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Sample records for radiation chemistry applications

  1. Industrial applications of radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puig, Jean Rene

    1959-01-01

    The status of industrial applications of radiation chemistry as it stands 6 months after the second Geneva international conference is described. The main features of the interaction of ionizing radiations with matter are briefly stated and a review is made of the best studied and the more promising systems of radiation chemistry. The fields of organics, plastics, heterogeneous catalysis are emphasized. Economies of radiation production and utilization are discussed. Reprint of a paper published in Industries atomiques - no. 5-6, 1959

  2. Radiation chemistry and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majima, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    Effects of radiation to human body have been seriously discussed nowadays. These are important issues for the realization of sustainable society. It should be emphasized that various reactive intermediates generated by radiation play important roles in each cases. Radiation chemical studies will provide various reaction-mechanistic aspects on these important issues. Our research group has continuously carried out reaction-mechanistic studies using radiation chemical methods. From these studies, we have obtained a variety of results on basic molecular systems, reactions, materials that are close to practical application, biological systems and so on. Reactive species are generated from the radiation reactions in solution, and can be used as one-electron oxidative and reductive reagent to give selectively radical cation and anion of solute molecules such as various organic and inorganic molecules. Therefore, the radiation chemistry has contributed significantly to chemistry in which one-electron oxidation and reduction play the important role. The kinetics of such redox processes and the following reduction play the important role. The kinetics of such redox processes and the following reactions can be studied in real time with the transition absorption measurement by the pulse radiolysis technique. Even though the target compounds cannot be oxidized and reduced in chemical or electrochemical oxidation and reduction, their one-electron redox can be performed by the electron beam radiation. Therefore, radiation chemistry is very useful technique for basic science. Moreover, application potentials of radiation chemistry are so high for various research subjects. Moreover, application potentials of radiation chemistry are so high for various research subjects

  3. Radiation chemistry and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    In recent years considerable progress has been made in understanding the fundamental chemical reactions that occur when materials are irradiated. This has followed from the development of new techniques for studying these reactions. The International Atomic Energy Agency held a Panel on Radiation Chemistry in Vienna on 17-21 April 1967, to review the current status of various sources, new techniques in radiation chemistry, and their applications. The main sources mentioned by the Panel were isotope sources, electron accelerators, and chemonuclear reactors. Among the basic techniques discussed were pulsed radiolysis, flash photolysis, fast ESR methods, irradiation at liquid helium temperatures, electric discharge methods and far ultra-violet methods. Interesting industrial applications were discussed, such as the development of wood-plastic combinations, and a paper was given on the curing of paints and thin films Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Radiation applications of physical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talrose, V.L.

    1993-01-01

    Many chemical energy problems have a physical chemistry nature connected with chemical kinetics and thermodynamics. In our country, the development in this field is associated with the name N.N. Semenov, who was involved in a large number of fundamental and applied physical chemistry problems.Energy development during the last decades created or sharpened new problems. Our new Institute, the Institute of Energy problems of Chemical Physics, USSR Academy of Sciences, is dealing with some of them. The present article is an overview of our work on radiation applications. Examples of the use of radiation in power industry (such as coal gasification), tire production, mechanical joints, metal powder production and sterilization of pharmaceutical products are given. Methods and problems involved in these applications are discussed and the great potential for vast utilization is demonstrated. (authors)

  5. Radiation chemistry; principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, F.; Rodgers, M.A.J.

    1994-01-01

    The book attempts to present those fields of radiation chemistry which depend on the principles of radiation chemistry. The first four chapters are some prelude about radiation chemistry principles with respect to how ionizing radiation interacts with matter, and primary results from these interactions and, which kinetic laws are followed by these primary interactions and which equipment for qualitative studies is necessary. Following chapters included principles fields of radiation chemistry. The last six chapters discussed of principle of chemistry from physical and chemical point of view. In this connection the fundamentals of radiation on biological system is emphasised. On one hand, the importance of it for hygiene and safety as neoplasms therapy is discussed. on the other hand, its industrial importance is presented

  6. Diverse applications of radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, R.

    1998-01-01

    Radiation chemistry began as early radiotherapists needed a reliable and appropriate dosimeter. The iron sulphate dosimeter, using ferrous iron in sulphuric acid and oxidation by irradiation, was a nasty brew of chemicals but it was sensitive, reliable and conveniently had the same density as human tissue. Water irradiation chemistry studies were driven by the need to understand the fundamental processes in radiotherapy; to control the corrosion problems in the cooling/ heat exchange systems of nuclear reactors and to find stable solvents and reagents for use in spent fuel element processing. The electrical and mechanical stability of materials in high radiation fields stimulated the attention of radiation chemists to the study of defects in solids. The coupled use of radiation and Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) enabled the identity of defect structures to be probed. This research led to the development of the sensitive Thermoluminescent Dosimeters, TLD's and a technique for dating of archaeological pottery artefacts. Radiation chemistry in the area of medicine is very active with fundamental studies of the mechanism of DNA strand breakage and the development of radiation sensitisers and protectors for therapeutic purposes. The major area of polymer radiation chemistry is one which Australia commands great international respect

  7. Radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, F.; Rodgers, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book include: Interaction of ionizing radiation with matter; Primary products in radiation chemistry; Theoretical aspects of radiation chemistry; Theories of the solvated electron; The radiation chemistry of gases; Radiation chemistry of colloidal aggregates; Radiation chemistry of the alkali halides; Radiation chemistry of polymers; Radiation chemistry of biopolymers; Radiation processing and sterilization; and Compound index

  8. Radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swallow, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: introduction (defines scope of article as dealing with the chemistry of reactive species, (e.g. excess electrons, excited states, free radicals and inorganic ions in unusual valency states) as studied using radiation with radiation chemistry in its traditional sense and with biological and industrial applications); gases; water and simple inorganic systems; aqueous metallo-organic compounds and metalloproteins; small organic molecules in aqueous solution; microheterogeneous systems; non-aqueous liquids and solutions; solids; biological macromolecules; synthetic polymers. (U.K.)

  9. Application of the principle of supramolecular chemistry in the fields of radiochemistry and radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Xinghai; Chen Qingde; Gao Hongcheng

    2008-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry, one of the front fields in chemistry, is defined as 'chemistry beyond the molecule', bearing on the organized entities of higher complexity that result from the association of two or more chemical species held together by intermolecular forces. This article focuses on the application of the principle of supramolecular chemistry in the fields of radiochemistry and radiation chemistry. The following aspects are concerned: (1) the recent progress of supramolecular chemistry; (2) the application of the principle of supramolecular chemistry and the functions of supramolecular system, i.e., recognition, assembly and translocation, in the extraction of nuclides; (3) the application of microemulsion, ionic imprinted polymers, ionic liquids and cloud point extraction in the enrichment of nuclides; (4) the radiation effect of supramolecular systems. (authors)

  10. Radiation chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1973-07-01

    Research progress is reported on radiation chemistry of heavy elements that includes the following topics: radiation chemistry of plutonium in nitric acid solutions (spectrophotometric analysis and gamma radiolysis of Pu(IV) and Pu(VI) in nitric acid solution); EPR studies of intermediates formed in radiolytic reactions with aqueous medium; two-phase radiolysis and its effect on the distribution coefficient of plutonium; and radiation chemistry of nitric acid. (DHM)

  11. Some applications of radiation chemistry to biochemistry and radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wardman, P.

    1987-01-01

    In this chapter illustrate the use of radiation chemistry as a tool in investigating biologically important radical reactions, and also outline some studies of models for radiobiological damage. Because aqueous solutions usually offer the most important matrix, an appreciation of the main features of water radiolysis will be essential. Most of the illustrations involve pulse radiolysis, and some familiarity with chemical kinetics is assumed. In addition to these and other chapters in this book, readers find the proceedings of a recent NATO Advanced Study Institute most useful. The authors shall not try to review here all the applications of radiation chemistry to biochemistry and biology, but they will illustrate, using selected examples, the main principles and practical advantages and problems. Another recent volume covers the main contributions of flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis to the chemistry of biology and medicine, complementing earlier reviews. Papers from symposia on radical processes in radiobiology and carcinogenesis, and on super-oxide dismutases, and proceedings of recent international congresses of radiation research, together with the other publications referred to above will enable the reader to gain a comprehensive overview of the role of radicals in biological processes and the contributions of radiation chemistry

  12. ESR application to radiation chemistry of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwabara, H.

    1988-01-01

    Important results obtained in our group in the field of ESR application to the study of irradiated polymers are summarized. They are the analysis of the decay reaction of the free radicals, spur-like trapping of the free radicals and the related discussions. A diffusion controlled bimolecular reaction scheme was a good way of analyzing the data of the decay reaction. Power saturation phenomenon of ESR spectra of the free radicals showed a circumstance of the spur-like trapping of the free radicals in irradiated polyethylene. The phenomenon of spur-like trapping was quite consistent with the interpretation of the decay reaction of the free radicals. (author)

  13. Application of radiation chemistry in materials modification and environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation chemistry is a part of the physical chemistry similarly like photo-chemistry, plasma-chemistry, ultrasonic-chemistry etc. Ionizing radiation produces abundant secondary electrons. Following these primary events, the ions, secondary electrons and excited molecules undergo further transformations, exchanging charges and energy and reacting with surrounding molecules, thereby producing free radicals and other reactive species which finally evolve into new stable products. Three main sources of radiation are applied for radiation processing. These are electron accelerators, gamma sources and X-ray unit based on e-/X conversion process. Radiation processing was used early on for polymer modification. The intermediates formed during material irradiation can follow several reaction paths that result in disproportion, hydrogen abstraction, arrangements and/or the formation of new bonds. Nowadays, the modification of polymers covers radiation cross-linking, radiation-induced polymerization (graft polymerization and curing) and the degradation of polymers. Some polymers predominantly undergo crosslinking other degradation. However new techniques allow crosslinking of polymers which were considered to be degradable only, like PTFE and cellulose derivatives. Regarding natural polymers the biggest application concerns rubber pre-crosslinking in tire industry. The processing of natural polymers is also being developed to elaborate new biodegradable materials. The radiation crosslinked wires and cables show excellent heat resistance (long-term thermal stability and short-term thermal stability) as well as abrasion resistance. Other big application is crosslinking of XLPE type pipes which are widely used for hot water and floor heating [30]. Polybutelene terephthalate (PBT), which is a plastic for electronic industry, can be crosslinked by radiation and lead free soldering materials can be applied in such a case. This method of crosslinking is also applied to manufacture

  14. Industrial applications of radiation chemistry; Perspectives industrielles de la chimie sous rayonnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puig, Jean Rene [Commissariat a l' energie atomique et aux energies alternatives - CEA, Service de chimie-physique, CEN de Saclay (France)

    1959-07-01

    The status of industrial applications of radiation chemistry as it stands 6 months after the second Geneva international conference is described. The main features of the interaction of ionizing radiations with matter are briefly stated and a review is made of the best studied and the more promising systems of radiation chemistry. The fields of organics, plastics, heterogeneous catalysis are emphasized. Economies of radiation production and utilization are discussed. Reprint of a paper published in Industries atomiques - no. 5-6, 1959.

  15. Present status and future trend of radiation chemistry and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabata, Yoneho

    1977-01-01

    The recent reports or reviews on the results of basic study of radiation chemistry were introduced. Especially, vapor-phase radiation chemistry, electron behavior in liquid glass and molecular crystal were reviewed. The basic study of radiation chemistry which has attracted much attention contains the short-life pico-second pulse radiolysis, the study on the effect of LET and the study by ESR in the various fields. The present status of these studies were explained as well as the chemistry of positron e + and positronium Ps. As the studies of radiation chemistry in the field of macromolecules, radiation polymerization, degradation of polymer and the graft-polymerization were reviewed to discuss the prospective development and problem for its industrial application. (Kobatake, H.)

  16. New developments and trends in radiation chemistry applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueven, O.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. This paper attempts to review the recent developments in the application of ionizing radiation in various industrial processes. Modification of structure and properties of polymeric materials of both synthetic and natural origin has been the leading field benefiting from unique advantages of high-energy radiation. The developments recently achieved in this highly industries area includes polymer composite production, micro-device production, surface curing and modification, preparation of membranes, adsorbents, controlled degradation, recycling of plastics. Health-care industries continue to benefit from radiation technology in the production of health-care aids, decontamination and sterilization of pharmaceuticals in addition to well-accepted sterilization of implants and single-use medical devices. Radiation processing continues to find growing use in mitigating environmental problems ranging from removal of persistent organic pollutants from gaseous and aqueous effluents to destruction of biohazardous compounds. Some of the new technological innovations and R and D activities in above-mentioned applications will be briefly described

  17. Radiation Chemistry and Physical Chemistry of Chitosan and Other Polysaccharides. Fundamental Studies and Practical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosiak, Janusz M.; Czechowska-Biskup, Renata; Rokita, Bożena; Olejnik, Alicja K.

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the second year of activities performed at the Institute of Applied Radiation Chemistry (IARC) within the framework of the CRP project. It consists of two parts. Part I is a brief account of the activities related to design, tests, sample procurement and characterization and formulation of “Protocol for determination of intrinsic viscosity of chitosan” designed to be the basis of the interlaboratory study on viscometric determination of chitosan molecular weight as well as on radiation degradation of chitosan in controlled conditions. Part II contains the text of the Protocol, and is given in the Annex. (author)

  18. Preparative radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drawe, H.

    1978-01-01

    Preparative synthesis of compounds with the aid of radiation chemistry is increasingly used in laboratories as well as on a technical scale. A large number of new compounds has been produced with the methods of radiation chemistry. With the increasing number of available radiation sources, also the number of synthesis metods in radiation chemistry has increased. This paper can only briefly mention the many possible ways of synthesis in radiation chemistry. (orig./HK) [de

  19. Proceedings of the Scientific Meeting on Application of Isotopes and Radiation: Book 2. Chemistry, Environment, Radiation Process, And Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhadi, F; Sisworo, E L; Maha, M; Ismachin, M; Hilmy, N; Sumatra, M; Mugiono,; Wandowo,; Soebianto, Y S [Center for Application of Isotopes and Radiation, National Atomic Energy Agency, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    1998-07-01

    The aim of the 10th Meeting of the Isotope and Radiation Application is to disseminate the result of research on application of nuclear techniques on agriculture, animal, biology, chemistry, environment, radiation process and industry. The meeting was held in Jakarta, 18-19 February 1998, and there were 6 invited papers and 52 papers indexed individually. This proceeding is divided by two volumes. Volume I and volume II consists of agriculture, animal, biology and chemistry, environment, radiation process and industry, respectively.(ID)

  20. Proceedings of the Scientific Meeting on Application of Isotopes and Radiation: Book 2. Chemistry, Environment, Radiation Process, And Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhadi, F.; Sisworo, E.L.; Maha, M.; Ismachin, M.; Hilmy, N.; Sumatra, M.; Mugiono; Wandowo; Soebianto, Y.S.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the 10th Meeting of the Isotope and Radiation Application is to disseminate the result of research on application of nuclear techniques on agriculture, animal, biology, chemistry, environment, radiation process and industry. The meeting was held in Jakarta, 18-19 February 1998, and there were 6 invited papers and 52 papers indexed individually. This proceeding is divided by two volumes. Volume I and volume II consists of agriculture, animal, biology and chemistry, environment, radiation process and industry, respectively.(ID)

  1. Radiation Chemistry of Polyethylenes for Total Joint Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muratoglu, O.K.

    2006-01-01

    Wear and fatigue damage of polyethylene could limit the longevity of total hip and knee reconstructions used to treat end-stage joint diseases. Wear debris causes peri-prosthetic osteolysis, resulting in bone loss and component loosening ultimately necessitating revision surgery. Wear rate of polyethylene can be reduced by radiation crosslinking. Irradiation not only crosslinks the amorphous phase of polyethylene but also creates residual free radicals (RFR), the precursor to long-term oxidation. We used post-irradiation melting to eliminate the RFRs and improve oxidative stability. We determined the molecular weight between crosslinks (M c ) as a function of radiation-dose level and showed the wear rate to scale linearly with M c . Irradiated and melted polyethylene, in clinical use since 1998, show a significant reduction in wear in vivo through radiographic follow-up studies and analysis of surgically explanted acetabular liners. Irradiation and melting reduces the crystallinity and mechanical properties of polyethylene therefore it cannot be used for high demand joint applications, such as posterior stabilized knees. We replaced the post-irradiation melting step with ?-tocopherol (vitamin-E) doping to stabilize the RFRs and prevent long-term stability and at the same time prevent the loss of mechanical properties. 100kGy irradiated polyethylene was soaked in 120 degree vitamin-E followed by a homogenization step at 120degree. The ?-tocopherol doped samples showed no detectable oxidation after accelerating aging at 80degree in air for 5 weeks. The wear rate was comparable to that of 100-kGy irradiated and melted polyethylene with both clean and third body added bovine serum lubrication. The fatigue strength of ?-tocopherol doped polyethylene (ΔKi=0.9MPa.m 1 /2) were higher than that of 100-kGy irradiated and melted polyethylene (ΔKi=0.5 MPa.m 1 /2). Similarly, the ultimate tensile and yield strength of α-tocopherol doped polyethylenes were significantly

  2. Radiation chemistry from basics to applications in material and life sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belloni, J.; Mostafavi, M.; Douki, Th.; Spotheim-Maurizot, M.

    2008-01-01

    This book gives a progress report on the many and original contributions of radiation chemistry to the fundamental knowledge of the vast domain of chemical reactions and its applications. Radiation chemistry techniques indeed make it possible to elucidate detailed physicochemical mechanisms in inorganic and organic chemistry (including in space) and in biochemistry. Moreover, this comprehension is applied in materials science to precisely control syntheses by radiation, such as radiopolymerization, radio-grafting, specific treatment of surfaces (textiles, paintings, inks,..), synthesis of complex nano-materials, degradation of environmental pollutants and radioresistance of materials for nuclear reactors. In life sciences, the study of the effects of radiation on bio-macromolecules (DNA, proteins, lipids) not only permits the comprehension of normal or pathological biological mechanisms, but also the improvement of our health. In particular, many advances in cancer radiotherapy, in the radioprotection of nuclear workers and the general population, as well as in the treatment of diseases and the radiosterilization of drugs, could be obtained thanks to this research. Abundantly illustrated and written in English by top international specialists who have taken care to render the subjects accessible, this work will greatly interest those curious about a scientific field that is new to them and students attracted by the original and multidisciplinary aspects of the field. At a time when radiation chemistry research is experiencing spectacular development in numerous countries, this book will attract newcomers to the field. (authors)

  3. From radiation chemistry to radiation engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballantine, D.S.

    1976-01-01

    During the past 25 years there has been a steady recognition that radiation in the form of electrons or gamma rays can offer positive advantages as a processing technology. Underlying this process industry, and largely responsible for its success, are significant contributions from the field of basic and applied radiation chemistry. In this paper it is attempted to relate fundamental radiation chemistry studies directly to the practical engineering applications

  4. Chemistry with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preses, J.; Grover, J.R.; White, M.G.; Kvick, A.

    1990-01-01

    An accidental by-product of high-energy physics, synchrotron radiation, has emerged as one of the most powerful tools for the understanding of chemical reactions. Advances made by using synchrotron radiation in physical chemistry are reviewed herein. Descriptions of experiments exploiting the many ways that synchrotron radiation can be manipulated are presented. These manipulations include intensification of the radiation and compression or shifting of its spectral structure. Combinations of the use of synchrotron radiation, which provides access to very short wavelengths and is, at the same time, continuously and easily tunable, with laser radiation, which offers much higher resolution and much more intense radiation per pulse, but is difficult to tune in the ultraviolet region of the spectra, gives the chemist a way to map a molecule's potential energy curve, to note the lengths and strengths of chemical bonds, and to predict and explain novel reactions of more complex molecules. The use of diffraction of x-rays to study the spacing of atoms in crystals is discussed. Various applications of synchrotron radiation to studies of the fluorescence of hydrocarbons and to the chiral dichroism studies of other natural products like DNA and RNA are described. Methods for enhancing synchrotron light sources by insertion devices, such as wigglers and undulators, that increase the available photo flux and construction of new sources of synchrotron radiation are mentioned

  5. The radiation chemistry of macromolecules

    CERN Document Server

    1973-01-01

    The Radiation Chemistry of Macromolecules, Volume II is a collection of papers that discusses radiation chemistry of specific systems. Part 1 deals with radiation chemistry of substituted vinyl polymers, particularly polypropylene (PP) as its structure is intermediate between polyethylene and polyisobutylene. This part also discusses polypropylene oxide (PPOx) for it can be prepared in the atactic, isotactic, and optically active forms. One paper focuses on the fundamental chemical processes and the changes in physical properties that give rise to many different applications of polystyrene. An

  6. Radiation chemistry and bioradical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferradini, C.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen metabolism results, at the cellular level, in the formation of superoxyde radical O 2 - · and probably also of hydroxyl radical OH·. Other radical species can be produced from exogenous or endogenous molecules and nearly all of them have the possibility to react with oxygen giving peroxyradicals. Some of these transients play a role in various biological processes such as phagocytosis, inflammation or ischemy although the mechanisms invoked are poorly understood. Radiation chemistry is an invaluable tool for obtaining a quantitative view of these mechanisms. A description is given of this interaction [fr

  7. New trends and developments in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    Radiation chemistry is a branch of chemistry that studies chemical transformations in materials exposed to high-energy radiations. It uses radiation as the initiator of chemical reactions. Practical applications of radiation chemistry today extend to many fields, including health care, food and agriculture, manufacturing, industrial pollution abatement, biotechnology and telecommunications. The important advantage of radiation chemistry lies in its ability to be used to produce, and study, almost any reactive atomic and molecular species playing a part in chemical reactions, synthesis, industrial processes, or in biological systems. The techniques are applicable to gaseous, liquid, solid, and heterogeneous systems. By combining different techniques of radiation chemistry with analytical chemistry, the reaction mechanism and kinetics of chemical reactions are studied. In November 1988 in Bologna, Italy, the IAEA convened an advisory group meeting to assess new trends and developments in radiation chemistry. The present publication includes most of the contributions presented at the meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  8. Scientific projection paper for radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simic, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    Together with radiation physics, an understanding of radiation chemistry is necessary for full appreciation of biological effects of high and low energy radiations, and for the development of prophylactic, therapeutic and potentiating methods and techniques in biological organisms. Areas covered in some detail in this report include: the early chemical events involved in the deposition of radiation energy; the kinetics of free radical and excited state reactions; the application of radiation chemistry to radiation biology; and the availability of instrumentation

  9. Research in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, J.

    1974-01-01

    In the survey the author discusses phenomena which are unique to radiation chemistry, as well as those in which radiation chemistry research plays a principal role. Works in this field such as spur phenomena and effects of scavengers in the radiolysis of water and liquid alkane, intraspur effects in styrene and polymerization of styrene at high dose rates are presented. The problem of the missing hydrogen atoms in irradiated alkanes needs answer and sensitization of crosslinking reactions may involve some unique aspects of radiation chemistry. Pairwise trapping of radicals in irradiated n-hydrocarbons have been observed in ESP-spectra. A well defined spectrum of radical pairs when the crystals of n-eicosane is irradiated and observed at 77 deg K. The nature of the spectrum, its changes with temperature and the effect of LET is discussed in the paper. (M.S.)

  10. Current developments in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, R.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The theme of the 2000 Gordon Conference on Radiation Chemistry was 'diversity'. The range of topics covered was heralded by the opening presentations which went from the galactic to molecular biology, radiation chemistry and non thermal surface processes in the outer solar system to achievements and open challenges in DNA research. The rest of the conference reflected the extended usage of radiation chemistry -its processes and techniques - applied to a panorama of topics. The ability to generate either oxidising or reducing free radicals in known quantities has been the foundation stone on which all applications are based. In particular it is noticeable that biological systems have been attempted by an increasing number of workers, such as studies of biological ageing and also reactions of nitric oxide in biological environments. Electron transfer processes in proteins are straightforward applications of solvated electron chemistry even if the results are not straightforward in their interpretation. Other topics presented include, radiation chemical processes induced in: supercritical CO 2 , treatment of contaminated materials, 3-dimensional Fullerenes, zeolites and radiation catalysis. In material science, aspects of ions and excited states in polymers, conducting polymers, donor acceptor processes in photo curing, enhancement of photo-electron yields in doped silver halides- improvement of the photographic process, radiation chemistry in cages and bubbles are discussed. The fundamental aspects of radiation chemistry are not yet all worked out. Subpicosecond pulsed electron beam sources, some of them 'tabletop', are still being planned to probe the early events in radiation chemistry both in water and in organic solvents. There is still an interest in the chemistry produced by pre-solvated electrons and the processes induced by heavy ion radiolysis. The description of the relaxation of an irradiated system which contains uneven distributions of ions

  11. Radiation chemistry and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Getoff, F.

    1998-01-01

    The rather strong and many-sided pollution of the environment (atmosphere, water resources, soil) as a consequence of human activities is summarized. The solution of the arised problems by application of radiation chemistry methods and the utilization of modern environmentally ''clean'' and economical technologies, founded on electron beam processing, are mentioned. Some basic environmental problems and their solution are briefly discussed: i) Removal of CO 2 from flue gases and its radiation induced utilization. ii) Principals for degradation of aqueous pollutants by electron beam processing in the presence of ozone (synergistic effect). The radiation chemistry as a modern and manifold discipline with very broad applications can also essentially contribute in the conservation of the environment

  12. Radiation chemistry and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Getoff, Nikola

    1999-01-01

    The rather strong and many-sided pollution of the environment (atmosphere, water resources, soil) as a consequence of human activity is summarized. The solution of the arised problems by application of radiation chemistry methods and the utilization of modern environmentally 'clean' and economical technologies, founded on electron beam processing, are mentioned. Some basic environmental problems and their solution are briefly discussed. (i) Removal of CO 2 from flue gases and its radiation induced utilization. (ii) Principals for degradation of aqueous pollutants by electron beam processing in the presence of ozone (synergistic effect). The radiation chemistry as a modern and manifold discipline with very broad applications can also essentially contribute in the conservation of the environment

  13. Study on the application of sensitizing and protective agent in the process of radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, Z.

    1976-01-01

    The role of sensitizing agent and protective agent in the process of radiation chemistry is studied. Direct and indirect radiation effects on bio molecules, molecular and sensitizing agent mechanism, electron activities as the basis for sensitizing agent mechanism, protective agent mechanism on irradiated macro molecules, and kinds of protective and sensitizing agents, are discussed. (RUW)

  14. Bibliographies on radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.Z.; Ross, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    The one-electron oxidation and reduction of metal ions and complexes can yield species in unusual oxidation states, and ligand-radicals coordinated to the central metal. These often unstable species can be mechanistically important intermediates in thermal, photochemical, and electrochemical reactions involving metal-containing substances. Their generation via radiolysis provides an alternate means of characterizing them using kinetic and spectroscopic techniques. We hope these bibliographies on the radiation chemistry of metal ions and complexes, presented according to periodic groups, will prove useful to researchers in metallo-redox chemistry. These bibliographies contain only primary literature sources; reviews are not included. However, a list of general review articles on the radiation chemistry of metal ions and complexes is presented here in the first section which covers cobalt, rhodium and iridium, Group 9 in the new IUPAC notation. Additional parts of the bibliography are planned, covering other periodic groups. Part A of the bibliography was prepared by a search of the Radiation Chemistry Data Center Bibliographic Data Base (RCDCbib) through January 1986 for papers on rhodium, iridium and cobalt compounds, and radiolysis (both continuous and pulsed). Papers in which the use of metal compounds was incidental to the primary objective of the study were excluded. Excluded also were publications in unrefereed and obscure sources such as meeting proceedings, internal reports, dissertations, and patents. The majority of the studies in the resultant compilation deal with experiments performed on solutions, mainly aqueous, although a substantial fraction is devoted to solid-state esr measurements. The references are listed in separate sections for each of the metals, and are presented in approximate chronological order. (author)

  15. Radiation chemistry in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumura, Yosuke

    2006-01-01

    The importance of radiation chemistry in the field of nuclear technology including reactor chemistry, spent fuel reprocessing and radioactive high level waste repository, is summarized and, in parallel, our research activity will be briefly presented. (author)

  16. Future perspectives of radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Yoshihiko

    2009-01-01

    Future perspectives of radiation chemistry are discussed by the analysis of the related information in detail as obtained from our recent surveys of publications and scientific meetings in radiation chemistry and its neighboring research fields, giving some examples, and are summarized as follows. (1) Traditionally important core-parts of radiation chemistry should be activated more. The corresponding research programs are listed in detail. (2) Research fields of physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, and technology in radiation research should interact more among them with each other. (3) Basic research of radiation chemistry should interact more with its applied research. (4) Interface research fields with radiation chemistry should be produced more with mutually common viewpoints and research interests between the two. Interfaces are not only applied research but also basic one.

  17. Nitrogen Compounds in Radiation Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, H.E.; Dey, G.R.; Vaudey, C.E.; Peaucelle, C.; Boucher, J.L.; Toulhoat, N.; Bererd, N.; Koppenol, W.H.; Janata, E.; Dauvois, V.; Durand, D.; Legand, S.; Roujou, J.L.; Doizi, D.; Dannoux, A.; Lamouroux, C.

    2009-01-01

    Water radiolysis in presence of N 2 is probably the topic the most controversy in the field of water radiolysis. It still exists a strong discrepancy between the different reports of ammonia formation by water radiolysis in presence of N 2 and moreover in absence of oxygen there is no agreement on the formation or not of nitrogen oxide like NO 2 - and NO 3 -. These discrepancies come from multiple sources: - the complexity of the reaction mechanisms where nitrogen is involved - the experimental difficulties - and, the irradiation conditions. The aim of the workshop is to capitalize the knowledge needed to go further in simulations and understanding the problems caused (or not) by the presence of nitrogen / water in the environment of radioactive materials. Implications are evident in terms of corrosion, understanding of biological systems and atmospheric chemistry under radiation. Topics covered include experimental and theoretical approaches, application and fundamental researches: - Nitrate and Ammonia in radiation chemistry in nuclear cycle; - NOx in biological systems and atmospheric chemistry; - Formation of Nitrogen compounds in Nuclear installations; - Nitrogen in future power plant projects (Gen4, ITER...) and large particle accelerators. This document gathers the transparencies available for 7 of the presentations given at this workshop. These are: - H.E SIMS: 'Radiation Chemistry of Nitrogen Compounds in Nuclear Power Plant'; - G.R. DEY: 'Nitrogen Compounds Formation in the Radiolysis of Aqueous Solutions'; - C.E. VAUDEY et al.: 'Radiolytic corrosion of nuclear graphite studied with the dedicated gas irradiation cell of IPNL'; - J.L. BOUCHER: 'Roles and biosynthesis of NO in eukaryotes and prokaryotes'; - W.H. KOPPENOL: 'Chemistry of NOx'; - E. JANATA: 'Yield of OH in N 2 O saturated aqueous solution'; - V. DAUVOIS: 'Analytical strategy for the study of radiolysis gases'

  18. International meeting on radiation chemistry and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    The conference heard 76 papers; the abstracts of 74 of them were inputted in INIS. They deal with the basic principles and mechanisms of radiation chemistry, with radiolysis, radiation cross-linking of polymers, with methods and instruments for irradiation beam dosimetry, and with radiation application in the irradiation of foods and wastes. (M.D.)

  19. Radiation chemistry of polymeric system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machi, Sueo; Ishigaki, Isao

    1978-01-01

    Among wide application of radiation in the field of polymer chemistry, practices of polymerization, graft polymerization, bridging, etc. are introduced hereinafter. As for the radiation sources of radiation polymerization, in addition to the 60 Co-γ ray with long permeation distance which has been usually applied, electron beam accelerators with high energy, large current and high reliability have come to be produced, and the liquid phase polymerization by electron beam has attracted attention industrially. Concerning polymerizing reactions, explanations were given to electron beam polymerization under high dose rate, the polymerization in supercooling state or under high pressure, and emulsifying polymerization. As for radiation bridging, radiation is applied for the bridging of hydrogel, acceleration of bridging and improvement of radiation resistance. It is also utilized for reforming membranes by graft polymerization, and synthesis of polymers for medical use. Application of fixed enzymes in the medical field has been investigated by fixing various enzymes by low temperature γ-ray polymerization with glassy monomers such as HEMA. (Kobatake, H.)

  20. Discussion meeting on nuclear-, radio- and radiation chemistry - basics and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The following fields have been represented at this meeting: 1. nuclear reactions and properties of the formed products; 2. geo- and cosmochemistry; 3. chemistry of actinides and other radioisotopes; 4. radioanalysis; 5. isotope applications; 6. nuclear fuel cycle. Single papers are listed under appropriate categories. (RB)

  1. Bibliographies on radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenstock, C.L.; Ross, A.B.; Helman, W.P.

    1981-01-01

    This bibliography lists about 400 papers dealing solely with the production and reactivity of superoxide radical anions in irradiated aqueous and organic liquids. Only papers dealing with quantitative mechanistic, spectroscopic or kinetic data have been included. The listing was prepared by searching the RCDC bibliographic data base with SELECT keywords O 2 - or HO 2 and aqueous solution. The key words radicals (oxygen), peroxy radicals, pulse radiolysis, flash radiolysis, esr and gamma rays were also used. Additional relevant references were obtained from inspection of reviews, individual author indexes and cited references. The present bibliography excludes solid and gas phase studies, and also technical, government and in-house reports, theses, patents and some symposia proceedings. Several references prior to 1960 have been added, and the list should be reasonably comprehensive from 1965-1980. The listing is in chronological order, according to year of publication in the categories Photochemistry, Radiation Chemistry, Other, and Reviews. (author)

  2. Nuclear science in the 20th century. Radiation chemistry and radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Tao; Xu Furong; Zheng Chunkai

    2003-01-01

    The application of nuclear science and technology to chemistry has led to two important subjects, radiation chemistry and radiation processing, which are playing important roles in many aspects of science and society. We review the development and major applications of radiation chemistry and radiation processing, including the basic physical and chemical mechanisms involved

  3. Solid state radiation chemistry. Features important in basic research and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorski, Z.P.

    1998-01-01

    The basic research of chemical radiation effects has been mostly proceeded in aqueous systems. When one turns from aqueous to the 'dry solute' systems, reactions are running in a very different way. The examined compound, previously the solute, becomes then the only constituent of the system, absorbing all ionising energy. Majority of dosimeters and of radiation processed systems is solid: these are crystalline or rigid substances of high viscosity, sometimes of complicated phase-compositions being no longer homogenous like liquids. Main features of the solid (and rigid) state radiation chemistry is to be discussed in five parts: I. Character of absorption process. Absorption of radiation is in all media heterogenous on the molecular level, i.e. with formation of single- and multi-ionisation spurs. The yield of the latters is 15-25% of the total ionisations, depending on the system, even at low LET radiation. In spite of random distribution of initial ionisations, the single-ionisation spurs can turn rapidly into specifically arranged, temporal localisations. The variety of spur reactions is usually more complicated than that in aqueous systems. II. Character of transients. Intermediates in solid state radiation chemistry exhibit very different transport properties: from free electrons moving fast and far, to electrons changing the position by different physicochemical mechanisms, to easy movable H-atoms, and to practically unmovable, only vibrating, new fragments of a lattice or glass. III. Paramagnetic intermediates. Radicals living for microseconds in liquids, when created and trapped in a solid matrix are usually very stable, e.g. they can have a difference of half-life times of 12 orders of magnitude, however their chemical composition remais identical. (author)

  4. Advanced radiation chemistry research: Current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    Radiation chemistry is a branch of chemistry that studies chemical transformations in materials exposed to high-energy radiations. It is based on the use of ionizing radiation as the initiator or catalyst in chemical reactions. The most significant advantage of radiation chemistry lies in its ability to be used in the production and study of almost any reactive atomic and molecular species playing a part in chemical reaction, synthesis, industrial processes, or in biological systems. Over the the last few years a number of meetings have taken place, under the auspices of the IAEA, in order to evaluate recent developments in radiation chemistry as well as the trends indicated by the results obtained. Radiation chemists from different countries have participated at these meetings. The present publication, a companion to the previous publication - New Trends and Development in Radiation Chemistry, IAEA-TECDOC-527 (1989) - includes some of the important contributions presented at these meetings. It is hoped that it will provide a useful overview of current activities and of emerging trends in this field, thus promoting better understanding of potential contributions of radiation chemistry to other fields of knowledge as well as to practical applications in industry, medicine and agriculture. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. Advanced radiation chemistry research: Current status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    Radiation chemistry is a branch of chemistry that studies chemical transformations in materials exposed to high-energy radiations. It is based on the use of ionizing radiation as the initiator or catalyst in chemical reactions. The most significant advantage of radiation chemistry lies in its ability to be used in the production and study of almost any reactive atomic and molecular species playing a part in chemical reaction, synthesis, industrial processes, or in biological systems. Over the the last few years a number of meetings have taken place, under the auspices of the IAEA, in order to evaluate recent developments in radiation chemistry as well as the trends indicated by the results obtained. Radiation chemists from different countries have participated at these meetings. The present publication, a companion to the previous publication - New Trends and Development in Radiation Chemistry, IAEA-TECDOC-527 (1989) - includes some of the important contributions presented at these meetings. It is hoped that it will provide a useful overview of current activities and of emerging trends in this field, thus promoting better understanding of potential contributions of radiation chemistry to other fields of knowledge as well as to practical applications in industry, medicine and agriculture. Refs, figs and tabs.

  6. Application of Radiation Chemistry to Some Selected Technological Issues Related to the Development of Nuclear Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrowski, Krzysztof; Skotnicki, Konrad; Szreder, Tomasz

    2016-10-01

    The most important contributions of radiation chemistry to some selected technological issues related to water-cooled reactors, reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes, and fuel evolution during final radioactive waste disposal are highlighted. Chemical reactions occurring at the operating temperatures and pressures of reactors and involving primary transients and stable products from water radiolysis are presented and discussed in terms of the kinetic parameters and radiation chemical yields. The knowledge of these parameters is essential since they serve as input data to the models of water radiolysis in the primary loop of light water reactors and super critical water reactors. Selected features of water radiolysis in heterogeneous systems, such as aqueous nanoparticle suspensions and slurries, ceramic oxides surfaces, nanoporous, and cement-based materials, are discussed. They are of particular concern in the primary cooling loops in nuclear reactors and long-term storage of nuclear waste in geological repositories. This also includes radiation-induced processes related to corrosion of cladding materials and copper-coated iron canisters, dissolution of spent nuclear fuel, and changes of bentonite clays properties. Radiation-induced processes affecting stability of solvents and solvent extraction ligands as well oxidation states of actinide metal ions during recycling of the spent nuclear fuel are also briefly summarized.

  7. Polish contribution to radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroh, J.

    1989-01-01

    This article outlines the history of radiation chemistry research in Poland from 1899 to the present day, with particular reference to radiolysis studies of aqueous solutions of radioactive compounds. (UK)

  8. Radiation chemistry: basic, strategic or tactical science?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wardman, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The work of Weiss in the 1930s, particularly with Haber, has only recently been recognized to have implications in biology and medicine. Similarly, research in radiation chemistry and the application of the pulse radiolysis technique, for example, have implications far beyond traditional radiation chemistry. Some examples of such research are discussed against a background of categorization into 'basic', 'strategic' or 'tactical' science. Examples discussed include redox properties of free radicals, and the identification and characterization of nitro radicals as intermediates in drug metabolism. Radical reactions often take place in multicomponent systems, and the techniques of radiation chemistry can be used to probe, for example, events occurring at interfaces in micelles. Industrial processes involving radiation are attracting investment, particularly in Japan. (author)

  9. Some progress on radiation chemistry of substances of biological interests and biological applications of radiation technology in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jilan; Fang Xingwang

    1995-01-01

    Studies in China on the detection method of irradiated food, mechanism of DNA damage induced by peroxidation, radiolysis of natural products and herbs are reviewed on the update open literature, and some progress on applications of radiation technology is summarized. (author)

  10. Applications of supramolecular chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Hans-Jörg

    2012-01-01

    ""The time is ripe for the present volume, which gathers thorough presentations of the numerous actually realized or potentially accessible applications of supramolecular chemistry by a number of the leading figures in the field. The variety of topics covered is witness to the diversity of the approaches and the areas of implementation…a broad and timely panorama of the field assembling an eminent roster of contributors.""-Jean-Marie Lehn, 1987 Noble Prize Winner in Chemistry

  11. First picosecond in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bednar, J.

    1983-01-01

    The early processes of absorption by matter of ionizing radiation are discussed on the level of collision processes of electrons of the degradation spectrum of radiation with molecules of the medium. A short survey of the processes of initial excitations, superexcitations and ionizations is given occurring during absorption and relaxation processes. Collisions of fast charged particles with atoms and molecules are discussed within the first Bethe-Born approximation. A short theoretical description is given of the basic radiation chemical quantities, such as primary radiation chemical yield g and total absorbed energy Q/sub tot/ due to energy absorption from the totality of fast and slow electrons of the degradation spectrum. A short survey of current chemical and physical models of the track of a fast electron in condensed media is given together with some comments on the effect of the chemical composition of the medium on its initial radiation chemical decomposition. The model of the molecule in a high Rydberg state is sketched briefly together with some implications for radiation chemistry of formation and decay of this kind of highly excited matter. In conclusion, a survey of the initial yields of products in gases and track entities in liquids is presented and a few remarks are made concerning the intrinsic problems of radiation sciences, i.e. radiation physics, chemistry, dosimetry and biology

  12. Radiation chemistry in the nuclear power reactor environment: from laboratory study to practical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the work carried out at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories in underlying and applied radiation chemical research performed to optimise the processes occurring in the four aqueous systems in and around the core. The aqueous systems subject to radiolysis in CANDU reactors are Heat Transport System, Moderator, Liquid Zone Controls and End Shields.

  13. Radiation chemistry of anionic disazo dyes in Cellophane films applications for high-dose dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, W.L.William L

    2003-06-01

    Thin transparent Cellophane films containing anionic disazo 'Direct' dyes, e.g. blue Cellophanes, have long been used as monitors of large absorbed doses of ionizing radiation (10-300 kGy) and especially for mapping electron-beam dose profiles. Examples of dyes for such purposes are variations on forms of the disazo dyes, Direct Orange, Direct Violet or Direct Blue. The films have a thickness of 25.6 {mu}m (+0.1 {mu}m) and are available in rolls of either 30 mx0.51 m or 60 mx0.76 m. Such dyed Cellophanes are typically lightfast but can readily be bleached irreversibly by ionizing radiation, as a means of dosimetry using spectrophotometry as the analytical tool. The radiation response is markedly dependent on temperature and relative humidity during irradiation. The reaction is initiated mainly by dehydrogenation and nitrosation upon electrophilic reductive attack on the dye molecule by the thermal electrons, at initial reaction rate constants in the range 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} s{sup -1}.

  14. Connections between radiation and positronium chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirade, Tetsuya

    2007-01-01

    Some of the important connections between radiation chemistry and positronium chemistry started from the establishment of the spur reaction model proposed by Mogensen. Now, the modified model, the blob model proposed by Stepanov and Byakov, is making it possible to have the quantitative or semi-quantitative view of the positronium formation by using the distributions of positrons and excess electrons. Some of the interesting topics will be picked up here to understand the connections between radiation chemistry and positronium chemistry

  15. The radiation chemistry of colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellers, R.M.

    1976-08-01

    One of the most important problems associated with water cooled reactors is the accumulation on the pipework of radio-active deposits. These are formed from corrosion products which become activated during their passage through the reactor core. The first step of the activation process involves the deposition of the corrosion products, which are present as either colloidal or particulate matter, onto surfaces in the reactor core, i.e. within the radiation zone. A review of the literature on the effect of radiation on colloids is presented. Particular emphasis is given to the dependence of colloidal parameters such as particle size, turbidity and electrophoretic mobility on radiation dose. Most of the data available is of a qualitative nature only. Evidence is presented that colloids of iron are affected (in some cases precipitated) by radiation, and it is suggested that this process plays a part in the deposition of corrosion products in nuclear reactor cores. The bulk of the information available can be rationalized in terms of the radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions, and the interaction of the radicals produced with the atoms or molecules at the surface of the colloidal particles. This approach is very successful in explaining the variation of the mean particle size of monodisperse sulphur hydrosols with dose, for which quantitative experimental data are available. (author)

  16. Radiation chemistry in development and research of radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Rui

    2010-01-01

    During the establishment and development of radiation biology, radiation chemistry acts like bridge which units the spatial and temporal insight coming from radiation physics with radiation biology. The theory, model, and methodology of radiation chemistry play an important role in promoting research and development of radiation biology. Following research development of radiation biology effects towards systems radiation biology the illustration and exploration both diversity of biological responses and complex process of biological effect occurring remain to need the theory, model, and methodology come from radiation chemistry. (authors)

  17. 8th `Tihany` Symposium on Radiation Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Several aspects of radiation chemistry and radiation effects on various substances have been treated at the meeting, short communications of papers are presented in this publication. All items within the scope of INIS database were indexed individually.

  18. 8th 'Tihany' Symposium on Radiation Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Several aspects of radiation chemistry and radiation effects on various substances have been treated at the meeting, short communications of papers are presented in this publication. All items within the scope of INIS database were indexed individually

  19. Radiation chemistry in Taiwan, fundamental and applied

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, U.P.

    1980-01-01

    Both fundamental and applied research works on radiation chemistry in Taiwan have been described from the view point of economic development of new radiation chemical industry by applying unique chemical reactions on radiation processing. Seven items on the basic and applied research works and the status of recent industrial development of radiation chemistry have been consequently selected to be delineated as the major contents along this line in this paper. (author)

  20. Radiation chemistry of the alkali halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, V.J.; Chandratillake, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    By far the most thoroughly investigated group of compounds in solid-state radiation chemistry are the alkali halides. Some of the reasons are undoubtedly practical: large single crystals of high purity are readily prepared. The crystals are transparent over a wide range of wavelengths. They are more sensitive to radiation damage than most other ionic solids. The crystals have simple well-defined structures, and the products of radiolysis have also in many cases been clearly identified by a variety of experimental techniques, the most important being optical methods and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). In recent years the application of pulse techniques-radiolysis and laser photolysis-has yielded a wealth of information concerning the mechanisms of the primary processes of radiation damage, on the one hand, and of thermal and photolytic reactions that the radiolysis products undergo, on the other

  1. Chemistry and radiation in oxy-fuel combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of combustion chemistry and radiation heat transfer in oxy-fuel combustion modeling, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling study has been performed for two different oxy-fuel furnaces. One is a lab-scale 0.8MW oxy-natural gas flame furnace whose detailed in....... Among the key issues in combustion modeling, e.g., mixing, radiation and chemistry, this paper derives useful guidelines on radiation and chemistry implementation for reliable CFD analyses of oxy-fuel combustion, particularly for industrial applications....

  2. Heavy-ion radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Masashi

    1975-01-01

    New aspect of heavy ion radiation chemistry is reviewed. Experiment has been carried out with carbon ions and nitrogen ions accelerated by a 160 cm cyclotron of the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research. The results of experiments are discussed, taking into consideration the effects of core radius depending on heavy ion energy and of the branch tracks of secondary electrons outside the core on chemical reaction and the yield of products. The effect of core size on chemical reaction was not able to be observed, because the incident energy of heavy ions was only several tens of MeV. Regarding high radical density, attention must be given to the production of oxygen in the core. It is possible to produce O 2 in the core in case of high linear energy transfer (LET), while no production of O 2 in case of low LET radiation. This may be one of study problems in future. LET effects on the yield of decomposed products were examined on acetone, methyl-ethyl-ketone and diethyl ketone, using heavy ions (C and N) as well as gamma radiation and helium ions. These three ketones showed that the LET change of two gaseous products, H 2 and CO, was THF type. There are peaks at 50-70 eV/A in the yield of both products. The peaks suggest the occurrence of ''saturation'' in decomposition. Attention was drawn to acetone containing a small amount (2 wt.%) of H 2 O. H 2 O and CO produced from this system differ from those in the pure system. The hydrogen connection formed by such a small amount of H 2 O may mediate the energy transfer. Sodium acetate tri-hydrate produces CH 3 radical selectively by gamma-ray irradiation at 77 K. In this case, the production of CH 2 COO - increases with the increase of LET of radiation. This phenomenon may be an important study problem. (Iwakiri, K.)

  3. Radiation chemistry of aqueous trichloroethene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, R.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Halogenated hydrocarbons have played a key role in Industrial processes for many years. The problems of disposal of used solvents and chloroderivatives is now a problem facing chemical companies, industrial and domestic users. A range of treatments have been suggested and tried from high efficiency incineration to photo-catalytic hydrolysis. Radiation chemistry offers a route to dissolution and dehalogenation of halocarbons in general by virtue of free radical reactions and in particular the dissociative electron capture process resulting from the generation of solvated electrons. RCl + e - aq → R + Cl - aq . The fate of the free radical, R, is crucial to the subsequent degradation of the halocarbon. It will probably contain more organic chlorine, or other halogens, which ideally should be degradable to inert inorganic halide. In this study pulse radiolysis studies have been conducted on aqueous solutions of trichloroethene (TCE) which is a commonly used industrial cleaning solvent. The production of free radicals has been monitored by fast time resolution absorption spectroscopy using a pulse radiolysis facility at the Australian Radiation Laboratory Yallambie Victoria. Fee radical species have been detected in pulse electron irradiated solutions of TCE at various pH's and in the presence of Oxygen and Nitrous oxide. The nature of these radical species will be discussed. The production of inorganic chlorine is being monitored by a spectrophotometric technique based upon a mercuric thiocyanate/ ferric ion complexation which can detect free chloride ion concentrations down to ppm levels

  4. The role of radiation in polymer chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Plessis, T.A.

    1977-10-01

    The very important role which polymer chemistry plays in radiation technology is discussed. The present status of radiation processing and the radiation sources that are used by industry are described. The process by which ionising radiation interacts with vinyl monomers and polymers are treated briefly, and the kinetics and mechanisms of the industrially important radiation processes in the polymer field is discussed. Finally, some of the most important industrial radiation processes related to the field of polymers are pointed out [af

  5. Developments and prospects of radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Masashi

    1984-01-01

    The fruitful achievement which has been obtained in the radiation chemistry laboratory of the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research during the research for twenty years from 1963 to 1983 is summarized in this review. In the section of investigation of radiation-induced chemical reaction, the new problems and their interpretation of LET effect in the case of aqueous solution of ferrous chloride and liquid organic compound, and the radiation chemistry of liquid methanol are described, and in the section of investigation of ion-radicals, low temperature rigid solution-γ-ray irradiation method including the outline of the method and the electron absorption spectra of ion-radicals and the structure are described. In the section of pulse-radiolysis method (pulsed electron beam irradiation method), the application to the investigation of dimer cations, the initial process of dimer anions and ionic polymerization, the solvation process of anion radicals, and the long distance transfer of electrons in amorphous solid are explained. In the section of research on metal porphyrin complex related to the chemical conversion of solar energy, chlorophyll-a and its dimer, and synthetic metal porphyrin complex, and in the section of research on photochemical reaction, photochemical reaction and the chemical effect on radioactive disintegration are explained. (Yoshitake, I.)

