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Sample records for radiation damage annealing

  1. Hydration-annealing of chemical radiation damage in calcium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, S.M.K.; James, C.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of hydration on the annealing of chemical radiation damage in anhydrous calcium nitrate has been investigated. Rehydration of the anhydrous irradiated nitrate induces direct recovery of the damage. The rehydrated salt is susceptible to thermal annealing but the extent of annealing is small compared to that in the anhydrous salt. The direct recovery of damage on rehydration is due to enhanced lattice mobility. The recovery process is unimolecular. (author)

  2. Laser annealing heals radiation damage in avalanche photodiodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jin Gyu [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Anisimova, Elena; Higgins, Brendon L.; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Jennewein, Thomas [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Quantum Information Science Program, Toronto, ON (Canada); Makarov, Vadim [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2017-12-15

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are a practical option for space-based quantum communications requiring single-photon detection. However, radiation damage to APDs significantly increases their dark count rates and thus reduces their useful lifetimes in orbit. We show that high-power laser annealing of irradiated APDs of three different models (Excelitas C30902SH, Excelitas SLiK, and Laser Components SAP500S2) heals the radiation damage and several APDs are restored to typical pre-radiation dark count rates. Of nine samples we test, six APDs were thermally annealed in a previous experiment as another solution to mitigate the radiation damage. Laser annealing reduces the dark count rates further in all samples with the maximum dark count rate reduction factor varying between 5.3 and 758 when operating at -80 C. This indicates that laser annealing is a more effective method than thermal annealing. The illumination power to reach these reduction factors ranges from 0.8 to 1.6 W. Other photon detection characteristics, such as photon detection efficiency, timing jitter, and afterpulsing probability, fluctuate but the overall performance of quantum communications should be largely unaffected by these variations. These results herald a promising method to extend the lifetime of a quantum satellite equipped with APDs. (orig.)

  3. Thermal annealing of natural, radiation-damaged pyrochlore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zietlow, Peter; Beirau, Tobias; Mihailova, Boriana; Groat, Lee A.; Chudy, Thomas; Shelyug, Anna; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Ewing, Rodney C.; Schlüter, Jochen; Škoda, Radek; Bismayer, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Abstract

    Radiation damage in minerals is caused by the α-decay of incorporated radionuclides, such as U and Th and their decay products. The effect of thermal annealing (400–1000 K) on radiation-damaged pyrochlores has been investigated by Raman scattering, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and combined differential scanning calorimetry/thermogravimetry (DSC/TG). The analysis of three natural radiation-damaged pyrochlore samples from Miass/Russia [6.4 wt% Th, 23.1·10

  4. Radiation damage and annealing in plutonium tetrafluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Kaylyn; Casella, Amanda; Sinkov, Sergey; Sweet, Lucas; McNamara, Bruce; Delegard, Calvin; Jevremovic, Tatjana

    2017-12-01

    A sample of plutonium tetrafluoride that was separated prior to 1966 at the Hanford Site in Washington State was analyzed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2015 and 2016. The plutonium tetrafluoride, as received, was an unusual color and considering the age of the plutonium, there were questions about the condition of the material. These questions had to be answered in order to determine the suitability of the material for future use or long-term storage. Therefore, thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction evaluations were conducted to determine the plutonium's crystal structure, oxide content, and moisture content; these analyses reported that the plutonium was predominately amorphous and tetrafluoride, with an oxide content near ten percent. Freshly fluorinated plutonium tetrafluoride is known to be monoclinic. During the initial thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyses, it was discovered that an exothermic event occurred within the material near 414 °C. X-ray diffraction analyses were conducted on the annealed tetrafluoride. The X-ray diffraction analyses indicated that some degree of recrystallization occurred in conjunction with the 414 °C event. The following commentary describes the series of thermogravimetric/differential thermal and X-ray diffraction analyses that were conducted as part of this investigation at PNNL.

  5. Radiation damage and annealing in plutonium tetrafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, Kaylyn; Casella, Amanda; Sinkov, Sergey; Sweet, Lucas; McNamara, Bruce; Delegard, Calvin; Jevremovic, Tatjana

    2017-12-01

    Plutonium tetrafluoride that was separated prior to 1966 at the Hanford Site in Washington State was analyzed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2015 and 2016. The plutonium tetrafluoride, as received, was an off-normal color and considering the age of the plutonium, there were questions about the condition of the material. These questions had to be answered in order to determine the suitability of the material for future use or long-term storage. Therefore, Thermogravimetric/Differential Thermal Analysis and X-ray Diffraction evaluations were conducted to determine the plutonium’s crystal structure, oxide content, and moisture content; these analyses reported that the plutonium was predominately amorphous and tetrafluoride, with an oxide content near ten percent. Freshly fluorinated plutonium tetrafluoride is known to be monoclinic. During the initial Thermogravimetric/Differential Thermal analyses, it was discovered that an exothermic event occurred within the material near 414°C. X-ray Diffraction analyses were conducted on the annealed tetrafluoride. The X-ray Diffraction analyses indicated that some degree of recrystallization occurred in conjunction with the 414°C event. The following commentary describes the series of Thermogravimetric/Differential Thermal and X-ray Diffraction analyses that were conducted as part of this investigation at PNNL, in collaboration with the University of Utah Nuclear Engineering Program.

  6. Radiation damage and annealing in plutonium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, Kaylyn; Casella, Amanda; Sinkov, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    A sample of plutonium tetrafluoride that was separated prior to 1966 at the Hanford Site in Washington State was analyzed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2015 and 2016. The plutonium tetrafluoride, as received, was an unusual color and considering the age of the plutonium, there were questions about the condition of the material. These questions had to be answered in order to determine the suitability of the material for future use or long-term storage. Therefore, thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction evaluations were conducted to determine the plutonium's crystal structure, oxide content, and moisture content; these analyses reported that the plutonium was predominately amorphous and tetrafluoride, with an oxide content near ten percent. Freshly fluorinated plutonium tetrafluoride is known to be monoclinic. And during the initial thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyses, it was discovered that an exothermic event occurred within the material near 414 °C. X-ray diffraction analyses were conducted on the annealed tetrafluoride. The X-ray diffraction analyses indicated that some degree of recrystallization occurred in conjunction with the 414 °C event. This commentary describes the series of thermogravimetric/differential thermal and X-ray diffraction analyses that were conducted as part of this investigation at PNNL.

  7. The annealing of radiation damage in type Ia diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, Alan T; Kiflawi, Isaac

    2009-01-01

    The kinetics of the recovery of radiation damage in type Ia diamond has been investigated using isothermal annealing at 600 deg. C. In diamonds having a reasonably homogeneous distribution of nitrogen the decay of the vacancy concentration with time can be approximately described by a single exponential. Previous investigations have identified 'fast' and 'slow' components in the annealing, and we show that the existence of more than one time constant is associated with inhomogeneous nitrogen concentrations. The measurements show further that, in order to obtain the oscillator strengths of nitrogen-vacancy centres, studies must be restricted to diamonds with moderately high nitrogen concentrations.

  8. Development and anneal of radiation damage in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Celma, A.; Donker, H.; Soppe, W.J.; Miralles, L.

    1993-12-01

    Laboratory gamma-irradiations at a constant temperature (100 C) were carried out in two sorts of experiments, one at variable and another at approximately constant dose rates. The damage developed during irradiation was analyzed by thermal analysis, microstructural analysis and small angle neutron scattering. The results were compared with the yields of the Jain-Lidiard model for each experiment. Experiments at a constant dose rate were planned to obtain information on radiation damage development and anneal in conditions as near as possible to those of radioactive waste repository concepts. For this reason the dose rates were kept low. (orig./DG)

  9. Thermal annealing of natural, radiation-damaged pyrochlore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zietlow, Peter; Mihailova, Boriana [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Beirau, Tobias [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; and others

    2017-03-01

    Radiation damage in minerals is caused by the α-decay of incorporated radionuclides, such as U and Th and their decay products. The effect of thermal annealing (400-1000 K) on radiation-damaged pyrochlores has been investigated by Raman scattering, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and combined differential scanning calorimetry/thermogravimetry (DSC/TG). The analysis of three natural radiation-damaged pyrochlore samples from Miass/Russia [6.4 wt% Th, 23.1.10{sup 18} α-decay events per gram (dpg)], Panda Hill/Tanzania (1.6 wt% Th, 1.6.10{sup 18} dpg), and Blue River/Canada (10.5 wt% U, 115.4.10{sup 18} dpg), are compared with a crystalline reference pyrochlore from Schelingen (Germany). The type of structural recovery depends on the initial degree of radiation damage (Panda Hill 28%, Blue River 85% and Miass 100% according to XRD), as the recrystallization temperature increases with increasing degree of amorphization. Raman spectra indicate reordering on the local scale during annealing-induced recrystallization. As Raman modes around 800 cm{sup -1} are sensitive to radiation damage (M. T. Vandenborre, E. Husson, Comparison of the force field in various pyrochlore families. I. The A{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7} oxides. J. Solid State Chem. 1983, 50, 362, S. Moll, G. Sattonnay, L. Thome, J. Jagielski, C. Decorse, P. Simon, I. Monnet, W. J. Weber, Irradiation damage in Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} single crystals: Ballistic versus ionization processes. Phys. Rev. 2011, 84, 64115.), the degree of local order was deduced from the ratio of the integrated intensities of the sum of the Raman bands between 605 and 680 cm{sup -1} divided by the sum of the integrated intensities of the bands between 810 and 860 cm{sup -1}. The most radiation damaged pyrochlore (Miass) shows an abrupt recovery of both, its short- (Raman) and long-range order (X-ray) between 800 and 850 K, while the weakly damaged pyrochlore (Panda Hill) begins to recover at considerably lower temperatures (near 500 K

  10. Annealing of chemical radiation damage in zirconium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahamood, Aysha; Chandunni, E.; Nair, S.M.K.

    1979-01-01

    A kinetic study of the annealing of γ-irradiation damage in zirconium nitrate is presented. The annealing can be represented as a combination of a first order and a second order process. It is considered that the first order process is the combination of close correlated pairs of Osup(-) and NO fragments and the second order process involves the single reaction of random recombination of the fragments throughout the crystal. (auth.)

  11. Regrowth zones in laser annealed radiation damaged diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamieson, D.N.; Prawer, S.; Dooley, S.P.; Kalish, R.; Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa

    1993-01-01

    Focused laser annealing of ion implanted diamond with a 15 μm diameter laser spot produces as variety of effects that depend on the power density of the laser. Channeling Contrast Microscopy (CCM) provides a relatively straight forward, rapid, method to analyse the annealed regions of the diamond to characterize the effects. In order of increasing laser power density, effects that are observed include: regrowth of the end of range damage of the ion implantation, formation of a buried graphitic layer and complete graphitization of the surface of the diamond down to the bottom of the original damage layer. Information provided by CCM leads to an understanding the causes of these effects and provides insight into the carbon phase diagram in the neighbourhood of the graphite to diamond phase transition. Analysis of the effects of laser annealing by CCM are complicated by the swelling of the diamond lattice caused by the original ion implantation, compaction following regrowth and the effect of the analysis beam irradiation itself. 12 refs., 5 figs

  12. Very low temperature rise laser annealing of radiation-damaged solar cells in orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulek, V.

    1988-01-01

    Solar cells of all space objects are damaged by radiation in orbit. This damage, however, can be removed by laser annealing. A new in-orbit laser regeneration system for both body- and spin-stabilized space objects is proposed. For successful annealing of solar cells damaged by 10 years' radiation dose in orbit it is necessary for the temperature rise in the incidence point of the laser beam to reach about 400 0 C. By continuous regeneration, however, between two annealing cycles the solar cells are hit by about two orders of magnitude lower radiation dose. This makes it possible to carry out the regeneration at a temperature rise well under 1 0 C! If an optimal laser regeneration system is used, such low temperature rise laser annealing of radiation-damaged solar cells is possible. A semiconductor GaAlAs diode laser with output power up to 10 mW CW was used for annealing. Some results of the very low temperature rise annealing experiment are given in this paper. (author)

  13. Radiation damage structure in irradiated and annealed 440 WWER-Type reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocik, J.; Keilova, E.

    1993-01-01

    A review of irradiation damages in WWER-type RPV steels based on conventional Transmission Electron Microscopy investigations in a power reactor and a research reactor, is presented; the samples consist in Cr-Mo-V ferritic steel (15Kh2MFA type). The visible part of radiation-induced defects consists of very fine vanadium carbide precipitates, small dislocation loops and black dots (presumably corresponding to clusters and particle embryos formed from vacancies and solute-atoms (vanadium, copper, phosphorus) and carbon associated with vanadium. Radiation-induced defects are concentrated at dislocation substructure during irradiation in a power reactor, revealing the role of radiation-enhanced diffusion in damage structure forming process. Contrarily, the distribution of defects resulting from annealing of specimens irradiated in the research reactor is pre-determined by an homogenous distribution of radiation-induced defects prior to annealing. Increasing the number of re-irradiation and annealing cycles, the amount of dislocation loops among all defects seems to be growing. Simultaneously, the dislocation substructure recovers considerably. (authors). 14 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Radiation damage structure in irradiated and annealed 440 WWER-Type reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocik, J; Keilova, E [Czech Nuclear Society, Prague (Czech Republic)

    1994-12-31

    A review of irradiation damages in WWER-type RPV steels based on conventional Transmission Electron Microscopy investigations in a power reactor and a research reactor, is presented; the samples consist in Cr-Mo-V ferritic steel (15Kh2MFA type). The visible part of radiation-induced defects consists of very fine vanadium carbide precipitates, small dislocation loops and black dots (presumably corresponding) to clusters and particle embryos formed from vacancies and solute-atoms (vanadium, copper, phosphorus) and carbon associated with vanadium. Radiation-induced defects are concentrated at dislocation substructure during irradiation in a power reactor, revealing the role of radiation-enhanced diffusion in damage structure forming process. Contrarily, the distribution of defects resulting from annealing of specimens irradiated in the research reactor is pre-determined by an homogenous distribution of radiation-induced defects prior to annealing. Increasing the number of re-irradiation and annealing cycles, the amount of dislocation loops among all defects seems to be growing. Simultaneously, the dislocation substructure recovers considerably. (authors). 14 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Radiation damage annealing mechanisms and possible low temperature annealing in silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.

    1980-01-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy and the Shockley-Read-Hall recombination theory are used to identify the defect responsible for reverse annealing in 2 ohm-cm n+/p silicon solar cells. This defect, with energy level at Ev + 0.30 eV, has been tentatively identified as a boron-oxygen-vacancy complex. It has been also determined by calculation that the removal of this defect could result in significant annealing at temperatures as low as 200 C for 2 ohm-cm and lower resistivity cells.

  16. The effects of radiation damage accumulation and annealing on fission-track dating of titanite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enkelmann, Eva; Jonckheere, Raymond; Ratschbacher, Lothar

    2005-01-01

    Fission-track dating of titanite is hindered by the fact that track etching is anisotropic in fresh titanites and becomes isotropic with increasing radiation damage. Independent age determinations with the population method are problematic due to different track counting efficiencies (Q) for ρ s in unannealed and ρ i in annealed titanite. Independent age determinations with the external detector method depend on correction factors for the track registration geometries (G = 0.5), counting efficiencies (Q) and range deficit (R = 1.38); however, Q is unaffected by annealing. It was attempted to determine GQR through calculation, direct experiment and on the basis of age standards. The direct experiment involves measurements of the ratio of the induced-track densities in titanite and a co-irradiated external detector. The track densities in the internal titanite surfaces could not be measured but the results for the external surfaces confirm that this approach leads to a significant overestimation of GQR, due to prior annealing. The GQR-values determined on the basis of age standards are consistent with that obtained by calculation assuming that Q ∼ 1, although there is no experimental confirmation for this fact apart from their isotropic etching characteristics. The fact that identical GQR-factors were obtained on standards of different age and uranium content suggests that a single GQR-value is appropriate for dating titanites within a broad range of radiation damage. In terms of the ζ-calibration this implies that a single ζ-factor is also suitable for dating different titanites. These findings suggest that other factors besides the accumulation of alpha-recoil damage, such as a phase transition, could be co-responsible for the different etching characteristics of annealed and unannealed titanites

  17. Annealing of natural metamict zircons. I low degree of radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Colombo, M

    1998-01-01

    In-situ time dependent high temperature X-ray powder diffraction was used to investigate the ordering process occurring during annealing of natural zircons with a low degree of radiation damage. It was possible to distinguish two stages of this process. Firstly, the diffusion of defects induced by alpha-particles, this stage contributes only to a certain degree of relaxation in the unit cell. In the second stage there is some degree of recrystallization. A hkl-dependence in the variation of the integrated intensity is observed and the increase in the volume of crystalline zircon is therefore related to a process of migration of dislocations.

  18. Influence of Radiation Damage and Isochronal Annealing on the Magnetic Susceptibility of Pu1-xAmx Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCall, Scott K.; Fluss, Michael J.; Chung, Brandon W.; Haire, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    Results of radiation damage in Pu and Pu 1-x Am x alloys studied with magnetic susceptibility, χ(T), and resistivity are presented. Damage accumulated at low temperatures increases χ(T) for all measured alloys, with the trend generally enhanced as the lattice expands. There is a trend towards saturation observable in the damage induced magnetic susceptibility data. that is not evident in similar damage induced resistivity data taken on the same specimen. A comparison of isochronal annealing curves measured by both resistivity and magnetic susceptibility on a 4.3 at% Ga stabilized δ-Pu specimen show that Stage I annealing, where interstitials begin to move, is largely transparent to the magnetic measurement. This indicates that interstitials have little impact on the damage induced increase in the magnetic susceptibility. The isochronal annealing curves of the Pu 1-x Am x alloys do not show distinct annealing stages as expected for alloys. However, samples near 20% Am concentration show an unexpected increase in magnetization beginning when specimens are annealed to 35 K. This behavior is also reflected in a time dependent increase in the magnetic susceptibility of damaged specimens indicative of first order kinetics. These results suggest there may be a metastable phase induced by radiation damage and annealing in Pu 1-x Am x alloys. (authors)

  19. Radiation damage and annealing of lithium-doped silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statler, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    Evidence has been presented that a lithium-diffused crucible-grown silicon solar cell can be made with better efficiency than the flight-quality n p 10 ohms-cm solar cell. When this lithium cell is exposed to a continuous radiation evironment at 60 C (electron spectrum from gamma rays) it has a higher power output than the N/P cell after a fluence equivalent to 1 MeV. A comparison of annealing of proton- and electron-damage in this lithium cell reveals a decidedly faster rate of recovery and higher level of recoverable power from the proton effects. Therefore, the lithium cell shows a good potential for many space missions where the proton flux is a significant fraction of the radiation field to be encountered.

  20. Thermal annealing of radiation damage in CMOS ICs in the temperature range -140 C to +375 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchenko, V.; Fang, P. H.; Brashears, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    Annealing of radiation damage was investigated in the commercial, Z- and J-processes of the RCA CD4007A ICs in the temperature range from -140 C to +375 C. Tempering curves were analyzed for activation energies of thermal annealing, following irradiation at -140 C. It was found that at -140 C, the radiation-induced shifts in the threshold potentials were similar for all three processes. The radiation hardness of the Z- and J-process is primarily due to rapid annealing of radiation damage at room temperature. In the region -140 to 20 C, no dopant-dependent charge trapping is seen, similar to that observed at higher temperatures. In the unbiased Z-process n-channels, after 1 MeV electron irradiation, considerable negative charge remains in the gate oxide.

  1. Effect of hydration on the annealing of chemical radiation damage in gamma-irradiated strontium bromate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, S.M.K.; Sahish, T.S.

    1991-01-01

    Rehydration of γ-irradiated anhydrous strontium bromate induces direct recovery of damage. The recovery process is unimolecular and the rehydrated salt is susceptible to thermal annealing. (author) 11 refs.; 2 figs

  2. Role of dopant in annealing of chemical radiation damage in potassium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohapatra, B.M.; Bhatta, D.

    1984-01-01

    The role of cationic vacancy in th annealing of gamma-irradiated potassium nitrate has been investigated using Ba 2+ as a dopant. Isothermal annealing data show that the pure potassium nitrate is immune to annealing above and below the temperature of crystal transition 127degC (Rhombic↔tTrigonal), while the doped crystals undergo recovery by a combination of one first order and one second order process above the phase change and by a second order process below this temperature. The recovery process above 127degC is initially fast (upto 1 hr) but subsequently it slows down to a pseudo-plateau. The proportion of damage which recombines by first and second order processes is 40.6 and 59.4 respectively. (author)

  3. Thermal annealing of high dose radiation induced damage at room temperature in alkali halides. Stored energy, thermoluminiscence and colouration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, L.

    1980-01-01

    The possible relation between stored energy, thermoluminiscence and colour centre annealing in gamma and electron irradiated alkali halides is studied. Thermoluminiscence occurs at temperature higher than the temperature at which the main stored energy peak appears. No stored energy release is detected in additively coloured KCl samples. Plastic deformation and doping with Ca and Sr induce a stored energy spectrum different from the spectrum observed in pure and as cleaved samples, but the amount of stored energy does not change for a given irradiation dose. Capacity of alkali halides to sotore energy by irradiation increases as the cation size decreases. It appears that most of the observed release is not related to annealing processes of the radiation induced anion Frenkel pairs. The existence of damage in the cation sublattice with which this energy release might be related is considered. (auth.)

  4. Combined radiation damage, annealing, and ageing studies of InGaAsP /InP 1310 nm lasers for the CMS tracker optical links

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, K; Troska, Jan K; Vasey, F

    2002-01-01

    A summary is presented of the combined effects of radiation damage, accelerated annealing and accelerated ageing in 1310 nm InGaAsP/InP multi-quantum-well lasers, the type chosen for use in the CMS Tracker optical links. The radiation damage effects are compared for a variety of radiation sources: /sup 60/Co-gamma, 0.8 MeV (average energy) neutrons, 20 MeV (average energy) neutrons and 300 MeV/c pions that represent important parts of the spectrum of particles that will be encountered in the CMS Tracker. The relative damage factors of the various sources are calculated by comparing the laser threshold current increase due to radiation damage giving approximately=0 : 0.12 : 0.53 : 1 for /sup 60/Co-gamma, approximately =0.8 MeV neutrons, approximately=20 MeV neutrons with respect to 300 MeV/c pions. The effects of bias current and temperature on the annealing were measured and, in all cases, the annealing is proportional to log(annealing time). A bias current of 60 mA increases the annealing, in terms of the ti...

  5. Annealing of radiation damage in 0.1- and 2-ohm-centimeter Silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.

    1979-01-01

    Isochronal and isothermal annealing studies were conducted on 0.1 and 2 ohm centimeter n(+)/p silicon cells after irradiation by 1 MeV electrons at fluences of 10 to the 14th power, 5 times 10 to the 14th power, and 10 to the 15th power per square centimeter. For the 0.1 ohm centimeter cells, reverse annealing was not observed in the isochronal data. However, reverse annealing was observed between approximately 200 and 325 C in the isochronal data of the 2 ohm centimeter cells. Isothermal annealing of 0.1 ohm centimeter cells at 500 C restored pre-irradiation maximum power P sub max within 20 minutes at fluence = 10 to the 14th power, in 180 minutes at fluence = 5 times 10 to the 14th power and to 92 percent of pre-irradiation P sub max in 180 minutes for fluence = 10 to the 15th power. Annealing at 450 C was found inadequate to restore 0.1 ohm centimeter cell performance within reasonable times for all fluence levels. By comparison, at 450 C, the P sub max of 2 ohm centimeter cells was restored within 45 minutes, for the two highest fluence levels, while for the lowest fluence, restoration was completed within 15 minutes. Spectral response data indicate that, for both resistivities, degradation occurs predominantly in the cells p-type base region.

  6. The effects of lithium counterdoping on radiation damage and annealing in n(+)p silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, I.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.; Mehta, S.; Swartz, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    Boron-doped silicon n(+)p solar cells were counterdoped with lithium by ion implantation and the resultant n(+)p cells irradiated by 1 MeV electrons. Performance parameters were determined as a function of fluence and a deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) study was conducted. The lithium counterdoped cells exhibited significantly increased radiation resistance when compared to boron doped control cells. Isochronal annealing studies of cell performance indicate that significant annealing occurs at 100 C. Isochronal annealing of the deep level defects showed a correlation between a single defect at E sub v + 0.43 eV and the annealing behavior of short circuit current in the counterdoped cells. The annealing behavior was controlled by dissociation and recombination of this defect. The DLTS studies showed that counterdoping with lithium eliminated three deep level defects and resulted in three new defects. The increased radiation resistance of the counterdoped cells is due to the interaction of lithium with oxygen, single vacancies and divacancies. The lithium-oxygen interaction is the most effective in contributing to the increased radiation resistance.

  7. Radiation annealing in cuprous oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vajda, P.

    1966-01-01

    Experimental results from high-intensity gamma-irradiation of cuprous oxide are used to investigate the annealing of defects with increasing radiation dose. The results are analysed on the basis of the Balarin and Hauser (1965) statistical model of radiation annealing, giving a square...

  8. Minority-carrier injection-enhanced annealing of radiation damage to InGaP solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Okuda, T.; Taylor, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    The observation of minority-carrier injection-enhanced annealing of radiation-induced defects in InGaP is reported. 1-MeV electron irradiation results demonstrate superior radiation-resistance of InGa 0.5 P 0.5 solar cells compared to GaAs-on-Ge cells. Moreover, minority-carrier injection under forward bias conditions is shown to enhance defect annealing in InGaP and to result in the recovery of InGaP solar cell properties. These results suggest that the radiation-resistance of InGaP-based devices such as InGaP/GaAs(/Ge) multijunction solar cells and InGaP(As) light-emitting devices is further improved under minority-carrier injection condition. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  9. Radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, Erik H M; CERN. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    a) Radiation damage in organic materials. This series of lectures will give an overview of radiation effects on materials and components frequently used in accelerator engineering and experiments. Basic degradation phenomena will be presented for organic materials with comprehensive damage threshold doses for commonly used rubbers, thermoplastics, thermosets and composite materials. Some indications will be given for glass, scintillators and optical fibres. b) Radiation effects in semiconductor materials and devices. The major part of the time will be devoted to treat radiation effects in semiconductor sensors and the associated electronics, in particular displacement damage, interface and single event phenomena. Evaluation methods and practical aspects will be shown. Strategies will be developed for the survival of the materials under the expected environmental conditions of the LHC machine and detectors. I will describe profound revolution in our understanding of black holes and their relation to quantum me...

  10. Thermal annealing of high dose radiation induced damage at room temperature in alkaline. Stored energy, thermoluminescence and coloration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, L.

    1980-01-01

    The possible relation between stored energy, thermoluminescence and colour centre annealing in gamma and electron irradiated alkali halides is studied. Thermoluminescence occurs at temperature higher than the temperature at which the main stored energy peak appears. No stored energy release is detected in additively coloured KC1 samples. Plastic deformation and doping with Ca and Sr induce a stored energy spectrum different from the spectrum observed in pure and as cleaved samples, but the amount of stored energy does not change for a given irradiation dose.Capacity of alkali halides to store energy by irradiation increases as the cation size decreases. (Author) 51 refs

  11. Production and beam annealing of damage in carbon implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kool, W.H.; Roosendaal, H.E.; Wiggers, L.W.; Saris, F.W.

    1978-01-01

    The annealing of damage introduced by 70 keV C implantation of Si is studied for impact of H + and He + beams in the energy interval 30 to 200 keV. For a good description of the annealing behaviour it is necessary to account for the damage introduction which occurs simultaneously. It turns out that the initial damage annealing rate is proportional to the amount of damage. The proportionality constant is related to a quantity introduced in an earlier paper in order to describe saturation effects in the damage production after H + or He + impact in unimplanted Si. This indicates that the same mechanism governs both processes: beam induced damage annealing and saturation of the damage introduction. (author)

  12. Neutron radiation damage studies on silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zheng; Chen, W.; Kraner, H.W.

    1990-10-01

    Effects of neutron radiation on electrical properties of Si detectors have been studied. At high neutron fluence (Φ n ≥ 10 12 n/cm 2 ), C-V characteristics of detectors with high resistivities (ρ ≥ 1 kΩ-cm) become frequency dependent. A two-trap level model describing this frequency dependent effect is proposed. Room temperature anneal of neutron damaged (at LN 2 temperature) detectors shows three anneal stages, while only two anneal stages were observed in elevated temperature anneal. 19 refs., 14 figs

  13. Radiation damage of nonmetallic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goland, A.N.

    1975-01-01

    A review of data and information on radiation damage in nonmetallic solids is presented. Discussions are included on defects in nonmetals, radiation damage processes in nonmetals, electronic damage processes, physical damage processes, atomic displacement, photochemical damage processes, and ion implantation

  14. Radiation damage to mushrooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattler, P.W.

    1986-01-01

    This document contains newspaper cuttings and correspondence with various ministries in Hessen on the subject of radiation damage to mushrooms from the Odenwald area. The reader is given, amongst other things, detailed information on radiation damage to different types of mushroom in 1986. (MG) [de

  15. Damage formation and annealing in InP due to swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamarou, A.; Wesch, W.; Wendler, E.; Klaumuenzer, S.

    2004-01-01

    Virgin and pre-damaged InP samples were irradiated at room temperature (RT) and at liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) with different fluences of 140 MeV Kr, 390 MeV Xe and 600 MeV Au ions. The pre-damaging was performed with 600 keV Ge ions at LNT to obtain different damage levels. The samples were analysed by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) in random and channelling geometry. A relatively weak damage accumulation in virgin InP and a very significant defect annealing in pre-damaged InP occurs due to 140 MeV Kr irradiation. The damaging of virgin InP with 390 MeV Xe and 600 MeV Au is much more efficient in comparison with that of 140 MeV Kr. Further, annealing of the pre-damaged InP due to 390 MeV Xe irradiation is hardly visible. At LNT InP appears to be much more radiation-resistant to swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation than at RT. Our results show that during SHI irradiation of InP both damage formation and damage annealing occur simultaneously. Whether the first or the second one plays a more important role depends on the SHI mass and energy

  16. Cascade annealing: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doran, D.G.; Schiffgens, J.O.

    1976-04-01

    Concepts and an overview of radiation displacement damage modeling and annealing kinetics are presented. Short-term annealing methodology is described and results of annealing simulations performed on damage cascades generated using the Marlowe and Cascade programs are included. Observations concerning the inconsistencies and inadequacies of current methods are presented along with simulation of high energy cascades and simulation of longer-term annealing

  17. Radiation damages in superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinz, W.; Seibt, E.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation damage investigations of technical superconductors are reported and discussed with respect to their main properties like critical current jsub(c), transition temperature Tsub(c), upper critical field Bsub(c2), pinning and annealing behaviour. Ordered A15 type alloys (like Nb 3 Sn and V 3 Ga) show significant reductions of all critical parameters above a threshold of about 2x10 21 m -2 with 50 MeV deuterons corresponding to 2x10 22 neutrons/m 2 (Esub(n)>0.1 MeV). Pure metals and disordered B1 type alloys (like Nb or NbTi) show only a small linear decrease in critical parameters (except Bsub(c2) of niobium). Experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations. (author)

  18. Radiation damage of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarevic, Dj.

    1966-11-01

    Study of radiation damage covered the following: Kinetics of electric resistance of uranium and uranium alloy with 1% of molybdenum dependent on the second phase and burnup rate; Study of gas precipitation and diffusion of bubbles by transmission electron microscopy; Numerical analysis of the influence of defects distribution and concentration on the rare gas precipitation in uranium; study of thermal sedimentation of uranium alloy with molybdenum; diffusion of rare gas in metal by gas chromatography method

  19. Burst annealing of electron damage in silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, A.C.; Horne, W.E.; Thompson, M.A.; Lancaster, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    A study has been performed of burst annealing of electron damage in silicon solar cells. Three groups of cells consisting of 3 and 0.3 ohm-cm silicon were exposed to fluences of 2 x 10 to the 14th power, 4 x 10 to the 14th power, and 8 x 10 to the 14th power 1-MeV electrons/sq cm, respectively. They were subsequently subjected to 1-minute bursts of annealing at 500 C. The 3 ohm-cm cells showed complete recovery from each fluence level. The 0.3 ohm-cm cells showed complete recovery from the 2 x 10 to the 14th power e/sq cm fluence; however, some of the 0.3 ohm-cm cells did not recover completely from the higher influences. From an analysis of the results it is concluded that burst annealing of moderate to high resistivity silicon cell arrays in space is feasible and that with more complete understanding, even the potentially higher efficiency low resistivity cells may be usable in annealable arrays in space

  20. Annealing simulation of cascade damage using MARLOWE-DAIQUIRI codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroga, Takeo

    1984-01-01

    The localization effect of the defects generated by the cascade damage on the properties of solids was studied by using a computer code. The code is based on the two-body collision approximation method and the Monte Carlo method. The MARLOWE and DAIQUIRI codes were partly improved to fit the present calculation of the annealing of cascade damage. The purpose of this study is to investigate the behavior of defects under the simulated reactive and irradiation condition. Calculation was made for alpha iron (BCC), and the threshold energy was set at 40 eV. The temperature dependence of annealing and the growth of a cluster were studied. The overlapping effect of cascade was studied. At first, the extreme case of overlapping was studied, then the practical cases were estimated by interpolation. The state of overlapping of cascade corresponded to the irradiation speed. The interaction between cascade and dislocations was studied, and the calculation of the annealing of primary knock-out atoms (PKA) in alpha iron was performed. At low temperature, the effect of dislocations was large, but the growth of vacancy was not seen. At high temperature, the effect of dislocations was small. The evaluation of the simulation of various ion irradiation and the growth efficiency of defects were performed. (Kato, T.)

  1. Radiation damage prediction system using damage function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Mori, Seiji

    1979-01-01

    The irradiation damage analysis system using a damage function was investigated. This irradiation damage analysis system consists of the following three processes, the unfolding of a damage function, the calculation of the neutron flux spectrum of the object of damage analysis and the estimation of irradiation effect of the object of damage analysis. The damage function is calculated by applying the SAND-2 code. The ANISN and DOT3, 5 codes are used to calculate neutron flux. The neutron radiation and the allowable time of reactor operation can be estimated based on these calculations of the damage function and neutron flux. The flow diagram of the process of analyzing irradiation damage by a damage function and the flow diagram of SAND-2 code are presented, and the analytical code for estimating damage, which is determined with a damage function and a neutron spectrum, is explained. The application of the irradiation damage analysis system using a damage function was carried out to the core support structure of a fast breeder reactor for the damage estimation and the uncertainty evaluation. The fundamental analytical conditions and the analytical model for this work are presented, then the irradiation data for SUS304, the initial estimated values of a damage function, the error analysis for a damage function and the analytical results are explained concerning the computation of a damage function for 10% total elongation. Concerning the damage estimation of FBR core support structure, the standard and lower limiting values of damage, the permissible neutron flux and the allowable years of reactor operation are presented and were evaluated. (Nakai, Y.)

  2. Radiation damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafleur, V.

    1978-01-01

    A number of experiments are described with the purpose to obtain a better insight in the chemical nature and the biological significance of radiation-induced damage in DNA, with some emphasis on the significance of alkali-labile sites. It is shown that not only reactions of OH radicals but also of H radicals introduce breaks and other inactivating damage in single-standed phiX174 DNA. It is found that phosphate buffer is very suitable for the study of the reactions of H radicals with DNA, as the H 2 PO 4 - ions convert the hydrated electrons into H radicals. The hydrated electron, which does react with DNA, does not cause a detectable inactivation. (Auth.)

  3. Unified model of damage annealing in CMOS, from freeze-in to transient annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sander, H.H.; Gregory, B.L.

    Results of an experimental study at 76 0 K, are presented showing that radiation-produced holes in SiO 2 are immobile at this temperature. If an electric field is present in the SiO 2 during low temperature (76 0 K) irradiation to sweep out the mobile electrons, the holes will virtually all be trapped where created and produce a uniform positive charge density in the oxide. These results are the basis for concluding that if a complimentary p,n metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) device is irradiated for sufficient time at 76 0 K to build-in an appreciable field, further irradiation with gate bias removed will produce very little additional change in V/sub th/, since the field in the oxide tends to keep all generated electrons in the oxide where they recombine with trapped holes. Hence the hole trapping rate = the hole annihilation rate. The room-temperature annealing following a pulsed gamma exposure occurs in two regimes. The first recovery of V/sub th/ occurs prior to 10 -4 seconds. The magnitude of this very early-time recovery, at room temperature, is oxide-dependent, and oxide process dependent. The rate-of-annealing is what is truly different between a rad-hard and a rad-soft device, since annealing in the hardest devices occurs very quickly at room temperature. (U.S.)

  4. Radiation damage to histones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mee, L.K.; Adelstein, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The damage to histones irradiated in isolation is being elaborated to aid the identification of the crosslinking sites in radiation-induced DNA-histone adducts. Histones are being examined by amino acid analysis to determine the destruction of residues and by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to delineate changes in conformation. For the slightly lysine-rich histone, H2A, a specific attack on selective residues has been established, the aromatic residues, tyrosine and phenylalanine, and the heterocyclic residue, histidine, being significantly destroyed. In addition, a significant increase in aspartic acid was found; this may represent a radiation product from scission of the ring in the histidine residues. The similarity of the effects on residues in nitrous oxide-saturated and nitrogen-saturated solutions suggests that OH . and e/sub aq//sup -/ are equally efficient and selective in their attack. On gel electrophoresis degradation of the histone H2A was found to be greatest for irradiations in nitrous oxide-saturated solutions, suggesting CH . is the most effective radical for producing changes in conformation; O/sub 2//sup -/ was essentially ineffective. Other histones are being examined for changes in amino acid composition, conformation, and for the formation of radiation products

  5. Annealing damage caused by implantation of group IB elements into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, A.; Svenningsen, B.; Chadderton, L.T.; Whitton, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the Rutherford backscattering method (RBS) have been used in an investigation of the annealing of radiation damage produced in silicon by 80 keV Cu + , Ag + and Au + ions up to doses of 10 15 ions/cm 2 . Whilst the damage caused by Cu + and Ag + implantation, measured by RBS, persists following annealing sequences up to temperatures of 800 0 C, Au + -implanted samples show recovery. Furthermore, RBS indicates quite clearly that, in the case of gold, atomic diffusion to the silicon surface takes place. TEM and electron diffraction both indicate that in all three implants the anomalous 'damage' remaining in RBS spectra is due to an amorphous-polycrystalline transition. In the case of Au + implants, however, there is less inhibition of the process of recovery, quite apart from the thermal history of the sample. The importance of using another technique, especially TEM, in conjunction with RBS investigations of radiation damage in the solid state is emphasized. (author)

  6. Corneal Damage from Infrared Radiation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCally, Russell

    2000-01-01

    ...) laser radiation at 10.6 (micrometer) and Tm: YAG laser radiation at 2.02 (micrometer). Retinal damage from sources with rectangular irradiance distributions was also modeled. Thresholds for CO(2...

  7. Radiation Damage in Scintillating Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu Ren Yuan

    1998-01-01

    Crystal Calorimetry in future high energy physics experiments faces a new challenge to maintain its precision in a hostile radiation environment. This paper discusses the effects of radiation damage in scintillating crystals, and concludes that the predominant radiation damage effect in crystal scintillators is the radiation induced absorption, or color center formation, not the loss of the scintillation light yield. The importance of maintaining crystal's light response uniformity and the feasibility to build a precision crystal calorimeter under radiation are elaborated. The mechanism of the radiation damage in scintillating crystals is also discussed. While the damage in alkali halides is found to be caused by the oxygen or hydroxyl contamination, it is the structure defects, such as oxygen vacancies, cause damage in oxides. Material analysis methods used to reach these conclusions are presented in details.

  8. Study of radiation damage in metals by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauster, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    Positron annihilation is a sensitive technique for probing defects in metals and it has recently been shown to be a valuable tool for the study of radiation damage. After an introduction to the three basic experimental methods (angular correlation, Doppler broadening, and lifetime measurements), the interaction of positrons with lattice defects is reviewed. Results for the annealing of damage after low temperature irradiation are used to show that positron annihilation has provided new information on annealing kinetics. The role of positron techniques in characterizing complex defect structures resulting from high-temperature neutron irradiation is reviewed and the possible utility of positron annihilation as a nondestructive monitor of property changes is pointed out

  9. Radiation damage in biomolecular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Fuss, Martina Christina

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of X-rays and radioactivity, ionizing radiations have been widely applied in medicine both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The risks associated with radiation exposure and handling led to the parallel development of the field of radiation protection. Pioneering experiments done by Sanche and co-workers in 2000 showed that low-energy secondary electrons, which are abundantly generated along radiation tracks, are primarily responsible for radiation damage through successive interactions with the molecular constituents of the medium. Apart from ionizing processes, which are usually related to radiation damage, below the ionization level low-energy electrons can induce molecular fragmentation via dissociative processes such as internal excitation and electron attachment. This prompted collaborative projects between different research groups from European countries together with other specialists from Canada,  the USA and Australia. This book summarizes the advances achieved by these...

  10. Neutron induced radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.M.R.

    1977-01-01

    We derive a general expression for the number of displaced atoms of type j caused by a primary knock-on of type i. The Kinchin-Pease model is used, but considerably generalised to allow for realistic atomic potentials. Two cases are considered in detail: the single particle problem causing a cascade and the neutron initiated problem which leads to multiple subcascades. Numerical results have been obtained for a variety of scattering laws. An important conclusion is that neutron initiated damage is much more severe than atom-initiated damage and leads to the number of displaced atoms being a factor of (A+1) 2 /4A larger than the single primary knock-on theory predicts. A is the ratio of the atomic mass to the neutron mass. The importance of this result to the theory of neutron sputtering is explained. (orig.) [de

  11. Radiation Damage and Dimensional Changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Barbary, A.A.; Lebda, H.I.; Kamel, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    The dimensional changes have been modeled in order to be accommodated in the reactor design. This study has major implications for the interpretation of damage in carbon based nuclear fission and fusion plant materials. Radiation damage of graphite leads to self-interstitials and vacancies defects. The aggregation of these defects causes dimensional changes. Vacancies aggregate into lines and disks which heal and contract the basal planes. Interstitials aggregate into interlayer disks which expand the dimension

  12. Radiation-induced liver damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcial, V.A.; Santiago-Delpin, E.A.; Lanaro, A.E.; Castro-Vita, H.; Arroyo, G.; Moscol, J.A.; Gomez, C.; Velazquez, J.; Prado, K.

    1977-01-01

    Due to the recent increase in the use of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer with or without chemotherapy, the risk of liver radiation damage has become a significant concern for the radiotherapist when the treated tumour is located in the upper abdomen or lower thorax. Clinically evident radiation liver damage may result in significant mortality, but at times patients recover without sequelae. The dose of 3000 rads in 3 weeks to the entire liver with 5 fractions per week of 200 rads each, seems to be tolerated well clinically by adult humans. Lower doses may lead to damage when used in children, when chemotherapy is added, as in recent hepatectomy cases, and in the presence of pre-existent liver damage. Reduced fractionation may lead to increased damage. Increased fractionation, limitation of the dose delivered to the entire liver, and restriction of the high dose irradiation volume may afford protection. With the aim of studying the problems of hepatic radiation injury in humans, a project of liver irradiation in the dog is being conducted. Mongrel dogs are being conditioned, submitted to pre-irradiation studies (haemogram, blood chemistry, liver scan and biopsy), irradiated under conditions resembling human cancer therapy, and submitted to post-irradiation evaluation of the liver. Twenty-two dogs have been entered in the study but only four qualify for the evaluation of all the study parameters. It has been found that dogs are susceptible to liver irradiation damage similar to humans. The initial mortality has been high mainly due to non-radiation factors which are being kept under control at the present phase of the study. After the initial experiences, the study will involve variations in total dose and fractionation, and the addition of anticoagulant therapy for possible prevention of radiation liver injury. (author)

  13. Radiation damage in plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majewski, S.

    1990-01-01

    Results of radiation damage studies in plastic scintillators are reviewed and critically analyzed from the point of view of applications of plastic scintillators in calorimetric detectors for the SSC. Damage to transmission and to fluorescent yield in different conditions is discussed. New directions in R ampersand D are outlined. Several examples are given of the most recent data on the new scintillating materials made with old and new plastics and fluors, which are exhibiting significantly improved radiation resistance. With a present rate of a vigorous R D programme, the survival limits in the vicinity of 100 MRad seem to be feasible within a couple of years

  14. RBS channeling measurement of damage annealing in InAs/AlSb HEMT structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallén, Anders; Moschetti, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Electrical isolation of InAs/AlSb high electron mobility transistors has been achieved by the ion implantation isolation technique. The multilayered structures are grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs substrates. The optimal isolation is provided by damaging patterned areas by 100 keV Ar ions implanted at room temperature using fluence of 2 × 10 15 cm −2 , and then annealing the samples in 365 °C for 30 min. The damage build-up and annealing is studied by channeling Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and compared to sheet resistance measurements. Only a low level of damage annealing can be seen in RBS for the post-implant annealed samples, but for Ar fluence higher than 2 × 10 14 cm −2 , a strong electrical resistivity increase can still be achieved

  15. Radiation exposure and chromosome damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, D.

    1979-01-01

    Chromosome damage is discussed as a means of biologically measuring radiation exposure to the body. Human lymphocytes are commonly used for this test since the extent of chromosome damage induced is related to the exposure dose. Several hundred lymphocytes are analysed in metaphase for chromosome damage, particularly dicentrics. The dose estimate is made by comparing the observed dicentric yield against calibration curves, previously produced by in vitro irradiation of blood samples to known doses of different types of radiation. This test is useful when there is doubt that the film badge has recorded a reasonable whole body dose and also when there is an absence of any physical data. A case of deliberate exposure is described where the chromosome damage test estimated an exposure of 152 rads. The life span of cell aberrations is also considered. Regular checks on radiotherapy patients and some accidental overdose cases have shown little reduction in the aberration levels over the first six weeks after which the damage disappears slowly with a half-life of about three years. In conclusion, chromosome studies have been shown to be of value in resolving practical problems in radiological protection. (U.K.)

  16. Analysis of radiation damaged nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitek, J.; Dekan, J.; Sedlackova, K.; Sagatova, A.

    2014-01-01

    Ribbon-shaped specimens of the master alloy were prepared by planar flow casting. The ribbons with nominal composition of (Fe_1_-_xN_x)_8_1Nb_7B_1_2 (x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75) were about 25 μm thick and 10 mm wide. To achieve nanocrystalline state, the amorphous ribbons were annealed in vacuum at the temperature of 550 grad C for 1 hour. Samples were irradiated by neutrons in nuclear reactor with fluence of 10"1"6 n/cm"2 and 10"1"7 n/cm"2. and by electrons in linear accelerator with dose 1 MGy at the Slovak Medical University. Moessbauer spectra were collected in transmission geometry by a conventional constant-acceleration spectrometer with a "5"7Co(Rh) source. All spectra were measured at room temperature and evaluated by the CONFIT program, which allows simultaneous treatment of crystalline and residual amorphous phase by means of individual lines and distribution of hyperfine components. After summarizing all obtained results, the fluence 10"1"6 n/cm"2 is still not sufficiently high significantly damage amorphous and crystalline structure. This fluence more or less modify the structure than damage. After fluence 10"17"n/cm"2 we observed beginning of the. structural damage. Our results show, that high electron dose also modify the structure of nanocrystaline alloys. In further study of this alloy it would be necessary to find the limit of electron dose under that the alloy is resistant against electron's damage. From point of view Moessbauer spectroscopy the most sensitive parameter is direction of net magnetic moment. (authors)

  17. Damage and in-situ annealing during ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadana, D.K.; Washburn, J.; Byrne, P.F.; Cheung, N.W.

    1982-11-01

    Formation of amorphous (α) layers in Si during ion implantation in the energy range 100 keV-11 MeV and temperature range liquid nitrogen (LN)-100 0 C has been investigated. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) shows that buried amorphous layers can be created for both room temperature (RT) and LN temperature implants, with a wider 100 percent amorphous region for the LN cooled case. The relative narrowing of the α layer during RT implantation is attributed to in-situ annealing. Implantation to the same fluence at temperatures above 100 0 C does not produce α layers. To further investigate in situ annealing effects, specimens already containing buried α layers were further irradiated with ion beams in the temperature range RT-400 0 C. It was found that isolated small α zones (less than or equal to 50 diameter) embedded in the crystalline matrix near the two α/c interfaces dissolved into the crystal but the thickness of the 100 percent α layer was not appreciably affected by further implantation at 200 0 C. A model for in situ annealing during implantation is presented

  18. Radiation damage in silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lindström, G

    2003-01-01

    Radiation damage effects in silicon detectors under severe hadron and gamma-irradiation are surveyed, focusing on bulk effects. Both macroscopic detector properties (reverse current, depletion voltage and charge collection) as also the underlying microscopic defect generation are covered. Basic results are taken from the work done in the CERN-RD48 (ROSE) collaboration updated by results of recent work. Preliminary studies on the use of dimerized float zone and Czochralski silicon as detector material show possible benefits. An essential progress in the understanding of the radiation-induced detector deterioration had recently been achieved in gamma irradiation, directly correlating defect analysis data with the macroscopic detector performance.

  19. Effect of radiation damage on the infrared properties of apatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anis Faridah Md Nori; Yusof Mohd Amin; Rosli Mahat; Burhanuddin Kamaluddin

    1991-01-01

    Apatites are known to contain radioactive elements such as uranium and thorium at a few ppm in concentration. These elements decay and produce fission tracks inside the crystals. The presence of such tracks have been known to affect the thermoluminescence (TL) properties of apatites. These fission tracks can be removed by annealing the crystals in air. In this paper we present the result of a preliminary study on the effect of radiation damage on the infrared transmission of apatites

  20. Solar radiation and mitochondrial DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, H.Z.; Locitzer, J.; Nassrin, E.; Ogbonnaya, A.; Hubbard, K.

    2003-01-01

    The 16.6 kB human mitochondrial DNA contains two homologous 13 base pair direct repeats separated by about 5 kB. During asynchronous mitochondrial DNA replication, the distant repeat sequences are thought to anneal, resulting in the looping out of a portion of the non-template strand which is subsequently deleted as a result of interaction with reactive oxygen species (ROS). A normal daughter and a deleted daughter mitochondrion result from such insults. This deletion has been termed the common deletion as it is the most frequent of the known mitochondrial DNA deletions. The common deletion is present in high frequency in several mitochondrial disorders, accumulates with age in slow turnover tissues and is increased in sun-exposed skin. Berneburg, et al. (Photochem. Photobiol. 66: 271, 1997) induced the common deletion in normal human fibroblasts after repeated exposures to UVA. In this study, the common deletion has been shown to be induced by repeated non-lethal exposures to FS20 sunlamp irradiation. Increases in the common deletion were demonstrated using nested PCR which produced a 303 bp product that was compared to a 324 bp product that required the presence of the undeleted 5 kB region. The cells were exposed to 10 repeated doses ranging from 0.5 (UVB) - 0.24 (UVA) J/sq m to 14.4 (UVB) - 5.8 J/sq m (UVA) measured using a UVX digital radiometer and UVB and UVA detectors respectively. Comparison with the earlier study by Berneberg, et al. suggests that this type of simulated solar damage is considerably more effective in fewer exposures than UVA radiation alone. The common deletion provides a cytoplasmic end-point for ROS damage produced by low dose chronic irradiations and other low level toxic exposures and should prove useful in evaluating cytoplasmic damage produced by ionizing radiation as well

  1. Radiation damage of structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutsky, J.; Kocik, J.

    1994-01-01

    Maintaining the integrity of nuclear power plants (NPP) is critical in the prevention or control of severe accidents. This monograph deals with both basic groups of structural materials used in the design of light-water nuclear reactors, making the primary safety barriers of NPPs. Emphasis is placed on materials used in VVER-type nuclear reactors: Cr-Mo-V and Cr-Ni-Mo-V steel for reactor pressure vessels (RPV) and Zr-Nb alloys for fuel element cladding. The book is divided into seven main chapters, with the exception of the opening one and the chapter providing phenomenological background for the subject of radiation damage. Chapters 3-6 are devoted to RPV steels and chapters 7-9 to zirconium alloys, analyzing their radiation damage structure, changes of mechanical properties due to neutron irradiation as well as factors influencing the degree of their performance degradation. The recovery of damaged materials is also discussed. Considerable attention is paid to a comparison of VVER-type and western-type light-water materials

  2. Positron annihilation lifetime study of radiation-damaged natural zircons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, J. [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); Gaugliardo, P. [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Physics, University of Western Australia (Australia); Farnan, I.; Zhang, M. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Vance, E.R.; Davis, J.; Karatchevtseva, I.; Knott, R.B. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (Australia); Mudie, S. [The Australian Synchrotron, Victoria (Australia); Buckman, S.J. [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); Institute for Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Sullivan, J.P., E-mail: james.sullivan@anu.edu.au [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)

    2016-04-01

    Zircons are a well-known candidate waste form for actinides and their radiation damage behaviour has been widely studied by a range of techniques. In this study, well-characterised natural single crystal zircons have been studied using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS). In some, but not all, of the crystals that had incurred at least half of the alpha-event damage of ∼10{sup 19} α/g required to render them structurally amorphous, PALS spectra displayed long lifetimes corresponding to voids of ∼0.5 nm in diameter. The long lifetimes corresponded to expectations from published Small-Angle X-ray Scattering data on similar samples. However, the non-observation by PALS of such voids in some of the heavily damaged samples may reflect large size variations among the voids such that no singular size can be distinguished or. Characterisation of a range of samples was also performed using scanning electron microscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, Raman scattering and X-ray scattering/diffraction, with the degree of alpha damage being inferred mainly from the Raman technique and X-ray diffraction. The observed void diameters and intensities of the long lifetime components were changed somewhat by annealing at 700 °C; annealing at 1200 °C removed the voids entirely. The voids themselves may derive from He gas bubbles or voids created by the inclusion of small quantities of organic and hydrous matter, notwithstanding the observation that no voidage was evidenced by PALS in two samples containing hydrous and organic matter. - Highlights: • Study of a range of naturally occurring zircons damaged by alpha radiation. • Characterised using a range of techniques, including PALS spectroscopy. • Effects on hydrous material appear important, rather than direct radiation damage. • Annealing is shown to remove the observed voids.

  3. Electron Beam Induced Radiation Damage of the Semiconductor Radiation Detector based on Silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Han Soo; Kim, Yong Kyun; Park, Se Hwan; Haa, Jang Ho; Kang, Sang Mook; Chung, Chong Eun; Cho, Seung Yeon; Park, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Tae Hyung

    2005-01-01

    A Silicon Surface Barrier (SSB) semiconductor detector which is generally used to detect a charged particle such as an alpha particle was developed. The performance of the developed SSB semiconductor detector was measured with an I-V curve and an alpha spectrum. The response for an alpha particle was measured by Pu-238 sources. A SSB semiconductor detector was irradiated firstly at 30sec, at 30μA and secondly 40sec, 40μA with a 2MeV pulsed electron beam generator in KAERI. And the electron beam induced radiation damage of a homemade SSB detector and the commercially available PIN photodiode were investigated. An annealing effect of the damaged SSB and PIN diode detector were also investigated using a Rapid Thermal Annealing (RTA). This data may assist in designing the silicon based semiconductor radiation detector when it is operated in a high radiation field such as space or a nuclear power plant

  4. Radiation damage of structural materials

    CERN Document Server

    Koutsky, Jaroslav

    1994-01-01

    Maintaining the integrity of nuclear power plants is critical in the prevention or control of severe accidents. This monograph deals with both basic groups of structural materials used in the design of light-water nuclear reactors, making the primary safety barriers of NPPs. Emphasis is placed on materials used in VVER-type nuclear reactors: Cr-Mo-V and Cr-Ni-Mo-V steel for RPV and Zr-Nb alloys for fuel element cladding. The book is divided into 7 main chapters, with the exception of the opening one and the chapter providing a phenomenological background for the subject of radiation damage. Ch

  5. Damages by radiation in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olguin, F.; Gutierrez, C.; Cisniega, G.; Flores, J.H.; Golzarri, J.I.; Espinoza, G.

