WorldWideScience

Sample records for radiation chemical study

  1. Statistical trend of radiation chemical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi

    1980-01-01

    In the field of radiation chemistry, over 1,000 reports are published year after year. Attempt has been made to review the trends in this field for more than five years, by looking through the lists of papers statistically. As for the period from 1974 to 1978, Annual Cumulation with Keyword and Author Indexes in the Biweekly List of Papers on Radiation Chemistry was referred to. For 1979, because of the unavailability of the Cumulation, Chemical Abstracts Search by Japan Information Center of Science and Technology was referred to. The contents are as follows: how far radiation chemistry is studied, what the trends of radiation chemistry is in recent years, who contributes to the advance of radiation chemistry, and where, the trend radiation chemistry takes in 1979. (J.P.N.)

  2. Studies on chemical protectors against radiation, 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinoda, Masato; Ohta, Setsuko; Hayase, Yukitoshi

    1978-01-01

    Radiation protective effect of S,2-aminomethylisothiuronium bromide hydrobromide and 2-mercaptoethylamine hydrochloride was tested on mice irradiated with soft x-ray of 70 kVp, using life-prolongation effect as an index. These compounds showed a marked effect on mice irradiated with 11000--13000 R, using a 10 mm acrylate filter. This method seemed to be usable as a potency testing for chemical radioprotectors. (auth.)

  3. Studies of radiation and chemical toxicity. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Annual report for the Studies of Radiation and Chemical Toxicity Program at the University of Rochester is presented. Progress is reported on four projects: Neurobehavorial Toxicity of Organometallic Fuel Additives, Mechanisms of Permanent and Delayed Pathologic Effects of Ionizing Radiation, Solid State Radiation Chemistry of the DNA Backbone, and Pulmonary Biochemistry

  4. Studies on chemical protectors against radiation, 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yushi; Ohta, Setsuko; Shinoda, Masato

    1990-01-01

    Protective effects of Aloe arborescens (AA) on mouse skin injury induced by soft X-irradiation were examined. The mechanisms on radiation protection by measuring scavenge activity of activated oxygen, protective effects of nucleic acid, induction of antioxidative protein and so on were further investigated. Consequently a significant protective effect of skin injury was observed in AA S6-3-b. As the mechanisms of radiation protection in AA, the following matters were found. AA S6-3-b showed scavenge activity of hydroxyl radicals generated by Haber-Weiss reaction. AA S6-3-b suppressed the changes of activity in superoxide dismutase and gluthathione peroxidase at 7d after soft X-irradiation. Metallothionein was induced in the skin and liver against normal mice at 24 h after administration of AA S6-3-b. (author)

  5. Studies on chemical protectors against radiation, 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yushi; Ohta, Setsuko; Sakurai, Nobuko; Shinoda, Masato

    1989-01-01

    The protective potency against skin injury on mice induced by X-irradiation was studied by use of 72 extracts of crude drugs. The protective potency was determined according to the degrees of skin injury after irradiation of 1100 R, 30 kVp soft X-ray. As a result of this study, 16 kinds of crude drugs such as Rosae Fructus, Aloe arboresces (Herba), Citri Leiocarpae Exocarpium, Schizonepetae Spica, Evodiae Fructus, Bupleuri Radix, Corni Fructus, Perillae Herba, Anemarrhenae Rhizoma, Menthae Herba, Trapae Fructus, Angelicae Dahuricae Radix, Sinomeni Caulis et Rhizoma, Ephedrae Herba. Acer nikoense (Cortex), Forsythiae Fructus, revealed protective potencies on skin injury. (author)

  6. Studies on chemical protectors against radiation, 29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Cheng-Ming; Ohta, Setsuko; Shinoda, Masato

    1990-01-01

    In order to investigate useful protective medicines for the relief of skin injury induced by irradiation, 60 methanol extracts of Chinese traditional medicines were used in the test of protective potency on skin injury. ICR male mice at 6 weeks of age were whole-body irradiated with 1100R by using a soft X-ray generator (30 kVp, 10 mA, 190 R/min). Each methanol extract of these medicines was injected intraperitoneally into mice before or after irradiation. The degrees of skin injury were determined by a score system of skin reaction within the observation period from 21st to 40th day after irradiation. Protective potency of each medicine on skin injury was calculated from the maximum mean scores of administrated group and un-administrated group. As a result of these studies, the protective potency was detected in Unsei-in, Kumibinro-to, Keisi-syakuyaku-chimo-to, Keigai-rengyo-to, Gosyuyu-to, Koso-san, Saiko-seikan-to, Syo-kankyo-to, Syo-saiko-to, Syoma-kakkon-to, Sen-kan-meimoku-to, Zokumei-to, Sokei-kakketu-to, Bokuryo-in, Mao-to and Rikkunsi-to by intraperitoneal injection before irradiation. Of these effective medicines, only Unsei-in and Mao-to are shown to have a significant protective effect by intraperitoneal injection after irradiation. (author)

  7. Radiation chemical studies on the treatment of waste water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakumoto, Akihisa; Miyata, Teijiro; Arai, Michimasa; Arai, Hidehiko

    1982-10-01

    The radiation induced reaction in aqueous solution was studied to develope the radiation treatment as a new technique for waste water and to elevate the effectiveness of radiation. The effectiveness of radiation was enhanced by combination of radiation induced reaction with conventional methods such as biological treatment and coagulation treatment. The synergistic effect of radiation and ozone was studied by using phenol and ethylene glycol. The chain reaction was observed in the radiation induced oxidation. The combination of radiation and ozone is considered to be one of the most useful method. In this report, the mechanism of each reaction and the applicability of the reaction to the treatment of waste water are discussed. (author)

  8. Role of ionizing radiation in chemical evolution studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albarran, G.; Negron-Mendoza, A.; Trevino, C.; Torres, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the role of ionizing radiation in radiation-induced reactions in prebiotic chemistry. The use of ionizing radiation as an energy source is based on its unique qualities, its specific manner of energy deposition and its abundance in the Earth's crust. As an example of radiation-induced reactions, the radiolysis of malonic acid was investigated. Malonic acid is converted into other carboxylic acids. The results obtained have been correlated with the ready formation of this compound in prebiotic experiments. (author)

  9. Chemical effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philips, G.O.

    1986-01-01

    Ionizing radiations initiate chemical changes in materials because of the high energy of their quanta. In water, highly reactive free radicals are produced which can initiate secondary changes of solutes, and in chemical of biological molecules in contact with the water. Free radicals can also be directly produced in irradiated medical products. Their fate can be identified and the molecular basis of radiation inactivation clarified. Methods have now been developed to protect and minimise such radiation damage. (author)

  10. Chemical and radiation environmental risk management at the crossroads: Case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, N.; Burke, T.; Locke, P.

    1999-01-01

    Although many of the major environmental risk management decisions we face today require the simultaneous evaluation and control of both radiological and chemical risks, the separation of radiation and chemical risk management persists along legal, regulatory, programmatic, training and professional practice levels. In June 1998, a panel of 40 chemical and radiation risk experts met at an interactive workshop entitled 'Addressing the Similarities and Differences in Chemical and Radiation Environmental Risk Management,' in Annapolis, Maryland to discuss several perspectives on harmonizing chemical and radiation risk management approaches. At the conclusion of the meeting, workshop participants recommended that case studies of clean-up sites at which radioactive materials and hazardous chemical risks were addressed, be developed to help educate participants in the harmonization dialogue about their counterpart's issues, stimulate discussion and sharpen issues in a way that they can be resolved. Several key risk management issues that were highlighted from the discussion at the Annapolis meeting are being evaluated in the case studies. They include: decision criteria, costs and public/stakeholder input. This paper presents these key issues and the approach taken in the case studies. (author)

  11. Radiation chemical synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagoretz, P.A.; Poluetkov, V.A.; Shostenko, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    The authors consider processes in radiation chemical synthesis which are being developed in various scientific-research organizations. The important advantages of radiation chlorination, viz. the lower temperature compared with the thermal method and the absence of dehydrochlorination products are discussed. The authors examine the liquid-phase chlorination of trifluorochloroethyltrichloromethyl ether to obtain the pentachloro-contining ether, trifluorodichloroethyltrichloromethyl ether. The authors discuss radiation synthesis processes that have be used formulated kinetic equations on which models have been based. It is concluded that the possibilities of preparative (micro- and low-tonnage) radiation synthesis are promising

  12. Physico-chemical studies of radiation effects in cells: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, E.L.

    1987-03-01

    The career of Dr. E.L. Powers, a pioneer in the development of radiobiology, is reviewed. His initial research involved the effects of radiation and certain chemicals on Paramecium, associated ultrastructural studies on protozoan cells, responses of Rickettsia and bacteriophage to irradiation, and the development of techniques for studying bacterial spores. These efforts established the basic radiation biology of the spore and its importance in understanding the effects of free radicals, oxygen, and water. His recent research extended work on the dry spore to the very wet spore and to other selected chemical systems in aqueous suspension. 126 refs., 2 figs

  13. Radiation and photo chemical studies on triphenyl methane dyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhasikuttan, A.C.; Sapre, A.V.; Shastri, L.V.; Mittal, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    Electron transfer and H atom abstraction reactions undergone by TPM dyes with suitable photoexcited substrates are being widely studied. Excited state and radical processes have been studied using the techniques of laser flash photolysis and electron pulse radiolysis. In these studies exciplexes of CV with aromatic hydrocarbons like biphenyl have been identified and characterized. Interesting behaviour has been seen during energy transfer between 3 CV and fullerene C 6 0 by monitoring changes in the near IR region

  14. Physico-chemical studies for strontium sulfate radiation dosimeter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.H. Rushdi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Anhydrous strontium sulfate (SrSO4 has shown a promise candidate as a dosimeter for low dose applications producing unique EPR signals with γ-rays which it has a linear response relationship (r2 = 0.999 in the range of 1–100 Gy. The present study extended to evaluate the properties of strontium sulfate dosimeter in intermediate dose range of technology applications. It was observed that the intensity of the EPR signal at g = 2.01081 increases with a 3rd polynomial function in the range of 0.10–15 kGy. In addition, the radical (SO4− provides a stable signal with a good reproducibility (0.107%. Other physics characteristic including the collision of mass stopping power dependence of the system and the effect of atomic number in different energy regions were investigated. The uncertainty budget for high doses has obtained from the measurement with value of 3.57% at 2σ confidence level.

  15. Use of medaka as a tool in studies of radiation effects and chemical carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyodo-Taguchi, Y.; Aoki, K.; Matsudaira, H.

    1982-01-01

    The medaka, Oryzias latipes, a small freshwater oviparous fish, is common in Japan and found in some parts of Asia. Adult fish are 3.0-3.5 cm long and weigh 0.5-0.7 g. The small fish have been used extensively in this laboratory for analysis of radiation effects and for study of chemical carcinogenesis. These fish are relatively easy to rear and their reproductive biology is well known. Recently, inbred strains of the fish have been established by full sister-brother mating. In this report, we will review experimental results using medaka in studies of : 1) radiation effects on spermatogenesis, and 2) induction of hepatic tumors by MAM acetate, we will also review use of medaka in related studies of radiation effects and chemical carcinogenesis. (author)

  16. Study of the mechanism of radiation-chemical transformations in rubber-resinous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharova, L.B.; Astakhova, L.G. Trufanova, N.D.; Persinen, A.A.; Vasil'ev, I.A.

    1993-01-01

    Materials based on butadiene-nitrile rubbers reinforced by phenol-formaldehyde resins presently find wide application as reliable heat-insulating coatings for various metallic constructions and are utilized under exposure to ionizing radiation. In this connection, when estimating the assured lifetime of heat-insulating coatings, it is necessary to take into account the character and degree of their radiation-chemical transformations. The aim of the present work was to study the radiation-chemical transformations of materials based on a composite of butadiene-nitrile rubber and phenol-formaldehyde resin. The investigations were carried out on model materials S-O, S-25, S-100, S-130, and S-150 based on the SKN-40M rubber with a varied content of SF-010A brand phenol-formaldehyde resin, the content of which in parts by weight per 100 parts by weight of rubber is indicated in the specifications of the materials. The possible directions of the radiation-chemical transformations in the rubber-resinous vulcanizates were studied by the method of disrupted total internal reflection (MDTIR) IR spectroscopy

  17. Radiation chemical studies on the electron-beam treatment of exhaust gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washino, Masamitsu; Tokunaga, Okihiro; Nishimura, Koichi; Suzuki, Nobutake

    1980-03-01

    This report summarizes the radiation chemical studies on the synthetic models of exhaust gases which has been done in JAERI-Takasaki. Radiation-induced reactions of low concentrations of SO 2 and NO was studied in dry and moist mixtures of N 2 and O 2 . SO 2 was oxidized to H 2 SO 4 only in the moist mixtures. Oxidation of NO and reduction of NO 2 took place simultaneously and approached to a radiation-chemical stationary state in the dry N 2 -O 2 systems. NO was easily oxidized to NO 2 and finally to HNO 3 in the moist systems. Addition of NH 3 in the mixture enhanced the NO-removing reactions and suppressed the NO 2 - and HNO 3 -formations. A set of reaction mechanisms deduced is proposed. The reaction proceeds by the mechanism of such indirect effect of radiation as the energies absorbed by the main components are transferred and utilized effectively to the SO 2 - and NO sub(x)-removing reactions. (author)

  18. Chemical and radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugo, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    The paper is a discussion of radiation injuries and the treatment thereof. Radiation injuries are mainly caused as a result of nuclear leaks or nuclear bomb explosions. Such an explosion is usually accompanied by a light flash, noise, heat radiation and nuclear radiation which can all caurse various types of injuries. The general effect of radioactive radiation is discussed. The seriousness of the situation where the whole body was exposed to nuclear radiation, depends on the total radiation dose received and varies from person to person. The progress of radiation sickness is described. Mention is also made of long term radiation effects. The emergency treatment of the injured before specialised aid is available, is discussed. The primary aim of treatment is to save life and to prevent further injuries and complications. Injured people must be removed as far as possible from the point of maximum radiation. Attention must also be given to decontamination

  19. Radiation Dose Measurement Using Chemical Dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min Sun; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Yu Ri; Han, Bum Soo

    2010-01-01

    The radiation dose can be estimated in various ways. Dose estimates can be obtained by either experiment or theoretical analysis. In experiments, radiation impact is assessed by measuring any change caused by energy deposition to the exposed matter, in terms of energy state (physical change), chemical production (chemical change) or biological abnormality (biological change). The chemical dosimetry is based on the implication that the energy deposited to the matter can be inferred from the consequential change in chemical production. The chemical dosimetry usually works on the sample that is an aqueous solution, a biological matter, or an organic substance. In this study, we estimated absorbed doses by quantitating chemical changes in matter caused by radiation exposure. Two different chemical dosimeters, Fricke and ECB (Ethanol-Chlorobenzene) dosimeter, were compared in several features including efficacy as dose indicator and effective dose range

  20. Physico-chemical Study of Some Prepared Dyed Films and Possible Application as Radiation Dosimetry Monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, A.S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation processing, a relatively young industry dating from the mid 1950s, has prospered and continues to grow rapidly. The sterilization of medical products by radiation was demonstrated earlier and accounts for a considerable proportion of the industry establishing itself soundly during the 1970s. The radiation processing of polymers and food treatment by radiation have been thoroughly investigated and are important aspects of study. Radiation technology is now well established and is contributing to the industrial development, thus playing its legitimate role, taking into account the total value of the products treated with ionizing radiation, the economic scale of this technology is enormous. Some well established applications like sterilization, and polymers and semiconductors modification are in common use. This is especially true for health care products in industrial countries like the USA and Canada, where it is estimated that more than half of these products is currently sterilized using ionizing radiation

  1. Radiation, chemicals and combined effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, W.K.

    1991-01-01

    A brief background has been provided on current carcinogenic risks from ionizing radiation and their magnitude in background circumstances. The magnitude of the risks from possibly carcinogenic chemicals at background levels in air, water and food are surprisingly similar. The exception is, perhaps, for the single source of radon which, while variable, on the average stands out above all other sources. Some basic principles concerning the interaction of combined radiation and chemicals and some practical examples where the two interact synergistically to enhance radiation effects has also been provided. Areas for human research in the future are discussed. (Author)

  2. Physico-chemical studies of radiation effects in cells. Progress report, February 15, 1982-February 14, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, E.L.

    1982-01-01

    Progress in studies investigating the chemical mechanisms involved in radiation-induced cellular damage is reported. Three organisms currently being tested are Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus subtilis, and Escherichia coli, silver and mercury have been used as radiosensitizers, and their interaction with DNA studied

  3. Gold and gold-copper nanoparticles in 2-propanol: A radiation chemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, G.R.

    2011-01-01

    The studies on the reduction of Au 3+ to gold nanoparticles in presence and absence of Cu 2+ under deoxygenated conditions in 2-propanol by radiolytic method have been carried out. On γ-radiolysis, preliminary yellow colored solution of Au 3+ changed to purple color owing to gold nanoparticles formation, which exhibits an absorption peak at around 540 nm. In the presence of Cu 2+ , absorption of gold-copper nanoparticles, which was also produced during γ-radiolysis, was red shifted in contrast to the system containing no Cu 2+ . Under DLS studies the sizes of gold nanoparticles in the absence and the presence of Cu 2+ were found to be larger (>400 nm). However, in presence of polyethylene glycol, a stabilizer the nanoparticle sizes became smaller, sizes measured for gold and gold-copper nanoparticles are 40 and 140 nm, respectively. Moreover, the change in UV-vis spectra in the Cu 2+ and Au 3+ mixed system highlights the formation of gold-copper nanoparticles in core-shell type arrangement. - Highlights: → Present radiation chemical study highlights high reactivity of Au ·2+ with Cu 2+ . → Absorption of gold-copper nanoparticles is blue shifted as compared to copper nanoparticles. → Change in UV-vis spectra with dose emphasizes core-shell type arrangement of Au-Cu nanoparticles.

  4. Comparative experimental study of cancer induced by ionizing radiations or by chemical carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafuma, J.

    1983-01-01

    Animal experiments have contributed to specify a number of parameters used in setting human safety limits for ionizing radiation. In the same way, comparisons have been made between cancers induced in man and in animals in well-defined conditions. In order to use the same experimental data for chemical carcinogens, the mechanisms of carcinogenesis should be the same, i.e. additivity of responses instead of synergy of effects, which requires the development of a new experimental method [fr

  5. Tumor virus induction: a model for studying gene derepression by light radiation and chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellman, K.B.

    1981-01-01

    Cells of most, if not all, animal species contain information for type C retraviruses. This information is normally repressed, but may be derepressed after cellular exposure to a variety of agents. This phenomenon of virus induction can be utilized to investigate the phenomenon of gene derepression, since control of type C virus induction is thought to be under regulatory processes affecting cellular genes. Properties of type C retraviruses, results of virus induction studies, and discussion of a possible mechanism(s) for virus induction are presented in this review. Utilizing the Al-2 nonproducer cell line, originally derived from cells of the BALB/c mouse, quantitative and kinetic dose-response data have been obtained for type C virus induction by uv radiation, chemicals, and biological agents. Studies showing that protease inhibitors suppress induction suggest the presence of a common mechanism for controlling virus induction; i.e., a protein repressor(s) which acts to control virus gene derepression. Since protease inhibitors suppress induction of prophage in E. coli, similar processes may control virus induction in animal and bacterial systems

  6. Field studies on long term ecosystem consequences of ionising radiation and chemical pollutants (EANOR Project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oughton, D. [Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD (Norway); Evseeva, T. [Institute of Biology RAS (Russian Federation); Erenturk, S. [Istanbul Technical University (Turkey)

    2014-07-01

    Chernobyl and other nuclear accidents have demonstrated that high levels of ionizing radiation can result in impacts on plants and animals, however little is known about the long-term effects of chronic exposure on biodiversity or other population and ecosystem level effects. The issue of ecological impact has been addressed after the Fukushima accident, which has raised questions about the impacts of radioactivity not only on human health, but also on wildlife. The overall aim of the EANOR project (2012-2015) is to assess the impacts of chronic exposure to enhanced radioactivity and chemical pollutants by studying the diversity of plant and soil invertebrate populations at two field sites. The first is a radium contaminated site in the Vodny area of the Komi Republic, Russia. Between 1931 and 1956, this was the main location of Soviet radium production. Wastes from the industry caused contamination of the environment, leading to high levels of radionuclides, heavy metals and rare-earth elements in the surroundings. The prolonged exposure of the ecosystem, combined with relatively low human activities, makes the site an excellent field laboratory for investigating the long-term effects of pollution. The second site is metal mining (Fe, Au, Ag, Mn, Mo, Cu, Pb and Zn) and industrial area on the Eastern Black Sea Region, Turkey, having elevated levels of both heavy metals and radionuclides for many decades. Eastern Black Sea Region is a mountainous area covered with dense forests, where numerous rivers and torrents flow through gorges and is characterized by heavy rainfall, humid summers, and mild winters. Based on these conditions, the region is rich in biological diversity. Joint field expeditions have been carried out in 2012 and 2013 with the objective of documenting levels of radionuclides and other chemical contaminants in soils and organisms, and assessing plant and soil invertebrate biodiversity. Measurement of a range of biomarkers, including soil meta

  7. Chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livesey, J.C.; Reed, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Over 40 years have passed since the research of the Manhattan Project suggested the possibility of chemical protection against ionizing radiation. During that time, much has been learned about the nature of radiation-induced injury and the factors governing the expression of that injury. Thousands of compounds have been tested for radioprotective efficacy, and numerous theories have been proposed to account for these actions. The literature on chemical radioprotection is large. In this article, the authors consider several of the mechanisms by which chemicals may protect against radiation injury. They have chosen to accent this view of radioprotector research as opposed to that research geared toward developing specific molecules as protective agents because they feel that such an approach is more beneficial in stimulating research of general applicability. This paper describes the matrix of biological factors upon which an exogenous radioprotector is superimposed, and examines evidence for and against various mechanisms by which these agents may protect biological systems against ionizing radiation. It concludes with a brief outlook for research in chemical radioprotection

  8. Animal experiment studies on biological and chemical radiation protection - the combined effects of serotonin and erythropoletin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasse, U.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of a prophylactic combination treatment with serotonin and erythropoietin on the inhibited erythropoiesis of whole-body irradiated mice (500 R) was studied. Both erythropoietin and serotonin turned out to compensate the radiation-induced inhibition of the formation rate for erythrocytes to a small extent. However, only the enhancement of erythropoiesis due to serotonin indicated significant values. Yet the combined application of the named substances yielded a distinct and significant effect in radiation protection which even exceeded the simple addition of the protective effect yielded by serotonin and erythropoietin alone. But despite of this considerable success the radiation damage in the erythropoietic system was not even half compensated for. (orig./MG) [de

  9. [Studies on chemical protectors against radiation. XXXII. Protective effects of methanol extracts of various Taiwan crude drugs on radiation injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C M; Ohta, S; Shinoda, M

    1990-11-01

    This study is to investigate radioprotective effects of 23 Taiwan crude drugs on X-ray induced bone marrow death and skin injury in mice. Each methanol extract of these Taiwan crude drugs was injected intraperitoneally into ICR male mice at 6 weeks of age before irradiation. Mice were whole-body irradiated with a soft X-ray generator. Radiation factors of the two screening tests used were as follows: 70 kVp, 10 mA, 10 mm acrylate filter, 70R/min, 2100R for survival test, and 30 kVp, 10 mA, 190R/min, 1100R for protective test on skin injury. As a result of these studies, the survival effect was recognized in Solani Incani Herba and Orthosiphi Aristati Herba. On the other hand, Mimosae Herba, Canarii Radix, Bombacis Radix, Arecae Fructus, Hedyotidis Diffusae Herba and Cynomorii Caulis were shown to have significant protective potency on skin injury.

  10. Chemical effects of ionizing radiation and sonic energy in the context of chemical evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negron Mendoza, A.; Albarran, G.

    1992-01-01

    Ionizing radiation and sonic energy are considered as sources for chemical evolution processes. These sources have still a modest place in the interdisciplinary approach for the prebiological synthesis of organic compounds. Studies in Radiation Chemistry and Sonochemistry can provide a deeper insight into the chemical processes that may have importance for prebiotic chemistry. The present work concerns the analysis of some chemical reactions induced by ionizing radiation or cavitation in aqueous media that may be relevant to chemical evolution studies. (author)

  11. Synchrotron radiation facilities for chemical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Yoshihiko

    1995-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) research is of great importance in understanding radiation chemistry, physics, and biology. It is also clearly recognized in the international chemical community that chemical applications of SR are greatly advanced and divided into 1) Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics Studies-Gases, Surfaces, and Condensed Matter- , 2) Radiation Chemistry and Photochemistry, 3) X-ray Structural and XAFS Studies-Crystals, Surfaces, and Liquids- , 4) Analytical Chemistry, and 5) Synthesis or R and D of New Materials. In this paper, a survey is given of recent advances in the application of SR to the chemistry of excitation and ionization of molecules, i.e., SR chemistry, in the wavelength region between near-ultraviolet and hard X-rays. The topics will be chosen from those obtained at some leading SR facilities. (J.P.N.)

  12. The role of cellular and molecular studies in evaluation of health effects from combined radiation and chemical exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, A.L.; Gilbert, E.S.; Kitchin, R.M.; Johnson, N.F.

    1992-06-01

    Additive models are currently used to predict risks following exposure to multiple agents or complex mixtures. Use of these models is questioned because different methods are used to derive risks for chemical and physical agents depending on the database used. Risks for the induction of cancer from radiation are based on large sets of human data, while standards are set for most chemical carcinogens using information derived from animal studies. However, it is not, from a scientific point of view, appropriate to add risks from physical and chemical agents to derive potential health impact from combined exposures. The range of safety factors built into the estimates, the large differences in the data sets used to evaluate and establish standards, and the differences in the basic philosophy for deriving risks for physical and chemical agents make the additive model unacceptable for estimating risks from combined exposures. To understand the potential health impacts from environmental exposure, it is important (1) to consider how risks were derived and (2) to determine if interactions exist between damage induced by the different agents to ensure that additive assumptions are valid. This presentation discusses a number of these safety factors for specific chemicals

  13. Combined effects of a chemical mutagen and radiation sterilized diet in mutagenicity and reproduction studies in the same mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renner, H.W.

    1975-01-01

    The possible intensification of the mutagenic effect of cyclophosphamide (Endoxan) by the feeding of a radiation-sterilized diet (dose, 4.5 Mrad) was studied in 2000 NMRI/Han mice. In a dominant lethal test, males were pretreated with 100 mg Endoxan/kg body weight. The greatest sensitivity towards Endoxan was observed during the late-spermatid stage. No significant differences were detected between the control group (Endoxan plus non-irradiated diet) and the experimental group (Endoxan plus radiation-sterilized diet). In this test, radiation-sterilized feed showed no co-mutagenic effect when combined with Endoxan treatment. In a reproduction study of 7 months duration (continuous mating without lactation periods), the females were treated every 2 wk with 20 mg Endoxan/kg body weight. The decline in litter size with increasing number of litters (i.e. with advancing age of the females) was more pronounced after treatment with the chemical mutagen than in the untreated group. Increases in the frequency of abortions and in premature sterility resulted from Endoxan treatment. During the entire observation period, no effects from the intake of radiation-sterilized food were detected. (author)

  14. A functional and chemical study of radiation effects on rat parotid and submandibular/sublingual glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vissink, A.; S-Gravenmade, E.J.; Ligeon, E.E.; Konings, W.T.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor composition and rate of secretion of rat parotid and submandibular/sublingual saliva following local single doses of X-rays ranging from 5 to 20 Gy. Pilocarpine-stimulated samples of parotid and submandibular/sublingual saliva were simultaneously collected with miniaturized Lashley cups before and 1-30 days after irradiation. The lag phase (period between injection of pilocarpine and start of the secretion) and flow rate were recorded and the concentrations of sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphate, and amylase were measured. With increasing dose and time, the salivary flow rate as well as sodium concentration decreased, while potassium concentrations increased throughout the follow-up period. The lag phase and the concentration of amylase reached their maximum at 3 and 10 days after irradiation, respectively. The changes in lag phase and flow rate were most obvious after doses of 15 or 20 Gy and showed a great similarity for parotid and submandibular/sublingual saliva. No dose-response relationship was observed for the changes in concentrations of calcium and phosphate. It is concluded that for radiation doses of 10 Gy and above, irreversible changes (lag phase, flow rate, potassium, sodium) were observed. A saturation of the irradiation effects (lag phase, flow rate) seems to exist at doses larger than 15 Gy. No significant differences were observed between the radiation-induced functional changes in parotid and submandibular/sublingual salivary gland tissue

  15. A study of the chemical budget of Lake Baikal using neutron activation and synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granina, L.; Tomza, U.; Arimoto, R.; Grachev, A.; Granin, M.

    2000-01-01

    Beginning in 1993, neutron activation analysis (NAA) and synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis (SRXFA) have been used to investigate the composition of particles suspended in Lake Baikal and its major tributaries. Both techniques have provided data on the concentration of a wide range of elements with neutron activation offering the first data on several rare earth elements and other minor elements. While each technique appears to be more suitable for determining the concentration of certain elements than an alternate technique, both techniques are in close agreement in their analysis of most of the elements studied. International standard reference materials were used to calibrate and validate the analyses and allow results from the two methods to be compared. The results of this study have been combined with published data to calculate the total elemental input into the lake

  16. Chemical reactions on platinum-group metal surfaces studied by synchrotron-radiation-based spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondoh, Hiroshi; Nakai, Ikuyo; Nagasaka, Masanari; Amemiya, Kenta; Ohta, Toshiaki

    2009-01-01

    A new version of synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray spectroscopy, wave-length-dispersive near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (dispersive-NEXAFS), and fast x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have been applied to mechanistic studies on several surface catalytic reactions on platinum-group-metal surfaces. In this review, our approach using above techniques to understand the reaction mechanism and actual application studies on three well-known catalytic surface reactions, CO oxidation on Pt(111) and Pd(111), NO reduction on Rh(111), and H 2 O formation on Pt(111), are introduced. Spectroscopic monitoring of the progress of the surface reactions enabled us to detect reaction intermediates and analyze the reaction kinetics quantitatively which provides information on reaction order, rate constant, pre-exponential factor, activation energy and etc. Such quantitative analyses combined with scanning tunneling microscopy and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations revealed significant contribution of the adsorbate configurations and their dynamic changes to the reaction mechanisms of the above fundamental catalytic surface reactions. (author)

  17. Study the effect of gamma radiation pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse on its physcio-chemical morphological and structural properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Khushboo; Garg, Neelima; Diwan, R. K.; Varshney, Lalit; Tyagi, Ajay K.

    2017-12-01

    Sugarcane bagasse was exposed to gamma radiation at different doses i.e. 100, 500, 1000 and 2000 kGy at a dose rate of 2.5 kGy/h and characterized for physical, chemical, morphological and structural properties. Results showed that on exposure of sugarcane bagasse, hemicellulose content reduced from 31% to 12.4% at 2000 kGy dose. The cellulose content of bagasse did not get affected much upto 1000 kGy exposure; however at 2000 kGy dose it decreased considerably. XRD study shows an initial increase in crystallinity index of bagasse at a dose level of 100 kGy while on further increase in radiation dose from 100 kGy to 2000 kGy the crystallinity index of bagasse decreases. Pores in the SEM photograph were observed on the surface of irradiated bagasse. UV-Vis spectra of bagasse showed a red shift indicating internal changes caused by radiation exposure. Study shows that the irradiation of bagasse results in disrupton of the lignocellulosic structure of Bagasse which opens up for easy accessibility of acids and hydrolytic enzymes for cellulosic hydrolysis resulting into fermentable sugars.

  18. A comparative study on thermal, mechanical and dielectric characteristics of low density polyethylene crosslinked by radiation and chemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, B.H.; Ling, D.Y.; Kim, J.S.

    1976-01-01

    A comparative study on thermal, static mechanical and dielectric characteristics were made over a temperature range of ca. 20 0 C to 320 0 C and a frequency range of KHZ band on low density polyethylene specimens crosslinked, respectively, by radiation and chemical method. The thermal property of both specimens shows that softening point appears to unchange by crosslinking however, melting and liquidizing temperatures attain rapid increase at the imitation of crosslinking. Mechanical properties show little difference to both specimens crosslinked by different method, further the behaviors were discussed in connection with the relaxation of molecular segments in amorphous phase. Dose dependent dielectric characteristics observed at ambient temperature under several fixed frequencies exhibit extremities at ca. 20 Mrad and the behaviors also were interpreted qualitatively by taking into consideration of dipole concentration change in amorphous phase together with the role of specimen geometry to the depth of oxidative layer. Observing frequency dependent dielectric characteristics, it was also proved that ionic conduction loss is appreciably greater in the specimen prepared by chemical method than that by radiation. (author)

  19. Comparison of radiation and chemical risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, G.

    1988-01-01

    Injury to living cells is caused by mechanisms which in many cases are similar for radiation and chemicals. It is thus not surprising that radiation and many chemicals can cause similar biological effects, e.g. cancer, fetal injury and hereditary disease. Both radiation and chemicals are always found in our environment. One agent may strengthen or weaken the effect of another, be it radiation in combination with chemicals or one chemical with another. The implications of such synergistic or antagonistic effects are discussed. Intricate mechanisms help the body to defend itself against threats to health from radiation and chemicals, even against cancer risks. In a strategy for health, it might be worth to exploit actively these defense mechanisms, in parallel with decreasing the exposures. On particular interest are the large exposures from commonly known sources such as smoking, sun tanning and high fat contents of food. (author)

  20. Radiation treatment of toxic chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.J.; Jung, I.H.; Jo, S.K.

    2010-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were commercially produced from 1920s as complex mixtures containing multiple isomers for a variety of applications. They are very toxic, chemically stable and resist microbial, photochemical, chemical, and thermal degradation. The public, legal, and scientific concerns about PCBs arose from research indicating they were environmental contaminants that had a potential to adversely impact the environment, and, therefore, were undesirable as commercial products. Eventually, most producers reduced or stopped production of PCBs in the 1970s. Stockholm convention on POPs (Persistent Organic Pollutants), which was effective on May 2004 and 151 nations including Korea were joined on June 2005, asked to dispose of PCBs by 2028 with environmental friendly methods. Korean government also has declared to conduct by 2015. According to the Environmental law of Korea, over 2 ppm of PCBs has to be decomposed by legal methods of incineration and thermal destruction. But those are inapplicable owing to the environmental groups. KAERI(Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) has recently developed a remarkable technology for radiation treatment of toxic chemicals including chlorides using an electron beam accelerator. Electron beam accelerator of 2.5 MeV energy and 100 kW power capacity was used to decompose of PCBs having been used as a commercial transformer oil for more than 30 years. The oil were irradiated with ∼ 0.1 percent of TEA (Triethyl Amin) to make chloride ion aparted off from the PCBs into precipitate at the conditions of normal temperature and pressure. The concentrations of PCBs were measured by GC (Gas Chromatography) with ECD (Electron Capture Detector) following the KS (Korean Standard) test procedure. Electron beam should be a useful tool for environmental conservation. Residual concentrations of PCBs after irradiation were depended on the absorption dose of electron beam energy. Advantages comparing to other methods such as

  1. Galaxy formation with radiative and chemical feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graziani, L.; Salvadori, S.; Schneider, R.; Kawata, D.; de Bennassuti, M.; Maselli, A.

    Here we introduce GAMESH, a novel pipeline that implements self-consistent radiative and chemical feedback in a computational model of galaxy formation. By combining the cosmological chemical-evolution model GAMETE with the radiative transfer code CRASH, GAMESH can post-process realistic outputs of

  2. Study of Chemical Treatment Combined with Radiation to Prepare Biotic Elicitor for Utilization in Agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Quoc Hien

    2010-01-01

    Chitosan was prepared from shrimp shell (alpha chitosan) and from squid pen (beta chitosan) with degree of deacetylation of about 70%. Degradation of chitosan in flake form by combined treatment with H 2 O 2 and gamma Co-60 radiation was carried out. Results showed that combined treatment was highly effective for degradation of chitosan to obtain low molecular weight of 1-2 × 10 5 . Oligochitosan was prepared by irradiation of chitosan solution of 50g/l (5%, w/v). The dose required for oligochitosan with water soluble content of more than 70% was of 32kGy and 48kGy for beta and alpha chitosan, respectively. Synergic effect of degradation of chitosan in solution with H 2 O 2 and gamma Co-60 radiation was also investigated. The dose to obtain oligochitosan was reduced from 32kGy to 4kGy for beta chitosan and from 48kGy to 8kGy for alpha chitosan. The elicitation and growth promotion effect of oligochiotsan for sugarcane and rice were investigated. Results showed that oligochitosan with water soluble content of 70-80% (Mw~5,000-10,000) exhibited the most effective elicitation and growth promotion for plant. The optimum oligochitosan concentration by spraying was of 30 and 15ppm for sugarcane and rice, respectively. The disease index of Ustilgo scitaminea and Collectotrichum falcatum on sugarcane were reduced to 44.5 and 72.3% compared to control (100%). The productivity of sugarcane was increased about 13% (8tons/ha). The disease index of Pyricularia grisea on rice was reduced to 53.0% for leaf and 34.1% for neck of bloom compared to control (100%). The productivity of rice was increased for 11-26% (0.6-1.4 tons/ha). The obtained results indicated that oligochitosan is promising to use as a biotic elicitor for plant particularly for sugarcane and rice. The procedure for production of oligochitosan elicitor by γ- irradiation method was described. (author)

  3. Radiation, chemicals, and occupational health research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation protection and its interplay with physical research programs are described. Differences and similarities between problems in health protection for chemicals and for radiation are discussed. The importance of dosimetry in radiation work and its relevance to chemicals are cited. A collaborative program between physical and biological scientists on the toxicity of metals is briefly described. It serves as an example of new research directed toward the development of fundamental concepts and principles as a basis for understanding and controlling occupational and population exposures to chemicals. 12 references, 4 figures

  4. Radical cations in radiation chemistry of aldehydes. ESR study and quantum chemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belevskii, V.N.; Tyurin, D.A.; Chuvilkin, N.D.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum-chemical (MNDO-UHF) calculations of electronic, spin and energy characteristics of radical cations (RC) of ethanal, propanal, butanal, and pentanal and their distonic isomers were performed. The calculations both with 'frozen' (vertical ionization) and completely optimize geometry (adiabatic approximation) were made. It was been shown that the most positive charge and spin population are localized at O atoms and adjacent C atom as well as at aldehyde protons. The C-H bonds corresponding to those protons as well as neighboring C-O and C-C bonds are considerable weaker (longer) in radical cations as compared to their neutral precursors. That is why such reaction centers are apt to deprotonation with the formation of acyl radical as well as to α- and β-splitting (scission) which are well-known from aldehydes mass-spectra. Our calculations shown that distonic RC (products of intramolecular H-atom transfer) are more stable as compare to their classical isomers: e.g. the difference in energy ΔE = -0.95 eV, -1.2 eV, and -1.5 eV for tree distonic isomers of butanal RC as compare to classical isomer, ΔE -1.2 eV for distonic RC of ethanal. The results of calculations are effectively correlated with ESR data obtained in freonic solutions, X- and gamma-irradiated at 77 K and in liquid aldehydes, X-irradiated by using 2,4,6-tri-tert-burylnitrosobenzene (BNB) and t-BuNO (NtB) as a spin traps. (author)

  5. Some radiation chemical aspects of nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikaev, A.K.; Kabakchi, S.A.; Egorov, G.F.