  6. Research needs and opportunities in radiation chemistry workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbara, Paul F

    1998-04-19

    heterogeneous systems. These various goals necessitate the development and application of complementary programs of experiment and theory, and will involve the use of nonconventional radiation sources and the study of novel homogeneous and heterogeneous chemical systems. There is also a need to upgrade other types of instrumentation used in radiation chemistry in the national laboratories, including high field electron paramagnetic resonance, and modern analytical tools. The development and enhancement of these various tools will allow for a much wider use of the national radiation chemistry facilities.

  7. IV Bach conference on radiation chemistry. Abstracts of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    IV Bach conference on radiation chemistry was conducted in the framework of the conference Physico-chemical foundations of new technologies of XXI century. Problems of radiolysis of modern polymeric materials, post-irradiation examination of different organic and inorganic compounds treated with ionizing radiation, equipment used for these examinations, application of data obtained in these researches were represented in reports [ru

  8. Introduction to radiation chemistry of polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohd Dahlan, Khairul Zaman [Nuclear Energy Unit, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    1994-12-31

    The topics briefly discussed are 1. What are radiation chemistry 2. Type of ionising radiation 3. gamma rays versus electron beam 4. Interaction of radiation with matters 5. What is polymers 6. Techniques of crosslinking 7. Crosslinking of polymers i.e. polyethylene, ethylene copolymer, polypropylene, polyamides, polyvinyl chloride, natural rubber.

  9. Introduction to radiation chemistry of polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khairul Zaman Mohd Dahlan

    1994-01-01

    The topics briefly discussed are 1. What are radiation chemistry 2. Type of ionising radiation 3. gamma rays versus electron beam 4. Interaction of radiation with matters 5. What is polymers 6. Techniques of crosslinking 7. Crosslinking of polymers i.e. polyethylene, ethylene copolymer, polypropylene, polyamides, polyvinyl chloride, natural rubber

  10. Technological aspects of the radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    Main technological aspects of the radiation chemistry are reviewed: network formation in polymers and caoutchouc, production of the sterile hydrogels, sterilisation of the expendable medical equipment and the environmental protection technologies (e.g. purification of the combustion gases from the sulfur oxides). Achievements of the are reviewed Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland) in these fields are presented

  11. Recollections of the maturation of radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dainton, F.S.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper the background to the study of the identification of primary species in irradiated aqueous solutions is presented. Theoretical aspects are discussed. The radiation chemistry of glossy and crystalline solids is briefly discussed. (UK)

  12. Some remarks on applied radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurada, I.

    1979-01-01

    Radiation induced polymerization and grafting are two important reactions in the processing. Numerous reports concerning these subjects have appeared in the literature. There are, however, still many problems which have been left unsolved or neglected. Several problems will be taken up in this paper and discussed on experiments carried out in Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry and Department of Polymer Chemistry of Kyoto University. (author)

  13. Electron collision cross sections and radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Y.

    1983-01-01

    A survey is given of the cross section data needs in radiation chemistry, and of the recent progress in electron impact studies on dissociative excitation of molecules. In the former some of the important target species, processes, and collision energies are presented, while in the latter it is demonstrated that radiation chemistry is a source of new ideas and information in atomic collision research. 37 references, 4 figures

  14. Bibliography of astatine chemistry and biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berei, K.; Vasaros, L.

    1992-02-01

    An overall bibliography is presented on astatine chemistry and on the biomedical applications of its 211 At isotope. The references were grouped in the following chapters: General reviews; Discovery, Natural Occurence; Nuclear Data; Preparation, Handling, Radiation Risk; Physico-chemical Properties; Astatine Compounds and Chemical Reactions; Biological Effects and Applications. Entries are sorted alphabetically by authors name in each chapter, and cross-references to other chapters are provided if appropriate. (R.P.)

  15. The chemistry of UV and BE radiation curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnett, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    The application of photopolymerisation (UV) and electron beams (EB) technologies in radiation rapid cure (PRC) processing is discussed. The chemistry associated with such reactions and the mechanisms of the processes are treated. The occurrence of concurrent grafting to substrate with radiation curing of films is shown to be an advantage in enhancing the properties of certain finished products. The parameters influencing the optimum grafting yield in such PRC processes are discussed. In many applications, the chemistry of such processes combined with the machine, specially for EB is shown. (author)

  16. The chemistry of UV and EB radiation curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnett, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The application of photopolymerisation (UV) and electron beam (EB) technologies in radiation rapid cure (RRC) processing is discussed. The chemistry associated with such reactions and the mechanisms of the processes are treated. The occurrence of concurrent grafting to substrate with radiation curing of film is shown to be an advantage in enhancing the properties of certain finished products. The parameters influencing the optimum grafting yield in such RRC processes are discussed. In many applications, the chemistry of the process combined with the machine, expecially for EB, is shown a so-called ''turn-key'' operation. (author)

  17. 2010 Gordon Research Conference On Radiation Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlando, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 Gordon Conference on Radiation Chemistry will present cutting edge research regarding the study of radiation-induced chemical transformations. Radiation Chemistry or 'high energy' chemistry is primarily initiated by ionizing radiation: i.e. photons or particles with energy sufficient to create conduction band electrons and 'holes', excitons, ionic and neutral free radicals, highly excited states, and solvated electrons. These transients often interact or 'react' to form products vastly different than those produced under thermal equilibrium conditions. The non-equilibrium, non-thermal conditions driving radiation chemistry exist in plasmas, star-forming regions, the outer solar system, nuclear reactors, nuclear waste repositories, radiation-based medical/clinical treatment centers and in radiation/materials processing facilities. The 2010 conference has a strong interdisciplinary flavor with focus areas spanning (1) the fundamental physics and chemistry involved in ultrafast (atto/femtosecond) energy deposition events, (2) radiation-induced processes in biology (particularly spatially resolved studies), (3) radiation-induced modification of materials at the nanoscale and cosmic ray/x-ray mediated processes in planetary science/astrochemistry. While the conference concentrates on fundamental science, topical applied areas covered will also include nuclear power, materials/polymer processing, and clinical/radiation treatment in medicine. The Conference will bring together investigators at the forefront of their field, and will provide opportunities for junior scientists and graduate students to present work in poster format or as contributors to the Young Investigator session. The program and format provides excellent avenues to promote cross-disciplinary collaborations.

  18. Radiation chemistry of the liquid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buxton, G.V.

    1987-01-01

    More is known about the radiation chemistry of water than any other liquid. From a practical viewpoint out knowledge is virtually complete, and water radiolysis now provides a very convenient way of generating an enormous variety of unstable species under well-defined conditions. This facility, coupled with the techniques of pulse radiolysis, has opened up new areas in aqueous inorganic, organic, and biochemistry that cannot be readily studied by thermal or photochemical methods. This chapter is aimed, therefore, at those who wish to use radiolytic methods to generate and study unstable species in aqueous solution. The basic features of the radiation chemistry of water are described first to show how the primary radical and molecular products evolve with time and to delineate the bounds of useful experimental conditions. Next, the properties of the primary radicals are summarized, and examples are given to show how the primary radicals can be converted into secondary radicals, often of a single kind. This is an important aspect of the radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions. Lastly, the impact of our knowledge of the radiation chemistry of water on advances in general chemistry is illustrated by examples from the fields of inorganic and organic chemistry

  19. Basic radiation physics and chemistry of composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przybytniak, G.; Zagorski, Z.P.

    2006-01-01

    Composites are increasingly more important in the applied and fundamental polymer science, and the participation of radiation processing of these systems increase. In presented paper the newest achievements of radiation physics and chemistry of composites are reviewed. It is stressed, that although main experimental effort is directed towards the development of composites as such, and investigation of their specific properties, mechanical, physicochemical and physical, the radiation processing will enter the field on the wider scale, especially as concerns specialized plastics

  20. Scientific projection paper for radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    Among all the environmental hazards to which man is exposed, ionizing radiation is the most thoroughly investigated and the most responsibly monitored and controlled. Nevertheless, because of the importance of radiation in modern society from both the hazard as well as the utilitarian standpoints, much more information concerning the biological effects induced and their modification and reversal is required. Together with radiation physics, an understanding of radiation chemistry is necessary for full appreciation of biological effects of high and low energy radiations, and for the development of prophylactic, therapeutic and potentiating methods and techniques in biological organisms

  1. Radiation chemistry of biologically compatible polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.J. T.; Pomery, P.J.; Saadat, G.; Whittaker, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Poly (2-hydroxy ethyl methacrylate) [PHEMA] and poly (2-ethoxy ethyl methacrylate) [PEEMA] are of biomedical and industrial interest due to their biocompatibility with living tissue. In this paper the effect of high energy radiation on these polymers is reported. PHEMA and PEEMA have similar molecular structures to poly (methyl methacrylate)[PMMA], and the γ irradiation of this polymer is well understood. Hence the radiation chemistry of PMMA is used as model system for the the analysis of the radiation chemistry of these polymers. The mechanism of the radiation induced chemistry of the polymers has been investigated using a range of techniques including electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) to establish free radical pathways, GC to identify small molecule volatile products, NMR to identify small molecule radiation products and Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC) to determine molecular weight changes. Whilst much of the major part of the radiation chemistry can be attributed to similar reactions which can be observed in PMMA, there are a number of new radicals which are present as a result of the influence of the side chain interactions which reduces the mobility of the polymer chain

  2. 13th AINSE radiation chemistry conference, 12-14 November 1986, Lucas Heights - AINSE Theatre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Abstracts of papers are given which cover the fields of radiolysis in aqueous solutions, solids and gases, radiation polymerisation and degradation, excitation in solids and gases, and industrial applications of radiation chemistry

  3. Radiation chemistry and environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermakov, A.N.; Tarasova, N.P.; Bugaenko, L.T.

    1992-01-01

    A combination of different technological methods in one plant is usually economically advantageous in industry. Such a general approach is also useful in solving ecological problems by methods of radiation technology. This method of cleaning 'harsh' sufactants and 'mold' products and a stage of subsequent biological purification of these products from the water. Combining radiation and adsorption techniques is also promising. A relatively large number of examples can now be cited. At the same time, purely radiational technologies are also possible. The authors discuss one of these technologies in more detail. This concerns electron-beam scrubbing of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides from the gases from electric power plants. This method can also be used for scrubbing sulfur dioxide from waste gases from sulfuric acid and metallurgical plants

  4. Extraterrestrial Radiation Chemistry and Molecular Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Moore, Marla H.

    2009-01-01

    Astronomical observations of both solar system and interstellar regions have revealed a rich chemical inventory that includes most classes of organic molecules and selected inorganics. For example, gas-phase ethylene glycol and SOz have been observed by astronomers, while solidphase detections include OCS, H2O2 , and the cyanate anion.' All of these are found in environments that are, by earthly standards, exceedingly hostile: temperatures of 10 - 100 K, miniscule densities, and near-ubiquitous ionizing-radiation fields. Beyond the simplest chemical species, these conditions have made it difficult-to-impassible to account for the observed molecular abundances using gas-phase chemistry, suggesting solid-phase reactions play an important role. In extraterrestrial environments, cosmic rays, UV photons, and magnetospheric radiation all drive chemical reactions, even at cryogenic temperatures. To study this chemistry, radiation astrochemists conduct experiments on icy materials, frozen under vacuum and exposed to sources such as keV electrons and MeV protons. Compositional changes usually are followed with IR spectroscopy and, in selected cases, more-sensitive mass-spectral techniques. This talk will review some recent results on known and suspected extraterrestrial molecules and ions. Spectra and reaction pathways will be presented, and predictions made for interstellar chemistry and the chemistry of selected solar system objects. Some past radiation-chemical contributions, and future needs, will be explored.

  5. Radiation chemistry - its Czechoslovak story and comments on general present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bednar, J.

    1978-01-01

    The history is outlined of radiation chemistry in Czechoslovakia since 1954 and scientists contributing to the respective stages of its development are listed. Current trends of radiation chemistry in the world are indicated. (J.P.)

  6. Areas of research in radiation chemistry fundamental to radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    Among all the environmental hazards to which man is exposed, ionizing radiation is the most thoroughly investigated and the most responsibly monitored and controlled. Nevertheless, because of the importance of radiation in modern society from both the hazard as well as the utilitarian standpoints, much more information concerning the biological effects induced and their modification and reversal is required. Together with radiation physics, an understanding of radiation chemistry is necessary for full appreciation of biological effects of high and low energy radiations, and for the development of prophylactic, therapeutic and potentiating methods and techniques in biological organisms. The necessity of understanding the chemistry of any system, biological or not, that is to be manipulated and controlled, is so obvious as to make trivial a statement to that effect. If any natural phenomenon is to be put to our use, surely the elements of it must be studied and appreciated fully. In the preliminary statements of the various panels of this general group, the need for additional information on the basic radiation chemistry concerned in radiation-induced biological effects pervades throughout

  7. Radiation chemistry research education in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangster, D.F.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation chemistry techniques may be used to solve research problems in other fields of chemistry and biology particularly when free radicals, excited states or reduction-oxidation reactions are involved. Using pulse radiolysis, absolute kinetic rate constants can be measured. The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering is an organization jointly funded by universities, ANSTO and CSIRO. Over the past several years it has provided fares, accommodation and specialized supplementary equipment to enable PhD students and post doctoral fellows to make use of the unique electron beam and gamma irradiation facilities at the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories. It also arranges biennial conferences at which this work is presented and discussed. This talk will discuss the contribution made to the education of students in the undergraduate final year and in physical, metal-organic, organic, polymer and enzyme chemistry research

  8. Radiation chemistry of synthetic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisel, D.; Diamond, H.; Horwitz, E.P.; Jonah, C.D.; Matheson, M.S.; Sauer, M.C. Jr.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1991-11-01

    The yield of H 2 from radiolysis of aqueous solutions is substantially reduced by the presence of nitrate and nitrite in the waste solutions. Nitrate is more efficient in scavenging the precursors to H 2 than is nitrite, therefore, the latter should be maintained at higher levels if minimization of radiolytic gas production is required. Nitrate is the major scavenger for e aq - and nitrite is the major scavenger for H atoms. At the concentration levels of the waste solutions some fraction of the radiation energy will be absorbed directly by the solutes, primarily the nitrate/nitrite components. Organic additive will increase the generation of H 2 and mechanistic information is available to allow predictive modeling of trends in the rate of the generation. Physical parameters such as temperature, viscosity, and pressure will not significantly affect the gas generation relative to its generation under normal conditions. Radiolytic generation of N 2 O is very inefficient in the absence of organic solutes. No mechanistic information is available on its generation in the presence of organic additives. At the concentration levels of the inorganic salts in the waste solutions, it will be very difficult to find a chemical additive that could efficiently reduce the yield of the generated H 2 , except, perhaps, increasing the concentration of the nitrite/nitrate components

  9. Radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions of acetonitrile and propionitrile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shushtarian, M.J.

    1975-01-01

    The radiation chemistry of water and aqueous solutions is a branch of radiation chemistry dealing with chemical changes in water and aqueous solutions induced by high energy radiations. High energy radiations of interest in radiation chemistry are short-wave electromagnetic radiations (X- and γ-rays) and fast charged particles (α- and β-particles, electrons, deuterons and fission fragments). The energy of the particles and photons bringing about chemical reactions in the field of modern radiation chemistry is much higher than that of photons causing photochemical reactions

  10. Hydrolysis and Radiation Chemistry of the DGAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mincher, Bruce Jay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zarzana, Christopher Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This document was prepared to meet FCR&D level 3 milestone M3FT-16IN030104052, “continue the study of the short chain compounds,” and, “ study the radiolysis of the non-symmetrical DGA (D3DODGA)….,” under the Radiation Chemistry FCR&D work package. Toward these goals, the short chain DGA, tetraethyldiglycolamide (TEDGA) was investigated for its hydrolytic stability in HNO3 solution, with comparisons to the less oxidizing mineral acid HCl. Initial gamma-irradiations were also performed on DGA solutions, to inform a more detailed investigation of several short chain compounds anticipated for FY17. The hydrolytic and radiolysis behavior of TEDGA is of interest for two reasons. First, previous long chain DGA radiolysis was conducted in dodecane solution since the long chain compounds are soluble in that diluent, and new radiation chemistry is expected in the aqueous environment due to reactions with •OH radical. The second reason is that this water-soluble DGA has been proposed for use as a stripping or holdback agent in both European and American fuel cycle scenarios. Therefore, this work was performed in collaboration Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ), and the European SACSESS program. Additionally, results are presented here regarding the radiation of chemistry the non-symmetrical DGA didodecyldioctyldiglycolamide (D3DODGA), for comparison to previous work with symmetrical DGAs such as TODGA and TEHDGA. This was also conducted in collaboration with researchers in the SACSESS program.

  11. 21. Brdicka days of radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasil, Z.

    1987-10-01

    The conference proceeded in four sessions. Session 1 dealt with radiolysis of compounds, with photochemically and radiation-induced reactions and heard papers that could not be included in the other sessions. Session 2 discussed the ionizing radiation effect on polymers and the properties of radiation cross-linked polymers. Session 3 heard papers on radiation sources and on studies of the ionizing radiation effect on semiconductors. Main attention was devoted to different types of radiation dosemeters. Session 4 discussed the applications of radiation technologies in forestry and water management, radiation sterilization of drugs and irradiation of foods. The proceedings only contain the abstracts of submitted papers. In some cases where no abstract has been submitted, only the title is shown. (E.S.)

  12. Surface chemistry theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bikerman, J J

    2013-01-01

    Surface Chemistry Theory and Applications focuses on liquid-gas, liquid-liquid, solid-gas, solid-liquid, and solid-solid surfaces. The book first offers information on liquid-gas surfaces, including surface tension, measurement of surface tension, rate of capillarity rise, capillary attraction, bubble pressure and pore size, and surface tension and temperature. The text then ponders on liquid-liquid and solid-gas surfaces. Discussions focus on surface energy of solids, surface roughness and cleanness, adsorption of gases and vapors, adsorption hysteresis, interfacial tension, and interfacial t

  13. Recent trends in radiation polymer chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, S.

    1993-01-01

    This book contains five contributions with the following topics: 1. Electron Spin Echo Studies of Free Radicals in Irradiated Polymers (H. Yoshida, T. Ichikawa); 2. Application of Pulse Radiolysis to the Study of Polymers and Polymerizations (M. Ogasawara); 3. Radiation Synthesis of Polymeric Materials for Biomedical and Biochemical Applications (I. Kaetsu); 4. Radiation Effects of Ion Beams on Polymers (S. Tagawa); and 5. Polymer Materials for Fusion Reactors (H. Yamaoka). (orig./MM). 74 figs., 12 tabs

  14. Applications of EPR in radiation research

    CERN Document Server

    Lund, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Applications of EPR in Radiation Research is a multi-author contributed volume presented in eight themes: I. Elementary radiation processes (in situ and low temperature radiolysis, quantum solids); II: Solid state radiation chemistry (crystalline, amorphous and heterogeneous systems); III: Biochemistry, biophysics and biology applications (radicals in biomaterials, spin trapping, free-radical-induced DNA damage); IV: Materials science (polymeric and electronic materials, materials for treatment of nuclear waste, irradiated food); V: Radiation metrology (EPR-dosimetry, retrospective and medical

  15. 12. 'Tihany' symposium on radiation chemistry. Program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The 12th 'Tihany' symposium on radiation chemistry was held in Zalakaros in the organization of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Isotope and Surface Chemistry. The scientific program of the Symposium will cover all the major disciplines of both basic and applied radiation chemistry. The topics were the fundamental processes in radiation chemistry, the different irradiations ways, radiolysis of inorganic and organic systems, nanoscale and the macromolecular systems. Also could be seen presentations in the subject of the food irradiation, the environmental protection, biomedical materials radiation, about the resistant materials, the radiation sterilization and the dosimetry. (S.I.)

  16. 12. 'Tihany' symposium on radiation chemistry. Program and abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The 12th 'Tihany' symposium on radiation chemistry was held in Zalakaros in the organization of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Isotope and Surface Chemistry. The scientific program of the Symposium will cover all the major disciplines of both basic and applied radiation chemistry. The topics were the fundamental processes in radiation chemistry, the different irradiations ways, radiolysis of inorganic and organic systems, nanoscale and the macromolecular systems. Also could be seen presentations in the subject of the food irradiation, the environmental protection, biomedical materials radiation, about the resistant materials, the radiation sterilization and the dosimetry. (S.I.)

  17. Inorganic and organic radiation chemistry: state and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyazin, E.P.; Bugaenko, L.T.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation inorganic and organic chemistry is presented on the basis of the general scheme and classification of radiolysis products and elementary processes, by which evolution of radiation-affected substances up to the final radiolysis products takes place. The evolution is traced for the representatives of inorganic and organic compounds. The contribution of radiation inorganic and organic chemistry to radiation technology, radiation materials technology, radiation ecology and medicine, is shown. Tendencies in the development of radiation chemistry and prediction of its certain directions are considered

  18. Contribution of radiation chemistry to cluster science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belloni, J.

    2006-01-01

    Nanoclusters are small objects made of a few atoms, with a size of a few nanometers at most, which constitute a state of matter, named mesoscopic, intermediary between the atom and the bulk metal. In the 70's, radiation chemistry experiments have demonstrated that metal clusters exhibited indeed, due to their very small size, specific properties distinct from the bulk metal. The properties, physical and chemical, change with the number of atoms they contain. Their optical absorption spectrum, for example, as well as their redox potential, depends on the nuclearity, and also on the environment. Radiation chemistry methods have been proven to be of high potentiality to induce small and size-monodispersed metal clusters, as nanocolloids or supported on various materials. Pulse radiolysis provides the means to study the dynamics of nucleation and growth of clusters, monoand bi-metallic, from the monomers to the stable nanoparticle and to observe directly their reactivity, especially to determine during the growth their nuclearity-dependent properties, such as the redox potential. These are of crucial importance for the understanding of the mechanism of the cluster growth itself, in the radiation-induced as well as in the chemical or photochemical reduction processes, and also of the mechanism of certain catalytic reactions. (authors)

  19. Radiation Chemistry and Photochemistry of Ionic Liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wishart, J.F.; Takahaski, K.

    2010-01-01

    As our understanding of ionic liquids and their tunable properties has grown, it is possible to see many opportunities for ionic liquids to contribute to the sustainable use of energy. The potential safety and environmental benefits of ionic liquids, as compared to conventional solvents, have attracted interest in their use as processing media for the nuclear fuel cycle. Therefore, an understanding of the interactions of ionizing radiation and photons with ionic liquids is strongly needed. However, the radiation chemistry of ionic liquids is still a relatively unexplored topic although there has been a significant increase in the number of researchers in the field recently. This article provides a brief introduction to ionic liquids and their interesting properties, and recent advances in the radiation chemistry and photochemistry of ionic liquids. In this article, we will mainly focus on excess electron dynamics and radical reaction dynamics. Because solvation dynamics processes in ionic liquids are much slower than in molecular solvents, one of the distinguishing characteristics is that pre-solvated electrons play an important role in ionic liquid radiolysis. It will be also shown that the reaction dynamics of radical ions is significantly different from that observed in molecular solvents because of the Coulombic screening effects and electrostatic interactions in ionic liquids.

  20. Radiation chemistry and origins of life on earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorski, Z.P.

    2003-01-01

    An introduction to problems of the working group at the European COST programme D-27 (Prebiotic Chemistry and Early Evolution) is presented. The neglected role of radiation chemistry in that field is discussed

  1. Roles of radiation chemistry in development and research of radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Rui

    2009-01-01

    Radiation chemistry acts as a bridge connecting radiation physics with radiation biology in spatial and temporal insight. The theory, model, and methodology coming from radiation chemistry play an important role in the research and development of radiation biology. The chemical changes induced by ionizing radiation are involved not only in early event of biological effects caused by ionizing radiation but in function radiation biology, such as DNA damage and repair, sensitive modification, metabolism and function of active oxygen and so on. Following the research development of radiation biology, systems radiation biology, accurate quality and quantity of radiation biology effects need more methods and perfect tools from radiation chemistry. (authors)

  2. Solid state chemistry and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    West, Anthony R

    2013-01-01

    Solid State Chemistry and its Applications, 2nd Edition: Student Edition is an extensive update and sequel to the bestselling textbook Basic Solid State Chemistry, the classic text for undergraduate teaching in solid state chemistry worldwide. Solid state chemistry lies at the heart of many significant scientific advances from recent decades, including the discovery of high-temperature superconductors, new forms of carbon and countless other developments in the synthesis, characterisation and applications of inorganic materials. Looking forward, solid state chemistry will be crucial for the

  3. Synchrotron radiation facilities for chemical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Yoshihiko

    1995-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) research is of great importance in understanding radiation chemistry, physics, and biology. It is also clearly recognized in the international chemical community that chemical applications of SR are greatly advanced and divided into 1) Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics Studies-Gases, Surfaces, and Condensed Matter- , 2) Radiation Chemistry and Photochemistry, 3) X-ray Structural and XAFS Studies-Crystals, Surfaces, and Liquids- , 4) Analytical Chemistry, and 5) Synthesis or R and D of New Materials. In this paper, a survey is given of recent advances in the application of SR to the chemistry of excitation and ionization of molecules, i.e., SR chemistry, in the wavelength region between near-ultraviolet and hard X-rays. The topics will be chosen from those obtained at some leading SR facilities. (J.P.N.)

  4. Experience of water chemistry and radiation levels in Swedish BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivars, R.; Elkert, J.

    1981-01-01

    From the BWR operational experience in Sweden it has been found that the occupational radiation exposures have been comparatively low in an international comparison. One main reason for the favourable conditions is the good water chemistry performance. This paper deals at first with the design considerations of water chemistry and materials selection. Next, the experience of water chemistry and radiation levels are provided. Finally, some methods to further reduce the radiation sources are discussed. (author)

  5. Food irradiation: chemistry and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, B.R.; Singh, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    Food irradiation is one of the most extensively and thoroughly studied methods of food preservation. Despite voluminous data on safety and wholesomeness of irradiated foods, food irradiation is still a “process in waiting.” Although some countries are allowing the use of irradiation technology on certain foods, its full potential is not recognized. Only 37 countries worldwide permit the use of this technology. If used to its full potential, food irradiation can save millions of human lives being lost annually due to food‐borne diseases or starvation and can add billions of dollars to the world economy. This paper briefly reviews the history and chemistry of food irradiation along with its main applications, impediments to its adoption, and its role in improving food availability and health situation, particularly in developing countries of the world

  6. Radiation chemistry in exploration of Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorski, Z.P.

    2005-01-01

    Problems of exploration of Mars are seldom connected with radiation research. Improvements in such approach, more and more visible, are reported in this paper, written by the present author working on prebiotic chemistry and origins of life on Earth. Objects on Mars subjected to radiation are very different from those on Earth. Density of the Martian atmosphere is by two orders smaller than over Earth and does not protect the surface of Mars from ionizing radiations, contrary to the case of Earth, shielded by the equivalent of ca. 3 meters of concrete. High energy protons from the Sun are diverted magnetically around Earth, and Mars is deprived of that protection. The radiolysis of martian '' air '' (95.3% of carbon dioxide) starts with the formation of CO 2 + , whereas the primary product over Earth is N 2 + ion radical. The lack of water vapor over Mars prevents the formation of many secondary products. The important feature of Martian regolith is the possibility of the presence of hydrated minerals, which could have been formed milliards years ago, when (probably) water was present on Mars. The interface of the atmosphere and the regolith can be the site of many chemical reactions, induced also by intensive UV, which includes part of the vacuum UV. Minerals like sodalite, discovered on Mars can contribute as reagents in many reactions. Conclusions are dedicated to questions of the live organisms connected with exploration of Mars; from microorganisms, comparatively resistant to ionizing radiation, to human beings, considered not to be fit to manned flight, survival on Mars and return to Earth. Pharmaceuticals proposed as radiobiological protection cannot improve the situation. Exploration over the distance of millions of kilometers performed successfully without presence of man, withstands more easily the presence of ionizing radiation. (author)

  7. All-union conference on theoretical and applied radiation chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putilov, A.V.; Barashkov, N.N.

    1985-01-01

    The All-Union Conference on Theoretical and Applied Radiation Chemistry was held in Obninsk in October 1984. The subjects covered by the all-union conference included practically all urgent problems of modern radiation chemistry: theoretical principles of radiation chemistry, solid state radiation chemistry, radiation chemistry of heterogeneous processes, radiolysis of organic and inorganic substances, radiation polymerization and hardening, radiation chemistry of polymers, the technology of radiation chemistry and instrument making. Twenty-three plenary reports given by scientists representing the corresponding directions were devoted to an examination of the basic problems of modern radiation chemistry. Around 100 oral communications were heard and discussed at meetings of six sections operating within the framework of the conference. In addition the conference participants were able to acquaint themselves with and discuss more than 230 displays in parallel with the oral reports. Abstracts of all of the section oral reports and displays were published by the organizing committee in the form of a separate collection. The texts of the plenary reports were published in the journal Khimiya Vysokikh Energiy in 1985.

  8. HMI Radiation Chemistry Department. Scientific report 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Results of the R and D activities of the Radiation Chemistry Department, Hahn-Meitner-Institut, are reported, primarily dealing with the following subjects: a) Interface processes and energy conversion; b) Pulsed radiolysis and kinematics; c) Insulating materials and polymers. Activities belonging to group (a) above include the development of photosensitive materials for energy conversion, photovoltaic solar cells, light-induced hydrogen liberation, and inclusion reactions, model experiments studying photoactive interfaces, rapid kinematic measurements at interfaces after laser-induced excitation, surface preparation of amorphous silicon and its effects on electronic properties, photochemical reactions and catalysts. Work performed in group (b) above included studies into various chemical reactions involving radicals, and on interactions between atoms, ions, molecules and molecular clusters induced by low-energy collisions. Group (c) above all performed studies into the physical and chemical elementary processes induced by high-energy radiation, light and UV light, especially in electronegative gases. Further activities in this group included photochemical and radiation chemical investigations on polymers. The report lists publications and lectures prepared by H.M.I. members and guest scientists in the year 1985. (RB) [de

  9. Chemistry of radiation damage to wire chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, J.

    1992-08-01

    Proportional counters are used to study aspects of radiation damage to wire chambers (wire aging). Principles of low-pressure, rf plasma chemistry are used to predict the plasma chemistry in electron avalanches (1 atm, dc). (1) Aging is studied in CF 4 /iC 4 H 10 gas mixtures. Wire deposits are analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. An apparent cathode aging process resulting in loss of gain rather than in a self-sustained current is observed in CF 4 -rich gases. A four-part model considering plasma polymerization of the hydrocarbon, etching of wire deposits by CF 4 , acceleration of deposition processes in strongly etching environments, and reactivity of the wire surface is developed to understand anode wire aging in CF 4 /iC 4 H 10 gases. Practical guidelines suggested by the model are discussed. (2) Data are presented to suggest that trace amounts of Freons do not affect aging rates in either dimethyl ether or Ar/C 2 H 6 . Apparent loss of gain is explained by attachment of primary electrons to a continuously increasing concentration of Freon 11 (CCl 3 F) in the counter gas. An increase in the concentration of Freon 11 in dimethyl ether is caused by a distillation process in the gas supply bottle and is a natural consequence of the unequal volatilities of the two compounds

  10. Scavenging and recombination kinetics in radiation chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Samra, Eyad H; Green, Nicholas J B

    2017-08-02

    This work describes stochastic models developed to study the competition between radical scavenging and recombination for simple model systems typical of radiation chemistry, where the reactive particles are tightly clustered and reactions are assumed fully diffusion limited. Three models are developed: a Monte Carlo random flights model with a periodic boundary condition for scavengers, Monte Carlo simulations in which the scavenging rate is calculated from the Smoluchowski theory for diffusion-limited reactions and a modification of the independent reaction times method where the scavengers close to the spur are explicitly included and the scavengers further away are treated as a continuum. The results indicate that the Smoluchowski theory makes a systematic overestimate of the scavenging rate when such competition is present. A correction for the Smoluchowski rate constant is suggested, an analytical justification is presented and it is tested against the simulations, and shown to be a substantial improvement.

  11. Theoretical study of reaction dynamics in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachiya, Masanori

    2008-01-01

    The period from late 1950's to early 1970's was golden age of radiation chemistry. During this period the hydrated electron was discovered, various new phenomena were found in ionic processes in liquid hydrocarbons, and the trapped electron and electron tunneling were discovered in organic glasses. In those days radiation chemistry was a vast treasure-house of theoretical problems. We could find not only problems special to radiation chemistry but also many problems interesting as general physical chemistry. In this review I explain how some theoretical problems discovered in the field of radiation chemistry have evolved into those of general physical chemistry, with special emphasis on my own work. (author)

  12. 10. 'Tihany' symposium on radiation chemistry. Program and abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The 10th 'Tihany' Symposium on Radiation Chemistry was held between August 31 and September 5, 2002, in Sopron, Hungary. An oral presentation section and two poster sections were organized, in every aspects of Radiation Chemistry and Radiochemistry. All presentation have been processed in abstracts form in the INIS database. (R.P.)

  13. 10. 'Tihany' symposium on radiation chemistry. Program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The 10th 'Tihany' Symposium on Radiation Chemistry was held between August 31 and September 5, 2002, in Sopron, Hungary. An oral presentation section and two poster sections were organized, in every aspects of Radiation Chemistry and Radiochemistry. All presentation have been processed in abstracts form in the INIS database. (R.P.)

  14. The industrial applications of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This report presents all industrial applications of ionizing radiations in France, for food preservation, radiosterilization of drugs, medical materials and cosmetic products, for radiation chemistry of polymers. This report also describes the industrial plants of irradiation (electron, cobalt 60). Finally, it explains the legal and safety aspects

  15. The aqueous radiation chemistry of pesticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornelius, K.; Laurence, G.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The degradation of pesticides is an important issue affecting the users and the environment. Degradation rates influence the spatial and temporal application rates and the effects on crops sown in subsequent seasons. Free radical reactions have been widely suggested as important in the aqueous degradation chemistry of pesticides and we report direct measurements of free radical reactions of nine pesticides widely used in Australia. Steady-state gamma radiolysis and pulse radiolysis have been used to follow the chemistry of the reactions of OH, H, O 2 - ,SO 4 - ,CO 2 - ,e aq - and other radical species with the nine pesticides. HPLC and mass spectrometry were used to determine the reaction products and the spectra and kinetics of the primary radical reactions and their products were followed by pulse radiolysis. Elucidation of the reaction mechanisms and the structures of the radical intermediates formed from the initial radical attacks has been aided by the use of molecular modelling programs to estimate the configuration and electron density of the intermediates. The results, particularly the rate constants for the Initial radical attack, do not suggest that photochemically generated free radicals play a large part in the degradation of these pesticides in the environment

  16. Utilizations of intense pulsed neutron source in radiochemistry and radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiokawa, Takanobu; Yoshihara, Kenji; Kaji, Harumi; Kusaka, Yuzuru; Tabata, Yoneho.

    1975-01-01

    Intense pulsed neutron sources is expected to supply more useful and fundamental informations in radiochemistry and radiation chemistry. Short-lived intermediate species may be detected and the mechanisms of radiation induced reactions will be elucidated more precisely. Analytical application of pulsed neutrons is also very useful. (auth.)

  17. Radiation chemistry of plastic crystals. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingen, T.J.

    1979-01-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to summarize the research done under this contract over the past twelve years. Since it is manifestly impossible to provide all the details involved in this work in this report only the primary results of these studies are discussed. The detailed radiolytic mechanisms and kinetics, as well as other detailed information on the systems studied have previously been reported in the annual reports, ORO-3781-1 through 14 and in the journal articles listed in the Contract Publications section of this report. The initial purpose of this work was to study the gamma-ray induced polymerization of organo-substituted carboranes in the solid state. With time this purpose changed to understanding in detail the effects plastic crystallinity had on the overall radiolysis of materials in this type of mesomorphic state. This work included the effects of phase, charge transfer, organic substituent and the ability of the carboranes to act as electron scavengers. For clarity of presentation, the work in the various areas which was performed under this contract is reported in four separate sections: plastic crystallinity, radiation chemistry, electrooptical properties, and thermal oligomerization

  18. Radiation Chemistry 2008 Gordon Research Conference - July 6-11, 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Radiation Chemistry is chemistry initiated by ionizing radiation: i.e. photons or particles with energy sufficient to create charge pairs and/or free radicals in a medium. The important transients include conduction band electrons and 'holes', excitons, ionic and neutral free radicals, highly excited states, and solvated electrons. Effects of radiation span timescales from the energy deposition in femtoseconds, through geminate recombination in picoseconds and nanoseconds, to fast radical chemistry in microseconds and milliseconds, and ultimately to processes like cancer occurring decades later. The radiation sources used to study these processes likewise run from femtosecond lasers to nanosecond accelerators to years of gamma irradiation. As a result the conference has a strong interdisciplinary flavor ranging from fundamental physics to clinical biology. While the conference focuses on fundamental science, application areas highlighted in the present conference will include nuclear power, polymer processing, and extraterrestrial chemistry.

  19. Applications of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Developments in standard applications and brand new nuclear technologies, with high impact on the future of the agriculture, medicine, industry and the environmental preservation. The Radiation Technology Center (CTR) mission is to apply the radiation and radioisotope technologies in Industry, Health, Agriculture, and Environmental Protection, expanding the scientific knowledge, improving human power resources, transferring technology, generating products and offering services for the Brazilian society. The CTR main R and D activities are in consonance with the IPEN Director Plan (2011-2013) and the Applications of Ionizing Radiation Program, with four subprograms: Irradiation of Food and Agricultural Products; Radiation and Radioisotopes Applications in Industry and Environment; Radioactive Sources and Radiation Applications in Human Health; and Radioactive Facilities and Equipment for the Applications of Nuclear Techniques

  20. Applications of ionizing radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    Developments in standard applications and brand new nuclear technologies, with high impact on the future of the agriculture, medicine, industry and the environmental preservation. The Radiation Technology Center (CTR) mission is to apply the radiation and radioisotope technologies in Industry, Health, Agriculture, and Environmental Protection, expanding the scientific knowledge, improving human power resources, transferring technology, generating products and offering services for the Brazilian society. The CTR main R and D activities are in consonance with the IPEN Director Plan (2011-2013) and the Applications of Ionizing Radiation Program, with four subprograms: Irradiation of Food and Agricultural Products; Radiation and Radioisotopes Applications in Industry and Environment; Radioactive Sources and Radiation Applications in Human Health; and Radioactive Facilities and Equipment for the Applications of Nuclear Techniques.

  1. Radiation chemistry of amino acids and peptides in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simic, M.G.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation chemistry relevant to radiation preservation of high protein foods is reviewed. Some conclusions concerning the chemistry of irradiated amino acids, peptides, and proteins have been derived from product analysis of γ-irradiated solutions while the main mechanistic considerations result from the chemistry and kinetics of free radical intermediates observed by pulse radiolysis. The precursors of chemistry in not too concentrated solutions ( - , OH, and H. Their reactivity with molecules and their preference for characteristic groups within the molecule are discussed. The reviewed reactions of the model systems are accountable for a variety of radiolytic products found in irradiated foods. From detailed understanding of radiation chemistry in aqueous and frozen systems formation of many classes of compounds can be predicted or entirely eliminated in order to corroborate and extend the conclusions reached from the animal feeding experiments concerning the formation of toxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic compounds and/or reduction of the nutritional value of foods

  2. AINSE conference on radiation biology and chemistry. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The conference handbook contains 60 oral and poster presentations dealing with recent advances in radiation chemistry applied to biological studies, radiopharmaceuticals, radiosensitizers as well as to solid state chemical physics

  3. AINSE conference on radiation biology and chemistry. Conference handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The conference handbook contains 60 oral and poster presentations dealing with recent advances in radiation chemistry applied to biological studies, radiopharmaceuticals, radiosensitizers as well as to solid state chemical physics.

  4. Contribution of radiation chemistry to the study of metal clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloni, J

    1998-11-01

    Radiation chemistry dates from the discovery of radioactivity one century ago by H. Becquerel and P. and M. Curie. The complex phenomena induced by ionizing radiation have been explained progressively. At present, the methodology of radiation chemistry, particularly in the pulsed mode, provides a powerful means to study not only the early processes after the energy absorption, but more generally a broad diversity of chemical and biochemical reaction mechanisms. Among them, the new area of metal cluster chemistry illustrates how radiation chemistry contributed to this field in suggesting fruitful original concepts, in guiding and controlling specific syntheses, and in the detailed elaboration of the mechanisms of complex and long-unsolved processes, such as the dynamics of nucleation, electron transfer catalysis and photographic development.

  5. 7th Nuclear Chemistry, Radiochemistry and Radiation Chemistry Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    The conference heard a total of 58 papers of which 56 were incorporated in INIS, namely those dealing with radioimmunoassay, radiation shielding materials, and radiochemistry of technetium, iodine, uranium, rare earths and actinides. (MR)

  6. Computational radiation chemistry: the emergence of a new field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartczak, W.M.; Kroh, J.

    1991-01-01

    The role of the computer experiment as an information source, which is complementary to the ''real'' experiment in radiation chemistry, is discussed. The discussion is followed by a brief review of some of the simulation techniques, which have been recently applied to the problems of radiation chemistry: ion recombination in spurs and tracks of ionization, electron tunnelling in low-temperature glasses, electron localization in disordered media. (author)

  7. Position paper on main areas of nuclear chemistry research and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear chemistry, with its specialized areas of nuclear chemistry, radiochemistry, and radiation chemistry, mainly covers these fields: basic research in nuclear chemistry; actinide chemistry; radioanalysis; nuclear chemistry in the life sciences, geosciences, and cosmic chemistry; radiotracers in technology; nuclear power technology; nuclear waste management; tritium chemistry in fusion technology, and radiation protection and radioecology. In the more than one hundred years of history of this branch of science and technology, which was opened up by the discovery of radioactivity and of the radioelements, pioneering discoveries and developments have been made in many sectors. Far beyond the confines of this area of work, they have achieved overriding importance in applications in many fields of technology and industry and in the life sciences. Research and application in nuclear chemistry continue to be highly relevant to society, ecology, and the economy, and the potential of science and technology in this field in Germany is acknowledged internationally. In the light of this vast area of activity, and against the need to maintain competence in nuclear chemistry for the use of nuclear power, irrespective of the status of this continued use in Germany, nuclear chemistry is indispensable to the solution of future problems. The Nuclear Chemistry Group of the Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker therefore uses this position paper to draw attention to the urgent need to keep up and further advance nuclear chemistry applications in a variety of areas of science and technology, also as a public duty of thorough education and research. (orig.) [de

  8. Advances in nuclear chemistry and its applications in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dela Rosa, Alumanda M.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear chemistry was born almost 120 years ago with the discovery of radioactivity by Antoine Henry Becquerel in 1896. Nuclear chemistry is a subfield of chemistry that deals with radioactivity, nuclear reactions and processes, and nuclear properties. The composition of the nucleus and the changes that occur within the nucleus define the properties of the radioisotope and the nuclear reactions and processes it is involved in. Almost six decades ago, nuclear chemistry established its roots in the Philippines under the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission, presently the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute. The main areas of nuclear chemistry, namely, namely radiochemistry, radiation chemistry, radiation biology, and isotopic chemistry have been studies, and have found applications in food and agriculture, medicine and health, in idustry, and in the protection of the environment. Early work in nuclear chemistry utilized the Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1) for the production of radioisotopes which were used in either research or direct applications in food and agriculture, health and medicine, and industry. The PRR-1 provided neutrons for the non destructive multi element analysis of various samples using the neutron activation analysis technique. Radioactive materials as sources of ionizing radiation are being used extensively to study the chemical and biological effects of radiation on matter. Current studies involve the irradiation of certain plants and insects causing changes in their DNA which result in mutation for better crop varieties and sterility in insects for quarantine treatment and pest management. Radiation can modify the properties of polymers. Natural polymers such as carrageenan, chitosan and cellulose in abaca and water hyacinth fibers are subjected to gamma irradiation changing their properties and resulting in new products such as wound drressing, hemostatic agents, plant growth promoters, and metal-chelating agents. Radioisotopes are also

  9. Chemistry Teachers' Knowledge and Application of Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zuhao; Chi, Shaohui; Hu, Kaiyan; Chen, Wenting

    2014-01-01

    Teachers' knowledge and application of model play an important role in students' development of modeling ability and scientific literacy. In this study, we investigated Chinese chemistry teachers' knowledge and application of models. Data were collected through test questionnaire and analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. The result indicated…

  10. Modern trends in theoretical radiation chemistry development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, I.G.

    1983-01-01

    Most important trends in the development of radiation chemitry theory are considered. Wide use of electronic computers for modeling different stages of radiolysis in conjUnction with advanced precision experimental methods (picosecond pulse radiolysis, acceptor additions method, magnetic method of detecting interstitial active particles) is noted. Information obtained in photochemistry and molecular spectroscopy, including laser photolysis, is in common use in developing the theory. It is noted that data on the processes occurring within less than 10 -12 s time can be obtained now only on the base of theoretical representations about the mechanism of ionizing irradiation interaction with molecular medium. Therefore, special attention in the review is paid to investigation of primary radiolysis processes. Besides investigation of primary medium excitation processes theoretical investigations into the ways of energy degradation, knocked out electrons and their further state are continued. It is noted that a considerable number of papers deal with the nature and behaviour of radiation-induced excess electrons in non-polar solutions and solid matrices. Works on application of diffusion kinetics in radiolysis have been developed in recent years

  11. Ionic Liquids: Radiation Chemistry, Solvation Dynamics and Reactivity Patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wishart, J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are a rapidly expanding family of condensed-phase media with important applications in energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs generally have low volatilities and are combustion-resistant, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of primary radiation chemistry, charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of reactions and product distributions. We study these issues by characterization of primary radiolysis products and measurements of their yields and reactivity, quantification of electron solvation dynamics and scavenging of electrons in different states of solvation. From this knowledge we wish to learn how to predict radiolytic mechanisms and control them or mitigate their effects on the properties of materials used in nuclear fuel processing, for example, and to apply IL radiation chemistry to answer questions about general chemical reactivity in ionic liquids that will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that the slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increase the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alter product distributions and subsequent chemistry. This difference from conventional solvents has profound effects on predicting and controlling radiolytic yields

  12. Industrial applications of radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallien, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation processing refers to the use of ionizing radiation to initiate chemical or biological changes in various materials as a substitute for conventional thermal or chemical processes. The method was inroduced in the industrial field 30 years ago and is now being widely used for numerous applications, among which industrial radiography, polymer modification, sterilization or decontamination, and food preservation. Both electron beam accelerators and gamma sources can be used, depending mainly of the amount of radiation and the penetration required. Radiation processing presents an increasing economical importance; in 1986 the market volume of ionized products ranged 3 billion $ [fr

  13. Radiation chemistry - extravaganza or an integral component of radiation processing of food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simic, M.G.; DeGraff, E.

    1983-01-01

    The role of radiation chemistry in radiation processing of foods is discussed in detail. A few examples demonstrating the relevance of the radiation chemistry of model systems to food-irradiation technology are given. The importance of irradiation parameters such as dose, dose rate, temperature, atmosphere, physical state and additives in achieving acceptable and high quality of irradiated foods are emphasized. A few examples of radiation-induced free radical reactions in model compounds relevant to foods are also discussed. (author)

  14. 2012 RADIATION CHEMISTRY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE AND GORDON RESEARCH SEMINAR, JULY 28, - AUGUST 3, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    y LaVerne

    2012-08-03

    The overarching objective of this conference is to catalyze the interchange of new ideas and recent discoveries within the basic radiation sciences of physics, chemistry, and biology, and to facilitate translating this knowledge to applications in medicine and industry. The 9 topics for the GRC are: "œFrom Energy Absorption to Disease", "œBiodosimetry after a Radiological Incident," "œTrack Structure and Low Energy Electrons," "Free Radical Processes in DNA and Proteins," "Irradiated Polymers for Industrial/ Medical Applications," "Space Radiation Chemistry/Biology," "Nuclear Power and Waste Management," "Nanoparticles and Surface Interfaces", and the "Young Investigator" session.

  15. Radiative heat transfer in turbulent combustion systems theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Modest, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    This introduction reviews why combustion and radiation are important, as well as the technical challenges posed by radiation. Emphasis is on interactions among turbulence, chemistry and radiation (turbulence-chemistry-radiation interactions – TCRI) in Reynolds-averaged and large-eddy simulations. Subsequent chapters cover: chemically reacting turbulent flows; radiation properties, Reynolds transport equation (RTE) solution methods, and TCRI; radiation effects in laminar flames; TCRI in turbulent flames; and high-pressure combustion systems. This Brief presents integrated approach that includes radiation at the outset, rather than as an afterthought. It stands as the most recent developments in physical modeling, numerical algorithms, and applications collected in one monograph.

  16. RADIATION CHEMISTRY 2010 GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE JULY 18-23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Orlando

    2010-07-23

    The 2010 Gordon Conference on Radiation Chemistry will present cutting edge research regarding the study of radiation-induced chemical transformations. Radiation Chemistry or 'high energy' chemistry is primarily initiated by ionizing radiation: i.e. photons or particles with energy sufficient to create conduction band electrons and 'holes', excitons, ionic and neutral free radicals, highly excited states, and solvated electrons. These transients often interact or 'react' to form products vastly different than those produced under thermal equilibrium conditions. The non-equilibrium, non-thermal conditions driving radiation chemistry exist in plasmas, star-forming regions, the outer solar system, nuclear reactors, nuclear waste repositories, radiation-based medical/clinical treatment centers and in radiation/materials processing facilities. The 2010 conference has a strong interdisciplinary flavor with focus areas spanning (1) the fundamental physics and chemistry involved in ultrafast (atto/femtosecond) energy deposition events, (2) radiation-induced processes in biology (particularly spatially resolved studies), (3) radiation-induced modification of materials at the nanoscale and cosmic ray/x-ray mediated processes in planetary science/astrochemistry. While the conference concentrates on fundamental science, topical applied areas covered will also include nuclear power, materials/polymer processing, and clinical/radiation treatment in medicine. The Conference will bring together investigators at the forefront of their field, and will provide opportunities for junior scientists and graduate students to present work in poster format or as contributors to the Young Investigator session. The program and format provides excellent avenues to promote cross-disciplinary collaborations.