    1997-01-01

    As a part of the works carried out to characterize the electrons beam from the Pelletron accelerator of the Mexican Nuclear Center aluminium-silicate glass samples were irradiated. The purpose of these irradiations is to cause alterations in the amorphous microstructure of the material by means of the creation of color centers. The population density of these defects, consequence to the irradiation, is function of the exposure time which varied from 1 to 30 minutes, with an electronic beam energy of 400 keV, doing the irradiations at free atmosphere. the obtained spectra are correlated by damage which the radiation produced. (Author)

  6. Health effects of radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasimova, K; Azizova, F; Mehdieva, K.

    2012-01-01

    Full text : A summary of the nature of radiactive contamination would be incomplete without some mention of the human health effects relatied to radioactivity and radioactive materials. Several excellent reviews at the variety of levels of detail have been written and should be consulted by the reader. Internal exposures of alpha and beta particles are important for ingested and inhaled radionuclides. Dosimetry models are used to estimate the dose from internally deposited radioactive particles. As mentioned above weighting parameters that take into account the radiation type, the biological half-life and the tissue or organ at risk are used to convert the physically absorbed dose in units of gray (or red) to the biologically significant committed equivalent dose and effective dose, measured in units of Sv (or rem). There is considerable controversy over the shape of the dose-response curve at the chronic low dose levels important for enviromental contamination. Proposed models include linear models, non-linear models and threshold models. Because risks at low dose must be extrapolated from available date at high doses, the shape of the dose-response curve has important implications for the environmental regulations used to protect the general public. The health effect of radiation damage depends on a combination of events of on the cellular, tissue and systemic levels. These lead to mutations and cellular of the irradiated parent cell. The dose level at which significant damage occurs depends on the cell type. Cells that reproduce rapidily, such as those found in bone marrow or the gastrointestinal tract, will be more sensitive to radiation than those that are longer lived, such as striated muscle or nerve cells. The effects of high radiation doses on an organ depends on the various cell types it contains

  7. Radiation damage to DNA constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergene, R.

    1977-01-01

    The molecular changes of the DNA molecule, in various systems exposed to inoizing radiation, have been the subject of a great number of studies. In the present work electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) has been applied to irradiated crystalline systems, in particular single crystals of DNA subunits and their derivatives. The main conclusions about the molecular damage are based on this technique in combination with molecular orbital calculations. It should be emphasized that the ESR technique is restricted to damage containing unpaired electrons. These unstable intermediates called free radicals seem, however, to be involved in all molecular models describing the action of radiation on DNA. One of the premises for a detailed theory of the radiation induced reactions at the physico-chemical level seems to involve exact knowledge of the induced free radicals as well as the modes of their formation and fate. For DNA, as such, it is hardly possible to arrive at such a level of knowledge since the molecular complexity prevents selective studies of the many different radiation induced products. One possible approach is to study the free radicals formed in the constituents of DNA. In the present work three lines of approach should be mentioned. The first is based on the observation that radical formation in general causes only minor structural alterations to the molecule in question. The use of isotopes with different spin and magnetic moment (in particular deuterium) may also serve a source of information. Deuteration leads to a number of protons, mainly NH - and OH, becoming substituted, and if any of these are involved in interactions with unpaired protons the resonance pattern is influeneed. The third source of information is molecular orbital calculation. The electron spin density distribution is a function in the three dimensional space based on the system's electronic wave functions. This constitutes the basis for the idea that ESR data can be correlated with

  8. Effect of pressure on the radiation annealing of recoil atoms in chromates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamouli, M.I.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of pressure on the annealing of recoil atoms by gamma radiation in neutron irradiated potassium chromate, ammonium chromate and ammonium dichromate was studied. In potassium chromate the pressure applied before the gamma-irradiation was found to retard the radiation annealing process. In ammonium chromate and ammonium dichromate the radiation annealing was found to be enhanced in the compressed samples in comparison to the noncompressed ones. (author)

  9. Radiation damage in lithium orthosilicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, K.; Nakazawa, T.; Ishii, Y.; Fukai, K.; Watanabe, H. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment); Matsui, H.; Vollath, D.

    1993-11-01

    Radiation damage in lithium orthosilicate (Li[sub 4]SiO[sub 4]) and Al-doped Li[sub 4]SiO[sub 4] (Li[sub 3.7]Al[sub 0.1]SiO[sub 4]) irradiated with oxygen ions was studied with ionic conductivity measurements, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared photo-acoustic spectroscopy (FT-IR PAS) and transmission electron microscopy. It was seen from the ionic conductivity measurements that lithium-ion vacancies were introduced as irradiation defects for Li-ions sites in both materials due to the irradiation. By the Raman spectroscopy, oxygen atoms in SiO[sub 4] tetrahedra were considered to be preferentially displaced due to the irradiation for Li[sub 4]SiO[sub 4], although only a decrease of the number of SiO[sub 4] tetrahedra occurred for Li[sub 3.7]Al[sub 0.1]SiO[sub 4] by displacement of both silicon and oxygen atoms. Decomposition of SiO[sub 4] tetrahedra and formation of some new phases having Si-O-Si and Si-O bonds were found to take place for both Li[sub 4]SiO[sub 4] and Li[sub 3.7]Al[sub 0.1]SiO[sub 4] by FT-IR PAS. In the electron microscopy, damage microstructure consisting of many voids or cavities and amorphization were observed for Li[sub 4]SiO[sub 4] irradiated with oxygen ions. The recovery behavior of radiation damage mentioned above was also investigated. (author).

  10. Annealing of proton-damaged GaAs and 1/f noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.Y.; Folter, de L.C.

    1997-01-01

    GaAs layers were grown by MBE. The layers were then damaged by 3 MeV proton irradiation and later annealed. We performed Hall effect and low-frequency noise measurements at temperatures between 77 K and 300 K after each step. Several generation - recombination noise components created by proton

  11. Radiation-induced damage of membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonei, Shuji

    1977-01-01

    An outline of membranous structure was stated, and radiation-induced damage of membranes were surveyed. By irradiation, permeability of membranes, especially passive transportation mechanism, was damaged, and glycoprotein in the surface layers of cells and the surface layer structures were changed. The intramembranous damage was induced by decrease of electrophoresis of nuclear mambranes and a quantitative change of cytochrome P450 of microsomal membranes of the liver, and peroxidation of membranous lipid and SH substitute damage of membranous protein were mentioned as the mechanism of membranous damage. Recovery of membranous damage depends on radiation dose and temperature, and membranous damage participates largely in proliferation death. (tsunoda, M.)

  12. Damage accumulation and annealing in 6H-SiC irradiated with Si+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, W.; Weber, W.J.; Thevuthasan, S.; McCready, D.E.

    1998-01-01

    Damage accumulation and annealing in 6H-silicon carbide (α-SiC) single crystals have been studied in situ using 2.0 MeV He + RBS in a left angle 0001 right angle -axial channeling geometry (RBS/C). The damage was induced by 550 keV Si + ion implantation (30 off normal) at a temperature of -110 C, and the damage recovery was investigated by subsequent isochronal annealing (20 min) over the temperature range from -110 C to 900 C. At ion fluences below 7.5 x 10 13 Si + /cm 2 (0.04 dpa in the damage peak), only point defects appear to be created. Furthermore, the defects on the Si sublattice can be completely recovered by thermal annealing at room temperature (RT), and recovery of defects on the C sublattice is suggested. At higher fluences, amorphization occurs; however, partial damage recovery at RT is still observed, even at a fluence of 6.6 x 10 14 Si + /cm 2 (0.35 dpa in the damage peak) where a buried amorphous layer is produced. At an ion fluence of 6.0 x 10 15 Si + /cm 2 (-90 C), an amorphous layer is created from the surface to a depth of 0.6 μm. Because of recovery processes at the buried crystalline-amorphous interface, the apparent thickness of this amorphous layer decreases slightly (<10%) with increasing temperature over the range from -90 C to 600 C. (orig.)

  13. Radiation damages in solids and tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cevc, P.; Kogovsek, F.; Kanduser, A.; Peternelj, M.; Skaleric, U.; Funduk, N.

    1977-01-01

    In submitted research work we have studied radiation damages in ferroelectric crystals and application of ferroelectric crystals. Studying the radiation damages we have introduced new technique of EPR measurements under high hydrostatic pressure, that will enable us to obtain additional data on crystal lattice dynamics. A change of piroelectric coefficient with high radiation doses in dopped TGS has been measured also

  14. Radiation damage testing at the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinowsky, W.; Thun, R.

    1990-06-01

    A Task Force on Radiation Damage Testing met at the SSC Laboratory on March 5--6, 1990. This Task Force was asked to assess the availability of appropriate facilities for radiation damage tests of SSC detector materials and components. The Task Force was also instructed to review the techniques and standards for conducting such tests. Semiconductors were considered separately from other detector materials. Radiation damage test of electronic devices generally require exposures to both ionizing radiation and neutrons, whereas non-electric components such as plastic scintillating materials, adhesives, cable insulation, and other organic polymers are adequately tested with ionizing radiation only. Test standards are discussed with respect to irradiation techniques, environmental factors, dosimetry, and mechanisms whereby various materials are damaged. It is emphasized that radiation sources should be chosen to duplicate as much as possible the expected SSC environment and that the effects from ionizing particles and from neutrons be investigated separately. Radiation damage tests at reactors must be designed with particular care complex spectra of neutrons and gamma rays are produced at such facilities. It is also essential to investigate dose-rate effects since they are known to be important in many cases. The required irradiations may last several months and are most easily carried out with dedicated radioactive sources. Environmental factors such as the presence of oxygen when testing plastic scintillators, or temperature when measuring semiconductor annealing effects, must also be taken into account. The importance of reliable dosimetry is stressed and suitable references cited. Finally, it is noted that an understanding of the mechanisms for radiation damage in semiconductor and other materials is important in planning irradiations and evaluating results

  15. Facilities for studying radiation damage in nonmetals during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, P.W.

    1984-08-01

    Two facilities have been developed for making optical absorption, luminescence and other measurements on a single sample before, during and after irradiation. One facility uses 60 Co gamma rays and the other 0.5 to 3 MeV electrons from an accelerator. Optical relays function as spectrophotometers, luminescenc detectors, etc. All radiation sensitive components are outside of walk-in irradiation chambers; all measurement control and data recording is computerized. Irradiations are made at controlled temperatures between 5K and 900 0 C. The materials studied include glasses, quartz, alkali halides (especially natural rock salt), organic crystals, etc. As determined from color center measurements the damage formation rate in all materials studied at 25 0 C or above is strongly temperature dependent. The defect concentration during irradiation is usually much greater than that measured after irradiation. The fraction of defects annealing after irradiation and the annealing rate usually increases as the irradiation temperature increases. The completed studies demonstrate that, in most cases, the extent of maximum damage and the damage formation and annealing kinetics can be determined only by making measurements during irradiation

  16. Low-temperature annealing of radiation defects in electron-irradiated gallium phosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, A.A.; Megela, I.G.; Buturlakin, A.P.; Goyer, D.B.

    1990-01-01

    The isochronal annealing of radiation defects in high-energy electron irradiated n-GaP monocrystals within the 77 to 300 K range has been investigated by optical and electrical techniques. The changes in conductance and charge carrier mobility as functions of annealing temperature as well as the variation of optical absorption spectra of GaP under irradiation and annealing provide evidence that most of radiation defects are likely secondary complexes of defects

  17. Semiconductor annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.M.; Scovell, P.D.

    1981-01-01

    A process for annealing crystal damage in ion implanted semiconductor devices is described in which the device is rapidly heated to a temperature between 450 and 600 0 C and allowed to cool. It has been found that such heating of the device to these relatively low temperatures results in rapid annealing. In one application the device may be heated on a graphite element mounted between electrodes in an inert atmosphere in a chamber. The process may be enhanced by the application of optical radiation from a Xenon lamp. (author)

  18. Ion implantation damage annealing in 4H-SiC monitored by scanning spreading resistance microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchodolskis, A.; Hallen, A.; Linnarsson, M.K.; Osterman, J.; Karlsson, U.O.

    2006-01-01

    To obtain a better understanding of the damage annealing process and dopant defect incorporation and activation we have implanted epitaxially grown 4H-SiC layers with high doses of Al + ions. Cross-sections of the samples are investigated by scanning spreading resistance microscopy (SSRM) using a commercial atomic force microscopy (AFM). The defects caused by the implanted ions compensate for the doping and decrease the charge carrier mobility. This causes the resistivity to increase in the as-implanted regions. The calculated profile of implanted ions is in good agreement with the measured ones and shows a skewed Gaussian shape. Implanted samples are annealed up to 400 deg. C. Despite these low annealing temperatures we observe a clear improvement of the sample conductivity in the as-implanted region

  19. Radiation damage in silicon exposed to high-energy protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, Gordon; Hayama, Shusaku; Murin, Leonid; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard; Bondarenko, Vladimir; Sengupta, Asmita; Davia, Cinzia; Karpenko, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Photoluminescence, infrared absorption, positron annihilation, and deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) have been used to investigate the radiation damage produced by 24 GeV/c protons in crystalline silicon. The irradiation doses and the concentrations of carbon and oxygen in the samples have been chosen to monitor the mobility of the damage products. Single vacancies (and self-interstitials) are introduced at the rate of ∼1 cm -1 , and divacancies at 0.5 cm -1 . Stable di-interstitials are formed when two self-interstitials are displaced in one damage event, and they are mobile at room temperature. In the initial stages of annealing the evolution of the point defects can be understood mainly in terms of trapping at the impurities. However, the positron signal shows that about two orders of magnitude more vacancies are produced by the protons than are detected in the point defects. Damage clusters exist, and are largely removed by annealing at 700 to 800 K, when there is an associated loss of broad band emission between 850 and 1000 meV. The well-known W center is generated by restructuring within clusters, with a range of activation energies of about 1.3 to 1.6 eV, reflecting the disordered nature of the clusters. Comparison of the formation of the X centers in oxygenated and oxygen-lean samples suggests that the J defect may be interstitial related rather than vacancy related. To a large extent, the damage and annealing behavior may be factorized into point defects (monitored by sharp-line optical spectra and DLTS) and cluster defects (monitored by positron annihilation and broadband luminescence). Taking this view to the limit, the generation rates for the point defects are as predicted by simply taking the damage generated by the Coulomb interaction of the protons and Si nuclei

  20. Room-temperature annealing of Si implantation damage in InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akano, U.G.; Mitchell, I.V.

    1991-01-01

    Spontaneous recovery at 295 K of Si implant damage in InP is reported. InP(Zn) and InP(S) wafers of (100) orientation have been implanted at room temperature with 600 keV Si + ions to doses ranging from 3.6x10 11 to 2x10 14 cm -2 . Room-temperature annealing of the resultant damage has been monitored by the Rutherford backscattering/channeling technique. For Si doses ≤4x10 13 cm -2 , up to 70% of the initial damage (displaced atoms) annealed out over a period of ∼85 days. The degree of recovery was found to depend on the initial level of damage. Recovery is characterized by at least two time constants t 1 2 ∼100 days. Anneal rates observed between 295 and 375 K are consistent with an activation energy of 1.2 eV, suggesting that the migration of implant-induced vacancies is associated with the reordering of the InP lattice

  1. Thermal annealing of high dose radiation induced damage at room temperature in alkaline. Stored energy, thermoluminescence and coloration; Aniquilacion termica de dano inducido por irradiacion a altas dosis en haluros alcalinos a 300 k. energia almacenda. Termoluminiscencia y coloracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, L

    1980-07-01

    The possible relation between stored energy, thermoluminescence and colour centre annealing in gamma and electron irradiated alkali halides is studied. Thermoluminescence occurs at temperature higher than the temperature at which the main stored energy peak appears. No stored energy release is detected in additively coloured KC1 samples. Plastic deformation and doping with Ca and Sr induce a stored energy spectrum different from the spectrum observed in pure and as cleaved samples, but the amount of stored energy does not change for a given irradiation dose.Capacity of alkali halides to store energy by irradiation increases as the cation size decreases. (Author) 51 refs.

  2. Metamict state radiation damage in crystalline materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haaker, R.F.; Ewing, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    Metamict minerals provide an excellent basis for the evaluation of long-term radiation damage effects, particularly such changes in physical and chemical properties as microfracturing, hydrothermal alteration, and solubility. This paper summarizes pertinent literature on metamictization and proposes experiments that are critical to the elucidation of structural controls on radiation damage in crystalline phases

  3. [Mechanisms of electromagnetic radiation damaging male reproduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Lei; Chen, Hao-Yu; Wang, Shui-Ming

    2012-08-01

    More and more evidence from over 50 years of researches on the effects of electromagnetic radiation on male reproduction show that a certain dose of electromagnetic radiation obviously damages male reproduction, particularly the structure and function of spermatogenic cells. The mechanisms of the injury may be associated with energy dysmetabolism, lipid peroxidation, abnormal expressions of apoptosis-related genes and proteins, and DNA damage.

  4. Repair of radiation damage in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The responses, such as survival, mutation, and carcinogenesis, of mammalian cells and tissues to radiation are dependent not only on the magnitude of the damage to macromolecular structures - DNA, RNA, protein, and membranes - but on the rates of macromolecular syntheses of cells relative to the half-lives of the damages. Cells possess a number of mechanisms for repairing damage to DNA. If the repair systems are rapid and error free, cells can tolerate much larger doses than if repair is slow or error prone. It is important to understand the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage because there exist reasonable amounts of epidemiological data that permits the construction of dose-response curves for humans. The shapes of such curves or the magnitude of the response will depend on repair. Radiation damage is emphasized because: (a) radiation dosimetry, with all its uncertainties for populations, is excellent compared to chemical dosimetry; (b) a number of cancer-prone diseases are known in which there are defects in DNA repair and radiation results in more chromosomal damage in cells from such individuals than in cells from normal individuals; (c) in some cases, specific radiation products in DNA have been correlated with biological effects, and (d) many chemical effects seem to mimic radiation effects. A further reason for emphasizing damage to DNA is the wealth of experimental evidence indicating that damages to DNA can be initiating events in carcinogenesis.

  5. Nature of radiation damage in ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunch, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    Efforts to determine the equivalence between different sources of radiation damage in ceramics are reviewed. The ways in which ceramics differ from metals are examined and proposed mechanisms for creation and stabilization of defects in insulators are outlined. Work on radiation damage in crystalline oxides is summarized and suggestions for further research are offered

  6. Repair of radiation damage in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The responses, such as survival, mutation, and carcinogenesis, of mammalian cells and tissues to radiation are dependent not only on the magnitude of the damage to macromolecular structures - DNA, RNA, protein, and membranes - but on the rates of macromolecular syntheses of cells relative to the half-lives of the damages. Cells possess a number of mechanisms for repairing damage to DNA. If the repair systems are rapid and error free, cells can tolerate much larger doses than if repair is slow or error prone. It is important to understand the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage because there exist reasonable amounts of epidemiological data that permits the construction of dose-response curves for humans. The shapes of such curves or the magnitude of the response will depend on repair. Radiation damage is emphasized because: (a) radiation dosimetry, with all its uncertainties for populations, is excellent compared to chemical dosimetry; (b) a number of cancer-prone diseases are known in which there are defects in DNA repair and radiation results in more chromosomal damage in cells from such individuals than in cells from normal individuals; (c) in some cases, specific radiation products in DNA have been correlated with biological effects, and (d) many chemical effects seem to mimic radiation effects. A further reason for emphasizing damage to DNA is the wealth of experimental evidence indicating that damages to DNA can be initiating events in carcinogenesis

  7. Radiation damage measurements on CZT drift strip detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Korsbech, Uffe C C

    2003-01-01

    from 2 x 10(8) to 60 x 10(8) p(+)/cm(2). Even for the highest fluences, which had a dramatic effect on the spectroscopic performance, we were able to recover the detectors after an appropriate annealing procedure. The radiation damage was studied as a function of depth inside the detector material...... with the proton dose. The radiation contribution to the electron trapping was found to obey the following relation: (mutau(e)(-1))(rad) = (2.5+/-0.2) x 10(-7) x Phi (V/cm)(2) with the proton fluence, Phi in p(+)/cm(2). The trapping depth dependence, however, did not agree well with the damage profile calculated...

  8. Dermal damage from ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kligman, L.H.

    1988-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is increasingly recognized as the cause of a vast number of changes in the skin of humans and animals. These include alterations at the molecular, cellular, tissue and systematic levels. In the recent past, much has been learned about the immediate effects in skin of acute UV exposure (i.e. sunburn) with its epidermal cell death, inflammation and vasolidation. With chronic exposure, many of the clinical and histologic effects can be seen only after decades. Visually, these are hyper- and hypopigmented macules, dry scaly, wrinkled skin with a variety of benign, pre-malignant and malignant neoplasms. All epidermal in origin, they lead, inexorably in humans, to the appearance the authors described as photo-aged. Underlying many of these visible manifestations are drastic changes in the dermis. These relate chiefly to destruction of mature collagen, with a compensatory overproduction of reticulin fibers, hyperplasia of elastic fibers eventuating in elastosis, increased levels of the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) comprising the ground substance and changes in the microvasculature. First described in actinically damaged humans, systematic investigation required an animal model

  9. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy of the ion implantation damage in annealed diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derry, T.E. [DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials and School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Wits 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa)], E-mail: Trevor.Derry@wits.ac.za; Nshingabigwi, E.K. [DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials and School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Wits 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa); Department of Physics, National University of Rwanda, P.O. Box 117, Huye (Rwanda); Levitt, M. [DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials and School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Wits 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa); Neethling, J. [DST/NRF CoE-SM and Physics Department, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Naidoo, S.R. [DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials and School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Wits 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2009-08-15

    It has formerly been shown that low-damage levels, produced during the implantation doping of diamond as a semiconductor, anneal easily while high levels 'graphitize' (above about 5.2 x 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}). The difference in the defect types and their profiles, in the two cases, has never been directly observed. We have succeeded in using cross-section transmission electron microscopy to do so. The experiments were difficult because the specimens must be polished to {approx}40 {mu}m thickness, then implanted on edge and annealed, before final ion beam thinning to electron transparency. The low-damage micrographs reveal some deeply penetrating dislocations, whose existence had been predicted in earlier work.

  10. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy of the ion implantation damage in annealed diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derry, T.E.; Nshingabigwi, E.K.; Levitt, M.; Neethling, J.; Naidoo, S.R.

    2009-01-01

    It has formerly been shown that low-damage levels, produced during the implantation doping of diamond as a semiconductor, anneal easily while high levels 'graphitize' (above about 5.2 x 10 15 ions/cm 2 ). The difference in the defect types and their profiles, in the two cases, has never been directly observed. We have succeeded in using cross-section transmission electron microscopy to do so. The experiments were difficult because the specimens must be polished to ∼40 μm thickness, then implanted on edge and annealed, before final ion beam thinning to electron transparency. The low-damage micrographs reveal some deeply penetrating dislocations, whose existence had been predicted in earlier work.

  11. Radiation damage in proton-irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, Joern

    2009-07-01

    In this work radiation hardness of 75 μm, 100 μm and 150 μm thick epitaxial silicon pad diodes of both standard and oxygenated material was investigated. Damage after 24 GeV/c proton irradiation in a 1MeV neutron equivalent fluence range between 10 14 cm -2 and 10 16 cm -2 was studied and isothermal annealing experiments at 80 C were carried out. Standard CV/IV measurements could be performed up to 4 x 10 15 cm -2 . The volume-normalised reverse current was found to increase linearly with fluence with a slope independent of the thickness and impurity concentration. However, due to large fluctuations the fluences had to be renormalised using the current-related damage parameter. Concerning the depletion voltage, nearly all materials remained at a moderate level up to 4 x 10 15 cm -2 . During short-term annealing acceptors annealed out, whereas others were introduced during the long-term annealing. The stable damage was characterised by donor removal at low fluences and fluence-proportional predominant donor introduction for highly irradiated diodes, depending on the oxygen level. No type inversion was observed. Time-resolved measurements with a new 670 nm laser-TCT setup made the determination of the trapping time constant with the charge correction method possible. The results agreed with expectations and showed a linear increase of trapping probability with fluence. The electric field exhibited a double peak structure in highly irradiated diodes. Charge collection efficiency measurements with α-particles were independent of oxygen concentration, but showed an improved efficiency for thinner diodes. A comparison to simulation revealed systematic discrepancies. A non-constant trapping time parameter was proposed as possible solution. (orig.)

  12. Radiation damage in proton-irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, Joern

    2009-07-15

    In this work radiation hardness of 75 {mu}m, 100 {mu}m and 150 {mu}m thick epitaxial silicon pad diodes of both standard and oxygenated material was investigated. Damage after 24 GeV/c proton irradiation in a 1MeV neutron equivalent fluence range between 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} and 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} was studied and isothermal annealing experiments at 80 C were carried out. Standard CV/IV measurements could be performed up to 4 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The volume-normalised reverse current was found to increase linearly with fluence with a slope independent of the thickness and impurity concentration. However, due to large fluctuations the fluences had to be renormalised using the current-related damage parameter. Concerning the depletion voltage, nearly all materials remained at a moderate level up to 4 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. During short-term annealing acceptors annealed out, whereas others were introduced during the long-term annealing. The stable damage was characterised by donor removal at low fluences and fluence-proportional predominant donor introduction for highly irradiated diodes, depending on the oxygen level. No type inversion was observed. Time-resolved measurements with a new 670 nm laser-TCT setup made the determination of the trapping time constant with the charge correction method possible. The results agreed with expectations and showed a linear increase of trapping probability with fluence. The electric field exhibited a double peak structure in highly irradiated diodes. Charge collection efficiency measurements with {alpha}-particles were independent of oxygen concentration, but showed an improved efficiency for thinner diodes. A comparison to simulation revealed systematic discrepancies. A non-constant trapping time parameter was proposed as possible solution. (orig.)

  13. Dislocations and radiation damage in α-uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leteurtre, J.

    1969-01-01

    Dislocations in α-uranium were studied by electron microscopy. Electropolishing of thin foils was performed at low temperature (-110 deg. C) to prevent oxidation. Burgers vectors of twins dislocations are defined. Interactions between slip and twinning are studied from both experimental and theoretical point of view. Samples irradiated at several burn-up were examined. In order to explain our micrographic results, and also all information gathered in literature about radiation damage in α-uranium, a coherent model is propound for the fission particles effects. We analyse the influences of parameters: temperature, dislocation density, impurity content. The number of point defects created by one initial fission is determined for pure and annealed metal. The importance of the self-anneal which occurs immediately in each displacement spike, and the anneal due to a new fission on the damage resulting from a previous fission, are estimated. The focussing distance in [100] direction is found to be about 1000 Angstrom, at 4 deg. K. (author) [fr

  14. Radiation damage in semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraner, H.W.

    1981-12-01

    A survey is presented of the important damage-producing interactions in semiconductor detectors and estimates of defect numbers are made for MeV protons, neutrons and electrons. Damage effects of fast neutrons in germanium gamma ray spectrometers are given in some detail. General effects in silicon detectors are discussed and damage constants and their relationship to leakage current is introduced

  15. Radiation damage in the alkali halide crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diller, K.M.

    1975-10-01

    A general review is given of the experimental data on radiation damage in the alkali halide crystals. A report is presented of an experimental investigation of irradiation produced interstitial dislocation loops in NaCl. These loops are found to exhibit the usual growth and coarsening behaviour during thermal annealing which operates by a glide and self-climb mechanism. It is shown that the recombination of defects in these crystals is a two stage process, and that the loss of interstitials stabilized at the loops is caused by extrinsic vacancies. The theoretical techniques used in simulating point defects in ionic crystals are described. Shell model potentials are derived for all the alkali halide crystals by fitting to bulk crystal data. The fitting is supplemented by calculations of the repulsive second neighbour interactions using methods based on the simple electron gas model. The properties of intrinsic and substitutional impurity defects are calculated. The HADES computer program is used in all the defect calculations. Finally the report returns to the problems of irradiation produced interstitial defects. The properties of H centres are discussed; their structure, formation energies, trapping at impurities and dimerization. The structure, formation energies and mobility of the intermediate and final molecular defects are then discussed. The thermodynamics of interstitial loop formation is considered for all the alklai halide crystals. The nucleation of interstitial loops in NaCl and NaBr is discussed, and the recombination of interstitial and vacancy defects. The models are found to account for all the main features of the experimental data. (author)

  16. Damage recovery in ZnO by post-implantation annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audren, A.; Hallen, A.; Linnarsson, M.K.; Possnert, G.

    2010-01-01

    ZnO bulk samples were implanted with 200 keV-Co ions at room temperature with two fluences, 1 x 10 16 and 8 x 10 16 cm -2 , and then annealed in air for 30 min at different temperatures up to 900 o C. After the implantation and each annealing step, the samples were analyzed by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) in random and channeling directions to follow the evolution of the disorder profile. The RBS spectra reveal that disorder is created during implantation in proportion to the Co fluence. The thermal treatments induce a disorder recovery, which is however, not complete after annealing at 900 o C, where about 15% of the damage remains. To study the Co profile evolution during annealing, the samples were, in addition to RBS, characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The results show that Co diffusion starts at 800 o C, but also that a very different behavior is seen for Co concentrations below and above the solubility limit.

  17. APD Properties and Recovery from Radiation Damage

    CERN Document Server

    Baccaro, Stefania; Caruso, S; Cavallari, Francesca; Dafinei, Ioan; Diemoz, Marcella; Emeliantchik, Igor; Festinesi, Armando; Longo, Egidio; Montecchi, Marco; Organtini, Giovanni; Rosi, G

    1997-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes will be used to detect scintillation light from PWO crystals in the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter. Properties of Hamamatsu APD are reported special attention has been devoted to the study of radiation hardness and room temperature annealing. We found a fast recovery with a time constant of 1.3 days a medium fast recovery with a lifetime of the order of 10 days and indication of a third component with very long time constant of the order of 300 days.

  18. Radiation damage in optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.; Ogle, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Optical fibers provide important advantages over coaxial cables for many data transmission applications. Some of these applications require that the fibers transmit data during a radiation pulse. Other applications utilize the fiber as a radiation-to-light transducer. In either case, radiation-induced luminescence and absorption must be understood. Most studies of radiation effects in fibers have emphasized time scales of interest in telecommunication systems, from the msec to hour range. Few studies have concentrated on response at times below 1 + s. At Los Alamos, both laboratory electron accelerators and nuclear tests have been used as radiation sources to probe this early time region. The use of a fiber (or any optical medium) as a Cerenkov radiation-to-light transducer is discussed. Since the radiation induces attenuation in the medium, the light output is not proportional to the radiation input. The nonlinearity introduced by this attenuation is calculated

  19. Programmed cellular response to ionizing radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crompton, N.E.A.

    1998-01-01

    Three forms of radiation response were investigated to evaluate the hypothesis that cellular radiation response is the result of active molecular signaling and not simply a passive physicochemical process. The decision whether or not a cell should respond to radiation-induced damage either by induction of rescue systems, e.g. mobilization of repair proteins, or induction of suicide mechanisms, e.g. programmed cell death, appears to be the expression of intricate cellular biochemistry. A cell must recognize damage in its genetic material and then activate the appropriate responses. Cell type is important; the response of a fibroblast to radiation damage is both quantitatively and qualitatively different form that of a lymphocyte. The programmed component of radiation response is significant in radiation oncology and predicted to create unique opportunities for enhanced treatment success. (orig.)

  20. Radiation damage in barium fluoride detector materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levey, P.W.; Kierstead, J.A.; Woody, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    To develop radiation hard detectors, particularly for high energy physics studies, radiation damage is being studied in BaF 2 , both undoped and doped with La, Ce, Nd, Eu, Gd and Tm. Some dopants reduce radiation damage. In La doped BaF 2 they reduce the unwanted long lifetime luminescence which interferes with the short-lived fluorescence used to detect particles. Radiation induced coloring is being studied with facilities for making optical measurements before, during and after irradiation with 60 C0 gamma rays. Doses of 10 6 rad, or less, create only ionization induced charge transfer effects since lattice atom displacement damage is negligible at these doses. All crystals studied exhibit color center formation, between approximately 200 and 800 nm, during irradiation and color center decay after irradiation. Thus only measurements made during irradiation show the total absorption present in a radiation field. Both undoped and La doped BaF 2 develop damage at minimum detectable levels in the UV---which is important for particle detectors. For particle detector applications these studies must be extended to high dose irradiations with particles energetic enough to cause lattice atom displacement damage. In principle, the reduction in damage provided by dopants could apply to other applications requiring radiation damage resistant materials

  1. The kinetics of isothermal annealing of gamma-irradiation damage in crystalline barium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, S.M.K.; Krishnan, M.S.; James, C.

    1983-01-01

    The annealing of #betta#-irradiation damage in crystalline barium nitrate at different temperatures in the range 370 to 430 deg C is a combination of a first-order process affecting a small portion of the fragments and a second-order process, with a higher energy of activation, governing the behaviour of the remainder approx. 73%. The annealing data have been analysed on the models for simple interstitial vacancy recombination and also as a combination of a first-order and second-order process with an energy of activation of 10.9 and 24.0 kcal mole - 1 respectively. It is considered that the first-order process is the combination of close-correlated pairs of O and NO 2- fragments and the second order process involves the single reaction of random recombination of the fragments throughout the crystal. (author)

  2. Radiation damage analysis by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    The application of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) to the characterization and study of defects in metals produced by radiation damage is discussed. The physical basis for the positron annihilation techniques (lifetime, Doppler broadening, angular correlation) is introduced and the techniques briefly described. Some examples of the application of PAS to radiation damage analysis are presented with a view toward elucidating the particular advantages of PAS over more traditional defect characterization techniques

  3. DNA Damage Signals and Space Radiation Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Space radiation is comprised of high-energy and charge (HZE) nuclei and protons. The initial DNA damage from HZE nuclei is qualitatively different from X-rays or gamma rays due to the clustering of damage sites which increases their complexity. Clustering of DNA damage occurs on several scales. First there is clustering of single strand breaks (SSB), double strand breaks (DSB), and base damage within a few to several hundred base pairs (bp). A second form of damage clustering occurs on the scale of a few kbp where several DSB?s may be induced by single HZE nuclei. These forms of damage clusters do not occur at low to moderate doses of X-rays or gamma rays thus presenting new challenges to DNA repair systems. We review current knowledge of differences that occur in DNA repair pathways for different types of radiation and possible relationships to mutations, chromosomal aberrations and cancer risks.

  4. New technique for global solar radiation forecasting by simulated annealing and genetic algorithms using

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolabi, H.B.; Ayob, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel approach based on simulated annealing algorithm as a meta-heuristic method is implemented in MATLAB software to estimate the monthly average daily global solar radiation on a horizontal surface for six different climate cities of Iran. A search method based on genetic algorithm is applied to accelerate problem solving. Results show that simulated annealing based on genetic algorithm search is a suitable method to find the global solar radiation. (author)

  5. Effect of substrate temperature on the radiation damage from MeV Si implantation in Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, X.K.; Shao Lin; Rusakova, Irene; Wang, X.M.; Ma, K.B.; Chen, H.; Liu, Jiarui; Chu, W.-K.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the radiation damage by MeV implantation of Si in Si and its evolution under thermal annealing. Si wafers were implanted with MeV Si at various substrate temperatures. Damages were characterized by Rutherford-backscattering (RBS) channeling and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Defect formation after post-implantation annealing is very sensitive to the substrate temperatures during implantation. When the substrate temperature was decreased to 200 K, TEM revealed two distinct bands of damage after annealing: one around the mean projected ion range and another at half the projected range. Our study indicates that the formation of defects at half range results from the solid phase epitaxy growth of initial buried amorphous layers

  6. Characterization of damaging in apatitic materials irradiated with heavy ions and thermally annealed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tisserand, R.

    2004-12-01

    Some minerals belonging to the family of apatite are seen to be potential candidates for use as conditioning matrices or transmutation targets for high level nuclear waste management. Indeed, studies of natural nuclear reactors (Oklo) highlighted the strong ability of these minerals to anneal irradiation damage. In order to determine the global behaviour of these materials, we performed a fundamental study on the evolution of irradiation damage induced by various heavy ions in two apatites: a natural phospho-calcic fluor-apatite from Durango and a synthetic sintered mono-silicated fluor-apatite, called britholite. The damage in these materials was measured by using channelling R.B.S. and X-ray diffraction respectively and by determining an amorphization effective radius Re. The results revealed a similar behaviour for both apatites according to the electronic energy deposit at the entrance of the material. In addition, the effect of an isothermal annealing at 300 C was quantified on a mono-silicated britholite previously irradiated with Kr ions. We highlighted in this case the return of the lattice parameters to their initial values, followed by a partial and slow rebuilding of the crystalline lattice versus the annealing time. Finally, we followed the changes in the morphology of etch pits in the Durango fluor-apatite after acid dissolution as a function of the energy deposit by the ions. We showed that the influence of crystallography leads quickly to opening angles close to 30 degrees. The calculation of etching velocities within the irradiated material highlighted that there is a range of deposit energy where the velocity ratio increases strongly before becoming constant. (author)

  7. Low dose radiation damage effects in silicon strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.

    2016-01-01

    The radiation damage effects in silicon segmented detectors caused by X-rays have become recently an important research topic driven mainly by development of new detectors for applications at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (E-XFEL). However, radiation damage in silicon strip is observed not only after extreme doses up to 1 GGy expected at E-XFEL, but also at doses in the range of tens of Gy, to which the detectors in laboratory instruments like X-ray diffractometers or X-ray spectrometers can be exposed. In this paper we report on investigation of radiation damage effects in a custom developed silicon strip detector used in laboratory diffractometers equipped with X-ray tubes. Our results show that significant degradation of detector performance occurs at low doses, well below 200 Gy, which can be reached during normal operation of laboratory instruments. Degradation of the detector energy resolution can be explained by increasing leakage current and increasing interstrip capacitance of the sensor. Another observed effect caused by accumulation of charge trapped in the surface oxide layer is change of charge division between adjacent strips. In addition, we have observed unexpected anomalies in the annealing process.

  8. Low dose radiation damage effects in silicon strip detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.

    2016-11-01

    The radiation damage effects in silicon segmented detectors caused by X-rays have become recently an important research topic driven mainly by development of new detectors for applications at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (E-XFEL). However, radiation damage in silicon strip is observed not only after extreme doses up to 1 GGy expected at E-XFEL, but also at doses in the range of tens of Gy, to which the detectors in laboratory instruments like X-ray diffractometers or X-ray spectrometers can be exposed. In this paper we report on investigation of radiation damage effects in a custom developed silicon strip detector used in laboratory diffractometers equipped with X-ray tubes. Our results show that significant degradation of detector performance occurs at low doses, well below 200 Gy, which can be reached during normal operation of laboratory instruments. Degradation of the detector energy resolution can be explained by increasing leakage current and increasing interstrip capacitance of the sensor. Another observed effect caused by accumulation of charge trapped in the surface oxide layer is change of charge division between adjacent strips. In addition, we have observed unexpected anomalies in the annealing process.

  9. Radiation damage of metal uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihajlovic, A.

    1965-01-01

    This report is concerned with the role of dispersion second phase in uranium and burnup rate. The role of dispersion phases in radiation stability of metal uranium was studies by three methods: variation of electric conductivity dependent on the neutron flux and temperature of pure uranium for different states of dispersion second phase; influence of dispersion phase on the radiation creep; transmission electron microscopy of fresh and irradiated uranium

  10. Molecular mechanisms in radiation damage to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this work are to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for radiation-induced DNA damage. The overall goal is to understand the relationship between the chemical and structural changes produced by ionizing radiation in DNA and the resulting impairment of biological function expressed as carcinogenesis or cell death. The studies are based on theoretical explorations of possible mechanisms that link initial radiation damage in the form of base and sugar damage to conformational changes in DNA. These mechanistic explorations should lead to the formulation of testable hypothesis regarding the processes of impairment of regulation of gene expression, alternation in DNA repair, and damage to DNA structure involved in cell death or cancer

  11. Properties and recrystallization of radiation damaged pyrochlore and titanite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zietlow, Peter

    2016-11-02

    Radiation damage in minerals is caused by the alpha-decay of incorporated radionuclides, such as U and Th and their decay products. The effect of thermal annealing (400-1400 K) on radiation-damaged pyrochlores has been investigated by Raman scattering, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and combined differential scanning calorimetry/thermogravimetry (DSC/TG) (Zietlow et al., in print). The analysis of three natural radiation-damaged pyrochlore samples from Miass/Russia (6.4 wt% Th, 23.1.10{sup 18} a-decay events per gram (dpg)), Zlatoust/Russia (6.3 wt% Th, 23.1.10{sup 18} dpg), Panda Hill/Tanzania (1.6 wt% Th, 1.6.10{sup 18} dpg), and Blue River/Canada (10.5 wt% U, 115.4.10{sup 18} dpg), are compared with a crystalline reference pyrochlore from Schelingen (Germany). The type of structural recovery depends on the initial degree of radiation damage (Panda Hill 28 %, Blue River 85 %, Zlatoust and Miass 100 % according to XRD), as the recrystallization temperature increases with increasing degree of amorphization. Raman spectra indicate reordering on the local scale during annealing-induced recrystallization. As Raman modes around 800 cm{sup -1} are sensitive to radiation damage (Vandenborre and Husson 1983, Moll et al. 2011), the degree of local order was deduced from the ratio of the integrated intensities of the sum of the Raman bands between 605 and 680 cm{sup -1} devided by the sum of the integrated intensities of the bands between 810 and 860 cm{sup -1}. The most radiation damaged pyrochlores (Miass and Zlatoust) show an abrupt recovery of both, its short- (Raman) and long-range order (X-ray) between 800 and 850 K. The volume decrease upon recrystallization in Zlatoust pyrochlore was large enough to crack the sample repeatedly. In contrast, the weakly damaged pyrochlore (Panda Hill) begins to recover at considerably lower temperatures (near 500 K), extending over a temperature range of ca. 300 K, up to 800 K (Raman). The pyrochlore from Blue River shows in its

  12. New concepts for radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelin, Severino C.

    2004-01-01

    Evidence accumulated over the past two decades has indicated that exposure of cell populations to ionizing radiation results in significant biological effects occurring in both the irradiated and non-irradiated cells in the population. This phenomenon, termed the 'bystander response', has been shown to occur both in vitro and in vivo. Experiments have indicated that genetic alterations, changes in gene expression and lethality occur in bystander cells that neighbour directly irradiated cells. Furthermore, cells recipient of growth medium harvested from irradiated cultures exhibit responses similar to those of the irradiated cells. Several mechanisms involving secreted soluble factors, gap-junction intercellular communication and oxidative metabolism have been proposed to regulate the radiation-induced bystander effect. In this lecture, our current knowledge of this phenomenon and its potential impact both on the estimation of risks of exposure to low doses/low fluences of ionizing radiation and on radiotherapy is discussed. (author)

  13. Damage annealing in low temperature Fe/Mn implanted ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunnlaugsson, H. P. [University of Aarhus, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Bharuth-Ram, K., E-mail: kbr@tlabs.ac.za [Durban University of Technology, Physics Department (South Africa); Johnston, K. [PH Department, ISOLDE/CERN (Switzerland); Langouche, G. [University of Leuven, Instituut voor Kern-en Stralings fysika (Belgium); Mantovan, R. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR (Italy); Mølholt, T. E. [University of Iceland, Science Institute (Iceland); Naidoo, D. [University of the Witwatersrand, School of Physics (South Africa); Ólafsson, O. [University of Iceland, Science Institute (Iceland); Weyer, G. [University of Aarhus, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark)

    2015-04-15

    {sup 57}Fe Emission Mössbauer spectra obtained after low fluence (<10{sup 12} cm {sup −2}) implantation of {sup 57}Mn (T{sub 1/2}= 1.5 min.) into ZnO single crystal held at temperatures below room temperature (RT) are presented. The spectra can be analysed in terms of four components due to Fe {sup 2+} and Fe {sup 3+} on Zn sites, interstitial Fe and Fe in damage regions (Fe {sub D}). The Fe {sub D} component is found to be indistinguishable from similar component observed in emission Mössbauer spectra of higher fluence (∼10{sup 15} cm {sup −2}){sup 57}Fe/ {sup 57}Co implanted ZnO and {sup 57}Fe implanted ZnO, demonstrating that the nature of the damage regions in the two types of experiments is similar. The defect component observed in the low temperature regime was found to anneal below RT.

  14. Damage annealing in low temperature Fe/Mn implanted ZnO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Bharuth-Ram, K.; Johnston, K.; Langouche, G.; Mantovan, R.; Mølholt, T. E.; Naidoo, D.; Ólafsson, O.; Weyer, G.

    2015-01-01

    57 Fe Emission Mössbauer spectra obtained after low fluence (<10 12 cm −2 ) implantation of 57 Mn (T 1/2 = 1.5 min.) into ZnO single crystal held at temperatures below room temperature (RT) are presented. The spectra can be analysed in terms of four components due to Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ on Zn sites, interstitial Fe and Fe in damage regions (Fe D ). The Fe D component is found to be indistinguishable from similar component observed in emission Mössbauer spectra of higher fluence (∼10 15 cm −2 ) 57 Fe/ 57 Co implanted ZnO and 57 Fe implanted ZnO, demonstrating that the nature of the damage regions in the two types of experiments is similar. The defect component observed in the low temperature regime was found to anneal below RT

  15. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1993-12-01

    In this project the author has proposed several mechanisms for radiation damage to DNA and its constituents, and has detailed a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectroscopy, HPLC, GC-mass spectroscopy and ab initio molecular orbital calculations to test the proposed mechanisms. In this years work he has completed several experiments on the role of hydration water on DNA radiation damage, continued the investigation of the localization of the initial charges and their reactions on DNA, investigated protonation reactions in DNA base anions, and employed ab initio molecular orbital theory to gain insight into the initial events of radiation damage to DNA. Ab initio calculations have provided an understanding of the energetics evolved in anion and cation formation, ion radical transfer in DNA as well as proton transfer with DNA base pair radical ions. This has been extended in this years work to a consideration of ionization energies of various components of the DNA deoxyribose backbone and resulting neutral sugar radicals. This information has aided the formation of new radiation models for the effect of radiation on DNA. During this fiscal year four articles have been published, four are in press, one is submitted and several more are in preparation. Four papers have been presented at scientific meetings. This years effort will include another review article on the open-quotes Electron Spin Resonance of Radiation Damage to DNAclose quotes

  16. Propagating self-sustained annealing of radiation-induced interstitial complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokov, P M; Selyshchev, P A

    2016-01-01

    A propagating self-sustained annealing of radiation induced defects as a result of thermal-concentration instability is studied. The defects that are considered in the model are complexes. Each of them consists of one atom of impunity and of one interstitial atom. Crystal with defects has extra energy which is transformed into heat during defect annealing. Simulation of the auto-wave of annealing has been performed. The front and the speed of the auto-wave have been obtained. It is shown that annealing occurs in a narrow region of time and space. There are two kinds of such annealing behaviour. In the first case the speed of the auto-wave oscillates near its constant mean value and the front of temperature oscillates in a complex way. In the second case the speed of propagation is constant and fronts of temperature and concentration look like sigmoid functions. (paper)

  17. Nanofoams Response to Radiation Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Engang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Serrano De Caro, Magdalena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yongqiang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nastasi, Michael [Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, NE 68508; Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis [PLS, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551; Bringa, Eduardo M. [CONICET and Inst. Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza, 5500 Argentina; Baldwin, Jon K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Caro, Jose A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-30

    Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) np-Au foams were successfully synthesized by de-alloying process; (2) np-Au foams remain porous structure after Ne ion irradiation to 1 dpa; (3) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams with highest and intermediate flux, while no SFTs were observed with lowest flux; (4) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams at RT, whereas no SFTs were observed at LNT irradiation; (5) The diffusivity of vacancies in Au at RT is high enough so that the vacancies have enough time to agglomerate and thus collapse. As a result, SFTs were formed; (6) The high flux created much more damage/time, vacancies don't have enough time to diffuse or recombine. As a result, SFTs were formed.

  18. Tooth-germ damage by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobkowiak, E.M.; Beetke, E.; Bienengraeber, V.; Held, M.; Kittner, K.H.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments on animals (four-week-old dogs) were conducted in an investigation made to study the possibility of dose-dependent tooth-germ damage produced by ionizing radiation. The individual doses were 50 R and 200 R, respectively, and they were administered once to three times at weekly intervals. Hyperemia and edemata could be observed on tooth-germ pulps from 150 R onward. Both of these conditions became more acute as the radiation dose increased (from 150 R to 600 R). Possible damage to both the dentin and enamel is pointed out. (author)

  19. Radiation damage in organic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, F.J.

    1981-01-01

    A surprising number of electrical components and seals are listed as being inside the containment building of a nuclear power plant. The types of radiation and their interaction with organic materials lead to a dosimetry discussion, and then a brief description of the chemical mechanisms which predominate in typical organic materials follows. Relative stability of polymer structures and the types of additives that contribute stabilization to the basic polymer matrix in formulated compounds are reviewed. However, the emphasis must now be directed toward the need to consider the total environment of nuclear plant service on the degradation of these materials if maximum reliability is to be achieved. The degradation mechanisms may be strongly affected by the dose-rate/oxidation effect. Temperature, steam and physical stress, when applied concurrently with the radiation field, can also influence the amount of absorbed dose required to produce a given change in the property being tested. Determining the degree of these influences and developing standardized test procedures to evaluate them have become the objective of several prominent research programs and international committee efforts. (author)

  20. Radiation damage to electronic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battisti, S.; Bossart, R.; Schoenbacher, H.; Van de Voorde, M.

    1975-01-01

    Characteristic properties are presented of some 40 different electronic components (resistors, capacitors, diodes, transistors, and integrated circuits) which were irradiated in a nuclear reactor up to 1015 n/cm 2 (E > 1 MeV). Complete circuits (e.g. RF amplifiers and detectors, mixers, differential amplifiers, voltage-to-frequency converters, oscillators, power supplies) were irradiated near the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings up to 106 rad(RPL) (dose measured with radiophotoluminescent dosimeters) under simulated operational conditions. Representative measured parameters, such as resistance, capacitance, forward voltage, reverse current, toggle frequencies, are given in graphs as a function of radiation dose. The results are discussed in detail and lead to the over-all conclusion that the operation of electronic components and circuits is seriously affected by radiation environments with doses in the order of 10 13 n/cm 2 or 10 4 rad(RPL); some components and circuits fail completely at doses of 10 14 n/cm 2 or 10 5 rad(RPL). (Author)

  1. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1985-07-01

    Radiation damage to DNA results from the direct interaction of radiation with DNA where positive ions, electrons and excited states are formed in the DNA, and the indirect effect where radical species formed in the surrounding medium by the radiation attack the DNA. The primary mechanism proposed for radiation damage, by the direct effect, is that positive and negative ions formed within the DNA strand migrate through the stacked DNA bases. The ions can then recombine, react with the DNA bases most likely to react by protonation of the anion and deprotonation or hydroxylation of the cation or transfer out of the DNA chain to the surrounding histone protein. This work as aimed at understanding the possible reactions of the DNA base ion radicals, as well as their initial distribution in the DNA strand. 31 refs

  2. Electric field effects on radiation defects annealing in p-InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibille, A.

    1983-01-01

    Annealing experiments have been performed on electron irradiated Schottky diodes on p-InP. They show a strong influence of the applied reverse bias during annealing on the recovery of the free holes concentration, as well as on the disappearance of the dominant radiation induced hole traps detected by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). Compensating defects are observed to drift under the action of the electric field and accumulate at the edge of the depleted zone, while the main hole traps created by the irradiation anneal faster when empty of holes or subjected to an electric field. (author)

  3. Size effect in radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.

    1979-01-01

    Radiation embrittlement of nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels is mostly measured using small standard specimens in dynamic bend tests. Their dimensions are much smaller than those of the reactor. The increase in the critical temperature (transition temperature from the brittle-to-ductile fracture) is normally measured using standard Charpy-V type specimens or small CT-type specimens. This increase is then used as the main parameter for the pressure vessel safety evaluation. The philosophy of experiments is discussed used for the nonirradiated and irradiated pressure vessel steels. A comparison of the increase in the transition temperature measured in different types of specimens using various testing methods (static and dynamic bend tests with notch or crack) is also made. The results of this comparison and another study showed a relatively good agreement. (author)

  4. Radiation induced genetic damage in Aspergillus nidulans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiou, J.T.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism by which ionizing radiation induces genetic damage in haploid and diploid conidia of Aspergillus nidulans was investigated. Although the linear dose-response curves obtained following low LET irradiation implied a 'single-hit' action of radiation, high LET radiations were much more efficient than low LET radiations, which suggests the involvement of a multiple target system. It was found that the RBE values for non-disjunction and mitotic crossing-over were very different. Unlike mitotic crossing-over, the RBE values for non-disjunction were much greater than for cell killing. This suggests that non-disjunction is a particularly sensitive genetical endpoint that is brought about by damage to a small, probably non-DNA target. Radiosensitisers were used to study whether radiation acts at the level of the DNA or some other cellular component. The sensitisation to electrons and/or X-rays by oxygen, and two nitroimidazoles (metronidazole and misonidazole) was examined for radiation induced non-disjunction, mitotic crossing-over, gene conversion, point mutation and cell killing. It was found that these compounds sensitised the cells considerably more to genetic damage than to cell killing. (author)

  5. Radiation annealing of gallium arsenide implanted with sulphur

    CERN Document Server

    Ardyshev, V M

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur ions were implanted in a semi-insulating GaAs. Photon annealing (805 deg C/(10-12) s) and the thermal one (800 deg C/30 min) were conducted under SiO sub 2 -films coating obtained by different ways. Contents of GaAs components in films were determined from Rutherford backscattering spectra; concentration profiles of electrons were measured by the voltage-capacitance method. Diffusion of sulfur was shown to go in two directions - to the surface and into bulk of GaAs. The first process was induced by vacancies that had been formed near the surface of semiconductors during the dielectric coating. The coefficient of the bulk-diffusion and diffusion-to-surface of sulfur ions under photon annealing was twice as much as that under thermal one. The doping efficiency was also larger

  6. Radiation damage effect on avalanche photodiodes

    CERN Document Server

    Baccaro, S; Cavallari, F; Da Ponte, V; Deiters, K; Denes, P; Diemoz, M; Kirn, Th; Lintern, A L; Longo, E; Montecchi, M; Musienko, Y; Pansart, J P; Renker, D; Reucroft, S; Rosi, G; Rusack, R; Ruuska, D; Stephenson, R; Torbet, M J

    1999-01-01

    Avalanche Photodiodes have been chosen as photon sensors for the electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS experiment at the LHC. These sensors should operate in the 4T magnetic field of the experiment. Because of the high neutron radiation in the detector extensive studies have been done by the CMS collaboration on the APD neutron radiation damage. The characteristics of these devices after irradiation have been analized, with particular attention to the quantum efficiency and the dark current. The recovery of the radiation induced dark current has been studied carefully at room temperature and at slightly lower and higher temperatures. The temperature dependence of the defects decay-time has been evaluated.

  7. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    Several mechanisms are proposed for radiation damage to DNA and its constituents, and a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry have been used to test the proposed mechanisms. In the past we have concentrated chiefly on investigating irradiated systems of DNA constituents. In this year's effort we have concentrated on radiation effects on DNA itself. In addition studies of radiation effects on lipids and model compounds have been performed which shed light on the only other proposed site for cell kill, the membrane

  8. The Status of Radiation Damage Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Richard L.; Legore, Virginia L.; Schaef, Herbert T.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2001-01-01

    Experiments have been on-going for about two years to determine the effects that radiation damage have on the physical and chemical properties of candidate titanate ceramics for the immobilization of plutonium. We summarize the results of these experiments in this document

  9. Radiation damage of polymers in ultrasonic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anbalagan, Poornnima

    2008-07-01

    Radiation damage has always been a topic of great interest in various fields of sciences. In this work, an attempt is made to probe into the effect of subthreshold ultrasonic waves on the radiation damage created by irradiation of deuterons in polymer samples wherein the polymer samples act as model systems. Two equal volumes of radiation damage were produced in a single polymer sample wherein a standing wave of ultrasound was introduced into one. Three polymers namely, Polycarbonate, Polymethylmethacrylate and Polyvinyl chloride were used in this work. Four independent techniques were used to analyze the irradiated samples and visualize the radiation damage. Interferometric measurements give a measure of the refractive index modulation in the irradiated sample. Polymers, being transparent, do not absorb in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy shows absorption peaks in the visible region in irradiated polymer samples. Ion irradiation causes coloration of polymers. The light microscope is used to measure the absorption of white light by the irradiated polymers. Positron annihilation spectroscopy is used to obtain a measure of the open volume created by irradiation in polymers. A comparison between the irradiated region and the region exposed to ultrasonic waves simultaneously with irradiation in a polymer sample shows the polymer specific influence of the ultrasonic standing wave. (orig.)

