the two jog sites on two partial dislocations) and after some relaxation the total jog was shifted to one atomic distance through the spreading out of the strain due to an SIA from one partial side to the other side. (orig.)

  10. Overexposure of patients due to malfunctions or defects in radiation equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Some 38 incidents involving patient overexposure due to malfunctions or defects in radiation equipment were notified to HSE between 1986 and 1990. Of these cases, 30 involved diagnostic X ray equipment, while the remainder involved nuclear medicine or radiotherapy equipment. Those cases involving X ray equipment are examined in detail and grouped into six categories. The numbers of patients affected varied. In one case an estimated 350 patients were affected: in another, 240; while 13 cases affected only a single patient. A very rough estimate of the collective effective dose equivalent in the 30 cases comes to 5 man sieverts. It is concluded that improvements are needed in fault finding procedures, and guidance is needed on consistent methods of dose estimation and reporting. Improvements for the longer term include the selection of reliable components during manufacture; application of HSE guidance in software design for programmable electronic systems; and equipment design to incorporate fault detection and inhibition of operation to prevent excessive exposures

  11. Positron annihilation study of radiation defects in α-Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramoto, Eiichi; Aono, Yasuhisa; Takenaka, Minoru

    1989-01-01

    Positron annihilation studies have been performed for the radiation-induced defects in α-Al 2 O 3 specimens. Before irradiation polycrystals of α-Al 2 O 3 showed positron annihilation lifetime about 125 psec. But this value was increased by 60 MeV O 6+ ion irradiation to about 155 psec. This is considered to be corresponding to positron lifetime at O-vacancy sites. But, this lifetime disappeared gradually in the period of several months probably because of recombination of vacancies and interstitial atoms at room temperature. On the other hand, it was found that in single crystals positron lifetime before irradiation is between these two values. This is probably due to lack of oxygen atoms in single crystals in the fabrication process and it already has O-vacancies in the matrix before irradiation. (author)

  12. Enhanced diffusion of solute metals forming complexes with radiation defects in silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivin, J.C.; Garrido, E.; Rizza, G.; Thome, L.

    1998-01-01

    The mixing kinetics of Cu, Ag, W, Pt, and Au single layers embedded in silica when irradiated with heavy ions at temperatures (T) of 110 and 300 K was investigated by means of in situ RBS analyses in alternation with irradiations. The spreading of peaks related to the metallic species is generally anisotropic and obeys either a quadratic or a linear dependence on the ion dose according to the increasing T. The quadratic law is attributed to a control of the diffusion by the coupling of the large impurity atoms M with matrix defects, and a classical regime of radiation enhanced diffusion is observed when this coupling is made easier (higher T or mass of M). Other factors such as internal stresses affect the rates of M dissolution and diffusion. (orig.)

  13. Effect of homologous impurities on primary radiation defect accumulation in alkali halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernov, S.A.; Gavrilov, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    To clarify the mechanism of the effect of anion and cation homologous impurities on the primary radiation-induced defect accumulation, the transient absorption of H and F centers was studied in KCl and KBr crystals. Pulse electron accelerator technique was used. Pure and doped crystals were investigated. It was obtained that the cation homologue Na in the concentration range from 0 to 0.5 m. % in 10 -8 -10 -6 s post-irradiation time has no effect on the defect accumulation efficiency at low temperature and increases the latter at high temperature. At large post-irradiation time and at high temperatures the rise of efficiency at low Na concentration and decrease of it at high Na concentrations were observed. The conclusion was made that Na does not affect the generation process. The anion homologous impurities (I and Br) lead to a significant increase of the accumulation efficiency due to the formation of more stable F-H pair at self-trapped exciton decay on anion impurities compared with that formed in perfect lattice. Some assumptions are advanced to explain the effect [ru

  14. On the application of the weak-beam technique to the determination of the sizes of small point-defect clusters in ion-irradiated copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    We have made an analysis of the conditions necessary for the successful use of the weak-beam technique for identifying and characterizing small point-defect clusters in ion-irradiated copper. The visibility of small defects was found to depend only weakly on the magnitude of the beam-convergence. In general, the image sizes of small clusters were found to be most sensitive to the magnitude of Sa with the image sizes of some individual defects changing by large amounts with changes as small as 0.025 nm -1 . The most reliable information on the true defect size is likely to be obtained by taking a series of 5-9 micrographs with a systematic variation of deviation parameter from 0.2-0.3 nm -1 . This procedure allows size information to be obtained down to a resolution limit of about 0.5 nm for defects situated throughout a foil thickness of 60 nm. The technique has been applied to the determination of changes in the sizes of small defects produced by a low-temperature in-situ irradiation and annealing experiment

  15. Effects of radiation quality and oxygen on clustered DNA lesions and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Robert D; Yu, Victor K; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Koumenis, Constantinos; Park, Joo Han; Carlson, David J

    2011-11-01

    Radiation quality and cellular oxygen concentration have a substantial impact on DNA damage, reproductive cell death and, ultimately, the potential efficacy of radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer. To better understand and quantify the effects of radiation quality and oxygen on the induction of clustered DNA lesions, we have now extended the Monte Carlo Damage Simulation (MCDS) to account for reductions in the initial lesion yield arising from enhanced chemical repair of DNA radicals under hypoxic conditions. The kinetic energy range and types of particles considered in the MCDS have also been expanded to include charged particles up to and including (56)Fe ions. The induction of individual and clustered DNA lesions for arbitrary mixtures of different types of radiation can now be directly simulated. For low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiations, cells irradiated under normoxic conditions sustain about 2.9 times as many double-strand breaks (DSBs) as cells irradiated under anoxic conditions. New experiments performed by us demonstrate similar trends in the yields of non-DSB (Fpg and Endo III) clusters in HeLa cells irradiated by γ rays under aerobic and hypoxic conditions. The good agreement among measured and predicted DSBs, Fpg and Endo III cluster yields suggests that, for the first time, it may be possible to determine nucleotide-level maps of the multitude of different types of clustered DNA lesions formed in cells under reduced oxygen conditions. As particle LET increases, the MCDS predicts that the ratio of DSBs formed under normoxic to hypoxic conditions by the same type of radiation decreases monotonically toward unity. However, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of higher-LET radiations compared to (60)Co γ rays (0.24 keV/μm) tends to increase with decreasing oxygen concentration. The predicted RBE of a 1 MeV proton (26.9 keV/μm) relative to (60)Co γ rays for DSB induction increases from 1.9 to 2.3 as oxygen concentration

  16. Radiation damage and defect behavior in proton irradiated lithium-counterdoped n/sup +/p silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stupica, J.; Goradia, C.; Swartz, C.K.; Weinberg, I.

    1987-01-01

    Two lithium-counterdoped n/sup +/p silicon solar cells with different lithium concentrations were irradiated by 10 MeV protons. Cell performance was measured as a function of fluence, and it was found that the cell with the highest concentration of lithium had the higher radiation resistance. Deep level defects were studied using deep level transient spectroscopy which yielded two defects that were lithium related. Relating the defect energy levels obtained from this study under 10 MeV protons, with an earlier work using 1 MeV electron irradiations shows no correlation of the defect energy levels. There is one marked comparison though. The absence of the boron interstitial-oxygen interstitial defect. This consistency strengthens the belief that lithium interacts with oxygen to prevent the formation of the boron interstitial-oxygen interstitial defect. The present results indicate that, in general, addition of lithium in small amounts to the p-base of a boron doped silicon solar cell such that the base remains p-type, tends to increase the radiation resistance of the cell

  17. Radiation defect production in quartz crystals with various structure perfectness degree; Radiatsionnoe defektoobrazovanie v kristallakh kvartsa s razlichnoj stepen`yu sovershenstva struktury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khushvakov, O B

    1992-01-01

    Radiation defects production processes in pure and doped quartz crystals with various structure defectness, caused by preliminary irradiation with neutrons, protons, deuterons and {alpha}-particles, during various electron excitation densities were investigated. The distribution of colour centres along the thickness of irradiated quartz crystals was measured. It was supposed that colour centres are produced on account of inelastic energy losses as the result of collective decay of two or more interacting excitons. It was shown that in quartz crystals under the actions of protons with overthreshold energy 18 MeV and electrons with subthreshold energy 100 keV the same structure defects are formed. It was established that radiation defect production process has two stages. The first stage reveals radiation defects produced by preliminary irradiation. The second one reveals additional intrinsic defects formed under the action of gamma-rays and electrons. The probability dependence of defect production on neutron fluence and masses of incident particles was studied. It was supposed that the creation of additional defects in preliminary irradiated crystals is due to non-radiative decay of electron excitations near radiation-induced defects. It was shown that increase of impurity concentration leads to rate growth of accumulation of radiation induced defects. (A.A.D.) 15 refs. 4 figs.

  18. Initial events in the cellular effects of ionizing radiations: clustered damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodhead, D.T.

    1994-01-01

    Ionizing radiations produce many hundreds of different simple chemical products in DNA and also multitudes of possible clustered combinations. The simple products, including single-strand breaks, tend to correlate poorly with biological effectiveness. Even for initial double-strand breaks, as a broad class, there is apparently little or no increase in yield with increasing ionization density, in contrast with the large rise in relative biological effectiveness for cellular effects. Track structure analysis has revealed that clustered DNA damage of severity greater than simple double-strand breaks is likely to occur at biologically relevant frequencies with all ionizing radiations. Studies are in progress to describe in more detail the chemical nature of these clustered lesions and to consider the implications for cellular repair. (author)

  19. Effect of stacking fault energy on the neutron radiation induced defect accumulation in stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoqiang; Al Mazouzi Abderrahim

    2009-01-01

    Current knowledge highlights the radiation induced segregation (RIS) and the radiation hardening as the two main effects on irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). Stacking fault energy is considered as a key parameter of materials, which can influence IASCC of stainless steels in nuclear light water reactor (LWR), because it plays an important role in every process of plastic deformation, work hardening and creep behaviour. The study of the impact of SFE variations on the plastic deformation and SCC behaviour of irradiated and unirradiated austenitic steels will contribute to the understanding of IASCC mechanism. The objectives of this work, as a task within the FP6-European Project PERFECT, are to investigate the influence of the SFE on IASCC susceptibility of stainless steels, to correlation n-irradiation induced defect production, accumulation and mechanical deformation behaviour with SFE by using the state of the art experimental tools such as transmission electron microscope (TEM), positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), slow strain rate tests (SSRT) in simulated LWR conditions

  20. Recombination of radiation defects in solid methane: neutron sources and cryo-volcanism on celestial bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichek, O.; Savchenko, E. V.; Lawson, C. R.; Khyzhniy, I. V.; Jenkins, D. M.; Uyutnov, S. A.; Bludov, M. A.; Haynes, D. J.

    2018-03-01

    Physicochemical properties of solid methane exposed to ionizing radiation have attracted significant interest in recent years. Here we present new trends in the study of radiation effects in solid methane. We particularly focus on relaxation phenomena in solid methane pre-irradiated by energetic neutrons and electron beam. We compare experimental results obtained in the temperature range from 10K to 100K with a model based on the assumption that radiolysis defect recombinations happen in two stages, at two different temperatures. In the case of slow heating up of the solid methane sample, irradiated at 10K, the first wave of recombination occurs around 20K with a further second wave taking place between 50 and 60K. We also discuss the role of the recombination mechanisms in “burp” phenomenon discovered by J. Carpenter in the late 1980s. An understanding of these mechanisms is vital for the designing and operation of solid methane moderators used in advanced neutron sources and could also be a possible explanation for the driving forces behind cryo-volcanism on celestial bodies.

  1. Modeling of excimer laser radiation induced defect generation in fluoride phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natura, U.; Ehrt, D.

    2001-01-01

    Fluoride phosphate (FP) glasses with low phosphate content are high-transparent in the deep ultraviolet (UV) range and attractive candidates for UV-optics. Their optical properties are complementary to fluoride crystals. The anomalous partial dispersion makes them desirable for optical lens designs to reduce the secondary spectrum. Their UV transmission is limited by trace impurities introduced by raw materials and decreases when exposed to UV-radiation (lamps, lasers). The experiments of the paper published previously in this journal were used in order to separate radiation induced absorption bands in the fluoride phosphate glass FP10. In this paper the generation mechanism of the phosphorus-oxygen related hole center POHC 2 is investigated in detail in glasses of various compositions (various phosphate and impurity contents) in order to predict the transmission loss in case of long-time irradiation. Experiments were carried out using ArF- and KrF-excimer lasers (ns-pulses). POHC 2 generation strongly depends on the phosphate content and on the content of Pb 2+ . A model was developed on these terms. Rate equations are formulated, incorporating the influence of the Pb 2+ -content on the defect generation, a two-step creation term including an energy transfer process and a one-photon bleaching term. This results in a set of coupled nonlinear differential equations. Absorption coefficients and lifetimes of the excited states were calculated as well. Experimental results compared well with the numerical analysis of the theoretical rate equations

  2. Influence of stacking fault energies on the size distribution and character of defect clusters formed by collision cascades in face-centered cubic metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to evaluate the influence of the stacking fault energy (SFE as a single variable parameter on defect formation by collision cascades in face-centered cubic metals. The simulations are performed for energies of a primary knock-on atom (EPKA up to 50keV at 100K by using six sets of the recently developed embedded atom method–type potentials. Neither the number of residual defects nor their clustering behavior is found to be affected by the SFE, except for the mean size of the vacancy clusters at EPKA=50keV. The mean size increases as the SFE decreases because of the enhanced formation of large vacancy clusters, which prefer to have stacking faults inside them. On the other hand, the ratio of glissile self-interstitial atom (SIA clusters decreases as the SFE increases. At higher SFEs, both the number of Frank loops and number of perfect loops tend to decrease; instead, three-dimensional irregular clusters with higher densities appear, most of which are sessile. The effect of SFE on the number of Frank loops becomes apparent only at a high EPKA of 50keV, where comparably large SIA clusters can be formed with a higher density.

  3. AFM studies of a new type of radiation defect on mica surfaces caused by highly charged ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruehlicke, C.; Briere, M.A.; Schneider, D.

    1994-01-01

    Radiation induced defects on mica caused by the impact of slow very highly charged ions (SVHCI) have been investigated with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Freshly cleaved surfaces of different types of muscovite were irradiated with SVHCI extracted from the LLNL electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at velocities of ca. 2 keV/amu. Atomic force microscopy of the surface reveals the formation of blisterlike defects associated with single ion impact. The determined defect volume which appears to increase linearly with the incident charge state and exhibits a threshold incident charge state has been determined using the AFM. These results indicate that target atoms are subjected to mutual electrostatic repulsion due to ionization through potential electron emission upon approach of the ion. If the repulsion leads to permanent atomic displacement, surface defects are formed

  4. Reconstruction of mandibular defects after radiation, using a free, living bone, graft transferred by microvascular anastomoses. An experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrup, L.T.; Fredrickson, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    The replacement of a mandibular defect by a free, composite rib graft, transferred by microvascular anastomoses of the posterior intercostal vessels to donor vessels in the neck was described previously. We now present data which demonstrate that successful results can be achieved even after radical mandibular radiation. This technique, done in dogs, has obvious implications in the management of oral cancer in man

  5. Study of defects and radiation damage in solids by field-ion and atom-probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidman, D.N.

    1979-06-01

    A brief review is presented of: the basic physical principles of the field-ion and atom-probe microscopes; the many applications of these instruments to the study of defects and radiation damage in solids; and the application of the atom-probe field-ion microscope to the study of the behavior of implanted 3 He and 4 He in tungsten

  6. The Role of Cerenkov Radiation in the Pressure Balance of Cool Core Clusters of Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lieu, Richard [Department of Physics, University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2017-03-20

    Despite the substantial progress made recently in understanding the role of AGN feedback and associated non-thermal effects, the precise mechanism that prevents the core of some clusters of galaxies from collapsing catastrophically by radiative cooling remains unidentified. In this Letter, we demonstrate that the evolution of a cluster's cooling core, in terms of its density, temperature, and magnetic field strength, inevitably enables the plasma electrons there to quickly become Cerenkov loss dominated, with emission at the radio frequency of ≲350 Hz, and with a rate considerably exceeding free–free continuum and line emission. However, the same does not apply to the plasmas at the cluster's outskirts, which lacks such radiation. Owing to its low frequency, the radiation cannot escape, but because over the relevant scale size of a Cerenkov wavelength the energy of an electron in the gas cannot follow the Boltzmann distribution to the requisite precision to ensure reabsorption always occurs faster than stimulated emission, the emitting gas cools before it reheats. This leaves behind the radiation itself, trapped by the overlying reflective plasma, yet providing enough pressure to maintain quasi-hydrostatic equilibrium. The mass condensation then happens by Rayleigh–Taylor instability, at a rate determined by the outermost radius where Cerenkov radiation can occur. In this way, it is possible to estimate the rate at ≈2 M {sub ⊙} year{sup −1}, consistent with observational inference. Thus, the process appears to provide a natural solution to the longstanding problem of “cooling flow” in clusters; at least it offers another line of defense against cooling and collapse should gas heating by AGN feedback be inadequate in some clusters.

  7. The influence of radiation-induced defects on thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence of α-Al_2O_3:C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyirenda, A.N.; Chithambo, M.L.

    2017-01-01

    It is known that when α-Al_2O_3:C is exposed to excessive amounts of ionising radiation, defects are induced within its matrix. We report the influence of radiation-induced defects on the thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) measured from α-Al_2O_3:C after irradiation to 1000 Gy. These radiation-induced defects are thermally unstable in the region 450–650 °C and result in TL peaks in this range when the TL is measured at 1 °C/s. Heating a sample to 700 °C obliterates the radiation-induced defects, that is, the TL peaks corresponding to the radiation induced defects are no longer observed in the subsequent TL measurements when moderate irradiation doses below 10 Gy are used. The charge traps associated with these radiation-induced defects are more stable than the dosimetric trap when the sample is exposed to either sunlight or 470-nm blue light from LEDs. TL glow curves measured following the defect-inducing irradiation produce a dosimetric peak that is broader and positioned at a higher temperature than observed in glow curves obtained before the heavy irradiation. In addition, sample sensitization/desensitization occurs due to the presence of these radiation-induced defects. Furthermore, both the activation energy and the kinetic order of the dosimetric peak evaluated when the radiation-induced defects are present in the sample are significantly lower in value than those obtained when these defects are absent. The radiation-induced defects also affect the shape and total light sum of the OSL signal as well as the position and width of the resultant residual phototransferred thermoluminescence main peak.

  8. The influence of radiation-induced defects on thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence of α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyirenda, A.N., E-mail: anyirenda@gmail.com; Chithambo, M.L.

    2017-04-15

    It is known that when α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C is exposed to excessive amounts of ionising radiation, defects are induced within its matrix. We report the influence of radiation-induced defects on the thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) measured from α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C after irradiation to 1000 Gy. These radiation-induced defects are thermally unstable in the region 450–650 °C and result in TL peaks in this range when the TL is measured at 1 °C/s. Heating a sample to 700 °C obliterates the radiation-induced defects, that is, the TL peaks corresponding to the radiation induced defects are no longer observed in the subsequent TL measurements when moderate irradiation doses below 10 Gy are used. The charge traps associated with these radiation-induced defects are more stable than the dosimetric trap when the sample is exposed to either sunlight or 470-nm blue light from LEDs. TL glow curves measured following the defect-inducing irradiation produce a dosimetric peak that is broader and positioned at a higher temperature than observed in glow curves obtained before the heavy irradiation. In addition, sample sensitization/desensitization occurs due to the presence of these radiation-induced defects. Furthermore, both the activation energy and the kinetic order of the dosimetric peak evaluated when the radiation-induced defects are present in the sample are significantly lower in value than those obtained when these defects are absent. The radiation-induced defects also affect the shape and total light sum of the OSL signal as well as the position and width of the resultant residual phototransferred thermoluminescence main peak.

  9. Detection of hot gas in clusters of galaxies by observation of the microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gull, S.F.; Northover, K.J.E.

    1976-01-01

    It is stated that satellite observations have indicated that many rich clusters are powerful sources of x-rays. This has been interpreted as due to either thermal bremsstrahlung from very hot gas filling the clusters or as inverse Compton scattering of photons by relativistic electrons. Spectral evidence appears to favour a thermal origin for the radiation, implying the existence of large amounts of hot gas. This gas may be a major constituent of the Universe, and independent confirmation of its existence is very important. Observations are here reported of small diminutions in the cosmic microwave background radiation in the direction of several rich clusters of galaxies. This is considered to confirm the existence of large amounts of very hot gas in these clusters and to indicate that the x-radiation is thermal bremsstrahlung and not inverse Compton emission. The observations were made in 1975/1976 using the 25m. telescope at the SRC Appleton Laboratory at a frequency of 10.6 GH2, and details are given of the technique employed. (U.K.)

  10. Radiation damage and defect behavior in proton irradiated lithium-counterdoped n+p silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupica, John; Goradia, Chandra; Swartz, Clifford K.; Weinberg, Irving

    1987-01-01

    Two lithium-counterdoped n+p silicon solar cells with different lithium concentrations were irradiated by 10-MeV protons. Cell performance was measured as a function of fluence, and it was found that the cell with the highest concentration of lithium had the highest radiation resistance. Deep level transient spectroscopy which showed two deep level defects that were lithium related. Relating the defect energy levels obtained from this study with those from earlier work using 1-MeV electron irradiation shows no correlation of the defect energy levels. There is one marked similarity: the absence of the boron-interstitial-oxygen-interstitial defect. This consistency strengthens the belief that lithium interacts with oxygen to prevent the formation of the boron interstitial-oxygen interstitial defect. The results indicate that, in general, addition of lithium in small amounts to the p-base of a boron doped silicon solar cell such that the base remains p-type, tends to increase the radiation resistance of the cell.

  11. Production and recombination of radiation defects in argon and krypton crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giersberg, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    Relative changes in the lattice constants of argon and krypton crystals have been measured by X-ray diffraction. As a result X-ray irradiation is found to produce stable defects. The recombination behaviour of these defects can be determined by isochronous and isothermal annealing. The creation of primary defects can be explained by exciton excitation and double-ionisation. (orig.) [de

  12. Semiconductor color-center structure and excitation spectra: Equation-of-motion coupled-cluster description of vacancy and transition-metal defect photoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Jesse J.; Duan, Xiaofeng F.; Burggraf, Larry W.

    2018-03-01

    Valence excitation spectra are computed for deep-center silicon-vacancy defects in 3C, 4H, and 6H silicon carbide (SiC), and comparisons are made with literature photoluminescence measurements. Optimizations of nuclear geometries surrounding the defect centers are performed within a Gaussian basis-set framework using many-body perturbation theory or density functional theory (DFT) methods, with computational expenses minimized by a QM/MM technique called SIMOMM. Vertical excitation energies are subsequently obtained by applying excitation-energy, electron-attached, and ionized equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOMCC) methods, where appropriate, as well as time-dependent (TD) DFT, to small models including only a few atoms adjacent to the defect center. We consider the relative quality of various EOMCC and TD-DFT methods for (i) energy-ordering potential ground states differing incrementally in charge and multiplicity, (ii) accurately reproducing experimentally measured photoluminescence peaks, and (iii) energy-ordering defects of different types occurring within a given polytype. The extensibility of this approach to transition-metal defects is also tested by applying it to silicon-substituted chromium defects in SiC and comparing with measurements. It is demonstrated that, when used in conjunction with SIMOMM-optimized geometries, EOMCC-based methods can provide a reliable prediction of the ground-state charge and multiplicity, while also giving a quantitative description of the photoluminescence spectra, accurate to within 0.1 eV of measurement for all cases considered.

  13. Clustered DNA damages induced in isolated DNA and in human cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, B. M.; Bennett, P. V.; Sidorkina, O.; Laval, J.; Lowenstein, D. I. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Clustered DNA damages-two or more closely spaced damages (strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases) on opposing strands-are suspects as critical lesions producing lethal and mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. However, as a result of the lack of methods for measuring damage clusters induced by ionizing radiation in genomic DNA, neither the frequencies of their production by physiological doses of radiation, nor their repairability, nor their biological effects are known. On the basis of methods that we developed for quantitating damages in large DNAs, we have devised and validated a way of measuring ionizing radiation-induced clustered lesions in genomic DNA, including DNA from human cells. DNA is treated with an endonuclease that induces a single-strand cleavage at an oxidized base or abasic site. If there are two closely spaced damages on opposing strands, such cleavage will reduce the size of the DNA on a nondenaturing gel. We show that ionizing radiation does induce clustered DNA damages containing abasic sites, oxidized purines, or oxidized pyrimidines. Further, the frequency of each of these cluster classes is comparable to that of frank double-strand breaks; among all complex damages induced by ionizing radiation, double-strand breaks are only about 20%, with other clustered damage constituting some 80%. We also show that even low doses (0.1-1 Gy) of high linear energy transfer ionizing radiation induce clustered damages in human cells.

  14. Compound Poisson Processes and Clustered Damage of Radiation Induced DNA Double Strand Breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudowska-Nowak, E.; Ritter, S.; Taucher-Scholz, G.; Kraft, G.

    2000-01-01

    Recent experimental data have demonstrated that DNA damage induced by densely ionizing radiation in mammalian cells is distributed along the DNA molecule in the form of clusters. The principal constituent of DNA damage are double-strand breaks (DSB) which are formed when the breaks occur in both DNA strands and are directly opposite or separated by only a few base pairs. DSBs are believed to be most important lesions produced in chromosomes by radiation; interaction between DSBs can lead to cell killing, mutation or carcinogenesis. The paper discusses a model of clustered DSB formation viewed in terms of compound Poisson process along with the predictive essay of the formalism in application to experimental data. (author)

  15. Electron Tomography of Nanoparticle Clusters: Implications for Atmospheric Lifetimes and Radiative Forcing of Soot

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanPoppel, Laura H.; Friedrich, Heiner; Spinsby, Jacob; Chung, Serena H.; Seinfeld, John H.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2005-01-01

    Nanoparticles are ubiquitous in nature. Their large surface areas and consequent chemical reactivity typically result in their aggregation into clusters. Their chemical and physical properties depend on cluster shapes, which are commonly complex and unknown. This is the first application of electron tomography with a transmission electron microscope to quantitatively determine the three-dimensional (3D) shapes, volumes, and surface areas of nanoparticle clusters. We use soot (black carbon, BC) nanoparticles as an example because it is a major contributor to environmental degradation and global climate change. To the extent that our samples are representative, we find that quantitative measurements of soot surface areas and volumes derived from electron tomograms differ from geometrically derived values by, respectively, almost one and two orders of magnitude. Global sensitivity studies suggest that the global burden and direct radiative forcing of fractal BC are only about 60% of the value if it is assumed that BC has a spherical shape.

  16. Dynamics of photoprocesses induced by femtosecond infrared radiation in free molecules and clusters of iron pentacarbonyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kompanets, V. O.; Lokhman, V. N.; Poydashev, D. G.; Chekalin, S. V.; Ryabov, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of photoprocesses induced by femtosecond infrared radiation in free Fe(CO) 5 molecules and their clusters owing to the resonant excitation of vibrations of CO bonds in the 5-μm range has been studied. The technique of infrared excitation and photoionization probing (λ = 400 nm) by femtosecond pulses has been used in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. It has been found that an infrared pulse selectively excites vibrations of CO bonds in free molecules, which results in a decrease in the yield of the Fe(CO) 5 + molecular ion. Subsequent relaxation processes have been analyzed and the results have been interpreted. The time of the energy transfer from excited vibrations to other vibrations of the molecule owing to intramolecular relaxation has been measured. The dynamics of dissociation of [Fe(CO) 5 ] n clusters irradiated by femtosecond infrared radiation has been studied. The time dependence of the yield of free molecules has been measured under different infrared laser excitation conditions. We have proposed a model that well describes the results of the experiment and makes it possible, in particular, to calculate the profile of variation of the temperature of clusters within the “evaporation ensemble” concept. The intramolecular and intracluster vibrational relaxation rates in [Fe(CO) 5 ] n clusters have been estimated.

  17. Radiation defects in GaP and solid solution of GaAssub(1-x)Psub(x)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brailovsky, E.Y.; Grigoryan, N.E.; Marchouk, N.D.; Pambuhchyan, N.H.; Tartachnik, V.P.

    1979-01-01

    The introduction and annealing behaviour of radiation defects in GaP and GaAssub(1-x)Psub(x) at 1 to 50 MeV electron irradiation was investigated by the Hall effect, thermal stimulated current (TSC) and optical absorption. The recovery of electrical properties of irradiated GaAssub(1-x)Psub(x) was dependent on x. From TSC measurement it has been shown that the predominant radiation defects in GaP are electron traps Esub(c) - (1.2 +- 0.1)eV and hole traps Esub(v) + (1.5 +- 0.15)eV which are the cause of n and p decreasing in GaP crystals. The formation of density state 'tails' during irradiation was investigated. (author)

  18. Study of correlation between the structural defects and inhomogeneities of CDTE based radiation detectors used for medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buis, Camille

    2013-01-01

    In the present Ph.D. thesis, we investigate microstructural defects in a chlorine-doped cadmium telluride crystal (CdTe:Cl), to understand the relationship between defects and performance of CdTe-based radiation detectors. Characterization tools, such as diffraction topography and chemical etching, are used for bulk and surface investigations of the distribution of dislocations. Dislocations are arranged into walls. Most of them appear to cross the whole thickness of the sample. Very good correlation is observed between areas with variations of dark-current and photo-current, and positions of the dislocation walls revealed at the surface of the sample. Then spectroscopic analysis of these defects was performed at low temperatures. It highlighted that dislocation walls induce non-radiative recombination, but it didn't show any Y luminescence usually attributed to dislocations in the literature. Ion Beam Induced Current (IBIC) measurements were used to evaluate the influence of dislocation walls on charge carrier transport properties. This experiment shows that they reduce the mobility-lifetime product of the charge carriers. A very clear correlation was, in fact, established between the distribution of the dislocation network and the linear defects revealed by their lower CIE on the device. (author) [fr

  19. Gamma radiation effect on n-InP crystals with impurity clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitovskij, N.A.; Dakhno, A.N.; Emel'yanenko, O.V.; Lagunova, T.S.; Mashovets, T.V.

    1982-01-01

    Parameters of acceptor-impurity atom clusters have been investigated for the cases of nonirradiated and gamma-irradiated n-InP crystals. Temperature dependences of electric conductivity, the Hall coefficient and the longitudinal magnetoresistance have been measured both in darkness and in lighting, the kinetics of the photoconductivity drop has also been studied. It is shown that in nonirradiated n-InP:Cu and n-InP-Zn the number of atoms in the cluster may be about 25-30. The concentration of the clusters may reach 10 11 cm -3 . Gamma-radiation increases the number of atoms in the cluster up to approximately equal to 40 with the insignificant change of the radius. In the nonirradiated material, the potential barrier heights created by the cluster are 0.15 eV and 0.4 eV at 78 and 300 K, respectively. The irradiation increases the barrier and the fraction of the volume occupied by the space-charge regions which overlap if the dose is sufficiently high

  20. On correction of model of stabilization of distribution of concentration of radiation defects in a multilayer structure with account experiment data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratov, E. L.

    2018-05-01

    We introduce a model of redistribution of point radiation defects, their interaction between themselves and redistribution of their simplest complexes (divacancies and diinterstitials) in a multilayer structure. The model gives a possibility to describe qualitatively nonmonotonicity of distributions of concentrations of radiation defects on interfaces between layers of the multilayer structure. The nonmonotonicity was recently found experimentally. To take into account the nonmonotonicity we modify recently used in literature model for analysis of distribution of concentration of radiation defects. To analyze the model we used an approach of solution of boundary problems, which could be used without crosslinking of solutions on interfaces between layers of the considered multilayer structures.

  1. Destruction-polymerization transformations as a source of radiation-induced extended defects in chalcogenide glassy semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpotyuk, Oleh; Filipecki, Jacek; Shpotyuk, Mykhaylo

    2013-01-01

    Long-wave shift of the optical transmission spectrum in the region of fundamental optical absorption edge is registered for As 2 S 3 chalcogenide glassy semiconductors after γ-irradiation. This effect is explained in the frameworks of the destruction-polymerization transformations concept by accepting the switching of the heteropolar As-S covalent bonds into homopolar As-As ones. It is assumed that (As 4 + ; S 1 - ) defect pairs are created under such switching. Formula to calculate content of the induced defects in chalcogenide glassy semiconductors is proposed. It is assumed that defects concentration depends on energy of broken covalent bond, bond-switching energy balance, correlation energy, optical band-gap and energy of excitation light. It is shown that theoretically calculated maximally possible content of radiation-induced defects in As 2 S 3 is about 1.6% while concentration of native defects is negligible. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Abnormal photothermal effect of laser radiation on highly defect oxide bronze nanoparticles under the sub-threshold excitation of absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyaev, P.; Kotvanova, M.; Omelchenko, A.

    2017-05-01

    The mechanism of abnormal photo-thermal effect of laser radiation on nanoparticles of oxide bronzes has been proposed in this paper. The basic features of the observed effect are: a) sub-threshold absorption of laser radiation by the excitation of donor-like levels formed in the energy gap due to superficial defects of the oxide bronze nano-crystals; b) an interband radiationless transition of energy of excitation on deep triplet levels and c) consequent recombination occurring at the plasmon absorption. K or Na atoms thermally intercalated to the octahedral crystal structure of TiO2 in the wave SHS combustion generate acceptor levels in the gap. The prepared oxide bronzes of the non-stoichiometric composition NaxTiO2 and KxTiO2 were examined by high resolution TEM, and then grinded in a planetary mill with powerful dispersion energy density up to 4000 J/g. This made it possible to obtain nanoparticles about 50 nm with high surface defect density (1017-1019 cm-2 at a depth of 10 nm). High photo-thermal effect of laser radiation on the defect nanocrystals observed after its impregnation into cartilaginous tissue exceeds 7 times in comparison with the intact ones.