  17. Progress of radiation chemistry engineering in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breger, A.Kh.

    1988-01-01

    A brief review of works in the field of radiation chemistry engineering (RCE) in the recent 20 years is given. Main results of development of theoretic, engineering and economic bases for creating plants for realization of RCE processes using radionuclide (long- and short-living) γ radiation sources and electron accelerators, are considered. The current state in this field meets the requirements placed in connection with forthcoming wide introduction of radiation technology to the soviet industry

  18. Applications, benefits and challenges of flow chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitic, Aleksandar; Heintz, Søren; Ringborg, Rolf Hoffmeyer

    2013-01-01

    , environmental and manufacturing perspective. A potential solution to resolve these issues is to use flow chemistry in such processes, preferably with applications of micro-and mini-sized equipment. In addition, Process Analytical Technology (PAT) may be implemented in a very efficient way in such equipment due...

  19. Application of radiation nowadays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habibah Adnan

    2009-01-01

    Despite of scientist know about radiation since 1890, but they have successfully developed many of application to help human life. Now, we can see that radiation was applied in medical, academic, industrial, and generating electricity. Besides that, radiations also have other applications that can help in agriculture activities, archaeology, legislation, geology, space exploration and many more. In hospital, doctor use nuclear medicine to trace, monitor and save almost thousands of people every year. According to research, 7 out of 10 American citizens had already use this services at least once in their life. Universities, college, secondary school, research center also use nuclear material in their laboratory. For example, through research, radiation can help in plants study, agriculture technique, soils study and others. Industrial sector are one sector that applied radiation widely. For example, radiation can kill almost 80 % bacteria or dangerous microorganism in food or export products. Nowadays, radiation cannot be curtailed although it can give more benefit more than risk. It depends on how we manage it.

  20. Radiation chemistry and origins of life on earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorski, Z.P.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Radiation chemistry is involved in mechanisms of origins of life on Earth in three aspects: 1. The formation of prebiotic 'soup' of organic compounds related to future life, 2. Possible role in formation of pure enantiomers of chiral compounds, 3. Role in rejection of hypothesis of Life transported from the outside worlds (Panspermia). As concerns 1, radiation chemistry explains better the formation of proper prebiotic 'soup' than Miller hypothesis of electric discharges in gaseous atmosphere. Radiation-induced reactions proceeded in liquid phase, also in the presence of solid state and as specific surface reactions, all at the ambient temperature. As concerns 2, radiation chemistry offers limited possibilities, but papers still are published to that effect and efforts are needed to tell facts from artifacts. As concerns 3, radiation chemistry and its cousin - radiobiology speak out definitively, that any transportation of life, even of low organisation, from the outer space is impossible. The main reason is irreversible dehydrogenation even at very low temperatures, during the travel lasting for years and light-years. The same applies in higher degree to the well organised life, making an appearance of 'ET' on Earth not likely. Even the manned travels to Mars and living in houses at the surface, can end with radiation sickness and premature death

  1. Excitation in the radiation chemistry of inorganic gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, C.; Boyd, A.W.

    1976-01-01

    Gas phase radiation chemistry yield data and electron impact cross-section data are used to derive excitation mechanisms and to discuss the role of excited states in the radiation chemistry of O 2 , N 2 , N 2 O, CO, CO 2 , H 2 S, H 2 O and NH 3 . For each of these systems available cross-sections for ionization and neutral excitation are listed, together with relevant reaction rate data and a summary of the radiation chemistry studies at both high and low dose rates. In general, fairly complete mechanisms are derived and further tested by energy balance calculations. In order to present as complete a picture as possible, a summary of rates and products of ion-neutralization reactions is given at the end of the paper. (author)

  2. High fidelity chemistry and radiation modeling for oxy -- combustion scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Sater, Hassan A.

    To account for the thermal and chemical effects associated with the high CO2 concentrations in an oxy-combustion atmosphere, several refined gas-phase chemistry and radiative property models have been formulated for laminar to highly turbulent systems. This thesis examines the accuracies of several chemistry and radiative property models employed in computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of laminar to transitional oxy-methane diffusion flames by comparing their predictions against experimental data. Literature review about chemistry and radiation modeling in oxy-combustion atmospheres considered turbulent systems where the predictions are impacted by the interplay and accuracies of the turbulence, radiation and chemistry models. Thus, by considering a laminar system we minimize the impact of turbulence and the uncertainties associated with turbulence models. In the first section of this thesis, an assessment and validation of gray and non-gray formulations of a recently proposed weighted-sum-of-gray gas model in oxy-combustion scenarios was undertaken. Predictions of gas, wall temperatures and flame lengths were in good agreement with experimental measurements. The temperature and flame length predictions were not sensitive to the radiative property model employed. However, there were significant variations between the gray and non-gray model radiant fraction predictions with the variations in general increasing with decrease in Reynolds numbers possibly attributed to shorter flames and steeper temperature gradients. The results of this section confirm that non-gray model predictions of radiative heat fluxes are more accurate than gray model predictions especially at steeper temperature gradients. In the second section, the accuracies of three gas-phase chemistry models were assessed by comparing their predictions against experimental measurements of temperature, species concentrations and flame lengths. The chemistry was modeled employing the Eddy

  3. The radiation chemistry of polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dole, M.

    1991-01-01

    With the use of plastics in the construction of space satellites which may be exposed in geosynchronous orbit to 100 MGy (10,000 Mrad) of high-energy radiation in 30 years of use, the effect of these radiations on the polymer becomes of practical importance. To understand the effects we consider first various radiation-resistant groups that are incorporated into the polymer and their relative effectiveness in reducing molecular scissions due to the radiation. The location of such groups in the polymer is also discussed. Next the chemical structures of a number of resins such as epoxies, polyimides, etc. are described followed by a detailed account of methods of improving the radiation resistance of plastics by the incorporation of carbon or glass fibers. Finally, the role of oxygen in causing chain scissions and other effects during irradiation which reduce the mechanical strength of the plastics and the fiber resin composites are also considered. (author)

  4. The radiation chemistry of symmetric aliphatic polyesters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babanalbandi, A.; Hill, D.J.T.; Pomery, P.J.; Whittaker, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Naturally occurring, symmetric polyesters, including polyglycolic acid, polylactic acid and polyhydroxybutyrate, have found biomedical applications in areas as diverse as the controlled release of pharmaceuticals and the manufacture of surgical sutures. As biomedical products, the materials require sterilization by high energy radiation. This has provided the motivation for the present work. D'Alelio et al. have reported that linear, asymmetric polyesters undergo scission on irradiation, but that branched polyesters containing a methyl group in the diol segments undergo crosslinking. However, for the symmetric polyhydroxybutyrate, Carswell-Pomerantz et al. have reported that only scission occurs on radiolysis, with the evolution of CO and CO 2 as a result of the loss of ester linkages. These workers also found that G(CO + CO 2 ) was approximately equal to G(S) for this polyester. By contrast, Collett et al. have reported that G(S) = 1.26 and G(X) = 0.53 for polylactic acid, which indicates that the polymer undergoes nett crosslinking on radiolysis to form a gel. They have also reported that poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) should form a gel on radiolysis, since G(S) = 1.66 and G(X) = 0.65 for a 1:1 copolymer composition. In the present work the radiolysis of polylactic acid and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) have been reinvestigated in order to resolve the differences between the work of Collett et al. and that of Carswell-Pomerantz et al. In these studies, ESR has been used to study the radicals formed, GPC has been used to investigate scission and crosslinking, GC has been used to study the small molecule volatile products and NMR spectroscopy has been used to identify and measure the new chemical structures formed in the polymers

  5. Liquid metals: fundamentals and applications in chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daeneke, T; Khoshmanesh, K; Mahmood, N; de Castro, I A; Esrafilzadeh, D; Barrow, S J; Dickey, M D; Kalantar-Zadeh, K

    2018-04-03

    Post-transition elements, together with zinc-group metals and their alloys belong to an emerging class of materials with fascinating characteristics originating from their simultaneous metallic and liquid natures. These metals and alloys are characterised by having low melting points (i.e. between room temperature and 300 °C), making their liquid state accessible to practical applications in various fields of physical chemistry and synthesis. These materials can offer extraordinary capabilities in the synthesis of new materials, catalysis and can also enable novel applications including microfluidics, flexible electronics and drug delivery. However, surprisingly liquid metals have been somewhat neglected by the wider research community. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the fundamentals underlying liquid metal research, including liquid metal synthesis, surface functionalisation and liquid metal enabled chemistry. Furthermore, we discuss phenomena that warrant further investigations in relevant fields and outline how liquid metals can contribute to exciting future applications.

  6. Radiation-chemical aspects of solid state hot atom chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, T.; Collins, K.E.; Collins, C.H.

    1984-01-01

    The study of nuclear hot atom chemical (NHAC) processes occurring in solids is seriously limited by the lack of adequate methods for directly studying the chemical species containing hot atoms. In the present review the effects of ionizing radiation on parent and non-parent yields from solid state targets is surveyed and qualitative interpretations are given. After a few general remarks of the relationship of radiation chemistry to solid state NHAC, a detailed description of the radiation effects is given (radiation annealing, neutron activation, changes in separable yield). (Auth.)

  7. Proceedings of the colloquium on radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Radiolysis of organic compounds is examined in this colloquium, mainly by gamma radiation but also by muons or positons. Radicals produced, reactions kinetics, influence of solvents, temperature, pH etc... are studied in the different papers [fr

  8. Microtron for radiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, H.C.; Ramamurthi, S.S.

    1993-01-01

    The electron accelerator called microtron is a powerful tool for research, medical and industrial applications which need electron beam in energy range of few tens of MeV. Either electron beam from microtron is directly used for radiation applications or electron beam is utilized to produce x-rays or neutrons which are eventually used for radiation applications. After considering the vast potential, lower cost, simpler construction and excellent quality of electron beam from microtron, it was decided to develop this machine at Centre for Advanced Technology (CAT). The microtrons in two standard models have been developed which will cover all the above mentioned applications except free electron lasers. The microtron of model 1 provides electron beam of 20 MeV, 15/30 mA and that of model 2 provides electron beam of 8/12 MeV, 50/30 mA. (author). 2 figs., 1 tab

  9. Principles of interaction of ionizing radiation with matter and basic radiation chemistry processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santar, I.; Bednar, J.

    1976-01-01

    The basic principles are given of the interaction of ionizing radiation with matter and the main trends are pointed out in radiation chemistry. A brief characteristics is given of the basic radiation chemical processes in gases and in the condensed phase, namely in water and in organic substances. (B.S.)

  10. The effects of temperature on the radiation chemistry of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.J.T.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of high energy radiation on polymers is dependent on a number of factors. One of the most important factors is the radiolysis temperature. This paper discusses the effects of the α-transition and the other secondary transitions, as well as the ceiling and melting temperatures, on the nature of the radiolysis reactions which occur for a number of polymers. Some implications of changes in the radiation chemistry of polymers with a change in the temperature are also considered. (author)

  11. Ion-molecule reactions: their role in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lias, S.G.; Ausloos, P.

    1975-01-01

    A comprehensive review of ion--molecule reactions is presented, including information from mass spectrometric, organic chemistry, and NMR studies, from theoretical calculations, and from gas and liquid phase radiation chemistry. Special emphasis is placed on interpreting the role of ion--molecule reactions in systems under high energy irradiation. The discussion is presented under the following chapter headings: ion--molecule reactions and their role in radiation chemistry; unimolecular processes: the nature and structure of ionic intermediates in radiolysis; ion lifetimes and the fate of unreactive ions; kinetics and mechanisms of ion--molecule reactions; proton transfer reactions; negative atom and two-atom transfer reactions; condensation reactions; and, association or clustering reactions

  12. 9. 'Tihany' symposium on radiation chemistry. Programme and abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Various aspects of radiation chemistry has been covered on the symposium, consisting of 19 sessions plus a poster session. 85 items has been reproduced as full text and indexed for the INIS database selected from the 69 short communications of the talks plus the 57 posters. (R.P.)

  13. 9. `Tihany` symposium on radiation chemistry. Programme and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-12-31

    Various aspects of radiation chemistry has been covered on the symposium, consisting of 19 sessions plus a poster session. 85 items has been reproduced as full text and indexed for the INIS database selected from the 69 short communications of the talks plus the 57 posters. (R.P.)

  14. Notions of radiation chemistry in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastro, N.L. del.

    1989-10-01

    The present paper examines some aspects of the direct and indirect biological radiation effects: pair formation, free radicals, superoxide ion, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, oxygen singlet together with the endogen radioprotector mechanisms of organisms and the ways in which an improved radioresistance of biochemical systems can be achieved. (author) [pt

  15. Radiation chemistry of aromatic dimer radical cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Kazumasa; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    π-π Interactions of aromatic molecules are paid attention much in many fields, especially biology, chemistry, and applied physics, represented as protein, DNA, electron donor-accepter complexes, charge transfers, and self assembly molecules. Aromatic molecules including benzene rings are the simplest case to study the π-π interactions. To interpret the charge resonance (CR) structure in the dimer radical cations, spectroscopic and ESR methods have been carried out. The spectroscopic study on the dimer radical ion of molecules with two chromophores would be profitable to identify the electronic and configurational properties. In this article, dynamics of the dimer radical cation of benzenes, polystyrenes, and resist polymers is described on the basis of direct observation of CR band by the nanosecond pulse radiolysis and low temperature γ-radiolysis methods. (author)

  16. Report on the actual state of the basic, applied research and industrial applications of the radiation in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez V, H.

    1991-07-01

    In this report the main works of basic, applied research and industrial applications that are carried out in Mexico, about radiations (radiation chemistry, technology, applications, use and isotope production, etc.): infrastructure, radiation sources, groups and research programs are presented. (Author)

  17. Ionic Liquids: Radiation Chemistry, Solvation Dynamics and Reactivity Patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wishart, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are a rapidly expanding family of condensed-phase media with important applications in energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs are generally nonvolatile, noncombustible, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of chemical reactions and product distributions. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments, where their safety advantages could be significant, requires an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of IL radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material. An understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry will also facilitate pulse radiolysis studies of general chemical reactivity in ILs, which will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increases the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alters product distributions. Parallel studies of IL solvation phenomena using coumarin-153 dynamic Stokes shifts and polarization anisotropy decay rates are done to compare with electron solvation studies and to evaluate

  18. Application of Radiation in Nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewska, D.K.; Chmielewski, A.G.; Michalik, J.

    2005-01-01

    The Nanotechnology is one of the fastest growing new areas in science and engineering. The subject arises from the convergence of electronics, physics, chemistry, biology and materials science to create new functional systems of nano-scale dimensions. Nanotechnology deals with science and technology associated with dimensions in the range of 0.1 to 100 nm. The ability to fabricate structures with nano-metric precision is of fundamental importance to any exploitation of nanotechnology. Nanotechnology is predicted to have a major impact on the manufacturing technology in 20 to 30 years from now. The ability to fabricate structures with nano-metric precision is of fundamental importance to any exploitation of nanotechnology. The potential of combining radiation effects with nano-materials has been recognized from the very early stages of nano-science research. In the many uses of nano- structures, and nano-particles in particular, from catalysis, bio-sensing, nano-electronics, magnetic applications including separations, mechano-chemical conversion, and to molecular computing, radiation can play a significant role. The use of radiation, UV beam, electron-beam, or focused ion-beam is clearly central to the fabrication of the nanostructured systems. The relative advantages and deficiencies of each of them are still to be clarified as the technology advances. Whether UV or electron beam will lead to the highest resolution is still debated but it is clear that these techniques offer unmatched reproducibility and very narrow size distribution. Other studies concern formation and synthesis of nano-particles and nano-composites. Radiation synthesis of copper, silver and other metals' nanoparticles is studied. Metal and salt-polymer composites are synthesized by this method. Metal sulphide semiconductors of nano-metric matrices are prepared using gamma irradiation of a suitable solution of monomer, sulphur and metal sources. These products find application in photoluminescent

  19. Model for radiation damage in cells by direct effect and by indirect effect: a radiation chemistry approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaels, H.B.; Hunt, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    A model is presented to describe the contributions of direct and indirect effects to the radiation damage of cells. The model is derived using principles of radiation chemistry and of pulse radiolysis in particular. From data available in the literature, parameters for cellular composition and values of rate constants for indirect action have been used in preliminary applications of the model. The results obtained in calculations of the protective effect of .OH and .H scavengers are consistent with experimental data. Possible modifications and improvements to the model are suggested, along with proposed future applications of the model in radiobiological studies

  20. Radiation chemistry in the Jovian stratosphere - Laboratory simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, Gene D.; Thompson, W. R.; Sagan, Carl

    1992-01-01

    The results of the present low-pressure/continuous-flow laboratory simulations of H2/He/CH4/NH3 atmospheres' plasma-induced chemistry indicate radiation yields of both hydrocarbon and N2-containing organic compounds which increase with decreasing pressure. On the basis of these findings, upper limits of 1 million-1 billion molecules/sq cm/sec are established for production rates of major auroral-chemistry species in the Jovian stratosphere. It is noted that auroral processes may account for 10-100 percent of the total abundances of most of the observed polar-region organic species.

  1. Study of catalytic phenomena in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dran, J.C.

    1965-01-01

    Two phenomena have been studied: the action of γ rays from radio-cobalt on the adsorption and catalytic properties of ZnO and NiO in. relationship with the heterogeneous oxidation of CO, and the homogeneous catalysis by OsO 4 of the oxidation of various aqueous phase solutes by the same radiation. The prior irradiation of ZnO and of NiO does not modify their catalytic activity but generally increases the adsorption energy of -the gases CO and O 2 . The influence of the radiations appears to be connected with the presence of traces of water on ZnO and of an excess of oxygen on NiO. Osmium tetroxide which is not degraded by irradiation in acid solution, accelerates the radiolytic oxidation of certain compounds (Te IV , Pt 11 , As 111 ) in the presence of oxygen, as a result of its sensitizing effect on the oxidation by H 2 O 2 . In the case of phosphites on the other hand, OsO 4 has a protecting action under certain conditions of acidity and may suppress entirely the chain reaction which characterizes the oxidation of this solute byγ rays. A general mechanism is proposed for these phenomena. The rate constant for the OsO 4 + HO 2 reaction is calculated to be 5.7 x 10 5 l.mol -1 . sec -1 . (author) [fr

  2. Radiation physical chemistry effects on organic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesquita, C.H.; Duarte, C.L.; Hamada, M.M.

    2003-01-01

    The radiation damage effect on a liquid scintillating system was evaluated in the PPO and POPOP solutes. Samples containing PPO (1%w/v) and POPOP (0.2%w/v) diluted in toluene were irradiated at different doses, using a 60 Co irradiator at 1.8 Gy/s. The transmittance and the chemical degradation of those solutes were evaluated as a function of dose. The PPO transmittance at 360 nm decayed exponentially with the dose, while the POPOP transmittance at 420 nm decayed linearly. The chemical degradation on the PPO and POPOP was fitted to a bi-exponential mathematical model as a function of dose. The first exponential (fast slope) was interpreted as damage produced by toluene radiolytics whereas the second exponential (slow slope) was interpreted as the damage caused by primary interaction of the γ-radiation with targets, i.e., γ photons that hit PPO and POPOP directly. The w (eV/damage molecule) and G (damaged molecules/100 eV) parameters were estimated in this paper

  3. Solved? The reductive radiation chemistry of alanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Ewald; De Cooman, Hendrik; Waroquier, Michel; Hole, Eli O; Sagstuen, Einar

    2014-02-14

    The structural changes throughout the entire reductive radiation-induced pathway of l-α-alanine are solved on an atomistic level with the aid of periodic DFT and nudged elastic band (NEB) simulations. This yields unprecedented information on the conformational changes taking place, including the protonation state of the carboxyl group in the "unstable" and "stable" alanine radicals and the internal transformation converting these two radical variants at temperatures above 220 K. The structures of all stable radicals were verified by calculating EPR properties and comparing those with experimental data. The variation of the energy throughout the full radiochemical process provides crucial insight into the reason why these structural changes and rearrangements occur. Starting from electron capture, the excess electron quickly localizes on the carbon of a carboxyl group, which pyramidalizes and receives a proton from the amino group of a neighboring alanine molecule, forming a first stable radical species (up to 150 K). In the temperature interval 150-220 K, this radical deaminates and deprotonates at the carboxyl group, the detached amino group undergoes inversion and its methyl group sustains an internal rotation. This yields the so-called "unstable alanine radical". Above 220 K, triggered by the attachment of an additional proton on the detached amino group, the radical then undergoes an internal rotation in the reverse direction, giving rise to the "stable alanine radical", which is the final stage in the reductive radiation-induced decay of alanine.

  4. Max Planck Institute for Radiation Chemistry, Muelheim a.d. Ruhr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The Institute carriers out research in the field of radiation chemistry, which is understood as a field of science combining photochemistry and radiation chemistry. The research programme focuses on: the radiation chemistry of the deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA), DNA constituents, and DNA model compounds; photobiochemistry and fundamentals of photobiology; organic and organometallic photochemistry, particularly reaction mechanisms and synthesis; photophysics. (orig.) [de

  5. Radiation protection in medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldonado M, H.

    2008-12-01

    The justification of the practices is the fundamental principle on which rests the peaceful use of ionizing radiations. They actually contain as aspirations to improve the quality of people's lives, contributing to sustainable development through environmental protection, so that the sources security and the individuals protection will be conditions which are not and should can not be operated. For medical applications is a highly illustrative example of this, since both for the diagnosis and therapy, the goal is to achieve what is sought for the white tissue, secured the least possible damage to the neighboring tissues so that in turn reduce the negative effects for the patient. As a basis for achieving the above, it is essential to have qualified personnel in all areas incidents, for example users, workers, officials and staff members. There are a variety of specialists in the field of medical applications as, nuclear chemistry, nuclear engineering, radiation protection, medical physics, radiation physics and others. Among the human resource in the country must make up the majority are medical radiologists, highlighting gaps in the number of radiotherapy and nuclear medicine but specially in the medical physics, who is in some way from a special viewpoint of the formal school, new to the country. This is true for the number of facilities which are in the country. The radiation protection responsibilities in medical applications focus primarily on two figures: the radiology safety manager, who is primarily dedicated to the protection of occupationally exposed personnel and the public, and the medical physicist whose functions are geared towards the radiological protection of the patient. The principal legislation in the medical applications area has been enacted and is monitored by the Health Secretary and National Commission on Nuclear Safety and Safeguards, entities that have reached agreements to avoid overlap and over-regulation. Medical applications in the

  6. Mechanistic aspects of polymer chemistry for radiation curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, Lawrence W.

    1988-01-01

    The chemistry of polymer production has been reviewed for the purpose of identifying suitable uses for high-energy electron accelerators in the plastics industry. High-energy radiation produces free radicals, electrons and ions in irradiated materials. These species initiate polymerization and cross-linking reactions in a manner analogous to that of chemical agents. The chemical mechanisms of radiation-induced polymerization, co-polymerization and cross-linking are compared with those of chemical and thermal initiation. Radiation polymerization can be a very fast process, but the polymerization reactions are quite exothermic, and temperature increases of up to 400 degrees Celcius may result if insufficient cooling is provided. Several approaches to reducing the temperature increase during radiation curing are presented. Chemical kinetic simulations of the radiation-induced cationic polymerization of styrene have shown that the effect of water inhibition on the rate of polymerization may be eliminated at the high dose rates available from high power accelerators. 25 refs

  7. Radiation physics and chemistry of biomolecules. Recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2016-11-01

    A chapter of the book ;Radiation chemistry. From basics to application in materials and life sciences (EDP Science, Paris, France, 2008); was devoted to the state-of-the-art in the research on ionizing radiation (IR) effects on biomolecules. An update, eight years later, seemed pertinent enough to the editors of this journal who accepted to dedicate a Special Issue to the latest developments in this area of high interest for cancer radiotherapy, nuclear workers' radioprotection and food radiosterilisation. We sincerely thank them and the authors who accepted to present reviews of their most recent work. Obviously, only a small part of the research in the fascinating domain of molecular radiobiology can be covered here. Some articles are presenting the contribution of biophysical models and computational techniques to the understanding of IR effects on molecules such as DNA and proteins, or on larger systems such as chromatin, chromosomes and even cells (Nikjoo et al., Štěpán & Davídková, Ballarini & Carante, and Nikitaki et al.). In these papers, as well as in many others, several qualities of IR are compared in order to explain the observed differences of effects. The damages induced by the low energy electrons and new techniques involved in their study are discussed in great detail (Sanche and Fromm & Boulanouar). The chemistry behind the IR induced damages (single or clustered), studied in many laboratories around the world is presented in several papers (Cadet & Wagner, Sevilla et al., Chatgilialoglu et al., and Greenberg). One of them addresses a very useful comparison between the effects of IR and UV exposure on DNA (Ravanat & Douki). The majority of the papers in this Special Issue is dealing with DNA and this reflects the real situation: damages of DNA are more studied than those of other biomolecules. This is due to the role of DNA as main support of hereditary information. Nevertheless, more and more studies are outlining the influence of epigenetic

  8. IONIC LIQUIDS: RADIATION CHEMISTRY, SOLVATION DYNAMICS AND REACTIVITY PATTERNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WISHART, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs are generally nonvolatile, noncombustible, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of chemical reactions and product distributions. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments, where their safety advantages could be significant, requires an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of IL radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material. An understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry will also facilitate pulse radiolysis studies of general chemical reactivity in ILs, which will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increases the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alters product distributions. Parallel studies of IL solvation phenomena using coumarin-153 dynamic Stokes shifts and polarization anisotropy decay rates are done to compare with electron solvation studies and to evaluate the influence of ILs on charge transport processes. Methods. Picosecond pulse radiolysis studies at BNL

  9. Radiation Chemistry Studies on Chemotherapeutic Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gohn, M.; Getoff, N.; Bjergbakke, Erling

    1977-01-01

    Adrenalin has been studied as a model radiation protective agent by means of pulse radiolysis in aqueous solutions. The rate constants for the reactions of adrenalin with e–aq and OH were determined : k(e–aq+ adr—NH+2)= 7.5 × 108 dm3 mol–1 s–1, k(e–aq+ adr—NH)= 2.5 × 108 dm3 mol–1 s–1, and k......(OH + adr)= 2.2 × 1010 dm3 mol–1 s–1(pH = 9.2). e–aq attacks the amino group by splitting off methylamine, whereas OH and O–aq lead to the formation of the corresponding adducts of the cyclohexadienyl type. OH radicals can also abstract an electron from an O– group at pH > 8....

  10. Synchrotron radiation in solid state chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghigna, Paolo; Pin, Sonia; Spinolo, Giorgio; Newton, Mark A.; Chiara Tarantino, Serena; Zema, Michele

    2011-01-01

    An approach towards the reactivity in the solid state is proposed, primarily based on recognizing the crucial role played by the interfacial free energy and by the topotactical relationship between the two reactants, which in turn control formation of the new phase and its spatial and orientational relationships with respect to the parent phases. Using one of the reactants in the form of film, the ratio between bulk and interfacial free energy can be changed, and the effect of interfacial free energy is maximized. The role of Synchrotron Radiation in such an approach is exemplified by using a new developed technique for μ-XANES mapping with nanometric resolution for studying the reactivity of thin films of NiO onto differently oriented Al 2 O 3 single crystals. The result obtained allowed us to speculate about the rate determining step of the NiO+Al 2 O 3 →NiAl 2 O 4 interfacial reaction.

  11. Radiation chemistry studies on chemotherapeutic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohn, M.; Getoff, N.; Bjergbakke, E.

    1977-01-01

    Adrenalin has been studied as a model radiation protective agent by means of pulse radiolysis in aqueous solutions. The rate constants for the reactions of adrenalin with e - sub(aq) and OH were determined: k(e - sub(aq) + adr -NH + 2 ) = 7.5 x 10 8 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 , k(e - sub(aq) + adr - NH) = 2.5 x 10 8 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 , and k(OH + adr) = 2.2 x 10 -10 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 (pH = 9.2). e - sub(aq) attacks the amino group by splitting off methylamine, whereas OH and O - sub(aq) lead to the formation of the corresponding adducts of the cyclohexadienyl type. OH radicals can also abstract an electron from an 0 - group at pH > 8. (author)

  12. Nuclear analytical chemistry: recent developments and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, R.

    2013-01-01

    Recent R and D studies on Nuclear Analytical Chemistry utilizing techniques like Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), Prompt Gamma-ray NAA (PGNAA), Particle Induced Gamma Ray and X-Ray Emission (PICE/PIXE) for compositional analysis of materials have been summarized. The work includes developments and applications of (i) single comparator NAA, called as k 0 -NAA, (ii) k 0 -based internal monostandard NAA (IM-NAA), (iii) k 0 -based prompt gamma ray NAA (PGNAA) and (iv) instrumental NAA using thermal and epithermal neutrons and (v) PIGE and PIXE methods using proton beam for low Z and medium Z elements, respectively. (author)

  13. Glycoconjugates of Quinolines: Application in Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveri, Valentina; Vecchio, Graziella

    2016-09-02

    Compounds with the quinoline scaffold are widely investigated and offer a variety of therapeutical properties. A number of quinoline derivatives have been synthesized and among these there are glycoconjugated derivatives. Based on the interest for this family of compounds, we reviewed the different biological activities (molecular probes, antiinfective, antiproliferative, antiaggregant and antioxidant) and the potential applications in medicinal chemistry of quinoline glycoconjugates. This review wants to show an example of the glycoconjugation strategy which arose not only to modify the water solubility of the quinolines but also to influence their activity and targeting properties.

  14. The radiation chemistry of organic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willard, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    The yields of primary products (ions, electrons, and excited state) produced by exposure of an organic compound to ionizing radiation are essentially independent of whether it is in the gas, liquid, or solid state. However, the nature and yields of the final products are often dependent on the state. This is the result of the effects of density and temperature on the relative probabilities of competing reactions of the primary species and of the radicals which they produce. The density effects are of two types. First, the dose proximity of neighboring molecules in the solid favors reactivation rather than decomposition of excited molecules and favors prompt recombination in the parent cage of the fragments of any that do decompose. Second, since the distance traveled by an energetic electron is depositing its energy is inversely proportional to the density of the medium, the tracks are shorter and the spur radii smaller in the solid than in the liquid (and in great contrast to the gas, where spur effects are negligible). The increased role of intraspur reactions of radicals, electrons, and cations in solids is shown by the results discussed in this chapter

  15. Moessbauer spectroscopy and transition metal chemistry. Fundamentals and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guetlich, Philipp; Trautwein, Alfred X.

    2011-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy is a profound analytical method which has nevertheless continued to develop. The authors now present a state-of-the art book which consists of two parts. The first part details the fundamentals of Moessbauer spectroscopy and is based on a book published in 1978 in the Springer series 'Inorganic Chemistry Concepts' by P. Guetlich, R. Link and A.X. Trautwein. The second part covers useful practical aspects of measurements, and the application of the techniques to many problems of materials characterization. The update includes the use of synchroton radiation and many instructive and illustrative examples in fields such as solid state chemistry, biology and physics, materials and the geosciences, as well as industrial applications. Special chapters on magnetic relaxation phenomena (S. Morup) and computation of hyperfine interaction parameters (F. Neese) are also included. An attached CD-ROM with more than 400 full-color PowerPoint images provides self-explanatory examples. The book concentrates on teaching the technique using theory as much as needed and as little as possible. The reader will learn the fundamentals of the technique and how to apply it to many problems of materials characterization. Transition metal chemistry, studied on the basis of the most widely used Moessbauer isotopes, is in the foreground. (orig.)

  16. Radiation chemistry of high polymers. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dole, M.; Welch, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Work on calibrating the radiation intensity in our γ-ray source as a function of height and horizontal displacement was completed. For extended chain (high crystallinity) polyethylene (PE) before and after quenching from the melt irradiated at room temperature, the crosslinking yield increased twofold on lowering the crystallinity from 96 to 70%. The G-value for alkyl radical production was about 75% higher in the quenched extended chain sample as compared to the value before quenching. The G (alkyl) values were determined for irradiations at 77K. The rate of decay of the alkyl radicals in PE samples of single crystals having different stem lengths was studied at 80 and 85 0 . It was found that the mole fraction of the slowly decaying free radicals increased with the stem length. Hydrogen gas was found to catalyze both the slow and fast decays. Because hydrogen does not dissolve in the crystalline regions of the PE, the catalytic effect must occur at the amorphous boundary of the crystalline stems. With respect to the kinetics of the allyl radical, either it was found that the data could be explained in terms of two simultaneous but spatially separated second order reactions. As the temperature is raised to 135 0 , the two reactions merge into one. Hydrogen gas has no effect on the decay of the allyl radicals. In the case of the highly crystalline extended chain samples, the allyl decay in some cases follows the simple kinetic equation (1/c) - (1/c 0 ) = k√t, where k is called a time independent diffusion controlled reaction rate constant. The less the crystallinity of the sample the greater the k constant. A preliminary study of isotactic polypropylene (PP) was carried out and a definite hydrogen gas catalysis of the free radical decay in PP was seen. Similarly in crystalline 1-leucine the hydrogen catalytic effect could also be clearly demonstrated

  17. Radiation chemistry and the environment: the radiation degradation of pesticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornelius, K.; Laurence, G.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The chemistry of the degradation of organic pesticides, herbicides and fungicides in natural systems determines operationally important parameters such as withholding times before planting or consumption. Free radicals are being increasingly recognised as important in environmental chemistry and in aqueous systems the OH, H, and O 2 - radicals are believed to be relevant to the degradation of organic molecules. Sources of these radicals in natural aqueous systems have been suggested as photochemical or transition metal reactions involving dissolved organic species such as humic acids. We are undertaking a systematic study of the reactions of OH, H, and O 2 - radicals and halogen radical ions such as Cl 2 - , with important herbicides and fungicides in order to obtain rate constant data for modelling the possible reactions in field conditions and to establish whether the postulated reactions are capable of accounting for the disappearance of the materials in the environment. In addition to using gamma and pulse radiolysis to determine product yields, rate constants and the presence of reactive intermediates, we have begun to explore the stability and geometry of possible radial intermediates using Gaussian computations. At present six pesticides in current use in Australia are being studied. Our results for one of these, Inoxyl will be discussed. While electron transfer to or from the molecule is the initial reaction path for OH and H radicals, superoxide radical species are unreactive. (authors)

  18. Innovative Applications in Radiation Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vroom, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    Prior to acquisition by Tyco International, Raychem Corporation initiated several programs to develop new products, reduce the production cost of existing products and identify new market areas that would utilize the skills available in the company in the area of radiation chemistry and radiation technology. Several areas were considered including radiation initiation of specific chemical reactions in polymers at high temperatures, the use of purpose built irradiation equipment for low cost production of specific high volume products and environmental remediation of ground or waste water. In this regard, the Corporation supported a program to improve how material is processed through an electron accelerator and to develop specific equipment to utilize these improvements. The goal was to make the radiation process a single entity as opposed to an accelerator and a material handling system. This paper discusses some of the developments from this program. In the area of radiation induced chemical reactions in polymers at elevated temperatures, a robust accelerator was developed that would allow the irradiation of polymeric materials in the melt as they exited forming equipment such as plastics extruders. Here the goal was to have a low energy, self shielded accelerator in the 300 KeV to 500 KeV range in which extruded polymeric material could be immediately processed in a single pass at melt temperature before it was cooled and allowed to encounter any surfaces. Two machines that met these criteria were constructed and will be discussed. Several of the innovations coming from the high processing temperature, single pass accelerator project were incorporated into the development of purpose built machines to process specific existing products such as wire and heat shrink tubing. Here the goal was to have machines with the minimum acceptable electron energy and compact shielding to reduce cost and foot print. Beam scanning technology developed will be discussed. A major

  19. Radiation chemistry in solvent extraction: FY2010 Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce J. Mincher; Leigh R. Martin; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes work accomplished under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) program in the area of radiation chemistry during FY 2010. The tasks assigned during FY 2010 included: • Development of techniques to measure free radical reaction kinetics in the organic phase. • Initiation of an alpha-radiolysis program • Initiation of an effort to understand dose rate effects in radiation chemistry • Continued work to characterize TALSPEAK radiation chemistry Progress made on each of these tasks is reported here. Briefly, a method was developed and used to measure the kinetics of the reactions of the •NO3 radical with solvent extraction ligands in organic solution, and the method to measure •OH radical reactions under the same conditions has been designed. Rate constants for the CMPO and DMDOHEMA reaction with •NO3 radical in organic solution are reported. Alpha-radiolysis was initiated on samples of DMDOHEMA in alkane solution using He ion beam irradiation and 211At isotope irradiation. The samples are currently being analyzed for comparison to DMDOHEMA ?-irradiations using a custom-developed mass spectrometric method. Results are also reported for the radiolytic generation of nitrous acid, in ?-irradiated nitric acid. It is shown that the yield of nitrous acid is unaffected by an order-of-magnitude change in dose rate. Finally, recent results for TALSPEAK radiolysis are reported, summarizing the effects on solvent extraction efficiency due to HDEHP irradiation, and the stable products of lactic acid and DTPA irradiation. In addition, results representing increased scope are presented for the radiation chemistry program. These include an investigation of the effect of metal complexation on radical reaction kinetics using DTPA as an example, and the production of a manuscript reporting the mechanism of Cs-7SB radiolysis. The Cs-7SB work takes advantage of recent results from a current LDRD program to understand the fundamental chemistry

  20. Radiation chemistry in solvent extraction: FY2010 Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Martin, Leigh R.; Mezyk, Stephen P.

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes work accomplished under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR and D) program in the area of radiation chemistry during FY 2010. The tasks assigned during FY 2010 included: (1) Development of techniques to measure free radical reaction kinetics in the organic phase. (2) Initiation of an alpha-radiolysis program; (3) Initiation of an effort to understand dose rate effects in radiation chemistry; (4) Continued work to characterize TALSPEAK radiation chemistry Progress made on each of these tasks is reported here. Briefly, a method was developed and used to measure the kinetics of the reactions of the NO3 radical with solvent extraction ligands in organic solution, and the method to measure OH radical reactions under the same conditions has been designed. Rate constants for the CMPO and DMDOHEMA reaction with NO3 radical in organic solution are reported. Alpha-radiolysis was initiated on samples of DMDOHEMA in alkane solution using He ion beam irradiation and 211At isotope irradiation. The samples are currently being analyzed for comparison to DMDOHEMA ?-irradiations using a custom-developed mass spectrometric method. Results are also reported for the radiolytic generation of nitrous acid, in ?-irradiated nitric acid. It is shown that the yield of nitrous acid is unaffected by an order-of-magnitude change in dose rate. Finally, recent results for TALSPEAK radiolysis are reported, summarizing the effects on solvent extraction efficiency due to HDEHP irradiation, and the stable products of lactic acid and DTPA irradiation. In addition, results representing increased scope are presented for the radiation chemistry program. These include an investigation of the effect of metal complexation on radical reaction kinetics using DTPA as an example, and the production of a manuscript reporting the mechanism of Cs-7SB radiolysis. The Cs-7SB work takes advantage of recent results from a current LDRD program to understand the fundamental chemistry of

  1. Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases

  2. Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-04-01

    The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  3. Industrial application of radiation curing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1994-12-31

    The contents are advantages of radiation processes - a solvent-free system, less energy consumative, higher production rate, processability at ambient temperature; electron beams vs. ultraviolet curing; applications -broad spectrum of markets use radiation curable materials.

  4. Industrial application of radiation curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashi Sasaki

    1993-01-01

    The contents are advantages of radiation processes - a solvent-free system, less energy consumative, higher production rate, processability at ambient temperature; electron beams vs. ultraviolet curing; applications -broad spectrum of markets use radiation curable materials

  5. Exploration Of `Click' Chemistry For Microelectronic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, Osama M.; Sridhar, Laxmisha M.

    The ‘Click’ chemistry was explored for low temperature snap cure and for possible use as an adhesion promoter in electronic applications. Several azide and alkyne resins were synthesized and their curing potential was evaluated with a special emphasis on exploring Cu(I) catalyst effect. The preliminary curing study in the absence of catalysts showed a strong dependence of cure temperatures on the electronic nature of alkynes. The cure temperatures showed a tendency to increase with decreasing electronegativity of the substituent on alkynes. The capability of Cu(I) catalysts to accelerate the ‘Click’ chemistry was demonstrated for the first time in bulk phase. Using several Cu(I) catalysts, the cure temperatures could be lowered by as much as 40-100°C compared to the control, depending on the nature of catalyst and the catalyst loading. We discovered a novel synergistic effect between Cu(I) and silver filler in lowering the cure temperatures. Using this combination, lower cure temperatures could be obtained than using either alone. Among several resins screened, one resin system has shown promise for 80°C snap-cure in which the aforementioned synergistic effect is operative. Solution phase ‘Click’ chemistry was employed for the synthesis of a hybrid triazole-epoxy resin system. This system was found to cure without added amine curative. The triazole group here serves as a linker as well as an internal adhesion promoter. To address the incompatibility and volatility issues, which arose during evaluation, a controlled oligomerization method has been developed using controlled heating of azides and alkynes in solution phase.

  6. Ionic liquids: radiation chemistry, solvation dynamics and reactivity patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wishart, J.F.; Funston, A.M.; Szreder, T.

    2006-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are a rapidly expanding family of condensed-phase media with important applications in energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs are nonvolatile, noncombustible, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of chemical reactions and product distributions. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments, where their safety advantages could be significant, requires an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of IL radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material. An understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry will also facilitate pulse radiolysis studies of general chemical reactivity in ILs, which will aid in the development of energy production, chemical industry and environmental applications. Pulse radiolysis of [R 4 N][NTf 2 ] [R 4 N][N(CN) 2 ], and [R 4 P][N(CN) 2 ] ionic liquids produces solvated electrons that absorb over a broad range in the near infrared and persisting for hundreds of nanoseconds. Systematic cation variation shows that solvated electron's spectroscopic properties depend strongly on the lattice structure of the ionic liquid. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that

  7. Organic radiation chemistry--the present state and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sareava, V.V.; Kalyazin, E.P.

    1985-01-01

    The authors pose the principal problems to be solved in organic radiation chemistry: 1) to derive from the structural formula of a given organic compound the composition of the products from its radiolysis under standard conditions; 2) to use a number of physicochemical properties of a given compound at the molecular and material levels to predict the variation in composition and fraction of products from the radiolysis of the compounds with a change in irradiation conditions, i.e., the parameters of the acting radiation and the state of the substance, to indicate the direction of the principal radiation chemical processes in complex mixtures of natural or technical origin. Having stated the problems, the authors attempt to show the level of understanding of the radiolysis of organic compounds, using aliphatic hydrocarbons as principal discussion subjects

  8. Radiation measurements and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, H.C.; Rogers, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    This 1990 symposium was the seventh in a series of meetings which began in 1964. The 300 participants from 23 countries and the 65 oral and 77 poster presentations were more than double the size of the 1985 symposium. Some of this increase derived from the broadened scope of the program. Previous meetings emphasized X-rays and gamma-rays, but it has been increasingly clear that distinction from other forms of radiation (i.e., electrons, alpha-particles and neutrons) was contrived. This broadening led to papers in fields such as ''airport'' monitors and arms control. However, most of the increase in size of the symposium is simply a reflection of the vigorous activity, both academic and industrial in radiation measurements and their many applications. The papers in these Proceedings are arranged by major topic without regard to whether the paper was invited or contributed, oral or poster. Discussion, although an important part of the meeting, was not recorded and therefore is not included in the Proceedings

  9. Sodium-water clusters and their role in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhar, S.; Kestner, N.R.

    1988-01-01

    Studies of sodium-water clusters are presented which could serve as models for the recently suggested intermediate species in the radiation chemistry of water. The ionization potentials and the lower excited states of sodium with n-water molecules are calculated by ab initio quantum chemistry methods. The ionization potential calculated at the SCF level for the water monomer is 4.10 eV, which becomes 4.34 at the MP2 correlation level. The experimental value is 4.379 ± 0.002 eV. Structural data is presented for the lower members of the sodium with n-water clusters. In addition the Hartree-Fock calculations indicate that there should be some strong charge transfer to solvent transitions at higher energies. (author)

  10. Radiation modification of polymers: fundamentals and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clough, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    When polymers were first exposed to ionizing radiation some 50 years ago, the resultant changes were found to be complex and relatively non-selective. Most importantly, irradiation was seen to give a mix of bond forming and bond breaking processes, and different polymer types were classified into two groups according to which process predominated. For polymers in the 'crosslinking' category, large industrial applications emerged within the first two decades of the initiation of this field, including heat shrink products, high performance wire insulation and tire manufacturing. There has been continuing work toward development of a wide range of new applications based on polymers and radiation, and this field remains quite active today. One approach to finding new commercial processes has been to take advantage of a variety of different radiation-induced phenomena (for example, uses for chain scission have emerged for enhancing the processing properties of various bulk polymers, for recycling of rubber, and for microlithography and LIGA). Another approach has taken advantage of progress in the science of radiation chemistry, by employing our increasing knowledge to enhance and/or reduce competing processes through the use of additives, the design of specialized resins, controlling gaseous atmospheres, varying processing conditions such as temperature, post-irradiation treatments, etc. This presentation will survey some of the exciting developments in polymer radiation processing, and will point out some of the underlying phenomena that are being manipulated to further their success. We will finish by describing progress on fundamental isotope-labeling studies of one longstanding mechanistic complexity, oxidation chemistry, which is critical in many radiation processing applications, such as retarding post-irradiation degradation problems, enhancing chain scission where desired, altering surface polarity, and providing a useful pretreatment in grafting schemes

  11. Biomedical applications of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosiak, J.M.; Pietrzak, M.

    1997-01-01

    Application of ionizing radiation for sterilization of medical devices, hygienization of cosmetics products as well as formation of biomaterials have been discussed. The advantages of radiation sterilization over the conventional methods have been indicated. The properties of modern biomaterials, hydrogels as well as some ways of their formation and modification under action of ionizing radiation were presented. Some commercial biomaterials of this kind produced in accordance with original Polish methods by means of radiation technique have been pointed out. (author)

  12. Radiation chemistry and advanced polymer materials studied by picosecond pulse radiolysis combined with femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, S.; Yoshida, Y.; Miki, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Ushida, K.; Izumi, Y.

    1996-01-01

    We have synchronized a single picosecond MeV electron pulse from L-band linear accelerator (linac) of The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research of Osaka University to a single femtosecond laser pulse of Ti:Sapphire laser. It is an essential technique for the future femtosecond pulse radiolysis and is also applied to many kinds of combined application of more than two different beams from accelerators in very short time range. Radiation chemistry and new type of polymers have been studied by LL (laser-linac) twin picosecond pulse radiolysis. Especially the early events in radiation chemistry such as geminate recombination processes of electrons and radical cations are have been studied in both liquids and solids. (author)

  13. Polymerization by radiation. Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, M.; Fernandez Miranda, J.

    1997-01-01

    Achieved results of the research work done in the field of radiation polymerization are summarized. Developing new chromatographic matrices, the radiation grafting of Glycidyl methacrylate on the surface of Low Density Polyethylene beads was studied. The dependence of both, the grafted degree and width of the grafted layer, with the radiation dose applied, is presented

  14. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1987 through March 31, 1988. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: (i) studies on surface phenomena under electron and ion irradiations and (ii) studies on radiation chemistry of high polymers and radiation dosimetry. (J.P.N.)

  15. Chemistry and technology of radiation processed composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czvikovszky, T.

    1985-01-01

    Composite materials of synthetics (based on monomers, oligomers and thermoplastics) and of natural polymers (wood and other fibrous cellulosics) prepared by radiation processing, offer valuable structural materials with enhanced coupling forces between the components. The applied polymer chemistry of such composites shows several common features with that of radiation grafting, e.g. the polymerization rate of oligomer-monomer mixtures in wood remains in most cases proportional to the square-root of the initiating dose-rate, just as in the simultaneous grafting, demonstrating that the chain termination kinetics remain regularly bimolecular in the corresponding dose-rate ranges. In the processing experiences of such composites, low dose requirement, easy process-control, and good technical feasibility have been found for composites of wood with oligomer-monomer mixtures, for coconut fibres with unsaturated polyesters and for pretreated wood fibre with polypropylene. (author)

  16. Optimum Water Chemistry in radiation field buildup control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chien, C. [Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Nuclear utilities continue to face the challenGE of reducing exposure of plant maintenance personnel. GE Nuclear Energy has developed the concept of Optimum Water Chemistry (OWC) to reduce the radiation field buildup and minimize the radioactive waste production. It is believed that reduction of radioactive sources and improvement of the water chemistry quality should significantly reduce both the radiation exposure and radwaste production. The most important source of radioactivity is cobalt and replacement of cobalt containing alloy in the core region as well as in the entire primary system is considered the first priority to achieve the goal of low exposure and minimized waste production. A plant specific computerized cobalt transport model has been developed to evaluate various options in a BWR system under specific conditions. Reduction of iron input and maintaining low ionic impurities in the coolant have been identified as two major tasks for operators. Addition of depleted zinc is a proven technique to reduce Co-60 in reactor water and on out-of-core piping surfaces. The effect of HWC on Co-60 transport in the primary system will also be discussed.

  17. Application of californium-252 neutron sources for analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Daido

    1976-01-01

    The researches made for the application of Cf-252 neutron sources to analytical chemistry during the period from 1970 to 1974 including partly 1975 are reviewed. The first part is the introduction to the above. The second part deals with general review of symposia, publications and the like. Attention is directed to ERDA publishing the periodical ''Californium-252 Progress'' and to a study group of Cf-252 utilization held by Japanese Radioisotope Association in 1974. The third part deals with its application for radio activation analysis. The automated absolute activation analysis (AAAA) of Savannha River is briefly explained. The joint experiment of Savannha River operation office with New Brunswick laboratory is mentioned. Cf-252 radiation source was used for the non-destructive analysis of elements in river water. East neutrons of Cf-252 were used for the quantitative analysis of lead in paints. Many applications for industrial control processes have been reported. Attention is drawn to the application of Cf-252 neutron sources for the field search of neutral resources. For example, a logging sonde for searching uranium resources was developed. the fourth part deals with the application of the analysis with gamma ray by capturing neutrons. For example, a bore hole sonde and the process control analysis of sulfur in fuel utilized capture gamma ray. The prompt gamma ray by capturing neutrons may be used for the nondestructive analysis of enrivonment. (Iwakiri, K.)