  10. Radiation damage of polymers in ultrasonic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anbalagan, Poornnima

    2008-01-01

    Radiation damage has always been a topic of great interest in various fields of sciences. In this work, an attempt is made to probe into the effect of subthreshold ultrasonic waves on the radiation damage created by irradiation of deuterons in polymer samples wherein the polymer samples act as model systems. Two equal volumes of radiation damage were produced in a single polymer sample wherein a standing wave of ultrasound was introduced into one. Three polymers namely, Polycarbonate, Polymethylmethacrylate and Polyvinyl chloride were used in this work. Four independent techniques were used to analyze the irradiated samples and visualize the radiation damage. Interferometric measurements give a measure of the refractive index modulation in the irradiated sample. Polymers, being transparent, do not absorb in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy shows absorption peaks in the visible region in irradiated polymer samples. Ion irradiation causes coloration of polymers. The light microscope is used to measure the absorption of white light by the irradiated polymers. Positron annihilation spectroscopy is used to obtain a measure of the open volume created by irradiation in polymers. A comparison between the irradiated region and the region exposed to ultrasonic waves simultaneously with irradiation in a polymer sample shows the polymer specific influence of the ultrasonic standing wave. (orig.)

  11. Acoustic emission sensor radiation damage threshold experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeson, K.M.; Pepper, C.E.

    1994-01-01

    Determination of the threshold for damage to acoustic emission sensors exposed to radiation is important in their application to leak detection in radioactive waste transport and storage. Proper response to system leaks is necessary to ensure the safe operation of these systems. A radiation impaired sensor could provide ''false negative or false positive'' indication of acoustic signals from leaks within the system. Research was carried out in the Radiochemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the beta/gamma radiation damage threshold for acoustic emission sensor systems. The individual system consisted of an acoustic sensor mounted with a two part epoxy onto a stainless steel waveguide. The systems were placed in an irradiation fixture and exposed to a Cobalt-60 source. After each irradiation, the sensors were recalibrated by Physical Acoustics Corporation. The results were compared to the initial calibrations performed prior to irradiation and a control group, not exposed to radiation, was used to validate the results. This experiment determines the radiation damage threshold of each acoustic sensor system and verifies its life expectancy, usefulness and reliability for many applications in radioactive environments

  12. Radiation-Induced Damage and Recovery of Ultra-Nanocrystalline Diamond: Toward Applications in Harsh Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Aiden A; Filevich, Jorge; Straw, Marcus; Randolph, Steven; Botman, Aurélien; Aharonovich, Igor; Toth, Milos

    2017-11-15

    Ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) is increasingly being used in the fabrication of devices and coatings due to its excellent tribological properties, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. Here, we study its response to irradiation with kiloelectronvolt electrons as a controlled model for extreme ionizing environments. Real time Raman spectroscopy reveals that the radiation-damage mechanism entails dehydrogenation of UNCD grain boundaries, and we show that the damage can be recovered by annealing at 883 K. Our results have significant practical implications for the implementation of UNCD in extreme environment applications, and indicate that the films can be used as radiation sensors.

  13. A new cryostat for 'in situ' radiation damage studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hariharan, Y.; Radhakrishnan, T.S.

    1977-01-01

    Conventional cryostats to study properties of materials between 4deg K and 300deg K base their designs either on continuous flow or bath type. A new cryostat which incorporates the advantages of both these has been designed and fabricated. This essentially has three chambers isolated from each other by poor thermal links. These are enclosed in a vacuum chamber and the whole assembly is immersed in a 4 He bath. The lowermost chamber is kept in good thermal contact with the bath. The second chamber can be maintained between 4deg K and 77deg K by circulation of cold 4 He vapour. The uppermost chamber can be maintained between 77deg K and 300deg K by circulating cold nitrogen vapours. There is a through axial hole in the centre, through which the sample can be moved up and down by means of a thin walled stainless steel tube. This comes out from the top of the cryostat through a Wilson seal. Thus the specimen can be anchored in any of the three chambers. This cryostat can be used to study the radiation damages caused by α-particles the sample being kept at 4.2deg K. There is provision for isolating the sample from the radiation zone. Isothermal and isochronal annealing of the damage caused can also be studied. Provision for taking out electrical leads from both inside and outside the sample chamber are also there. (auth.)

  14. Radiation damage studies of nuclear structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barat, P.

    2012-01-01

    Maximum utilization of fuel in nuclear reactors is one of the important aspects for operating them economically. The main hindrance to achieve this higher burnups of nuclear fuel for the nuclear reactors is the possibility of the failure of the metallic core components during their operation. Thus, the study of the cause of the possibility of failure of these metallic structural materials of nuclear reactors during full power operation due to radiation damage, suffered inside the reactor core, is an important field of studies bearing the basic to industrial scientific views.The variation of the microstructure of the metallic core components of the nuclear reactors due to radiation damage causes enormous variation in the structure and mechanical properties. A firm understanding of this variation of the mechanical properties with the variation of microstructure will serve as a guide for creating new, more radiation-tolerant materials. In our centre we have irradiated structural materials of Indian nuclear reactors by charged particles from accelerator to generate radiation damage and studied the some aspects of the variation of microstructure by X-ray diffraction studies. Results achieved in this regards, will be presented. (author)

  15. Radiation-damage calculations with NJOY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacFarlane, R.E.; Muir, D.W.; Mann, F.W.

    1983-01-01

    Atomic displacement, gas production, transmutation, and nuclear heating can all be calculated with the NJOY nuclear data processing system using evaluated data in ENDF/B format. Using NJOY helps assure consistency between damage cross sections and those used for transport, and NJOY provides convenient interface formats for linking data to application codes. Unique features of the damage calculation include a simple momentum balance treatment for radiative capture and a new model for (n, particle) reactions based on statistical model calculations. Sample results for iron and nickel are given and compared with the results of other methods

  16. Burst annealing of high temperature GaAs solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, P. R.; Horne, W. E.

    1991-01-01

    One of the major limitations of solar cells in space power systems is their vulnerability to radiation damage. One solution to this problem is to periodically heat the cells to anneal the radiation damage. Annealing was demonstrated with silicon cells. The obstacle to annealing of GaAs cells was their susceptibility to thermal damage at the temperatures required to completely anneal the radiation damage. GaAs cells with high temperature contacts and encapsulation were developed. The cells tested are designed for concentrator use at 30 suns AMO. The circular active area is 2.5 mm in diameter for an area of 0.05 sq cm. Typical one sun AMO efficiency of these cells is over 18 percent. The cells were demonstrated to be resistant to damage after thermal excursions in excess of 600 C. This high temperature tolerance should allow these cells to survive the annealing of radiation damage. A limited set of experiments were devised to investigate the feasibility of annealing these high temperature cells. The effect of repeated cycles of electron and proton irradiation was tested. The damage mechanisms were analyzed. Limitations in annealing recovery suggested improvements in cell design for more complete recovery. These preliminary experiments also indicate the need for further study to isolate damage mechanisms. The primary objective of the experiments was to demonstrate and quantify the annealing behavior of high temperature GaAs cells. Secondary objectives were to measure the radiation degradation and to determine the effect of repeated irradiation and anneal cycles.

  17. Burst annealing of high temperature GaAs solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brothers, P.R.; Horne, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    One of the major limitations of solar cells in space power systems is their vulnerability to radiation damage. One solution to this problem is to periodically heat the cells to anneal the radiation damage. Annealing was demonstrated with silicon cells. The obstacle to annealing of GaAs cells was their susceptibility to thermal damage at the temperatures required to completely anneal the radiation damage. GaAs cells with high temperature contacts and encapsulation were developed. The cells tested are designed for concentrator use at 30 suns AMO. The circular active area is 2.5 mm in diameter for an area of 0.05 sq cm. Typical one sun AMO efficiency of these cells is over 18 percent. The cells were demonstrated to be resistant to damage after thermal excursions in excess of 600 degree C. This high temperature tolerance should allow these cells to survive the annealing of radiation damage. A limited set of experiments were devised to investigate the feasibility of annealing these high temperature cells. The effect of repeated cycles of electron and proton irradiation was tested. The damage mechanisms were analyzed. Limitations in annealing recovery suggested improvements in cell design for more complete recovery. These preliminary experiments also indicate the need for further study to isolate damage mechanisms. The primary objective of the experiments was to demonstrate and quantify the annealing behavior of high temperature GaAs cells. Secondary objectives were to measure the radiation degradation and to determine the effect of repeated irradiation and anneal cycles

  18. Radiation damage in nanostructured metallic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kaiyuan

    High energy neutron and charged particle radiation cause microstructural and mechanical degradation in structural metals and alloys, such as phase segregation, void swelling, embrittlement and creep. Radiation induced damages typically limit nuclear materials to a lifetime of about 40 years. Next generation nuclear reactors require materials that can sustain over 60 - 80 years. Therefore it is of great significance to explore new materials with better radiation resistance, to design metals with favorable microstructures and to investigate their response to radiation. The goals of this thesis are to study the radiation responses of several nanostructured metallic thin film systems, including Ag/Ni multilayers, nanotwinned Ag and nanocrystalline Fe. Such systems obtain high volume fraction of boundaries, which are considered sinks to radiation induced defects. From the viewpoint of nanomechanics, it is of interest to investigate the plastic deformation mechanisms of nanostructured films, which typically show strong size dependence. By controlling the feature size (layer thickness, twin spacing and grain size), it is applicable to picture a deformation mechanism map which also provides prerequisite information for subsequent radiation hardening study. And from the viewpoint of radiation effects, it is of interest to explore the fundamentals of radiation response, to examine the microstructural and mechanical variations of irradiated nanometals and to enrich the design database. More importantly, with the assistance of in situ techniques, it is appealing to examine the defect generation, evolution, annihilation, absorption and interaction with internal interfaces (layer interfaces, twin boundaries and grain boundaries). Moreover, well-designed nanostructures can also verify the speculation that radiation induced defect density and hardening show clear size dependence. The focus of this thesis lies in the radiation response of Ag/Ni multilayers and nanotwinned Ag

  19. Silicon P.I.N. Junctions used for studies of radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanore, J.

    1964-06-01

    Irradiation of silicon P.I.N. junction has been studied primarily for the purpose of developing a radiation damage dosimeter, but also for the purpose of investigating silicon itself. It is known that the rate of recombination of electrons and holes is a linear function of defects introduced by neutron irradiation. Two methods have been used to measure that rate of recombination: forward characteristic measurements, recovery time measurements. In order to explain how these two parameters depend on recombination rate we have given a theory of the P.I.N. junction. We have also given an idea of the carrier lifetime dependence versus temperature. Annealing effects in the range of 70 to 700 K have also been studied, we found five annealing stages with corresponding activation energies. As an application for these studies, we developed a radiation damage dosimeter with which we made several experiments in facilities such as Naiade or Marias. (author) [fr

  20. Radiation damage in flash memory cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claeys, C.; Ohyama, H.; Simoen, E.; Nakabayashi, M.; Kobayashi, K.

    2002-01-01

    Results are presented of a study on the effects of total ionization dose and displacement damage, induced by high-energy electrons, protons and alphas, on the performance degradation of flash memory cells integrated in a microcomputer. A conventional stacked-gate n-channel flash memory cell using a 0.8 μm n-polysilicon gate technology is employed. Irradiations by 1-MeV electrons and 20-MeV protons and alpha particles were done at room temperature. The impact of the fluence on the input characteristics, threshold voltage shift and drain and gate leakage was investigated. The threshold voltage change for proton and alpha irradiations is about three orders of magnitude larger than that for electrons. The performance degradation is mainly caused by the total ionization dose (TID) damage in the tunnel oxide and in the interpoly dielectric layer and by the creation of interface traps at the Si-SiO 2 interface. The impact of the irradiation temperature on the device degradation was studied for electrons and gammas, pointing out that irradiation at room temperature is mostly the worst case. Finally, attention is given to the impact of isochronal and isothermal annealing on the recovery of the degradation introduced after room temperature proton and electron irradiation

  1. Radiation damage in nuclear waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jencic, I.

    2000-01-01

    Final disposal of high-level radioactive nuclear waste is usually envisioned in some sort of ceramic material. The physical and chemical properties of host materials for nuclear waste can be altered by internal radiation and consequently their structural integrity can be jeopardized. Assessment of long-term performance of these ceramic materials is therefore vital for a safe and successful disposal. This paper presents an overview of studies on several possible candidate materials for immobilization of fission products and actinides, such as spinel (MgAl 2 O 4 ), perovskite (CaTiO 3 ), zircon (ZrSiO 4 ), and pyrochlore (Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 and Gd 2 Zr 2 O 7 ). The basic microscopic picture of radiation damage in ceramics consists of atomic displacements and ionization. In many cases these processes result in amorphization (metaminctization) of irradiated material. The evolution of microscopic structure during irradiation leads to various macroscopic radiation effects. The connection between microscopic and macroscopic picture is in most cases at least qualitatively known and studies of radiation induced microscopic changes are therefore an essential step in the design of a reliable nuclear waste host material. The relevance of these technologically important results on our general understanding of radiation damage processes and on current research efforts in Slovenia is also addressed. (author)

  2. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danly, C R; Merrill, F E; Barlow, D; Mariam, F G

    2014-08-01

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL's pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components.

  3. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Barlow, D.; Mariam, F. G.

    2014-01-01

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL’s pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components

  4. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Barlow, D.; Mariam, F. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL’s pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components.

  5. Radiation damage at LHCb, results and expectations

    CERN Multimedia

    Faerber, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The LHCb Detector is a single-arm spectrometer at the LHC designed to detect new physics through measuring CP violation and rare decays of heavy flavor mesons. The detector consists of vertex detector, tracking system, dipole magnet, 2 RICH detectors, em. calorimeter, hadron calorimeter, muon detector which all use different technologies and suffer differently from radiation damage. These radiation damage results and the investigation methods will be shown. The delivered luminosity till July 2011 was about 450 pb−1. The Vertex detector receives the highest particle flux at LHCb. The currents drawn by the silicon sensors are, as expected, increasing proportional to the integrated luminosity. The highest irradiaton regions of the n-bulk silicon sensors are observed to have recently undergone space charge sign inversion. The Silicon Trackers show increasing leakage currents comparable with earlier predictions. The electromagentic calorimeter and hadron calorimeter suffer under percent-level signal decrease whi...

  6. Radiation Damage in the LHCb VELO

    CERN Multimedia

    Harrison, Jon

    2011-01-01

    The VErtex LOcator (VELO) is a silicon strip detector designed to reconstruct particle tracks and vertices produced by proton-proton interactions near to the LHCb interaction point. The excellent track resolution and decay vertex separation provided by the VELO are essential to all LHCb analyses. For the integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC up to the end of $2011$ the VELO is exposed to higher particle fluences than any other silicon detector of the four major LHC experiments. These proceedings present results from radiation damage studies carried out during the first two years of data taking at the LHC. Radiation damage has been observed in all of the $88$ VELO silicon strip sensors, with many sensors showing evidence of type-inversion in the highest fluence regions. Particular attention has been given to the two \

  7. Mitigating radiation damage of single photon detectors for space applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anisimova, Elena; Higgins, Brendon L.; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Cranmer, Miles [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Choi, Eric [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Magellan Aerospace, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Hudson, Danya; Piche, Louis P.; Scott, Alan [Honeywell Aerospace (formerly COM DEV Ltd.), Ottawa, ON (Canada); Makarov, Vadim [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Jennewein, Thomas [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Quantum Information Science Program, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2017-12-15

    Single-photon detectors in space must retain useful performance characteristics despite being bombarded with sub-atomic particles. Mitigating the effects of this space radiation is vital to enabling new space applications which require high-fidelity single-photon detection. To this end, we conducted proton radiation tests of various models of avalanche photodiodes (APDs) and one model of photomultiplier tube potentially suitable for satellite-based quantum communications. The samples were irradiated with 106 MeV protons at doses approximately equivalent to lifetimes of 0.6, 6, 12 and 24 months in a low-Earth polar orbit. Although most detection properties were preserved, including efficiency, timing jitter and afterpulsing probability, all APD samples demonstrated significant increases in dark count rate (DCR) due to radiation-induced damage, many orders of magnitude higher than the 200 counts per second (cps) required for ground-to-satellite quantum communications. We then successfully demonstrated the mitigation of this DCR degradation through the use of deep cooling, to as low as -86 C. This achieved DCR below the required 200 cps over the 24 months orbit duration. DCR was further reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures of +50 to +100 C. (orig.)

  8. Radiation damage of uranium; Radijaciono ostecenje urana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarevic, Dj [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1966-11-15

    Study of radiation damage covered the following: Kinetics of electric resistance of uranium and uranium alloy with 1% of molybdenum dependent on the second phase and burnup rate; Study of gas precipitation and diffusion of bubbles by transmission electron microscopy; Numerical analysis of the influence of defects distribution and concentration on the rare gas precipitation in uranium; study of thermal sedimentation of uranium alloy with molybdenum; diffusion of rare gas in metal by gas chromatography method.

  9. DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachs, R.K.; Peili Chen; Hahnfeldt, P.J.; Klatky, L.R.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is given of continuous-time Markov chain models for ionizing radiation damage to the genome of mammalian cells. In such models, immediate damage induced by the radiation is regarded as a batch-Poisson arrival process of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Enzymatic modification of the immediate damage is modeled as a Markov process similar to those described by the master equation of stochastic chemical kinetics. An illustrative example is the restitution/complete-exchange model. The model postulates that, after being induced by radiation, DSBs subsequently either undergo enzymatically mediated restitution (repair) or participate pairwise in chromosome exchanges. Some of the exchanges make irremediable lesions such as dicentric chromosome aberrations. One may have rapid irradiation followed by enzymatic DSB processing or have prolonged irradiation with both DSB arrival and enzymatic DSB processing continuing throughout the irradiation period. Methods for analyzing the Markov chains include using an approximate model for expected values, the discrete-time Markov chain embedded at transitions, partial differential equations for generating functions, normal perturbation theory, singular perturbation theory with scaling, numerical computations, and certain matrix methods that combine Perron-Frobenius theory with variational estimates. Applications to experimental results on expected values, variances, and statistical distributions of DNA lesions are briefly outlined. Continuous-time Markov chains are the most systematic of those radiation damage models that treat DSB-DSB interactions within the cell nucleus as homogeneous (e.g., ignore diffusion limitations). They contain virtually all other relevant homogeneous models and semiempirical summaries as special cases, limiting cases, or approximations. However, the Markov models do not seem to be well suited for studying spatial dependence of DSB interactions. 51 refs., 5 figs

  10. Pathology of radiation induced lung damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Yoshinori; Murata, Yoshihiko; Ogata, Hideo; Katagiri, Shiro; Sugita, Hironobu; Iwai, Kazuo; Sakurai, Isamu.

    1985-01-01

    We examined pathological findings of radiation induced lung damage. Twenty-three cases are chosen from our hospital autopsy cases for 9 years, which fulfil strict criteria of radiation lung damage. Lung damage could be classified into 3 groups : 1) interstitial pneumonia type (9 cases), 2) intermediate pneumonia type (8 cases), and 3) alveolar pneumonia type (6 cases), according to the degree of intra-luminal exudation. These classification is well correlated with clinical findings. Pathological alveolar pneumonia type corresponds to symptomatic, radiologic ground glass pneumonic shadow. And pathologic interstitial type corresponds to clinical asymptomatic, radiologic reticulo-nodular shadow. From the clinico-pathological view point these classification is reasonable one. Radiation affects many lung structures and showed characteristic feature of repair. Elastofibrosis of the alveolar wall is observed in every cases, obstructive bronchiolitis are observed in 5 cases, and obstructive bronchiolitis in 9 cases. They are remarkable additional findings. Thickening of the interlobular septum, broncho-vascular connective tissue, and pleural layer are observed in every cases together with vascular lesions. (author)

  11. Radiation damage in CTR magnet components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullmaier, H.

    1976-01-01

    Data are reviewed (already existing or to be acquired) which should allow prediction of the behavior of large superconducting coils in the radiation field of a future fusion reactor. The electrical and mechanical stability of such magnets is determined by the irradiation induced deterioration of the magnet components, i.e., (a) changes in critical current, field and temperature of the superconductor (NbTi, A-15 phases), (b) resistivity increase in the stabilizer (Cu, Al), and (c) changes in mechanical and dielectric properties of insulators and spacers. Recent low temperature simulation experiments (with fission neutrons and heavy ions) show that the superconductor will not be the critical component of a fusion magnet--at least as far as radiation damage is concerned. Much more severe is the loss of stability due to the resistivity increase of the stabilizing material. It seems, however, that the magnitude of this effect can be predicted rather reliably and therefore taken into account in the coil design. Almost no data exist about the low temperature behavior of insulator and spacer materials in a radiation field. Furthermore, very little is known about the nature of the radiation damage in non-metals, which makes extrapolations of the few existing data to other materials or to other doses highly speculative. Only future experiments can decide if the insulators will be the limiting component of a CTR magnet or not

  12. Ion - biomolecule interactions and radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlathoelter, T.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The biological effects of ionizing radiation in living cells are not a mere result of the direct impact of high energy quanta of radiation. Secondary particles such as low energy electrons, radicals and (multiply charged) ions are formed within the track. The interaction of these secondary particles with biologically relevant molecules is responsible for a large fraction of biological radiation damage to a cell, as well. Singly and multiply charged ions can be of importance as both, primary and secondary particles, and are known to cause severe biological damage. For instance, in heavy ion therapy and proton therapy the pronounced Bragg peak of fast (typically a few 100 MeV/u) ions in biological tissue is utilized. The Bragg peak is located at a depth, where the ions (mostly C q+ or protons) are slowed down to about 100 keV/u and have their maximum linear energy transfer (LET) to the medium. This depth is reasonably well defined and depends on the initial ion kinetic energy. Since the ions are rapidly stopped in this energy range, penetration beyond the Bragg peak is weak and it is thus possible to 'scan' the Bragg peak through a malignant tumour without excessive damage of the surrounding tissue by mere variation of the ion kinetic energy (i.e. the penetration depth). Severe biological damage is almost only possible, when the track of a primary quantum of ionizing radiation crosses the nucleus of a cell. Particularly the induction of double strand breaks of DNA or clustered DNA lesions is potentially lethal or mutagenic. A primary particle interacting with individual molecules within this environment leads to molecular excitation, ionization and fragmentation. In the process, the primary particle looses energy and slow secondary electrons and ions are formed, which might induce further damage. For a deep understanding of biological radiation damage on the level of individual molecules it is thus important to quantify excitation, ionization and

  13. Effect of Pre-Irradiation Annealing and Laser Modification on the Formation of Radiation-Induced Surface Color Centers in Lithium Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitovich, A. P.; Kalinov, V. S.; Novikov, A. N.; Radkevich, A. V.; Runets, L. P.; Stupak, A. P.; Tarasenko, N. V.

    2017-01-01

    It is shown that surface color centers of the same type are formed in the surface layer and in regions with damaged crystal structure inside crystalline lithium fluoride after γ-irradiation. Results are presented from a study of the effect of pre-irradiation annealing on the efficiency with which surface centers are formed in lithium fluoride nanocrystals. Raising the temperature for pre-irradiation annealing from room temperature to 250°C leads to a substantial reduction in the efficiency with which these centers are created. Surface color centers are not detected after γ-irradiation for pre-irradiation annealing temperatures of 300°C and above. Adsorption of atmospheric gases on the crystal surface cannot be regarded as a necessary condition for the formation of radiation-induced surface centers.

  14. Field oxide radiation damage measurements in silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laakso, M [Particle Detector Group, Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States) Research Inst. for High Energy Physics (SEFT), Helsinki (Finland); Singh, P; Shepard, P F [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1993-04-01

    Surface radiation damage in planar processed silicon detectors is caused by radiation generated holes being trapped in the silicon dioxide layers on the detector wafer. We have studied charge trapping in thick (field) oxide layers on detector wafers by irradiating FOXFET biased strip detectors and MOS test capacitors. Special emphasis was put on studying how a negative bias voltage across the oxide during irradiation affects hole trapping. In addition to FOXFET biased detectors, negatively biased field oxide layers may exist on the n-side of double-sided strip detectors with field plate based n-strip separation. The results indicate that charge trapping occurred both close to the Si-SiO[sub 2] interface and in the bulk of the oxide. The charge trapped in the bulk was found to modify the electric field in the oxide in a way that leads to saturation in the amount of charge trapped in the bulk when the flatband/threshold voltage shift equals the voltage applied over the oxide during irradiation. After irradiation only charge trapped close to the interface is annealed by electrons tunneling to the oxide from the n-type bulk. (orig.).

  15. Influence of post-radiation, accelerate annealing and discreteness on the TID parameters of memerizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qunyong; Liu Yanfang; Chen Yu; Jiang Dayong; Bai Ye; Song Yan

    2010-01-01

    By the study of post-radiation and accelerate annealing in the total ionizing dose (TID), we find out that the additional 50% dose radiation and high temperature accelerate annealing (100 degree C 168 h) can not be skipped in the test because it is necessary to strictly check the memory's TID effect in the space radiation environment. The analysis of device's discreteness in the test shows that parameters of device should be tested before the radiation to get their standard deviation. The high reliability of the memorizer which used in the satellite can be ensured by rejecting the device which increases the standard deviation. The TID test in the NASA report have been confirmed that the effectiveness of parameter test in 'read-only', 'write' and 'erase' mode is better than the test in 'only read' mode as it can reflect the degradation characteristics of the memorizer following ionizing radiation more reasonable. The test sequence applied for each memory at any electrical measurement steps after exposures annealing should be considered. (authors)

  16. Thermodynamics of post-growth annealing of cadmium zinc telluride nuclear radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Aaron Lee

    Nuclear Radiation Detectors are used for detecting, tracking, and identifying radioactive materials which emit high-energy gamma and X-rays. The use of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) detectors is particularly attractive because of the detector's ability to operate at room temperature and measure the energy spectra of gamma-ray sources with a high resolution, typically less than 1% at 662 keV. While CdZnTe detectors are acceptable imperfections in the crystals limit their full market potential. One of the major imperfections are Tellurium inclusions generated during the crystal growth process by the retrograde solubility of Tellurium and Tellurium-rich melt trapped at the growth interface. Tellurium inclusions trap charge carriers generated by gamma and X-ray photons and thus reduce the portion of generated charge carriers that reach the electrodes for collection and conversion into a readable signal which is representative of the ionizing radiation's energy and intensity. One approach in resolving this problem is post-growth annealing which has the potential of removing the Tellurium inclusions and associated impurities. The goal of this project is to use experimental techniques to study the thermodynamics of Tellurium inclusion migration in post-growth annealing of CdZnTe nuclear detectors with the temperature gradient zone migration (TGZM) technique. Systematic experiments will be carried out to provide adequate thermodynamic data that will inform the engineering community of the optimum annealing parameters. Additionally, multivariable correlations that involve the Tellurium diffusion coefficient, annealing parameters, and CdZnTe properties will be analyzed. The experimental approach will involve systematic annealing experiments (in Cd vapor overpressure) on different sizes of CdZnTe crystals at varying temperature gradients ranging from 0 to 60°C/mm (used to migrate the Tellurium inclusion to one side of the crystal), and at annealing temperatures ranging

  17. Studies on the strategies of minimizing radiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hee Yong; Sohn, Young Sook

    1998-04-01

    We studied on the strategies of minimizing radiation damage in animal system. To this end we studied following areas of research (1) mechanisms involved in bone marrow damage after total body irradiation, (2) extraction of components that are useful in protecting hematopoietic system from radiation damage, (3) cell therapy approach in restoring the damaged tissue, (4) development of radioprotective chemical reagent, and (5) epidemiological study on the population that had been exposed to radiation.

  18. Studies on the strategies of minimizing radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hee Yong; Sohn, Young Sook

    1998-04-01

    We studied on the strategies of minimizing radiation damage in animal system. To this end we studied following areas of research 1) mechanisms involved in bone marrow damage after total body irradiation, 2) extraction of components that are useful in protecting hematopoietic system from radiation damage, 3) cell therapy approach in restoring the damaged tissue, 4) development of radioprotective chemical reagent, and 5) epidemiological study on the population that had been exposed to radiation

  19. Compilation of radiation damage test data. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenbacher, H.; Stolarz-Izycka, A.

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes radiation damage test data on commercially available organic cable insulation and jacket materials: ethylene-propylene rubber, Hypalon, neoprene rubber, polyethylene, polyurethane, polyvinylchloride, silicone rubber, etc. The materials have been irradiated in a nuclear reactor to integrated absorbed doses from 5 X 10 5 to 5 X 10 6 Gy. Mechanical properties, e.g. tensile strength, elongation at break, and hardness, have been tested on irradiated and non-irradiated samples. The results are presented in the form of tables and graphs, to show the effect of the absorbed dose on the measured properties. (Auth.)

  20. Radiation damage to DNA-protein complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spotheim-Maurizot, M.; Davídková, Marie

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 261, zima (2011), s. 1-10 ISSN 1742-6588. [COST Chemistry CM0603-MELUSYN Joint Meeting Damages Induced in Biomolecules by Low and High Energy Radiations. Paříž, 09.03.2010-12.03.2010] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1048103; GA AV ČR KJB4048401; GA MŠk 1P05OC085; GA MŠk OC09012; GA AV ČR IAB1048901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : radiolysis * molecular-dynamics simulation * hydroxyl radical attack * induced strand breakage Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  1. Ultraviolet radiation, sun damage and preventing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsen, B.; Christensen, T.; Nilsen, L.T.; Hannevik, M.

    2013-01-01

    The report focuses on the large impact of health damages due to excessive UV exposure from natural sun. The first part of the report gives background information on factors significantly affecting the intensity of UV radiation. The second part gives an overview of health effects related to UV exposure, with recommendations on how to avoid excessive UV exposure and still enjoy the positive sides of outdoor activity. The report is intended to contribute to informational activities about sun exposure as recommended by the World Health Organisation and the World Meteorology Organisation. (Author)

  2. Radiation damage calculations for the LANSCE degrader

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, P.D.; Sommer, W.F.; Dudziak, D.J.; Wechsler, M.S.; Barnett, M.H.; Corzine, R.K.

    1998-01-01

    The A-6 water degrader at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) linear proton accelerator has an outer shell of Inconel 718. The degrader was irradiated by 800-MeV protons during 1988--1993 to an exposure of 5.3 ampere-hours (A h). As described in Ref. 1, material from the Inconel is currently being cut into specimens for microhardness, three-point bending, ball punch, microscopy, and corrosion tests. This paper is devoted to calculations of radiation damage, particularly displacement and He production, sustained by the degrader Inconel

  3. Radiation annealing in Ag and Au due to energetic displacement cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averback, R.S.; Merkle, K.L.

    1975-01-01

    Radiation annealing due to energetic displacement cascades has been studied in Ag and Au. Thin film specimens, 2500 A, were doped to various concentrations of Frenkel pair defects by irradiating with 150 keV protons at temperatures below 10 K. Subsequently, the specimens were irradiated below 10 K with energetic, approximately 540 keV, self-ions. Electrical resistivity measurements were used to monitor the concentration of defects as a function of dose. In Au, approximately 5 percent of the doped-in Frenkel pairs, annealed during the 540 keV Au irradiation. The annealing volume associated with individual cascades was found to be 2.1 x 10 -16 cm 3 . In Ag approximately 5 percent of the doped-in defects annealed during a 500 keV Ag irradiation and the annealing volume of the cascade was found to be 5 x 10 -16 cm 3 . In addition, the effects of doping concentration and specimen temperature during doping were investigated

  4. LHCb: Radiation Damage in the LHCb VELO

    CERN Multimedia

    Rodriguez Perez, P

    2012-01-01

    LHCb is a dedicated experiment to study new physics in the decays of beauty and charm hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The beauty and charm hadrons are identified through their flight distance in the Vertex Locator (VELO), and hence the detector is critical for both the trigger and offline physics analyses. The 88 VELO sensors are all n-on-n type but one, which is made from n-on-p silicon, and is the only n-on-p module silicon sensor operated at the LHC. The sensors have an inner radius of only 7 mm from the LHC beam and an outer radius of 42 mm, consequently the sensors receive a large and non-uniform radiation dose. The LHCb is planned to record an integrated luminosity up to 5 $fb^{-1}$ with collision energies between 7 and 14 TeV before 2018. The leakage current in the sensors has increased significantly following the delivered luminosity, and decreased during shutdown periods due to annealing. The effective depletion voltage of the sensors is measured from the charge collection effi...

  5. Ultraviolet Radiations: Skin Defense-Damage Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohania, Dheeraj; Chandel, Shikha; Kumar, Parveen; Verma, Vivek; Digvijay, Kumar; Tripathi, Deepika; Choudhury, Khushboo; Mitten, Sandeep Kumar; Shah, Dilip

    2017-01-01

    UV-radiations are the invisible part of light spectra having a wavelength between visible rays and X-rays. Based on wavelength, UV rays are subdivided into UV-A (320-400 nm), UV-B (280-320 nm) and UV-C (200-280 nm). Ultraviolet rays can have both harmful and beneficial effects. UV-C has the property of ionization thus acting as a strong mutagen, which can cause immune-mediated disease and cancer in adverse cases. Numbers of genetic factors have been identified in human involved in inducing skin cancer from UV-radiations. Certain heredity diseases have been found susceptible to UV-induced skin cancer. UV radiations activate the cutaneous immune system, which led to an inflammatory response by different mechanisms. The first line of defense mechanism against UV radiation is melanin (an epidermal pigment), and UV absorbing pigment of skin, which dissipate UV radiation as heat. Cell surface death receptor (e.g. Fas) of keratinocytes responds to UV-induced injury and elicits apoptosis to avoid malignant transformation. In addition to the formation of photo-dimers in the genome, UV also can induce mutation by generating ROS and nucleotides are highly susceptible to these free radical injuries. Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) has been known to be implicated in different UV-induced damages such as pigmentation, adaptive tanning, and skin cancer. UV-B induces the formation of pre-vitamin D3 in the epidermal layer of skin. UV-induced tans act as a photoprotection by providing a sun protection factor (SPF) of 3-4 and epidermal hyperplasia. There is a need to prevent the harmful effects and harness the useful effects of UV radiations.

  6. Characteristics of withstanding radiation damage of InP crystals and devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Ando, Koshi

    1988-01-01

    Recently, the authors discovered that the characteristics of with standing radiation damage of InP crystals and devices (solar cells) are superior to those of Si and GaAs crystals and devices. Also the restoration phenomena at room temperature of radiation deterioration and the accelerated anneal phenomena by light irradiation and the injection of other minority, carriers in InP system devices were found. Such excellent characteristics suggested that InP devices are promising for the use in space. In this paper, taking an example of solar cells, the radiation resistance characteristics and their mechanism of InP crystals and devices are reported, based on the results of analysis by deep level transient spectroscopy and others. In InP solar cells, the high efficiency of photoelectric conversion was maintained even in the high dose irradiation of 1 MeV electron beam. As the carrier concentration in InP crystals is higher, they are stronger against radiation. With the increase of carrier concentration, the rate of anneal of radiation deterioration at room temperature increased. The accelerated anneal effect by minority carrier injection was remarkable in n + -p junction cells. The excellent characteristics of InP crystals are due to the formation of Frenkel defects of P and their instability. (K.I.)

  7. Radiation damage studies of mineral apatite, using fission tracks and thermoluminescence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Khalifa, I.J.M.

    1988-01-01

    In a uranium (/thorium)-rich mineral sample which has not suffered a recent geological high-temperature excursion, the fossil fission track density (FFTD) will give a good indication of its natural radiation damage, provided that its U/Th ratio is known. From our studies of FFTD and thermoluminescence (TL) properties of several samples of apatite from different locations, and containing varying degrees of natural-radiation damage, an anti-correlation is observed between FFTD and TL sensitivity. It is also found that an anti-correlation exists between TL sensitivity and the amount of damage produced artificially by bombarding apatite crystals with different fluences of ∼30 MeV α-particles from a cyclotron. These results indicate that the presence of radiation damage in this mineral (viz., fluorapatite) can severely affect its TL sensitivity (i.e. TL output per unit test dose). The effect of crystal composition on the thermoluminescence and fission track annealing properties of mineral apatite is also reported. We have found that fission track annealing sensitivity and TL sensitivity are both significantly lower in samples of chlorapatite than in samples consisting predominantly of fluorapatite. (author)

  8. Radiation damage analysis by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) has in recent years become a valuable new tool for investigating defects in metals. The ability of the positron to localize in a trapped state at various defect sites, in which the positron annihilates with unique characteristics, has enabled the positron to be used as a localized probe of these defect sites. Several reviews of the application of PAS to the study of defects in metals have been published, as have more general treatises on the applications of positron annihilation to the study of solids. PAS has made, and has considerably greater potential for, a significant contribution to radiation damage analysis in two areas of importance: (1) the determination of atomic-defect properties, a knowledge of which is necessary for the modeling required to couple the results of model experiments using electron and ion irradiation with the expected irradiation conditions of reactor systems, and (2) the monitoring and characterization of irradiation-induced microstructure development. A unique aspect of PAS for radiation damage analysis is the defect specificity of the annihilation characteristics of a trapped positron. In addition to its value as an independent analytical tool, PAS can be a useful complement to more traditional techniques for defect studies

  9. Radiation damage in non-metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoneham, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    Work on the problem of radiation damage in non-metals over the past 25 years is reviewed with especial emphasis on the contribution made at AERE, Harwell and in particular by members of the Theoretical Physics Division. In the years between 1954 and the end of the 1960's the main thrust in the radiation damage of non-metals was model-building including devising defect models and mechanisms that were qualitatively acceptable, and compiling systematic data. The early 1970's made greater quantitative demands as computer techniques made theory more powerful. In many cases it was possible to predict defect properties accurately, so that one could distinguish between different defect models which were hard to tell apart by experiment alone. In the late 1970's the most important aspect has moved towards mechanisms of defect processes, especially in cases where experiment by itself is limited by timescale, by complexity, by the unintentional impurities inevitable in real crystals, or by the extreme conditions required. (UK)

  10. Radiation damage to DNA-binding proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culard, G.; Eon, S.; DeVuyst, G.; Charlier, M.; Spotheim-Maurizot, M.

    2003-01-01

    The DNA-binding properties of proteins are strongly affected upon irradiation. The tetrameric lactose repressor (a dimer of dimers) losses its ability to bind operator DNA as soon as at least two damages per protomer of each dimer occur. The monomeric MC1 protein losses its ability to bind DNA in two steps : i) at low doses only the specific binding is abolished, whereas the non-specific one is still possible; ii) at high doses all binding vanishes. Moreover, the DNA bending induced by MC1 binding is less pronounced for a protein that underwent the low dose irradiation. When the entire DNA-protein complexes are irradiated, the observed disruption of the complexes is mainly due to the damage of the proteins and not to that of DNA. The doses necessary for complex disruption are higher than those inactivating the free protein. This difference, larger for MC1 than for lactose repressor, is due to the protection of the protein by the bound DNA. The oxidation of the protein side chains that are accessible to the radiation-induced hydroxyl radicals seems to represent the inactivating damage

  11. Investigation of solar cell radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.; Reulet, R.; Arndt, R.A.

    1974-01-01

    Development of communications satellites has led to the requirement for a greater and longer lived solar cell power source. Accordingly, studies have been undertaken with the aim of determining which solar cell array provides the greatest power at end of life and the amount of degradation. Investigation of the damage done to thin silicon and thin film CdS solar cells is being carried out in two steps. First, irradiations were performed singly with 0.15, 1.0 and 2.0MeV electrons and 0.7, 2.5 and 22MeV proton. Solar cells and their cover materials were irradiated separately in order to locate the sites of the damage. Diffusion length and I.V. characteristics of the cells and transmission properties of the cover materials were measured. All neasurements were made in vacuum immediately after irradiation. In the second part it is intended to study the effect of various combinations of proton, electron and photon irradiation both with and without an electrical load. The results of this part show whether synergism is involved in solar cell damage and the relative importance of each of three radiation sources if synergism is found [fr

  12. Molecular mechanisms in radiation damage to DNA: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, R.

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that were responsible for radiation-induced DNA damage. The studies were based on theoretical explorations of possible mechanisms that link initial radiation damage in the form of base and sugar damage to conformational changes in DNA

  13. Thermal Decomposition of Radiation-Damaged Polystyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J Abrefah, J.; Klinger, G.S.

    2000-01-01

    The radiation-damaged polystyrene material (''polycube'') used in this study was synthesized by mixing a high-density polystyrene (''Dylene Fines No. 100'') with plutonium and uranium oxides. The polycubes were used on the Hanford Site in the 1960s for criticality studies to determine the hydrogen-to-fissile atom ratios for neutron moderation during processing of spent nuclear fuel. Upon completion of the studies, two methods were developed to reclaim the transuranic (TRU) oxides from the polymer matrix: (1) burning the polycubes in air at 873 K; and (2) heating the polycubes in the absence of oxygen and scrubbing the released monomer and other volatile organics using carbon tetrachloride. Neither of these methods was satisfactory in separating the TRU oxides from the polystyrene. Consequently, the remaining polycubes were sent to the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for storage. Over time, the high dose of alpha and gamma radiation has resulted in a polystyrene matrix that is highly cross-linked and hydrogen deficient and a stabilization process is being developed in support of Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 94-1. Baseline processes involve thermal treatment to pyrolyze the polycubes in a furnace to decompose the polystyrene and separate out the TRU oxides. Thermal decomposition products from this degraded polystyrene matrix were characterized by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to provide information for determining the environmental impact of the process and for optimizing the process parameters. A gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) system coupled to a horizontal tube furnace was used for the characterization studies. The decomposition studies were performed both in air and helium atmospheres at 773 K, the planned processing temperature. The volatile and semi-volatile organic products identified for the radiation-damaged polystyrene were different from those observed for virgin polystyrene. The differences were in the

  14. Computer simulations of radiation damage in protein crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehnder, M.

    2007-03-01

    The achievable resolution and the quality of the dataset of an intensity data collection for structure analysis of protein crystals with X-rays is limited among other factors by radiation damage. The aim of this work is to obtain a better quantitative understanding of the radiation damage process in proteins. Since radiation damage is unavoidable it was intended to look for the optimum ratio between elastically scattered intensity and radiation damage. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm physical processes after an inelastic photon interaction are studied. The main radiation damage consists of ionizations of the atoms through the electron cascade following any inelastic photon interaction. Results of the method introduced in this investigation and results of an earlier theoretical studies of the influence of Auger-electron transport in diamond are in a good agreement. The dependence of the radiation damage as a function of the energy of the incident photon was studied by computer-aided simulations. The optimum energy range for diffraction experiments on the protein myoglobin is 10-40 keV. Studies of radiation damage as a function of crystal volume and shape revealed that very small plate or rod shaped crystals suffer less damage than crystals formed like a cube with the same volume. Furthermore the influence of a few heavy atoms in the protein molecule on radiation damage was examined. Already two iron atoms in the unit cell of myoglobin increase radiation damage significantly. (orig.)

  15. Radiation Damage In Reactor Cavity Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G [ORNL; Le Pape, Yann [ORNL; Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Remec, Igor [ORNL; Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Rosseel, Thomas M [ORNL; Wall, Dr. James Joseph [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

    2015-01-01

    License renewal up to 60 years and the possibility of subsequent license renewal to 80 years has established a renewed focus on long-term aging of nuclear generating stations materials, and recently, on concrete. Large irreplaceable sections of most nuclear generating stations include concrete. The Expanded Materials Degradation Analysis (EMDA), jointly performed by the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Industry, identified the urgent need to develop a consistent knowledge base on irradiation effects in concrete. Much of the historical mechanical performance data of irradiated concrete does not accurately reflect typical radiation conditions in NPPs or conditions out to 60 or 80 years of radiation exposure. To address these potential gaps in the knowledge base, The Electric Power Research Institute and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working to disposition radiation damage as a degradation mechanism. This paper outlines the research program within this pathway including: (i) defining the upper bound of the neutron and gamma dose levels expected in the biological shield concrete for extended operation (80 years of operation and beyond), (ii) determining the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation as well as extended time at temperature on concrete, (iii) evaluating opportunities to irradiate prototypical concrete under accelerated neutron and gamma dose levels to establish a conservative bound and share data obtained from different flux, temperature, and fluence levels, (iv) evaluating opportunities to harvest and test irradiated concrete from international NPPs, (v) developing cooperative test programs to improve confidence in the results from the various concretes and research reactors, (vi) furthering the understanding of the effects of radiation on concrete (see companion paper) and (vii) establishing an international collaborative research and information exchange effort to leverage capabilities and knowledge.

  16. Compilation of radiation damage test data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenbacher, H.; Tavlet, M.

    1989-01-01

    This report summarizes radiation damage test data on commercially available organic cable insulation and jacket materials: Ethylene-propylene rubbers, polyethylenes, polyurethanes, silicone rubbers, and copolymers based on polyethylene. The materials have been irradiated either in a nuclear reactor, or with a cobalt-60 source, or in the CERN accelerators, at different dose rates. The absorbed doses were between 10 3 and 5x10 6 Gy. Mechanical properties, e.g. tensile strength, elongation at break, and hardness, have been tested on irradiated and non-irradiated samples, according to the recommendations of the International Electrotechnical Commission. The results are presented in the form of tables and graphs to show the effect of the absorbed dose on the measured properties. (orig.)

  17. Compilation of radiation damage test data. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenbacher, H.; Stolarz-Izycka, A.

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes radiation damage test data on thermosetting and thermoplastic resins, with the main emphasis on epoxy resins used for magnet coil insulations. Also, other materials such as polyesters, phenolics, polyurethanes, silicones, etc., are represented. The materials have been irradiated in a nuclear reactor to integrated absorbed doses between 5x10 6 Gy and 1x10 8 Gy. The mechanical properties, e.g. the flexural strength, deflection at break, and tangent modulus of elasticity, have been measured on irradiated and non-irradiated samples. The results are given as variation of these parameters versus absorbed dose and are presented in the form of tables and graphs. The tested materials are catalogued in alphabetical order. (Auth.)

  18. Protection of DNA damage by radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Kim, In Gyu; Lee, Kang Suk; Kim, Kug Chan; Oh, Tae Jung

    1998-12-01

    The SOS response of Escherichia coli is positively regulated by RecA. To examine the effects of polyamines on The SOS response of E. Coli, we investigated the expression of recA gene in polyamine-deficient mutant and wild type carrying recA'::lacZ fusion gene. As a result, recA expression by mitomycin C is higher in wild type than that of polyamine-deficient mutant, but recA expression by UV radiation is higher in wild type than of mutant. We also found that exogenous polyamines restored the recA expression in the polyamine-deficient mutant to the wild type level. These results proposed that polyamines play an important role in mechanism of intracellular DNA protection by DNA damaging agents.

  19. Protection of DNA damage by radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Kim, In Gyu; Lee, Kang Suk; Kim, Kug Chan; Oh, Tae Jung

    1998-12-01

    The SOS response of Escherichia coli is positively regulated by RecA. To examine the effects of polyamines on The SOS response of E. Coli, we investigated the expression of recA gene in polyamine-deficient mutant and wild type carrying recA'::lacZ fusion gene. As a result, recA expression by mitomycin C is higher in wild type than that of polyamine-deficient mutant, but recA expression by UV radiation is higher in wild type than of mutant. We also found that exogenous polyamines restored the recA expression in the polyamine-deficient mutant to the wild type level. These results proposed that polyamines play an important role in mechanism of intracellular DNA protection by DNA damaging agents

  20. Protection of DNA damage by radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Kim, In Gyu; Lee, Kang Suk; Kim, Kug Chan; Oh, Tae Jung

    1998-12-01

    The SOS response of Escherichia coli is positively regulated by RecA. To examine the effects of polyamines on The SOS response of E. Coli, we investigated the expression of recA gene in polyamine-deficient mutant and wild type carrying recA'::lacZ fusion gene. As a result, recA expression by mitomycin C is higher in wild type than that of polyamine-deficient mutant, but recA expression by UV radiation is higher in wild type than of mutant. We also found that exogenous polyamines restored the recA expression in the polyamine-deficient mutant to the wild type level. These results proposed that polyamines play an important role in mechanism of intracellular DNA protection by DNA damaging agents.

  1. Annealing study on radiation-induced defects in 6H-SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinheiro, M.V.B.; Lingner, T.; Caudepon, F.; Greulich-Weber, S.; Spaeth, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of a systematic isochronal annealing investigation of vacancy-related defects in electron-irradiated n-type 6H-SiC:N. A series of 10 samples cut from a commercial wafer and annealed up to 1200 C after electron-irradiation (1.5 x 10 18 cm -3 ) was characterized with photoluminescence (PL), Magnetic circular dichroism of the absorption (MCDA) and conventional electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Apart from less stable triplet-related defects which vanished between 150 C and 300 C, the thermal behavior of three radiation-induced defects was studied: the silicon vacancy (V Si ), the carbon-antisite-carbon-vacancy pair (C Si -V C ) and the D1 center. Their annealing behavior showed that the destruction of the isolated V Si between 750 C and 900 C is followed by the formation of thermally more stable C Si -V C pairs, a result that has been theoretically predicted recently. By further heating the samples the C Si -V C pairs are annealed out between 900 C and 1050 C and were followed by an increase in the D1 center concentration. (orig.)

  2. Measurement of radiation damage on an optical reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, K.C.; Sahu, S.K.; Huang, H.C.; Ueno, K.; Chang, Y.H.; Wang, C.H.; Hou, W.S.

    1997-01-01

    We measured the radiation damage on an optical white fluorocarbon reflector called Goretex, which is to be used for aerogel threshold counters and crystal calorimeters of the BELLE detector of the KEK B-factory. Reflectance of the Goretex surface was monitored to see any effect of the radiation damage. Maximum equivalent dose was 8.6 Mrad. No radiation damage is observed within measurement errors. (orig.)

  3. Influence of radiation damage evolution on lattice-location, measurements for Yb and Au in iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, C.; Abel, F.; Bruneaux, M.; Thome, L.; Bernas, H.; Chaumont, J.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of radiation damage on lattice-location of heavy impurities (Yb and Au) implanted in iron is studied by channeling experiments. The nature of the impurity-radiation damage interaction has been modified by annealing of room-temperature implanted samples or high temperature implantation. The value of the corrected extinction ratio epsilon measured in several crystallographic directions on room-temperature implanted Yb and Au impurities cannot be interpreted uniquely in terms of different site populations. The annealing and implantation temperature dependences of the ratio epsilon for Yb-implanted Fe are very different. Upon annealing, the value of epsilon is unchanged up to 420 0 C and then drops abruptly. In hot-implant experiments, the extinction ratio starts to fall at approximately 150 0 C when vacancies become mobile. Vacancy-assisted diffusion is suggested to cause the changes of epsilon in both experiments. The temperature dependence of epsilon for the (100) plane is found to differ from that in other directions. This planar effect suggests that Yb impurities move preferentially in the (100) plane, which is the plane of vacancy-loops in Fe. A quantitative analysis of these lattice-location results and of related hyperfne interaction results is presented in a companion paper

  4. Influence of Hot Implantation on Residual Radiation Damage in Silicon Carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawski, M.; Zuk, J.; Kulik, M.; Drozdziel, A.; Pyszniak, K.; Turek, M.; Lin, L.; Prucnal, S.

    2011-01-01

    Remarkable thermomechanical and electrical properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this material very attractive for high-temperature, high-power, and high-frequency applications. Because of very low values of diffusion coefficient of most impurities in SiC, ion implantation is the best method to selectively introduce dopants over well-defined depths in SiC. Aluminium is commonly used for creating p-type regions in SiC. However, post-implantation radiation damage, which strongly deteriorates required electric properties of the implanted layers, is difficult to anneal even at high temperatures because of remaining residual damage. Therefore implantation at elevated target temperatures (hot implantation) is nowadays an accepted method to decrease the level of the residual radiation damage by avoiding ion beam-induced amorphization. The main objective of this study is to compare the results of the Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy with channeling and micro-Raman spectroscopy investigations of room temperature and 500 o C Al + ion implantation-induced damage in 6H-SiC and its removal by high temperature (up to 1600 o C) thermal annealing. (author)

  5. Spallation radiation damage and the radiation damage facility at the LAMPF A-6 target station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wechsler, M.S.; Sommer, W.F. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1984-05-01

    A redesign of the Clinton P. Anderson Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) A-6 Target Station is underway that will permit materials irradiations to be conducted in the proton beam and in the spallation neutron environment under more controlled conditions than has been possible heretofore. The protons of energy near 800 MeV and beam current approaching one mA are able to produce radiation damage rates (displacement production rates) as high as can be achieved in fission reactors, and the damage is uniform over macroscopic dimensions. The spallation neutrons have a degraded fission spectrum energy distribution, with the important admixture of a high energy tail up to 800 MeV. Irradiations in these radiation environments can be used to address important problems in the development of materials for fusion reactors. The redesign of the A-6 Target Station is described and plans for its use are discussed.

  6. Temperature dependence of radiation colloidal centers production and annealing in alkali halide crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristapson, J.Z.; Ozerskii, V.J.

    1981-01-01

    The investigation results on temperature dependences of production and annealing of radiation colloidal color centers have been reviewed. In order to produce such centers in NaCl, KCl and KBr crystals the doses of 10 2 -10 4 Mrad as well as irradiation temperatures of 300-600 K and post-irradiation heating of up to 800 K were applied. It has been demonstrated that to produce X-centers, it is necessary to have optimal temperature and initial critical dose during both irradiation and post-irradiation heating of crystals. It has been also found that during annealing hole centers produced are different with regard to thermal stability. The possible recombination mechanisms of hole and electron products of radiolysis during post-irradiation heating has been analyzed [ru

  7. Radiation Damage and Fission Product Release in Zirconium Nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egeland, Gerald W. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2005-08-29

    Zirconium nitride is a material of interest to the AFCI program due to some of its particular properties, such as its high melting point, strength and thermal conductivity. It is to be used as an inert matrix or diluent with a nuclear fuel based on transuranics. As such, it must sustain not only high temperatures, but also continuous irradiation from fission and decay products. This study addresses the issues of irradiation damage and fission product retention in zirconium nitride through an assessment of defects that are produced, how they react, and how predictions can be made as to the overall lifespan of the complete nuclear fuel package. Ion irradiation experiments are a standard method for producing radiation damage to a surface for observation. Cryogenic irradiations are performed to produce the maximum accumulation of defects, while elevated temperature irradiations may be used to allow defects to migrate and react to form clusters and loops. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and grazing-incidence x-ray diffractometry were used in evaluating the effects that irradiation has on the crystal structure and microstructure of the material. Other techniques were employed to evaluate physical effects, such as nanoindentation and helium release measurements. Results of the irradiations showed that, at cryogenic temperatures, ZrN withstood over 200 displacements per atom without amorphization. No significant change to the lattice or microstructure was observed. At elevated temperatures, the large amount of damage showed mobility, but did not anneal significantly. Defect clustering was possibly observed, yet the size was too small to evaluate, and bubble formation was not observed. Defects, specifically nitrogen vacancies, affect the mechanical behavior of ZrN dramatically. Current and previous work on dislocations shows a distinct change in slip plane, which is evidence of the bonding characteristics. The stacking-fault energy changes dramatically with

  8. Radiation damage: special reference to gas filled radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaur, Sudha; Joshi, Pankaj Kumar; Rathore, Shakuntla

    2012-01-01

    Radiation damage is a term associated with ionizing radiation. In gas filled particle detectors, radiation damage to gases plays an important role in the device's ageing, especially in devices exposed to high intensity radiation, e.g. detector for the large hadrons collide. Ionization processes require energy above 10 eV, while splitting covalent bond in molecules and generating free radical require only 3-4 eV. The electrical discharges initiated by the ionization event by the particles result in plasma populated by large amount of free radical. The highly reactive free radical can recombine back to original molecules, or initiate a chain of free radical polymerization reaction with other molecules, yielding compounds with increasing molecular weight. These high molecular weight compounds then precipitate from gases phase, forming conductive or non-conductive deposits on the electrodes an insulating surfaces of the detector and distorting it's response. Gases containing hydrocarbon quenchers, e.g. argon-methane, are typically sensitive to ageing by polymerization; addition of oxygen tends to lower the ageing rates. Trace amount of silicon oils, present form out gassing of silicon elastomers and especially from traces of silicon lubricant tend to decompose and form deposits of silicon crystals on the surfaces. Gases mixture of argon (or xenon) with CO 2 and optimally also with 2-3 % of oxygen are highly tolerant to high radiation fluxes. The oxygen is added as noble gas with CO 2 has too high transparency for high energy photons; ozone formed from the oxygen is a strong absorber of ultra violet photons. Carbon tetra fluoride can be used as a component of the gas for high-rate detectors; the fluorine radical produced during the operation however limit the choice of materials for the chambers and electrodes (e.g. gold electrodes are required, as the fluorine radicals attack metals, forming fluorides). Addition of carbon tetra fluoride can however eliminate the

  9. Effects of impurities on radiation damage in InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Ando, K.

    1986-01-01

    Strong impurity effects upon introduction and annealing behavior of radiation-induced defects in InP irradiated with 1-MeV electrons have been found. The main defect center of 0.37-eV hole trap H4 in p-InP, which must be due to a point defect, is annealed even at room temperature. Its annealing rate is found to be proportional to the 2/3 power of the preirradiation carrier concentration in InP. Moreover, the density of the hole trap H5 (E/sub v/+0.52 eV) in p-InP, which must be due to a point defect--impurity complex, increases with increase in the InP carrier concentration. These results suggest that the radiation-induced defects in InP must recover through long-range diffusion mediated by impurity atoms. A model is proposed in which point defects diffuse to sinks through impurities so as to disappear or bind impurities so as to form point defect--impurity complexes. In addition to the long-range diffusion mechanism, the possibility of charge-state effects responsible for the thermal annealing of radiation-induced defects in InP is also discussed

  10. Radiation Damage Monitoring in the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Seidel, S

    2013-01-01

    We describe the implementation of radiation damage monitoring using measurement of leakage current in the ATLAS silicon pixel sensors. The dependence of the leakage current upon the integrated luminosity is presented. The measurement of the radiation damage corresponding to integrated luminosity 5.6 fb$^{-1}$ is presented along with a comparison to the theoretical model.