    1988-01-01

    Some radiation chemical aspects of nuclear engineering are discussed (predominantly on the base of the works performed in the Soviet Union). The data on the influence of temperature within the range of 0-300 0 C on the yields of water radiolysis products are considered. The results obtained from the study of reactivity of actinide ions towards inorganic free radicals in acid aqueous solutions are summarized. The information on composition and properties of the products of radiolytic transformations of different extragents and diluents and on their influence on the behaviour of extraction systems during processing of irradiated nuclear fuel is presented. (author)

  6. Physico-chemical studies of radiation effects in cells. Progress report, November 15, 1980-February 14, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    The primary interest is investigating and understanding the chemical mechanisms involved in radiation-induced cellular damage. Most recently the perturbating devices have been metals which increase, in various ways and modes, the radiation sensitivity of several cell types. While the chief cell type has been the bacterial spore, chosen because of its biological inertness and its hardiness, allowing it to survive the unphysiological conditions of the physical chemist and, thus, inquiry into the free radical mechanisms involved very soon after energy absorption, recently vegetative cells have been introduced. A number of metals have been used and practically all of them sensitize - but to varying degrees. Straight biological techniques such as the measurement of cell survival under various conditions in the different cells have been used, as well as parallel experiments in pulse radiolysis to attack the specific leads in a chemical fashion suggested by the biology

  7. The study of the radiation chemical transformation of the hexane on the surface of aluminium by IR-spectroscopy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimikhanova, A.N.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: In this work the experimental results of the radiation-chemical transformation of hexane on the aluminum surface obtained by IR spectroscopy method at room temperature have been presented. The metallic aluminum plates which was obtained by stage pressing granules by mark of AD-00 with the reflection coefficient R=0,85 in the middle infrared range of waves length λ=15 ± 2,2 mkm were used. As an adsorbate unsaturated vapors of hexane were used, the absorption of which was being carried out at the room temperature by the method. The radiation of system was carried out with γ-quanta of Co 60 with doze rate of 1,03 Gy/s - 1, and the absorbed doze in the system was (0,5-2)10 4 Gy. IR reflection spectra when beams fall on the sample under angle near the slipping were measured in diapason of 3600-650 cm - 1 by the spectrophotometer S pecord 71IR . The radiation chemical decomposition of hexane in heterosystem was being traced in stretching (3000-2700 cm - 1) and deformation (1500-1300 cm - 1) vibration diapasons of C-H bonds. The analysis of IR reflection spectra of Al-ads.hexane heterosystem showed that the main products of radiation chemical transformation are hydrocarbons C1-C5, olefins: propylene, butene-1, hexene-1, transhexene-3 and hydrocarbons more heavy than hexane. In frequency range of 1700-2000 cm - 1 the absorption bands of Al-H vibration which concern to aluminum hydrides are founded. By increasing of radiation dose the tendency of increasing of hydrogen accumulation as aluminum hydrides has been established

  8. Radiation Chemical Studies of Gly-Met-Gly in Aqueous Solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barata-Vallejo, Sebastian; Ferreri, Carla; Zhang, Tao; Permentier, Hjalmar; Bischoff, Rainer; Bobrowski, Krzysztof; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos

    2016-01-01

    Important biological consequences are related to the reaction of HO(•) radicals with methionine (Met). Several fundamental aspects remain to be defined when Met is an amino acid residue incorporated in the interior of peptides and proteins. The present study focuses on Gly-Met-Gly, the simplest

  9. Radiation-chemical aspects of solid state hot atom chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, T.; Collins, K.E.; Collins, C.H.

    1984-01-01

    The study of nuclear hot atom chemical (NHAC) processes occurring in solids is seriously limited by the lack of adequate methods for directly studying the chemical species containing hot atoms. In the present review the effects of ionizing radiation on parent and non-parent yields from solid state targets is surveyed and qualitative interpretations are given. After a few general remarks of the relationship of radiation chemistry to solid state NHAC, a detailed description of the radiation effects is given (radiation annealing, neutron activation, changes in separable yield). (Auth.)

  10. Use tradescantia (clones 02 and 4430) in studies on radiation and chemical mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osipova, R.G.; Shevchenko, V.A. (AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Obshchej Genetiki)

    1984-01-01

    Biological and genetic characteristics of tradescantia clones 02 and 4430, widely used as sensitive test-objects to determine genetic effects of various mutagens, have been considered. Experimentally obtained data on the effect of X-rays and various concentrations of uranium-238 salt on the system of staminal fiber hair (SFH) of tradescantia clone 2 are presented. Under the effect of X-rays the dose-effect curve is characterized by the presence of the maximum at the doses of about 2 Gy. In the dose range 0.05-2 Gy the dependence between logarithm of induction frequency of single mutations and dose logarithm is close to the linear one. The study of mutagenic effect of uranium-238 has confirmed the high sensitivity of the SFH system. Even the low concentration like 1.7 mg/l has the mutation effect approximately equal to the effect of 0.03-0.05 Gy of X-rays.

  11. The use tradescantia (clones 02 and 4430) in studies on radiation and chemical mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osipova, R.G.; Shevchenko, V.A.

    1984-01-01

    Biological and genetic characteristics of tradescantia clones 02 and 4430, widely used as sensitive test-objects to determine genetic effects of various mutagenes, have been considered. Experimentally obtained data on the effect of X-rays and various concentrations of uranium-238 salt on the system of staminal fiber hair (SFH) of tradescantia clone 2 are presented. Under the effect of X-rays the dose-effect curve is characterized by the presence of the maximum at the doses of about 2 Gy. In the dose range 0.05-2 Gy the dependence between logarithm of induction frequency of single mutations and dose logarithm is close to the linear one. The study of mutagenic effect of uranium-238 has confirmed the high sensitivity of the SFH system. Even the low concentration like 1.7 mg/l has the mutation effect approximately equal to the effect of 0.03-0.05 Gy of X-rays

  12. Radiation chemical and photochemical study of Z-DNA modified by 2-aminopurine and 8- bromodeoxyguanosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, T.; Kawai, K.; Majima, T.

    2003-01-01

    DNA is able to take a number of local conformations. (CG) n repeats have the highest potential to Z-DNA which has a left-handed zig-zag backbone and unusual syn-conformation purine base. Because of the polymorphic nature of dinucleotide repeats, it seems possible that Z-DNA forming sequences may provide a source of genetic variation if they occur in regions that are important for the regulation of gene activity. Here, we investigated structural properties of Z-DNA compared with those of B-DNA with respects to one-electron attachment reaction of 8-bromodeoxyguanosine (dBrG) and fluorescence properties of 2-aminopurine (Ap). To investigate one-electron attachment reaction of Z-DNA, we synthesized oligodeoxynucleotides modified by dBrG in which syn-conformation deoxyguanosine was stabilized by steric repulsion between 8-bromo group of dBrG and sugar moiety in Z-DNA. Debromination from the dBrG modified oligodeoxynucleotides occurred from the one-electron attachment during the gamma-ray irradiation. The structural dependence of B- and Z-DNA was observed in the one-electron attachment reaction. Interestingly, the higher conversion of dBrG were observed in the Z-DNA than in the B-DNA. Since the solvent accessibility to purine base in Z-DNA increases compared with that in B-DNA, it is suggested that the electron attachment is enhanced in Z-DNA than in B-DNA. Next we studied the fluorescence properties of Ap in left-handed Z-DNA and compared with those in B-DNA. Since photoexcited adenine analogue Ap can serve as a sensitive probe of DNA structural dynamics, we synthesized Ap- and dBrG-modified oligodeoxynucleotides. Higher intensity was observed in the steady-state fluorescence of Ap in Z-DNA than in B-DNA. A new peak at 275 nm was observed in the excitation spectrum measured at the Ap emission wavelength 370 nm in Z-DNA. This has been explained by the energy transfer from the excited nucleobases to Ap. It is found that Ap is a useful fluorescence probe of Z-DNA

  13. Chemical aspects of radiation damage processes: radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asmus, K.D.

    1975-01-01

    The formation of primary species and radiation chemical yields are discussed. In a section on chemical scavenging of primary species the author considers scavenging kinetics and competition reactions and gives a brief outline of some experimental methods. The radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions is discussed as an example for polar solvents. Cyclohexane is used as an example for non-polar solvents. The importance of excited states and energy transfer is considered. Reactions in the solid state are discussed and results on linear energy transfer and average ion pair formation for various kinds of radiation are surveyed. (B.R.H.)

  14. Natural radiation sources fabricated from potassic chemical fertilizers and application to radiation education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Takao

    2010-01-01

    Potassic chemical fertilizers contain potassium, a small part of which is potassium-40. Since potassium-40 is a naturally occurring radioisotope, potassic chemical fertilizers are often used for demonstrations of the existence of natural radioisotopes and radiation. To fabricate radiation sources as educational tools, the compression and formation method developed by our previous study was applied to 13 brands of commercially available chemical fertilizers containing different amounts of potassium. The suitability (size, weight, and solidness) of thus fabricated sources was examined and 12 of them were selected as easy-to-use radiation sources at radiation educational courses. The radiation strength (radiation count rate measured by a GM survey meter) and potassium content of the 12 sources were examined. It was found that the count rate was wholly proportional to the percentage of potassium, and a new educational application was proposed and discussed for understanding that the substance emitting radiation must be the potassium present in the raw fertilizers. (author)

  15. Natural radiation, nuclear wastes and chemical pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, T.; Ehdwall, H.; Stranden, E.

    1990-01-01

    Doses from natural radiation to the population in the Nordic Countries are summarized and man made modifications of the natural radiation environment are discussed. An account is given of the radiological consequences of energy conservation by reduced ventilation. Risks from possible future releases of radioactivity from final repositories of spent nuclear fuel are compared to the risks from present natural radioactivity in the environment. The possibilities for comparison between chemical and radiological risks are discussed. (author) 13 refs

  16. Chemical and kinetic equilibrations via radiative parton transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Bin; Wortman, Warner A

    2011-01-01

    A hot and dense partonic system can be produced in the early stage of a relativistic heavy ion collision. How it equilibrates is important for the extraction of Quark-Gluon Plasma properties. We study the chemical and kinetic equilibrations of the Quark-Gluon Plasma using a radiative transport model. Thermal and Color-Glass-Condensate motivated initial conditions are used. We observe that screened parton interactions always lead to partial pressure isotropization. Different initial pressure anisotropies result in the same asymptotic evolution. Comparison of evolutions with and without radiative processes shows that chemical equilibration interacts with kinetic equilibration and radiative processes can contribute significantly to pressure isotropization.

  17. Recovery during radiation and chemical mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deen, D.F.

    1975-01-01

    These investigations were directed toward the study of recovery in radiation and chemical mutagenesis in cultured mammalian cells. A mutagenesis system was established in which mutation of V79-17lb Chinese hamster cells to 8-azaguanine resistance was tested. The effects of split dose and postirradiation treatments upon both x-ray and EMS induced mutagenesis were determined. Increasing the cell inoculum by a factor of 5 (from 10 5 to 5 x 10 5 ) decreased both the spontaneous and x-ray induced mutation frequencies by two orders of magnitude. The x-ray induced mutation frequency was found to be higher for those cells allowed to attach for 5 hours before irradiation, in comparison to those allowed to attach for 2 hours. The uv spectrum of 8-azaguanine changes as a function of storage time at low temperature, but not when diluted to either 10 μg/ml or 30 μg/ml and maintained at 37 0 C. The optimal expression time required after irradiation is dose dependent and can be determined from the relationship: E.T. = 1.93(10 -2 )D + 15.5. (E.T. = hours; D = rads). The duration of the optimal expression time can be estimated by summing the cell cycle time and the radiation induced lag time

  18. Chemical Industry Bandwidth Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2006-12-01

    The Chemical Bandwidth Study provides a snapshot of potentially recoverable energy losses during chemical manufacturing. The advantage of this study is the use of "exergy" analysis as a tool for pinpointing inefficiencies.

  19. Radiation-chemical destruction of cellulose and other polysaccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ershov, B.G.

    1998-01-01

    The studies concerning the radiation-chemical destruction of cellulose, its ethers and some polysaccharides (xylan, starch, decstrans, chitin, chitosan and geparin) are discussed. Ionising irradiation causes the destruction of these compounds with the decay of pyranose ring, accompanied by the formation of compounds containing carbonyl or carboxyl groups, as well as hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and carbon oxide. The efficiency of radiation degradation increases with increasing the temperature and depends on the structure of polysaccharides and the nature of substituents. The mechanism of radiation-chemical transformations of cellulose and others polysaccharides is proposed. Prospects of the application of radiation-chemical methods of treatment of cellulose and other polysaccharides in industry and agriculture considered [ru

  20. Histological and genetic studies on the male sterile mutants of tomato induced by gamma radiation and chemical mutagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, J K [Office of Rural Development, Suwon (Republic of Korea) Horticultural Experiment Station

    1976-03-01

    The object of this experiment was to test the radiosensitivity of the M/sub 1/ generation, and to determine the inheritance and morphological characteristics of the male-sterile mutants in tomatoes. The results obtained are as follows: Radiation damage varied with the water content of the seeds. The least damage occurred in the range of 11.34 to 14.29 percent moisture. Four tomato cultivars were gamma irradiated. The cultivar Sekai-ichi was the most sensitive while the other responded similarly to each other. Chemical mutagen treatments caused greater damage to germination, to delayed flowering and to pollen fertility than did radiation. Pollen fertility and seeds per fruit in seedling gamma irradiated plants decreased as the dosage and dose rate increased. Five male-sterile mutants were found. Each was controlled by a single recessive gene. All five male-steriles were nonallelic. Floral sized of the male-sterile mutants were slightly smaller. Ovule fertility varied, usually being lower than normal type. Male sterility varied, usually being lower than normal type. Male sterility in 109-1ms strain was caused by unbalanced, insufficient nutrients being made available to the pollen-mother cells from the tapetal tissued. (author).

  1. Effects of radiation and chemical substances on cells and organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fremuth, F.

    1981-01-01

    The book treats the radiation chemistry part of biophysics and applied biophysics in the sphere of ionizing radiation. Discussed are the concepts of radiation units and radioactivity units and the relative biological efficiency. The effects of ionizing and UV radiations are analyzed at the level of macromolecular changes. Chapters dealing with genetic radiation effects discuss the effects at the cellular level with respect to cell proliferation. All these problems are used to illustrate the effect on the organism as a whole. The chapters on applied biophysics deal with the indications of radiation and chemical damage, sensitivity of cells and the organism, and the study and influencing of growth at the cellular level. The concluding chapter is devoted to the environmental impact of radiation. (J.P.)

  2. Study of physical, chemical and structural effects caused by ionizing radiation and preservation on human costal cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinho Junior, Antonio Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Tissue Banks around the world have stored human cartilages obtained from cadaver donors for use in several kinds of reconstructive surgeries. To ensure that such tissues are not contaminated, they have been sterilized with ionizing radiation. However, high doses of gamma radiation may cause undesirable changes in the tissues, decreasing the mechanical properties of the grafts. In this work, we evaluate physical/chemical and structural changes in deep-frozen (-70 deg C) or high concentration of glycerol (> 98%) preserved costal cartilage, before and after sterilization by ionizing radiation at 3 different doses (15, 25 and 50 kGy). Samples of human costal cartilage were obtained from 20 cadaver donors ranging between 18 and 55 years old. A 60 Co irradiator was used as irradiation source. Thermogravimetry (TG), Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and mechanical tension and compression tests were carried out to evaluate the changes in the cartilage. Regarding the thermogravimetric results, the obtained data has shown that the TG curves have the same pattern independently of the sample irradiated or not. On the other hand, non-irradiated samples showed great variability of thermogravimetric curves among different donors and for the same donor. Concerning the mechanical tests, when cartilages were irradiated with 15 kGy, their mechanical strength to tension was increased about 24%, in both deep-froze and preserved in glycerol samples. Samples deep-frozen, when irradiated with 25 and 50 kGy, presented a decrease of their mechanical behavior smaller than those preserved in high concentrations of glycerol and irradiated with the same dose. Therefore, deep-frozen cartilages can be sterilized with doses until 50 kGy and cartilages preserved in high concentrations of glycerol can be sterilized with doses until 25 kGy without significant changes in their bio-mechanical properties.(author)

  3. Chemical Protection Against Ionizing Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    cystathionine [3763. Exogen- ous sources of cysteine such as - acetylcysteine and L-2-oxothiazolldine-4 carboxylate promote glutathione synthesis. Whereas the...tubular epithelium and catalyzes the oxidation of extracellular thfols only. Substrates include GSH, cysteine, N- acetylcysteine and dithiothreitol [328,329...extracellular C&2+ . These studies have demonstrated the depression of Ca 2+ sequestration in liver microsomes and mitochondrta after treatment with

  4. Chemical protection against ionizing radiation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livesey, J.C.; Reed, D.J.; Adamson, L.F.

    1984-08-01

    The scientific literature on radiation-protective drugs is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms involved in determining the sensitivity of biological material to ionizing radiation and mechanisms of chemical radioprotection. In Section I, the types of radiation are described and the effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems are reviewed. The effects of ionizing radiation are briefly contrasted with the effects of non-ionizing radiation. Section II reviews the contributions of various natural factors which influence the inherent radiosensitivity of biological systems. Inlcuded in the list of these factors are water, oxygen, thiols, vitamins and antioxidants. Brief attention is given to the model describing competition between oxygen and natural radioprotective substances (principally, thiols) in determining the net cellular radiosensitivity. Several theories of the mechanism(s) of action of radioprotective drugs are described in Section III. These mechanisms include the production of hypoxia, detoxication of radiochemical reactive species, stabilization of the radiobiological target and the enhancement of damage repair processes. Section IV describes the current strategies for the treatment of radiation injury. Likely areas in which fruitful research might be performed are described in Section V. 495 references

  5. Chemical protection against ionizing radiation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livesey, J.C.; Reed, D.J.; Adamson, L.F.

    1984-08-01

    The scientific literature on radiation-protective drugs is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms involved in determining the sensitivity of biological material to ionizing radiation and mechanisms of chemical radioprotection. In Section I, the types of radiation are described and the effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems are reviewed. The effects of ionizing radiation are briefly contrasted with the effects of non-ionizing radiation. Section II reviews the contributions of various natural factors which influence the inherent radiosensitivity of biological systems. Inlcuded in the list of these factors are water, oxygen, thiols, vitamins and antioxidants. Brief attention is given to the model describing competition between oxygen and natural radioprotective substances (principally, thiols) in determining the net cellular radiosensitivity. Several theories of the mechanism(s) of action of radioprotective drugs are described in Section III. These mechanisms include the production of hypoxia, detoxication of radiochemical reactive species, stabilization of the radiobiological target and the enhancement of damage repair processes. Section IV describes the current strategies for the treatment of radiation injury. Likely areas in which fruitful research might be performed are described in Section V. 495 references.

  6. Track models and radiation chemical yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Magee, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The authors are concerned only with systems in which single track effects dominate and radiation chemical yields are sums of yields for individual tracks. The authors know that the energy deposits of heavy particle tracks are composed of spurs along the particle trajectory (about one-half of the energy) and a more diffuse pattern composed of the tracks of knock-on electrons, called the penumbra (about one-half of the energy). The simplest way to introduce the concept of a unified track model for heavy particles is to consider the special case of the track of a heavy particle with an LET below 0.2-0.3eV/A, which in practice limits us to protons, deuterons, or particles with energy above 100 MeV per nucleon. At these LET values, to a good approximation, spurs formed by the main particle track can be considered to remain isolated throughout the radiation chemical reactions

  7. Combined genetic effects of chemicals and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kada, T.; Inoue, T.; Yokoiyama, A.; Russel, L.B.

    1979-01-01

    Interactions of chemicals and radiation are complex and there may exist other unexpected patterns that are not mentioned. We show some examples. Photodynamic mutation induction by fluorescein dyes and Radiosensitization with iodine compounds are classified as Interactions of chemicals and radiation outside of the cell. On the other hand, the Antimutagenic effects of cobaltous chloride is concerned with events taking place in cells that had already been exposed to a mutagenic agent. It is likely that the action of a mutagenic agent is not direct and that cellular functions, such as mutators or repair systems, are involved in the mutagenesis initiated by the agent. Such cellular functions can be affected by a second agent. In sexually reproducing organisms, the two agents can also act on separate cells (male and female germcells) which subsequently fuse. Interaction effects of all types will be useful in future research in shedding light on the main pathways of mutagenesis

  8. Environmental chemical mutagens and genetic risks: Lessons from radiation genetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankaranarayanan, K.

    1996-01-01

    The last three decades have witnessed substantial progress in the development and use of a variety of in vitro and in vivo assay systems for the testing of environmental chemicals which may pose a mutagenic hazard to humans. This is also true of basic studies in chemical mutagenesis on mechanisms, DNA repair, molecular dosimetry, structure-activity relationships, etc. However, the field of quantitative evaluation of genetic risks of environmental chemicals to humans is still in it infancy. This commentary addresses the question of how our experience in estimating genetic risks of exposure to ionizing radiation can be helpful in similar endeavors with environmental chemical mutagens. 24 refs., 3 tabs

  9. Combined genetic effects of chemicals and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kada, T.; Inoue, T.; Yokoiyama, A.; Russell, L.B.

    1979-01-01

    The interactions of chemicals and radiation are complex, and there may exist other unexpected patterns. The photodynamic induction of mutation by fluorescein dyes, and the radiosensitization with iodine compounds are classified as the interactions of chemicals and radiation outside cells. On the other hand, the antimutagenic effects of cobaltous chloride is concerned with the events taking place in the cells that had already been exposed to mutagenic agents. It is likely that the action of mutagenic agents is not direct, and that cellular functions, such as mutators or repair systems, are involved in the mutagenesis initiated by the agents. Such cellular functions can be affected by a second agent. In sexually reproducing organisms, two agents can also act on separate cells (male and female germ cells) which subsequently fuse. In mice, the experiments combining the radiation applied to one sex with the chemicals given to the other sex are only in early stages. Males were irradiated with X-ray (spermatozoa and spermatids sampled) and females (mature oocytes) were treated with caffeine. When the endpoint was dominant lethal, the level of X-ray effect induced in the male genome was independent of the caffeine treatment of the female. However, when the endpoint was sex-chromosome-loss, and a different strain of female was used, the caffeine potentiation was statistically significant at 5% level. (Yamashita, S.)

  10. Radiation chemical transformations of some polyarylates by γ-radiation in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyashevich, V.V.; Korshak, V.V.; Rodeh, V.V.; Timofeeva, G.I.

    1976-01-01

    A study was made of ageing by radiation of F-2 and D-9 polyarylates using γ-radiation in vacuum. Their high resistance to radiation was indicated. It was found that γ-radiation on polymers caused competing reactions to take place resulting in macromolecular breakdown and structure formation, which in the end produced threedimensional network formation. The initial formation of gel fractions was preceded by the formation of branched macromolecules. The radiation resistance of polyarylates depends on the type of lateral substituent at the central carbon atom of the initial bis-phenol and increases in the presence of a fluorene ring in the lateral chain. The radiation resistance of a lactone ring is lower than that of an ether bond of the main chain. It was shown that 0-hydroxy-ketone structures were formed in the polyarylates examined as a result of regrouping due to radiation. A basic system is proposed for chemical conversion of polyarylates by radiation

  11. Biological Effects of Interaction between Radiation and Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyun, Kyung Man; Han, Min; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Nili, Mohammad [Dawnesh Radiation Research Institute, Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    The organisms are exposed to natural radiations from cosmic or terrestrial origins. Radiation is known to cause cell death, mainly due to its ability to produce reactive oxygen species in cells. The combined action between radiation and various chemicals is a distinguishing feature of modern life. Mercury chloride is a widespread environmental pollutant that is known to have toxic effects. Synergistic effects of radiation and HgCl{sub 2} on human cells was previously reported. NAC is a well-known sulfhydryl-containing antioxidant whose role in radioprotection has been explored in several studies. There has been an increasing interest of studying the role of NAC as a radioprotective substance. The present study was designed not only to assess the synergistic effects between radiation and HgCl{sub 2}, but also to investigate protective effects of NAC on cells.

  12. Multiplied effect of heat and radiation in chemical stress relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masayuki

    1981-01-01

    About the deterioration of rubber due to radiation, useful knowledge can be obtained by the measurement of chemical stress relaxation. As an example, the rubber coating of cables in a reactor containment vessel is estimated to be irradiated by weak radiation at the temperature between 60 and 90 deg C for about 40 years. In such case, it is desirable to establish the method of accelerated test of the deterioration. The author showed previously that the law of time-dose rate conversion holds in the case of radiation. In this study, the chemical stress relaxation to rubber was measured by the simultaneous application of heat and radiation, and it was found that there was the multiplied effect of heat and radiation in the stress relaxation speed. Therefore the factor of multiplication of heat and radiation was proposed to describe quantitatively the degree of the multiplied effect. The chloroprene rubber used was offered by Hitachi Cable Co., Ltd. The experimental method and the results are reported. The multiplication of heat and radiation is not caused by the direct cut of molecular chains by radiation, instead, it is based on the temperature dependence of various reaction rates at which the activated species reached the cut of molecular chains through complex reaction mechanism and the temperature dependence of the diffusion rate of oxygen in rubber. (Kako, I.)

  13. State and tendencies of chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, G.; Tapp, E.; Haehn, J.; Hannig, H.; Dlaske, R.; Martinek, K.

    1977-01-01

    Papers published in 1976 in the field of chemical protection against ionizing radiation are reviewed. Protection studies in vitro and in vivo, the biochemical, pharmacological and toxic effects, the mechanisms of protection of radioprotective agents and the trends in this field of research are described. (author)

  14. State and tendencies of chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, G.; Tapp, E.; Hannig, H.; Dlaske, R.; Haehn, J.; Martinek, K.

    1980-01-01

    Papers published in 1978 in the field of chemical protection against ionizing radiation are reviewed. Protection studies in in-vivo and model systems, the biochemical, pharmacological and toxic effects, and modes of action of radioprotective agents are described and the trends in this field of research appreciated. (author)

  15. State and tendencies of chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, G.; Tapp, E.; Hannig, H.; Dlaske, R.; Papendieck, W.; Martinek, K.; Haehn, J.

    1982-01-01

    Papers published in 1979 and 1980 in the field of chemical protection against ionizing radiation are reviewed. Protection studies in in-vivo and model systems, the biochemical, pharmacological and toxic effects, and modes of action of radioprotective agents are described and the trends in this field of research estimated. (author)

  16. State and tendencies of chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, G.; Tapp, E.; Haehn, J.; Hannig, H.; Dlaske, R.

    1976-03-01

    Papers published in 1974 in the field of chemical protection against ionizing radiation are reviewed. Protection studies in vitro and in vivo, the biochemical, pharmacological and toxic effects, the mechanisms of protection of radioprotective agents and the trends in this field of research are described. (author)

  17. State and tendencies of chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, G.; Tapp, E.; Haehn, J.; Hannig, H.; Dlaske, R.; Martinek, K.

    1977-01-01

    Papers published in 1975 in the field of chemical protection against ionizing radiation are reviewed. Protection studies in vitro and in vivo, the biochemical, pharmacological and toxic effects, the mechanisms of protection of radioprotective agents and the trends in this field of research are described. (author)

  18. Radiation-chemical hardening of phenol-formaldehyde oligomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlapatskaya, V.V.; Omel'chenko, S.I.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation-chemical hardening of phenol formaldehyde oligomers of the resol type has been studied in the presence of furfural and diallylphthalate diluents. The samples have been hardened on an electron accelerator at an electron energy of 1.0-1.1 MeV and a dose rate of 2-3 Mrad/s. The kinetics of hardening has been studied on the yield of gel fraction within the range of absorbed doses from 7 to 400 Mrad. Radiation-chemical hardening of the studied compositions is activated with sensitizers, namely, amines, metal chlorides, and heterocyclic derivatives of metals. Furfural and diallylphthalate compositions are suitable for forming glass-fibre plastic items by the wet method and coatings under the action of ionizing radiations

  19. Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases

  20. Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-04-01

    The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  1. Studies in Chemical Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabitz, Herschel; Ho, Tak-San

    2003-01-01

    This final report draws together the research carried from February, 1986 through January, 2003 concerning a series of topics in chemical dynamics. The specific areas of study include molecular collisions, chemical kinetics, data inversion to extract potential energy surfaces, and model reduction of complex kinetic systems

  2. Study the effect of chemical reaction and variable viscosity on free convection MHD radiating flow over an inclined plate bounded by porous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, M., E-mail: ali.mehidi93@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh); Department of Mathematics, Chittagong University of Engineering and Technology, Chittagong-4349 (Bangladesh); Alim, M. A., E-mail: maalim@math.buet.ac.bd; Nasrin, R., E-mail: rehena@math.buet.ac.bd [Department of Mathematics, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh); Alam, M. S., E-mail: shahalammaths@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Chittagong University of Engineering and Technology, Chittagong-4349 (Bangladesh)

    2016-07-12

    An analysis is performed to study the free convection heat and mass transfer flow of an electrically conducting incompressible viscous fluid about a semi-infinite inclined porous plate under the action of radiation, chemical reaction in presence of magnetic field with variable viscosity. The dimensionless governing equations are steady, two-dimensional coupled and non-linear ordinary differential equation. Nachtsgeim-Swigert shooting iteration technique along with Runge-Kutta integration scheme is used to solve the non-dimensional governing equations. The effects of magnetic parameter, viscosity parameter and chemical reaction parameter on velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are discussed numerically and shown graphically. Therefore, the results of velocity profile decreases for increasing values of magnetic parameter and viscosity parameter but there is no effect for reaction parameter. The temperature profile decreases in presence of magnetic parameter, viscosity parameter and Prandtl number but increases for radiation parameter. Also, concentration profile decreases for the increasing values of magnetic parameter, viscosity parameter and reaction parameter. All numerical calculations are done with respect to salt water and fixed angle of inclination of the plate.

  3. Study the effect of chemical reaction and variable viscosity on free convection MHD radiating flow over an inclined plate bounded by porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, M.; Alim, M. A.; Nasrin, R.; Alam, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    An analysis is performed to study the free convection heat and mass transfer flow of an electrically conducting incompressible viscous fluid about a semi-infinite inclined porous plate under the action of radiation, chemical reaction in presence of magnetic field with variable viscosity. The dimensionless governing equations are steady, two-dimensional coupled and non-linear ordinary differential equation. Nachtsgeim-Swigert shooting iteration technique along with Runge-Kutta integration scheme is used to solve the non-dimensional governing equations. The effects of magnetic parameter, viscosity parameter and chemical reaction parameter on velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are discussed numerically and shown graphically. Therefore, the results of velocity profile decreases for increasing values of magnetic parameter and viscosity parameter but there is no effect for reaction parameter. The temperature profile decreases in presence of magnetic parameter, viscosity parameter and Prandtl number but increases for radiation parameter. Also, concentration profile decreases for the increasing values of magnetic parameter, viscosity parameter and reaction parameter. All numerical calculations are done with respect to salt water and fixed angle of inclination of the plate.

  4. Study on the stability of the Maytenus aquifolium Martius chemical components submitted to ionizing radiation (X-ray and γ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Patricia

    1995-01-01

    The interest for medicinal plants has raised again in the last decades, after overcoming a declination period caused by the advances in the researches and development of the synthetic drugs industries. This growing interest has been stimulated mainly by searching cheap and accessible alternative therapies. However, in order to have natural products based treatment in an efficient and safety way, it is necessary to guarantee the plant authenticity, finding adulterations and to assure a low level of microbiological contaminations to avoid damages to consumer's health. The decontamination method should be chosen for eliminating or reduce the microorganisms level without loss of the plant active constituents that would destroy its therapeutic action. At the present work, the possibility of using γ and X electromagnetic radiations to sterilize a Brazilian medicinal plant (Maytenus aquifolium Martius, Celastraceae), which shows anti-ulcer activity, was studied by accomplishing its actives constituent behavior, the triterpenes friedeline and friedelan-3-ol and the phenolic compounds by spectrophotometric techniques (UV-Vis.), high resolution gas chromatography (HRGC) and high resolution gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HRGC-MS). (author)

  5. Is ionizing radiation regulated more stringently than chemical carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, C.C.; Pack, S.R.; Hattemer-Frey, H.A.

    1989-01-01

    It is widely believed that United States government agencies regulate exposure to ionizing radiation more stringently than exposure to chemical carcinogens. It is difficult to verify this perception, however, because chemical carcinogens and ionizing radiation are regulated using vastly different strategies. Chemical carcinogens are generally regulated individually. Regulators consider the risk of exposure to one chemical rather than the cumulative radiation exposure from all sources. Moreover, standards for chemical carcinogens are generally set in terms of quantities released or resultant environmental concentrations, while standards for ionizing radiation are set in terms of dose to the human body. Since chemicals and ionizing radiation cannot be compared on the basis of equal dose to the exposed individual, standards regulating chemicals and ionizing radiation cannot be compared directly. It is feasible, however, to compare the two sets of standards on the basis of equal risk to the exposed individual, assuming that standards for chemicals and ionizing radiation are equivalent if estimated risk levels are equitable. This paper compares risk levels associated with current standards for ionizing radiation and chemical carcinogens. The authors do not attempt to determine whether either type of risk is regulated too stringently or not stringently enough but endeavor only to ascertain if ionizing radiation is actually regulated more strictly than chemical carcinogens

  6. Study on the changes of physical and chemical properties for the black liquor of straw plug induced by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Guanghua; Lan Liqiao

    1994-12-01

    The black liquor of straw plug was treated by electron beam or γ-ray radiation. The relationship between the viscosity of the black liquor of straw plug and the radiation beam type, the irradiated dose, the temperature of the black liquor at irradiation time and the concentration of the solid state matter in the black liquor was investigated. The result shows that the radiation treatment makes the organic big molecular of the black liquor decomposed, the environmental loading factor of the black liquor reduced; after an irradiation of 20 kGy, the viscosity of the black liquor of straw plug with 30% solid state matter is reduced by 50%, the property of vaporization is obviously improved, but the calorific value of the black liquor has almost no change

  7. Radiation protection in clinical chemical laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, K.

    1980-01-01

    In the clinical-chemical laboratory, the problems of the personal radiation protection can be handled relatively simply. Important conditions are certain requirements as far as the building is concerned and the keeping to protection measures to invoid ingestion, inhalation, and resorption of open radioactive substances. Very intensive attention must be paid to a clean working technique in order to be able to exclude the danger of contamination which is very disturbing during the extremely sensitive measurements. The higgest problem in the handling of open radioactive substances, however, is in our opinion the waste management because it requires which space and personnel this causing high costs. Furthermore, since 1 January 1979, the permission for the final storage of radioactive waste in the shut down mine ASSE was taken back from the county collection places and it cannot be said yet if and when this permission will be given again. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Studying the synergistic damage effects induced by 1.8 GHz radiofrequency field radiation (RFR) with four chemical mutagens on human lymphocyte DNA using comet assay in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Baohong; He Jiliang; Jin Lifen; Lu Deqiang; Zheng Wei; Lou Jianlin; Deng Hongping

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study the synergistic DNA damage effects in human lymphocytes induced by 1.8 GHz radiofrequency field radiation (RFR, SAR of 3 W/kg) with four chemical mutagens, i.e. mitomycin C (MMC, DNA crosslinker), bleomycin (BLM, radiomimetic agent), methyl methanesulfonate (MMS, alkylating agent), and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO, UV-mimetic agent). The DNA damage of lymphocytes exposed to RFR and/or with chemical mutagens was detected at two incubation time (0 or 21 h) after treatment with comet assay in vitro. Three combinative exposure ways were used. Cells were exposed to RFR and chemical mutagens for 2 and 3 h, respectively. Tail length (TL) and tail moment (TM) were utilized as DNA damage indexes. The results showed no difference of DNA damage indexes between RFR group and control group at 0 and 21 h incubation after exposure (P > 0.05). There were significant difference of DNA damage indexes between MMC group and RFR + MMC co-exposure group at 0 and 21 h incubation after treatment (P 0.05). The experimental results indicated 1.8 GHz RFR (SAR, 3 W/kg) for 2 h did not induce the human lymphocyte DNA damage effects in vitro, but could enhance the human lymphocyte DNA damage effects induced by MMC and 4NQO. The synergistic DNA damage effects of 1.8 GHz RFR with BLM or MMS were not obvious

  9. Studies in chemical dynamics and radiation chemistry. Technical progress report, 1 July 1974--30 June 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuppermann, A.

    1975-01-01

    Research progress in the following areas is reported: low energy electron scattering; photoelectron spectrometry; elementary reactions by photolysis at variable wavelengths; collisions in crossed molecular beams; and, diffusion kinetics in the radiation chemistry of water. Publications related to the work are included. (JGB)

  10. Radiation-chemical alkylation of olefines with adamantane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podkhalyuzin, A.T.; Vikulin, V.V.; Morozov, V.A.; Nazarova, M.P.; Vereshchinskii, I.V.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation-chemical alkylation of C 2 to C 4 olefines with adamantane was studied in gas phase at temperatures 270 to 430 0 C. The main reaction product is monoalkyladamantane. The reaction proceeds by a free radical chain mechanism. The effective activation energy is of the order of 8 to 10 kcal/mole. Thermal alkylation was carried out for comparison and the contribution of the thermal component to the radiation-thermal process was estimated. Liquid phase alkylation of hexafluoropropylene with adamantane was studied in the presence of solvents. Under various conditions mono- and di-substituted adamantanes are produced containing fluorine in end groups. These compounds were converted to corresponding fluoroalkenyladamantanes by dehydrofluorination. The kinetic parameters were calculated and physical-chemical data concerning some of the resulting products were determined. (author)

  11. Radiation Studies, Vol.10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadareishvili, K.; Tsitskishvili, M.; Chankseliani, Z.; Gelashvili, K.; Mtskhoetadze, A.; Oniani, T.; Todua, F.; Vepkhoadze, N.; Zaalishvili, T.