  18. Radiation acoustics and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyamshev, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a new branch of acoustics, developing on the boundary of acoustics, nuclear physics, elementary particles and high-energy physics. Its fundamentals are laying in the research of acoustical effects due to the interaction of penetrating radiation with matter. The study of radiation-acoustical effects leads to the new opportunities in the penetration radiation research (acoustical detection, radiation-acoustical dosimetry), study of the physical parameters of matter, in a solution of some applied problems of nondestructive testing, and also for the radiation-acoustical influence on physical and chemical structure of the matter. Results of theoretical and experimental investigations are given. Different mechanisms of the sound generation by penetrating radiation of liquids and solids are considered. Some applications - the radiation acoustical microscopy and visualisation, the acoustical detection of high energy X-ray particles and possibility of using of high energy neutrino beams in geoacoustics - are discussed

  19. Towards 'selection rules' in the radiation chemistry of molecular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, V.I.; Inst. of Synthetic Polymetric Materials, Moscow; Moscow State Univ.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. There are a lot of experimental evidences suggesting that the primary radiation-induced events in organic solids and polymers are highly selective and sensitive to conformation, molecular packing, matrix environment, etc. Nevertheless, specific 'selection rules' in the radiation chemistry of molecules in solids are still not established. This contribution presents a review of our recent studies of the radiation damage in organic molecules in low-temperature matrices and polymers aimed at elucidation of basic physical factors controlling selectivity of the primary chemical events. The following aspects will be analyzed: 1. 'Fine tuning' effects in positive hole trapping in rigid systems containing molecular 'traps' with close ionization energy. 2. Selective chemical bond weakening in ionized molecules: experimental and theoretical results. 3. Matrix-assisted and matrix-controlled chemical reactions of ionized molecules in solid media (including the effect of 'matrix-catalysis'). 4. Effect of excess energy on the fate of ionized molecules in solid matrices: the role of intramolecular and intermolecular relaxation. Finally, the problem of experimental and theoretical simulation of the distribution of the radiation-induced events in complex molecular systems and polymers will be addressed

  20. Environmental Green Chemistry Applications of Nanoporous Carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos, J.; Garcia, A; Poon, P

    2010-01-01

    Influence of surface properties of nanoporous carbons on activity and selectivity during the photooxidation of 4-chlorophenol on UV-irradiated TiO{sub 2} was performed. Characterization by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy confirm the presence of a contact interface between both solids and suggest the coordination of some functional organic groups of the carbon surface, mainly ethers and carboxylic acids, to metallic centre Ti{sup +4} in TiO{sub 2}. Changes in surface pH of carbons from basic to neutral or acid remarkably increase the production of 4-chlorocathecol by a factor of 22 on TiO{sub 2}-Carbon in comparison of TiO{sub 2} alone. A scheme of interaction between TiO{sub 2} and carbon is proposed to the increased photoactivity of TiO{sub 2} and a reaction mechanism for the different intermediate products detected is also proposed. Results showed that TiO{sub 2}-Carbon can be used as an alternative photocatalyst for environmental green chemistry and selective organic synthesis applications.

  1. Nuclear chemistry on the Czech Technical University in Prague after introduction of structured study and foundation of the Centre for Radiochemistry and Radiation Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, J.

    2007-01-01

    In this presentation the author (head of the Centre for Radiochemistry and Radiation Chemistry) give a short review of history of the Department of Nuclear Chemistry and of the Centre for Radiochemistry and Radiation Chemistry of the Czech Technical University in Prague. Education in structured study in specialisation of nuclear chemistry in bachelor level, master level, as well as post-graduate study in nuclear chemistry with academic degree PhD. are realised. Some scientific results are presented

  2. Radiation chemistry of salicylic and methyl substituted salicylic acids: Models for the radiation chemistry of pharmaceutical compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayatollahi, Shakiba; Kalnina, Daina; Song, Weihua; Turks, Maris; Cooper, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Salicylic acid and its derivatives are components of many medications and moieties found in numerous pharmaceutical compounds. They have been used as models for various pharmaceutical compounds in pharmacological studies, for the treatment of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), and, reactions with natural organic matter (NOM). In this study, the radiation chemistry of benzoic acid, salicylic acid and four methyl substituted salicylic acids (MSA) is reported. The absolute bimolecular reaction rate constants for hydroxyl radical reaction with benzoic and salicylic acids as well as 3-methyl-, 4-methyl-, 5-methyl-, and 6-methyl-salicylic acid were determined (5.86±0.54)×10 9 , (1.07±0.07)×10 10 , (7.48±0.17)×10 9 , (7.31±0.29)×10 9 , (5.47±0.25)×10 9 , (6.94±0.10)×10 9 (M −1 s −1 ), respectively. The hydrated electron reaction rate constants were measured (3.02±0.10)×10 9 , (8.98±0.27)×10 9 , (5.39±0.21)×10 9 , (4.33±0.17)×10 9 , (4.72±0.15)×10 9 , (1.42±0.02)×10 9 (M −1 s −1 ), respectively. The transient absorption spectra for the six model compounds were examined and their role as model compounds for the radiation chemistry of pharmaceuticals investigated. - Highlights: • Free radical chemistry of salicylic and 4 methyl salicylic acids is investigated. • The transient absorptions spectra for model compounds are measured. • Absolute bimolecular reaction rate constants for hydroxyl radical are determined. • Solvated electron reaction rate constants are calculated. • The use of salicylic acids as models for pharmaceuticals is explored

  3. Proceedings of the 8th Japan-China bilateral symposium on radiation chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaoka, Hitoshi; Hase, Hirotomo; Makuuchi, Keizou [eds.

    2000-03-01

    This issue is the collection of papers presented at The 8th Japan-China Bilateral Symposium on Radiation Chemistry held on October 25-29, 1999 at Kyodai Kaikan in Kyoto. The total number of the contributed papers is 69 which consists of 41 and 28 papers for oral and poster presentations, respectively. The papers presented are classified into five categories: A: Radiation Chemistry - Fundament (21 papers), B: Radiation Chemistry - Polymer (10 papers), C: Radiation Chemistry - Biological System (8 papers), D: Radiation Processing (19 papers), and E: Advanced Radiation Chemistry - Ion Beams and Positron (11 papers). The output of the Symposium and the history of the Bilateral Symposium were compiled in the Closing. (J.P.N.)

  4. Biomedical applications of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatek, W.M.; Galka, M.; Hanson, A.L.; Paluszkiewicz, Cz.; Cichocki, T.

    2001-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation techniques application in medical diagnostics have been presented especially for: trace element analysis in tissues, elemental mapping, chemical speciation at trace levels, chemical structure determination. Presented techniques are very useful for early cancer discovery

  5. Industrial applications of radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, K.S.S.

    2012-01-01

    During the past one decade, Radiation Technology applications utilizing gamma radiation and high energy electrons have made a big way into the Indian industry bringing quality and value-added products in a more environment-friendly way. While radiation sterilization of health care products, hygienization of food materials, modification of polymer materials etc. are established as successful processes world wide including India, new applications are emerging especially in the field of environmental remediation. Two types of installations viz. gamma irradiators and high energy electron accelerators are in use right now to carry out such applications. The aim of the talk is to put forward before the audience about the potential applications developed in India and abroad, role of Department of Atomic Energy and current status of radiation processing for industrial utilization

  6. Marine chemistry and tracer applications of radiocaesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, W.A.

    1983-03-01

    The general aims of this project were to study the marine chemistry of Windscale-derived radiocaesium and to continue previous research at Glasgow University on its tracer application in Scottish waters and sediments. It was found that a considerable percentage of sediment-associated 137 Cs (approximately 12 to 50%) may be contained by carbonate, oxide and organic coatings which appear to be relatively stable under a wide range of redox conditions. Whilst the partitioning of 137 Cs is related to the concentration of these oxides, organics and, to a much lesser extent, carbonates, their function is predominantly to prevent 137 Cs release from clay mineral exchange sites. 137 Cs activities per unit sediment weight were highest in the clay fraction with its uptake by coarse sediments appearing to be controlled by clay minerals coatings formed in the marine environment and cemented partly by oxides and organics. Though the sites sampled (Clyde Sea Area (C.S.A.) and L. Etive) encompassed a wide range of sediment types, the range of estimated 137 Cs distribution coefficients (K D ) was relatively small (360 to 890). Coatings may thus have more influence on K d s in the coastal marine environment than particle size distributions. Apparent concentration factors (C F s) of X325, X2800 and X1910 were determined for the associated carbonate, oxide and organic coatings, for a site off Greenock. Use of 'dry' sediments appeared to produce considerably overestimated values for the degree of 137 Cs fixation. Thus 'wet' sediments were used in these studies. Over the 1978-1981 period, approximately 35% of Windscale output passed through the C.S.A., diluted 26 times during transit. An estimated 0.3% of this water-borne inventory was removed into the sediments. Windscale to C.S.A. transit and residence times of 4 and 12 months respectively were derived. Monitoring the deeper levels of L. Etive allowed 137 Cs to be used to trace patterns of w

  7. Nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.; Kiss, I.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the application of nuclear science in modern chemistry. The first group of chapters discuss the basic phenomena and concepts of nuclear physics with emphasis on their relation to chemical problems, including the main properties and the composition of atomic nuclei, nuclear reactions, radioactive decay and interactions of radiation with matter. These chapters provide the basis for understanding the following chapters which encompass the wide scope of nuclear chemistry. The methods of the investigation of chemical structure based on the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter including positronium chemistry and other exotic atoms is elaborated in particular detail. Separate chapters are devoted to the use of radioactive tracers, the chemical consequences of nuclear processes (i.e. hot atom chemistry), radiation chemistry, isotope effects and their applications, and the operation of nuclear reactors

  8. Nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.; Kiss, I.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the application of nuclear science in modern chemistry. The first group of chapters discuss the basic phenomena and concepts of nuclear physics with emphasis on their relation to chemical problems, including the main properties and the composition of atomic nuclei, nuclear reactions, radioactive decay and interactions of radiation with matter. These chapters provide the basis for understanding the following chapters which encompass the wide scope of nuclear chemistry. The methods of the investigation of chemical structure based on the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter including positronium chemistry and other exotic atoms is elaborated in particular detail. Separate chapters are devoted to the use of radioactive tracers, the chemical consequences of nuclear processes (i.e. hot atom chemistry), radiation chemistry, isotope effects and their applications, and the operation of nuclear reactors. (Auth.)

  9. Radiation chemistry of alternative fuel oxygenates - substituted ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezyk, S. P.; Cooper, W. J.; Bartels, D. M.; Tobien, T.; O'Shea, K. E.

    1999-01-01

    The electron beam process, an advanced oxidation and reduction technology, is based in the field of radiation chemistry. Fundamental to the development of treatment processes is an understanding of the underlying chemistry. The authors have previously evaluated the bimolecular rate constants for the reactions of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and with this study have extended their studies to include ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE), di-isopropyl ether (DIPE) and tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME) with the hydroxyl radical, hydrogen atom and solvated electron using pulse radiolysis. For all of the oxygenates the reaction with the hydroxyl radical appears to be of primary interest in the destruction of the compounds in water. The rates with the solvated electron are limiting values as the rates appear to be relatively low. The hydrogen atom rate constants are relatively low, coupled with the low yield in radiolysis, they concluded that these are of little significance in the destruction of the alternative fuel oxygenates (and MTBE)

  10. High technology for radiation application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Toshiyuki

    2005-03-01

    Fundamentals of radiations, radioactivity, and their applications in recent industrial, medical, agricultural and various research fields are reviewed. The book begins with historical description regarding to discovery of radiation at the end of 19th century and the exploration into the inside of an atom utilizing the radiation discovered, discovery of the neutron which finally leaded to nuclear energy liberation. Developments of radiation sources, including nuclear reactors, and charged-particle accelerators follow with simultaneous description on radiation measurement or detection technology. In medical fields, X-ray diagnosis, interventional radiology (IVR), nuclear medicine (PET and others), and radiation therapy are introduced. In pharmaceutical field, synthesis of labeled compounds and tracer techniques are explained. In industrial application, radiation-reinforced wires and heat-resistant cables whose economic effect can be estimated to amount to more than 10 12 yen, radiation mutation, food irradiation, and applied accelerators such as polymer modifications, decomposition of environmentally harmful substances, and ion-implantations important in semiconductor device fabrication. Finally, problems relating to general public such as radiation education and safety concept are also discussed. (S. Ohno)

  11. Classifying hot water chemistry: Application of MULTIVARIATE STATISTICS

    OpenAIRE

    Sumintadireja, Prihadi; Irawan, Dasapta Erwin; Rezky, Yuanno; Gio, Prana Ugiana; Agustin, Anggita

    2016-01-01

    This file is the dataset for the following paper "Classifying hot water chemistry: Application of MULTIVARIATE STATISTICS". Authors: Prihadi Sumintadireja1, Dasapta Erwin Irawan1, Yuano Rezky2, Prana Ugiana Gio3, Anggita Agustin1

  12. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1992-01-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic X-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become incrasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of X-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved. (orig.)

  13. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved

  14. Research advancements and applications of carboranes in nuclear medicinal chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wen; Wei Hongyuan; Luo Shunzhong

    2011-01-01

    Because of their uniquely high thermal and chemical stabilities, carboranes have become a subject of study with high interest in the chemistry of supra molecules, catalysts and radiopharmaceuticals. In recent years, the role of carboranes in nuclear medicinal chemistry has been diversified, from the traditional use in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), to the clinical applications in molecular radio imaging and therapy. This paper provides an overview of the synthesis and characterization of carboranes and their applications in nuclear medicinal chemistry, with highlights of recent key advancements in the re- search areas of BNCT and radio imaging. (authors)

  15. 15. workshop on radiation induced chemistry. JECR - 2010. Compilation of summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abidi, Wafa; Agelou, Mathieu; Atinault, Elodie; Balcerzyk, Anna; Baldacchino, Gerard; Barillon, Remi; Belloni, Jacqueline; Berlu, Lilian; Berthon, Laurence; Blain, Guillaume; Boogaerts, Anne; Bouniol, Pascal; Bouteleux, Simon; Canizares, Aurelien; Champion, Christophe; Chatelain, Caroline; Cobut, Vincent; Cochin, Florence; Costa, Cedric; Criquet, Justine; Crumiere, Francis; Damaj, Ziad; Dannoux, Adeline; Dauvois, Vincent; Davidkova, Maria; Delorme, Rachel; Deschanel, Xavier; Devineau, Stephanie; El Omar, Abdel-Karim; Essehli, Rachid; Fattahi, Massoud; Fereira da Silva, Filipe; Fromm, Michel; Gardes-Albert, Monique; Green, Nicholas; Guetat, Philippe; Guimbretiere, Guillaume; Hagen, Cornelius; Hanot, Maite; Hickel, Bernard; Hioul, Mohamed; Incerti, Sebastien; Jore, Daniel; Jung, Jean Marc; Khandal, Dhriti; Karamitros, Mathieu; Karpel, Vel; Leitner, Nathalie; Kovacs, Marie-Paule; Kowandy, Christelle; Krzeminski, Michael; Kuntz, Florent; Labed, Veronique; Lafosse, Anne; Le Caer, Sophie; Le Cocguen, Alexandre; Lehoux, Anais; Leoni, Elisa; Marchioni, Eric; Martin, Violaine; Melo, Rita; Mostafavi, Mehran; Moisy, Philippe; Mozeika-Araujo, Michel; Munier, Melodie; Musat, Raluca; Muzeau, Benoist; Pain, Laurent; Pastina, Barbara; Peyrat, Michel; Pin, Serge; Raffi, Jacques; Raffy, Quentin; Renault, Jean Philippe; Rolland, Severine; Saffre, Dimitri; Samraoui, Khalid; Savin-Martinez, Martine; Sicart-Roselli, Cecile; Sohier, Till; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie; Stammose, Denise; Tilquin, Bernard; Toquer, Guillaume; Traboulsi, Ali; Tribet, Magaly; Vandenborre, Johan; Vieira, Abel; Vigneron, Georges; Wasselin-Trupin, Virginie; Wishart, James; Yamashita, Shinichi

    2010-05-01

    This workshop is the most important international french-speaking meeting dedicated to the study of the effects of ionising radiations on matter; the discussed themes, interdisciplinary, go from primary physical interaction to physico-chemical, chemical and biochemical effects, including applications such as industrial irradiation, radiotherapy and radio-pharmaceutics. Titles of the 9 main sessions are: primary events; extreme conditions; radicalar bio-chemistry; radiolysis of specific molecules; nano-sciences, nano-technologies; dosimetry / direct effect; warehousing / storage; polymers / ionic liquids; astro-radiolysis

  16. Use of ionising radiation in the teaching of physics and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The guide lays down the safety requirements for the use of radiation in school education, as well as the principles regulating the use of radiation sources without the safety licence referred to in section 16 of the Finnish Radiation Act (592/1991). The guide covers the use of radiation sources emitting ionising radiation in elementary schools and high schools, as well as the use of radiation in the teaching of physics and chemistry in vocational training institutions and corresponding educational institutions

  17. Use of ionizing radiation in the teaching of physics and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The guide specifies the safety requirements for the use of radiation in school education as well as the principles regulating the use of radiation sources without the safety license referred to the Section 16 of the Finnish Radiation Act (592/91). The guide covers the use of radiation sources emitting ionizing radiation in elementary schools and high schools, as well as the use of radiation in the teaching of physics and chemistry in vocational training institutions and corresponding educational institutions. (3 refs.)

  18. Enhancing prospective chemistry teachers cognitive structures in the topics of bonding and hybridization by internet-assisted chemistry applications

    OpenAIRE

    Özge Özyalçın Oskay, Sinem Dinçol

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of internet-assisted chemistry applications on prospective chemistry teachers’ cognitive structures in the topics of bonding and hybridization. The sample of the study consisted of 36 prospective chemistry teachers attending Hacettepe University, Faculty of Education, the Department of Chemistry Education in 2010-2011 academic year and taking Basic Chemistry I lesson. In the study, students were separated into experimental and control gr...

  19. Applied radiation chemistry - the present status in the Institute for Nuclear Research Academia Sinica (INRAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nian-yun, L.

    1981-01-01

    The department of radiation chemistry in INRAS is one of the research centers of radiation chemistry in China. Since its establishment in 1958, basic theoretical and applied radiation chemistry have been extensively studied and promoted. In the field of applied radiation chemistry of polymers, radiation modification of polymeric systems is an important and active branch. Materials such as permselective membranes based on different polymer films have been prepared by means of radiation crosslinking and grafting. Superfine powdered wax, which may be used for the preparation of special lubricating grease of high quality, has been obtained via radiation degradation of PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene). As for applied organic radiation chemistry, the main technological conditions of preparation of alkane sulfonic acid by radiation sulphoxidation of n-paraffin were optimized and the radiation sensitization effects of halogenated alkane and acetic anhydride on the indicated system were studied. The radiation stability of linear conjugated molecules and the related effects of intra- and intermolecular radiation protection were particularly investigated. These studies are described. (author)

  20. Industrial applications of radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabharwal, Sunil

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, radiation processing has emerged as an alternative to conventional technologies such as thermal and chemical processing for many industrial applications. The industry is expanding at a fast rate all over the world. The actual industrial benefits on commercial basis, however, depends on the need of the individual society and may vary from country to country. In India, the applications of radiation technology have been found in areas of health care, agriculture, food preservation, industry and environment. Both gamma radiation and electron beam accelerators are being utilized for this purpose. Presently, 6 commercial gamma irradiators housing about 1.5 million curie 60 Co and an annual turnover of over US$ 2 million and 3 commercial electron beam (EB) accelerators with installed capacity of 185 kW are commercially operating in India. The new areas being explored include use of electron beam irradiation for surface treatment, radiation processed membranes for a variety of applications and radiation processing of natural polymers. In the present paper, the current status of this program, especially the recent developments and future direction of radiation processing technology is reviewed. (author)

  1. Organofluorine chemistry : applications, sources and sustainability.

    OpenAIRE

    Harsanyi, A.; Sandford, G.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorine is an essential element for life in the developed world that impacts hugely on the general public because many pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, anaesthetics, materials and air conditioning materials owe their important properties to the presence of fluorine atoms within their structures. All fluorine atoms used in organic chemistry are ultimately sourced from a mined raw material, fluorspar (CaF2), but, given current usage and global reserve estimates, there is only sufficient fluorsp...

  2. Radiation biodosimetry: Applications for spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, W. F.; Miller, A. C.; Grace, M. B.; McLeland, C. B.; Luo, L.; Muderhwa, J. M.; Miner, V. L.; Prasanna, P. G. S.

    The multiparametric dosimetry system that we are developing for medical radiological defense applications could be adapted for spaceflight environments. The system complements the internationally accepted personnel dosimeters and cytogenetic analysis of chromosome aberrations, considered the best means of documenting radiation doses for health records. Our system consists of a portable hematology analyzer, molecular biodosimetry using nucleic acid and antigen-based diagnostic equipment, and a dose assessment management software application. A dry-capillary tube reagent-based centrifuge blood cell counter (QBC Autoread Plus, Beckon Dickinson Bioscience) measures peripheral blood lymphocytes and monocytes, which could determine radiation dose based on the kinetics of blood cell depletion. Molecular biomarkers for ionizing radiation exposure (gene expression changes, blood proteins) can be measured in real time using such diagnostic detection technologies as miniaturized nucleic acid sequences and antigen-based biosensors, but they require validation of dose-dependent targets and development of optimized protocols and analysis systems. The Biodosimetry Assessment Tool, a software application, calculates radiation dose based on a patient's physical signs and symptoms and blood cell count analysis. It also annotates location of personnel dosimeters, displays a summary of a patient's dosimetric information to healthcare professionals, and archives the data for further use. These radiation assessment diagnostic technologies can have dual-use applications supporting general medical-related care.

  3. Radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions of hydrazine at elevated temperatures: Pt. 2. Solutions containing oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buxton, G.V.; Stuart, C.R.

    1997-01-01

    Here, we investigate the effects of oxygen on the radiation chemistry of hydrazine at elevated temperatures. The chemistry of this system is important to reactor coolant chemistry, particularly under start-up conditions when hydrazine is added to suppress corrosion which would otherwise be caused by the ingress of oxygen. The radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions of hydrazine has been investigated previously in the presence of oxygen by Ershov et al., but only at room temperature. In those experiments, both steady-state γ-radiolysis and pulse radiolysis were used to deduce the mechanism of decomposition of hydrazine in the presence of oxygen. (author)

  4. Liquid crystals beyond displays chemistry, physics, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Quan

    2012-01-01

    The chemistry, physics, and applications of liquid crystals beyond LCDs Liquid Crystals (LCs) combine order and mobility on a molecular and supramolecular level. But while these remarkable states of matter are most commonly associated with visual display technologies, they have important applications for a variety of other fields as well. Liquid Crystals Beyond Displays: Chemistry, Physics, and Applications considers these, bringing together cutting-edge research from some of the most promising areas of LC science. Featuring contributions from respected researchers from around the globe, th

  5. Radiation chemistry of heavy-particle tracks. I. General considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, J.L.; Chatterjee, A.

    1980-01-01

    The radiation chemistry of heavy-particle tracks in dilute aqueous solution is considered in a unified manner. Emphasis is on the physical and chemical phenomena which are involved rather than on the construction of models to be used in actual calculations although the latter problem is discussed. A differential segment of a heavy-particle track is composed of two parts which we call core and penumbra; elementary considerations show that all properties of such a differential track can be uniquely specified in terms of a two-parameter system, and we choose energy per nucleon (E) and atomic numbers (Z) as independent parameters. The nature of heavy-particle-track processes varies with the magnitude of the energy deposit (LET), and we discuss three categories of track problems, for low-, intermediate-, and high-LET cases, respectively. Scavenger reactions normally terminate radical recombination in a track, and for heavy-particle tracks we find a criterion involving the scavenger concentration for a convenient separation of core and penumbra into essentially noninteracting parts which can be treated independently. Problems of the core expansion in the three regions are considered, and it is found that a versatile model can be constructed on concepts previously introduced by Ganguly and Magee. A model for the penumbra, based on the authors' electron-track theory, is presented and discussed

  6. Applicative chemistry of tanning metallic heterocomplexes

    CERN Document Server

    Gaidau, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    The chemistry of heterocomplex compounds is a fascinating field for experts in chemical synthesis and structural analysis, and for technologists specializing in leather processing. This volume describes the vast theoretical and practical possibilities of exploiting the action synergism of metals with different collagen cross-linking capacity. The possibility of reducing chromium content from leather tanning agents by replacing it with other tanning metals has significant environmental implications and minimum changes in terms of quality and production costs of natural leather, and is a viable

  7. Radiation processing of polymers and semiconductors at the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimek, Z.; Przybytniak, G.; Kaluska, I.

    2006-01-01

    R(and)D studies in the field of radiation technology in Poland are mostly concentrated at the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (INCT). The results of the INCT works on polymer and semiconductor modification have been implemented in various branches of national economy, particularly in industry and medicine. Radiation technology for polymer modification was implemented in the middle of the 1970-ties. Among others, the processes of irradiation and heat shrinkable products expansion have been developed. The transfer of this technology to Polish industry was performed in the middle of the 1980-ties. The present study aims at the formulation of new PE composites better suited to new generation of heat shrinkable products, for example, a new generation of hot-melt adhesives has been developed to meet specific requirements of customers. Modified polypropylene was used for the production of medical devices sterilized by radiation, especially disposable syringes, to overcome the low radiation resistance of the basic material. Modified polypropylene (PP-M) has been formulated at the INCT to provide material suitable for medical application and radiation sterilization process. Modification of semiconductor devices by EB was applied on an industrial scale since 1978 when the INCT and the LAMINA semiconductor factory successfully adopted that technology to improve specific semiconductor devices. This activity is continued on commercial basis where the INCT facilities served to contract irradiation of certain semiconductor devices according to the manufacturing program of the Polish factory and customers from abroad. (author)

  8. Application of radiation in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naiyyum Choudhury; Najmul Alam Chowdhury; Feroza Akhtar [Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2001-03-01

    Radiation technology offers a very wide scope for utilisation and commercial exploitation in various field. All over the world, this technology is being favourably considered for different applications like radiation sterilisation of medical products, preservation of food by controlling the physiological processes for extending shelf-life and eradication of microbial and insect pests, radiation processing of polymeric materials and treatment of sewage sludge. Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission has taken radiation processing programmes in a big way right from its inception. This paper describes the studies carried out by various research groups in Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission mainly using Cobalt-60 gamma radiation. The investigation covers medical sterilisation, food preservation and development and modification of polymeric materials by gamma radiation. Both food preservation and radiation sterilisation of medical products are now being commercially carried out in the Gammatech facility as a joint venture company of BAEC and a private entrepreneur. Bangladesh is soon going to establish a full-fledged Tissue Bank to cater the needs of various tissue allografts for surgical replacement. Recently Government of Bangladesh has allocated US$ 1.00 million for strengthening of the Tissue Banking Laboratory. BAEC has made quite a good research contribution on vulcanization of natural rubber latex, wood plastic composites, surface coating curing, polymer modification etc. As a result of successful achievement of R and D activities in all these projects, a pilot plant project involving about US$ 4.00 million is under implementation at the Atomic energy Research Establishment campus of BAEC. In addition a project on 'National Polymer Centre' at a cost of US$ 2.00 million has already been approved. It is expected that work on radiation processing including commercialization will be accelerated with the implementation of these projects. The impact of radiation

  9. Application of radiation in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naiyyum Choudhury; Najmul Alam Chowdhury; Feroza Akhtar

    2001-01-01

    Radiation technology offers a very wide scope for utilisation and commercial exploitation in various field. All over the world, this technology is being favourably considered for different applications like radiation sterilisation of medical products, preservation of food by controlling the physiological processes for extending shelf-life and eradication of microbial and insect pests, radiation processing of polymeric materials and treatment of sewage sludge. Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission has taken radiation processing programmes in a big way right from its inception. This paper describes the studies carried out by various research groups in Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission mainly using Cobalt-60 gamma radiation. The investigation covers medical sterilisation, food preservation and development and modification of polymeric materials by gamma radiation. Both food preservation and radiation sterilisation of medical products are now being commercially carried out in the Gammatech facility as a joint venture company of BAEC and a private entrepreneur. Bangladesh is soon going to establish a full-fledged Tissue Bank to cater the needs of various tissue allografts for surgical replacement. Recently Government of Bangladesh has allocated US$ 1.00 million for strengthening of the Tissue Banking Laboratory. BAEC has made quite a good research contribution on vulcanization of natural rubber latex, wood plastic composites, surface coating curing, polymer modification etc. As a result of successful achievement of R and D activities in all these projects, a pilot plant project involving about US$ 4.00 million is under implementation at the Atomic energy Research Establishment campus of BAEC. In addition a project on 'National Polymer Centre' at a cost of US$ 2.00 million has already been approved. It is expected that work on radiation processing including commercialization will be accelerated with the implementation of these projects. The impact of radiation processing

  10. Application of radiation in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhury, Naiyyum; Chowdhury, Najmul Alam; Akhtar, Feroza [Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2001-03-01

    Radiation technology offers a very wide scope for utilisation and commercial exploitation in various field. All over the world, this technology is being favourably considered for different applications like radiation sterilisation of medical products, preservation of food by controlling the physiological processes for extending shelf-life and eradication of microbial and insect pests, radiation processing of polymeric materials and treatment of sewage sludge. Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission has taken radiation processing programmes in a big way right from its inception. This paper describes the studies carried out by various research groups in Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission mainly using Cobalt-60 gamma radiation. The investigation covers medical sterilisation, food preservation and development and modification of polymeric materials by gamma radiation. Both food preservation and radiation sterilisation of medical products are now being commercially carried out in the Gammatech facility as a joint venture company of BAEC and a private entrepreneur. Bangladesh is soon going to establish a full-fledged Tissue Bank to cater the needs of various tissue allografts for surgical replacement. Recently Government of Bangladesh has allocated US$ 1.00 million for strengthening of the Tissue Banking Laboratory. BAEC has made quite a good research contribution on vulcanization of natural rubber latex, wood plastic composites, surface coating curing, polymer modification etc. As a result of successful achievement of R and D activities in all these projects, a pilot plant project involving about US$ 4.00 million is under implementation at the Atomic energy Research Establishment campus of BAEC. In addition a project on 'National Polymer Centre' at a cost of US$ 2.00 million has already been approved. It is expected that work on radiation processing including commercialization will be accelerated with the implementation of these projects. The impact of radiation processing

  11. Development of medical application methods using radiation. Radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, S. M.; Kim, E.H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lim, S. J.; Choi, T. H.; Hong, S. W.; Chung, H. Y.; No, W. C.; Oh, B. H.; Hong, H. J.

    1999-04-01

    In this project, we studied following subjects: 1. development of monoclonal antibodies and radiopharmaceuticals 2. clinical applications of radionuclide therapy 3. radioimmunoguided surgery 4. prevention of restenosis with intracoronary radiation. The results can be applied for the following objectives: 1) radionuclide therapy will be applied in clinical practice to treat the cancer patients or other diseases in multi-center trial. 2) The newly developed monoclonal antibodies and biomolecules can be used in biology, chemistry or other basic life science research. 3) The new methods for the analysis of therapeutic effects, such as dosimetry, and quantitative analysis methods of radioactivity, can be applied in basic research, such as radiation oncology and radiation biology

  12. Development of medical application methods using radiation. Radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, S. M.; Kim, E.H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lim, S. J.; Choi, T. H.; Hong, S. W.; Chung, H. Y.; No, W. C. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul, (Korea, Republic of); Oh, B. H. [Seoul National University. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, H. J. [Antibody Engineering Research Unit, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    In this project, we studied following subjects: 1. development of monoclonal antibodies and radiopharmaceuticals 2. clinical applications of radionuclide therapy 3. radioimmunoguided surgery 4. prevention of restenosis with intracoronary radiation. The results can be applied for the following objectives: (1) radionuclide therapy will be applied in clinical practice to treat the cancer patients or other diseases in multi-center trial. (2) The newly developed monoclonal antibodies and biomolecules can be used in biology, chemistry or other basic life science research. (3) The new methods for the analysis of therapeutic effects, such as dosimetry, and quantitative analysis methods of radioactivity, can be applied in basic research, such as radiation oncology and radiation biology.

  13. Radiation hazards from medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beekman, Z.M.

    1981-01-01

    An introduction is presented on the radiation hazards connected with biomedical radiography and nuclear medicine. The frequency of radiodiagnostic efforts was rather high in the Netherlands. This was reduced considerably by abolishing the thorax screening of the population. About diagnostic nuclear medicine less can be said because far fewer numerical data are available. An exposition of genetically and somatically significant doses and how to compute them is given. The drawing up of a profit versus risk evaluation for medical applications of ionizing radiations is recommended. (Auth.)

  14. New approaches to chemical reaction mechanisms by means of radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2009-01-01

    Since active species generated during radiolysis can be used as oxidative or reductive regents of various organic and inorganic compounds, radiation chemistry has been applied to wide range of research fields. We have studied charge-delocalization process in molecular systems, properties of intermediates in the excited states, mechanism of light emitting device, photo-catalyst for degradation of toxic compounds and so on by means of radiation chemistry. In the present paper, we summarize our recent research results. (author)

  15. The radiation chemistry of aqueous sodium terephthalate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, R.W.

    1980-04-01

    The radiation chemistry of cobalt-60 gamma-irradiated aqueous sodium terephthalate solutions has been studied. In aerated 4 x 10 -4 M sodium hydroxide solutions, the main products are hydroxyterephthalate (HTA) (G = 0.99 +- 0.01), carbonate (G = 1.31 +- 0.08), and peroxides (G = 2.84 +- 0.04). The HTA and carbonate species are both formed as a result of hydroxyl radical attack and account for approximately 90 per cent of hydroxyl radical reactions. Oxygen needs to be present for efficient conversion of the terephthalate-OH radical adduct to HTA and oxygenation increases G(HTA) above the aerated solution value. G(HTA) is unaffected by changes in terephthalate concentration between 1 x 10 -4 M and 1 x 10 -2 M in sodium hydroxide solutions at pH 10. Decreasing the solution pH does however affect G(HTA). In phosphate buffered solutions pH 6.85, G(HTA) is 0.93 +- 0.01 and lower values are obtained with further decrease in solution pH. The lowering of the G(HTA) value is attributed to recombination reactions between the terephthalate-OH radical products and reducing radical products. Experimental evidence supporting the recombination postulate was obtained from the measurement of a parallel decrease in the peroxide yield and the observation of a dose rate effect on G(HTA). Competition kinetic studies with the added solutes carbonate and bicarbonate gave the rate ratios k (OH + TA 2- ) : k(OH + CO 3 2- ) : k(OH + HCO 3 - ) = 1 : 0.105 : 0.0036

  16. Scalable Computational Chemistry: New Developments and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeev, Yuri [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The computational part of the thesis is the investigation of titanium chloride (II) as a potential catalyst for the bis-silylation reaction of ethylene with hexaclorodisilane at different levels of theory. Bis-silylation is an important reaction for producing bis(silyl) compounds and new C-Si bonds, which can serve as monomers for silicon containing polymers and silicon carbides. Ab initio calculations on the steps involved in a proposed mechanism are presented. This choice of reactants allows them to study this reaction at reliable levels of theory without compromising accuracy. The calculations indicate that this is a highly exothermic barrierless reaction. The TiCl2 catalyst removes a 50 kcal/mol activation energy barrier required for the reaction without the catalyst. The first step is interaction of TiCl2 with ethylene to form an intermediate that is 60 kcal/mol below the energy of the reactants. This is the driving force for the entire reaction. Dynamic correlation plays a significant role because RHF calculations indicate that the net barrier for the catalyzed reaction is 50 kcal/mol. They conclude that divalent Ti has the potential to become an important industrial catalyst for silylation reactions. In the programming part of the thesis, parallelization of different quantum chemistry methods is presented. The parallelization of code is becoming important aspects of quantum chemistry code development. Two trends contribute to it: the overall desire to study large chemical systems and the desire to employ highly correlated methods which are usually computationally and memory expensive. In the presented distributed data algorithms computation is parallelized and the largest arrays are evenly distributed among CPUs. First, the parallelization of the Hartree-Fock self-consistent field (SCF) method is considered. SCF method is the most common starting point for more accurate calculations. The Fock build (sub step of SCF) from AO integrals is

  17. Multibeam radiation therapy treatment application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manens, J.P.; Le Gall, G.; Chenal, C.; Ben Hassel, M.; Fresne, F.; Barillot, C.; Gibaud, B.; Lemoine, D.; Bouliou, A.; Scarabin, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    A software package has been developed for multibeam radiation therapy treatment application. We present in this study a computer-assisted dosimetric planning procedure which includes: i), an analytical stage for setting up the large volume via 2D and 3D displays; ii), a planning stage for issue of a treatment strategy including dosimetric simulations; and iii), a treatment stage to drive the target volume to the radiation unit isocenter. The combined use of stereotactic methods and multimodality imagery ensures spatial coherence and makes target definition and cognition of structure environment more accurate. The dosimetric planning suited to the spatial reference (the stereotactic frame) guarantees optimal distribution of the dose, computed by the original 3D volumetric algorithm. A computer-driven chair-framework cluster was designed to position the target volume at the radiation unit isocenter [fr

  18. Nuclear radiation application to nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakarvarti, S.K.

    2012-01-01

    Out of the numerous uses and applications of nuclear radiation, in particular heavy ions, the interaction of radiation with materials have culminated into a gamut of fine tools and technologies for taming the synergetic potential of the interaction. One such field of the immense importance is nanotechnology through nuclear radiation via use of ion-crafted polymeric membranes- so called 'Template Synthesis'. This talk will be addressed to the users of membranes - organic (polymeric) in general, formed through irradiation of polymeric foils with heavy and energetic ions followed by chemical processing leading finally to what is known as 'Track Etch Membranes (TEMs)', and present the review of the innovative uses of these membranes from filtration to electro-kinetic based applications and nano-/micro fabrication of devices- the potent aspect of emerging technologies. The emphasis would be on the dependence of useful and novel usages including applications in nano devices' fabrication. A membrane, with its most comprehensive and clear definition, is an intervening phase separating two phases and/or acting as an active or passive barrier to the transport of matter between phases. The very existence of a membrane relies upon the functionality domain of the pores contained therein. The geometrical traits and morphology of the pore ensembles dictate the applications, which any membrane can serve to. There are variety of membranes being developed and used in myriad of applications in diverse fields of science and technology. The range of commercially available membrane materials is quiet diverse and varies widely in terms of composition, and physical structure. The creation of pores, whether through natural self-assembling phenomenon or man-made processes, might itself be an issue of interest but these are the pore-traits which are fundamentally more important, whether the membrane is being used for sieving-one of the ever most important applications the mankind has been

  19. Report on the actual state of the basic, applied research and industrial applications of the radiation in Mexico; Informe sobre el estado actual de la investigacion basica, aplicada y aplicaciones industriales de la radiacion en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez V, H

    1991-07-15

    In this report the main works of basic, applied research and industrial applications that are carried out in Mexico, about radiations (radiation chemistry, technology, applications, use and isotope production, etc.): infrastructure, radiation sources, groups and research programs are presented. (Author)

  20. Applications of Azide-Based Bioorthogonal Click Chemistry in Glycobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu Zhang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Click chemistry is a powerful chemical reaction with excellent bioorthogonality features: biocompatible, rapid and highly specific in biological environments. For glycobiology, bioorthogonal click chemistry has created a new method for glycan non-invasive imaging in living systems, selective metabolic engineering, and offered an elite chemical handle for biological manipulation and glycomics studies. Especially the [3 + 2] dipolar cycloadditions of azides with strained alkynes and the Staudinger ligation of azides and triarylphosphines have been widely used among the extant click reactions. This review focuses on the azide-based bioorthogonal click chemistry, describing the characteristics and development of these reactions, introducing some recent applications in glycobiology research, especially in glycan metabolic engineering, including glycan non-invasive imaging, glycomics studies and viral surface manipulation for drug discovery as well as other applications like activity-based protein profiling and carbohydrate microarrays.

  1. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The irradiation of biological systems leads to the formation of radiolytic species such as H(raised dot), (raised dot)OH, H2, H2O2, e(sup -)(sub aq), etc.[1]. These species react with neighboring molecules, which result in damage in biological molecules such as DNA. Radiation chemistry is there for every important to understand the radiobiological consequences of radiation[2]. In this work, we discuss an approach based on the exact Green Functions for diffusion-influenced reactions which may be used to simulate radiation chemistry and eventually extended to study more complex systems, including DNA.

  2. Hydrogel-Tissue Chemistry: Principles and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradinaru, Viviana; Treweek, Jennifer; Overton, Kristin; Deisseroth, Karl

    2018-05-20

    Over the past five years, a rapidly developing experimental approach has enabled high-resolution and high-content information retrieval from intact multicellular animal (metazoan) systems. New chemical and physical forms are created in the hydrogel-tissue chemistry process, and the retention and retrieval of crucial phenotypic information regarding constituent cells and molecules (and their joint interrelationships) are thereby enabled. For example, rich data sets defining both single-cell-resolution gene expression and single-cell-resolution activity during behavior can now be collected while still preserving information on three-dimensional positioning and/or brain-wide wiring of those very same neurons-even within vertebrate brains. This new approach and its variants, as applied to neuroscience, are beginning to illuminate the fundamental cellular and chemical representations of sensation, cognition, and action. More generally, reimagining metazoans as metareactants-or positionally defined three-dimensional graphs of constituent chemicals made available for ongoing functionalization, transformation, and readout-is stimulating innovation across biology and medicine.

  3. Environmental application of radiation grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamada, Masao

    2007-01-01

    Adsorbent having high selectivity against a certain metal ion was synthesized by means of radiation-induced graft polymerization for the purpose of environmental application. The resulting adsorbents were utilized for the removal of toxic metal from scallop waste and the collection of uranium from seawater. As a novel application of grafting, the biodegradability of poly-hydroxybutylate was controlled by grafting. The biodegradability could be depressed by the graft chain and then recovered by external stimuli such as thermal and chemical treatments. (author)

  4. Recent development and application of radioanalytical chemistry in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Khun guj.

    1996-01-01

    A brief description of the recent investigations and different applications of the methods of radioanalytical chemistry in China is given in the paper. The various important aspects (activation analysis, determination of actinide elements, analysis of nuclear reaction products and environmental samples) have been emphasized. 40 refs

  5. Applications of quality assurance in an educational chemistry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The implementation of a quality assurance system in a Chemistry laboratory reduces shortcomings associated with student failure, which includes unpreparedness, mismanagement of time, lack of practical work techniques, improper data processing and presentation. This can be instituted, in part, by the application of ...

  6. SATLC applications as examples for systemic chemistry education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is also used as a vehicle to engage the students in a deep learning that focuses on relating ideas and making connection between new and prior knowledge. As applications of SATLC I present here systemic chemistry related units experimented in Egyptian secondary schools and universities with examples on systemic ...

  7. Application and Utilization of Electrochemistry in Organic Chemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátil, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 17 (2011), s. 2921-2922 ISSN 1385-2728 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : electrochemistry * organic chemistry * applications Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.064, year: 2011

  8. Radiation chemistry of salt-mine brines and hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenks, G.H.; Walton, J.R.; Bronstein, H.R.; Baes, C.F. Jr.

    1981-07-01

    Certain aspects of the radiation chemistry of NaCl-saturated MgCl 2 solutions and MgCl 2 hydrates at temperatures in the range of 30 to 180 0 C were investigated through experiments. A principal objective was to establish the values for the yields of H 2 [G(H 2 )] and accompanying oxidants in the gamma-ray radiolysis of concentrated brines that might occur in waste repositories in salt. We concluded that G(H 2 ) from gamma-irradiated brine solution into a simultaneously irradiated, deaerated atmosphere above the solution is between 0.48 and 0.49 over most of the range 30 to 143 0 C. The yield is probably somewhat lower at the lower end of this range, averaging 0.44 at 30 to 45 0 C. Changes in the relative amounts of MgCl 2 and NaCl in the NaCl-saturated solutions have negligible effects on the yield. The yield of O 2 into the same atmosphere averages 0.13, independent of the temperature and brine composition, showing that only about 50% of the radiolytic oxidant that was formed along with the H 2 was present as O 2 . We did not identify the species that compose the remainder of the oxidant. We concluded that the yield of H 2 from a gamma-irradiated brine solution into a simultaneously irradiated atmosphere containing 5 to 8% air in He may be greater than the yield in deaerated systems by amounts ranging from 0% for temperatures of 73 to 85 0 C, to about 30 and 40% for temperatures in the ranges 100 to 143 0 C and 30 to 45 0 C, respectively. We did not establish the mechanism whereby the air affected the yields of H 2 and O 2 . The values found in this work for G(H 2 ) in deaerated systems are in approximate agreement with the value of 0.44 for the gamma-irradiation yield of H 2 in pure H 2 O at room temperature. They are also in agreement with the values predicted by extrapolation from the findings of previous researchers for the value for G(H 2 ) in 2 M NaCl solutions at room temperature

  9. Polymers and electromagnetic radiation fundamentals and practical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Schnabel, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    This first book to cover the interaction of polymers with radiation from the entire electromagnetic spectrum adopts a multidisciplinary approach to bridge polymer chemistry and physics, photochemistry, photophysics and materials science. The text is equally unique in its scope, devoting equal amounts of attention to the three aspects of synthesis, characterization, and applications. The first part deals with the interaction of polymers with non-ionizing radiation in the frequency-range from sub-terahertz via infrared radiation to visible and ultraviolet light, while the second covers interaction with ionizing radiation from the extreme ultraviolet to X-ray photons. The result is a systematic overview of how both types of radiation can be used for different polymerization approaches, spectroscopy methods and lithography techniques. Authored by a world-renowned researcher and teacher with over 40 years of experience in the field, this is a highly practical and authoritative guide.

  10. Defect Chemistry of Oxides for Energy Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweke, Danielle; Mordehovitz, Yuval; Halabi, Mahdi; Shelly, Lee; Hayun, Shmuel

    2018-05-31

    Oxides are widely used for energy applications, as solid electrolytes in various solid oxide fuel cell devices or as catalysts (often associated with noble metal particles) for numerous reactions involving oxidation or reduction. Defects are the major factors governing the efficiency of a given oxide for the above applications. In this paper, the common defects in oxide systems and external factors influencing the defect concentration and distribution are presented, with special emphasis on ceria (CeO 2 ) based materials. It is shown that the behavior of a variety of oxide systems with respect to properties relevant for energy applications (conductivity and catalytic activity) can be rationalized by general considerations about the type and concentration of defects in the specific system. A new method based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM), recently reported by the authors for mapping space charge defects and measuring space charge potentials, is shown to be of potential importance for understanding conductivity mechanisms in oxides. The influence of defects on gas-surface reactions is exemplified on the interaction of CO 2 and H 2 O with ceria, by correlating between the defect distribution in the material and its adsorption capacity or splitting efficiency. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Stochasticity in processes fundamentals and applications to chemistry and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Schuster, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This book has developed over the past fifteen years from a modern course on stochastic chemical kinetics for graduate students in physics, chemistry and biology. The first part presents a systematic collection of the mathematical background material needed to understand probability, statistics, and stochastic processes as a prerequisite for the increasingly challenging practical applications in chemistry and the life sciences examined in the second part. Recent advances in the development of new techniques and in the resolution of conventional experiments at nano-scales have been tremendous: today molecular spectroscopy can provide insights into processes down to scales at which current theories at the interface of physics, chemistry and the life sciences cannot be successful without a firm grasp of randomness and its sources. Routinely measured data is now sufficiently accurate to allow the direct recording of fluctuations. As a result, the sampling of data and the modeling of relevant processes are doomed t...

  12. Computer applications in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, P.R.; Moores, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    Computer applications in general and diagnostic radiology in particular are becoming more widespread. Their application to the field of radiation protection in medical imaging, including quality control initiatives, is similarly becoming more widespread. Advances in computer technology have enabled departments of diagnostic radiology to have access to powerful yet affordable personal computers. The application of databases, expert systems and computer-based learning is under way. The executive information systems for the management of dose and QA data that are under way at IRS are discussed. An important consideration in developing these pragmatic software tools has been the range of computer literacy within the end user group. Using interfaces have been specifically designed to reflect the requirements of many end users who will have little or no computer knowledge. (Author)

  13. Photoreconfigurable polymers for biomedical applications: chemistry and macromolecular engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Congcong; Ninh, Chi; Bettinger, Christopher J

    2014-10-13

    Stimuli-responsive polymers play an important role in many biomedical technologies. Light responsive polymers are particularly desirable because the parameters of irradiated light and diverse photoactive chemistries produce a large number of combinations between functional materials and associated stimuli. This Review summarizes recent advances in utilizing photoactive chemistries in macromolecules for prospective use in biomedical applications. Special focus is granted to selection criterion when choosing photofunctional groups. Synthetic strategies to incorporate these functionalities into polymers and networks with different topologies are also highlighted herein. Prospective applications of these materials are discussed including programmable matrices for controlled release, dynamic scaffolds for tissue engineering, and functional coatings for medical devices. The article concludes by summarizing the state of the art in photoresponsive polymers for biomedical applications including current challenges and future opportunities.

  14. Chemistry of cements for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, P.; Glasser, F.P.

    1992-01-01

    In recent times the nuclear industry has thrown up challenges which cannot be met by the application of conventional civil and materials engineering knowledge. The contributions in this volume investigate all aspects of cement performance. The scope of the papers demonstrates the current balance of activities which have as their objective the elucidation of kinetics and immobilization, determining material interactions and of assessing future performance. The papers reflect the varied goals of the sponsors who include national governments, the Commission of the European Communities and the nuclear industries. In six parts attention is paid to the durability of cement and concrete in repository environment; interactions between cement, waste components and ground water; properties and performance of cement materials; leach behavior and mechanisms, diffusional properties of cement and concrete, including porosity-permeability relationships; and thermodynamics of cementitious systems and modelling of cement performance

  15. Application of online chemistry monitoring programs and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, D.; Choi, S.; Haas, C.

    2010-01-01

    To fully understand the impact of chemistry changes, several plant parameters must be considered and reviewed with actual chemistry analyses and compared to plant operating parameters. In some cases, this requires the ability to rapidly correlate plant operational data with laboratory and chemistry data. An effective online monitoring system should be able to: Integrate and extract online data from the plant laboratory and operating information from various plant data sources continuously; Interrogate and extract laboratory data from manually entered data on predefined frequencies; Interact with multiple laboratories in multiple locations; Evaluate data against plant limits (calculated or static) and provide personnel with action level or notification of plant exceeding limits; and, Provide the ability to evaluate against a standard and site specific set of calculations. The nuclear power industry continues to refine and apply new technologies in an effort to notify operators of changes in chemical conditions, calculate complex high temperature results, and monitor system performance. EPRI developed software specifically focused on plant chemistry program optimization using power operation and shutdown data applied with plant equipment. This software evolved into the family of software referred to as EPRI ChemWorks™ applications. As technology changed and improved, the application of online monitoring was essential for plant personnel working offsite. These changes in technology prompted EPRI to the development of SMART ChemWorks™ using the EPRI ChemWorks™ plant chemistry simulator and MULTEQ applications as the backbone for these simulations and calculations. SMART ChemWorks™ is an online monitoring system that queries plant databases and continuously monitors plant and chemistry parameters. The system uses a real-time intelligence engine to perform virtual sensing, identify normal and off-normal conditions and compare in-line instrument output to grab

  16. Radiation biology using synchrotron radiation. In relation to radiation chemistry as an initial process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Katsumi

    1995-01-01

    Radiation biology using synchrotron radiation have been investigated, focusing on the mechanism of the formation of molecular damage. This paper introduces recent outcome of these studies. First, the process from imparted energy to the formation of molecular damage is outlined. The previous studies can be largely categorized as dealing with (1) biological effects of inner-shell ionization on elements composing the living body and (2) X-ray energy dependence of biological effects. Bromine and phosphorus are used as elements for the study of inner-cell ionization. In the study on lethal effects of monochromatic soft X-rays on the BrdUMP-incorporated yeast cells, Auger enhancement was found to occur. The first report on the effects of K-shell absorption of cellular phosphorus atoms has revealed that biological effects on cellular lethality and genetic changes was enhanced by 40%. Plasmid DNA and oligonucleotide have been used to study biological effects of vacuum ultraviolet rays to monochromatic soft X-ray, which makes it possible to study strand breaks. Because experimental production of energy required for the formation of double strand breaks has become possible, synchrotron radiation plays a very important role in radiation biological studies. Finally, future issues are presented. (N.K.)