  11. Use of heavy ions to model radiation damage of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirokov, S.V.; Vyshemirskij, M.P.

    2011-01-01

    The methods for modeling radiation damage of metals using heavy ions are reviewed and the results obtained are analyzed. It is shown that irradiation of metals with heavy ion can simulate neutron exposure with the equivalent dose with adequate accuracy and permits a detailed analysis of radiation damage of metals

  12. Constructive and critical approach of the radiation damage simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becquart, Ch.

    2002-11-01

    This work deals with the problem of radiation damage in materials for applications in development of fission and nuclear fusion technologies. It is organised in 3 sections. In section 1 are presented the mechanisms of formation and the evolution kinetics of the primary damage. Section 2 is devoted to the study of the sensitivity of the radiation damage at different approximations. Section 3 discusses the contribution of the ab initio calculations to the study of radiation damage and more particularly the point defects in a dilute Fe-Cu ferritic alloy. This work is illustrated by several publications added in each section. (O.M.)

  13. Radiation damage in commercial optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolotti, M.; Franceschini, F.A.; Serra, A.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental results obtained by exposure of commercial optical fibers to 60 Co γ-ray irradiation, are reported. The possibility of utilizing these fibers as far as a total dose of 6000 rad in the light spectrum is shown. It is also shown that it is possible to obtain total recovery of irradiated fibers by annealing at 500 0 C. (author)

  14. Radiation damage to DNA: the effect of LET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J F; Milligan, J R [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). School of Medicine

    1997-03-01

    Mechanisms whereby ionizing radiation induced damage are introduced into cellular DNA are discussed. The types of lesions induced are summarized and the rationale is presented which supports the statement that radiation induced singly damaged sites are biologically unimportant. The conclusion that multiply damaged sites are critical is discussed and the mechanisms whereby such lesions are formed are presented. Structures of multiply damaged sites are summarized and problems which they present to cellular repair systems are discussed. Lastly the effects of linear energy transfer on the complexity of multiply damaged sites are surveyed and the consequences of this increased complexity are considered in terms of cell survival and mutation. (author)

  15. Biologically important radiation damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    Most DNA damage by the hydroxyl radical is confined to the bases, and this base damage represents an important component of locally multiply demanded sites (LMOS). The yields of the major damaged bases have been determined by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. For our propose, it was necessary to convert a known fraction of these damaged bases to strand breaks and then assay these labile sites as the increase in strand break yield over the normally observed level. Three potential agents by which this strategy of conversion of base damage to strand break could be implemented were identified in the original application: 1, Sl nuclease; 2, piperidine; and 3, base damage specific enzymes

  16. Radiation damage in a high Ni weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Kytka, M.; Kopriva, R.

    2015-01-01

    WWER-1000 RPV weld metals are characterized by a high content of nickel, mostly about 1.7 mass % with content of manganese around 0.8 mass % with a very low copper content - about 0.05 mass %. In such material some late blooming phase effect should be observed during irradiation. Such typical weld material was irradiated in the experimental reactor LVR-15 in N RI Rez at the irradiation temperature 290 C degrees and at five neutron fluences from 1.5 to 9.5 *10 23 m -2 (E>1 MeV). Charpy V-notch impact tests, static fracture toughness tests, tensile and hardness measurement were performed to obtain effect of neutron fluence on radiation hardening as well as embrittlement. Neutron fluence dependences of all these property changes have monotonic character but with a high neutron embrittlement exponent around 0.8. Scanning electron microscope of fracture surfaces showed no or very small portion of intercrystalline fracture. Transmission electron microscopy was performed on specimens from all neutron fluences. Only low density of black-dot damage has been observed. It is assumed that most of defect are dislocation loops. The late blooming phase which may be observed from results of mechanical properties are probably below the resolution of the used JEM-2010, i.e. 1.5 nm. (authors)

  17. Chemistry of radiation damage to wire chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, J.

    1992-08-01

    Proportional counters are used to study aspects of radiation damage to wire chambers (wire aging). Principles of low-pressure, rf plasma chemistry are used to predict the plasma chemistry in electron avalanches (1 atm, dc). (1) Aging is studied in CF 4 /iC 4 H 10 gas mixtures. Wire deposits are analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. An apparent cathode aging process resulting in loss of gain rather than in a self-sustained current is observed in CF 4 -rich gases. A four-part model considering plasma polymerization of the hydrocarbon, etching of wire deposits by CF 4 , acceleration of deposition processes in strongly etching environments, and reactivity of the wire surface is developed to understand anode wire aging in CF 4 /iC 4 H 10 gases. Practical guidelines suggested by the model are discussed. (2) Data are presented to suggest that trace amounts of Freons do not affect aging rates in either dimethyl ether or Ar/C 2 H 6 . Apparent loss of gain is explained by attachment of primary electrons to a continuously increasing concentration of Freon 11 (CCl 3 F) in the counter gas. An increase in the concentration of Freon 11 in dimethyl ether is caused by a distillation process in the gas supply bottle and is a natural consequence of the unequal volatilities of the two compounds

  18. Radiation Damage in Electronic Memory Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Fetahović, Irfan; Pejović, Milić; Vujisić, Miloš

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the behavior of semiconductor memories exposed to radiation in order to establish their applicability in a radiation environment. The experimental procedure has been used to test radiation hardness of commercial semiconductor memories. Different types of memory chips have been exposed to indirect ionizing radiation by changing radiation dose intensity. The effect of direct ionizing radiation on semiconductor memory behavior has been analyzed by using Monte Carlo simula...

  19. Radiation damage measurements in room temperature semiconductor radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franks, L.A.; Olsen, R.W.; James, R.B.; Brunett, B.A.; Walsh, D.S.; Doyle, B.L.; Vizkelethy, G.; Trombka, J.I.

    1998-01-01

    The literature of radiation damage measurements on cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), cadmium telluride (CT), and mercuric iodide (HgI 2 ) is reviewed and in the case of CZT supplemented by new alpha particle data. CZT strip detectors exposed to intermediate energy (1.3 MeV) proton fluences exhibit increased interstrip leakage after 10 10 p/cm 2 and significant bulk leakage after 10 12 p/cm 2 . CZT exposed to 200 MeV protons shows a two-fold loss in energy resolution after a fluence of 5 x 10 9 p/cm 2 in thick (3 mm) planar devices but little effect in 2 mm devices. No energy resolution effects were noted from moderated fission spectrum of neutrons after fluences up to 10 10 n/cm 2 , although activation was evident. Exposures of CZT to 5 MeV alpha particle at fluences up to 1.5 x 10 10 α/cm 2 produced a near linear decrease in peak position with fluence and increases in FWHM beginning at about 7.5 x 10 9 α/cm 2 . CT detectors show resolution losses after fluences of 3 x 10 9 p/cm 2 at 33 MeV for chlorine-doped detectors. Indium doped material may be more resistant. Neutron exposures (8 MeV) caused resolution losses after fluences of 2 x 10 10 n/cm 2 . Mercuric iodide has been studied with intermediate energy protons (10 to 33 MeV) at fluences up to 10 12 p/cm 2 and with 1.5 GeV protons at fluences up to 1.2 x 10 8 p/cm 2 . Neutron exposures at 8 MeV have been reported at fluences up to 10 15 n/cm 2 . No radiation damage was reported under these irradiation conditions

  20. Radiation damage and its repair in non-sporulating bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moseley, B.E.B.

    1984-01-01

    A review is given of radiation damage and its repair in non-sporulating bacteria. The identification and measurement of radiation damage in the DNA of the bacteria after exposure to ultraviolet radiation and ionizing radiation is described. Measuring the extent of DNA repair and ways of isolating repair mutants are also described. The DNA repair mechanisms for UV-induced damage are discussed including photoreactivation repair, excision repair, post-replication recombination repair and induced error-prone repair. The DNA repair mechanisms for ionizing radiation damage are also discussed including the repair of both single and double-strand breaks. Other aspects discussed include the effects of growth, irradiation medium and recovery medium on survival, DNA repair in humans, the commercial use of UV and ionizing radiations and the future of ionizing irradiation as a food treatment process. (U.K.)

  1. Microstructural evolution of radiation induced defects in ZnO during isochronal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, S.; Puff, W.; Balogh, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    In this study the authors discuss the microstructural changes after electron and proton irradiation and the thermal evolution of the radiation induced defects during isochronal annealing. The nominally undoped samples were irradiated either with 3 MeV protons to a fluence of 1.2 x 10 18 p/cm 2 or with 1 MeV electrons to a fluence of 1 x 10 18 e/cm 2 . The investigation was performed with positron lifetime and Doppler-Broadening measurements. The measurements were done at room temperature and in some cases down to 10 K to investigate the thermal dependence of the trapping characteristics of the positrons

  2. Semiconductor annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.M.; Scovell, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    A process for annealing crystal damage in ion implanted semiconductor devices in which the device is rapidly heated to a temperature between 450 and 900 0 C and allowed to cool. It has been found that such heating of the device to these relatively low temperatures results in rapid annealing. In one application the device may be heated on a graphite element mounted between electrodes in an inert atmosphere in a chamber. (author)

  3. Post-annealing recrystallization and damage recovery process in Fe ion implanted Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Muneyuki; Hirata, Akihiko; Ishimaru, Manabu; Hirotsu, Yoshihiko

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated ion-beam-induced and thermal annealing-induced microstructures in high fluence Fe implanted Si using transmission electron microscopy. Si(1 1 1) substrates were irradiated with 120 keV Fe ions at 120 K to fluences of 0.4 x 10 17 and 4.0 x 10 17 cm -2 . A continuous amorphous layer was formed on Si substrates in both as-implanted samples. After thermal annealing at 1073 K for 2 h, β-FeSi 2 fine particles buried in a polycrystalline Si layer were observed in the low fluence sample, while a continuous β-FeSi 2 layer was formed in the high fluence sample. We discuss the relationship between ion fluence and defects recovery process in Fe ion implanted Si

  4. Radiation Damage in Electronic Memory Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Fetahović

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the behavior of semiconductor memories exposed to radiation in order to establish their applicability in a radiation environment. The experimental procedure has been used to test radiation hardness of commercial semiconductor memories. Different types of memory chips have been exposed to indirect ionizing radiation by changing radiation dose intensity. The effect of direct ionizing radiation on semiconductor memory behavior has been analyzed by using Monte Carlo simulation method. Obtained results show that gamma radiation causes decrease in threshold voltage, being proportional to the absorbed dose of radiation. Monte Carlo simulations of radiation interaction with material proved to be significant and can be a good estimation tool in probing semiconductor memory behavior in radiation environment.

  5. Progress on clustered DNA damage in radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Li'na; Zhang Hong; Di Cuixia; Zhang Qiuning; Wang Xiaohu

    2012-01-01

    Clustered DNA damage which caused by high LET heavy ion radiation can lead to mutation, tumorigenesis and apoptosis. Promoting apoptosis of cancer cells is always the basis of cancer treatment. Clustered DNA damage has been the hot topic in radiobiology. The detect method is diversity, but there is not a detail and complete protocol to analyze clustered DNA damage. In order to provide reference for clustered DNA damage in the radiotherapy study, the clustered DNA damage characteristics, the latest progresses on clustered DNA damage and the detecting methods are reviewed and discussed in detail in this paper. (authors)

  6. Radiation damage to nucleoprotein complexes in macromolecular crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bury, Charles; Garman, Elspeth F.; Ginn, Helen Mary; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.; Carmichael, Ian; Kneale, Geoff; McGeehan, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative X-ray induced radiation damage studies employing a model protein–DNA complex revealed a striking partition of damage sites. The DNA component was observed to be far more resistant to specific damage compared with the protein. Significant progress has been made in macromolecular crystallography over recent years in both the understanding and mitigation of X-ray induced radiation damage when collecting diffraction data from crystalline proteins. In contrast, despite the large field that is productively engaged in the study of radiation chemistry of nucleic acids, particularly of DNA, there are currently very few X-ray crystallographic studies on radiation damage mechanisms in nucleic acids. Quantitative comparison of damage to protein and DNA crystals separately is challenging, but many of the issues are circumvented by studying pre-formed biological nucleoprotein complexes where direct comparison of each component can be made under the same controlled conditions. Here a model protein–DNA complex C.Esp1396I is employed to investigate specific damage mechanisms for protein and DNA in a biologically relevant complex over a large dose range (2.07–44.63 MGy). In order to allow a quantitative analysis of radiation damage sites from a complex series of macromolecular diffraction data, a computational method has been developed that is generally applicable to the field. Typical specific damage was observed for both the protein on particular amino acids and for the DNA on, for example, the cleavage of base-sugar N 1 —C and sugar-phosphate C—O bonds. Strikingly the DNA component was determined to be far more resistant to specific damage than the protein for the investigated dose range. At low doses the protein was observed to be susceptible to radiation damage while the DNA was far more resistant, damage only being observed at significantly higher doses

  7. Effect of Thermal Annealing and Second Harmonic Generation on Bulk Damage Performance of Rapid-Growth KDP Type I Doublers at 1064 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runkel, M; Maricle, S; Torres, R; Auerbach, J; Floyd, R; Hawley-Fedder, R; Burnham, A K

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of thermal annealing and in-situ second harmonic generation (SHG) damage tests performed on six rapid growth KDP type 1 doubler crystals at 1064 nm (1 ω) on the Zeus automated damage test facility. Unconditioned (S/1) and conditioned (R/1) damage probability tests were performed before and after thermal annealing, then with and without SHG on six doubler crystals from the NIF-size, rapid growth KDP boule F6. The tests revealed that unannealed, last-grown material from the boule in either prismatic or pyramidal sectors exhibited the highest damage curves. After thermal annealing at 160 C for seven days, the prismatic sector samples increased in performance ranging from 1.6 to 2.4X, while material from the pyramidal sector increased only modestly, ranging from 1.0 to 1.4X. Second harmonic generation decreased the damage fluence by an average of 20 percent for the S/1 tests and 40 percent for R/1 tests. Conversion efficiencies under test conditions were measured to be 20 to 30 percent and compared quite well to predicted behavior, as modeled by LLNL frequency conversion computer codes. The damage probabilities at the 1 ω NIF redline fluence (scaled to 10 ns via t 0.5 ) for S/1 tests for the unannealed samples ranged from 20 percent in one sample to 90-100 percent for the other 5 samples. Thermal annealing reduced the damage probabilities to less than 35 percent for 3 of the poor-performing crystals, while two pyramidal samples remained in the 80 to 90 percent range. Second harmonic generation in the annealed crystal increased the S/1 damage probabilities on all the crystals and ranged from 40 to 100 percent. In contrast, R/1 testing of an unannealed crystal resulted in a damage probability at the NIF redline fluence of 16%. Annealing increased the damage performance to the extent that all test sites survived NIF redline fluences without damage. Second harmonic generation in the R/1 test yielded a damage probability of less than 2

  8. Radiation damage for the spallation target of ADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Sheng; Ye Yanlin; Xu Chuncheng; Chen Tao; Sobolevsky, N.M.

    2000-01-01

    By using SHIELD codes system, the authors investigate the radiation damage, such as radiation damage cross section, displacement atom cross section and the rate of displacement atom, gas production cross section, the rate of gas production and the ratio, R, of the helium and displacement production rates in target, container window and spallation neutron source materials as W and Pb induced from intermediate energy proton and neutron incident. And the study of radiation damage in the thick Pb target with long 60 cm, radius 20 cm is presented

  9. Radiation damage monitoring in the ATLAS pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, Sally

    2013-01-01

    We describe the implementation of radiation damage monitoring using measurement of leakage current in the ATLAS silicon pixel sensors. The dependence of the leakage current upon the integrated luminosity is presented. The measurement of the radiation damage corresponding to an integrated luminosity 5.6 fb −1 is presented along with a comparison to a model. -- Highlights: ► Radiation damage monitoring via silicon leakage current is implemented in the ATLAS (LHC) pixel detector. ► Leakage currents measured are consistent with the Hamburg/Dortmund model. ► This information can be used to validate the ATLAS simulation model.

  10. Fundamental Technology Development for Radiation Damage in Nuclear Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Sang Chul; Kwon, J. H.; Kim, E. S. and others

    2005-04-01

    This project was performed to achieve technologies for the evaluation of radiation effects at materials irradiated at HANARO and nuclear power plants, to establish measurement equipment and software for the analysis of radiation defects and to set up facilities for the measurements of radiation damage with non-destructive methods. Major targets were 1) establishment of hot laboratories and remote handling facilities/ technologies for the radioactive material tests, 2) irradiation test for the simulation of nuclear power plant environment and measurement/calculation of physical radiation damage, 3) evaluation and analysis of nano-scale radiation damage, 4) evaluation of radiation embrittlement with ultrasonic resonance spectrum measurement and electromagnetic measurement and 5) basic research of radiation embrittlement and radiation damage mechanism. Through the performance of 3 years, preliminary basics were established for the application research to evaluation of irradiated materials of present nuclear power plants and GEN-IV systems. Particularly the results of SANS, PAS and TEM analyses were the first output in Korea. And computer simulations of radiation damage were tried for the first time in Korea. The technologies will be developed for the design of GEN-IV material

  11. Radiation damages and electro-conductive characteristics of Neutron-Transmutation-Doped GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriyama, Kazuo; Sato, Masataka; Sakai, Kiyohiro [Hosei Univ., Koganei, Tokyo (Japan). Coll. of Engineering; Okada, Moritami

    1996-04-01

    Neutron Transmutation Doping (NTD) method made it possible to do homogeneous doping of impurities and to easily control the doping level. Thus, the method has been put into practice for some materials such as silicon. Here, the annealing behavior of anti-site defects generated in neutron-irradiated GaAs was studied. Electric activations of NTD-impurities were started around 550degC in P1 and P2 radiation fields, which were coincident with the beginning of extinction of electron trapping which was caused by anti-site defects due to fast neutron radiation. The electric resistivities of GaAs in neutron radiation fields; P1, P2 and P3 changed depending with the annealing temperature. The electric resistivities of GaAs in P1 and P2 fields indicate the presence of hopping conduction through radiation damages. The resistance of GaAs irradiated in P1 was smaller by nearly 2 orders than that of the untreated control. Further, the electric activation process for NTD-impurities was investigated using ESR and Raman spectroscopy. (M.N.)

  12. Photobiological aspects of radiation damage to bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myasnik, M.N.; Skvortsov, V.G.; Sokolov, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    In this report, we, submit a critical analysis of experiments aimed to estimate the contribution of the processes of ionization and electron excitation to lethal and mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. In discussing the phenomenon of photoreactivation after the effect of ionizing radiation, we arrived at a conclusion that the processes of electron excitation, initiated by either Vavilov-Cerenkov light or the direct reaction of radiation energy with the substance, play an important role in the biological effect of ionizing radiation [ru

  13. Radiation damage measurements in room-temperature semiconductor radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Franks, L A; Olsen, R W; Walsh, D S; Vizkelethy, G; Trombka, J I; Doyle, B L; James, R B

    1999-01-01

    The literature of radiation damage measurements on cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), cadmium telluride (CT), and mercuric iodide (HgI sub 2) is reviewed and in the case of CZT supplemented by new alpha particle data. CZT strip detectors exposed to intermediate energy (1.3 MeV) proton fluences exhibit increased interstrip leakage after 10 sup 1 sup 0 p/cm sup 2 and significant bulk leakage after 10 sup 1 sup 2 p/cm sup 2. CZT exposed to 200 MeV protons shows a two-fold loss in energy resolution after a fluence of 5x10 sup 9 p/cm sup 2 in thick (3 mm) planar devices but little effect in 2 mm devices. No energy resolution effects were noted from a moderated fission spectrum of neutrons after fluences up to 10 sup 1 sup 0 n/cm sup 2 , although activation was evident. Exposures of CZT to 5 MeV alpha particles at fluences up to 1.5x10 sup 1 sup 0 alpha/cm sup 2 produced a near linear decrease in peak position with fluence and increases in FWHM beginning at about 7.5x10 sup 9 alpha/cm sup 2. CT detectors show resolution...

  14. Influence of annealing on X-ray radiation sensing properties of TiO2 thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, M. P.; Kalita, J. M.; Wary, G.

    2018-03-01

    A recent study shows that the titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin film synthesised by a chemical bath deposition technique is a very useful material for the X-ray radiation sensor. In this work, we reported the influence of annealing on the X-ray radiation detection sensitivity of the TiO2 film. The films were annealed at 333 K, 363 K, 393 K, 473 K, and 573 K for 1 hour. Structural analyses showed that the microstrain and dislocation density decreased whereas the average crystallite size increased with annealing. The band gap of the films also decreased from 3.26 eV to 3.10 eV after annealing. The I-V characteristics record under the dark condition and under the X-ray irradiation showed that the conductivity increased with annealing. The influence of annealing on the detection sensitivity was negligible if the bias voltage applied across the films was low (within 0.2 V‒1.0 V). At higher bias voltage (>1.0 V), the contribution of electrons excited by X-ray became less significant which affected the detection sensitivity.

  15. Activation and radiation damage in the environment of hadron accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Kiselev, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    A component which suffers radiation damage usually also becomes radioactive, since the source of activation and radiation damage is the interaction of the material with particles from an accelerator or with reaction products. However, the underlying mechanisms of the two phenomena are different. These mechanisms are described here. Activation and radiation damage can have far-reaching consequences. Components such as targets, collimators, and beam dumps are the first candidates for failure as a result of radiation damage. This means that they have to be replaced or repaired. This takes time, during which personnel accumulate dose. If the dose to personnel at work would exceed permitted limits, remote handling becomes necessary. The remaining material has to be disposed of as radioactive waste, for which an elaborate procedure acceptable to the authorities is required. One of the requirements of the authorities is a complete nuclide inventory. The methods used for calculation of such inventories are presented,...

  16. High LET radiation and mechanism of DNA damage repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2004-01-01

    Clarifying the mechanism of repair from radiation damage gives most important information on radiation effects on cells. Approximately 10% of biological experiments groups in Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) cooperative research group has performed the subject. They gave a lot of new findings on the mechanism, and solved some open questions. The reason to show the peak of relative biological effectiveness RBE at around 100-200 keV/μm causes miss-repair of DNA damage. Sub-lethal damage generated by high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation can be repaired fully. Potentially lethal damages by high-LET radiation also repaired, but the efficiency decreased with the LET, and so on. (author)

  17. Positron annihilation and perturbed angular correlation studies of radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jiazheng; Li Anli; Xu Yongjun; Wang Zhiqiang; Zhou Dongmei; Zheng Yongnan; Zhu Shengyun; Iwata, T.

    2002-01-01

    The positron annihilation and perturbed angular correlation techniques have been employed to study radiation damage in Si and Nb. The results obtained by the positron annihilation are consistent with those given by the perturbed angular correlation

  18. Single Molecule Scanning of DNA Radiation Oxidative Damage, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal will develop an assay to map genomic DNA, at the single molecule level and in a nanodevice, for oxidative DNA damage arising from radiation exposure;...

  19. A simple method to identify radiation and annealing biases that lead to worst-case CMOS static RAM postirradiation response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Dressendorfer, P.V.

    1987-01-01

    The authors illustrate a simple method to identify bias conditions that lead to worst-case postirradiation speed and timing response for SRAMs. Switching cell states between radiation and anneal should lead to maximum speed and timing degradation for many hardened designs and technologies. The greatest SRAM cell imbalance is also established by these radiation and annealing conditions for the hardened and commercial parts that we have examined. These results should provide insight into the behavior of SRAMs during and after irradiation. The results should also be useful to establishing guidelines for integrated-circuit functionality testing, and SEU and dose-rate upset testing, after total-dose irradiation

  20. Inverted Apatite (U-Th)/He and Fission-track Dates from the Rae craton, Baffin Island, Canada and Implications for Apatite Radiation Damage-He Diffusivity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, A. K.; Reiners, P. W.; Thomson, S. N.; Miller, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    Coupled apatite (U-Th)/He and fission-track (AFT) thermochronology data from the same sample can be used to decipher complex low temperature thermal histories and evaluate compatibility between these two methods. Existing apatite He damage-diffusivity models parameterize radiation damage annealing as fission-track annealing and yield inverted apatite He and AFT dates for samples with prolonged residence in the He partial retention zone. Apatite chemistry also impacts radiation damage and fission-track annealing, temperature sensitivity, and dates in both systems. We present inverted apatite He and AFT dates from the Rae craton, Baffin Island, Canada, that cannot be explained by apatite chemistry or existing damage-diffusivity and fission track models. Apatite He dates from 34 individual analyses from 6 samples range from 237 ± 44 Ma to 511 ± 25 Ma and collectively define a positive date-eU relationship. AFT dates from these same samples are 238 ± 15 Ma to 350 ± 20 Ma. These dates and associated track length data are inversely correlated and define the left segment of a boomerang diagram. Three of the six samples with 20-90 ppm eU apatite grains yield apatite He and AFT dates inverted by 300 million years. These samples have average apatite Cl chemistry of ≤0.02 wt.%, with no correlation between Cl content and Dpar. Thermal history simulations using geologic constraints, an apatite He radiation damage accumulation and annealing model, apatite He dates with the range of eU values, and AFT date and track length data, do not yield any viable time-temperature paths. Apatite He and AFT data modeled separately predict thermal histories with Paleozoic-Mesozoic peaks reheating temperatures differing by ≥15 °C. By modifying the parameter controlling damage annealing (Rmr0) from the canonical 0.83 to 0.5-0.6, forward models reproduce the apatite He date-eU correlation and AFT dates with a common thermal history. Results imply apatite radiation damage anneals at

  1. Radiation damage to the brain: neuropsychiatric aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, T.; Vahora, S.

    1986-01-01

    Although radiation necrosis of the brain is a recognized complication of irradiation of the central nervous system, the psychiatric aspects of this phenomenon are less well defined. Two cases of radiation necrosis in which psychiatric symptoms were a prominent part of the clinical picture are presented. Factors that determine the evolution and clinical presentation of radiation necrosis are reviewed. In particular, the role of the consultation psychiatrist in the diagnosis and management of such patients is discussed

  2. Automated analysis of damages for radiation in plastics surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, C.; Camacho M, E.; Tavera, L.; Balcazar, M.

    1990-02-01

    Analysis of damages done by the radiation in a polymer characterized by optic properties of polished surfaces, of uniformity and chemical resistance that the acrylic; resistant until the 150 centigrade grades of temperature, and with an approximate weight of half of the glass. An objective of this work is the development of a method that analyze in automated form the superficial damages induced by radiation in plastic materials means an images analyst. (Author)

  3. Macroscopic morphology of radiation damage in copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, K.E.

    1977-01-01

    This Thesis describes the damage produced in copper single crystals when they are irradiated with neutrons from a nuclear reactor, and shows that the morphology of the damage is dependent on the temperature of irradiation. The production of point defects in the initial stages of the bombardment and their subsequent diffusion is described in Chapter One. Chapter Two describes the techniques used to etch and thus make visible the damage regions. The defect clusters were examined with a microscope. A typical selection of micrographs of the damage is presented and discussed in Chapter Three. In the final chapter, Chapter Four, the results of the present work are discussed in the light of work done by other research workers. The Thesis ends with a brief suggestion for future work to be carried out on neutron irradiated copper single crystals

  4. Investigation of radiation damage effects in neutron irradiated CCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brau, James E.; Igonkina, Olga; Potter, Chris T.; Sinev, Nikolai B.

    2005-01-01

    A Charge Coupled Devices (CCD)-based vertex detector is a leading option for vertex detection at the future linear collider. A major issue for this application is the radiation hardness of such devices. Tests of radiation hardness of CCDs used in the SLD vertex detector, VXD3, have been reported earlier. The first measurements of 1998 involved a spare VXD3 CCD that was irradiated with neutrons from a radioactive source (Pu-Be), and from a nuclear reactor. In 2003, we had the opportunity to disassemble the VXD3 detector and study the nature of the radiation damage it incurred during 3 years of operation at SLC. In the preparation for this study, additional experiments with the spare VXD3 CCD were performed. These included measurements of trapping times in neutron irradiated CCDs. Results, reported here, will help us better understand the mechanism of radiation damage effects and develop techniques to minimize performance degradation due to radiation damage

  5. Radiation damage to DNA: The importance of track structure

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, M A

    1999-01-01

    A wide variety of biological effects are induced by ionizing radiation, from cell death to mutations and carcinogenesis. The biological effectiveness is found to vary not only with the absorbed dose but also with the type of radiation and its energy, i.e., with the nature of radiation tracks. An overview is presented of some of the biological experiments using different qualities of radiation, which when compared with Monte Carlo track structure studies, have highlighted the importance of the localized spatial properties of stochastic energy deposition on the nanometer scale at or near DNA. The track structure leads to clustering of damage which may include DNA breaks, base damage etc., the complexity of the cluster and therefore its biological repairability varying with radiation type. The ability of individual tracks to produce clustered damage, and the subsequent biological response are important in the assessment of the risk associated with low-level human exposure. Recent experiments have also shown that...

  6. A review on radiation damage of erythrocyte membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junling; Wang Weidong; Qin Guangyong

    2007-01-01

    Biomembrane has very important biological function. Its damage will seriously disturb the directivity, the orderly nature and coordination of cell metabolism, and finally causes the cell death. This paper reviewed the effects of radiation damage on erythrocyte membrane in membrane composition, membrane function and oxidation resistance system. (authors)

  7. Thermal engineering of FAPbI3 perovskite material via radiative thermal annealing and in situ XRD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Vanessa L.; Dou, Benjia; Van Campen, Douglas G.; Klein-Stockert, Talysa R.; Barnes, Frank S.; Shaheen, Sean E.; Ahmad, Md I.; van Hest, Maikel F. A. M.; Toney, Michael F.

    2017-01-01

    Lead halide perovskites have emerged as successful optoelectronic materials with high photovoltaic power conversion efficiencies and low material cost. However, substantial challenges remain in the scalability, stability and fundamental understanding of the materials. Here we present the application of radiative thermal annealing, an easily scalable processing method for synthesizing formamidinium lead iodide (FAPbI3) perovskite solar absorbers. Devices fabricated from films formed via radiative thermal annealing have equivalent efficiencies to those annealed using a conventional hotplate. By coupling results from in situ X-ray diffraction using a radiative thermal annealing system with device performances, we mapped the processing phase space of FAPbI3 and corresponding device efficiencies. Our map of processing-structure-performance space suggests the commonly used FAPbI3 annealing time, 10 min at 170 °C, can be significantly reduced to 40 s at 170 °C without affecting the photovoltaic performance. The Johnson-Mehl-Avrami model was used to determine the activation energy for decomposition of FAPbI3 into PbI2. PMID:28094249

  8. DAMAGE IN MOLYBDENUM ASSOCIATED WITH NEUTRON IRRADIATION AND SUBSEQUENT POST-IRRADIATION ANNEALING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastel, B.

    1963-07-23

    Molybdemum containing carbon was studied in an attempt to establish the combined effect of impurity content and neutron irradiation on the properties and structure of specific metals. Molybdenum foils were punched into discs and heat treated in vacuum. They were then slow-cooled and irradiated. After irradiation and subsequent decay of radioactivity to a low level the foils were subjected to x-ray diffraction measurements. Cold-worked foils with less than 10 ppm carbon showed no change in microstructure due to irradiation. Molybdenum foils that were annealed prior to irradiation showed spot defects. In foils containing up to 500 ppm carbon, it was concluded that the small loops present after irradiation are due to the clustering of point defects at interstitial carbon atoms, followed by collapse to form a dislocation loop. The amount of lattice expansion after irradiation was strongly dependent on impurity content. Neutron irradiation was found to reduce the number of active slip systems. (M.C.G.)

  9. Effect of foil orientation on damage accumulation during irradiation in magnesium and annealing response of dislocation loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.K.; Yao, Z.; Daymond, M.R.; Holt, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Effect of foil orientation on electron irradiation damage in Mg is analyzed. ► Prism plane defects increases in prism foils as compared to basal foils. ► Basal faults were interstitial and prism plane defects were mixed in character. ► Shrinkage of interstitial dislocations takes place by the self diffusion mechanism. - Abstract: The effect of foil orientation on damage accumulation behavior in commercial purity magnesium is investigated by in situ electron and ion irradiation. Transmission electron microscope has been used to study the dislocation loops formed by the agglomeration of point defects during irradiation. It has been observed that the ratio of prism plane to basal plane defects increases as the foil orientation is changed from basal to the prism foil. The ratio of vacancy to interstitial defects also increases in prism foils as compared to the basal foils. This point defect accumulation behavior is reversed when magnesium is irradiated with 1 MeV Kr 2+ ions and the formation of basal plane dislocation loops were only observed in prism foils and did not take place in the basal foils. Analysis showed that all the basal plane dislocation loops have Burgers vector of the type 1/(6〈202 ¯ 3〉) and are interstitial in nature whereas prism plane dislocation loops have Burgers vector of the type 1/(3〈112 ¯ 0〉) and are of mixed interstitial/vacancy in character. In situ annealing experiments at different temperatures performed on electron irradiated magnesium foils suggest that those dislocation loops that become thermodynamically unstable anneal out in a matter of few seconds whereas other stable dislocation loops continue to shrink by absorbing surrounding vacancy clusters. The activation energy for the shrinkage of the interstitial dislocation loops has been derived and the results show that the shrinkage of interstitial dislocation loops takes place by the mechanism of vacancy assisted self diffusion.

  10. Radiation-induced brain damage in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, Shizuo; Kokunai, Takashi; Ijichi, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Raimondi, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    The nature and sequence of the radiation-induced changes in the brain were studied postmortem in 34 children with glioma, 22 of whom underwent central nervous system radiation therapy. Twenty received whole-brain or whole-neuroaxis radiation at a total mean dosage of 4063 cGy. Brain tissue alternations were analyzed histologically by means of various staining methods, including immunohistochemical techniques. The histological features of irradiated brains were compared with those of non-irradiated brains. Microscopic findings included demyelination (seven cases), focal necrosis (six cases), cortical atrophy (four cases), endothelial proliferation (four cases), and telangiectatic vascular proliferation with vascular thickening and oozing of a thick fluid (one case). Such findings were rare in non-irradiated patients. Demyelination was observed earliest in a patient who died 5 months after radiation therapy and was more common after 9 months. Focal necrosis was first observed 9 months post-irradiation but was more advanced and extensive after 1 year. Calcified foci were found only after 60 months. Various vascular changes such as vascular thickening and thrombosis suggested ischemic insult to the brain as a late effect of radiation injury. The results of this study suggest that the immature brain may be more sensitive to radiation than is the adult brain, and that the manifestations of radiation-induced injury depend on the time elapsed after irradiation. (author)

  11. Development of fusion first-wall radiation damage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, R.J.; Atkins, T.

    1986-11-01

    The report describes work performed on the development of fusion-reactor first-wall simulation facilities on the Variable Energy Cyclotron, at Harwell, United Kingdom. Two irradiation facilities have been constructed: i) a device for helium and hydrogen filling up to 1000 ppm for post-irradiation mechanical properties studies, and ii) a helium implantation and damage facility for simultaneous injection of helium and radiation damage into a specimen under stress. These facilities are now fully commissioned and are available for investigations of first-wall radiation damage and for intercorrelation of fission- and fusion -reactor materials behaviour. (U.K.)

  12. Chemical aspects of radiation damage processes: radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asmus, K.D.

    1975-01-01

    The formation of primary species and radiation chemical yields are discussed. In a section on chemical scavenging of primary species the author considers scavenging kinetics and competition reactions and gives a brief outline of some experimental methods. The radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions is discussed as an example for polar solvents. Cyclohexane is used as an example for non-polar solvents. The importance of excited states and energy transfer is considered. Reactions in the solid state are discussed and results on linear energy transfer and average ion pair formation for various kinds of radiation are surveyed. (B.R.H.)

  13. Radiation damage in molybdenum and tungsten in high neutron fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veljkovic, S; Milasin, N [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Department of Reactor Materials, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1964-04-15

    The effects of radiation on molybdenum and tungsten in high neutron fluxes are presented. The changes induced, particularly defects with a high migration activation energy, are analyzed. The correlation of these changes with the basic concepts of radiation damage in solids is considered. An attempt is made to relate the defects studied with the changes in macroscopic properties (author)

  14. Early mechanisms in radiation-induced biological damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    An introduction to the mechanisms of radiation action in biological systems is presented. Several questions about the nature of the radiation damage process are discussed, including recognition of the oxygen effects, dose-response relationships, and the importance of the hydroxyl radical

  15. Radiation damage in molybdenum and tungsten in high neutron fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veljkovic, S.; Milasin, N.

    1964-01-01

    The effects of radiation on molybdenum and tungsten in high neutron fluxes are presented. The changes induced, particularly defects with a high migration activation energy, are analyzed. The correlation of these changes with the basic concepts of radiation damage in solids is considered. An attempt is made to relate the defects studied with the changes in macroscopic properties (author)

  16. Issues of damage estimation under radiation emergency situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volobuev, P.V.; Kozlova, N.I.

    2005-01-01

    The specificity of social, economical and ecological consequences of major radiation emergency situation is considered in the paper. The definitions and structure of direct and indirect damage under radiation emergency situation are given. The priority components of immediate expenses and those of long-term living on the contaminated territories are considered in the paper. (author)

  17. Radiation damage calculations for compound materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, L.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the SPECOMP computer code, developed to calculate neutron-induced displacement damage cross sections for compound materials such as alloys, insulators, and ceramic tritium breeders for fusion reactors. These new calculations rely on recoil atom energy distributions previously computed with the DISCS computer code, the results of which are stored in SPECTER computer code master libraries. All reaction channels were considered in the DISCS calculations and the neutron cross sections were taken from ENDF/B-V. Compound damage calculations with SPECOMP thus do not need to perform any recoil atom calculations and consequently need no access to ENDF or other neutron data bases. The calculations proceed by determining secondary displacements for each combination of recoil atom and matrix atom using the Lindhard partition of the recoil energy to establish the damage energy

  18. Radiation damage calculations for compound materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, L.R.

    1989-01-01

    Displacement damage calculations can be performed for 40 elements in the energy range up to 20 MeV with the SPECTER computer code. A recent addition to the code, called SPECOMP, can intermix atomic recoil energy distributions for any four elements to calculate the proper displacement damage for compound materials. The calculations take advantage of the atomic recoil data in the SPECTER libraries, which were determined by the DISCS computer code, using evaluated neutron cross section and angular distribution data in ENDF/B-V. Resultant damage cross sections for any compound can be added to the SPECTER libraries for the routine calculation of displacements in any given neutron field. Users do not require access to neutron cross section files. Results are presented for a variety of fusion materials and a new ceramic superconductor material. Future plans and nuclear data needs are discussed. 11 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  19. Carrier concentration effects on radiation damage in InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Ando, K.; Uemura, C.

    1984-01-01

    Minority carrier diffusion length and carrier concentration studies have been made on room-temperature 1-MeV electron irradiated liquid-encapsulated Czochralski grown Zn-doped p-InP. The damage rate for the diffusion length and carrier removal rate due to irradiation have been found to strongly decrease with an increase in the carrier concentration in InP. These phenomena suggest that the induced defects interact with impurities in InP. A preliminary study on the annealing behavior has also been performed

  20. Molecular mechanisms in radiation damage to DNA. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, R.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this work are to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for radiation-induced DNA damage. The overall goal is to understand the relationship between the chemical and structural changes produced by ionizing radiation in DNA and the resulting impairment of biological function expressed as carcinogenesis or cell death. The studies are based on theoretical explorations of possible mechanisms that link initial radiation damage in the form of base and sugar damage to conformational changes in DNA. These mechanistic explorations should lead to the formulation of testable hypotheses regarding the processes of impairment of regulation of gene expression, alteration in DNA repair, and damage to DNA structure involved in cell death or cancer

  1. The role of radiation damage analysis in the fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doran, D.G.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of radiation damage analysis is the prediction of the performance of facility components exposed to a radiation environment. The US Magnetic Fusion Energy materials program includes an explicit damage analysis activity within the Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies (DAFS) Program. Many of the papers in these Proceedings report work done directly or indirectly in support of the DAFS program. The emphasis of this program is on developing procedures, based on an understanding of damage mechanisms, for applying data obtained in diverse radiation environments to the prediction of component behavior in fusion devices. It is assumed that the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility will be available in the late 1980s to test (and calibrate where necessary) correlation procedures to the high fluences expected in commercial reactors. (orig.)

  2. State of damage of radiation facilities in great Hanshin earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The southern Hyogo Prefecture earthquake of magnitude 7.2 occurred in the early morning of January 17, 1995. The outline of the earthquake and dead and injured, the damages of buildings, life lines, roads, railways and harbors, liquefaction phenomena, the state of occurrence of fires and so on are reported. The districts where the earthquakes of magnitude 5 or stronger occurred, and the radiation facilities in those districts are shown. The state of damage of radiation facilities in past earthquakes is summarized. From January 17 to 19 after the earthquake, Science and Technology Agency gave necessary instruction to and heard the state of damage from 79 permitted facilities in the areas of magnitude 7 or 6 by telephone, and received the report that there was not the fear of radiation damage in all facilities. Also the state of damage of radiation facilities was investigated at the actual places, and the questionnaires on the state of radiation facilities and the action at the time of the earthquake were performed. The state of radiation facilities accompanying the earthquake is reported. The matters to be reflected to the countermeasures to earthquakes anew for the protection of facilities, communication system, facility checkup system and the resumption of use are pointed out. (K.I.)

  3. Radiation Damage in Reactor Materials. Part of the Proceedings of the Symposium on Radiation Damage in Solids and Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1963-08-15

    Radiation damage has presented a new design parameter for the selection of materials to be used in fuel and cladding elements, moderators, structural components and pressure vessels in nuclear reactors. The severe and novel requirements for certain optimum combinations of physical and nuclear properties have emphasized the need for a better understanding of the basic mechanisms of radiation damage. This knowledge is not only essential for progress in the field of nuclear energy, but has direct applications to space technology and semi-conductor research as well. The IAEA, as part of its programme of promoting nuclear technology, therefore convened the Symposium on Radiation Damage in Solids and Reactor Materials, 7-11 May 1962. At the invitation of, and with generous material assistance from, the Government of Italy, the Symposium was held at Venice. The Symposium was primarily concerned with the investigation of the fundamental processes of radiation that underlie the behaviour of metals, alloys and ceramics that are actually useful or potentially useful reactor materials. Two sessions were devoted to studies of irradiation effects on simple metals, as these effects are easiest to interpret. Other topics included general theory, alloys, fissionable and moderator materials and special experimental techniques for radiation damage studies. The properties influenced by irradiation which were of main concern were those of primary importance to the behaviour of solids as reactor materials (e. g. dimensional stability, phase transformation, radiation hardening, fracture, fission-gas escape from uranium and its compounds). Other properties, such as optical, electrical and magnetic properties, and effects on semiconductors, ionic and other non-metallic crystals are also of interest in that these studies can increase our knowledge of the mechanism of radiation damage in solids and provide a tool for investigation into the physics of the solid state by offering a means of

  4. Radiation Damage in Reactor Materials. Part of the Proceedings of the Symposium on Radiation Damage in Solids and Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    Radiation damage has presented a new design parameter for the selection of materials to be used in fuel and cladding elements, moderators, structural components and pressure vessels in nuclear reactors. The severe and novel requirements for certain optimum combinations of physical and nuclear properties have emphasized the need for a better understanding of the basic mechanisms of radiation damage. This knowledge is not only essential for progress in the field of nuclear energy, but has direct applications to space technology and semi-conductor research as well. The IAEA, as part of its programme of promoting nuclear technology, therefore convened the Symposium on Radiation Damage in Solids and Reactor Materials, 7-11 May 1962. At the invitation of, and with generous material assistance from, the Government of Italy, the Symposium was held at Venice. The Symposium was primarily concerned with the investigation of the fundamental processes of radiation that underlie the behaviour of metals, alloys and ceramics that are actually useful or potentially useful reactor materials. Two sessions were devoted to studies of irradiation effects on simple metals, as these effects are easiest to interpret. Other topics included general theory, alloys, fissionable and moderator materials and special experimental techniques for radiation damage studies. The properties influenced by irradiation which were of main concern were those of primary importance to the behaviour of solids as reactor materials (e. g. dimensional stability, phase transformation, radiation hardening, fracture, fission-gas escape from uranium and its compounds). Other properties, such as optical, electrical and magnetic properties, and effects on semiconductors, ionic and other non-metallic crystals are also of interest in that these studies can increase our knowledge of the mechanism of radiation damage in solids and provide a tool for investigation into the physics of the solid state by offering a means of

  5. Introduction of neutron metrology for reactor radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberman, A.; Genthon, J.P.; Schneider, W.; Wright, S.B.; Zijp, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    The background of the procedures for determining irradiation parameters which are of interest in radiation damage experiments is described. The first two chapters outline the concept of damage functions and damage models. The next two chapters give information on methods to determine neutron fluences and neutron spectra. The fifth chapter gives a review of correlation data available for graphite and steels. The last chapter gives guidance how to report the relevant irradiation parameters. Attention is given to the role of the neutron spectrum in deriving values for damage fluence, energy transferred to the lattice, and number of displacements

  6. The influence of non-equilibrium fluctuations on radiation damage and recovery of metals under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubinko, V.I.; Klepikov, V.F.

    2007-01-01

    In the conventional theory of radiation damage, it is assumed that the main effect of irradiation is due to formation of Frenkel pairs of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) and their clusters. The difference in absorption of vacancies and SIAs by primary or radiation-induced extended defects (EDs) is thought to be the main reason of microstructural evolution under irradiation. On the other hand, the recovery of radiation damage is thought to be driven exclusively by thermal fluctuations resulting in the vacancy evaporation from voids (void annealing) or dislocations (thermal creep) and in the fluctuation-driven overcoming of obstacles by gliding dislocations (plastic strain). However, these recovery mechanisms can be efficient only at sufficiently high temperatures. At lower irradiation temperatures, the main driving force of the recovery processes may be due to nonequilibrium fluctuations of energy states of the atoms surrounding EDs arising as a result of scattering of radiation-induced excitations of atomic and electronic structure at EDs. In the present paper, the mechanisms of nonequilibrium fluctuations that result in such phenomena as the void shrinkage under irradiation at low temperatures (or high dose rates), irradiation creep and irradiation-induced increase of plasticity under sub-threshold irradiation was considered

  7. Radiation damage in nuclear waste ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcotte, R.P.; Roberts, F.P.; Rusin, J.M.; Wald, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    The text contains a number of specific observations about the radiation-induced changes in glass, glass-ceramic, and supercalcine nuclear waste forms. Other, more general conclusions can be summarized: Radiation-induced property changes follow an exponential ingrowth curve to saturation. Actinide host phases in both crystalline waste forms become X-ray amorphous. The magnitudes of the waste-form density changes observed could not be directly related to observed changes in the primary actinide phases. Although large crystal-structure changes occur in the materials studied, obvious physical degradation was not observed

  8. Radiation damage at the molecular level: Nanodosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, F.; Munoz, A.; Lagares, J. I.; Nunez, L.; Garcia, G.

    2013-01-01

    One of the main practical use of the model is its use as a tool of nanodosimetry which basically consists in characterizing the effect of radiation on nano volumes (comparable to the DNA of volumes) in terms of link breaks and molecular dissociations. (Author)

  9. Radiation damage on high polymer epoxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pak, H M [Royal Military Coll. of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    The effect of irradiation in a SLOWPOKE-2 reactor on the adhesive strength of epoxy resins was studied using the ASTM D897 standard testing procedure. Although the results were variable, indicating the doses were not well defined, nevertheless, there was evidence of strengthening associated with radiation-induced crosslinking. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Radioactivity, shielding, radiation damage, and remote handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M.T.

    1975-01-01

    Proton beams of a few hundred million electron volts of energy are capable of inducing hundreds of curies of activity per microampere of beam intensity into the materials they intercept. This adds a new dimension to the parameters that must be considered when designing and operating a high-intensity accelerator facility. Large investments must be made in shielding. The shielding itself may become activated and require special considerations as to its composition, location, and method of handling. Equipment must be designed to withstand large radiation dosages. Items such as vacuum seals, water tubing, and electrical insulation must be fabricated from radiation-resistant materials. Methods of maintaining and replacing equipment are required that limit the radiation dosages to workers.The high-intensity facilities of LAMPF, SIN, and TRIUMF and the high-energy facility of FERMILAB have each evolved a philosophy of radiation handling that matches their particular machine and physical plant layouts. Special tooling, commercial manipulator systems, remote viewing, and other techniques of the hot cell and fission reactor realms are finding application within accelerator facilities. (U.S.)

  11. Indium implantation and annealing of GaN: Lattice damage and recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsikini, M.; Ves, S.; Paloura, E.C. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, School of Physics, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Arvanitidis, J. [Technological Educational Institute of Thessaloniki, Department of Applied Sciences, 57400 Sindos (Greece); Wendler, E.; Wesch, W. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    The effect of indium (In) implantation in n-type GaN is studied using Raman spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering (RBS). The RBS analysis reveals that the 700 keV In implantation results in the formation of a subsurface defective region that extends to a depth of 400 nm. An abrupt increase ({proportional_to}93%) of the maximum defect concentration is observed for fluences in the range 1.5 and 5 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. A further increase of the fluence to 5 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} renders the implanted layer amorphous. In the Raman spectra recorded in the backscattering geometry only the E{sup 2}{sub 2} peak is resolved since the A{sub 1}(LO) is completely damped due to plasmon - phonon coupling. As the fluence increases, the characteristic sharp peaks of the as-grown sample broaden due to relaxation of the q-selection rules allowing phonons with q{ne}0 to contribute in the Raman scattering. Furthermore, three additional broad peaks are detected in the implanted samples even after implantation with the fluence of 5 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}. They are ascribed to disorder activated Raman scattering or acoustic overtones (300 cm{sup -1}, 420 cm{sup -1}) and the formation of point defects (670 cm{sup -1}), respectively. Rapid thermal annealing at 1000 C causes partial recovery of the lattice. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Enhancement of radiation damage in germinating wheat seeds by hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Fangqing; Gu Ruiqi

    1994-01-01

    Enhancement of X-ray induced radiation damage in germinating wheat seeds by heat treatment (44 degree C or 41 degree C, 20 min) has been investigated. The enhancement effect of heat treatment after irradiation was more significant than that of heat treatment before irradiation at dose range of 4.3-8.6 Gy. It was observed that germinating wheat seeds were very sensitive to heat treatment within 15 min after irradiation, which indicated that the repair of radiation damage was very active and rapid in a short period after irradiation. The repair of radiation damage in interval of fractionated irradiation was severely inhibited by heat treatment. The sensitivity of seeds to heat treatment corresponded with the levels of their repair activities. The more active the repairs of the seeds are, the more sensitive to heat treatment the seeds show. It was assumed that the enhancement of radiation damage by heat treatment in germinating wheat seeds was attributed to the inhibition of radiation damage repair by heat treatment, which is similar to the results of animal experiments

  13. Molecular dynamics study of radiation damage and microstructure evolution of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes under carbon ion incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Tang, Xiaobin; Chen, Feida; Huang, Hai; Liu, Jian; Chen, Da

    2016-07-01

    The radiation damage and microstructure evolution of different zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were investigated under incident carbon ion by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The radiation damage of SWCNTs under incident carbon ion with energy ranging from 25 eV to 1 keV at 300 K showed many differences at different incident sites, and the defect production increased to the maximum value with the increase in incident ion energy, and slightly decreased but stayed fairly stable within the majority of the energy range. The maximum damage of SWCNTs appeared when the incident ion energy reached 200 eV and the level of damage was directly proportional to incident ion fluence. The radiation damage was also studied at 100 K and 700 K and the defect production decreased distinctly with rising temperature because radiation-induced defects would anneal and recombine by saturating dangling bonds and reconstructing carbon network at the higher temperature. Furthermore, the stability of a large-diameter tube surpassed that of a thin one under the same radiation environments.

  14. Study on DNA damages induced by UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doan Hong Van; Dinh Ba Tuan; Tran Tuan Anh; Nguyen Thuy Ngan; Ta Bich Thuan; Vo Thi Thuong Lan; Tran Minh Quynh; Nguyen Thi Thom

    2015-01-01

    DNA damages in Escherichia coli (E. coli) exposed to UV radiation have been investigated. After 30 min of exposure to UV radiation of 5 mJ/cm"2, the growth of E. coli in LB broth medium was about only 10% in compared with non-irradiated one. This results suggested that the UV radiation caused the damages for E. coli genome resulted in reduction in its growth and survival, and those lesions can be somewhat recovered. For both solutions of plasmid DNAs and E. coli cells containing plasmid DNA, this dose also caused the breakage on single and double strands of DNA, shifted the morphology of DNA plasmid from supercoiled to circular and linear forms. The formation of pyrimidine dimers upon UV radiation significantly reduced when the DNA was irradiated in the presence of Ganoderma lucidum extract. Thus, studies on UV-induced DNA damage at molecular level are very essential to determine the UV radiation doses corresponding to the DNA damages, especially for creation and selection of useful radiation-induced mutants, as well as elucidation the protective effects of the specific compounds against UV light. (author)

  15. Request from radiation damage evaluation in materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuya, Koji; Kimura, Itsuro

    2003-01-01

    Radiation transport calculations in a PWR using cross-section data sets based on JENDL3.2 showed that the calculated neutron fluence agreed well with the dosimeter measurements and that the fast neutron flux and dpa rate differed within 10% from to those calculated using ENDF/B-IV and ENDF/B-VI based data sets. Calculations of helium generation in structural materials in the PWR using ENDF/B-VI showed that the dominant source of helium is the (n, α) reaction of 59 Ni and that the calculated helium content agreed with the measurements. For accurate estimation of radiation field from a material viewpoint, it is desirable to construct proper cross-section libraries, which have a proper energy group structure and contain sufficient elements including 59 Ni as an indispensable element. (author)

  16. Radiation damage to integrated injection logic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pease, R.L.; Galloway, K.F.; Stehlin, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of neutron and total dose gamma irradiations on the electrical characteristics of an integrated injection logic (l 2 L) cell and an l 2 L multiple inverter circuit were investigated. These units were designed and fabricated to obtain circuit development information and did not have radiation hardness as a goal. The following parameters of the test structures were measured as a function of total dose and neutron fluence: the dc common-base current gain of the lateral pnp transistor; the dc common-emitter current gain of the vertical npn transistor; the forward current-voltage characteristics of the injector-substrate junction, and the propagation delay versus power dissipation per gate for the multiple inverter circuit. The limitations of the present test structures in a radiation environment and possible hardening techniques are discussed

  17. Extra lethal damage due to residual incompletely repaired sublethal damage in hyperfractionated and continuous radiation treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.; van de Geijn, J.; Goffman, T. (ROB, DCT, NCI, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (US))

    1991-05-01

    In the conventional linear--quadratic model of single-dose response, the {alpha} and {beta} terms reflect lethal damage created {ital during} the delivery of a dose, from two different presumed molecular processes, one linear with dose, the other quadratic. With the conventional one-fraction-per-day (or less) regimens, the sublethal damage (SLD), presumably repairing exponentially over time, is essentially completely fixed by the time of the next dose of radiation. If this assumption is true, the effects of subsequent fractions of radiation should be independent, that is, there should be little, if any, reversible damage left from previous fractions, at the time of the next dose. For multiple daily fractions, or for the limiting case, continuous radiation, this simplification may overlook damaged cells that have had insufficient time for repair. A generalized method is presented for accounting for extra lethal damage (ELD) arising from such residual SLD for hyperfractionation and continuous irradiation schemes. It may help to predict differences in toxicity and tumor control, if any, obtained with unconventional'' treatment regimens. A key element in the present model is the finite size and the dynamic character of the pool of sublethal damage. Besides creating the usual linear and quadratic components of lethal damage, each new fraction converts a certain fraction of the existing SLD into ELD, and creates some new SLD.

  18. Extra lethal damage due to residual incompletely repaired sublethal damage in hyperfractionated and continuous radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.; van de Geijn, J.; Goffman, T.