    2002-01-01

    'Radiation studies' - is a periodical edition of Scientific Research Center of Radiobiology and Radiation Ecology of Georgian Academy of Sciences, Problem Council of Radiobiology of Georgian Academy of Sciences and Georgian Academy of Ecological Sciences. The 10th volume of 'Radiation studies' reflects activities of above-mentioned institutions during previous two years and contains 26 articles, from which 17 are within the scope of INIS

  12. Radiation-chemical degradation of chloroform in water solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadov, S.A; Gurbanov, M.A; Iskenderova, Z.I; Abdullaev, E.T; Ibadov, N.A.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Chloroform is the major chlorine-containing compound forming at chlorination of drinking water. As our basic water resources of Kur and Araz rivers are mostly polluted along the territory of the neighbor republics their chlorination for the purpose of biological purification can result in forming of chloroform. Unfortunately, there are only poor data about containing of chloroform in drinking water in the Republic, however the particular problem is to develop new methods of drinking water purification from chloroform, taking into account the high toxicity of this compounds. Appropriate works indicate that radiation-chemical processing can mostly reduce the concentration of chloroform in drinking water. The purification degree can achieve 95-98%. This work studies the tendency of chloroform decomposition at its radiolysis processes in percentage. Taking into account the dissolvability of chloroform in water solutions it can be said that examined water solutions are homogeneous. Following advancements are studied: b Determination of radiation-chemical yield of chloroform decomposition at its various initial concentrations;Impact of adsorbed dose on pH of solutions;Formation of by-products.It is set that radiation-chemical output of chloroform decomposition is equal to 3.10-3-125 mol 100ev.

  13. Advanced Chemical Propulsion Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, Gordon; Byers, Dave; Alexander, Leslie A.; Krebsbach, Al

    2004-01-01

    A study was performed of advanced chemical propulsion technology application to space science (Code S) missions. The purpose was to begin the process of selecting chemical propulsion technology advancement activities that would provide greatest benefits to Code S missions. Several missions were selected from Code S planning data, and a range of advanced chemical propulsion options was analyzed to assess capabilities and benefits re these missions. Selected beneficial applications were found for higher-performing bipropellants, gelled propellants, and cryogenic propellants. Technology advancement recommendations included cryocoolers and small turbopump engines for cryogenic propellants; space storable propellants such as LOX-hydrazine; and advanced monopropellants. It was noted that fluorine-bearing oxidizers offer performance gains over more benign oxidizers. Potential benefits were observed for gelled propellants that could be allowed to freeze, then thawed for use.

  14. Harmonization of risk management approaches: radiation and chemical exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, P. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Radiation Safety Systems Div., Mumbai (India)

    2006-07-01

    Assessment of occupational and public risk from the environmental pollutants like chemicals, radiation, etc demands that the effects be considered not only from each individual pollutant, but from the combination of all the pollutants. An integrated risk assessment system needs to be in place to have an overall risk perspective for the benefit of policy makers and decision takers to try to achieve risk reduction in totality. The basis for risk-based radiation dose limits is derived from epidemiological studies, which provide a rich source of data largely unavailable to chemical risk assessors. In addition, use of the principle of optimization as expressed in the ALARA concept has resulted in a safety culture, which is much more than just complying with stipulated limits. The conservative hypothesis of no-threshold dose-effect relation (ICRP) is universally assumed. The end-points and the severity of different classes of pollutants and even different pollutants in a same class vary over a wide range. Hence, it is difficult to arrive at a quantitative value for the net detriment that weighs the various types of end-points and various classes of pollutants. Once the risk due to other pollutants is quantified by some acceptable methodology, it can be expressed in terms of the Risk Equivalent Radiation Dose (R.E.R.D.) for easy comparison with options involving radiation exposure. This paper is an effort to use to quantify and present the risk due to exposure to chemicals and radiation in a common scale for the purpose of easy comparison to facilitate decision taking. (authors)

  15. Harmonization of risk management approaches: radiation and chemical exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, P.

    2006-01-01

    Assessment of occupational and public risk from the environmental pollutants like chemicals, radiation, etc demands that the effects be considered not only from each individual pollutant, but from the combination of all the pollutants. An integrated risk assessment system needs to be in place to have an overall risk perspective for the benefit of policy makers and decision takers to try to achieve risk reduction in totality. The basis for risk-based radiation dose limits is derived from epidemiological studies, which provide a rich source of data largely unavailable to chemical risk assessors. In addition, use of the principle of optimization as expressed in the ALARA concept has resulted in a safety culture, which is much more than just complying with stipulated limits. The conservative hypothesis of no-threshold dose-effect relation (ICRP) is universally assumed. The end-points and the severity of different classes of pollutants and even different pollutants in a same class vary over a wide range. Hence, it is difficult to arrive at a quantitative value for the net detriment that weighs the various types of end-points and various classes of pollutants. Once the risk due to other pollutants is quantified by some acceptable methodology, it can be expressed in terms of the Risk Equivalent Radiation Dose (R.E.R.D.) for easy comparison with options involving radiation exposure. This paper is an effort to use to quantify and present the risk due to exposure to chemicals and radiation in a common scale for the purpose of easy comparison to facilitate decision taking. (authors)

  16. Efficiency of interaction between various radiation and chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Song, H. S.; Kim, J. S.; Chun, K. J.; Lee, Y. K.; Lee, B. H.; Shin, H. S.; Lee, K. H.; Petin, Vladislav G.

    2002-01-01

    KAERI and INP (Poland) have been carried out parallel study and joint experiments on the major topics according to MOU about their cooperative project. Major experimental techniques were TSH assay, comet assay, and synergism assay. The research consisted of the following workscopes. 1) Application of TSH bioindicator for studying the biological efficiency of radiation, 2) Relative biological efficiency of californium-252 neutrons in the induction of gene and lethal mutations in TSH cells normal and enriched with boron compound, 3) Effect of pesticide on radiation-induced mutations in TSH cells, 4) Interaction of radiation with pesticide on DNA damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes, 5) Radiomodifying effect of boron and gadolinium compounds in human peripheral blood lymphocytes, 6) Mathematical description of synergistic interactions, 7) General regularities of synergistic interactions, and 8) Determinant of synergistic interaction between radiation, heat and chemicals in cell killing. Both institutes have established wide variety of research techniques applicable to various radiation research through the cooperation. The results of research can make the role of fundamental basis for the better relationship between Korea and Poland

  17. Chemical and radiation carcinogenesis. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    Gamma radiation, as a quantitative perturbation reference, has been related to oxygen toxicity as the unavoidable background risk due to living in an oxygen atmosphere. The basic mechanisms shared by gamma irradiation and oxygen toxicity have been studied. The response to these two perturbations has been characterized at the molecular level through DNA chemistry and monoclonal antibodies, and by cellular biological responses. The investigation of cellular responses is being extended to the molecular level through a study of alteration of gene arrangement and gene expression. Concentration has been on the study of the involvement of the evolutionally conserved repetitive DNA sequences shared by hamster and man. Such sequences were found and some have been isolated in plasmids. Two cellular systems were chosen for investigation, the embryonic/adult mesenchymal system and the hematopoietic tissues system. Concentration has been on the isolation, properties, and response to perturbation of the progenitor cells and the stem cell populations

  18. Radiation chemical effects in experiments to study the reaction of glass in an environment of gamma-irradiated air, groundwater, and tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The results of experiments performed by John K. Bates et al. on the reaction of nuclear waste glass with a gamma-irradiated 90 0 C aqueous solution were analyzed using theory developed from past research in radiation chemistry. The aqueous solution they used is similar to what would be expected in a water-saturated environment in a nuclear waste repository in tuff. The purpose of our study was to develop an understanding of the radiation-chemical processes that occurred in the Bates et al. experiments so the results could be applied to the design and performance analysis of a proposed repository in unsaturated tuff in Nevada. For the Bates et al. experiments at the highest dose (269 Mrad), which originally contained about 16 ml of ''equilibrated'' water taken from Nevada Test Site Well J-13 and 5.4 ml of air, we predicted that water decomposition to H 2 and O 2 would produce a pressure increase of at least 1.0 MPa at 20 0 C. We also predicted that nitrogen fixation from the air would occur, producing an increase of 1.6 x 10 -4 M in total fixed nitrogen concentration in solution. In addition, an equimolar production of H + would occur, which would be buffered by the HCO 3 - in the water. The fixed nitrogen in solution was predicted to be present as NO 2 - and NO 3 - with the ratio influenced by the presence of materials catalytic to the decomposition of H 2 O 2 . We found reasonable agreement between our predictions and the observations of Bates et al., where comparisons were possible. We apply the results to the proposed Nevada repository to the degree possible, given the different expected conditions

  19. Physico-chemical studies of radiation effects in cells. Progress report, February 15, 1984-February 14, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    The radioprotective effects of Hg ++ were investigated in Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria having very different gc ratios in their DNA. A protective effect is seen in both with first order curves or at least in the k/sub L/ region of the breakpoints. However, it is curious that there is a distinct difference in the metal-free N 2 baseline of Staphylococcus aureus compared to its EtOH metal-free N 2 response while with Pseudomonas aeruginosa both the metal-free N 2 baseline and its EtOH metal-free results are similar. In related studies a new radioprotective substance was evaluated in bacterial systems. Results showed that, in the presence of Rh(NH 3 ) 3 C/ 3 , the anoxic cell shows greater sensitivity than the oxygenated cell. This compound has considerable therapeutic promise providing it acts the same on mammalian cells. 8 refs., 6 figs. (DT)

  20. Features of radiation chemical processes in ethylene-styrene copolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leshchenko, S.S.; Mal'tseva, A.P.; Iskakov, L.I.; Karpov, V.L.

    1976-01-01

    A study was made of statistical copolymers of ethylene with styrene to determine their structure and properties and radio-chemical transformations. The styrene content of the copolymers ranged from 1 to 85 mole%. The investigation covered non-irradiated copolymers and those irradiated with doses of 1-1000Mrad at room temperature and at liquid nitrogen temperature. It is shown that styrene units present in the CES inhibited all radio-chemical processes compared with PE irradiated under similar conditions. It is suggested that the radiation resistance of CES with styrene contents up to 10 mole % increases in the course of irradiation as a result of the formation of structures with a high degree of conjugation which are more capable of scattering absorbed energy than in the case of phenyl rings by themselves. The most promising of the CES examined is the one with a styrene content of 5 mole %. The mechanical properties of this copolymer are similar to those of PE, and its radiation resistance rises under service conditions in the presence of ionizing radiation

  1. The use of ionizing radiations in the treatment of liquid and solid waste; biological and physico-chemical effects and industrial study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallien, C.L.

    1977-01-01

    Short recycling of waste water and the use of liquid or dehydrated sludge as natural manure for agriculture, or animal supplement feed is of great economical and ecological interest. However, it requires strong disinfection. Treatment with ionizing radiation can be used as a complement to conventional methods in the treatment of liquid and solid wastes. An experiment conducted with a high-energy electron beam linear accellerator (10 MeV) is presented. Degradation of undesirable metabolites in wastes occurs at a dose of 50 krad. Undesirable seeds, present in sludge, are destroyed with a 200-krad dose. The same dose is sufficient for parasitic and bacterial disinfection (DL 90). Destruction of poliovirus (DL 90) is obtained at 400 krad. Higher doses (1000-2000 krad) produce mineralisation of toxic organic mercury or reduce some toxic chemical pollutants present in sludge and improve flocculation. Industrial study shows that waste treatment with high-energy electron beams is technically and economically feasible. The design for a treatment unit of 5 MCi cobalt-equivalent, with a capacity of 500 t/Mrad/24h is presented, with indicative cost calculation

  2. Chemical structure and radiation stability of solid crystalline antibiotics: thiamphenicol and chloramphenicol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varshney, Lalit; Soe Nwe

    1997-01-01

    Antibiotics in solid state show significant radiation resistance and some of them are exposed to gamma or electron beam irradiation for sterilization. Even small radiation degradation in solid state antibiotics is not desirable. Two antibiotics namely thiamphenicol (TPL) and chloramphenicol (CPL) having similar chemical and solid state structure were irradiated at different graded radiation doses to study their stability. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to evaluate purity, entropy of radiation processing, heat of fusion and melting point. (author). 3 refs., 1 tab

  3. Action of certain chemical compounds on radiation haemolysis of erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolesnikov, Yu.A.; Shulgina, M.A.; Yartsev, E.I.; Novoseltseva, S.D.; Bogatyrev, G.P.

    1975-01-01

    A radioprotective action of a number of protective chemicals on radiation haemolysis of erythrocytes has been studied. S-bearing radioprotectors, serotonin and arginine possess the highest radioprotective activity. The same radioprotectors delivered to the medium after irradiation do not influence the development of the post-irradiation haemolysis. Certain amino acids, namely proline, serine and taurine have a pronounced radio-protective action when given to the medium after irradiation, taurine producing the strongest effect on the development of radiation haemolysis. The mechanism of action of these substances is unrelated to the increased osmotic pressure of the medium and might be explained by normalization of the functional state of cytomembranes and processes of cell metabolism

  4. Radiation carcinogenesis, laboratory studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shellabarger, C.J.

    1974-01-01

    Laboratory studies on radioinduced carcinogenesis are reviewed. Some topics discussed are: radioinduced neoplasia in relation to life shortening; dose-response relationships; induction of skin tumors in rats by alpha particles and electrons; effects of hormones on tumor response; effects of low LET radiations delivered at low dose-rates; effects of fractionated neutron radiation; interaction of RBE and dose rate effects; and estimates of risks for humans from animal data. (U.S.)

  5. Radiation-chemical disinfection of dissolved impurities and environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrukhin, N.V.; Putilov, A.V.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation-chemical neutralization of dissolved toxic impurities formed in the production processes of different materials, while modern plants being in use, is considered. For the first time the processes of deep industrial waste detoxication and due to this peculiarities of practically thorough neutralization of dissolved toxic impurities are considered. Attention is paid to devices and economic factors of neutralization of dissolved toxic impurities. The role of radiation-chemical detoxication for environment protection is considered

  6. Radiation-chemical degradation of chloroform in water solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadov, S.A.; Gurbanov, M.A.; Iskenderova, Z.I.; Abdullayev, E.T.; Ibadov, N.A.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Chloroform is the major chlorine-containing compound forming at chlorination of drinking water. As our basic water resources of Kur and Araz rivers are mostly polluted along the territory of the neighbour republics their chlorination for the purpose of biological purification can result in forming of chloroform. Unfortunately, there are only poor data about containing of chloroform in drinking water in the Republic, however the particular problem is to develop new methods of drinking water purification from chloroform, taking into account the high toxicity of this compounds. Appropriate works indicate that radiation-chemical processing can mostly reduce the concentration of chloroform in drinking water. The purification degree can achieve 95-98 percent. This work studies the tendency of chloroform decomposition at its radiolysis processes in water solutions. The concentration of chloroform changed in the range of 0,03-1 weight percentage. Taking into account the dissolvability of chloroform in water solutions it can be said that examined water solutions are homogeneous. Following advancements are studied: 1) Determination of radiation-chemical yield of chloroform decomposition at its various initial concentrations; 2) Impact of adsorbed dose on pH of solutions; 3) Formation of by-products. It is set that radiation-chemical output of chloroform decomposition is equal to 3 * 10 - 3 - 125 mol/100 ev. The high yield of chloroform decomposition can be connected with the chain process of oxidation with presence of dissolved oxygen. However, taking into account the fact that at its water radiolysis the yield of active particles of OH, e - aq, H-atoms does not exceed 6-7 particles/100 ev, the observed high yield can be explained only with the chain process with presence of dissolved oxygen

  7. Centralized radiation protection in the chemical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kistner, A.C.

    2006-01-01

    At Novartis the so-called ''ZSS'' department (''Zentraler Strahlenschutz'') respectively (''central radiation protection'') administrates all in-house data concerning radiation. When the time for a contemporary and thus more flexible software solution had come, the heterogenous company had many demands to be met - for example reorganizational ability, multi-client capability, device-specific scalability as well as customizability and individual data entries concerning all employees exposed to ionized radiation. A customized software-solution was then developed and build by Sirius Technologies AG from Basel. The application is composed modularly and therefore adapts well to miscellaneous data sets of various working areas, devices, radiation sources, factories, partners, approvals, isotopes etc. The conception even contains future enhancement and supplementation. (orig.)

  8. Radiation protection in the pharmaceutical-chemical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griesser, R.

    1992-01-01

    Some aspects of the use of ionizing radiation in research in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries will be discussed, the emphasis being placed on the handling of open radioactive materials in research laboratories. The compliance with official regulations and the preparation of company internal radiation protection regulations are described. 1 tab., 9 refs

  9. Oncogenic transformation with radiation and chemicals: review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Hei, T.K.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative in vitro assay systems for oncogenic transformation are a powerful research tool. They may be based on short-term cultures of hamster embryo cells, or established cell lines of mouse origin. While X-ray-induced transformation of human cells has been demonstrated, it has proved difficult to develop quantitative assay systems based on cells of human origin. The presently available quantitative assays have two quite distinct basic uses. First, they may be useful to accumulate data which is essentially pragmatic in nature. For example, they may be used to compare and contrast the oncogenic potential of chemotherapeutic agents or hypoxic cell sensitizers used or proposed in the clinic. They may be used to identify compounds that inhibit or suppress the transformation incidence resulting from known oncogenic agents, or they may be used to demonstrate the interaction between two different agents, such as radiation and asbestos. Second, they may prove to be invaluable in the study of the basic mechanisms of carcinogenesis, inasmuch as they represent models of tumourigenesis in which the various steps can be manipulated and modified more readily and in a controlled way. (author)

  10. The study and the realization of radiation detectors made from polycrystalline diamond films grown by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jany, Ch.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop radiation detectors made from polycrystalline diamond films grown by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique. The influence of surface treatments, contact technology and diamond growth parameters on the diamond detectors characteristics was investigated in order to optimise the detector response to alpha particles. The first part of the study focused on the electrical behaviour of as-deposited diamond surface, showing a p type conduction and its influence on the leakage current of the device. A surface preparation process was established in order to reduce the leakage current of the device by surface dehydrogenation using an oxidising step. Several methods to form and treat electrical contacts were also investigated showing that the collection efficiency of the device decreases after contact annealing. In the second part, we reported the influence of the diamond deposition parameters on the characteristics of the detectors. The increase of the deposition temperature and/or methane concentration was shown to lead η to decrease. In contrast, η was found to increase with the micro-wave power. The evolution of the diamond detector characteristics results from the variation in sp 2 phases incorporation and in the crystallography quality of the films. These defects increase the leakage current and reduce the carrier mobility and lifetime. Measurements carried out on detectors with different thicknesses showed that the physical properties varies along the growth direction, improving with the film thickness. Finally, the addition of nitrogen (> 10 ppm) in the gas mixture during diamond deposition was found to strongly reduce the collection efficiency of the detectors. To conclude the study, we fabricated and characterised diamond devices which were used for thermal neutron detection and for the intensity and shape measurement of VUV and soft X-ray pulses. (author)

  11. Role of free radicals in radiation chemical aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenstock, C L

    1986-01-01

    Ionizing radiation initiates chemical changes in DNA, phospholipid membranes and other critical cell targets, that, if allowed to accumulate unrepaired, may lead to aging and other chronic effects. The chemical effects are free radical mediated, the principal damaging species being radical OH and to a lesser extent O2-anion radical and the molecular product H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. Many compounds can act in combination with ionizing radiation, to amplify the potential oxidative stress. Chemicals, ultra-violet light, lipid peroxides and their breakdown products may increase the extent of acute and chronic radiobiological effects.

  12. Biomarkers of DNA and cytogenetic damages induced by environmental chemicals or radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses results from the studies on various biomarkers of the DNA and cytogenetic damages induced by environmental chemicals or radiation. Results of the biomonitoring studies have shown that particularly in the condition of Poland, health hazard from radiation exposure is overestimated in contradistinction to the environmental hazard

  13. Chemical protection from high LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko; Matsushita, Satoru; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Ohara, Hiroshi

    1992-01-01

    Radioprotection by WR151327 from high LET fast neutrons was investigated and compared with that from low LET radiation. Radiation damage in bone marrow, intestine, skin and leg length were all protected by a pretreatment with 400 mg/kg WR151327. Most prominent protection was observed for bone marrow, which gave a Dose Modifying Factor (DMF) of 2.2 against γ rays. Identical protection was observed between early and late radiation damage. WR151327 protected fast neutrons less efficiently than γ rays; 40% for bone marrow and 80% for skin leg. Pathological findings indicated that hyperplastic change in both dermis and epidermis associated with late skin shrinkage. Laser doppler flow-metry showed a good relationship between reduction of blood flow and late skin shrinkage. Irradiation of skin by heavy particle Carbon-12 indicated that skin shrinkage was modified by unirradiated surrounding normal tissues, which proposed a significant role of 'Volume Effect' in radiation damage. Tumor tissues were less protected by WR151327 than normal tissues. Dependence of radioprotection by WR151327 on tissue oxygen concentration is a probable reason to explain the difference between normal and tumor tissues. (author)

  14. Studies on the Radiation-Chemical Basis of Synthesizing Oligosaccharides and Polymer Microgels, and Analytical Methods for their Characterization. Chapter 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czechowska-Biskup, R.; Kadlubowski, S.; Rokita, B.; Rosiak, J. M.; Ulanski, P.; Wach, R. [Institute of Applied Radiation Chemistry (IARC), Lodz University of Technology (Poland)

    2014-07-15

    This report summarizes recent studies performed at the Institute of Applied Radiation Chemistry (IARC) at the Lodz University of Technology in fields related to radiation synthesis and the modification of polymers for agricultural applications. These projects included both natural and synthetic polymers. Based on the extensive studies conducted on the mechanism and kinetics of radiation-induced reactions in polysaccharides within the CRP’s “Development of Radiation-Processed Products of Natural Polymers for Application in Agriculture, Healthcare, Industry, and Environment”, interlaboratory activities to assess existing methods in determining the molecular weight and degree of deacetylation of chitosan, and to refine protocols for performing these measurements have been planned, performed and evaluated. Synthetic polymers have been used in the basic and application-oriented research on the radiation synthesis of hydrogels, microgels, and nanogels (> 50 papers). IARC is ready to support research teams from member states that work on the elaboration and implementation of polymers for agricultural applications, using the existing experience in basic studies and in analytical methods to evaluate the physicochemical properties of polysaccharides. (author)

  15. The relation between repair of DNA and radiation and chemical mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, L.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of various genes involved in DNA repair functions on radiation and chemical mutagenesis in Escherichia coli is discussed and compared to similar studies done in yeast. Results of the effect of various genes conferring radiation-sensitivty on mutation induction in yeast are presented and related to current ideas of mutagenesis

  16. Application of synchrotron radiation in chemical dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimann, P.; Koike, M.; Kung, A.H.; Ng, C.Y.; White, M.G.; Wodtke, A.

    1993-05-01

    In October 1992, funding was approved to begin construction of a beamline and two end stations to support chemical dynamics experiments at LBL's Advanced Light Source (ALS). This workshop was organized to develop specifications and plans and to select a working team to design and supervise the construction project. Target date for starting the experiments is January 1995. Conclusions of the workshop and representative experiments proposed in earlier workshops to form the basis for beamline plans and end-station designs are summarized in this report. 6 figs

  17. Natural radiation, radioactive waste and chemical risk determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, T.; Mustonen, R.; Edhwall, H.; Hansen, H.; Soerensen, A.; Stranden, E.

    1990-01-01

    Doses from natural radiation to the population in the Nordic countries are summarized, and man-made modifications of the natural radiation environment are discussed. An account is given for the radiological concequences of energy concervation by reduced ventilation. Risks from possible future releases of radioactivity from final depositories of spent nuclear fuel are compared to the risks from present natural radioactivity in the environment. The possibilities for comparison between chemical and radiological risks are discussed. 104 refs., 36 figs., 47 tabs

  18. Human Genetic Marker for Resistance to Radiation and Chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieberman, Howard B.

    2001-01-01

    TO characterize the human HRDAD9 gene and evaluate its potential as a biomarker to predict susceptibility to the deleterious health effects potentially caused by exposure to radiations or chemicals present at DOE hazardous waste cleanup sites. HRAD9 is a human gene that is highly conserved throughout evolution. Related genes have been isolated from yeasts and mice, underscoring its biological significance. Most of our previous work involved characterization of the yeast gene cognate, wherein it was determined that the corresponding protein plays a significant role in promoting resistance of cells to radiations and chemicals, and in particular, controlling cell growth in response to DNA damage

  19. Chemical protection and sensitization to ionizing radiation:molecular investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badiello, R.

    1980-01-01

    Chemical radioprotection and radiosensitization are induced by the presence of certain chemical compounds, which reduce or enhance the effect of ionizing radiation on living organisms. Such substances are either naturally present or may be artificially introduced in the living cells. Chemical radioprotectors are interesting for possible application in the health protection of both professionally exposed workers and patients treated by radiation for diagnostic and thereapeutic purposes. Interest in chemical radiosensitization has increased recently because of its potential application in the radiotherapy of tumours. Both radioprotection and radiosensitization occur by means of complicated mechanisms, which at first correspond to very fast reactions. The mechanism of the interaction between such substances and radiation-induced biological radicals has been investigated by means of pulse radiolysis and rapid mixing techniques. Examples of the application of these techniques are given to illustrate how information has been obtained on the molecular basis of radiation chemical modi-fication at the cellular level. In particular some interactions between model systems of biological interest (DNA, DNA components, enzymes, amino acids, etc.) and sulphur-containing radioprotectors (glutathione, cysteine, etc.) and/or electroaffinic radiosensitizers, are described. (H.K.)

  20. Influence of chemical inhibitors on cell recovery after exposure to different LET radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evstratova, Ekaterina S.; Petin, Vladislav G. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Kim, Jin Kyu; KIm, Jin Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Chemical radiosensitizers are often used to increase cell radiosensitivity. It is known that the ability of chemical drugs to increase cell radiosensitivity is related with inhibition of cell recovery from damage induced by ionizing radiation. However, there are little comparative investigations of cell sensitivity modification after exposure to radiation with high linear energy transfer (LET). Therefore, we studied the anticancer drugs cisplatin and endoxan and their impact on the ability of yeast cells to recover after cell exposure to radiations with different LET. The ability of cell recovery from radiation damage was less effective after exposure to high-LET radiation, when cells were irradiated without drug, with the increase in cisplatin concentration resulting in the disappearance of this difference. The increase of cisplatin concentration results in progressive increase in the fraction of irreversible damage independently of radiation quality.

  1. Influence of chemical inhibitors on cell recovery after exposure to different LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evstratova, Ekaterina S.; Petin, Vladislav G.; Kim, Jin Kyu; KIm, Jin Hong

    2016-01-01

    Chemical radiosensitizers are often used to increase cell radiosensitivity. It is known that the ability of chemical drugs to increase cell radiosensitivity is related with inhibition of cell recovery from damage induced by ionizing radiation. However, there are little comparative investigations of cell sensitivity modification after exposure to radiation with high linear energy transfer (LET). Therefore, we studied the anticancer drugs cisplatin and endoxan and their impact on the ability of yeast cells to recover after cell exposure to radiations with different LET. The ability of cell recovery from radiation damage was less effective after exposure to high-LET radiation, when cells were irradiated without drug, with the increase in cisplatin concentration resulting in the disappearance of this difference. The increase of cisplatin concentration results in progressive increase in the fraction of irreversible damage independently of radiation quality.

  2. Radiation-chemical preparation of poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duflot, Anastasia V.; Kitaeva, Natalia K.; Duflot, Vladimir R.

    2015-01-01

    This work reports the usage of method of radiation-chemical synthesis to prepare cross-linked hydrogels from poly(vinyl alcohol) modified with glycidyl methacrylate. Synthesis kinetics of modified poly(vinyl alcohol) and properties of hydrogels were studied. The gel fraction, swelling, mechanical properties, and water content of the hydrogels were measured. It was found that gel fraction increases with increasing radiation dose, concentration of modified poly(vinyl alcohol), and reaches 60%. It was established by differential scanning calorimetry that a fraction of the “bound” water in hydrogels is 50–70% and independent of gel fraction content. In addition to “bound” and “free” states, water in hydrogels is also present in the intermediate state. - Highlights: • The synthesis and the properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels were studied. • PVA was modified by glycidyl methacrylate before gamma cross-linking. • The modification results in decreasing of PVA cross-linking dose by 3 orders lower. • The gel fraction and water content of the hydrogels were measured. • A fraction of the “bound” water in hydrogels is independent of gel fraction content

  3. Contribution of chemical radiation research to the general theory of oxidation of organic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladygin, B.Ya.; Saraev, V.V.; Revin, A.A.; Zimina, G.M.

    1996-01-01

    Paper studies mechanisms and main elementary stages of liquid-phase oxidation of organic compounds at thermal and radiation initiation of this reaction. The results of investigations into radiation and chemical conversion of organic compounds at presence of oxygen and without it are discussed on the ground of data obtained by means of pulse radiolysis and EPR-spectroscopy. The bach-Engler theory of slow oxidation of organic compounds with participation of peroxides used as intermediate compounds is shown to be proved essentially and to enjoy further development due to the conducted radiation and chemical investigations. 68 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Radiation-chemical sanitation of dissolved pollutants and environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrukhin, N.V.; Putilov, A.V.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation-chemical sanitation of dissolved toxic pollutants resulted from the production processes of different substances and modern equipment operation is considered. The processes of fundamental industrial sewage processing and, as a result, features of practically total disposal of dissolved toxic agents are considered for the first time

  5. Radiation, chemical and biological protection. Mass destruction weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janasek, D.; Svetlik, J.

    2005-01-01

    In this text-book mass destruction weapons and radiation, chemical and biological protection are reviewed. The text-book contains the following chapter: (1) Mass destruction weapons; (2) Matter and material; (3) Radioactive materials; (4) Toxic materials; (5) Biological resources; (6) Nuclear energetic equipment; Appendices; References.

  6. Radiation modification of swollen and chemically modified cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsa, J.; Toth, T.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Biodegradable hydrogel was produced by radiation-induced crosslinking of water soluble carboxymethyl cellulose. Mobility of the molecular chain was found to play an important role in the crosslinking reaction. In this work the role of cellulose chains' mobility in radiation-induced reactions of fibrous cellulose was studied. Mobility of chains was improved by swelling (in sodium hydroxide and tetramethylammonium hydroxide) and chemical modification (substitution of about 3 % of hydroxyl groups with carboxymethyl groups), respectively. All samples were neutralized after the treatments. Accessibility of cellulose characterized by water adsorption and retention was significantly improved by the treatments in the following order: sodium hydroxide < tetramethylammonium hydroxide < carboxymethylation. Less fibrillar structure of modified fibers was observed by electron microscope. Samples were irradiated in wet form in open air (10 kGy). Untreated sample coated with soluble CMC was also irradiated. Degree of polymerization, FTIR spectra, and water sorption of samples before and after irradiation are presented. Amount of water adsorbed on samples decreased after irradiation. It can be considered the consequence of crosslinks, which might improve the crease recovery ability of cotton fabric. High accessibility improved degradation rather than crosslinking of cellulose chains

  7. Transgenerational effects of radiation and chemicals in mice and humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Taisei

    2006-01-01

    Parental exposure of mice to radiation and chemicals causes a variety of adverse effects (e.g., tumors, congenital malformations and embryonic deaths) in the progeny and the tumor-susceptibility phenotype is transmissible beyond the first post-radiation generation. The induced rates of tumors were 100-fold higher than those known for mouse specific locus mutations. There were clear strain differences in the types of naturally-occurring and induced tumors and most of the latter were malignant. Another important finding was that germ-line exposure elicited very weak tumorigenic responses, but caused persistent hypersensitivity in the offspring for the subsequent development of cancer by the postnatal environment. Activations of oncogenes, ras, mos, abl, etc. and mutations in tumor suppressor genes such as p53 were also detected in specific tumors in cancer-prone descendants. However, the majority of tumors observed in the progeny were those commonly observed in the strains that were used and oncogene activations were rarely observed in these tumors. It can be hypothesized that genetic instability modifies tumor occurrence in a transgenerational manner, but so far no links could be established between chromosomal and molecular changes and transmissible tumor risks. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that cumulative changes in many normal but cancer-related genes affecting immunological, biochemical and physiological functions may slightly elevate the incidence of tumors or fasten the tumor development. This hypothesis is supported by our GeneChip analyses which showed suppression and/or over-expression of many such genes in the offspring of mice exposed to radiation. In humans, a higher risk of leukemia and birth defects has been reported in the children of fathers who had been exposed to radionuclides in the nuclear reprocessing plants and to diagnostic radiation. These findings have not been supported in the children of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima

  8. Effect of gamma radiation on chemical composition and storability of lime RTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, S.K.; Bisen, A.; Dwivedi, V.

    2008-01-01

    In the present investigation, the RTS was irradiated with different doses of gamma radiation to study their effect on chemical composition and storability of lime RTS and vitamin C content only was influenced significantly by 50 Gy gamma radiation during storage (16 days) without adversely affecting the quality of lime fruits, whereas, under control and higher doses of gamma radiation, the quality of lime RTS was deteriorated. The irradiation of lime with 50 Gy gamma radiation may be useful for extending storability of lime of RTS and stabilizing the market demand. (author)

  9. Florida statewide radiation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagda, N.L.; Koontz, M.D.; Fortmann, R.C.; Schoenborn, W.A.; Mehegan, L.L.

    1987-01-01

    Florida phosphate deposits contain higher levels of uranium than most other soils and rocks, thus exposing the population to higher-than-desirable levels of radon and its short-lived daughters. The Florida Legislature ordered a survey of significant land areas where an environmental radiation standard should be applied. Among other things, the study assessed indoor radon in 6,000 homes, soil radon at 3,000 residences, and all data existing prior to the study. The report explains the purpose of the study, how it was designed and conducted, and its results. It concludes with a discussion of radon/radon decay product equilibrium factor, correlation between indoor and soil radon, and preliminary attempts to develop a safe threshold for soil radon below which few elevated indoor levels would be anticipated

  10. Influence of vitamins on cytostatic drugs: radiation-chemical and radiation-biological investigations in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, E.

    2002-03-01

    Many environmental burdens (air pollution, formation of ozone etc.), humans nowadays are exposed to, in connection with unhealthy way of living promote the formation of free radicals e.g. OH and peroxylradicals in the organism. Those show an enormous cell-damaging effect, and can weaken the immune system or cause cancer diseases. The number of humans suffering from different forms of cancer is rising world-wide. Therefore it is necessary to find new and better therapy forms for this illness. The organism has its own protective system, which is able to capture free radicals and make them innocuous to a large extent. Apart from various enzyme systems the antioxidizing vitamins C (ascorbic acid), E (α-tocopherol) and β-carotin play an important role in this process. Now it was of interest whether vitamin B1 (thiamine) also possesses the ability to work as a radiation protector or to influence the effect of different cytostatic drugs. In the context of this thesis the radiation-chemical and radiation-biological behaviour of vitamin B1 was examined under different conditions (in presence and absence of oxygen as well as in media saturated with N 2 O). HPLC analysis were performed to establish radiolysis products. Furthermore the synergistic effect of vitamin B1 on cytostatic drugs (sanazole, mitomycin C) was studied alone or in combination with other vitamins (C, E and β-carotin) by using two different E. coli bacteria strains as a model for living systems. (author)

  11. Chemical and biological effects of radiation sterilization of medical products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, B.L.

    1975-01-01

    Radiation is extensively used for the sterilization of plastic materials, pharmaceuticals and biological tissue grafts. The pharmaceuticals may be solid, liquid, or suspension in a liquid or a solution. Cobalt-60 gamma radiation, generally used for sterilization, primarily interacts with these materials through the Compton process. The resulting damage may be direct or indirect. In aqueous systems the primary species produced compete for interaction among themselves and the dissolved solutes. The nature, the G-values and the reactions of the primary species very much depend on the pH of the solution. The important chemical changes in plastic materials are gas liberation, change in concentration of double bonds, cross-linking, degradation and oxidation. These chemical changes lead to some physical changes like crystallinity, specific conductivity and permeability. The reactions in biological systems are very complex and are influenced by the presence or absence of water and oxygen. Water produces indirect damage and the radiation effect is generally more in the presence of oxygen. Most microorganisms are relatively radioresistant. Various tissues of an animal differ in their response to radiation. Catgut is not stable to irradiation. Lyophilized human serum is stable to irradiation whereas, when irradiated in aqueous solutions, several changes are observed. Generally, pharmaceuticals are considerably more stable in the dry solid state to ionizing radiations than in aqueous solutions or in any other form of molecular aggregation. (author)

  12. Studies in chemical dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuppermann, A.

    1978-01-01

    Progress made in the following studies is reported: low-energy electron scattering; variable-angle photoelectron spectroscopy; laser photochemistry and spectroscopy; and collisions in crossed molecular beams

  13. Radiation induced chemical reaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Shun-ichi; Nishii, Masanobu

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies of radiation induced chemical reactions of CO-H 2 mixture have revealed that the yields of oxygen containing products were larger than those of hydrocarbons. In the present study, methane was added to CO-H 2 mixture in order to increase further the yields of the oxygen containing products. The yields of most products except a few products such as formaldehyde increased with the addition of small amount of methane. Especially, the yields of trioxane and tetraoxane gave the maximum values when CO-H 2 mixture containing 1 mol% methane was irradiated. When large amounts of methane were added to the mixture, the yields of aldehydes and carboxylic acids having more than two carbon atoms increased, whereas those of trioxane and tetraoxane decreased. From the study at reaction temperature over the range of 200 to 473 K, it was found that the yields of aldehydes and carboxylic acids showed maxima at 323 K. The studies on the effects of addition of cationic scavenger (NH 3 ) and radical scavenger (O 2 ) on the products yields were also carried out on the CO-H 2 -CH 4 mixture. (author)

  14. CHEMICAL VAPOUR DEPOSITION FROM A RADIATION-SENSITIVE PRECURSOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention relates in one aspect to a method of depositing a thin film on a substrate by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) from a radiation-sensitive precursor substance. The method comprises the steps of: (i) placing the substrate in a reaction chamber of a CVD system; (ii) heating...... heating pulse followed by an idle period; (iii) during at least one of the idle periods, providing a pressure pulse of precursor substance inside the reaction chamber by feeding at least one precursor substance to the reaction chamber so as to establish a reaction partial pressure for thin film deposition...... is formed. According to a further aspect, the invention relates to a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) system for depositing a thin film onto a substrate using precursor substances containing at least one radiation sensitive species....