  17. Primary water chemistry improvement for radiation exposure reduction at Japanese PWR Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishizawa, Eiichi [Omiya Technical Institute, Saitama-ken (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    Radiation exposure during the refueling outages at Japanese Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Plants has been gradually decreased through continuous efforts keeping the radiation dose rates at relatively low level. The improvement of primary water chemistry in respect to reduction of the radiation sources appears as one of the most important contributions to the achieved results and can be classified by the plant operation conditions as follows

  18. Water Chemistry Control in Reducing Corrosion and Radiation Exposure at PWR Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Febrianto

    2006-01-01

    Water chemistry control plays an important role in relation to plant availability, reliability and occupational radiation exposures. Radiation exposures of nuclear plant workers are determined by the radiation rate dose and by the amount maintenance and repair work time Water chemistry has always been, from beginning of operation of power Pressurized Water Reactor, an important factor in determining the integrity of reactor components, fuel cladding integrity and minimize out of core radiation exposures. For primary system, the parameters to control the quality of water chemistry have been subject to change in time. Reactor water coolant pH need to be optimally controlled and be operated in range pH 6.9 to 7.4. At pH lower than 6.9, cause increasing the radiation exposure level and increasing coolant water pH higher than 7.4 will decrease radiation exposure level but increasing risk to fuel cladding and steam generator tube. Since beginning 90 decade, PWR water coolant pH tend to be operated at pH 7.4. This paper will discuss concerning water chemistry development in reducing corrosion and radiation exposure dose in PWR reactor. (author)

  19. Application of ionizing radiation processing in biomedical engineering and microelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hongfej, H.; Jilan, W.

    1988-01-01

    The applied radiation chemistry has made great contributions to the development of polymeric industrial materials by the characteristics reaction means such as crosslinking, graft copolymerization and low-temperature or solid-phase polymerization, and become a important field on peaceful use of atomic energy. A brief review on the applications of ionizing radiation processing in biomedical engineering and microelectronics is presented. The examples of this technique were the studies on biocompatible and biofunctional polymers for medical use and on resists of lithography in microelectronics

  20. Applications of ionizing radiation processing in biomedical engineering and microelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha Hongfei; Wu Jilan

    1987-01-01

    The applied radiation chemistry has made great contributions to the development of polymeric industrial materials by the characteristic reaction means such as corsslinking, graft copolymerization and low-temperature or solid-phase polymerization, and become an important field on peaceful use of atomic energy. A brief review on the applications of ionizing radiation processing in biomedical engineering and microelectronics is presented. The examples of this techique were the studies on biocompatible and biofunctional polymers for medical use and on resists of lithography in microelectronics. (author)

  1. Calibration services for medical applications of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWerd, L.A.

    1993-12-31

    Calibration services for the medical community applications of radiation involve measuring radiation precisely and having traceability to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Radiation therapy applications involve the use of ionization chambers and electrometers for external beams and well-type ionization chamber systems as well as radioactive sources for brachytherapy. Diagnostic x-ray applications involve ionization chamber systems and devices to measure other parameters of the x-ray machine, such as non-invasive kVp meters. Calibration laboratories have been established to provide radiation calibration services while maintaining traceability to NIST. New radiation applications of the medical community spur investigation to provide the future calibration needs.

  2. Calibration services for medical applications of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWerd, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    Calibration services for the medical community applications of radiation involve measuring radiation precisely and having traceability to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Radiation therapy applications involve the use of ionization chambers and electrometers for external beams and well-type ionization chamber systems as well as radioactive sources for brachytherapy. Diagnostic x-ray applications involve ionization chamber systems and devices to measure other parameters of the x-ray machine, such as non-invasive kVp meters. Calibration laboratories have been established to provide radiation calibration services while maintaining traceability to NIST. New radiation applications of the medical community spur investigation to provide the future calibration needs

  3. Studies on application of radiation and radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Rok; Lee, Ji Bok; Lee, Yeong Iil; Jin, Joon Ha; Beon, Myeong Uh; Park, Kyeong Bae; Han, Heon Soo; Jeong, Yong Sam; Uh, Jong Seop; Kang, Kyeong Cheol; Cho, Han Ok; Song, Hui Seop; Yoon, Byeong Mok; Jeon, Byeong Jin; Park, Hong Sik; Kim, Jae Seong; Jeong, Un Soo; Baek, Sam Tae; Cho, Seong Won; Jeon, Yeong Keon; Kim, Joon Yeon; Kwon, Joong Ho; Kim, Ki Yeop; Yang, Jae Seung; No, Yeong Chang; Lee, Yeong Keun; Shin, Byeong Cheol; Park, Sang Joon; Hong, Kwang Pyo; Cho, Seung Yeon; Kang, Iil Joon; Cho, Seong Ki; Jeong, Yeong Joo; Park, Chun Deuk; Lee, Yeong Koo; Seo, Chun Ha; Han, Kwang Hui; Shin, Hyeon Young; Kim, Jong Kuk; Park, Soon Chul; Shin, In Cheol; Lee, Sang Jae; Lee, Ki Un; Lim, Yong Taek; Park, Eung Uh; Kim, Dong Soo; Jeon, Sang Soo

    1993-05-01

    With the completion of construction of KMRR, the facility and technology of radiation application will be greatly improved. This study was performed as follows; (1) Studies on the production and application of radioisotopes. (2) The development of radiation processing technology. (3) The application of Irradiation techniques for food preservation and process improvement. (4) Studies on the radiation application for the development of genetic resources (5) Development of the radioisotope (RI) production facilities for Korea Multipurpose Research Reactor (KMRR)

  4. Proceedings of the Meeting on Techniques and Applications of Synchrotron Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Several techniques and applications of the synchrotron radiation used in Physics, Biophysics and Chemistry are extensively discussed. The major part of the subjects of the works treat with the possible implantation of a national synchrotron radiation laboratory in Brazil. (L.C.) [pt

  5. 25 years of radiation application at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, P.

    1981-01-01

    A summary is presented of the work carried out at the CEA on the industrial applications of radiations. The following topics are covered: use of spent fuel elements as gamma sources; food conservation; cobalt 60 sources; electron accelerators; sterilization of medical accessories; radiation chemistry; polymerization. (U.K.)

  6. 25 years of radiation application at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, P [CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Dept. de Chimie Appliquee et d' Etudes Analytiques

    1981-01-01

    A summary is presented of the work carried out at the CEA on the industrial applications of radiations. The following topics are covered: use of spent fuel elements as gamma sources; food conservation; cobalt 60 sources; electron accelerators; sterilization of medical accessories; radiation chemistry; polymerization.

  7. Radiation protection in medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacc, R.A.; Rubiolo, J.; Herrero, F.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The goal of this paper is to identify the areas in which radiation protection is actually needed and the relative importance of protection measures. A correlation between the different medical applications of the ionizing radiations and the associated risks, mainly due to ignorance, has been a constant throughout the history of mankind. At the beginning, the accidents were originated in research nuclear laboratories working on the atomic bomb, while the incidents occurred in medical areas because of virtual ignorance of the harmful effects on humans. The 60's were characterized by the oil fever, which produced innumerable accidents due to the practice of industrial radiography; in the 70's the use of radiations on medical applications was intensified, to such and extent that a new type of victim appeared: the patient. Unfortunately, during 80's and 90's the number of accidents in different medical practices has increased, projecting the occurred in Zaragoza (Spain) on 1990 with a linear accelerator for radiotherapy treatments. In some developed countries, foreseeing the probability of producing biological effects as a result of different radiology practices, more strict security rules are adopted to guarantee the application of the three principles of the radioprotection: justification, optimization and limitation of individual dose. In this way, in the U.S.A., the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organization (JCAHO), favors a vigilance politics in the different departments of Radiodiagnostic and Nuclear Medicine to secure an effective management in security, communications and quality control, in which the medical physicists play an important role. One of the requirements for example is to attach the value of entrance exposition dose in the radiological diagnostic report. So, the doses in the different organs are compared with the tabulated doses. Basically, a quality control programme is designed to minimize the risks for patients

  8. Modeling of iodine radiation chemistry in the presence of organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taghipour, Fariborz; Evans, Greg J.

    2002-01-01

    A kinetic-based model was developed that simulates the radiation chemistry of iodine in the presence of organic compounds. The model's mechanistic description of iodine chemistry and generic semi-mechanistic reactions for various classes of organics, provided a reasonable representation of experimental results. The majority of the model and experimental results of iodine volatilization rates were in agreement within an order of magnitude

  9. Applications of synchrotron radiation in Biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bemski, G.

    1983-01-01

    A short introduction to the generation of the synchrotron radiation is made. Following, the applications of such a radiation in biophysics with emphasis to the study of the hemoglobin molecule are presented. (L.C.) [pt

  10. On air-chemistry reduction for hypersonic external flow applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Ashraf; Suman, Sawan; Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The existence of the slow manifold for the air-mixture system is shown. • The QSSA estimate of the slow manifold is fairly accurate. • For mid-temperature range the reduction mechanisms could be useful. - Abstract: In external hypersonic flows, viscous and compressibility effects generate very high temperatures leading to significant chemical reactions among air constituents. Therefore, hypersonic flow computations require coupled calculations of flow and chemistry. Accurate and efficient computations of air-chemistry kinetics are of much importance for many practical applications but calculations accounting for detailed chemical kinetics can be prohibitively expensive. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of applying chemical kinetics reduction schemes for hypersonic air-chemistry. We consider two chemical kinetics sets appropriate for three different temperature ranges: 2500 K to 4500 K; 4500 K to 9000 K; and above 9000 K. By demonstrating the existence of the so-called the slow manifold in each of the chemistry sets, we show that judicious chemical kinetics reduction leading to significant computational savings is possible without much loss in accuracy

  11. Chemistry and physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broerse, J.J.; Barendsen, G.W.; Kal, H.B.; Kogel, A.J. van der

    1983-01-01

    This book contains the extended abstracts of the contributions of the poster workshop sessions on chemistry and physics of the 7th international congress of radiation research. They cover the following main topics: primary processes in radiation physics and chemistry, general chemistry in radiation chemistry, DNA and model systems in radiation chemistry, molecules of biological interest in radiation chemistry, techniques in radiation chemistry, hot atom chemistry. refs.; figs.; tabs

  12. Emanation thermal analysis. Application in solid state chemistry, analytical chemistry and engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balek, V.; Tel'deshi, Yu.

    1986-01-01

    Voluminous material on application of emenation thermal analysis for investigation of solids is systematized. General concepts and historical review of development of the method are given. Methods of introduction of inert gases into solids are considered. Theoretical aspects of inert gas evolution from solids labelled by radioactive gas or its maternal isotope are stated. The methods for measuring inert gases are considered. The possibilities, limitations and perspectives of development of radiometric emanation methods for the solution of various problems of analytical chemistry and thechnology are discussed

  13. Basic radiation chemistry for the ionising energy treatment of food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    Before we can understand the chemistry involved in the irradiation of complex substances such as food we need to have some appreciation of the reactions involved and the products formed when ionising energy interacts with the simple substances such as water and dilute solutions. Reactions involving hydrated electrons, hydrogen atoms and hydroxyl radicals are examined and methods for minimising radiolytic effects in foods are discussed

  14. Spin and time-resolved magnetic resonance in radiation chemistry. Recent developments and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shkrob, I.A.; Trifunac, A.D.

    1997-01-01

    Time-resolved pulsed EPR and ODMR in studies on early events in radiation chemistry are examined. It is concluded that these techniques yield valuable and diverse information about chemical reactions in spurs, despite the fact that the spur reactions occur on a time scale that is much shorter than the time resolution of these methods. Several recent examples include EPR of H/D atoms in vitreous silica and cryogenic liquids and ODMR of doped alkane solids and amorphous semiconductors. It is argued that a wider use of time-resolved magnetic resonance methods would benefit the studies on radiation chemistry of disordered solids, simple liquids, and polymers. (author)

  15. Minimizing core deposits radiation fields in PWRs by coordinated Li/B chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesmer, J.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of coolant chemistry on the buildup and composition of core deposits and on out-of-core radiation fields was investigated in the Beaver Valley and Trojan plants. Coordinated Li/B coolant chemistry led to an appreciable reduction of the surface concentration of core deposits, decreased greatly the formation of crud films on fresh fuel, and resulted in a reduction in the rate and level of radiation field buildup in the out-of-core regions of the primary circuits. (author)

  16. 9. International symposium on nuclear chemistry, radiochemistry and radiation chemistry. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The report presents the abstracts of 30 contributions covering mainly photochemical reactions, irradiation of organic chemicals, gamma-radiation in wastewater treatment, PIXE analysis, and some aspects of nuclear spectroscopic instrumentation in radiochemical analysis

  17. Several interfaces between radiation physics and chemistry that could pleasure each other more

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    This paper offers an overview of currently active areas in Radiation Chemistry that may be pertinent to what Radiation Physicists can calculate. It begins with an overlapping topic, the nonhomogeneous kinetics of reactions in spurs followed by electron thermalization distances and thermal electron mobilities in fluids, electron scattering in gases, and finally, a possible new approach to calculating the energies and shapes of the optical absorption bands of solvated electrons. 18 figures, 2 tables

  18. Modern state of radiation chemistry of inorganic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, Yu.A.; Nevostruev, V.A.; Ryabykh, S.M.; Safonov, Yu.N.

    1985-01-01

    Regularities of radiolysis of different metal salts and inorganic acid complex anions are considered taking account of the nature of electron states and radiation transformations in them. By chemical processes during irradiation the solid salts considered are divided into 2 groups: salts in which the processes stimulated by radiation lead to chemical transformations in anion and cation subsystems, their valency changed, (1st group); salts in which radiation-chemical transformations influence anion sublattice and cation valency is without any change (2nd group). It is shown that the main part of secondary chemical transformations is realized from low-energy excited electron states. For first group salts these states are of cation nature, at this secondary reactions are determined by ionization processes. For second group salts low-energy electron terms are mostly of anion nature. Classification of inorganic salts by the character of transformations in anion sublattices is marked to be developed

  19. Photo and radiation chemistry of polymeric systems and nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhaylov, A.I.

    2004-01-01

    New approaches of analytical ESR-spectroscopy to studying of free-radical and electron-transport processes at radiation-chemical and photochemical modification both fictionalization of polymeric systems and nanomaterials were surveyed. Measuring techniques using of ESR-spectroscopy of paramagnetic centers were fulfilled. The radiation-chemical processes of modification, microencapsulation and kinetic stabilization of thermodynamically incompatible systems and interfaces for nanomaterials including fullerenes, nanotubes, nanofibres, etc. and composites on the basis of synthetic and natural polymers including plant fibers, fluoropolymers, polyolefins, etc. were developed

  20. Effects of shutdown chemistry on steam generator radiation levels at Point Beach Unit 2. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kormuth, J.W.

    1982-05-01

    A refueling shutdown chemistry test was conducted at a PWR, Point Beach Unit 2. The objective was to yield reactor coolant chemistry data during the cooldown/shutdown process which might establish a relationship between shutdown chemistry and its effects on steam generator radiation fields. Of particular concern were the effects of the presence of hydrogen in the coolant as contrasted to an oxygenated coolant. Analysis of reactor coolant samples showed a rapid soluble release (spike) in Co-58, Co-60, and nickel caused by oxygenation of the coolant. The measurement of radioisotope specific activities indicates that the material undergoing dissolution during the shutdown originated from different sources which had varying histories of activation. The test program developed no data which would support theories that oxygenation of the coolant while the steam generators are full of water contributes to increased steam generator radiation levels

  1. Regulation for radiation protection in applications of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonawane, Avinash U.

    2016-01-01

    Applications of ionising radiation in multifarious field are increasing in the country for the societal benefits. The national regulatory body ensures safety and security of radiation sources by enforcing provisions in the national law and other relevant rules issued under the principle law. In addition, the enforcement of detailed requirements contained in practice specific safety codes and standard and issuance of safety directives brings effectiveness in ensuring safe handling and secure management of radiation sources. The regulatory requirements for control over radiation sources throughout their life-cycle have evolved over the years from experience gained. Nevertheless, some of the regulatory activities which require special attention have been identified such as the development of regulation to deal with advance emerging radiation technology in applications of radiation in medicine and industry; sustaining continuity in ensuring human resource development programme; inspections of category 3 and 4 disused sources and their safe disposal; measures for controlling transboundary movement of radiation sources. The regulatory measures have been contemplated and are being enforced to deal with the above issues in an effective manner. The complete involvement of the management of radiation facilities, radiation workers and their commitment in establishing and maintaining safety and security culture is essential to handle the radiation sources safely and efficiently at all times

  2. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiolytic species are formed approximately 1 ps after the passage of ionizing radiation through matter. After their formation, they diffuse and chemically react with other radiolytic species and neighboring biological molecules, leading to various oxidative damage. Therefore, the simulation of radiation chemistry is of considerable importance to understand how radiolytic species damage biological molecules [1]. The step-by-step simulation of chemical reactions is difficult, because the radiolytic species are distributed non-homogeneously in the medium. Consequently, computational approaches based on Green functions for diffusion-influenced reactions should be used [2]. Recently, Green functions for more complex type of reactions have been published [3-4]. We have developed exact random variate generators of these Green functions [5], which will allow us to use them in radiation chemistry codes. Moreover, simulating chemistry using the Green functions is which is computationally very demanding, because the probabilities of reactions between each pair of particles should be evaluated at each timestep [2]. This kind of problem is well adapted for General Purpose Graphic Processing Units (GPGPU), which can handle a large number of similar calculations simultaneously. These new developments will allow us to include more complex reactions in chemistry codes, and to improve the calculation time. This code should be of importance to link radiation track structure simulations and DNA damage models.

  3. Role of the H bond network in the radiation chemistry of hydrated systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pommeret, S.; Renault, J.P.; Caeer, S.Le; Vigneron, G.; Vuilleumier, R.; Bratos, S.; Leicknam, J.Cl.

    2006-01-01

    In the present contribution a review of the recent work on the H bond dynamics, in absence of any reactant and a new theory that unambiguously establishes a new link between spectroscopic observation and geometric properties is presented, along with results on the radiation chemistry of nanoporous media and its influence on the H bond network of an interface

  4. Production of metals and compounds by radiation chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsik, S. J.; Philipp, W. H.

    1969-01-01

    Preparation of metals and compounds by radiation induced chemical reactions involves irradiation of metal salt solutions with high energy electrons. This technique offers a method for the preparation of high purity metals with minimum contamination from the container material or the cover gas.

  5. The story of the radiation chemistry of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, A.O.

    1989-01-01

    This chapter is an account of the author's involvement in the atomic bomb project at the University of Chicago in 1942. He was assigned to study the effects of radiation on water with reference to its use for cooling a plutonium producing reactor. (UK)

  6. Radiation chemistry and origins of life on earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorski, Z. P.

    2001-01-01

    The role of radiation chemical processes in prebiotic time of earth history and their influence on arise of organic life on Earth has been discussed. The formation of chiral compounds in prebiotic s oup' and its further evolution for creation of bioorganic molecules was also presented and discussed as an alternative of existing hypothesis of cosmic origin of biologic life in the Earth

  7. Application of inorganic mass spectrometry to problems in atmospheric chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The measurement of isotopes by thermal ionization mass spectrometry is a highly sensitive and accurate technique which can be used to determine the concentration of specific nuclides as well as the isotopic composition in environmental samples. The first application uses isotope dilution which makes possible the determination of all elements with two or more stable isotopes in all types of matrices. The second application is a very powerful and useful application in atmospheric chemistry because it permits the use of stable isotopes as definitive intentional tracers of emissions from high temperature combustion sources. The use of stable isotopes of S, Nd, Sm, and U in the study of visibility, deposition, and definitive tracing of emissions will be presented

  8. Enhancing prospective chemistry teachers cognitive structures in the topics of bonding and hybridization by internet-assisted chemistry applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özge Özyalçın Oskay, Sinem Dinçol

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of internet-assisted chemistry applications on prospective chemistry teachers’ cognitive structures in the topics of bonding and hybridization. The sample of the study consisted of 36 prospective chemistry teachers attending Hacettepe University, Faculty of Education, the Department of Chemistry Education in 2010-2011 academic year and taking Basic Chemistry I lesson. In the study, students were separated into experimental and control groups according to their pre-cognitive structures. Students were requested to answer two open ended questions. Answers by each student were gathered and evaluated by flow map method. “Bonding and hybridization” topics were taught to control group with traditional teaching method and to experimental group besides traditional method internet-assisted applications were conducted. The same open-ended questions were given to both groups and their cognitive structures were examined once more. The differences between control and experimental groups’ cognitive structures were examined. A significant difference was identified in favour of experimental group (p<0, 05. The mean score of the Experimental group was X=19.94, and the mean score of the Control group was X=13.88. In addition, subsequent to internet assisted chemistry applications differences in terms of concepts and descriptions in prospective chemistry teachers’ in experimental and control group cognitive structure have been determined. When post flow maps of prospective chemistry teachers in experimental group, on whom internet assisted chemistry applications were made, are formed, it has been determined that there are more statements about hybridization, hybridization types, molecule geometry and bond angles compared to control grou

  9. Medical applications with synchrotron radiation in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, T.; Itai, Y. [Univ. of Tsukuba, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba (Japan); Hyodo, K.; Ando, M. [KEK, Tsukuba (Japan); Akatsuka, T. [Yamagata Univ., Faculty of Engineering, Yamagata (Japan); Uyama, C. [National Cardiovascular Centre, Suita (Japan)

    1998-05-01

    In Japan, various medical applications of synchrotron X-ray imaging, such as angiography, monochromatic X-ray computed tomography (CT), radiography and radiation therapy, are being developed. In particular, coronary arteriography (CAG) is quite an important clinical application of synchrotron radiation. Using a two-dimensional imaging method, the first human intravenous CAG was carried out at KEK in May 1996; however, further improvements of image quality are required in clinical practice. On the other hand, two-dimensional aortographic CAG revealed canine coronary arteries as clearly as those on selective CAG, and coronary arteries less than 0.2 mm in diameter. Among applications of synchrotron radiation to X-ray CT, phase-contrast X-ray CT and fluorescent X-ray CT are expected to be very interesting future applications of synchrotron radiation. For actual clinical applications of synchrotron radiation, a medical beamline and a laboratory are now being constructed at SPring-8 in Harima. 55 refs.

  10. The hidden radiation chemistry in plasma modification and XPS analysis of polymer surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, G.A.; Le, T.T.; Elms, F.M.; Wood, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The surface modification of polymers using plasma treatments is being widely researched to achieve changes in the surface energetics and consequent wetting and reactivity for a range of applications. These include i) adhesion for polymer bonding and composite material fabrication and ii) biocompatibility of polymers when used as orthopedic implants, catheters and prosthetics. A low pressure rf plasma produces a variety of species from the introduced gas which may react with the surface of a hydrocarbon polymer, such as polyethylene. In the case of 0 2 and H 2 0, these species include oxygen atoms, singlet molecular oxygen and hydroxyl radicals, all of which may oxidise and, depending on their energy, ablate the polymer surface. In order to better understand the reactive species formed both in and downstream from a plasma and the relative contributions of oxidation and ablation, self-assembled monolayers of n-alkane thiols on gold are being used as well characterised substrates for quantitative X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The identification and quantification of oxidised carbon species on plasma treated polymers from broad, asymmetric XPS signals is difficult, so derivatisation is often used to enhance sensitivity and specificity. For example, trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFAA) selectively labels hydroxyl functionality. The surface analysis of a modified polymer surface may be confounded by high energy radiation chemistry which may occur during XPS analysis. Examples include scission of carbon-halogen bonds (as in TFM adducts), decarboxylation and main-chain polyene formation. The extent of free-radical chemistry occurring in polyethylene while undergoing XPS analysis may be seen by both ESR and FT-IR analysis

  11. Solid state radiation chemistry of the DNA backbone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard, W.A.

    1989-09-01

    The long term goal of this program is to determine the fundamental rules needed to predict the type and yield of damage produced in DNA due to direct effects of ionizing radiation. The focus is on damage to the sugar-phosphate backbone, damage that would lead to strand breaks. Model systems have been chosen that permit various aspects of this problem to be investigated. The emphasis will be on single crystals of monosaccharides, nucleosides, and nucleotides but will also include some powder work on polynucleotides. In these model systems, free radical products and reactions are observed by electron spin resonance (ESR) and electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) techniques. The information thus gained is used in constructing rules that predict what primary free radicals are formed in single crystals of model compounds and the reactions stemming from the primary radicals. The formulation of a set of rules that work in model systems will represent a major advance toward formulating a set of rules that predict the direct damage in DNA itself. In a broader context this program is part of the effort to understand and predict the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation received at low dose rates over long periods of time. Assessment of low dose effects requires a basic understanding of the action of radiation at the molecular level. By contributing to that basic understanding, this program will help solve the problems of risk assessment under low dose conditions. 5 refs., 3 figs

  12. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, (No. 26)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The annual research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during the fiscal year of 1992 (April 1, 1992 - March 31, 1993) are described. The research activities were conducted under the two research programs: the study on laser-induced organic chemical reactions and the study on basic radiation technology for functional materials. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: laser-induced organic synthesis, modification of polymer surface by laser irradiation, radiation-induced polymerization, preparation of fine particles by gamma ray irradiation, and electron beam dosimetry. The operation report of the irradiation facilities is also included. (author)

  13. The present status of iodine chemistry research in Canada and its application to reactor safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, K R [Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Toronto (Canada); Kupferschmid, W C.H.; Wren, J C; Ball, J M [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1996-12-01

    The current need to understand iodine chemistry in a reactor safety context has become more sharply focussed as the level of that understanding has advanced. At the same time, the situations of most concern within containment, from an iodine perspective, are also being redefined in the light of that understanding. The present paper summarises these developments. Over the past five years, considerable advances have occurred in our understanding of iodine chemistry under conditions of interest in reactor accidents. A number of key experiments have yielded important results in the areas of solution chemistry, the role of surfaces, the importance of organics and the effects of impurities. This understanding supplements the already substantial gains made in characterising the key roles of pH and the effects of radiation. All these factors underline the now evident fact that the kinetics of iodine are the controlling factor when radiation is involved, and that a number of reactive species, not present in thermal reactions, effectively control the observed volatility of iodine. In this paper, recent advances are summarised and the present status of our understanding of iodine chemistry is reviewed. Specifically, an attempt is made to identify those areas where our understanding appears to be relatively complete, and to flag the remaining critical areas where our attention is currently focussed. The state of our modelling capability is reviewed, as is the significance or related areas such as the role of mass transfer. Finally, an overview is presented of the significance of this work for reactor safety, and our expectations for its application over the near term future. (author) 2 figs., 12 refs.

  14. The present status of iodine chemistry research in Canada and its application to reactor safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, K.R.; Kupferschmid, W.C.H.; Wren, J.C.; Ball, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The current need to understand iodine chemistry in a reactor safety context has become more sharply focussed as the level of that understanding has advanced. At the same time, the situations of most concern within containment, from an iodine perspective, are also being redefined in the light of that understanding. The present paper summarises these developments. Over the past five years, considerable advances have occurred in our understanding of iodine chemistry under conditions of interest in reactor accidents. A number of key experiments have yielded important results in the areas of solution chemistry, the role of surfaces, the importance of organics and the effects of impurities. This understanding supplements the already substantial gains made in characterising the key roles of pH and the effects of radiation. All these factors underline the now evident fact that the kinetics of iodine are the controlling factor when radiation is involved, and that a number of reactive species, not present in thermal reactions, effectively control the observed volatility of iodine. In this paper, recent advances are summarised and the present status of our understanding of iodine chemistry is reviewed. Specifically, an attempt is made to identify those areas where our understanding appears to be relatively complete, and to flag the remaining critical areas where our attention is currently focussed. The state of our modelling capability is reviewed, as is the significance or related areas such as the role of mass transfer. Finally, an overview is presented of the significance of this work for reactor safety, and our expectations for its application over the near term future. (author) 2 figs., 12 refs

  15. Green Chemistry: Effect of Microwave Irradiationon Synthesis of Chitosan for Biomedical Grade Applications of Biodegradable Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amri Setyawati

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Microwave assisted chitosan synthesis as biodegradable material for biomedical application has been done. The purpose of this research is to synthesis of chitosan with high DD and low molecular weight using microwave energy, the study of reaction conditions include parameters of power and reaction time. Chitosan was prepared by deacetylation of chitin with 60% NaOH solution. Conventional method has been done by reflux for 90minutes, resulting chitosan with DD of 79.5%, 72.6% yields and molecular weight 6051 g/mol. Green chemistry method using microwave radiation at 800 Watts for 5 minutes has produced chitosan with highest DD, yield and molecular weight of 86%, 75% and 3797 g/mole respectively. Synthesis of Chitosan by microwave radiation method can save 10x electrical energy for the reaction, also rapidly and effectively to produce chitosan with low molecular weight compared to conventional methods

  16. Occupational applications of ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, P.

    1987-01-01

    A large population of workers are exposed to ultraviolet radiation in various occupational environments which often necessitates protection. Since ultraviolet radiation may create other environmental problems an occupational hazard- and protection evaluation can be complicated. Threshold Limit Values adopted by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) on ultraviolet radiation are used in most countries as guidelines for risk assessment and control measures. This review addresses the levels of ultraviolet radiation met in occupational environments, its measurement and evaluation, and discusses different protection methods. Ultraviolet lasers are beginning to find their way into industrial processes but are still limited in number and they will not be covered here. Emphasis is on broad band incoherent radiation in high risk environments such as welding, and on the evaluation of protective eyewear, see-through curtains and plastics. Other occupational risks associated with the emission of ultraviolet radiation are discussed

  17. Introduction to chemistry of crystalline zeolites and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo Cabezas, Raul Francisco

    2006-01-01

    Establishes the zeolites as the most important group of solid acids and its relation to the contemporaneous chemical industry. It describes that zeolites are used in the following applications: refineries, chemicals/petrochemicals, environmental chemistry, separation of gas, adsorbent ia and ionic exchange in water purification in mineral processes, medicine and agricultural industry. Zeolites are defined as crystalline aluminium silicates with a compound structure of interconnected tetrahedrons. It mentions the key components in zeolites structure. It focuses that structural basic unity of the zeolite is the tetrahedron and compound structural unities are: cells and columns. Besides, it describes that pore system defines a lot of all its properties; but chemical composition affects them. Composition and properties of zeolites are established: adsorption, molecular sieves, acidity, selectivity, transition state in the hydrocarbon's chemistry. It concludes that the newer application of zeolite is in oxidations: Titanium-Silicate-1; production of propylene's oxide using peroxide of hydrogen as oxidizing. The catalysis is an active area of research, and the most popular areas are related to chemicals and the environment [es

  18. Practical applications of coherent transition radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    The predictable nature of transition radiation (TR) emissions has been demonstrated under a wide variety of experimental conditions. The reliable character of TR allows the design of specific practical applications that use emissions from the optical to the x-ray spectral regions. Applications often can be enhanced by the spatial coherence of TR, and some have become highly developed. New applications may be developed through the use of other related radiation mechanisms. 20 refs., 3 figs

  19. Observations of radiation fog chemistry in the Eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, D.; Hutchings, J.; Herckes, P.

    2010-07-01

    The chemical composition of radiation fog in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States has been the focus of an ongoing field campaign based in Selinsgrove, PA. This field study was established to provide a long term record that can be used to identify the effects of meteorology and air mass source regions on fog composition and to shed light on the role that fog can play in the production of secondary inorganic and organic aerosol mass. In the United States, studies that focus on radiation fog have been relatively rare. For the most part, they have been limited geographically to the Central Valley of California, though individual studies have also been conducted in the Central United States and along the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast. Sample collection for the current study began during the fall of 2007. Through 2009, samples from 25 radiation fog events have been obtained. A Caltech Heated Rod Cloudwater Collector (CHRCC) having a Dp50 of approximately 8 microns was used to collect one fog sample per event. Samples were typically collected between 2:00 AM and 7:00 AM under conditions of light winds, clear skies, and recent rainfall. Sample volumes ranged from 2.9 ml to 150 ml. Following collection, samples were analyzed for pH and then one of the following: major inorganic ions, dissolved total organic carbon, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), metals, or organic speciation. Through 2009, sample pH varied between 4.28 and 6.86 and averaged 5.03 based on H+ concentration. Ammonium and sulfate were found to be the most abundant ionic species in the fog samples. Sufficient ammonium was detected in nearly every sample to fully neutralize nitrate and sulfate. The concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium observed in this study were lower than values reported in the literature for most other cloud and fog studies conducted in the US. Due to significant ammonium input, pH in the current study was higher than most other studies. Concentrations of total organic carbon

  20. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, L.M.

    1975-01-01

    The chemical research and development efforts related to the design and ultimate operation of molten-salt breeder reactor systems are concentrated on fuel- and coolant-salt chemistry, including the development of analytical methods for use in these systems. The chemistry of tellurium in fuel salt is being studied to help elucidate the role of this element in the intergranular cracking of Hastelloy N. Studies were continued of the effect of oxygen-containing species on the equilibrium between dissolved UF 3 and dissolved UF 4 , and, in some cases, between the dissolved uranium fluorides and graphite, and the UC 2 . Several aspects of coolant-salt chemistry are under investigation. Hydroxy and oxy compounds that could be formed in molten NaBF 4 are being synthesized and characterized. Studies of the chemistry of chromium (III) compounds in fluoroborate melts were continued as part of a systematic investigation of the corrosion of structural alloys by coolant salt. An in-line voltammetric method for determining U 4+ /U 3+ ratios in fuel salt was tested in a forced-convection loop over a six-month period. (LK)

  1. Teledosimetry and its application in radiation hygiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, J.

    1975-01-01

    The principle and application is dealt with of teledosimetry, a new method of telemetric transfer of data on the flux density of ionizing radiation. A teledosimetric apparatus is described consisting of a transmitter with a halogen GM tube and a receiver with an evaluation device. Two cases of the application of teledosimetry in radiation hygiene practice are reported. The new method makes possible the monitoring of personnel working with radiation, the testing of the efficiency of radiation protection, and a reduction of doses to personnel in the process studied. (author)

  2. Modular coupling of transport and chemistry: theory and model applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfingsten, W.

    1994-06-01

    For the description of complex processes in the near-field of a radioactive waste repository, the coupling of transport and chemistry is necessary. A reason for the relatively minor use of coupled codes in this area is the high amount of computer time and storage capacity necessary for calculations by conventional codes, and lack of available data. The simple application of the sequentially coupled code MCOTAC, which couples one-dimensional advective, dispersive and diffusive transport with chemical equilibrium complexation and precipitation/dissolution reactions in a porous medium, shows some promising features with respect to applicability to relevant problems. Transport, described by random walk of multi-species particles, and chemical equilibrium calculations are solved separately, coupled only by an exchange term to ensure mass conservation. (For full text of the abstract see 25:072321)

  3. Recent Advances in Glycerol Polymers: Chemistry and Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Glycerol polymers are attracting increased attention due to the diversity of polymer compositions and architectures available. This article provides a brief chronological review on the current status of these polymers along with representative examples of their use for biomedical applications. First, we describe the underlying chemistry of glycerol, which provides access to a range of monomers for subsequent polymerizations. We then review the various synthetic methodologies to prepare glycerol-based polymers including polyethers, polycarbonates, polyesters, and so forth. Next, we describe several biomedical applications where glycerol polymers are being investigated including carriers for drug delivery, sealants or coatings for tissue repair, and agents possessing antibacterial activity. Fourth, we describe the growing market opportunity for the use of polymers in medicine. Finally we conclude and summarize the findings, as well as discuss potential opportunities for continued research efforts. PMID:25308354

  4. Micro-segmented flow applications in chemistry and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Cahill, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The book is dedicated to the method and application potential of micro segmented flow. The recent state of development of this powerful technique is presented in 12 chapters by leading researchers from different countries. In the first section, the principles of generation and manipulation of micro-fluidic segments are explained. In the second section, the micro continuous-flow synthesis of different types of nanomaterials is shown as a typical example for the use of advantages of the technique in chemistry. In the third part, the particular importance of the technique in biotechnical applications is presented demonstrating the progress for miniaturized cell-free processes, for molecular biology and DNA-based diagnostis and sequencing as well as for the development of antibiotics and the evaluation of toxic effects in medicine and environment.

  5. Plasmon-induced charge separation: chemistry and wide applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuma, Tetsu; Nishi, Hiroyasu; Ishida, Takuya

    2017-05-01

    Recent development of nanoplasmonics has stimulated chemists to utilize plasmonic nanomaterials for efficient and distinctive photochemical applications, and physicists to boldly go inside the "wet" chemistry world. The discovery of plasmon-induced charge separation (PICS) has even accelerated these trends. On the other hand, some confusion is found in discussions about PICS. In this perspective, we focus on differences between PICS and some other phenomena such as co-catalysis effect and plasmonic nanoantenna effect. In addition, materials and nanostructures suitable for PICS are shown, and characteristics and features unique to PICS are documented. Although it is well known that PICS has been applied to photovoltaics and photocatalysis, here light is shed on other applications that take better advantage of PICS, such as chemical sensing and biosensing, various photochromisms, photoswitchable functionalities and nanoscale photofabrication.

  6. Radiation technology in emerging industrial applications. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In many industrial applications radiation processing has proven to be a technology of choice either because of its economic competitiveness or its technical superiority. Although the chemical effects of ionizing radiation have been known for more than a century, its industrial applications became possible only after the availability of reliable gamma sources and powerful electron accelerators during the last couple of decades.The programmes of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in radiation processing are implemented through the Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications and the Department of Technical Co-operation. The IAEA has been active in this field for many years, contributing to new developments, training, promotion and transfer of technology. In September 1997, the IAEA held an international symposium in Zakopane, Poland on the 'Use of radiation technology for the conservation of environment' where the status of current developments and of applications of radiation processing in the control of environmental pollution was reviewed (IAEA-TECDOC-1023, 1998). Recent developments and achievements in various aspects of radiation processing have been assessed continuously through the organization of consultants meetings, advisory group meetings and research co-ordination meetings. Worldwide growing interest in the use of radiation technology in various new industrial applications, as exemplified by the reports and presentations made at these meetings, has led the IAEA to organize a symposium to cover every aspect of radiation processing and, exclusively, the emerging industrial applications of radiation technology. The International Symposium on Radiation Technology in Emerging Industrial Applications was convened in November 2000 in Beijing, China. Its main purpose was to bring scientists,technologists, industrialists and regulatory authorities together with a view of exchanging information and reviewing the status of current developments and

  7. Radiation technology in emerging industrial applications. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-09-01

    In many industrial applications radiation processing has proven to be a technology of choice either because of its economic competitiveness or its technical superiority. Although the chemical effects of ionizing radiation have been known for more than a century, its industrial applications became possible only after the availability of reliable gamma sources and powerful electron accelerators during the last couple of decades.The programmes of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in radiation processing are implemented through the Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications and the Department of Technical Co-operation. The IAEA has been active in this field for many years, contributing to new developments, training, promotion and transfer of technology. In September 1997, the IAEA held an international symposium in Zakopane, Poland on the 'Use of radiation technology for the conservation of environment' where the status of current developments and of applications of radiation processing in the control of environmental pollution was reviewed (IAEA-TECDOC-1023, 1998). Recent developments and achievements in various aspects of radiation processing have been assessed continuously through the organization of consultants meetings, advisory group meetings and research co-ordination meetings. Worldwide growing interest in the use of radiation technology in various new industrial applications, as exemplified by the reports and presentations made at these meetings, has led the IAEA to organize a symposium to cover every aspect of radiation processing and, exclusively, the emerging industrial applications of radiation technology. The International Symposium on Radiation Technology in Emerging Industrial Applications was convened in November 2000 in Beijing, China. Its main purpose was to bring scientists,technologists, industrialists and regulatory authorities together with a view of exchanging information and reviewing the status of current developments and

  8. Education of radiochemistry and radiation chemistry at a college of medical technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Takeyoshi

    2005-01-01

    The present report aims at introducing my creative textbook on the subject. The contents start from the history of the 20th century on discovery and use of radiation and radioisotope''. In the study of the history the students can aware of their position in a future profession as a medical radiation worker. In addition, own originality for the textbook was shown in the descriptions of (1) Auger effect of EC decay nuclide used remarkably in nuclear medicine, (2) the relation between isotope, isotone and isobar and the kind of nuclear reaction, (3) the distinction of the use of isotope dilution method in substoichiometry and radioimmunoassay, (4) nuclear reactor chemistry (nuclear fuel cycle and disposal of high level radioactive waste), (5) fundamental constants used in radioisotope techniques and (6) the exposure dose in taking a side view of the radiation chemistry. A questionnaire survey after the closing the lesson showed that the students took an interest in 60% of the contents in the textbook of radiochemistry and radiation chemistry. (author)

  9. The prospect of food irradiation and the contribution of radiation chemistry to enact the hygienic safety standard of irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jilan; Yuan Rongyao

    1986-01-01

    Now, it is said that we are at the dawn of food irradiation application both nationally and internationally. However, referring to the acceptability of customers the labeling of irradiated foods has been a nightmare to the food processors. On the other hand the recommended international standard has the shortcomings of thinking in absolute terms. In this paper a proposal which puts special emphasis on enacting hygienic safety standard of individual irradiated food is recommended. The hygienic safety standard of the irradiated food may be classified in three classes: 1) its hygienic safety standard is similar to that of common food; 2) the maximum permissible quantities of harmful compounds induced by radiation must be controlled; and 3) the quantity of unique radiolysis products may by dutermined. Radiation chemistry plays an important role in enacting the hygienic safety standard of irradiated foods. For international cooperation in this field some suggestions are made

  10. Astrobiological Aspects of Radiation Chemistry in Europa's Icy Regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R. W.; Hand, K. P.

    2006-05-01

    Jupiter's moon Europa, with its likely subsurface ocean and young, active surface, is a promising habitat for life. Europa orbits in the heart of Jupiter's powerful magnetosphere and suffers intense energetic particle bombardment, producing both positive and negative aspects for astrobiology at Europa. Ionizing radiation can produce oxidants that could support a radiation-driven ecology as proposed by Chyba. On the other hand, biomolecular evidence for life that may be upwelled to the surface is rapidly altered by irradiation, complicating astrobiological searches for evidence of life. We present an overview of laboratory work performed at JPL and elsewhere and observational results related to these two aspects. The oxidants hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen are known to exist on Europa and the radiolytic production of these species has been studied in the laboratory for both electron and ion irradiation. Laboratory- measured equilibrium concentrations of H2O2, where production and destruction rates are equal, are in general agreement with the observed 0.1% molar abundance on Europa. The shape of Europa's peroxide band is consistent with the line shapes observed in radiolysis and with H2O2 dispersed in water ice rather than occurring as H2O2 aggregates. Surprisingly, molecular oxygen may be even more abundant on Europa even though O2 is extremely volatile ande would be expected to escape from the ice surface. Radiolysis can produce molecular oxygen and appears to simultaneously alter the ice matrix, trapping the O2. Other species observed on Europa are CO2 and SO2, and laboratory radiolysis of these species in H2O ice produces carbonic and sulfuric acid, respectively. We are studying the radiolytic degradation of biomarkers in ice at Europa temperatures by studying both simple organics and more complex biomolecules, including microorganisms. Hydrocarbon radiolysis yields carbon dioxide and methane, which can escape the system and results in loss of carbon. In

  11. Application of modeling to local chemistry in PWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauchon, C.; Millett, P.J.; Ollar, P.

    1998-01-01

    Localized corrosion of the SG tubes and other components is due to the presence of an aggressive environment in local crevices and occluded regions. In crevices and on vertical and horizontal tube surfaces, corrosion products and particulate matter can accumulate in the form of porous deposits. The SG water contains impurities at extremely low levels (ppb). Low levels of non-volatile impurities, however, can be efficiently concentrated in crevices and sludge piles by a thermal hydraulic mechanism. The temperature gradient across the SG tube coupled with local flow starvation, produces local boiling in the sludge and crevices. Since mass transfer processes are inhibited in these geometries, the residual liquid becomes enriched in many of the species present in the SG water. The resulting concentrated solutions have been shown to be aggressive and can corrode the SG materials. This corrosion may occur under various conditions which result in different types of attack such as pitting, stress corrosion cracking, wastage and denting. A major goal of EPRI's research program has been the development of models of the concentration process and the resulting chemistry. An improved understanding should eventually allow utilities to reduce or eliminate the corrosion by the appropriate manipulation of the steam generator water chemistry and or crevice conditions. The application of these models to experimental data obtained for prototypical SG tube support crevices is described in this paper. The models adequately describe the key features of the experimental data allowing extrapolations to be made to plant conditions. (author)

  12. Radiation chemistry of plastic crystals. Annual progress report, November 1, 1976--October 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingen, T.J.

    1977-01-01

    The overall purpose of this investigation is the understanding of the role that mesomorphism plays in the radiation chemistry of plastic crystals. In approaching this problem, the first step is to obtain data on the basic radiation chemistry of the most ordered solid state--the crystalline state. Thus, the results reported here are concerned with determination of the radiolysis of three plastic crystals in their highest ordered state. In addition to these studies, investigation of the optical properties and the positron life time properties of these materials in their plastic crystalline state was undertaken. The primary purpose of these studies during the current reporting period was the determination of the feasibility of these techniques to provide useful information to the overall project goal

  13. Considerations for the independent reaction times and step-by-step methods for radiation chemistry simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Devroye, Luc

    2017-10-01

    Ionizing radiation interacts with the water molecules of the tissues mostly by ionizations and excitations, which result in the formation of the radiation track structure and the creation of radiolytic species such as H.,.OH, H2, H2O2, and e-aq. After their creation, these species diffuse and may chemically react with the neighboring species and with the molecules of the medium. Therefore radiation chemistry is of great importance in radiation biology. As the chemical species are not distributed homogeneously, the use of conventional models of homogeneous reactions cannot completely describe the reaction kinetics of the particles. Actually, many simulations of radiation chemistry are done using the Independent Reaction Time (IRT) method, which is a very fast technique to calculate radiochemical yields but which do not calculate the positions of the radiolytic species as a function of time. Step-by-step (SBS) methods, which are able to provide such information, have been used only sparsely because these are time-consuming in terms of calculation. Recent improvements in computer performance now allow the regular use of the SBS method in radiation chemistry. The SBS and IRT methods are both based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE). In this paper, several sampling algorithms of the GFDE and for the IRT method are presented. We show that the IRT and SBS methods are exactly equivalent for 2-particles systems for diffusion and partially diffusion-controlled reactions between non-interacting particles. We also show that the results obtained with the SBS simulation method with periodic boundary conditions are in agreement with the predictions by classical reaction kinetics theory, which is an important step towards using this method for modelling of biochemical networks and metabolic pathways involved in oxidative stress. Finally, the first simulation results obtained with the code RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) are presented.

  14. Nuclear radiation applications in hydrological investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, S.M.

    1978-01-01

    The applications of radiation sources for the determination of water and soil properties in hydrological investigations are many and varied. These include snow gauging, soil moisture and density determinations, measurement of suspended sediment concentrations in natural streams and nuclear well logging for groundwater exploitation. Besides the above, many radiation physics aspects play an important role in the development of radiotracer techniques, particularly in sediment transport studies. The article reviews the above applications with reference to their limitations and advantages. (author)

  15. Design, Properties and Recent Application of Macrocycles in Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermert, Philipp

    2017-10-25

    Macrocyclic compounds have recently received increasing attention in drug discovery as these compounds offer the potential to modulate difficult targets and to access novel chemotypes. Approaches towards libraries of macrocyclic compounds based on modular organic synthesis and applications of these technology platforms to find and improve biologically active compounds are introduced in this minireview. Alternatively, lead compounds may be obtained by truncation and modification of macrocyclic natural products. Selected medicinal chemistry programs are discussed, illustrating a macrocyclization approach toward ligands with improved properties. The design of such ligands is often informed by X-ray crystal structures of protein-ligand complexes. Efforts to understand cellular permeability and oral bioavailability of cyclic peptides and non-peptidic macrocycles are summarized.

  16. Applications of ICP-MS in marine analytical chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaren, J W; Siu, K W.M.; Lam, J W; Willie, S N; Maxwell, P S; Palepu, A; Koether, M; Berman, S S [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Analytical Chemistry Section

    1990-07-01

    The versatility of ICP-MS in marine analytical chemistry is illustrated with applications to the multielement trace analysis of two recently released marine reference materials, the coastal seawater CASS-2 and the non-defatted lobster hepatopancreas tissue LUTS-1, and to the determination of tributyltin and dibutyltin in the harbour sediment reference material PACS-1 by HPLC-ICP-MS. Seawater analyses were performed after separation of the trace elements either by adsorption on immobilized 8-hydroxyquinoline or by reductive coprecipitation with iron and palladium. Simultaneous determination of seven trace elements in LUTS-1, including mercury, by isotope dilution ICP-MS, was achieved after dissolution by microwave digestion with nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide. Butyltin species in PACS-1 were separated by cation exchange HPLC of an extract of the sediment; method detection limits for tributyltin and dibutyltin in sediment samples are estimated to be 5 ng Sn/g and 12 ng Sn/g, respectively. (orig.).

  17. Synchrotron radiation x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study on the interface chemistry of high-k PrxAl2-xO3 (x=0-2) dielectrics on TiN for dynamic random access memory applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, T.; Lupina, G.; Sohal, R.; Lippert, G.; Wenger, Ch.; Seifarth, O.; Tallarida, M.; Schmeisser, D.