  3. clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-09-27

    Sep 27, 2017 ... Author for correspondence (zh4403701@126.com). MS received 15 ... lic clusters using density functional theory (DFT)-GGA of the DMOL3 package. ... In the process of geometric optimization, con- vergence thresholds ..... and Postgraduate Research & Practice Innovation Program of. Jiangsu Province ...

  4. clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    environmental as well as technical problems during fuel gas utilization. ... adsorption on some alloys of Pd, namely PdAu, PdAg ... ried out on small neutral and charged Au24,26,27, Cu,28 ... study of Zanti et al.29 on Pdn (n = 1–9) clusters.

  5. Echo detected EPR as a tool for detecting radiation-induced defect signals in pottery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoleo, Alfonso; Bortolussi, Claudia; Brustolon, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Archaeological fragments of pottery have been investigated by using CW-EPR and Echo Detected EPR (EDEPR). EDEPR allows to remove the CW-EPR dominant Fe(III) background spectrum, hiding much weaker signals potentially useful for dating purpose. EDEPR spectra attributed to a methyl radical and to feldspar defects have been recorded at room and low temperature for an Iron Age cooking ware (700 B.C.). A study on the dependence of EDEPR intensity over absorbed dose on a series of γ-irradiated brick samples (estimated age of 562 ± 140 B.C.) has confirmed the potential efficacy of the proposed method for spotting defect signals out of the strong iron background. - Highlights: → Fe(III) CW-EPR signals cover CW-EPR-detectable defects in ceramics. → Echo detected EPR gets rid of Fe(III) signals, disclosing defect signals. → Echo detected EPR detects defect signals even at relatively low doses.

  6. Accumulation of transposable elements in Hox gene clusters during adaptive radiation of Anolis lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiner, Nathalie

    2016-10-12

    Transposable elements (TEs) are DNA sequences that can insert elsewhere in the genome and modify genome structure and gene regulation. The role of TEs in evolution is contentious. One hypothesis posits that TE activity generates genomic incompatibilities that can cause reproductive isolation between incipient species. This predicts that TEs will accumulate during speciation events. Here, I tested the prediction that extant lineages with a relatively high rate of speciation have a high number of TEs in their genomes. I sequenced and analysed the TE content of a marker genomic region (Hox clusters) in Anolis lizards, a classic case of an adaptive radiation. Unlike other vertebrates, including closely related lizards, Anolis lizards have high numbers of TEs in their Hox clusters, genomic regions that regulate development of the morphological adaptations that characterize habitat specialists in these lizards. Following a burst of TE activity in the lineage leading to extant Anolis, TEs have continued to accumulate during or after speciation events, resulting in a positive relationship between TE density and lineage speciation rate. These results are consistent with the prediction that TE activity contributes to adaptive radiation by promoting speciation. Although there was no evidence that TE density per se is associated with ecological morphology, the activity of TEs in Hox clusters could have been a rich source for phenotypic variation that may have facilitated the rapid parallel morphological adaptation to microhabitats seen in extant Anolis lizards. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. Semiconductors Under Ion Radiation: Ultrafast Electron-Ion Dynamics in Perfect Crystals and the Effect of Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Wei; Schleife, André

    Stability and safety issues have been challenging difficulties for materials and devices under radiation such as solar panels in outer space. On the other hand, radiation can be utilized to modify materials and increase their performance via focused-ion beam patterning at nano-scale. In order to grasp the underlying processes, further understanding of the radiation-material and radiation-defect interactions is required and inevitably involves the electron-ion dynamics that was traditionally hard to capture. By applying Ehrenfest dynamics based on time-dependent density functional theory, we have been able to perform real-time simulation of electron-ion dynamics in MgO and InP/GaP. By simulating a high-energy proton penetrating the material, the energy gain of electronic system can be interpreted as electronic stopping power and the result is compared to existing data. We also study electronic stopping in the vicinity of defects: for both oxygen vacancy in MgO and interface of InP/GaP superlattice, electronic stopping shows strong dependence on the velocity of the proton. To study the energy transfer from electronic system to lattice, simulations of about 100 femto-seconds are performed and we analyze the difference between Ehrenfest and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics.

  8. Direct evidence for radiative charge transfer after inner-shell excitation and ionization of large clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Andreas; Stumpf, Vasili; Holzapfel, Xaver; Wiegandt, Florian; Schmidt, Philipp; Ozga, Christian; Reiß, Philipp; Ben Ltaief, Ltaief; Küstner-Wetekam, Catmarna; Jahnke, Till; Ehresmann, Arno; Demekhin, Philipp V.; Gokhberg, Kirill; Knie, André

    2018-01-01

    We directly observe radiative charge transfer (RCT) in Ne clusters by dispersed vacuum-ultraviolet photon detection. The doubly ionized Ne2+-{{{N}}{{e}}}n-1 initial states of RCT are populated after resonant 1s-3p photoexcitation or 1s photoionization of Ne n clusters with ≈ 2800. These states relax further producing Ne+-Ne+-{{{N}}{{e}}}n-2 final states, and the RCT photon is emitted. Ab initio calculations assign the observed RCT signal to the{}{{{N}}{{e}}}2+(2{{{p}}}-2{[}1{{D}}]){--}{{{N}}{{e}}}n-1 initial state, while transitions from other possible initial states are proposed to be quenched by competing relaxation processes. The present results are in agreement with the commonly discussed scenario, where the doubly ionized atom in a noble gas cluster forms a dimer which dissipates its vibrational energy on a picosecond timescale. Our study complements the picture of the RCT process in weakly bound clusters, providing information which is inaccessible by charged particle detection techniques.

  9. A hybrid method based on a new clustering technique and multilayer perceptron neural networks for hourly solar radiation forecasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azimi, R.; Ghayekhloo, M.; Ghofrani, M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel clustering approach is proposed based on the data transformation approach. • A novel cluster selection method based on correlation analysis is presented. • The proposed hybrid clustering approach leads to deep learning for MLPNN. • A hybrid forecasting method is developed to predict solar radiations. • The evaluation results show superior performance of the proposed forecasting model. - Abstract: Accurate forecasting of renewable energy sources plays a key role in their integration into the grid. This paper proposes a hybrid solar irradiance forecasting framework using a Transformation based K-means algorithm, named TB K-means, to increase the forecast accuracy. The proposed clustering method is a combination of a new initialization technique, K-means algorithm and a new gradual data transformation approach. Unlike the other K-means based clustering methods which are not capable of providing a fixed and definitive answer due to the selection of different cluster centroids for each run, the proposed clustering provides constant results for different runs of the algorithm. The proposed clustering is combined with a time-series analysis, a novel cluster selection algorithm and a multilayer perceptron neural network (MLPNN) to develop the hybrid solar radiation forecasting method for different time horizons (1 h ahead, 2 h ahead, …, 48 h ahead). The performance of the proposed TB K-means clustering is evaluated using several different datasets and compared with different variants of K-means algorithm. Solar datasets with different solar radiation characteristics are also used to determine the accuracy and processing speed of the developed forecasting method with the proposed TB K-means and other clustering techniques. The results of direct comparison with other well-established forecasting models demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed hybrid forecasting method. Furthermore, a comparative analysis with the benchmark solar

  10. Microstructure and fracture toughness of irradiated stainless steel retrieved from the field: the potential role of radiation-induced clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, P.; Soneda, N.; Nishida, K.; Dohi, K.; Marquis, E.A.; Chen, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The microstructures of six material/fluence combinations of stainless steels retrieved from BWR components (top guide and control rods) have been examined by atom probe tomography; the irradiated microstructure had been already characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fracture toughness of two material/fluence combinations had been previously measured. The aggregate results strongly suggest that radiation-induced clusters play a significant role in the degradation of fracture toughness that occurs at fluences below ∼ 13 dpa. Because TEM has not been able to consistently identify and quantify the nano-sized clusters in this fluence range, it has not highlighted the potential role of radiation-induced clusters. (authors)

  11. Proceedings of the TMS symposium on radiation facilities and defect studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, C.L. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Intent of the symposium is to highlight the various means of producing and characterizing irradition-induced defects in materials of interest in nuclear applications. Viewgraphs are presented for 18 papers. Separate abstracts were prepared for the data base

  12. Dynamics of voids and clusters and fluctuations in the cosmic background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salpeter, E.E.

    1983-01-01

    The author summarizes briefly calculations on spherically symmetric models without dissipation for the dynamical development of large voids and galaxy (super)clusters from small underdensities and overdensities, respectively, at the recombination era. Implications are mentioned and conjectures for more complex geometries are discussed. He infers the density fluctuations which must have been present just after the recombination era to produce some present-day configuration. Fluctuations in the present-day cosmic background radiation are related to this and their inferred amplitude depends very strongly on the present-day value of the cosmological density parameter. The relation to observed upper limits on these fluctuations are discussed. (Auth.)

  13. Defect of Fe-S cluster binding by DNA polymerase δ in yeast suppresses UV-induced mutagenesis, but enhances DNA polymerase ζ - dependent spontaneous mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepchenkova, E I; Tarakhovskaya, E R; Siebler, H M; Pavlov, Y I

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are duplicated by a complex machinery, utilizing high fidelity replicative B-family DNA polymerases (pols) α, δ and ε. Specialized error-prone pol ζ, the fourth B-family member, is recruited when DNA synthesis by the accurate trio is impeded by replication stress or DNA damage. The damage tolerance mechanism dependent on pol ζ prevents DNA/genome instability and cell death at the expense of increased mutation rates. The pol switches occurring during this specialized replication are not fully understood. The loss of pol ζ results in the absence of induced mutagenesis and suppression of spontaneous mutagenesis. Disruption of the Fe-S cluster motif that abolish the interaction of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the catalytic subunit of pol ζ with its accessory subunits, which are shared with pol δ, leads to a similar defect in induced mutagenesis. Intriguingly, the pol3-13 mutation that affects the Fe-S cluster in the CTD of the catalytic subunit of pol δ also leads to defective induced mutagenesis, suggesting the possibility that Fe-S clusters are essential for the pol switches during replication of damaged DNA. We confirmed that yeast strains with the pol3-13 mutation are UV-sensitive and defective in UV-induced mutagenesis. However, they have increased spontaneous mutation rates. We found that this increase is dependent on functional pol ζ. In the pol3-13 mutant strain with defective pol δ, there is a sharp increase in transversions and complex mutations, which require functional pol ζ, and an increase in the occurrence of large deletions, whose size is controlled by pol ζ. Therefore, the pol3-13 mutation abrogates pol ζ-dependent induced mutagenesis, but allows for pol ζ recruitment for the generation of spontaneous mutations and prevention of larger deletions. These results reveal differential control of the two major types of pol ζ-dependent mutagenesis by the Fe-S cluster present in replicative pol δ. Copyright © 2016

  14. The detection of radiation defects by means of the Kossel effect investigated in proton-irradiated GaP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, H.J.; Rolle, S.; Geist, V.; Stephan, D.

    1984-01-01

    The line intensity of Ga-K/sub α/- and P-K/sub α/-Kossel reflections from GaP irradiated by 0.3 to 1.3 MeV protons in a wide dose range (10 14 to 5 x 10 17 cm -2 ) has been investigated. The excitation of the characteristic X-rays inside the crystal lattice has been performed either by 40 keV electrons or 1.3 MeV protons. It is established that, in contrast to the P-K/sub α/-lines, certain Ga-K/sub α/-reflections respond very sensitively to radiation defects, manifest as increase or decrease in line intensity. The reason is probably a modification of extinction effects caused by lattice defects. The different behaviour of these phenomena is discussed and an explanation proposed. The lattice disorder is determined by channeling backscattering measurements. (author)

  15. Study of defects, radiation damage and implanted gases in solids by field-ion and atom-probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidman, D.N.; Amano, J.; Wagner, A.

    1980-10-01

    The ability of the field-ion microscope to image individual atoms has been applied, at Cornell University, to the study of fundamental properties of point defects in irradiated or quenched metals. The capability of the atom probe field-ion microscope to determine the chemistry - that is, the mass-to-charge ratio - of a single ion has been used to investigate the behavior of different implanted species in metals. A brief review is presented of: (1) the basic physical principles of the field-ion and atom-probe microscopes; (2) the many applications of these instruments to the study of defects and radiation damage in solids; and (3) the application of the atom-probe field-ion microscope to the study of the behavior of implanted 3 He and 4 He atoms in tungsten. The paper is heavily referenced so that the reader can pursue his specific research interests in detail

  16. Use of Isobestic and Isoemission Points in Absorption and Luminescence Spectra for Study of the Transformation of Radiation Defects in Lithium Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitovich, A. P.; Kalinov, V. S.; Stupak, A. P.; Runets, L. P.

    2015-03-01

    Isobestic and isoemission points are recorded in the combined absorption and luminescence spectra of two types of radiation defects involved in complex processes consisting of several simultaneous parallel and sequential reactions. These points are observed if a constant sum of two terms, each formed by the product of the concentration of the corresponding defect and a characteristic integral coefficient associated with it, is conserved. The complicated processes involved in the transformation of radiation defects in lithium fluoride are studied using these points. It is found that the ratio of the changes in the concentrations of one of the components and the reaction product remains constant in the course of several simultaneous reactions.

  17. Interaction between solute atoms and radiation defects in Fe-Ni-Si and Fe-Mn-Si alloys under irradiation with proton ions at low-temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Kenta, E-mail: murakami@tokai.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, 319-1188 (Japan); Iwai, Takeo, E-mail: iwai@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, 2-2-2 Iida-Nishi, Yamagata, Yamagata-shi, 990-9585 (Japan); Abe, Hiroaki [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, 319-1188 (Japan); Sekimura, Naoto, E-mail: sekimura@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo, 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Isochronal annealing followed by residual resistivity measurements at 12 K was performed in Fe-0.6Ni-0.6Si and Fe-1.5Mn-0.6Si alloys irradiated with 1 MeV proton ions below 70 K, and recovery stages were compared with those of Fe–0.6Ni and Fe–1.5Mn. The effects of silicon addition in the Fe-Ni alloy was observed as the appearance of a new recovery stage at 282–372 K, presumably corresponding to clustering of solute atoms in matrix, and as a change in mixed dumbbell migration at 122–142 K. Silicon addition mitigated the manganese effect in Fe–Mn alloy that is obstructing the recovery of radiation defects. Reduction of resistivity in Fe-Mn-Si alloy also suggested formation of small solute atom clusters.

  18. Fine interstitial clusters as recombinators in decomposing solid solutions under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trushin, Yu.V.

    1991-01-01

    Behaviour of interstitial clusters and their roll in processes of radiation swelling of metals are described. It is shown that occurrence of coherent advanced precipitations during decomposition of solid solutions under irradiation leads to matrix supersaturation over interstitial atoms. This enhances recombination of unlike defects due to vacancy precipitation on fine interstitial clusters. Evaluation of cluster sizes was conducted

  19. Formation of radiation-induced point defects in silicon doped thin films upon ion implantation and activating annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bublik, V.T.; Shcherbachev, K.D.; Komarnitskaya, E.A.; Parkhomenko, Yu.N.; Vygovskaya, E.A.; Evgen'ev, S.B.

    1999-01-01

    The formation and relaxation processes for radiation-induced defects in the implantation of 50 keV Si + ions into gallium arsenide and subsequent 10-min annealing in arsine at 850 deg. C have been studied by the triple-crystal X-ray diffractometry and secondary-ion mass spectroscopy techniques. It is shown that the existence of the vacancy-enriched layer stimulating diffusion of introduced dopants into the substrate surface can significantly affect the distribution profile of the dopant in the course of preparation of thin implanted layers

  20. Calculation of the Doppler broadening of the electron-positron annihilation radiation in defect-free bulk materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, V. J.; Alatalo, M.; Asoka-Kumar, P.; Nielsen, B.; Lynn, K. G.; Kruseman, A. C.; Mijnarends, P. E.

    2000-01-01

    Results of a calculation of the Doppler broadening of the positron-electron annihilation radiation and positron lifetimes in a large number of elemental defect-free materials are presented. A simple scheme based on the method of superimposed atoms is used for these calculations. Calculated values of the Doppler broadening are compared with experimental data for a number of elemental materials, and qualitative agreement is obtained. These results provide a database which can be used for characterizing materials and identifying impurity-vacancy complexes. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  1. Study of defects and radiation damage in solids by field-ion and atom-probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidman, D.N.

    1982-01-01

    An attempt is made to introduce the reader to the basic physical ideas involved in the field-ion and atom-probe field-ion microscope techniques, and to the applications of these techniques to the study of defects and radiation damage in solids. The final section discusses, in precise form, the application of the atom-probe field-ion microscope to the study of the behavior of implanted 3 He and 4 He atoms in tungsten. The paper is heavily referenced so that the reader can pursue his specific research interest in detail

  2. Mechanism for radiative recombination and defect properties of GaP/GaNP core/shell nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrovolsky, A.; Stehr, J. E.; Chen, S. L.; Chen, W. M.; Buyanova, I. A.; Kuang, Y. J.; Sukrittanon, S.; Tu, C. W.

    2012-01-01

    Recombination processes in GaP/GaNP core/shell nanowires (NWs) grown on a Si substrate by molecular beam epitaxy are examined using a variety of optical characterization techniques, including cw- and time-resolved photoluminescence and optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR). Superior optical quality of the structures is demonstrated based on the observation of intense emission from a single NW at room temperature. This emission is shown to originate from radiative transitions within N-related localized states. From ODMR, growth of GaP/GaNP NWs is also found to facilitate formation of complex defects containing a P atom at its core that act as centers of competing non-radiative recombination.

  3. 3D-imaging of selective laser melting defects in a Co–Cr–Mo alloy by synchrotron radiation micro-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Xin; Wang, Dianzheng; Liu, Xihe; Zhang, DanDan; Qu, Shilian; Ma, Jing; London, Gary; Shen, Zhijian; Liu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Microstructure defects set the mechanical property limits for solid Co–Cr–Mo alloy prepared by selective laser melting (SLM). Previous studies were mainly based on 2D SEM images and thus not able to provide information of the 3D morphologies of the complex defects. In this paper, the remaining porosities in Co–Cr–Mo alloy parts prepared by selective laser melting were presented in relation to the laser processing parameters. In order to understand the defect forming mechanism, accurate 3D images of defects inside SLM fabricated Co–Cr–Mo samples were provided by synchrotron radiation micro-CT imaging of 300 μm thick slices cut from a 10 mm cube. With 3D reconstructed images distinctive morphologies of SLM defects spanning across the consolidated powder layers were generated. The faults can be classified as single layer or multi-layers defects. The accidental single layer defects form as gaps between adjacent laser melt tracks or melt track discontinuousness caused by inherent fluid instability under various disturbances. The first formed single layer defect generates often a multi-layer defect spanning for 2–3 subsequent powder layers. By stabilizing the melt pool flow and by reducing the surface roughness through adjusting processing parameters it appears possible to reduce the defect concentrations

  4. Cell lines derived from a Medaka radiation-sensitive mutant have defects in DNA double-strand break responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidaka, Masayuki; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi; Kuwahara, Yoshikazu; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2010-01-01

    It was reported that the radiation-sensitive Medaka mutant 'ric1' has a defect in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by γ-rays during early embryogenesis. To study the cellular response of a ric1 mutant to ionizing radiation (IR), we established the mutant embryonic cell lines RIC1-e9, RIC1-e42, RIC1-e43. Following exposure to γ-irradiation, the DSBs in wild-type cells were repaired within 1 h, while those in RIC1 cells were not rejoined even after 2 h. Cell death was induced in the wild-type cells with cell fragmentation, but only a small proportion of the RIC1 cells underwent cell death, and without cell fragmentation. Although both wild-type and RIC1 cells showed mitotic inhibition immediately after γ-irradiation, cell division was much slower to resume in the wild-type cells (20 h versus 12 h). In both wild-type and RIC1 cells, Ser139 phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) foci were formed after γ-irradiation, however, the γH2AX foci disappeared more quickly in the RIC1 cell lines. These results suggest that the instability of γH2AX foci in RIC1 cells cause an aberration of the DNA damage response. As RIC1 cultured cells showed similar defective DNA repair as ric1 embryos and RIC1 cells revealed defective cell death and cell cycle checkpoint, they are useful for investigating DNA damage responses in vitro. (author)

  5. Study by electrical resistivity measurements of the radiation induced defects in gold-copper alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamo, A.

    1983-09-01

    Point defect production rate in Cu 3 Au and CuAu ordered and disordered alloys was studied by electrical resistivity measurements, as function of electron energy ranging from 0.4 to 2.5 MeV. The irradiations were performed at 20 K. The production curves are analysed using a displacement model for diatomic materials and the following values are found for the average displacement threshold energies: Esub(d)sup(Cu) approximately 22 eV and Esub(d)sup(Au) approximately 18 eV, for both alloys. Elementary defect migration was examined during isochronal annealing performed after irradiations. A simple type of self-interstitial seems to migrate in the ordered alloys: probably a split-interstitial of Cu-Cu type. Interstitial migration seems to be very difficult and complex in the disordered alloys. Vacancy mobility was detected after recovery at temperature above 300 K and was responsible of an increase of long range order. Fast neutron irradiations at 20 K produce disordering in the initially ordered alloys. Ratios of 38 and 18 antistructure defects per atomic displacement are estimated for Cu 3 Au and CuAu respectively [fr

  6. Annealing of radiation-induced defects in vanadium and vanadium-titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leguey, T.

    1996-01-01

    The annealing of defects induced by electron irradiation up to a dose of 6.10 21 m -2 at T<293 K has been investigated in single-crystals of pure vanadium and in vanadium-titanium alloys with compositions 0.3, 1 and 5 at.% Ti using positron annihilation spectroscopy. The recovery of the positron annihilation parameters in V single-crystals indicates that the defect annealing takes place in the temperature range 410-470 K without formation of microvoids for the present irradiation conditions. For the alloys the recovery onset is shifted to 460 K, the width of the annealing stage is gradually broadened with increasing Ti content, and microvoids are formed for annealing temperatures at the end of the recovery stage. The results show that the vacancy release from vacancy-interstitial impurity pairs and subsequent recombination with interstitial loops is the mechanism of the recovery in pure V. For V-Ti alloys, vacancy-Ti-interstitial impurity complexes and vacancy-Ti pairs appear to be the defects responsible for the positron trapping. The broadening of the recovery stage with increasing Ti content indicates that solute Ti is a very effective trap for vacancies in V. (orig.)

  7. Wide-banded NTC radiation: local to remote observations by the four Cluster satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. E. Décréau

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Cluster multi-point mission offers a unique collection of non-thermal continuum (NTC radio waves observed in the 2–80 kHz frequency range over almost 15 years, from various view points over the radiating plasmasphere. Here we present rather infrequent case events, such as when primary electrostatic sources of such waves are embedded within the plasmapause boundary far from the magnetic equatorial plane. The spectral signature of the emitted electromagnetic waves is structured as a series of wide harmonic bands within the range covered by the step in plasma frequency encountered at the boundary. Developing the concept that the frequency distance df between harmonic bands measures the magnetic field magnitude B at the source (df = Fce, electron gyrofrequency, we analyse three selected events. The first one (studied in Grimald et al., 2008 presents electric field signatures observed by a Cluster constellation of small size (~ 200 to 1000 km spacecraft separation placed in the vicinity of sources. The electric field frequency spectra display frequency peaks placed at frequencies fs = n df (n being an integer, with df of the order of Fce values encountered at the plasmapause by the spacecraft. The second event, taken from the Cluster tilt campaign, leads to a 3-D view of NTC waves ray path orientations and to a localization of a global source region at several Earth radii (RE from Cluster (Décréau et al., 2013. The measured spectra present successive peaks placed at fs ~ (n+ 1/2 df. Next, considering if both situations might be two facets of the same phenomenon, we analyze a third event. The Cluster fleet, configured into a constellation of large size (~ 8000 to 25 000 km spacecraft separation, allows us to observe wide-banded NTC waves at different distances from their sources. Two new findings can be derived from our analysis. First, we point out that a large portion of the plasmasphere boundary layer, covering a large range of magnetic

  8. Evaluation of defects induced by neutron radiation in reactor pressure vessels steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Jimenez, J.

    1978-01-01

    We have developed a method for calculating the production of neutron induced defects (depleted zone and crowdions) in ferritic pressure vessel steels for different neutron spectra. They have been analysed both the recoil primary atoms produced by elastic and inelastic collisions with fast neutrons and the ones produced by gamma-ray emission by thermal neutron absorption. Theoretical modelling of increasing in the ductile-brittle transition temperature of ferritic steels has been correlated with experimental data at irradiation temperature up to 400 degree centigree (Author) 15 refs

  9. THE INFRARED PROPERTIES OF EMBEDDED SUPER STAR CLUSTERS: PREDICTIONS FROM THREE-DIMENSIONAL RADIATIVE TRANSFER MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, David G.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Indebetouw, Remy; Whitney, Barbara A.; Wood, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    With high-resolution infrared data becoming available that can probe the formation of high-mass stellar clusters for the first time, appropriate models that make testable predictions of these objects are necessary. We utilize a three-dimensional radiative transfer code, including a hierarchically clumped dusty envelope, to study the earliest stages of super star cluster (SSC) evolution. We explore a range of parameter space in geometric sequences that mimic the hypothesized evolution of an embedded SSC. The inclusion of a hierarchically clumped medium can make the envelope porous, in accordance with previous models and supporting observational evidence. The infrared luminosity inferred from observations can differ by a factor of two from the true value in the clumpiest envelopes depending on the viewing angle. The infrared spectral energy distribution also varies with viewing angle for clumpy envelopes, creating a range in possible observable infrared colors and magnitudes, silicate feature depths, and dust continua. General observable features of cluster evolution differ between envelopes that are relatively opaque or transparent to mid-infrared photons. For optically thick envelopes, evolution is marked by a gradual decline of the 9.8 μm silicate absorption feature depth and a corresponding increase in the visual/ultraviolet flux. For the optically thin envelopes, clusters typically begin with a strong hot dust component and silicates in emission, and these features gradually fade until the mid-infrared polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features are predominant. For the models with a smooth dust distribution, the Spitzer MIPS or Herschel PACS [70]-[160] color is a good probe of the stellar mass relative to the total mass or star formation efficiency (SFE). Likewise, the IRAC/MIPS [3.6]-[24] color can be used to constrain the R in and R out values of the envelope. However, clumpiness confuses the general trends seen in the smooth dust distribution models, making it

  10. Summary Report of the Technical Meeting on Primary Radiation Damage: From Nuclear Reaction to Point Defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoller, R. E.; Nordlund, K.; Simakov, S.P.

    2012-11-01

    The Meeting was convened to bring together the experts from both the nuclear data and materials research communities because of their common objective of accurately characterizing irradiation environments and resulting material damage. The meeting demonstrated that significant uncertainties remain regarding both the status of nuclear data and the use of these data by the materials modeling community to determine the primary damage state obtained in irradiated materials. At the conclusion of the meeting, the participants agreed that there is clear motivation to initiate a CRP that engages participants from the nuclear data and materials research communities. The overall objective of this CRP would be to determine the best possible parameter (or a few parameters) for correlating damage from irradiation facilities with very different particle types and energy spectra, including fission and fusion reactors, charged particle accelerators, and spallation irradiation facilities. Regarding progress achieved during the last decade in the atomistic simulation of primary defects in crystalline materials, one of the essential and quantitative outcomes from the CRP is expected to be cross sections for point defects left after recoil cascade quenching. (author)

  11. arXiv Description of radiation damage in diamond sensors using an effective defect model

    CERN Document Server

    Kassel, Florian; Dabrowski, Anne; De Boer, Wim

    The BCML system is a beam monitoring device in the CMS experiment at the LHC. As detectors poly-crystalline diamond sensors are used. Here high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the CCE. However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is so much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the rate of incident particles. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field, which in turn increases the trapping rate and hence reduces the CCE even further. In order to connect these macroscopic measurements with the microscopic defects acting as traps for the ionization charge the TCAD simulation program SILVACO was used. Two effective acceptor and donor levels were needed ...

  12. First principles calculation of point defects and mobility degradation in bulk AlSb for radiation detection application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lordi, V; Aberg, D; Erhart, P; Wu, K J

    2007-01-01

    The development of high resolution, room temperature semiconductor radiation detectors requires the introduction of materials with increased carrier mobility-lifetime (μτ) product, while having a band gap in the 1.4-2.2 eV range. AlSb is a promising material for this application. However, systematic improvements in the material quality are necessary to achieve an adequate μτ product. We are using a combination of simulation and experiment to develop a fundamental understanding of the factors which affect detector material quality. First principles calculations are used to study the microscopic mechanisms of mobility degradation from point defects and to calculate the intrinsic limit of mobility from phonon scattering. We use density functional theory (DFT) to calculate the formation energies of native and impurity point defects, to determine their equilibrium concentrations as a function of temperature and charge state. Perturbation theory via the Born approximation is coupled with Boltzmann transport theory to calculate the contribution toward mobility degradation of each type of point defect, using DFT-computed carrier scattering rates. A comparison is made to measured carrier concentrations and mobilities from AlSb crystals grown in our lab. We find our predictions in good quantitative agreement with experiment, allowing optimized annealing conditions to be deduced. A major result is the determination of oxygen impurity as a severe mobility killer, despite the ability of oxygen to compensation dope AlSb and reduce the net carrier concentration. In this case, increased resistivity is not a good indicator of improved material performance, due to the concomitant sharp reduction in μτ

  13. Clusters of DNA induced by ionizing radiation: formation of short DNA fragments. I. Theoretical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, W. R.; Chatterjee, A.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a general theoretical model for the interaction of ionizing radiation with chromatin. Chromatin is modeled as a 30-nm-diameter solenoidal fiber comprised of 20 turns of nucleosomes, 6 nucleosomes per turn. Charged-particle tracks are modeled by partitioning the energy deposition between primary track core, resulting from glancing collisions with 100 eV or less per event, and delta rays due to knock-on collisions involving energy transfers >100 eV. A Monte Carlo simulation incorporates damages due to the following molecular mechanisms: (1) ionization of water molecules leading to the formation of OH, H, eaq, etc.; (2) OH attack on sugar molecules leading to strand breaks: (3) OH attack on bases; (4) direct ionization of the sugar molecules leading to strand breaks; (5) direct ionization of the bases. Our calculations predict significant clustering of damage both locally, over regions up to 40 bp and over regions extending to several kilobase pairs. A characteristic feature of the regional damage predicted by our model is the production of short fragments of DNA associated with multiple nearby strand breaks. The shapes of the spectra of DNA fragment lengths depend on the symmetries or approximate symmetries of the chromatin structure. Such fragments have subsequently been detected experimentally and are reported in an accompanying paper (B. Rydberg, Radiat, Res. 145, 200-209, 1996) after exposure to both high- and low-LET radiation. The overall measured yields agree well quantitatively with the theoretical predictions. Our theoretical results predict the existence of a strong peak at about 85 bp, which represents the revolution period about the nucleosome. Other peaks at multiples of about 1,000 bp correspond to the periodicity of the particular solenoid model of chromatin used in these calculations. Theoretical results in combination with experimental data on fragmentation spectra may help determine the consensus or average structure of the

  14. Generation and alteration of the defects induced by particle irradiation and electromagnetic radiation in alkali halogen compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nistor, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    Interactions between electron beams, CO 2 - laser radiation and alkali halogen compound have led to interesting results: 1. The development of two types of F-centre respectively in normal lattice or near the dislocations. 2. The beginning of metal colloids development process at low temperature when a thermal treatment is applied. 3. An experimental confirmation of the Pooley-Hersh model for crystal defects has been brought up. 4. The surface penetration is an explosive process. 5. Surface polygonizations were also investigated. A model has been proposed to describe the destructive channels development within alkali halogen crystals with molecular anions impurities of less than 10 ppm. KCl monocrystals of advanced purity level was prepared for building up passive optical components of strong CO 2 lasers. (author)

  15. Electronic relaxations of radiative defects of the anion sublattice in cesium bromide crystals and exoemission of electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Galyij, P V

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents the results of investigations of thermostimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) from CsBr crystal, excited by moderate doses (D <= 10 sup 4 Gy) of ultraviolet (h nu <= 7 eV) that selectively creates anion excitons and radiative defects in the anion sublattice. Having used the previously established connection between thermoactivated processes such as thermostimulated exoemission, electroconductivity, and luminescence in the irradiated crystal lattice, the concentrations of exoemission-active centers (EAC) and kinetics parameters of TSEE are calculated. The EAC concentration calculated on a base of the bulk, thermoactivated-recombinational, and band-gap Auger-like exoemission mechanisms, are in satisfactory agreement with the concentration of electron color centers in the irradiated crystals.