  15. Hydration-annealing of chemical radiation damage in calcium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, S.M.K.; James, C.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of hydration on the annealing of chemical radiation damage in anhydrous calcium nitrate has been investigated. Rehydration of the anhydrous irradiated nitrate induces direct recovery of the damage. The rehydrated salt is susceptible to thermal annealing but the extent of annealing is small compared to that in the anhydrous salt. The direct recovery of damage on rehydration is due to enhanced lattice mobility. The recovery process is unimolecular. (author)

  16. Investigation into radiation-chemical transformations of polyamide P-54

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khabarov, V.N.; Kozlov, L.L.; Panchenkov, G.M.

    1981-01-01

    Investigation results of alcohol-soluble polyamide P-54 radiolysis by different physicochemical methods are presented. It has been established that under the effect of γ-radiation certain processes take place in polyamide, which are connected with branching, structurization and destruction of macromolecules. Radiation-chemical yields of gaseous products during irradiation in the air and in vacuum at irradiation temperatures from 273 to 393 K are calculated. The ratio of the rates of lacing and destruction processes is found and radiation yields of the processes are determined. Under irradiation in the air at temperatures >333 K chain oxidation of P-54 takes place and the growth of pe-- roxide compounds with 8 molecules/100 eV at 298 K up to 135 mole-- cules/100 eV at irradiation temperature 373 K testifies to the fact

  17. Preparation of polymeric biomaterials with the aid of radiation-chemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabanov, Vitalii Ya

    1998-01-01

    The results of the application of radiation-chemical methods for the preparation of polymeric biomaterials are surveyed and treated systematically. The characteristic features of these methods and their advantages and disadvantages are indicated. The properties of polymeric biomaterials prepared using ionising radiation are examined. Particular attention is devoted to studies carried out during the last 10-15 years. The bibliography includes 492 references.

  18. Test plan for Digface Chemical and Radiation Assay System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akers, D.W.

    1993-07-01

    The Digface Chemical and Radiation Assay System (CRAS) Project will develop a sensor using Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) that can detect the present of hazardous chemicals and radioactive materials. The CRAS is being designed for in situ assay of closed drums and contaminated soils for gamma-ray emitting radionuclides and hazardous elements. The CRAS is based upon the use of 252 Cf PGNAA with a germanium gamma-ray spectrometer as the analyzer. Tasks being performed include determining detection limits for a number of hazardous chemicals and assessing matrix and transmission effects through soil. Initial analyses suggest that the technique is applicable to a number of hazardous materials such as trichloroethane and carbon tetrachloride

  19. In vitro transformation: interactions of chemical carcinogens and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiPaolo, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    The development of reproducible quantitative in vitro procedures resulting in neoplastic transformation of mammalian cells has made possible the separation of events related to the process leading to transformation from secondary events that interfere with the early recognition of transformation. The use of chemical carcinogens on Syrian hamster cell strains results in a dose-response relation consistent with a Poisson distribution, indicating that the transformation phenomenon is inductive. In some circumstances, the joint action or interaction of chemical carcinogens with other agents results in an increased incidence of transformation. The pretreatment of Syrian hamster cells with ionizing radiation (250 R) or alkylating chemicals enhances the frequency of transformation on a cell or colony basis ordinarily obtained with known chemical carcinogens. Pretreatment with non-ionizing irradiation (uv, 254 nm) did not have a similar effect. The two types of irradiation and the alkylating agents reduced the cloning efficiency of the cells. X ray alone produced no transformation; the alkylating chemicals produced transformations infrequently, whereas uv produced a significant number of transformations. The number of transformations associated with uv is increased by pretreatment of the cells by x-irradiation. The enhancement of transformation by x-ray or x-ray-type agents appears to be independent of the type of second carcinogen used

  20. Mechanism of Interaction between Ionizing Radiation and Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, B H; Shin, H S [and others

    2008-03-15

    This research project has been carried out jointly with INP (Poland) to develop technologies for 'Mechanism of Interaction between ionizing radiation and chemicals{sup .} Several biological end-points were assessed in experimental organisms such as higher plants, rats, cell lines and yeast cells to establish proper bioassay techniques. The Tradescantia somatic cell mutation assay was carried out, and immunohistochemistry and hormone assays were done in Fisher 344 rats and cell lines to analyse the combined effect of ionizing radiation with mercury chloride. Using the common regularities of combined actions of two factors, a theoretical model was established, and applied to the thermo radiation action and synergism between two chemicals, as well. The model approach made it possible to predict the condition under which the maximum synergism could be attained. The research results were published in high standard journals and presented in the scientific conferences to verify KAERI's current technology level. The experience of collaboration can be used as a fundamental tool for multinational collaboration, and make the role of improving relationship between Korea and Poland.

  1. Mechanism of Interaction between Ionizing Radiation and Chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, B. H.; Shin, H. S.

    2008-03-01

    This research project has been carried out jointly with INP (Poland) to develop technologies for 'Mechanism of Interaction between ionizing radiation and chemicals . Several biological end-points were assessed in experimental organisms such as higher plants, rats, cell lines and yeast cells to establish proper bioassay techniques. The Tradescantia somatic cell mutation assay was carried out, and immunohistochemistry and hormone assays were done in Fisher 344 rats and cell lines to analyse the combined effect of ionizing radiation with mercury chloride. Using the common regularities of combined actions of two factors, a theoretical model was established, and applied to the thermo radiation action and synergism between two chemicals, as well. The model approach made it possible to predict the condition under which the maximum synergism could be attained. The research results were published in high standard journals and presented in the scientific conferences to verify KAERI's current technology level. The experience of collaboration can be used as a fundamental tool for multinational collaboration, and make the role of improving relationship between Korea and Poland

  2. Chemical implications of heat and radiation damage to rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pederson, L.R.

    1984-11-01

    Chemical changes induced in Palo Duro and Paradox Basin natural rock salts and in synthetic NaCl by heat and gamma radiation were investigated. Heating of unirradiated natural rock salts to 300 0 C resulted in HCl (most prevalent), SO 2 , CO 2 , and H 2 S evolution, and increased the base content of the remaining salt by not more than 10 microequivalents per gram; whereas, heating of synthetic NaCl gave no product. Gamma irradiation produced sodium colloids and neutral chlorine in amounts similar to the results of Levy and coworkers. When the irradiated salts were heated, three reactions were apparent: (1) radiation-induced defects recombined; (2) neutral chlorine was evolved; and (3) HCl, SO 2 , CO 2 , and H 2 S were evolved, similar to results for unirradiated salts. Because reaction (1) appeared to dominate over reaction (2), it is expected that the influence of radiation damage to salt on the near-field chemical environment will be minor. 4 figures, 1 table

  3. Mechanism of Interaction between Ionizing Radiation and Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, B. H.; Shin, H. S. (and others)

    2008-03-15

    This research project has been carried out jointly with INP (Poland) to develop technologies for 'Mechanism of Interaction between ionizing radiation and chemicals{sup .} Several biological end-points were assessed in experimental organisms such as higher plants, rats, cell lines and yeast cells to establish proper bioassay techniques. The Tradescantia somatic cell mutation assay was carried out, and immunohistochemistry and hormone assays were done in Fisher 344 rats and cell lines to analyse the combined effect of ionizing radiation with mercury chloride. Using the common regularities of combined actions of two factors, a theoretical model was established, and applied to the thermo radiation action and synergism between two chemicals, as well. The model approach made it possible to predict the condition under which the maximum synergism could be attained. The research results were published in high standard journals and presented in the scientific conferences to verify KAERI's current technology level. The experience of collaboration can be used as a fundamental tool for multinational collaboration, and make the role of improving relationship between Korea and Poland.

  4. Fabrication of radiation sources for educational purposes from chemical fertilizers using compressing and forming method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Takao

    2008-01-01

    Chemical fertilizers contain potassium, which is composed of a small amount of naturally occurring potassium-40. The potassium-40 radionuclide emits beta and gamma radiation. Three brands of chemical fertilizer were used to fabricate disk-shaped radiation sources and the fabricated radiation sources were examined for applicability to an educational radiation course. In the examination, tests to determine dependence of count rate on distance, shielding thickness, and shielding materials were conducted using the radiation sources. Results showed that radiation sources fabricated from the three brands of chemical fertilizer were equivalent for explaining radiation characteristics, particularly those related to the dependence of radiation strength on distance and shielding thickness. The relation between shielding effect and mass density can be explained qualitatively. Thus, chemical fertilizer radiation sources can be a useful teaching aid for educational courses to better promote understanding of radiation characteristics and the principles of radiation protection. (author)

  5. Treatment of spices with ionizing radiation - chemical, organoleptical, microbiological and toxicological analyses. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuettler, C.; Boegl, W.

    1984-09-01

    In the present second part of a study of the relevant literature the results of tests on 14 radiation treated spices and 2 radiation treated spice-mixtures were evaluated. The tests in this part contain mainly toxicological but also chemical and sensorial analyses. Most of the spices were treated with gamma radiation from cobalt-60 sources with doses between 80 Gy and 60 kGy. This part contains a cumulated subject index for part 1 and part 2. (orig./AJ) [de

  6. Comparative biological hazards of chemical pollutants and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, R.N.

    1978-01-01

    Chemical pollutants from conventional energy and industrial sources released to the environment presumably pose a hazard to man's health and environmental resources. Insufficient knowledge of their detailed mechanisms of interaction with the biological systems seems to provide the greatest drawback in current attempts for realistic assessment of the health risks of chemical pollutants in the short and long terms. Nevertheless, their detrimental health consequences are becoming more and more apparent as a result of recent epidemiological surveys of workers in conventional energy installations and of the chronically exposed general public. So far nuclear power has succeeded in achieving a remarkable health safety record. In view of its projected expansion, research on biological effects of low-level radiation and radionuclides should continue to re-evaluate the health safety consequences. However, a projection from past experiences together with continued efforts to improvements of health safety aspects seem to justify an expectation that the proposed expansions in the nuclear power programme should not have an unfavourable impact on the environment. The potential hazards and challenges from the associated radiation in man's environment have proved manageable. More attention now needs to be paid urgently to safeguard human health and environment against the chemical pollutants

  7. Comparative biological hazards of chemical pollutants and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, R N [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Div. of Life Sciences

    1978-06-01

    Chemical pollutants from conventional energy and industrial sources released to the environment presumably pose a hazard to man's health and environmental resources. Insufficient knowledge of their detailed mechanisms of interaction with the biological systems seems to provide the greatest drawback in current attempts for realistic assessment of the health risks of chemical pollutants in the short and long terms. Nevertheless, their detrimental health consequences are becoming more and more apparent as a result of recent epidemiological surveys of workers in conventional energy installations and of the chronically exposed general public. So far nuclear power has succeeded in achieving a remarkable health safety record. In view of its projected expansion, research on biological effects of low-level radiation and radionuclides should continue to re-evaluate the health safety consequences. However, a projection from past experiences together with continued efforts to improvements of health safety aspects seem to justify an expectation that the proposed expansions in the nuclear power programme should not have an unfavourable impact on the environment. The potential hazards and challenges from the associated radiation in man's environment have proved manageable. More attention now needs to be paid urgently to safeguard human health and environment against the chemical pollutants.

  8. Applications of synchrotron radiation to Chemical Engineering Science: Workshop report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This report contains extended abstracts that summarize presentations made at the Workshop on Applications of Synchrotron Radiation to Chemical Engineering Science held at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL, on April 22--23, 1991. The talks emphasized the application of techniques involving absorption fluorescence, diffraction, and reflection of synchrotron x-rays, with a focus on problems in applied chemistry and chemical engineering, as well as on the use of x-rays in topographic, tomographic, and lithographic procedures. The attendees at the workshop included experts in the field of synchrotron science, scientists and engineers from ANL, other national laboratories, industry, and universities; and graduate and undergraduate students who were enrolled in ANL educational programs at the time of the workshop. Talks in the Plenary and Overview Session described the status of and special capabilities to be offered by the Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as strategies and opportunities for utilization of synchrotron radiation to solve science and engineering problems. Invited talks given in subsequent sessions covered the use of intense infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray photon beams (as provided by synchrotrons) in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering research related to electrochemical and corrosion science, catalyst development and characterization, lithography and imaging techniques, and microanalysis

  9. Applications of synchrotron radiation to Chemical Engineering Science: Workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-07-01

    This report contains extended abstracts that summarize presentations made at the Workshop on Applications of Synchrotron Radiation to Chemical Engineering Science held at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL, on April 22--23, 1991. The talks emphasized the application of techniques involving absorption fluorescence, diffraction, and reflection of synchrotron x-rays, with a focus on problems in applied chemistry and chemical engineering, as well as on the use of x-rays in topographic, tomographic, and lithographic procedures. The attendees at the workshop included experts in the field of synchrotron science, scientists and engineers from ANL, other national laboratories, industry, and universities; and graduate and undergraduate students who were enrolled in ANL educational programs at the time of the workshop. Talks in the Plenary and Overview Session described the status of and special capabilities to be offered by the Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as strategies and opportunities for utilization of synchrotron radiation to solve science and engineering problems. Invited talks given in subsequent sessions covered the use of intense infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray photon beams (as provided by synchrotrons) in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering research related to electrochemical and corrosion science, catalyst development and characterization, lithography and imaging techniques, and microanalysis.

  10. Physiological and genetics studies of highly radiation-resistant bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, L.C.

    1981-01-01

    The phenomenon of radiation resistance was studied using micrococci and Moraxella-Acinetobacter capable of surviving very high doses of gamma radiation which were isolated from foods. Physiological age, or growth phase, was found to be an important factor in making comparisons of radiation-resistance among different bacteria and their mutants. Radiation-resistant bacteria were highly resistant to the lethal effect of nitrosoguanidine used for mutagenesis. Studies of relative resistance of radiation-resistant bacteria, radiation-sensitive mutants, and nonradiation-resistant bacteria to killing by different chemical mutagens did not reveal a correlation between the traits of radiation resistance and mutagen resistance among different strains. Comparisons of plasmid profiles of radiation-resistant bacteria and selected radiation-sensitive mutants suggested the possibility that plasmids may carry genes involved in radiation resistance

  11. Radiation and environment - impact studies awareness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boniface Ekechukwu; Mohd. Zohadie Bardaie

    2005-01-01

    Radiation, which is simply defined as energy, that travels in the form of waves or particles has both positive and negative effects on humans. This has necessitated a careful study on how to create awareness on the 'two-edge sword'. Since radiation cannot be removed from our environment we, however, reduce our risks by controlling our exposure to it through various ways. Understanding radiation and radioactivity will help us make informed decisions about our exposure. Many difference types of radiation have range of energy that form electromagnetic spectrum. Their sources include nuclear power plants, nuclear weapons, and medicine. Others include, microwaves, radar, electrical power lines, cellular phones, and sunlight' and so on. However, the radiation used in nuclear power, nuclear weapons, and medicine has enough energy to break chemical bonds, and is referred to as 'ionizing radiation', which is dangerous to life. Because of this negative effect of radiation there is common fear and myths related to radiation, radioactivity, uranium mining and milling, and the nuclear industry. This radiation education and energy-environmental education attempt to dispel the common fears and myths relating to them in so far as there is perfect protection from harmful exposure and abuse. The design of an integrated unit of study radiation and environmental energy uses arts of language, life skills, skill designs, social studies and mathematical skills in creating understanding and abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry by the students without abuse or danger. The education unit is designed to assess materials for, factual information and appropriate language and identification of potential bias in environmental education materials and evaluate materials in perspective of cultural and ethnic upbringing. (author)

  12. Treatment of spices with ionizing radiation - chemical, sensory, microbiological and toxicological aspects. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuettler, C.; Boegl, W.

    1986-10-01

    In the present third part of a study of the relevant literature the results of tests on 34 different radiation treated spices were evaluated. Moreover, the present part contains a summary of all analyses and results, described in the previous parts, in chemical and toxicological changes of spices caused by irradiation. This summary contains results of 55 different spices. (orig.) [de

  13. Application of large radiation sources in chemical processing industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, K.

    1977-01-01

    Large radiation sources and their application in chemical processing industry are described. A reference has also been made to the present developments in this field in India. Radioactive sources, notably 60 Co, are employed in production of wood-plastic and concrete-polymer composites, vulcanised rubbers, polymers, sulfochlorinated paraffin hydrocarbons and in a number of other applications which require deep penetration and high reliability of source. Machine sources of electrons are used in production of heat shrinkable plastics, insulation materials for cables, curing of paints etc. Radiation sources have also been used for sewage hygienisation. As for the scene in India, 60 Co sources, gamma chambers and batch irradiators are manufactured. A list of the on-going R and D projects and organisations engaged in research in this field is given. (M.G.B.)

  14. Biological efficiency of interaction between various radiation and chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Yu, Dong Han; Lee, Byoung Hun; Petin, Vladislav G.; Geras'kin, Stanislav A.; Cebulska-Wasilewska, Antonina; Panek, Agnieszka; Wiechec, Anna

    2004-06-01

    This research project has been carried out jointly with INP (Poland) to develop technologies to assess the biological efficiency of interaction between radiation and chemicals. Through the cooperative project, KAERI and INP have established wide variety of bioassay techniques applicable to radiation bioscience, human monitoring, molecular epidemiology and environmental science. The joint experiment, in special, made it possible to utilize the merits of both institutes and to upgrade and verify KAERI's current technology level. All results of the cooperative research will be jointly published in high standard scientific journals listed in the Science Citation Index (SCI), which can make the role of fundamental basis for improving relationship between Korea and Poland. Research skills such as Trad-MCN assay, SCGE assay, immunohistochemical assay and molecular assay developed through joint research will be further elaborated and will be continuously used for the collaboration between two institutes

  15. Analysis of mechanism of complex chemical reaction taking radiation chemical purification of gases from impurities as an example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimov, G.Ya.; Makarov, V.N.

    1997-01-01

    Algorithm of selecting optimal mechanism of complex chemical reaction, enabling to reduce the number of its stages, is suggested. Main steps of constructing the kinetic model of the medium are considered, taking the radiation chemical purification (using fast electron radiation) of gases (N 2 , CO 2 , O 2 and others) from impurities as an example. 17 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Studying uses of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1969-07-01

    Among the events this year which have demonstrated the efforts of the Agency and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations to increase the knowledge of nuclear techniques have been two six-week courses held in association with national atomic energy organizations. In Italy the use of radiation to induce beneficial mutations in plans was the subject, and in India stress was on ways of preserving food, in addition to the sterilization of biomedical products. (author)

  17. Is radiation an appropriate model for chemical mutagenesis and carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter attempts to show why the quadratic, or ''linear quadratic,'' relationship holds for organ dose-single cell radiation effects, and to explore the extension of this relationship to chemical exposures in general. Demonstrates that although the ''αD + βD 2 relationship'' may be unexpected for normal pharmacologicalmedical dose-response relationships, a linear, no-threshold curve of this kind is expected for all stochastic-type (accidental or risk) situations with health consequences (e.g. all common accidents) including exposure to ''low-level radiation'' (LLR). Discusses the stochastic or risk approach, relevant radiobiology, and the stochastic for chemicals. Assumes that even though actual mutational rates cannot be expected to apply to the relevance of Tradescantia or any other single cell system as a predictor for mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in animals and man, the cardinal principles of genetics largely transcend species and the particular environment in which the cell is located. Concludes that with regard to LLR, the curve shapes and other relationships developed for Tradescantia would be expected to apply in principle to animal and human mutagenesis and carcinogenesis

  18. Involvement of MAPK proteins in bystander effects induced by chemicals and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asur, Rajalakshmi; Balasubramaniam, Mamtha; Marples, Brian; Thomas, Robert A.; Tucker, James D.

    2010-01-01

    Many studies have examined bystander effects induced by ionizing radiation, however few have evaluated the ability of chemicals to induce similar effects. We previously reported the ability of two chemicals, mitomycin C (MMC) and phleomycin (PHL) to induce bystander effects in normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines. The focus of the current study was to determine the involvement of the MAPK proteins in bystander effects induced by physical and chemical DNA damaging agents and to evaluate the effects of MAPK inhibition on bystander-induced caspase 3/7 activation. The phosphorylation levels of the MAPK proteins ERK1/2, JNK, and p38, were measured from 1 to 24 h following direct or bystander exposure to MMC, PHL or radiation. We observed transient phosphorylation, at early time points, of all 3 proteins in bystander cells. We also evaluated the effect of MAPK inhibition on bystander-induced caspase 3/7 activity to determine the role of MAPK proteins in bystander-induced apoptosis. We observed bystander-induced activation of caspase 3/7 in bystander cells. Inhibition of MAPK proteins resulted in a decrease in caspase 3/7 activity at the early time points, and the caspase activity increased (in the case of ERK inhibition) or returned to basal levels (in the case of JNK or p38 inhibition) between 12 and 24 h. PHL is considered to be a radiomimetic agent, however in the present study PHL behaved more like a chemical and not like radiation in terms of MAPK phosphorylation. These results point to the involvement of MAPK proteins in the bystander effect induced by radiation and chemicals and provide additional evidence that this response is not limited to radiation but is a generalized stress response in cells.

  19. Studies on the strategies of minimizing radiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hee Yong; Sohn, Young Sook

    1998-04-01

    We studied on the strategies of minimizing radiation damage in animal system. To this end we studied following areas of research (1) mechanisms involved in bone marrow damage after total body irradiation, (2) extraction of components that are useful in protecting hematopoietic system from radiation damage, (3) cell therapy approach in restoring the damaged tissue, (4) development of radioprotective chemical reagent, and (5) epidemiological study on the population that had been exposed to radiation.

  20. Studies on the strategies of minimizing radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hee Yong; Sohn, Young Sook

    1998-04-01

    We studied on the strategies of minimizing radiation damage in animal system. To this end we studied following areas of research 1) mechanisms involved in bone marrow damage after total body irradiation, 2) extraction of components that are useful in protecting hematopoietic system from radiation damage, 3) cell therapy approach in restoring the damaged tissue, 4) development of radioprotective chemical reagent, and 5) epidemiological study on the population that had been exposed to radiation

  1. Study on radiation hazard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Rong-Chan

    1981-01-01

    A series of experiments were designed to know the influence of the teeth on the radiation hazard for mandible. The right mandible of adult dogs were irradiated by means of an x-radiation generator (total dose was 3000 R and 6000 R). Radiation hazards for the soft tissue revealed a significant difference between the dentulous and edentulous mandibles, macroscopically. The gingiva of irradiated dentulous mandible showed an ulceration after the irradiation. Necrosis of the alveolar mucosa, buccal mucosa and skin followed an ulceration, and eventually exposure of the alveolar bone of mandible occurred. The pathologic condition progressed rapidly and a loosening and an exfoliation of the teeth or a pathologic fracture of the mandible occurred eventually. In the edentulous mandible (6000 R irradiated group) an ulceration of the skin developed as the first disturbance. The tissue necrosis progressed from the skin to the buccal mucosa and gingiva. Eventually an exposure of the alveolar bone occurred but no pathologic fracture was seen in the edentulous mandible. No specific pathologic findings were seen in the 3000 R irradiated edentulous mandible. The early roentgenological findings in the irradiated dentulous mandible were resorption of the alveolar crest and widening of the periodontal membrane space. Another changes of bone were osteoporosis and cortical bone destruction. In the edentulous mandible (6000 R irradiated group) pathologic bone condition occurred later than in the dentulous mandible, and osteosclerosis and cortical bone destruction were also seen. Periosteal reaction was found roentgenologically in the 6000 R irradiated dentulous and edentulous mandibles. No roentgenological findings were seen in the 3000 R irradiated edentulous mandible. (J.P.N.)

  2. Radiation chemical behavior of Rh(III) in HClO4 and HNO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirova, M.V.; Khalkina, E.V.

    1995-01-01

    The radiation chemical behavior of Rh is very interesting since Rh accumulates in irradiated U but has not been reported in the literature. Scattered data do exist for the radiation chemical behavior of Rh(III) in weakly acidic and alkaline solutions. Pulsed radiolysis was used to investigate the formation of unstable oxidation states of Rh during reduction and oxidation of Rh(III) in neutral solutions. The rate constant of the reaction Rh(III) + e aq - was found to be 6·10 10 liter/mole·sec. The radiation chemical behavior of Rh(III) toward γ-radiolysis in neutral, weakly acidic (up to 0.1 N), and alkaline solutions was examined. In neutral solutions of [Rh(NH 3 ) 5 Cl]Cl 2 and RhCl 3 , metallic Rh is formed. The degree of reduction is ∼ 1%. In neutral and weakly acidic solutions of Rh(NO 3 ) 3 , Rh 2 O 3 ·xH 2 O is formed. Irradiation of Rh(ClO 4 ) 3 solutions produces no reduction. The radiation chemical behavior of Rh(III) in HClO 4 and HNO 3 solutions at concentrations > 1 M is studied in the present work

  3. Low environmental radiation background impairs biological defence of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to chemical radiomimetic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satta, L.; Augusti-Tocco, G.; Ceccarelli, R.; Paggi, P.; Scarsella, G.; Esposito, A.; Fiore, M.; Poggesi, I.; Ricordy, R.; Cundari, E.

    1995-01-01

    Background radiation is likely to constitute one of the factors involved in biological evolution since radiations are able to affect biological processes. Therefore, it is possible to hypothesize that organisms are adapted to environmental background radiation and that this adaptation could increase their ability to respond to the harmful effects of ionizing radiations. In fact, adaptive responses to alkylating agents and to low doses of ionizing radiation have been found in many organisms. In order to test for effects of adaptation, cell susceptibility to treatments with high doses of radiomimetic chemical agents has been studied by growing them in a reduced environmental radiation background. The experiment has been performed by culturing yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae D7) in parallel in a standard background environment and in the underground Gran Sasso National Laboratory, with reduced environmental background radiation. After a conditioning period, yeast cells were exposed to recombinogenic doses of methyl methanesulfonate. The yeast cells grown in the Gran Sasso Laboratory showed a higher frequency of radiomimetic induced recombination as compared to those grown in the standard environment. This suggests that environmental radiation may act as a conditioning agent

  4. A Study of Chemically Reactive Species and Thermal Radiation Effects on an Unsteady MHD Free Convection Flow Through a Porous Medium Past a Flat Plate with Ramped Wall Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandit K. K.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of the effects of a chemical reaction and thermal radiation on unsteady MHD free convection heat and mass transfer flow of an electrically conducting, viscous, incompressible fluid past a vertical infinite flat plate embedded in a porous medium is carried out. The flow is induced by a general time-dependent movement of the vertical plate, and the cases of ramped temperature and isothermal plates are studied. An exact solution of the governing equations is obtained in closed form by the Laplace Transform technique. Some applications of practical interest for different types of plate motions are discussed. The numerical values of fluid velocity, temperature and species concentration are displayed graphically whereas the numerical values of skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are presented in a tabular form for various values of pertinent flow parameters for both ramped temperature and isothermal plates.

  5. A Study of Chemically Reactive Species and Thermal Radiation Effects on an Unsteady MHD Free Convection Flow Through a Porous Medium Past a Flat Plate with Ramped Wall Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, K. K.; Sarma, D.; Singh, S. I.

    2017-12-01

    An investigation of the effects of a chemical reaction and thermal radiation on unsteady MHD free convection heat and mass transfer flow of an electrically conducting, viscous, incompressible fluid past a vertical infinite flat plate embedded in a porous medium is carried out. The flow is induced by a general time-dependent movement of the vertical plate, and the cases of ramped temperature and isothermal plates are studied. An exact solution of the governing equations is obtained in closed form by the Laplace Transform technique. Some applications of practical interest for different types of plate motions are discussed. The numerical values of fluid velocity, temperature and species concentration are displayed graphically whereas the numerical values of skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are presented in a tabular form for various values of pertinent flow parameters for both ramped temperature and isothermal plates.

  6. Mutagenic effect of ionizing radiation and chemical and environmental agents in Tradescantia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebulska-Wasilewska, A.

    1988-01-01

    The studies covered the following problems: an influence of some environmental agents on the mutagenic effectiveness of ionizing radiation, interaction between ionizing radiation and chemical mutagens in the induction of somatic mutations and also an application of Tradescantia model system for biological monitoring. The studies showed that the pretreatment of Tradescantia plants with sodium fluoride or the modification of the soil composition with dolomite admixture, visibly influences plants radiosensitivity. The analysis of the changes in the dose-response curves suggested that the employed agents were influencing in different ways the repair processes of the DNA. The studies on the interaction between agents proved that the synergistic effect occurs in case of combined action of ionizing radiation with such chemical mutagens as ethyl methansulfonate or 1,2 dibromomethane. It was also discovered that in the range of low doses the effect was proportional to radiation dose and total exposition to chemical mutagen. The field application of Tradescantia method defined the mutagenicity of air pollution in the Cracow area. The highest frequencies of mutations were detected after the Chernobyl accident and after the damage of the filters in the Pharmaceutical Plant. The applied method was evaluated in respect of its usefulness for biological monitoring of environmental pollution. 163 refs. (author)

  7. Chemical effects of ionizing radiation on the individual amino acids within intact and pure protein molecules. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freidberg, F.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: gamma radiation induced chemical and molecular weight changes in proteins; the free radical pattern for the irradiated protein; similarities in the mechanism of action of ionizing and of uv radiation; and spin trapping in the study of gamma radiolysis

  8. Problems and solutions in the estimation of genetic risks from radiation and chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    Extensive investigations with mice on the effects of various physical and biological factors, such as dose rate, sex and cell stage, on radiation-induced mutation have provided an evaluation of the genetics hazards of radiation in man. The mutational results obtained in both sexes with progressive lowering of the radiation dose rate have permitted estimation of the mutation frequency expected under the low-level radiation conditions of most human exposure. Supplementing the studies on mutation frequency are investigations on the phenotypic effects of mutations in mice, particularly anatomical disorders of the skeleton, which allow an estimation of the degree of human handicap associated with the occurrence of parallel defects in man. Estimation of the genetic risk from chemical mutagens is much more difficult, and the research is much less advanced. Results on transmitted mutations in mice indicate a poor correlation with mutation induction in non-mammalian organisms

  9. Radiation chemical oxidation of propen under the influence of UV- and gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litschke, P.I.

    1978-01-01

    The oxidation of propen is studied in the liquid state under the influence of electromagnetic radiation using hydrogenperoxide, organic hydroperoxides and oxygen. In this investigation propen oxide is of main interest. The study of systems with oxygen is based on the concept that the formation of hydroperoxide from organic oxygen compounds is enhanced by irradiation, thus favouring an in situ method for expoxidation with hydroperoxides. The influence of UV-radiation from high and low pressure mercury discharge lamps and 60 Co gamma radiation has been studied as well as the effect of solvents and catalysers, which are resolved in the system. (orig./WBU) [de

  10. Investigation of radiation-chemical behaviour of divalent palladium in perchloric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirova, M.V.; Kalinina, S.V.

    1988-01-01

    Gamma-radiolysis of divalent palladium in perchloric acid solutions is studied. Absorption spectra of intermediate palladium compounds formed in the irradiated solution are taken. The analysis of literature data as well as comparative analysis of the absorption spectra obtained under irradiation of palladium (2) perchloric acid solutions with absorption spectra of palladium chlorocomplexes allows to suppose that the mentioned compounds are chlorocomplexes of palladium (2) of different composition depending on HClO 4 concentration in the initial solution and absorbed radiation dose. Radiation-chemical reduction of palladium (2) up to metal is stated to take place in the whole studied range of initial concentrations of components of the system and dose rates. Kinetic dependences of metallic palladium formation are obtained. Values of radiation-chemical yields of metallic palladium formation depending on the initial concentrations of palladium (2) and perchloric acid are given. A mechanism of radiolytic reduction of palladium (2) in the investigated system is suggested based on the experimental data, and a theoretical value of the radiation-chemical yield of palladium (2) reduction being in a good agreement with experimentally found values is calculated

  11. Radiation-chemical behaviour of actinides in extraction systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirova, M.V.; Fedoseev, D.A.; Bojkova, I.A.; Milovanova, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation-chemical behaviour of Pu(4) in γ-irradiated triisoamyl phosphate (TIAP) solutions in n-dodecane with metal concentration of 9.5x10 -3 mol/l is investigated by spectrophotometric and extraction methods within the interval of γ-irradiation absorbed dose values from 1.5x10 4 to 1.0x10 5 Gy. Absorption spectra of Pu(4) complexes with TIAP and diisoamylphosphoric acid (DIAPA) are taken for the first time and their extinction molar coefficients (e.m.c.) are determined. Apparent stability constants of Pu(4) complexes with DIAPA with molar ratio of acid to metal of 1:1 and 2:1 are determined. It is as certained, that in the result of organic solution γ-irradiation Pu(4) does not change its valent state, but forms complexes with DIAPA. Radiation-chemical yield of these complexes formation G D practically does not differ from G D for Pu(4) dibutylphosphate complexes and makes up 1.0±0.2 molec./100 eV. It is shown, that coefficients of Pu(4) distribution between γ-irradiated TIAP solutions in n-dodecane and HNO 3 aqueous solutions (0.1 ml/l) linearly increase with E γ growth. Absorption spectrum configuration and e.m.c. values of Pu(4) organic solutions after fourfold re-extraction testify to the fact, that nonextractable Pu(4) constitutes complexes with DIAPA with molar ratio of acid to metal of 1:1 and 2:1

  12. Status of the solar and infrared radiation submodels in the LLNL 1-D and 2-D chemical-transport models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, K.E.; Taylor, K.E.; Ellis, J.S.; Wuebbles, D.J.

    1987-07-01

    The authors have implemented a series of state of the art radiation transport submodels in previously developed one dimensional and two dimensional chemical transport models of the troposphere and stratosphere. These submodels provide the capability of calculating accurate solar and infrared heating rates. They are a firm basis for further radiation submodel development as well as for studying interactions between radiation and model dynamics under varying conditions of clear sky, clouds, and aerosols. 37 refs., 3 figs

  13. Reduction of radiation effects by chemical protector (WR-2721)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.H.; Kim, Y.K.; Yun, T.K.; Koh, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    As a part studies on effect of radiation, the present report was carried out to evaluate the changes of leukocytes, lymphocytes percent of leukocytes and several organs in swiss webster (NIH-GP) mice by radiation protective agents prior to γ-ray exposure. The whole body irradiation after administration of a radiation protective agents was done in dose level of 25,50,100 and 300 rads by a single exposure of γ-ray delivered from 60 Co, source tele-irradiation unit at a dose rate of 100 rad/min. Mice of each experimental group were whole body γ-irradiated in plastic cage with special producted rotating machine. The radiation protective agent was employed WR-2721 and the amounts injected intraperitoneally were 400mg/kg of body weight. The leukocytes were counted with hemocytometer. Differential count of leukocytes was done with 200 cells every smear and lymphocyte percent of leukocyte were determined in relative proportion only. All major organ were examined grossly and weighted. After fixation with formalin solution, histo-pathological preparations were made for microscopical study. (Author)

  14. Survey of chemical speciation of trace elements using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    Information concerning the chemical state of trace elements in biological systems generally has not been available. Such information for toxic elements and metals in metalloproteins could prove extremely valuable in the elucidation of their metabolism and other biological processes. The shielding of core electrons by binding electrons affect the energy required for creating inner-shell holes. Furthermore, the molecular binding and the symmetry of the local environment of an atom affect the absorption spectrum in the neighborhood of the absorption edge. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) using synchrotron radiation excitation can be used to provide chemical speciation information for trace elements at concentrations as low as 10 ppM. The structure and position of the absorption curve in the region of an edge can yield vital data about the local structure and oxidation state of the trace element in question. Data are most easily interpreted by comparing the observed edge structure and position with those of model compounds of the element covering the entire range of possible oxidation states. Examples of such analyses are reviewed. 14 refs., 1 fig

  15. Chemical structure and physical properties of radiation-induced crosslinking of polytetrafluoroethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Akihiro; Ikeda, Shigetoshi; Katoh, Etsuko; Tabata, Yoneho

    2001-01-01

    The chemical structure and physical properties of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) that has been crosslinked by radiation have been studied by various methods. It has been found that a Y-type crosslinking structure and a Y-type structure incorporating a double bond (modified Y-type) is formed in PTFE by radiation-crosslinking in the molten state. In addition, various types of double bond structures, excluding the crosslinking site, have been identified. The crosslinked PTFE has a good light transparency due to the loss of crystallites, whilst it retains the excellent properties of electrical insulation and heat resistance. The coefficient of abrasion and the permanent creep are also greatly improved by crosslinking

  16. Effect of genes controlling radiation sensitivity on chemical mutagenesis in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, L.

    1975-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation, x radiation, nitrogen mustard, methyl methanesulfonate, and dimethyl sulfate were found to revert all the tester strains with the same efficiency or without any dependence on simple types of base-pair changes, and it was concluded that these mutagens were nonspecific in the types of base-pair changes produced. The cycl-131 tester was used in studies designed to determine the genetic control of mutation induction using a variety of mutagens. The rad 6 and rad g genes greatly reduce the frequency of chemically induced reversion of cycl-131

  17. Gas-phase hydrosilylation of cyclohexene in an experimental radiation-chemical accelerator apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecherkin, A.S.; Sidorov, V.I.; Chernyshev, E.A.

    1992-01-01

    A process for the synthesis of methylcyclohexyldichlorosilane (a basic monomer for the production of organosilicon photoresists) has been investigated and perfected on an experimental apparatus with an ELV-2 electron accelerator; this synthesis involves gas-phase radiation-induced hydrosilylation of cyclohexene by methyldichlorosilane. Basic characteristics of the yield of the desired product under static conditions were determined. With the help of experiments on the synthesis of methylcyclohexyldichlorosilane in a flow- through mode, the technical features of the process of radiation-chemical hydrosilylation of cyclohexene on an accelerator apparatus were determined and studied, the optimal conditions for the synthesis were determined, and an experimental batch of the desired product was produced

  18. physical, chemical, technological and biological properties of some mutant oil seeds induced by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, H.G.M.