    2007-07-01

    Engineered dielectrics combined with compatible metal electrodes are important materials science approaches to scale three-dimensional trench dynamic random access memory (DRAM) cells. Highly insulating dielectrics with high dielectric constants were engineered in this study on TiN metal electrodes by partly substituting Al in the wide band gap insulator Al2O3 by Pr cations. High quality PrAlO3 metal-insulator-metal capacitors were processed with a dielectric constant of 19, three times higher than in the case of Al2O3 reference cells. As a parasitic low dielectric constant interface layer between PrAlO3 and TiN limits the total performance gain, a systematic nondestructive synchrotron x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study on the interface chemistry of PrxAl2-xO3 (x =0-2) dielectrics on TiN layers was applied to unveil its chemical origin. The interface layer results from the decreasing chemical reactivity of PrxAl2-xO3 dielectrics with increasing Pr content x to reduce native Ti oxide compounds present on unprotected TiN films. Accordingly, PrAlO3 based DRAM capacitors require strict control of the surface chemistry of the TiN electrode, a parameter furthermore of importance to engineer the band offsets of PrxAl2-xO3/TiN heterojunctions.

  18. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (no.19)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1985 through March 31, 1986. The latest report, for 1984, is JAERI-M 86-051. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on surface phenomena under electron and ion irradiations; polymerization under the irradiation of electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  19. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, (no. 20)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1986 through March 31, 1987. The latest report, for 1985, is JAERI-M 87-046. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on surface phenomena under electron and ion irradiations; polymerization under the irradiation of electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  20. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1980 through March 31, 1981. The latest report, for 1980, is JAERI-M 9214. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on reactions of carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane; polymerization under the irradiation of high dose rate electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  1. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-12-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1981 through March 31, 1982. The latest report, for 1981, is JAERI-M 9856. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on reactions of carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane; polymerization under the irradiation of high dose rate electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  2. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, No. 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-11-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1978 through March 31, 1979. The latest report, for 1978, is JAERI-M 7949. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on reactions of carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane; polymerization under the irradiation of high dose rate electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  3. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, (17)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1983 through March 31, 1984. The latest report, for 1983, is JAERI-M 83-199. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on surface phenomena under electron and ion irradiations; polymerization under the irradiation of electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  4. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, (13)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-11-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1979 through March 31, 1980. The latest report, for 1979, is JAERI-M 8569. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on reactions of carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane; polymerization under the irradiation of high dose rate electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  5. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, (9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-09-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1975 through March 31, 1976. The latest report, for 1975, is JAERI-M 6260. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on reactions of carbon monoxide and hydrogen; polymerization under the irradiation of high dose rate electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and drafting. (auth.)

  6. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (no. 18)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1984 through March 31, 1985. The latest report, for 1984, is JAERI-M 84-239. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on surface phenomena under electron and ion irradiations; polymerization under the irradiation of electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  7. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, No. 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1976 through March 31, 1977. The latest report, for 1976, is JAERI-M 6702. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on reactions of carbon monoxide and hydrogen; polymerization under the irradiation of high dose rate electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (auth.)

  8. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (no. 16)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-11-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1982 through March 31, 1983. The latest report, for 1982, is JAERI-M 82-192. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on reactions of carbon monoxide, water and methane; polymerization under the irradiation of high dose rate electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  9. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, (no. 11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-10-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1977 through March 31, 1978. The latest report, for 1977, is JAERI-M 7355. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on reactions of carbon monoxide and hydrogen; polymerization under the irradiation of high dose rate electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  10. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (No. 8)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    This report describes research activities in Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during the one year period from April 1, 1974 through March 31, 1975. The major research field covers the following subjects: studies related to reactions of carbon monoxide and hydrogen; polymerization studies under the irradiation of high dose rate electron beams; modification of polymers; fundamental studies on polymerization, degradation, crosslinking, and grafting. (auth.)

  11. SPRAI: coupling of radiative feedback and primordial chemistry in moving mesh hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaura, O.; Glover, S. C. O.; Klessen, R. S.; Paardekooper, J.-P.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new radiative transfer code SPRAI (Simplex Photon Radiation in the Arepo Implementation) based on the SIMPLEX radiation transfer method. This method, originally used only for post-processing, is now directly integrated into the AREPO code and takes advantage of its adaptive unstructured mesh. Radiated photons are transferred from the sources through the series of Voronoi gas cells within a specific solid angle. From the photon attenuation, we derive corresponding photon fluxes and ionization rates and feed them to a primordial chemistry module. This gives us a self-consistent method for studying dynamical and chemical processes caused by ionizing sources in primordial gas. Since the computational cost of the SIMPLEX method does not scale directly with the number of sources, it is convenient for studying systems such as primordial star-forming haloes that may form multiple ionizing sources.

  12. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, L.M.

    1976-01-01

    Research progress is reported in programs on fuel-salt chemistry, properties of compounds in the Li--Te system, Te spectroscopy UF 4 --H equilibria, porous electrode studies of molten salts, fuel salt-coolant salt reactions, thermodynamic properties of transition-metal fluorides, and properties of sodium fluoroborate. Developmental work on analytical methods is summarized including in-line analysis of molten MSBR fuel, analysis of coolant-salts for tritium, analysis of molten LiF--BeF 2 --ThF 4 for Fe and analysis of LiF--BeF--ThF 4 for Te

  13. Synchrotron radiation and prospects of its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulipanov, G; Skrinskii, A

    1981-04-01

    Current and prospective applications are described of synchrotron radiation resulting from the motion of high-energy electrons or positrons in a magnetic field and covering a wide spectral range from the infrared to X-ray. The advantages of the synchrotron radiation include a big source luminance, a small angular divergence, the possibility of calculating the absolute intensity and the spectral distribution of the radiation. Special storage rings are most suitable as a source. Synchrotron radiation is applied in X-ray microscopy, energy diffractometry, atomic and molecular spectroscopy, in the structural analysis of microcrystals, very rapid diffractometry of biological objects and crystals, and in Moessbauer spectroscopy. The prospective applications include uses in metrology, medicine, X-ray lithography, elemental analysis, molecular microsurgery, and in radiation technology.

  14. Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Radiation Sciences and Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-04-01

    The publication has been set up as proceedings of the Radiation Sciences and Application conference. the conference consistes of Chemistry; Food Sciences and Technology; Entomolgy; Biology; Waste Management; Safety and Microbiology. This conference consists of one volume and 360 pages., figs., tabs., refs.

  15. Economical scale of radiation applications in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Kume, Tamikazu; Makuuchi, Keizo; Takeshita, Hidefumi

    2000-01-01

    As a scale to quantify actual state of a thing, person, material and money are used in general, and money or economical scale has been frequently investigated on radiation application. As some investigations on annual sales (economical scale) of tire for car and germination protection of tomato had been tried to estimate in Japan, they were carried out only partially but not in general. On the other hand, in U.S.A. some general investigations were carried out, to report 421 billion dollars for nuclear energy application where its 80% was occupied by radiation application and remained 20 % was energy application (electricity). Therefore, JAERI established a special group (radiation frontier research group) aiming to investigate economical scale of radiation application in Japan to industrial, agricultural and medical field in general under cooperation of universities and private companies by receiving trust of the Science and Technology Agency. Here were described on basic concept on the investigation, its results, and total image on economical scale of radiation application and its comparison with that of energy application. (G.K.)

  16. Radiation Protection Aspects of Primary Water Chemistry and Source-term Management Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-04-01

    Since the beginning of the 1990's, occupational exposures in nuclear power plant has strongly decreased, outlining efforts achieved by worldwide nuclear operators in order to reach and maintain occupational exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) in accordance with international recommendations and national regulations. These efforts have focused on both technical and organisational aspects. According to many radiation protection experts, one of the key features to reach this goal is the management of the primary system water chemistry and the ability to avoid dissemination of radioactivity within the system. It outlines the importance for radiation protection staff to work closely with chemistry staff (as well as operation staff) and thus to have sufficient knowledge to understand the links between chemistry and the generation of radiation field. This report was prepared with the primary objective to provide such knowledge to 'non-chemist'. The publication primarily focuses on three topics dealing with water chemistry, source term management and remediation techniques. One key objective of the report is to provide current knowledge regarding these topics and to address clearly related radiation protection issues. In that mind, the report prepared by the EGWC was also reviewed by radiation protection experts. In order to address various designs, PWRs, VVERs, PHWRs and BWRs are addressed within the document. Additionally, available information addressing current operating units and lessons learnt is outlined with choices that have been made for the design of new plants. Chapter 3 of this report addresses current practices regarding primary chemistry management for different designs, 'how to limit activity in the primary circuit and to minimise contamination'. General information is provided regarding activation, corrosion and transport of activated materials in the primary circuit (background on radiation field generation). Primary chemistry aspects that

  17. Modular coupling of transport and chemistry: theory and model applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfingsten, W.

    1994-06-01

    For the description of complex processes in the near-field of a radioactive waste repository, the coupling of transport and chemistry is necessary. A reason for the relatively minor use of coupled codes in this area is the high amount of computer time and storage capacity necessary for calculations by conventional codes, and lack of available data. The simple application of the sequentially coupled code MCOTAC, which couples one-dimensional advective, dispersive and diffusive transport with chemical equilibrium complexation and precipitation/dissolution reactions in a porous medium, shows some promising features with respect to applicability to relevant problems. Transport, described by a random walk of multi-species particles, and chemical equilibrium calculations are solved separately, coupled only by an exchange term to ensure mass conservation. The modular-structured code was applied to three problems: a) incongruent dissolution of hydrated silicate gels, b) dissolution of portlandite and c) calcite dissolution and hypothetical dolomite precipitation. This allows for a comparison with other codes and their applications. The incongruent dissolution of cement phases, important for degradation of cementitious materials in a repository, can be included in the model without the problems which occur with a directly coupled code. The handling of a sharp multi-mineral front system showed a much faster calculation time compared to a directly coupled code application. Altogether, the results are in good agreement with other code calculations. Hence, the chosen modular concept of MCOTAC is more open to an easy extension of the code to include additional processes like sorption, kinetically controlled processes, transport in two or three spatial dimensions, and adaptation to new developments in computing (hardware and software), an important factor for applicability. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  18. Application of radiation technology to sewage sludge processing: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jianlong; Wang Jiazhuo

    2007-01-01

    Sewage sludge is unwanted residual solid wastes generated in wastewater treatment and its management is one of the most critical environmental issues of today. The treatment and disposal of sludge contribute a considerable proportion of the cost for running a wastewater treatment plant. The increasing amount of swage sludge and more and more legislative regulation of its disposal have stimulated the need for developing new technologies to process sewage sludge efficiently and economically. One ideal consideration is to recycle it after proper treatment. Radiation technology is regarded to be a promising alternative for its high efficiency in pathogen inactivation, organic pollutants oxidation, odor nuisance elimination and some other characteristics enhancement, which will facilitate the down-stream process of sludge treatment and disposal. Here we present a brief review of application of radiation technology on sewage sludge processing. Some basic information of two currently available irradiation systems and fundamental radiation chemistry are introduced firstly; then the world-wide application of this promising technology is reviewed; various effects of radiation on sludge is discussed in detail; and some concluding remarks are given and some future directions are also proposed

  19. Internet applications in radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, P.; Geisse, C.; Wuest, E.

    1998-01-01

    As a means of effective communication the Internet is presently becoming more and more important in German speaking countries, too. Its possibilities to exchange and to obtain information efficiently and rapidly are excellent. Internet and email access are available now in most institutions for professional use. Internet services of importance to radiation safety professionals are described. (orig.) [de

  20. Proceedings of the Scientific Meeting on Application of Isotopes and Radiation, Book I, Agricultural, Animal and Biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhadi, F.; Sisworo, E.L.; Maha, M.; Ismachin, M.; Hilmy, N.; Sumatra, M.; Mugiono; Wandowo; Soebianto, Y.S

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the 10 t h Meeting of the Isotope and Radiation Application is to disseminate the result of research on application of nuclear techniques on agriculture, animal, biology, chemistry, environment, radiation process and industry. The meeting was held in Jakarta, 18-19 February 1998, and there were 6 invited papers and 52 papers indexed individually. This proceeding is divided by two volumes. Volume I and volume II consists of agriculture, animal, biology and chemistry, environment, radiation process and industry, respectively.(ID)

  1. Application of ionizing radiation for metal nanoclusters synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smietanko-Chmielewska, D.K.; Chmielewski, A.G.; Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Possibility of ionizing radiation application in nanotechnology has been observed from very beginning when this field of science and technology was named. The lithography is based on electron and ion beam applications, and metal clusters synthesis by radiation induced radicals was reported many years ago. International Atomic Energy Agency was the first organization which has started coordinated programs on radiation applications in nanotechnology which are being continued in the frame of regional cooperation project RER8014. Some of applications led to patented technical solutions. Then review papers and chapters in the books have been published. The main applications beside of lithography deal with metal nanoclusters and nano-composites synthesis. Polymer composites containing metal nanoparticles have attracted a great interest due to their unique chemical and physical properties. 'Green' chemistry promotes application of natural fibers in such structures, among them cellulose is one of the most frequently used. However, cellulose fabric have ability to absorb moisture, so under certain conditions of humidity and temperature they can be subjected to microbial attack. One of the most popular and best known antibacterial agents is silver, which serves as a potential antibacterial material acting against an exceptionally broad spectrum of bacteria including activity against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were grown at the cellulose fibers surface by direct reduction of AgNO 3 with electron beam (EB) application. The big field of development concerns nano composites, possibility of e/X units application enlarge this possibility to industrial scale product manufacturing. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by the IAEA, regional project RER/8/014 and by the Ministry of Science and Higher Education, project DPN/W14/IAEA/2009.

  2. Bibliographies on radiation chemistry. 9. Metal ions and complexes. Part A: Cobalt, rhodium, iridium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, M Z; Ross, A B

    1986-01-01

    The one-electron oxidation and reduction of metal ions and complexes can yield species in unusual oxidation states, and ligand-radicals coordinated to the central metal. These often unstable species can be mechanistically important intermediates in thermal, photochemical, and electrochemical reactions involving metal-containing substances. Their generation via radiolysis provides an alternate means of characterizing them using kinetic and spectroscopic techniques. We hope these bibliographies on the radiation chemistry of metal ions and complexes, presented according to periodic groups, will prove useful to researchers in metallo-redox chemistry. These bibliographies contain only primary literature sources; reviews are not included. However, a list of general review articles on the radiation chemistry of metal ions and complexes is presented here in the first section which covers cobalt, rhodium and iridium, Group 9 in the new IUPAC notation. Additional parts of the bibliography are planned, covering other periodic groups. Part A of the bibliography was prepared by a search of the Radiation Chemistry Data Center Bibliographic Data Base (RCDCbib) through January 1986 for papers on rhodium, iridium and cobalt compounds, and radiolysis (both continuous and pulsed). Papers in which the use of metal compounds was incidental to the primary objective of the study were excluded. Excluded also were publications in unrefereed and obscure sources such as meeting proceedings, internal reports, dissertations, and patents. The majority of the studies in the resultant compilation deal with experiments performed on solutions, mainly aqueous, although a substantial fraction is devoted to solid-state esr measurements. The references are listed in separate sections for each of the metals, and are presented in approximate chronological order.

  3. Semiconductor radiation detectors technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this book is to educate the reader on radiation detectors, from sensor to read-out electronics to application. Relatively new detector materials, such as CdZTe and Cr compensated GaAs, are introduced, along with emerging applications of radiation detectors. This X-ray technology has practical applications in medical, industrial, and security applications. It identifies materials based on their molecular composition, not densities as the traditional transmission equipment does. With chapters written by an international selection of authors from both academia and industry, the book covers a wide range of topics on radiation detectors, which will satisfy the needs of both beginners and experts in the field.

  4. Computational methods for industrial radiation measurement applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, R.P.; Guo, P.; Ao, Q.

    1996-01-01

    Computational methods have been used with considerable success to complement radiation measurements in solving a wide range of industrial problems. The almost exponential growth of computer capability and applications in the last few years leads to a open-quotes black boxclose quotes mentality for radiation measurement applications. If a black box is defined as any radiation measurement device that is capable of measuring the parameters of interest when a wide range of operating and sample conditions may occur, then the development of computational methods for industrial radiation measurement applications should now be focused on the black box approach and the deduction of properties of interest from the response with acceptable accuracy and reasonable efficiency. Nowadays, increasingly better understanding of radiation physical processes, more accurate and complete fundamental physical data, and more advanced modeling and software/hardware techniques have made it possible to make giant strides in that direction with new ideas implemented with computer software. The Center for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes (CEAR) at North Carolina State University has been working on a variety of projects in the area of radiation analyzers and gauges for accomplishing this for quite some time, and they are discussed here with emphasis on current accomplishments

  5. The effects of gamma radiation on groundwater chemistry and glass reaction in a saturated tuff environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1986-12-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations project has completed a series of experiments that provide insight into groundwater chemistry and glass waste form performance in the presence of a gamma radiation field at 90 0 C. Results from experiments done at 1 x 10 3 and O R/hr are presented and compared to similar experiments done at 2 x 10 5 and 1 x 10 4 R/hr. The major effect of radiation is to lower the groundwater pH to a value near 6.4. The addition of glass to the system results in slightly more basic final pH, both in the presence and absence of radiation. However, there is essentially no difference in the extent of glass reaction, as measured by elemental release, as a function of dose rate or total dose, for reaction periods up to 278 days

  6. Synchrotron radiation applications in biophysics and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burattini, E.

    1985-01-01

    The peculiar properties of synchrotron radiation are briefly summarized. A short review on the possible applications of synchrotron radiation in two important fields like Biophysics and Medicine is presented. Details are given on experiments both in progress and carried out in many synchrotron radiation facilities, all over the world, using different techniques like X-ray absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence microanalysis, X-ray microscopy and digital subtraction angiography. Some news about the photon-activation therapy are briefly reported too

  7. Synchrotron radiation: its characteristics and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blewett, J.P.; Chasman, R.; Green, G.K.

    1977-01-01

    It has been known for a century that charged particles radiate when accelerated and that relativistic electrons in the energy range between 100 MeV and several GeV and constrained to travel in circular orbits emit concentrated, intense beams with broad continuous spectra that can cover the electromagnetic spectrum from infrared through hard X-rays. Recently the possible applications of this radiation have been appreciated and electron synchrotrons and electron storage rings are now being used in many centers for studies of the properties of matter in the solid, liquid and gaseous states. A brief history is presented of ''synchrotron radiation'' as it is now called. The basic properties of this radiation are described and the world-wide distribution is indicated of facilities for its production. Particular attention is given to the proposed facility at Brookhaven which will be the first major installation to be dedicated only to the production and use of synchrotron radiation. Finally, typical examples are given of applications in the areas of radiation absorption studies, techniques based on scattering of radiation, and advances based on X-ray lithography

  8. Applications of Radiation Processing in Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abad, Lucille V.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation processing has long been known as commercially viable technology that can be beneficially used to enhance the characteristics of many materials. Several gamma irradiators and electron beam accelerators are operating worldwide which are utilized for various established industrial applications. These could be used for the following processes: a) radiation crosslinking e.g. crosslinking of wires and cables, heat shrinkable film and tube productions, manufacture of plastic bags and tubings for medical products, pre-curing of automobile tire components, curing of polymeric coatings, etc. b) radiation degradation e.g. Scrap Teflon (Polytetraflouroethylene) to form powders, disinfestations and pasteurization of agricultural products, sterilization of medical products, etc.; and c) radiation grafting e.g. grafted non-woven fabrics for metal adsorbent. Emerging applications for radiation processing include grafted membranes for fuel cell, electrodes, cell sheet for tissue engineering, nanoparticle production, polymer composite synthesis, and fibrous catalyst for biodiesel production. Current researches at the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute consist of crosslinking of natural and synthetic polymers for medical application e.g. wound dressing, hemostats, and bioimplants for vesicouretal reflux (VUR); grafting of natural and synthetic fabrics for metal adsorbents; and radiation degradation of carrageenan as plant growth promoter. (author)

  9. CHEMIFOGV - A Model to Simulate Radiation Fogs and their Interaction with Vegetation and Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterrath, Tanja; Bott, Andreas

    2001-01-01

    Radiation fog is an important modifier of atmospheric compounds in the planetary boundary layer. In vegetated areas effects are especially pronounced due to the enlarged surface area. Besides affecting the lower boundary of atmospheric models fog acts as a multi-phase reaction chamber leading to acid deposition. Here we present the 1-dimensional radiation fog modelCHEMIFOG V to simulate regional radiation fog events. The key feature of the fog model is the detailed microphysics, where the aerosol/droplet spectrum is described with a joint 2-dimensional distribution, but also the dynamics, thermodynamics, and radiative transfer are calculated. To investigate the interaction between fog and the biosphere a multi-layer vegetation module, including a soil module as well as a dry deposition module were coupled. Vegetation influences the dynamics, thermodynamics, and the radiation field of the lowest atmospheric layers. With CHEMIFOG V , numerical case studies on dry and moist deposition processes on vegetation surfaces were performed. Hereby multi-phase chemistry and the processing of aerosols were considered. The results show that the chemical composition of the deposited fog droplets is mainly determined by the aerosol composition. Dry deposition fluxes are dependent on the incoming radiation and the leaves' surface conditions with respect to water coverage.Due to chemical aerosol processing and deposition, the aerosol spectrum is significantly modified in the planetary boundary layer

  10. CHEMISTRY OF A PROTOPLANETARY DISK WITH GRAIN SETTLING AND Lyα RADIATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogel, Jeffrey K. J.; Bethell, Thomas J.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Calvet, Nuria; Semenov, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    We present results from a model of the chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks. In our models, we directly calculate the changing propagation and penetration of a high energy radiation field with Lyα radiation included. We also explore the effect on our models of including dust grain settling. We find that, in agreement with earlier studies, the evolution of dust grains plays a large role in determining how deep the UV radiation penetrates into the disk. Significant grain settling at the midplane leads to much smaller freeze-out regions and a correspondingly larger molecular layer, which leads to an increase in column density for molecular species such as CO, CN, and SO. The inclusion of Lyα radiation impacts the disk chemistry through specific species that have large photodissociation cross sections at 1216 A. These include HCN, NH 3 , and CH 4 , for which the column densities are decreased by an order of magnitude or more due to the presence of Lyα radiation in the UV spectrum. A few species, such as CO 2 and SO, are enhanced by the presence of Lyα radiation, but rarely by more than a factor of a few.

  11. A general method for the inclusion of radiation chemistry in astrochemical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shingledecker, Christopher N; Herbst, Eric

    2018-02-21

    In this paper, we propose a general formalism that allows for the estimation of radiolysis decomposition pathways and rate coefficients suitable for use in astrochemical models, with a focus on solid phase chemistry. Such a theory can help increase the connection between laboratory astrophysics experiments and astrochemical models by providing a means for modelers to incorporate radiation chemistry into chemical networks. The general method proposed here is targeted particularly at the majority of species now included in chemical networks for which little radiochemical data exist; however, the method can also be used as a starting point for considering better studied species. We here apply our theory to the irradiation of H 2 O ice and compare the results with previous experimental data.

  12. Application of the CRAY-1 for quantum chemistry calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, V.R.; Guest, M.F.

    1982-01-01

    The following steps in a typical quantum chemistry calculation will be considered: 1. Gaussian integrals evaluation. 2. Hartree-Fock computation of an uncorrelated wavefunction. 3. 4-index transformation of two-electron integrals. 4. Configuration interaction calculations of a correlated wavefunction. In all the above steps we have found that algorithms may be devised which formulate the problem as being dominated by a series of matrix multiplications: R=AB, where A (or B) is sparse. A routine for performing the sparse matrix multiply has been prepared with a maximum measured performance of 147 M flops. When this routine is used in our applications packages, overall performance of approximately 50, 100 and 120 M flops are observed for steps 1, 3 and 4, respectively. The result in step 2 is not so successful, as effective implementation of the matrix multiplication requires efficient performance of data gather and scatter sequences (not vectorisable on the CRAY-1), and a performance of 10 M flops is observed. The importance of gather/scatter sequences in such operations as file sorting is pointed out. The present performance is compared with that previously obtained on CDC 7600 equipment and from this data we deduce the cost-effectiveness of the CRAY-1 in our field. (orig.)

  13. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, L.M.

    1975-01-01

    Research and development activities dealing with the chemical problems related to design and ultimate operation of molten-salt reactor systems are described. An experimental test stand was constructed to expose metallurgical test specimens to Te 2 vapor at defined temperatures and deposition rates. To better define the chemistry of fluoroborate coolant, several aspects are being investigated. The behavior of hydroxy and oxy compounds in molten NaBF 4 is being investigated to define reactions and compounds that may be involved in corrosion and/or could be involved in methods for trapping tritium. Two corrosion products of Hastelloy N, Na 3 CrF 6 and Na 5 Cr 3 F 14 , were identified from fluoroborate systems. The evaluation of fluoroborate and alternate coolants continued. Research on the behavior of hydrogen and its isotopes is summarized. The solubilities of hydrogen, deuterium, and helium in Li 2 BeF 4 are very low. The sorption of tritium on graphite was found to be significant (a few milligrams of tritium per kilogram of graphite), possibly providing a means of sequestering a portion of the tritium produced. Development of analytical methods continued with emphasis on voltammetric and spectrophotometric techniques for the in-line analysis of corrosion products such as Fe 2+ and Cr 3+ and the determination of the U 3+ /U 4+ ratio in MSBR fuel salt. Similar studies were conducted with the NaBF 4 --NaF coolant salt. Information developed during the previous operation of the CSTF has been assessed and used to formulate plans for evaluation of in-line analytical methods in future CSTF operations. Electroanalytical and spectrophotometric research suggests that an electroactive protonic species is present in molten NaBF 4 --NaF, and that this species rapidly equilibrates with a volatile proton-containing species. Data obtained from the CSTF indicated that tritium was concentrated in the volatile species. (JGB)

  14. Medical application of Synchrotron Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Nishimura, Katsuyuki.

    1990-01-01

    The number of patients suffering from ischemic heart disease is also increasing rapidly in Japan. The standard method for assessing coronary artery diseases is the coronary angiography. Excellent images are taken by this method, however, it is an invasive method in which a catheter into a peripheral artery. The patients would obtain great benefit if the coronary arteries could be distinguished by intravenous injection of the contrast material. The K-edge subtraction method, which uses the K-edge discontinuity in the attenuation coefficient of the contrast material, is considered to be the most suitable method for coronary angiography by peripheral venous injection. Synchrotron Radiation (SR) is so intense that it allows selection of monochromatic X-rays, and studies on K-edge subtraction using SR has been started at some facilities. Recent activities K-edge subtraction method at the Accumulation Ring are briefly described here. (author)

  15. Fundamentals of nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majer, V.

    1982-01-01

    The author of the book has had 25 years of experience at the Nuclear Chemistry of Prague Technical University. In consequence, the book is intended as a basic textbook for students of this field. Its main objectives are an easily understandable presentation of the complex subject and in spite of the uncertainty which still characterizes the definition and subjects of nuclear chemistry - a systematic classification and logical structure. Contents: 1. Introduction (history and definition); 2. General nuclear chemistry (physical fundamentals, hot atom chemistry, interaction of nuclear radiation with matter, radioactive elements, isotope effects, isotope exchange, chemistry of radioactive trace elements); 3. Methods of nuclear chemistry of nuclear chemistry (radiochemical methods, activation, separation and enrichment chemistry); 4. Preparative nuclear chemistry (isotope production, labelled compounds); 5. Analytival nuclear chemistry; 6. Applied nuclear chemistry (isotope applications in general physical and analytical chemistry). The book is supplemented by an annex with tables, a name catalogue and a subject index which will facilitate access to important information. (RB) [de

  16. ICT accelerators for radiation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Shiqin; Chen Dali (Research Inst. of Automation for Machine-Building Industry, Beijing (China))

    Several ICT accelerators were designed and constructed during the past two decades and are now in use in some factories and institutes in various parts of China. The specifications, design considerations, construction specialities and information about the applications of these accelerators are given in the present paper. (author).

  17. Radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides and proteins in relation to the radiation sterilization of high-protein foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrison, W.M.

    1979-03-01

    An important source of information on the question of whether or not toxic or other deleterious substances are formed in the radiation sterilization of foods is the chemical study of reaction products and reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of individual food components. The present evaluation of the radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides and proteins outlines the various radiation-induced processes which lead to amino acid degradation and to the synthesis of amino acid derivatives of higher molecular weight. Among the latter are the α,α'-diamino dicarboxylic acids which are formed as major products in the radiolysis of peptides both in aqueous solution and in the solid state. The α,α'-diamino acids are of particular interest as irradiation products because they represent a class of compounds not normally encountered in plant and animal protein sources. Such compounds have, however, been isolated from certain types of bacteria and pathogenic toxins. All of the available data strongly suggest that the α,α'-diamino acids are produced in significant yield in the radiation sterilization of high protein foods. The importance of initiating extensive chemical and biological studies of initiating extensive chemical and biological studies of these and of other high molecular weight products in irradiated food is emphasized

  18. Radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides and proteins in relation to the radiation sterilization of high-protein foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrison, W.M.

    1981-12-01

    An important source of information on the question of whether or not toxic or other deleterious substances are formed in the radiation sterilization of foods is the chemical study of reaction products and reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of individual food components. The present evaluation of the radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides, and proteins outlines the various radiation-induced processes which lead to amino acid degradation and to the synthesis of amino acid derivatives of higher molecular weight. Among the latter are the α,α'-diamino dicarboxylic acids which are formed as major products in the radiolysis of peptides both in aqueous solution and in the solid state. The α,α'-diamino acids are of particular interest as irradiation products because they represent a class of compounds not normally encountered in plant and animal protein sources. Such compounds have, however, been isolated from certain types of bacteria and bacterial products. All of the available data strongly suggest that the α,α'-diamino acids are produced in significant yield in the radiation sterilization of high protein foods. The importance of initiating extensive chemical and biological studies of these and of other high molecular weight products in irradiated food is emphasized

  19. Radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides and proteins in relation to the radiation sterilization of high-protein foods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, W. M.

    1981-12-01

    An important source of information on the question of whether or not toxic or other deleterious substances are formed in the radiation sterilization of foods is the chemical study of reaction products and reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of individual food components. The present evaluation of the radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides, and proteins outlines the various radiation-induced processes which lead to amino acid degradation and to the synthesis of amino acid derivatives of higher molecular weight. Among the latter are the ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diamino dicarboxylic acids which are formed as major products in the radiolysis of peptides both in aqueous solution and in the solid state. The ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diamino acids are of particular interest as irradiation products because they represent a class of compounds not normally encountered in plant and animal protein sources. Such compounds have, however, been isolated from certain types of bacteria and bacterial products. All of the available data strongly suggest that the ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diamino acids are produced in significant yield in the radiation sterilization of high protein foods. The importance of initiating extensive chemical and biological studies of these and of other high molecular weight products in irradiated food is emphasized.

  20. Medical and industrial application of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajayi, I.R.

    1999-01-01

    While dosimetry is not a radiation application, accurate dosage of radiation of utmost importance for all radiation applications. For both therapeutic and industrial applications it can be matter of life and death. For this reason, great efforts have been made to ensure that radiation dosages given to patients and used in all industrial applications are as near as possible to those prescribed. The World Health Organization (WHO) and the IAEA, together with many National Standard Laboratories and with the International Bureau of Weight and Measures, have been very active and successful during the last 20 years in ascertaining that normal cobalt-60 therapy unit. For this purpose, 63 Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories have been established of which more than half are in developing countries. FRPS houses one of the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories. As accurate dosimetry is a prerequisite in radiotherapy, so it is in industrial exposures and all laboratories responsible for dosimetry have to make frequent intercomparisons with one of the Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories. The SSDL at FRPS hopes to commence this as soon as our new Harshaw 6600 TLD reader arrives. This has already been approved by the IAEA. Much high doses of radiation are used for some industrial applications, as discussed in a previous lecture, such as sterilization of rubber, and food preservation and newly developed techniques are being used for the assurance of the prescribed dose. IAEA provides assistance in this area also through the secondary standard dosimetry laboratories. The IAEA has a broad programme of assistance which includes the calibration of all instruments in the laboratories of the participants, be it for radiation protection, or high dose measurements

  1. Radiation Detection for Homeland Security Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, James

    2008-05-01

    In the past twenty years or so, there have been significant changes in the strategy and applications for homeland security. Recently there have been significant at deterring and interdicting terrorists and associated organizations. This is a shift in the normal paradigm of deterrence and surveillance of a nation and the `conventional' methods of warfare to the `unconventional' means that terrorist organizations resort to. With that shift comes the responsibility to monitor international borders for weapons of mass destruction, including radiological weapons. As a result, countries around the world are deploying radiation detection instrumentation to interdict the illegal shipment of radioactive material crossing international borders. These efforts include deployments at land, rail, air, and sea ports of entry in the US and in European and Asian countries. Radioactive signatures of concern include radiation dispersal devices (RDD), nuclear warheads, and special nuclear material (SNM). Radiation portal monitors (RPMs) are used as the main screening tool for vehicles and cargo at borders, supplemented by handheld detectors, personal radiation detectors, and x-ray imaging systems. This talk will present an overview of radiation detection equipment with emphasis on radiation portal monitors. In the US, the deployment of radiation detection equipment is being coordinated by the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office within the Department of Homeland Security, and a brief summary of the program will be covered. Challenges with current generation systems will be discussed as well as areas of investigation and opportunities for improvements. The next generation of radiation portal monitors is being produced under the Advanced Spectroscopic Portal program and will be available for deployment in the near future. Additional technologies, from commercially available to experimental, that provide additional information for radiation screening, such as density imaging equipment, will

  2. The present status and perspectives on the development of radiation chemistry and technology in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroh, J.; Rosiak, J.; Wolszczak, M.; Bobrowski, K.; Chmielewski, A. G.; Zimek, Z.; Forys, M.; Kalecinski, J.

    2001-01-01

    Having in mind the world research trends in the field of radiation chemistry and technology, the development of this domain in Poland has been discussed in this report. The condition of apparatus and man power at the Polish scientific institutions and academic centers acting in the above mentioned scientific and technological area has been analyzed. It has been shown that the basic research achievements of national institutions are placing them among the most advanced foreign centers. As to the implemented technological elaborations it may be said that is one of the few high-tech fields in which Poland can compete with the most advanced centers in the world. (author)

  3. Novel Concrete Chemistry Achieved with Low Dose Gamma Radiation Curing and Resistance to Neutron Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Steven Robert

    As much as 50% of ageing-related problems with concrete structures can be attributed to con-struction deficiencies at the time of placement. The most influential time affecting longevity of concrete structures is the curing phase, or commonly the initial 28 days following its placement. A novel advanced atomistic analysis of novel concrete chemistry is presented in this dissertation with the objective to improve concrete structural properties and its longevity. Based on experiments and computational models, this novel concrete chemistry is discussed in two cases: (a) concrete chemistry changes when exposed to low-dose gamma radiation in its early curing stage, thus improving its strength in a shorter period of time then curing for the conventional 28 days; (b) concrete chemistry is controlled by its atomistic components to assure strength is not reduced but that its activation due to long-term exposure to neutron flux in nuclear power plants is negligible. High dose gamma radiation is well documented as a degradation mechanism that decreases concrete's compressive strength; however, the effects of low-dose gamma radiation on the initial curing phase of concrete, having never been studied before, proved its compressive strength increases. Using a 137 Cs source, concrete samples were subjected to gamma radiation during the initial curing phase for seven, 14, and 28 days. The compressive strength after seven days is improved for gamma cured concrete by 24% and after 14 days by 76%. Concrete shows no improvement in compressive strength after 28 days of exposure to gamma radiation, showing that there is a threshold effect. Scanning Electron Microscopy is used to examine the microstructure of low-dose gamma radiation where no damage to its microstructure is found, showing no difference between gamma cured and conventionally cured concrete. Molecular dynamics modeling based on the MOPAC package is used to study how gamma radiation during the curing stage improves

  4. Scattered Radiation Emission Imaging: Principles and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Nguyen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging processes built on the Compton scattering effect have been under continuing investigation since it was first suggested in the 50s. However, despite many innovative contributions, there are still formidable theoretical and technical challenges to overcome. In this paper, we review the state-of-the-art principles of the so-called scattered radiation emission imaging. Basically, it consists of using the cleverly collected scattered radiation from a radiating object to reconstruct its inner structure. Image formation is based on the mathematical concept of compounded conical projection. It entails a Radon transform defined on circular cone surfaces in order to express the scattered radiation flux density on a detecting pixel. We discuss in particular invertible cases of such conical Radon transforms which form a mathematical basis for image reconstruction methods. Numerical simulations performed in two and three space dimensions speak in favor of the viability of this imaging principle and its potential applications in various fields.

  5. Women's viewpoints on radiation and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Tamiko

    2005-01-01

    The discoveries of X-ray by W.C. Roentgen and of radium by M. Curie were immediately followed by application of them to medical field. After the World War II, nuclear energy has been used as an energy source on the one hand, and radiations have been also applied to various familiar fields in daily life on the other hand. These are now being developed into essential technologies in our present life. However, many people in general still fear nuclear power and radiation. There are numerous cases clearly indicating a widespread rejection of anything ''nuclear'' in the society as a whole. People in radiation'' community have made great efforts to remove these unfortunate misunderstandings and negative regarding the use of radiation, but these have not been satisfied. In this paper, I would like to reexamine possible factors that have been led to the dissatisfaction and do so from a different perspective from the standpoint of women. (author)

  6. Emerging applications of radiation-modified carrageenans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abad, Lucille V., E-mail: lvabad@pnri.dost.gov.ph; Aranilla, Charito T.; Relleve, Lorna S.; Dela Rosa, Alumanda M.

    2014-10-01

    The Philippines supplies almost half of the world’s processed carrageenan as ingredient for different applications. In order to maintain the country’s competitive advantage, R and D on radiation processed carrageenan with various potential applications had been undertaken. PVP-carrageenan hydrogels for wound dressing had been developed. A carrageenan-based radiation dose indicator can detect radiation dose of as low as 5 kGy. Irradiated carrageenan has also been tested as plant growth promoter. Irradiated carrageenans have been found have been found to contain some antioxidant properties which increase with increasing dose and concentration. Carboxymethyl carrageenans had also been developed that shows promising effect as super water absorbent for soil conditioner in plants.

  7. Application of Chemistry in Materials Research at NASA GRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavandi, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    Overview of NASA GRC Materials Development. New materials enabled by new chemistries offering unique properties and chemical processing techniques. Durability of materials in harsh environments requires understanding and modeling of chemical interaction of materials with the environment.

  8. Fruit and cereal bioactives: sources, chemistry, and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tokusoglu, Ozlem; Hall, Clifford, III

    2011-01-01

    "Presenting up-to-date data in an easy-to-use format, this comprehensive overview of the chemistry of bioactive components of fruits and cereals addresses the role of these compounds in determining...

  9. HMI Department of Radiation Chemistry: Results of scientific activities in 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    In the radiation chemistry department of the Hahn-Meitner-Institute in Berlin, 4 subjects are treated largely the progress of which made in 1984 is herein reported: 1) Interface processes and energy conversion (reaction pathways of photoinduced charge carriers and their in energy conversion mechanisms); 2) Pulse radiolysis (generation and investigation of shortlived chemically quick-reacting particles); 3) Kinematics (reciprocal action with ion, atom and molecule collisions; clarification of the dynamics of chemical reactions; 4) Insulators and plastics/physical and chemical primary processes when these materials are subjected to high-energy radiation, light or UV light). A list of publications and lectures is added to complement the description of results gained from R and D work. (BR) [de

  10. Radiation chemistry of carbohydrates and of the sugar moiety in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonntag, C. von

    1979-01-01

    The free radical chemistry of carbohydrates as studied by radiation techniques is briefly reviewed. In aqueous solutions OH radicals and H atoms abstract carbon-bound H atoms to give the primary carbohydrate radicals which can undergo a number of elimination and rearrangement reactions leading to secondary carbohydrate radicals. Oxygen can suppress these elimination and rearrangement reactions by converting the primary carbohydrate radicals into the corresponding peroxyl radicals. The reactions leading to the observed products are discussed. In the solid state a few carbohydrates show radiation-induced chain reactions which are of preparative interest. Hydroxyl radical attack at the sugar moiety of DNA eventually leads to DNA strand breaks and to alkali-labile sites. (Auth.)

  11. The radiation chemistry of heterogeneous and homogeneous nitrogen and water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linacre, J.K.; Marsh, W.R.

    1981-06-01

    Measurements were made of the radiation chemical products such as nitric acid formed when nitrogen gas mixtures in the presence of water vapour and liquid were irradiated with the mixed neutron/gamma field of the BEPO reactor to doses of ca 10 21 to 10 23 eVg -1 . The water was analysed for NO 3 - , NO 2 - and NH 4 + ions, also for H 2 O 2 , NH 2 OH and N 2 H 4 . The investigation was aimed at obtaining information relevant to the DIDO and PLUTO reactors, but the results are of more general interest. The results are discussed in terms of reactions to be expected, especially those of N atoms, and are compared with those of other work on radiation and gas discharge chemistry. (author)

  12. World perspective of radiation and isotope application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machi, Sueo

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear technology for non-power application has been serving in contribution to sustainable development and human welfare in terms of environmental protection, human health, clean energy and food security. The paper focuses on radiation processing for manufacturing and sterilization, non-destructive testing by radiography for quality control, nucleonic control systems for process control and optimization, and tracer technology for process optimization and trouble-shooting. More specifically, the paper reports heat and chemical resistant polymers produced by radiation cross-linking, the curing of surface coatings, and recent trends in radiation sources for industrial processing including ion beam sources. It further reports radiation sterilization of medical products and radiation technology for cleaning flue gases from power stations burning coal or oil emitting air polluting substances. As agricultural applications, plant mutation breeding for improving productivity, food irradiation for safe use of foods, and controlling of insect pests replacing pesticide are mentioned. Finally, an important role of international cooperation, such as IAEA-RCA program, FNCA (Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia), and bilateral collaboration, to promote technology transfer to developing countries is stressed. (S. Ohno)

  13. Radiation in perspective applications, risks and protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Everyone on earth is exposed to natural radiation. Radiation produced artificially is no different, either in kind or in effect, from that originating naturally. Although radiation has many beneficial applications, throughout medicine, industry and research, it can be harmful to human beings who must be adequately protected from unnecessary or excessive exposures. For this purpose, a thorough system of international principles and standards and stringent national legislations have been put in place. Yet radiation continues to be the subject of much public fear and controversy. This clearly written report, intended for the nonspecialist reader, aims to contribute to an enlightened debate on this subject by presenting the most up-to-date and authoritative material on sources, uses and affects of radiation, and ways in which people are protected from its risks. It discusses the development of radiation protection measures, its internationally agreed principles, and also addresses social and economic issues such as ethical questions, risk perceptions, risk comparisons, public participation in decision-making and the cost of protection. (author)

  14. Geological applications of synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, C. M. B.; Cressey, G.; Redfern, S. A. T.

    1995-03-01

    Synchrotron-based, Earth sciences research carried out over the last 5 years is reviewed with special attention being given to X-ray absorption studies; X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence microprobe applications are considered more briefly. A comprehensive bibliography is included. The main part of the paper summarizes recent work carried out at the Daresbury SRS. K-edge XAS studies of glasses as models for silicate melts provide information on the local structural environments of Si, Fe 2+ and Fe 3+. By analogy with synthetic "leucites" which contain Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ in tetrahedral framework sites, it seems that many model glasses also contain both oxidation states of Fe in the network, rather than as network modifiers. The structural sites occupied by the minor elements Mn, Zn and Ti in staurolite have been identified using XAFS; Mn and Zn substitute for Fe 2+ in the tetrahedral T2 site, while Ti occupies the distorted M2 octahedral site. L-edge spectroscopy is used to identify the valencies and electronic structures of Mn and Fe in minerals and the Fe 2+:Fe 3+ ratio in a natural spinel is determined. The polarized nature of the synchrotron beam is exploited in determining the Fe X-ray absorption anisotropy in single crystal tourmaline and epidote. XRD powder studies include Rietveld-refinement structure determination and compressibility studies. Synthetic "leucites" having the stoichiometry K 2MgSi 5O 12 have distinctly different structures. The dry-synthesized form is cubic Ia3d with Si and Mg fully disordered on tetrahedral framework sites, while the hydrothermally-synthesized polymorph is monoclinic P2 1/c with Si and Mg fully disordered on, respectively, 10 and 2 tetrahedral sites. The reversible tetragonal to orthorhombic phase transition in gillespite (BaFeSi 4O 10) has been studied in a diamond anvil cell using ED detection and found to occur at 1.2 ± 0.1 GPa. The anomalous compressibility observed has been interpreted in terms of ferroelastic and

  15. Inhibition and anti-inhibition effects of positronium formation in cyclohexane and their relation to radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Y.; Miyake, Y.; Tabata, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Positronium formation in cyclohexane has been studied using C 2 H 5 Br or CCl 4 as an inhibitor and C 6 F 6 as an anti-inhibitor. The results are analyzed using an empirical formula which is well established in radiation chemistry for electron scavenging reactions in cyclohexane. The reactivity parameters derived from the radiation chemistry are shown to successfully reproduce the experimental results. Very close correlation between positronium formation and radiation chemistry is evident, and the spur reaction model of positronium formation is corroborated. From a simple model of the positron spur in which only a single ion pair and a positron is assumed, it is estimated that about 75% of the spur electron combines with the positron. (author)

  16. Applications of radiation processing: SRI experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajput, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Shriram Applied Radiation Centre (SARC) is a part of Shriram Institute for Industrial Research (SRI), and was established in 1986, in collaboration with Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT), Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB). SARC was established with a objective to popularize the radiation processing technology for various applications. SARC is a fully automatic, computerized plant setup as per the design and norms of BRIT/AERB for round the clock fail safe operations. The capacity of SARC Irradiator is 800 kCi of Cobalt -60 source which can process up to 10,000 cubic meters of material (0.1g/cc) at 25 kGy level

  17. Role of dosimetry in radiation processing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, Kishor

    2001-01-01

    Today, radiation processing is a growing technology offering potential technological advantages as well as enhanced safety and economy. It is expanding on two fronts: the variety of applications is exploding as well as the sources of radiation. And with that comes the necessary advances in dosimetry. However, the success of the technology still depends on the assertion that the irradiated products are reliable and safe, whether they are health care products or cables and wires. And this is best assured through quality assurance programmes. The key element in QA in radiation processing is a well-characterised, reliable dosimetry that is traceable to the international measurement system. Traceability is the foundation for international acceptance of the irradiated products; and with international trade of irradiated products on the rise, it becomes absolutely critical. It is thus vital that the industry recognises this pivotal position of good dosimetry and the role a national standards laboratory plays in that connection. (author)

  18. Applications of synchrotron radiation to Chemical Engineering Science: Workshop report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This report contains extended abstracts that summarize presentations made at the Workshop on Applications of Synchrotron Radiation to Chemical Engineering Science held at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL, on April 22--23, 1991. The talks emphasized the application of techniques involving absorption fluorescence, diffraction, and reflection of synchrotron x-rays, with a focus on problems in applied chemistry and chemical engineering, as well as on the use of x-rays in topographic, tomographic, and lithographic procedures. The attendees at the workshop included experts in the field of synchrotron science, scientists and engineers from ANL, other national laboratories, industry, and universities; and graduate and undergraduate students who were enrolled in ANL educational programs at the time of the workshop. Talks in the Plenary and Overview Session described the status of and special capabilities to be offered by the Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as strategies and opportunities for utilization of synchrotron radiation to solve science and engineering problems. Invited talks given in subsequent sessions covered the use of intense infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray photon beams (as provided by synchrotrons) in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering research related to electrochemical and corrosion science, catalyst development and characterization, lithography and imaging techniques, and microanalysis

  19. Applications of synchrotron radiation to Chemical Engineering Science: Workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-07-01

    This report contains extended abstracts that summarize presentations made at the Workshop on Applications of Synchrotron Radiation to Chemical Engineering Science held at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL, on April 22--23, 1991. The talks emphasized the application of techniques involving absorption fluorescence, diffraction, and reflection of synchrotron x-rays, with a focus on problems in applied chemistry and chemical engineering, as well as on the use of x-rays in topographic, tomographic, and lithographic procedures. The attendees at the workshop included experts in the field of synchrotron science, scientists and engineers from ANL, other national laboratories, industry, and universities; and graduate and undergraduate students who were enrolled in ANL educational programs at the time of the workshop. Talks in the Plenary and Overview Session described the status of and special capabilities to be offered by the Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as strategies and opportunities for utilization of synchrotron radiation to solve science and engineering problems. Invited talks given in subsequent sessions covered the use of intense infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray photon beams (as provided by synchrotrons) in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering research related to electrochemical and corrosion science, catalyst development and characterization, lithography and imaging techniques, and microanalysis.

  20. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, D.; Forkman, B.; Persson, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection.

  1. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brune, D.; Forkman, B.; Persson, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection

  2. Development of clinical application of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seoung Yul; Yoo, Hyung Jun [and others

    2000-04-01

    The aim is to develop the clinical radiation therapy techniques, which increase local control and cure rate of cancer. The contents were 1. technique of stereotactic radiotherapy 2. technique of intraoperative radiation therapy(IORT) 3. technique of fractionated radiotherapy 4. technique of 3D conformal therapy 5. chemoradiotherapy in lung cancer, rectal cancer and biliopancreatic cancer 6. network based information communication system of radiation oncology 7. animal studies for the best application of chemoradiotherapy and for elucidating mechanism of slide effect in radiotherapy. The results were 1. completion of quality assurance protocol, frame and mounting system 2. completion of applicator of IORT 3. clinical protocol of fractionated radiotherapy 4. clinical protocol of 3D conformal therapy for brain, head and neck, breast and lung cancer 5. completion of multimodality treatment protocol for lung, rectal and biliopancreatic cancer 6. completion of database system for patient information and simulation image 7. standardization of estimation for radiation induced pneumonitis in animal model. Future plans are (1) developed fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy system will be commercialized (2) developed applicator of brachytherapy for IORT will be commercialized (3) 3D conformal therapy will increase local control rate for brain tumor and decrease complications such as zerostomia after treatment for nasopharygeal cancer (4) training manpower and skills for randomized clinical trial (5) suggest possibility of clinical usefulness of oral 5-fluorouracil (6) to provide basic technique for electric chart (7) promote developing database system for image information (8) also in view of double edge sword effect of NO, it is possible to modify the NO production from irradiation to increase the tolerance to radiation.