  16. Developments for radiation hard silicon detectors by defect engineering - results by the CERN RD48 (ROSE) Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstroem, G.; Ahmed, M.; Albergo, S.; Allport, P.; Anderson, D.; Andricek, L.; Angarano, M.M.; Augelli, V.; Bacchetta, N.; Bartalini, P.; Bates, R.; Biggeri, U.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Boemi, D.; Borchi, E.; Botila, T.; Brodbeck, T.J.; Bruzzi, M.; Budzynski, T.; Burger, P.; Campabadal, F.; Casse, G.; Catacchini, E.; Chilingarov, A.; Ciampolini, P.; Cindro, V.; Costa, M.J.; Creanza, D.; Clauws, P.; Da Via, C.; Davies, G.; De Boer, W.; Dell'Orso, R.; De Palma, M.; Dezillie, B.; Eremin, V.; Evrard, O.; Fallica, G.; Fanourakis, G.; Feick, H.; Focardi, E.; Fonseca, L.; Fretwurst, E.; Fuster, J.; Gabathuler, K.; Glaser, M.; Grabiec, P.; Grigoriev, E.; Hall, G.; Hanlon, M.; Hauler, F.; Heising, S.; Holmes-Siedle, A.; Horisberger, R.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Ilyashenko, I.; Ivanov, A.; Jones, B.K.; Jungermann, L.; Kaminsky, A.; Kohout, Z.; Kramberger, G.; Kuhnke, M.; Kwan, S.; Lemeilleur, F.; Leroy, C.; Letheren, M.; Li, Z.; Ligonzo, T.; Linhart, V.; Litovchenko, P.; Loukas, D.; Lozano, M.; Luczynski, Z.; Lutz, G.; MacEvoy, B.; Manolopoulos, S.; Markou, A.; Martinez, C.; Messineo, A.; Miku, M.; Moll, M.; Nossarzewska, E.; Ottaviani, G.; Oshea, V.; Parrini, G.; Passeri, D.; Petre, D.; Pickford, A.; Pintilie, I.; Pintilie, L.; Pospisil, S.; Potenza, R.; Radicci, V.; Raine, C.; Rafi, J.M.; Ratoff, P.N.; Richter, R.H.; Riedler, P.; Roe, S.; Roy, P.; Ruzin, A.; Ryazanov, A.I.; Santocchia, A.; Schiavulli, L.; Sicho, P.; Siotis, I.; Sloan, T.; Slysz, W.; Smith, K.; Solanky, M.; Sopko, B.; Stolze, K.; Sundby Avset, B.; Svensson, B.; Tivarus, C.; Tonelli, G.; Tricomi, A.; Tzamarias, S.; Valvo, G.; Vasilescu, A.; Vayaki, A.; Verbitskaya, E.; Verdini, P.; Vrba, V.; Watts, S.; Weber, E.R.; Wegrzecki, M.; Wegrzecka, I.; Weilhammer, P.; Wheadon, R.; Wilburn, C.; Wilhelm, I.; Wunstorf, R.; Wuestenfeld, J.; Wyss, J.; Zankel, K.; Zabierowski, P.; Zontar, D.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarises the final results obtained by the RD48 collaboration. The emphasis is on the more practical aspects directly relevant for LHC applications. The report is based on the comprehensive survey given in the 1999 status report (RD48 3rd Status Report, CERN/LHCC 2000-009, December 1999), a recent conference report (Lindstroem et al. (RD48), and some latest experimental results. Additional data have been reported in the last ROSE workshop (5th ROSE workshop, CERN, CERN/LEB 2000-005). A compilation of all RD48 internal reports and a full publication list can be found on the RD48 homepage (http://cern.ch/RD48/). The success of the oxygen enrichment of FZ-silicon as a highly powerful defect engineering technique and its optimisation with various commercial manufacturers are reported. The focus is on the changes of the effective doping concentration (depletion voltage). The RD48 model for the dependence of radiation effects on fluence, temperature and operational time is verified; projections to operational scenarios for main LHC experiments demonstrate vital benefits. Progress in the microscopic understanding of damage effects as well as the application of defect kinetics models and device modelling for the prediction of the macroscopic behaviour has also been achieved but will not be covered in detail

  17. Overview of radiation damage in silicon detectors - models and defect engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews recent work in the area of radiation damage in silicon detectors. It is not intended as a comprehensive review, but provides a snapshot guide to current ideas and indicates how the subject is expected to develop in the immediate future. (orig.)

  18. Investigation of single defects created in crystals by laser emission and hard radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynovich, E F; Dresvyanskiy, V P; Boychenko, S V; Rakevich, A L; Zilov, S A; Bagayev, S N

    2017-01-01

    The possibility of identifying radiation-created quantum systems via the characteristics of quantum trajectories of luminescence intensity measured on individual centers by confocal scanning fluorescence microscopy with the time-correlated single photon counting has been studied. Calculations of the quantum trajectories have been carried out by the density matrix method. Experimental studies have been carried out using a confocal microscope. (paper)

  19. Trapping of hydrogen isotopes in radiation defects formed in tungsten by neutron and ion irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Y., E-mail: hatano@ctg.u-toyama.ac.jp [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Shimada, M. [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Alimov, V.Kh.; Shi, J.; Hara, M.; Nozaki, T. [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Oya, Y.; Kobayashi, M.; Okuno, K. [Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Oda, T. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Cao, G. [Department of Engineering Physics, The University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Yoshida, N.; Futagami, N. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Sugiyama, K.; Roth, J.; Tyburska-Püschel, B.; Dorner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Takagi, I. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Hatakeyama, M.; Kurishita, H. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai 311-1313 (Japan); and others

    2013-07-15

    Retention of D in neutron-irradiated W and desorption were examined after plasma exposure at 773 K. Deuterium was accumulated at a relatively high concentration up to a large depth of 50–100 μm due to the trapping effects of defects uniformly induced in the bulk. A significant D release in a vacuum continued to temperatures ⩾1173 K because of the small effective diffusion coefficient and the long diffusion distance. Exposure of ion-irradiated W to D{sub 2} gas showed a clear correlation between concentrations of trapped and solute D as determined by the trapping–detrapping equilibrium. These observations indicated that the accumulation of tritium in high concentrations is possible even at high temperatures if the concentration of solute tritium is high, and baking at moderate temperatures is ineffective for removal of tritium deeply penetrating into the bulk. Nevertheless, clear enhancement of D release was observed under the presence of solute H.

  20. Allograft pretreatment for the repair of sciatic nerve defects: green tea polyphenols versus radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-hu Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pretreatment of nerve allografts by exposure to irradiation or green tea polyphenols can eliminate neuroimmunogenicity, inhibit early immunological rejection, encourage nerve regeneration and functional recovery, improve tissue preservation, and minimize postoperative infection. In the present study, we investigate which intervention achieves better results. We produced a 1.0 cm sciatic nerve defect in rats, and divided the rats into four treatment groups: autograft, fresh nerve allograft, green tea polyphenol-pretreated (1 mg/mL, 4°C nerve allograft, and irradiation-pretreated nerve allograft (26.39 Gy/min for 12 hours; total 19 kGy. The animals were observed, and sciatic nerve electrophysiology, histology, and transmission electron microscopy were carried out at 6 and 12 weeks after grafting. The circumference and structure of the transplanted nerve in rats that received autografts or green tea polyphenol-pretreated nerve allografts were similar to those of the host sciatic nerve. Compared with the groups that received fresh or irradiation-pretreated nerve allografts, motor nerve conduction velocity in the autograft and fresh nerve allograft groups was greater, more neurites grew into the allografts, Schwann cell proliferation was evident, and a large number of new blood vessels was observed; in addition, massive myelinated nerve fibers formed, and abundant microfilaments and microtubules were present in the axoplasm. Our findings indicate that nerve allografts pretreated by green tea polyphenols are equivalent to transplanting autologous nerves in the repair of sciatic nerve defects, and promote nerve regeneration. Pretreatment using green tea polyphenols is better than pretreatment with irradiation

  1. Long-persistent relaxation and frozen conductivity in Zn Se with radiation-induced defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blajcu, A.I.; Djuadi, D.; Casian, V.A.; Moseiciuc, G.S.; Nedeoglo, D.D.

    1993-01-01

    In an n-Zn Se crystals which have been preliminarily annealed in liquid Zn and then exposed to irradiation by a flow of electrons with an energy of E = 1.3 MeV and a dose of irradiation from 2.73 x 10 16 to 5.19 x 10 17 el/cm 2 , phenomena of a long-persistent conductivity relaxation (LCR) and frozen conduction (FC) at 77 K have been brought out and examined. It has been shown that the character of the relaxation processes at small doses of irradiation is rather well explained by the two-barrier model of an inhomogeneous semiconductor which represents a low-resistance matrix with high-resistance inclusions (clusters). As the dose of irradiation increases the overlapping of regions of space charge which surrounds the high-resistance inclusions increases and the considered model of high-resistance inclusions must be changed at D = 3 x 10 17 el/cm 2 into of a random potential relief. The temperature quenching of FC is explain in the assumption that, with the temperature increase, the drift and the recombination barriers decrease simultaneously as the result of variation of the sizes of space charge region surrounding the clusters. (Author)

  2. Optical properties of Ni2+ and radiation defects in MgF sub 2 and MnF sub 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerhelm, L. N.

    1980-03-01

    The radiation defects in pure MgF2 were made by observating the polarized absorption, luminescence, and excitation spectra in electron-irradiated MgF2. Additionally, studies of the absorption, emission, excitation, and temperature dependence of the lifetimes of transitions in nickel-doped MgF2 and MnF2 were accomplished, as well as the observation of radiation effects on these crystals. The absorption band at about 320 nm in irradiated MgF2 is identified to be due to the F2(D2b) center, and to have an emission at about 450 nm. Analysis of the temperature dependence of this band indicates a dominant phonon mode of 255 cm(-1) for the excited state. The F2(C1) center is identified with an absorption of about 360 nm and an emission of 410 nm. An absorption peak at 300 nm, for which no corresponding emission was found, is tentatively identified to be the F3-center, and to have a dominant phonon mode of 255 cm(-1). The temperature dependence of the lifetimes of transitions in nickel-doped MgF2 is analyzed by the quantum mechanical single configuration coordinate model of Struck and Fonger, and a complete configuration coordinate model is made for this crystal. Similar studies are made in MnF2:Ni.

  3. Formation of radiation-induced defects and their influence on tritium extraction from lithium silicates in out-of-pile experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramenkovs, A.A.; Tiliks, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Formation and properties of radiation-induced defects and radiolysis products in lithium silicates irradiated in nuclear reactor till absorbed doses 1000 MGy were studied. Radiation-induced defects (RD) and radiolysis products (RP) were qualitatively and quantitatively determinated by methods of chemical scavengers (MHS), electron-spin resonance (ESR) and optical spectroscopy. Colloidal silicon and lithium, lithium and silicon oxides, oxygen, silicon and lithium peroxides are the final products of the lithium silicates radiolysis at absorbed energy doses D abs = 1000 MGy. The concentration of radiation defects and products of radiolysis strongly depend on the temperature of irradiation, humidity, granural size. The thermostimulated extraction of tritiated water (95-98% of the released tritium is in chemical form of water) from lithium silicates ceramics proceeds according to two independent mechanisms: a) chemidesorption of surface localized tritiated water (the first order chemical reaction); b) formation of the tritium water molecules limited by triton diffusion to the near-surface layer of grains. It has been found that the concentration of radiation-induced defects considerably affects the tritium localization and releasing processes from lithium silicates. (orig.)

  4. Clusters of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation: Formation of short DNA fragments. I. Theoretical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holley, W.R.; Chatterjee, A.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a general theoretical model for the interaction of ionizing radiation with chromatin. Chromatin is modeled as a 30-nm-diameter solenoidal fiber composed of 20 turns of nucleosomes, 6 nucleosomes per turn. Charged-particle tracks are modeled by partitioning the energy deposition between primary track core, resulting from glancing collisions with 100 eV or less per event, and δ rays due to knock-on collisions involving energy transfers > 100 eV. A Monte Carlo simulation incorporates damages due to the following molecular mechanisms: (1) ionization of water molecules leading to the formation of circ OH, circ H, e aq , etc.; circ OH attack on sugar molecules leading to strand breaks; circ OH attack on bases; direct ionization of the sugar molecules leading to strand breaks; direct ionization of the bases. Our calculations predict significant clustering of damage both locally, over regions up to 40 hp and over regions extending to several kilobase pairs. A characteristic feature of the regional damage predicted by our model is the production of short fragments of DNA associated with multiple nearby strand breaks. Such fragments have subsequently been detected experimentally and are reported in an accompanying paper after exposure to both high- and low-LET radiation. The overall measured yields agree well quantitatively with the theoretical predictions. Our theoretical results predict the existence of a strong peak at about 85 bp, which represents the revolution period about the nucleosome. Other peaks at multiples of about 1,000 bp correspond to the periodicity of the particular solenoid model of chromatin used in these calculations. Theoretical results in combination with experimental data on fragmentation spectra may help determine the consensus or average structure of the chromatin fibers in mammalian DNA. 27 refs., 7 figs

  5. Computer stimulation of radiation-induced defects in metals irradiated with heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupchishin, A.A.; Kupchishin, A.I.; Shmygaleva, T.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In the work for account of defect concentration at ion irradiation the formula is proposed with use the modified cascade-probability function. It is necessary to find a real domain of result for account of cascade-probability functions (CPF) subject to losses of energy for ions depend upon a number of interactions. CPF first grows, achieving a maximum, then one decreases in the found region. The regularities of behavior of result region at change of a charge of flying particles are the following: 1. The increase of a charge z of a flying particle results in a displacement of result determination region to the left and narrowing it; 2. At the large value z, the maximum value of CPF displaces to the left as respects of h/λ already at small depths, and at the large depths the result is in a narrow region (less than 1 %, silver, gold); 3. The narrowest region of result arises at a large charge of flying particle and a target with small charge on the end of run and amounts to 100-th shares of percents

  6. Identification of explosives and drugs and inspection of material defects with THz radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cunlin; Mu, Kaijun; Jiang, Xue; Jiao, Yueying; Zhang, Liangliang; Zhou, Qingli; Zhang, Yan; Shen, Jingling; Zhao, Guoshong; Zhang, X.-C.

    2008-03-01

    We report the sensing of explosive materials and illicit drugs by using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and imaging. Several explosive materials, such as γ-HNIW, RDX, 2,4-DNT, TNT, Nitro-aniline, and illicit drugs, such as methamphetamine (MA) etc were researched here. Non-destructive testing, as one of the major applications of THz imaging, can be applied to an area of critical need: the testing of aerospace materials. Composite materials such as carbon fiber are widely used in this industry. The nature of their use requires technologies that are able to differentiate between safe and unsafe materials, due to either manufacturing tolerance or damage acquired while in use. In this paper, we discuss the applicability of terahertz (THz) imaging systems to this purpose, focusing on graphite fiber composite materials, carbon silicon composite materials and so on. We applied THz imaging technology to evaluate the fire damage to a variety of carbon fiber composite samples. Major carbon fiber materials have polarization-dependent reflectivity in THz frequency range, and we show how the polarization dependence changes versus the burned damage level. Additionally, time domain information acquired through a THz time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) system provides further information with which to characterize the damage. We also detect fuel tank insulation foam panel defects with pulse and continuous-wave (CW) terahertz system.

  7. Effect of gamma radiation on resting B lymphocytes. II. Functional characterization of the antigen-presentation defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashwell, J.D.; Jenkins, M.K.; Schwartz, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of radiation on three discrete Ag-presentation functions in resting B cells was examined: 1) Ag uptake and processing, 2) expression of processed Ag in the context of functional class II molecules, and 3) provision of necessary co-stimulatory, or second, signals. Analysis of radiation's effect on B cell presentation of intact vs fragmented Ag or its effect on presentation by Ag-pulsed B cells indicated that damage to Ag uptake and processing could not account for the bulk of the radiation-induced Ag-presentation defect. Experiments with phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis as an indirect measure of TCR occupancy suggested that irradiation caused a fairly rapid (within 1 to 2 h) decrease in the ability of the B cell APC to display a stimulatory combination of Ag and class II molecule. Ag dose-response analyses demonstrated that when presenting a fragment of the Ag pigeon cytochrome c to a T cell clone, 3000 rad-treated B cell APC were able to stimulate approximately 50% as much phosphatidylinositol turnover as unirradiated B cells. It was also found that, in contrast to their inability to initiate T cell proliferation, and similarly to chemically cross-linked splenocytes, heavily irradiated resting B cells plus Ag induced a state of Ag hyporesponsiveness in T cell clones. This effect on T cells had the same Ag- and MHC-specificity as did receptor occupancy required for proliferation, indicating that heavily irradiated resting B cells bear functional class II molecules. Co-culture of T cells with allogeneic B cells and syngeneic heavily irradiated B cells or chemically cross-linked splenic APC plus Ag resulted in T cell proliferation and interfered with the induction of the hyporesponsive state. This co-stimulatory function was radiosensitive in resting allogeneic B cells

  8. Preferential repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage in the transcribed strand of an active human gene is defective in Cockayne syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leadon, S.A.; Copper, P.K.

    1993-01-01

    Cells from patients with Cockayne syndrome (CS), which are sensitive to killing by UV although overall damage removal appears normal, are specifically defective in repair of UV damage in actively transcribe genes. Because several CS strains display cross-sensitivity to killing by ionizing radiation, the authors examined whether ionizing radiation-induced damage in active genes is preferentially repaired by normal cells and whether the radiosensitivity of CS cells can be explained by a defect in this process. They found that ionizing radiation-induced damage was repaired more rapidly in the transcriptionally active metallothionein IIA (MTIIA) gene than in the inactive MTIIB gene or in the genome overall in normal cells as a result of faster repair on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Cells of the radiosensitive CS strain CS1AN are completely defective in this strand-selective repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage, although their overall repair rate appears normal. CS3BE cells, which are intermediate in radiosensitivity, do exhibit more rapid repair of the transcribed strand but at a reduced rate compared to normal cells. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A cells, which are hypersensitive to UV light because of a defect in the nucleotide excision repair pathway but do not show increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation, preferentially repair ionizing radiation-induced damage on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Thus, the ability to rapidly repair ionizing radiation-induced damage in actively transcribing genes correlates with cell survival. The results extend the generality of preferential repair in active genes to include damage other than bulky lesions

  9. Optical Properties of Nickel(ii) and Radiation Defects in Magnesium-Fluoride and Manganese-Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerhelm, Leonard Norman

    1980-12-01

    Scope and Method of Study. A study has been made of the radiation defects in pure MgF(,2) by observating the polarized absorption, luminescence, and excitation spectra in electron-irradiated MgF(,2). Additionally, studies of the absorption, emission, excitation, and temperature dependence of the lifetimes of transitions in nickel-doped MgF(,2) and MnF(,2) have been accomplished, as well as the observation of radiation effects on these crystals. Findings and Conclusions. The absorption band at about 320 nm in irradiated MgF(,2) is identified to be due to the F(,2)(D(,2h)) center, and to have an emission at about 450 nm. Analysis of the temperature dependence of this band indicates a dominant phonon mode of 255 cm(' -1) for the excited state. The F(,2)(C(,1)) center is identified with an absorption of about 360 nm and an emission of 410 nm. An absorption peak at 300 nm, for which no corresponding emission has been found, is tentatively identified to be the F(,3)-center, and to have a dominant phonon mode of 255 cm('-1). The temperature dependence of the lifetimes of transitions in nickel-doped MgF(,2) have been analyzed by the quantum mechanical single configuration coordinate model of Struck and Fonger, and a complete configuration coordinate model has been made for this crystal. Similar studies have been made in MnF(,2):Ni, but energy transfer between Mn('2+) ions and Ni('2+) ions prevents completion of the complete model. Energy transfer in this crystal was studied, with the finding that a gain of about 2 in luminescence output was possible for excitation in the visible region (400-600 nm) as compared with MgF(,2):Ni. The effects of radiation upon the Ni('2+) transitions in these crystals were studied with the finding that no observable change occurred in the Ni('2+) transitions with radiation, although other radiation effects were noted in the crystal.

  10. Impurity-related point defects and gamma-radiation response of massive quartz from the Borborema pegmatite province, in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Milena Ribas de; Gonzaga, Raysa Sthefany Gomes; Guzzo, Pedro Luiz; Barreto, Sandra de Brito; Melgarejo, Joan Carles

    2012-01-01

    This work has investigated the changes induced by γ-radiation on impurity-related point defects in massive rose quartz from one deposit located at The Borborema Pegmatite Province (Northeast Region, in Brazil). Samples extracted from rose and colorless (milky) quartz blocks were irradiated with doses of 60 Co, from 0.5 to 96 kGy. Point defects related to Al, Ge, Li and OH were measured by optical, infrared, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, prior and after irradiation. The contents of Al, Li, Ge, Fe, Ti and other impurities were measured by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry in quartz fragments exhibiting rose, pale-rose, and milky colorations. It was found that [AlO 4 ] 0 , [AlO 4 /H] 0 and [GeO 4 /Li] 0 were generated by the dissociation of [AlO 4 /Li] 0 and [Li-OH] centers with doses as lower as 0.5 kGy. Above 8 kGy, the electron paramagnetic resonance signal related to [GeO 4 /Li] 0 decreases due to the intense mobility of Li species throughout the quartz lattice, giving rise to E' 1 centers perturbed by Ge. The increase in [AlO 4 ] 0 content with γ doses and the consequent rise in the intensity of smoky color were similar for both rose and colorless quartz. Scanning electron microscopy carried out in insoluble residues obtained after chemical dissolution of each type of quartz revealed the presence of nanometric fibers only in rose specimens. These results suggested that the cause of rose color in massive quartz from Borborema Pegmatite Province is probably related to the presence of dumortierite inclusions. (author)

  11. Lung Cancer Cell Line Screen Links Fanconi Anemia/BRCA Pathway Defects to Increased Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qi; Ghosh, Priyanjali; Magpayo, Nicole; Testa, Mauro; Tang, Shikui; Gheorghiu, Liliana; Biggs, Peter; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Held, Kathryn D.; Willers, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Growing knowledge of genomic heterogeneity in cancer, especially when it results in altered DNA damage responses, requires re-examination of the generic relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 of protons. Methods and Materials: For determination of cellular radiosensitivity, we irradiated 17 lung cancer cell lines at the mid-spread-out Bragg peak of a clinical proton beam (linear energy transfer, 2.5 keV/μm). For comparison, 250-kVp X rays and 137 Cs γ-rays were used. To estimate the RBE of protons relative to 60 Co (Co60eq), we assigned an RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.1 to X rays to correct the physical dose measured. Standard DNA repair foci assays were used to monitor damage responses. FANCD2 was depleted using RNA interference. Results: Five lung cancer cell lines (29.4%) exhibited reduced clonogenic survival after proton irradiation compared with X-irradiation with the same physical doses. This was confirmed in a 3-dimensional sphere assay. Corresponding proton RBE(Co60Eq) estimates were statistically significantly different from 1.1 (P≤.05): 1.31 to 1.77 (for a survival fraction of 0.5). In 3 of these lines, increased RBE was correlated with alterations in the Fanconi anemia (FA)/BRCA pathway of DNA repair. In Calu-6 cells, the data pointed toward an FA pathway defect, leading to a previously unreported persistence of proton-induced RAD51 foci. The FA/BRCA-defective cells displayed a 25% increase in the size of subnuclear 53BP1 foci 18 hours after proton irradiation. Conclusions: Our cell line screen has revealed variations in proton RBE that are partly due to FA/BRCA pathway defects, suggesting that the use of a generic RBE for cancers should be revisited. We propose that functional biomarkers, such as size of residual 53BP1 foci, may be used to identify cancers with increased sensitivity to proton radiation

  12. Lung Cancer Cell Line Screen Links Fanconi Anemia/BRCA Pathway Defects to Increased Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qi; Ghosh, Priyanjali; Magpayo, Nicole [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Testa, Mauro; Tang, Shikui [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gheorghiu, Liliana [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Biggs, Peter; Paganetti, Harald [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A. [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lu, Hsiao-Ming [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Held, Kathryn D. [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Willers, Henning, E-mail: hwillers@mgh.harvard.edu [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: Growing knowledge of genomic heterogeneity in cancer, especially when it results in altered DNA damage responses, requires re-examination of the generic relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 of protons. Methods and Materials: For determination of cellular radiosensitivity, we irradiated 17 lung cancer cell lines at the mid-spread-out Bragg peak of a clinical proton beam (linear energy transfer, 2.5 keV/μm). For comparison, 250-kVp X rays and {sup 137}Cs γ-rays were used. To estimate the RBE of protons relative to {sup 60}Co (Co60eq), we assigned an RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.1 to X rays to correct the physical dose measured. Standard DNA repair foci assays were used to monitor damage responses. FANCD2 was depleted using RNA interference. Results: Five lung cancer cell lines (29.4%) exhibited reduced clonogenic survival after proton irradiation compared with X-irradiation with the same physical doses. This was confirmed in a 3-dimensional sphere assay. Corresponding proton RBE(Co60Eq) estimates were statistically significantly different from 1.1 (P≤.05): 1.31 to 1.77 (for a survival fraction of 0.5). In 3 of these lines, increased RBE was correlated with alterations in the Fanconi anemia (FA)/BRCA pathway of DNA repair. In Calu-6 cells, the data pointed toward an FA pathway defect, leading to a previously unreported persistence of proton-induced RAD51 foci. The FA/BRCA-defective cells displayed a 25% increase in the size of subnuclear 53BP1 foci 18 hours after proton irradiation. Conclusions: Our cell line screen has revealed variations in proton RBE that are partly due to FA/BRCA pathway defects, suggesting that the use of a generic RBE for cancers should be revisited. We propose that functional biomarkers, such as size of residual 53BP1 foci, may be used to identify cancers with increased sensitivity to proton radiation.

  13. Research and application of fuzzy subtractive clustering model on tensile strength of radiation vulcanization for nitrile-butadiene rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Duwen; Wang Hong; Zhu Nankang

    2010-01-01

    By use of fuzzy subtractive clustering model, the relationship between tensile strength of radiation vulcanization of NBRL (Nitrile-butadiene rubber latex) and irradiation parameters have been investigated. The correlation coefficient was calculated to be 0.8222 in the comparison of experimental data to the predicted data. It was obvious that fuzzy model identification method is not only high precision with small computation, but also easy to be used. It can directly supply the evolution of tensile strength of NBR by fuzzy modeling method in radiation vulcanization process for nitrile-butadiene rubber. (authors)

  14. Production and stability of radiation-induced defects in MgAl2O4 under electronic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Seki, S.; Shiiyama, K.; Matsumura, S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the formation process of radiation-induced defects in magnesium aluminate spinel and their stability using transmission electron microscopy, with emphasis on the effects of electronic excitation. Small interstitial-type dislocation loops disappeared under electron-induced electronic excitation. The elimination rate of the loops was found to be one order higher than for α-alumina. The disappearance of dislocation loops by a dissociation mechanism into isolated interstitials is discussed through analysis of the growth-and-shrink process of the loops. HARECXS analysis on cross section specimens irradiated with 350 MeV Au ions has shown the progress of cation disordering along ion tracks to be a function of electronic stopping power, (dE/dx) e . Cations were found to exchange their sites toward a random configuration. Such disordering appears from (dE/dx) e = 10 keV/nm, and increases in size with increasing (dE/dx) e to reach nearly 10 nm in diameter at 30 keV/nm, under an assumption of a fully disordered configuration

  15. Calculations of radiation defect formation cross sections in reactor materials in (n,p) and (n,α) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupchishin, A.A.; Kupchishin, A.I.; Omarbekova, Zh.

    2001-01-01

    In the work an experimental data analysis by integral σ(E 1 ) and differential [dσ(E 1 ,E 2 )]/dE 2 neutron interaction cross sections with reactor materials with the secondary protons and alpha particles generation as well as with the primarily knock-on atoms production in such reactions are carried out. It is shown, that in the (n,p) and (n',α) reactions the recoil nuclei receive essential energy portion and they are the patriarchs for atom-atom cascades in the substance. Nuclear reactions with formation of the secondary α-particles and and recoil nuclei are considered. It is shown, that these reactions are effectively proceeding within neutrons energy range 0.3-15 MeV. The nuclear reactions kinematics of above mentioned processes is studied. Energy conservation law for these reaction is applied. Deferential cross section conservation and transformation law for radiation defect formation in the (n,α) reaction are considered as well

  16. Optical studies of defects produced by radiation in LiF:Mg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranieri, Izilda Marcia

    1979-01-01

    Lithium fluoride crystals doped with magnesium were grown from the melt by the Czochralski's method. Using the fact that the presence of Mg enhances the production of F and M color centers, the relative concentration of Mg was determined by a method devised in this work, This method utilizes the optical density of color centers in irradiated samples where the dose rate is proportional to the rate of formation of these centers. The dynamical equilibrium between F and M centers was studies after X-Rays radiation damage. Thermal treatments at 1000 K and quenches to 77 K, previously to the irradiation, showed that one can dissociate impurity aggregates formed when the crystal was grown. This dissociation implies in a decrease of the formation rate of F and M centers. It was found that isolated Mg impurities trap F centers to form Z centers. In the aggregate form, Mg impurities trap interstitial ions that are produced by the irradiation and that are the anti-centers of the F center. By this mechanism F and its anti-centers are thermally stabilized. It was observed that stoking the crystals at room temperature and well protected from the light show an increase in the M center production with a corresponding decrease in the F center production. This is because periods such as 20 hours are enough to perturb the thermodynamical equilibrium between F and M centers obtained just after the irradiation. To determine the stability of these color centers under light of different wavelengths, optical exposures were used. It was found that M center band is stable under its own wavelength's irradiation at room temperature and does not show dichroism. It was determined that the rate of formation of F and M centers at 343 and 403 K, follows the same behavior at room temperature. An Arrhenius study was made to determine the activation energies of these processes and produced 0,12 eV and 0,24 eV for the F and M centers respectively. Studies of fluorescence were also made after X and t

  17. Fundamental radiation effects in αAg-Zn alloys: Zener relaxation, study of the mobility of point defects and the evolution of their populations in a particle flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbwachs, Michel.

    1977-01-01

    After a recall on the physical effects of radiations, a model used to describe the defect populations produced in a fast particle flux is presented. The experimental devices used and the measurements carried out on a solid solution of αAg-Zn are described. The results obtained in an electron flux are compared with the forecastings of the theoretical models. The mobility and the apparent recombination radius of vacancies and autointerstitials, the absorption efficiency of dislocations in regard to point defects and the participation of autointerstitials to short-range order are studied. A similar study carried out under neutron irradiation is reported. The influence of neutron doses and temperature on atomic mobility is investigated. An experiment carried out under gamma photon irradiation enables a comparison to be made between the creation of defects by gamma photons and electrons [fr

  18. Nucleation of voids and other irradiation-produced defect aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedersich, H.; Katz, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    The nucleation of defect clusters in crystalline solids from radiation-produced defects is different from the usual nucleation processes in one important aspect: the condensing defects, interstitial atoms and vacancies, can mutually annihilate and are thus similar to matter and antimatter. The nucleation process is described as the simultaneous reaction of vacancies and interstitials (and gas atoms if present) with embryos of all sizes. The reaction rates for acquisition of point defects (and gas atoms) are calculated from their respective jump frequencies and concentrations in the supersaturated system. The reaction rates for emission of point defects are derived from the free energies of the defect clusters in the thermodynamic equilibrium system, i.e., the system without excess point defects. This procedure differs from that used in conventional nucleation theory and permits the inclusion of the ''antimatter'' defect into the set of reaction-rate equations in a straightforward manner. The method is applied to steady-state nucleation, during irradiation, of both dislocation loops and voids in the absence and in the presence of immobile and mobile gas. The predictions of the nucleation theory are shown to be in qualitative agreement with experimental observations, e.g., void densities increase with increasing displacement rates; gases such as helium enhance void nucleation; at low displacement rates and at high temperatures the presence of gas is essential to void formation. For quantitative predictions, the theory must be extended to include the termination of nucleation

  19. Radiation-Induced Defects in Kaolinite as Tracers of Past Occurrence of Radionuclides in a Natural Analogue of High Level Nuclear Waste Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, T.; Fourdrin, C.; Calas, G.

    2007-05-01

    Understanding the processes controlling migrations of radioelements at the Earth's surface is an important issue for the long-term safety assessment of high level nuclear waste repositories (HLNWR). Evidence of past occurrence and transfer of radionuclides can be found using radiation-induced defects in minerals. Clay minerals are particularly relevant because of their widespread occurrence at the Earth's surface and their finely divided nature which provides high contact area with radioactive fluids. Owing to its sensitivity to radiations, kaolinite can be used as natural, in situ dosimeter. Kaolinite is known to contain radiation-induced defects which are detected by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. They are differentiated by their nature, their production kinetics and their thermal stability. One of these defects is stable at the scale of geological periods and provides a record of past radionuclide occurrence. Based on artificial irradiations, a methodology has been subsequently proposed to determine paleodose cumulated by kaolinite since its formation. The paleodose can be used to derive equivalent radioelement concentrations, provided that the age of kaolinite formation can be constrained. This allows quantitative reconstruction of past transfers of radioelements in natural systems. An example is given for the Nopal I U-deposit (Chihuahua, Mexico), hosted in hydrothermally altered volcanic tufs and considered as analogue of the Yucca Mountain site. The paleodoses experienced by kaolinites were determined from the concentration of defects and dosimetry parameters of experimental irradiations. Using few geochemical assumption, a equivalent U-content responsible for defects in kaolinite was calculated from the paleodose, a dose rate balance and model ages of kaolinites constrained by tectonic phases. In a former study, the ages were assumptions derived from regional tectonic events. In thepresent study, ages of mineralization events are measured from U

  20. Cluster-cluster clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, J.; Dekel, A.; Efstathiou, G.; Frenk, C.S.; Yale Univ., New Haven, CT; California Univ., Santa Barbara; Cambridge Univ., England; Sussex Univ., Brighton, England)

    1985-01-01

    The cluster correlation function xi sub c(r) is compared with the particle correlation function, xi(r) in cosmological N-body simulations with a wide range of initial conditions. The experiments include scale-free initial conditions, pancake models with a coherence length in the initial density field, and hybrid models. Three N-body techniques and two cluster-finding algorithms are used. In scale-free models with white noise initial conditions, xi sub c and xi are essentially identical. In scale-free models with more power on large scales, it is found that the amplitude of xi sub c increases with cluster richness; in this case the clusters give a biased estimate of the particle correlations. In the pancake and hybrid models (with n = 0 or 1), xi sub c is steeper than xi, but the cluster correlation length exceeds that of the points by less than a factor of 2, independent of cluster richness. Thus the high amplitude of xi sub c found in studies of rich clusters of galaxies is inconsistent with white noise and pancake models and may indicate a primordial fluctuation spectrum with substantial power on large scales. 30 references

  1. Application of pulsed multi-ion irradiations in radiation damage research: A stochastic cluster dynamics simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Tuan L.; Nazarov, Roman; Kang, Changwoo; Fan, Jiangyuan

    2018-07-01

    Under the multi-ion irradiation conditions present in accelerated material-testing facilities or fission/fusion nuclear reactors, the combined effects of atomic displacements with radiation products may induce complex synergies in the structural materials. However, limited access to multi-ion irradiation facilities and the lack of computational models capable of simulating the evolution of complex defects and their synergies make it difficult to understand the actual physical processes taking place in the materials under these extreme conditions. In this paper, we propose the application of pulsed single/dual-beam irradiation as replacements for the expensive steady triple-beam irradiation to study radiation damages in materials under multi-ion irradiation.