    2003-01-01

    The present study has been undertaken to evaluated sesame, sunflower and safflower seeds induced by gamma rays, as plant breeding unit, plant research department, radioisotope application division, nuclear research center, atomic energy authority Inshas. the obtained results indicate the following : chemical composition of mutant seeds: the radiation mutation caused a significant increase in both oil and ash content total carbohydrates showed a significant decreased in sesame seeds. radiation mutation induced significant increase in oil and protein content of sunflower and safflower seeds. while the total carbohydrate showed a significant decrease. physiochemical properties of oils extracted mutant seeds: the radiation mutation had no real effect on the refractive index and A.V of oils extracted from control and mutant sesame, sunflower and safflower seeds. while it caused a slight increase in red color and P.V. of sesame oil, the thiobarbituric acid (TBA) value of mutant sesame oil was not alter upon radiation mutation, but it induced a slight decrease in TBA of mutant sunflower and safflower oils. the unsaponifiable matter percentage of oils extracted from mutant sesame, sunflower and safflower seeds were slightly increased by radiation mutation .radiation mutation of seeds had no real effect on the total SFA and USFA of sesame oil. however, radiation mutation induced a remarkable changes in fatty acid profiles of sunflower and safflower oil as total SFA decreased, while USFA increased. Uric acid was only detected in oil extracted from mutant sunflower seeds

  19. Radiation-dosimetry and chemical-toxicity considerations for 99Tc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, J.L.; Hayes, R.L.; Rafter, J.J.; Watson, E.E.; Carlton, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    Technetium-99 (T/sub 1/2/ = 2.13 x 10 5 y) is produced in the fission of 235 U and 239 Pu. Technitium-99 has been found to contaminate some areas of the uranium re-enrichment process. ICRP-30 Part 2 gives the Annual Limit on Intake (ALI) for 99 Tc as 2 x 10 8 Bq (5.4 mCi) for class D inhaled material (IC80). The ICRP states clearly that ALIs are based on radiation risk only and that chemical toxicity is not considered (IC79). No data were found on the chemical toxicity of 99 Tc, possibly because there are no stable isotopes of technetium with which to study the toxicity, although, because of its long T/sub 1/2/, 99 Tc can, for all practical purposes, be considered stable. The ALI values for 99 Tc are based on data obtained using high specific activity /sup 99m/Tc (T/sub 1/2/ = 6 h) and /sup 95m/Tc (T/sub 1/2/ = 61 days). Since the specific activities of 99 Tc and Na 99 TcO 4 are quite low (17 mCi/g and 9 mCi/g, respectively) and 99 Tc is available in abundant supply, we have attempted to assess the relative radiation and chemical hazards that are associated with this radionuclide. The approach in this study was (1) to study the effect of chemical dose on the whole body retention of 99 Tc sodium pertechnetate in rats and to relate these effects to the radiation dose and the ALI and (2) to compare the chemical toxicity of 99 Tc sodium pertechnetate with the ALI at different chemical dose levels

  20. Experimental radiation carcinogenesis is studies at NIRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sado, Toshihiko

    1992-01-01

    Experimental radiation carcinogenesis studies conducted during the past decade at NIRS are briefly reviewed. They include the following: 1) Age dependency of susceptibility to radiation carcinogenesis. 2) Radiation-induced myeloid leukemia. 3) Mechanism of fractionated X-irradiation (FX) induced thymic lymphomas. 4) Significance of radiation-induced immunosuppression in radiation carcinogenesis in vivo. 5) Other ongoing studies. (author)

  1. Radiation chemical effects of X-rays on liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holroyd, R.A.; Preses, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    This review describes some of the chemical changes induced by photoelectrons which are released in liquids when X-rays are absorbed. Both experimental studies and theory are discussed. In part 1, the basic processes occurring upon absorption of X-rays are described. Parts 2 and 3 deal with hydrocarbon liquids; in part 2 the ion yields, including effects at K-edges, and in part 3, the yields of excited states. Part 4 discusses chemical effects of X-rays in aqueous solutions. The authors end with a summary of future needs and directions

  2. Radiation chemical dosimetry by means of nitrate-nitrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tormo Ferrero, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    The different chemical systems used in dosimetry and the selection criteria for them are described. The general topics in dosimetry with alkali nitrates as well as the phenomena occurring in their radiolisis are also treated. The possibility of application in dosimetric areas useful in radiosterilization and industrial processes is studied too. (author) [es

  3. Radiation chemical dosimetry by means of nitrate-nitrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tormo Ferrero, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    The different chemical systems used in dosimetry and the selection criteria for them are described. The general topics in dosimetry with alkali nitrates as well as the phenomena occurring in their radiolysis are also treated. The possibility of application in dosimetric areas useful in radiosterilization and industrial processes is studied too. (Author) 22 refs

  4. A study of the ionizing radiation effect on some chemical changes in irradiated soy-bean flour, and its biological value assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tencheva, S.; Katsareva, Ts.

    1985-01-01

    The results of the assessment of a number of chemical indicators are presented, namely: formation of free radicals in defatted soy-bean flour irradiated with 10 kGy using EPR-spectrometry, alteration in the residual lipid fraction, estimated by the UV spectrometry and TB test. Assessment of the biological value of protein is done on the basis of the protein efficiency coefficient (PEC). For the purpose two kinds of synthetic diets, including 10% soy-bean protein, are employed. Growing rats of the Wistar line (body weight 55 g) are used in the experiment. The amino acid profile of irradiated and non-irradiated soy-bean flour is also outlined. The obtained results indicate that the amount of free radicals, found in soy-bean flour irradiated with dose 10 kGy,is approximately 11 times larger than in flour irradiated with 5 kGy. Changes in the UV spectrum of the lipid fraction are likewise disclosed

  5. Immunohistological studies in radiation proctitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honke, Yoshifumi; Katsuta, Shizutomo; Haruma, Ken

    1985-01-01

    Immunohistological studies of radiation proctitis were performed in comparison with those in control subjects, with special reference to the number of immunoglobulin bearing cells in the rectal mucosa. The results obtained were as follows: 1) The rates of distribution of immunoglobulin bearing cells were 16.9% in IgG, 71.7% in IgA, and 11.4% in IgM in control subjects. 2) The number of IgG bearing cells in acute and late radiation proctitis markedly decreased in comparison with those in control subjects. 3) The number of IgA bearing cells in the patients with acute radiation proctitis decreased slightly and recovere 1 in late phase. 4) The number of IgM bearing cells markedly decreased in 11 Gy to 30 Gy radiation group with acute phase. 5) No significant difference could be found in the number of immunoglobulin bearing cells in late radiation proctitis with and without rectal bleeding. 6) Serum immunoglobulin levels of patients with acute radiation proctitis decreased and were well correlated with change the number of immunoglobulin bearing cells. (author)

  6. Radiation-chemical formation of acids in polyvinyl butyral films with chlorinated additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriminiskaya, Z.K.

    1993-01-01

    Radiochromic indicators are commonly produced by reacting an indicator dye with an acid formed inside a polymer by irradiation. Halogenated and unhalogenated polymers were used, the latter containing halogenated organics. It was therefore of interest to study the formation of acid in polyvinyl butyral (PVD) with addition of a halogenated compound. Yields were measured of radiation-chemical acid formation in PVB films containing chloral hydrate and hexachloroethane. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  7. Effects of chemical sensitizers on gamma radiation processing of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The potential of gamma radiation processing in cross-linking natural rubber latex (NRL) for production of dipped goods has been studied. NRL produced in Ghana was irradiated to 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 kGy, respectively, in a Gamma Chamber of dose rate 0.65 kGy/h. Irradiation of the NRL was also carried out in the ...

  8. Parametric studies on automotive radiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliet, C.; Oliva, A.; Castro, J.; Perez-Segarra, C.D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a set of parametric studies performed on automotive radiators by means of a detailed rating and design heat exchanger model developed by the authors. This numerical tool has been previously verified and validated using a wide experimental data bank. A first part of the analysis focuses on the influence of working conditions on both fluids (mass flows, inlet temperatures) and the impact of the selected coolant fluid. Following these studies, the influence of some geometrical parameters is analysed (fin pitch, louver angle) as well as the importance of coolant flow lay-out on the radiator global performance. This work provides an overall behaviour report of automobile radiators working at usual range of operating conditions, while significant knowledge-based design conclusions have also been reported. The results show the utility of this numerical model as a rating and design tool for heat exchangers manufacturers, being a reasonable compromise between classic ε - NTU methods and CFD

  9. Radiation-chemical transformations of coumarins in ethanolic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samovich, S.N.; Brinkevich, S.D.; Edimecheva, I.P.; Shadyro, O.I.

    2014-01-01

    Effects of coumarin and its derivatives on product formation during radiolysis of deaerated and oxygenated ethanol were investigated. The data obtained in this study indicate that coumarin, 4-hydroxycoumarin and warfarin effectively oxidized α-hydroxyethyl radicals (α-HER), while esculetin and fraxetin predominantly reduced the above named intermediates. Coumarin, esculetin and fraxetin were able to add α-HER to the double carbon–carbon bond of the pyrone ring to form stable products with molecular masses exceeding those of the starting molecules. Coumarin, warfarin, esculetin and fraxetin were shown to display antioxidant activity during radiation-induced oxidation of ethanol. - Highlights: • Coumarin, 4-hydroxycoumarin and warfarin oxidize α-hydroxyethyl radicals. • Esculetin and fraxetin predominantly reduce α-hydroxyethyl radicals. • Coumarins add α-hydroxyethyl radicals to the C=C bonds of the pyrone ring. • Coumarins display antioxidant activity on radiation-induced oxidation of ethanol

  10. Radiation chemically induced telomerization of ethylene with selected telogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachtendunk, H.J. von.

    1975-01-01

    The suitability of different compounds for the use as telogenes in the telomerization of ethylene has been studied. In all cases the reactions are initiated by the γ-radiation of a 60 Co-source. Temperature programed gas chromatography has proved to be an adequate method of analysis. In the teleomerization process with ethylene also methane tri carboxylic acid tri-ethylene ester (MTE), ortho-formic acid tri-ethylene ester (o-ASE), formic acid, bromium cyane, chlorine cyane and dicyane have been used. The telomerization of MTE and ethylene has been performed successfully with a high yield. The dependence of the reaction on temperature, pressure, radiation dose has been studied as well as the influence of a solvent (acetonitrile). In the attempt to telomerize ortho-formic acid tri-ethylene ester only high molecular weight solid product could be isolated. No interpretable results could be obtained for the telomerization of formic acid with ethylene. In the case of the radiation induced telomerization of chlorine cyane or di-cyane with ethylene in the gas phase, no reaction products could be found. No telomerization between di-cyane and ethylene has been observed even when palladium (II)-cyanide is used as a catalyst of after cocatalys is with triphenyl-phosphile in acetonitrile. (orig./HK) [de

  11. Radiation-chemical behaviour of Rh(4) in perchlorate and nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirova, M.V.; Khalkina, E.V.

    1994-01-01

    Kinetic of rhodium(4) reduction in the process of radiolysis in solutions of perchloric (0.6-3.2 mol/l) and nitric (2-9 mol/l) acids with rhodium (4) concentration (0.4-5)x10 -3 mol/l has been studied. Irradiation of the solutions was carried out using a 60 Co source with dose rate of 3.5 Gy/s in the absorbed dose range up to 10 4 Gy. A mechanism of radiation-chemical reduction of rhodium(4) in perchloric and nitric acid solutions in suggested, the reason for high radiation-chemical yields of reduction is discussed. 7 refs.; 9 figs.; 2 tabs

  12. Oocyte toxicity: female germ-cell loss from radiation and chemical exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobson, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    In some mammals, female germ cells are extraordinarily sensitive to killing by exposure to ionizing radiation, especially during development. Immature oocytes, which constitute the lifetime germ-cell pool of the female, have an LD 50 in juvenile mice of only 6 rad (compared with typical LD 50 s of 100-300 rad for most other cell types studied). Essentially, the entire germ-cell supply in female squirrel monkeys is destroyed prenatally by exposure of only 0.7 rad/day. Severe but lesser destruction has been found in other species. However, evidence suggests (though not ruled out for all developmental stages) that unusually high sensitivity probably does not occur in the human female. Germ cells can also be killed by certain chemicals, and similarities exist between chemical and radiation effects. More than 75 compounds have been quantitatively studied in mice, with determination of OTI values (OTI = oocyte toxicity index = mouse LD 50 /oocyte LD 50 ) to measure the degree of preferential oocyte killing. High sensitivity in mice does not mean necessarily high sensitivity in women. Of special interest is the recent discovery that the lethal target in the extremely sensitive mouse immature oocyte is probably the plasma membrane, not DNA. Since mouse data form the main basis from which human genetic hazard (for both radiation and chemicals) is estimated, this has important implications for the determination of genetic risk in women

  13. Comparative efficiency of chemical and radiation mutagens on two Cicer arietinum Rhizobial strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khare, A K; Shinde, D A; Nayak, M L [Jawaharlal Nehru Krishi Vishwa Vidyalaya, Indore (India)

    1982-03-01

    A comparison of efficacy due to chemical and radiation mutagens on morphology, nutritional totipotence and symbiotic character of two Cicer arietinum rhizobia has been made. The mutants produced as a result of radiations (gamma and UV rays) differed from parents in that, the mutant colony size was bigger and gelatinase activity was higher. The mutants were not deficient nutritionally, had wider host range and the size and number of nodules produced were higher. Radiation mutagenic effects were more pronounced than chemical mutagens. The mutants derived from chemicals were not as efficient as radiation mutants although they were better than parents in total nodulation.

  14. Quantitative and qualitative changes in the lymphocytes of rats chronically exposed to radiation and chemical factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V.V.

    1986-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative characteristics of lymphocytes in peripheral blood, thymus and spleen of rats chronically exposed to combined external γ-radiation trichlorfon pesticide effect have been studied. It is shown that chronical combined trichlorfon and γ irradiation effect is accompanied by suppression of lymphopoiesis already at the early stages of the experience. The observed effects are formed depending on both daily and cumulative doses of the effect. The development of the combined effect is based on the summation of effects of chronical effect of ionizing radiation and pesticide. The revealed changes in lymphocytes population exposed to radiation and chemical factors can lead to substantial decrease of natural immunity thereby decreasing to various diseases

  15. Effect of electromagnetic radiation on the physico-chemical properties of minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez M, A.; Delgadillo G, J. A.; Vega C, H. R.

    2014-08-01

    The electromagnetic radiation effect represented by gamma rays was investigated through; chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (Sem) and magnetization when applied at a dose of 0.5704 Gy (0.5704 J/ kg) at a feed relation of 18.40 ± 1.13 mGy/ h., in different minerals; in order to characterize the impact of the same from 137 Cs in the physicochemical properties of these minerals. All the irradiated samples showed chemical stability at this stage undetectable other both in the XRD study and in the images analysis obtained by Sem; and at present almost the same chemical composition as the non-irradiated samples. So the same patterns of X-ray diffraction thereof, show a tendency to slightly lower the intensity of the most representative peaks of each mineral phase, which may be due to a decrease in crystallinity or preferential crystallographic orientation in crystals. In the micrographs analysis obtained by Sem on the irradiated samples, some holes (open pores) present in the particles were observed, mainly chalcopyrite and sphalerite lesser extent, seen this fact may be due to Compton Effect, in the radiation process. In relation to the magnetization property, a variation is obtained in the saturation magnetization (Ms) for the irradiated samples containing iron and more significantly in the chalcopyrite case. Therefore, with the radiation level used; slight changes occurring in the physical properties of minerals, whereas they remained stable chemically. These small changes may represent a signal that electromagnetic radiation applied at higher doses, is a viable option for improving the mineral processing. (author)

  16. Advanced Chemical Propulsion System Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portz, Ron; Alexander, Leslie; Chapman, Jack; England, Chris; Henderson, Scott; Krismer, David; Lu, Frank; Wilson, Kim; Miller, Scott

    2007-01-01

    A detailed; mission-level systems study has been performed to show the benefit resulting from engine performance gains that will result from NASA's In-Space Propulsion ROSS Cycle 3A NRA, Advanced Chemical Technology sub-topic. The technology development roadmap to accomplish the NRA goals are also detailed in this paper. NASA-Marshall and NASA-JPL have conducted mission-level studies to define engine requirements, operating conditions, and interfaces. Five reference missions have been chosen for this analysis based on scientific interest, current launch vehicle capability and trends in space craft size: a) GTO to GEO, 4800 kg, delta-V for GEO insertion only approx.1830 m/s; b) Titan Orbiter with aerocapture, 6620 kg, total delta V approx.210 m/s, mostly for periapsis raise after aerocapture; c) Enceladus Orbiter (Titan aerocapture) 6620 kg, delta V approx.2400 m/s; d) Europa Orbiter, 2170 kg, total delta V approx.2600 m/s; and e) Mars Orbiter, 2250 kg, total delta V approx.1860 m/s. The figures of merit used to define the benefit of increased propulsion efficiency at the spacecraft level include propulsion subsystem wet mass, volume and overall cost. The objective of the NRA is to increase the specific impulse of pressure-fed earth storable bipropellant rocket engines to greater than 330 seconds with nitrogen tetroxide and monomothylhydrazine propellants and greater than 335 , seconds with nitrogen tetroxide and hydrazine. Achievement of the NRA goals will significantly benefit NASA interplanetary missions and other government and commercial opportunities by enabling reduced launch weight and/or increased payload. The study also constitutes a crucial stepping stone to future development, such as pump-fed storable engines.

  17. Workstations studies and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahaye, T.; Donadille, L.; Rehel, J.L.; Paquet, F.; Beneli, C.; Cordoliani, Y.S.; Vrigneaud, J.M.; Gauron, C.; Petrequin, A.; Frison, D.; Jeannin, B.; Charles, D.; Carballeda, G.; Crouail, P.; Valot, C.

    2006-01-01

    This day on the workstations studies for the workers follow-up, was organised by the research and health section. Devoted to the company doctors, for the competent persons in radiation protection, for the engineers of safety, it presented examples of methodologies and applications in the medical, industrial domain and the research, so contributing to a better understanding and an application of regulatory measures. The analysis of the workstation has to allow a reduction of the exposures and the risks and lead to the optimization of the medical follow-up. The agenda of this day included the different subjects as follow: evolution of the regulation in matter of demarcation of the regulated zones where the measures of workers protection are strengthened; presentation of the I.R.S.N. guide of help to the realization of a workstation study; implementation of a workstation study: case of radiology; the workstation studies in the research area; Is it necessary to impose the operational dosimetry in the services of radiodiagnostic? The experience feedback of a competent person in radiation protection (P.C.R.) in a hospital environment; radiation protection: elaboration of a good practices guide in medical field; the activities file in nuclear power plant: an evaluation tool of risks for the prevention. Methodological presentation and examples; insulated workstation study; the experience feedback of a provider; Contribution of the ergonomics to the determiners characterization in the ionizing radiation exposure situations;The workstations studies for the internal contamination in the fuel cycle facilities and the consideration of the results in the medical follow-up; R.E.L.I.R. necessity of workstation studies; the consideration of the human factor. (N.C.)

  18. Radiation chemical route for preparation of metal nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapoor, S.; Mukherjee, T.

    2006-01-01

    Nanoparticles show properties that are neither seen in the bulk or at atomic level. The unusual properties are governed by quantum size effect. Due to this various methodologies have been endeavored to control the size of the particles. In the present work we show the use of two complimentary techniques (radiation and photo) to synthesize and control the size of the metal particles. In-situ synthesis of fine silver, thallium and cadmium particles has been carried out by gamma-irradiation and electron pulse irradiation at room temperature in the pre-organized gel of polyacrylamide or cyclodextrin cavity. The role of generation of nuclei in high concentrations in stabilization of metal nanoparticles in hydrophobic cavity is shown. Similarly the importance of entrapment of metal ions in the polymer matrix during its formation is highlighted. The work is further extended to exploit the microemulsion droplets for stabilization of Cd nanoparticles. Utility of pulse radiolysis in probing the mechanism of the formation of metal nanoparticles is also shown. Ultrafast laser pulses were employed to control the morphology of the pre-prepared Pt nanoparticles. The changes in reduction of shape and size are considered to occur through melting and vaporization of the nanoparticles. Pt nanoparticles were coated on the inner walls of the tubular pyrex reactor and tested for their catalytic activity for oxidation of CO. It was observed that Pt nanoparticles prepared in the presence of a stabilizer (gelatin) showed a higher tendency to adhere to the inner walls of the pyrex reactor as compared to that prepared in the presence of silica nanoparticles. The catalyst was found to be active at ≥150 degree C giving CO 2 . Chemically reduced Pt nanoparticles stabilized on silica nanoparticles gave ∼7% CO conversion per hr. However, radiolytically prepared Pt nanoaprticles stabilized by gelatin gave ∼10% conversion per hr. The data indicates that catalytic oxidation of CO takes place

  19. Chemical effects and their consequences for individuals occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvador, C.; Kahl, G.G.; Kühn, P.; Zottis, A.D.; Flôr, R.C.

    2017-01-01

    By legal determination, workers exposed to ionizing radiation should use individual dosimeters in the most exposed region of the body, designed to estimate the effective dose, as well as radiation protective clothing to minimize occupational exposures. Regarding dosimetry, in most cases it is perceived that the monthly values of exposure are within the limits of normality, however, even being below the limit can not rule out the possibility of damage that the low dose of ionizing radiation can cause. The objective of this article is to highlight the main chemical effects caused by exposure to ionizing radiation, especially biochemical damage in DNA, chromosomal aberrations and the correlation with the exposure of occupationally exposed individuals, as well as individuals from the public. A bibliographic search was carried out in indexed databases from February to April 2017 with the following descriptors: Radiation Ionizing, DNA Damage and Occupational Exposure. In the 'Science Direct' database were found 1205 articles, in the 'Scopus' 19 articles, in the 'Web of Science' 83 articles, in the 'PubMed' 22 articles and in the 'VHL' 60 articles related to the theme. It was concluded that exposure to ionizing radiation can affect the DNA molecule despite its repair mechanisms, which may result in genotoxicity. It has been reported a correlation between occupationally exposed individuals and chromosomal aberrations, demonstrating that even low doses of ionizing radiation can compromise the genetic material integrity of exposed workers, leading to the need for a periodic cytogenetic study for this group of workers

  20. Radiation-chemical oxidation of neptunium in perchloric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shilov, V.P.; Gusev, Yu.K.; Pikaev, A.K.; Stepanova, E.S.; Krot, N.N.

    1979-01-01

    The γ-radiation effect (at a dose rate of 5x10 16 eV/mlxs) on 1x10 -3 Np(6) and Np(5) perchloric acid solutions is studied. The output of Np(6) loss in aerated 0.001-0.005M HClO 4 solutions was 2.4 ions/100 eV. The output of Np(5) loss in solutions saturated with nitrous oxide was 2.1 ions/100 eV at pH-4. In aerated 0.1-1.0 M HClO 4 solutions in presence of XeO 4 the output of Np(5) loss grows from 6.6 to 13.5 ions/100 eV as (XeO 3 ) 0 increases from 1x10 -3 to 2x10 -2 M. Possible process mechanisms have been proposed

  1. The ionising radiation effect on physico-chemical properties of organosilicon oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnopyorova, A.P.

    1998-01-01

    The physico-chemical characteristics of organosilicon oils, as dielectric constant, viscosity, and refractive index, have been measured before and after the gamma irradiation with the doses of 10 3 to 10 6 Gray. The organosilicons studied were PMS-1, PMS-5, PMS-VV, and PMFS. All the measurements were performed with 60 Co in open test tubes as a source of gamma radiation. The structure modifications in oil molecules depending on irradiation dose have been studied with IR spectrometry. When comparing the main characteristics of the studied organosilicons before and after the irradiation one may arrange them into the following sequence with the increasing of their resistance to the gamma radiation: PMS-VV 6 GRay. For the liquids PMS-1 and PMS-VV it is found that the increasing of their viscosity with the dose absorbed obeys exponential law: ν ν 0 exp (K γ .D), where ν 0 and ν are the viscosities of the sample before and after the irradiation, respectively; D is the absorbed radiation dose; K γ is the radiation damage factor. (author)

  2. Contribution to radiation-chemically catalyzed hydroformylation of butenes in the presence of metal carbonyls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joosten, L.

    1976-01-01

    In this paper a study is presented of the influence of gamma-radiation on the catalytic hydroformylation of olefines. As model olefines buten-1 and buten-2 as well as their mixtures have been used together with the catalysts di-cobalt octacarbonyle and rhodium (I) tristri phenyl-phosphine carbonyle hydride. In addition the catalytic activity of the VI. side group carbonyles Cr(CO) 6 , Mo(CO) 6 and W(CO) 6 has been studied under radiation chemical conditions. For this purpose a mixture of olefine, solvent (cyclo hexane) and calalyst has been pressurized and processed in a mixing autoklave together with a Co and H 2 (1:1) mixture, variing the reaction variables within certain limits. (orig.) [de

  3. Radiation damages in chemical components of organic scintillator detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes Neto, Jose Maria

    2003-01-01

    Samples containing PPO (1%, g/ml), diluted in toluene, they were irradiated in a 60 Co irradiator (6.46 kGy/h) at different doses. The PPO concentration decay bi-exponentially with the dose, generating the degradation products: benzoic acid, benzamide and benzilic alcohol. The liquid scintillator system was not sensitive to the radiation damage until 20 kGy. Otherwise, the pulse height analysis showed that dose among 30 to 40 kGy generate significant loss of quality of the sensor (liquid scintillating) and the light yield was reduced in half with the dose of (34.04 ± 0.80) kGy. This value practically was confirmed by the photo peak position analysis that resulted D 1/2 = (31.7 ± 1,4) kGy, The transmittance, at 360 nm, of the irradiated solution decreased exponentially. The compartmental model using five compartments (fast decay PPO, slow decay PPO, benzamide, benzoic acid and benzilic alcohol) it was satisfactory to explain the decay of the PPO in its degradation products in function of the dose. The explanation coefficient r 2 = 0.985636 assures that the model was capable to explain 98.6% of the experimental variations. The Target Theory together with the Compartmental Analysis showed that PPO irradiated in toluene solution presents two sensitive molecular diameters both of them larger than the true PPO diameter. >From this analysis it showed that the radiolytic are generated, comparatively, at four toluene molecules diameter far from PPO molecules. For each one PPO-target it was calculated the G parameter (damage/100 eV). For the target expressed by the fast decay the G value was (418.4 ± 54.1) damages/100 eV, and for the slow decay target the G value was (54.5 ± 8.9) damages/100 eV. The energies involved in the chemical reactions were w (0.239 ± 0.031) eV/damage (fast decay) and w = (1 834 ± 0.301) eV/damage (slow decay). (author)

  4. Estimation of Radiative Efficiency of Chemicals with Potentially Significant Global Warming Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betowski, Don; Bevington, Charles; Allison, Thomas C

    2016-01-19

    Halogenated chemical substances are used in a broad array of applications, and new chemical substances are continually being developed and introduced into commerce. While recent research has considerably increased our understanding of the global warming potentials (GWPs) of multiple individual chemical substances, this research inevitably lags behind the development of new chemical substances. There are currently over 200 substances known to have high GWP. Evaluation of schemes to estimate radiative efficiency (RE) based on computational chemistry are useful where no measured IR spectrum is available. This study assesses the reliability of values of RE calculated using computational chemistry techniques for 235 chemical substances against the best available values. Computed vibrational frequency data is used to estimate RE values using several Pinnock-type models, and reasonable agreement with reported values is found. Significant improvement is obtained through scaling of both vibrational frequencies and intensities. The effect of varying the computational method and basis set used to calculate the frequency data is discussed. It is found that the vibrational intensities have a strong dependence on basis set and are largely responsible for differences in computed RE values.

  5. Radiation-induced cancers in the rat, an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, M.; Lafuma, J.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation carcinogenesis at low doses raises a major radiological protection problem; we have attempted to deal with it through animal investigations involving over 3,000 rats. For various radiation types, dose-effect relationships as well as possible synergies with endogenous or exogenous chemical factors were studied. The chief problem being the possibility of extrapolation to man, a comparison was made between man and rat with the only human data available from radon inhalation in uranium miners [fr

  6. Radiation-induced cancers in the rat, an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, M.; Lafuma, J.

    1988-09-01

    Radiation carcinogenesis at low doses raises a major radiological protection problem; we have attempted to deal with it through animal investigations involving over 3,000 rats. For various radiation types, dose-effect relationships as well as possible synergies with endogenous or exogenous chemical factors were studied. The chief problem being the possibility of extrapolation to man, a comparison was made between man and rat with the only human data available from radon inhalation in uranium miners [fr

  7. Double stratification effects in chemically reactive squeezed Sutterby fluid flow with thermal radiation and mixed convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ahmad

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A current analysis is carried out to study theoretically the mixed convection characteristics in squeezing flow of Sutterby fluid in squeezed channel. The constitutive equation of Sutterby model is utilized to characterize the rheology of squeezing phenomenon. Flow characteristics are explored with dual stratification. In flowing fluid which contains heat and mass transport, the first order chemical reaction and radiative heat flux affect the transport phenomenon. The systems of non-linear governing equations have been modulating which then solved by mean of convergent approach (Homotopy Analysis Method. The graphs are reported and illustrated for emerging parameters. Through graphical explanations, drag force, rate of heat and mass transport are conversed for different pertinent parameters. It is found that heat and mass transport rate decays with dominant double stratified parameters and chemical reaction parameter. The present two-dimensional examination is applicable in some of the engineering processes and industrial fluid mechanics. Keywords: Squeezing flow, Sutterby fluid model, Mixed convection, Double stratification, Thermal radiation, Chemical reaction

  8. The Dow Chemical Company's synchrotron radiation effort - A case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubeck, R.A.; Bare, S.R.; DeKoven, B.M.; Heaney, M.D.; Rudolf, P.R.

    1994-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is used in a broad array of technologies to study everything from molecular orientation at interfaces, through the structure of active catalyst phases. It is also a key to understanding structure-property relationships and providing fundamental information in polymers, ceramics, and other materials. The Dow Synchrotron User group, formed in 1991, has developed a long-term plan for effective utilization of synchrotron technology. The current efforts at Brookhaven National Lab. and Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source are examined, as will the long-term commitment at the Advanced Photon Source. Current examples included are in-situ studies of polymer processing, surface and interfaces characterization, and real-time deformation studies. The APS is one of only three open-quotes Third Generationclose quotes synchrotron sources that are planned world-wide, the others being in France and Japan. With a scheduled completion date of mid-1995, the APS has remained both on-budget and ahead-of-schedule since ground-breaking in the spring of 1990. The DuPont - Northwestern University - Dow Collaborative Access Team (DND-CAT) is the first CAT to successfully pass all the necessary hurdles before beamline construction can begin. Some of the goals of the DND-CAT program are mentioned, together with the strengths of this unique collaborative effort

  9. Treatment of wastewater and sludge, and decomposition of endocrine disrupting chemicals with radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Hisaaki

    2006-01-01

    This country report describes the past and current research activities in Japan on radiation treatment of wastewater and sludge carried out by early 90s, and decomposition of endocrine disrupting chemicals that is going-on. (author)

  10. Chemical stability of fluorine-containing coatings of cold drying for radiation - protection technique articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigorina, I.I.; Zvyagintseva, N.V.; Egorov, B.N.

    1977-01-01

    The chemical stability of fluorolon coatings, which are not subjected to heat treatment or hot drying during application, has been studied. The test for layer life-time has been performed by submerging specimens in agressive medium. The time for one upper removable layer to fail under steady action of agressive liquid is found to be: > 12 months at 20 deg C, 6-9 months at 40 deg C; at 60 deg C the time of layer stability depends upon medium: 1 month for nitric, 2 months for acetic, 2-3 months for sulphuric and hydrochloric acid. The coatings are recommended for practical application in radiation-protective technique

  11. Radiation toxicity studies in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, T.E.; Carnes, B.A.; Duggal, K.

    1985-01-01

    These studies provide data that identify tissue sensitivities, target organs, disease processes, life shortening values, and mortality rates that result from continuous and terminated exposures to whole-body radiations and relate them to various total doses and dose rates. The data from protracted exposures given at rates between 3.8 and 26.3 cGys per day show that the life shortening and numbers of fatal tumors are determined by total dose when the irradiation is terminated at total doses between 450 and 3000 cGys. 4 refs

  12. Impact of radiation treatment on chemical, biochemical and sensory properties, and microbiological quality of mackerel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinter, Nino; Maltar-Strmečki, Nadica; Kozačinski, Lidija; Njari, Bela; Cvrtila Fleck, Željka

    2015-12-01

    The effect of gamma radiation on shelf-life of mackerel (Scomber scombrus) was studied. Changes in raw fish stored at 4 °C were investigated simultaneously, by performing sensory evaluation, chemical analysis (pH value and NH3 concentration), and biochemical analyses of histamine concentration and microbiological quality. Analyses showed that preservation by gamma irradiation prolonged the freshness and sustainability without any unintended sensory changes. Furthermore, increasing the dose during the 10 days of storage considerably reduced the concentration of histamine, but only slightly reduced the concentration of ammonia (NH3). Bacterial examinations showed that gamma radiation decreased the total number of bacteria. Our results indicated that the shelf-life of mackerel stored at 4 °C can be prolonged by irradiation with a dose of 3 kGy.

  13. Functional status of liverin conditions of radiation and chemical exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Severynovs’ka

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic influences of low-intensity X-rays in doses of 0.15 and 0.25 Gr and mix of heavy metals salts in a dose of 2 EPC (extreme permissible concentrations for each metal, as a single factor or as a combination of factors, on the state of pro-/antioxidative system in a rat liver have been studied. Analysis of the data concerning combined influences allows to conclude that effects under these doses have some differences: a splash of processes of lipid peroxidation are observed in both causes, but under the lower dose an additivity takes place, and under the dose of 0.25 Gr a synergism of the agent effects in relation to the development of peroxidative reactions is registered. The results testify that technogenic contamination of water with heavy metals worsens the action of radiation factor, specifically, eliminates a hormetic splash of antioxidative activity at 0.15 Gr. Biochemical indexes of the liver activity, as a central organ of a general metabolism, and a structure of morbidity have been studied in liquidators of the Chernobyl accident from industrial Prydnieprovie region. Disturbances of liver functions have been shown, especially in persons obtained the exposure dose about 0.25 Gr. A comparison of these results and data of tests with laboratory animals reveals their mutual accordance and supports a relevancy of extrapolation of data of model experiments on a person health state, which undergone a similar influence.

  14. Physico-chemical effects of electron beam radiation on polypropylene film and its polyphenolic antioxydant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aymes-Chodur, C.; Legendre, B.; Yagoubi, N.; Betz, N.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Even though plastics are widely used in various industrial applications, problems have occurred concerning the quality of the packaged products, due to the presence of potentially toxic additives that can migrate out of the polymer and thus contaminate the surrounding medium. This phenomenon is due to the fact that the additives are only mixed with the polymer powder before the plastic is molded, and as no chemical bond keeps them into the polymer matrix, additives are able to migrate as the plastic ages. In order to avoid this phenomenon, which can lead to the rejection of biomaterials, or food or drugs contamination problems, we intend to graft the additives into the polymer matrix by means of ionizing radiation. Indeed, previous studies have shown that radiation induces the formation of free radicals and hydroperoxides that can react with monomers to create covalent bonds. Our work deals with electron beam irradiation of polypropylene (PP) containing a known concentration of Irganox 1010, a polyphenolic antioxidant. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) measurements have been performed in order to evaluate the behavior of the additives under ionizing radiation, but the polymer matrix must also be characterized as a function of the absorbed radiation dose. This present study gives FTIR, high temperature size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results performed on both PP and Irganox 1010. They evidence the formation of oxidative groups such as free alcohols and hydroperoxides, and the formation of double bonds in the PP. SEC results highlight the scission of the polymer chains correlated to the degradation of the crystalline domains observed by DSC. Those physico-chemical modifications must be characterized for the understanding of the grafting and before the antioxidant activity is evaluated

  15. Acclimation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to ultraviolet radiation and its impact on chemical toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkaric, Muris; Xiao, Mao [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Behra, Renata [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Eggen, Rik I.L., E-mail: rik.eggen@eawag.ch [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Systematic study of UVR acclimation and its impact on chemical toxicity in C. reinhardtii. • UVR acclimation is mediated through fast and reversible physiological defense mechanisms. • Pigment analysis suggests a role of lutein in UVR acclimation. • Co-tolerance to rose bengal suggests a role of singlet oxygen defense in UVR acclimation. • Knowledge on the toxic mechanism of chemicals needed to predict co-tolerance. - Abstract: The toxicity of chemical pollutants can be modulated under stressful environmental conditions, such as increased temperature, salinity or ultraviolet radiation (UVR), due to the interaction of effects during simultaneous stressor exposure. However, organisms may acclimate to such conditions by activation of physiological and biochemical defence mechanisms. In sequential exposures, organisms acclimated to environmental stressors may display an increased sensitivity or co-tolerance towards chemical pollutants. It has been suggested that co-tolerance might be expected for similarly acting stressors due to common defence mechanisms. To test this for combinations of UVR and chemical stressors, we first acclimatized the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to UVR and subsequently compared the sensitivity of UVR pre-exposed and control algae towards chemicals. Selected chemicals all act on photosynthesis and thus share a common physiological target, but display distinct toxicity mechanisms. Results showed that UVR pre-exposure for four days partially inhibited algal growth and photosynthesis, but also increased algal tolerance to higher UVR levels, confirming UVR acclimation. HPLC analysis of algal pigments indicated that UVR acclimation might in part be explained by the protective function of lutein while the contribution of UVR absorbing compounds was less clear. Challenge exposure to chemicals in the absence of UVR showed that acclimated algae were co-tolerant to the photosensitizer rose bengal, but not to the

  16. Acclimation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to ultraviolet radiation and its impact on chemical toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korkaric, Muris; Xiao, Mao; Behra, Renata; Eggen, Rik I.L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Systematic study of UVR acclimation and its impact on chemical toxicity in C. reinhardtii. • UVR acclimation is mediated through fast and reversible physiological defense mechanisms. • Pigment analysis suggests a role of lutein in UVR acclimation. • Co-tolerance to rose bengal suggests a role of singlet oxygen defense in UVR acclimation. • Knowledge on the toxic mechanism of chemicals needed to predict co-tolerance. - Abstract: The toxicity of chemical pollutants can be modulated under stressful environmental conditions, such as increased temperature, salinity or ultraviolet radiation (UVR), due to the interaction of effects during simultaneous stressor exposure. However, organisms may acclimate to such conditions by activation of physiological and biochemical defence mechanisms. In sequential exposures, organisms acclimated to environmental stressors may display an increased sensitivity or co-tolerance towards chemical pollutants. It has been suggested that co-tolerance might be expected for similarly acting stressors due to common defence mechanisms. To test this for combinations of UVR and chemical stressors, we first acclimatized the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to UVR and subsequently compared the sensitivity of UVR pre-exposed and control algae towards chemicals. Selected chemicals all act on photosynthesis and thus share a common physiological target, but display distinct toxicity mechanisms. Results showed that UVR pre-exposure for four days partially inhibited algal growth and photosynthesis, but also increased algal tolerance to higher UVR levels, confirming UVR acclimation. HPLC analysis of algal pigments indicated that UVR acclimation might in part be explained by the protective function of lutein while the contribution of UVR absorbing compounds was less clear. Challenge exposure to chemicals in the absence of UVR showed that acclimated algae were co-tolerant to the photosensitizer rose bengal, but not to the

  17. Impact of chemical reaction in fully developed radiated mixed convective flow between two rotating disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, T.; Khan, M. Waleed Ahmed; Khan, M. Ijaz; Waqas, M.; Alsaedi, A.