  3. Development of clinical application of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seoung Yul; Yoo, Hyung Jun

    2000-04-01

    The aim is to develop the clinical radiation therapy techniques, which increase local control and cure rate of cancer. The contents were 1. technique of stereotactic radiotherapy 2. technique of intraoperative radiation therapy(IORT) 3. technique of fractionated radiotherapy 4. technique of 3D conformal therapy 5. chemoradiotherapy in lung cancer, rectal cancer and biliopancreatic cancer 6. network based information communication system of radiation oncology 7. animal studies for the best application of chemoradiotherapy and for elucidating mechanism of slide effect in radiotherapy. The results were 1. completion of quality assurance protocol, frame and mounting system 2. completion of applicator of IORT 3. clinical protocol of fractionated radiotherapy 4. clinical protocol of 3D conformal therapy for brain, head and neck, breast and lung cancer 5. completion of multimodality treatment protocol for lung, rectal and biliopancreatic cancer 6. completion of database system for patient information and simulation image 7. standardization of estimation for radiation induced pneumonitis in animal model. Future plans are 1) developed fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy system will be commercialized 2) developed applicator of brachytherapy for IORT will be commercialized 3) 3D conformal therapy will increase local control rate for brain tumor and decrease complications such as zerostomia after treatment for nasopharygeal cancer 4) training manpower and skills for randomized clinical trial 5) suggest possibility of clinical usefulness of oral 5-fluorouracil 6) to provide basic technique for electric chart 7) promote developing database system for image information 8) also in view of double edge sword effect of NO, it is possible to modify the NO production from irradiation to increase the tolerance to radiation

  4. Radiation applications in NDT in space program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, K.

    1994-01-01

    Non-destructive testing (NDT) and evaluation play an important role in the qualification of sub-systems and components in space programme. NDT is carried out at various stages of manufacturing of components and also prior to end use to ensure a high degree of reliability. Penetrating radiations such as X-rays, γ-rays and neutrons are extensively used for the radiographic inspection of components, sub-systems and assemblies in both the launch vehicles and satellites. Both low and high energy radiations are employed for the evaluation of the above components depending on their size and nature. Real time radiography (RTR) and computed tomography (CT) are also used in certain specific applications where more detailed information is needed. Neutron radiography is employed for the inspection of pyro-devices used in separation, destruct and satellite deployment systems. Besides their use for non-destructive testing purposes, the radiation sources are also used for various special applications like solid propellant slurry flow measurement simulation of radiation environment on components used in the satellites and also for studying migration of ingredients in solid rocket motor. (author). 12 refs., 6 figs

  5. Rubber - application of radiation to tire manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, J.D.; Alliger, G.

    1979-01-01

    Since the advent of commercial accelerators during the last several years capable of producing controllable electron beams of high energy, Firestone has devoted a considerable effort to the better understanding of the possible applications of such radiation to the production of tires or tire components. A number of chemical reactions can occur when elastomeric compounds are exposed to high energy waves, but crosslinking and degradation are the most important. The degree to which the crosslinking reaction predominates depends upon the nature of the rubber, compounding ingredients and the dosage. In general then, the effects achieved by the radiation of a rubber are quite similar to those resulting from heat. However, radiation cure or precure of compounds offers the advantage that the degree of crosslinking can be better controlled. Uniform crosslinking is possible since the high speed electrons penetrate uniformly throughout the sample. Curing with heat on the other hand may result in a greater degree of crosslinking on the surface of the sample than the center because of low heat conductivity. In general, radiation can be used to advantage to crosslink partially rubber tire components so that they retain better their shape and dimension during tire assembly and final cure or vulcanization. Added advantages of radiation precure include: a reduction of material usage, substitution of synthetic for natural rubber without loss in strength and the fact that partially crosslinked components will not thin out or become displaced during construction and vulcanization of the tire. (author)

  6. Application of radiation to environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Okihiro; Machi, Sueo

    1987-01-01

    A survey was made to investigate the current applications of radiations to environmental protection. Electron irradiation is used for desulfurization and denitration of flue gas. Flue gas generated from combusted fossil fuel such as coal and oil is irradiated with electrons to oxidize sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, which are then removed to clean the flue gas. Ammonia or lime may be added before irradiation to convert sulfer dioxide and nitrogen oxides into ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate or convert sulfur dioxide into calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate. Radiations are helpful for treatment of waste water. When water is irradiated with radiations, most of the energy is absorbed by water to cause decomposition of water molecules, resulting in the production of highly reactive species such as OH radical and H atom. Contaminants then react with these species and are oxidized into carbon dioxide and water. Other methods are also available for applying radiations to water treatment. Sludge contains a large amount of organic substances that serve as fertilizer components. Thus, radiations can be used to sterilize and compost sludge. (Nogami, K.)

  7. Applications of self-assembled monolayers in materials chemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Physical and Materials Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory,. Pune 411 008, India e-mail: viji@ems.ncl.res.in. Abstract. Self-assembly provides a simple route to organise suitable organic molecules on noble metal and selected nanocluster surfaces by using monolayers of long chain organic molecules with ...

  8. The Application of Computational Chemistry to Problems in Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantum chemistry is capable of calculating a wide range of electronic and thermodynamic properties of interest to a chemist or physicist. Calculations can be used both to predict the results of future experiments and to aid in the interpretation of existing results. This paper w...

  9. Prediction of Log "P": ALOGPS Application in Medicinal Chemistry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawski, Jacek; Bernard, Marek K.; Janusz, Anna; Kuzma, Weronika

    2012-01-01

    Molecular hydrophobicity (lipophilicity), usually quantified as log "P" where "P" is the partition coefficient, is an important molecular characteristic in medicinal chemistry and drug design. The log "P" coefficient is one of the principal parameters for the estimation of lipophilicity of chemical compounds and pharmacokinetic properties. The…

  10. satlc applications as examples for systemic chemistry education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IICBA01

    Systemic Approach to Teaching and Learning [SATL] has evolved in the field of .... sciences, engineering sciences, agriculture, and pharmaceutical sciences. .... A study of the efficacy of systemic methods applied to the first semester of the second year organic chemistry course (16 lectures, 32 hours) at Zagazeg University ...

  11. Applications and opportunities for radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Round, K.J.

    1984-01-01

    An important spin-off benefit from the nuclear industry has been the ability to produce a wide variety of ionizing radiation sources for industrial, medical and scientific applications. These sources include radionuclides produced by irradiation of target material in reactors and cyclotrons or recovered from spent fuels, and accelerators. The uses of radiation in both medicine and industry can be expected to evolve. Traditional uses such as cancer therapy will mature and in some cases be displaced by new technology. Major new applications, including food processing and waste treatment, are expected to maintain the demand for isotopes such as cobalt 60 and to stimulate the development of economical and reliable accelerator systems. (L.L.) (Tab., 2 figs.)

  12. New environmental applications of radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikaev, A.K.

    1998-01-01

    The paper is a brief review of recent data on environmental applications of radiation technology obtained with participation of the author. It includes the results of the study on combined electron-beam and ozone treatment of municipal wastewater in the aerosol flow and electron-beam purification of water from heavy metals (lead, cadmium, mercury, chromium) by two methods (in the presence of formate as an OH radical scavenger or sorbents of inorganic and plant origins)

  13. A Radiation Chemistry Code Based on the Greens Functions of the Diffusion Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation produces several radiolytic species such as.OH, e-aq, and H. when interacting with biological matter. Following their creation, radiolytic species diffuse and chemically react with biological molecules such as DNA. Despite years of research, many questions on the DNA damage by ionizing radiation remains, notably on the indirect effect, i.e. the damage resulting from the reactions of the radiolytic species with DNA. To simulate DNA damage by ionizing radiation, we are developing a step-by-step radiation chemistry code that is based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE), which is able to follow the trajectories of all particles and their reactions with time. In the recent years, simulations based on the GFDE have been used extensively in biochemistry, notably to simulate biochemical networks in time and space and are often used as the "gold standard" to validate diffusion-reaction theories. The exact GFDE for partially diffusion-controlled reactions is difficult to use because of its complex form. Therefore, the radial Green's function, which is much simpler, is often used. Hence, much effort has been devoted to the sampling of the radial Green's functions, for which we have developed a sampling algorithm This algorithm only yields the inter-particle distance vector length after a time step; the sampling of the deviation angle of the inter-particle vector is not taken into consideration. In this work, we show that the radial distribution is predicted by the exact radial Green's function. We also use a technique developed by Clifford et al. to generate the inter-particle vector deviation angles, knowing the inter-particle vector length before and after a time step. The results are compared with those predicted by the exact GFDE and by the analytical angular functions for free diffusion. This first step in the creation of the radiation chemistry code should help the understanding of the contribution of the indirect effect in the

  14. Changes in domestic heating fuel use in Greece: effects on atmospheric chemistry and radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasopoulou, Eleni; Speyer, Orestis; Brunner, Dominik; Vogel, Heike; Vogel, Bernhard; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos

    2017-09-01

    For the past 8 years, Greece has been experiencing a major financial crisis which, among other side effects, has led to a shift in the fuel used for residential heating from fossil fuel towards biofuels, primarily wood. This study simulates the fate of the residential wood burning aerosol plume (RWB smog) and the implications on atmospheric chemistry and radiation, with the support of detailed aerosol characterization from measurements during the winter of 2013-2014 in Athens. The applied model system (TNO-MACC_II emissions and COSMO-ART model) and configuration used reproduces the measured frequent nighttime aerosol spikes (hourly PM10 > 75 µg m-3) and their chemical profile (carbonaceous components and ratios). Updated temporal and chemical RWB emission profiles, derived from measurements, were used, while the level of the model performance was tested for different heating demand (HD) conditions, resulting in better agreement with measurements for Tmin < 9 °C. Half of the aerosol mass over the Athens basin is organic in the submicron range, of which 80 % corresponds to RWB (average values during the smog period). Although organic particles are important light scatterers, the direct radiative cooling of the aerosol plume during wintertime is found low (monthly average forcing of -0.4 W m-2 at the surface), followed by a minor feedback to the concentration levels of aerosol species. The low radiative cooling of a period with such intense air pollution conditions is attributed to the timing of the smog plume appearance, both directly (longwave radiation increases during nighttime) and indirectly (the mild effect of the residual plume on solar radiation during the next day, due to removal and dispersion processes).

  15. Stratospheric sulfur and its implications for radiative forcing simulated by the chemistry climate model EMAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brühl, C; Lelieveld, J; Tost, H; Höpfner, M; Glatthor, N

    2015-03-16

    Multiyear simulations with the atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC with a microphysical modal aerosol module at high vertical resolution demonstrate that the sulfur gases COS and SO 2 , the latter from low-latitude and midlatitude volcanic eruptions, predominantly control the formation of stratospheric aerosol. Marine dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and other SO 2 sources, including strong anthropogenic emissions in China, are found to play a minor role except in the lowermost stratosphere. Estimates of volcanic SO 2 emissions are based on satellite observations using Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer and Ozone Monitoring Instrument for total injected mass and Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) on Envisat or Stratospheric Aerosol and Gases Experiment for the spatial distribution. The 10 year SO 2 and COS data set of MIPAS is also used for model evaluation. The calculated radiative forcing of stratospheric background aerosol including sulfate from COS and small contributions by DMS oxidation, and organic aerosol from biomass burning, is about 0.07W/m 2 . For stratospheric sulfate aerosol from medium and small volcanic eruptions between 2005 and 2011 a global radiative forcing up to 0.2W/m 2 is calculated, moderating climate warming, while for the major Pinatubo eruption the simulated forcing reaches 5W/m 2 , leading to temporary climate cooling. The Pinatubo simulation demonstrates the importance of radiative feedback on dynamics, e.g., enhanced tropical upwelling, for large volcanic eruptions.

  16. Application of Virtual Reality to Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamela, B.; Felipe, A.; Sanchez-Mayoral, M. L.; Mreino, A.; Sarti, F.

    2004-01-01

    In order to optimize the operations and procedures in several aspects of a Nuclear Power Plants, Iberdrola Ingenieria y Consultoria (Iberinco) has been developed some projects with Virtual Reality: CIPRES, ACEWO, TILOS and SICOMORO. With the experience acquired in these projects, Iberinco has checked the utility and advantageous of Virtual Reality applications that could have a direct application to Radiation Protection. With Virtual Reality it is possible to optimize the procedures involved in several critical aspects of the Plant Management. A training program bases on Virtual Reality systems could be one of the most important application. In Emergency situations the time of reaction is very important and in order to reduce it and dose, Virtual Reality is a very important tool, that could be used for training and to guide response team actions. Finally, the reduction of dose to workers, in a NPP, and patients, in hospital, is one of the most important application of Virtual Reality. (Author) 5 refs

  17. Bioorthogonal chemistry: applications in activity-based protein profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Lianne I; van der Linden, Wouter A; Li, Nan; Li, Kah-Yee; Liu, Nora; Hoogendoorn, Sascha; van der Marel, Gijs A; Florea, Bogdan I; Overkleeft, Herman S

    2011-09-20

    The close interaction between organic chemistry and biology goes back to the late 18th century, when the modern natural sciences began to take shape. After synthetic organic chemistry arose as a discipline, organic chemists almost immediately began to pursue the synthesis of naturally occurring compounds, thereby contributing to the understanding of their functions in biological processes. Research in those days was often remarkably interdisciplinary; in fact, it constituted chemical biology research before the phrase even existed. For example, histological dyes, both of an organic and inorganic nature, were developed and applied by independent researchers (Gram and Golgi) with the aim of visualizing cellular substructures (the bacterial cell wall and the Golgi apparatus). Over the years, as knowledge within the various fields of the natural sciences deepened, research disciplines drifted apart, becoming rather monodisciplinary. In these years, broadly ranging from the end of World War II to about the 1980s, organic chemistry continued to impact life sciences research, but contributions were of a more indirect nature. As an example, the development of the polymerase chain reaction, from which molecular biology and genetics research have greatly profited, was partly predicated on the availability of synthetic oligonucleotides. These molecules first became available in the late 1960s, the result of organic chemists pursuing the synthesis of DNA oligomers primarily because of the synthetic challenges involved. Today, academic natural sciences research is again becoming more interdisciplinary, and sometimes even multidisciplinary. What was termed "chemical biology" by Stuart Schreiber at the end of the last century can be roughly described as the use of intellectually chemical approaches to shed light on processes that are fundamentally rooted in biology. Chemical tools and techniques that are developed for biological studies in the exciting and rapidly evolving field

  18. Study of catalytic phenomena in radiation chemistry; Etude des phenomenes catalytiques en chimie des radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dran, J C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-01-01

    Two phenomena have been studied: the action of {gamma} rays from radio-cobalt on the adsorption and catalytic properties of ZnO and NiO in. relationship with the heterogeneous oxidation of CO, and the homogeneous catalysis by OsO{sub 4} of the oxidation of various aqueous phase solutes by the same radiation. The prior irradiation of ZnO and of NiO does not modify their catalytic activity but generally increases the adsorption energy of -the gases CO and O{sub 2}. The influence of the radiations appears to be connected with the presence of traces of water on ZnO and of an excess of oxygen on NiO. Osmium tetroxide which is not degraded by irradiation in acid solution, accelerates the radiolytic oxidation of certain compounds (Te{sup IV}, Pt{sup 11}, As{sup 111}) in the presence of oxygen, as a result of its sensitizing effect on the oxidation by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. In the case of phosphites on the other hand, OsO{sub 4} has a protecting action under certain conditions of acidity and may suppress entirely the chain reaction which characterizes the oxidation of this solute by{gamma} rays. A general mechanism is proposed for these phenomena. The rate constant for the OsO{sub 4} + HO{sub 2} reaction is calculated to be 5.7 x 10{sup 5} l.mol{sup -1}. sec{sup -1}. (author) [French] Deux phenomenes ont ete etudies: l'action des rayons {gamma} du radio-cobalt sur les proprietes adsorptives et catalytiques de ZnO et NiO en relation avec l'oxydation heterogene de CO et la catalyse homogene par OsO{sub 4} de l'oxydation de divers solutes en phase aqueuse par ce meme rayonnement. L'irradiation prealable de ZnO et de NiO n'a pas modifie leur activite catalytique, mais a generalement accru l'energie d'adsorption des gaz CO et O{sub 2}. L'influence des radiations semble liee a la presence de traces d'eau sur ZnO et d'un exces d'oxygene sur NiO. Le tetroxyde d'osmium qui n'est pas altere par le rayonnement en solution acide, accelere l'oxydation radiolytique de certains composes. (Te

  19. Study of catalytic phenomena in radiation chemistry; Etude des phenomenes catalytiques en chimie des radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dran, J.C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-01-01

    Two phenomena have been studied: the action of {gamma} rays from radio-cobalt on the adsorption and catalytic properties of ZnO and NiO in. relationship with the heterogeneous oxidation of CO, and the homogeneous catalysis by OsO{sub 4} of the oxidation of various aqueous phase solutes by the same radiation. The prior irradiation of ZnO and of NiO does not modify their catalytic activity but generally increases the adsorption energy of -the gases CO and O{sub 2}. The influence of the radiations appears to be connected with the presence of traces of water on ZnO and of an excess of oxygen on NiO. Osmium tetroxide which is not degraded by irradiation in acid solution, accelerates the radiolytic oxidation of certain compounds (Te{sup IV}, Pt{sup 11}, As{sup 111}) in the presence of oxygen, as a result of its sensitizing effect on the oxidation by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. In the case of phosphites on the other hand, OsO{sub 4} has a protecting action under certain conditions of acidity and may suppress entirely the chain reaction which characterizes the oxidation of this solute by{gamma} rays. A general mechanism is proposed for these phenomena. The rate constant for the OsO{sub 4} + HO{sub 2} reaction is calculated to be 5.7 x 10{sup 5} l.mol{sup -1}. sec{sup -1}. (author) [French] Deux phenomenes ont ete etudies: l'action des rayons {gamma} du radio-cobalt sur les proprietes adsorptives et catalytiques de ZnO et NiO en relation avec l'oxydation heterogene de CO et la catalyse homogene par OsO{sub 4} de l'oxydation de divers solutes en phase aqueuse par ce meme rayonnement. L'irradiation prealable de ZnO et de NiO n'a pas modifie leur activite catalytique, mais a generalement accru l'energie d'adsorption des gaz CO et O{sub 2}. L'influence des radiations semble liee a la presence de traces d'eau sur ZnO et d'un exces d'oxygene sur NiO. Le tetroxyde d'osmium qui n'est pas altere par le rayonnement en solution

  20. Progress in radiation chemistry of crown ether extractants used for the solvent extraction of "9"0Sr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Jing; Yu Chuhong; Cui Zhenpeng; Zhai Maolin

    2011-01-01

    The separation of the long-lived fission products from dissolved nuclear fuel could improve the safe disposal of high-level nuclear wastes and reduce their threaten to human being and environment. Since the extractant system will be exposed to high radiation environment during the solvent extraction of long-lived fission products. The understanding of radiation chemistry of extractants is very important for practical design of extractant system. The radiation chemistry of crown ether systems proposed for use in the solvent extraction of one of fission products "9"0Sr were reviewed based on the study on the radiation stability and radiolysis mechanism of crown ether system. Finally some challenges were suggested. (authors)

  1. Pulse radiolysis of nucleic acids and their base constituents: bibliographies on radiation chemistry: Pt. 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonntag, C von; Ross, A B

    1987-01-01

    For this compilation the data stored by the Radiation Chemistry Data Center bibliographic database through 1986 were processed using the SELECT keywords: purines, pyrimidines, nucleotides, nucleosides, nucleic acids and pulse radiolysis. The number of citations found was reduced by about one-third by eliminating privately published symposia papers, theses and papers not strictly relevant to this topic, e.g. on flavins, NADH, one-electron reduction of nitrouracil or the redox potential of isobarbituric acid. On the other hand, a few more papers known to us but not revealed by the keywords were added. The bibliography is arranged in approximately chronological order, references grouped by year of publication. Reviews are collected at the end of the bibliography in a separate section.

  2. Pulse radiolysis of nucleic acids and their base constituents: bibliographies on radiation chemistry: Pt. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonntag, C. von; Ross, A.B.; Notre Dame Univ., IN

    1987-01-01

    For this compilation the data stored by the Radiation Chemistry Data Center bibliographic database through 1986 were processed using the SELECT keywords: purines, pyrimidines, nucleotides, nucleosides, nucleic acids and pulse radiolysis. The number of citations found was reduced by about one-third by eliminating privately published symposia papers, theses and papers not strictly relevant to this topic, e.g. on flavins, NADH, one-electron reduction of nitrouracil or the redox potential of isobarbituric acid. On the other hand, a few more papers known to us but not revealed by the keywords were added. The bibliography is arranged in approximately chronological order, references grouped by year of publication. Reviews are collected at the end of the bibliography in a separate section. (author)

  3. Application of magnetohydrodynamic actuation to continuous flow chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jonathan; Karamata, Boris; Lillis, Brian; Gleeson, James P; Alderman, John; Collins, John K; Lane, William; Mathewson, Alan; Berney, Helen

    2002-11-01

    Continuous flow microreactors with an annular microchannel for cyclical chemical reactions were fabricated by either bulk micromachining in silicon or by rapid prototyping using EPON SU-8. Fluid propulsion in these unusual microchannels was achieved using AC magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) actuation. This integrated micropumping mechanism obviates the use of moving parts by acting locally on the electrolyte, exploiting its inherent conductive nature. Both silicon and SU-8 microreactors were capable of MHD actuation, attaining fluid velocities of the order of 300 microm s(-1) when using a 500 mM KCl electrolyte. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a thermocycling process, was chosen as an illustrative example of a cyclical chemistry. Accordingly, temperature zones were provided to enable a thermal cycle during each revolution. With this approach, fluid velocity determines cycle duration. Here, we report device fabrication and performance, a model to accurately describe fluid circulation by MHD actuation, and compatibility issues relating to this approach to chemistry.

  4. The application of green chemistry methods in organophosphorus synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odinets, Irina L; Matveeva, E V

    2012-01-01

    Data concerning the synthesis of organophosphorus compounds in ionic liquids, in water and under solvent-free conditions are considered and summarized. It is shown that this strategy, which complies with the definition of green chemistry, has advantages in terms of the rate of the process and the yields of target products as compared with syntheses in common organic solvents. The Wittig, Horner–Wadsworth–Emmons, Kabachnik–Fields, Arbuzov and Michaelis reactions are considered as examples. The bibliography includes 178 references.

  5. Application of radioprotectors in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kljajic, R.R.; Masic, Z.S.

    2000-01-01

    Application of the ionizing radiation in almost all the fields of human activities enlarged the knowledge of their harming influence on the living beings. At the same time there have been many investigations of different chemical means that could successfully be used in protection from radiation. Until today several hundreds of different chemical compounds have been considered to be a potential chemical radioprotector. Analyzing the results of investigating great number of potential radioprotective compounds, it can be said that those containing sulfur provide the most effective protection. That are aminothiols, aminodisulphides, derivatives of thiourea, thiosulphuric and thiophosphate acid, dithiocarbamates, thiazolines, some of biogen amines and their derivates. Among the investigated compounds there is a certain number that, under some circumstances, has shown a protective effect on the experimental animals. In the work comparative investigation of the protective effect of cistaphosa (WR-638) and gamaphosa (WR-2721) have been researched on the big experimental animals, radiated with a high level of X-radiation. Well protective influence of both radioprotectors has been proven but gamafos showed higher efficiency. (author)

  6. Primary processes in radiation chemistry. LET (Linear Energy Transfer) effect in water radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trupin-Wasselin, V.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiations on aqueous solutions leads to water ionization and then to the formation of radical species and molecular products (e - aq , H . , OH . , H 2 O 2 , H 2 ). It has been shown that the stopping power, characterized by the LET value (Linear Energy Transfer) becomes different when the nature of the ionizing radiations is different. Few data are nowadays available for high LET radiations such as protons and high energy heavy ions. These particles have been used to better understand the primary processes in radiation chemistry. The yield of a chemical dosimeter (the Fricke dosimeter) and those of the hydrogen peroxide have been determined for different LET. The effect of the dose rate on the Fricke dosimeter yield and on the H 2 O 2 yield has been studied too. When the dose rate increases, an increase of the molecular products yield is observed. At very high dose rate, this yield decreases on account of the attack of the molecular products by radicals. The H 2 O 2 yield in alkaline medium decreases when the pH reaches 12. This decrease can be explained by a slowing down of the H 2 O 2 formation velocity in alkaline medium. Superoxide radical has also been studied in this work. A new detection method: the time-resolved chemiluminescence has been perfected for this radical. This technique is more sensitive than the absorption spectroscopy. Experiments with heavy ions have allowed to determine the O 2 .- yield directly in the irradiation cell. The experimental results have been compared with those obtained with a Monte Carlo simulation code. (O.M.)

  7. Responsibility structure in medical radiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beekman, Z.M.

    1989-01-01

    The author discusses the various aspects of the responsibilities of physicians and clinical physicists with regard to radiation protection in medical applications of ionizing radiation. It becomes still clearer that the physician, who carries out the examination or the treatment, also has to bear the responsibility. this holds for the indication assessment as well as for optimization of the quality of the examination or treatment versus radiation burden of the patient, radiologic worker and thirds. Further it is clear that the physician in these will have to delegate specific tasks and responsibilities, whether or not in the elongated-arm construction. The clinical physicist is responsible in particular for the applications of the physical methods and watches the quality of the apparatus and methods used. As such he also is responsible for the technical workers, who take care of the preventive and corrective maintenance. The principal responsibility of the clinical physicist however lies in the field of standardization and calibration of medical-physical instruments. Besides this investigation into and development of new techniques, methods and apparatus come up, while also education and training of various profession groups involved need attention. (author). 6 refs.; 1 tab

  8. Multiphase chemistry in a microphysical radiation fog model—A numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bott, Andreas; Carmichael, Gregory R.

    A microphysical radiation fog model is coupled with a detailed chemistry module to simulate chemical reactions in the gas phase and in fog water during a radiation fog event. In the chemical part of the model the microphysical particle spectrum is subdivided into three size classes corresponding to non-activated aerosol particles, small and large fog droplets. Chemical reactions in the liquid phase are separately calculated in the small and in the large droplet size class. The impact of the chemical constitution of activated aerosols on fogwater chemistry is considered in the model simulations. The mass transfer of chemical species between the gas phase and the two liquid phases is treated in detail by solving the corresponding coupled differential equation system. The model also accounts for concentration changes of gas-phase and aqueous-phase chemical species which are induced by turbulence, gravitational settling and by evaporation/condensation processes. Numerical results demonstrate that fogwater chemistry is strongly controlled by dynamic processes, i.e. the vertical growth of the fog, turbulent mixing processes and the gravitational settling of the particles. The concentrations of aqueous-phase chemical species are different in the two droplet size classes. Reactands with lower water solubility are mainly found in the large droplet size class because the characteristic time for their mass transfer from the gas phase into the liquid phase is essentially longer than the characteristic time for the formation of large fog droplets. Species with high water solubility are rapidly transferred into the small fog droplets and are then washed out by wet deposition before these particles grow further to form large droplets. Thus, the concentrations of the major ions (NO 3-, NH 4+) are much higher in small than in large droplets, yielding distinctly lower pH values of the small particles. In the present study the reaction of sulfur with H 2O 2 and the Fe

  9. Studies in chemical dynamics and radiation chemistry. Technical progress report, 1 July 1974--30 June 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuppermann, A.

    1975-01-01

    Research progress in the following areas is reported: low energy electron scattering; photoelectron spectrometry; elementary reactions by photolysis at variable wavelengths; collisions in crossed molecular beams; and, diffusion kinetics in the radiation chemistry of water. Publications related to the work are included. (JGB)

  10. Can a coupled meteorology–chemistry model reproduce the historical trend in aerosol direct radiative effects over the Northern Hemisphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of a coupled meteorology–chemistry model, i.e., Weather Research and Forecast and Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF-CMAQ), to reproduce the historical trend in aerosol optical depth (AOD) and clear-sky shortwave radiation (SWR) over the Northern Hemisphere h...

  11. Role of the H bond network in the radiation chemistry of hydrated systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pommeret, S.; Renault, J.P.; Le Caer, S.; Vigneron, G.; Palmer, J.; Lima, M.; Righini, R.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: In the present contribution, we want to address the influence of the H bond network on the observed reactivity of hydrated system. In radiation chemistry the primary species appear extremely simple and at the same time are very reactive. The comprehension of their dynamics is rather difficult since their reactivity involves the solvent molecules as reactant. Some of those species like the hydrated electron and the proton are highly hydrophilic, while others like the hydroxide radical and the H atom are rather hydrophobic. Both the hydrated electron and the H atom locate near a defect of the H bond network i.e. a cavity. As an example of the role of the environment in radical chemistry, when studying the radiation chemistry of porous media we noticed that the interface play a crucial role in the outcome of that chemistry. More particularly we observed that the silanol band of the silica/water interface was strongly affected by the irradiation even so no energy is directly absorbed by an interface. In this contribution, we will first review the recent work on the H bond dynamics, in absence of any reactant. We will then present recent results on the radiation chemistry of nanoporous media and its influence on the H bond network of an interface and will also present recent results obtained on the H bond dynamics at an alumina-water interface. All those results will be discussed in light of the H bonded nature of neat water. Radiation chemistry of an H bonded interface: A Fourier transformed infrared detection associated to an electron accelerator was developed so as to characterise in situ the effects of irradiation on various systems. The FT-IR spectrometer and the detector were moved out of the accelerator room to be protected against radiation. The infrared beam was guided on a distance of 6 meters by optical conduits and mirrors. The spectra were obtained from 100 scans accumulated with a Bruker Vertex 70 equipment operating with a 4 cm -1 resolution

  12. Radiation leakage from linac electron applicator assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keys, R.A.; Purdy, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The electron beam applicator system currently in use on the linear accelerator is constructed of light-weight fiberglass and aluminum. With an applicator in place on the accelerator, the photon collimator jaws are automatically set several centimeters greater than the electron field size projected at the patient's surface. To ensure that no regions of high dose levels exist outside the useful beam, ionization and film measurements were made to quantitate the amount of leakage radiation through the 10 cm x 10 cm and 25 cm x 25 cm applicators. In most regions, the ionization levels at the patient's surface were below 5% of the central axis dose. In one area for the 25 cm applicator, the percentage ionization was 8.5%, which could be reduced by the addition of a small piece of 1/8 inch thick lead. However, ionization levels on the outside surface of the applicator were found to be considerably higher at certain locations for the 25 cm applicator. Results for 6, 9, 12 and 20 MeV electrons are reported here

  13. A gist of comprehensive review of hadronic chemistry and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangde, Vijay M. [Post Graduate Teaching Department of Chemistry, Rashtrasant Tukadoji Maharaj Nagpur University, Amravati Road Campus, NAGPUR - 440 033, India, Email: vijaytn6@gmail.com (India)

    2015-03-10

    20{sup th} century theories of Quantum Mechanics and Quantum Chemistry are exactly valid only when considered to represent the atomic structures. While considering the more general aspects of atomic combinations these theories fail to explain all the related experimental data from first unadulterated axiomatic principles. According to Quantum Chemistry two valence electrons should repel each other and as such there is no mathematical representation of a strong attractive forces between such valence electrons. In view of these and other insufficiencies of Quantum Chemistry, an Italian-American Scientist Professor Ruggero Maria Santilli during his more than five decades of dedicated and sustained research has denounced the fact that quantum chemistry is mostly based on mere nomenclatures. Professor R M Santilli first formulated the iso-, geno- and hyper- mathematics [1, 2, 3, 4] that helped in understanding numerous diversified problems and removing inadequacies in most of the established and celebrated theories of 20th century physics and chemistry. This involves the isotopic, genotopic, etc. lifting of Lie algebra that generated Lie admissible mathematics to properly describe irreversible processes. The studies on Hadronic Mechanics in general and chemistry in particular based on Santilli’s mathematics[3, 4, 5] for the first time has removed the very fundamental limitations of quantum chemistry [2, 6, 7, 8]. In the present discussion, a comprehensive review of Hadronic Chemistry is presented that imparts the completeness to the Quantum Chemistry via an addition of effects at distances of the order of 1 fm (only) which are assumed to be Non-linear, Non-local, Non-potential, Non-hamiltonian and thus Non-unitary, stepwise successes of Hadronic Chemistry and its application in development of a new chemical species called Magnecules.

  14. A gist of comprehensive review of hadronic chemistry and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tangde, Vijay M.

    2015-01-01

    20 th century theories of Quantum Mechanics and Quantum Chemistry are exactly valid only when considered to represent the atomic structures. While considering the more general aspects of atomic combinations these theories fail to explain all the related experimental data from first unadulterated axiomatic principles. According to Quantum Chemistry two valence electrons should repel each other and as such there is no mathematical representation of a strong attractive forces between such valence electrons. In view of these and other insufficiencies of Quantum Chemistry, an Italian-American Scientist Professor Ruggero Maria Santilli during his more than five decades of dedicated and sustained research has denounced the fact that quantum chemistry is mostly based on mere nomenclatures. Professor R M Santilli first formulated the iso-, geno- and hyper- mathematics [1, 2, 3, 4] that helped in understanding numerous diversified problems and removing inadequacies in most of the established and celebrated theories of 20th century physics and chemistry. This involves the isotopic, genotopic, etc. lifting of Lie algebra that generated Lie admissible mathematics to properly describe irreversible processes. The studies on Hadronic Mechanics in general and chemistry in particular based on Santilli’s mathematics[3, 4, 5] for the first time has removed the very fundamental limitations of quantum chemistry [2, 6, 7, 8]. In the present discussion, a comprehensive review of Hadronic Chemistry is presented that imparts the completeness to the Quantum Chemistry via an addition of effects at distances of the order of 1 fm (only) which are assumed to be Non-linear, Non-local, Non-potential, Non-hamiltonian and thus Non-unitary, stepwise successes of Hadronic Chemistry and its application in development of a new chemical species called Magnecules

  15. Ionizing radiations: medical and industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, H.

    1994-01-01

    Medical diagnosis with X-rays is the best known use of ionizing radiations on account of its wide diffusion (about 57 500 units in France). Other medical applications of artificial radionuclides involving a smaller number of installations are also well known, i.e. gamma teletherapy (167 units), brachytherapy (119 units) or therapy using unsealed sources (257 units). The industrial uses of ionising radiation, the diversity of which is very large, are generally less well known. The use of X- and gamma rays for non-destructive testing or food preservation and the use of tracers have some notoriety, but few people know that radioactive sources are involved in the measurement of parameters controlling industrial processes. The number of persons authorized to hold, use and/or sell artificial radionuclides amounts to about 4 800, all applications included. Approximately 650 of them are involved in therapy and 500 in medical research. The aim of this paper, which is not exhaustive, is to review a few typical applications of radionuclides both in the medical and industrial fields. It also supplies data both on the number of people authorized to use each technique and the radionuclides involved. (author). 10 tabs

  16. Modern electronic structure theory and applications in organic chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Davidson, ER

    1997-01-01

    This volume focuses on the use of quantum theory to understand and explain experiments in organic chemistry. High level ab initio calculations, when properly performed, are useful in making quantitative distinctions between various possible interpretations of structures, reactions and spectra. Chemical reasoning based on simpler quantum models is, however, essential to enumerating the likely possibilities. The simpler models also often suggest the type of wave function likely to be involved in ground and excited states at various points along reaction paths. This preliminary understanding is n

  17. Dynamic light scattering with applications to chemistry, biology, and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Berne, Bruce J

    2000-01-01

    Lasers play an increasingly important role in a variety of detection techniques, making inelastic light scattering a tool of growing value in the investigation of dynamic and structural problems in chemistry, biology, and physics. Until the initial publication of this work, however, no monograph treated the principles behind current developments in the field.This volume presents a comprehensive introduction to the principles underlying laser light scattering, focusing on the time dependence of fluctuations in fluid systems; it also serves as an introduction to the theory of time correlation f

  18. A review of the radiation chemistry of iodine compounds in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellers, R.M.

    1977-06-01

    Large amounts of radioactive iodine are formed in the fission of uranium in nuclear reactors. Some of this may be released to the coolant from the fuel either by diffusion through the canning material, or following the failure of a fuel pin. The iodine, which is released mainly as I 2 and methyl iodide, is transported with the coolant and, in direct cycle water cooled reactors, some is carried over with the steam to the turbines, where contamination may build up in the vicinity of steam leaks. Any assessment of the mechanism of the transport of iodine requires a knowledge of the relative amounts of the various oxidation states present, and must consider not only the thermal behaviour of iodine in water, but also the radiation chemical effects. A review is presented of the radiation chemistry of inorganic iodine compounds and methyl iodide in aqueous solutions. A number of unstable intermediates have been identified including species with iodide in valency states II, IV, VI and VIII. A considerable number of discrepancies exist in the literature data, and requirements for further work are identified. (author)

  19. Application of radiation and isotopes in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrzej, G. Chmielewski

    2006-01-01

    Full text: A vast variety of nuclear techniques is available for industrial, environmental, medical and research applications. Sealed or open radioisotope sources are applied as radiotracer in the system, in nucleonic gauges, in non destructive testing and in nuclear analytical techniques. Beside of isotopes X-ray tubes and accelerators operated in e-/X mode as a source of radiation are applied as well. These methods are used for process and material control, non-destructive evaluation of wells, castings and assembled machinery help to make industrial processes safer and more cost effective. For natural resource exploration radiotracers (RTT), sealed sources and nucleonic gauges (NCS) are used in the oil industry, in mineral processing and waste water treatment plants. Radioisotopes make important contributions in several sectors of economic significance including medicine industry, agriculture, structural safety and research. They are generally produced in research reactors or cyclotrons. More than 150 different radioisotopes in different forms are in use for various applications. Non-destructive testing (NDT) is essential for quality assurance of various products in diverse industries and construction projects apart from well established NDT protocols for industrial components, machinery and chemical pipelines, new techniques and applications, such as digital radiography for ecological safety, online inspection of concrete structures and pipe corrosion, are being developed. The new applications concern cargo inspection where Co 60 or e-/X sources are used. Radioisotopes are applied as radiotracers in industry and environment. Oil fields and refineries, chemical and metallurgical industries and wastewater purification installations are the end users benefiting from radioisotope techniques. Radioisotope techniques (radiotracers, gamma scanning, tomography and single particle tracking) are extensively used to identify and quantify multiphase reactors (phase hold

  20. The TAC Radiation Source for Bremsstrahlung Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demir, N.

    2008-01-01

    The TAC is a project for the first Turkish radiation source and currently design study is produced with funding from the DPT (State Planning Unity). Two main part of the project will be IR-FEL and Bremsstrahlung facility. Each LINAC will provide max. electron energy of 20 MeV. The Bremsstrahlung facility at TAC will consist two of the LINAC module and will be obtained 35 MeV photon energy. This would provide a chance to investigate nuclear structure at this energy range and also some application of photonuclear physics. In this work the main parameter and plans for those of facility will be detailed

  1. Applications of microwave radiation environmental remediation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, T.R.; Helt, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    A growing number of environmental remediation technologies (e.g., drying, melting, or sintering) utilize microwave radiation as an integral part of the process. An increasing number of novel applications, such as sustaining low-temperature plasmas or enhancing chemical reactivity, are also being developed. An overview of such technologies being developed by the Department of Energy is presented. A specific example being developed at Argonne National Laboratory, microwave-induced plasma reactors for the destruction of volatile organic compounds, is discussed in more detail

  2. Radiation chemistry of polymeric X-ray resists; Zur Strahlenchemie polymerer Roentgenresists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollersheim, O.

    1995-03-01

    In this study, the radiation chemical reactions in poly(methyl-methacrylate) (PMMA) and homo- and copolymers of lactide and glycollide during X-ray exposure with synchrotron radiation from the Bonn ELSA electron storage ring are quantitatively analyzed. In situ studies of the irradiated PMMA and lactide/glycollide polymers with mass spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and ESR spectroscopy combined with ex situ methods as size exclusion chromatography and titration lead to a complete and quantitative understanding of the radiation chemical reactions in both polymer classes. The implications for the application of the polymers in the X-ray deep etch lithography, which is the appropriate process for the production of microsystem components, are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Radiation curing technology progress and its industrial applications in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukachi, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    Optics, electronics and display industries are now the driving forces for the Japanese radiation curing technology. The purpose of this paper is to overview the newly developed radiation curing technology in Japan, in particular, its industrial applications, and to present the market figures in radiation curing applications, which were surveyed by RadTech Japan in 2002 afresh. (author)

  4. Chemistry Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  5. Activation analysis in water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, A.; Toth, A.

    1978-01-01

    The potential applications of activation analysis in water chemistry are discussed. The principle, unit operations, the radiation sources and measuring instruments of activation analysis are described. The sensitivity of activation analysis is given in tabulated form for some elements of major importance in water chemistry and the elements readily accessible to determination by measurement of the spontaneous gamma radiation are listed. A few papers selected from the recent international professional literature are finally reviewed, in which the authors report on the results obtained by activation analysis applied to water chemistry. (author)

  6. Application of synchrotron radiation in archaeology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakai, Izumi [Science University of Tokyo, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Chemistry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    This paper reports current status of archaeological application of synchrotron radiation (SR). The advantages of SR in archaeological research and various application possibilities of X-ray powder diffraction (XPD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analyses of objects and materials of cultural heritage value are demonstrated through a number of case studies from literatures. They include XPD characterizations of Egyptian cosmetic powder, Attic Black Gloss, and pigments in Gothic altarpieces, provenance analysis of Old-Kutani china wares by high energy XRF, and XAFS analyses to reveal to origin of red color in Satsuma copper-ruby glass and role of iron in Maya blue. (author)

  7. On the Applicability of the Green Chemistry Principles to Sustainability of Organic Matter on Asteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera M. Kolb

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The connection between astrobiology and green chemistry represents a new approach to sustainability of organic matter on asteroids or similar bodies. Green chemistry is chemistry which is environmentally friendly. One obvious way for chemistry to be green is to use water as a solvent, instead of more toxic organic solvents. Many astrobiological reactions occur in the aqueous medium, for example in the prebiotic soup or during the aqueous alteration period on asteroids. Thus any advances in the green organic reactions in water are directly applicable to astrobiology. Another green chemistry approach is to abolish use of toxic solvents. This can be accomplished by carrying out the reactions without a solvent in the solventless or solid-state reactions. The advances in these green reactions are directly applicable to the chemistry on asteroids during the periods when water was not available. Many reactions on asteroids may have been done in the solid mixtures. These reactions may be responsible for a myriad of organic compounds that have been isolated from the meteorites.

  8. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.4--Nuclear chemistry and radiation chemistry sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 24 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the fourth one, the content is about Nuclear chemistry and radiation chemistry sub-volume

  9. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 22. April 1, 1988 - March 31, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1988 through March 31, 1989. The latest report, for 1987, is JAERI-M 90-054. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects : (i) studies on laser-induced organic chemical reactions and (ii) studies on radiation chemistry of high polymers and radiation dosimetry. (J.P.N.)

  10. Status of radiation applications in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roushdy, H.M.

    1979-01-01

    A summary is given of the following applications: radiotherapy; sterilization of medical products and biological tissues; inactivation of virus; food preservation; insect control and eradication; improvement in field crops; treatment of waste waters and sewage sludge. In industry, irradiation technology has contributed to the manufacturing industries for new product developments in the plastics, textiles, wood, rubber, petroleum, concrete and chemical industries. Irradiation technology offers a fascinating outlet for developing countries for improving their condition of medical care, upgrading of their natural materials, stimulating their industrial development, decreasing their food losses and increasing their crop production. These lines would certainly contribute to their national economy and would result in an enhanced rate of development. However, transfer of radiation technology to developing countries should be undertaken in view of the actual national and regional needs and supported by an overall well studied national and regional planning for trained manpower development. The choice of a radiation source for a potential application should be based on the demand of the process, compromise between desirability and cost and quantitative data on installation, operation and maintenance conditions, and costs. The program developed and implemented by Egypt is herein presented. Facilities, organization, personnel, current and past activities, and future plans are described. (author)

  11. High field nuclear magnetic resonance application to polysaccharide chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincendon, Marc

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance has been applied to polysaccharide chemistry using time averaging technique and high fields (100 and 250 MHz). The three methyl signals of methyl cellulose and cellulose triacetate are separated, and the C-6 substituent has been identified. Biosynthesis of bacterial cellulose has been performed using deuterium labelled D-glucose and Acetobacter xylinum. Per-acetylated derivative of bacterial cellulose has been studied by NMR; this study permitted us to determine the quantity of deuterium on each position of the anhydro-glucose unit in the polymer. NMR has also been used to see the anomeric end chain of cellulose and amylose derivatives and to show the fixation of bromine and t-butyl group on the free anomeric end chain of cellulose triacetate. (author) [fr

  12. Application of ion chemistry to tropospheric VOC measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansel, A.; Wisthaler, A.; Graus, M.; Grabmer, W.

    2002-01-01

    The main interest in tropospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) originating from biogenic sources such as forests and anthropogenic sources such as cities is because these reactive trace gases can have a significant impact on levels of oxidants such as ozone (O 3 ) and the hydroxyl radical (OH). The proton-transfer-reaction mass-spectrometry (PTR-MS) technique developed by Werner Lindingers Laboratory, utilizes positive ion chemistry to measure trace neutral concentrations in air. It has been applied in food research, medicine and environmental studies to gain gas phase information about VOCs at parts per trillion (pptv) levels.The real-time method relies on proton transfer reactions between H 3 O + primary ions and VOCs which have a higher proton affinity than water molecules. Organic trace gases such as hydrocarbons, carbonyls, alcohols, acetonitrile, and others can be monitored on-line.Results on tropospheric VOCs measurements in tropical regions and in cities are discussed. (nevyjel)

  13. Application of hormone receptor assay for clinical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Seiya

    1978-01-01

    A conception of hormone receptors was explained to understand radioreceptor assay (RRA), and various problems in the operation of this method were described mainly. The principle of RRA is the same as that of RIA and CPBA, and measured values by RRA resembled to those by bioassay more closely than those by RIA. However, the sensitivity of RRA was inferior to that of RIA. It was important in using this method especially for measurement of peptide hormone not to deactivate biological the base by radioactivation. As the significance of this method in clinical chemistry, it was mentioned that this method was one kind of experiment to observe the biological activity of hormones, and that properties analysis of receptors, studies on action mechanism, the structure and function of hormone, the pathological analysis of endocrine abnormalities, and the development of drugs and treatment methods for receptors may become possible by this method. The other usefulness of this method was also mentioned. (Kanao, N.)

  14. Application of hormone receptor assay for clinical chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, S [Kitasato Univ. Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1978-06-01

    A conception of hormone receptors was explained to understand radioreceptor assay (RRA), and various problems in the operation of this method were described mainly. The principle of RRA is the same as that of RIA and CPBA, and measured values by RRA resembled to those by bioassay more closely than those by RIA. However, the sensitivity of RRA was inferior to that of RIA. It was important in using this method especially for measurement of peptide hormone not to deactivate biological the base by radioactivation. As the significance of this method in clinical chemistry, it was mentioned that this method was one kind of experiment to observe the biological activity of hormones, and that properties analysis of receptors, studies on action mechanism, the structure and function of hormone, the pathological analysis of endocrine abnormalities, and the development of drugs and treatment methods for receptors may become possible by this method. The other usefulness of this method was also mentioned.

  15. Lithium Ion Battery Chemistries from Renewable Energy Storage to Automotive and Back-up Power Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stan, Ana-Irina; Swierczynski, Maciej Jozef; Stroe, Daniel Ioan

    2014-01-01

    Lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries have been extensively used in consumer electronics because of their characteristics, such as high efficiency, long life, and high gravimetric and volumetric energy. In addition, Li-ion batteries are becoming the most attractive candidate as electrochemical storage...... systems for stationary applications, as well as power source for sustainable automotive and back-up power supply applications. This paper gives an overview of the Li-ion battery chemistries that are available at present in the market, and describes the three out of four main applications (except...... the consumers’ applications), grid support, automotive, and back-up power, for which the Li-ion batteries are suitable. Each of these applications has its own specifications and thus, the chemistry of the Li-ion battery should be chosen to fulfil the requirements of the corresponding application. Consequently...

  16. Application of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) in forensic chemistry and toxicology with focus on biological matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Werner; Keller, Thomas; Regenscheit, Priska

    1995-01-01

    The IMS (Ion Mobility Spectroscopy) instrument 'Ionscan' takes advantage of the fact that trace quantities of illicit drugs are adsorbed on dust particles on clothes, in cars and on other items of evidence. The dust particles are collected on a membrane filter by a special attachment on a vacuum cleaner. The sample is then directly inserted into the spectrometer and can be analyzed immediately. We show casework applications of a forensic chemistry and toxicology laboratory. One new application of IMS in forensic chemistry is the detection of psilocybin in dried mushrooms without any further sample preparation.

  17. Introduction to chemistry and applications in nature of mass independent isotope effects special feature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemens, Mark H

    2013-10-29

    Stable isotope ratio variations are regulated by physical and chemical laws. These rules depend on a relation with mass differences between isotopes. New classes of isotope variation effects that deviate from mass dependent laws, termed mass independent isotope effects, were discovered in 1983 and have a wide range of applications in basic chemistry and nature. In this special edition, new applications of these effects to physical chemistry, solar system origin models, terrestrial atmospheric and biogenic evolution, polar paleo climatology, snowball earth geology, and present day atmospheric sciences are presented.

  18. Computational chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J. O.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of supercomputers, modern computational chemistry algorithms and codes, a powerful tool was created to help fill NASA's continuing need for information on the properties of matter in hostile or unusual environments. Computational resources provided under the National Aerodynamics Simulator (NAS) program were a cornerstone for recent advancements in this field. Properties of gases, materials, and their interactions can be determined from solutions of the governing equations. In the case of gases, for example, radiative transition probabilites per particle, bond-dissociation energies, and rates of simple chemical reactions can be determined computationally as reliably as from experiment. The data are proving to be quite valuable in providing inputs to real-gas flow simulation codes used to compute aerothermodynamic loads on NASA's aeroassist orbital transfer vehicles and a host of problems related to the National Aerospace Plane Program. Although more approximate, similar solutions can be obtained for ensembles of atoms simulating small particles of materials with and without the presence of gases. Computational chemistry has application in studying catalysis, properties of polymers, all of interest to various NASA missions, including those previously mentioned. In addition to discussing these applications of computational chemistry within NASA, the governing equations and the need for supercomputers for their solution is outlined.