    1991-01-01

    In the conventional linear--quadratic model of single-dose response, the α and β terms reflect lethal damage created during the delivery of a dose, from two different presumed molecular processes, one linear with dose, the other quadratic. With the conventional one-fraction-per-day (or less) regimens, the sublethal damage (SLD), presumably repairing exponentially over time, is essentially completely fixed by the time of the next dose of radiation. If this assumption is true, the effects of subsequent fractions of radiation should be independent, that is, there should be little, if any, reversible damage left from previous fractions, at the time of the next dose. For multiple daily fractions, or for the limiting case, continuous radiation, this simplification may overlook damaged cells that have had insufficient time for repair. A generalized method is presented for accounting for extra lethal damage (ELD) arising from such residual SLD for hyperfractionation and continuous irradiation schemes. It may help to predict differences in toxicity and tumor control, if any, obtained with ''unconventional'' treatment regimens. A key element in the present model is the finite size and the dynamic character of the pool of sublethal damage. Besides creating the usual linear and quadratic components of lethal damage, each new fraction converts a certain fraction of the existing SLD into ELD, and creates some new SLD

  19. Damage of DNA by radiation and it's recovery, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Noboru; Matsuura, Tomio; Sato, Hiroyuki.

    1974-01-01

    The damage and recovery of DNA was investigated by the incorporation of thymine derivatives (DHT, I trans, II trans, cis and glycol) into exponentially growing Tetrahymena cells. The strain employed was Tetrahymena pyriformis, Variety I, mating type IV. It is well known that these thymine derivatives are induced in vivo by radiation. The in vivo damage of DNA induced by radiation, and its recovery, were confirmed experimentally by means of gradient separation of sucrose density and by analytical ultra centrifugation (UVC). The recovery of DNA, its excision repair and its recombinational repair were compared with the recovery of Bacillus subtilis whose recovery kinetics were already known. 1) The damage of DNA was more sensitive to glycol than to II trans and cis. On the other hand, DHT is not sensitive for breaking DNA strand. 2) In its recovery damaged DNA was no more sensitive to glycol than to hhp as was true for Bacillus subtilis. (author)

  20. The dependence of radiation damage analysis on neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goland, A.N.; Parkin, D.M.

    1977-01-01

    The characteristics of defect production in neutron spectra can be determined by utilizing neutron cross section data (e.g. ENDF/B), detailed neutron spectral data and radiation damage models. The combination of neutron cross section and spectral data is a fundamental starting point in applying damage models. Calculations using these data and damage models show that there are significant differences in the way defects are produced in various neutron spectra. Nonelastic events dominate the recoil energy distribution in high-energy neutron sources such as those based upon fusion and deuteron-breakup reactions. Therefore, high-energy neutron cross sections must be measured or calculated to supplement existing data files. Radiation damage models can then be used to further characterize the diverse neutron spectra

  1. THE ROLE OF RADIATION ACCIDENTS AND INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS OF IONIZING RADIATION SOURCES IN THE PROBLEM OF RADIATION DAMAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Кіхтенко, Ігор Миколайович

    2016-01-01

    Subject of research – the relevance of radiation damage at modern development of industry and medicine. In the world of radiation sources used in different fields of practice and their application in the future will increase, which greatly increases the likelihood of injury in a significant contingent of people.Research topic – the definition of the role of nuclear energy and the industrial use of ionizing radiation sources in the problem of radiation damage. The purpose of research – identif...

  2. Role of endothelium in radiation-induced normal tissue damages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milliat, F.

    2007-05-01

    More than half of cancers are treated with radiation therapy alone or in combination with surgery and/or chemotherapy. The goal of radiation therapy is to deliver enough ionising radiation to destroy cancer cells without exceeding the level that the surrounding healthy cells can tolerate. Unfortunately, radiation-induced normal tissue injury is still a dose limiting factor in the treatment of cancer with radiotherapy. The knowledge of normal tissue radiobiology is needed to determine molecular mechanisms involved in normal tissue pathogenic pathways in order to identify therapeutic targets and develop strategies to prevent and /or reduce side effects of radiation therapy. The endothelium is known to play a critical role in radiation-induced injury. Our work shows that endothelial cells promote vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, migration and fibro-genic phenotype after irradiation. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time the importance of PAI-1 in radiation-induced normal tissue damage suggesting that PAI-1 may represent a molecular target to limit injury following radiotherapy. We describe a new role for the TGF-b/Smad pathway in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced damages. TGF-b/Smad pathway is involved in the fibro-genic phenotype of VSMC induced by irradiated EC as well as in the radiation-induced PAI-1 expression in endothelial cells. (author)

  3. Radiation Damage Theory: Past, Present and Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barashev, Aleksandr; Golubov, Stanislav I.

    2009-01-01

    Efforts of many scientists for more than a half of a century have resulted in substantial understanding of the response of various materials to irradiation. The theory has contributed significantly to this process but has not acquired a status allowing it to play a decisive role in creating radiation-resistant materials. Moreover, some theoretical predictions are in contradiction with observations, which indicates that something important has escaped attention. In the present paper, the current theoretical framework and experimental data are analyzed to elucidate the reasons for such a situation. A way of developing a predictive theory is proposed.

  4. Animal Models of Ionizing Radiation Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    194. Stepanovic, S.R., and J.L. Nikolic, The Effect of X -irradiation on the Amount of Dopamine in Corpus Striatum of the Rat, Experientia, 35:111...Effect of X -irradiation on the Fragility of Rat Spleen Lysosomes, Radiat. Res., 20:741-750, 1963. 324. Rappaport, D.A., Influence of Total-body X -rays...NUMER C DOMB No. 0704-0188 Pubk€ "mt burden for Vft collectio al 0.0oni is san i jo avwa I how nemeai m n k x W o rqvWin srucilim seard" af da sources

  5. Radiation damage effects on calorimeter compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, T.A.; Handler, T.

    1990-01-01

    An important consideration in the design of a detector that is to be used at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is the response of the calorimeter to electromagnetic and hadronic particles and the equality of those responses for different types of particles at equal incident energies, i.e. compensation. However, as the simulations that are reported show, the compensation characteristics of a calorimeter can be seriously compromised over a relatively short period of time due to the large radiation levels that are expected in the SSC environment. 6 refs., 3 figs

  6. ANL/WSU radiation damage studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowski, D.; Lopiano, D.; Proudfoot, J.; Underwood, D.; Miles, L.; Neidiger, J.; Tripard, G.

    1993-01-01

    We report preliminary results for the radiation hardness of (polystryrene) plastic scintillator stacks using a spectrum of energy hardened neutrons from a MARK-III TRIGA reactor. The total dose ranged from 100 KRad to 3MRad. The corresponding fluence was 3.8 x 10 13 to 3.8 x 10 14 (n/cm/cm) with the gamma contribution on the order 2--3% (of fluence). The measurements used Li-6, Li-7 Thermo-luminescence dosimeters. Radiochromic/GaF- Chromic film, and activated foils simultaneously allowing an inter-comparison of these various methods of dosimetry

  7. Raman study of radiation-damaged zircon under hydrostatic compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasdala, Lutz; Miletich, Ronald; Ruschel, Katja; Váczi, Tamás

    2008-12-01

    Pressure-induced changes of Raman band parameters of four natural, gem-quality zircon samples with different degrees of self-irradiation damage, and synthetic ZrSiO4 without radiation damage, have been studied under hydrostatic compression in a diamond anvil cell up to ~10 GPa. Radiation-damaged zircon shows similar up-shifts of internal SiO4 stretching modes at elevated pressures as non-damaged ZrSiO4. Only minor changes of band-widths were observed in all cases. This makes it possible to estimate the degree of radiation damage from the width of the ν3(SiO4) band of zircon inclusions in situ, almost independent from potential “fossilized pressures” or compressive strain acting on the inclusions. An application is the non-destructive analysis of gemstones such as corundum or spinel: broadened Raman bands are a reliable indicator of self-irradiation damage in zircon inclusions, whose presence allows one to exclude artificial color enhancement by high-temperature treatment of the specimen.

  8. Radiation damage of pixelated photon detector by neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Isamu [KEK, 1-1 Oho Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)], E-mail: isamu.nakamura@kek.jp

    2009-10-21

    Radiation Damage of Pixelated Photon Detector by neutron irradiation is reported. MPPC, one of PPD or Geiger-mode APD, developed by Hamamatsu Photonics, is planned to be used in many high energy physics experiments. In such experiments radiation damage is a serious issue. A series of neutron irradiation tests is performed at the Reactor YAYOI of the University of Tokyo. MPPCs were irradiated at the reactor up to 10{sup 12}neutron/cm{sup 2}. In this paper, the effect of neutron irradiation on the basic characteristics of PPD including gain, noise rate, photon detection efficiency is presented.

  9. Multiscale approach to the physics of radiation damage with ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surdutovich, Eugene [Physics Department, Oakland University, 2200 N. Squirrel Rd., Rochester MI 48309 (United States); Solov' yov, Andrey V. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Goethe University, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, Frankfurt am Main 60438 (Germany)

    2013-04-19

    We review a multiscale approach to the physics of ion-beam cancer therapy, an approach suggested in order to understand the interplay of a large number of phenomena involved in radiation damage scenario occurring on a range of temporal, spatial, and energy scales. We briefly overview its history and present the current stage of its development. The differences of the multiscale approach from other methods of understanding and assessment of radiation damage are discussed as well as its relationship to other branches of physics, chemistry and biology.

  10. Advances in SSTR techniques for dosimetry and radiation damage measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Ruddy, F.H.

    1979-01-01

    Solid state track recorders (SSTR) have been applied in the diverse nuclear reactor research. Two recent advances are described which possess outstanding relevance for reactor research, namely the evolvement of SSTR radiation damage monitors and the development of CR-39, a new plastic SSTR of extremely high sensitivity. Results from high fluence irradiations of natural quartz crystal SSTR are used to illustrate the concept of the SSTR radiation damage monitor. Response characteristics of CR-39 are presented with emphasis on the remarkable proton sensitivity of this new SSTR

  11. Radiation damage in BaF2 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woody, C.L.; Kierstead, J.A.; Levy, P.W.; Stoll, S.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of radiation damage and recovery have been studied in BaF 2 crystals exposed to 60 Co radiation. The change in optical transmission and scintillation light output have been measured as a function of dose up to 4.7 x 10 6 rad. Although some crystals exhibit a small change in transmission, a greater change in scintillation light output is observed. Several 25 cm long crystals whichhave been irradiated show large changes in both transmission and light output. Recovery from radiation damage has been studied as a function of time and exposure to UV light. A long lived radiation induced phosphorescence has been observed in all irradiated samples which is distinct from the standard fast and slow scintillation emissions. The emission spectrum of the phosphorescence has been measured and shown a peakat ∼330 nm, near the region of the slow scintillation component. Results are given on the dependence of the decay time of the phosphorescence with dose

  12. Genomic damage in children accidentally exposed to ionizing radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fucic, A; Brunborg, G; Lasan, R

    2007-01-01

    During the last decade, our knowledge of the mechanisms by which children respond to exposures to physical and chemical agents present in the environment, has significantly increased. Results of recent projects and programmes focused on children's health underline a specific vulnerability of chil...... and efficient preventive measures, by means of a better knowledge of the early and delayed health effects in children resulting from radiation exposure....... of children to environmental genotoxicants. Environmental research on children predominantly investigates the health effects of air pollution while effects from radiation exposure deserve more attention. The main sources of knowledge on genome damage of children exposed to radiation are studies performed...... after the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident in 1986. The present review presents and discusses data collected from papers analyzing genome damage in children environmentally exposed to ionizing radiation. Overall, the evidence from the studies conducted following the Chernobyl accident, nuclear tests...

  13. Alleviation of acute radiation damages by post-irradiation treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurishita, A.; Ono, T.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation induced hematopoietic and gastro-intestinal damages in mice were tried to alleviate experimentally by post-treatment. Combined treatment of OK-432 and aztreonam clearly prevented the radiation induced sepsis and elevated the survival rate in mice; the survival was 80% in the OK-432 plus aztreonam group while it was 55% in the group treated with OK-432 alone and 0% with saline. Irsogladine maleate, an anti-ulcer drug, increased the survival rate of jejunal crypt stem cells with a clear dose-related trend. The D 0 for irsogladine maleate was 2.8 Gy although it was 2.3 Gy for saline, These findings suggest that some conventional drugs are effective for radiation induced hematopoietic and gastro-intestinal damages and the possibility that they can be applied for people exposed to radiation accidentally. (author)

  14. Radiation induced DNA damage and repair in mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strniste, G.F.; Chen, D.J.; Okinaka, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    The central theme in cellular radiobiological research has been the mechanisms of radiation action and the physiological response of cells to this action. Considerable effort has been directed toward the characterization of radiation-induced DNA damage and the correlation of this damage to cellular genetic change that is expressed as mutation or initiating events leading to cellular transformation and ultimately carcinogenesis. In addition, there has been a significant advancement in their understanding of the role of DNA repair in the process of mutation leading to genetic change in cells. There is extensive literature concerning studies that address radiation action in both procaryotic and eucaryotic systems. This brief report will make no attempt to summarize this voluminous data but will focus on recent results from their laboratory of experiments in which they have examined, at both the cellular and molecular levels, the process of ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis in cultured human cells

  15. Radiation damage in nonmetallic solids under dense electronic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Noriaki; Tanimura, Katsumi; Nakai, Yasuo

    1992-01-01

    Basic processes of radiation damage of insulators by dense electronic excitation are reviewed. First it is pointed out that electronic excitation of nonmetallic solids produces the self-trapped excitons and defect-related metastable states having relatively long lifetimes, and that the excitation of these metastable states, produces stable defects. The effects of irradiation with heavy ions, including track registration, are surveyed on the basis of the microscopic studies. It is pointed out also that the excitation of the metastable states plays a role in laser-induced damage at relatively low fluences, while the laser damage has been reported to be governed by heating of free electrons produced by multiphoton excitation. Difference in the contributions of the excitation of metastable defects to laser-induced damage of surfaces, or laser ablation, and laser-induced bulk damage is stressed. (orig.)

  16. Ion irradiation and biomolecular radiation damage II. Indirect effect

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wei; Yu, Zengliang; Su, Wenhui

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that damage of genome in a living cell by ionizing radiation is about one-third direct and two-thirds indirect. The former which has been introduced in our last paper, concerns direct energy deposition and ionizing reactions in the biomolecules; the latter results from radiation induced reactive species (mainly radicals) in the medium (mainly water) surrounding the biomolecules. In this review, a short description of ion implantation induced radical formation in water is ...

  17. Monitoring the Radiation Damage of the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cooke, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Pixel Detector is the innermost charged particle tracking component employed by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The instantaneous luminosity delivered by the LHC, now routinely in excess of 5x10^{33} cm^{-2} s^{-1}, results in a rapidly increasing accumulated radiation dose to the detector. Methods based on the sensor depletion properties and leakage current are used to monitor the evolution of the radiation damage, and results from the 2011 run are presented.

  18. Monitoring the radiation damage of the ATLAS pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooke, M.

    2013-01-01

    The pixel detector is the innermost charged particle tracking component employed by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The instantaneous luminosity delivered by the LHC, now routinely in excess of 5×10 33 cm −2 s −1 , results in a rapidly increasing accumulated radiation dose to the detector. Methods based on the sensor depletion properties and leakage current are used to monitor the evolution of the radiation damage, and results from the 2011 run are presented

  19. Modification of radiation damage by naturally occurring substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, K.N.

    1984-01-01

    The major objectives of studying the modification of radiation sensitivity have been (1) to identify a compound that will produce a differential protection or sensitization of the effect of irradiation on normal and tumor tissue, and (2) to understand more about the mechanisms of radiation damage. In spite of massive research on this particular problem since World War II, the first objective remains elusive. During this period, numerous radioprotective and radiosensitizing agents have been identified. These agents have served as important biologic tools for increasing our understanding of radiation injuries. Most of these substances are synthetic compounds and are very toxic to humans. In addition, very few of the compounds provide differential modifications of the effect of radiation on tumor and normal cells. This chapter presents objectives for identifying naturally occurring substances that modify the effect of x-radiation on mammalian cells and discusses the role of physiologic substances in modifying radiation injuries on mammalian normal and tumor cells

  20. Radiation damage to DNA: The importance of track structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    A wide variety of biological effects are induced by ionizing radiation, from cell death to mutations and carcinogenesis. The biological effectiveness is found to vary not only with the absorbed dose but also with the type of radiation and its energy, i.e., with the nature of radiation tracks. An overview is presented of some of the biological experiments using different qualities of radiation, which when compared with Monte Carlo track structure studies, have highlighted the importance of the localized spatial properties of stochastic energy deposition on the nanometer scale at or near DNA. The track structure leads to clustering of damage which may include DNA breaks, base damage etc., the complexity of the cluster and therefore its biological repairability varying with radiation type. The ability of individual tracks to produce clustered damage, and the subsequent biological response are important in the assessment of the risk associated with low-level human exposure. Recent experiments have also shown that biological response to radiation is not always restricted to the 'hit' cell but can sometimes be induced in 'un-hit' cells near by

  1. Radiation damage in carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.; Eartherly, W.P.; Nelson, G.E.

    1992-01-01

    Graphite and carbon-carbon composite materials are widely used in plasma facing applications in current Tokamak devices such as TFTR and DIIID in the USA, JET, Tore Supra and TEXTOR in Europe, and JT-60U in Japan. Carbon-carbon composites are attractive choices for Tokamak limiters and diverters because of their low atomic number, high thermal shock resistance, high melting point, and high thermal conductivity. Next generation machines such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will utilize carbon-carbon composites in their first wall and diverter. ITER will be an ignition machine and thus will produce substantial neutron fluences from the D-T fusion reaction. The resultant high energy neutrons will cause carbon atom displacements in the plasma facing materials which will markedly affect their structure and physical properties. The effect of neutron damage on graphite has been studied for over forty years. Recently the effects of neutron irradiation on the fusion relevant graphite GraphNOL N3M was reviewed. In contrast to graphite, relatively little work has been performed to elucidate the effects of neutron irradiation on carbon-carbon composites. The results of our previous irradiation experiments have been published elsewhere. Here the irradiation induced dimensional changes in 1D, 2D, and 3D carbon-carbon composites are reported for fluences up to 4.7 dpa at an irradiation temperature of 600 degree C

  2. Radiation-induced normal tissue damage: implications for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasanna, Pataje G.

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an important treatment modality for many malignancies, either alone or as a part of combined modality treatment. However, despite technological advances in physical treatment delivery, patients suffer adverse effects from radiation therapy due to normal tissue damage. These side effects may be acute, occurring during or within weeks after therapy, or intermediate to late, occurring months to years after therapy. Minimizing normal tissue damage from radiotherapy will allow enhancement of tumor killing and improve tumor control and patients quality of life. Understanding mechanisms through which radiation toxicity develops in normal tissue will facilitate the development of next generation radiation effect modulators. Translation of these agents to the clinic will also require an understanding of the impact of these protectors and mitigators on tumor radiation response. In addition, normal tissues vary in radiobiologically important ways, including organ sensitivity to radiation, cellular turnover rate, and differences in mechanisms of injury manifestation and damage response. Therefore, successful development of radiation modulators may require multiple approaches to address organ/site-specific needs. These may include treatments that modify cellular damage and death processes, inflammation, alteration of normal flora, wound healing, tissue regeneration and others, specifically to counter cancer site-specific adverse effects. Further, an understanding of mechanisms of normal tissue damage will allow development of predictive biomarkers; however harmonization of such assays is critical. This is a necessary step towards patient-specific treatment customization. Examples of important adverse effects of radiotherapy either alone or in conjunction with chemotherapy, and important limitations in the current approaches of using radioprotectors for improving therapeutic outcome will be highlighted. (author)

  3. Empirical constraints on the effects of radiation damage on helium diffusion in zircon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Alyssa J.; Hodges, Kip V.; van Soest, Matthijs C.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we empirically evaluate the impact of radiation damage on zircon (U-Th)/He closure temperatures for a suite of zircon crystals from the slowly cooled McClure Mountain syenite of south-central Colorado, USA. We present new zircon, titanite, and apatite conventional (U-Th)/He dates, zircon laser ablation (U-Th)/He and U-Pb dates, and zircon Raman spectra for crystals from the syenite. Titanite and apatite (U-Th)/He dates range from 447 to 523 Ma and 88.0 to 138.9 Ma, respectively, and display no clear correlation between (U-Th)/He date and effective uranium concentration. Conventional zircon (U-Th)/He dates range from 230.3 to 474 Ma, while laser ablation zircon (U-Th)/He dates show even greater dispersion, ranging from 5.31 to 520 Ma. Dates from both zircon (U-Th)/He datasets decrease with increasing alpha dose, indicating that most of the dispersion can be attributed to radiation damage. Alpha dose values for the dated zircon crystals range from effectively zero to 2.15 × 1019 α /g, spanning the complete damage spectrum. We use an independently constrained thermal model to empirically assign a closure temperature to each dated zircon grain. If we assume that this thermal model is robust, the zircon radiation damage accumulation and annealing model of Guenthner et al. (2013) does not accurately predict closure temperatures for many of the analyzed zircon crystals. Raman maps of the zircons dated by laser ablation document complex radiation damage zoning, sometimes revealing crystalline zones in grains with alpha dose values suggestive of amorphous material. Such zoning likely resulted in heterogeneous intra-crystalline helium diffusion and may help explain some of the discrepancies between our empirical findings and the Guenthner et al. (2013) model predictions. Because U-Th zoning is a common feature in zircon, radiation damage zoning is likely to be a concern for most ancient, slowly cooled zircon (U-Th)/He datasets. Whenever possible, multiple

  4. Radiation Damage Studies of Silicon Photomultipliers

    CERN Document Server

    Bohn, P; Hazen, E.; Heering, A.; Rohlf, J.; Freeman, J.; Los, Sergey V.; Cascio, E.; Kuleshov, S.; Musienko, Y.; Piemonte, C.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the radiation hardness of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) manufactured by Fondazione Bruno Kessler in Italy (1 mm$^2$ and 6.2 mm$^2$), Center of Perspective Technology and Apparatus in Russia (1 mm$^2$ and 4.4 mm$^2$), and Hamamatsu Corporation in Japan (1 mm$^2$). The SiPMs were irradiated using a beam of 212 MeV protons at Massachusetts General Hospital, receiving fluences of up to $3 \\times 10^{10}$ protons per cm$^2$ with the SiPMs at operating voltage. Leakage currents were read continuously during the irradiation. The delivery of the protons was paused periodically to record scope traces in response to calibrated light pulses to monitor the gains, photon detection efficiencies, and dark counts of the SiPMs. The leakage current and dark noise are found to increase with fluence. Te leakage current is found to be proportional to the mean square deviation of the noise distribution, indicating the dark counts are due to increased random individual pixel activation, while SiPM...

  5. UV and ionizing radiations induced DNA damage, differences and similarities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Douki, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    Both UV and ionizing radiations damage DNA. Two main mechanisms, so-called direct and indirect pathways, are involved in the degradation of DNA induced by ionizing radiations. The direct effect of radiation corresponds to direct ionization of DNA (one electron ejection) whereas indirect effects are produced by reactive oxygen species generated through water radiolysis, including the highly reactive hydroxyl radicals, which damage DNA. UV (and visible) light damages DNA by again two distinct mechanisms. UVC and to a lesser extend UVB photons are directly absorbed by DNA bases, generating their excited states that are at the origin of the formation of pyrimidine dimers. UVA (and visible) light by interaction with endogenous or exogenous photosensitizers induce the formation of DNA damage through photosensitization reactions. The excited photosensitizer is able to induce either a one-electron oxidation of DNA (type I) or to produce singlet oxygen (type II) that reacts with DNA. In addition, through an energy transfer from the excited photosensitizer to DNA bases (sometime called type III mechanism) formation of pyrimidine dimers could be produced. Interestingly it has been shown recently that pyrimidine dimers are also produced by direct absorption of UVA light by DNA, even if absorption of DNA bases at these wavelengths is very low. It should be stressed that some excited photosensitizers (such as psoralens) could add directly to DNA bases to generate adducts. The review will described the differences and similarities in terms of damage formation (structure and mechanisms) between these two physical genotoxic agents.

  6. Potential radiation damage: Storage tanks for liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    High level waste at SRS is stored in carbon steel tanks constructed during the period 1951 to 1981. This waste contains radionuclides that decay by alpha, beta, or gamma emission or are spontaneous neutronsources. Thus, a low intensity radiation field is generated that is capable of causing displacement damage to the carbon steel. The potential for degradation of mechanical properties was evaluated by comparing the estimated displacement damage with published data relating changes in Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact energy to neutron exposure. Experimental radiation data was available for three of the four grades of carbonsteel from which the tanks were constructed and is applicable to all four steels. Estimates of displacement damage arising from gamma and neutron radiation have been made based on the radionuclide contents for high level waste that are cited in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the Liquid Waste Handling Facilities in the 200-Area. Alpha and beta emissions do not penetrate carbon steel to a sufficient depth to affect the bulk properties of the tank walls but may aggravate corrosion processes. The damage estimates take into account the source of the waste (F- or H-Area), the several types of tank service, and assume wateras an attenuating medium. Estimates of displacement damage are conservative because they are based on the highest levels of radionuclide contents reported in the SAR and continuous replenishment of the radionuclides

  7. Investigations into radiation damages of reactor materials by computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronnikov, V.A.

    2004-01-01

    Data on the state of works in European countries in the field of computerized simulation of radiation damages of reactor materials under the context of the international projects ITEM (European Database for Multiscale Modelling) and SIRENA (Simulation of Radiation Effects in Zr-Nb alloys) - computerized simulation of stress corrosion when contact of Zr-Nb alloys with iodine are presented. Computer codes for the simulation of radiation effects in reactor materials were developed. European Database for Multiscale Modelling (EDAM) was organized using the results of the investigations provided in the ITEM project [ru

  8. Nuclear data for radiation damage assessment and related safety aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocherov, N.P.

    1989-12-01

    The IAEA Advisory Group Meeting on Nuclear Data for Radiation Damage Assessment and Related Safety Aspects was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, 19-22 September 1989. This report contains the conclusions and recommendations of this meeting. The papers which the participants prepared for and presented at the meeting will be published as an IAEA Technical Document. (author)

  9. Effect of Rosiglitazone on Radiation Damage in Bone Marrow Hemopoiesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benko', Klara; Pintye, Eva; Szabo, Boglarka; Geresi, Krisztina; Megyeri, Attila; Benko, Ilona

    2008-01-01

    To study radiobiological effects and drugs, which can modify radiation injury, has an importance if we would like to avoid harmful effects of radiation due to emergency situations or treat patients with malignant diseases by radiotherapy. During the long treatment schedules patients may be treated by not only anticancer but many other drugs because of accompanying diseases. These drugs may also modify radiobiological effects. Rosiglitazone pre-treatment proved to be myeloprotective and accelerated recovery of 5-fluorouracil-damaged bone marrow in our previous experiments. Our new studies are designed to evaluate whether rosiglitazone has similar beneficial effects in radiation-damaged hemopoiesis. Bone marrow damage was precipitated by total body irradiation (TBI) using single increasing doses (2-10 Gy) of γ--irradiation in groups of mice. Lethality was well correlated with damage in hemopoiesis measured by cellularity of bone marrow (LD 50 values were 4.8 and 5.3 gray respectively). Rosiglitazone, an insulin-sensitizing drug, had no significant effect on bone marrow cellularity. Insulin resistance associated with obesity or diabetes mellitus type 2 is intensively growing among cancer patients requiring some kind of radiotherapy. Therefore it is important to know whether drugs used for their therapy can modify radiation effects.

  10. Effect of Rosiglitazone on Radiation Damage in Bone Marrow Hemopoiesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkő, Klára; Pintye, Éva; Szabó, Boglárka; Géresi, Krisztina; Megyeri, Attila; Benkő, Ilona

    2008-12-01

    To study radiobiological effects and drugs, which can modify radiation injury, has an importance if we would like to avoid harmful effects of radiation due to emergency situations or treat patients with malignant diseases by radiotherapy. During the long treatment schedules patients may be treated by not only anticancer but many other drugs because of accompanying diseases. These drugs may also modify radiobiological effects. Rosiglitazone pre-treatment proved to be myeloprotective and accelerated recovery of 5-fluorouracil-damaged bone marrow in our previous experiments. Our new studies are designed to evaluate whether rosiglitazone has similar beneficial effects in radiation-damaged hemopoiesis. Bone marrow damage was precipitated by total body irradiation (TBI) using single increasing doses (2-10 Gy) of γ—irradiation in groups of mice. Lethality was well correlated with damage in hemopoiesis measured by cellularity of bone marrow (LD50 values were 4.8 and 5.3 gray respectively). Rosiglitazone, an insulin-sensitizing drug, had no significant effect on bone marrow cellularity. Insulin resistance associated with obesity or diabetes mellitus type 2 is intensively growing among cancer patients requiring some kind of radiotherapy. Therefore it is important to know whether drugs used for their therapy can modify radiation effects.

  11. Experimental data available for radiation damage modelling in reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollenberger, H.

    Radiation damage modelling requires rate constants for production, annihilation and trapping of defects. The literature is reviewed with respect to experimental determination of such constants. Useful quantitative information exists only for Cu and Al. Special emphasis is given to the temperature dependence of the rate constants

  12. Ion bombardment simulation: a review related to fusion radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brimhall, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    Prime emphasis is given to reviewing the ion bombardment data on the refractory metals molybdenum, niobium and vanadium which have been proposed for use in advanced fusion devices. The temperature and dose dependence of the void parameters are correlated among these metals. The effect of helium and hydrogen gas on the void parameters is also included. The similarities and differences of the response of these materials to high dose, high temperature radiation damage are evaluated. Comparisons are made with results obtained from stainless steel and nickel base alloys. The ion bombardment data is then compared and correlated, as far as possible, with existing neutron data on the refractory metals. The theoretically calculated damage state produced by neutrons and ions is also briefly discussed and compared to experimental data wherever possible. The advantages and limitations of ion simulation in relation to fusion radiation damage are finally summarized

  13. Radiation induced crystallinity damage in poly(L-lactic acid)

    CERN Document Server

    Kantoglu, O

    2002-01-01

    The radiation-induced crystallinity damage in poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) in the presence of air and in vacuum, is studied. From the heat of fusion enthalpy values of gamma irradiated samples, some changes on the thermal properties were determined. To identify these changes, first the glass transition temperature (T sub g) of L-lactic acid polymers irradiated to various doses in air and vacuum have been investigated and it is found that it is independent of irradiation atmosphere and dose. The fraction of damaged units of PLLA per unit of absorbed energy has been measured. For this purpose, SAXS and differential scanning calorimetry methods were used, and the radiation yield of number of damaged units (G(-u)) is found to be 0.74 and 0.58 for PLLA samples irradiated in vacuum and air, respectively.

  14. Radiation damage study in montmorillonites. Application to the high-level nuclear waste disposal in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorieul, St.

    2003-11-01

    Smectite is a major component of bentonite, a material considered for engineered barriers in high level nuclear wastes repositories (HLNWR). In order to predict the long-term performance of the bentonite, various physical and chemical factors such as, e.g., thermal gradient, redox potential or mechanical stresses are currently considered. By contrast, little is known about radiation effects in smectite, although it might affect the properties of this mineral through cumulative radiation damages produced by ionizing radiations. The present study focuses on radiation damage in montmorillonite considered herein as a simplified model of bentonite. Two reference clays have been selected, one from Liaoning (China, CHI), containing native radiation-induced defects, and the other (called MX) separated from the MX80 reference bentonite (Wyoming, USA). They are distinguished by layer composition, particularly iron content (1 % and 4 % for CHI and MX, respectively). Radiation effects have been studied by combining X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Moessbauer spectroscopies. Ionizing irradiation induces two main effects. First, several paramagnetic point defects are identified as trapped holes located on oxygen atoms of the smectite structure. These defects are characterized by different thermal stabilities, according to annealing experiments. Their creation is limited by saturation curve with maximum damage around 100 MGy. The response of the two montmorillonites is different in terms of nature and production of point defects, indicating a role of layer composition and structural precursors. Besides, EPR and Moessbauer results show substantial modifications of the oxidation state of structural iron, which are sample and dose-dependent. Irradiation induces reduction and oxidation of iron in CHI and MX samples, respectively. Moreover, physico-chemical treatments show that intensity of redox effects varies

  15. Radiation damage resistance in mercuric iodide X-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patt, B E; Dolin, R C; Devore, T M; Markakis, J M [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Goleta, CA (USA); Iwanczyk, J S; Dorri, N [Xsirius, Inc., Marina del Rey, CA (USA); Trombka, J [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (USA). Goddard Space Flight Center

    1990-12-20

    Mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) radiation detectors show great potential as ambient-temperature solid-state detectors for X-rays, gamma rays and visible light, with parameters that are competitive with existing technologies. In a previous experiment, HgI{sub 2} detectors irradiated with 10 MeV protons/cm{sup 2} exhibited no damage. The 10 MeV protons represent only the low range of the spectrum of energies that are important. An experiment has been conducted at the Saturne accelerator facility at Saclay, France, to determine the susceptibility of these detectors to radiation damage by high-energy (1.5 GeV) protons. The detectors were irradiated to a fluence of 10{sup 8} protons/cm{sup 2}. This fluence is equivalent to the cosmic radiation expected in a one-year period in space. The resolution of the detectors was measured as a function of the integral dose. No degradation in the response of any of the detectors or spectrometers was seen. It is clear from this data that HgI{sub 2} has extremely high radiation-damage resistance, exceeding that of most other semiconductor materials used for radiation detectors. Based on the results shown to date, HgI{sub 2} detectors are suitable for applications in which they may be exposed to high integral dose levels. (orig.).

  16. Radiation damage studies for the D0 silicon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, F.

    2004-01-01

    We report on irradiation studies performed on spare production silicon detector modules for the current D0 silicon detector. The lifetime expectations due to radiation damage effects of the existing silicon detector are reviewed. A new upgrade project was started with the goal of a complete replacement of the existing silicon detector. In that context, several investigations on the radiation hardness of new prototype silicon microstrip detectors were carried out. The irradiation on different detector types was performed with 10 MeV protons up to fluences of 10 14 p/cm 2 at the J.R. Mcdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University. The flux calibration was carefully checked using different normalization techniques. As a result, we observe roughly 40-50% less radiation damage in silicon for 10 MeV p exposure than it is expected by the predicted NIEL scaling

  17. Radiation damage studies for the DOe silicon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, Frank

    2004-01-01

    We report on irradiation studies performed on spare production silicon detector modules for the current DOe silicon detector. The lifetime expectations due to radiation damage effects of the existing silicon detector are reviewed. A new upgrade project was started with the goal of a complete replacement of the existing silicon detector. In that context, several investigations on the radiation hardness of new prototype silicon microstrip detectors were carried out. The irradiation on different detector types was performed with 10 MeV protons up to fluences of 10 14 p/cm 2 at the J.R. Mcdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University. The flux calibration was carefully checked using different normalisation techniques. As a result, we observe roughly 40-50% less radiation damage in silicon for 10 MeV p exposure than it is expected by the predicted NIEL scaling

  18. Temperature effects on radiation damage in plastic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza A, D.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of present work was to study the temperature effect on radiation damage registration in the structure of a Solid State Nuclear Track Detector of the type CR-39. In order to study the radiation damage as a function of irradiation temperature, sheets of CR-39 detectors were irradiated with electron beams, simulating the interaction of positive ions. CR-39 detectors were maintained at a constant temperature from room temperature up to 373 K during irradiation. Two techniques were used from analyzing changes in the detector structure: Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Infrared Spectroscopy (IR). It was found by EPR analysis that the amount of free radicals decrease as irradiation temperature increases. The IR spectrums show yield of new functional group identified as an hydroxyl group (OH). A proposed model of interaction of radiation with CR-39 detectors is discussed. (Author)

  19. Introduction to neutron metrology for reactor radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberman, A.; Genthon, J.P.; Wright, S.B.; Zijp, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    This document, prepared by members of the Irradiation Damage Subgroup of the Euratom Working Group on Reactor Dosimetry (EWGRD) describes the background of the procedures for determining irradiation parameters which are of interest in radiation damage experiments. The first two chapters outline the concept of damage functions and damge models. The next two chapters give information on methods to determine neutron fluences and neutron spectra. The fifth chapter gives a review of correlation data available for graphite and steels. The last chapter gives guidance how to report the relevant irradiation parameters. Attention is given to the role of the neutron spectrum in deriving values for damage fluence, energy transferred to the lattice, and number of displacements. A suggested list to report data relevant to the irradiation, the instrumentation and the testing of material is included

  20. Radiation damage in A-15 materials: EXAFS studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, G.S.; Kampwirth, R.T.; Georgopoulos, P.; Brown, B.S.

    1980-01-01

    EXAFS measurements are useful in determining the local atomic environment of a particular element in a solid. Since there has been some controversy about the nature of the defects produced in A-15 materials by radiation damage, such studies were carried out on some A-15 compounds, V 3 Ga which was damaged by neutrons, as well as Nb 3 Ge damaged by 2.5 MeV a particles. In the V 3 Ga sample, site exchange disorder seems to be the most important result of the neutron damage with less than 20% of the vanadium atoms on wrong sites. However, in the Nb 3 Ge samples in addition to site exchange disorder, an unusual splitting of the first near-neighbor distance between the Ge and Nb is found. This splitting, approximately 0.2 A, may explain the large Debye Waller factors observed by Burbank et al

  1. Radiation damage in silicon. Defect analysis and detector properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoenniger, F.

    2008-01-01

    Silicon microstrip and pixel detectors are vital sensor-components as particle tracking detectors for present as well as future high-energy physics (HEP) experiments. All experiments at the large Hadron Collider (LHC) are equipped with such detectors. Also for experiments after the upgrade of the LHC (the so-called Super-LHC), with its ten times higher luminosity, or the planned International Linear Collider (ILC) silicon tracking detectors are forseen. Close to the interaction region these detectors have to face harsh radiation fields with intensities above the presently tolerable level. defect engineering of the used material, e. g. oxygen enrichment of high resistivity float zone silicon and growing of thin low resistivityepitaxial layers on Czochralski silicon substrates has been established to improve the radiation hardness of silicon sensors. This thesis focuses mainly on the investigation of radiation induced defects and their differences observed in various kinds of epitaxial silicon material. Comparisons with other materials like float zone or Czochralski silicon are added. Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) and Thermally Stimulated Current (TSC) measurements have been performed after γ-, electron-, proton- and neutron-irradiation. The differenced in the formation of vacancy and interstitial related defects as well as so-called clustered regions were investigated for various types of irradiation. In addition to the well known defects VO i , C i O i , C i C s , VP or V 2 several other defect complexes have been found and investigated. Also the material dependence of the defect introduction rates and the defect annealing behavior has been studied by isothermal and isochronal annealing experiments. Especially the IO 2 defect which is an indicator for the oxygen-dimer content of the material has been investigated in detail. On the basis of radiation induced defects like the bistable donor (BD) defect and a deep acceptor, a model has been introduced to

  2. Radiation damage in silicon. Defect analysis and detector properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoenniger, F.

    2008-01-15

    Silicon microstrip and pixel detectors are vital sensor-components as particle tracking detectors for present as well as future high-energy physics (HEP) experiments. All experiments at the large Hadron Collider (LHC) are equipped with such detectors. Also for experiments after the upgrade of the LHC (the so-called Super-LHC), with its ten times higher luminosity, or the planned International Linear Collider (ILC) silicon tracking detectors are forseen. Close to the interaction region these detectors have to face harsh radiation fields with intensities above the presently tolerable level. defect engineering of the used material, e. g. oxygen enrichment of high resistivity float zone silicon and growing of thin low resistivityepitaxial layers on Czochralski silicon substrates has been established to improve the radiation hardness of silicon sensors. This thesis focuses mainly on the investigation of radiation induced defects and their differences observed in various kinds of epitaxial silicon material. Comparisons with other materials like float zone or Czochralski silicon are added. Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) and Thermally Stimulated Current (TSC) measurements have been performed after {gamma}-, electron-, proton- and neutron-irradiation. The differenced in the formation of vacancy and interstitial related defects as well as so-called clustered regions were investigated for various types of irradiation. In addition to the well known defects VO{sub i}, C{sub i}O{sub i}, C{sub i}C{sub s}, VP or V{sub 2} several other defect complexes have been found and investigated. Also the material dependence of the defect introduction rates and the defect annealing behavior has been studied by isothermal and isochronal annealing experiments. Especially the IO{sub 2} defect which is an indicator for the oxygen-dimer content of the material has been investigated in detail. On the basis of radiation induced defects like the bistable donor (BD) defect and a deep

  3. Influence of radiation damage evolution on hyperfine interactions of implanted impurities: 169Tm and 175Lu in Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, L.; Bernas, H.; Meunier, R.

    1978-01-01

    The hyperfine interaction of 169 Tm and 175 Lu implanted in Fe and annealed, or implanted at high temperatures, was studied by time-integral and time-differential perturbed angular correlation experiments. The heat treatment was performed in order to modify the impurity-radiation damage interaction in the sample. Comparison of our results with other hyperfine interaction results on rare earths implanted in iron shows that after room-temperature implantation, all the implanted nuclei experience the same hyperfine interaction. The annealing-and implantation-temperature dependences of the fraction of nuclei experiencing this hyperfine interaction are significantly different. The results are interpreted in terms of precipitation of an increasing proportion of implanted impurities. A discussion of their relation to the implanted impurity lattice location is presented in a companion paper

  4. Compilation of radiation damage test data. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beynel, P.; Maier, P.; Schoenbacher, H.

    1982-01-01

    This handbook gives the results of radiation damage tests on various engineering materials and components intended for installation in radiation areas of the CERN high-energy particle accelerators. It complements two previous volumes covering organic cable-insulating materials and thermoplastic and thermosetting resins. The irradiation have been carried out at various radiation sources and the results of the different tests are reported, sometimes illustrated by tables and graphs to show the variation of the measured property with absorbed radiation dose. For each entry, an appreciation of the radiation resistance is given, based on measurement data, indicating the range of damage (moderate to severe) for doses from 10 to 10 8 Gy. Also included are tables, selected from published reports, of general relative radiation effects for several groups of materials, to which there are systematic cross-references in the alphabetical part. This third and last volume contains cross-references to all the materials presented up to now, so that it can be used as a guide to the three volumes. (orig.)

  5. Radiation damage in natural materials: implications for radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    The long-term effect of radiation damage on waste forms, either crystalline or glass, is a factor in the evaluation of the integrity of waste disposal mediums. Natural analogs, such as metamict minerals, provide one approach for the evaluaton of radiation damage effects that might be observed in crystalline waste forms, such as supercalcine or synroc. Metamict minerals are a special class of amorphous materials which were initially crystalline. Although the mechanism for the loss of crystallinity in these minerals (mostly actinide-containing oxides and silicates) is not clearly understood, damage caused by alpha particles and recoil nuclei is critical to the metamictization process. The study of metamict minerals allows the evaluation of long-term radiation damage effects, particularly changes in physical and chemical properties such as microfracturing, hydrothermal alteration, and solubility. In addition, structures susceptible to metamictization share some common properties: (1) complex compositions; (2) some degree of covalent bonding, instead of being ionic close-packed MO/sub x/ structures; and (3) channels or interstitial voids which may accommodate displaced atoms or absorbed water. On the basis of these empirical criteria, minerals such as pollucite, sodalite, nepheline and leucite warrant careful scrutiny as potential waste form phases. Phases with the monazite or fluorite structures are excellent candidates

  6. Multiscale approach to the physics of radiation damage with ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surdutovich, E.; Solov'yov, A.

    2014-01-01

    The multiscale approach to the assessment of bio-damage resulting upon irradiation of biological media with ions is reviewed, explained and compared to other approaches. The processes of ion propagation in the medium concurrent with ionization and excitation of molecules, transport of secondary products, dynamics of the medium, and biological damage take place on a number of different temporal, spatial and energy scales. The multiscale approach, a physical phenomenon-based analysis of the scenario that leads to radiation damage, has been designed to consider all relevant effects on a variety of scales and develop an approach to the quantitative assessment of biological damage as a result of irradiation with ions. Presently, physical and chemical effects are included in the scenario while the biological effects such as DNA repair are only mentioned. This paper explains the scenario of radiation damage with ions, overviews its major parts, and applies the multiscale approach to different experimental conditions. On the basis of this experience, the recipe for application of the multiscale approach is formulated. The recipe leads to the calculation of relative biological effectiveness. (authors)

  7. Radiation-induced Pulmonary Damage in Lung Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Su Mi; Choi, Ihl Bohng; Kang, Mi Mun; Kim, In Ah; Shinn, Kyung Sub

    1993-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective analysis was performed to evaluate the incidence of radiation induced lung damage after the radiation therapy for the patients with carcinoma of the lung. Method and Materials: Sixty-six patients with lung cancer (squamous cell carcinoma 27, adenocarcinoma 14, large cell carcinoma 2, small cell carcinoma 13, unknown 10) were treated with definitive, postoperative or palliative radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy between July 1987 and December 1991. There were 50 males and 16 females with median age of 63 years(range: 33-80 years). Total lung doses ranged from 500 to 6,660 cGy (median 3960 cGy) given in 2 to 38 fractions (median 20) over a range of 2 to 150 days (median 40 days) using 6 MV or 15 MV linear accelerator. To represent different fractionation schedules of equivalent biological effect, the estimated single dose(ED) model, ED=D·N-0.377·T-0.058 was used in which D was the lung dose in cGy, N was the number of fractions, and T was the overall treatment time in days. The range of ED was 370 to 1357. The endpoint was a visible increase in lung density within the irradiated volume on chest X-ray as observed independently by three diagnostic radiologists. Patients were grouped according to ED, treatment duration, treatment modality and age, and the percent incidence of pulmonary damage for each group was determined. Result: In 40 of 66 patients, radiation induced change was seen on chest radiographs between 11 days and 314 days after initiation of radiation therapy. The incidence of radiation pneumonitis was increased according to increased ED, which was statistically significant (p=0.001). Roentgenographic charges consistent with radiation pneumonitis were seen in 100% of patients receiving radiotherapy after lobectomy or pneumonectomy, which was not statistically significant. In 32 patients who also received chemotherapy, there was no difference in the incidence of radiation induced charge between the group with radiation

  8. Monitoring radiation damage in the ATLAS pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Schorlemmer, André Lukas; Quadt, Arnulf; Große-Knetter, Jörn; Rembser, Christoph; Di Girolamo, Beniamino

    2014-11-05

    Radiation hardness is one of the most important features of the ATLAS pixel detector in order to ensure a good performance and a long lifetime. Monitoring of radiation damage is crucial in order to assess and predict the expected performance of the detector. Key values for the assessment of radiation damage in silicon, such as the depletion voltage and depletion depth in the sensors, are measured on a regular basis during operations. This thesis summarises the monitoring program that is conducted in order to assess the impact of radiation damage and compares it to model predictions. In addition, the physics performance of the ATLAS detector highly depends on the amount of disabled modules in the ATLAS pixel detector. A worrying amount of module failures was observed during run I. Thus it was decided to recover repairable modules during the long shutdown (LS1) by extracting the pixel detector. The impact of the module repairs and module failures on the detector performance is analysed in this thesis.

  9. Radiation damage in CaF2: Gd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado, L.

    1979-01-01

    Calcium fluoride crystals doped with Gd 3+ at four different concentrations were irradiated at room temperature. The damage produced by radiation and the primary and secondary effects as well were studied by optical spectroscopy. The increase in optical absorption (with loss of transparency) varied from sample as a function of concentration and dose. The coloration curves showed an evolution from two to three radiation damage steps when going from a pure to the most Gd 3+ concentrated sample. The obtained spectra were analysed at characteristic wave lenghts of electronic defects (photochromic centers, F and its aggregates) and of Gd 3+ and Gd 2+ defects. As a result of the radiation damage the valence change (Gd 3+ →Gd 2+ ) and its reversible character under thermal activation were directly observed. These effects were correlated with other observed effects such as the room temperature luminescence after the irradiation ceased. The non radiative F centers formation from the interaction of holes and photochromic centers was also observed and analysed. A thermal activation study of the several defects responsible for the different absorption bands was made. Values of activation energies were obtained as expected for the kind of defects involved in these processes [pt

  10. Primary radiation damage and disturbance in cell divisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Yun-Jong; Kim, Jae-Hun; Petin, Vladislav G.; Nili, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    Survived cells from a homogeneous population exposed to ionizing radiation form various colonies of different sizes and morphology on a solid nutrient medium, which appear at different time intervals after irradiation. Such a phenomenon agrees well with the modern theory of microdosimetry and classical hit-and-target models of radiobiology. According to the hit-principle, individual cells exposed to the same dose of radiation are damaged in different manners. It means that the survived cells can differ in the content of sublethal damage (hits) produced by the energy absorbed into the cell and which is not enough to give rise to effective radiation damage which is responsible for cell killing or inactivation. In diploid yeast cells, the growth rate of cells from 250 colonies of various sizes appeared at different time intervals after irradiation with 600 Gy of gamma radiation from a 60 Co isotopic source was analyzed. The survival rate after irradiation was 20%. Based on the analyses results, it was possible to categorize the clones grown from irradiated cells according to the number of sub-lesions from 1 to 4. The clones with various numbers of sub-lesions were shown to be different in their viability, radiosensitivity, sensitivity to environmental conditions, and the frequency of recombination and respiratory deficient mutations. Cells from unstable clones exhibited an enhanced radiosensitivity, and an increased portion of morphologically changed cells, nonviable cells and respiration mutants, as well. The degree of expression of the foregoing effects was higher if the number of primary sublethal lesions was greater in the originally irradiated cell. Disturbance in cell division can be characterized by cell inactivation or incorrect distribution of mitochondria between daughter cells. Thus, the suggested methodology of identification of cells with a definite number of primary sublethal lesions will promote further elucidation of the nature of primary radiation

  11. Consequential late radiation damage in the skin in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wei; Kong Ling; Zhang Youwang; Hu Chaosu; Wu Yongru

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between early and late radiation damage in skin. Methods: 335 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with radical radiotherapy were evaluated. 240 patients had lymph nodes in the neck at initial diagnosis. The median doses were 70 Gy (55-86 Gy) to the nasopharyngeal region by external beam radiotherapy. The median doses were 64 Gy (46-72 Gy) to the neck with lymph node metastases, 55 Gy (21-67 Gy) to the node-negative neck. 71 patients were treated with facial-neck fields, while 264 patients were treated with pre-auricular fields. Chemotherapy was given in 48 patients. According to the 1995 SOMA scales late radiation damage in the skin was evaluated. Results: The median time from the radiotherapy to follow up was 14 years (range, 5-38 years). 63 patients have grade 0 late radiation reactions in the neck skin, the grade 1,2, 3,4 late radiation reactions in the neck skin were 43.9% (147 patients), 20.9% (70 patients), 13.7% (46 patients) and 2.7% (9 patients), respectively. 44 patients had moist desquamation in the medical records. The grade 1,2,3,4 late radiation reactions in the neck skin were 41%, 23%, 30% and 5%, respectively in patients with moist desquamation, while in patients without moist desquamation, the corresponding rates were 44.3%, 20.6%, 11.3% and 2.4%, respectively. The difference were significant between these two groups by chi-square analysis(χ 2 =17.42, P=0.002). Furthermore, whether patients had positive lymph node in the neck or not, the size of facial-neck fields and higher doses to the neck had more severe late radiation reaction in the neck skin, while age, gender and chemotherapy failed to show any effects on the development of late radiation reactions in the neck skin. Conclusion: The severe early radiation damage in the skin possibly increases the late radiation damage in the neck skin. (authors)

  12. Measuring Radiation Damage from Heavy Energetic Ions in Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostin, M., PI-MSU; Ronningen, R., PI-MSU; Ahle, L., PI-LLNL; Gabriel, T., Scientific Investigation and Development; Mansur, L., PI-ORNL; Leonard, K., ORNL; Mokhov, N., FNAL; Niita, K., RIST, Japan

    2009-02-21

    An intense beam of 122 MeV/u (9.3 GeV) 76Ge ions was stopped in aluminum samples at the Coupled Cyclotron Facility at NSCL, MSU. Attempts were made at ORNL to measure changes in material properties by measuring changes in electrical resistivity and microhardness, and by transmission electron microscopy characterization, for defect density caused by radiation damage, as a function of depth and integrated ion flux. These measurements are relevant for estimating damage to components at a rare isotope beam facility.

  13. Genetic damage from low-level and natural background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oftedal, P.

    1988-01-01

    Relevant predictions that have been made of possible low level biological effects on man are reviewed, and the estimate of genetic damage is discussed. It is concluded that in spite of a number of attempts, no clear-cut case of effects in human populations of radiation at natural levels has been demonstrated. The stability of genetic material is dynamic, with damage, repair and selection running as continuous processes. Genetic materials are well protected and are conservative in the extreme, not least because evolution by genetic adaptation is an expensive process: Substitution of one allele A 1 by another A 2 means the death of the whole A 1 population

  14. Chromatin damage induced by fast neutrons or UV laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, L.; Constantinescu, B.; Gazdaru, D.; Mihailescu, I

    2002-07-01

    Chromatin samples from livers of Wistar rats were subjected to fast neutron irradiation in doses of 10-100 Gy or to a 248 nm excimer laser radiation, in doses of 0.5-3 MJ.m{sup -2}. The action of the radiation on chromatin was monitored by chromatin intrinsic fluorescence and fluorescence lifetimes (of bound ethidium bromide to chromatin) and by analysing fluorescence resonance energy transfer between dansyl chloride and acridine orange coupled to chromatin. For the mentioned doses of UV excimer laser radiation, the action on chromatin was more intense than in the case of fast neutrons. The same types of damage are produced by the two radiations: acidic and basic destruction of chromatin protein structure, DNA strand breaking and the increase of the distance between DNA and proteins in chromatin. (author)

  15. Chromatin damage induced by fast neutrons or UV laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radu, L.; Constantinescu, B.; Gazdaru, D.; Mihailescu, I.

    2002-01-01

    Chromatin samples from livers of Wistar rats were subjected to fast neutron irradiation in doses of 10-100 Gy or to a 248 nm excimer laser radiation, in doses of 0.5-3 MJ.m -2 . The action of the radiation on chromatin was monitored by chromatin intrinsic fluorescence and fluorescence lifetimes (of bound ethidium bromide to chromatin) and by analysing fluorescence resonance energy transfer between dansyl chloride and acridine orange coupled to chromatin. For the mentioned doses of UV excimer laser radiation, the action on chromatin was more intense than in the case of fast neutrons. The same types of damage are produced by the two radiations: acidic and basic destruction of chromatin protein structure, DNA strand breaking and the increase of the distance between DNA and proteins in chromatin. (author)

  16. Study on the process of radiation defects annealing in corundum crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdukadyrova, I.Kh.; Vakhidov, Sh.A.; Khaimov-Mal'kov, V.Ya.

    1975-01-01

    The paper reports on the results of an investigation of the annealing of the colour centres that appear in samples of corundum during reactor irradiation and located in the near ultra-violet and visible portions of the spectrum. (author)

  17. Protection from ionizing radiation induced damages by phytoceuticals and nutraceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, C.K.K.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of living systems to ionizing radiation cause a variety of damages to DNA and membranes due to generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species. The radiation induced lesions in the cellular DNA are mainly strand breaks, damage to sugar moiety, alterations and elimination of bases, cross links of the intra and inter strand type and cross links to proteins while peroxidation of the lipids and oxidation of proteins constitute the major lesions in the membranes. The radioprotectors elicit their action by various mechanisms such as i) by suppressing the formation of reactive species, ii) detoxification of radiation induced species, iii) target stabilization and iv) enhancing the repair and recovery processes. The radioprotective compounds are of importance in medical, industrial, environmental, military and space science applications. Radiation protection might offer a tactical advantage on the battlefield in the event of a nuclear warfare. Radioprotectors might reduce the cancer risk to populations exposed to radiations directly or indirectly through industrial and military applications. The antioxidant and radioprotective properties a few of these agents under in vitro and in vivo conditions in animal models will be discussed

  18. Radiation damage studies of detector-compatible Si JFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; Boscardin, Maurizio; Candelori, Andrea; Pancheri, Lucio; Piemonte, Claudio; Ratti, Lodovico; Zorzi, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    We have largely improved the performance of our detector-compatible Si JFETs by optimizing the fabrication technology. New devices feature thermal noise values close to the theoretical ones, and remarkably low 1/f noise figures. In view of adopting these JFETs for X-ray imaging and HEP applications, bulk and surface radiation damage tests have been carried out by irradiating single transistors and test structures with neutrons and X-rays. Selected results from static and noise characterization of irradiated devices are discussed in this paper, and the impact of radiation effects on the performance of JFET-based circuits is addressed

  19. Radiation damage and induced tetraploidy in mulberry (Morus alba L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, K.