    2018-06-01

    Flow of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) viscous fluid between two rotating disks is modeled. Angular velocities of two disks are different. Flow is investigated for nonlinear mixed convection. Heat transfer is analyzed for nonlinear thermal radiation and heat generation/absorption. Chemical reaction is also implemented. Convective conditions of heat and mass transfer are studied. Transformations used lead to reduction of PDEs into the ODEs. The impacts of important physical variables like Prandtl number, Reynold number, Hartman number, mixed convection parameter, chemical reaction and Schmidt number on velocities, temperature and concentration are elaborated. In addition velocity and temperature gradients are physically interpreted. Our obtained results indicate that radial, axial and tangential velocities decrease for higher estimation of Hartman number.

  18. Double stratification effects in chemically reactive squeezed Sutterby fluid flow with thermal radiation and mixed convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S.; Farooq, M.; Javed, M.; Anjum, Aisha

    2018-03-01

    A current analysis is carried out to study theoretically the mixed convection characteristics in squeezing flow of Sutterby fluid in squeezed channel. The constitutive equation of Sutterby model is utilized to characterize the rheology of squeezing phenomenon. Flow characteristics are explored with dual stratification. In flowing fluid which contains heat and mass transport, the first order chemical reaction and radiative heat flux affect the transport phenomenon. The systems of non-linear governing equations have been modulating which then solved by mean of convergent approach (Homotopy Analysis Method). The graphs are reported and illustrated for emerging parameters. Through graphical explanations, drag force, rate of heat and mass transport are conversed for different pertinent parameters. It is found that heat and mass transport rate decays with dominant double stratified parameters and chemical reaction parameter. The present two-dimensional examination is applicable in some of the engineering processes and industrial fluid mechanics.

  19. Comparison between cytogenetic damage induced in human lymphocytes by environmental chemicals or radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebulska-Wasilewska, A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    Author compared cytogenetic effects of chemicals (benzene and the member at benzene related compounds) and ionizing radiation on the human lymphocytes. Levels of various types of cytogenetic damage observed among people from petroleum plants workers groups are similar to the levels of damages detected in the blood of people suspected of the accidental exposure to a radiation source

  20. Comparison between cytogenetic damage induced in human lymphocytes by environmental chemicals or radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebulska-Wasilewska, A.

    1997-01-01

    Author compared cytogenetic effects of chemicals (benzene and the member at benzene related compounds) and ionizing radiation on the human lymphocytes. Levels of various types of cytogenetic damage observed among people from petroleum plants workers groups are similar to the levels of damages detected in the blood of people suspected of the accidental exposure to a radiation source

  1. Estimation of the effects of chemical mutagens: lessons from radiation genetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, S.; Calfornia Univ., Los Angeles

    1975-01-01

    Years of work with ionizing radiations have produced a wealth of data on radiation-induced mutations. These data, which have given insights regarding the mutational processes, should form the background for all mutagenesis work. In chemical mutagenesis, as in radiation mutagenesis, it is important to know the shape of the dose-effect curve in order to make further interpretations and calculations. It is also important to be on the constant alert for new relations that can be explored

  2. Physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation, application for conservation of food products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    1986-01-01

    The author sets about ''defining the parameters'' and ''describing the systems'' by means of which ionizing radiation can be used to conserve food products and make them more healthy. After defining the different types of radiation, he goes on to examine interactions between these types of radiation and the food to be processed, including the chemical reactions caused by the ionization and excitation processes [fr

  3. An investigation of the interactions of low doses of ionising radiation and chemical pollutants on Artemia Salina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danova, D.; Benova, K.; Hromada, R.; Falis, M.; Dvorak, P.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear reactor failures present a risk of global contamination which can be affected by other environmental factors, such as chemicals. The present study has investigated the effect of low doses of gamma radiation in relation to the presence of low doses of Cr and Cd. (authors)

  4. Molecular activation analysis for chemical speciation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai-Chifang

    1998-01-01

    The term of Molecular Activation Analysis (MAA) refers to an activation analysis method that is able to provide information about the chemical species of elements in system of interests, though its definition has remained to be assigned. Its development is strongly stimulated by the urgent need to know the chemical species of elements, because the total concentrations are often without any meaning when assessing health or environmental risks of trace elements.In practice, the MAA is a combination of conventional instrumental or radiochemical activation analysis and physical, chemical or biochemical separation techniques. The MAA is able to play a particular role in speciation studies. However, the critical point in the MAA is that it is not permitted to change the primitive chemical species of elements in systems, or the change has to be under control; in the meantime it is not allowed to form the 'new artifact' originally not present in systems. Some practical examples of MAA for chemical species research performed recently in our laboratory will be presented as follows: Chemical species of platinum group elements in sediment; Chemical species of iodine in marine algae; Chemical species of mercury in human tissues; Chemical species of selenium in corn; Chemical species of rare earth elements in natural plant, etc. The merits and limitations of MAA will be described as well. (author)

  5. Inferences from the collaboration in the field of pharmaco-chemical protection and treatment of radiation injury according to the 'Intercosmos' program. Study of new prophylactic and therapeutic agents to manage radiation disease from protracted exposure. Topic 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogozkin, D D [Institut Biofiziki, Moscow (USSR)

    1976-01-01

    Primary consideration was given to agents promoting general systemic resistance. In short-term or protracted irradiation experiments, confirmatory evidence was obtained for antiradiation effects produced by amitetravit, urease, and yeast polysaccharides. On Ehrlich ascites tumor cells and lymphosarcoma cells, exogenous DNA was shown to enhance repair of the DNA molecule, even with regard to double-strand breaks. Usefulness of serum globulins as an antiradiation agent was substantiated in acute experiments on rabbits, where survival of animals was seen to rise and natural immunity factors to be normalized and stimulated. A similar favorable effect of serum globulins was demonstrated on hemopoiesis in mice, where incidence of autoinfections was also decreased. Studies are continuing to elucidate mechanisms underlying hemopoiesis protection by hypoxic hypoxia and hypoxic hypothermy in mice. Minimum amounts of protective preparations needed to produce an appreciable effect on mouse stem cells were determined. ATP and noradrenalin were found to act largely through their influence on blood formation.

  6. Studies of radiation effects on allopathic formulations for cancer management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varshney, L; Choughule, S V; Dodke, P B; Jothish, P K [International Standard Orthopedic Measurements Education and Development (ISOMED), Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2005-07-01

    In the present study, two anticancer drugs, Cyclophosphamide and Doxorubucin Hydrochloride have been investigated. The results of various physico-chemical tests on unirradiated and irradiated drugs indicate possibility of use of lower radiation doses and cryo-irradiation in case of sterilization of Cyclophosphamide. Doxorubcin Hydrochloride could be sterilized at 25 kGy without any significant changes in its physico-chemical properties. HPLC studies reveal formation of several trace level degradation products in irradiated cyclophosphamide. HPLC/MS studies revealed that higher and lower molecular weight products of the original molecules are formed on irradiation. Although, no significant changes are observed in absolute purity values, a little discolouration and formation of degradation products in Cyclophosphamide are the main impediments in acceptability of radiation sterilization. On the other hand, orange-red coloured Doxorubicin Hydrochloride did not show any such changes and could be radiation sterilized at normal sterilization dose of 25 kGy. (author)

  7. Studies of radiation effects on allopathic formulations for cancer management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varshney, L.; Choughule, S.V.; Dodke, P.B.; Jothish, P.K.

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, two anticancer drugs, Cyclophosphamide and Doxorubucin Hydrochloride have been investigated. The results of various physico-chemical tests on unirradiated and irradiated drugs indicate possibility of use of lower radiation doses and cryo-irradiation in case of sterilization of Cyclophosphamide. Doxorubcin Hydrochloride could be sterilized at 25 kGy without any significant changes in its physico-chemical properties. HPLC studies reveal formation of several trace level degradation products in irradiated cyclophosphamide. HPLC/MS studies revealed that higher and lower molecular weight products of the original molecules are formed on irradiation. Although, no significant changes are observed in absolute purity values, a little discolouration and formation of degradation products in Cyclophosphamide are the main impediments in acceptability of radiation sterilization. On the other hand, orange-red coloured Doxorubicin Hydrochloride did not show any such changes and could be radiation sterilized at normal sterilization dose of 25 kGy. (author)

  8. The chemical basis of DNA damage by the direct pathway of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Kiran Kumar K.

    2013-01-01

    Free radicals in living system has been implicated as playing a major role in the etiology of variety of diseases. The mechanism of free radicals in vivo involves predominantly the reaction with the DNA, producing different types of damage to the DNA. These lesions induced to the DNA could lead to mutation and even cell death. Radiolysis techniques, which uses ionizing radiation has proven to be one of the most advanced and excellent tool for studying the free radical reaction mechanisms as it can produce a host of well characterized free radicals. The effects of ionizing radiation on DNA have been studied for many years. Ionizing radiation interacts with DNA in vivo by two pathways, direct and indirect. The indirect accounts for 50-60% while the direct effect accounts for 40-50%. The chemical mechanism of the former reaction arising mainly from the reactive species produced by radiolysis of water has been extensively studied, however with respect to the later pathway, which creates holes and electrons to the DNA molecule using DNA films and crystals is an active area of research as both the pathways plays important roles in DNA damage in vivo particularly in chromosomal DNA which are tightly bound with histones and compartmentalized

  9. Radiation-induced free radicals in DNA studied by electron paramagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graeslund, A.

    1974-01-01

    Radiation biology aims at an understanding of the effects of radiation on biological material. The studied systems may vary in complexity and size from a whole organism to the molecular constituents of a cell. The observed effects are accordingly varied, from visible somatic effects on the organism to physico-chemical molecular changes. Radiation biophysics may be considered as a specialized branch of radiation biology, dealing with physical aspects of radiation damage, particularly at a molecular or sub-cellular level. The work to be presented here is in the field of radiation biophysics, and concerns physical studies of radiation effects on deoxyribonucleic acid, DNA, the hereditary substance of all living organisms. (author)

  10. Study of biological effect of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guisheng

    1992-01-01

    The some progress on the study of biological effect for protract exposure to low dose rate radiation is reported, and it is indicated that the potential risk of this exposure for the human health and the importance of the routine monitoring of radiation dose for various nuclear installations. The potential exposure to the low dose rate radiation would attract people's extra attention

  11. Radiation studies in the antiproton source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, M.

    1990-01-01

    Experiment E760 has a lead glass (Pb-G) calorimeter situated in the antiproton source tunnel in the accumulator ring at location A50. This location is exposed to radiation from several sources during antiproton stacking operations. A series of radiation studies has been performed over the last two years to determine the sources of this radiation and as a result, some shielding has been installed in the antiproton source in order to protect the lead glass from radiation damage

  12. Experimental Study on radiation myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Itsuo; Matsushima, Hideno; Yamada, Teruyo

    1979-01-01

    Experimental radiation myelopathy was carried out useing rats. This studies were done refering the effect to skin, the body weight, the status of the paralysis and the capillary densities of the cervical cords. The quadriplegia was seen on the animals which were irradiated over 4000 rad. The vacuoal degeneration was observed on the cervical cords which were irradiated over 4000 rad. The capillary densities of gray matter and white matter decreased finally in proportions to the irradiation dose. The vacuoal degeneration was recognized on the cervical cord in which the capillary density decreased to under 70 per cent of normal density. Decrease of the capillary density is seemed to be the one of the cause of the paralysis. (author)

  13. Development of a global 1-D chemically radiatively coupled model and an introduction to the development of a chemically coupled General Circulation Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyoshi, H.

    1997-01-01

    A global one-dimensional, chemically and radiatively coupled model has been developed. The basic concept of the coupled model, definition of globally averaged zenith angles, the formulation of the model chemistry, radiation, the coupled processes, and profiles and diurnal variations of temperature and chemical species at a normal steady state are presented. Furthermore, a suddenly doubled CO 2 experiment and a Pinatubo aerosol increase experiment were performed with the model. The time scales of variations in ozone and temperature in the lower stratosphere of the coupled system in the doubled CO 2 experiment was long, due to a feedback process among ultra violet radiation, O(1D), NO y , NO x , and O 3 . From the Pinatubo aerosol experiment, a delay of maximum ozone decrease from the maximum aerosol loading is shown and discussed. Developments of 3-D chemical models with coupled processes are briefly described, and the ozone distribution from the first version of the 3-D model are presented. Chemical model development in National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) are briefly described. (author)

  14. Stabilization of colour of woolenized jute by radiation chemical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Siddique, F.R.

    1978-09-01

    The radiation-induced graft polymerization of methyl methacrylate, ethyl acrylate, acrylonitrile, and venylacetate onto jute to prevent yellowing of the jute by light is reported. Samples were irradiated with a 5000 C; gamma-source at 0.1 Mrad per hour

  15. Radiation-chemical copolymerization of oligoalkylene- maleinants of alicyclic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, P.A.; Videnina, N.G.; Omel'chenko, S.I.

    1982-01-01

    Effect of glycol used in synthesis on the properties of oligoalkylenemaleinates and their copolymers is considered. It is shown that oligoesters during copolymerization with sterol have enough high sensitivity to the effect of gamma radiation and electrons of high energy. The copolymers have a good mechanical-and-physical properties at low absorbed doses

  16. Trans-generational radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the female enhances the action of chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camats, Nuria; Garcia, Francisca; Parrilla, Juan Jose; Calaf, Joaquim; Martin, Miguel; Caldes, Montserrat Garcia

    2008-01-01

    Genomic instability can be produced by ionising radiation, so-called radiation-induced genomic instability, and chemical mutagens. Radiation-induced genomic instability occurs in both germinal and somatic cells and also in the offspring of irradiated individuals, and it is characterised by genetic changes including chromosomal rearrangements. The majority of studies of trans-generational, radiation-induced genomic instability have been described in the male germ line, whereas the authors who have chosen the female as a model are scarce. The aim of this work is to find out the radiation-induced effects in the foetal offspring of X-ray-treated female rats and, at the same time, the possible impact of this radiation-induced genomic instability on the action of a chemical mutagen. In order to achieve both goals, the quantity and quality of chromosomal damage were analysed. In order to detect trans-generational genomic instability, a total of 4806 metaphases from foetal tissues from the foetal offspring of X-irradiated female rats (5 Gy, acute dose) were analysed. The study's results showed that there is radiation-induced genomic instability: the number of aberrant metaphases and the breaks per total metaphases studied increased and were found to be statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05), with regard to the control group. In order to identify how this trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability could influence the chromosomal behaviour of the offspring of irradiated rat females in front of a chemical agent (aphidicolin), a total of 2481 metaphases were studied. The observed results showed that there is an enhancement of the action of the chemical agent: chromosomal breaks per aberrant metaphases show significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) in the X-ray- and aphidicolin-treated group as regards the aphidicolin-treated group. In conclusion, our findings indicate that there is trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the foetal cells

  17. Trans-generational radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the female enhances the action of chemical mutagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camats, Nuria [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, Francisca [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Parrilla, Juan Jose [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, 30120 El Palmar, Murcia (Spain); Calaf, Joaquim [Servei de Ginecologia i Obstetricia, Hospital Universitari de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Martin, Miguel [Departament de Pediatria, d' Obstetricia i Ginecologia i de Medicina Preventiva, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Caldes, Montserrat Garcia [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: Montserrat.Garcia.Caldes@uab.es

    2008-04-02

    Genomic instability can be produced by ionising radiation, so-called radiation-induced genomic instability, and chemical mutagens. Radiation-induced genomic instability occurs in both germinal and somatic cells and also in the offspring of irradiated individuals, and it is characterised by genetic changes including chromosomal rearrangements. The majority of studies of trans-generational, radiation-induced genomic instability have been described in the male germ line, whereas the authors who have chosen the female as a model are scarce. The aim of this work is to find out the radiation-induced effects in the foetal offspring of X-ray-treated female rats and, at the same time, the possible impact of this radiation-induced genomic instability on the action of a chemical mutagen. In order to achieve both goals, the quantity and quality of chromosomal damage were analysed. In order to detect trans-generational genomic instability, a total of 4806 metaphases from foetal tissues from the foetal offspring of X-irradiated female rats (5 Gy, acute dose) were analysed. The study's results showed that there is radiation-induced genomic instability: the number of aberrant metaphases and the breaks per total metaphases studied increased and were found to be statistically significant (p {<=} 0.05), with regard to the control group. In order to identify how this trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability could influence the chromosomal behaviour of the offspring of irradiated rat females in front of a chemical agent (aphidicolin), a total of 2481 metaphases were studied. The observed results showed that there is an enhancement of the action of the chemical agent: chromosomal breaks per aberrant metaphases show significant differences (p {<=} 0.05) in the X-ray- and aphidicolin-treated group as regards the aphidicolin-treated group. In conclusion, our findings indicate that there is trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the foetal

  18. Mechanisms of chemical modification of neoplastic cell transformation by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T.C.; Tobias, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    During space travel, astronauts will be continuously exposed to ionizing radiation; therefore, it is necessary to minimize the radiation damage by all possible means. The authors' studies show that DMSO (when present during irradiation) can protect cells from being killed and transformed by X rays and that low concentration of DMSO can reduce the transformation frequency significantly when it is applied to cells, even many days after irradiation. The process of neoplastic cell transformation is a complicated one and includes at least two different stages: induction and expression. DMSO apparently can modify the radiation damage during both stages. There are several possible mechanisms for the DMSO effect: (1) changing the cell membrane structure and properties; (2) inducing cell differentiation by acting on DNA; and (3) scavanging free radicals in the cell. Recent studies with various chemical agents, e.g., 5-azacytidine, dexamethane, rhodamin-123, etc., indicate that the induction of cell differentiation by acting on DNA may be an important mechanism for the suppression of expression of neoplastic cell transformation by DMSO

  19. Formation of by-products at radiation - chemical treatment of water solutions of chloroform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmedov, S.A.; Abdullayev, E.T.; Gurbanov, M.A.; Gurbanov, A.H.; Ibadov, N.A.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Radiation-chemical treatment is considered as a perspective method of water purification from chloroform. It provides the high level of purification (98 percent) of water solutions from chloroform and other chlorine-containing compounds. Meanwhile, other chlorine-containing products can be formed during the process of chloroform degradation and as a result of it the quality of water can change. This work studies the formation of by-products of γ-radiolysis of water solutions at various initial contents of chloroform. Dichlormethane and tetrachlorethane are identified as by-products. It is shown that at high contents of chloroform after certain adsorbed dose the forming products are reducing till their full disappearing. At small contents of chloroform in the studied interval of doses di-chlor-methane is forming. Differences of dose dependences of by-products at various contents of chloroform can be connected with the transition from radical mechanism to chain reaction at high concentrations of chloroform in solutions saturated by oxygen. pH-solutions also reduces during the radiation till pH=1, although this reduction also depends on initial concentration of chloroform. Essential change of pH occurs only at the radiolysis of water solutions containing chloroform ≥0,2 percent. And at radiating of 0,03 percent solution pH reduces only till 4 - 4,5

  20. Effects of radiation and other influences on chemical lymphomagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, H.J.

    1987-06-01

    Methylnitrosourea (MNU) or butylnitrosourea (BNU) was used to induce T cell lymphomas (thymomas) in BDF/sub 1/ mice. In addition to the chemical, X-rays in various dose schedules were applied. An effect of the irradiation (shortening of the latency period) was seen with 12 x 0.25 Gy in protocols with a prolonged median induction time in the controls as a result of a dose reduction of the chemical (median induction time 27-36 weeks instead of 16-18 weeks under optimal conditions using 50 mg kg/sup -1/ of MNU). Preirradiation 2-5 weeks before 40 mg kg/sup -1/ of MNU resulted in enhanced leukaemogenesis. Also, mice with regenerating lympho-haemopoiesis after lethal irradiation and bone marrow transplantation were more sensitive to the effect of both chemicals than were the controls. Treatment with anti-thy 1.2 and with corynebacterium parvum during the latency period had no influence.

  1. Activation of chemical biological defense mechanisms and remission of vital oxidative injury by low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, K.; Nomura, T.; Kojima, S.

    2000-01-01

    Excessive active oxygen produced in vivo by various causes is toxic. Accumulation of oxidation injuries due to excessive active causes cell and tissue injuries, inducing various pathologic conditions such as aging and carcinogenesis. On the other hand, there are chemical defense mechanisms in the body that eliminate active oxygen or repair damaged molecules, defending against resultant injury. It is interesting reports that appropriate oxidation stress activate the chemical biological defense mechanisms. In this study, to elucidate these phenomena and its mechanism by low dose radiation, we studied on the below subjects. Activation of chemical biological defense mechanisms by low dose radiation: (1) The effects radiation on lipid peroxide (LPO) levels in the organs, membrane fluidity and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were examined in rats and rabbits. Rats were irradiated with low dose X-ray over their entire bodies, and rabbits inhaled vaporized radon spring water, which primarily emitted α-ray. The following results were obtained. Unlike high dose X-ray, low dose X-ray and radon inhalation both reduced LPO levels and made the state of the SH-group on membrane-bound proteins closer to that of juvenile animals, although the sensitivity to radioactivity varied depending on the age of the animals and among different organs and tissues. The SOD activity was elevated, suggesting that low dose X-ray and radon both activate the host defensive function. Those changes were particularly marked in the organs related to immune functions of the animals which received low dose X-ray, while they were particularly marked in the brain after radon inhalation. It was also found that those changes continued for longer periods after low dose X-irradiation. (2) Since SOD is an enzyme that mediates the dismutation of O 2 - to H 2 O 2 , the question as to whether the resultant H 2 O 2 is further detoxicated into H 2 O and O 2 or not must still be evaluated. Hence, we studied

  2. Central blood circulation in children at chronic combined low dose radiation and chemical action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arinchin, A.N.

    2000-01-01

    The state of central blood circulation and its hormonal regulation were studied in 1465 children living permanently under chronic low dose radiation and chemical action. Basic group consisted of 1093 children (579 boys and 514 girls) . 372 children (115 boys and 227 girls permanently living on 'clean' areas) were investigated in control group. Average age was 10,8 years old in basic group and 10,4 years old in the control group. Such parameters as arterial pressure, level of lead in blood and urine, adrenaline, noradrenaline and dophamine content in urine, thyroxine, iodothyronine, prostaglandins and cyclic AMP content in the blood serum has been controlled. Hypotensive states were determined to prevail in children living permanently under chronic low dose radiation and chemical action. The main pathogenic mechanism of this defeat is consider to be a reduction of the sympathoadrenal system activity combined with a decreasing of the thyroid system activity and of cyclic AMP level as well as predominance of prostaglandin depressive activity

  3. Effects of ionizing radiation on plastic food packaging materials: a review. 1. Chemical and physical changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchalla, R.; Schuttler, C.; Bögl, K.W.

    1993-01-01

    Irradiation of prepackaged food causes chemical and physical changes in plastic packaging materials. The effects of ionizing radiation on these materials have been studied for almost 40 years; the respective literature is reviewed to provide the basis for a safety evaluation of plastics for use in food irradiation. Permeability of plastic films is generally not affected; deterioration of mechanical properties, that may occur with certain polymers, can usually be controlled with adequate stabilizers; and changes in infrared and UV/VIS spectra are slight at food irradiation doses. Gaseous radiolysis products include hydrogen, methane, CO 2 , CO, hydrocarbons, and for chlorine-containing polymers, hydrogen chloride. A range of volatile products, mainly hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, and carboxylic acids, has been characterized for low density polyethylene and polypropylene, other important materials, e.g., polystyrene and poly(vinyl chloride), are less well-investigated. Comparatively little is known on the effect of irradiation on multilayer structures. Radiation-induced changes are shown to depend on the chemical structure of the polymer, on the composition (additives) and processing history of the plastic, and on the irradiation conditions

  4. U.S. Department of Energy Workers' mental models of radiation and chemical hazards in the workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadrel, M.J.; Blanchard, K.A.; Lundgren, R.E.; McMakin, A.H.; Mosley, M.T.; Strom, D.J.

    1994-05-01

    A pilot study was performed to test the mental models methodology regarding knowledge and perceptions of U.S. Department of Energy contractor radiation workers about ionizing radiation and hazardous chemicals. The mental models methodology establishes a target population's beliefs about risks and compares them with current scientific knowledge. The ultimate intent is to develop risk communication guidelines that address information gaps or misperceptions that could affect decisions and behavior. In this study, 15 radiation workers from the Hanford Site in Washington State were interviewed about radiation exposure processes and effects. Their beliefs were mapped onto a science model of the same topics to see where differences occurred. In general, workers' mental models covered many of the high-level parts of the science model but did not have the same level of detail. The following concepts appeared to be well understood by most interviewees: types, form, and properties of workplace radiation; administrative and physical controls to reduce radiation exposure risk; and the relationship of dose and effects. However, several concepts were rarely mentioned by most interviewees, indicating potential gaps in worker understanding. Most workers did not discuss the wide range of measures for neutralizing or decontaminating individuals following internal contamination. Few noted specific ways of measuring dose or factors that affect dose. Few mentioned the range of possible effects, including genetic effects, birth defects, or high dose effects. Variables that influence potential effects were rarely discussed. Workers rarely mentioned how basic radiation principles influenced the source, type, or mitigation of radiation risk in the workplace

  5. Role of noble metal nanoparticles in DNA base damage and catalysis: a radiation chemical investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Geeta K.

    2011-01-01

    In the emerging field of nanoscience and nanotechnology, tremendous focus has been made by researcher to explore the applications of nanomaterials for human welfare by converting the findings into technology. Some of the examples have been the use of nanoparticles in the field of opto-electronic, fuel cells, medicine and catalysis. These wide applications and significance lies in the fact that nanoparticles possess unique physical and chemical properties very different from their bulk precursors. Numerous methods for the synthesis of noble nanoparticles with tunable shape and size have been reported in literature. The goal of our group is to use different methods of synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles (Au, Ag, Pt and Pd) and test their protective/damaging role towards DNA base damage induced by ionizing radiation (Au and Ag) and to test the catalytic activity of nanoparticles (Pt and Pd) in certain known organic synthesis/electron transfer reactions. Using radiation chemical techniques such as pulse radiolysis and steady state radiolysis complemented by the product analysis using HPLC/LC-MS, a detailed mechanism for the formation of transient species, kinetics leading to the formation of stable end products is studied in the DNA base damage induced by ionizing radiation in presence and absence of Au and Ag nanoparticles. Unraveling the complex interaction between catalysts and reactants under operando conditions is a key step towards gaining fundamental insight in catalysis. The catalytic activity of Pt and Pd nanoparticles in electron transfer and Suzuki coupling reactions has been determined. Investigations are currently underway to gain insight into the interaction between catalysts and reactants using time resolved spectroscopic measurements. These studies will be detailed during the presentation. (author)

  6. Developmental effects of magnetic field (50 Hz) in combination with ionizing radiation and chemical teratogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pafková, H; Jerábek, J; Tejnorová, I; Bednár, V

    1996-11-01

    The influence of a 50 Hz magnetic field (MF) on avian and mammalian embryogenesis, the MF level and vector, as well as the effect of exposure to MF (50 Hz, 10 mT) in combination with X-rays has been recently reported [2,3]. No significant alterations of chick or rat embryogenesis were found after repeated exposures to 50 Hz MF at 10 mT or 6 microT or with different vectors. However, X-ray chick embryotoxicity was significantly affected by repeated exposures of developing organisms to MF. A strong dependence of effect on the type of interaction was revealed. A decrease of X-ray induced teratogenicity was observed when MF preceded X-ray exposure (indirect interaction), while MF exposure applied immediately after X-ray radiation (direct interaction) non-significantly potentiated adverse developmental effects of ionizing radiation. This study deals with the effects of MF in combination with insulin or tetracycline. Exposure of chick embryos to MF influenced the sensitivity of embryonic morphogenetic systems to the subsequently administered chemical teratogens, insulin and/or tetracycline. A protective effect of MF was detected similarly as in the case of indirect interaction with ionizing radiation.

  7. The high pH chemical and radiation compatibility of various liner materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whyatt, G.A.; Farnsworth, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on a flexible membrane liner that has been proposed to line a concrete vault in which liquid low-level radioactive waste will be solidified. High-density polyethylene (HDPE) and polypropylene liners were tested at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory in an EPA method 9090 format to determine their chemical compatibility with the waste. Radiation effects were also investigated. The liners were immersed in a highly caustic (pH>14), primarily inorganic solution at 90 degrees C. The liners were subjected to radiation doses up to 38.9 Mrad, which was the expected dose the liner would receive over a 30-year life inside the vault. Recent changes have placed the liner outside the vault. The acceptance criteria for judging the compatibility of the liner with radiation would be different that those used for judging chemical compatibility. The radiation damage over the life of the liner can be simulated in a short-term test. Both HDPE and polypropylene liners were judged to be acceptable from a chemical and radiation standpoint when placed outside of the vault, while several other liners were not compatible. Radiation did not have a significant effect on chemical degradation rates

  8. The high pH chemical and radiation compatibility of various liner materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whyatt, G.; Farnsworth, R.

    1990-01-01

    A flexible membrane liner has been proposed to line a concrete vault in which liquid low-level radioactive waste will be solidified. High-density polyethylene (HDPE) and polypropylene liners were tested at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory in an EPA method 9090 format to determine their chemical compatibility with the waste. Radiation effects were also investigated. The liners were immersed in a highly caustic (pH>14), primarily inorganic solution at 90 degrees C. The liners were subjected to radiation doses up to 38.9 Mrad, which was the expected dose the liner would receive over a 30-year life inside the vault. Recent changes have placed the liner outside the vault. The acceptance criteria for judging the compatibility of the liner with radiation should be different than those used for judging chemical compatibility. The radiation damage over the life of the liner can be simulated in a short-term test. Both HDPE and polypropylene liners were judged to be acceptable from a chemical and radiation standpoint when placed outside of the vault, while several other liners were not compatible. Radiation did not have a significant effect on chemical degradation rates

  9. Study of physical, chemical and structural effects caused by ionizing radiation and preservation on human costal cartilage; Estudo dos efeitos fisicos, quimicos e estruturais ocasionados pela radiacao ionizante e preservacao em cartilagem costal humana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinho, Junior, Antonio Carlos

    2008-07-01

    Tissue Banks around the world have stored human cartilages obtained from cadaver donors for use in several kinds of reconstructive surgeries. To ensure that such tissues are not contaminated, they have been sterilized with ionizing radiation. However, high doses of gamma radiation may cause undesirable changes in the tissues, decreasing the mechanical properties of the grafts. In this work, we evaluate physical/chemical and structural changes in deep-frozen (-70 deg C) or high concentration of glycerol (> 98%) preserved costal cartilage, before and after sterilization by ionizing radiation at 3 different doses (15, 25 and 50 kGy). Samples of human costal cartilage were obtained from 20 cadaver donors ranging between 18 and 55 years old. A {sup 60}Co irradiator was used as irradiation source. Thermogravimetry (TG), Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and mechanical tension and compression tests were carried out to evaluate the changes in the cartilage. Regarding the thermogravimetric results, the obtained data has shown that the TG curves have the same pattern independently of the sample irradiated or not. On the other hand, non-irradiated samples showed great variability of thermogravimetric curves among different donors and for the same donor. Concerning the mechanical tests, when cartilages were irradiated with 15 kGy, their mechanical strength to tension was increased about 24%, in both deep-froze and preserved in glycerol samples. Samples deep-frozen, when irradiated with 25 and 50 kGy, presented a decrease of their mechanical behavior smaller than those preserved in high concentrations of glycerol and irradiated with the same dose. Therefore, deep-frozen cartilages can be sterilized with doses until 50 kGy and cartilages preserved in high concentrations of glycerol can be sterilized with doses until 25 kGy without significant changes in their bio-mechanical properties.(author)

  10. Chemical and physical conversion in cold atmosphere and the effect of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulmala, M.; Aalto, P.; Korhonen, P.; Laaksonen, A.; Vesala, T. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The project is focusing on the formation and growth mechanisms of atmospheric aerosol and cloud droplets. Both aerosol particles and cloud droplets affect strongly on the atmospheric radiation fluxes by scattering and absorption. The droplet formation results from physical and chemical processes occurring simultaneously. The studies concerning the tropospheric cloud droplet formation, laboratory experiments with a cloud chamber and stratospheric cloud formation are summarized. The recent studies summarized in this presentation indicate that both aerosol particles and cloud droplets have a significant role in climatic change and ozone depletion problems. The anthropogenic emissions of gaseous and particulate pollutants change the properties of atmospheric aerosols and cloud droplets. The research in this field will be continued and more quantitative understanding based both experimental and theoretical studies is required

  11. Chemical and physical conversion in cold atmosphere and the effect of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulmala, M; Aalto, P; Korhonen, P; Laaksonen, A; Vesala, T [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics

    1997-12-31

    The project is focusing on the formation and growth mechanisms of atmospheric aerosol and cloud droplets. Both aerosol particles and cloud droplets affect strongly on the atmospheric radiation fluxes by scattering and absorption. The droplet formation results from physical and chemical processes occurring simultaneously. The studies concerning the tropospheric cloud droplet formation, laboratory experiments with a cloud chamber and stratospheric cloud formation are summarized. The recent studies summarized in this presentation indicate that both aerosol particles and cloud droplets have a significant role in climatic change and ozone depletion problems. The anthropogenic emissions of gaseous and particulate pollutants change the properties of atmospheric aerosols and cloud droplets. The research in this field will be continued and more quantitative understanding based both experimental and theoretical studies is required

  12. Studies on application of radiation and radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Rok; Lee, Ji Bok; Lee, Yeong Iil; Jin, Joon Ha; Beon, Myeong Uh; Park, Kyeong Bae; Han, Heon Soo; Jeong, Yong Sam; Uh, Jong Seop; Kang, Kyeong Cheol; Cho, Han Ok; Song, Hui Seop; Yoon, Byeong Mok; Jeon, Byeong Jin; Park, Hong Sik; Kim, Jae Seong; Jeong, Un Soo; Baek, Sam Tae; Cho, Seong Won; Jeon, Yeong Keon; Kim, Joon Yeon; Kwon, Joong Ho; Kim, Ki Yeop; Yang, Jae Seung; No, Yeong Chang; Lee, Yeong Keun; Shin, Byeong Cheol; Park, Sang Joon; Hong, Kwang Pyo; Cho, Seung Yeon; Kang, Iil Joon; Cho, Seong Ki; Jeong, Yeong Joo; Park, Chun Deuk; Lee, Yeong Koo; Seo, Chun Ha; Han, Kwang Hui; Shin, Hyeon Young; Kim, Jong Kuk; Park, Soon Chul; Shin, In Cheol; Lee, Sang Jae; Lee, Ki Un; Lim, Yong Taek; Park, Eung Uh; Kim, Dong Soo; Jeon, Sang Soo

    1993-05-01

    With the completion of construction of KMRR, the facility and technology of radiation application will be greatly improved. This study was performed as follows; (1) Studies on the production and application of radioisotopes. (2) The development of radiation processing technology. (3) The application of Irradiation techniques for food preservation and process improvement. (4) Studies on the radiation application for the development of genetic resources (5) Development of the radioisotope (RI) production facilities for Korea Multipurpose Research Reactor (KMRR)

  13. Physico-chemical evaluation of radiation effects on apple juice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumer, Lucimara; Domarco, Rachel E.; Spoto, Maria H.F.; Walder, Julio M.M.; Matraia, Clarice

    1997-01-01

    Gala and Fuji varieties apple's juice were clarified with enzyme and irradiated aiming to extend the shelf-life without conservants and chemical additives. The juices were analysed for soluble solids, titrable acidity, pH and color. Results showed effect of storage periods in soluble solids, pH and color. The variety and storage period modified the titrable acidity. The pH was altered by irradiation dose and the storage period. (author). 9 refs., 6 figs

  14. Treatment of spices with ionizing radiation - chemical, organoleptical, microbiological and toxicological analyses. Pt. 1. Behandlung von Gewuerzen mit ionisierenden Strahlen - chemische, organoleptische, mikrobiologische und toxikologische Aspekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuettler, C; Boegl, W

    1984-01-01

    In a study of the relevant literature the results of tests on 30 radiation treated spices were evaluated. The tests contain chemical, organoleptical, microbiological and toxicological analyses. Most of the spices were treated with gamma radiation from cobalt-60 sources with doses up to 60 kGy.

  15. Radiation-induced chemical processes in polystyrene scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milinchuk, V.K.; Bolbit, N.M.; Klinshpont, E.R.; Tupikov, V.I.; Zhdanov, G.S.; Taraban, S.B.; Shelukhov, I.P.; Smoljanskii, A.S.

    1999-01-01

    The regularities established for macroradical accumulation and intensity of radioluminescence under γ-irradiation of a polystyrene scintillator prove benzyl macroradicals to be efficient quenchers of the excited scintillator molecules. Dissolved oxygen was determined to have a constant of the quenching rate 100 times lower than that of macroradicals. Oxygen is an efficient antirad because of participating in oxidation reactions and subsequent recombination of macroradicals. The method was developed to obtain a polymeric scintillator with a polystyrene matrix containing a dispersed system of pores and channels. Radiation resistance of such a scintillator is 5-10 times higher than that of standard types

  16. Radiation chemical addition of dimethylformamide to α-olefins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dederichs, B.; Saus, A.; Lennertz, A.M.

    1977-10-01

    With n-hexene-1, n-octene-1 and n-decene-1 the radiation-initiated addition of demethyl formamide to α-olefins is described for the fist time. N,N-dimethyl alkane carbonic acid amides and N-methyl-N-alkyl formamides are formed in a ratio of about 50:50. The addition reaction is investigated in depencence of a solvent, of the ratio of the reaction, temperature, reaction time and dose rate. Mechanistic considerations are performed by radiolysis experiments of dimethyl formamide. (orig.) [de

  17. Liquid droplet radiator performance studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattick, A. T.; Hertzberg, A.

    By making use of droplets rather than solid surfaces to radiate waste heat in space, the liquid droplet radiator (LDR) achieves a radiating area/mass much larger than that of conventional radiators which use fins or heat pipes. The lightweight potential of the LDR is shown to be limited primarily by the radiative properties of the droplets. The requirement that the LDR heat transfer fluid have a very low vapor pressure limits the choice of fluids to relatively few—several liquid metals and Dow 705 silicone fluid are the only suitable candidates so far identified. An experimental determination of the emittance of submillimeter droplets of Dow 705 fluid indicates than an LDR using this fluid at temperatures of 275-335 K would be ⋍ 10 times lighter than the lightest solid surface radiators. Although several liquid metals appear to offer excellent performance in LDR applications at temperatures between 200 K and 975 K, experimental determination of liquid metal emissivities is needed for a conclusive assessment.