  2. Effect of thermal treatment on the density of radiation-induced defects in dielectrics and on the semiconductor surface of silicon MDS structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daliev, Kh.S.; Lebedev, A.A.; Ehkke, V.; 3425000DD)

    1987-01-01

    Isochronous annealing of radiation defects formed under MIS structure irradiation by γ-quanta at the presence of shift stress on a metal electrode is studied. Complex measurements of non-stationary capacitance spectroscopy and volt-farad characteristics (VFC) have shown that a built-in charge and volumetric states (VS) of the dielectric are annealed at 250 deg C, fast surface states (SS) - at 350 deg C, and the characteristic radiation defect in the Si-SiO 2 transition layer is completely annealed only at 400 deg C. Additional VS and SS occurring in the structures at positive shift on the metal electrode under radiation are annealed at 120 deg C, the kinetics of defect annealing at higher temperatures is independent from shift polarity. SS density calculated by VFC is determined in reality by recharging not only SS but some VS of the dielectric in the range of width of the order of 3.5 nm from the surface of the semiconductor

  3. Formation mechanism of solute clusters under neutron irradiation in ferritic model alloys and in a reactor pressure vessel steel: clusters of defects; Mecanismes de fragilisation sous irradiation aux neutrons d'alliages modeles ferritiques et d'un acier de cuve: amas de defauts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meslin-Chiffon, E

    2007-11-15

    The embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under irradiation is partly due to the formation of point defects (PD) and solute clusters. The aim of this work was to gain more insight into the formation mechanisms of solute clusters in low copper ([Cu] = 0.1 wt%) FeCu and FeCuMnNi model alloys, in a copper free FeMnNi model alloy and in a low copper French RPV steel (16MND5). These materials were neutron-irradiated around 300 C in a test reactor. Solute clusters were characterized by tomographic atom probe whereas PD clusters were simulated with a rate theory numerical code calibrated under cascade damage conditions using transmission electron microscopy analysis. The confrontation between experiments and simulation reveals that a heterogeneous irradiation-induced solute precipitation/segregation probably occurs on PD clusters. (author)

  4. Clustering and segregation of small vacancy clusters near tungsten (0 0 1) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Guohua; Li, Xiangyan; Xu, Yichun; Zhang, Yange; Jiang, Yan; Hao, Congyu; Liu, C. S.; Fang, Q. F.; Chen, Jun-Ling; Luo, G.-N.; Wang, Zhiguang

    2018-01-01

    Nanoporous metals have been shown to exhibit radiation-tolerance due to the trapping of the defects by the surface. However, the behavior of vacancy clusters near the surface is not clear which involves the competition between the self-trapping and segregation of small vacancy clusters (Vn) nearby the surface. In this study, we investigated the energetic and kinetic properties of small vacancy clusters near tungsten (0 0 1) surface by combining molecular statics (MS) calculations and object Kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations. Results show that vacancies could be clustered with the reduced formation energy and migration energy of the single vacancy around a cluster as the respective energetic and kinetic driving forces. The small cluster has a migration energy barrier comparable to that for the single vacancy; the migration energy barriers for V1-5 and V7 are 1.80, 1.94, 2.17, 2.78, 3.12 and 3.11 eV, respectively. Clusters and become unstable near surface (0 0 1) and tend to dissociate into the surface. At the operation temperature of 1000 K, the single vacancy, V2, 2 V 3 V3 and V4 were observed to segregate to the surface within a time of one hour. Meanwhile, larger clusters survived near the surface, which could serve as nucleating center for voids near the surface. Our results suggest that under a low radiation dose, surface (0 0 1) could act as a sink for small vacancy clusters, alleviating defect accumulation in the material under a low radiation dose. We also obtained several empirical expressions for the vacancy cluster formation energy, binding energy, and trapping radius as a function of the number of vacancies in the cluster.

  5. Multi-Cluster Network on a Chip Reconfigurable Radiation Hardened Radio, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Phase-I research is to architect, model and simulate a multi-cluster Network on a Chip (NoC) reconfigurable Radio in SystemC RTL, with...

  6. Monitoring and assessment of radiation exposure from routine radioactive discharges, and its relevance to the question of disease clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    Over the period of more than 30 years in which nuclear facilities have been operating, monitoring of the environment around such facilities has produced a wealth of information about the levels of radioactivity in the environment and about how radioactivity, introduced into the environment from effluent discharges, behaves in natural systems. Techniques for estimating radiation exposure to people from environmental measurements, or from theoretical models relating discharges to radiation exposure, have also been developed and validated where possible. The existence of localised excesses of leukaemia near the reprocessing plants at Sellafield and Dounreay, which cannot be explained on the basis of radiation exposure using these established methodologies, could be taken to imply that the methodologies are defective. However the radiation risk estimates have been shown to be robust to many of the suggested deficiencies and there are other, more qualitative, indications that discharges may not be a causative factor. It is argued that a broader search for possible causative factors may be more productive in resolving the conundrum. (author)

  7. New aspects on the contribution of primary defects in silicon due to long-time degradation of detectors operating in high fields of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazanu, Sorina; Lazanu, Ionel

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Silicon detectors will represent an important option for the next generation of experiments in high energy physics, for astroparticle and nuclear experiments, where the requirements to operate long time in high radiation environments will represent a major problem. After the long-time operation in high radiation fields, the bulk displacement damage produces the following effects at the device level: increase of the leakage current, decrease of the satisfactory Signal/Noise ratio, increase of the effective carrier concentration, and thus of the depletion voltage, decrease of the charge collection efficiency up to unacceptable levels. In this contribution we investigate the new perspective in understanding the fundamental phenomena in silicon and implications for the degradation of the characteristics of detectors given by the consideration of the existence of the new primary defect: fourfold coordinated defect, Si FFCD , with a lower value of the formation energy by comparison with the 'classically' known vacancies and interstitials. Predicted by Goedecker and co-workers, its characteristics were indirectly determined by Lazanu and Lazanu. The correlation between the rate of generation of primary defects, material composition and observable effects is investigated considering different growth technologies and resistivities (up to tens of kΩcm) as time and fluence dependencies. This allows to estimate the expected behaviour of the materials and detectors in concrete environments at the next generations of high energy physics experiments as SLHC or VLHC for example. This new defect could represent the elementary block for new extended defects and in principle it could generate local amorphization of the semiconductor. Its existence and characteristics in other semiconductors is also investigated. (author)

  8. In situ probing of the evolution of irradiation-induced defects in copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, N.; Hattar, K.; Misra, A.

    2013-01-01

    Through in situ Cu 3+ ion irradiation at room temperature in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), we have investigated the evolution of defect clusters as a function of the radiation dose at different distances from the 3 {1 1 2} incoherent twin boundary (ITB) in Cu. Post in situ ion irradiation, high resolution TEM was used to explore the types of defects, which are composed of a high-density of vacancy stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) and sparsely distributed interstitial Frank loops. During irradiation, defect clusters evolve through four stages: (i) incubation, (ii) non-interaction, (iii) interaction and (iv) saturation; and the corresponding density was observed to initially increase with irradiation dose and then approach saturation. No obvious denuded zone is observed along the 3 {1 1 2} ITB and the configuration of defects at the boundary displays as truncated SFTs. Several defect evolution models have been proposed to explain the observed phenomena

  9. Time and temperature dependence of cascade induced defect production in in situ experiments and computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, Shiori

    1993-01-01

    Understanding of the defect production and annihilation processes in a cascade is important in modelling of radiation damage for establishing irradiation correlation. In situ observation of heavy ion radiation damage has a great prospect in this respect. Time and temperature dependence of formation and annihilation of vacancy clusters in a cascade with a time resolution of 30 ms has been studied with a facility which comprises a heavy ion accelerator and an electron microscope. Formation and annihilation rates of defect clusters have been separately measured by this technique. The observed processes have been analysed by simple kinetic equations, taking into account the sink effect of surface and the defect clusters themselves together with the annihilation process due to thermal emission of vacancies from the defect clusters. Another tool to study time and temperature dependence of defect production in a cascade is computer simulation. Recent results of molecular dynamics calculations on the temperature dependence of cascade evolution are presented, including directional and temperature dependence of the lengths of replacement collision sequences, temperature dependence of the process to reach thermal equilibrium and so on. These results are discussed under general time frame of radiation damage evolution covering from 10 -15 to 10 9 s, and several important issues for the general understanding have been identified. (orig.)

  10. Non-random intrachromosomal distribution of radiation-induced chromatid aberrations in Vicia faba. [Aberration clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, I; Rieger, R [Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Gatersleben. Zentralinst. fuer Genetik und Kulturpflanzenforschung

    1976-04-01

    A reconstructed karyotype of Vicia faba, with all chromosomes individually distinguishable, was treated with X-rays, fast neutrons, (/sup 3/H) uridine (/sup 3/HU). The distribution within metaphase chromosomes of induced chromatid aberrations was non-random for all agents used. Aberration clustering, in part agent specific, occurred in chromosome segments containing heterochromatin as defined by the presence of G bands. The pattern of aberration clustering found after treatment with /sup 3/HU did not allow the recognition of chromosome regions active in transcription during treatment. Furthermore, it was impossible to obtain unambiguous indications of the presence of AT- and GC-base clusters from the patterns of /sup 3/HT- and /sup 3/HC-induced chromatid aberrations, respectively. Possible reasons underlying these observations are discussed.

  11. Radiation-Induced Chemical Dynamics in Ar Clusters Exposed to Strong X-Ray Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Yoshiaki; Jurek, Zoltan; Xu, Weiqing; Fukuzawa, Hironobu; Motomura, Koji; Iablonskyi, Denys; Nagaya, Kiyonobu; Wada, Shin-ichi; Mondal, Subhendu; Tachibana, Tetsuya; Ito, Yuta; Sakai, Tsukasa; Matsunami, Kenji; Nishiyama, Toshiyuki; Umemoto, Takayuki; Nicolas, Christophe; Miron, Catalin; Togashi, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kanade; Owada, Shigeki; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Son, Sang-Kil; Ziaja, Beata; Santra, Robin; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2018-06-01

    We show that electron and ion spectroscopy reveals the details of the oligomer formation in Ar clusters exposed to an x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) pulse, i.e., chemical dynamics triggered by x rays. With guidance from a dedicated molecular dynamics simulation tool, we find that van der Waals bonding, the oligomer formation mechanism, and charge transfer among the cluster constituents significantly affect ionization dynamics induced by an XFEL pulse of moderate fluence. Our results clearly demonstrate that XFEL pulses can be used not only to "damage and destroy" molecular assemblies but also to modify and transform their molecular structure. The accuracy of the predictions obtained makes it possible to apply the cluster spectroscopy, in connection with the respective simulations, for estimation of the XFEL pulse fluence in the fluence regime below single-atom multiple-photon absorption, which is hardly accessible with other diagnostic tools.

  12. Hot HB Stars in Globular Clusters: Physical Parameters and Consequences for Theory. 5; Radiative Levitation Versus Helium Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehler, S.; Sweigart, A. V.; Landsman, W. B.; Heber, U.

    2000-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters (T(sub eff), log g), masses and helium abundances are derived for 42 hot horizontal branch (HB) stars in the globular cluster NGC6752. For 19 stars we derive magnesium and iron abundances as well and find that iron is enriched by a factor of 50 on average with respect to the cluster abundance whereas the magnesium abundances are consistent with the cluster abundance. Radiation pressure may levitate heavy elements like iron to the surface of the star in a diffusive process. Taking into account the enrichment of heavy elements in our spectroscopic analyses we find that high iron abundances can explain part, but not all, of the problem of anomalously low gravities along the blue HB. The blue HB stars cooler than about 15,100 K and the sdB stars (T(sub eff) greater than or = 20,000 K) agree well with canonical theory when analysed with metal-rich ([M/H] = +0.5) model atmospheres, but the stars in between these two groups remain offset towards lower gravities and masses. Deep Mixing in the red giant progenitor phase is discussed as another mechanism that may influence the position of the blue HB stars in the (T(sub eff), log g)-plane but not their masses.

  13. Compton scattering of microwave background radiation by gas in galaxy clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, R.J.; Rephaeli, Y.

    1978-01-01

    Based on data on the X-ray spectrum of the Coma cluster, interpreted as thermal bremsstrahlung, the expected brightness depletion from Compton scattering of the microwave background in the direction of the cluster is computed. The calculated depletion is about one-third that recently observed by Gull and Northover, and the discrepancy is discussed. In comparing the observed microwave depletion in the direction of other clusters which are X-ray sources it is found that there is no correlation with the cluster X-ray luminosity, while a dependence proportional to L/sub x//sup 1/2/ is expected. Consequently, the microwave depletion observations cannot yet be taken as good evidence for a thermal bremsstrahlung origin for the X-ray emission. The perturbation from Compton scattering of photons on the high-frequency (Wien) tail of the blackbody distribution is computed and found to be much larger than predicted in previous calculations. In the Wien tail the effect is a relative increase in the blackbody intensity that is appreciably greater in magnitude than the depletion in the Rayleigh-Jeans domain

  14. Effect of radiation induced defects and incompatibility elastic stresses on the diffusion of ion implantated boron in silicon at the pulse annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stel'makh, V.F.; Suprun-Belevich, Yu.R.; Chelyadinskij, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    For determination of radiation defects effect on diffusion of the implanted boron in silicon at the pulse annealing, silicon crystals, implanted with boron, preliminary irradiated by silicon ions of different flows for checked defects implantation, were investigated. Silicon crystals additionally implanted by Ge + ions were investigated to research the effect of the incompatibility elastic stresses, emerging in implanted structures due to lattice periods noncoincidence in matrix and alloyed layers, on implanted boron diffusion. It is shown, that abnormally high values of boron diffusion coefficients in silicon at the pulse annealing are explained by silicon interstitial atom participation in redistribution of diffusing boron atoms by two diffusion channels - interstitial and vacation - and by incompatibility elastic stresses effect on diffusion

  15. Role of 3d-ions for radiation defect production in MgO and MgAl2O4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mironova, N.A.; Grinvald, G.A.; Skvortsova, V.N.

    1985-01-01

    Optical properties of MgO and MgAl 2 O 4 crystals containing chromium and manganese impurity ions were studied by exposure to but all types of radiation. Complicated defects of the ''impurity-intrinsic matrix defect'' type were preferably considered. It has been shown that different symmetry center forming chromium ions in MgO:Crsup(3+) change their valency with various efficiency being exposed to external action. Besides, the compensating vacancy does not participate in the hole center formation. For MgOxAl 2 O 3 single crystals the presence of octahedrally coordinated manganese ions suppresses the hole center creation by gamma-irradiation. Studying luminescence spectra of Crsup(3+) ions in MgAl 2 O 4 it has been states that neutron irradiation increases the degree of inversion for the magnesium-aluminium spinel

  16. Annealing of the Sb-vacancy and a closely related radiation induced defect in n-type germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Abraham W.; Auret, F. D.; Meyer, W. E.

    2018-04-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy was used to study the defects induced by alpha-particle irradiation from an Am241 source in antimony doped n-type germanium. Previous investigations of the well know Sb-vacancy defect have led to the discovery of a second defect with very similar emission properties, referred to as the E‧. Although both defects have similar emission rates, they have very different annealing properties. In this study we further investigated these properties of the E‧ in Sb doped samples irradiated at 270 K with alpha particles from an Am241 source. Laplace deep level transient spectroscopy was used to determine the concentration of each defect. An isothermal annealing study of the E‧ was carried out in the temperature range 300 K to 325 K in 5 K increments, while the Sb-vacancy was annealed out completely at 410 K onwards, long after the E‧ was completely annealed out. The annealing activation energy was determined through isothermal annealing profiles for both the Sb-Vacancy and the E‧ as 1.05 eV and 0.73 eV respectively with a prefactor of 2.05 × 109 s-1 and 2.7 × 108 s-1.

  17. α/β-particle radiation identification based on fuzzy C-means clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yijianxia; Yang Lu; Li Wenqiang

    2013-01-01

    A pulse shape recognition method based on fuzzy C-means clustering for the discrimination of α/βparticle was presented. A detection circuit to isolate α/β-particles is designed. Using a single probe scintillating detector to acquire α/β particles. By comparing the results to pulse amplitude analysis, it is shown that by Fuzzy C-means clustering α-particle count rate increased by 42.9% and the cross-talk ratio of α-β is decreased by 15.9% for 6190 cps 0420 αsource; β-particle count rate increased by 31.8% and the cross -talk ratio of β-α is decreased by 7.7% for 05-05β source. (authors)

  18. Defects in dilute nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.M.; Buyanova, I.A.; Tu, C.W.; Yonezu, H.

    2005-01-01

    We provide a brief review our recent results from optically detected magnetic resonance studies of grown-in non-radiative defects in dilute nitrides, i.e. Ga(In)NAs and Ga(Al,In)NP. Defect complexes involving intrinsic defects such as As Ga antisites and Ga i self interstitials were positively identified.Effects of growth conditions, chemical compositions and post-growth treatments on formation of the defects are closely examined. These grown-in defects are shown to play an important role in non-radiative carrier recombination and thus in degrading optical quality of the alloys, harmful to performance of potential optoelectronic and photonic devices based on these dilute nitrides. (author)

  19. Defect kinetics in novel detector materials

    CERN Document Server

    MacEvoy, B C

    2000-01-01

    Silicon particle detectors will be used extensively in experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, where unprecedented particle fluences will cause significant atomic displacement damage. We present a model of the evolution of defect concentrations and consequent electrical behaviour in "novel" detector materials with various oxygen and carbon impurity concentrations. The divacancy-oxygen (V/sub 2/O) defect is identified as the cause of changes in device characteristics during /sup 60/Co gamma irradiation. In the case of hadron irradiation changes in detector doping concentration (N/sub eff/) are dominated by cluster defects, in particular the divacancy (V/sub 2/), which exchange charge directly via a non-Shockley-Read- Hall mechanism. The V/sub 2/O defect also contributes to Ne/sub eff/. This defect is more copiously produced during 24 GeV/c proton irradiation than during 1 MeV neutron irradiation on account of the higher vacancy introduction rate, hence the radiation hardness of materials is more sensiti...

  20. Theory of differential and integral scattering of laser radiation by a dielectric surface taking a defect layer into account

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azarova, VV; Dmitriev, VG; Lokhov, YN; Malitskii, KN

    The differential and integral light scattering by dielectric surfaces is studied theoretically taking a thin nearsurface defect layer into account. The expressions for the intensities of differential and total integral scattering are found by the Green function method. Conditions are found under

  1. Reliable Radiation Hybrid Maps: An Efficient Scalable Clustering-based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    The process of mapping markers from radiation hybrid mapping (RHM) experiments is equivalent to the traveling salesman problem and, thereby, has combinatorial complexity. As an additional problem, experiments typically result in some unreliable markers that reduce the overall quality of the map. We ...

  2. Study of radiation defects by in-situ measurements of the Hall effect in narrow-gap semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favre, J.

    1990-01-01

    Semiconducting compounds of II-VI, III-V and IV-VI groups were irradiated in liquid hydrogen by high energy (0.7 to 2.7 MeV) electrons. The Hall coefficient and resistivity variations were measured in situ during irradiation. The doping by irradiation induced defects is of p-type in III-V group compounds, while n-type doping occurs in II-VI and IV-VI group materials. A semiconductor to insulator or reverse transition was observed under irradiation when the chemical potential crossed the band edges. In IV-VI group compounds the two successive transitions take place in initially p-type samples. A metastable behaviour, characteristic to strong compensation, appears in the vicinity of those semiconductor - insulator transitions in IV-VI compounds. The slope of free carrier concentration vs. fluence variation was analyzed. It was compared to defect creation rates, calculated in the framework of a cascade model. The charge state of created defects was deduced in this way. - In IV-VI group compounds, the presence of localized levels degenerated with the conduction band and, in PbTe, of additional defect associated levels in the forbidden gap, was demonstrated. Those results are consistent with the saturation of electron concentration increase at high fluence as well as with the analysis of annealing experiments. - In Hg 1-x Cd x Te compounds, the analysis of electron concentration versus fluence increase indicates that only mercury Frenkel pairs are electrically active. The variation with cadmium content of the defect associated level energy was deduced from the saturation values of the electron concentration [fr

  3. Studies of defects and defect agglomerates by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Singh, B.N.

    1997-01-01

    A brief introduction to positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), and in particular lo its use for defect studies in metals is given. Positrons injected into a metal may become trapped in defects such as vacancies, vacancy clusters, voids, bubbles and dislocations and subsequently annihilate from...... the trapped state iri the defect. The annihilation characteristics (e.g., the lifetime of the positron) can be measured and provide information about the nature of the defect (e.g., size, density, morphology). The technique is sensitive to both defect size (in the range from monovacancies up to cavities...

  4. Determination of ionization energies of small silicon clusters with vacuum?ultraviolet (VUV) radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostko, Oleg; Leone, Stephen R.; Duncan, Michael A.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2009-09-23

    In this work we report on single photon vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of small silicon clusters (n=1-7) produced via laser ablation of Si. The adiabatic ionization energies (AIE) are extracted from experimental photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves with the help of Frank?Condon simulations, used to interpret the shape and onset of the PIE curves. The obtained AIEs are (all energies are in eV): Si (8.13+-0.05), Si2 (7.92+-0.05), Si3 (8.12+-0.05), Si4 (8.2+-0.1), Si5 (7.96+-0.07), Si6 (7.8+-0.1), and Si7 (7.8+-0.1). Most of the experimental AIE values are in good agreement with ab initio electronic structure calculations. To explain observed deviations between the experimental and theoretical AIEs for Si4 and Si6, a theoretical search of different isomers of these species is performed. Electronic structure calculations aid in the interpretation of the a2PIu state of Si2+ dimer in the PIE spectrum. Time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations are performed to reveal the energies of electronically excited states in the cations for a number of Si clusters.

  5. Low Concentration of Exogenous Carbon Monoxide Modulates Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect in Mammalian Cell Cluster Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqing Wu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available During radiotherapy procedures, radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE can potentially lead to genetic hazards to normal tissues surrounding the targeted regions. Previous studies showed that RIBE intensities in cell cluster models were much higher than those in monolayer cultured cell models. On the other hand, low-concentration carbon monoxide (CO was previously shown to exert biological functions via binding to the heme domain of proteins and then modulating various signaling pathways. In relation, our previous studies showed that exogenous CO generated by the CO releasing molecule, tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (CORM-2, at a relatively low concentration (20 µM, effectively attenuated the formation of RIBE-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB and micronucleus (MN. In the present work, we further investigated the capability of a low concentration of exogenous CO (CORM-2 of attenuating or inhibiting RIBE in a mixed-cell cluster model. Our results showed that CO (CORM-2 with a low concentration of 30 µM could effectively suppress RIBE-induced DSB (p53 binding protein 1, p53BP1, MN formation and cell proliferation in bystander cells but not irradiated cells via modulating the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS andcyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2. The results can help mitigate RIBE-induced hazards during radiotherapy procedures.

  6. Dependence of displacement fields on the damage cluster nucleus geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigor'ev, A.N.; Zabela, A.G.; Nikolajchuk, L.I.; Prokhorenko, E.M.; Khizhnyak, N.A.

    1988-01-01

    Displacement fields in doped crystals of cubic and hexagonal structures containing extended defects are studied. The numerical results are presented depending on the damage cluster nucleus geometry. All calculations are based on analytical representations of displacement fields in an integral form using elasticity theory equations. The investigation results are vital for radiation physics as they permit to predict and calculate both the character and geometry of distortions near damaged region cluster and determine cluster parameters on the basis of the known structure of distortions. Dependences are obtained for the following monocrystals: Mg, ZnO, CdS, W, Au. 6 refs.; 3 figs

  7. Study by electronic structure calculations of the radiation damage in the UO2 nuclear fuel: behaviour of the point defects and fission gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vathonne, Emerson

    2014-01-01

    Uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) is worldwide the most widely used fuel in nuclear plants in the world and in particular in pressurized water reactors (PWR). In-pile the fission of uranium nuclei creates fission products and point defects in the fuel. The understanding of the evolution of these radiation damages requires a multi-scale modelling approach of the nuclear fuel, from the scale of the pellet to the atomic scale. We used an electronic structure calculation method based on the density functional theory (DFT) to model radiation damage in UO 2 at the atomic scale. A Hubbard-type Coulomb interaction term is added to the standard DFT formalism to take into account the strong correlations of the 5f electrons in UO 2 . This method is used to study point defects with various charge states and the incorporation and diffusion of krypton in uranium dioxide. This study allowed us to obtain essential data for higher scale models but also to interpret experimental results. In parallel of this study, three ways to improve the state of the art of electronic structure calculations of UO 2 have been explored: the consideration of the spin-orbit coupling neglected in current point defect calculations, the application of functionals allowing one to take into account the non-local interactions such as van der Waals interactions important for rare gases and the use of the Dynamical Mean Field Theory combined to the DFT method in order to take into account the dynamical effects in the 5f electron correlations. (author) [fr

  8. Features of transformation of impurity-defect complexes in СdTe:Сl under the influence of microwave radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budzulyak S. I.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available High-resistance cadmium telluride single crystals are promising material for production of ionizing radiation detectors. To increase crystal resistance, they are doped with chlorine. The detector quality depends on uniformity of chlorine impurity distribution over crystal. It is known that low-dose microwave irradiation can homogenize impurity distribution in a specimen. In the present work, we made an attempt to improve the detector material quality by using such post-technological treatment, as well as to study state variation for impurity-defect complexes. To this end, the effect of microwave irradiation on transformation of impurity-defect complexes in CdTe:Cl single crystals was investigated using low-temperature photoluminescence. It is shown that activation of ClTe donor centers by microwave irradiation for 10 s and presence of VCd acceptor centers in the specimens under investigation effectively facilitate formation of (VNd–ClTe defect centers at which excitons are bound. Detailed investigations of the band form for donor-acceptor pairs (DAPs in CdTe:Cl single crystals made it possible to determine the Huang—Rhys factor (that characterizes electron-phonon interaction in CdTe:Cl DAPs as a function of microwave treatment duration. It is shown for single crystals with NCl = 5·1017 cm–3 and 5·1019 cm–3 that the Huang—Rhys factor grows with microwave irradiation dose. This is related to both homogenization of donor and acceptor centers distribution and increase of donor—acceptor spacing. It is shown that microwave irradiation of CdTe:Cl single crystals results in concentration reduction for separate cadmium vacancies VCd because of formation of (VNd—ClTe defect centers at which excitons are bound.

  9. Positronic probe of vacancy defects on surfaces of Au nanoparticles embedded in MgO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Jun; Moxom, J.; Somieski, B.; White, C. W.; Mills, A. P.; Suzuki, R.; Ishibashi, S.

    2001-01-01

    Clusters of four atomic vacancies were found in Au nanoparticle-embedded MgO by positron lifetime spectroscopy [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 4586 (1999)]. These clusters were also suggested to locate at the surface of Au nanoparticles by one-detector measurements of Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation. In this work we provide evidence, using two-detector coincidence experiments of Doppler broadening (2D-DBAR), to clarify that these vacancy clusters reside on the surfaces of Au nanoparticles. This work also demonstrates a method for identifying defects at nanomaterials interfaces: a combination of both positron lifetime spectroscopy, which tells the type of the defects, and 2D-DBAR measurements, which reveals chemical environment of the defects

  10. Positronic probe of vacancy defects on surfaces of Au nanoparticles embedded in MgO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Moxom, J.; Somieski, B.; White, C. W.; Mills, A. P., Jr.; Suzuki, R.; Ishibashi, S.

    2001-09-01

    Clusters of four atomic vacancies were found in Au nanoparticle-embedded MgO by positron lifetime spectroscopy [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 4586 (1999)]. These clusters were also suggested to locate at the surface of Au nanoparticles by one-detector measurements of Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation. In this work we provide evidence, using two-detector coincidence experiments of Doppler broadening (2D-DBAR), to clarify that these vacancy clusters reside on the surfaces of Au nanoparticles. This work also demonstrates a method for identifying defects at nanomaterials interfaces: a combination of both positron lifetime spectroscopy, which tells the type of the defects, and 2D-DBAR measurements, which reveals chemical environment of the defects.

  11. Defective thymine dimer excision in radiation-sensitive mutants rad10 and rad16 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, L [Rochester Univ., N.Y. (USA). School of Medicine and Dentistry

    1977-04-01

    Two rad mutants of yeast, rad10 and rad16, are shown to be defective in the removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers since DNAs obtained from irradiated cells following a post-irradiation incubation in the dark still retain UV-endonuclease-sensitive sites. Both rad10 and rad16 mutants are in the same pathway of excision-repair as the rad1, rad2, rad3, and rad4 mutants.

  12. Role of Defects in Swelling and Creep of Irradiated SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szlufarska, Izabela [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Voyles, Paul [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-01-16

    Silicon carbide is a promising cladding material because of its high strength and relatively good corrosion resistance. However, SiC is brittle and therefore SiC-based components need to be carefully designed to avoid cracking and failure by fracture. In design of SiC-based composites for nuclear reactor applications it is essential to take into account how mechanical properties are affected by radiation and temperature, or in other words, what strains and stresses develop in this material due to environmental conditions. While thermal strains in SiC can be predicted using classical theories, radiation-induced strains are much less understood. In particular, it is critical to correctly account for radiation swelling and radiation creep, which contribute significantly to dimensional instability of SiC under radiation. Swelling typically increases logarithmically with radiation dose and saturates at relatively low doses (damage levels of a few dpa). Consequently, swelling-induced stresses are likely to develop within a few months of operation of a reactor. Radiation-induced volume swelling in SiC can be as high as 2%, which is significantly higher than the cracking strain of 0.1% in SiC. Swelling-induced strains will lead to enormous stresses and fracture, unless these stresses can be relaxed via some other mechanism. An effective way to achieve stress relaxation is via radiation creep. Although it has been hypothesized that both radiation swelling and radiation creep are driven by formation of defect clusters, existing models for swelling and creep in SiC are limited by the lack of understanding of specific defects that form due to radiation in the range of temperatures relevant to fuel cladding in light water reactors (LWRs) (<1000°C). For example, defects that can be detected with traditional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques account only for 10-45% of the swelling measured in irradiated SiC. Here, we have undertaken an integrated experimental and

  13. Role of Defects in Swelling and Creep of Irradiated SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Voyles, Paul; Sridharan, Kumar; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-01-01

    Silicon carbide is a promising cladding material because of its high strength and relatively good corrosion resistance. However, SiC is brittle and therefore SiC-based components need to be carefully designed to avoid cracking and failure by fracture. In design of SiC-based composites for nuclear reactor applications it is essential to take into account how mechanical properties are affected by radiation and temperature, or in other words, what strains and stresses develop in this material due to environmental conditions. While thermal strains in SiC can be predicted using classical theories, radiation-induced strains are much less understood. In particular, it is critical to correctly account for radiation swelling and radiation creep, which contribute significantly to dimensional instability of SiC under radiation. Swelling typically increases logarithmically with radiation dose and saturates at relatively low doses (damage levels of a few dpa). Consequently, swelling-induced stresses are likely to develop within a few months of operation of a reactor. Radiation-induced volume swelling in SiC can be as high as 2%, which is significantly higher than the cracking strain of 0.1% in SiC. Swelling-induced strains will lead to enormous stresses and fracture, unless these stresses can be relaxed via some other mechanism. An effective way to achieve stress relaxation is via radiation creep. Although it has been hypothesized that both radiation swelling and radiation creep are driven by formation of defect clusters, existing models for swelling and creep in SiC are limited by the lack of understanding of specific defects that form due to radiation in the range of temperatures relevant to fuel cladding in light water reactors (LWRs) (<1000°C). For example, defects that can be detected with traditional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques account only for 10-45% of the swelling measured in irradiated SiC. Here, we have undertaken an integrated experimental and

  14. Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of ... in the United States is born with a birth defect. A birth defect may affect how the ...