    1976-01-01

    Vigorously growing mulberry shoots were exposed to 5 kR of gamma rays at the rate of 0.2 kR/hr and 5.0 kR/hr and successively pruned three times in two growing seasons. The most radiosensitive part of both the apical and axillary meristems was the second cell layer. The younger axillary bud primordia were more sensitive to radiation then the older ones. Recovery from radiation damage was assumed to be from the flank meristem in the shoot apex. The frequency of mutations was much lower than that of tetraploidy. Among the tetraploids 50% were 2-4-4 chimeras. (author)

  20. Prediction of radiation-related small-bowel damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potish, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    In order to predict which patients have a high risk for radiation-related small-bowel damage, the concept of the dose-response curve was applied to the predisposing factors (number of previous laparotomies, extent of surgery, thin physique, hypertension, age, cancer stage, number of treatment days, fractionation, and weight change during radiotherapy) present in 92 patients receiving identical radiation doses and volumes This analysis allows an estimate of the probability of complication to be assigned to individual patients. The utility and limitations of the dose-response concept are discussed

  1. Radiation damage assessment of Nb tunnel junction devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, S.E.; Magno, R.; Maisch, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the radiation hardness of a new technology using Josephson junctions that was explored by an irradiation using a fluence of 7.6 x 10 14 protons/cm 2 at an energy of 63 MeV from the U.C. Davis cyclotron. In what the authors believe is the first radiation assessment of Nb/Al 2 O 3 /Nb devices, the permanent damage in these devices was investigated. No permanent changes in the I-V characteristics of the junctions were observed indicating no significant level of material defects have occurred at this level of irradiation

  2. Influence of radiation damage on internal friction background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burbelo, R.M.; Grinik, Eh.U.; Paliokha, M.I.; Orlinskij, A.B.

    1984-01-01

    Influence of radiation damage on internal friction background in samples of polycrystalline nickel and iron irradiated by a fast neutron flux approximately 10 14 neutr/(cm 2 xs) at 350 deg C has been studied using the low-frequency unit of the reverse torsion pendulum type. It has been established experimentally that a high-temperature background of internal friction of iron and nickel samples decreases as accumulating radiation defects occurring under neutron irradiation. Assumptions on a possible mechanism of the effect have been proposed. Simple expression for the background magnitude evaluation has been suggested

  3. Dislocations and radiation damage in {alpha}-uranium; Dislocations et effets des radiations dans l'uranium {alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leteurtre, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 92 - Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    Dislocations in {alpha}-uranium were studied by electron microscopy. Electropolishing of thin foils was performed at low temperature (-110 deg. C) to prevent oxidation. Burgers vectors of twins dislocations are defined. Interactions between slip and twinning are studied from both experimental and theoretical point of view. Samples irradiated at several burn-up were examined. In order to explain our micrographic results, and also all information gathered in literature about radiation damage in {alpha}-uranium, a coherent model is propound for the fission particles effects. We analyse the influences of parameters: temperature, dislocation density, impurity content. The number of point defects created by one initial fission is determined for pure and annealed metal. The importance of the self-anneal which occurs immediately in each displacement spike, and the anneal due to a new fission on the damage resulting from a previous fission, are estimated. The focussing distance in [100] direction is found to be about 1000 Angstrom, at 4 deg. K. (author) [French] Ce travail est une etude par microscopie electronique des dislocations induites dans l'uranium {alpha}, soit par deformation plastique, soit par irradiation. Une methode de preparation des lames minces a basse temperature (-110 deg. C) a ete mise au point. Les vecteurs de Burgers des diverses dislocations de macles de ce metal ont ete definis. Les interactions glissements- maclages sont etudiees experimentalement et theoriquement. Des echantillons irradies a divers taux de combustion ont ete examines. Pour expliquer nos resultats micrographiques, et aussi l'ensemble des informations recueillies dans la litterature concernant l'endommagement par irradiation de l'uranium-{alpha}, nous proposons un modele coherent de l'effet des fragments de fission dans ce metal. L'influence des parametres: temperature, densite de dislocations, impuretes est analysee. Le nombre de defauts ponctuels crees

  4. Dislocations and radiation damage in {alpha}-uranium; Dislocations et effets des radiations dans l'uranium {alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leteurtre, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 92 - Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    Dislocations in {alpha}-uranium were studied by electron microscopy. Electropolishing of thin foils was performed at low temperature (-110 deg. C) to prevent oxidation. Burgers vectors of twins dislocations are defined. Interactions between slip and twinning are studied from both experimental and theoretical point of view. Samples irradiated at several burn-up were examined. In order to explain our micrographic results, and also all information gathered in literature about radiation damage in {alpha}-uranium, a coherent model is propound for the fission particles effects. We analyse the influences of parameters: temperature, dislocation density, impurity content. The number of point defects created by one initial fission is determined for pure and annealed metal. The importance of the self-anneal which occurs immediately in each displacement spike, and the anneal due to a new fission on the damage resulting from a previous fission, are estimated. The focussing distance in [100] direction is found to be about 1000 Angstrom, at 4 deg. K. (author) [French] Ce travail est une etude par microscopie electronique des dislocations induites dans l'uranium {alpha}, soit par deformation plastique, soit par irradiation. Une methode de preparation des lames minces a basse temperature (-110 deg. C) a ete mise au point. Les vecteurs de Burgers des diverses dislocations de macles de ce metal ont ete definis. Les interactions glissements- maclages sont etudiees experimentalement et theoriquement. Des echantillons irradies a divers taux de combustion ont ete examines. Pour expliquer nos resultats micrographiques, et aussi l'ensemble des informations recueillies dans la litterature concernant l'endommagement par irradiation de l'uranium-{alpha}, nous proposons un modele coherent de l'effet des fragments de fission dans ce metal. L'influence des parametres: temperature, densite de dislocations, impuretes est analysee. Le nombre de defauts ponctuels crees par une fission dans du metal

  5. Intensification of ultraviolet-induced dermal damage by infrared radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kligman, L.H.

    1982-01-01

    To assess the role of IR in actinic damage to the dermis, albino guinea pigs were irradiated for 45 weeks with UV-B and UV-A, with and without IR. Control animals received IR only or no irradiation at all. Unirradiated dermis contains small amounts of elastic fibers in the upper dermis with greater depositions around follicles and sebaceous glands. After irradiation with UV, the fibers became more numerous, thicker, and more twisted; IR alone producd many fine, feathery fibers. The addition of IR to UV resulted in dense matlike elastic fiber depositions that exceeded what was observed with either irradiation alone. In combination or alone UV and IR radiation produced a large increase in ground substance, a finding also seen in actinically damaged human skin. Infrared radiation, in the physiologic range, though pleasant is not innocuous. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Mexamine used to decrease radiation damage to Wistar rat embryogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palyga, G.F.; Zakoshchikov, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    In experiments with 330 Wistar rats experiencing their pregnancy and 1430 neonatal rats of the first generation a study was made on the toxicity and radioprotective efficiency of a single subcutaneous injection of 10 mg/kg mexamine on days 3, 11 and 19 pregnancy. The agent caused various abnormalities in pregnancy, delivery and postnatal development of the offspring of nonirradiated animals, and it was almost ineffective when used for the prevention of radiation damages during the anrnatal ontogenesis

  7. Reduction in thermal conductivity of ceramics due to radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klemens, P.G.; Hurley, G.F.; Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a number of applications in fusion reactors. In several of these applications, the thermal conductivity is an important design parameter as it affects the level of temperature and thermal stress in service. Ceramic insulators are known to suffer substantial reduction in thermal conductivity due to neutron irradiation damage. The present study estimates the reduction in thermal conductivity at high temperature due to radiation induced defects. Point, extended, and extended partly transparent defects are considered

  8. Radiation damage status of the ATLAS silicon strip detectors (SCT)

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, Takahiko; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Silicon microstrip detector system (SCT) of the ATLAS experiment at LHC has been working well for about 7 years since 2010. The innermost layer has already received a few times of 10**13 1-MeV neutron-equivalent fluences/cm2. The evolutions of the radiation damage effects on strip sensors such as leakage current and full depletion voltages will be presented.

  9. Ascorbic acid (AA) metabolism in protection against radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, R.C.; Koch, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility is considered that AA protects tissues against radiation damage by scavenging free radicals that result from radiolysis of water. A physiologic buffer (pH 6.7) was incubated with 14 C-AA and 1 mM thiourea (to slow spontaneous oxidation of AA). Aliquots were assayed by HPLC and scintillation spectrometry to identify the 14 C-label. Samples exposed to Cobalt-60 radiation had a half time of AA decay of 30 minutes) indicating that AA scavenges radiation-induced free radicals and forms the ascorbate free radical (AFR). Pairs of 14 C-AFR disproportionate, with the net effect of 14 C-dehydroascorbic acid formation from 14 C-AA. Having established that AFR result from ionizing radiation in an aqueous solution, the possibility was evaluated that a tissue factor reduces AFR. Cortical tissue from the kidneys of male rats was minced, homogenized in buffer and centrifuged at 8000 xg. The supernatant was found to slow the rate of radiation-induced AA degradation by > 90% when incubated at 23 0 C in the presence of 15 μM 14 C-AA. Samples of supernatant maintained at 100 0 C for 10 minutes or precipitated with 5% PCA did not prevent radiation-induced AA degradation. AA may have a specific role in scavenging free radicals generated by ionizing radiation and thereby protect body tissues

  10. Historical update of past and recent skin damage radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lushbaugh, C.C.; Fry, S.A.; Ricks, R.C.; Hubner, K.F.; Burr, W.W.

    1986-01-01

    Records of radiation accidents worldwide since 1944 are maintained at the Radiation Accident Registry of the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) in Oak Ridge. These records show that in 263 major radiation accidents there have been 150 severe local radiation injuries, of which 117 have been exposure to sealed radioactive sources. Most lesions resulted from the unsafe handling of 192 Ir radiography sources. Recent redesign of these devices, used for testing the integrity of welds, promises to eliminate these accidents. However, many other kinds of irradiators used in industry and scientific research still remain in the public domain, capable of causing irreparable dermal damage. Registry records reveal many unsolved physical and medical problems whose solution is urgently needed to improve the prognosis and therapy of such lesions. Pathologically, radiation-induced skin lesions are well described and an approximate dose-response relationship is univerally accepted even though the actual 'dose' is rarely known at first. Radiation dose is estimated biologically after the lesion has run its pathological course or after a medical physicist has prepared a retrospective 'mock-up' of the accident. (author)

  11. Radiobiology in clinical radiation therapy - Part III: Normal tissue damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, Elizabeth L.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: This is the third part of a course designed for residents in radiation oncology preparing for their boards. This part of the course will focus on the mechanisms underlying damage in normal tissues. Although conventional wisdom long held that killing and depletion of a critical cell(s) in a tissue was responsible for the later expression of damage, histopathologic changes in normal tissue can now be explained and better understood in terms of the new molecular biology. The concept that depletion of a single cell type is responsible for the observed histopathologic changes in normal tissues has been replaced by the hypothesis that damage results from the interaction of many different cell systems, including epithelial, endothelial, macrophages and fibroblasts, via the production of specific autocrine, paracrine and endocrine growth factors. A portion of this course will discuss the clinical and experimental data on the production and interaction of those cytokines and cell systems considered to be critical to tissue damage. It had long been suggested that interindividual differences in radiation-induced normal tissue damage was genetically regulated, at least in part. Both clinical and experimental data supported this hypothesis but it is the recent advances in human and mouse molecular genetics which have provided the tools to dissect out the genetic component of normal tissue damage. These data will be presented and related to the potential to develop genetic markers to identify sensitive individuals. The impact on clinical outcome of the ability to identify prospectively sensitive patients will be discussed. Clinically it is well-accepted that the volume of tissue irradiated is a critical factor in determining tissue damage. A profusion of mathematical models for estimating dose-volume relationships in a number of organs have been published recently despite the fact that little data are available to support these models. This course will review the

  12. Gamma radiation damage in pixelated detector based on carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyva, A.; Pinnera, I.; Leyva, D.; Abreu, Y.; Cruz, C. M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the possible gamma radiation damage in high pixelated based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes detectors, grown on two different substrata, when it is operating in aggressive radiational environments. The radiation damage in displacements per atom (dpa) terms were calculated using the MCCM algorithm, which takes into account the McKinley-Feshbach approach with the Kinchin-Pease approximation for the damage function. Was observed that with increasing of the gamma energy the displacement total number grows monotonically reaching values of 0.39 displacements for a 10 MeV incident photon. The profiles of point defects distributions inside the carbon nanotube pixel linearly rise with depth, increasing its slope with photon energy. In the 0.1 MeV - 10 MeV studied energy interval the electron contribution to the total displacement number become higher than the positron ones, reaching this last one a maximum value of 12% for the 10 MeV incident photons. Differences between the calculation results for the two used different substrata were not observed. (Author)

  13. Study on radiation damage of electron and γ-rays and mechanism of nuclear hardening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Tao

    2001-01-01

    Radiation damage effects of electrons and γ-rays are presented. The damage defects are studied by experimental methods. On the basis of these studies the damage mechanism and nuclear hardening techniques are studied

  14. Acetylation dynamics of human nuclear proteins during the ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennetzen, Martin; Andersen, J.S.; Lasen, D.H.

    2013-01-01

    Genotoxic insults, such as ionizing radiation (IR), cause DNA damage that evokes a multifaceted cellular DNA damage response (DDR). DNA damage signaling events that control protein activity, subcellular localization, DNA binding, protein-protein interactions, etc. rely heavily on time...

  15. Radiation damage of DNA. Model for direct ionization of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Kazuo; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2004-01-01

    Current aspects of radiation damage of DNA, particularly induced by the direct effect of radiation, and author's method of pulse radiolysis are described in relation to behavior of ions formed by radiation and active principles to induce the strand break. In irradiation of DNA solution in water, the direct effect of radiation is derived from ionization of DNA itself and indirect one, from the reaction between DNA and radicals generated from water molecules and the former direct one has been scarcely investigated due to difficulty of experimental approach. Radicals generated in sugar moiety of DNA are shown important in the strand break by recent studies on crystalline DNA irradiated by X-ray, DNA solution by electron and photon beams, hydrated DNA by γ-ray and by high linear energy transfer (LET) ion. Author's pulse radiolysis studies have revealed behaviors of guanine and adenine radical cations in dynamics of DNA oxidation. Since reactions described are the model, the experimental approach is thought necessary for elucidation of the actually occurring DNA damage in living cells. (N.I.)

  16. Investigation of damage mechanism by ionising radiation on biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau How Mooi

    1996-01-01

    Occupational radiation hazard is a very controversial subject. Effects from high radiation doses are well known from past experiences. However, hazard from low doses is still a subject that is hotly debated upon until now. The occupational dosimetry used now is based on a macroscopic scale. Lately, microdosimetry is fast gaining recognition as a more superior way of measuring hazard. More importantly, scientists are researching the basic damage mechanism that leads to biological effects by ionising radiation. In this report, a simulation study of the basic damage mechanism is discussed . This simulation is based upon Monte Carlo calculations and using polyuridylic acid (Poly-U) as the DNA model This simulation tries to relate the physics and chemistry of interactions of ionising radiation with biomolecules. The computer codes used in this simulation, OREC and RADLYS were created by Hamm et al. (1983) in Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The biological endpoints in this simulation are the strand break and base release of the DNA, which is the precursor of all biological effects. These results are compared with model studies that had been done experimentally to check the validity of this simulation. The G-values of strand break and base release from this simulation were -2.35 and 2.75 and compared well with results from irradiation experiments by von Sonntag (I 98 7) from Max Plank's Institute, Germany

  17. Experimental studies on radiation damages of CsI(Tl) crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jingtang; Mao Yufang; Dong Xiaoli; Chen Duanbao; Li Zuhao

    1997-01-01

    The results of experimental studies on radiation damage of CsI(Tl) crystal were reported. There are radiation damage effects on CsI(Tl) crystal. Experimental studies on recovery of damaged CsI(Tl) crystals were made. It seems that after heating at 200 degree C for 4 hours, the damaged crystals could be recovered completely

  18. Chromatin modifications and the DNA damage response to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Singh, Mayank; Gupta, Arun; Misra, Hari S.; Albuquerque, Kevin; Hunt, Clayton R.; Pandita, Tej K.

    2013-01-01

    In order to survive, cells have evolved highly effective repair mechanisms to deal with the potentially lethal DNA damage produced by exposure to endogenous as well as exogenous agents. Ionizing radiation exposure induces highly lethal DNA damage, especially DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), that is sensed by the cellular machinery and then subsequently repaired by either of two different DSB repair mechanisms: (1) non-homologous end joining, which re-ligates the broken ends of the DNA and (2) homologous recombination, that employs an undamaged identical DNA sequence as a template, to maintain the fidelity of DNA repair. Repair of DSBs must occur within the natural context of the cellular DNA which, along with specific proteins, is organized to form chromatin, the overall structure of which can impede DNA damage site access by repair proteins. The chromatin complex is a dynamic structure and is known to change as required for ongoing cellular processes such as gene transcription or DNA replication. Similarly, during the process of DNA damage sensing and repair, chromatin needs to undergo several changes in order to facilitate accessibility of the repair machinery. Cells utilize several factors to modify the chromatin in order to locally open up the structure to reveal the underlying DNA sequence but post-translational modification of the histone components is one of the primary mechanisms. In this review, we will summarize chromatin modifications by the respective chromatin modifying factors that occur during the DNA damage response.

  19. Radiation-induced neuropathies: collateral damage of improved cancer prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradat, Pierre-Francois; Maisonobe, Thierry; Psimaras, Dimitri; Lenglet, Timothee; Porcher, Raphael; Lefaix, J.L.; Delenian, S.

    2012-01-01

    Because of the improvement of cancer prognosis, long-term damages of treatments become a medical and public health problem. Among the iatrogenic complications, neurological impairment is crucial to consider since motor disability and pain have a considerable impact on quality of life of long cancer survivors. However, radiation-induced neuropathies have not been the focus of great attention. The objective of this paper is to provide an updated review about the radiation-induced lesions of the peripheral nerve system. Radiation-induced neuropathies are characterized by their heterogeneity in both symptoms and disease course. Signs and symptoms depend on the affected structures of the peripheral nerve system (nerve roots, nerve plexus or nerve trunks). Early-onset complications are often transient and late complications are usually progressive and associated with a poor prognosis. The most frequent and well known is delayed radiation-induced brachial plexopathy, which may follow breast cancer irradiation. Radiation-induced lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy is characterized by pure or predominant lower motor neuron signs. They can be misdiagnosed, confused with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or with leptomeningeal metastases since nodular MRI enhancement of the nerve roots of the cauda equina and increased cerebrospinal fluid protein content can be observed. In the absence of specific markers of the link with radiotherapy, the diagnosis of post-radiation neuropathy may be difficult. Recently, a posteriori conformal radiotherapy with 3D dosimetric reconstitution has been developed to link a precise anatomical site to unexpected excess irradiation. The importance of early diagnosis of radiation-induced neuropathies is underscored by the emergence of new disease-modifying treatments. Although the pathophysiology is not fully understood, it is already possible to target radiation-induced fibrosis but also associated factors such as ischemia, oxidative stress and

  20. Radiation intensification of the reactor pressure vessels recovery by low temperature heat treatment (wet annealing)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasikov, E.

    2015-04-01

    As a main barrier against radioactivity outlet reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is a key component in terms of NPP safety. Therefore present-day demands in RPV reliability enhance have to be met by all possible actions for RPV in-service embrittlement mitigation. Annealing treatment is known to be the effective measure to restore the RPV metal properties deteriorated by neutron irradiation. There are two approaches to annealing. The first one is so-called «dry» high temperature (∼475°C) annealing. It allows obtaining practically complete recovery, but requires the removal of the reactor core and internals. External heat source (furnace) is required to carry out RPV heat treatment. The alternative approach is to anneal RPV at a maximum coolant temperature which can be obtained using the reactor core or primary circuit pumps while operating within the RPV design limits. This low temperature «wet» annealing, although it cannot be expected to produce complete recovery, is more attractive from the practical point of view especially in cases when the removal of the internals is impossible.

  1. Radiation intensification of the reactor pressure vessels recovery by low temperature heat treatment (wet annealing)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasikov, E

    2015-01-01

    As a main barrier against radioactivity outlet reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is a key component in terms of NPP safety. Therefore present-day demands in RPV reliability enhance have to be met by all possible actions for RPV in-service embrittlement mitigation. Annealing treatment is known to be the effective measure to restore the RPV metal properties deteriorated by neutron irradiation.There are two approaches to annealing. The first one is so-called «dry» high temperature (∼475°C) annealing. It allows obtaining practically complete recovery, but requires the removal of the reactor core and internals. External heat source (furnace) is required to carry out RPV heat treatment.The alternative approach is to anneal RPV at a maximum coolant temperature which can be obtained using the reactor core or primary circuit pumps while operating within the RPV design limits. This low temperature «wet» annealing, although it cannot be expected to produce complete recovery, is more attractive from the practical point of view especially in cases when the removal of the internals is impossible. (paper)

  2. Radiation damage and rate limitations in tracking devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilchriese, M.G.D.

    1984-01-01

    In this note the author briefly discusses radiation damage to wire chambers and silicon strip devices and the electronics that may be associated with each of these. Scintillating fibers and CCD's are not discussed although the former appears to be a potentially radiation-resistant detector. In order to calculate radiation levels and rates the author assumed the following: an inelastic cross section of 100 mb at the SSC - six charged particles per unit of rapidity - photons and neutrons do not contribute to the background (photon conversions are negligible with a thin Be beam pipe) - beam gas interactions and beam losses (except during injection when I assume that the detector is ''off'') are negligible. This is discussed in a later section. - 1 Rad = 3.5 x 10 7 minimum ionizing particlescm 2

  3. Basic aspects of spallation radiation damage to materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wechsler, M.S.; Lin, C. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Sommer, W.F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The nature of radiation effects, as learned from investigations using reactor neutron irradiations, is reviewed, and its relevance to spallation radiation damage to materials in accelerator-driven neutron sources is discussed. Property changes upon irradiation are due to (1) displaced atoms, producing vacancy and interstitial defect clusters, which cause radiation hardening and embrittlement; (2) helium production, the helium then forming bubbles, which engenders high-temperature grain-boundary fracture; and (3) transmutations, which means that impurity concentrations are introduced. Methods for analyzing displacement production are related, and recent calculations of displacement cross sections using SPECTER and LAHET are described, with special reference to tungsten, a major candidate for a target material in accelerator-driven neutron systems.

  4. PREFACE: Radiation Damage in Biomolecular Systems (RADAM07)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuigan, Kevin G.

    2008-03-01

    The annual meeting of the COST P9 Action `Radiation damage in biomolecular systems' took place from 19-22 June 2007 in the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, in Dublin. The conference was structured into 5 Working Group sessions: Electrons and biomolecular interactions Ions and biomolecular interactions Radiation in physiological environments Theoretical developments for radiation damage Track structure in cells Each of the five working groups presented two sessions of invited talks. Professor Ron Chesser of Texas Tech University, USA gave a riveting plenary talk on `Mechanisms of Adaptive Radiation Responses in Mammals at Chernobyl' and the implications his work has on the Linear-No Threshold model of radiation damage. In addition, this was the first RADAM meeting to take place after the Alexander Litvenenko affair and we were fortunate to have one of the leading scientists involved in the European response Professor Herwig Paretzke of GSF-Institut für Strahlenschutz, Neuherberg, Germany, available to speak. The remaining contributions were presented in the poster session. A total of 72 scientific contributions (32 oral, 40 poster), presented by 97 participants from 22 different countries, gave an overview on the current progress in the 5 different subfields. A 1-day pre-conference `Early Researcher Tutorial Workshop' on the same topic kicked off on 19 June attended by more than 40 postgrads, postdocs and senior researchers. Twenty papers, based on these reports, are included in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. All the contributions in this volume were fully refereed, and they represent a sample of the courses, invited talks and contributed talks presented during RADAM07. The interdisciplinary RADAM07 conference brought together researchers from a variety of different fields with a common interest in biomolecular radiation damage. This is reflected by the disparate backgrounds of the authors of the papers presented in these proceedings

  5. Delayed damage after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Yoshiyuki [Osaka Dental Univ., Hirakata (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    I investigated radiation damage, including osteoradionecrosis, arising from tooth extraction in fields that had received radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, and evaluated the effectiveness of pilocarpine for xerostomia. Between January 1990 and April 1996, I examined 30 patients for bone changes after tooth extraction in fields irradiated at the Department of Oral Radiology, Osaka Dental University Hospital. Nineteen of the patients had been treated for nasopharyngeal cancer and 11 for oropharyngeal cancer. Between January and April 1996, 4 additional patients were given pilocarpine hydrochloride (3-mg, 6-mg and 9-mg of KSS-694 orally three times a day) for 12 weeks and evaluated every 4 weeks as a base line. One had been treated for nasopharyngeal carcinoma, two for cancer of the cheek and one for an unknown carcinoma. Eighteen of the patients (11 with nasopharyngeal carcinoma and 7 with oropharyngeal carcinoma) had extractions. Use of preoperative and postoperative radiographs indicated that damage to the bone following tooth extraction after radiation exposure was related to whether antibiotics were administered the day before the extraction, whether forceps or elevators were used, and whether the tooth was in the field of radiation. Xerostomia improved in all 4 of the patients who received 6-mg or 9-mg of pilocarpine. It improved saliva production and relieved the symptoms of xerostomia after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, although there were minor side effects such as fever. This information can be used to improve the oral environment of patients who have received radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, and to better understand their oral environment. (author)

  6. Delayed damage after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Yoshiyuki

    2000-01-01

    I investigated radiation damage, including osteoradionecrosis, arising from tooth extraction in fields that had received radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, and evaluated the effectiveness of pilocarpine for xerostomia. Between January 1990 and April 1996, I examined 30 patients for bone changes after tooth extraction in fields irradiated at the Department of Oral Radiology, Osaka Dental University Hospital. Nineteen of the patients had been treated for nasopharyngeal cancer and 11 for oropharyngeal cancer. Between January and April 1996, 4 additional patients were given pilocarpine hydrochloride (3-mg, 6-mg and 9-mg of KSS-694 orally three times a day) for 12 weeks and evaluated every 4 weeks as a base line. One had been treated for nasopharyngeal carcinoma, two for cancer of the cheek and one for an unknown carcinoma. Eighteen of the patients (11 with nasopharyngeal carcinoma and 7 with oropharyngeal carcinoma) had extractions. Use of preoperative and postoperative radiographs indicated that damage to the bone following tooth extraction after radiation exposure was related to whether antibiotics were administered the day before the extraction, whether forceps or elevators were used, and whether the tooth was in the field of radiation. Xerostomia improved in all 4 of the patients who received 6-mg or 9-mg of pilocarpine. It improved saliva production and relieved the symptoms of xerostomia after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, although there were minor side effects such as fever. This information can be used to improve the oral environment of patients who have received radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, and to better understand their oral environment. (author)

  7. Contribution of endogenous and exogenous damage to the total radiation-induced damage in the bacterial spore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, G.P.; Samuni, A.; Czapski, G.

    1980-01-01

    Radical scavengers such as polyethylene glycol 4000 and bovine albumin have been used to define the contribution of exogenous and endogenous damage to the total radiation-induced damage in aqueous buffered suspensions of Bacillus pumilus spores. The results indicate that this damage in the bacterial spore is predominantly endogenous

  8. Heavy ion linear accelerator for radiation damage studies of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutsaev, Sergey V.; Mustapha, Brahim; Ostroumov, Peter N.; Nolen, Jerry; Barcikowski, Albert; Pellin, Michael; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2017-03-01

    A new eXtreme MATerial (XMAT) research facility is being proposed at Argonne National Laboratory to enable rapid in situ mesoscale bulk analysis of ion radiation damage in advanced materials and nuclear fuels. This facility combines a new heavy-ion accelerator with the existing high-energy X-ray analysis capability of the Argonne Advanced Photon Source. The heavy-ion accelerator and target complex will enable experimenters to emulate the environment of a nuclear reactor making possible the study of fission fragment damage in materials. Material scientists will be able to use the measured material parameters to validate computer simulation codes and extrapolate the response of the material in a nuclear reactor environment. Utilizing a new heavy-ion accelerator will provide the appropriate energies and intensities to study these effects with beam intensities which allow experiments to run over hours or days instead of years. The XMAT facility will use a CW heavy-ion accelerator capable of providing beams of any stable isotope with adjustable energy up to 1.2 MeV/u for U-238(50+) and 1.7 MeV for protons. This energy is crucial to the design since it well mimics fission fragments that provide the major portion of the damage in nuclear fuels. The energy also allows damage to be created far from the surface of the material allowing bulk radiation damage effects to be investigated. The XMAT ion linac includes an electron cyclotron resonance ion source, a normal-conducting radio-frequency quadrupole and four normal-conducting multi-gap quarter-wave resonators operating at 60.625 MHz. This paper presents the 3D multi-physics design and analysis of the accelerating structures and beam dynamics studies of the linac.

  9. Heavy ion linear accelerator for radiation damage studies of materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsaev, Sergey V; Mustapha, Brahim; Ostroumov, Peter N; Nolen, Jerry; Barcikowski, Albert; Pellin, Michael; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2017-03-01

    A new eXtreme MATerial (XMAT) research facility is being proposed at Argonne National Laboratory to enable rapid in situ mesoscale bulk analysis of ion radiation damage in advanced materials and nuclear fuels. This facility combines a new heavy-ion accelerator with the existing high-energy X-ray analysis capability of the Argonne Advanced Photon Source. The heavy-ion accelerator and target complex will enable experimenters to emulate the environment of a nuclear reactor making possible the study of fission fragment damage in materials. Material scientists will be able to use the measured material parameters to validate computer simulation codes and extrapolate the response of the material in a nuclear reactor environment. Utilizing a new heavy-ion accelerator will provide the appropriate energies and intensities to study these effects with beam intensities which allow experiments to run over hours or days instead of years. The XMAT facility will use a CW heavy-ion accelerator capable of providing beams of any stable isotope with adjustable energy up to 1.2 MeV/u for 238 U 50+ and 1.7 MeV for protons. This energy is crucial to the design since it well mimics fission fragments that provide the major portion of the damage in nuclear fuels. The energy also allows damage to be created far from the surface of the material allowing bulk radiation damage effects to be investigated. The XMAT ion linac includes an electron cyclotron resonance ion source, a normal-conducting radio-frequency quadrupole and four normal-conducting multi-gap quarter-wave resonators operating at 60.625 MHz. This paper presents the 3D multi-physics design and analysis of the accelerating structures and beam dynamics studies of the linac.

  10. Curcumin Attenuates Gamma Radiation Induced Intestinal Damage in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EI-Tahawy, N.A.

    2009-01-01

    Small Intestine exhibits numerous morphological and functional alterations during radiation exposure. Oxidative stress, a factor implicated in the intestinal injury may contribute towards some of these alterations. The present work was designed to evaluate the efficacy of curcumin, a yellow pigment of turmeric on y-radiation-induced oxidative damage in the small intestine by measuring alterations in the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TSARS), serotonin metabolism, catecholamine levels, and monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity in parallel to changes in the architecture of intestinal tissues. In addition, monoamine level, MAO activity and TSARS level were determined in the serum. Curcumin was supplemented orally via gavages, to rats at a dose of (45 mg/ Kg body wt/ day) for 2 weeks pre-irradiation and the last supplementation was 30 min pre exposure to 6.5 Gy gamma radiations (applied as one shot dose). Animals were sacrificed on the 7th day after irradiation. The results demonstrated that, whole body exposure of rats to ionizing radiation has induced oxidative damage in small intestine obvious by significant increases of TSARS content, MAO activity and 5-hydroxy indole acetic acid (5-HIAA) and by significant decreases of serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI) levels. In parallel histopathological studies of the small intestine of irradiated rats through light microscopic showed significant decrease in the number of villi, villus height, mixed sub mucosa layer with more fibres and fibroblasts. Intestinal damage was in parallel to significant alterations of serum MAO activity, TBARS, 5-HT, DA, NE and EPI levels. Administration of curcumin before irradiation has significantly improved the levels of monoamines in small intestine and serum of irradiated rats, which was associated with significant amelioration in MAO activity and TBARS contents

  11. Defense mechanisms against radiation induced teratogenic damage in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, F.; Ootsuyama, A.; Nomoto, S.; Norimura, T.

    2002-01-01

    Experimental studies with mice have established that fetuses at midgestational stage are highly susceptible to malformation at high, but not low, doses of radiation. When DNA damage is produced by a small amount of radiation, it is efficiently eliminated by DNA repair. However, DNA repair is not perfect. There must be defense mechanisms other than DNA repair. In order to elucidate the essential role of p53 gene in apoptotic tissue repair, we compared the incidence of radiation-induced malformations and deaths (deaths after day 10) in wild-type p53 (+/+) mice and null p53 (-/-) mice. For p53 (+/+) mice, an X-ray dose of 2 Gy given at a high dose-rate (450 mGy/min) to fetuses at 9.5 days of gestation was highly lethal and considerably teratogenic whereas it was only slightly lethal but highly teratogenic for p53 (-/-) fetuses. This reciprocal relationship of radiosensitivity to malformations and deaths supports the notion that fetal tissues have a p53 -dependent idguardianln of the tissue that aborts cells bearing radiation-induced teratogenic DNA damage. When an equal dose of 2 Gy given at a 400-fold lower dose-rate (1.2 mGy/min), this dose became not teratogenic for p53 (+/+) fetuses exhibiting p53 -dependent apoptosis, whereas this dose remained teratogenic for p53 (-/-) fetuses unable to carry out apoptosis. Furthermore, when the dose was divided into two equal dose fractions (1+1 Gy) at high dose rate, separated by 24 hours, the incidences of malformations were equal with control level for p53 (+/+), but higher for p53 (-/-) mice. Hence, complete elimination of teratogenic damage from irradiated tissues requires a concerted cooperation of two mechanisms; proficient DNA repair and p53-dependent apoptotic tissue repair

  12. A study of the effect of natural radiation damage in a zircon crystal using thermoluminescence, fission track etching and X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Y.M.

    1989-01-01

    The natural radiation damage in zircon caused by the decay of uranium and thorium, present as impurities, is studied. The radiation damage is first gauged by etching the fission tracks. It is found that thermoluminescence (TL) sensitivity (defined as light output per unit test-dose) decreases as the radiation damage increases, suggesting a destruction of TL centers. The spacing d of the (112)-plane is also measured. It is also found that the d-value increases with radiation damage, suggesting the displacement of atoms from their normal lattice sites. However, as the track density increases beyond ≅ 3x10 6 tracks/cm 2 , the d-value remains at ≅ 2.52 A. By annealing the crystal, the displaced atoms are found to return to the original lattice sites, and this is followed by a reduction in d-value as well as the recovery of TL sensitivity. The fission track density also decreases and all the tracks disappear at the annealing temperature of ≅ 800 0 C. (orig.)

  13. Protective Effect of HSP25 on Radiation Induced Tissue Damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kwon, Hee-Choong; Bae, Sang-Woo; Lee, Yun-Sil; Kim, Sung Ho

    2007-01-01

    Control of cancer by irradiation therapy alone or in conjunction with combination chemotherapy is often limited by organ specific toxicity. Ionizing irradiation toxicity is initiated by damage to normal tissue near the tumor target and within the transit volume of radiotherapy beams. Irradiation-induced cellular, tissue, and organ damage is mediated by acute effects, which can be dose limiting. A latent period follows recovery from the acute reaction, then chronic irradiation fibrosis (late effects) pose a second cause of organ failure. HSP25/27 has been suggested to protect cells against apoptotic cell death triggered by hyperthermia, ionizing radiation, oxidative stress, Fas ligand, and cytotoxic drugs. And several mechanisms have been proposed to account for HSP27-mediated apoptotic protection. However radioprotective effect of HSP25/27 in vivo system has not yet been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of exogenous HSP25 expression, as delivered by adenoviral vectors, to protect animal from radiation induced tissue damage

  14. Formation of radiation-induced point defects in silicon doped thin films upon ion implantation and activating annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bublik, V.T.; Shcherbachev, K.D.; Komarnitskaya, E.A.; Parkhomenko, Yu.N.; Vygovskaya, E.A.; Evgen'ev, S.B.

    1999-01-01

    The formation and relaxation processes for radiation-induced defects in the implantation of 50 keV Si + ions into gallium arsenide and subsequent 10-min annealing in arsine at 850 deg. C have been studied by the triple-crystal X-ray diffractometry and secondary-ion mass spectroscopy techniques. It is shown that the existence of the vacancy-enriched layer stimulating diffusion of introduced dopants into the substrate surface can significantly affect the distribution profile of the dopant in the course of preparation of thin implanted layers

  15. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ducourthial, Audrey; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of $10^{15} n_{eq}/cm^2$ and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we present first predictions for basic pixel cluster properties alongside...

  16. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Rossini, Lorenzo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of 10^15 neq/cm^2 and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current and future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time and considers both planar and 3D sensor designs. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we compare predictions for b...

  17. Modeling radiation damage to pixel sensors in the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ducourthial, Audrey; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of $10^{15}n_{eq}/cm^2$ and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we present first predictions for basic pixel cluster properties alongside ...

  18. Modeling radiation damage to pixel sensors in the ATLAS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducourthial, A.

    2018-03-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) . As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subject to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) [1], the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of 1015 neq/cm2 and the HL-LHC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is essential in order to make accurate predictions for current and future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects on the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we present first predictions for basic pixel cluster properties alongside early studies with LHC Run 2 proton-proton collision data.

  19. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Rossini, Lorenzo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High- Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of 10^15 neq/cm2 and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time and considers both planar and 3D sensor designs. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we compare predictions for basic...

  20. Annealing of radiation-induced defects in vanadium and vanadium-titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leguey, T.

    1996-01-01

    The annealing of defects induced by electron irradiation up to a dose of 6.10 21 m -2 at T<293 K has been investigated in single-crystals of pure vanadium and in vanadium-titanium alloys with compositions 0.3, 1 and 5 at.% Ti using positron annihilation spectroscopy. The recovery of the positron annihilation parameters in V single-crystals indicates that the defect annealing takes place in the temperature range 410-470 K without formation of microvoids for the present irradiation conditions. For the alloys the recovery onset is shifted to 460 K, the width of the annealing stage is gradually broadened with increasing Ti content, and microvoids are formed for annealing temperatures at the end of the recovery stage. The results show that the vacancy release from vacancy-interstitial impurity pairs and subsequent recombination with interstitial loops is the mechanism of the recovery in pure V. For V-Ti alloys, vacancy-Ti-interstitial impurity complexes and vacancy-Ti pairs appear to be the defects responsible for the positron trapping. The broadening of the recovery stage with increasing Ti content indicates that solute Ti is a very effective trap for vacancies in V. (orig.)

  1. An approach to modelling radiation damage by fast ionizing particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents a statistical approach to modelling radiation damage in small biological structures such as enzymes, viruses, and some cells. Irreparable damage is assumed to be caused by the occurrence of ionizations within sensitive regions. For structures containing double-stranded DNA, one or more ionizations occurring within each strand of the DNA will cause inactivation; for simpler structures without double-stranded DNA a single ionization within the structure will be sufficient for inactivation. Damaging ionizations occur along tracks of primary irradiating particles or along tracks of secondary particles released at primary ionizations. An inactivation probability is derived for each damage mechanism, expressed in integral form in terms of the radius of the biological structure (assumed spherical), rate of ionization along primary tracks, and maximum energy for secondary particles. The performance of each model is assessed by comparing results from the model with those derived from data from various experimental studies extracted from the literature. For structures where a single ionization is sufficient for inactivation, the model gives qualitatively promising results; for larger more complex structures containing double-stranded DNA, the model requires further refinements. (author)

  2. Importance of the neutron spectrum for determination of radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hehn, G.; Stiller, P.; Mattes, M.

    1977-01-01

    Since the radiation effects of neutrons depend strongly on the neutron energy, the correlation between the induced damage and the fluence of the fast neutrons shows appreciable disadvantages. The measured values of changes in material properties resulted in large differences for the same fast neutron fluence, being partly due to different neutron spectra. The uncertainties in damage data led to strong overdesign of important structural components. Different neutron environment at surveillance sample position may give an underestimation of the embrittlement in the reactor pressure vessel, which has to be avoided. The application of damage functions combined with accurately calculated neutron spectra, promise to be a reasonable solution. The damage function has the advantage of a phenomenological quantity that all spectral effects are included. But the correlation quantity has to be determined of high experimental costs. Therefore approximations of its energy distributions are very important. For the keV energy region the kerma function is reasonably good. For the MeV energy region a higher effort is needed to calculate the displacement cross section. The same holds for the low energy part. In all three parts the formation of stable material property levels may vary, so that the final correlation can be determined only by measurements of material properties in different neutron spectra. In material samples the spectra distribution of the displacement production rate was determined at different local positions outside the reactor core of a PWR and a fast breeder showing the most important energy regions of both reactors. (orig.) [de

  3. Repair of radiation damage caused by cyclotron-produced neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, B.I.

    1979-01-01

    Hall et al. present experimental data on repair of sublethal damage in cultured mammalian cells exposed to 35 MeV neutrons and 60 Co γ rays. Hall and Kraljevic present experimental data on repair of potentially lethal damage in cultured mammalian cells exposed to 35 MeV neutrons and 210 kVp x rays. These results of Hall et al. are very difficult to explain from basic concepts in radiobiology. Contrary to Rossi, these data do not support his thesis that repair of radiation damage is dose-dependent and linear energy transfer independent. Nor do these results meet the expectations of multitarget-single hit theory which would require dose-independent repair equal to n. The observation of the same extrapolation number for neutrons and for x rays is also surprising. From the point of view of radiotherapy, the doses of interest are about 140 rad for neutrons and about 300 rad for x rays. There are no data for repair of potentially lethal damage below 800 rad for x rays and 400 rad for neutrons. The difference in survival between single and split dose is negligible up to a total of about 600 rad of x rays or of neutrons. These data of Hall et al. therefore have little significance to radiotherapists and are an enigma to radiobiologists

  4. Long-term radiation damage to a spaceborne germanium spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Kurczynski, P; Hull, E L; Palmer, D; Harris, M J; Seifert, H; Teegarden, B J; Gehrels, N; Cline, T L; Ramaty, R; Sheppard, D; Madden, N W; Luke, P N; Cork, C P; Landis, D A; Malone, D F; Hurley, K

    1999-01-01

    The Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer aboard the Wind spacecraft in deep space has observed gamma-ray bursts and solar events for four years. The germanium detector in the instrument has gradually deteriorated from exposure to the approx 10 sup 8 p/cm sup 2 /yr(>100 MeV) cosmic-ray flux. Low-energy tailing and loss of efficiency, attributed to hole trapping and conversion of the germanium from n- to p-type as a result of crystal damage, were observed. Raising the detector bias voltage ameliorated both difficulties and restored the spectrometer to working operation. Together, these observations extend our understanding of the effects of radiation damage to include the previously unsuccessfully studied regime of long-term operation in space. (author)

  5. Compilation of radiation damage test data cable insulating materials

    CERN Document Server

    Schönbacher, H; CERN. Geneva

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes radiation damage test data on commercially available organic cable insulation and jacket materials: ethylene- propylene rubber, Hypalon, neoprene rubber, polyethylene, polyurethane, polyvinylchloride, silicone rubber, etc. The materials have been irradiated in a nuclear reactor to integrated absorbed doses from 5*10/sup 5/ to 5*10/sup 6/ Gy. Mechanical properties, e.g. tensile strength, elongation at break, and hardness, have been tested on irradiated and non-irradiated samples. The results are presented in the form of tables and graphs, to show the effect of the absorbed dose on the measured properties. (13 refs).

  6. The cost of the radiation damage by the ALARA conception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kononovich, A.L.; Nosov, A.V.; Ivanov, A.V.; Pechkurov, A.V.

    2000-01-01

    A basis for the determination of the cost of the radiation risk as a method for its optimization are given. The correlation between different components of the risk is considered. The aim for optimization as a requirement on decrease of the cumulative risk is formulated. The reliability in the use of mathematic modelling on the determination of the cost of the risk and damage is noted. The lines of approach to determination of the cost of the risk based on the direct analysis of financial expenses are proposed. The results of estimation of the cost of the risk are given. The use of suggested approach is demonstrated on a hypothetical example [ru

  7. Effects of radiation damage on the silicon lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Katherine A.; Lowry, Lynn; Russo, O. Louis

    1987-01-01

    Silicon was irradiated with both proton and electron particle beams in order to investigate changes in the structural and optical properties of the lattice as a result of the radiation damage. Lattice expansions occurred when large strain fields (+0.34 percent) developed after 1- and 3-MeV proton bombardment. The strain was a factor of three less after 1-MeV electron irradiation. Average increases of approximately 22 meV in the 3.46-eV interband energy gap and 14 meV in the Lorentz broadening parameter were measured after the electron irradiation.

  8. Radiation damage in an amorphous Lennard-Jones solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaki, T.K.; Li, J.C.M.

    1985-01-01

    A molecular-dynamics simulation of radiation damage in an amorphous Lennard-Jones solid has been undertaken. A three-dimensional structure of 685 atoms with periodic boundary conditions was used. An atom was injected inward from the middle of one surface, and as it lost its energy its velocity and position were recorded. The temperature profile around the injection direction was also calculated. The amorphous structure was examined before and after irradiation by calculating the volume distribution of the Voronoi polyhedra and its time evolution. The production of vacancies and interstitials was observed. The interstitials were found to disappear rapidly, and the vacancies slowly. (author)

  9. Radiation damage assessment by digital correlation of images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, J.; Salih, S.M.; Cosslett, V.E.

    1974-01-01

    Structural changes in the electron microscopic specimen due to radiation damage are conveniently studied by electron diffraction. However, two disadvantages of this method are that it does not work for amorphous specimens and that it is not sensitive to structural changes that affect only the phase of the structure factor. It has been proposed that a series of successive images taken under minimum exposure conditions could provide additional information in those cases where the relationship between object function and image intensity can be established. In order to test the proposed method, both lattice images and diffraction patterns of coronene crystals were recorded in separate experiments at controlled levels of exposure. (author)

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of radiation damage cascades in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchan, J. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia); Robinson, M. [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia); Christie, H. J.; Roach, D. L.; Ross, D. K. [Physics and Materials Research Centre, School of Computing, Science and Engineering, University of Salford, Salford, Greater Manchester M5 4WT (United Kingdom); Marks, N. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia); Nanochemistry Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia)

    2015-06-28

    Radiation damage cascades in diamond are studied by molecular dynamics simulations employing the Environment Dependent Interaction Potential for carbon. Primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies up to 2.5 keV are considered and a uniformly distributed set of 25 initial PKA directions provide robust statistics. The simulations reveal the atomistic origins of radiation-resistance in diamond and provide a comprehensive computational analysis of cascade evolution and dynamics. As for the case of graphite, the atomic trajectories are found to have a fractal-like character, thermal spikes are absent and only isolated point defects are generated. Quantitative analysis shows that the instantaneous maximum kinetic energy decays exponentially with time, and that the timescale of the ballistic phase has a power-law dependence on PKA energy. Defect recombination is efficient and independent of PKA energy, with only 50% of displacements resulting in defects, superior to graphite where the same quantity is nearly 75%.

  11. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Nachman, Benjamin Philip; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon Pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector. As the detector in closest proximity to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the HL-LHC, the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of $10^{15}$ 1 MeV $n_\\mathrm{eq}/\\mathrm{cm}^2$ and the HL-LHC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. This talk presents a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS Pixel sensors for the first time. After a thorough description of the setup, predictions for basic Pixel cluster properties are presented alongside first validation studies with Run 2 collision data.

  12. Radiation damage on sub-cellular scales: beyond DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, H L; McNamara, A L; Domanova, W; Kuncic, Z; Guatelli, S

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates a model cell as a target for low-dose radiation using Monte Carlo simulations. Mono-energetic electrons and photons are used with initial energies between 10 and 50 keV, relevant to out-of-field radiotherapy scenarios where modern treatment modalities expose relatively large amounts of healthy tissue to low-dose radiation, and also to microbeam cell irradiation studies which show the importance of the cytoplasm as a radiation target. The relative proportions of number of ionizations and total energy deposit in the nucleus and cytoplasm are calculated. We show that for a macroscopic dose of no more than 1 Gy only a few hundred ionizations occur in the nucleus volume whereas the number of ionizations in the cytoplasm is over a magnitude larger. We find that the cell geometry can have an appreciable effect on the energy deposit in the cell and can cause a nonlinear increase in energy deposit with cytoplasm density. We also show that changing the nucleus volume has negligible effect on the total energy deposit but alters the relative proportion deposited in the nucleus and cytoplasm; the nucleus volume must increase to approximately the same volume as the cytoplasm before the energy deposit in the nucleus matches that in the cytoplasm. Additionally we find that energy deposited by electrons is generally insensitive to spatial variations in chemical composition, which can be attributed to negligible differences in electron stopping power for cytoplasm and nucleus materials. On the other hand, we find that chemical composition can affect energy deposited by photons due to non-negligible differences in attenuation coefficients. These results are of relevance in considering radiation effects in healthy cells, which tend to have smaller nuclei. Our results further show that the cytoplasm and organelles residing therein can be important targets for low-dose radiation damage in healthy cells and warrant investigation as much as the conventional focus

  13. Annealing behaviour of excess carriers in neutron-transmutation-doped silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, T.; Nogami, S.; Inoue, S.

    1993-01-01

    In neutron-transmutation-doped silicon wafers excess carriers are clearly generated over the transmuted phosphorus atoms. The generation occurs for annealing temperatures above 900 o C. The maximum percentage of excess carriers obtained is about 24.5% of the final carrier concentration. Due to the difference in energy of generation and removal, the excess carriers can be removed by annealing above 800 o C. The radiation damage responsible for generation of excess carriers is fairly thermostable in the range of annealing temperatures below 800 o C. From deep-level transient spectroscopy measurements, it is found that the radiation damage remains insensitive to changes in carrier concentration. The activation energies of excess carrier generation and removal are estimated from the analysis of the thermal and temporal behaviours of radiation damage in the annealing process. (Author)

  14. Radiation damage in lithium-counterdoped N/P silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, A. M.; Swartz, C. K.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.; Weinberg, I.

    1980-01-01

    The radiation resistance and low-temperature annealing properties of lithium-counterdoped n(+)-p silicon solar cells are investigated. Cells fabricated from float zone and Czochralski grown silicon were irradiated with 1 MeV electrons and their performance compared to that of 0.35 ohm-cm control cells. The float zone cells demonstrated superior radiation resistance compared to the control cells, while no improvement was noted for the Czochralski grown cells. Annealing kinetics were found to lie between first and second order for relatively short times, and the most likely annealing mechanism was found to be the diffusion of lithium to defects with the subsequent neutralization of defects by combination with lithium. Cells with zero lithium gradients exhibited the best radiation resistance.

  15. DNA Damage by Radiation in Tradescantia Leaf Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Min; Hyun, Kyung Man; Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin Kyu; Nili, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    The comet assay is currently used in different areas of biological sciences to detect DNA damage. The comet assay, due to its simplicity, sensitivity and need of a few cells, is ideal as a short-term genotoxicity test. The comet assay can theoretically be applied to every type of eukaryotic cell, including plant cells. Plants are very useful as monitors of genetic effects caused by pollution in the atmosphere, water and soil. Tradescantia tests are very useful tools for screening the mutagenic potential in the environment. Experiments were conducted to study the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiations on the genome integrity, particularly of Tradescantia. The increasingly frequent use of Tradescantia as a sensitive environmental bioindicator of genotoxic effects. This study was designed to assess the genotoxicity of ionizing radiation using Tradescnatia-comet assay. The development of comet assay has enabled investigators to detect DNA damage at the levels of cells. To adapt this assay to plant cells, nuclei were directly obtained from Tradescantia leaf samples. A significant dose-dependent increase in the average tail moment values over the negative control was observed. Recently the adaptation of this technique to plant cells opens new possibilities for studies in variety area. The future applications of the comet assay could impact some other important areas, certainly, one of the limiting factors to its utility is the imagination of the investigator.

  16. DNA Damage by Radiation in Tradescantia Leaf Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Min; Hyun, Kyung Man; Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Nili, Mohammad [Dawnesh Radiation Research Institute, Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-04-15

    The comet assay is currently used in different areas of biological sciences to detect DNA damage. The comet assay, due to its simplicity, sensitivity and need of a few cells, is ideal as a short-term genotoxicity test. The comet assay can theoretically be applied to every type of eukaryotic cell, including plant cells. Plants are very useful as monitors of genetic effects caused by pollution in the atmosphere, water and soil. Tradescantia tests are very useful tools for screening the mutagenic potential in the environment. Experiments were conducted to study the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiations on the genome integrity, particularly of Tradescantia. The increasingly frequent use of Tradescantia as a sensitive environmental bioindicator of genotoxic effects. This study was designed to assess the genotoxicity of ionizing radiation using Tradescnatia-comet assay. The development of comet assay has enabled investigators to detect DNA damage at the levels of cells. To adapt this assay to plant cells, nuclei were directly obtained from Tradescantia leaf samples. A significant dose-dependent increase in the average tail moment values over the negative control was observed. Recently the adaptation of this technique to plant cells opens new possibilities for studies in variety area. The future applications of the comet assay could impact some other important areas, certainly, one of the limiting factors to its utility is the imagination of the investigator.

  17. Analysis of radiation damage in on-orbit solar array of Venus explorer Akatsuki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyota, Hiroyuki; Shimada, Takanobu; Takahashi, You; Imamura, Takeshi; Hada, Yuko; Ishii, Takako T.; Isobe, Hiroaki; Asai, Ayumi; Shiota, Daikou

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an analysis of radiation damage in solar array of Venus explorer Akatsuki observed on orbit. The output voltage of the solar array have shown sudden drops, which are most reasonably associated with radiation damage, three times since its launch. The analysis of these radiation damages is difficult, because no direct observation data of the spectra and the amount of the high-energy particles is available. We calculated the radiation damage using the relative damage coefficient (RDC) method assuming a typical spectral shape of protons. (author)

  18. Study of radiation damages in AISI 316 and 347 steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G.R. dos.

    1993-03-01

    The CV-28 cyclotron at IEN (Nuclear Engineering Institute) has been used to simulated, in a short time scale, uniform He concentrations produced during neutron irradiation of metals by (n, α) reactions. Helium was implanted at concentrations of 1 to 300 ppm in 100 μm thick sheet samples of AISI 316 and 347 S S by degrading a 28 MeV alpha particle beam with a rotating energy degrader. The effects of He on the mechanical properties of the steels were studied by both non-destructive (positron annihilation) and destructive tests (tensile, creep, TEM and SEM). The positron lifetime measurements of irradiated and annealed samples were used as the base to discuss the He diffusion mechanism. Activation energies of 0.34±0.04 eV for 316 S S and 0.57±0.06 eV for 347 S S, characterized a dissociative process above 650 0 C. TEM analyses have suggested the Ostwald ripening process for bubble growth over the full range of He concentrations studied. It was shown, in agreement with theoretical calculations that, by themselves the displacements produced during the helium implantation, at rate of 1.8 x 10 -3 d pa/ppm, were not sufficient to cause significant changes in ductility. However, a strong ductility loss with increasing He concentration was observed for both types of steel for tensile tests at 25 0 C, as well as in creep at 750 0 C over the range of strain (100 to 200 MPa). Finally, it was shown that charged particle simulation associated with positron annihilation techniques provides a fast, relatively low cost, and useful method to study different kinds of neutron damage in materials. (author)

  19. Rosiglitazone attenuates pulmonary fibrosis and radiation-induced intestinal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangoni, M.; Gerini, C.; Sottili, M.; Cassani, S.; Stefania, G.; Biti, G.; Castiglione, F.; Vanzi, E.; Bottoncetti, A.; Pupi, A.