  18. Radiation-induced oxidative chemical changes in dehydrated egg products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katusin-Rasem, B.; Mihaljevic, B.; Razem, D.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation-induced buildup of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) and destruction of carotenoids were followed in whole egg powder and egg yolk powder as functions of dose, dose rate, and the presence of oxygen. In the absence of air the formation of LOOH was limited by the available oxygen, while destruction of carotenoids progressed linearly with dose; neither process depended on the dose rate. In the presence of air, the accumulation of LOOH and the destruction of carotenoids were strongly coupled and inversely proportional to the dose rate. The induction dose of 2.5 kGy was observed in air in both whole egg powder and egg yolk powder, independent of the dose rate. The practical consequence is that radiation decontamination can be carried out in the presence of air at the highest available dose rate by a dose not exceeding 2.5 kGy to avoid extensive degradation. This dose is adequate for a 10(3) reduction factor of Salmonella and well within the threshold dose of 3 kGy for organoleptic changes

  19. Time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy of radiation-chemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, G.N.R.

    1983-01-01

    A tunable pulsed laser Raman spectrometer for time resolved Raman studies of radiation-chemical processes is described. This apparatus utilizes the state of art optical multichannel detection and analysis techniques for data acquisition and electron pulse radiolysis for initiating the reactions. By using this technique the resonance Raman spectra of intermediates with absorption spectra in the 248-900 nm region, and mean lifetimes > 30 ns can be examined. This apparatus can be used to time resolve the vibrational spectral overlap between transients absorbing in the same region, and to follow their decay kinetics by monitoring the well resolved Raman peaks. For kinetic measurements at millisecond time scale, the Raman technique is preferable over optical absorption method where low frequency noise is quite bothersome. A time resolved Raman study of the pulse radiolytic oxidation of aqueous tetrafluorohydroquinone and p-methoxyphenol is briefly discussed. 15 references, 5 figures

  20. Effects of radiation and chemicals on SV40 oncogenesis. Final progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggin, J.H. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    This project is directed toward developing rapid, quantitative methods and immunologic markers which will permit the early detection of newly forming tumors induced or enhanced by x-irradiation, chemical carcinogens, viruses or combinations of the three. The projects under study in our ongoing collaborative program seek to develop the detailed understanding and precise methodology required for the early detection of embryonic antigens in transformed cells induced by the co-carcinogenic effects of viruses and low-level radiation. A new technique for assaying the earliest transformed cells appearing in a carcinogen treated population affords a unique tool for this study. Present plans involve efforts to purify embryonic determinants from fetal and transformed cells of hamsters and mice in order to define their role in the transformation process and in tumor development

  1. Safety of natural radiation exposure. A meta-analysis of epidemiological studies on natural radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osaki, S.

    2000-01-01

    People have been exposed every time and everywhere to natural radiation and ''intuitively'' know the safety of this radiation exposure. On the other hand the theory of no threshold value on radiological carcinogenesis is known widely, and many people feel danger with even a smallest dose of radiation exposure. The safety of natural radiation exposure can be used for the risk communication with the public. For this communication, the safety of natural radiation exposure should be proved ''scientifically''. Safety is often discussed scientifically as the risks of the mortality from many practices, and the absolute risks of safe practices on the public are 1E-5 to 1E-6. The risks based on the difference of natural radiation exposure on carcinogenesis have been analyzed by epidemiological studies. Much of the epidemiological studies have been focused on the relationship between radiation doses and cancer mortalities, and their results have been described as relative risks or correlation factors. In respect to the safety, however, absolute risks are necessary for the discussion. Cancer mortalities depend not only on radiation exposure, but also on ethnic groups, sexes, ages, social classes, foods, smoking, environmental chemicals, medical radiation, etc. In order to control these confounding factors, the data are collected from restricted groups or/and localities, but any these ecological studies can not perfectly compensate the confounding factors. So positive or negative values of relative risks or the meaningful correlation factors can not be confirmed that their values are derived originally from the difference of their exposure doses. The absolute risks on these epidemiological studies are also affected by many factors containing radiation exposure. The absolute risk or the upper value of the confidence limit obtained from the epidemiological study which is well regulated confounding factors is possible to be a maximum risk on the difference of the exposure doses

  2. Effect of Radiation on Microbial Contamination Activity and Chemical Composition of Antimicrobial Herbs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leelapattranuruk, Paveena

    1999-01-01

    The selected herbs which are known to have antimicrobial compounds i.e. garlic (Allium sativum Linn.) bulbs, pomegranate (Punica granatum Linn.) fruit rinds, roselle (Hibiscus sabdoriffa Linn.) calyxes, and tea (Camellia sinensis Linn.) leaves were exposed to gamma and ultraviolet (UV) radiations. After being irradiated with 1, 3 and 5 kGy of ionizing radiation from a cobalt-60 source for 5, 15 and 15 minutes and with non-ionizing radiation from ultraviolet source for 30, 60 and 120 minutes, the irradiated herbs were examined for number of contaminants and specified microorganisms i.e. Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli. Salmonella spp. and Clostridium spp, as well as antimicrobial potency and components and compared to unirradiated herbs. The results showed that unirradiated garlic was most heavily contaminated with bacteria and fungi. The specified microorganisms were not detected in either unirradiated or irradiated samples. In comparison of radiated herbs, the reduction of microorganisms in UV treated herbs was less than that in gamma ray treated ones, especially at the treatment dose of 5 kGy. There was slight reduction of microbial number in UV treated herbs as compared to the untreated herbs. Gamma treatment at 5 kGy reduced the microbe contamination more than other doses and caused complete elimination in tea. The UV and gamma treatments had no effect on antimicrobial potency of herbs except for that of garlic. The preliminary chemical analysis to examine if there was any radiolytic components in these herbs by thin layer chromatography (TLC) revealed that no such compounds were detected in any tested herbs. This study indicated that gamma irradiation treatment was one of the physical methods to decontaminate microbes in herbs

  3. Radiation equivalence of genotoxic chemicals - Validation in cultered mammalian cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, M.S.S.

    1982-01-01

    Published data on mutations induced by ionizing radiation and 6 monofunctional alkylating agents, namely EMS, MMS, ENNG, MNNG, ENU and MNU, in different cell lines (Chinese hamster ovary, Chinese hamster lung V79, mouse lymphoma L5178 and human cells) were analysed so that radiation-equivalent chemical (REC) values could be calculated. REC values thus obtained for a given alkylating agent with different cell lines fall within a narrow range suggesting its validation in cultured mammalian cell systems including human. (orig.)

  4. Treatment of spices with ionizing radiation - chemical, organoleptical, microbiological and toxicological analyses. Pt. 2. Behandlung von Gewuerzen mit ionisierenden Strahlen - chemische, sensorische, mikrobiologische und toxikologische Aspekte. T. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuettler, C; Boegl, W

    1984-09-01

    In the present second part of a study of the relevant literature the results of tests on 14 radiation treated spices and 2 radiation treated spice-mixtures were evaluated. The tests in this part contain mainly toxicological but also chemical and sensorial analyses. Most of the spices were treated with gamma radiation from cobalt-60 sources with doses between 80 Gy and 60 kGy. This part contains a cumulated subject index for part 1 and part 2.

  5. Radiation-chemical yields of molecular hydrogen formation in cyclohexane based alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Val'ter, A.I.; Kovalev, G.V.

    1988-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen radiation-chemical yields in γ-irradiated cyclohexanol, 1.2-cis- and 1.2-trans-cyclohexandiols and inositol are determined within the general problem frameworks of radiolysis mechanism for cyclohexanering-base alcohols. Irradiation was conducted at 77 and 293 K, dose rate - 4 Gy/s. Hydrogen concentration in all irradiated alcohols depends linearly on the dose. Radiation-chemical yields of H 2 and of stabilized radicals, as well, in the irradiated crystalline alcohols are analyzed depending on the irradiation temperature, alcohol molecular structure

  6. Radiation chemical grafting of vinyl acetate and styrene on nitrocellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapiro, A.; Foex, M.; Jendrychowska-Bonamour, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    Vinyl acetate and styrene were grafted onto nitrocellulose using the direct radiation grafting technique with 500 and 3000 Ci 60 Co γ sources. For vinyl acetate, the reaction proceeds homogeneously. The kinetics are dominated by degradative chain transfer to the nitrocellulose. The polymerization of vinyl acetate was examined in the presence of isoamyl nitrate, a model for nitrocellulose; the transfer constant was determined and the results are treated semi-quantitatively. For styrene, grafting occurs in a swollen film irradiated in the presence of excess monomer. The diffusion of styrene into nitrocellulose is extremely slow; methanol was added to the reaction mixture to favour diffusion which was found to obey Fick's law. The diffusion constant and activation energy of diffusion are evaluated. The grafting kinetics are controlled by monomer diffusion, accounting for the increase of dose-rate exponent with temperature. A spontaneous grafting process occurs in the absence of irradiation. It is initiated by macroradicals arising from thermal decomposition of nitrocellulose. (author)

  7. Contribution of radiation chemistry to the study of metal clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloni, J

    1998-11-01

    Radiation chemistry dates from the discovery of radioactivity one century ago by H. Becquerel and P. and M. Curie. The complex phenomena induced by ionizing radiation have been explained progressively. At present, the methodology of radiation chemistry, particularly in the pulsed mode, provides a powerful means to study not only the early processes after the energy absorption, but more generally a broad diversity of chemical and biochemical reaction mechanisms. Among them, the new area of metal cluster chemistry illustrates how radiation chemistry contributed to this field in suggesting fruitful original concepts, in guiding and controlling specific syntheses, and in the detailed elaboration of the mechanisms of complex and long-unsolved processes, such as the dynamics of nucleation, electron transfer catalysis and photographic development.

  8. Changes of some indicators of cellular immunity in rats under their chronic radiation and chemical exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvedov, V.L.; Anisimova, G.G.

    1989-01-01

    The experiments on rats exposed separately and in combination to radiation and chemical substances showed that the time of body pesticide intake (the total dose) was the leading factor affecting the phagocytosis indices. A daily pesticide dose had a credible impact on some indices. The combined effect was formed primarily due to chemical compounds. In general the effect could be regarded as less than additive though at some time it was additive and more than that

  9. Investigation into effects of ionizing radiations on physical-chemical properties of bulgarian sorts of peaches and grapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, D.; Kalinov, V.; Nikolova, M.; Pavlova, E.

    1974-01-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the degree and direction of those changes in physicochemical characteristics of irradiated peaches and grapes which determine their quality after irradiation and during storage. The following main conclusions are made: irradiation with doses of 200 to 300 krad does not cause significant alterations in the chemical composition and physicochemical characteristics of peaches and grapes; irradiation has a direct effect on the consistancy of peaches and grapes, leading to their softening which is proportional to the radiation dose used; radiation treatment is advisable in the case of peaches and grapes in tended for short-term rather than long-term storage at low temperatures

  10. Gamma radiation effects on some nutritional and physico-chemical characteristics of stored beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancini Filho, J.

    1990-01-01

    The radiation effects on physico-chemical and nutritional characteristics of three Brazilian varieties of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris, L.) - Catu, Rajado and Carioca -were studied. The analytical parameters were obtained by the determination of soaking and cooking times, biological value in rats, protein electrophoretic profile, reductors sugars, oligosaccharides, fiber and fatty acids content. Also, amyloglucosidase, phytohemagglutinins, α-amylase and tryptic inhibitors activities were analysed. It was observed the gamma radiation until determined doses promotes changes on those parameters subsequently reducing substantially the cooking time without modification of the biological value of the proteins. This alteration was particularly noticed in the hard-to-cook beans. (author)

  11. Chemical and radiation induced late dominant lethal effects in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favor, J.; Crenshaw, J.W. Jr.; Soares, E.R.

    1978-01-01

    Although theoretically expected, experimental data to date have not shown dominant lethal expression to occur throughout the developmental period. Specifically, late post-implantation effects have not been demonstrated. The authors routinely use an experimental technique in which parental females mated to mutagenically treated males are allowed to give birth and wean their litter, and their uterine horns are then inspected for uterine scars indicative of live and dead embryos. In a number of experiments in which males were mutagenically treated with either chemicals or X-irradiation, a discrepancy was observed between the number of live embryos as determined by the scar technique and the number of live observed at birth, suggesting the possibility of embryonic losses at a late stage in development. Initial analyses showed that mutagenic treatment increased the percentage of these late losses. These differences were statistically significant in 2 of 3 analyses. Factors affecting statistical significance and an understanding of dominant lethal mutations are discussed. (Auth.)

  12. Mechanisms in endogenous leukemia virus induction by radiation and chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennant, R.W.; Rascati, R.J.; Lavelle, G.C.

    1976-01-01

    A model of endogenous leukemia virus induction in AKR strain mouse cells based on two distinct types of alterations in cellular or proviral DNA is presented. The first type are non-repairable alterations, such as those caused by the incorporation of halogenated pyrimidines; the second type are repairable lesions, such as those caused by irradiation or certain other chemicals. The production of non-repairable lesions leads to the formation of a stable, proviral state which is dependent upon cell division for complete virus expression. A stable provirus intermediate state is not demonstrable in cells induced by treatments which cause repairable lesions, since replication of damaged or altered DNA must occur before the lesions are removed by repair synthesis. Experimental support for this model is presented

  13. Photo- and radiation-chemical stability of molecules. Reactions of monomolecular hydrogen atom splitting off

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plotnikov, V.G.; Ovchinnikov, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    In the review of works published up to 1978 one of the main problems of radiation chemistry is discussed, namely the relationship between the structure of organic molecules and their resistance to the effect of ionizing radiation. Theoretical aspects of this problem are considered for reactions of monomolecular hydrogen atom splitting off. It is shown that the radical yield in low-temperature radiation-chemical experiments is connected with the position of lower triplet states of molecules, ionization potentials, polarity of medium and the energy of C-H bonds in cation radicals

  14. Studies on education for radiation and courses of study (2009)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuraba, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Hideo; Ukai, Mitsuko

    2009-01-01

    The Courses of Study are provided as the standards for educational courses in all schools in Japan. The new Courses of Study have been started this year. In this research, we revealed the ways how to teach radiation using the Courses of Study (2009). Education for radiation was first opened for the third grade of secondary school children. The contents in terms of radiation education in this Courses of Study (2009) are the characterization and application of radiation. To promote this new study courses, the knowledge about radiation of young man and woman were also studied. We concluded it is necessary to start radiation education from elementary school. Furthermore to apply the Courses of Study effectively, we need the comments on radiation education from the researcher of radiation. After the comments, teachers are able to make precise educational materials for their own children. (author)

  15. Radiative flow of Carreau liquid in presence of Newtonian heating and chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, T.; Ullah, Ikram; Ahmad, B.; Alsaedi, A.

    Objective of this article is to investigate the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer stretched flow of Carreau fluid in the presence of Newtonian heating. Sheet is presumed permeable. Analysis is studied in the presence of chemical reaction and thermal radiation. Mathematical formulation is established by using the boundary layer approximations. The resultant nonlinear flow analysis is computed for the convergent solutions. Interval of convergence via numerical data and plots are obtained and verified. Impact of numerous pertinent variables on the velocity, temperature and concentration is outlined. Numerical data for surface drag coefficient, surface heat transfer (local Nusselt number) and mass transfer (local Sherwood number) is executed and inspected. Comparison of skin friction coefficient in limiting case is made for the verification of current derived solutions.

  16. Analysis of radiation and chemical factors which define the ecological situation of environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trofimenko, A.P.

    1996-01-01

    A new method of large information set statistical analysis is proposed. It permits to define the main directions of work in a given field in the world or in a particular country, to find the most important investigated problems and to evaluate the role each of them quantitatively, as well as to study the dynamics of work development in time, the methods of research used, the centres in which this research is mostly developed, authors of publications etc. Statistical analysis may be supplemented with subject analysis of selected publications. Main factors which influence on different environment components and on public health are presented as an example of this method use, and the role of radiation and chemical factors is evaluated. 18 refs., 6 tab

  17. Enhancing the healing processes of chemical burns with He-Ne radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakai, S.F.K.; Albarwari, S.E.; Alsenawi, T.A.

    1988-02-01

    The process by which He-Ne laser radiation (λ = 632.8 nm) enhances the healing of cutaneous wounds, made by concentrated nitric acid on mice has been studied. The dose used was of the order of 2.7 Joule per day, till the day of complete wound closure. The wounds were irradiated at three points on its periphery so that to form a semitriangular pattern this method was adopted, because chemical burns involve the killing of both the epidermis and dermis. The influence of the laser on the healing was estimated quantitatively and statistically, with a significance of p<0.001 over the control (the unirradiated). (author). 8 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  18. Radiation-induced chemical reactions of carbon monoxide and hydrogen mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, S.; Nishii, M.; Sugiura, T.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation chemical reaction of CO-H 2 mixture has been studied in the pressure range from 10 4 to 1.3 x 10 5 Pa using 7 l. reaction vessel made of stainless steel. Various hydrocarbons and oxygen containing compounds such as methane, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and methanol have been obtained as radiolytic products. The amounts and the G values of these products depended upon the irradiation conditions such as composition of reactant, total pressure, reaction temperature, and dose. It was found that the irradiation at low dose produced small amounts of trioxane and tetraoxane, which have not yet been reported in literature. The yields of these cyclic ethers increased at high pressure and at low temperature. An experiment was also made on CO-H 2 mixture containing ammonia as a cation scavenger to investigate the precursor of these products. (author)

  19. Radiochemical problems of radiation chemical synthesis in n, γ-field of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mironov, V.P.; Frejdus, N.V.; Bugaenko, L.T.; Kalyazin, E.P.; Petryaev, E.P.

    1981-01-01

    A wide applicability of products of radiation chemical synthesis (RCS), using n, γ-irradiation, is limited by possible contamination of the latter with long-lived radioactive isotopes of chemical elements included in the composition of the reagent and compounds syntesized (chemically non-separable radionuclides - CNR). A technique of the determination of the limit accumulation CNR on the basis of radiation chemical parameters of the synthesis (radiation-chemical yield, the dose rate absorbed, singleness of purpose of RCS etc.) and radiochemical parameters of formation and accumulation of CNR (radiochemical yields of CNR in the products of radiolysis, neutron fluence, the reagent purity etc.) is suggested. The radiochemical evaluation of CNR accumulation (tritium and carbon-14), formed at the expense of activation with neutrons of chemical elements of water and organic substances, consisting of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen has shown that at relatively low yields of final products (> or approximately 3 molecules/100 eV) no accumulation of radionuclides in concentrations reaching the average admissible concentration takes place [ru

  20. Disk shaped radiation sources for education purposes made of chemical fertilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Takao

    2008-01-01

    A method for fabricating a disk-shaped radiation source from material containing natural radioisotopes was developed. In this compression and formation method, a certain amount of powdered material is placed in a stainless steel formwork and compressed to form a solid disk. Using this method, educational radiation sources were fabricated using commercially available chemical fertilizers that naturally contain the radionuclide, 40 K, which emits either beta or gamma rays, at each disintegration. The compression and formation method was evaluated by inspecting eleven radiation sources thus fabricated. Then the suitability of the fertilizer radiation source as an education aid was evaluated. The results showed that the method could be used to fabricate radiation sources without the need for learning special skills or techniques. It was also found that the potassium fertilizer radiation source could be used to demonstrate that the inverse-square law can be applied to the distance between the radiation source and detector, and that an exponential relationship can be seen between the shielding effectiveness and the total thickness of the shielding materials. It is concluded that a natural fertilizer radiation source is an appropriate aid for demonstrating the characteristics of radiation. (author)

  1. Multiple stressor effects in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii – Toward understanding mechanisms of interaction between effects of ultraviolet radiation and chemical pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkaric, Muris [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, 8600, Duebendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Behra, Renata; Fischer, Beat B. [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, 8600, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Junghans, Marion [Swiss Center for Applied Ecotoxicology Eawag-EPFL, 8600, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Eggen, Rik I.L., E-mail: rik.eggen@eawag.ch [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, 8600, Duebendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Systematic study of multiple stressor effects of UVR and chemicals in C. reinhardtii. • UVR and chemicals did not act independently on algal photosynthesis and reproduction. • Multiple stressor effects of UVR and chemicals depended on chemical MOA. • Synergistic effect interactions not limited to oxidative stress inducing chemicals. • Multiple MOAs of UVR may limit applicability of current prediction models. - Abstract: The effects of chemical pollutants and environmental stressors, such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR), can interact when organisms are simultaneously exposed, resulting in higher (synergistic) or lower (antagonistic) multiple stressor effects than expected based on the effects of single stressors. Current understanding of interactive effects is limited due to a lack of mechanism-based multiple stressor studies. It has been hypothesized that effect interactions may generally occur if chemical and non-chemical stressors cause similar physiological effects in the organism. To test this hypothesis, we exposed the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to combinations of UVR and single chemicals displaying modes of action (MOA) similar or dissimilar to the impact of UVR on photosynthesis. Stressor interactions were analyzed based on the independent action model. Effect interactions were found to depend on the MOA of the chemicals, and also on their concentrations, the exposure time and the measured endpoint. Indeed, only chemicals assumed to cause effects on photosynthesis similar to UVR showed interactions with UVR on photosynthetic yield: synergistic in case of Cd(II) and paraquat and antagonistic in case of diuron. No interaction on photosynthesis was observed for S-metolachlor, which acts dissimilarly to UVR. However, combined effects of S-metolachlor and UVR on algal reproduction were synergistic, highlighting the importance of considering additional MOA of UVR. Possible mechanisms of stressor effect interactions are

  2. Multiple stressor effects in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii – Toward understanding mechanisms of interaction between effects of ultraviolet radiation and chemical pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korkaric, Muris; Behra, Renata; Fischer, Beat B.; Junghans, Marion; Eggen, Rik I.L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Systematic study of multiple stressor effects of UVR and chemicals in C. reinhardtii. • UVR and chemicals did not act independently on algal photosynthesis and reproduction. • Multiple stressor effects of UVR and chemicals depended on chemical MOA. • Synergistic effect interactions not limited to oxidative stress inducing chemicals. • Multiple MOAs of UVR may limit applicability of current prediction models. - Abstract: The effects of chemical pollutants and environmental stressors, such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR), can interact when organisms are simultaneously exposed, resulting in higher (synergistic) or lower (antagonistic) multiple stressor effects than expected based on the effects of single stressors. Current understanding of interactive effects is limited due to a lack of mechanism-based multiple stressor studies. It has been hypothesized that effect interactions may generally occur if chemical and non-chemical stressors cause similar physiological effects in the organism. To test this hypothesis, we exposed the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to combinations of UVR and single chemicals displaying modes of action (MOA) similar or dissimilar to the impact of UVR on photosynthesis. Stressor interactions were analyzed based on the independent action model. Effect interactions were found to depend on the MOA of the chemicals, and also on their concentrations, the exposure time and the measured endpoint. Indeed, only chemicals assumed to cause effects on photosynthesis similar to UVR showed interactions with UVR on photosynthetic yield: synergistic in case of Cd(II) and paraquat and antagonistic in case of diuron. No interaction on photosynthesis was observed for S-metolachlor, which acts dissimilarly to UVR. However, combined effects of S-metolachlor and UVR on algal reproduction were synergistic, highlighting the importance of considering additional MOA of UVR. Possible mechanisms of stressor effect interactions are

  3. Epidemiological studies on radiation workers in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo Yong Choi; Hai Won Chung

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objectives: The aim of this study is to analyze the occupational exposure for external radiation and to evaluate radiation effects on Korean radiation workers. Methods: The National Dose Registry contains radiation exposure records for all monitored radiation workers since its creation in 1983. We are carrying out epidemiological survey for radiation workers. The items of information included personal identification, employment and dose data. The frequencies of various types of chromosome aberrations in radiation workers were compared with controls. The data were analyzed according to year, sex, age, duration of occupation, exposure dose, etc. using SPSS statistical package(version 15.0). The goodness-of-fit test for Poisson assumption and dispersion test for detecting heterogeneity for Poisson distribution were done with chromosomal aberrations among study subjects. Results: The total number of workers registered from 1983 to 2005 was 61,610. The number of workers steadily increased and the accumulated dose somewhat increased. The collective annual dose of radiation workers was 345.823 man Sv and the mean annual dose was 1.34mSv. The frequencies of chromosome aberrations in 102 workers were compared with those in 42 controls. The frequencies of all types of chromosome aberrations in the exposed subjects were higher than those in the control group. Poisson regression analysis showed that there was significant association of chromosome aberrations with radiation dose, duration of work, age and alcohol intake. We started to survey radiation workers in order to evaluate radiation effects, collected epidemiological data for 9,157 workers at present and analyzed their lifetime radiation exposure doses. Follow-up is carrying out using the Korean Mortality Data, Cancer Registry and individual investigation. Among study patients, 11 of 38 deaths were identified with cancer. Conclusions: The data on occupational doses shows that

  4. Study of radiation induced structural changes in nitrile rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardona, F.; Hill, D.J.T.; Pomery, P.J.; Whittaker, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Copolymers of butadiene (BD) and acrylonitrile (AN) (NBR rubber), have become important commercial material. NBR rubbers are part of a larger classification of products often referred to as special-purpose rubbers. Oil resistance is the most important property of nitrile rubbers, and refer to the ability of the vulcanised product to retain its original physical properties such as modulus, tensile strength, abrasion resistance and dimensions, while in contact with oils and fuels. Despite these reported advantages very few studies have been conducted on the radiation yields and structural changes in nitrile rubbers during exposure to high energy radiation. In this study we are investigating the stability against gamma and UV radiation, to different doses in vacuum, of butadiene, acrylonitrile and NBR copolymers with different composition ratio BD/AN. The mechanism of radiation induced structural changes is being investigated using experimental techniques such as ESR, NMR (Solid-state), FT-IR, RAMAN and UV spectroscopy. Also is being investigated the effect of irradiation on the mechanical properties of stressed and unstressed samples by TGA, DSC, DMA, Instron and Creep Test measurements. So far the main effect have been a marked radiation-induced loss of unsaturation in the butadiene units, cis to trans isomerization and formation of crosslink structures (intermolecular and intramolecular). One of the main challenges in the studies of NBR polymers is to observe directly the crosslinks produces by the radiation induced chemical reactions. IR spectroscopy is unsuitable because of the low molar absorbity of the peaks related to intermolecular crosslinking and the overlapping of the peaks (1630-1670 cm-1) related to intramolecular crosslinking (cyclization), with conjugated and nonconjugated (-C=C-; -C=N-) double bonds. A. K. Whittaker has shown that crosslink structures in PBD can be detected and measured directly using solid-state 13 C NMR. This technique

  5. Mutation induction in rice by radiation combined with chemical protectants and mutagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, A [Agricultural College, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    1970-03-01

    Seeds of the rice variety 'Dourado Precoce' were treated with different combinations of gamma rays, cysteine and EMS or gamma rays, cysteine and dES. Cysteine showed some protection against the effects of gamma radiation and combined gamma-ray + chemical treatments with regard to germination, seedling height and fertility. There are also indications of changes in the spectra of chlorophyll mutations. (author)

  6. Chemical systems in aqueous solutions for using in the holographic ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolau-Rebigan, S.

    1979-01-01

    Some types of chemical systems in aqueous solutions for utilization as active media in holographic ionizing radiation dosimeter are presented. One discussed some advantages of the holographic dosimeter comparatively with another existing types. It is outlined the advantages of using aqueousss solutions as active media in holographic dosimeter. (author)

  7. BYSTANDER EFFECTS, GENOMIC INSTABILITY, ADAPTIVE RESPONSE AND CANCER RISK ASSESSMENT FOR RADIATION AND CHEMICAL EXPOSURES

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is an increased interest in utilizing mechanistic data in support of the cancer risk assessment process for ionizing radiation and environmental chemical exposures. In this regard the use of biologically based dose-response models is particularly advocated. The aim is to pr...

  8. Study of detectors in beta radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, M. da P.P.; Xavier, M.; Caldas, L.V.E.

    1987-01-01

    Several commercial detectors used with gamma or X radiation are studied. Their sensibility and energetic dependence are analysed in exposures of beta radiation fields. A comparative evaluation with the reference detector (the extrapolation chamber) is presented. (M.A.C.) [pt

  9. Pilot-industrial plant for radiation-chemical finishing of textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burov, V.K.; Vanyushkin, B.M.; Voskoboev, A.E.

    1976-01-01

    A pilot technological radiational-chemical line for liquid-phase radiational-chemical finish of fabrics is described, which is being mounted at the Glukhov cotton group of enterprises now. It is designed primarily for the anti-microbe finish of cotton fabrics by grafting copper polyacrylate. The technological scheme is built on the principle of direct (combined) irradiation of the fabric impregnated by a monomer solution. Graft of the monomer to the fabric is performed by the radiational method. As source of radiation, an electron accelerator with the beam power of 0.4-0.7 Mev and with a biological protection has been employed. Depending on the thickness of the material irradiated and irradiation conditions, the fabric drive mechanism permits to change a number of irradiated fabric layers from 1 to 9 and by this to utilize in the most complete manner the energy of the accelerated electron beam. The nominal width of the irradiated material is 1000 m, the transportation velocity can vary in the range from 10 through 100 m/min. The radiational-chemical method of fabric finish is economical, highly productive and easily controllable

  10. Radiation-induced mammary carcinogenesis in rodent models. What's different from chemical carcinogenesis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Iizuka, Daisuke; Daino, Kazuhiro; Takabatake, Takashi; Okamoto, Mieko; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2009-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is one of a few well-characterized etiologic factors of human breast cancer. Laboratory rodents serve as useful experimental models for investigating dose responses and mechanisms of cancer development. Using these models, a lot of information has been accumulated about mammary gland cancer, which can be induced by both chemical carcinogens and radiation. In this review, we first list some experimental rodent models of breast cancer induction. We then focus on several topics that are important in understanding the mechanisms and risk modification of breast cancer development, and compare radiation and chemical carcinogenesis models. We will focus on the pathology and natural history of cancer development in these models, genetic changes observed in induced cancers, indirect effects of carcinogens, and finally risk modification by reproductive factors and age at exposure to the carcinogens. In addition, we summarize the knowledge available on mammary stem/progenitor cells as a potential target of carcinogens. Comparison of chemical and radiation carcinogenesis models on these topics indicates certain similarities, but it also indicates clear differences in several important aspects, such as genetic alterations of induced cancers and modification of susceptibility by age and reproductive factors. Identification of the target cell type and relevant translational research for human risk management may be among the important issues that are addressed by radiation carcinogenesis models. (author)

  11. Chemical vapor deposition diamond based multilayered radiation detector: Physical analysis of detection properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almaviva, S.; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.; Dolbnya, I.; Sawhney, K.; Tartoni, N.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, solid state photovoltaic Schottky diodes, able to detect ionizing radiation, in particular, x-ray and ultraviolet radiation, have been developed at the University of Rome 'Tor Vergata'. We report on a physical and electrical properties analysis of the device and a detailed study of its detection capabilities as determined by its electrical properties. The design of the device is based on a metal/nominally intrinsic/p-type diamond layered structure obtained by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition of homoepitaxial single crystal diamond followed by thermal evaporation of a metallic contact. The device can operate in an unbiased mode by using the built-in potential arising from the electrode-diamond junction. We compare the expected response of the device to photons of various energies calculated through Monte Carlo simulation with experimental data collected in a well controlled experimental setup i.e., monochromatic high flux x-ray beams from 6 to 20 keV, available at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron in Harwell (U.K.).

  12. Chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes in subjects occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation or chemical clastogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalic, H.; Radosevic-Stasic, B.

    2002-01-01

    To get an insight into genotoxic risk in some occupations, in this study the chromosome aberration analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes was made in 20 physicians and nurses exposed to a low dose of ionizing radiation in a hospital, 12 individuals working with X-rays in a cement factory and 19 technicians working with some chemical toxic agents in the laboratories of a medical school. The control group consisted of 14 sex- and age-matched unexposed persons living in the same district area. The data showed that the total number of chromosome aberrations in 200 scored metaphases in all examined groups were almost the same and inside the low-permitted values. In hospital workers, however, the percentage of acentric and dicentric fragments (1.63 ± 0.28 vs 0.31 ± 0.21 and 0.47 ± 0.18 vs 0.0, respectively) increased predominantly in contrast to cement-factory employees and laboratory workers, where a higher incidence of minutes (0.58 ± 0.19 vs 0.31 ± 0.2) or gaps (2.21 ± 0.37 vs 1.15 ± 1.15) was noticed. Moreover, in groups exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation (hospital and factory), a positive correlation was found between the total number of chromosome aberrations and the 6-year absorption dose or working period, suggesting an effect of cumulative dosage. (author)

  13. Biochemical studies on the effect of radiation on plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonies, R.M.M.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of gamma radiation, microwave radiation, interaction between gamma and microwave radiation and storage of radiated oil seeds (soybean and sesame) were investigated in this study to find out the best treatment which have the maximum reduction of anti nutritional factors (Trypsin inhibitor and lipoxygenase activities) without significant effect on the chemical constituents. The gamma rays was used at three doses of 2.5, 5.0 and 8.0 K.Gy, microwave radiation was at 70 level power for 2 and 4 mins, and the storage of seeds was at rome temperature, R.H.50-55% for 6 months. The results showed no significant changes in the chemical constituents (ash, moisture, protein, carbohydrate, lipid) in both investigated seeds under all treatments. On the other hand, the best treatments which had highly significant reduction effects on the anti nutritional factors (trypsin inhibitor, tannins, phytic acis, phenols and lipoxygenase) were 8.0 K.Gy for 6 months, 4 mins M.W. for soybean, 2 mins M.W. for sesame and 8.0 K.Gy +4 mins M.W. at 6 months. 38 tabs., 39 figs., 279 refs

  14. Physical, chemical, and biological properties of radiocerium relevant to radiation protection guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Present knowledge of the relevant physical, chemical, and biological properties of radiocerium as a basis for establishing radiation protection guidelines is summarized. The first section of the report reviews the chemical and physical properties of radiocerium relative to the biological behavior of internally-deposited cerium and other lanthanides. The second section of the report gives the sources of radiocerium in the environment and the pathways to man. The third section of the report describes the metabolic fate of cerium in several mammalian species as a basis for predicting its metabolic fate in man. The fourth section of the report considers the biomedical effects of radiocerium in light of extensive animal experimentation. The last two sections of the report describe the history of radiation protection guidelines for radiocerium and summarize data required for evaluating the adequacy of current radiation protection guidelines. Each section begins with a summary of the most important findings that follow

  15. Repair of human DNA: radiation and chemical damage in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regan, J.D.; Setlow, R.B.