  19. High-energy radiation and polymers: A review of commercial processes and emerging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clough, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has been found to be widely applicable in modifying the structure and properties of polymers, and can be used to tailor the performance of either bulk materials or surfaces. Fifty years of research in polymer radiation chemistry has led to numerous applications of commercial and economic importance, and work remains active in the application of radiation to practical uses involving polymeric materials. This paper provides a survey of radiation-processing methods of industrial interest, ranging from technologies already commercially well established, through innovations in the active R and D stage which show exceptional promise for future commercial use. Radiation-processing technologies are discussed under the following categories: cross-linking of plastics and rubbers, curing of coatings and inks, heat-shrink products, fiber-matrix composites, chain-scission for processing control, surface modification, grafting, hydrogels, sterilization, natural product enhancement, plastics recycling, ceramic precursors, electronic property materials, ion-track membranes and lithography for microdevice production. In addition to new technological innovations utilizing conventional gamma and e-beam sources, a number of promising new applications make use of novel radiation types which include ion beams (heavy ions, light ions, highly focused microscopic beams and high-intensity pulses), soft X-rays which are focused, coherent X-rays (from a synchrotron) and e-beams which undergo scattering to generate patterns

  20. Can radiation chemistry supply a highly efficient AO(R)P process for organics removal from drinking and waste water? A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojanowicz, Marek; Bojanowska-Czajka, Anna; Capodaglio, Andrea G

    2017-09-01

    The increasing role of chemistry in industrial production and its direct and indirect impacts in everyday life create the need for continuous search and efficiency improvement of new methods for decomposition/removal of different classes of waterborne anthropogenic pollutants. This review paper addresses a highly promising class of water treatment solutions, aimed at tackling the pressing problem of emerging contaminants in natural and drinking waters and wastewater discharges. Radiation processing, a technology originating from radiation chemistry studies, has shown encouraging results in the treatment of (mainly) organic water pollution. Radiation ("high energy") processing is an additive-free technology using short-lived reactive species formed by the radiolysis of water, both oxidative and reducing, to carry out decomposition of organic pollutants. The paper illustrates the basic principles of radiolytic treatment of organic pollutants in water and wastewaters and specifically of one of its most practical implementations (electron beam processing). Application examples, highlighting the technology's strong points and operational conditions are described, and a discussion on the possible future of this technology follows.

  1. The application of radiation technology in industrial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvermann, J.

    1974-01-01

    The author makes a general survey of current applications for radiation processing such as sterilization of biological and medical supplies, crosslinking of polymers, production of durable press fabrics, radiation-cured coating, production of wood-plastic composites, radiation degradation and chemical synthesis. The adoption of radiation processing on large scale by Western Electric is presented. The trend in costs and the environmental problems has a profound effect on the future of radiation processing. (M.S.)

  2. Application of ultraviolet and infrared radiation in food

    OpenAIRE

    D Jafarpour; M Alizadeh; F Siamak

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are many uses of radiation in the food industry. Radiation can be considered as one of the new processes and usage of it can offer new features of food. This process in most food doesn’t leave any physical or sensory changes. Therefore, in this review article, the application of ultraviolet and infrared radiation in food was studied. Methods: Search by the keywords “Ultraviolet Radiation Infrared Radiation Food” in databases Pubmed, Scopus and Web of Sci...

  3. Radiation safety aspects in the use of radiation sources in industrial and heath-care applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkat Raj, V.

    2001-01-01

    The principle underlying the philosophy of radiation protection and safety is to ensure that there exists an appropriate standard of protection and safety for humans, without unduly limiting the benefits of the practices giving rise to exposure or incurring disproportionate costs in interventions. To realise these objectives, the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP-60) and IAEA's Safety Series (IAEA Safety Series 120, 1996) have enunciated the following criteria for the application and use of radiation: (1) justification of practices; (2) optimisation of protection; (3) dose limitation and (4) safety of sources. Though these criteria are the basic tenets of radiation protection, the radiation hazard potentials of individual applications vary and the methods to achieve the above mentioned objectives principles are different. This paper gives a brief overview of the various applications of radiation and radioactive sources in India, their radiation hazard perspective and the radiation safety measures provided to achieve the basic radiation protection philosophy. (author)

  4. Radiation surveillance procedure during veterinary application of radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaldeep; Bhaktivinayagam, A.; Singh, Sanjay Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Radioisotopes have found wide applications in the field of biomedical veterinary nuclear medicine and research. Radiation safety issues during internal administration of radioisotopes to laboratory animals, unlike human use, are far more challenging and requires stringent, well planned and an organized system of radiation protection in the animal house facility. In this paper, we discuss our experience during veterinary research experiments involving use, handling and administration of liquid sources of 131 I. With extensive radiation protection surveillance and application of practical and essential radiation safety and hygiene practices, the radiation exposure and contamination levels during the veterinary application of isotopes can be kept ALARA

  5. Progress in radiation application to industry and agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Tamikazu

    2006-01-01

    Utilization of radiation in Japan has been actively promoted by various agencies including the Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment of JAERI (presently Japan Atomic Energy Agency: JAEA). The JAEA-Takasaki was established in April 1963 for the purpose of promoting research and development (R and D) activities with gamma rays and electron beams. The JAEA-Takasaki's activities were addressed principally to industry and agriculture. In Japan, purpose of utilization of radiation is aiming at increasing welfare and quality of life of our peoples. (author)

  6. Biweekly list of papers on radiation chemistry and photochemistry. Annual cumulation with keyword and author indexes. Volume 16. 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmichael, I.C.; Helman, W.P.; Hug, G.L.; Ross, A.B.

    1983-01-01

    The Biweekly List of Papers on Radiation Chemistry and Photochemistry is a current-awareness service published by the Radiation Chemistry Data Center (RCDC), with special emphasis on the kinetics and other properties of transient ions, radicals, and excited species. Papers are included on the radiation chemistry and photochemistry of organic and inorganic systems, biological molecules and polymers, with references to ESR and luminescence studies. Complete coverage is attempted only for those studies which are initiated by light or ionizing radiation, and which provide quantitative physical chemical data such as quantum yields, specific rates, G values, etc. No attempt is made to cover topics such as mechanistic and preparative photochemistry, photosynthesis, photography, and irradiation of metals. The references listed herein are obtained from scanning about 60 current journals as well as Chemical Abstracts, INIS Atomindex and several other publications listing current references. The reference lists, which are issued biweekly, are cumulated annually with the addition of keyword and author indexes. Indexed cumulations were published semiannually for Vol. 4-6 (1971-73) and are published annually for Vol. 7+ (1974+); back copies are available from the National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

  7. Application of radiation for wastewater treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Bumsoo; Kim Jinkyu; Kim Yuri

    2006-01-01

    Electron beam processing of wastewater is non-chemical, and uses fast formation of short-lived reactive radicals that can interact with a wide range of pollutants. Such reactive radicals are strong oxidizing or reducing agents that can transform the pollutants in the liquids wastes. The first studies on the radiation treatment of wastes were carried out in the 1950s principally for disinfection. In the 1960s, these studies were extended to the purification of water and wastewater. After some laboratory research on industrial wastewaters and polluted groundwater in 1970s and 1980s, several pilot plants were built for extended research in the 1990s. The first full-scale application was reported for the purification of wastewater at the Voronezh synthetic rubber plant in Russia. Two accelerators (50 kW each) were used to convert the non-biodegradable emulsifier, 'nekal', present in the wastewater to a biodegradable form . The installation treats up to 2000 m3 of effluent per day. A pilot plant of 1000 m 3 /d for treating textile-dyeing wastewater has been constructed in Daegu, Korea with 1 MeV, 40 kW electron accelerator. High-energy irradiation produces instantaneous radiolytical transformations by energy transfer from accelerated electrons to orbital electrons of water molecules. Absorbed energy disturbs the electron system of the molecule and results in breakage of inter-atomic bonds. Hydrated electron eaq, H atom, . OH and HO 2 . radicals and hydrogen peroxide H 2 O 2 and H 2 are the most important products of the primary interactions (radiolysis products). Generally, radiation processing of wastewater has maximum efficiency at pollutant concentration less than 10 -3 mol/L (∼100 ppm). The treatment of such wastewater is simple, requires low dose (about 1 kGy or less) and gives almost complete elimination of odor, color, taste and turbidity. The radiation processing of polluted water containing specific contaminants may require creation of special conditions to

  8. Laboratory studies of nitrate radical chemistry - application to atmospheric processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noremsaune, Ingse

    1997-12-31

    This thesis studies atmospheric chemistry and tries in particular to fill gaps in the data base of atmospheric reactions. It studies the nitrate radical reactions with chloroethenes and with but-2-yne (2-butyne). The mechanisms and rate coefficients for the NO{sub 3}-initiated degradation of the chloroethenes and 2-butyne were investigated by means of the static reaction chamber and the fast flow-discharge technique. The reactions between the nitrate radical and the chloroethenes were studied at atmospheric pressure in a reaction chamber with synthetic air as bath gas. FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy) spectroscopy was used to follow the reactions and to identify the products. Products were observed for the reactions with (E)-1,2-dichloroethene and tetrachloroethene, although the absorption bands are weak. The alkyl peroxynitrate and nitrate compounds form very strong and characteristic absorption bands. The rate coefficients for the reactions between NO{sub 3} and the chloroethenes were investigated at room temperature by three different methods. The results are given in tables. 132 refs., 44 figs., 21 tabs.

  9. Applicability of oxygenated water chemistry for PWR secondary systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermansson, H.P. [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Takiguchi, H.; Otoha, K. [Japan Atomic Power Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Introduction of oxygenated water chemistry (OWC) in PWR secondary side is considered as a means to reduce the transportation of corrosion products into the steam generator and thus also minimizing crevice deposits and subsequent materials problems. One main concern, however, is the risk of inter-granular attack (IGA) in crevices. In order to study effects on crevice tube IGA by OWC, a series of experiments were performed in a steam generator (SG) simulating loop. This comprised a SG tube and a tube support plate (TSP) together forming the crevice. The over-all objective of the work accounted here was to demonstrate that it is possible to operate the steam generator secondary side with OWC without causing intolerable IGA or other types of attack on the tube in the crevice area. Tubes of sensitized Alloy 600 were exposed during a total of nine experiments in an autoclave using a TSP/tube arrangement with an asymmetric crevice design. Experiments were performed at high and low pH and potential under open and packed crevice conditions. The aggressiveness of the crevice environment was also further increased by addition of carbonate and chloride. Furthermore the tube was pressurized. Experimental parameters were monitored on the primary side as well as in the secondary bulk phase and in the crevice. (authors)

  10. Application of maximum radiation exposure values and monitoring of radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    According to the Section 32 of the Radiation Act (592/91) the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety gives instructions concerning the monitoring of the radiation exposure and the application of the dose limits in Finland. The principles to be applied to calculating the equivalent and the effective doses are presented in the guide. Also the detailed instructions on the application of the maximum exposure values for the radiation work and for the natural radiation as well as the instructions on the monitoring of the exposures are given. Quantities and units for assessing radiation exposure are presented in the appendix of the guide

  11. Ionic liquid gel materials: applications in green and sustainable chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Marr, Patricia C.; Marr, Andrew C.

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquid gel materials offer a way to further utilise ionic liquids in technological applications. Combining the controlled and directed assembly of gels, with the diverse applications of ionic liquids, enables the design of a heady combination of functional tailored materials, leading to the development of task specific / functional ionic liquid gels. This review introduces gels and gel classification, focusing on ionic liquid gels and their potential roles in a more sustainable future. ...

  12. The radiation chemistry of Hoechst 33258 and its potential radiosensitizing analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nel, P.; Cooper, R.

    1996-01-01

    Collaborative research between Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute and The University of Melbourne is aimed to investigate the photochemistry and radiation chemistry of the halogenated analogues m-I Hoechst and o-I Hoechst (which are being developed as potential radiosensitizers). Studies were conducted on Hoechst 33258, phenyl Hoechst, m-I Hoechst and o-I Hoechst. The chemical interaction between the Hoechst analogues and the radiolysis products of water (the hydroxy radical and the aqueous electron) were investigated by saturating aqueous solutions with nitrogen or nitrous oxide (an electron scavenger) and using 2-propanol as a hydroxy radical scavenger. Hoechst 33258 was investigated at pH 5 and pH 9. Transient absorption spectra of micromolar solutions saturated with nitrogen or nitrous oxide suggest the formation of hydroxyl radical adduct(s). The rate of formation of these transient spectra was observed to be dependent on the concentration of Hoechst 33258. Phenyl Hoechst, m- I Hoechst and o-I Hoechst were studied at pH 5. Spectra again suggest the formation of hydroxy radical adducts and that both m-I Hoechst and o-I Hoechst react with aqueous electrons

  13. Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1995-01-01

    The medical projects employing synchrotron radiation as discussed in this paper are, for the most part, still in their infancies and no one can predict the direction in which they will develop. Both the basic research and applied medical programs are sure to be advanced at the new facilities coming on line, especially the ESRF and Spring- 8. However, success is not guaranteed. There is a lot of competition from advances in conventional imaging with the development of digital angiography, computed tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound. The synchrotron programs will have to provide significant advantages over these modalities in order to be accepted by the medical profession. Advances in image processing and potentially the development of compact sources will be required in order to move the synchrotron developed imaging technologies into the clinical world. In any event, it can be expected that the images produced by the synchrotron technologies will establish ''gold standards'' to be targeted by conventional modalities. A lot more work needs to be done in order to bring synchrotron radiation therapy and surgery to the level of human studies and, subsequently, to clinical applications

  14. Quality assurance in ionizing radiation application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastkhah; Nasser.

    1995-01-01

    Quality assurance is a mean for controlling all the activities within an organization which affect the quality of the product or service. A series of international standards have been prepared which incorporate the accumulated knowledge and provide guidance on what activities within an organization should be controlled. A proposal on a quality assurance system to be implemented in ionizing radiation application centers is the primary concern of Atomic Energy Organization of Iran is represented. The Objectives were identification of quality related problems ;Comply with national and international requirements ;Controlling all activities within an organization which affects the quality and assurance of maintaining the quality within organization. In performing protection measures, risk, cost, benefit consideration, cause of problems and the classic solution are summarized in four chapters

  15. Nuclear Cross Sections for Space Radiation Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werneth, C. M.; Maung, K. M.; Ford, W. P.; Norbury, J. W.; Vera, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    The eikonal, partial wave (PW) Lippmann-Schwinger, and three-dimensional Lippmann-Schwinger (LS3D) methods are compared for nuclear reactions that are relevant for space radiation applications. Numerical convergence of the eikonal method is readily achieved when exact formulas of the optical potential are used for light nuclei (A = 16) and the momentum-space optical potential is used for heavier nuclei. The PW solution method is known to be numerically unstable for systems that require a large number of partial waves, and, as a result, the LS3D method is employed. The effect of relativistic kinematics is studied with the PW and LS3D methods and is compared to eikonal results. It is recommended that the LS3D method be used for high energy nucleon-nucleus reactions and nucleus-nucleus reactions at all energies because of its rapid numerical convergence and stability for both non-relativistic and relativistic kinematics.

  16. Towards 31Mg-β-NMR resonance linewidths adequate for applications in magnesium chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stachura, M.; McFadden, R. M. L.; Chatzichristos, A.

    2017-01-01

    The span of most chemical shifts recorded in conventional 25Mg-NMR spectroscopy is ~ 100 ppm. Accordingly, linewidths of ~ 10 ppm or better are desirable to achieve adequate resolution for applications in chemistry. Here we present first high-field 31Mg- β-NMR measurements of 31Mg+ ions implanted...

  17. Effect of gamma radiation on groundwater chemistry and glass leaching as related to the NNWSI repository site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrajano, T.; Bates, J.; Ebert, W.; Gerding, T.

    1986-05-01

    To address the effect of ionizing radiation on groundwater chemistry and waste form durability, NNWSI is performing an extensive set of experiments as a function of dose rate (2 x 10 5 , 1 x 10 4 , 1 x 10 3 , and 0 rad/h). The results of the tests done at 2 x 10 5 rad/h have been reported, while the 1 x 10 3 and 0 rad/h tests are in progress. This paper presents an overview of the results of the tests done at 1 x 10 4 rad/h and discusses the relevance of these tests to repository conditions. An interpretation of the results relating to the manner by which the glass waste form corrodes is presented elsewhere. A complete discussion of the effect of gamma radiation on groundwater chemistry and waste form durability will be presented when the series of experiments are complete

  18. Annual reports of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, (No. 23, 24, 25)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    Research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during three year period from April 1, 1989 through March 31, 1992 are described. The latest report. for 1988, is JAERI-M 91-054. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: laser-induced organic synthesis, modification of polymer surface by laser irradiation, polymerization and modification of polymers by electron beam, and electron beam dosimetry. (author) 77 refs

  19. Behaviour of radiation fields in the Spanish PWR by the changes in coolant chemistry and primary system materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llovet, R.; Fernandez Lillo, E.

    1995-01-01

    The Spanish PWR Owners Group established a program to evaluate the behavior of ex-core radiation fields and discriminate the effects of changes in coolant chemistry and primary system materials. Data from Vandellos, Asco, Almaraz and Trillo NPPs were analyzed Vandellos 2 was chosen as the lead plant and its data were thoroughly studied. The dose-rates evolution could be explained at each plant as a consequence of this sucessful program.Actions derived from the developed knowledge on this field have produced the stabilization or even reduction of radiation fields at these plants

  20. Applications of neutron activation analysis in chemistry and pollution fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, S.

    1978-01-01

    Some examples of applications of activation analysis are given such as: chemical analysis of precious metals, nuclear graphite and hydrocarbons; control of pollution of water and seawater, analysis of food and seafood, atmospheric, dust and hair for determination of impurities [fr

  1. Liquid-state physical chemistry : fundamentals, modeling, and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    With, de G.

    2013-01-01

    This is the only comprehensive introduction to this central topic and thus a must-have for many chemists, chemical engineers and material scientists. The book describes the behavior of liquids and solutions and their simplest applications in a basic and self-contained way. The author has extensive

  2. Aerosols, Chemistry, and Radiative Forcing: A 3-D Model Analysis of Satellite and ACE-Asia data (ACMAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Mian; Ginoux, Paul; Torres, Omar; Zhao, Xue-Peng

    2005-01-01

    We propose a research project to incorporate a global 3-D model and satellite data into the multi-national Aerosol Characterization Experiment-Asia (ACE-Asia) mission. Our objectives are (1) to understand the physical, chemical, and optical properties of aerosols and the processes that control those properties over the Asian-Pacific region, (2) to investigate the interaction between aerosols and tropospheric chemistry, and (3) to determine the aerosol radiative forcing over the Asia-Pacific region. We will use the Georgia TecWGoddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model to link satellite observations and the ACE-Asia measurements. First, we will use the GOCART model to simulate aerosols and related species, and evaluate the model with satellite and in-situ observations. Second, the model generated aerosol vertical profiles and compositions will be used to validate the satellite products; and the satellite data will be used for during- and post- mission analysis. Third, we will use the model to analyze and interpret both satellite and ACE- Asia field campaign data and investigate the aerosol-chemistry interactions. Finally, we will calculate aerosol radiative forcing over the Asian-Pacific region, and assess the influence of Asian pollution in the global atmosphere. We propose a research project to incorporate a global 3-D model and satellite data into

  3. Activities of RADA in promotion of radiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanase, M.; Funayama, Y.; Tanaka, O.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation Application Development Association (RADA) was established to promote the applications of radiation in 1968. Among the activities of RADA, we have five works directly to promote the application of radiation to the public. One of them is to publish a quarterly journal 'Radiation and Industries' which carries comprehensive articles on timely topics of radiation-based applications, patent information etc. And also RADA organizes the Radiation Process Symposium, which has been held every other year strictly, for exchange of information on radiation applications. The symposium started in 1985, where researchers and engineers in various and wide fields have been discussed on the radiation applications to industries. As the third, RADA distributes beautiful ornaments, which were produced by gamma-ray irradiation of crystals, glass and pearls, to promote better understanding of radiation. We also have taken charge of two businesses contracted with the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). One is to hold seminars on radiation and nuclear energy for teachers of primary, junior high and senior high schools to enhance their understanding about radiation and nuclear energy, and to facilitate the use in their classrooms of such knowledge concerning energy, environment and their effects on our lives. The other is to facilitate the transfer of technologies of radiation application in the realms of industry, agriculture, medical treatment, etc. through dispatching of experts, releasing data on radiation applications, and organizing technical seminars. Recently, we arranged an opportunity to use neutrons from research reactors through trial experiments for transferring the technology to industries. (author)

  4. Applications of radiation technology and isotopes in industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machi, Sueo [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1994-12-31

    This paper reports the current status of applications of radiation technology and radioisotopes in industries, environmental conservation and medical products. The topics discussed are radiation processing - features and advantages, radiation sources, polymeric products, radiation cross-linking and grafting of polymers, radiation curing of surface coating, new developments; sterilization of medical products, applications for environmental protection i.e. cleaning the flue gases, disinfection of sewage and its recycling; nucleonic control system (NCS); major mechanisms of implementation of the Agency`s programme for technology transfer - research contract programme, model projects and technical cooperation projects.

  5. Applications of radiation technology and isotopes in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sueo Machi

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports the current status of applications of radiation technology and radioisotopes in industries, environmental conservation and medical products. The topics discussed are radiation processing - features and advantages, radiation sources, polymeric products, radiation cross-linking and grafting of polymers, radiation curing of surface coating, new developments; sterilization of medical products, applications for environmental protection i.e. cleaning the flue gases, disinfection of sewage and its recycling; nucleonic control system (NCS); major mechanisms of implementation of the Agency's programme for technology transfer - research contract programme, model projects and technical cooperation projects

  6. On Study of Application of Micro-reactor in Chemistry and Chemical Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunshen

    2018-02-01

    Serving as a micro-scale chemical reaction system, micro-reactor is characterized by high heat transfer efficiency and mass transfer, strictly controlled reaction time and good safety performance; compared with the traditional mixing reactor, it can effectively shorten reaction time by virtue of these advantages and greatly enhance the chemical reaction conversion rate. However, problems still exist in the process where micro-reactor is used for production in chemistry and chemical field, and relevant researchers are required to optimize and perfect the performance of micro-reactor. This paper analyzes specific application of micro-reactor in chemistry and chemical field.

  7. Recent developments and applications of clickable photoprobes in medicinal chemistry and chemical biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinsky, David J; Johnson, Douglas S

    2015-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling is a well-known biochemical technique that has grown significantly since the turn of the century, principally due to its combination with bioorthogonal/click chemistry reactions. This review highlights new developments and applications of clickable photoprobes in medicinal chemistry and chemical biology. In particular, recent examples of clickable photoprobes for target identification, activity- or affinity-based protein profiling (ABPP or AfBPP), characterization of sterol- or lipid-protein interactions and characterization of ligand-binding sites are presented.

  8. Predicting Radiative Heat Transfer in Oxy-Methane Flame Simulations: An Examination of Its Sensitivities to Chemistry and Radiative Property Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Abdul-Sater

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements from confined, laminar oxy-methane flames at different O2/CO2 dilution ratios in the oxidizer are first reported with measurements from methane-air flames included for comparison. Simulations of these flames employing appropriate chemistry and radiative property modeling options were performed to garner insights into the experimental trends and assess prediction sensitivities to the choice of modeling options. The chemistry was modeled employing a mixture-fraction based approach, Eddy dissipation concept (EDC, and refined global finite rate (FR models. Radiative properties were estimated employing four weighted-sum-of-gray-gases (WSGG models formulated from different spectroscopic/model databases. The mixture fraction and EDC models correctly predicted the trends in flame length and OH concentration variations, and the O2, CO2, and temperature measurements outside the flames. The refined FR chemistry model predictions of CO2 and O2 deviated from their measured values in the flame with 50% O2 in the oxidizer. Flame radiant power estimates varied by less than 10% between the mixture fraction and EDC models but more than 60% between the different WSGG models. The largest variations were attributed to the postcombustion gases in the temperature range 500 K–800 K in the upper sections of the furnace which also contributed significantly to the overall radiative transfer.

  9. Radiation protection in the application of ionizing radiation in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Yusof Mohamad Ali

    1987-01-01

    There is a substantial increase in the use of ionizing radiation in industry throughout the country especially in the last five years or so. With this growth in the number of users and activity of sources used, and together with the introduction of the new Atomic Energy Licensing Act (AELA) in 1984, the question of radiation safety and protection of workers and members of the public in general, can no longer be taken lightly. It has to be dealt with effectively. In this paper, a general discussion and clarification on certain practical aspects of radiation protection as recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is presented. Amongst the topics chosen are those on area monitoring, personnel monitoring, leak testing of sealed sources and training of personnel. Also presented in the paper is a brief discussion about UTN's experience in giving out radiation protection services to various agencies throughout the country. (author)

  10. Applications of DHDECMP extraction chromatography to nuclear analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.; Simi, O.R.

    1981-01-01

    Dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamylmethylenephosphonate (DHDECMP) is a highly selective extractant for actinides and lanthanides. This reagent, extensively studied for process-scale operations, also has valuable analytical applications. Extraction chromatographic columns of DHDECMP, supported on inert, porous, polymer beads effectively separate most metallic impurity elements from the retained inner transition elements. The retained elements can be separated into individual fractions of (1) lanthanides, (2) americium, (3) plutonium, and (4) uranium by mixed-solvent anion exchange

  11. Click Chemistry Mediated Functionalization of Vertical Nanowires for Biological Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vutti, Surendra; Schoffelen, Sanne; Bolinsson, Jessica; Buch-Månson, Nina; Bovet, Nicolas; Nygård, Jesper; Martinez, Karen L; Meldal, Morten

    2016-01-11

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) are gaining significant importance in various biological applications, such as biosensing and drug delivery. Efficient and controlled immobilization of biomolecules on the NW surface is crucial for many of these applications. Here, we present for the first time the use of the Cu(I) -catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition and its strain-promoted variant for the covalent functionalization of vertical NWs with peptides and proteins. The potential of the approach was demonstrated in two complementary applications of measuring enzyme activity and protein binding, which is of general interest for biological studies. The attachment of a peptide substrate provided NW arrays for the detection of protease activity. In addition, green fluorescent protein was immobilized in a site-specific manner and recognized by antibody binding to demonstrate the proof-of-concept for the use of covalently modified NWs for diagnostic purposes using minute amounts of material. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Flowfield and Radiation Analysis of Missile Exhaust Plumes Using a Turbulent-Chemistry Interaction Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Calhoon, W. H; Kenzakowski, D. C

    2000-01-01

    ... components and missile defense systems. Current engineering level models neglect turbulent-chemistry interactions and typically underpredict the intensity of plume afterburning and afterburning burnout...

  13. Radiation chemistry at the Metallurgical Laboratory, Manhattan Project, University of Chicago (1942-1947) and the Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (1947-1984)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, S.

    1989-01-01

    The events in radiation chemistry which occurred in the Manhattan Project Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory during World War II are reviewed. Research programmes from then until the present day are presented, with emphasis on pulse radiolysis studies. (UK)

  14. Application of maximum radiation exposure values and monitoring of radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The guide presents the principles to be applied in calculating the equivalent dose and the effective dose, instructions on application of the maximum values for radiation exposure, and instruction on monitoring of radiation exposure. In addition, the measurable quantities to be used in monitoring the radiation exposure are presented. (2 refs.)

  15. Radiation 2006. In association with the Polymer Division, Royal Australian Chemical Institute. Incorporating the 21st AINSE Radiation Chemistry Conference and the 18th Radiation Biology Conference, conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barner, L.; Davis, T. P.; Stenzel, M. H.; Barner-Kowollik, C.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) process is a controlled/'living' free radical polymerisation process that was invented in Australia by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSRIO) group led by Ezio Rizzardo. RAFT polymerisation has proven to be a powerful tool for the synthesis of polymers with predetermined molecular weight and low polydispersity. The RAFT process is capable of effecting living free radical polymerisation control over a great variety of monomers (eg (meth)acrylates, styrenes, acrylamides, vinyl acetate). The RAFT technique uses thiocarbonylthio compounds to mediate the polymerisation via a reversible chain transfer process. This leads to the establishment of an equilibrium under which all the propagating chains have approximately the same chain length at the same instant of time. The RAFT agent typically possesses a thiocarbonylthio group (S=C-S) with substituents R (radical leaving group) and Z (activating/stabilising group), which govern the reaction kinetics and the degree of structural control. In 2001, we reported the synthesis of RAFT agents (phenyl dithio acetates) that can be applied at low/ambient temperatures in the polymerization of alkyl acrylates and styrene. Low/ambient temperature RAFT agents allow the application of γ-radiation as source of initiation. The combination of γ-radiation and ambient temperature RAFT agents allows performing living polymerization at ambient temperature up to high conversions. This technique also opens the possibility to graft narrow polydisperse polymers from existing polymer surfaces. We have applied RAFT polymerization in conjunction with γ-radiation to graft various monomers (e.g. styrene, m-isopropenyl-α,α ' -dimethylbenzyl isocyanate (TMI), N,N ' -dimethyl acrylamide) from solid polypropylene phases that can be used for applications in combinatorial chemistry (eg peptide synthesis and scavenger reactions)

  16. Radiation hard diamond sensors for future tracking applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, W.; Boer, W. de; Borchi, E.

    2006-01-01

    Progress in experimental particle physics in the coming decade depends crucially upon the ability to carry out experiments in high-radiation areas. In order to perform these complex and expensive experiments, new radiation hard technologies must be developed. This paper discusses the use of diamond detectors in future tracking applications and their survivability in the highest radiation environments. We present results of devices constructed with the newest polycrystalline and single crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond and their tolerance to radiation

  17. Gamma radiation detectors for safeguards applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carchon, R.; Moeslinger, M.; Bourva, L.; Bass, C.; Zendel, M.

    2007-01-01

    The IAEA uses extensively a variety of gamma radiation detectors to verify nuclear material. These detectors are part of standardized spectrometry systems: germanium detectors for High-Resolution Gamma Spectrometry (HRGS); Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors for Room Temperature Gamma Spectrometry (RTGS); and NaI(Tl) detectors for Low Resolution Gamma Spectrometry (LRGS). HRGS with high-purity Germanium (HpGe) detectors cooled by liquid nitrogen is widely used in nuclear safeguards to verify the isotopic composition of plutonium or uranium in non-irradiated material. Alternative cooling systems have been evaluated and electrically cooled HpGe detectors show a potential added value, especially for unattended measurements. The spectrometric performance of CZT detectors, their robustness and simplicity are key to the successful verification of irradiated materials. Further development, such as limiting the charge trapping effects in CZT to provide improved sensitivity and energy resolution are discussed. NaI(Tl) detectors have many applications-specifically in hand-held radioisotope identification devices (RID) which are used to detect the presence of radioactive material where a lower resolution is sufficient, as they benefit from a generally higher sensitivity. The Agency is also continuously involved in the review and evaluation of new and emerging technologies in the field of radiation detection such as: Peltier-cooled CdTe detectors; semiconductor detectors operating at room temperature such as HgI 2 and GaAs; and, scintillator detectors using glass fibres or LaBr 3 . A final conclusion, proposing recommendations for future action, is made

  18. Anisotropic conducting films for electromagnetic radiation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Francesca; Lagally, Max G.; Rojas-Delgado, Richard

    2015-06-16

    Electronic devices for the generation of electromagnetic radiation are provided. Also provided are methods for using the devices to generate electromagnetic radiation. The radiation sources include an anisotropic electrically conducting thin film that is characterized by a periodically varying charge carrier mobility in the plane of the film. The periodic variation in carrier mobility gives rise to a spatially varying electric field, which produces electromagnetic radiation as charged particles pass through the film.

  19. Handbook of polymer coatings for electronics chemistry, technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Licari, James J

    1990-01-01

    This completely revised edition remains the only comprehensive treatise on polymer coatings for electronics. Since the original edition, the applications of coatings for the environmental protection of electronic systems have greatly increased, largely driven by the competitive need to reduce costs, weight and volume. The demands for high-speed circuits for the rapid processing of signals and data, high-density circuits for the storage and retrieval of megabits of memory, and the improved reliability required of electronics for guiding and controlling weapons and space vehicles have triggered

  20. THE ROLE OF RADIATION ACCIDENTS AND INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS OF IONIZING RADIATION SOURCES IN THE PROBLEM OF RADIATION DAMAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Кіхтенко, Ігор Миколайович

    2016-01-01

    Subject of research – the relevance of radiation damage at modern development of industry and medicine. In the world of radiation sources used in different fields of practice and their application in the future will increase, which greatly increases the likelihood of injury in a significant contingent of people.Research topic – the definition of the role of nuclear energy and the industrial use of ionizing radiation sources in the problem of radiation damage. The purpose of research – identif...

  1. Application of ultra high pressure (UHP) in starch chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Seok; Kim, Byung-Yong; Baik, Moo-Yeol

    2012-01-01

    Ultra high pressure (UHP) processing is an attractive non-thermal technique for food treatment and preservation at room temperature, with the potential to achieve interesting functional effects. The majority of UHP process applications in food systems have focused on shelf-life extension associated with non-thermal sterilization and a reduction or increase in enzymatic activity. Only a few studies have investigated modifications of structural characteristics and/or protein functionalities. Despite the rapid expansion of UHP applications in food systems, limited information is available on the effects of UHP on the structural and physicochemical properties of starch and/or its chemical derivatives included in most processed foods as major ingredients or minor additives. Starch and its chemical derivatives are responsible for textural and physical properties of food systems, impacting their end-use quality and/or shelf-life. This article reviews UHP processes for native (unmodified) starch granules and their effects on the physicochemical properties of UHP-treated starch. Furthermore, functional roles of UHP in acid-hydrolysis, hydroxypropylation, acetylation, and cross-linking reactions of starch granules, as well as the physicochemical properties of UHP-assisted starch chemical derivatives, are discussed.

  2. Radiation protection. Scientific fundamentals, legal regulations, practical applications. Compendium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchert, Guido; Gay, Juergen; Kirchner, Gerald; Michel, Rolf; Niggemann, Guenter; Schumann, Joerg; Wust, Peter; Jaehnert, Susanne; Strilek, Ralf; Martini, Ekkehard

    2011-06-01

    The compendium on radiation protection, scientific fundamentals, legal regulations and practical applications includes contributions to the following issues: (1) Effects and risk of ionizing radiation: fundamentals on effects and risk of ionizing radiation, news in radiation biology, advantages and disadvantages of screening investigations; (2) trends and legal regulations concerning radiation protection: development of European and national radiation protection laws, new regulations concerning X-rays, culture and ethics of radiation protection; (3) dosimetry and radiation measuring techniques: personal scanning using GHz radiation, new ''dose characteristics'' in practice, measuring techniques for the nuclear danger prevention and emergency hazard control; (4) radiation exposure in medicine: radiation exposure of modern medical techniques, heavy ion radiotherapy, deterministic and stochastic risks of the high-conformal photon radiotherapy, STEMO project - mobile CT for apoplectic stroke patients; (5) radiation exposure in technology: legal control of high-level radioactive sources, technical and public safety using enclosed radioactive sources for materials testing, radiation exposure in aviation, radon in Bavaria, NPP Fukushima-Daiichi - a status report; (6) radiation exposure in nuclear engineering: The Chernobyl accident - historical experiences or sustaining problem? European standards for radioactive waste disposal, radioactive material disposal in Germany risk assessment of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation (7) Case studies.

  3. Application of microprocessors to radiation protection measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zappe, D.; Meldes, C.

    1982-01-01

    In radiation protection measurements signals from radiation detectors or dosemeters have to be transformed into quantities relevant to radiation protection. In most cases this can only be done by taking into account various parameters (e.g. the quality factor). Moreover, the characteristics of the statistical laws of nuclear radiation emission have to be considered. These problems can properly be solved by microprocessors. After reviewing the main properties of microprocessors, some typical examples of applying them to problems of radiation protection measurement are given. (author)

  4. Liquid-state physical chemistry fundamentals, modeling, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    de With, Gijsbertus

    2013-01-01

    For many processes and applications in science and technology a basic knowledge of liquids and solutions is a must. Gaining a better understanding of the behavior and properties of pure liquids and solutions will help to improve many processes and to advance research in many different areas. This book provides a comprehensive, self-contained and integrated survey of this topic and is a must-have for many chemists, chemical engineers and material scientists, ranging from newcomers in the field to more experienced researchers. The author offers a clear, well-structured didactic approach and provides an overview of the most important types of liquids and solutions. Special topics include chemical reactions, surfaces and phase transitions. Suitable both for introductory as well as intermediate level as more advanced parts are clearly marked. Includes also problems and solutions.

  5. Molecular physics and chemistry applications of quantum Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, P.J.; Barnett, R.N.; Hammond, B.L.; Lester, W.A. Jr.

    1985-09-01

    We discuss recent work with the diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method in its application to molecular systems. The formal correspondence of the imaginary time Schroedinger equation to a diffusion equation allows one to calculate quantum mechanical expectation values as Monte Carlo averages over an ensemble of random walks. We report work on atomic and molecular total energies, as well as properties including electron affinities, binding energies, reaction barriers, and moments of the electronic charge distribution. A brief discussion is given on how standard QMC must be modified for calculating properties. Calculated energies and properties are presented for a number of molecular systems, including He, F, F - , H 2 , N, and N 2 . Recent progress in extending the basic QMC approach to the calculation of ''analytic'' (as opposed to finite-difference) derivatives of the energy is presented, together with an H 2 potential-energy curve obtained using analytic derivatives. 39 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  6. Radiation protection requirements for medical application of ionizing radiation in the Republic of Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nestoroska, Svetlana; Angelovski, Goran; Shahin, Nuzi

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the regulatory infrastructure in radiation protection in the Republic of Macedonia is presented. The national radiation protection requirements for the medical application of ionizing radiation are reviewed for both occupational exposed persons and patients undergoing a medical treatment with ionizing radiation and their compliance with the international standards is considered. The gaps identified on the national level are presented and steps for overcoming such gaps are analyzed.(Author)

  7. RITRACKS: A Software for Simulation of Stochastic Radiation Track Structure, Micro and Nanodosimetry, Radiation Chemistry and DNA Damage for Heavy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, I; Wu, H

    2014-01-01

    The code RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) has been developed over the last few years at the NASA Johnson Space Center to simulate the effects of ionizing radiations at the microscopic scale, to understand the effects of space radiation at the biological level. The fundamental part of this code is the stochastic simulation of radiation track structure of heavy ions, an important component of space radiations. The code can calculate many relevant quantities such as the radial dose, voxel dose, and may also be used to calculate the dose in spherical and cylindrical targets of various sizes. Recently, we have incorporated DNA structure and damage simulations at the molecular scale in RITRACKS. The direct effect of radiations is simulated by introducing a slight modification of the existing particle transport algorithms, using the Binary-Encounter-Bethe model of ionization cross sections for each molecular orbitals of DNA. The simulation of radiation chemistry is done by a step-by-step diffusion-reaction program based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation]. This approach is also used to simulate the indirect effect of ionizing radiation on DNA. The software can be installed independently on PC and tablets using the Windows operating system and does not require any coding from the user. It includes a Graphic User Interface (GUI) and a 3D OpenGL visualization interface. The calculations are executed simultaneously (in parallel) on multiple CPUs. The main features of the software will be presented.

  8. Electron enhanced Raman scattering and its applications in solution chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yui, Hiroharu

    2007-01-01

    The present review describes a new enhancement technique for Raman scattering in aqueous solutions. Raman scattering spectroscopy has an inherent ability to distinguish between molecules with great similarity and provides useful information on local physical and chemical environments at their functional groups' level. Since the Raman scattering signals from water molecules are quite weak, Raman spectroscopy has great advantage for detection or discrimination of a trace amount of analytes in aqueous environments. However, Raman scattering cross-sections are inherently small and it generally requires high power excitation and long acquisition times to obtain high-quality Raman spectra. These conditions create disadvantages for the analyses for living cells and real-time monitoring for environmental analyses. Here, I describe a new Raman enhancement technique, namely electron enhanced Raman scattering (EERS)', where artificially generated electrons additionally affect the polarizability of target molecular systems and enhance their inherent Raman cross-section. Principles of the EERS and its applications to aqueous solution are presented. (author)

  9. Modern trends: analytical chemistry - techniques and application to biodetection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khurshid, S.J.

    1993-01-01

    Microorganism isolated from specimens are usually identified by conventional bacterial identification procedures of morphological evaluation and cultural techniques. These complex methods of studying organisms are extremely tedious and time consuming. This causes serious problems by delaying the decision concerning the presence of pathogens and therefore the adequate drug therapy. Frequently, the decision about the presence of pathogens has to be made prior to the results of microbiological tests. In order to overcome these conditions, workers explored new instrumental methods for characterization, rapid acquisition, high reproducibility, computer aided data recording and interpretation of microorganisms. This article brief reviews application of these modern instrumental approaches such as Infrared Spectroscopy (IR), Gas Chromatography (GC), Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Bioluminescence, Chemiluminescence, FLow Cytometry, Micro calorimetry, GC-MASS Spectrometry, Electrical Impedance, Bio sensors and Radiometry. These techniques have increased the capacity of doing basic research with a major impact on both the clinical laboratories and industry. The radiometric procedure is being used for research and biological quality control of radiopharmaceuticals in our laboratory at PINSTECH. (author)

  10. External dosimetry - Applications to radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faussot, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Dosimetry is the essential component of radiation protection. It allows to determine by calculation and measurement the absorbed dose value, i.e. the energy amounts deposited in matter by ionizing radiations. It deals also with the irradiation effects on living organisms and with their biological consequences. This reference book gathers all the necessary information to understand and master the external dosimetry and the metrology of ionizing radiations, from the effects of radiations to the calibration of radiation protection devices. The first part is devoted to physical dosimetry and allows to obtain in a rigorous manner the mathematical formalisms leading to the absorbed dose for different ionizing radiation fields. The second part presents the biological effects of ionizing radiations on living matter and the determination of a set of specific radiation protection concepts and data to express the 'risk' to develop a radio-induced cancer. The third part deals with the metrology of ionizing radiations through the standardized study of the methods used for the calibration of radiation protection equipments. Some practical exercises with their corrections are proposed at the end of each chapter

  11. he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keene, William C. [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia

    2013-05-20

    This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry's MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences

  12. Evolution of energy deposition processes in anthracene single crystal from photochemistry to radiation chemistry under excitation with synchrotron radiation from 3 to 700 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Kazumichi; Jin, Zhaohui; Shimoyama, Iwao; Miyake, Yasuyuki; Ueno, Madoka; Kishigami, Yoichi; Horiuchi, Hiroki; Tanaka, Masahito; Kaneko, Fusae; Nishimagi, Hironobu; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Kotani, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    Absolute values of quantum yield Φ(hν) of singlet exciton formation in anthracene single crystals were measured as a function of photon energy hν, with the usage of synchrotron radiation (SR) in 3-700 eV region. Values of Φ(hν) were found to increase linearly for hν≥75 eV. For hν≤40 eV, values of Φ(hν) gave a wealth of structures and are not linear to hν. Because number of secondary electrons produced by radiation is thought to increase in proportional to the incident photon energy, it is natural to conclude that the radiation chemistry effect becomes dominant above 75 eV. On the other hand, values of Φ(hν) showed response due to resonance rather than linear dependence with hν, which implies that the photochemical effect is dominant below 40 eV

  13. A New Radio Spectral Line Survey of Planetary Nebulae: Exploring Radiatively Driven Heating and Chemistry of Molecular Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublitz, Jesse

    Planetary nebulae contain shells of cold gas and dust whose heating and chemistry is likely driven by UV and X-ray emission from their central stars and from wind-collision-generated shocks. We present the results of a survey of molecular line emissions in the 88 - 235 GHz range from nine nearby (Radioastronomie Millimetrique. Rotational transitions of nine molecules, including the well-studied CO isotopologues and chemically important trace species, were observed and the results compared with and augmented by previous studies of molecular gas in PNe. Lines of the molecules HCO+, HNC, HCN, and CN, which were detected in most objects, represent new detections for five planetary nebulae in our study. Flux ratios were analyzed to identify correlations between the central star and/or nebular ultraviolet/X-ray luminosities and the molecular chemistries of the nebulae. Analysis reveals the apparent dependence of the HNC/HCN line ratio on PN central star UV luminosity. There exists no such clear correlation between PN X-rays and various diagnostics of PN molecular chemistry. The correlation between HNC/HCN ratio and central star UV luminosity hints at the potential of molecular emission line studies of PNe for improving our understanding of the role that high-energy radiation plays in the heating and chemistry of photodissociation regions.

  14. Applications of ionizing radiation for monuments conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chyzewski, M.; Galant, S.; Perkowski, J.

    1996-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can be used for conservation of monuments and old art objects. The irradiation of wooden and cellulose objects for disinfestation has been described. The irradiation conditions and lethal doses in respect to different species have been discussed. The different technique is the radiation consolidation of historical objects made of various materials. The method consists in radiation polymerization. The object undergoing conservation is saturated with monomer prior irradiation. The radiation polymerization results in consolidation of the object pieces and reinforcement of its material. 3 figs

  15. Application of Java technology in radiation image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Weifeng; Li Zheng; Chen Zhiqiang; Zhang Li; Gao Wenhuan

    2002-01-01

    The acquisition and processing of radiation image plays an important role in modern application of civil nuclear technology. The author analyzes the rationale of Java image processing technology which includes Java AWT, Java 2D and JAI. In order to demonstrate applicability of Java technology in field of image processing, examples of application of JAI technology in processing of radiation images of large container have been given

  16. The role of IAEA in coordinating research and transferring technology in radiation chemistry and processing of polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haji-Saeid, M. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Wagramer Strasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: M.Haji-Saeid@iaea.org; Sampa, M.H.; Ramamoorthy, N. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Wagramer Strasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Gueven, O. [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Ankara (Turkey); Chmielewski, A.G. [Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2007-12-15

    The IAEA has been playing a significant role in fostering developments in radiation technology in general and radiation processing of polymers in particular, among its Member States (MS) and facilitate know-how/technology transfer to developing MS. The former is usually achieved through coordinated research projects (CRP) and thematic technical meetings, while the latter is mainly accomplished through technical cooperation (TC) projects. Coordinated research projects encourage research on, and development and practical application of, radiation technology to foster exchange of scientific and technical information. The technical cooperation (TC) programme helps Member States to realize their development priorities through the application of appropriate radiation technology. The IAEA has implemented several coordinated research projects (CRP) recently, including one on-going project, in the field of radiation processing of polymeric materials. The CRPs facilitated the acquisition and dissemination of know-how and technology for controlling of degradation effects in radiation processing of polymers, radiation synthesis of stimuli-responsive membranes, hydrogels and absorbents for separation purposes and the use of radiation processing to prepare biomaterials for applications in medicine. The IAEA extends cooperation to well-known international conferences dealing with radiation technology to facilitate participation of talented scientists from developing MS and building collaborations. The IAEA published technical documents, covering the findings of thematic technical meetings (TM) and coordinated research projects have been an important source of valuable practical information.

  17. The role of IAEA in coordinating research and transferring technology in radiation chemistry and processing of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haji-Saeid, M.; Sampa, M.H.; Ramamoorthy, N.; Gueven, O.; Chmielewski, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    The IAEA has been playing a significant role in fostering developments in radiation technology in general and radiation processing of polymers in particular, among its Member States (MS) and facilitate know-how/technology transfer to developing MS. The former is usually achieved through coordinated research projects (CRP) and thematic technical meetings, while the latter is mainly accomplished through technical cooperation (TC) projects. Coordinated research projects encourage research on, and development and practical application of, radiation technology to foster exchange of scientific and technical information. The technical cooperation (TC) programme helps Member States to realize their development priorities through the application of appropriate radiation technology. The IAEA has implemented several coordinated research projects (CRP) recently, including one on-going project, in the field of radiation processing of polymeric materials. The CRPs facilitated the acquisition and dissemination of know-how and technology for controlling of degradation effects in radiation processing of polymers, radiation synthesis of stimuli-responsive membranes, hydrogels and absorbents for separation purposes and the use of radiation processing to prepare biomaterials for applications in medicine. The IAEA extends cooperation to well-known international conferences dealing with radiation technology to facilitate participation of talented scientists from developing MS and building collaborations. The IAEA published technical documents, covering the findings of thematic technical meetings (TM) and coordinated research projects have been an important source of valuable practical information

  18. Magnetic separation: its application in mining, waste purification, medicine, biochemistry and chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranmanesh, M; Hulliger, J

    2017-10-02

    The use of strong magnetic field gradients and high magnetic fields generated by permanent magnets or superconducting coils has found applications in many fields such as mining, solid state chemistry, biochemistry and medical research. Lab scale or industrial implementations involve separation of macro- and nanoparticles, cells, proteins, and macromolecules down to small molecules and ions. Most promising are those attempts where the object to be separated is attached to a strong magnetic nanoparticle. Here, all kinds of specific affinity interactions are used to attach magnetic carrier particles to mainly objects of biological interest. Other attempts use a strong paramagnetic suspension for the separation of purely diamagnetic objects, such as bio-macromolecules or heavy metals. The application of magnetic separation to superconducting inorganic phases is of particular interest in combination with ceramic combinatorial chemistry to generate a library of e.g. cuprate superconductors.

  19. Regulatory aspects for nuclear and radiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duraisamy, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) is the national authority for ensuring that the use of ionizing radiation and nuclear energy does not cause any undue risk to the health of workers, members of the public and to the environment. AERB was constituted on November 15, 1983 and derives its regulatory power from the rules and notifications promulgated under the Atomic Energy Act, 1962 and the Environment (Protection) Act, 1986. AERB is provided with the necessary powers and mandate to frame safety policies, lay down safety standards and requirements for monitoring and enforcing the safety provisions. AERB follows multi-tier system for its review and assessment, safety monitoring, surveillance and enforcement. While regulating various nuclear and radiation facilities, AERB adopts a graded approach taking into account the hazard potential associated with the facilities being regulated. The regulatory process has been continuous evolving to cater to the new developments in reactor and radiation technologies. The regulatory effectiveness and efficiency of AERB have grown over the last three decades to make it into a robust organization. The radiation protection infrastructure in the country is on a sound footing and is constantly being strengthened based on experience and continued research and development. As one of its mandates AERB prescribes radiation dose limits for the occupational workers and the public, in line with the IAEA Safety Standard and ICRP recommendations. The current dose limits and the radiation safety requirements are more stringent than past. To meet the current safety standards, it is important for the facilities to have state of art radiation monitoring system and programme in place. While recognizing the current system in place, this presentation also highlights certain key radiation protection challenges associated with the implementation of radiation protection standards in the nuclear and radiation facilities especially in the areas of

  20. A New Radio Spectral Line Survey of Planetary Nebulae: Exploring Radiatively-driven Heating and Chemistry of Molecular Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublitz, Jesse; Kastner, Joel H.; Santander-García, Miguel; Montez, Rodolfo; Alcolea, Javier; Balick, Bruce; Bujarrabal, Valentín

    2018-01-01

    We report the results of a survey of mm-wave molecular line emission from nine nearby (Radioastronomie Millimétrique (IRAM) 30 m telescope. Our sample comprises molecule-rich PNe spanning a wide range of central star UV luminosities as well as central star and nebular X-ray emission properties. Nine molecular line frequencies were chosen to investigate the molecular chemistry of these nebulae. New detections of one or more of five molecules -- the molecular mass tracer 13CO and the chemically important trace species HCO+, CN, HCN, and HNC -- were made in at least one PN. We present analysis of emission line flux ratios that are potential diagnostics of the influence that ultraviolet and X-ray radiation have on the chemistry of residual molecular gas in PNe.