    2011-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.-The aim of the study was to evaluate radioprotective effect of rosiglitazone (RGZ) on a murine model of late pulmonary damage and of acute intestinal damage. Methods.- Lung fibrosis: C57 mice were treated with the radiomimetic agent bleomycin, with or without rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg/day). To obtain an independent qualitative and quantitative measure for lung fibrosis we used high resolution CT, performed twice a week during the entire observation period. Hounsfield Units (HU) of section slides from the upper and lower lung region were determined. On day 31 lungs were collected for histological analysis. Acute intestinal damage: mice underwent 12 Gy total body irradiation with or without rosiglitazone. Mice were sacrificed 24 or 72 h after total body irradiation and ileum and colon were collected. Results.- Lung fibrosis: after bleomycin treatment, mice showed typical CT features of lung fibrosis, including irregular septal thickening and patchy peripheral reticular abnormalities. Accordingly, HU lung density was dramatically increased. Rosiglitazone markedly attenuated the radiological signs of fibrosis and strongly inhibited HU lung density increase (60% inhibition at the end of the observation period). Histological analysis revealed that in bleomycin-treated mice, fibrosis involved 50-55% of pulmonary parenchyma and caused an alteration of the alveolar structures in 10% of parenchyma, while in rosiglitazone-treated mice, fibrosis involved only 20-25% of pulmonary parenchyma, without alterations of the alveolar structures. Acute intestinal damage: 24 h after 12 Gy of total body irradiation intestinal mucosa showed villi shortening, mucosal thickness and crypt necrotic changes. Rosiglitazone showed a histological improvement of tissue structure, with villi and crypts normalization and oedema reduction. Conclusion.- These results demonstrate that rosiglitazone displays a protective effect on pulmonary fibrosis and radiation

  20. Rosiglitazone attenuates pulmonary fibrosis and radiation-induced intestinal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangoni, M.; Gerini, C.; Sottili, M.; Cassani, S.; Stefania, G.; Biti, G. [Radiotherapy Unit, Clinical Physiopathology Department, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Castiglione, F. [Department of Human Pathology and Oncology, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Vanzi, E.; Bottoncetti, A.; Pupi, A. [Nuclear Medicine Unit, Clinical Physiopathology Department, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.-The aim of the study was to evaluate radioprotective effect of rosiglitazone (RGZ) on a murine model of late pulmonary damage and of acute intestinal damage. Methods.- Lung fibrosis: C57 mice were treated with the radiomimetic agent bleomycin, with or without rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg/day). To obtain an independent qualitative and quantitative measure for lung fibrosis we used high resolution CT, performed twice a week during the entire observation period. Hounsfield Units (HU) of section slides from the upper and lower lung region were determined. On day 31 lungs were collected for histological analysis. Acute intestinal damage: mice underwent 12 Gy total body irradiation with or without rosiglitazone. Mice were sacrificed 24 or 72 h after total body irradiation and ileum and colon were collected. Results.- Lung fibrosis: after bleomycin treatment, mice showed typical CT features of lung fibrosis, including irregular septal thickening and patchy peripheral reticular abnormalities. Accordingly, HU lung density was dramatically increased. Rosiglitazone markedly attenuated the radiological signs of fibrosis and strongly inhibited HU lung density increase (60% inhibition at the end of the observation period). Histological analysis revealed that in bleomycin-treated mice, fibrosis involved 50-55% of pulmonary parenchyma and caused an alteration of the alveolar structures in 10% of parenchyma, while in rosiglitazone-treated mice, fibrosis involved only 20-25% of pulmonary parenchyma, without alterations of the alveolar structures. Acute intestinal damage: 24 h after 12 Gy of total body irradiation intestinal mucosa showed villi shortening, mucosal thickness and crypt necrotic changes. Rosiglitazone showed a histological improvement of tissue structure, with villi and crypts normalization and oedema reduction. Conclusion.- These results demonstrate that rosiglitazone displays a protective effect on pulmonary fibrosis and radiation

  1. Synchrotron radiation. 4. Analyses of biological samples using synchrotron radiation. 3. Research on radiation damage to DNA using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takakura, Kaoru

    1998-01-01

    This review described how the synchrotron radiation (SR) is used to solve problems unknown hitherto in radiation biology. Historically, the target substance of UV light in bacterial death was suggested to be nucleic acid in 1930. Researches on the radiation damage to DNA were begun at around 1960 and have mainly used UV light, X-ray and γray. Soft X-ray and vacuum UV whose energy covering from several eV to scores of keV have not been used since UV and X-ray lack the energy of this range. This is one of reasons why detailed process leading to radiation-induced death, carcinogenicity and mutation has not been known hitherto. RS possesses wide range of energy, i.e., from UV to hard X-ray, of high intensity, which is helpful for studying the unknown problems. The RS studies were begun in nineteen-seventies. Those include the action spectrum studies and atomic target studies. In the former, the course of the effect, e.g., the mechanism of DNA double strand breakage, can be elucidated. In the latter, photon of known energy can be irradiated to the specified atom like phosphorus in DNA which elucidating the precise physicochemical process of the breakage. Use of RS in these studies is thought still meaningful in future. (K.H.) 62 refs

  2. Radiation damage effects in solids special topic volume with invited peer reviewed papers only

    CERN Document Server

    Virk, Hardev Singh

    2013-01-01

    Public interest and concern about radiation damage effects has increased during recent times. Nuclear radiation proved to be a precursor for the study of radiation damage effects in solids. In general, all types of radiation, e.g. X-ray, gamma ray, heavy ions, fission fragments and neutrons produce damage effects in materials. Radiation damage latent tracks in solids find applications in nuclear and elementary particle physics, chemistry, radiobiology, earth sciences, nuclear engineering, and a host of other areas such as nuclear safeguards, virus counting, ion track filters, uranium exploration and archaeology. Radiation dosimetry and reactor shielding also involve concepts based on radiation damage in solids. This special volume consists of ten Chapters, including Review and Research Papers on various topics in this field.Physical scientists known to be investigating the effects of radiation on material were invited to contribute research and review papers on the areas of their specialty. The topics include...

  3. Radiation damages in chemical components of organic scintillator detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes Neto, Jose Maria

    2003-01-01

    Samples containing PPO (1%, g/ml), diluted in toluene, they were irradiated in a 60 Co irradiator (6.46 kGy/h) at different doses. The PPO concentration decay bi-exponentially with the dose, generating the degradation products: benzoic acid, benzamide and benzilic alcohol. The liquid scintillator system was not sensitive to the radiation damage until 20 kGy. Otherwise, the pulse height analysis showed that dose among 30 to 40 kGy generate significant loss of quality of the sensor (liquid scintillating) and the light yield was reduced in half with the dose of (34.04 ± 0.80) kGy. This value practically was confirmed by the photo peak position analysis that resulted D 1/2 = (31.7 ± 1,4) kGy, The transmittance, at 360 nm, of the irradiated solution decreased exponentially. The compartmental model using five compartments (fast decay PPO, slow decay PPO, benzamide, benzoic acid and benzilic alcohol) it was satisfactory to explain the decay of the PPO in its degradation products in function of the dose. The explanation coefficient r 2 = 0.985636 assures that the model was capable to explain 98.6% of the experimental variations. The Target Theory together with the Compartmental Analysis showed that PPO irradiated in toluene solution presents two sensitive molecular diameters both of them larger than the true PPO diameter. >From this analysis it showed that the radiolytic are generated, comparatively, at four toluene molecules diameter far from PPO molecules. For each one PPO-target it was calculated the G parameter (damage/100 eV). For the target expressed by the fast decay the G value was (418.4 ± 54.1) damages/100 eV, and for the slow decay target the G value was (54.5 ± 8.9) damages/100 eV. The energies involved in the chemical reactions were w (0.239 ± 0.031) eV/damage (fast decay) and w = (1 834 ± 0.301) eV/damage (slow decay). (author)

  4. Chemical implications of heat and radiation damage to rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pederson, L.R.

    1984-11-01

    Chemical changes induced in Palo Duro and Paradox Basin natural rock salts and in synthetic NaCl by heat and gamma radiation were investigated. Heating of unirradiated natural rock salts to 300 0 C resulted in HCl (most prevalent), SO 2 , CO 2 , and H 2 S evolution, and increased the base content of the remaining salt by not more than 10 microequivalents per gram; whereas, heating of synthetic NaCl gave no product. Gamma irradiation produced sodium colloids and neutral chlorine in amounts similar to the results of Levy and coworkers. When the irradiated salts were heated, three reactions were apparent: (1) radiation-induced defects recombined; (2) neutral chlorine was evolved; and (3) HCl, SO 2 , CO 2 , and H 2 S were evolved, similar to results for unirradiated salts. Because reaction (1) appeared to dominate over reaction (2), it is expected that the influence of radiation damage to salt on the near-field chemical environment will be minor. 4 figures, 1 table

  5. Characterization of radiation damage induced by swift heavy ions in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, Christian

    2016-05-15

    irradiation temperatures above 200 C damage formation is mitigated due to defect annealing. Thus a controlled temperature of accelerator components is desirable in order to increase the lifetime. This thesis contributes to a better understanding of radiation damage in swift heavy ion-exposed graphite with the aim to optimize the design of beam catchers and production targets for secondary ion beams for the Super Fragment Separator (Super-FRS) at FAIR. Moreover, the results of this work provide important input data for simulations to describe the beam response and lifetime of high-dose exposed critical accelerator components.

  6. Low-temperature radiation damage in silicon - 1: Annealing studies on N-type material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awadelkarim, O.O.

    1986-07-01

    The presence of electrically active defects in electron-irradiated P-doped n-type silicon was monitored using capacitance and loss factor measurements. Irradiations were performed at temperatures c - 0.14) eV and (E c - 0.24) eV in the gap are ascribed to the carbon interstitial and the divacancy, respectively. (author)

  7. Computer simulations of radiation damage in protein crystals; Simulationsrechnungen zu Strahlenschaeden an Proteinkristallen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zehnder, M

    2007-03-15

    The achievable resolution and the quality of the dataset of an intensity data collection for structure analysis of protein crystals with X-rays is limited among other factors by radiation damage. The aim of this work is to obtain a better quantitative understanding of the radiation damage process in proteins. Since radiation damage is unavoidable it was intended to look for the optimum ratio between elastically scattered intensity and radiation damage. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm physical processes after an inelastic photon interaction are studied. The main radiation damage consists of ionizations of the atoms through the electron cascade following any inelastic photon interaction. Results of the method introduced in this investigation and results of an earlier theoretical studies of the influence of Auger-electron transport in diamond are in a good agreement. The dependence of the radiation damage as a function of the energy of the incident photon was studied by computer-aided simulations. The optimum energy range for diffraction experiments on the protein myoglobin is 10-40 keV. Studies of radiation damage as a function of crystal volume and shape revealed that very small plate or rod shaped crystals suffer less damage than crystals formed like a cube with the same volume. Furthermore the influence of a few heavy atoms in the protein molecule on radiation damage was examined. Already two iron atoms in the unit cell of myoglobin increase radiation damage significantly. (orig.)

  8. Imperfection and radiation damage in protein crystals studied with coherent radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nave, Colin; Sutton, Geoff; Evans, Gwyndaf; Owen, Robin; Rau, Christoph; Robinson, Ian; Stuart, David Ian

    2016-01-01

    Coherent diffraction observations from polyhedra crystals at cryotemperature are reported. Information is obtained about the lattice strain and the changes with radiation damage. Fringes and speckles occur within diffraction spots when a crystal is illuminated with coherent radiation during X-ray diffraction. The additional information in these features provides insight into the imperfections in the crystal at the sub-micrometre scale. In addition, these features can provide more accurate intensity measurements (e.g. by model-based profile fitting), detwinning (by distinguishing the various components), phasing (by exploiting sampling of the molecular transform) and refinement (by distinguishing regions with different unit-cell parameters). In order to exploit these potential benefits, the features due to coherent diffraction have to be recorded and any change due to radiation damage properly modelled. Initial results from recording coherent diffraction at cryotemperatures from polyhedrin crystals of approximately 2 µm in size are described. These measurements allowed information about the type of crystal imperfections to be obtained at the sub-micrometre level, together with the changes due to radiation damage

  9. Imperfection and radiation damage in protein crystals studied with coherent radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nave, Colin, E-mail: colin.nave@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Sutton, Geoff [Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Evans, Gwyndaf; Owen, Robin; Rau, Christoph [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Robinson, Ian [University College London, 17–19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Stuart, David Ian [Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-01

    Coherent diffraction observations from polyhedra crystals at cryotemperature are reported. Information is obtained about the lattice strain and the changes with radiation damage. Fringes and speckles occur within diffraction spots when a crystal is illuminated with coherent radiation during X-ray diffraction. The additional information in these features provides insight into the imperfections in the crystal at the sub-micrometre scale. In addition, these features can provide more accurate intensity measurements (e.g. by model-based profile fitting), detwinning (by distinguishing the various components), phasing (by exploiting sampling of the molecular transform) and refinement (by distinguishing regions with different unit-cell parameters). In order to exploit these potential benefits, the features due to coherent diffraction have to be recorded and any change due to radiation damage properly modelled. Initial results from recording coherent diffraction at cryotemperatures from polyhedrin crystals of approximately 2 µm in size are described. These measurements allowed information about the type of crystal imperfections to be obtained at the sub-micrometre level, together with the changes due to radiation damage.

  10. Atomic structure of radiation damages in FCC-metals after neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popova, E.V.; Ivchenko, V.A.; Kozlov, A.V.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Radiation clusters, formed at a neutron irradiation, are a product of evolution of cascade areas. The quantitative information about clusters can be used for verification of calculations of cascade damage ability, in particular, cascade efficiency. Data about concentration clusters and an average of the vacancies containing in them, allow to receive total of the vacancies reserved in them and to use them for comparison to results of calculations of cascade damage ability. A correctness of such comparison by that above, than below temperature of a neutron irradiation. The purpose of work was experimental studying radiation clusters formed in FCC-metals at a low temperature neutron irradiation methods of dilatometry, field ion (FIM) and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM). Radiation clusters were studied: in industrial austenite steel C0.05Crl6Nil5Mo2Mnl, irradiated in reactor Rw-2a at temperature 310 K up to fluence intermediate and fast neutrons (with E > 0,1 MeV) 6.7·l0 21 m -2 ; in a modelling material - Pt (cleanliness of 99.99 %) with the same - FCC-structure in an initial condition and after an irradiation in reactor RWW-2M at temperature 310 K up to fluence intermediate and fast neutrons (with E > 0.1 MeV) 3.5·10 22 m -2 . As a result of an irradiation of steel and pure Pt, in these materials by methods FIM and TEM many radiation clusters, the accelerated neutrons initiated by interaction with substance was revealed. It is established that these damage areas represent the depleted zones containing separate vacancies, and also small vacancy complexes, with the 'belt' interstitial atoms. The quantitative estimation of the sizes of such radiating defects is lead and their density in volume is experimentally established. So the neutron irradiation of steel at temperature 310 K up to fluence 6.7·10 21 m -2 causes formation radiation clusters which average diameter according to TEM makes 3 nanometers. Observable by methods FIM clusters have the

  11. Effects of primary recoil (PKA) energy spectrum on radiation damage in fcc metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Tadao; Iwase, Akihiro

    1997-10-01

    Irradiation effects by different energetic particles such as electrons, various ions and neutrons are compared in fcc metals, particularly in Cu and Ni. It is discussed on the statistical consideration that the logarithm of the so-called PKA median energy, log T 1/2 , is a good representative to characterize the primary recoil (i.e. PKA) energy spectrum with the resultant defect production. For the irradiations of electrons, various ions and neutrons to Cu and Ni, fundamental physical quantities such as the fraction of stage I recovery, the defect production cross sections and the radiation annealing cross sections can be well scaled as a function of log T 1/2 , if the effects of the electron excitation caused by irradiating ions are excluded. Namely, all data of the respective physical quantity lie on a single continuous curve as a function of log T 1/2 . This characteristic curve is utilized to predict the damage accumulation (i.e. defect concentration) as a function of dpa in Cu and Ni with the PKA median energy as a parameter. (author)

  12. Effects of primary recoil (PKA) energy spectrum on radiation damage in fcc metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwata, Tadao; Iwase, Akihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-10-01

    Irradiation effects by different energetic particles such as electrons, various ions and neutrons are compared in fcc metals, particularly in Cu and Ni. It is discussed on the statistical consideration that the logarithm of the so-called PKA median energy, log T{sub 1/2}, is a good representative to characterize the primary recoil (i.e. PKA) energy spectrum with the resultant defect production. For the irradiations of electrons, various ions and neutrons to Cu and Ni, fundamental physical quantities such as the fraction of stage I recovery, the defect production cross sections and the radiation annealing cross sections can be well scaled as a function of log T{sub 1/2}, if the effects of the electron excitation caused by irradiating ions are excluded. Namely, all data of the respective physical quantity lie on a single continuous curve as a function of log T{sub 1/2}. This characteristic curve is utilized to predict the damage accumulation (i.e. defect concentration) as a function of dpa in Cu and Ni with the PKA median energy as a parameter. (author)

  13. Effect of annealing and UV-radiation time over micropore architecture of self-assembled block copolymer thin film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. del C. Pizarro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Block copolymers have been recognized as versatile materials to prepare nanoporous polymer films or membranes, but their potential has not been completely explored. This study focuses on the formation and characterization of nanoporous polymer films based on poly(styrene-block-(methylmethacrylate/methacrylic acid; (PS-b-MMA/MAA were obtained through atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP, by using two different protocols: annealing and annealingirradiation; for improving the formation of microporous surface. The composition, crystallinity and structural order of the films were studied by Raman spectroscopy. The film polymer thickness was obtained through very high resolution ellipsometry (VHRE. Finally, atomic force microcopy (AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques were used to detect changes in the porous-structure. These results show that the morphological properties of the block copolymer were affected via the modification of two variables, UV-radiation time and annealing. SEM and AFM micrographs showed that the morphology exhibit a porous ordered structure. Contact angle measurement suggests additional interactions between hydrophilic functional groups that influence the film wettability.

  14. Collision density approach of radiation damage in a multispecies medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lux, I.; Pazsit, I.

    1981-01-01

    Space-energy dependent forward type equations for the collision densities of energetic atoms in a multispecies semi-infinite homogeneous medium are formulated. Introduction of the one-dimensional isotropic forward-backward model of Fermi for the scattering and application of the Laplace transform with respect to the lethargy variable will lead to a linear differential equation system with constant coefficients. This equation system is solved for an arbitrary number of species and relations between the collision densities and defect distributions of the different species are given in the Kinchin-Pease model of radiation damage. The case of an alien particle incident on a two-component target is examined in some detail and the sputtering spectra for the three species are given numerically. (author)

  15. Radiation damage in amorphous solids - a computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaki, T.K.; Li, J.C.M.

    1984-01-01

    It is known for crystalline materials that injection of high energy atoms introduces point defects. The nature of defects is not known for amorphous solids. So a molecular dynamic simulation of radiation damage in an amorphous metal was carried out. An amorphous structure of 685 atoms with periodic boundary conditions in all 3 dimensions was equilibrated first. Then one atom on the surface was given a high initial velocity so it was injected inward. Radial temperature distribution around the line of injection was calculated as a function of time. Void distribution and its evolution with time in the direction of injection was calculated by counting the atomic centers in thin slabs perpendicular to the line of injection. The swelling of the whole solid was calculated also. Some results are compared with experiments

  16. Radiation diagnosis of pelvic ring damages in acute injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dytalov, M.M.

    2000-01-01

    Data on 58 victims with multifocal damages to the pelvic ring were used to examine the diagnostic potentialities of different radiation diagnostic techniques and to compare their resolving power. The later was 65.1, 83.3 and 94.7% in plain and multidimensional X-ray studies, and computed tomography, respectively. Complex of signs is described closed sacral fractures on the plain and oblique pelvic inlet (caudal) radiograms proposed, which could improve the diagnosis of fractures by 8.8 times, and an original orthopedic gauze-plate for the detection and estimation of invisible pelvic bone displacement, and an original procedure for pelvic X-ray study with target load in acute injury. This all can improve the quality of examination of casualties substantially and define indications for different treatments more precise [ru

  17. Sensitization of ultraviolet radiation damage in bacteria and mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, G.J.; Watts, M.E.; Patel, K.B.; Adams, G.E.

    1978-01-01

    Bacteria (Serratia marcescens) and mammalian cells (Chinese hamsters V79-379A) were irradiated in monolayers with ultraviolet light at 254 nm or 365 nm in the presence or absence of radiosensitizing drugs. At 254 nm, killing is very efficient (Dsub(37) approximately equal 1 J m -2 exposure, or approximately equal 6 x 10 4 photons absorbed by DNA per bacterium), and sensitizers have no effect. At 365 nm, cells are not killed in buffer, but are inactivated in the presence of nifurpipone or misonidazole. Lethal exposures (approximately equal 5 x 10 3 J m -2 at 10 nM misonidazole) correspond to about 10 7 photons absorbed by sensitizer molecules per bacterium. Toxicity of stable photoproducts of the drugs is not involved, nor is oxygen required. Hence the transient species formed by photo-excitation of radiosensitizer molecules are capable of killing cells in the absence of other types of radiation damage. (author)

  18. Collision density approach of radiation damage in a multispecies medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lux, I; Pazsit, I [Koezponti Elelmiszeripari Kutato Intezet, Budapest (Hungary)

    1981-01-01

    Space-energy dependent forward type equations for the collision densities of energetic atoms in a multispecies semi-infinite homogeneous medium are formulated. Introduction of the one-dimensional isotropic forward-backward model of Fermi for the scattering and application of the Laplace transform with respect to the lethargy variable will lead to a linear differential equation system with constant coefficients. This equation system is solved for an arbitrary number of species and relations between the collision densities and defect distributions of the different species are given in the Kinchin-Pease model of radiation damage. The case of an alien particle incident on a two-component target is examined in some detail and the sputtering spectra for the three species are given numerically.

  19. Biological rhythms for rehabilitation of radiation damage of population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharova, T.G.; Vasil'eva, G.S.; Efimov, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    Considerable disturbances in biological eurhythmycal structure of redoracu were discovered for people living in Borodulikha area of the Semipalatinsk test site. The deep desynchronise may result in a development of the cardiovascular, bronco-pulmonary, endocrine, oncologic, neuro psychic diseases. A method to correct the biological eurhythmycal structure was developed. Homeopathic doses of melatonin ('rhythm driver' managing the most regenerating and immune systems) and uthynol (promoting production of dehydroepiandrosterone of maternal prehormone of 27 hormones) were used to provide the general correction. The endocrine diseases are not practically subjected to the homeopathic correction. The sub correction was sometimes carried out after 5 months. The developed methods of rehabilitation of the radiation damages are unique, since they allow performing the homeopathic correction using the acupuncture monitoring

  20. Study of radiation damage restoration and antimony ions redistribution in Si(1 0 0) and Si(1 1 1) crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Labbani, R; Chafi, Z

    2002-01-01

    In this work, we study the radiation damage restoration and antimony ions redistribution into and oriented silicon substrates. The samples are implanted with antimony to a dose of 5x10 sup 1 sup 4 Sb sup + cm sup - sup 2 at 60 keV energy, then annealed under oxygen atmosphere at 900 deg. C, 30 min. The thin layer of SiO sub 2 (which is formed on Si surface by dry oxidation and expected to prevent any loss of Sb sup + dopant during Si recovery) is removed by a 10% HF solution. The specimens are analyzed by H sup + Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry operating at 0.3 MeV energy in both random and channelling modes. The values of the projected range, R sub p , the standard deviation, DELTA R sub p , and the dose of antimony ions, which are estimated with a simple program, are in agreement with tabulated ones. It is also shown that the surface damage restoration is better for Si(1 0 0) samples than for Si(1 1 1) ones, in other words, the radiation damage is more significant in Si(1 1 1) substrates. Moreover,...

  1. Measurement of radiation damage on an epoxy-based optical glue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.C.; Peng, K.C.; Sahu, S.K.; Ueno, K.; Chang, Y.H.; Wang, C.H.; Hou, W.S.

    1997-01-01

    We measured the radiation damage on an optical glue called Eccobond-24, which is a candidate for CsI and BGO crystal calorimeters of the BELLE detector of the KEK B-factory. Absorption spectrophotometry in the range 300-800 nm was used to monitor the radiation damage. The maximum equivalent dose was 1.64 Mrad. The glue shows effects of damage, but is acceptable for the radiation level in the above-mentioned experiment. (orig.)

  2. Involvement of membrane lipids in radiation damage to potassium-ion permeability of Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, S [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. for Medical Science; Akamatsu, Y

    1978-02-01

    Radiation damage to K/sup +/ permeability of an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph of E.coli grown with oleate or linolenate was investigated at different temperatures. A remarkable effect of radiation was observed at 0/sup 0/C with cells that had been grown in linolenate at 42/sup 0/C. This indicates that, besides protein, membrane lipids at least are involved in the radiation damage. The damage also seems to be affected by the fluidity of membrane lipids.

  3. Ultraviolet radiation-mediated damage to cellular DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadet, Jean; Sage, Evelyne; Douki, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    Emphasis is placed in this review article on recent aspects of the photochemistry of cellular DNA in which both the UVB and UVA components of solar radiation are implicated individually or synergistically. Interestingly, further mechanistic insights into the UV-induced formation of DNA photoproducts were gained from the application of new accurate and sensitive chromatographic and enzymic assays aimed at measuring base damage. Thus, each of the twelve possible dimeric photoproducts that are produced at the four main bipyrimidine sites can now be singled out as dinucleoside monophosphates that are enzymatically released from UV-irradiated DNA. This was achieved using a recently developed high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay (HPLC-MS/MS) assay after DNA extraction and appropriate enzymic digestion. Interestingly, a similar photoproduct distribution pattern is observed in both isolated and cellular DNA upon exposure to low doses of either UVC or UVB radiation. This applies more specifically to the DNA of rodent and human cells, the cis-syn cyclobutadithymine being predominant over the two other main photolesions, namely thymine-cytosine pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone adduct and the related cyclobutyl dimer. UVA-irradiation was found to generate cyclobutane dimers at TT and to a lower extent at TC sites as a likely result of energy transfer mechanism involving still unknown photoexcited chromophore(s). Oxidative damage to DNA is also induced although less efficiently by UVA-mediated photosensitization processes that mostly involved 1 O 2 together with a smaller contribution of hydroxyl radical-mediated reactions through initially generated superoxide radicals

  4. Micronuclei: sensitivity for the detection of radiation induced damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giorgio, M.; Nasazzi, N.B.; Taja, M.R.

    1998-01-01

    The in vitro cytokinesis-block (CB) micronucleus (MN) assay for human peripheral blood has been used extensively for the assessment of chromosomal damage induced by ionizing radiation and chemicals and considered a suitable biological dosimeter for estimating in vivo whole body exposures, particularly in the case of large scale radiation accidents. One of the major drawbacks of the MN assay is its reduced sensitivity for the detection of damage induced by low doses of low LET radiation, due to the high variability among the spontaneous MN frequencies. It is suggested that age, smoking habit and sex are the main confounding factors that contribute to the observed variability. Previous work in our laboratory, shows a significant positive correlation of the spontaneous and radiation induced MN frequencies with age and smoking habit, the latter being the strongest confounder. These findings led to in vitro studies of the dose-response relationships for smoking and non smoking donors evaluated separately, using 60 Co γ rays. The objectives of the present work are: 1-To increase the amount of data of the dose-response relationships, using γ rays from a 60 Co source, for smoking and non smoking donors, in order to find, if applicable, a correction factor for the calibration curve that takes into account the smoking habit of the individual in the case of accidental overexposure dose assessment, particularly in the low dose range. 2-To establish general conclusions on the current state of the technique. The sample for smoking and non smoking calibration curves was enlarged in the range of 0Gy to 2Gy. The fitting of both curves, performed up to the 2Gy dose, resulted in a linear quadratic model. MN distribution among bi nucleated cells was found to be over dispersed with respect to Poisson distribution, the average ratio of variance to mean being 1.13 for non smokers and 1.17 for smokers. Each fitted calibration curve, for smoking and non smoking donors, fell within the 95

  5. Long term radiological features of radiation-induced lung damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Catarina; Landau, David; McClelland, Jamie R; Ledermann, Jonathan A; Hawkes, David; Janes, Sam M; Devaraj, Anand

    2018-02-01

    To describe the radiological findings of radiation-induced lung damage (RILD) present on CT imaging of lung cancer patients 12 months after radical chemoradiation. Baseline and 12-month CT scans of 33 patients were reviewed from a phase I/II clinical trial of isotoxic chemoradiation (IDEAL CRT). CT findings were scored in three categories derived from eleven sub-categories: (1) parenchymal change, defined as the presence of consolidation, ground-glass opacities (GGOs), traction bronchiectasis and/or reticulation; (2) lung volume reduction, identified through reduction in lung height and/or distortions in fissures, diaphragm, anterior junction line and major airways anatomy, and (3) pleural changes, either thickening and/or effusion. Six patients were excluded from the analysis due to anatomical changes caused by partial lung collapse and abscess. All remaining 27 patients had radiological evidence of lung damage. The three categories, parenchymal change, shrinkage and pleural change were present in 100%, 96% and 82% respectively. All patients had at least two categories of change present and 72% all three. GGOs, reticulation and traction bronchiectasis were present in 44%, 52% and 37% of patients. Parenchymal change, lung shrinkage and pleural change are present in a high proportion of patients and are frequently identified in RILD. GGOs, reticulation and traction bronchiectasis are common at 12 months but not diagnostic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Simulation of radiation damage in Fe and Fe-Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerstedt, Christina

    2005-11-01

    Steel is an important structural material in nuclear reactors used for example in pressure vessels and fast reactor cladding. In reactor environments it has been observed that ferritic steels are more resistant to swelling than the austenitic steels typically used. Much effort has been put into developing basic models of FeCr alloys which can serve as model alloys for describing ferritic steels. As a result, a number of interatomic potentials for Fe and FeCr alloys exist today. For the work in this thesis, basic material properties coming from experiments or ab initio calculations were used to fit interatomic potentials for Fe, Cr and FeCr implementing both the embedded atom method and the Finnis-Sinclair formalisms. The potentials were then validated by molecular dynamic calculations of material properties such as defect formation energies, migration energies and thermal expansion. Further studies of potential performance were carried out in simulations of radiation damage cascades and thermal aging. The influence of the interatomic potential on the primary defect state in materials under irradiation was analyzed in a study comparing results obtained using four different potentials. The objective of the study was to find correlations between potential properties and the primary damage state produced in simulations of displacement cascades. The defect evolution and clustering during different cascade stages were also investigated to try to gain a better understanding of these processes

  7. Dislocation dynamics modelling of radiation damage in thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferroni, Francesco; Tarleton, Edmund; Fitzgerald, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy is a key tool for the extraction of information on radiation damage, the understanding of which is critical for materials development for nuclear fusion and fission reactors. Dislocations in TEM samples are subject to strong image forces, owing to the nanometric sample thicknesses, which may introduce artifacts in the damage analysis. Using dislocation dynamics, we elucidate the roles played by dislocation–surface interactions, dislocation–dislocation interactions and self-interactions due to climb for loop types observed in TEM. Comparisons with analytic solutions for a dislocation loop and an edge dislocation in a half-space are included, and the relationship between glide force and loop tilt examined. The parameters for convergence of the zero-traction boundary conditions are obtained, after which the evolution of dislocation structures in a thin film is studied. It is found that three main length scales govern the physical processes: the image force is governed by the distance of the loop from the surface and scales with the film thickness; the glide force is governed by the image stress as well as the loop–loop interaction stress which is in turn governed by the loop spacing L∼1/√ρ, where ρ is the loop density; finally, the climb force depends on the loop size. The three forces compete and their relative magnitudes define the evolution pathway of the dislocation structure. (paper)

  8. Bystander effects: intercellular transmission of radiation damage signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, J.B.; Azzam, E.I.; Toledo, S.M. de; Nagasawa, H

    2002-07-01

    Biological effects were examined in confluent cultures of fibroblasts and epithelial cells exposed to very low mean doses of alpha radiation, doses by which only 1-2% of the cells were actually traversed by an alpha particle. Enhanced frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges and HPRT mutations occurred in the non-irradiation, 'bystander' cells associated with a similar increase in the frequency of micronuclei, indicating the induction of DNA damage in these cells. In order to gain information concerning molecular pathways, changes in gene expression were examined in bystander cells by western analysis and in situ immunofluorescence staining. The expression levels of p53, p21 and MDM2 were significantly modulated in bystander cells: the damage signals leading to these changes were transmitted from irradiated to bystander cells by gap junction mediated intracellular communication. The bystander response was suppressed by incubation with superoxide dismutase as well as an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, suggesting the effect may be mediated by oxidative stress. To examine other signalling pathways responsive to oxidative stress, the activation of stress-related kinases and their downstream transcription factors were analysed in bystander cells by western blotting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays: a 2-4 fold increase in the phosphorylation levels of JNK, EPK1/2, p90RSK, Elk-1 and ATF2 was observed. These changes were detected by 15 min after irradiation and persisted for at least 1 h. These findings indicate the activation of multiple signal transduction pathways in bystander cells, involving signals arising from the plasma membrane as well as from DNA damage. (author)

  9. Radiation damage of austenitic stainless steels and zirconium alloys; Pregled radijacionog ostecenja austenitnih nerdjajucih celika i legura cirkonijuma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanovic, V [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1965-11-15

    This review contains analyses of available data concerning texture deformations and radiation damage of zirconium and zircaloy-2; radiation damage, influence of neutron radiation on the mechanical properties of austenitic, ferritic and other types of stainless steels.

  10. Nuclear data for analysis of radiation damage processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aruga, Takeo

    1999-01-01

    Parameters needed to analyze radiation damages for neutron irradiations are presented, taking iron samples irradiated with JMTR neutrons for an example. Special interests have been put on a comparison between results obtained by irradiations for one case with a full neutron spectrum and the other with a Cd-shielded neutron spectrum. A possibility is described that although atomic displacement rates for the two case differ only less than 2%, production rates of freely migrating defects can differ appreciably, due to recoiled atoms by (n, γ) reactions. More over, it is also suggested that although the median energy of PKA, defined as a PKA energy above (or below) which one half of the total atomic displacements are to be produced, may differ only slightly between the two cases, final radiation effects can be significantly different. The effects of charged particles emitted with high energies due to nucleon irradiations are stressed in relation to the significance of defects produced by PKAs with lower energies than several keV, especially for the case of irradiations with highly energetic nucleons as anticipated in GeV proton irradiations. (author)

  11. Nuclear data for analysis of radiation damage processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aruga, Takeo [Department of Materials Science Research, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    Parameters needed to analyze radiation damages for neutron irradiations are presented, taking iron samples irradiated with JMTR neutrons for an example. Special interests have been put on a comparison between results obtained by irradiations for one case with a full neutron spectrum and the other with a Cd-shielded neutron spectrum. A possibility is described that although atomic displacement rates for the two case differ only less than 2%, production rates of freely migrating defects can differ appreciably, due to recoiled atoms by (n, {gamma}) reactions. More over, it is also suggested that although the median energy of PKA, defined as a PKA energy above (or below) which one half of the total atomic displacements are to be produced, may differ only slightly between the two cases, final radiation effects can be significantly different. The effects of charged particles emitted with high energies due to nucleon irradiations are stressed in relation to the significance of defects produced by PKAs with lower energies than several keV, especially for the case of irradiations with highly energetic nucleons as anticipated in GeV proton irradiations. (author)

  12. Energy Dependence of Proton Radiation Damage in Si-Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084399; Neubüser, C.

    2014-01-01

    Irradiation experiments on silicon sensors are used to mimic the radiation environment at collider experiments with the aim to forecast the change of the electrical properties of a detector with irradiation. Measurements on irradiated sensors are invaluable in choosing a material well suited for a silicon tracking detector. This is especially true for the upgraded detectors to be used in the high-luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC), where silicon sensors as currently used would suffer severe loss in signal from irradiation with charged and neutral hadrons.\\\\ The CMS Tracker Collaboration has initiated irradiation studies with protons with energies ranging from 23 MeV to 23 GeV. They are often used instead of charged hadrons, their radiation induced damage to the silicon being rather similar. However, in oxygen rich silicon, NIEL violation concerning the full depletion voltage has been observed.\\\\ In this paper results from investigations on bulk defects compared to the change of the electrical properties of ...

  13. Study of the radiation damage of silicon photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitschke, Michael; Chmill, Valery; Garutti, Erika; Klanner, Robert; Schwandt, Joern [Institute for Experimental Physics, Hamburg University, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Radiation damage significantly changes the performance of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM). In this work, we first have characterized KETEK SiPMs with a pixel size of 15 x 15 μm{sup 2} using I-V (current-voltage), C/G-V/f (capacitance/impedance-voltage/frequency) and Q-V (charge-voltage) measurements with and without illumination with blue light of 470 nm from an LED. The SiPM parameters determined are DCR (dark count rate), relative PDE (photon detection efficiency), G (Gain), XT (cross-talk), Geiger breakdown characteristics, C{sub pix} (pixel capacitance) and R{sub q} (quenching resistance). Following this first characterization, the SiPMs were irradiated using reactor neutrons with fluences of 10{sup 9}, 10{sup 10}, 10{sup 11}, 5 . 10{sup 11}, and 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2}. Afterwards, the same measurements were repeated, and the dependence of the SiPM parameters on neutron fluence was determined. The results are used to optimize the radiation tolerance of SiPMs.

  14. Multi-scale approach to radiation damage induced by ion beams: complex DNA damage and effects of thermal spikes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surdutovich, E.; Yakubovich, A.V.; Solov'yov, A.V.; Surdutovich, E.; Yakubovich, A.V.; Solov'yov, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    We present the latest advances of the multi-scale approach to radiation damage caused by irradiation of a tissue with energetic ions and report the calculations of complex DNA damage and the effects of thermal spikes on biomolecules. The multi-scale approach aims to quantify the most important physical, chemical, and biological phenomena taking place during and following irradiation with ions and provide a better means for clinically-necessary calculations with adequate accuracy. We suggest a way of quantifying the complex clustered damage, one of the most important features of the radiation damage caused by ions. This quantification allows the studying of how the clusterization of DNA lesions affects the lethality of damage. We discuss the first results of molecular dynamics simulations of ubiquitin in the environment of thermal spikes, predicted to occur in tissue for a short time after an ion's passage in the vicinity of the ions' tracks. (authors)

  15. Radiation hardening commercial off-the-shelf erbium doped fibers by optimal photo-annealing source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tz-Shiuan; Liu, Ren-Young; Lin, Yen-Chih; Mao, Ming-Hua; Wang, Lon A.

    2017-09-01

    Erbium doped fibers (EDFs) based devices are widely employed in space for optical communication [1], remote sensing [2], and navigation applications, e.g. interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG). However, the EDF suffers severely radiation induced attenuation (RIA) in radiation environments, e.g. space applications and nuclear reactors [3].

  16. Functional analysis of molecular mechanisms of radiation induced apoptosis, that are not mediated by DNA damages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angermeier, Marita; Moertl, Simone

    2012-01-01

    The effects of low-dose irradiation pose new challenges on the radiation protection efforts. Enhanced cellular radiation sensitivity is displayed by disturbed cellular reactions and resulting damage like cell cycle arrest, DNA repair and apoptosis. Apoptosis serves as genetically determinate parameter for the individual radiation sensitivity. In the frame of the project the radiation-induced apoptosis was mechanistically investigated. Since ionizing radiation induced direct DNA damage and generates a reactive oxygen species, the main focus of the research was the differentiation and weighting of DNA damage mediated apoptosis and apoptosis caused by the reactive oxygen species (ROS).

  17. Peculiarities of radiation defect formation and annealing in n-Si due to their interaction with each other and defect clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugakov, P.F.; Lukyanitsa, V.V.

    1984-01-01

    Rearrangement processes proceeding during annealing (T/sub a/ = 50 to 500 0 C) of radiation defects in 60 Co γ-irradiated (T/sub irr/ 0 C) n-Si crystals (rho = 100 to 600 Ωcm) grown by the vacuum float-zone technique are studied. The temperature dependences of the Hall coefficient are measured. The results obtained are interpreted taking into account the interaction during annealing of vacancy-type defects (E-centres, divacancies) with each other and interstitial radiation defects (C/sub i/-C/sub s/ complexes, interstitial carbon C/sub i/). Phosphorus-two vacancies complexes, stable to T/sub a/ >= 500 0 C, are shown to be formed as a result of rearrangements and interaction of E-centres between themselves. The character of interaction of vacancy defects with interstitial ones is found to change significantly in the presence of defect clusters in the bulk of the crystal which are formed under heat treatment (T = 800 0 C, two hours) of the samples preliminary irradiated with fast neutrons (flux PHI/sub n/ = 1x10 14 to 1x10 16 cm -2 ). The peculiarities of radiation defects annealing observed in this case are explained taking into account the influence of defect clusters on the migration processes of mobile defects. Nature of radiation defects being formed at various stages of annealing is discussed. (author)

  18. Report of the radiation group on radiation backgrounds and damage in the ISABELLE intersection regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludlam, T.; Kistiakowsky, V.; Toohig, T.E.

    1976-01-01

    The Radiation Group was charged to examine radiation aspects of the current ISABELLE design and the projected experimental arrangements. Some samples of questions to be addressed were: (1) how does the overall shielding design impact the experimental design, (2) what backgrounds might be expected from the proposed beam scraping, shaving, etc. schemes, (3) what are the radiation damage considerations for experimental electronics near the beam, and (4) what backgrounds might be expected in an experiment from operation of another experiment in the same or the adjacent intersection region. A review is given based on the ISABELLE Proposal, The Proceedings of the 1975 ISABELLE Summer Study, and the estimate of ISABELLE shielding requirements by Stevens and Thorndike

  19. Radiation effects and annealing of various power MOSFET applied in satellites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Gang; Niu Zhenhong; Gao Song; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Yu Xuefeng; Ren Diyuan

    2007-01-01

    Two kinds of Power MOSFET applied in the space have been irradiated and tested, and from the view of the changes of oxide charges and interface states, their total dose radiation responses and characteristics have been analyzed. And the relations between breakdown voltage and threshold voltage in the experiment of total close radiation have been investigated and compared. Results of our experiment have provided foundation for the application of these two type devices in spaceflight system. (authors)

  20. (De)coupled zircon metamictization, radiation damage, and He diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, A. K.; Guenthner, W.; Reiners, P. W.; Moser, A. C.; Miller, G. H.; Refsnider, K. A.

    2017-12-01

    We develop and apply a new protocol for targeting crystals for the zircon (U-Th)/He (He) thermochronometry to maximize effective U (eU) and corresponding closure temperature variability to develop zircon He date-eU correlations observed in some datasets. Our approach exploits visual proxies for radiation damage accumulation (metamictization) during zircon selection. We show that by purposefully targeting a spectrum of zircon textures from pristine to metamict grains, it is possible to generate broad eU variation in suites of zircon from a single sample and zircon He date-eU-metamictization trends that can be exploited to resolve increasingly complex thermal histories. We present plane light photographs, eU concentration, and zircon He results from 59 individual zircons from nine crystalline rock samples. Six of the nine samples come from exposed Proterozoic granitoids on SE Baffin Island, Canada; Boulder Creek, CO; Sandia Mountains, NM; and Mecca Hills, CA. We report data from three Archean Baffin samples to compare with the Proterozoic Baffin sample date-eU-metamictization trend. In each Proterozoic sample, target zircons display a spectrum of metamictization from pristine, transparent crystals to purple-brown, translucent grains. Progressive loss of transparency and increase in discoloration consistently corresponds to an increase in eU in all samples. Individual zircon eU varies from 89-1885 ppm and, within each sample, the total eU spread is 538 ppm to 1374 ppm. For any given eU value, the Archean zircon appear comparatively more metamict than the Proterozoic Baffin grains and samples collectively define a 1681 ppm range in eU, with more restrictive intrasample eU spreads (199-1120 ppm). Proterozoic samples from Baffin, Sandia, and Front Range yield negative zircon He date-eU correlations with intrasample date ranges of 90-783 Ma. Increasing eU and younger dates correspond with increasing metamictization. In contrast, all three Proterozoic Mecca Hills samples

  1. [Cellphone electromagnetic radiation damages the testicular ultrastructure of male rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiao-Hui; Hu, Hui-Rong; Ma, Xue-Lian; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Guo-Hong

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the influence of cellphone electromagnetic radiation (CER) on the testicular ultrastructure and the apoptosis of spermatogenic cells in male rats.atability, feasibility, applicability, and controllability in the construction of experimental animal models, we compared the major anatomic features of the penis of 20 adult beagle dogs with those of 10 adult men. Using microsurgical techniques, we performed cross-transplantation of the penis in the 20 (10 pairs) beagle dogs and observed the survival rate of the transplanted penises by FK506+MMF+MP immune induction. We compared the relevant indexes with those of the 10 cases of microsurgical replantation of the amputated penis. Thirty adult male SD rats were equally randomized into a 2 h CER, a 4 h CER, and a normal control group, the former two groups exposed to 30 days of 900 MHz CER for 2 and 4 hours a day, respectively, while the latter left untreated. Then the changes in the ultrastructure of the testis tissue were observed under the transmission electron microscope and the apoptosis of the spermatogenic cells was determined by TUNEL. Compared with the normal controls, the rats of the 2 h CER group showed swollen basement membrane of seminiferous tubules, separated tight junction of Sertoli cells, increased cell intervals, apparent vacuoles and medullization in some mitochondria, and increased apoptosis of spermatogenic cells, mainly the apoptosis of primary spermatocytes (P<0.05 ). In comparison with the 2 h CER group, the animals of the 4 h CER group exhibited swollen basement membrane of seminiferous tubules, more separated tight junction of Sertoli cells, wider cell intervals, incomplete membrane of spermatogonial cells, fragments of cytoplasm, nuclear pyknosis and notch, slight dilation of perinuclear space, abnormalities of intracellular mitochondria with vacuoles, fuzzy structure, and fusion or disappearance of some cristae, and increased damage of mitochondria and apoptosis of spermatogenic

  2. Comparison between cytogenetic damage induced in human lymphocytes by environmental chemicals or radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebulska-Wasilewska, A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    Author compared cytogenetic effects of chemicals (benzene and the member at benzene related compounds) and ionizing radiation on the human lymphocytes. Levels of various types of cytogenetic damage observed among people from petroleum plants workers groups are similar to the levels of damages detected in the blood of people suspected of the accidental exposure to a radiation source

  3. Comparison between cytogenetic damage induced in human lymphocytes by environmental chemicals or radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebulska-Wasilewska, A.

    1997-01-01

    Author compared cytogenetic effects of chemicals (benzene and the member at benzene related compounds) and ionizing radiation on the human lymphocytes. Levels of various types of cytogenetic damage observed among people from petroleum plants workers groups are similar to the levels of damages detected in the blood of people suspected of the accidental exposure to a radiation source

  4. Radiation damage of UO{sub 2} fuel; Radijaciono ostecenje UO{sub 2} goriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevanovic, M; Sigulinski, F [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1966-11-15

    Radiation damage study of fuel and fuel elements covers: study of radiation damage methods in Sweden; analysis of testing the fuel and fuel elements at the RA reactor; feasibility study of irradiation in the Institute compared to irradiation abroad in respect to the reactor possibilities. Tasks included in this study are relater to testing of irradiated UO{sub 2} and ceramic fuel elements.

  5. Design of offline measuring system for radiation damage effects on linear CCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yong; Tang Benqi; Xiao Zhigang; Wang Zujun; Huang Fang; Huang Shaoyan

    2004-01-01

    The paper discusses the hardware design of offline measuring system for radiation damage effects on linear CCD. Some credible results were achieved by using this system. The test results indicate that the system is available for the study of the radiation damage effects on linear CCD. (authors)

  6. Radiation damage studies related to nuclear waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, W.J.; Wald, J.W.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1981-12-01

    Much of the previously reported work on alpha radiation effects on crystalline phases of importance to nuclear waste forms has been derived from radiation effects studies of composite waste forms. In the present work, two single-phase crystalline materials, Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 (pyrochlore) and CaZrTi 2 O 7 (zirconolite), of relative importance to current waste forms were studied independently by doping with 244 Cm at the 3 wt % level. Changes in the crystalline structure measured by x-ray diffraction as a function of dose show that damage ingrowth follows an expected exponential relationship of the form ΔV/V 0 = A[1-exp(-BD)]. In both cases, the materials became x-ray amorphous before the estimated saturation value was reached. The predicted magnitudes of the unit cell volume changes at saturation are 5.4% and 3.5%, respectively, for Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 and CaZrTi 2 O 7 . The later material exhibited anisotropic behavior in which the expansion of the monoclinic cell in the c 0 direction was over five times that of the a 0 direction. The effects of transmutations on the properties of high-level waste solids have not been studied until now because of the long half-lives of the important fission products. This problem was circumvented in the present study by preparing materials containing natural cesium and then irradiating them with neutrons to produce 134 Cs, which has only a 2y half-life. The properties monitored at about one year intervals following irradiation have been density, leach rate and microstructure. A small amount of x-ray diffraction work has also been done. Small changes in density and leach rate have been observed for some of the materials, but they were not large enough to be of any consequence for the final disposal of high level wastes

  7. Alpha radiation and in-pile annealing effects on the fracture properties of a sintered alumino borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevilacqua, Arturo M.; Prado, Miguel O.; Messi de Bernasconi, Norma B.; Heredia, Arturo D.; Sanfilippo, Miguel

    1999-01-01

    The alpha radiation and the in-pile during irradiation effects on the hardness, the crack nucleation and the fracture toughness of the German alumino borosilicate glass SG7 were investigated by using the Vickers indentation. Cold pressed and sintered samples were irradiated with thermal neutrons, in the Argentine nuclear reactors RA-3 and RA-6, to produce alpha particles in the whole volume of the glass by means of the (n, alpha)-reaction with B-10. The Vickers hardness, the crack nucleation, as 50 percent fracture probability load, plotted as the Weibull's fracture probability distribution function and the fracture toughness, as critical stress intensity factor K Ic , were correlated to the four cumulative disintegration values. It was ascertained that: a) the Vickers hardness decreases from 5.6 GPa for the non-irradiated sample up to 4.7 GPa for the sample irradiated 70 h at the lower neutron flux (4.0 x 10 - sup 18 - alpha disintegration per cm - sup 3 -), b) the 50 % fracture probability load increases from 1.4 N for the non-irradiated sample up to 4.7 g for the sample irradiated 22 h at the higher flux (6.8 x 10 - sup 18 - alpha disintegration per cm - sup 3 -), and c) the stress intensity factor increases from 0.80 MPa.m - sup 1/2 - for the non irradiated sample up to 0.86 MPa.m - sup 1/2 - for the sample mentioned in b). The in-pile annealing was analyzed by comparing the crack nucleation after irradiation with data obtained by heavy ion irradiation followed by thermal annealing. Results for the SG7 glass were compared to those for soda-lime and borosilicate glasses. (author)

  8. Radiation damage in natural and synthetic halite. Progress report January 1992 - February 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Celma, A.

    1993-12-01

    This report complements the information presented in the report of December 1992 regarding the research performed at the ECN on radiation damage in salt. It consists of two parts. The first part regards the amount of stored energy which can be developed by gamma-irradiation on different types of halite and considers both the effect of low dose rates in developing radiation damage, and the possible saturation level of radiation damage in natural halite. The second part presents a model to simulate radiation damage development which incorporates some extensions in the Jain-Lidiard model. Due to malfunction of the Small Angle Neutron Scattering installation, neither the previously reported results nor the newly obtained can be trusted and therefore are not reported here. These results regard the shape, size and size distribution of radiation damage defects. (orig.)

  9. Clustered DNA damages induced in human hematopoietic cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Bennett, Paula V.; Cintron-Torres, Nela; Hada, Megumi; Trunk, John; Monteleone, Denise; Sutherland, John C.; Laval, Jacques; Stanislaus, Marisha; Gewirtz, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces clusters of DNA damages--oxidized bases, abasic sites and strand breaks--on opposing strands within a few helical turns. Such damages have been postulated to be difficult to repair, as are double strand breaks (one type of cluster). We have shown that low doses of low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induce such damage clusters in human cells. In human cells, DSB are about 30% of the total of complex damages, and the levels of DSBs and oxidized pyrimidine clusters are similar. The dose responses for cluster induction in cells can be described by a linear relationship, implying that even low doses of ionizing radiation can produce clustered damages. Studies are in progress to determine whether clusters can be produced by mechanisms other than ionizing radiation, as well as the levels of various cluster types formed by low and high LET radiation.

  10. Radiation damage studies of the FeNi alloys, pure and with impurities, by measuring magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciani, Valdir

    1978-01-01

    Radiation damage studies are interesting from various points of view, but they have two main aspects, fundamental and technological. The void formations in metals and alloys during irradiation with high energy particles is a problem of interest in Nuclear Technology. The supersaturation of vacancies is one condition for a void formation, which results in swelling as well as in changes of mechanical, electrical and magnetic properties of materials used in power reactor. Isothermal and linear annealings have been performed before, during and after irradiation with neutrons from the IEAR-1 reactor, between 400 and 500 deg C in argon atmosphere. The samples used have a following nominal compositions: Fe Ni (50 - 50% at); FeNiMo ( 50 - 50% at + 50 ppm); FeNiCr ( 49,95 - 49,95 - 0,1% at); FeNiCr (49,75 - 49,75 - 0,5% at). The initial permeability disaccommodation has been followed by Magnetic After Effect (MAE) Method, which permitted the determination of the time constants, activation energies and Curie points. From these parameters it was possible to evaluate the super saturation of vacancies, showing that the MAE can be used as practical method for the election of nuclear materials without attaining high fluences. Some observations have been performed for the sample FeNiCr (49,75 - 49,75 - 0,5% at), which showed pronounced anomalies in the initial permeability during linear annealing.(author)

  11. Scopolamine methylbromide mitigates radiation induced damage and lethality in zebrafish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, Nitisha; Joshi, Jayadev; Ghosh, Subhajit; Dimri, Manali; Prem Kumar, Indracanti; Sehgal, Neeta

    2014-01-01

    In view of the strategic importance radiation countermeasures hold, the present study was undertaken to screen a collection of small molecule clinical compounds for possible radioprotective action using zebrafish as a model system. Preliminary screening in developing zebrafish embryos (24 hour post fertilization, (hpf)) using damage manifestations and survival as end point identified scopolamine methylbromide (SMB), a muscarinic receptor antagonist, as a potential radiomitigator. It was found to be optimal (60% survival advantage after 6 th post irradiation day) at a dose of 80 μM when added 3 h post 20 Gy exposure. Mechanistic studies suggested that SMB though exhibited no significant antioxidant potential, but was found to limit radiation induced apoptosis (pre G1 population) quantified through flow cytometry (6 and 5% reduction after 8 or 24 h after treatments) and annexin V staining (8% reduction). Further, quantitative analysis, using caspase 3 assay, revealed a 2.46 fold increase in apoptosis in irradiated group and treatment of irradiated zebrafish embryos with SMB led to a significant reduction in global apoptosis (1.7 fold; p<0.05) when compared to irradiated group. In silico studies based on structural and functional similarity with known radioprotectors suggested similarities with atropine, a known anti-inflammatory agent with muscarinic antagonism and radioprotective potential. In view of this SMB was tested, in silico, for possible anti-inflammatory action. Molecular docking studies revealed that SMB interacts (B.E-8.0 Kcal/mole) with cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2). In lieu of this, anti-inflammation activity was assessed through ChIN (chemically induced inflammation) method in 3 dpf (days post fertilization) embryos and SMB was found to significantly inhibit inflammation at all doses studied from 20-200 μM at 3 and 6 hpi (hours post inflammation). Overall the result suggests that scopolamine methylbromide mitigates radiation induced injury and lethality in

  12. Radiation damage in diatomic materials at high doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, L.W.; Hughes, A.E.

    1975-10-01

    Radiation effects in diatomic materials can differ structurally from those in metals because of the need to take into account different displacement rates on the two sublattices and the inevitable stoichiometric implications; in most diatomic insulators the anion species has the greater displacement cross section. Anion point defect stabilisation in heavily-irradiated (0.1 to 10 dpa) diatomic insulators has been studied using radiolysis of alkali and alkaline earth halides. A temperatures > 0.3 Tsub(m), all anion defects are mobile and can aggregate. Aggregation of anion interstitials results in creation of perfect dislocation loops without the need for primary cation displacements; simultaneous formation of substitutional anion molecular centres provides the necessary cation interstitials. Aggregation of anion vacancies leads to formation of metallic inclusions of the cation species, in some cases in an ordered array, which is the analogue, on a single sublattice, to the void lattice in metals. Availability of sinks for both anion interstitials and anion vacancies yields defect growth kinetics similar to those observed during formation of voids in irradiated metals, and a very high level of damage (approximately 10%) can be sustained in the lattice. The width of the temperature region concerned is much narrower, however, due to the possibility of recombination of aggregated or re-emitted anion vacancies with mobile or dispersed anion molecular defects; the latter can also aggregate to form fluid anion molecular inclusions and so complete the decomposition of the solid into separate phases of its constituent elements. (author)

  13. Radiation displacement damage estimates for a radionuclide waste stabilization material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, K.W.