  15. Expression of blood serum proteins and lymphocyte differentiation clusters after chronic occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybkina, Valentina L.; Azizova, Tamara V.; Adamova, Galina V.; Teplyakova, Olga V.; Osovets, Sergey V.; Bannikova, Maria V. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute, Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region (Russian Federation); Scherthan, Harry; Meineke, Viktor; Doerr, Harald [University of Ulm, Bundeswehr Institute of Radiobiology, Munich (Germany); Zurochka, Alexander V. [Immunology Institute, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    This study aimed to assess effects of chronic occupational exposure on immune status in Mayak workers chronically exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). The study cohort consists of 77 workers occupationally exposed to external gamma-rays at total dose from 0.5 to 3.0 Gy (14 individuals) and workers with combined exposure (external gamma-rays at total dose range 0.7-5.1 Gy and internal alpha-radiation from incorporated plutonium with a body burden of 0.3-16.4 kBq). The control group consists of 43 age- and sex-matched individuals who never were exposed to IR, never involved in any cleanup operations following radiation accidents and never resided at contaminated areas. Enzyme-linked immunoassay and flow cytometry were used to determine the relative concentration of lymphocytes and proteins. The concentrations of T-lymphocytes, interleukin-8 and immunoglobulins G were decreased in external gamma-exposed workers relative to control. Relative concentrations of NKT-lymphocytes, concentrations of transforming growth factor-β, interferon gamma, immunoglobulins A, immunoglobulins M and matrix proteinase-9 were higher in this group as compared with control. Relative concentrations of T-lymphocytes and concentration of interleukin-8 were decreased, while both the relative and absolute concentration of natural killers, concentration of immunoglobulins A and M and matrix proteinase-9 were increased in workers with combined exposure as compared to control. An inverse linear relation was revealed between absolute concentration of T-lymphocytes, relative and absolute concentration of T-helpers cells, concentration of interferon gamma and total absorbed dose from external gamma-rays in exposed workers. For workers with incorporated plutonium, there was an inverse linear relation of absolute concentration of T-helpers as well as direct linear relation of relative concentration of NKT-lymphocytes to total absorbed red bone marrow dose from internal alpha-radiation. In all, chronic

  16. Expression of blood serum proteins and lymphocyte differentiation clusters after chronic occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybkina, Valentina L.; Azizova, Tamara V.; Adamova, Galina V.; Teplyakova, Olga V.; Osovets, Sergey V.; Bannikova, Maria V.; Scherthan, Harry; Meineke, Viktor; Doerr, Harald; Zurochka, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess effects of chronic occupational exposure on immune status in Mayak workers chronically exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). The study cohort consists of 77 workers occupationally exposed to external gamma-rays at total dose from 0.5 to 3.0 Gy (14 individuals) and workers with combined exposure (external gamma-rays at total dose range 0.7-5.1 Gy and internal alpha-radiation from incorporated plutonium with a body burden of 0.3-16.4 kBq). The control group consists of 43 age- and sex-matched individuals who never were exposed to IR, never involved in any cleanup operations following radiation accidents and never resided at contaminated areas. Enzyme-linked immunoassay and flow cytometry were used to determine the relative concentration of lymphocytes and proteins. The concentrations of T-lymphocytes, interleukin-8 and immunoglobulins G were decreased in external gamma-exposed workers relative to control. Relative concentrations of NKT-lymphocytes, concentrations of transforming growth factor-β, interferon gamma, immunoglobulins A, immunoglobulins M and matrix proteinase-9 were higher in this group as compared with control. Relative concentrations of T-lymphocytes and concentration of interleukin-8 were decreased, while both the relative and absolute concentration of natural killers, concentration of immunoglobulins A and M and matrix proteinase-9 were increased in workers with combined exposure as compared to control. An inverse linear relation was revealed between absolute concentration of T-lymphocytes, relative and absolute concentration of T-helpers cells, concentration of interferon gamma and total absorbed dose from external gamma-rays in exposed workers. For workers with incorporated plutonium, there was an inverse linear relation of absolute concentration of T-helpers as well as direct linear relation of relative concentration of NKT-lymphocytes to total absorbed red bone marrow dose from internal alpha-radiation. In all, chronic

  17. Estimating the risks of cancer mortality and genetic defects resulting from exposures to low levels of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhl, T.E.; Hansen, W.R.

    1984-05-01

    Estimators for calculating the risk of cancer and genetic disorders induced by exposure to ionizing radiation have been recommended by the US National Academy of Sciences Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations, the UN Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and the International Committee on Radiological Protection. These groups have also considered the risks of somatic effects other than cancer. The US National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements has discussed risk estimate procedures for radiation-induced health effects. The recommendations of these national and international advisory committees are summarized and compared in this report. Based on this review, two procedures for risk estimation are presented for use in radiological assessments performed by the US Department of Energy under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). In the first procedure, age- and sex-averaged risk estimators calculated with US average demographic statistics would be used with estimates of radiation dose to calculate the projected risk of cancer and genetic disorders that would result from the operation being reviewed under NEPA. If more site-specific risk estimators are needed, and the demographic information is available, a second procedure is described that would involve direct calculation of the risk estimators using recommended risk-rate factors. The computer program REPCAL has been written to perform this calculation and is described in this report. 25 references, 16 tables

  18. Estimating the risks of cancer mortality and genetic defects resulting from exposures to low levels of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhl, T.E.; Hansen, W.R.

    1984-05-01

    Estimators for calculating the risk of cancer and genetic disorders induced by exposure to ionizing radiation have been recommended by the US National Academy of Sciences Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations, the UN Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and the International Committee on Radiological Protection. These groups have also considered the risks of somatic effects other than cancer. The US National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements has discussed risk estimate procedures for radiation-induced health effects. The recommendations of these national and international advisory committees are summarized and compared in this report. Based on this review, two procedures for risk estimation are presented for use in radiological assessments performed by the US Department of Energy under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). In the first procedure, age- and sex-averaged risk estimators calculated with US average demographic statistics would be used with estimates of radiation dose to calculate the projected risk of cancer and genetic disorders that would result from the operation being reviewed under NEPA. If more site-specific risk estimators are needed, and the demographic information is available, a second procedure is described that would involve direct calculation of the risk estimators using recommended risk-rate factors. The computer program REPCAL has been written to perform this calculation and is described in this report. 25 references, 16 tables.

  19. The comparison of gamma-radiation and electrical stress influences on oxide and interface defects in power VDMOSFET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorić-Veljković Snežana M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of oxide and interface defects in n-channel power vertical double-diffused metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors, firstly degraded by the gamma-irradiation and electric field and subsequently recovered and annealed, is presented. By analyzing the transfer characteristic shifts, the changes of threshold voltage and underlying changes of gate oxide and interface trap densities during the stress (recovery, annealing of investigated devices, it is shown that these two types of stress influence differently on the gate oxide and the SiO2-Si interface. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI171026

  20. Reactions of mixed silver-gold cluster cations AgmAun+ (m+n=4,5,6) with CO: Radiative association kinetics and density functional theory computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumaier, Marco; Weigend, Florian; Hampe, Oliver; Kappes, Manfred M.

    2006-01-01

    Near thermal energy reactive collisions of small mixed metal cluster cations Ag m Au n + (m+n=4, 5, and 6) with carbon monoxide have been studied in the room temperature Penning trap of a Fourier transform ion-cyclotron-resonance mass spectrometer as a function of cluster size and composition. The tetrameric species AgAu 3 + and Ag 2 Au 2 + are found to react dissociatively by way of Au or Ag atom loss, respectively, to form the cluster carbonyl AgAu 2 CO + . In contrast, measurements on a selection of pentamers and hexamers show that CO is added with absolute rate constants that decrease with increasing silver content. Experimentally determined absolute rate constants for CO adsorption were analyzed using the radiative association kinetics model to obtain cluster cation-CO binding energies ranging from 0.77 to 1.09 eV. High-level ab initio density functional theory (DFT) computations identifying the lowest-energy cluster isomers and the respective CO adsorption energies are in good agreement with the experimental findings clearly showing that CO binds in a ''head-on'' fashion to a gold atom in the mixed clusters. DFT exploration of reaction pathways in the case of Ag 2 Au 2 + suggests that exoergicities are high enough to access the minimum energy products for all reactive clusters probed

  1. Reactions of mixed silver-gold cluster cations AgmAun+ (m+n=4,5,6) with CO: Radiative association kinetics and density functional theory computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumaier, Marco; Weigend, Florian; Hampe, Oliver; Kappes, Manfred M.

    2006-09-01

    Near thermal energy reactive collisions of small mixed metal cluster cations AgmAun+ (m +n=4, 5, and 6) with carbon monoxide have been studied in the room temperature Penning trap of a Fourier transform ion-cyclotron-resonance mass spectrometer as a function of cluster size and composition. The tetrameric species AgAu3+ and Ag2Au2+ are found to react dissociatively by way of Au or Ag atom loss, respectively, to form the cluster carbonyl AgAu2CO+. In contrast, measurements on a selection of pentamers and hexamers show that CO is added with absolute rate constants that decrease with increasing silver content. Experimentally determined absolute rate constants for CO adsorption were analyzed using the radiative association kinetics model to obtain cluster cation-CO binding energies ranging from 0.77to1.09eV. High-level ab initio density functional theory (DFT) computations identifying the lowest-energy cluster isomers and the respective CO adsorption energies are in good agreement with the experimental findings clearly showing that CO binds in a "head-on" fashion to a gold atom in the mixed clusters. DFT exploration of reaction pathways in the case of Ag2Au2+ suggests that exoergicities are high enough to access the minimum energy products for all reactive clusters probed.

  2. Evolution of the radiation-induced defect structure in 316 type stainless steel after post-irradiation annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Renterghem, W., E-mail: wvrenter@sckcen.be; Konstantinović, M.J., E-mail: mkonstan@sckcen.be; Vankeerberghen, M., E-mail: mvankeer@sckcen.be

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • TEM study of irradiated CW316 steel after post-irradiation annealing. • Frank loops were removed after annealing at 550 °C, by unfaulting and growing. • The cavity density decreases after annealing at 550 °C, but not completely removed. • Frank loop and cavity removal is controlled by the annealing temperature. • The dissolution of γ' precipitates is controlled by the iron diffusion length. - Abstract: The thermal stability of Frank loops, black dots, cavities and γ′ precipitates in an irradiated 316 stainless steel was studied by transmission electron microscopy. The samples were retrieved from a thimble tube irradiated at around 320 °C up to 80 dpa in a commercial nuclear power reactor, and thermally annealed, varying both annealing temperature and time. With increasing annealing temperature the density of all defects gradually decreased, resulting in the complete removal of Frank loops at 550 °C. In contrast to other defects, the density of the γ′ precipitates sharply decreased with increasing annealing time, which indicates that the dissolution of the γ′ precipitates is governed by the iron diffusion length.

  3. Clinical application of radiation sterilized demineralized freeze dried bone allograft (DFDBA) and DFDBA combined with bovine periosteum membrane in periodontal defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tantin R Dwijartini; Paramita Pandansari; Basril Abbas; Nazly Hilmy

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The objective of this report is to evaluate the effects of Radiation Sterilized Demineralized Freeze Dried Bone Allograft (DFDBA) and DFDBA combined with Bovine Periosteum Membrane (BPM) as well as BPM only in some cases of Periodontal Defects. BPM was used as a guided tissue regeneration. This study was carried out to 26 patients as follows : 10 cases for periodontal pocket using only DFDBA and DFDBA combined with BPM for 16 cases which consist of 10 cases of post extraction socket, 5 cases of gingival recession and one case of maxillary bone defect. DFDBA and periosteum membrane used were produced by BATAN Research Tissue Bank. Flap operation was done for all of the treatments, and followed by filling with DFDBA and/or DFDBA combined with periosteum membrane or BPM only. Evaluations were done up to 6 months. Parameters observed were the improvement of bone level, clinical attachment level, pocket depth and gingival margin location as well as increasing the thickness of maxillary bone. All of those evaluations were done by clinical observation and x-ray examination. Results obtained show that the improvement of clinical attachment level, reduces the pocket depth and increases bone density happened in all cases observed. It was also shows that BPM can be used as a guided tissue regeneration. No rejection could be observed in all of those cases. This study clearly indicated that DFDBA had an inductive effect on the formation of new bone and connective tissue. It can be concluded that DFDBA and Bovine Periosteum Membrane are promising to be used in treatment of the case of Periodontal Defects. (Author)

  4. The Effect of Radiation "Memory" in Alkali-Halide Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korovkin, M. V.; Sal'nikov, V. N.

    2017-01-01

    The exposure of the alkali-halide crystals to ionizing radiation leads to the destruction of their structure, the emergence of radiation defects, and the formation of the electron and hole color centers. Destruction of the color centers upon heating is accompanied by the crystal bleaching, luminescence, and radio-frequency electromagnetic emission (REME). After complete thermal bleaching of the crystal, radiation defects are not completely annealed, as the electrons and holes released from the color centers by heating leave charged and locally uncompensated defects. Clusters of these "pre centers" lead to electric microheterogeneity of the crystal, the formation of a quasi-electret state, and the emergence of micro-discharges accompanied by radio emission. The generation of REME associated with residual defectiveness, is a manifestation of the effect of radiation "memory" in dielectrics.

  5. Defect modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norgett, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Calculations, drawing principally on developments at AERE Harwell, of the relaxation about lattice defects are reviewed with emphasis on the techniques required for such calculations. The principles of defect modelling are outlined and various programs developed for defect simulations are discussed. Particular calculations for metals, ionic crystals and oxides, are considered. (UK)

  6. Birth defects in Norway by levels of external and food-based exposure to radiation from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lie, R.T.; Irgens, L.M.; Skjaerven, R.; Reitan, J.B.; Strand, P.; Strand, T.

    1992-01-01

    In Norway, external doses of radiation resulting from fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear accident were estimated from detailed measurements, including soil deposition patterns. Internal doses were estimated from measurements of radioactive cesium in meat and milk supplies. The doses were calculated as average monthly doses for each of 454 municipalities during 36 consecutive months after the accident in spring 1986. Prospectively collected data on all newborns listed in the Medical Birth Registry of Norway who were conceived in the period May 1983-April 1989 were used to assess possible dose-response relations between estimated external and food-based exposures and congenital malformations and some other conditions. A positive association was observed between total radiation dose (external plus food-based) and hydrocephaly, while a negative association was observed for Down's syndrome. However, an important conclusion of the study was that no associations were found for conditions previously reported to be associated with radiation, i.e., small head circumference, congenital cataracts, anencephaly, spina bifida, and low birth weight. Potential sources of bias, including exposure misclassification and incomplete ascertainment of cases, are discussed

  7. Electrical Characterization of Defects Created by γ-Radiation in HfO2-Based MIS Structures for RRAM Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, H.; González, M. B.; Mallol, M. M.; Castán, H.; Dueñas, S.; Campabadal, F.; Acero, M. C.; Sambuco Salomone, L.; Faigón, A.

    2018-04-01

    The γ-radiation effects on the electrical characteristics of metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors based on HfO2, and on the resistive switching characteristics of the structures have been studied. The HfO2 was grown directly on silicon substrates by atomic layer deposition. Some of the capacitors were submitted to a γ ray irradiation using three different doses (16 kGy, 96 kGy and 386 kGy). We studied the electrical characteristics in the pristine state of the capacitors. The radiation increased the interfacial state densities at the insulator/semiconductor interface, and the slow traps inside the insulator near the interface. However, the leakage current is not increased by the irradiation, and the conduction mechanism is Poole-Frenkel for all the samples. The switching characteristics were also studied, and no significant differences were obtained in the performance of the devices after having been irradiated, indicating that the fabricated capacitors present good radiation hardness for its use as a RS element.

  8. Disc defect classification for optical disc drives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helvoirt, van J.; Leenknegt, G.A.L.; Steinbuch, M.; Goossens, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    Optical disc drives are subject to various disturbances and faults. A special type of fault is the so-called disc defect. In this paper we present an approach for disc defect classification. It is based on hierarchical clustering of measured signals that are affected by disc defects. The

  9. Electrical resistivity and dechanneling study of radiation defects in iron by 235U fission fragments (F.F.). I - Study of damage induced by F.F. Irradiation at 20K. II - Recovery of radiation defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzelli, Nicole.

    1979-09-01

    The irradiation by 235 U fission fragments (F.F.) of two iron samples of different purities (the essential impurity being C) have been studied. Comparative measurements of electrical resistivity and dechanneling of 5 MeV α-particles have been made during irradiation and subsequent recovery. The production curves provide, from their slopes at the origin, the following informations: 14000 Frenkel pairs by F.F. (from electrical resistivity); aggregate's rate: 5 per mille (from dechanneling). These curves do not follow a simple law: it seems that one observes the superposition of two saturation mechanisms with very different kinetics. During recovery, the same stages that after electrons or neutrons irradiation are observed, but with very different proportions. Dechanneling puts in evidence: -great modifications in cementite precipitation of an Fe-C alloy, by irradiation; - the recovery stage of loops starting from 800 K and with an activation energy approximately 1 eV; - the preponderant effect of clustering during stages Isub(D), Isub(E), IIsub(C) and IIsub(D) [fr

  10. Brome isotope selective control of CF3Br molecule clustering by IR laser radiation in gas-dynamic expansion of CF3Br - Ar mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apatin, V. M.; Lokhman, V. N.; Makarov, G. N.; Ogurok, N.-D. D.; Ryabov, E. A.

    2018-02-01

    We report the results of research on the experimental control of CF3Br molecule clustering under gas-dynamic expansion of the CF3Br - Ar mixture at a nozzle exit by using IR laser radiation. A cw CO2 laser is used for exciting molecules and clusters in the beam and a time-of-flight mass-spectrometer with laser UV ionisation of particles for their detection. The parameters of the gas above the nozzle are determined (compositions and pressure) at which intensive molecule clustering occurs. It is found that in the case of the CF3Br gas without carrier when the pressure P0 above the nozzle does not exceed 4 atm, molecular clusters actually are not generated in the beam. If the gas mixture of CF3Br with argon is used at a pressure ratio 1 : N, where N >= 3, and the total pressure above the nozzle is P0 >= 2 atm, then there occurs molecule clustering. We study the dependences of the efficiency of suppressing the molecule clustering on parameters of the exciting pulse, gas parameters above the nozzle, and on a distance of the molecule irradiation zone from the nozzle exit section. It is shown that in the case of resonant vibrational excitation of gas-dynamically cooled CF3Br molecules at the nozzle exit one can realise isotope-selective suppression of molecule clustering with respect to bromine isotopes. With the CF3Br - Ar mixtures having the pressure ratio 1 : 3 and 1 : 15, the enrichment factors obtained with respect to bromine isotopes are kenr ≈ 1.05 ± 0.005 and kenr ≈ 1.06 ± 0.007, respectively, under jet irradiation by laser emission in the 9R(30) line (1084.635 cm-1). The results obtained let us assume that this method can be used to control clustering of molecules comprising heavy element isotopes, which have a small isotopic shift in IR absorption spectra.

  11. Formation and accumulation of radiation-induced defects and radiolysis products in modified lithium orthosilicate pebbles with additions of titanium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarins, Arturs; Valtenbergs, Oskars; Kizane, Gunta; Supe, Arnis; Knitter, Regina; Kolb, Matthias H. H.; Leys, Oliver; Baumane, Larisa; Conka, Davis

    2016-03-01

    Lithium orthosilicate (Li4SiO4) pebbles with 2.5 wt.% excess of silicon dioxide (SiO2) are the European Union's designated reference tritium breeding ceramics for the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Test Blanket Module (TBM). However, the latest irradiation experiments showed that the reference Li4SiO4 pebbles may crack and form fragments under operation conditions as expected in the HCPB TBM. Therefore, it has been suggested to change the chemical composition of the reference Li4SiO4 pebbles and to add titanium dioxide (TiO2), to obtain lithium metatitanate (Li2TiO3) as a second phase. The aim of this research was to investigate the formation and accumulation of radiation-induced defects (RD) and radiolysis products (RP) in the modified Li4SiO4 pebbles with different contents of TiO2 for the first time, in order to estimate and compare radiation stability. The reference and the modified Li4SiO4 pebbles were irradiated with accelerated electrons (E = 5 MeV) up to 5000 MGy absorbed dose at 300-990 K in a dry argon atmosphere. By using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy it was determined that in the modified Li4SiO4 pebbles, several paramagnetic RD and RP are formed and accumulated, like, E' centres (SiO33-/TiO33-), HC2 centres (SiO43-/TiO3-) etc. On the basis of the obtained results, it is concluded that the modified Li4SiO4 pebbles with TiO2 additions have comparable radiation stability with the reference pebbles.

  12. Site-directed mutagenesis of HIV-1 vpu gene demonstrates two clusters of replication-defective mutants with distinct ability to down-modulate cell surface CD4 and tetherin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako Nomaguchi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 Vpu acts positively on viral infectivity by mediating CD4 degradation in endoplasmic reticulum and enhances virion release by counteracting a virion release restriction factor, tetherin. In order to define the impact of Vpu activity on HIV-1 replication, we have generated a series of site-specific proviral vpu mutants. Of fifteen mutants examined, seven exhibited a replication-defect similar to that of a vpu-deletion mutant in a lymphocyte cell line H9. These mutations clustered in narrow regions within transmembrane domain (TMD and cytoplasmic domain (CTD. Replication-defective mutants displayed the reduced ability to enhance virion release from a monolayer cell line HEp2 without exception. Upon transfection with Vpu expression vectors, neither TMD mutants nor CTD mutants blocked CD4 expression at the cell surface in another monolayer cell line MAGI. While TMD mutants were unable to down-modulate cell surface tetherin in HEp2 cells, CTD mutants did quite efficiently. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed the difference of intracellular localization between TMD and CTD mutants. In total, replication capability of HIV-1 carrying vpu mutations correlates well with the ability of Vpu to enhance virion release and to impede the cell surface expression of CD4 but not with the ability to down-modulate cell surface tetherin. Our results here suggest that efficient viral replication requires not only down-regulation of cell surface tetherin but also its degradation.

  13. MD simulations to evaluate effects of applied tensile strain on irradiation-induced defect production at various PKA energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashiro, S.; Fujita, S.; Okita, T.; Okuda, H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Strain effects on defect formation were evaluated at various PKA energies by MD. ► Radiation-induced defects were increased numerically by external strain. ► Enhanced formation of larger clusters causes the numerical increase of defects. ► Strain influence on the number of defects was greatest at about 20 keV PKA. ► Cluster size, which is mostly affected by strain, was greater with higher PKA energy. - Abstract: Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted to investigate the influence of applied tensile strain on defect production during cascade damages at various Primary Knock-on Atom (PKA) energies of 1–30 keV. When 1% strain was applied, the number of surviving defects increased at PKA energies higher than 5 keV, although they did not increase at 1 keV. The rate of increase by strain application was higher with higher PKA energy, and attained the maximum at 20 keV PKA energy with a subsequent gradual decrease at 30 keV PKA energy The cluster size, mostly affected by strain, was larger with higher PKA energy, although clusters with fewer than seven interstitials did not increase in number at any PKA energy.

  14. Causes of defects and accuracy of structure reproduction in deep-etch X-ray lithography using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, J.; Ehrfeld, W.; Muenchmeyer, D.

    1988-07-01

    Under the LIGA process plastic microstructures with extraordinarily high aspect ratios are produced by means of deep-etch synchrotron radiation lithography. These microstructures are used as templates for the fabrication by electroforming of metallic microstructures. The several hundred micrometer thick resist layers required in the process are polymerized directly on a metal base plate using a methacrylate based resin. This provides sufficient stability during the production process and also a reliable plating base for the electrodeposition of the metal. Perfect adhesion of micron-sized microstructures on a smooth surface can be achieved if the polished metal surface is sputtered with titanium and chemically oxidized afterwards. Alternatively it is also possible to add an internal adhesion promoter like methacryl oxypropyl trimethoxy silane to the resin. By means of this adhesion promoter chemical bonding between the metal surface and the polymer is achieved. (orig.)

  15. Radiation damage in nanostructured metallic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kaiyuan

    subjected to charged particles. The radiation effects in irradiated nanograined Fe are also investigated for comparison. Radiation responses in these nanostructured metallic films suggest that immiscible incoherent Ag/Ni multilayers are more resistant to radiation in comparison to their monolithic counterparts. Their mechanical properties and radiation response show strong layer thickness dependence in terms of radiation hardening and defect density. Coherent twin boundaries can interact with stacking fault tetrahedral and remove them effectively. Twin boundaries can actively absorb radiation induced defects and defect clusters resulting in boundary migration. Size dependence is also found in nanograins where fewer defects exhibit in films with smaller grains.

  16. Yields of clustered DNA damage induced by charged-particle radiations of similar kinetic energy per nucleon: LET dependence in different DNA microenvironments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keszenman, D.J.; Sutherland, B.M.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the linear energy transfer (LET) dependence of the biological effects of densely ionizing radiation in relation to changes in the ionization density along the track, we measured the yields and spectrum of clustered DNA damages induced by charged particles of different atomic number but similar kinetic energy per nucleon in different DNA microenvironments. Yeast DNA embedded in agarose in solutions of different free radical scavenging capacity was irradiated with 1 GeV protons, 1 GeV/nucleon oxygen ions, 980 MeV/nucleon titanium ions or 968 MeV/nucleon iron ions. The frequencies of double-strand breaks (DSBs), abasic sites and oxypurine clusters were quantified. The total DNA damage yields per absorbed dose induced in non-radioquenching solution decreased with LET, with minor variations in radioquenching conditions being detected. However, the total damage yields per particle fluence increased with LET in both conditions, indicating a higher efficiency per particle to induce clustered DNA damages. The yields of DSBs and non-DSB clusters as well as the damage spectra varied with LET and DNA milieu, suggesting the involvement of more than one mechanism in the formation of the different types of clustered damages.

  17. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  18. Severe signal loss in diamond beam loss monitors in high particle rate environments by charge trapping in radiation-induced defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassel, Florian; Boer, Wim de [Institute for Experimental Nuclear Physics (IEKP), KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Guthoff, Moritz; Dabrowski, Anne [CERN, Meyrin (Switzerland)

    2016-10-15

    The beam condition monitoring leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC). As detectors 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors are positioned in rings around the beam pipe. Here, high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the charge collection efficiency (CCE). However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements and simulations, especially in single-crystalline (sCVD) diamonds, which have a low initial concentration of defects. After an integrated luminosity of a few fb{sup -1} corresponding to a few weeks of LHC operation, the CCE of the sCVD diamonds dropped by a factor of five or more and quickly approached the poor CCE of pCVD diamonds. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the ionization rate. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field, which in turn increases the trapping rate and recombination and hence reduces the CCE in a strongly non-linear way. A diamond irradiation campaign was started to investigate the rate-dependent electrical field deformation with respect to the radiation damage. Besides the electrical field measurements via the transient current technique (TCT), the CCE was measured. The experimental results were used to create an effective deep trap model that takes the radiation damage into account. Using this trap model, the rate-dependent electrical field deformation and the CCE were simulated with the software SILVACO TCAD. The simulation, tuned to rate-dependent measurements from a strong radioactive source, was able to predict the non-linear decrease of the

  19. Severe signal loss in diamond beam loss monitors in high particle rate environments by charge trapping in radiation-induced defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassel, Florian; Boer, Wim de; Guthoff, Moritz; Dabrowski, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The beam condition monitoring leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC). As detectors 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors are positioned in rings around the beam pipe. Here, high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the charge collection efficiency (CCE). However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements and simulations, especially in single-crystalline (sCVD) diamonds, which have a low initial concentration of defects. After an integrated luminosity of a few fb -1 corresponding to a few weeks of LHC operation, the CCE of the sCVD diamonds dropped by a factor of five or more and quickly approached the poor CCE of pCVD diamonds. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the ionization rate. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field, which in turn increases the trapping rate and recombination and hence reduces the CCE in a strongly non-linear way. A diamond irradiation campaign was started to investigate the rate-dependent electrical field deformation with respect to the radiation damage. Besides the electrical field measurements via the transient current technique (TCT), the CCE was measured. The experimental results were used to create an effective deep trap model that takes the radiation damage into account. Using this trap model, the rate-dependent electrical field deformation and the CCE were simulated with the software SILVACO TCAD. The simulation, tuned to rate-dependent measurements from a strong radioactive source, was able to predict the non-linear decrease of the CCE in

  20. Formation and accumulation of radiation-induced defects and radiolysis products in modified lithium orthosilicate pebbles with additions of titanium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarins, Arturs, E-mail: arturs.zarins@lu.lv [University of Latvia, Institute of Chemical Physics, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); University of Latvia, Faculty of Chemistry, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); Valtenbergs, Oskars [University of Latvia, Institute of Chemical Physics, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); University of Latvia, Faculty of Chemistry, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); Kizane, Gunta; Supe, Arnis [University of Latvia, Institute of Chemical Physics, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); Knitter, Regina; Kolb, Matthias H.H.; Leys, Oliver [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-KWT), 76021, Karlsruhe (Germany); Baumane, Larisa [University of Latvia, Institute of Chemical Physics, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); Latvian Institute of Organic Synthesis, Aizkraukles Street 21, LV-1006, Riga (Latvia); Conka, Davis [University of Latvia, Institute of Chemical Physics, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); University of Latvia, Faculty of Chemistry, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia)

    2016-03-15

    Lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) pebbles with 2.5 wt.% excess of silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) are the European Union's designated reference tritium breeding ceramics for the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Test Blanket Module (TBM). However, the latest irradiation experiments showed that the reference Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles may crack and form fragments under operation conditions as expected in the HCPB TBM. Therefore, it has been suggested to change the chemical composition of the reference Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles and to add titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), to obtain lithium metatitanate (Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}) as a second phase. The aim of this research was to investigate the formation and accumulation of radiation-induced defects (RD) and radiolysis products (RP) in the modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles with different contents of TiO{sub 2} for the first time, in order to estimate and compare radiation stability. The reference and the modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles were irradiated with accelerated electrons (E = 5 MeV) up to 5000 MGy absorbed dose at 300–990 K in a dry argon atmosphere. By using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy it was determined that in the modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles, several paramagnetic RD and RP are formed and accumulated, like, E' centres (SiO{sub 3}{sup 3−}/TiO{sub 3}{sup 3−}), HC{sub 2} centres (SiO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/TiO{sub 3}{sup −}) etc. On the basis of the obtained results, it is concluded that the modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles with TiO{sub 2} additions have comparable radiation stability with the reference pebbles. - Highlights: • Formation of RD and RP in modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles with additions of TiO{sub 2} is analysed for the first time. • Due to additions of TiO{sub 2}, concentration of paramagnetic RD slightly increased in modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles. • Modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles have good radiation stability compared to

  1. Problems and progress in radiation physics of semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinetskij, V.L.

    1982-01-01

    A survey of the current status of radiation physics of semiconductors comprises the analysis of some new problems and poses the statement of concern. The essential difference between the probability of interstitial-vacancy pair occurrence W(T) in elastic collisions and the generally accepted step distribution with a typical ''threshold'' energy Tsub(d) is indicated. The role of diffusion and reaction evolution of primary defects leading to specific properties of the cluster formation process is shown. Special features of defect formation in spatially inhomogeneous semiconductors, in particular for elastic stresses present, are described. Among most important advances in the radiation physics of semiconductors there are the discovery of non-activation motion of the ''extra'' atom in silicon, the observation of a low activation energy value for the vacancy diffusion, the understanding of subthreshold mechanism of defect formation and radiation-induced diffusion, the effects of laser annealing of defects and oriented crystallization

  2. Utility of Deep Inspiration Breath Hold for Left-Sided Breast Radiation Therapy in Preventing Early Cardiac Perfusion Defects: A Prospective Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagar, Timothy M., E-mail: zagar@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Kaidar-Person, Orit [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Tang, Xiaoli [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, West Harrison, New York (United States); Jones, Ellen E.; Matney, Jason; Das, Shiva K.; Green, Rebecca L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Sheikh, Arif [Department of Radiology, Columbia University, New York, New York (United States); Khandani, Amir H.; McCartney, William H.; Oldan, Jorge Daniel; Wong, Terence Z. [Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate early cardiac single photon computed tomography (SPECT) findings after left breast/chest wall postoperative radiation therapy (RT) in the setting of deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH). Methods and Materials: We performed a prospective single-institution single-arm study of patients who were planned for tangential RT with DIBH to the left breast/chest wall (± internal mammary nodes). The DIBH was done by use of a controlled surface monitoring technique (AlignRT, Vision RT Ltd, London, UK). The RT was given with tangential fields and a heart block. Radiation-induced cardiac perfusion and wall motion changes were assessed by pre-RT and 6-month post-RT SPECT scans. A cumulative SPECT summed-rest score was used to quantify perfusion in predefined left ventricle segments. The incidence of wall motion abnormalities was assessed in each of these same segments. Results: A total of 20 patients with normal pre-RT scans were studied; their median age was 56 years (range, 39-72 years). Seven (35%) patients also received irradiation to the left internal mammary chain, and 5 (25%) received an additional RT field to supraclavicular nodes. The median heart dose was 94 cGy (range, 56-200 cGy), and the median V25{sub Gy} was zero (range, 0-0.1). None of the patients had post-RT perfusion or wall motion abnormalities. Conclusions: Our results suggest that DIBH and conformal cardiac blocking for patients receiving tangential RT for left-sided breast cancer is an effective means to avoid early RT-associated cardiac perfusion defects.

  3. Effect of deep levels of radiation-induced defects in silicon γ-irradiated Al-V-n-Si structures characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzaneva, E.V.; Vdovichenko, A.D.; Kuznetsov, G.V.; Muntyan, Yu.G.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of high energy γ-quanta irradiation on the mechanism of current transmission in Al-V-N-Si structures employed in Schottky barrier instruments has been investigated. Before irradiation the structures have been annealed in the nitrogen atmosphere at T=500 deg C. The samples have been γ-irradiated on the side of the metall film at T=20 deg C. The irradiation spectrum is continuous, maximum γ-quanta energy 50 MeV, medium one is 20 MeV. The integral flux of γ-quanta, PHIsub(γ) varied from 10 7 to 10 13 quantum/cm -2 . The volt-ampere and volt-farad characteristics have been measred. It is shown that variation of the main electrophysical characteristics of the Al-V-nSi structures upon γ-irradiation is due to deep levels of radiation defects arising in silicon with the energetic position Esub(c)-E=0.38-0.4 eV and Esub(v)+Esub(2)=0.23-0.25 → β, where Esub(c), Esub(v) are energies for the conduction band bottom and the valence band ceiling. In the 77-293 K temperature range the determining range the determining effect on current mission mechanism in irradiated structures is exerted by resonance electron tunnelling with participation of a level with the Esub(c)-Esub(1)=0.38-0.4 eV

  4. Helium bubbles aggravated defects production in self-irradiated copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, FengChao; Zhu, YinBo; Wu, Qiang; Li, XinZhu; Wang, Pei; Wu, HengAn

    2017-12-01

    Under the environment of high radiation, materials used in fission and fusion reactors will internally accumulate numerous lattice defects and bubbles. With extensive studies focused on bubble resolution under irradiation, the mutually effects between helium bubbles and displacement cascades in irradiated materials remain unaddressed. Therefore, the defects production and microstructure evolution under self-irradiation events in vicinity of helium bubbles are investigated by preforming large scale molecular dynamics simulations in single-crystal copper. When subjected to displacement cascades, distinguished bubble resolution categories dependent on bubble size are observed. With the existence of bubbles, radiation damage is aggravated with the increasing bubble size, represented as the promotion of point defects and dislocations. The atomic mechanisms of heterogeneous dislocation structures are attributed to different helium-vacancy cluster modes, transforming from the resolved gas trapped with vacancies to the biased absorption of vacancies by the over-pressured bubble. In both cases, helium impedes the recombination of point defects, leading to the accelerated formation of interstitial loops. The results and insight obtained here might contribute to understand the underlying mechanism of transmutant solute on the long-term evolution of irradiated materials.