    1977-01-01

    Estimates of the number of atomic displacements produced in pollucite by the radioactive decay of Cs-134 are made. Pollucite is a candidate material for radionuclide waste stabilization, while Cs-134 is one of the radionuclide products which would be chemically bound in the pollucite lattice. At the maximum concentration of Cs-134 in pollucite, assuming a threshold displacement energy of 15.0 eV, the displacement rate is estimated to be 4.3 x 10 12 atoms/cm 3 /second which includes all atomic species in the pollucite lattice. It was found that most of the displacements, 85 percent, were caused by elastic scattering of photoelectrons and Compton electrons which are products of γ-ray interactions in the material. Most of the remaining displacements are caused by elastic scattering of β-particles. Recoil energies of the Ba daughter product are insufficient to cause displacement. Atomic displacements of nearest neighbors, atoms within one lattice spacing of the decay site, are estimated to be 2.7 x 10 6 atoms/cm 3 /second. These estimates provide a starting point for assessing the long term stability of pollucite to radiation damage

  14. Radiation damage to DNA in DNA-protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotheim-Maurizot, M; Davídková, M

    2011-06-03

    The most aggressive product of water radiolysis, the hydroxyl (OH) radical, is responsible for the indirect effect of ionizing radiations on DNA in solution and aerobic conditions. According to radiolytic footprinting experiments, the resulting strand breaks and base modifications are inhomogeneously distributed along the DNA molecule irradiated free or bound to ligands (polyamines, thiols, proteins). A Monte-Carlo based model of simulation of the reaction of OH radicals with the macromolecules, called RADACK, allows calculating the relative probability of damage of each nucleotide of DNA irradiated alone or in complexes with proteins. RADACK calculations require the knowledge of the three dimensional structure of DNA and its complexes (determined by X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy or molecular modeling). The confrontation of the calculated values with the results of the radiolytic footprinting experiments together with molecular modeling calculations show that: (1) the extent and location of the lesions are strongly dependent on the structure of DNA, which in turns is modulated by the base sequence and by the binding of proteins and (2) the regions in contact with the protein can be protected against the attack by the hydroxyl radicals via masking of the binding site and by scavenging of the radicals. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A novel theory of radiation damage at high doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeger, A.; Stuttgart Univ.

    1989-01-01

    Deviations of radiation damage (in the case of metals usually monitored by the residual electrical resistivity) from proportionality with the irradiation dose have so far been analysed almost exclusively in terms of extensions of models originally developed for small doses. The present theory considers the opposite limit i.e. the quasi-saturated state. It is argued that at high doses the Lueck-Sizmann effect may result in a self-organization of clusters of vacancies and self-interstitials, forming a heterogeneous froth. Possible structures of this froth and its effect on the electrical resistivity of metals are discussed. The model is shown to account for the dependence of the ''saturation resistivity'' on the nature of the irradiation as well as for several other hitherto poorly explained observations. Among them are the electrical-resistivity variation induced by high-dose irradiation with heavy ions, the amorphization of certain alloys by high-dose electron irradiation, and the occurrence of ordered arrays of stacking-fault tetrahedra after in-situ irradiations in high-voltage electron microscopes. (author)

  16. A hybrid model of primary radiation damage in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarin, S.I.; Dremov, V.V.

    2009-01-01

    The paper offers a hybrid model which combines molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo (MD+MC) methods to describe primary radiation damage in crystals, caused by particles whose energies are no higher than several tens of keV. The particles are tracked in accord with equations of motion with account for pair interaction. The model also considers particle interaction with the mean-field potential (MFP) of the crystal. Only particles involved in cascading are tracked. Equations of motion for these particles include dissipative forces which describe energy exchange between cascade particles and electrons. New particles - the atoms of the crystal in the cascade region - have stochastic parameters (phase coordinates); they are sampled by the Monte Carlo method from the distribution that describes the classic canonical ensemble of non-interacting particles subjected to the external MFP. The introduction of particle interaction with the MFP helps avoid difficulties related to crystal stability and the choice of an adequate interparticle interaction potential in the traditional MD methods. Our technique is many times as fast as the traditional MD methods because we consider only particles which are involved in cascading and apply special methods to speedup the calculation of forces by accounting for the short-range pair potential used

  17. Monitoring radiation damage in the LHCb Silicon Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Graverini, Elena

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of LHCb is to search for indirect evidence of new physics in decays of heavy hadrons. The LHCb detector is a single-arm forward spectrometer with precise silicon-strip detectors in the regions with highest particle occupancies. The non-uniform exposure of the LHCb sensors makes it an ideal laboratory to study radiation damage effects in silicon detectors. The LHCb Silicon Tracker is composed of an upstream tracker, the TT, and of the inner part of the downstream tracker (IT). Dedicated scans are regularly taken, which allow a precise measurement of the charge collection efficiency (CCE) and the calibration of the operational voltages. The measured evolution of the effective depletion voltage $V_{depl}$ is shown, and compared with the Hamburg model prediction. The magnitudes of the sensor leakage current are also analysed and compared to their expected evolution according to phenomenological models. Our results prove that both the TT and the IT will withstand normal operation until the end of the L...

  18. Radiation damage in stainless steel under varying temperature neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Naoaki [Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1998-03-01

    Microstructural evolution of model alloys of 316SS was examined by neutron irradiation at JMTR under cyclic temperature varying condition. In the case of Fe-16Cr-17Ni, formation of interstitial loops and voids are strongly suppressed by varying the temperature from 473K to 673K. By adding Ti as miner element (0.25wt%), however, abnormal accumulation of vacancies (void swelling of 11%dpa at 0.1dpa) was observed. Theoretical analysis standing on the rate theory of defect clustering and simulation irradiation experiments with heavy ions indicates that the vacancy-rich condition which appears temporally during and after changing the temperature from low to high brings these results. It was also shown that only 1 dpa pre-irradiation at low temperature changes swelling behavior at high temperature above several 10 dpa. The understanding of non-steady-state defect processes under temperature varying irradiation is very important to estimate the radiation damage under fusion environment where short-term and long-term temperature variation is expected. (author)

  19. Material properties of Bohunice 1 and 2 reactor pressure vessel materials before and after annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Novosad, P.; Vacek, M.

    1994-01-01

    Six types of experimental RPV materials were studied before and after irradiation in host nuclear power and research reactors. Recovery of RPV materials from radiation hardening and embrittlement after annealing was evaluated including a rate of radiation damage after reirradiation used. (author). 3 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  20. Radiation damage related to fusion-reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brimhall, J.L.

    1982-03-01

    Three reasons why the fusion irradiation environment could produce different damage microstructure will be discussed: (1) the primary damage state induced by a higher energy primary knock-on-spectra; (2) increased helium generation due to high eta, α cross sections; and (3) pulsed operation of the irradiation environment. Examples of the microstructural damage caused by each of the above will be given

  1. Defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Hara, Masanori; Otsuka, Teppei; Oya, Yasuhisa; Hatano, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Three tungsten samples irradiated at High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were exposed to deuterium plasma (ion fluence of 1 × 10 26 m −2 ) at three different temperatures (100, 200, and 500 °C) in Tritium Plasma Experiment at Idaho National Laboratory. Subsequently, thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed with a ramp rate of 10 °C min −1 up to 900 °C, and the samples were annealed at 900 °C for 0.5 h. These procedures were repeated three times to uncover defect-annealing effects on deuterium retention. The results show that deuterium retention decreases approximately 70% for at 500 °C after each annealing, and radiation damages were not annealed out completely even after the 3rd annealing. TMAP modeling revealed the trap concentration decreases approximately 80% after each annealing at 900 °C for 0.5 h

  2. Defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Masashi; Hara, Masanori; Otsuka, Teppei; Oya, Yasuhisa; Hatano, Yuji

    2015-08-01

    Three tungsten samples irradiated at High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were exposed to deuterium plasma (ion fluence of 1 × 1026 m-2) at three different temperatures (100, 200, and 500 °C) in Tritium Plasma Experiment at Idaho National Laboratory. Subsequently, thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed with a ramp rate of 10 °C min-1 up to 900 °C, and the samples were annealed at 900 °C for 0.5 h. These procedures were repeated three times to uncover defect-annealing effects on deuterium retention. The results show that deuterium retention decreases approximately 70% for at 500 °C after each annealing, and radiation damages were not annealed out completely even after the 3rd annealing. TMAP modeling revealed the trap concentration decreases approximately 80% after each annealing at 900 °C for 0.5 h.

  3. Defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Masashi, E-mail: Masashi.Shimada@inl.gov [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hara, Masanori [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama (Japan); Otsuka, Teppei [Kyushu University, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan); Oya, Yasuhisa [Radioscience Research Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka (Japan); Hatano, Yuji [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Three tungsten samples irradiated at High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were exposed to deuterium plasma (ion fluence of 1 × 10{sup 26} m{sup −2}) at three different temperatures (100, 200, and 500 °C) in Tritium Plasma Experiment at Idaho National Laboratory. Subsequently, thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed with a ramp rate of 10 °C min{sup −1} up to 900 °C, and the samples were annealed at 900 °C for 0.5 h. These procedures were repeated three times to uncover defect-annealing effects on deuterium retention. The results show that deuterium retention decreases approximately 70% for at 500 °C after each annealing, and radiation damages were not annealed out completely even after the 3rd annealing. TMAP modeling revealed the trap concentration decreases approximately 80% after each annealing at 900 °C for 0.5 h.

  4. Infrared thermal annealing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladys, M.J.; Clarke, I.; O'Connor, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    A device for annealing samples within an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) scanning tunneling microscopy system was designed, constructed, and tested. The device is based on illuminating the sample with infrared radiation from outside the UHV chamber with a tungsten projector bulb. The apparatus uses an elliptical mirror to focus the beam through a sapphire viewport for low absorption. Experiments were conducted on clean Pd(100) and annealing temperatures in excess of 1000 K were easily reached

  5. Development of radiation biological dosimetry and treatment of radiation-induced damaged tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Chul Koo; Kim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Yun Sil

    2000-04-01

    Util now, only a few methods have been developed for radiation biological dosimetry such as conventional chromosome aberration and micronucleus in peripheral blood cell. However, because these methods not only can be estimated by the expert, but also have a little limitation due to need high technique and many times in the case of radiation accident, it is very difficult to evaluate the absorbed dose of victims. Therefore, we should develop effective, easy, simple and rapid biodosimetry and its guideline(triage) to be able to be treated the victims as fast as possible. We established the apoptotic fragment assay, PCC, comet assay, and micronucleus assay which was the significant relationship between dose and cell damages to evaluate the irradiated dose as correct and rapid as possible using lymphocytes and crypt cells, and compared with chromosome dosimetry and micronucleus assay

  6. Development of radiation biological dosimetry and treatment of radiation-induced damaged tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chul Koo; Kim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Yun Sil [and others

    2000-04-01

    Util now, only a few methods have been developed for radiation biological dosimetry such as conventional chromosome aberration and micronucleus in peripheral blood cell. However, because these methods not only can be estimated by the expert, but also have a little limitation due to need high technique and many times in the case of radiation accident, it is very difficult to evaluate the absorbed dose of victims. Therefore, we should develop effective, easy, simple and rapid biodosimetry and its guideline(triage) to be able to be treated the victims as fast as possible. We established the apoptotic fragment assay, PCC, comet assay, and micronucleus assay which was the significant relationship between dose and cell damages to evaluate the irradiated dose as correct and rapid as possible using lymphocytes and crypt cells, and compared with chromosome dosimetry and micronucleus assay.

  7. Effects of thermal annealing on the radiation produced electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of bovine and equine tooth enamel: Fossil and modern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, Robert A.; Bogard, James S.; Elam, J. Michael; Weinand, Daniel C.; Kramer, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    The concentration of stable radiation-induced paramagnetic states in fossil teeth can be used as a measure of sample age. Temperature excursions >100 deg. C, however, can cause the paramagnetic state clock to differ from the actual postmortem time. We have heated irradiated enamel from both fossilized bovid and modern equine (MEQ) teeth for 30 min in 50 deg. C increments from 100 to 300 deg. C, measuring the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum after each anneal, to investigate such effects. Samples were irradiated again after the last anneal, with doses of 300-1200 Gy from 60 Co photons, and measured. Two unirradiated MEQ samples were also annealed for 30 min at 300 deg. C, one in an evacuated EPR tube and the other in a tube open to the atmosphere, and subsequently irradiated. The data showed that hyperfine components attributed to the alanine radical were not detected in the irradiated MEQ sample until after the anneals. The spectrum of the MEQ sample heated in air and then irradiated was similar to that of the heat treated fossil sample. We conclude that the hyperfine components are due to sample heating to temperatures/times >100 deg. C/30 min and that similarities between fossil and MEQ spectra after the 300 deg. C/30 min MEQ anneal are also due to sample heating. We conclude that the presence of the hyperfine components in spectra of fossil tooth enamel indicate that such thermal events occurred either at the time of death, or during the postmortem history

  8. Radiation annealing mechanisms of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steels dependent on irradiation temperature and neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pachur, D.

    1982-01-01

    Heat treatment after irradiation of reactor pressure vessel steels showed annealing of irradiation embrittlement. Depending on the irradiation temperature, the embrittlement started to anneal at about 220 0 C and was completely annealed at 500 0 C with 4 h of annealing time. The annealing behavior was normally measured in terms of the Vickers hardness increase produced by irradiation relative to the initial hardness as a function of the annealing temperature. Annealing results of other mechanical properties correspond to hardness results. During annealing, various recovery mechanisms occur in different temperature ranges. These are characterized by activation energies from 1.5 to 2.1 eV. The individual mechanisms were determined by the different time dependencies at various temperatures. The relative contributions of the mechanisms showed a neutron fluence dependence, with the lower activation energy mechanisms being predominant at low fluence and vice versa. In the temperature range where partial annealing of a mechanism took place during irradiation, an increase in activation energy was observed. Trend curves for the increase in transition temperature with irradiation, for the relative increase of Vickers hardness and yield strength, and for the relative decrease of Charpy-V upper shelf energy are interpreted by the behavior of different mechanisms

  9. Annealing effects on the migration of ion-implanted cadmium in glassy carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlatshwayo, T.T., E-mail: thulani.hlatshwayo@up.ac.za [Physics Department, University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa); Sebitla, L.D. [Physics Department, University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa); Physics Department, University of Botswana, Gaborone (Botswana); Njoroge, E.G.; Mlambo, M.; Malherbe, J.B. [Physics Department, University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2017-03-15

    The migration behaviour of cadmium (Cd) implanted into glassy carbon and the effects of annealing on radiation damage introduced by ion implantation were investigated. The glassy carbon substrates were implanted with Cd at a dose of 2 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} and energy of 360 keV. The implantation was performed at room temperature (RT), 430 °C and 600 °C. The RT implanted samples were isochronally annealed in vacuum at 350, 500 and 600 °C for 1 h and isothermally annealed at 350 °C up to 4 h. The as-implanted and annealed samples were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). Raman results revealed that implantation at room temperature amorphized the glassy carbon structure while high temperature implantations resulted in slightly less radiation damage. Isochronal annealing of the RT implanted samples resulted in some recrystallization as a function of increasing temperature. The original glassy carbon structure was not achieved at the highest annealing temperature of 600 °C. Diffusion of Cd in glassy carbon was already taking place during implantation at 430 °C. This diffusion of Cd was accompanied by significant loss from the surface during implantation at 600 °C. Isochronal annealing of the room temperature implanted samples at 350 °C for 1 h caused Cd to diffuse towards the bulk while isothermal annealing at 500 and 600 °C resulted in the migration of implanted Cd toward the surface accompanied by a loss of Cd from the surface. Isothermal annealing at 350 °C for 1 h caused Cd to diffuse towards the bulk while for annealing time >1 h Cd diffused towards the surface. These results were interpreted in terms of trapping and de-trapping of implanted Cd by radiation damage.

  10. Radiation damage calculations for the APT materials test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corzine, R.K.; Wechsler, M.S.; Dudziak, D.J.; Ferguson, P.D.; James, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    A materials irradiation was performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in the fall of 1996 and spring of 1997 in support of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program. Testing of the irradiated materials is underway. In the proposed APT design, materials in the target and blanket are to be exposed to protons and neutrons over a wide range of energies. The irradiation and testing program was undertaken to enlarge the very limited direct knowledge presently available of the effects of medium-energy protons (∼1 GeV) on the properties of engineering materials. APT candidate materials were placed in or near the LANSCE accelerator 800-MeV, 1-mA proton beam and received roughly the same proton current density in the center of the beam as would be the case for the APT facility. As a result, the proton fluences achieved in the irradiation were expected to approach the APT prototypic full-power-year values. To predict accurately the performance of materials in APT, radiation damage parameters for the materials experiment must be determined. By modeling the experiment, calculations for atomic displacement, helium and hydrogen cross sections and for proton and neutron fluences were done for representative samples in the 17A, 18A, and 18C areas. The LAHET code system (LCS) was used to model the irradiation program, LAHET 2.82 within LCS transports protons > 1 MeV, and neutrons >20 MeV. A modified version of MCNP for use in LCS, HMCNP 4A, was employed to tally neutrons of energies <20 MeV

  11. Radiation damage in Fe-Cr alloys: Atomistic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terentyev, Dmitry; Malerba, Lorenzo; Bonny, Giovanni; Castin, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    High-Cr ferritic-martensitic steels are the most promising candidate structural materials for future advanced fission reactors, as well as for fusion systems, due to their better thermomechanical properties and higher radiation resistance as compared to austenitic steels. The performance of these steels, especially under irradiation, appears to be largely determined by the Cr content. For instance, the current choice of steel compositions around ∼9 wt% Cr is mainly based on the observation of a local minimum in the ductile-brittle transition temperature shift at this composition. On the other hand, reduced void swelling is observed between 3 and 12 wt% Cr. The origin of these and other Cr-dependent effects remained unexplained for a long time, thereby calling for a physical modelling effort addressing these questions. In this presentation, an overview is given on the effort made in recent years to construct a whole modelling framework, from ab initio to dislocations, to provide explanations to the above-mentioned issues. Ab initio calculations combined to the development of the interatomic potentials capable of grasping key features of Cr atoms embedded in perfect and defected Fe matrix, were required. Primary damage, defect migration, Cr mass transport, phase separation, Cr-defect segregation and dislocation-defect interactions could then be studied using fully atomistic approaches. Our research shows that many of the effects of Cr content on the behaviour of these alloys under irradiation can be attributed to the only recently highlighted high solubility of Cr in Fe (∼10 wt%), below which, in addition, Cr atoms tend to order. The presentation will clarify how this aspect, combined with the high affinity between Cr atoms and self-interstitials defects, influences and partly explain both microstructure evolution and mechanical behaviour of high-Cr steels under irradiation. (author)

  12. Computer simulation of radiation damage in NaCl using a kinetic rate reaction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soppe, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    Sodium chloride and other alkali halides are known to be very susceptible to radiation damage in the halogen sublattice when exposed to ionizing radiation. The formation of radiation damage in NaCl has generated interest because of the relevance of this damage to the disposal of radioactive waste in rock salt formations. In order to estimate the long-term behaviour of a rock salt repository, an accurate theory describing the major processes of radiation damage in NaCl is required. The model presented in this paper is an extended version of the Jain-Lidiard model; its extensions comprise the effect of impurities and the colloid nucleation stage on the formation of radiation damage. The new model has been tested against various experimental data obtained from the literature and accounts for several well known aspects of radiation damage in alkali halides which were not covered by the original Jain-Lidiard model. The new model thus may be expected to provide more reliable predictions for the build-up of radiation damage in a rock salt nuclear waste repository. (Author)

  13. Current study on ionizing radiation-induced mitochondial DNA damage and mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xin; Wang Zhenhua; Zhang Hong

    2012-01-01

    Current advance in ionizing radiation-induced mitochondrial DNA damage and mutations is reviewed, in addition with the essential differences between mtDNA and nDNA damage and mutations. To extent the knowledge about radiation induced mitochondrial alterations, the researchers in Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences developed some technics such as real-time PCR, long-PCR for accurate quantification of radiation induced damage and mutations, and in-depth investigation about the functional changes of mitochondria based on mtDNA damage and mutations were also carried out. In conclusion, the important role of mitochondrial study in radiation biology is underlined, and further study on mitochondrial study associated with late effect and metabolism changes in radiation biology is pointed out. (authors)

  14. Infrared A radiation promotes survival of human melanocytes carrying ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimeswenger, Susanne; Schwarz, Agatha; Födinger, Dagmar; Müller, Susanne; Pehamberger, Hubert; Schwarz, Thomas; Jantschitsch, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The link between solar radiation and melanoma is still elusive. Although infrared radiation (IR) accounts for over 50% of terrestrial solar energy, its influence on human skin is not well explored. There is increasing evidence that IR influences the expression patterns of several molecules independently of heat. A previous in vivo study revealed that pretreatment with IR might promote the development of UVR-induced non-epithelial skin cancer and possibly of melanoma in mice. To expand on this, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of IR on UVR-induced apoptosis and DNA repair in normal human epidermal melanocytes. The balance between these two effects is a key factor of malignant transformation. Human melanocytes were exposed to physiologic doses of IR and UVR. Compared to cells irradiated with UVR only, simultaneous exposure to IR significantly reduced the apoptotic rate. However, IR did not influence the repair of UVR-induced DNA damage. IR partly reversed the pro-apoptotic effects of UVR via modification of the expression and activity of proteins mainly of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. In conclusion, IR enhances the survival of melanocytes carrying UVR-induced DNA damage and thereby might contribute to melanomagenesis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Origin of reverse annealing effect in hydrogen-implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di, Zengfeng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nastasi, Michael A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yongqiang [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In contradiction to conventional damage annealing, thermally annealed H-implanted Si exhibits an increase in damage or reverse annealing behavior, whose mechanism has remained elusive. On the basis of quantitative high resolution transmission electron microscopy combined with channeling Rutherford backscattering analysis, we conclusively elucidate that the reverse annealing effect is due to the nucleation and growth of hydrogen-induce platelets. Platelets are responsible for an increase in the height and width the channeling damage peak following increased isochronal anneals.

  16. Flavonoids can protect maize DNA from the induction of ultraviolet radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapleton, A.E.; Walbot, V.

    1994-01-01

    Diverse flavonoid compounds are widely distributed in angiosperm families. Flavonoids absorb radiation in the ultraviolet (UV) region of the spectrum, and it has been proposed that these compounds function as UV filters. We demonstrate that the DNA in Zea mays plants that contain flavonoids (primarily anthocyanins) is protected from the induction of damage caused by UV radiation relative to the DNA in plants that are genetically deficient in these compounds. DNA damage was measured with a sensitive and simple assay using individual monoclonal antibodies, one specific for cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer damage and the other specific for pyrimidine(6,4)pyrimidone damage. (author)

  17. Radiation damage in diagnostic windows for the TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primak, W.

    1979-01-01

    Radiation effects in diagnostic window materials are being estimated and additional experimental data on the radiation behavior are being sought. The materials considered thus far are vitreous silica, crystal quartz, and synthetic sapphire

  18. Annealing of radiation-induced defects in silicon in a simplified phenomenological model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazanu, S.; Lazanu, I.

    2001-01-01

    The concentration of primary radiation-induced defects has been previously estimated considering both the explicit mechanisms of the primary interaction between the incoming particle and the nuclei of the semiconductor lattice, and the recoil energy partition between ionisation and displacements, in the frame of the Lindhard theory. The primary displacement defects are vacancies and interstitials that are essentially unstable in silicon. They interact via migration, recombination, annihilation or produce other defects. In the present work, the time evolution of the concentration of defects induced by pions in medium and high resistivity silicon for detectors is modelled, after irradiation. In some approximations, the differential equations representing the time evolution processes could be decoupled. The theoretical equations so obtained are solved analytically in some particular cases, with one free parameter, for a wide range of particle fluences and/or for a wide energy range of incident particles, for different temperatures; the corresponding stationary solutions are also presented

  19. Evolution of the radiation-induced defect structure in 316 type stainless steel after post-irradiation annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Renterghem, W., E-mail: wvrenter@sckcen.be; Konstantinović, M.J., E-mail: mkonstan@sckcen.be; Vankeerberghen, M., E-mail: mvankeer@sckcen.be

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • TEM study of irradiated CW316 steel after post-irradiation annealing. • Frank loops were removed after annealing at 550 °C, by unfaulting and growing. • The cavity density decreases after annealing at 550 °C, but not completely removed. • Frank loop and cavity removal is controlled by the annealing temperature. • The dissolution of γ' precipitates is controlled by the iron diffusion length. - Abstract: The thermal stability of Frank loops, black dots, cavities and γ′ precipitates in an irradiated 316 stainless steel was studied by transmission electron microscopy. The samples were retrieved from a thimble tube irradiated at around 320 °C up to 80 dpa in a commercial nuclear power reactor, and thermally annealed, varying both annealing temperature and time. With increasing annealing temperature the density of all defects gradually decreased, resulting in the complete removal of Frank loops at 550 °C. In contrast to other defects, the density of the γ′ precipitates sharply decreased with increasing annealing time, which indicates that the dissolution of the γ′ precipitates is governed by the iron diffusion length.

  20. Studies of radiation damage in silicon sensors and a measurement of the inelastic proton--proton cross-section at 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00360674; Ward, Patricia

    This thesis presents studies of radiation damage in silicon sensors for the new ATLAS tracker at the high-luminosity LHC, calibrations of the LHC luminosity scale, and a measurement of the proton--proton inelastic cross-section at 13 TeV~with ATLAS data. The studies of radiation damage are performed by comparing sensor performance before and after irradiation, and include annealing studies. The measured quantities include: leakage current, depletion depth, inter-strip isolation, and charge collection. Surface and bulk damage is studied by comparing the results of sensors irradiated with protons and neutrons. The observed degradation of performance suggests the current sensor design will endure the radiation damage expected over the lifetime of the experiment at the high-luminosity LHC. The luminosity is calibrated for the proton--proton, proton--lead, and lead--lead collisions delivered by the LHC during 2013 and 2015. The absolute luminosity scale is derived with the van der Meer method. The systematic unc...

  1. Radiation damage studies on polystyrene-based scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britvich, G.I.; Peresypkin, A.I.; Rykalin, V.I.

    1991-01-01

    The radiation resistance of polystyrene-based scintillators containing various scintillation dopes is reported. All samples were irradiated to 137 Cs gamma rays in air at room temperature. The examination of radiation resistance of about thirty fluorescence compounds has been made. The most radiation-hard fluores are X25, X31, 3HF and M3HF. 1 fig.; 6 tabs

  2. Relative response of TL and component-resolved OSL to alpha and beta radiations in annealed sedimentary quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polymeris, George S.; Afouxenidis, Dimitrios; Raptis, Spyridoula; Liritzis, Ioannis; Tsirliganis, Nestor C.; Kitis, George

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the relative luminescence response to alpha and beta radiation is very important in TL and OSL dating. In the present study the relative alpha to beta response is studied in a sedimentary quartz sample, previously fired at 900 deg. C for 1 h, in the dose region between 1 and 128 Gy, for both thermoluminescence (TL) and linearly modulated optically stimulated luminescence (LM - OSL). The LM - OSL measurements were performed at room temperature and at 125 deg. C. All OSL signals were deconvolved into their individual components. Comparison of OSL curves after alpha and beta irradiation strongly supports that quartz OSL components follow first order kinetics in both cases. In the case of TL, the relative alpha to beta response is found to be very different for each TL glow-peak, but it does not depend strongly on irradiation dose. In the case of LM - OSL measurements, it is found that the relative behaviour of the alpha to beta response is different for three distinct regions, namely the fast OSL component, the region of medium OSL component originating from the TL glow-peak at 110 deg. C when stimulation takes place at room temperature and finally the region of slow OSL component. Following stimulation at ambient temperature, the relative alpha to beta response of all components was not observed to depend significantly on dose, with the value of ratio being 0.03 and a tendency to decrease with increasing dose. However, in the case of measurements performed at 125 deg. C, the relative response of the fast components is much enhanced, and for the remaining components it increases with increasing dose. Special care must be taken to examine the relative alpha to beta response of the fast component at 125 deg. C which contrasts the relative response of the TL peak at ca. 325 deg. C. The implications for the dating of annealed quartz are also briefly discussed. - Highlights: → Relative alpha to beta response for TL and LM-OSL is studied in annealed

  3. Photoprotection beyond ultraviolet radiation--effective sun protection has to include protection against infrared A radiation-induced skin damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, P; Calles, C; Benesova, T; Macaluso, F; Krutmann, J

    2010-01-01

    Solar radiation is well known to damage human skin, for example by causing premature skin ageing (i.e. photoageing). We have recently learned that this damage does not result from ultraviolet (UV) radiation alone, but also from longer wavelengths, in particular near-infrared radiation (IRA radiation, 760-1,440 nm). IRA radiation accounts for more than one third of the solar energy that reaches human skin. While infrared radiation of longer wavelengths (IRB and IRC) does not penetrate deeply into the skin, more than 65% of the shorter wavelength (IRA) reaches the dermis. IRA radiation has been demonstrated to alter the collagen equilibrium of the dermal extracellular matrix in at least two ways: (a) by leading to an increased expression of the collagen-degrading enzyme matrix metalloproteinase 1, and (b) by decreasing the de novo synthesis of the collagen itself. IRA radiation exposure therefore induces similar biological effects to UV radiation, but the underlying mechanisms are substantially different, specifically, the cellular response to IRA irradiation involves the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Effective sun protection requires specific strategies to prevent IRA radiation-induced skin damage. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Cytogenetic techniques as biological indicator and dosimeter of radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjidekova, V.; Hristova, R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The cytogenetic methods are established techniques for bio monitoring and bio dosimetry of professionally and accidentally exposed to ionizing radiation subjects. They are applied to continue the evaluation of the physical dosimetry and to consider the individual radiosensitivity. The results of cytogenetic monitoring and dosimetry of radiation exposed subjects carried out during the last 5 years in laboratory of Radiation Genetics, NCRRP is reported. Laboratory of Radiation genetics performs cytogenetic monitoring of low dose radiation professionally or medically exposed subjects: workers in Kozloduy NPP, radioactive waste repository workers, X-rays diagnostically exposed patients, and radiotherapy exposed as well. Three cytogenetic indicators are applied as the most sensitive indicators for human radiation exposure: analysis of micronuclei (MN), chromosomal aberrations (CA) and stable translocations (FISH). The optimized methodology for application of different cytogenetic techniques for radiation estimation is discussed

  5. Radio-oxidative membrane damage and its possible role as an indicator of radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amit Kumar; Pandey, B.N.; Mishra, K.P.

    2004-01-01

    Cellular membranes have been recognized as a sensitive target in the mechanism of ionizing radiation-induced cell killing. In our laboratory, studies have been devoted to investigations on gamma radiation induced oxidative damage to model and cellular membrane damage by employing fluorescence and electron spin resonance (ESR) methods Considerable evidences has accumulated to suggest that radiation induced oxidative damage was related to apoptotic death of a variety of cells in culture. Radiation induced damage involving lipid peroxidation, altered bilayer fluidity, permeability changes and intracellular generated ROS have been evaluated by chemical and physical methods. Modification of damage by structural modulating agents such as cholesterol and antioxidants such as eugenol, ascorbic acid, ellagic acid, triphala have been extensively investigated. Generation of intracellular ROS in radiation stressed normal cell e.g. mouse thymocytes, tumor cells e.g. Ehrlich ascites cells and human cervical cell line were evaluated after exposure from low to moderate doses of α-radiation. Results suggest that modulation of intracellular ROS level may be an important approach to alter radio-cytotoxicity of cells. This presentation would describe results of our study together with an overview of free radical mediated oxidative damage to cellular membrane as an indicator of radiation exposure. (author)

  6. Quantification of complex DNA damage by ionising radiation. An experimental and theoretical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulford, J.

    2000-05-01

    Ionising radiation potentially produces a broad spectrum of damage in DNA including single and double strand breaks (ssb and dsb) and base damages. It has been hypothesised that sites of complex damage within cellular DNA have particular biological significance due to an associated decreased efficiency in repair. The aim of this study is to gain further understanding of the formation of complex DNA damage. Irradiations of plasmid DNA illustrate that an increase in ionising density of the radiation results in a decrease in ssb yields/Gy but an increase in dsb per ssb, indicative of an increase in the number of complex damage sites per simple isolated damage site. As the mechanism for damage formation shifts from purely indirect at low scavenging capacities to a significant proportion of direct at higher scavenging capacities the proportion of complex damage increases. Comparisons with the yields of ssb and dsb simulated by Monte-Carlo calculations for Al K USX and α-particles also indicate this correspondence. The ionisation density of low energy, secondary electrons produced by photons was assessed experimentally from the dependence of the yield of OH radicals escaping intra-track recombination on photon energy. As energy decreases the OH radical yield initially decreases reflecting an increased ionisation density. However, with further decrease in photon energy the yield of OH radicals increases in line with theoretical calculations. Base damage yields were determined for low and high ionising density radiation over a range of scavenging capacities. As scavenging capacity increases the base damage: ssb ratios increases implying a contribution from electrons to base damage. It is proposed that base damage contributes to DNA damage complexity. Complex damage analysis reveals that at cell mimetic scavenging capacities, 23% and 72% of ssb have an additional spatially close damage site following γ-ray and α-particle irradiation respectively. (author)

  7. Non-Destructive Detection and Separation of Radiation Damaged Cells in Miniaturized, Inexpensive Device, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is a clear and well-identified need for rapid, efficient, non-destructive detection and isolation of radiation damaged cells. Available commercial technologies...

  8. Relation of radiation damage of metallic solids to electronic structure. Pt. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalaev, A.M.; Adamenko, A.A.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of relating a damage in metal solids to the parameters of radiation fluxes and the physical nature of a target is considered. Basing upon experimental and theoretical investigations into the processes of interaction of particle fluxes with solids, the following conclusions have been reached. Threshold energy of ion displacement in the crystal lattice of a metal solid is dependent on the energy of a bombarding particle, which is due to ionization and electroexcitation stimulated by energy transfer from a fast particle to a system of collectivized electrons. The rate of metal solid damage by radiation depends on the state of the crystal lattice, in particular on its defectness. Variations of local electron density in the vicinity of a defect are related with changing thermodynamic characteristics of radiation-induced defect formation. A type of atomic bond in a solid affects the rate of radiation damage. The greatest damage occurs in materials with a covalent bond

  9. Use of high voltage electron microscope to simulate radiation damage by neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, R.M.

    1976-01-01

    The use of the high voltage electron microscope to simulate radiation damage by neutrons is briefly reviewed. This information is important in explaining how alloying affects void formation during neutron irradiation

  10. Account of the effect of nuclear collision cascades in model of radiation damage of RPV steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevorkyan, Yu.R.; Nikolaev, Yu.A.

    1997-01-01

    A kinetic model is proposed for describing the effect of collision cascades in model of radiation damage of reactor pressure vessel steels. This is a closed system of equations which can be solved only by numerical methods in general case

  11. The use of the SRIM code for calculation of radiation damage induced by neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, A.; Hamidi, S.; Asadabad, Mohsen Asadi

    2017-12-01

    Materials subjected to neutron irradiation will being evolve to structural changes by the displacement cascades initiated by nuclear reaction. This study discusses a methodology to compute primary knock-on atoms or PKAs information that lead to radiation damage. A program AMTRACK has been developed for assessing of the PKAs information. This software determines the specifications of recoil atoms (using PTRAC card of MCNPX code) and also the kinematics of interactions. The deterministic method was used for verification of the results of (MCNPX+AMTRACK). The SRIM (formely TRIM) code is capable to compute neutron radiation damage. The PKAs information was extracted by AMTRACK program, which can be used as an input of SRIM codes for systematic analysis of primary radiation damage. Then the Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP) radiation damage on reactor pressure vessel is calculated.

  12. Radiation damage to tetramethylsilane and tetramethylgermanium ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Y.; Higuchi, M.; Oyama, K.

    1994-01-01

    Two detector media suitable for a warm liquid, ionization chamber filled with tetramethylsilane (TMS) and tetramethylgermanium (TMG) were exposed to γ radiation form a 60 Co source up to dose 579 Gray and 902 Gray, respectively. The electron lifetimes and the free ion yields were measured as a function of accumulated radiation dose. A similar behavior of the electron lifetimes and the free ion yields with increasing radiation does was observed between the TMS and TMG ionization chambers

  13. Impact of oxygen concentration on yields of DNA damages caused by ionizing radiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpán, Václav; Davídková, Marie

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 101, 012015 (2008), s. 1-4 ISSN 1742-6588. [Radiation Damage in Biomolecular Systems, RADAM'07. Dublin, 19.06.2007-22.06.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD202/05/H031; GA ČR GA202/05/2728 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : radiation damage to DNA * oxygen concentration * theoretical modeling Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  14. The Future of the South Atlantic Anomaly and Implications for Radiation Damage in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heirtzler, J. R.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    South Atlantic Anomaly of the geomagnetic field plays a dominant role in where radiation damage occurs in near Earth orbits. The historic and recent variations of the geomagnetic field in the South Atlantic are used to estimate the extent of the South Atlantic Anomaly until the year 2000. This projection indicates that radiation damage to spacecraft and humans in space will greatly increase and cover a much larger geographic area than present.

  15. Measurements and TCAD Simulations of Bulk and Surface Radiation Damage Effects

    CERN Document Server

    F. Moscatelli; G. M. Bilei; A. Morozzi; G.-F. Dalla Betta; R. Mendicino; M. Boscardin; N. Zorzi; L. Servoli; P. Maccagnani

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose the application of a radiation damage model based on the introduction of deep level traps/recombination centers suitable for device level numerical simulation of radiation detectors at very high fluences (e.g. 1÷2×1016 1-MeV equivalent neutrons per square centimeter) combined with a surface damage model developed by using experimental parameters extracted from measurements from gamma irradiated p-type dedicated test structures.

  16. Implantation of keV-energy argon clusters and radiation damage in diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir; Samela, Juha; Nordlund, Kai

    2012-01-01

    We show that for impacting argon clusters, both mean projected ranges of the constituents and depths of radiation damage in diamond scale linearly with momentum. The same dependence was earlier found for keV-energy cluster implantation in graphite, thus suggesting the universality of this scaling...... law. For diamond, a good agreement for the value of displacement energy for the case of cluster impact is found by comparing the calculated target sputtering and experimentally measured depth of radiation damage....

  17. Simulation study of radiation damage induced by energetic helium nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang Dac Luc; Vo Tuong Hanh; Hoang Dac Dat

    2003-01-01

    High energy alpha particles produced by neutron-induced nuclear reactions can damage severely reactor materials. Simulation of this process is described using theoretical calculation and ion irradiation experiments at different displacement doses and Helium doses. (author)

  18. Simulation study of radiation damage induced by energetic helium nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang Dac Luc; Hoang Dac Dat

    2003-01-01

    High energy alpha particles produced by neutron-induced nuclear reactions can damage severely reactor materials. Simulation of this process is described using theoretical calculation and ion irradiation experiments at different displacement doses and Helium doses.

  19. Effect of electron-excitation on radiation damage in ion-irradiated FCC metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwase, Akihiro

    1989-06-01

    FCC metals (Al, Cu, Ag, Ni) were irradiated with 0.5-1.8 MeV H, He, N and Ar ions, and 84-126 MeV C, F, Si, Cl, Br and I ions at liquid helium temperatures. After the irradiations, thermal annealing experiments were performed up to 300 K. Anomalous reduction of Stage-I recovery was observed in Al and Ni irradiated with high-energy (∼100 MeV) heavy ions. Radiation annealing by 100 MeV I ions was studied in predoped Ni and Cu. The experimental results were analyzed by using a new model which describes the production and radiation annealing of two or more types of defects. The extraordinarily large cross sections for subthreshold recombination of Stage-I defects were obtained in Ni. These results show that in Al and Ni, the energies transferred from the excited electrons to lattice through the electron-lattice interaction contribute to the annihilations of defects during irradiation. (author)

  20. Conformational variation of proteins at room temperature is not dominated by radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russi, Silvia; González, Ana; Kenner, Lillian R.; Keedy, Daniel A.; Fraser, James S.; Bedem, Henry van den

    2017-01-01

    Protein crystallography data collection at synchrotrons is routinely carried out at cryogenic temperatures to mitigate radiation damage. Although damage still takes place at 100 K and below, the immobilization of free radicals increases the lifetime of the crystals by approximately 100-fold. Recent studies have shown that flash-cooling decreases the heterogeneity of the conformational ensemble and can hide important functional mechanisms from observation. These discoveries have motivated increasing numbers of experiments to be carried out at room temperature. However, the trade-offs between increased risk of radiation damage and increased observation of alternative conformations at room temperature relative to cryogenic temperature have not been examined. A considerable amount of effort has previously been spent studying radiation damage at cryo-temperatures, but the relevance of these studies to room temperature diffraction is not well understood. Here, the effects of radiation damage on the conformational landscapes of three different proteins (T. danielli thaumatin, hen egg-white lysozyme and human cyclophilin A) at room (278 K) and cryogenic (100 K) temperatures are investigated. Increasingly damaged datasets were collected at each temperature, up to a maximum dose of the order of 10 7 Gy at 100 K and 10 5 Gy at 278 K. Although it was not possible to discern a clear trend between damage and multiple conformations at either temperature, it was observed that disorder, monitored by B-factor-dependent crystallographic order parameters, increased with higher absorbed dose for the three proteins at 100 K. At 278 K, however, the total increase in this disorder was only statistically significant for thaumatin. A correlation between specific radiation damage affecting side chains and the amount of disorder was not observed. Lastly, this analysis suggests that elevated conformational heterogeneity in crystal structures at room temperature is observed despite radiation

  1. Rapid thermal annealing of phosphorus implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.H.; Pogany, A.; Harrison, H.B.; Williams, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    Rapid thermal annealing (RTA) of phosphorus-implanted silicon has been investigated by four point probe, Van der Pauw methods and transmission electron microscopy. The results have been compared to furnace annealing. Experiments show that RTA, even at temperatures as low as 605 deg C, results in good electrical properties with little remnant damage and compares favourably with furnace annealing

  2. Annealing of the Sb-vacancy and a closely related radiation induced defect in n-type germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Abraham W.; Auret, F. D.; Meyer, W. E.

    2018-04-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy was used to study the defects induced by alpha-particle irradiation from an Am241 source in antimony doped n-type germanium. Previous investigations of the well know Sb-vacancy defect have led to the discovery of a second defect with very similar emission properties, referred to as the E‧. Although both defects have similar emission rates, they have very different annealing properties. In this study we further investigated these properties of the E‧ in Sb doped samples irradiated at 270 K with alpha particles from an Am241 source. Laplace deep level transient spectroscopy was used to determine the concentration of each defect. An isothermal annealing study of the E‧ was carried out in the temperature range 300 K to 325 K in 5 K increments, while the Sb-vacancy was annealed out completely at 410 K onwards, long after the E‧ was completely annealed out. The annealing activation energy was determined through isothermal annealing profiles for both the Sb-Vacancy and the E‧ as 1.05 eV and 0.73 eV respectively with a prefactor of 2.05 × 109 s-1 and 2.7 × 108 s-1.

  3. The Addition of Manganese Porphyrins during Radiation Inhibits Prostate Cancer Growth and Simultaneously Protects Normal Prostate Tissue from Radiation Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita Chatterjee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is commonly used for prostate cancer treatment; however, normal tissues can be damaged from the reactive oxygen species (ROS produced by radiation. In separate reports, we and others have shown that manganese porphyrins (MnPs, ROS scavengers, protect normal cells from radiation-induced damage but inhibit prostate cancer cell growth. However, there have been no studies demonstrating that MnPs protect normal tissues, while inhibiting tumor growth in the same model. LNCaP or PC3 cells were orthotopically implanted into athymic mice and treated with radiation (2 Gy, for 5 consecutive days in the presence or absence of MnPs. With radiation, MnPs enhanced overall life expectancy and significantly decreased the average tumor volume, as compared to the radiated alone group. MnPs enhanced lipid oxidation in tumor cells but reduced oxidative damage to normal prostate tissue adjacent to the prostate tumor in combination with radiation. Mechanistically, MnPs behave as pro-oxidants or antioxidants depending on the level of oxidative stress inside the treated cell. We found that MnPs act as pro-oxidants in prostate cancer cells, while in normal cells and tissues the MnPs act as antioxidants. For the first time, in the same in vivo model, this study reveals that MnPs enhance the tumoricidal effect of radiation and reduce oxidative damage to normal prostate tissue adjacent to the prostate tumor in the presence of radiation. This study suggests that MnPs are effective radio-protectors for radiation-mediated prostate cancer treatment.

  4. Kinetics of annealing of irradiated surveillance pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, D.J.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    Indentation hardness measurements as a function of annealing were made on broken halves of Charpy impact surveillance samples. The samples had been irradiated in commercial power reactors to a neutron fluence of approximately 1 x 10 18 neutrons per cm 2 , E > 1 MeV, at a temperature of about 300 0 C (570 0 F). Results are reported for the weld metal, which showed greater radiation hardening than the base plate or heat-affected zone material. Isochronal and isothermal anneals were conducted on the irradiated surveillance samples and on unirradiated control samples. No hardness changes upon annealing occurred for the control samples. The recovery in hardness for the irradiated samples took place mostly between 400 and 500 0 C. Based on the Meechan-Brinkman method of analysis, the activation energy for annealing was found to be 0.60 +- 0.06 eV. According to computer simulation calculations of Beeler, the activation energy for migration of vacancies in alpha iron is about 0.67 eV. Therefore, the results of this preliminary study appear to be consistent with a mechanism of annealing of radiation damage in pressure vessel steels based on the migration of radiation-produced lattice vacancies

  5. Effect of Mercuric Nitrate on Repair of Radiation-induced DNA Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paneka, Agnieszka; Antonina, Cebulska Wasilewska [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Han, Min; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    High concentrations of mercury can cause serious damage to the nervous system, immune system, kidneys and liver in humans. And mercury is toxic to developing embryos because mercury ions can penetrate the blood.placenta barrier to reach the embryo. Studies from human monitoring of occupational exposure to mercury vapours have shown that mercury can alter the ability of lymphocytes to repair radiation-induced DNA damage. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate, on the molecular and cytogenetic levels, the effect of exposure to mercury ions on the kinetics of the repair process of DNA damage induced by ionising radiation.

  6. Computer simulation of radiation damage in HTGR elements and structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gann, V.V.; Gurin, V.A.; Konotop, Yu.F.; Shilyaev, B.A.; Yamnitskij, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of mathematical simulation of radiation damages in material and items of HTGR is considered. A system-program complex IMITATOR, intended for imitation of neutron damages by means of charged particle beams, is used. Account of material composite structure and certain geometry of items permits to calculate fields of primary radiation damages and introductions of reaction products in composite fuel elements, microfuel elements, their shells, composite absorbing elements on the base of boron carbide, structural steels and alloys. A good correspondence of calculation and experimental burn-out of absorbing elements is obtained, application of absorbing element as medium for imitation experiments is grounded [ru

  7. Damaging effect of therapeutic radiation on programmable pacemakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamec, R.; Haefliger, J.M.; Killisch, J.P.; Niederer, J.; Jaquet, P.

    1982-01-01

    Two series of present-day pacemakers were tested in vitro with pulsed x-ray radiation. The first series of 12 pacemakers consisted of 10 different types and models of demand pacemakers (VVI). The second series of 13 pacemakers had 9 different types and models of programmable pacemakers. Unlike the first series which showed only mild changes in frequency and pulse width, all but four of the programmable pacemakers presented sudden complete failure after different radiation doses. We conclude that direct pulse radiation at therapeutic levels of programmable pacemakers should be avoided

  8. Biomarkers of DNA and cytogenetic damages induced by environmental chemicals or radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses results from the studies on various biomarkers of the DNA and cytogenetic damages induced by environmental chemicals or radiation. Results of the biomonitoring studies have shown that particularly in the condition of Poland, health hazard from radiation exposure is overestimated in contradistinction to the environmental hazard

  9. Imitation of radiation-induced damages to DNA with a radionuclide incorporated into polynucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolev, V.G.

    1984-01-01

    Because of a great variety and different reparability of radiation-induced DNA lesions it is difficult to evaluate the radiobiologacal significance of certain individual alterations. It is suggested that the radionuclides incorporated anto DNA can be used to imitate different types of radiation damages to DNA. Both qualitative and quantitative aspects of the problem are discussed

  10. Compilation of radiation damage test data part III: materials used around high-energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Beynel, P; Schönbacher, H; CERN. Geneva

    1982-01-01

    For pt.II see CERN report 79-08 (1979). This handbook gives the results of radiation damage tests on various engineering materials and components intended for installation in radiation areas of the CERN high-energy particle accelerators. It complements two previous volumes covering organic cable-insulating materials and thermoplastic and thermosetting resins.

  11. Evidence of Dopant Type-Inversion and Other Radiation Damage Effects of the CDF Silicon Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Ballarin, Roberto [Univ. of the Basque Country, Leioa (Spain)

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this document is to study the effect of radiation damage on the silicon sensors. The reflection of the effect of radiation can be observed in two fundamental parameters of the detector: the bias current and the bias voltage. The leakage current directly affects the noise, while the bias voltage is required to collect the maximum signal deposited by the charged particle.

  12. Flow cytometric assessment of DNA damage in the fish Catla catla (Ham.) exposed to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anbumani, S.; Mohankumar, Mary N.; Selvanayagam, M.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental mutagens such as ionizing radiation and chemicals induce DNA damage in a wide variety of organisms. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (lCRP) has recently emphasized the need to protect non-human biota from the potential effects of ionizing radiation. Radiation exposures to non-humans can occur as a result of low-level radioactive discharges into the environment. Molecular genetic effects at low-level radiation exposures are largely unexplored and systematic studies using sensitive biomarkers are required to assess DNA damage in representative non-human species. The objective of the study was to detect DNA damage in the fish Catla catla exposed to gamma radiation using flow cytometry at different time intervals. Increases in the coefficient of variation (CV) of the G 0 /G 1 peak, indicating abnormal DNA distributions were observed in fish exposed to gamma radiation than in controls. Significant increase in the CV was observed from day 12-90 and thereafter decreased. This increase in CV might be due to DNA damage in the cell populations at G 0 /G 1 phase or deletions and duplications caused by improper repair of chromosomes in the cell-cycle machinery. Ionizing radiation induced cell-cycle perturbations and apoptosis were also observed after gamma radiation exposure. (author)

  13. Time-scale invariances in preseismic electromagnetic radiation, magnetization and damage evolution of rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kawada

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the time-scale invariant changes in electromagnetic and mechanical energy releases prior to a rock failure or a large earthquake. The energy release processes are caused by damage evolutions such as crack propagation, motion of charged dislocation, area-enlargement of sheared asperities and repetitive creep-rate changes. Damage mechanics can be used to represent the time-scale invariant evolutions of both brittle and plastic damages. Irreversible thermodynamics applied to the damage mechanics reveals that the damage evolution produces the variations in charge, dipole and electromagnetic signals in addition to mechanical energy release, and yields the time-scale invariant patterns of Benioff electromagnetic radiation and cumulative Benioff strain-release. The irreversible thermodynamic framework of damage mechanics is also applicable to the seismo-magnetic effect, and the time-scale invariance is recognized in the remanent magnetization change associated with damage evolution prior to a rock failure.

  14. Radiation damage of uranium-thorium oxide, irradiated in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloem, P.J.C.; Nagel, W.; Plas, T. van der; Kema, N.V.

    1977-01-01

    A suspension in water of spherical particles of UO 2 -ThO 2 with diameter 5μm has been considered as the working fluid in an aqueous, homogeneous, thermal nuclear reactor. Irradiation experiments have shown that these particles suffer a gradual breakdown when irradiated in water. This behaviour is markedly different from that shown on irradiation in absence of water. As damage was defined the amount of solid dissolved by an etching liquid. Electron microscopic pictures showed that at higher irradiation temperatures in water the actual damage was larger than the etching values indicated. (orig.) [de

  15. Radiation effects and damage formation in semiconductors due to high-energy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamarou, A.

    2006-11-07

    The object of this thesis was the study of ion-beam induced damage formation and annealing in crystalline and conventionally predamaged Ge, GaAs, and InP. The samples were irradiated either at {approx}80 K or at room temperature with Kr, Xe, or Au ions with specific energy of about 0.3 MeV/u to 3 MeV/u. Thereafter the samples were studied by means of Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and/or transmission electron microscopy.

  16. Radiation effects and damage formation in semiconductors due to high-energy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamarou, A.

    2006-01-01

    The object of this thesis was the study of ion-beam induced damage formation and annealing in crystalline and conventionally predamaged Ge, GaAs, and InP. The samples were irradiated either at ∼80 K or at room temperature with Kr, Xe, or Au ions with specific energy of about 0.3 MeV/u to 3 MeV/u. Thereafter the samples were studied by means of Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and/or transmission electron microscopy

  17. Effects of thermal annealing on the radiation produced electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of bovine and equine tooth enamel: Fossil and modern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Robert A.; Bogard, James S.; Elam, J. Michael; Weinand, Daniel C.; Kramer, Andrew

    2003-06-01

    The concentration of stable radiation-induced paramagnetic states in fossil teeth can be used as a measure of sample age. Temperature excursions >100 °C, however, can cause the paramagnetic state clock to differ from the actual postmortem time. We have heated irradiated enamel from both fossilized bovid and modern equine (MEQ) teeth for 30 min in 50 °C increments from 100 to 300 °C, measuring the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum after each anneal, to investigate such effects. Samples were irradiated again after the last anneal, with doses of 300-1200 Gy from 60Co photons, and measured. Two unirradiated MEQ samples were also annealed for 30 min at 300 °C, one in an evacuated EPR tube and the other in a tube open to the atmosphere, and subsequently irradiated. The data showed that hyperfine components attributed to the alanine radical were not detected in the irradiated MEQ sample until after the anneals. The spectrum of the MEQ sample heated in air and then irradiated was similar to that of the heat treated fossil sample. We conclude that the hyperfine components are due to sample heating to temperatures/times >100 °C/30 min and that similarities between fossil and MEQ spectra after the 300 °C/30 min MEQ anneal are also due to sample heating. We conclude that the presence of the hyperfine components in spectra of fossil tooth enamel indicate that such thermal events occurred either at the time of death, or during the postmortem history.

  18. Relation between four types of radiation damage and induced repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radar, M.L.

    1977-08-01

    Four strains of Escherichia coli were exposed to uv and gamma radiation. Procedures are described for mutational studies, classification of revertants, inhibition of postirradiation DNA degradation and radioresistance. Comparisons were made of induction of the error-prone repair (epr) system with four mutagens; uv radiation, near uv radiation, gamma radiation, and DNA-protein crosslinks. An increase in the number of mutations was shown in every case. The observation that induction of mutagenesis, induction of inhibition of post-irradiation DNA degradation, and induction of radioresistance are closely parallel phenomena led to the investigation of the possibility that DNA-protein crosslinks which were known mutagens were also inducers of the epr system. The significance of the results is discussed

  19. Complex DNA Damage: A Route to Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability and Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ifigeneia V. Mavragani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cellular effects of ionizing radiation (IR are of great variety and level, but they are mainly damaging since radiation can perturb all important components of the cell, from the membrane to the nucleus, due to alteration of different biological molecules ranging from lipids to proteins or DNA. Regarding DNA damage, which is the main focus of this review, as well as its repair, all current knowledge indicates that IR-induced DNA damage is always more complex than the corresponding endogenous damage resulting from endogenous oxidative stress. Specifically, it is expected that IR will create clusters of damage comprised of a diversity of DNA lesions like double strand breaks (DSBs, single strand breaks (SSBs and base lesions within a short DNA region of up to 15–20 bp. Recent data from our groups and others support two main notions, that these damaged clusters are: (1 repair resistant, increasing genomic instability (GI and malignant transformation and (2 can be considered as persistent “danger” signals promoting chronic inflammation and immune response, causing detrimental effects to the organism (like radiation toxicity. Last but not least, the paradigm shift for the role of radiation-induced systemic effects is also incorporated in this picture of IR-effects and consequences of complex DNA damage induction and its erroneous repair.

  20. Radiation damage relative to transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens at low temperature: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaeser, R.M.; Taylor, K.A.

    1978-01-01

    When biological specimens are irradiated by the electron beam in the electron microscope, the specimen structure is damaged as a result of molecular excitation, ionization, and subsequent chemical reactions. The radiation damage that occurs in the normal process of electron microscopy is known to present severe limitations for imaging high resolution detail in biological specimens. The question of radiation damage at low temperatures has therefore been investigated with the view in mind of reducing somewhat the rate at which damage occurs. The radiation damage protection found for small molecule (anhydrous) organic compounds is generally rather limited or even non-existent. However, large molecule, hydrated materials show as much as a 10-fold reduction at low temperature in the rate at which radiation damage occurs, relative to the damage rate at room temperature. In the case of hydrated specimens, therefore, low temperature electron microscopy offers an important advantage as part of the overall effort required in obtaining high resolution images of complex biological structures. (author)