  5. Clustering of near clusters versus cluster compactness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Gao; Yipeng Jing

    1989-01-01

    The clustering properties of near Zwicky clusters are studied by using the two-point angular correlation function. The angular correlation functions for compact and medium compact clusters, for open clusters, and for all near Zwicky clusters are estimated. The results show much stronger clustering for compact and medium compact clusters than for open clusters, and that open clusters have nearly the same clustering strength as galaxies. A detailed study of the compactness-dependence of correlation function strength is worth investigating. (author)

  6. Metastable and bistable defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukashev, Bulat N; Abdullin, Kh A; Gorelkinskii, Yurii V

    2000-01-01

    Existing data on the properties and structure of metastable and bistable defects in silicon are analyzed. Primary radiation-induced defects (vacancies, self-interstitial atoms, and Frenkel pairs), complexes of oxygen, carbon, hydrogen, and other impurity atoms and defects with negative correlation energy are considered. (reviews of topical problems)

  7. Primary Radiation Damage in Materials. Review of Current Understanding and Proposed New Standard Displacement Damage Model to Incorporate in Cascade Defect Production Efficiency and Mixing Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordlund, Kai; Sand, Andrea E.; Granberg, Fredric; Zinkle, Steven J.; Stoller, Roger; Averback, Robert S.; Suzudo, Tomoaki; Malerba, Lorenzo; Banhart, Florian; Weber, William J.; Willaime, Francois; Dudarev, Sergei; Simeone, David

    2015-01-01

    Under the auspices of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC), the Working Party on Multi-scale Modelling of Fuels and Structural Materials for Nuclear Systems (WPMM) was established in 2008 to assess the scientific and engineering aspects of fuels and structural materials, aiming at evaluating multi-scale models and simulations as validated predictive tools for the design of nuclear systems, fuel fabrication and performance. The WPMM's objective is to promote the exchange of information on models and simulations of nuclear materials, theoretical and computational methods, experimental validation, and related topics. It also provides member countries with up-to-date information, shared data, models and expertise. The WPMM Expert Group on Primary Radiation Damage (PRD) was established in 2009 to determine the limitations of the NRT-dpa standard, in the light of both atomistic simulations and known experimental discrepancies, to revisit the NRT-dpa standard and to examine the possibility of proposing a new improved standard of primary damage characteristics. This report reviews the current understanding of primary radiation damage from neutrons, ions and electrons (excluding photons, atomic clusters and more exotic particles), with emphasis on the range of validity of the 'displacement per atom' (dpa) concept in all major classes of materials with the exception of organics. The report also introduces an 'athermal recombination-corrected dpa' (arc-dpa) relation that uses a relatively simple functional to address the well-known issue that 'displacement per atom' (dpa) overestimates damage production in metals under energetic displacement cascade conditions, as well as a 'replacements-per-atom' (rpa) equation, also using a relatively simple functional, that accounts for the fact that dpa is understood to severely underestimate actual atom relocation (ion beam mixing) in metals. (authors)

  8. Radiation hardening of metals irradiated by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didyk, A.Yu.; Skuratov, V.A.; Mikhajlova, N.Yu.; Regel', V.R.

    1988-01-01

    The damage dose dependence in the 10 -4 -10 -2 dpa region of radiation hardening of Al, V, Ni, Cu irradiated by xenon ions with 124 MeV energy is investigated using the microhardness technique and transmission electron microscope. It is shown that the pure metals radiation hardening is stimulated for defects clusters with the typical size less than 5 nm, as in the case of neutron and the light charge ion irradiation

  9. Vacancy-type defects induced by grinding of Si wafers studied by monoenergetic positron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uedono, Akira; Yoshihara, Nakaaki [Division of Applied Physics, Faculty of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Mizushima, Yoriko [Devices and Materials Labs Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd., Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0197 (Japan); ICE Cube Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Kim, Youngsuk [ICE Cube Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Disco Corporation, Ota, Tokyo 143-8580 (Japan); Nakamura, Tomoji [Devices and Materials Labs Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd., Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0197 (Japan); Ohba, Takayuki [ICE Cube Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Oshima, Nagayasu; Suzuki, Ryoichi [Research Institute of Instrumentation Frontier, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2014-10-07

    Vacancy-type defects introduced by the grinding of Czochralski-grown Si wafers were studied using monoenergetic positron beams. Measurements of Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation and the lifetime spectra of positrons showed that vacancy-type defects were introduced in the surface region (<98 nm), and the major defect species were identified as (i) relatively small vacancies incorporated in dislocations and (ii) large vacancy clusters. Annealing experiments showed that the defect concentration decreased with increasing annealing temperature in the range between 100 and 500°C. After 600–700°C annealing, the defect-rich region expanded up to about 170 nm, which was attributed to rearrangements of dislocation networks, and a resultant emission of point defects toward the inside of the sample. Above 800°C, the stability limit of those vacancies was reached and they started to disappear. After the vacancies were annealed out (900°C), oxygen-related defects were the major point defects and they were located at <25 nm.

  10. Geographic and sociodemographic factors in the etiology of juvenile neoplasms: implications for leukaemia clusters of several factors including density, background radiation, infections and immunisations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneale, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of data from the Oxford Survey of Childhood Cancers (OSCC) by the recently invented method of Fears and Brown, as modified (for correct variances of relative risk estimates) by Breslow and Zhao. The analysis has shown that, for OSCC cases, negative associations with population density, stillbirths and infant deaths were sufficiently strong for these alone to account for all but one of the leukaemia clusters so far reported in Britain as 'black hole' effects (the single exception being the Sellafield cluster). Finally, strong positive associations with regional levels of background radiation were found which have reinforced an earlier impression that these inevitable exposures are important causes of childhood cancer. (orig./MG)

  11. Defects and permutation branes in the Liouville field theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarkissian, Gor

    2009-01-01

    The defects and permutation branes for the Liouville field theory are considered. By exploiting cluster condition, equations satisfied by permutation branes and defects reflection amplitudes are obtained. It is shown that two types of solutions exist, discrete and continuous families.......The defects and permutation branes for the Liouville field theory are considered. By exploiting cluster condition, equations satisfied by permutation branes and defects reflection amplitudes are obtained. It is shown that two types of solutions exist, discrete and continuous families....

  12. Defect identification using positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beling, C.D.; Fung, S.

    2001-01-01

    The current use of the lifetime and Doppler broadening techniques in defect identification is demonstrated with two studies, the first being the identification of carbon vacancy in n-6H SiC through lifetime spectroscopy, and the second the production of de-hydrogenated voids in α-Si:H through light soaking. Some less conventional ideas are presented for more specific defect identification, namely (i) the amalgamation of lifetime and Doppler techniques with conventional deep level transient spectroscopy in what may be called ''positron-deep level transient spectroscopy'', and (ii) the extraction of more spatial information on vacancy defects by means of what may be called ''Fourier transform Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation spectroscopy'' (orig.)

  13. Electron paramagnetic resonance study on the ionizing radiation induced defects of the tooth enamel hydroxyapatite; Estudo por ressonancia paramagnetica eletronica de defeitos induzidos pelas radiacoes ionizantes na hidroxiapatita do esmalte dentario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Liana Macedo de

    1995-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite is the main constituent of calcified tissues. Defects induced by ionizing radiations in this biomineral can present high stability and then, these are used as biological markers in radiological accidents, irradiated food identifying and geological and archaeological dating. In this work, paramagnetic centers induced on the enamel of the teeth by environmental ionizing radiation, are investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Decay thermal kinetic presents high complexity and shows the formation of different electron ligation energy centers and structures 65 refs., 40 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Defects and defect processes in nonmetallic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, W

    2004-01-01

    This extensive survey covers defects in nonmetals, emphasizing point defects and point-defect processes. It encompasses electronic, vibrational, and optical properties of defective solids, plus dislocations and grain boundaries. 1985 edition.

  15. Process of defect formation in alkaline halogenides contaminated with Eu{sup 2+} induced by non ionizing radiation; Procesos de formacion de defectos en halogenuros alcalinos contaminados con Eu{sup 2+} inducidos por radiacion no ionizante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedroza M, M.; Melendrez, R.; Barboza F, M. [Centro de Investigacion en Fisica de la Universidad de Sonora, A.P. 5-088, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Castaneda, B. [UNISON, A.P. 1626, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    The creation of defects in polluted alkaline halogenides with divalent impurities exposed to ionizing radiation is explained by means of the creation of auto trapped excitons (STE), which can be formed by means of the excitement of the halogen ion or through the trapping of electrons in centers V{sub K} taken place during the process of ionization of the halogen ion. The luminescent recombination of the exciton auto trapped produces a characteristic exciton luminescence and the recombination non radiative causes the formation of the Frenkel type defects, even of centers F - H. Experimentally has been demonstrated that the same type of glasses, exposed to radiation non ionizing of the type UV of around 230 nm, they produce defects similar Frenkel. The situation is interesting all time that photons of 230 nm (5.3 eV) they cannot create excitons directly since they are in an energy level of approximately 2.4 inferior eV to the necessary energy for the production of the same ones. In order to investigating the type of process of creation of defects with UV light energy below the energy of the band prohibited in polluted alkaline halogenides with Eu{sup 2+}, mainly looking for experimental information that allows to explain the creation of defects taken place by the radiation non ionizing, one carries out the present work. It was found that, independently of the energy of the radiation used for the excitement, the emission comes from the transition 4f{sup 6}5d(t{sub 2g})-4f{sup 7}({sup 8}S{sub 7/2}) of the ion Eu{sup 2+} characterized by a wide band centered in 420 nm and an additional component in 460 nm of possibly intrinsic origin. It was determined that so much the F centers and F{sub z} participate in the thermoluminescent processes and of optically stimulated luminescence, achieving to identify those peaks of Tl strictly associated to the F centers (peak in 470 K for the KCl: Eu{sup 2+}) and F{sub z} (peak in 370 K). Also, by means of a process of selective photo

  16. Kinetic Modeling of the Lif:Mg,Ti TL System including Defect Creation: Implications to, and Development of Track Structure Theory Calculations of Heavy Charged Particle Radiation Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliyahu, Ian

    2015-01-01

    differ somewhat from the vacancies originally present in un-irradiated samples due to differences in their immediate environment. The kinetic model accurately simulates the experimentally observed F center dose response over the entire investigated dose range of 10 Gy -105 Gy under the following conditions: (i) The concentration of vacancies initially present is unexpectedly high at ~ 1023 m-3, possibly due to the highly doped, noncrystalline and hot-pressed nature of the LiF:Mg,Ti samples. (ii) The transition probability, An4o, for electron capture into the initially-present vacancies is ~ 40 times greater than An4, the transition probability for the viii radiation-created vacancies. These two factors marginalize the effect of the created vacancies at low dose resulting in a linear dose response. 3. Track structure theory: The third focus of investigation concerned the ability of TST to accurately calculate HCP induced OA Relative HCP OA efficiencies. Values of ηTST based on LID dose response, were compared with experimentally measured relative efficiencies, ηm, at no-track-overlap fluence levels of 1010-1011 cm-2 for protons and He particles. The F band values of ηm/ηTST are 2.0 and 2.6 for the He ions and protons respectively. The deviation from unity is explained as due to the neglect of enhanced vacancy/F center creation in the conventional TST calculations which ignore defect creation. It is demonstrated that kinetic analysis simulating LID dose response with enhanced vacancy creation, and incorporated into the TST calculation, can lead to values of ηm=ηTST for the F band. At the other extreme, for the 4.0 eV band, the values of ηm/ηTST are much less than unity, equal to 0.18 for the protons and < 0.12 for the He ions. These very low values suggest that the 4.0 eV trapping structure is being either destroyed or de-populated (perhaps by local heating/thermal spike/Coulomb explosion) during the HCP slowing down. Processes which do not occur (or are greatly

  17. Radiation-induced defects in clay minerals, markers of the mobility of the uranium in solution in the unconformity-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morichon, E.

    2008-10-01

    This study presents the works driven on three groups of clay minerals (kaolins, illite, sudoite (di-tri-octahedral chlorites)) characteristics of the alteration halos surrounding unconformity-type uranium deposits, in order to reveal uranium paleo-circulations in the intra-cratonic meso-Proterozoic basins (1,2 - 1,6 Ga). Thanks to Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (EPR), we were able to highlight the persistence of structural defects in kaolin-group minerals contemporaneous of the basin diagenesis, and demonstrate the existence of relatively stable defects in illites and sudoites contemporaneous of the uranium deposits setting. Thus, the main defect in illite (Ai centre) and the main defect in sudoite (As centre) are characterized by their g components such as, respectively, gt = 2,003 et g// = 2,051 for illite and gt = 2,008 et g// = 2,051 for sudoite. As the main defect in kaolins (kaolinite/dickite), the main defects in illite and sudoite are perpendicularly oriented according to the (ab) plane, on the tetrahedral Si-O bound. However, their thermal stabilities seem different. The observation of samples from different zones (background, anomal or mineralized) of the Athabasca basin (Canada) allowed to identify a parallel evolution between actual defects concentration measured in the different clay minerals and the proximity of the mineralisation zones. Consequently, clays minerals can be considered as potential plotters of zones where uranium-rich solutions have circulated. (author)

  18. Study of EUV induced defects on few-layer graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, An; Rizo, P.J.; Zoethout, E.; Scaccabarozzi, L.; Lee, Christopher James; Banine, V.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    Defects in graphene greatly affect its properties1-3. Radiation induced-defects may reduce the long-term survivability of graphene-based nano-devices. Here, we expose few-layer graphene to extreme ultraviolet (EUV, 13.5nm) radiation and show there is a power-dependent increase in defect density. We

  19. Radiation induced nano structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibragimova, E.M.; Kalanov, M.U.; Khakimov, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Nanometer-size silicon clusters have been attracting much attention due to their technological importance, in particular, as promising building blocks for nano electronic and nano photonic systems. Particularly, silicon wires are of great of interest since they have potential for use in one-dimensional quantum wire high-speed field effect transistors and light-emitting devices with extremely low power consumption. Carbon and metal nano structures are studied very intensely due to wide possible applications. Radiation material sciences have been dealing with sub-micron objects for a long time. Under interaction of high energy particles and ionizing radiation with solids by elastic and inelastic mechanisms, at first point defects are created, then they form clusters, column defects, disordered regions (amorphous colloids) and finally precipitates of another crystal phase in the matrix. Such irradiation induced evolution of structure defects and phase transformations was observed by X-diffraction techniques in dielectric crystals of quartz and corundum, which exist in and crystal modifications. If there is no polymorphism, like in alkali halide crystals, then due to radiolysis halogen atoms are evaporated from the surface that results in non-stoichiometry or accumulated in the pores formed by metal vacancies in the sub-surface layer. Nano-pores are created by intensive high energy particles irradiation at first chaotically and then they are ordered and in part filled by inert gas. It is well-known mechanism of radiation induced swelling and embrittlement of metals and alloys, which is undesirable for construction materials for nuclear reactors. Possible solution of this problem may come from nano-structured materials, where there is neither swelling nor embrittlement at gas absorption due to very low density of the structure, while strength keeps high. This review considers experimental observations of radiation induced nano-inclusions in insulating

  20. Effect of Defects Distribution on Fatigue Life of Wind Turbine Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafsanjani, Hesam Mirzaei; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2015-01-01

    by a Poisson process / field where the defects form clusters that consist of a parent defect and related defects around the parent defect. The fatigue life is dependent on the number, type, location and size of the defects in the component and is therefore quite uncertain and needs to be described...

  1. Defects in heavily phosphorus-doped Si epitaxial films probed by monoenergetic positron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uedono, Akira; Tanigawa, Shoichiro; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Mikado, Tomohisa.

    1994-01-01

    Vacancy-type defects in heavily phosphorus-doped Si epitaxial films were probed by monoenergetic positron beams. Doppler broadening profiles of the annihilation radiation and lifetime spectra of positrons were measured for the epitaxial films grown on the Si substrates by plasma chemical vapor deposition. For the as-deposited film, divacancy-phosphorus complexes were found with high concentration. After 600degC annealing, vacancy clusters were formed near the Si/Si interface, while no drastic change in the depth distribution of the divacancy-phosphorus complexes was observed. By 900degC annealing, the vacancy clusters were annealed out; however, the average number of phosphorus atoms coupled with divacancies increased. The relationship between the vacancy-type defects probed by the positron annihilation technique and the carrier concentration was confirmed. (author)

  2. Defects in heavily phosphorus-doped Si epitaxial films probed by monoenergetic positron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uedono, Akira; Tanigawa, Shoichiro [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Materials Science; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Mikado, Tomohisa

    1994-11-01

    Vacancy-type defects in heavily phosphorus-doped Si epitaxial films were probed by monoenergetic positron beams. Doppler broadening profiles of the annihilation radiation and lifetime spectra of positrons were measured for the epitaxial films grown on the Si substrates by plasma chemical vapor deposition. For the as-deposited film, divacancy-phosphorus complexes were found with high concentration. After 600degC annealing, vacancy clusters were formed near the Si/Si interface, while no drastic change in the depth distribution of the divacancy-phosphorus complexes was observed. By 900degC annealing, the vacancy clusters were annealed out; however, the average number of phosphorus atoms coupled with divacancies increased. The relationship between the vacancy-type defects probed by the positron annihilation technique and the carrier concentration was confirmed. (author).

  3. Identifying open-volume defects in doped and undoped perovskite-type LaCoO3, PbTiO3, and BaTiO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Vinita J.; Nielsen, Bent; Friessnegg, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Dopants, vacancies, and impurity-vacancy clusters have a substantial impact on the properties of perovskite-type metal oxides (general formula ABO 3 ). In order to determine synthesis and processing conditions that optimize the desirable properties of these materials a careful study of these defects is required. It is essential to identify the defects and to map the defect densities. Positron annihilation spectroscopy has often been used to identify vacancy-type defects. Calculations of the positron lifetime and Doppler-broadened profiles of the positron-electron annihilation radiation in undoped and doped LaCoO 3 , PbTiO 3 , and BaTiO 3 are reported, and compared with available experimental data. The results show that these positron techniques are excellent for studying open-volume defects, vacancy-impurity complexes, and for identifying the sublattice occupied by the dopants. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  4. The Effect of Reflexology on the Pain-Insomnia-Fatigue Disturbance Cluster of Breast Cancer Patients During Adjuvant Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrasch, Ricardo; Carmel-Neiderman, Narin N; Ben-Ami, Sarah; Kaufman, Bella; Pfeffer, Raphi; Ben-David, Merav; Gamus, Dorit

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of reflexology treatment on quality of life, sleep disturbances, and fatigue in breast cancer patients during radiation therapy. A total of 72 women with breast cancer (stages 1-3) scheduled for radiation therapy were recruited. Women were allocated upon their preference either to the group receiving reflexology treatments once a week concurrently with radiotherapy and continued for 10 weeks or to the control group (usual care). The Lee Fatigue Scale, General Sleep Disturbance Scale, and Multidimensional Quality of Life Scale Cancer were completed by each patient in both arms at the beginning of the radiation treatment, after 5 weeks, and after 10 weeks of reflexology treatment. The final analysis included 58 women. The reflexology treated group demonstrated statistically significant lower levels of fatigue after 5 weeks of radiation therapy (p fatigue, quality of sleep, pain, and quality of life in breast cancer patients during radiation therapy. Reflexology prevented the decline in quality of life and significantly ameliorated the fatigue and quality of sleep of these patients. An encouraging trend was also noted in amelioration of pain levels.

  5. Atomistic- and Meso-Scale Computational Simulations for Developing Multi-Timescale Theory for Radiation Degradation in Electronic and Optoelectronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-13

    displacement cascade, intermediate defect stabilization and cluster formation, as well as slow defect reaction and migration. The fundamental mechanisms...displacement cascade, intermediate defect stabilization and cluster formation, as well as slow defect reaction and migration. The fundamental mechanisms and

  6. Understanding of radiation effect on sink in aluminum base structure materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sang Il; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2014-01-01

    In case of aluminum, a slightly different approach is needed for the evaluation of radiation damage. Unlikely other structure materials such as zirconium alloy and iron based alloy, aluminum generate not only matrix defect but also much transmutation. Quantitative analysis of radiation damage of aluminum have been done in two research method. First research method is calculation of radiation damage quantity in the matrix. In this research, quantity of transmutation and matrix damage are evaluated by KMC simulation from ENDF database of IAEA. Most recently, radiation damage such as defect and transmutation are calculated in the MNSR reactor environment. The second research method is evaluation of sink morphology change by irradiation, which research method focus on accumulating behavior of radiation defects. Matrix defect and transmutation are clustering or dissolved by thermal diffusion and energy statue. These clustering defect such as dislocation loop, void and bubble directly affect mechanical properties. In this research area, it is hard to using deterministic method because it should describe envious and various reaction module in detail. However, in case of probabilistic method, it could be explained without detail reaction module. Most recently, there was KMC modeling about vacancy and helium cluster. From this cluster modeling, transmutation is quantitatively analyzed. After that cluster effect on swelling are explained. Unfortunately, silicon, which is another transmutation of aluminum, effect are neglected. Also primary cluster, which is generated by cascade, effect are neglected. For the fundamental understanding of radiation effect on aluminum alloy, it is needed that more various parameter such as alloy element and primary cluster effect should be researched. However, until now there was not general modeling which include alloy element and primary cluster effect on aluminum. However, there was not specified KMC platform for the quantitative analysis of

  7. Embedded defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriola, M.; Vachaspati, T.; Bucher, M.

    1994-01-01

    We give a prescription for embedding classical solutions and, in particular, topological defects in field theories which are invariant under symmetry groups that are not necessarily simple. After providing examples of embedded defects in field theories based on simple groups, we consider the electroweak model and show that it contains the Z string and a one-parameter family of strings called the W(α) string. It is argued that although the members of this family are gauge equivalent when considered in isolation, each member becomes physically distinct when multistring configurations are considered. We then turn to the issue of stability of embedded defects and demonstrate the instability of a large class of such solutions in the absence of bound states or condensates. The Z string is shown to be unstable for all values of the Higgs boson mass when θ W =π/4. W strings are also shown to be unstable for a large range of parameters. Embedded monopoles suffer from the Brandt-Neri-Coleman instability. Finally, we connect the electroweak string solutions to the sphaleron

  8. The study of defects in metallic alloys by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, R.; Salgueiro, W.; Somoza, A.

    1990-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) has become in a very useful non destructive testing to the study of condensed matter. Specially, in the last two decades, with the advent of solid state detectors and high-resolution time spectrometers. The basic information obtained with PAS in solid-state physics is on electronic structure in free defect materials. However, positron annihilation techniques (lifetime, angular correlation and Doppler broadening) have been succesfully applied to study crystal lattice defects with lower-than-average electron density, such as vacancies, small vacancy clusters, etc.. In this sense, information about: vacancy formation and migration energies, dislocations, grain boundaries, solid-solid phase transformation and radiation damage was obtained. In this work the application of the positron lifetime technique to study the thermal effects on a fine-grained superplastic Al-Ca-Zn alloy and the quenched-in defects in monocrystals of β Cu-Zn-Al alloy for several quenching temperatures is shown. (Author) [es

  9. High-voltage electron-microscope investigation of point-defect agglomerates in irradiated copper during in-situ annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, W.; Urban, K.; Frank, W.

    1980-01-01

    Thin copper foils were irradiated with 650 keV electrons at 10 K in a high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM) to doses phi in the range 2 x 10 23 electrons/m 2 approximately 25 electrons /m 2 and then annealed in situ up to room temperature and outside the HVEM between room temperature and 470 K. During irradiation visible defect clusters were formed only at phi >= 2.5 x 10 24 electrons/m 2 . At smaller doses defect clusters became visible after annealing at 50 K. Between 50 K and 120 K further clusters, mainly dislocation loops on brace111 planes, appeared. Above 120 K, particularly between 160 K and 300 K, some of the dislocation loops became glissile. They glided out of the specimens or agglomerated to larger clusters of frequently complex shapes. As a consequence between 160 K and 300 K the cluster density decreased strongly, whereas the mean cluster size increased monotonously through the entire range of annealing temperatures covered. Contrast analyses between 180 K and 400 K revealed that the great majority of the dislocation loops were of interstitial type. At 470 K a new type of small clusters emerged, presumably of vacancy type. These observations are compared with other studies on electron-irradiated copper and with the current models of radiation damage in metals. (author)

  10. Evaluation of a scattered radiation field in a cluster relevant for multiple-energy X-ray holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonda, L.

    1996-09-01

    We analyze theoretically a recent proposal of utilizing synchrotron radiation to generate an electromagnetic scattering field at a specific target atom inside a material sample. The direct wave coming from a wiggler interferes there with the waves scattered by the surrounding atoms. The suggestion is relevant for obtaining atomic holographic images. (author). 23 refs, 2 figs

  11. The benefits of prone SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging in reducing both artifact defects and patient radiation exposure; Beneficio da aquisicao de imagem na posicao Prona em perfusao miocardica com SPECT para reducao de artefatos e exposicao do paciente a radiacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stathaki, Maria; Koukouraki, Sophia; Papadaki, Emmanouela; Tsaroucha, Angeliki; Karkavitsas, Nikolaos, E-mail: mariast_cha@yahoo.gr [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2015-10-15

    Background: Prone imaging has been demonstrated to minimize diaphragmatic and breast tissue attenuation. Objectives: To determine the role of prone imaging on the reduction of unnecessary rest perfusion studies and coronary angiographies performed, thus decreasing investigation time and radiation exposure. Methods: We examined 139 patients, 120 with an inferior wall and 19 with an anterior wall perfusion defect that might represented attenuation artifact. Post-stress images were acquired in both the supine and prone position. Coronary angiography was used as the 'gold standard' for evaluating coronary artery patency. The study was terminated and rest imaging was obviated in the presence of complete improvement of the defect in the prone position. Quantitative interpretation was performed. Results were compared with clinical data and coronary angiographic findings. Results: Prone acquisition correctly revealed defect improvement in 89 patients (89/120) with inferior wall and 12 patients (12/19) with anterior wall attenuation artifact. Quantitative analysis demonstrated statistically significant difference in the mean summed stress scores (SSS) of supine and mean SSS of prone studies in patients with disappearing inferior wall defect in the prone position and patent right coronary artery (true negative results). The mean difference between SSS in supine and in prone position was higher with disappearing than with remaining defects. Conclusion: Technetium-99m (Tc-99m) tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion imaging with the patient in the prone position overcomes soft tissue attenuation; moreover it provides an inexpensive, accurate approach to limit the number of unnecessary rest perfusion studies and coronary angiographies performed. (author)

  12. Defect accumulation under cascade damage conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinkaus, H.; Singh, B.N.; Woo, C.H.

    1994-01-01

    in terms of this reaction kinetics taking into account cluster production, dissociation, migration and annihilation at extended sinks. Microstructural features which are characteristic of cascade damage and cannot be explained in terms of the conventional single defect reaction kinetics are emphasized......There is now ample evidence from both experimental and computer simulation studies that in displacement cascades not only intense recombination takes place but also efficient clustering of both self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) and vacancies. The size distributions of the two types of defects produced...... reactions kinetics associated with the specific features of cascade damage is described, with emphasis on asymmetries between SIA and vacancy type defects concerning their production, stability, mobility and interactions with other defects. Defect accumulation under cascade damage conditions is discussed...

  13. Research Update: Point defects in CdTexSe1−x crystals grown from a Te-rich solution for applications in detecting radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul, R.; Roy, U. N.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.; Lee, W.; Cui, Y.; Burger, A.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated cadmium telluride selenide (CdTeSe) crystals, newly grown by the Traveling Heater Method (THM), for the presence and abundance of point defects. Current Deep Level Transient spectroscopy (I-DLTS) was used to determine the energies of the traps, their capture cross sections, and densities. The bias across the detectors was varied from 1 to 30 V. Four types of point defects were identified, ranging from 10 meV to 0.35 eV. Two dominant traps at energies of 0.18 eV and 0.14 eV were studied in depth. Cd vacancies are found at lower concentrations than other point defects present in the material

  14. Impact of patient-specific factors, irradiated left ventricular volume, and treatment set-up errors on the development of myocardial perfusion defects after radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Elizabeth S.; Prosnitz, Robert G.; Yu Xiaoli; Zhou Sumin; Hollis, Donna R.; Wong, Terence Z.; Light, Kim L.; Hardenbergh, Patricia H.; Blazing, Michael A.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of patient-specific factors, left ventricle (LV) volume, and treatment set-up errors on the rate of perfusion defects 6 to 60 months post-radiation therapy (RT) in patients receiving tangential RT for left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2005, a total of 153 patients were enrolled onto an institutional review board-approved prospective study and had pre- and serial post-RT (6-60 months) cardiac perfusion scans to assess for perfusion defects. Of the patients, 108 had normal pre-RT perfusion scans and available follow-up data. The impact of patient-specific factors on the rate of perfusion defects was assessed at various time points using univariate and multivariate analysis. The impact of set-up errors on the rate of perfusion defects was also analyzed using a one-tailed Fisher's Exact test. Results: Consistent with our prior results, the volume of LV in the RT field was the most significant predictor of perfusion defects on both univariate (p = 0.0005 to 0.0058) and multivariate analysis (p = 0.0026 to 0.0029). Body mass index (BMI) was the only significant patient-specific factor on both univariate (p = 0.0005 to 0.022) and multivariate analysis (p = 0.0091 to 0.05). In patients with very small volumes of LV in the planned RT fields, the rate of perfusion defects was significantly higher when the fields set-up 'too deep' (83% vs. 30%, p = 0.059). The frequency of deep set-up errors was significantly higher among patients with BMI ≥25 kg/m 2 compared with patients of normal weight (47% vs. 28%, p = 0.068). Conclusions: BMI ≥25 kg/m 2 may be a significant risk factor for cardiac toxicity after RT for left-sided breast cancer, possibly because of more frequent deep set-up errors resulting in the inclusion of additional heart in the RT fields. Further study is necessary to better understand the impact of patient-specific factors and set-up errors on the development of RT

  15. Development of a radiation track structure clustering algorithm for the prediction of DNA DSB yields and radiation induced cell death in Eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Michael; Bezak, Eva; Penfold, Scott

    2015-04-21

    The preliminary framework of a combined radiobiological model is developed and calibrated in the current work. The model simulates the production of individual cells forming a tumour, the spatial distribution of individual ionization events (using Geant4-DNA) and the stochastic biochemical repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) leading to the prediction of survival or death of individual cells. In the current work, we expand upon a previously developed tumour generation and irradiation model to include a stochastic ionization damage clustering and DNA lesion repair model. The Geant4 code enabled the positions of each ionization event in the cells to be simulated and recorded for analysis. An algorithm was developed to cluster the ionization events in each cell into simple and complex double strand breaks. The two lesion kinetic (TLK) model was then adapted to predict DSB repair kinetics and the resultant cell survival curve. The parameters in the cell survival model were then calibrated using experimental cell survival data of V79 cells after low energy proton irradiation. A monolayer of V79 cells was simulated using the tumour generation code developed previously. The cells were then irradiated by protons with mean energies of 0.76 MeV and 1.9 MeV using a customized version of Geant4. By replicating the experimental parameters of a low energy proton irradiation experiment and calibrating the model with two sets of data, the model is now capable of predicting V79 cell survival after low energy (cell survival probability, the cell survival probability is calculated for each cell in the geometric tumour model developed in the current work. This model uses fundamental measurable microscopic quantities such as genome length rather than macroscopic radiobiological quantities such as alpha/beta ratios. This means that the model can be theoretically used under a wide range of conditions with a single set of input parameters once calibrated for a given cell line.

  16. Cluster analysis of track structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalik, V.

    1991-01-01

    One of the possibilities of classifying track structures is application of conventional partition techniques of analysis of multidimensional data to the track structure. Using these cluster algorithms this paper attempts to find characteristics of radiation reflecting the spatial distribution of ionizations in the primary particle track. An absolute frequency distribution of clusters of ionizations giving the mean number of clusters produced by radiation per unit of deposited energy can serve as this characteristic. General computation techniques used as well as methods of calculations of distributions of clusters for different radiations are discussed. 8 refs.; 5 figs

  17. An investigation of the role of defect levels on the radiation response of synthetic diamond crystals when used as sensors for the detection of mammography X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ade, Nicholas

    2017-09-01

    This study evaluates the role of defects on the performances of synthetic diamond sensors on exposure to mammography X-rays. Through systematic investigations, the main cause of instability of response of examined sensors necessitating pre-irradiation was isolated and ascribed to the presence of ambient light which has the effect of emptying shallow trapping levels. The changes in response between measurements in light and dark conditions varied from 2.8 ± 1.2% to 63.0 ± 0.3%. Sensitivities between 0.4 and 6.7nCGy -1 mm -3 determined for the sensors varied with defect levels. The study indicates that differences in crystal quality due to the presence and influence of defects would cause a discrepancy in the dosimetric performances of various diamond detectors. Once a sensor plate is selected (based on the influence of defect levels) and coupled to the probe housing with the response of the diamond sensor stabilised and appropriately shielded from ambient light, daily priming is not needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Study by nuclear techniques of the impurity-defect interaction in implanted metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, Lionel.

    1978-01-01

    The properties of out equilibrium alloys formed by impurity implantation are strongly influenced by radiation damage created during implantation. This work presents a study, via hyperfine interaction and lattice location experiments, of the impurity-defect interaction in ion implanted metals. When the impurity and defect concentrations in the implanted layer are small, i.e. when impurities are uniformly recoil implanted in the whole crystal volume following a nuclear reaction (Aq In experiments), the impurity interacts with its own damage cascade. In this case, a vacancy is found to be trapped by a fraction of impurities during an athermal process. The value of this fraction does not seem to depend critically on impurity and host. When the impurity and defect concentrations are such that defect cascades interact, i.e. when impurities are implanted with an isotope separator (Fe Yb experiments), the observed impurity-vacancy (or vacancy cluster) interactions depend then strongly on the nature of impurity and host. An empirical relation, which indicates the importance of elastic effects, has been found between the proportion of impurities interacting with defects and the difference between impurity and host atom radii. At implantation temperature such that vacancies are mobile, the impurity-defect interaction depends essentially on vacancy migration. A model based on chemical kinetics has been developed to account for the variation with temperature of measured quantities [fr

  19. SU-F-T-661: Dependence of Gold Nano Particles Cluster Morphology On Dose Enhancement of Photon Radiation Therapy Apply for Radiation Biology Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, S [Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, Sungkyunkwan University (Korea, Republic of); Chung, K; Han, Y; Park, H [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine radiation oncology (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Injected gold nano particles (GNPs) to a body for dose enhancement are known to form in the tumorcell cluster morphology. We investigated the dependence of dose enhancement on the morphology characteristic with an approximated morphology model by using Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: For MC simulation, TOPAS version 2.0P-03 was used. GNP cluster morphology was approximated as a body center cubic(BCC) model by placing 8 GNPs at the corner and one at the center of cube with length from 2.59 µm to 0.25 µm located in a 4 µm length water filled cube phantom. 4 µm length square shaped beams of poly-energetic 50, 260 kVp photons were irradiated to the water filled cube phantom with 100 nm diameter GNPs in it. Dose enhancement ratio(DER) was computed as a function of distance from the surface of the GNP at the cube center for 18 cubes geometries. For scoring particles, 10 nm width of concentric shell shaped detector was constructed up to 100 nm from the center. Total dose in a sphere of 100 nm radius of detector were normalized to 2.59 µm length cube morphology. To verified biological effect of BCC model applied to cell survival curve fitting. Results: DER increase as the distance of the GNPs reduces. DER was largest for 0.25 µm length cube. Dependence of GNP distance DER increment was 1.73, 1.60 for 50 kVp, 260 kVp photons, respectively. Also, Using BCC model applied to cell survival curve was well prediction. Conclusion: DER with GNPs was larger when they are closely packed in the phantom. Therefore, better therapeutic effects can be expected with close-packed GNPs. This research was supported by the NRF funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (2012M3A9B6055201 and 2012R1A1A2042414), Samsung Medical Center grant[GFO1130081].

  20. Radiation Induced Precipitation in Iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solly, B

    1964-02-15

    Foils of iron have been neutron-irradiated in the Swedish re- search reactor R2 to integrated doses in the range 10{sup 17} - 10{sup 19} nvt (> 1 MeV) and examined by transmission electron microscopy. Features have been observed having diffraction contrast similar to that of the prismatic dislocation loops formed in f.c.c. metals by the collapse of point-defect clusters. The features have been shown to be due to precipitation of impurities at radiation damage centres in the iron matrix.

  1. Radiation Induced Precipitation in Iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solly, B.

    1964-02-01

    Foils of iron have been neutron-irradiated in the Swedish re- search reactor R2 to integrated doses in the range 10 17 - 10 19 nvt (> 1 MeV) and examined by transmission electron microscopy. Features have been observed having diffraction contrast similar to that of the prismatic dislocation loops formed in f.c.c. metals by the collapse of point-defect clusters. The features have been shown to be due to precipitation of impurities at radiation damage centres in the iron matrix

  2. International conference on defects in insulating crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Short summaries of conference papers are presented. Some of the conference topics included transport properties, defect levels, superionic conductors, radiation effects, John-Teller effect, electron-lattice interactions, and relaxed excited states

  3. International conference on defects in insulating crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Short summaries of conference papers are presented. Some of the conference topics included transport properties, defect levels, superionic conductors, radiation effects, John-Teller effect, electron-lattice interactions, and relaxed excited states. (SDF)

  4. Radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujol Mora, J.

    1999-01-01

    The exposition to ionizing radiations is a constant fact in the life of the human being and its utilization as diagnostic and therapeutic method is generalized. However, it is notorious how as years go on, the fear to the ionizing radiation seems to persist too, and this fact is not limited to the common individual, but to the technical personnel and professional personnel that labors with them same. (S. Grainger) [es

  5. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  6. Mechanism of cluster DNA damage repair in response to high-atomic number and energy particles radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asaithamby, Aroumougame, E-mail: Aroumougame.Asaithamy@UTsouthwestern.edu [Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States); Chen, David J., E-mail: David.Chen@UTsouthwestern.edu [Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    Low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (i.e., {gamma}- and X-rays) induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that are rapidly repaired (rejoined). In contrast, DNA damage induced by the dense ionizing track of high-atomic number and energy (HZE) particles is slowly repaired or is irreparable. These unrepaired and/or misrepaired DNA lesions may contribute to the observed higher relative biological effectiveness for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in HZE particle irradiated cells compared to those treated with low-LET radiation. The types of DNA lesions induced by HZE particles have been characterized in vitro and usually consist of two or more closely spaced strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases on opposing strands. It is unclear why these lesions are difficult to repair. In this review, we highlight the potential of a new technology allowing direct visualization of different types of DNA lesions in human cells and document the emerging significance of live-cell imaging for elucidation of the spatio-temporal characterization of complex DNA damage. We focus on the recent insights into the molecular pathways that participate in the repair of HZE particle-induced DSBs. We also discuss recent advances in our understanding of how different end-processing nucleases aid in repair of DSBs with complicated ends generated by HZE particles. Understanding the mechanism underlying the repair of DNA damage induced by HZE particles will have important implications for estimating the risks to human health associated with HZE particle exposure.

  7. Mechanism of cluster DNA damage repair in response to high-atomic number and energy particles radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Chen, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (i.e., γ- and X-rays) induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that are rapidly repaired (rejoined). In contrast, DNA damage induced by the dense ionizing track of high-atomic number and energy (HZE) particles is slowly repaired or is irreparable. These unrepaired and/or misrepaired DNA lesions may contribute to the observed higher relative biological effectiveness for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in HZE particle irradiated cells compared to those treated with low-LET radiation. The types of DNA lesions induced by HZE particles have been characterized in vitro and usually consist of two or more closely spaced strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases on opposing strands. It is unclear why these lesions are difficult to repair. In this review, we highlight the potential of a new technology allowing direct visualization of different types of DNA lesions in human cells and document the emerging significance of live-cell imaging for elucidation of the spatio-temporal characterization of complex DNA damage. We focus on the recent insights into the molecular pathways that participate in the repair of HZE particle-induced DSBs. We also discuss recent advances in our understanding of how different end-processing nucleases aid in repair of DSBs with complicated ends generated by HZE particles. Understanding the mechanism underlying the repair of DNA damage induced by HZE particles will have important implications for estimating the risks to human health associated with HZE particle exposure.

  8. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winther, J.F.; Ulbak, K.; Dreyer, L.; Pukkala, E.; Oesterlind, A.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to solar and ionizing radiation increases the risk for cancer in humans. Some 5% of solar radiation is within the ultraviolet spectrum and may cause both malignant melanoma and non-melanocytic skin cancer; the latter is regarded as a benign disease and is accordingly not included in our estimation of avoidable cancers. Under the assumption that the rate of occurrence of malignant melanoma of the buttocks of both men and women and of the scalp of women would apply to all parts of the body in people completely unexposed to solar radiation, it was estimated that approximately 95% of all malignant melanomas arising in the Nordic populations around the year 2000 will be due to exposure to natural ultraviolet radiation, equivalent to an annual number of about 4700 cases, with 2100 in men and 2600 in women, or some 4% of all cancers notified. Exposure to ionizing radiation in the Nordic countries occurs at an average effective dose per capita per year of about 3 mSv (Iceland, 1.1 mSv) from natural sources, and about 1 mSv from man-made sources. While the natural sources are primarily radon in indoor air, natural radionuclides in food, cosmic radiation and gamma radiation from soil and building materials, the man-made sources are dominated by the diagnostic and therapeutic use of ionizing radiation. On the basis of measured levels of radon in Nordic dwellings and associated risk estimates for lung cancer derived from well-conducted epidemiological studies, we estimated that about 180 cases of lung cancer (1% of all lung cancer cases) per year could be avoided in the Nordic countries around the year 2000 if indoor exposure to radon were eliminated, and that an additional 720 cases (6%) could be avoided annually if either radon or tobacco smoking were eliminated. Similarly, it was estimated that the exposure of the Nordic populations to natural sources of ionizing radiation other than radon and to medical sources will each give rise to an annual total of 2120

  9. Parameters of radiation defects in GaP and GaAssub(1-x)Psub(x) with thermostimulated current measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brajlovskij, E.Yu.; Marchuk, N.D.

    1980-01-01

    Introduction of point defects in gallium phosphide crystals and GaAssub(1-x)Psub(x) solid solutions under the action of 1 MeV electrons is studied by TSC method on Schottky barriers. The TSC spectra processing using the computer is given. In GaP crystals the dominant electron and hole traps are D-centers (Esub(c)-1.24 eV) and M-centers (Esub(v)+1.43 eV). The received level spectrum explains the compensation of conductivity of n- and p-lGaP under irradiation. It is shown that main defects observed in electron irradiated GaP are most likely phosphorus vacancies (D-center)and gallium vacancies (M-center)

  10. Deep-level defects introduced by 1 MeV electron radiation in AlInGaP for multijunction space solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.S.; Yamaguchi, M.; Ekins-Daukes, N. J.; Khan, A.; Takamoto, T.; Agui, T.; Kamimura, K.; Kaneiwa, M.; Imaizumi, M.; Ohshima, T.; Itoh, H.

    2005-01-01

    Presented in this paper are 1 MeV electron irradiation effects on wide-band-gap (1.97 eV) (Al 0.08 Ga 0.92 ) 0.52 In 0.48 P diodes and solar cells. The carrier removal rate estimated in p-AlInGaP with electron fluence is about 1 cm -1 , which is lower than that in InP and GaAs. From high-temperature deep-level transient spectroscopy measurements, a deep-level defect center such as majority-carrier (hole) trap H2 (E ν +0.90±0.05 eV) was observed. The changes in carrier concentrations (Δp) and trap densities as a function of electron fluence were compared, and as a result the total introduction rate, 0.39 cm -1 , of majority-carrier trap centers (H1 and H2) is different from the carrier removal rate, 1 cm -1 , in p-AlInGaP. From the minority-carrier injection annealing (100 mA/cm 2 ), the annealing activation energy of H2 defect is ΔE=0.60 eV, which is likely to be associated with a vacancy-phosphorus Frenkel pair (V p -P i ). The recovery of defect concentration and carrier concentration in the irradiated p-AlInGaP by injection relates that a deep-level defect H2 acts as a recombination center as well as compensator center

  11. Distribution of defects in wind turbine blades and reliability assessment of blades containing defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensgaard Toft, Henrik; Branner, Kim; Berring, Peter

    2009-01-01

    on the assumption that one error in the production process tends to trigger several defects. For both models additional information about number, type and size of the defects is included as stochastic variables. The probability of failure for a wind turbine blade will not only depend on variations in the material......In the present paper two stochastic models for the distribution of defects in wind turbine blades are proposed. The first model assumes that the individual defects are completely randomly distributed in the blade. The second model assumes that the defects occur in clusters of different size based...... properties and the load but also on potential defects in the blades. As a numerical example the probability of failure is calculated for the main spar both with and without defects in terms of delaminations. The delaminations increase the probability of failure compared to a perfect blade, but by applying...

  12. Fundamental investigation of point defect interactions in FE-CR alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, B.D.; Lee, H.J.; Wong, K.

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Fe-Cr alloys are a leading candidate material for structural applications in Generation TV and fusion reactors, and there is a relatively large database on their irradiation performance. However, complete understanding of the response of Fe-Cr alloys to intermediate-to-high temperature irradiation, including the radiation induced segregation of Cr, requires knowledge of point defect and point defect cluster interactions with Cr solute atoms and impurities. We present results from a hierarchical multi-scale modelling approach of defect cluster behaviour in Fe-Cr alloys. The modelling includes ab initio electronic structure calculations performed using the VASP code with projector-augmented electron wave functions using PBE pseudo-potentials and a collinear treatment of magnetic spins, molecular dynamics using semi-empirical Finnic-Sinclair type potentials, and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of coupled defect and Cr transport responsible for microstructural evolution. The modelling results are compared to experimental observations in both binary Fe-Cr and more complex ferritic-martensitic alloys, and provide a basis for understanding a dislocation loop evolution and the observations of Cr enrichment and depletion at grain boundaries in various irradiation experiments. (authors)

  13. Radiation-enhanced diffusion in metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, N.Q.; Rothman, S.J.

    1975-01-01

    Some phenomena that involves diffusion during irradiation include fission-product redistribution in reactor fuels, defect clustering in CTR walls or fast-reactor cladding, smearing-out of gradients in ion-implanted semiconductors, and microstructure development in a HVEM. This paper is a review of the basics of radiation-enhanced diffusion (REM). The present status of REM today is somewhat the same as diffusion in the 1940's, and recommendations are made for further work. 105 references

  14. Defect evolution in a Ni−Mo−Cr−Fe alloy subjected to high-dose Kr ion irradiation at elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, Massey de los [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW, 2234 (Australia); Nuclear Fuel Cycle Royal Commission (NFCRC), 50 Grenfell Street Adelaide South Australia, 5000 (Australia); Voskoboinikov, Roman [The National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Kurchatov Sq 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Kirk, Marquis A. [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Huang, Hefei [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science (CAS), 2019 Jialuo Road, Jiading District, Shanghai 201800 (China); Lumpkin, Greg [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW, 2234 (Australia); Bhattacharyya, Dhriti, E-mail: dhriti.bhattacharyya@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW, 2234 (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    A candidate Ni−Mo−Cr−Fe alloy (GH3535) for application as a structural material in a molten salt nuclear reactor was irradiated with 1 MeV Kr{sup 2+} ions (723 K, max dose of 100 dpa) at the IVEM-Tandem facility. The evolution of defects like dislocation loops and vacancy- and self-interstitial clusters was examined in-situ. For obtaining a deeper insight into the true nature of these defects, the irradiated sample was further analysed under a TEM post-facto. The results show that there is a range of different types of defects formed under irradiation. Interaction of radiation defects with each other and with pre-existing defects, e.g., linear dislocations, leads to the formation of complex microstructures. Molecular dynamics simulations used to obtain a greater understanding of these defect transformations showed that the interaction between linear dislocations and radiation induced dislocation loops could form faulted structures that explain the fringed contrast of these defects observed in TEM.

  15. Molecular-dynamics simulation of defect formation energy in boron nitride nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, W.H.; Hwang, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the defect formation energy of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) using molecular dynamics simulation. Although the defect with tetragon-octagon pairs (TOP) is favored in the flat BNNTs cap, BN clusters, and the growth of BNNTs, the formation energy of the TOP defect is significantly higher than that of the pentagon-heptagon pairs (PHP) defect in BNNTs. The PHP defect reduces the effect of the structural distortion caused by the TOP defect, in spite of homoelemental bonds. The instability of the TOP defect generates the structural transformation into BNNTs with no defect at about 1500 K. This mechanism shows that the TOP defect is less favored in case of BNNTs

  16. Elastic interaction energies of defect structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, E.; de Fontaine, D.

    1976-01-01

    The elastic strain energy between point defects and small disk-shaped clusters of defects are calculated to determine stable configurations. A distortion tensor of tetragonal symmetry is assigned to each impurity atom. The tetragonality ratio t is varied to cover needle-type (t greater than 1), spherical (t = 1) and disk-type (t less than 0) strain fields. To vary the elastic properties of the host material, Fe, Cu, Al, and V were chosen as examples. Computer calculations are based on the microscopic theory of elasticity which emphasizes calculations in discrete Fourier space. Pairs of point defects order along [001] for t less than 1 and along (001) for t = 1 for all host elements. For t greater than 1 fcc lattices and bcc lattices behave differently. It is shown that only certain three dimensional periodic arrangements of parallel and perpendicular disk-like defect clusters are realized for given tetragonality ratio t and host element

  17. Cluster headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... Doctors do not know exactly what causes cluster headaches. They ... (chemical in the body released during an allergic response) or ...

  18. The study of the identification of minimal defects in radiograph, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senda, Tomio; Hirayama, Kazuo; Yokoyama, Keiji; Nakamura, Kazuo.

    1988-01-01

    In the first report, it was discussed in terms of the mass on the detectible limit of such minimal defects of cylindrical defect as a representative of ingot-defect and slit defect as a representative of plate-defect respectively which generally appear on the weld joints, using contrast distribution area of defects on the radiograph. In the second report, an experiment is done to vary the contrast of radiograph by dual exposure system and to vary the radiation by rotating photographing in order to investigate the corresponding relation of defectible limit of defect dimension between cylindrical defect and slit defect. (author)

  19. Accumulation of radiation defects and products of radiolysis in lithium orthosilicate pebbles with silicon dioxide additions under action of high absorbed doses and high temperature in air and inert atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarins, A.; Supe, A.; Kizane, G.; Knitter, R.; Baumane, L.

    2012-10-01

    One of the technological problems of a fusion reactor is the change in composition and structure of ceramic breeders (Li4SiO4 or Li2TiO3 pebbles) during long-term operation. In this study changes in the composition and microstructure of Li4SiO4 pebbles with 2.5 wt% silicon dioxide additions, fabricated by a melt-spraying process, were investigated after fast electron irradiation (E = 5 MeV, dose rate up to 88 MGy h-1) with high absorbed dose from 1.3 to 10.6 GGy at high temperature (543-573 K) in air and argon atmosphere. Three types of pebbles with different diameters and grain sizes were investigated. Products of radiolysis were studied by means of FTIR and XRD. TSL and ESR spectroscopy were used to detect radiation defects. SEM was used to investigate structure of pebbles. Experiments showed that Li4SiO4 pebbles with a diameter of 500 μm had similar radiation stability as pebbles with diameter <50 μm which were annealed at 1173 K for 128 h in argon and air atmosphere. As well as determined that lithium orthosilicate pebbles with size 500 (1243 K 168 h) and <50 μm (1173 K 128 h) have a higher radiation stability in air and argon atmosphere than pebbles with size <50 μm (1073 K 1 h). Degree of decomposition α10.56 of the lithium orthosilicate pebbles at an absorbed dose of 10.56 GGy in air atmosphere is 1.5% and 0.15% at irradiation in dry argon. It has been suggested that changes of radiation stability of lithium orthosilicate pebbles in air atmosphere comparing with irradiated pebbles in argon atmosphere is effect of chemical reaction of lithium orthosilicate surface with air containing - H2O and CO2 in irradiation process. As well as it has been suggested that silicon dioxide - lithium metasilicate admixtures do not affect formation mechanism of radiation defect and products of radiolysis in lithium orthosilicate pebbles.

  20. Accumulation of radiation defects and products of radiolysis in lithium orthosilicate pebbles with silicon dioxide additions under action of high absorbed doses and high temperature in air and inert atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarins, A.; Supe, A. [Laboratory of Radiation Chemistry of Solids, Institute of Chemical Physics, University of Latvia, Kronvalda Bulvaris 4, LV-1010 Riga (Latvia); Kizane, G., E-mail: gunta.kizane@lu.lv [Laboratory of Radiation Chemistry of Solids, Institute of Chemical Physics, University of Latvia, Kronvalda Bulvaris 4, LV-1010 Riga (Latvia); Knitter, R. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-WPT), POB 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Baumane, L. [Laboratory of Radiation Chemistry of Solids, Institute of Chemical Physics, University of Latvia, Kronvalda Bulvaris 4, LV-1010 Riga (Latvia)

    2012-10-15

    One of the technological problems of a fusion reactor is the change in composition and structure of ceramic breeders (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} or Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles) during long-term operation. In this study changes in the composition and microstructure of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles with 2.5 wt% silicon dioxide additions, fabricated by a melt-spraying process, were investigated after fast electron irradiation (E = 5 MeV, dose rate up to 88 MGy h{sup -1}) with high absorbed dose from 1.3 to 10.6 GGy at high temperature (543-573 K) in air and argon atmosphere. Three types of pebbles with different diameters and grain sizes were investigated. Products of radiolysis were studied by means of FTIR and XRD. TSL and ESR spectroscopy were used to detect radiation defects. SEM was used to investigate structure of pebbles. Experiments showed that Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles with a diameter of 500 {mu}m had similar radiation stability as pebbles with diameter <50 {mu}m which were annealed at 1173 K for 128 h in argon and air atmosphere. As well as determined that lithium orthosilicate pebbles with size 500 (1243 K 168 h) and <50 {mu}m (1173 K 128 h) have a higher radiation stability in air and argon atmosphere than pebbles with size <50 {mu}m (1073 K 1 h). Degree of decomposition {alpha}{sub 10.56} of the lithium orthosilicate pebbles at an absorbed dose of 10.56 GGy in air atmosphere is 1.5% and 0.15% at irradiation in dry argon. It has been suggested that changes of radiation stability of lithium orthosilicate pebbles in air atmosphere comparing with irradiated pebbles in argon atmosphere is effect of chemical reaction of lithium orthosilicate surface with air containing - H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} in irradiation process. As well as it has been suggested that silicon dioxide - lithium metasilicate admixtures do not affect formation mechanism of radiation defect and products of radiolysis in lithium orthosilicate pebbles.

  1. Evaluation of defects induced by neutron radiation in reactor pressure vessels steels; Evaluacion de los defectos inducidos por la radiacion neutronica en los aceros de vasijas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Jimenez, J

    1978-07-01

    We have developed a method for calculating the production of neutron induced defects (depleted zone and crowdions) in ferritic pressure vessel steels for different neutron spectra. They have been analysed both the recoil primary atoms produced by elastic and inelastic collisions with fast neutrons and the ones produced by gamma-ray emission by thermal neutron absorption. Theoretical modelling of increasing in the ductile-brittle transition temperature of ferritic steels has been correlated with experimental data at irradiation temperature up to 400 degree centigree (Author) 15 refs.

  2. Severe signal loss in diamond beam loss monitors in high particle rate environments by charge trapping in radiation-induced defects

    CERN Document Server

    Kassel, Florian; Dabrowski, Anne; de Boer, Wim

    2016-01-01

    The beam condition monitoring leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC). As detectors 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors are positioned in rings around the beam pipe. Here, high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the charge collection efficiency (CCE). However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements and simulations, especially in single-crystalline (sCVD) diamonds, which have a low initial concentration of defects. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the ionization rate. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field,...

  3. Facts about Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... label> Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts about Birth Defects Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... having a baby born without a birth defect. Birth Defects Are Common Every 4 ½ minutes, a ...

  4. Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the ... that she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In ...

  5. Atomic cluster collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korol, Andrey V.; Solov'yov, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    Atomic cluster collisions are a field of rapidly emerging research interest by both experimentalists and theorists. The international symposium on atomic cluster collisions (ISSAC) is the premier forum to present cutting-edge research in this field. It was established in 2003 and the most recent conference was held in Berlin, Germany in July of 2011. This Topical Issue presents original research results from some of the participants, who attended this conference. This issues specifically focuses on two research areas, namely Clusters and Fullerenes in External Fields and Nanoscale Insights in Radiation Biodamage.

  6. Strained interface defects in silicon nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Benjamin G.; Stradins, Paul [National Center for Photovoltaics, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Hiller, Daniel; Zacharias, Margit [IMTEK - Faculty of Engineering, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg (Germany); Luo, Jun-Wei; Beard, Matthew C. [Chemical and Materials Science, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Semonin, Octavi E. [Chemical and Materials Science, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2012-08-07

    The surface of silicon nanocrystals embedded in an oxide matrix can contain numerous interface defects. These defects strongly affect the nanocrystals' photoluminescence efficiency and optical absorption. Dangling-bond defects are nearly eliminated by H{sub 2} passivation, thus decreasing absorption below the quantum-confined bandgap and enhancing PL efficiency by an order of magnitude. However, there remain numerous other defects seen in absorption by photothermal deflection spectroscopy; these defects cause non-radiative recombination that limits the PL efficiency to <15%. Using atomistic pseudopotential simulations, we attribute these defects to two specific types of distorted bonds: Si-Si and bridging Si-O-Si bonds between two Si atoms at the nanocrystal surface. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Primary radiation damage characterization of α-iron under irradiation temperature for various PKA energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahi, Qurat-ul-ain; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2018-04-01

    The understanding of radiation-induced microstructural defects in body-centered cubic (BCC) iron is of major interest to those using advanced steel under extreme conditions in nuclear reactors. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were implemented to examine the primary radiation damage in BCC iron with displacement cascades of energy 1, 5, 10, 20, and 30 keV at temperatures ranging from 100 to 1000 K. Statistical analysis of eight MD simulations of collision cascades were carried out along each [110], [112], [111] and a high index [135] direction and the temperature dependence of the surviving number of point defects and the in-cascade clustering of vacancies and interstitials were studied. The peak time and the corresponding number of defects increase with increasing irradiation temperature and primary knock-on atom (PKA) energy. However, the final number of surviving point defects decreases with increasing lattice temperature. This is associated with the increase of thermal spike at high PKA energy and its long timespan at higher temperatures. Defect production efficiency (i.e., surviving MD defects, per Norgett-Robinson-Torrens displacements) also showed a continuous decrease with the increasing irradiation temperature and PKA energy. The number of interstitial clusters increases with both irradiation temperature and PKA energy. However, the increase in the number of vacancy clusters with PKA energy is minimal-to-constant and decreases as the irradiation temperature increases. Similarly, the probability and cluster size distribution for larger interstitials increase with temperature, whereas only smaller size vacancy clusters were observed at higher temperatures.

  8. Production and aging of paramagnetic point defects in P-doped floating zone silicon irradiated with high fluence 27 MeV electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joita, A. C.; Nistor, S. V.

    2018-04-01

    Enhancing the long term stable performance of silicon detectors used for monitoring the position and flux of the particle beams in high energy physics experiments requires a better knowledge of the nature, stability, and transformation properties of the radiation defects created over the operation time. We report the results of an electron spin resonance investigation in the nature, transformation, and long term stability of the irradiation paramagnetic point defects (IPPDs) produced by high fluence (2 × 1016 cm-2), high energy (27 MeV) electrons in n-type, P-doped standard floating zone silicon. We found out that both freshly irradiated and aged (i.e., stored after irradiation for 3.5 years at 250 K) samples mainly contain negatively charged tetravacancy and pentavacancy defects in the first case and tetravacancy defects in the second one. The fact that such small cluster vacancy defects have not been observed by irradiation with low energy (below 5 MeV) electrons, but were abundantly produced by irradiation with neutrons, strongly suggests the presence of the same mechanism of direct formation of small vacancy clusters by irradiation with neutrons and high energy, high fluence electrons, in agreement with theoretical predictions. Differences in the nature and annealing properties of the IPPDs observed between the 27 MeV electrons freshly irradiated, and irradiated and aged samples were attributed to the presence of a high concentration of divacancies in the freshly irradiated samples, defects which transform during storage at 250 K through diffusion and recombination processes.

  9. Radiation-induced defects and their recombination processes in the x-ray storage phosphor BaBr2:Eu2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secu, M; Schweizer, S; Rogulis, U; Spaeth, J-M

    2003-01-01

    The recombination processes in the x-ray storage phosphor BaBr 2 :Eu 2+ were investigated by optical and magneto-optical methods. A structure-sensitive investigation of the defects involved in the recombination processes was performed by detecting the microwave-induced changes in the recombination luminescence in a high magnetic field. F centres as well as V K hole centres are created after x-irradiation at low temperatures. The low-energy recombination band peaking at about 460 nm is due to F-V K centre recombinations, whereas the two high energy bands at 282 and 315 nm are probably due to recombinations of self-trapped excitons

  10. Frequency of mutant T lymphocytes defective in the expression of the T-cell antigen receptor gene among radiation-exposed people

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyoizumi, Seishi; Umeki, Shigeko; Akiyama, Mitoshi

    1991-06-01

    The frequency of mutant T lymphocytes defective in T-cell receptor gene (α or β) expression was measured using the two-color flow cytometric technique. Results for a total of 203 atomic bomb survivors, 78 of whom were proximally exposed (DS86 doses of ≥ 1.5 Gy) and 125 of whom were distally exposed (DS86 doses of 228 Th formerly used for radiodiagnosis. In addition, thyroid disease patients treated with 131 I showed a dose-related increase of mutant frequency. It was suggested that the present T-cell receptor mutation assay has a unique characteristic as a biological dosimeter for the measurement of recent exposures to genotoxic agents. (author)

  11. Radiation-induced defects and their recombination processes in the x-ray storage phosphor BaBr sub 2 :Eu sup 2 sup +

    CERN Document Server

    Secu, M; Rogulis, U; Spaeth, J M

    2003-01-01

    The recombination processes in the x-ray storage phosphor BaBr sub 2 :Eu sup 2 sup + were investigated by optical and magneto-optical methods. A structure-sensitive investigation of the defects involved in the recombination processes was performed by detecting the microwave-induced changes in the recombination luminescence in a high magnetic field. F centres as well as V sub K hole centres are created after x-irradiation at low temperatures. The low-energy recombination band peaking at about 460 nm is due to F-V sub K centre recombinations, whereas the two high energy bands at 282 and 315 nm are probably due to recombinations of self-trapped excitons.

  12. Weighted Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ackerman, Margareta; Ben-David, Shai; Branzei, Simina

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a natural generalization of the classical clustering problem, considering clustering tasks in which different instances may have different weights.We conduct the first extensive theoretical analysis on the influence of weighted data on standard clustering algorithms in both...... the partitional and hierarchical settings, characterizing the conditions under which algorithms react to weights. Extending a recent framework for clustering algorithm selection, we propose intuitive properties that would allow users to choose between clustering algorithms in the weighted setting and classify...

  13. Study on dependence of dose enhancement on cluster morphology of gold nanoparticles in radiation therapy using a body-centred cubic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sang Hee; Chung, Kwangzoo; Shin, Jung Wook; Cheon, Wonjoong; Han, Youngyih; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho

    2017-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) injected in a body for dose enhancement in radiation therapy are known to form clusters. We investigated the dependence of dose enhancement on the GNP morphology using Monte-Carlo simulations and compared the model predictions with experimental data. The cluster morphology was approximated as a body-centred cubic (BCC) structure by placing GNPs at the 8 corners and the centre of a cube with an edge length of 0.22-1.03 µm in a 4  ×  4  ×  4 µm3 water-filled phantom. We computed the dose enhancement ratio (DER) for 50 and 260 kVp photons as a function of the distance from the cube centre for 12 different cube sizes. A 10 nm-wide concentric shell shaped detector was placed up to 100 nm away from a GNP at the cube centre. For model validation, simulations based on BCC and nanoparticle random distribution (NRD) models were performed using parameters that corresponded to the experimental conditions, which measured increases in the relative biological effect due to GNPs. We employed the linear quadratic model to compute cell surviving fraction (SF) and sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER). The DER is inversely proportional to the distance to the GNPs. The largest DERs were 1.97 and 1.80 for 50 kVp and 260 kVp photons, respectively. The SF predicted by the BCC model agreed with the experimental value within 10%, up to a 5 Gy dose, while the NRD model showed a deviation larger than 10%. The SERs were 1.21  ±  0.13, 1.16  ±  0.11, and 1.08  ±  0.11 according to the experiment, BCC, and NRD models, respectively. We most accurately predicted the GNP radiosensitization effect using the BCC approximation and suggest that the BCC model is effective for use in nanoparticle dosimetry.

  14. Radiation damage in silicon exposed to high-energy protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, Gordon; Hayama, Shusaku; Murin, Leonid; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard; Bondarenko, Vladimir; Sengupta, Asmita; Davia, Cinzia; Karpenko, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Photoluminescence, infrared absorption, positron annihilation, and deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) have been used to investigate the radiation damage produced by 24 GeV/c protons in crystalline silicon. The irradiation doses and the concentrations of carbon and oxygen in the samples have been chosen to monitor the mobility of the damage products. Single vacancies (and self-interstitials) are introduced at the rate of ∼1 cm -1 , and divacancies at 0.5 cm -1 . Stable di-interstitials are formed when two self-interstitials are displaced in one damage event, and they are mobile at room temperature. In the initial stages of annealing the evolution of the point defects can be understood mainly in terms of trapping at the impurities. However, the positron signal shows that about two orders of magnitude more vacancies are produced by the protons than are detected in the point defects. Damage clusters exist, and are largely removed by annealing at 700 to 800 K, when there is an associated loss of broad band emission between 850 and 1000 meV. The well-known W center is generated by restructuring within clusters, with a range of activation energies of about 1.3 to 1.6 eV, reflecting the disordered nature of the clusters. Comparison of the formation of the X centers in oxygenated and oxygen-lean samples suggests that the J defect may be interstitial related rather than vacancy related. To a large extent, the damage and annealing behavior may be factorized into point defects (monitored by sharp-line optical spectra and DLTS) and cluster defects (monitored by positron annihilation and broadband luminescence). Taking this view to the limit, the generation rates for the point defects are as predicted by simply taking the damage generated by the Coulomb interaction of the protons and Si nuclei

  15. Dechanneling measurements of defect depth profiles and effective cross-channel distribution of misaligned atoms in ion irradiated gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronko, P.P.

    1975-01-01

    Defect depth profiles for self ion and He + irradiated gold are obtained from single and multiple scatter dechanneling analysis in single crystal gold films. Quantitative defect densities are obtained through use of atomic scattering cross sections. Integral damage profiles are extracted from the dechanneling spectra and subsequently differentiated to yield the volume concentration of defects as a function of depth. Results from the self ion irradiations suggest that incident ions produce defect distributions across depths much greater than predicted by random stopping theory. This is in agreement with TEM observations of others. Comparison of the experimental profiles is made with theoretical vacancy distributions predicted by defect diffusion in a radiation environment. Similarities are observed for the low fluence irradiations suggesting that profile characteristics may be controlled by rapid migration and loss of interstitials to the film surfaces during irradiation. Information on the across-channel distribution of misaligned atoms in the damaged films is obtained with the steady increase of transverse energy model applied to the dechanneling spectra. A predominance of slight misalignment is observed with no contribution to dechanneling coming from atoms displaced significantly close to the center of the channels. This is in keeping with what is expected for crystal distortions caused by the strain fields associated with vacancy cluster defects

  16. Dechanneling measurements of defect depth profiles and effective cross-channel distribution of misaligned atoms in ion-irradiated gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronko, P.P.

    1976-01-01

    Defect depth profiles for self-ion and He + irradiated gold are obtained from single and multiple scatter dechanneling analysis in single-crystal gold films. Quantitative defect densities are obtained through use of atomic-scattering cross sections. Integral damage profiles are extracted from the dechanneling spectra and subsequently differentiated to yield the volume concentration of defects as a function of depth. Results from the self-ion irradiations suggest that incident ions produce defect distributions across depths much greater than predicted by random stopping theory. This is in agreement with TEM observations of others. Comparison of the experimental profiles is made with theoretical vacancy distributions predicted by defect diffusion in a radiation environment. Similarities are observed for the low-fluence irradiations, suggesting that profile characteristics may be controlled by rapid migration and loss of interstitials to the film surfaces during irradiation. Information on the across-channel distribution of misaligned atoms in the damaged films is obtained with the steady increase of transverse energy model. A predominance of slight misalignment is observed with no contribution to dechanneling coming from atoms displaced significantly close to the center of the channels. This is in keeping with what is expected for crystal distortions caused by the strain fields associated with vacancy cluster defects. (Auth.)

  17. Cluster management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, R

    1992-11-01

    Cluster management is a management model that fosters decentralization of management, develops leadership potential of staff, and creates ownership of unit-based goals. Unlike shared governance models, there is no formal structure created by committees and it is less threatening for managers. There are two parts to the cluster management model. One is the formation of cluster groups, consisting of all staff and facilitated by a cluster leader. The cluster groups function for communication and problem-solving. The second part of the cluster management model is the creation of task forces. These task forces are designed to work on short-term goals, usually in response to solving one of the unit's goals. Sometimes the task forces are used for quality improvement or system problems. Clusters are groups of not more than five or six staff members, facilitated by a cluster leader. A cluster is made up of individuals who work the same shift. For example, people with job titles who work days would be in a cluster. There would be registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, nursing assistants, and unit clerks in the cluster. The cluster leader is chosen by the manager based on certain criteria and is trained for this specialized role. The concept of cluster management, criteria for choosing leaders, training for leaders, using cluster groups to solve quality improvement issues, and the learning process necessary for manager support are described.

  18. Spatial distribution of orofacial cleft defect births in Harris County, Texas, 1990 to 1994, and historical evidence for the presence of low-level radioactivity in tap water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cech, Irina; Burau, Keith D; Walston, Jane

    2007-06-01

    While both ionizing and nonionizing radiation are known to impair human reproductive capacity, the role of low-level domestic radiation continues to be an unsettled issue. We examined the geostatistical distribution (residential longitude and latitude) of orofacial cleft birth cases adjusted for the underlying population distribution. Furthermore, we examined the cleft birth rates enumerated by zip codes for possible associations with levels of radium and radon in drinking water. Cleft births and unaffected live births in Harris County, Texas, from 1990 to 1994, were geocoded by residential addresses and tested for spatial clusters using the space-time clustering program SaTScan. Historical sample data on local variations in water quality facilitated the assessment of the association of orofacial cleft defect births with low-level radiation exposure. A cluster of significantly greater than expected numbers of cleft defect births was identified in northwest Harris County, (relative risk = 3.0, P = 0.043), where the presence of elevated levels of radium (> 3 pCi/L) and radon (> 300 pCi/L) in the tap water has been known since the 1980s. Despite the ecological design of the study, lacking individual exposure measurements for cleft birth residences, there was strong suggestive evidence of an association between elevated radiation levels in tap water and elevated cleft birth prevalence rates by zip codes. Attention of physicians is invited to environmental causes as potential risk factors for orofacial cleft. This would aid in genetic counseling and the development of future preventive measures.

  19. Study of optical absorption in the ultraviolet region of mixed crystals ADA/ADP aiming to investigate defects and centers formed by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, S.

    1978-01-01

    The development of a crystal model to explain the ionizing radiation effect on the color centers is presented. The methods of crystal growth used in the sample preparation and the requirements necessary for an efficient optical study, such as area, thickness purity, etc, are described. The processes of color center production are analysed and the techniques used in the study of color centers, such as optical absorption, spectrometry and spin resonance, are described. The computer programs used in curve adjustment and the approximated calculation of centers per cm 3 are also presented. (M.C.K.) [pt

  20. Defect engineering of ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, M.H. [Center for Materials Research and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-2711 (United States)], E-mail: m_weber@wsu.edu; Selim, F.A.; Solodovnikov, D.; Lynn, K.G. [Center for Materials Research and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-2711 (United States)

    2008-10-31

    The defect responsible for the transparent to red color change of nominally undoped ZnO bulk single crystals is investigated. Upon annealing in the presence of metallic Zn as reported by Halliburton et al. and also Ti and Zr a native defect forms with an energy level about 0.7 eV below the conduction band. This change is reversible upon annealing in oxygen. Optical transmission data along with positron depth profiles and annealing studies are combined to identify the defect as oxygen vacancies. Vacancy clustering occurs at about 500 deg. C if isolated zinc and oxygen vacancies. In the absence of zinc vacancies, clusters form at about 800 deg. C.

  1. Defect engineering of ZnO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, M.H.; Selim, F.A.; Solodovnikov, D.; Lynn, K.G.

    2008-01-01

    The defect responsible for the transparent to red color change of nominally undoped ZnO bulk single crystals is investigated. Upon annealing in the presence of metallic Zn as reported by Halliburton et al. and also Ti and Zr a native defect forms with an energy level about 0.7 eV below the conduction band. This change is reversible upon annealing in oxygen. Optical transmission data along with positron depth profiles and annealing studies are combined to identify the defect as oxygen vacancies. Vacancy clustering occurs at about 500 deg. C if isolated zinc and oxygen vacancies. In the absence of zinc vacancies, clusters form at about 800 deg. C

  2. Diffuse x-ray scattering studies of defect reactions in electron-irradiated dilute nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averback, R.S.; Ehrhart, P.

    1984-01-01

    Huang diffuse scattering was employed to study defect properties in dilute Ni-Si alloys. Ni alloys containing 1 at.% and 0.05 at.% Si were irradiated with electrons at 4.2 K and were subsequently isochronally annealed. It was found that, prior to annealing, the Frenkel-pair resistivities and self-interstitial atom configurations were the same in the alloys as in pure Ni. The independence of the Frenkel-pair resistivity to Si concentration indicates that the resistivities arising from Frenkel pairs and Si solute are linearly additive in Ni. After annealing through stage I to 85 K, the defect cluster size grew to 1.5, 2.3 and 3.0 interstitial atoms for the 1 at.% Si, 0.05 at.% Si and pure Ni specimens, respectively. These results demonstrate that self-interstitial atoms are not immobilised by single Si atoms in Ni, but rather complexes involving several Si atoms and/or two interstitial atoms are the stable defects at the end of annealing stage I. It was also observed that Si solute in Ni strongly suppresses the growth of interstitial clusters in stage II. In the 1 at.% Si alloys di-interstitials were immobilised up to temperatures between 200 and 300 K. There was no indication that Si solute reduced vacancy mobility in annealing stage III. The consequences of these results for the understanding of high-temperature radiation effects in alloys are discussed. (author)

  3. Derivation of kinetic coefficients by atomistic methods for studying defect behavior in Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insepov, Z.; Rest, J.; Yacout, A.M.; Kuksin, A.Yu.; Norman, G.E.; Stegailov, V.V.; Starikov, S.V.; Yanilkin, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A multiscale concept couples molecular dynamics (MD) with ab initio and kinetic rate theory. ► Evolution of a system of self-interstitial atoms and vacancies in Mo is studied by MD. ► Formation of di-SIA clusters and SIA–vacancy recombination is analyzed. ► 1D diffusion of self-interstitials at various temperature and defect concentrations were studied. ► This paper provides a powerful predictive tool for simulating irradiation of nuclear materials. - Abstract: A multiscale concept for irradiated materials simulation is formulated based on coupling molecular dynamics simulations (MD) where the potential was obtained from ab initio data of energies of the basic defect structures, with kinetic mesoscale models. The evolution of a system containing self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) and vacancies in crystalline molybdenum is investigated by means of MD. The kinetics of formation of di-SIA clusters and SIA–vacancy recombination is analyzed via approaches used in the kinetic theory of radiation ageing. The effects of 1D diffusion of SIAs, temperature, and defect concentrations on the reaction rates are also studied. This approach can validate both the kinetic mechanisms and the appropriate kinetic coefficients, offering the potential to significantly reduce the uncertainty of the kinetic methodology and providing a powerful predictive tool for simulating irradiation behavior of nuclear materials.

  4. Isotopic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraedts, J.M.P.

    1983-01-01

    Spectra of isotopically mixed clusters (dimers of SF 6 ) are calculated as well as transition frequencies. The result leads to speculations about the suitability of the laser-cluster fragmentation process for isotope separation. (Auth.)

  5. Cluster Headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a role. Unlike migraine and tension headache, cluster headache generally isn't associated with triggers, such as foods, hormonal changes or stress. Once a cluster period begins, however, drinking alcohol ...

  6. Rapid transitions between defect configurations in a block copolymer melt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsarkova, Larisa; Knoll, Armin; Magerle, Robert

    2006-07-01

    With in situ scanning force microscopy, we image the ordering of cylindrical microdomains in a thin film of a diblock copolymer melt. Tracking the evolution of individual defects reveals elementary steps of defect motion via interfacial undulations and repetitive transitions between distinct defect configurations on a time scale of tens of seconds. The velocity of these transitions suggests a cooperative movement of clusters of chains. The activation energy for the opening/closing of a connection between two cylinders is estimated.

  7. Cluster Headache

    OpenAIRE

    Pearce, Iris

    1985-01-01

    Cluster headache is the most severe primary headache with recurrent pain attacks described as worse than giving birth. The aim of this paper was to make an overview of current knowledge on cluster headache with a focus on pathophysiology and treatment. This paper presents hypotheses of cluster headache pathophysiology, current treatment options and possible future therapy approaches. For years, the hypothalamus was regarded as the key structure in cluster headache, but is now thought to be pa...

  8. Categorias Cluster

    OpenAIRE

    Queiroz, Dayane Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Neste trabalho apresentamos as categorias cluster, que foram introduzidas por Aslak Bakke Buan, Robert Marsh, Markus Reineke, Idun Reiten e Gordana Todorov, com o objetivo de categoriíicar as algebras cluster criadas em 2002 por Sergey Fomin e Andrei Zelevinsky. Os autores acima, em [4], mostraram que existe uma estreita relação entre algebras cluster e categorias cluster para quivers cujo grafo subjacente é um diagrama de Dynkin. Para isto desenvolveram uma teoria tilting na estrutura triang...

  9. Meaningful Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  10. Horticultural cluster

    OpenAIRE

    SHERSTIUK S.V.; POSYLAYEVA K.I.

    2013-01-01

    In the article there are the theoretical and methodological approaches to the nature and existence of the cluster. The cluster differences from other kinds of cooperative and integration associations. Was develop by scientific-practical recommendations for forming a competitive horticultur cluster.

  11. Electron damage and defects in organic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howitt, D.G.

    1976-06-01

    The nature of the defects discernable from and the radiation damage that is induced by high resolution electron microscopy is reported. The structural aspects of the radiation damage process can be correlated to the expected radiochemical decomposition of these materials and these effects identified. The types of local defect formed by radiation damage are often clearly distinguishable, in high resolution images, from those inherent in the microstructure. Techniques used in this type of electron microscopy and the limitations imposed by radiation damage are described as are the relevant radiochemical characteristics of these processes. In copper pthalocyanine, microstructural features distinct from those induced by radiation damage were identified which are consistent with those predicted and described by other workers in similar materials. The high resolution studies indicate that some of the microstructures observed are caused by structural rearrangements that can account, to some extent, for additional crystallographic forms that have been identified in this material and the photochemical behaviour of related structures

  12. Impurity-related point defects and gamma-radiation response of massive quartz from the Borborema pegmatite province, in Brazil; Estudo da suscetibilidade ao escurecimento por radiacao gama de quartzo roseo-leitoso da provincia pegmatitica da Borborema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Milena Ribas de [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mineral; Gonzaga, Raysa Sthefany Gomes; Guzzo, Pedro Luiz [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Minas; Barreto, Sandra de Brito [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia; Melgarejo, Joan Carles, E-mail: milaribas@hotmail.com, E-mail: raysagonzaga@hotmail.com, E-mail: pguzzo@ufpe.br, E-mail: sandrabrito@smart.net.br, E-mail: joan.carles.melgarejo.draper@ub.edu [Universidade de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. de Cristalografia, Mineralogia e Depositos Minerais

    2012-06-15

    This work has investigated the changes induced by {gamma}-radiation on impurity-related point defects in massive rose quartz from one deposit located at The Borborema Pegmatite Province (Northeast Region, in Brazil). Samples extracted from rose and colorless (milky) quartz blocks were irradiated with doses of {sup 60}Co, from 0.5 to 96 kGy. Point defects related to Al, Ge, Li and OH were measured by optical, infrared, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, prior and after irradiation. The contents of Al, Li, Ge, Fe, Ti and other impurities were measured by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry in quartz fragments exhibiting rose, pale-rose, and milky colorations. It was found that [AlO{sub 4}]{sup 0}, [AlO{sub 4}/H]{sup 0} and [GeO{sub 4}/Li]{sup 0} were generated by the dissociation of [AlO{sub 4}/Li]{sup 0} and [Li-OH] centers with doses as lower as 0.5 kGy. Above 8 kGy, the electron paramagnetic resonance signal related to [GeO{sub 4}/Li]{sup 0} decreases due to the intense mobility of Li species throughout the quartz lattice, giving rise to E'{sub 1} centers perturbed by Ge. The increase in [AlO{sub 4}]{sup 0} content with {gamma} doses and the consequent rise in the intensity of smoky color were similar for both rose and colorless quartz. Scanning electron microscopy carried out in insoluble residues obtained after chemical dissolution of each type of quartz revealed the presence of nanometric fibers only in rose specimens. These results suggested that the cause of rose color in massive quartz from Borborema Pegmatite Province is probably related to the presence of dumortierite inclusions. (author)

  13. Cluster Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulati, Mukesh; Lund-Thomsen, Peter; Suresh, Sangeetha

    2018-01-01

    sell their products successfully in international markets, but there is also an increasingly large consumer base within India. Indeed, Indian industrial clusters have contributed to a substantial part of this growth process, and there are several hundred registered clusters within the country...... of this handbook, which focuses on the role of CSR in MSMEs. Hence we contribute to the literature on CSR in industrial clusters and specifically CSR in Indian industrial clusters by investigating the drivers of CSR in India’s industrial clusters....

  14. Radiation embrittlement of metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wechsler, M.S.

    1975-01-01

    Three types of radiation embrittlement are identified: (1) radiation embrittlement in nominally ductile metals, (2) radiation embrittlement in metals that undergo a ductile-brittle transition, and (3) high-temperature grain boundary embrittlement. This paper deals with type (1) and, more briefly, type (2) radiation embrittlement. Radiation embrittlement in nominally ductile metals is characterized by the premature onset of plastic instability, which causes a sharp decrease in the macroscopic plastic strain that the material can sustain before necking (uniform strain) and breaking (fracture strain). Dislocation channeling seems to be largely responsible and experimental results are reviewed. The origin of dislocation channeling is discussed. Irradiated metals that exhibit a ductile-brittle transition show an increase in the transition temperature but the nature of the transition (shear to cleavage fracture) does not appear to be greatly altered. A key factor is the temperature dependence of yielding and how it is affected upon irradiation. Impurities exert an influence on the stability of radiation-produced defect clusters and thus can alter the amount of radiation embrittlement experienced upon irradiation at somewhat elevated temperatures. In general, radiation embrittlement appears to stem mostly from changes in plastic properties (particularly in the trend toward more dynamic and inhomogeneous plastic deformation) rather than from changes in the inherent fracture process. 63 references, 10 figures

  15. Vacancy-indium clusters in implanted germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, Alexander I.

    2010-04-01

    Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements of heavily indium doped germanium samples revealed that a significant proportion of the indium dose is immobile. Using electronic structure calculations we address the possibility of indium clustering with point defects by predicting the stability of indium-vacancy clusters, InnVm. We find that the formation of large clusters is energetically favorable, which can explain the immobility of the indium ions. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Vacancy-indium clusters in implanted germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, Alexander I.; Kube, R.; Bracht, Hartmut A.; Grimes, Robin W.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2010-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements of heavily indium doped germanium samples revealed that a significant proportion of the indium dose is immobile. Using electronic structure calculations we address the possibility of indium clustering with point defects by predicting the stability of indium-vacancy clusters, InnVm. We find that the formation of large clusters is energetically favorable, which can explain the immobility of the indium ions. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiation damage structure in irradiated and annealed 440 WWER-Type reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocik, J.; Keilova, E.

    1993-01-01

    A review of irradiation damages in WWER-type RPV steels based on conventional Transmission Electron Microscopy investigations in a power reactor and a research reactor, is presented; the samples consist in Cr-Mo-V ferritic steel (15Kh2MFA type). The visible part of radiation-induced defects consists of very fine vanadium carbide precipitates, small dislocation loops and black dots (presumably corresponding to clusters and particle embryos formed from vacancies and solute-atoms (vanadium, copper, phosphorus) and carbon associated with vanadium. Radiation-induced defects are concentrated at dislocation substructure during irradiation in a power reactor, revealing the role of radiation-enhanced diffusion in damage structure forming process. Contrarily, the distribution of defects resulting from annealing of specimens irradiated in the research reactor is pre-determined by an homogenous distribution of radiation-induced defects prior to annealing. Increasing the number of re-irradiation and annealing cycles, the amount of dislocation loops among all defects seems to be growing. Simultaneously, the dislocation substructure recovers considerably. (authors). 14 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Radiation damage structure in irradiated and annealed 440 WWER-Type reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocik, J; Keilova, E [Czech Nuclear Society, Prague (Czech Republic)

    1994-12-31

    A review of irradiation damages in WWER-type RPV steels based on conventional Transmission Electron Microscopy investigations in a power reactor and a research reactor, is presented; the samples consist in Cr-Mo-V ferritic steel (15Kh2MFA type). The visible part of radiation-induced defects consists of very fine vanadium carbide precipitates, small dislocation loops and black dots (presumably corresponding) to clusters and particle embryos formed from vacancies and solute-atoms (vanadium, copper, phosphorus) and carbon associated with vanadium. Radiation-induced defects are concentrated at dislocation substructure during irradiation in a power reactor, revealing the role of radiation-enhanced diffusion in damage structure forming process. Contrarily, the distribution of defects resulting from annealing of specimens irradiated in the research reactor is pre-determined by an homogenous distribution of radiation-induced defects prior to annealing. Increasing the number of re-irradiation and annealing cycles, the amount of dislocation loops among all defects seems to be growing. Simultaneously, the dislocation substructure recovers considerably. (authors). 14 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Craniotomy Frontal Bone Defect

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-01

    Mar 1, 2018 ... Defect reconstruction and fixation of the graft: The defect of ... where all loose fragments of fractured frontal bone was removed via the ... Mandible. • Ilium. • Allograft ... pediatric patients owing to skull growth. Thus, autologous ...

  20. Congenital platelet function defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pool disorder; Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier syndrome; Platelet function defects - congenital ... Congenital platelet function defects are bleeding disorders that cause reduced platelet function. Most of the time, people with these disorders have ...

  1. Defect of the Eyelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guanning Nina; Pelton, Ron W; Humphrey, Clinton D; Kriet, John David

    2017-08-01

    Eyelid defects disrupt the complex natural form and function of the eyelids and present a surgical challenge. Detailed knowledge of eyelid anatomy is essential in evaluating a defect and composing a reconstructive plan. Numerous reconstructive techniques have been described, including primary closure, grafting, and a variety of local flaps. This article describes an updated reconstructive ladder for eyelid defects that can be used in various permutations to solve most eyelid defects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Computer simulation of defect behavior under fusion irradiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroga, T.; Ishino, S.

    1983-01-01

    To simulate defect behavior under irradiation, three kinds of cascade-annealing calculations have been carried out in alpha-iron using the codes MARLOWE, DAIQUIRI and their modifications. They are (1) cascade-annealing calculation with different masses of projectile, (2) defect drifting near dislocations after cascade production and (3) cascade-overlap calculation. The defect survival ratio is found to increase as decreasing mass of the projectile both after athermal close-pair recombination and after thermal annealing. It is shown that at moderate temperatures vacancy clustering is enhanced near dislocations. Cascade-overlap is found to decrease the defect survivability. In addition, the role of helium in vacancy clustering has been calculated in aluminium lattices and its effect is found to depend strongly on temperature, interstitials and the mobility of small clusters. These results correspond well to the experimental data and will be helpful for correlating between fusion and simulation irradiations. (orig.)

  3. Identification of vacancy defect complexes in transparent semiconducting oxides ZnO, In2O3 and SnO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makkonen, Ilja; Korhonen, Esa; Prozheeva, Vera; Tuomisto, Filip

    2016-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy, when combined with supporting high-quality modeling of positron states and annihilation in matter, is a powerful tool for detailed defect identification of vacancy-type defects in semiconductors and oxides. Here we demonstrate that the Doppler broadening of the positron annihilation radiation is a very sensitive means for observing the oxygen environment around cation vacancies, the main open-volume defects trapping positrons in measurements made for transparent semiconducting oxides. Changes in the positron annihilation signal due to external manipulation such as irradiation and annealing can be correlated with the associated changes in the sizes of the detected vacancy clusters. Our examples for ZnO, In 2 O 3 and SnO 2 demonstrate that oxygen vacancies in oxides can be detected directly using positron annihilation spectroscopy when they are complexed with cation vacancies. (paper)

  4. Identification of vacancy defect complexes in transparent semiconducting oxides ZnO, In2O3 and SnO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkonen, Ilja; Korhonen, Esa; Prozheeva, Vera; Tuomisto, Filip

    2016-06-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy, when combined with supporting high-quality modeling of positron states and annihilation in matter, is a powerful tool for detailed defect identification of vacancy-type defects in semiconductors and oxides. Here we demonstrate that the Doppler broadening of the positron annihilation radiation is a very sensitive means for observing the oxygen environment around cation vacancies, the main open-volume defects trapping positrons in measurements made for transparent semiconducting oxides. Changes in the positron annihilation signal due to external manipulation such as irradiation and annealing can be correlated with the associated changes in the sizes of the detected vacancy clusters. Our examples for ZnO, In2O3 and SnO2 demonstrate that oxygen vacancies in oxides can be detected directly using positron annihilation spectroscopy when they are complexed with cation vacancies.

  5. Data Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    On obtaining a new data set, the researcher is immediately faced with the challenge of obtaining a high-level understanding from the observations. What does a typical item look like? What are the dominant trends? How many distinct groups are included in the data set, and how is each one characterized? Which observable values are common, and which rarely occur? Which items stand out as anomalies or outliers from the rest of the data? This challenge is exacerbated by the steady growth in data set size [11] as new instruments push into new frontiers of parameter space, via improvements in temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution, or by the desire to "fuse" observations from different modalities and instruments into a larger-picture understanding of the same underlying phenomenon. Data clustering algorithms provide a variety of solutions for this task. They can generate summaries, locate outliers, compress data, identify dense or sparse regions of feature space, and build data models. It is useful to note up front that "clusters" in this context refer to groups of items within some descriptive feature space, not (necessarily) to "galaxy clusters" which are dense regions in physical space. The goal of this chapter is to survey a variety of data clustering methods, with an eye toward their applicability to astronomical data analysis. In addition to improving the individual researcher’s understanding of a given data set, clustering has led directly to scientific advances, such as the discovery of new subclasses of stars [14] and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [38]. All clustering algorithms seek to identify groups within a data set that reflect some observed, quantifiable structure. Clustering is traditionally an unsupervised approach to data analysis, in the sense that it operates without any direct guidance about which items should be assigned to which clusters. There has been a recent trend in the clustering literature toward supporting semisupervised or constrained

  6. Point defects in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The principal properties of point defects are studied: thermodynamics, electronic structure, interactions with etended defects, production by irradiation. Some measuring methods are presented: atomic diffusion, spectroscopic methods, diffuse scattering of neutron and X rays, positron annihilation, molecular dynamics. Then points defects in various materials are investigated: ionic crystals, oxides, semiconductor materials, metals, intermetallic compounds, carbides, nitrides [fr

  7. Fibrous metaphyseal defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritschl, P.; Hajek, P.C.; Pechmann, U.

    1989-01-01

    Sixteen patients with fibrous metaphyseal defects were examined with both plain radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Depending on the age of the fibrous metaphyseal defects, characteristic radiomorphologic changes were found which correlated well with MR images. Following intravenous Gadolinium-DTPA injection, fibrous metaphyseal defects invariably exhibited a hyperintense border and signal enhancement. (orig./GDG)

  8. Birth Defects (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Birth Defects KidsHealth / For Parents / Birth Defects What's in ... Prevented? Print en español Anomalías congénitas What Are Birth Defects? While still in the womb, some babies ...

  9. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, A.; Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  10. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, A.

    2015-06-18

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  11. Radiation-induced defects in LiAlO{sub 2} crystals: Holes trapped by lithium vacancies and their role in thermoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holston, M.S.; McClory, J.W.; Giles, N.C. [Department of Engineering Physics, Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); Halliburton, L.E., E-mail: Larry.Halliburton@mail.wvu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is used to identify the primary hole trap in undoped lithium aluminate (LiAlO{sub 2}) crystals. Our interest in this material arises because it is a candidate for radiation detection applications involving either optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) or thermoluminescence (TL). During an x-ray irradiation at room temperature, holes are trapped at oxygen ions adjacent to lithium vacancies. Large concentrations of these lithium vacancies are introduced into the crystal during growth. With the magnetic field along the [001] direction, the EPR spectrum from these trapped-hole centers consists of eleven lines, evenly spaced but with varying intensities, caused by nearly equal hyperfine interactions with two {sup 27}Al nuclei (I=5/2, 100% abundant). The g matrix is determined from the angular dependence of the EPR spectrum and has principal values of 2.0130, 2.0675, and 2.0015. These g shifts strongly support the model of a hole in a p orbital on an oxygen ion. The adjacent lithium vacancy stabilizes the hole on the oxygen ion. A sequence of pulsed thermal anneals above room temperature shows that the EPR spectrum from the holes trapped adjacent to the lithium vacancies disappears in the 90–120 °C range. The thermal decay of these hole centers directly correlates with an intense TL peak near 105 °C. Signals at lower magnetic field in the 9.4 GHz EPR spectra suggest that the electron trap associated with this TL peak at 105 °C may be a transition-metal-ion impurity, most likely Fe, located at a cation site. Additional less intense TL peaks are observed near 138, 176, and 278 °C. - Highlights: • Undoped LiAlO{sub 2} crystals are irradiated at room temperature with x-rays. • EPR is used to identify holes trapped at oxygen ions adjacent to lithium vacancies. • Thermal decay of the EPR spectrum correlates with an intense TL peak at 105 °C.

  12. Fractal kinetics of radiation-induced point-defect formation and decay in amorphous insulators: Application to color centers in silica-based optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griscom, David L.

    2001-11-01

    Formalisms have been developed to express the time evolution of bimolecular processes taking place in fractal spaces. These ``stretched-second-order'' solutions are specifically applicable to radiation-induced electron-hole pairs and/or vacancy-interstitial pairs in insulating glasses. Like the analogous Kohlrausch-type (stretched-first-order) expressions, the present solutions are functions of (kt)β, where 0the new second-order formalism and the familiar Kohlrausch approach have been used to fit experimental data (induced optical absorptions in silica-based glasses monitored at selected wavelengths) that serve as proxies for the numbers of color centers created by γ irradiation and/or destroyed by processes involving thermal, optical, or γ-ray activation. Two material systems were investigated: (1) optical fibers with Ge-doped-silica cores and (2) fibers with low-OH/low-chloride pure-silica cores. Successful fits of the growth curves for the Ge-doped-silica-core fibers at four widely separated dose rates were accomplished using solutions for color-center concentrations, N[(kt)β], which approach steady-state values, Nsat, as t-->∞. The parametrization of these fits reveals some unexpected, and potentially useful, empirical rules regarding the dose-rate dependences of β, k, and Nsat in the fractal regime (0the pure-silica-core fibers as well. In both material systems, there appear to be fractal classical phase transitions at certain threshold values of dose rate, below which the dose-rate dependencies of k and Nsat revert to those specified by classical (β=1) first- or second-order kinetics. For ktthe first- and second-order fractal kinetic growth curves become identical, i.e., N((kt)β)~Atβ, where the coefficient A depends on dose rate but not kinetic order. It is found empirically that A depends on the 3β/2 power of dose rate in both first- and second-order kinetics, thus ``accidentally'' becoming linearly proportional to dose rate in cases where β~2

  13. Cluster evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeffer, R.

    1987-01-01

    The galaxy and cluster luminosity functions are constructed from a model of the mass distribution based on hierarchical clustering at an epoch where the matter distribution is non-linear. These luminosity functions are seen to reproduce the present distribution of objects as can be inferred from the observations. They can be used to deduce the redshift dependence of the cluster distribution and to extrapolate the observations towards the past. The predicted evolution of the cluster distribution is quite strong, although somewhat less rapid than predicted by the linear theory

  14. Dirichlet topological defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, S.M.; Trodden, M.

    1998-01-01

    We propose a class of field theories featuring solitonic solutions in which topological defects can end when they intersect other defects of equal or higher dimensionality. Such configurations may be termed open-quotes Dirichlet topological defects,close quotes in analogy with the D-branes of string theory. Our discussion focuses on defects in scalar field theories with either gauge or global symmetries, in 3+1 dimensions; the types of defects considered include walls ending on walls, strings on walls, and strings on strings. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  15. Synthetic Defects for Vibrothermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Jeremy; Holland, Stephen D.; Thompson, R. Bruce; Eisenmann, David J.

    2010-02-01

    Synthetic defects are an important tool used for characterizing the performance of nondestructive evaluation techniques. Viscous material-filled synthetic defects were developed for use in vibrothermography (also known as sonic IR) as a tool to improve inspection accuracy and reliability. This paper describes how the heat-generation response of these VMF synthetic defects is similar to the response of real defects. It also shows how VMF defects can be applied to improve inspection accuracy for complex industrial parts and presents a study of their application in an aircraft engine stator vane.

  16. Defect production in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinoshita, C. [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  17. On holographic defect entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estes, John; Jensen, Kristan; O’Bannon, Andy; Tsatis, Efstratios; Wrase, Timm

    2014-01-01

    We study a number of (3+1)- and (2+1)-dimensional defect and boundary conformal field theories holographically dual to supergravity theories. In all cases the defects or boundaries are planar, and the defects are codimension-one. Using holography, we compute the entanglement entropy of a (hemi-)spherical region centered on the defect (boundary). We define defect and boundary entropies from the entanglement entropy by an appropriate background subtraction. For some (3+1)-dimensional theories we find evidence that the defect/boundary entropy changes monotonically under certain renormalization group flows triggered by operators localized at the defect or boundary. This provides evidence that the g-theorem of (1+1)-dimensional field theories generalizes to higher dimensions

  18. The effect of temperature on primary defect formation in Ni–Fe alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chengbin, E-mail: wangchengbin@sinap.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhang, Wei; Ren, Cuilan [Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Huai, Ping [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Radiation and Nuclear Energy Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhu, Zhiyuan [Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to study the influence of temperature on defect generation and evolution in nickel and Ni–Fe alloy (with 15% and 50% Fe content) with a 10-keV primary knock-on atom (PKA) at six different temperatures from 0 to 1500 K. The recently available Ni–Fe potential is used with its repulsive part modified by Vörtler. The temporal evolution and temperature dependence of stable defect formation and in-cascade clustering processes are analysed. The number of stable defect and the interstitial clustering fraction are found to increase with temperature whereas the vacancy clustering fraction decreases with temperature. The alloy composition dependence of the stable defect number is also found for the PKA energy considered here. Additionally, a study of the temperature influence on the cluster size distribution is performed, revealing a systematic change in the cluster size distributions, with higher temperature cascades producing larger interstitial clusters.

  19. Genital and Urinary Tract Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... conditions > Genital and urinary tract defects Genital and urinary tract defects E-mail to a friend Please fill ... and extra fluids. What problems can genital and urinary tract defects cause? Genital and urinary tract defects affect ...

  20. Radiation damage of nonmetallic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goland, A.N.

    1975-01-01

    A review of data and information on radiation damage in nonmetallic solids is presented. Discussions are included on defects in nonmetals, radiation damage processes in nonmetals, electronic damage processes, physical damage processes, atomic displacement, photochemical damage processes, and ion implantation