    1976-01-01

    We present the experimental evidence we have gathered, using a particular assay for DNA repair in human cells, the photolysis of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) incorporated during repair. This assay characterizes the sequence of repair events that occur in human cells after radiation, both ultraviolet and ionizing, and permits an estimation of the size of the average repaired region after these physical insults to DNA. We will discuss chemical insults to DNA and attempt to liken the repair processes after chemical damages of various kinds to those repair processes that occur in human DNA after damage from physical agents. We will also show results indicating that, under certain conditions, repair events resembling those seen after uv-irradiation can be observed in normal human cells after ionizing radiation. Furthermore the XP cells, defective in the repair of uv-induced DNA damage, show defective repair of these uv-like DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation

  16. Radiation purification of the chemical industry effluents and possibilities of realization of this method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petryaev, E.P.; Kovalevskaya, A.M.; Shlyk, V.G.; Savushkin, I.A.; Kazazyan, V.T.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation-chemical methods for synthetic fibre industry effluents purification from cyanides, sulphides and monomers, as well as for disinfection of circulation water and improvement in sedimental and filtering properties of waste active slurry in petrochemical industry are described. Chemical plant effluents are purified by 70-90% from cyanides at the dose rate of 0,3 - 0,5 Mrad, by 60 - 70% from sulphides and monomers at the dose of 0,2 Mrad. Circulation water of petroleum processing plant is disinfected at the dose of 0,08 Mrad; the rates of filtration and sedimentation of waste active slurry increase two and three fold, correspondingly, at the dose of 0,6 Mrad. The power of radiation sources required for the industrial realization of radiation purification of liquid wastes has been calculated

  17. Decomposition of halogenated organic chemicals in ionic liquid by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, A.; Taguchi, M.; Kojima, T.; Nagaishi, R.; Hiratsuka, H.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Halogenated organic chemicals such as polychlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, polychlorobiphenyls and hexachlorobenzene are widely spread in water environment. These pollutants are persistent against advanced oxidation treatments such as ozone/UV, ozone/hydrogen peroxide, ionizing radiation and photocatalysts. The ionizing radiation, however, can also produce homogeneously and quantitatively reducing species in water. On the other hand, room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) have unique properties such as nonflammable, high polarity, low melting point, hydrophobicity and wide electrochemical window. The combined method of reduction by ionizing radiation and RTILs is investigated as a new environmental conservation technology. Experimental: Chlorophenol (CP) is selected as model chemicals having the main frame of halogenated organic chemicals. Each o - , m - and p-CP were irradiated with 60 Co γ-ray in each diethylmethyl(2-methoxy-ethyl)ammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (DEMMA- TFSI), diethylmethyl(2-methoxyethyl)-ammonium tetrafluoroborate (DEMMA-BF4), methanol and ethanol as solvent. Decomposition of CP and formation of irradiation products were studied using HPLC, LC-MS and ion chromatography. Results and discussion: Concentration of CP in each solution decreased as a function of dose. G-value was estimated from the slope at the primary stage of the decomposition curve. The G(-CP) and G(Phenol) were shown in Table 1. G(-CP) in the aliphatic alcohols was 0.21 to 0.37, which is lower than G-value of reducing species in the alcohols, e.g. G=1.0 to 1.5 for solvated electron. Since the rate constant for reaction of CP with hydrated electron is 1.3 x 10 9 mol -1 ·dm 3 ·s -1 , the reverse reaction is considered to attribute. G(-CP) in DEMMA-TFSI or DEMMA-BF4 was about 2 to 3 times higher than that in each alcohol. Lifetime of the reducing species in RTILs would be longer than that in each alcohol. G(-CP) in DEMMA-TFSI decreased by adding acetone or oxygen

  18. Gamma radiation influence in physical and chemical characteristics of Bacaba Oil (Oenocarpus bacaba Mart.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Hugo Maia; Santos, Camila Oliveira dos; Cruz, Luis Paulo Adami; Arthur, Valter; Souza, Adriana Regia Marques de

    2015-01-01

    The bacaba (Oenocarpus bacaba Mart.) is a fruit originating from the Amazon forest, and its oil has similarity to the fatty acid composition of olive oil. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of bacaba oil submitted to gamma radiation in the of 5, 10 and 15 kGy. The extracted oil was irradiated at doses of 5, 10 and 15 kGy, and then the physical and chemical analysis were carried out: acid value, peroxide value, iodine value, refractive index, specific gravity, saponification value, coefficient specific extinction at 232 and 270 nm and color. Was possible to evidence that radiation promoted decrease in acidity of the oil 26.67%, 27.27% and 9.09%, respectively, at the doses of 5, 10 and 15 kGy, in relation to oil which has not gone through the process (standard). The values of specific gravity, refractive index and saponification value, have not changed, but the result of peroxides were significantly affected, increasing by 51.99%, 100.44% and 89.40% values relative to the standard. It was also observed a significant increase in K232 and K270 values, suggesting increased oxidation products, conjugated dienes and trienes. The oil color has been affected by the doses, generating a product with a more yellowish color and increased brightness. That way, from the analysis, it concluded that the use of gamma radiation at the doses used were not sufficient to make it, in the short term, unsafe for consumption, but changed substantially oil color. (author)

  19. Gamma radiation influence in physical and chemical characteristics of Bacaba Oil (Oenocarpus bacaba Mart.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, Hugo Maia; Santos, Camila Oliveira dos; Cruz, Luis Paulo Adami, E-mail: hmaiaf@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Tocantins (UFT), Palmas, TO (Brazil); Arthur, Valter, E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Irradiacao de Alimentos e Radioentomologia; Souza, Adriana Regia Marques de, E-mail: adriana.souza@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFGO), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Escola de Agronomia

    2015-07-01

    The bacaba (Oenocarpus bacaba Mart.) is a fruit originating from the Amazon forest, and its oil has similarity to the fatty acid composition of olive oil. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of bacaba oil submitted to gamma radiation in the of 5, 10 and 15 kGy. The extracted oil was irradiated at doses of 5, 10 and 15 kGy, and then the physical and chemical analysis were carried out: acid value, peroxide value, iodine value, refractive index, specific gravity, saponification value, coefficient specific extinction at 232 and 270 nm and color. Was possible to evidence that radiation promoted decrease in acidity of the oil 26.67%, 27.27% and 9.09%, respectively, at the doses of 5, 10 and 15 kGy, in relation to oil which has not gone through the process (standard). The values of specific gravity, refractive index and saponification value, have not changed, but the result of peroxides were significantly affected, increasing by 51.99%, 100.44% and 89.40% values relative to the standard. It was also observed a significant increase in K232 and K270 values, suggesting increased oxidation products, conjugated dienes and trienes. The oil color has been affected by the doses, generating a product with a more yellowish color and increased brightness. That way, from the analysis, it concluded that the use of gamma radiation at the doses used were not sufficient to make it, in the short term, unsafe for consumption, but changed substantially oil color. (author)

  20. Effects of the Mt. Pinatubo eruption on the radiative and chemical processes in the troposphere and stratosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinnison, D.E.; Grant, K.E.; Connell, P.S.; Wuebbles, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    The LLNL 2-D zonally averaged chemical-radiative transport model of the global atmosphere was used to study the effects of the June 15, 1991 eruption of the Mt. Pinatubo volcano on stratospheric processes. SAGE-11 time-dependent aerosol surface area density and optical extinction data were used as input into the model. By the winter solstice, 1991, a maximum change in column ozone was observed in the equatorial region of -2% (with heterogeneous chemical reactions on sulfuric acid aerosols) and -5.5% (including heterogeneous reactions plus radiative feedbacks). Maximum local ozone decreases of 12% were derived in the equatorial region, at 25 km, for winter solstice 1991. Column NO 2 peaked (-14%) at 30 S in October 1991. Local concentrations of NO x , Cl x , and HO x , in the lower stratosphere, were calculated to have changed between 30 S and 30 N by -40%, +80%, and +60% respectively

  1. Epidemiological studies in high background radiation areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, Suminori

    2012-01-01

    Below the doses of 100-200 mSv of radiation exposure, no acute health effect is observed, and the late health effects such as cancer are yet unclear. The problems making the risk evaluation of low dose radiation exposure difficult are the fact that the magnitude of expected health effects are small even if the risk is assumed to increase in proportion to radiation doses. As a result, studies need to be large particular when dealing with rare disease such as cancer. In addition, the expected health effects are so small that they can easily be masked by lifestyles and environmental factors including smoking. This paper will discuss cancer risk possibly associated with low-dose and low-dose rate radiation exposure, describing epidemiological studies on the residents in the high-background radiation areas. (author)

  2. Effect of Radiation processing on sensory and chemical characteristics of broad beans (Giza,2)(Vicia Faba)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, A.A.; El-Niely, F.G.

    2002-01-01

    Broad bean is the important leguminous protein consumed in egypt as a source of protein diet. The most popular way of preparing beans is the stewd form (Fool Medames). However, great losses due to insect infestation occur during storage. To combat these losses radiation processing has been used as an effective alternative of chemical fumigants to combat insect pets. The beans were irradiated at 25.5, 10 and kgy. The effects of treatments were investigated on sensory and chemical characteristics and on the solubility of broad beans protein, the amino acids content and on the nutritive value of bean protein from the view of its amino acids profile. The results of study indicate that the sensory evaluation of sewed irradiated 2.5 and 5 kGy samples revealed no significantdiffference in hardness, gumminess and acceptability. moreover, no significant changes in adhesivess, between samples irradiated at 5, 10 and 20 KGy, irradiation up to 20 KGy was found to improve the hardness of stewed broad bean which would improve the quality of broad of bean

  3. Cooperative biological effects between ionizing radiation and other physical and chemical agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manti, Lorenzo; D'Arco, Annalisa

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation (IR), at environmentally and therapeutically relevant doses or as a result of diagnostics or accidents, causes cyto- and genotoxic damage. However, exposure to IR alone is a rare event as it occurs in spatial and temporal combination with several physico-chemical agents. Some of these are of known noxiousness, as is the case with chemical compounds at high dose, hence additive/synergistic effects can be expected or have been demonstrated. Conversely, the cellular toxicity of other agents, such as non-ionizing electromagnetic fields (EMFs), is only presumed and their short- and long-term cooperation on IR-induced damage remains undetermined. In this review, we shall examine evidence in support of the interplay between spatially and/or temporally related environmentally relevant stressors. In vitro or animal-based studies as well as epidemiological surveys have generally examined the combined action of no more than a couple of known or potentially DNA-damaging agents. Moreover, most existing research mainly focused on short-term effects of combined exposures. Hence, it is important that quantitative research addresses the issue of the possible cooperation between chronic exposure to environmental trace contaminants and exposure to EMFs, examining not only the modulation of damage acutely induced by IR but also long-term genome stability. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Combined effects of radiation and chemical reaction on MHD flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (2016) have studied unsteady MHD flow in porous media over exponentially accelerated plate ... boundary layer flow of heat and mass transfer over a moving vertical plate with suction. ... flow considering free convection over a porous plate.

  5. Study of the gamma radiation of ionium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curie, I

    1949-12-01

    A Geiger counter study has been made of the ..gamma.. radiation of ionium. Eleven quanta of the L radiation of radium were observed for every hundred ..cap alpha.. disintegrations, and three ..gamma.. rays were found with energies of 68, 140, and 240 keV at a rate of 0.85, 0.33, 0.05 quanta, respectively, for 100 disintegrations. It is noted that the radiation spectrum of ionium as a whole is difficult to interpret. In the course of this work, the author calculated the efficiency of a thin-walled aluminum counter, both for the L radiation of radium and for ..gamma.. rays of 68 keV. The author also measured, for soft radiation, the ratio between the efficiency of a thin-walled aluminum counter and that of a similar counter lined with 0.11 mm of lead.

  6. Annealing of chemical radiation damage in zirconium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahamood, Aysha; Chandunni, E.; Nair, S.M.K.

    1979-01-01

    A kinetic study of the annealing of γ-irradiation damage in zirconium nitrate is presented. The annealing can be represented as a combination of a first order and a second order process. It is considered that the first order process is the combination of close correlated pairs of Osup(-) and NO fragments and the second order process involves the single reaction of random recombination of the fragments throughout the crystal. (auth.)

  7. Radiation-chemical concepts applied to the wholesomeness evaluation of irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basson, R.A.

    1977-06-01

    Food irradiation has anomalously been classified as a food additive rather than as a processing method. The justification for this is that chemical changes take place during the process. However, most foodstuffs consist of a large number of constituents, most of which are present in small concentrations. As a result, the amounts of radiolysis products which may be formed are far too low for identification and measurement, even by conventional analytical methods. Radiation-chemical knowledge is applied to determine the probable nature and concentration of reaction products produced in fruits. Fruits consist mainly of water and carbohydrates, with small amounts of protein, fat, inorganic material and vitamins as 'contaminants'. The real situation is exceedingly complex, but, using this simple model as a first approximation, predictions which may be verified in a relatively simple experimental scheme are made on the radiation stability of a typical fruit. Calculations using known radiation-chemical data show that, in the case of the mango, only carbohydrates are present in sufficient concentration and of sufficient sensitivity to merit attention from a toxicological viewpoint. Experimentally, the radiation sensitivity of numerous constituents of the fruit has been compared with that of glucose and, apart from a few exceptions whose concentrations are minimal, results obtained agree well with predicted values [af

  8. Perspective of radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Manwei

    1987-01-01

    The area of the applications of radiation techniques is very wide. This paper only relates to the applications of radiation techniques in industries including radiation chemical industry, radiation processing of foods and environmental protection by radiation, but the nuclear instruments and the instrumentations of radiation are out-side of our study. (author)

  9. Aerosol direct radiative effects over the northwest Atlantic, northwest Pacific, and North Indian Oceans: estimates based on in-situ chemical and optical measurements and chemical transport modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Bates

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The largest uncertainty in the radiative forcing of climate change over the industrial era is that due to aerosols, a substantial fraction of which is the uncertainty associated with scattering and absorption of shortwave (solar radiation by anthropogenic aerosols in cloud-free conditions (IPCC, 2001. Quantifying and reducing the uncertainty in aerosol influences on climate is critical to understanding climate change over the industrial period and to improving predictions of future climate change for assumed emission scenarios. Measurements of aerosol properties during major field campaigns in several regions of the globe during the past decade are contributing to an enhanced understanding of atmospheric aerosols and their effects on light scattering and climate. The present study, which focuses on three regions downwind of major urban/population centers (North Indian Ocean (NIO during INDOEX, the Northwest Pacific Ocean (NWP during ACE-Asia, and the Northwest Atlantic Ocean (NWA during ICARTT, incorporates understanding gained from field observations of aerosol distributions and properties into calculations of perturbations in radiative fluxes due to these aerosols. This study evaluates the current state of observations and of two chemical transport models (STEM and MOZART. Measurements of burdens, extinction optical depth (AOD, and direct radiative effect of aerosols (DRE – change in radiative flux due to total aerosols are used as measurement-model check points to assess uncertainties. In-situ measured and remotely sensed aerosol properties for each region (mixing state, mass scattering efficiency, single scattering albedo, and angular scattering properties and their dependences on relative humidity are used as input parameters to two radiative transfer models (GFDL and University of Michigan to constrain estimates of aerosol radiative effects, with uncertainties in each step propagated through the analysis. Constraining the radiative

  10. CHEMICAL PROPERTIES STUDYS OF PEATLANDON VARIOUS LANDUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yondra Yondra

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural peat swamp forests converted can alter the soil chemical properties. This study aims to determine the extent to which changes in soil chemical properties that occur after the conversion of land from peat swamp forest to palm oil plantation, HTI Acacia crasicarpa, and sago plantation and to know which types of plants are sustainable on peatlands. The results showed that soil pH increased after the change of land function. While the water content decreased. Chemical properties such as C-organic, ash content, CEC, alkaline saturation, macro nutrients (NPK and bases can be changed also undergo changes after undergoing landuse changes, but no violations based on the law made by the government in pp No 25 of 2000 on the criteria of peatland damage and government regulation no. 150 of 2000 on the control of soil damage for biomass production. Sago is the most sustainable plant compared to others due to changes in soil chemical properties not too much different from other landuse although planted in the long term.

  11. Occupational radiation exposure and mortality study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppock, E.; Dobson, D.; Fair, M.

    1992-06-01

    An epidemiological cohort study of some 300,000 Canadians enrolled in the National Dose Registry (NDR) is being undertaken to determine if there is excess cancer or other causes of mortality among those workers who are occupationally exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. The results of this study may provide better understanding of the dose-response relationship for low doses of ionizing radiation and aid in the verification of risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer mortality. The Department of National Health and Welfare (DNHW) is responsible for the Registry; this study is being carried out by the Bureau of Radiation and Medical Devices (BRMD) with financial assistance and co-operation of various agencies including Statistics Canada and the Atomic Energy Control Board

  12. Role of radiation in chemical leukemogenesis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajitani, Takashi; Hamada, Katsutomo; Ito, Takaaki; Yokoro, Kenjiro

    1980-01-01

    Leukemia was induced in adult mice 6 to 8 months of age by the combined use of x-rays and N-nitrosoethylurea (NEU). Changes in thymocytes due to irradiation with x-rays were studied in order to determine the mechanism of leukemogenesis. The incidence of leukemia was 61.3% in mice given sucessive doses of NEU immediately after whole-body irradiation with x-rays and 18.8% in mice given successive doses of NEU 3 months after whole-body irradiation with x-rays. The thymus weight, the thymocyte count, the mitotic index in thymocytes, and the rate of DNA-synthesizing cells in the thymus decreased rapidly in both adult and young adult mice that underwent whole-body irradiation (400 R). The lowest values were observed 3 days after irradiation. The thymus weight and thymocyte count in the irradiated mice returned to within normal range 7 to 8 days after irradiation (the values were almost the same as those before irradiation). Rapid rebound phenomena were observed in the rate of DNA-synthesizing cells and mitotic index in the thymus 5 days after irradiation. The results suggest that there is a close relationship between the incidence of leukemia and thymocyte activity after irradiation with x-rays; that is, there is a large percentage of juvenile cells with energetic proliferation capacity. (Tsunoda, M.)

  13. Study of the chemical sputtering in Tore-Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambe, A.

    2002-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis focuses on the interactions between energetic particles coming from thermonuclear plasma and the inner components of a fusion machine. This interaction induces two major problems: erosion of the wall, and tritium retention. This report treats the erosion of carbon based materials. The first part is devoted to chemical sputtering, that appears to be the principal erosion mechanism, compared to physical sputtering and radiation enhanced sublimation that both can be limited. Chemical sputtering has been studied in situ in the tokamak Tore-Supra for ohmic and lower hybrid (LH) heated discharges, by means of mass spectrometry and optical spectroscopy. We have shown that it is necessary to take into account both methane and heavier hydrocarbons (C 2 D x and C 3 D y ) in the determination of the chemical sputtering yield. It is found that for the ohmic discharges, the sputtering yield of CD 4 (Y CD4 ) is highly flux (φ) dependent, showing a variation of the form: Y CD4 ∝ φ -0.23 . The experimental study also reveals that an increase of the surface temperature induces an augmentation of Y CD4 . The interpretation and the modelling of the experimental results have been performed with a Monte Carlo code (BBQ. In the second part of this work, we have developed and installed an infrared spectroscopy diagnostic in the 0.8-1.6, μm wavelength range dedicated to the measurement of surface temperature, and the identification of atomic and molecular lines emitted during plasma/wall interactions. In the third part, we present the feasibility study of an in situ tungsten deposition process at low temperature(<80 deg C) in order to suppress the chemical sputtering. This study shows that, with this method call Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (PACVD), we are able to coat the whole inner vessel of a tokamak with 1 μm of tungsten. (author)

  14. X-ray photoemission analysis of chemically modified TlBr surfaces for improved radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, A. J.; Voss, L. F.; Beck, P. R.; Graff, R. T.; Conway, A. M.; Nikolic, R. J.; Payne, S. A.; Lee, J.-S.; Kim, H.; Cirignano, L.; Shah, K.

    2013-01-01

    We subjected device-grade TlBr to various chemical treatments used in room temperature radiation detector fabrication to determine the resulting surface composition and electronic structure. As-polished TlBr was treated separately with HCl, SOCl 2 , Br:MeOH and HF solutions. High-resolution photoemission measurements on the valence band electronic structure and Tl 4f, Br 3d, Cl 2p and S 2p core lines were used to evaluate surface chemistry and shallow heterojunction formation. Surface chemistry and valence band electronic structure were correlated with the goal of optimizing the long-term stability and radiation response

  15. Combining scanning tunneling microscopy and synchrotron radiation for high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy with chemical, electronic, and magnetic contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, M.L.; Chien, T.Y.; Preissner, C.; Madhavan, V.; Diesing, D.; Bode, M.; Freeland, J.W.; Rose, V.

    2012-01-01

    The combination of high-brilliance synchrotron radiation with scanning tunneling microscopy opens the path to high-resolution imaging with chemical, electronic, and magnetic contrast. Here, the design and experimental results of an in-situ synchrotron enhanced x-ray scanning tunneling microscope (SXSTM) system are presented. The system is designed to allow monochromatic synchrotron radiation to enter the chamber, illuminating the sample with x-ray radiation, while an insulator-coated tip (metallic tip apex open for tunneling, electron collection) is scanned over the surface. A unique feature of the SXSTM is the STM mount assembly, designed with a two free-flex pivot, providing an angular degree of freedom for the alignment of the tip and sample with respect to the incoming x-ray beam. The system designed successfully demonstrates the ability to resolve atomic-scale corrugations. In addition, experiments with synchrotron x-ray radiation validate the SXSTM system as an accurate analysis technique for the study of local magnetic and chemical properties on sample surfaces. The SXSTM system's capabilities have the potential to broaden and deepen the general understanding of surface phenomena by adding elemental contrast to the high-resolution of STM. -- Highlights: ► Synchrotron enhanced x-ray scanning tunneling microscope (SXSTM) system designed. ► Unique STM mount design allows angular DOF for tip alignment with x-ray beam. ► System demonstrates ability to resolve atomic corrugations on HOPG. ► Studies show chemical sensitivity with STM tip from photocurrent and tunneling. ► Results show system's ability to study local magnetic (XMCD) properties on Fe films.

  16. Chemical Processing effects on the radiation doses measured by Film Dosimeter System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihai, F.

    2009-01-01

    Halide film dosimetry is a quantitative method of measurement of the radiation doses. The fog density and chemical processing of the dosimeter film affect the radiation dose measurement accuracy. This work presents the effect of the developer solution concentration on the response of the dosimetric film which different fog densities. Thus, three batches of film, dosimeters with following fog density 0.312 ± 1.31 %, 0.71 ± 0.59% and 0.77 ± 0.81 %, were irradiated to 137 Cs standard source to dose value of 1mSv. The halide films have been chemical processed at different concentrations of the developer solution: 20 %; 14.29 %; 11.11%; all other physics-chemical conditions in baths of development have been kept constants. Concentration of 20% is considered to be chemical processed standard conditions of the films. In case of the films exposed to 1 mSv dose, optical density recorded on the low fog films processed at 20% developer solution is rather closed of high fog film optical densities processed at 11.11% developer solution concentration. Also, the chemical processing effect on the image contrast was taken into consideration

  17. Study on external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seoung Yul; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Ji, Young Hoon; Lee, Dong Han; Lee, Dong Hoon; Choi, Mun Sik; Yoo, Dae Heon; Lee, Hyo Nam; Kim, Kyeoung Jung

    1999-04-01

    To develop the therapy technique which promote accuracy and convenience in external radiation therapy, to obtain the development of clinical treatment methods for the global competition. The contents of the R and D were 1. structure, process and outcome analysis in radiation therapy department. 2. Development of multimodality treatment in radiation therapy 3. Development of computation using networking techniques 4. Development of quality assurance (QA) system in radiation therapy 5. Development of radiotherapy tools 6. Development of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) tools. The results of the R and D were 1. completion of survey and analysis about Korea radiation therapy status 2. Performing QA analysis about ICR on cervix cancer 3. Trial of multicenter randomized study on lung cancers 4. Setting up inter-departmental LAN using MS NT server and Notes program 5. Development of ionization chamber and dose-rate meter for QA in linear accelerator 6. Development on optimized radiation distribution algorithm for multiple slice 7. Implementation on 3 dimensional volume surface algorithm and 8. Implementation on adaptor and cone for IORT

  18. Study on external beam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seoung Yul; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Ji, Young Hoon; Lee, Dong Han; Lee, Dong Hoon; Choi, Mun Sik; Yoo, Dae Heon; Lee, Hyo Nam; Kim, Kyeoung Jung

    1999-04-01

    To develop the therapy technique which promote accuracy and convenience in external radiation therapy, to obtain the development of clinical treatment methods for the global competition. The contents of the R and D were 1. structure, process and outcome analysis in radiation therapy department. 2. Development of multimodality treatment in radiation therapy 3. Development of computation using networking techniques 4. Development of quality assurance (QA) system in radiation therapy 5. Development of radiotherapy tools 6. Development of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) tools. The results of the R and D were 1. completion of survey and analysis about Korea radiation therapy status 2. Performing QA analysis about ICR on cervix cancer 3. Trial of multicenter randomized study on lung cancers 4. Setting up inter-departmental LAN using MS NT server and Notes program 5. Development of ionization chamber and dose-rate meter for QA in linear accelerator 6. Development on optimized radiation distribution algorithm for multiple slice 7. Implementation on 3 dimensional volume surface algorithm and 8. Implementation on adaptor and cone for IORT.

  19. Chemical stress relaxation of ethylene-propylene copolymer rubber by heat and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, M.; Okada, S.; Kuriyama, I.

    1980-01-01

    An attempt was made to shorten the evaluation time for the deterioration under various conditions caused by chemical reactions by extending the time-temperature superposition principle for the stress relaxation of rubber. In the case of deterioration by radiation instead of by heat, a time-dose rate reduction is proposed and the master curves obtained for chemical-stress relaxation of rubber. A new method which contains a numerical analysis of stress decay curves is proposed to obtain the rate of crosslinking and scission under irradiation for already crosslinked samples. (author)

  20. Multiple stressor effects in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii--toward understanding mechanisms of interaction between effects of ultraviolet radiation and chemical pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkaric, Muris; Behra, Renata; Fischer, Beat B; Junghans, Marion; Eggen, Rik I L

    2015-05-01

    The effects of chemical pollutants and environmental stressors, such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR), can interact when organisms are simultaneously exposed, resulting in higher (synergistic) or lower (antagonistic) multiple stressor effects than expected based on the effects of single stressors. Current understanding of interactive effects is limited due to a lack of mechanism-based multiple stressor studies. It has been hypothesized that effect interactions may generally occur if chemical and non-chemical stressors cause similar physiological effects in the organism. To test this hypothesis, we exposed the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to combinations of UVR and single chemicals displaying modes of action (MOA) similar or dissimilar to the impact of UVR on photosynthesis. Stressor interactions were analyzed based on the independent action model. Effect interactions were found to depend on the MOA of the chemicals, and also on their concentrations, the exposure time and the measured endpoint. Indeed, only chemicals assumed to cause effects on photosynthesis similar to UVR showed interactions with UVR on photosynthetic yield: synergistic in case of Cd(II) and paraquat and antagonistic in case of diuron. No interaction on photosynthesis was observed for S-metolachlor, which acts dissimilarly to UVR. However, combined effects of S-metolachlor and UVR on algal reproduction were synergistic, highlighting the importance of considering additional MOA of UVR. Possible mechanisms of stressor effect interactions are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durant, J.L. Jr. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  2. Theoretical studies of chemical reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatz, G.C. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This collaborative program with the Theoretical Chemistry Group at Argonne involves theoretical studies of gas phase chemical reactions and related energy transfer and photodissociation processes. Many of the reactions studied are of direct relevance to combustion; others are selected they provide important examples of special dynamical processes, or are of relevance to experimental measurements. Both classical trajectory and quantum reactive scattering methods are used for these studies, and the types of information determined range from thermal rate constants to state to state differential cross sections.

  3. A radiation measurement study on cellular phone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Yusof Mohd Ali; Rozaimah Abd Rahim; Roha Tukimin; Khairol Nizam Mohamed; Mohd Amirul Nizam Mohamad Thari; Ahmad Fadzli Ahmad Sanusi

    2007-01-01

    This paper will explain the radiation level produced by various selected cellular phone from various models and brands available in the market. The result obtained from this study will also recommend whether a cellular phone is safe for public usage or it might cause any effect on public health. Finally, a database of radiation measurement level produced by selected various cellular phone will also be developed and exhibited in this paper. (Author)

  4. Laboratory and Feasibility Study for Industrial Wastewater Effluents Treatment by Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimek, Z.; Głuszewski, W. [Centre for Radiation Research and Technology, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-07-01

    The study of wastewater treatment by radiation regarding chemical processes contribution and physical-chemical separation of highly concentrated non-organic pollutants deposited in specific industrial waste are proposed. Laboratory stand should be build and the study should be performed to confirm possible mechanism of the sedimentation process of nonorganic pollutants during separation initiated by ionizing radiation. Evaluation from technical and economical point of view of this specific radiation technology and feasibility study preparation for industrial facility will be the main output at the final stage of the project. (author)

  5. Laboratory and Feasibility Study for Industrial Wastewater Effluents Treatment by Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimek, Z.; Głuszewski, W.

    2012-01-01

    The study of wastewater treatment by radiation regarding chemical processes contribution and physical-chemical separation of highly concentrated non-organic pollutants deposited in specific industrial waste are proposed. Laboratory stand should be build and the study should be performed to confirm possible mechanism of the sedimentation process of nonorganic pollutants during separation initiated by ionizing radiation. Evaluation from technical and economical point of view of this specific radiation technology and feasibility study preparation for industrial facility will be the main output at the final stage of the project. (author)

  6. Effect of crosslinking on the physico-chemical properties of radiation grafted PEM fuel cell membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed Mahmoud Nasef; Hamdani Saidi

    2006-01-01

    The effect of crosslinking on the physico-chemical properties of radiation grafted proton conducting membranes (PFA-g-PSSA) was investigated. The membranes were prepared by radiation induced grafting of styrene/divinylbenzene (DVB) mixtures onto poly (tetrafluoroethylene-co-perfluorovinyl either) (PFA) films followed by sulfonation reactions. The variation of DVB content in the grafting mixture was in the range of 1-4 vol %. The equivalent weight, swelling, behavior and the proton conductivity of crosslinked membranes having equal degrees of grafting prepared found to be dependent predominantly on the level of crosslinking. The obtained membranes were found to posses a good combination of physico-chemical properties that is matching the commercial Nation 117 membranes

  7. Radiation transformation studies: are they relevant to radiation protection problems?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seymour, C.B.; Mothersill, C.

    1988-01-01

    Because of the difficulties of studying radio-carcinogenesis in humans, several in vitro systems are utilised. These cell transformation systems are reviewed, with particular emphasis on their relevance to human radiological protection problems. Most available systems use rodent fibroblasts. These are discussed in detail. Attention is drawn to certain artefacts which can cause problems with interpretation of such data. The relevance of these systems is questionable because of species differences, particularly concerning life span and because most human tumours are derived from epithelial cells. New epithelial culture systems and three-dimensional tissue culture methods becoming available are discussed in the light of their potential for addressing radiation protection problems. (author)

  8. Estimation of the optimal operating conditions for a radiation chemical neutralization unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putilov, A.V.; Kamenetskaya, S.A.; Pshezhetskii, S.Ya.; Kazakov, M.S.; Kudryavtsev, S.L.; Petrukhin, N.V.; Misharin, B.A.; Koneev, V.Z.

    1985-01-01

    An estimate is made of the effect of the hydrodynamic conditions on the efficiency of foam units for the radiation chemical neutralization of impurities, taking into account the penetrating power of accelerated electrons having various energies. Expressions are obtained for calculating the efficiency of such units with sectionized operation of the chamber and taking account of the effect of incomplete mixing of the products of radiolysis through the height of the foam layer

  9. Protection by caffeine against oxic radiation damage and chemical carcinogens : mechanistic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesavan, P.C.

    1992-01-01

    There is little doubt that caffeine administered after exposure to UV light enhances the damage to cells and organisms by inhibiting photoreactivation, excision and/or recombinational repair. However, when already present in the system, it affords remarkable protection not only against O 2 -dependent component of radiation damage, but also against chemical carcinogens that require metabolic activation. Possible mechanistic aspects are discussed briefly. (author). 81 refs

  10. Induction of somatic mutations in ornamental plants by ionizing radiations and chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, B.M.; Abraham, V.

    1980-01-01

    Improvement in some ornamental plants through induction of somatic mutations by ionizing radiations and chemical mutagens viz. colchicine, EMS and DS has been attempted. Mutants of high ornamental value have been evolved, isolated and multiplied in canna, perennial portulaca, tuberose, bougainvillea, hibiscus, daisy, lilies. These pertain to changes in colour, shape and size of flower and foliage. Procedural details on induction, isolation, stabilisation of the mutants and description of the new characteristics are presented. (author)

  11. Viscous-shock-layer solutions for turbulent flow of radiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, E. C.; Moss, J. N.

    1975-01-01

    The viscous-shock-layer equations for hypersonic laminar and turbulent flows of radiating or nonradiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium are presented for two-dimensional and axially-symmetric flow fields. Solutions were obtained using an implicit finite-difference scheme and results are presented for hypersonic flow over spherically-blunted cone configurations at freestream conditions representative of entry into the atmosphere of Venus. These data are compared with solutions obtained using other methods of analysis.

  12. Viscous shock layer solutions for turbulent flow of radiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, E. C.; Moss, J. N.

    1975-01-01

    The viscous shock layer equations for hypersonic laminar and turbulent flows of radiating or nonradiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium are presented for two-dimensional and axially symmetric flow fields. Solutions are obtained using an implicit finite difference scheme and results are presented for hypersonic flow over spherically blunted cone configurations at free stream conditions representative of entry into the atmosphere of Venus. These data are compared with solutions obtained using other methods of analysis.

  13. Contribution of orientational effects into radiation-chemical properties of segregated block copolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bol'bit, N.M.; Korneev, Yu.N.

    1992-01-01

    Model of radiolysis of microphase-separated block copolymers of PS with PB is proposed. According this scheme the radiation-chemical yields of paramagnetic centres and crosslinks in PB domains differ from those for the PB homopolymer by the value proportional to the fraction of ordered chain segments. This orientational small-scale order arises as a result of the deformation of chains in a domain in the direction perpendicular to the interphase

  14. The correlation schemes in calculations of the rate constants of some radiation chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorets, P.A.; Shostenko, A.G.; Kim, V.

    1983-01-01

    The various correlation relationships of the evaluation of the rate constants of radiation chemical reactions of addition, abstraction and isomerization were considered. It was shown that neglection of the influence of solvent can result in errors in calculations of rate constants equalling two orders in magnitude. Several examples of isokinetic relationship are given. The methods of calculation of transmission coefficient of reaction addition have been discussed. (author)

  15. Mechanisms of radiation - chemical conversion of high-paraffinic crude oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaikin, Yu.A.; Zaikina, R.F.; Silverman, J.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Regularities of radiation-thermal cracking (RTC) are studied in high-paraffinic oil. Irradiation of oil samples by 2 MeV electrons was performed using a special facility assembled at the electron accelerator ELU-4. The following characteristic RTC features were observed in oil with high contents of heavy paraffins: low level of isomerization in light RTC fractions; very high polymerization rate and low olefin contents in RTC products; relatively low yields of light fractions at low irradiation dose rates; increase in the molecular weight of the gasoline fraction as the irradiation dose rate grows. Similar intense polymerization of RTC products was observed in our experiments with such wastes of oil extraction as asphalt-pitch-paraffin sediments (APPS). Theoretically this feedstock contains great reserves of hydrogen, and, therefore, has high potential yields of light fractions. However, in this case RTC was accompanied by intense reactions of polymerization and chemical adsorption that limited the maximum yields of light RTC products to 40% in our experiments. A specific feature of APPS radiation-induced destruction is formation of the big amount of a reactive paraffinic residue. As a result of interaction with the polymerizing residue the light liquid fractions were completely absorbed and the heavy residue got denser and solidified after several days of exposure at room temperature. RTC regularities in heavy paraffinic oil differ from those observed both in highly viscous petroleum feedstock and light paraffin oils. We attribute these observations to the behavior of heavy alkyl radicals that initiate polymerization and isomerization in heavy paraffin fractions

  16. Chain radiation-chemical oxidation of aromatic amines in polyvinylchloride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolninov, O.V.; Lisovskaya, I.A.; Milinchuk, V.K.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation-chemical oxidation of tetramethyldiaminediphenylmethane in polyvinylchloride (PVC) and polystyrene (PS) films was investigated in the presence of CBr 4 at 300 K. Radiation yields (G) of 70 and 1 were obtained for an oxidized amine form (Am + ) in PVC and PS, resp. High yields of Am + in PVC matrix indicate the chain character of an oxidation reaction. Triplet states, which form exciplexes with CBr 4 were established to participate in oxidation reactions. The kinetic scheme suggested for the chain radiation oxidation of Am takes into account energy transfer, formation and degradation of the excited states of molecules resulting in the initiation and propagation of the chain on the account of active particles. (author)

  17. Human genetic marker for resistance to radiations and chemicals. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieberman, H.B.

    1998-01-01

    'The broad objective of the project is to understand the molecular basis for the response of cells to radiations and chemicals, with the pragmatic goal of being able to identify human subpopulations that are exceptionally sensitive to DNA damaging agents. The project focuses on HRAD9, a human orthologue of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene rad9. S. pombe rad9::ura4+ mutant cells are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation, UV and many chemicals, such as the DNA synthesis inhibitor hydroxyurea. They also lack the ability to delay cycling transiently in S phase or in G2 following a block in DNA replication or after incurring DNA damage, respectively -i.e., they lack checkpoint controls. The attempt by mutant cells to progress through mitosis in the absence of fully intact DNA accounts at least in part for their sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Cells bearing rad9::ura4+ also aberrantly regulate UVDE, an enzyme that participates in a secondary DNA excision repair pathway. The key role played by S. pombe rad9 in promoting resistance to chemicals and radiations suggests that the evolutionarily conserved human cognate also has important functions in mammals. The first set of aims in this proposal centers on characterizing the structure and expression of HRAD9, to assess structure/function relationships and potentially link protein activity to a specific tissue. The next set of aims focuses on determining the role of HRAD9 in radio/chemoresponsiveness and cancer.'

  18. Characterization of chemical compounds for dosimetry of the radiation in industrial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galante, Ana Maria Sisti

    1999-01-01

    Different chemical compounds have been studied to optimize dosimetric systems in irradiation processes. In this study 2,3,5 Triphenyl -2H- Tetrazolium Chloride, Brilliant Cresyl Blue, Bromocresol Green and Potassium Nitrate were investigated for their merits or faults, for 60 Co gamma field, in order to verify if can be considered as dosimeters. Fricke solution was used as reference dosimeter to determine absorption dose rates at the gamma facilities.Only Bromocresol Green and Potassium Nitrate are recommended for dosimetry purposes since the main characteristics were achieved. The other two compounds could be used in dosimetry with changes in their formulation. Bromocresol Green and potassium Nitrate are reproducible and radiation sensitive for absorbed doses from 300 Gy to 150 kGy Bromocresol Green was used in liquid form and Potassium Nitrate was prepared in solid pellets form. Spectrophotometry in the visible region was used as the main detection technique, which allows relating optical absorption, before and after irradiation, with the absorbed dose. The maximum absorption wavelength for each compound was observed at 450-460nm for bromocresol Green and 546nm for Potassium Nitrate. Dose calibration curves are linear for both compounds in all dose intervals. When irradiated with accelerated electrons, with energies between o,9 MeV and 1,5MeV, optical absorption intensification, of about 2,6 times, was observed when comparing results for Potassium Nitrate, with those for gamma rays. All the evaluations are presented in this work. (author)

  19. Impact of uncertainties in inorganic chemical rate constants on tropospheric composition and ozone radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Newsome

    2017-12-01

    regions such as the tropics, poles and upper troposphere are most uncertain. This chemical uncertainty is sufficiently large to suggest that rate constant uncertainty should be considered alongside other processes when model results disagree with measurement. Calculations for the pre-industrial simulation allow a tropospheric ozone radiative forcing to be calculated of 0.412 ± 0.062 W m−2. This uncertainty (13 % is comparable to the inter-model spread in ozone radiative forcing found in previous model–model intercomparison studies where the rate constants used in the models are all identical or very similar. Thus, the uncertainty of tropospheric ozone radiative forcing should expanded to include this additional source of uncertainty. These rate constant uncertainties are significant and suggest that refinement of supposedly well-known chemical rate constants should be considered alongside other improvements to enhance our understanding of atmospheric processes.

  20. Dosimetric characterization of chemical-vapor-deposited diamond film irradiated with UV and beta radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meléndrez, R.; Chernov, V.; Pedroza-Montero, M.; Barboza-Flores, M.

    2003-03-01

    Diamond is an excellent prospect for clinical radiation dosimetry due to its tissue-equivalence properties and being chemically inert. The use of diamond in radiation dosimetry has been halted by the high market price; although recently the capability of growing high quality polycrystalline has renewed the interest in using diamond films as detectors and dosimeters. In the present work we have characterized the dosimetric properties of diamond films synthesized by using chemical vapor deposition. The thermoluminescence (TL) of UV and beta exposed samples shows a glow curve composed of at least four peaks; one located around 587 K presents excellent TL properties suitable for dosimetric applications with ionizing and non ionizing radiation. The TL excitation spectrum exhibits maximum TL efficiency at 220 nm. The samples show regions of linear as well as supralinear behavior as a function or irradiation dose. The linear dose dependence was found for up to sixteen minutes of UV irradiation and 300 Gy for beta irradiated samples. The activation energy and the frequency factor were determined and found in the range of 0.32 - 0.89 eV and 1.1x10^2 - 2x10^8s_-1, respectively. The observed TL performance is reasonable appropriate to justify further investigation of diamond films as radiation dosimeters.

  1. Effect of nuclear radiation on the electrical properties of chemical double layer capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laghari, J.R.; Hammoud, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of nuclear radiation on the electrical properties of chemical double layer capacitors are determined. The capacitors were irradiated in a 2-MW nuclear reactor to different fluence levels. The exposure rate was 2.2 x 10 10 n/cm 2 · s of thermal neutrons, 9.52 x 10 8 n/cm 2 · s of fast neutrons (> 2 MeV), and 1.47 x 10 6 rad/h of gamma radiation. The properties measured during and after irradiation included the capacitance, equivalent series resistance, and open-circuit voltage. The post-irradiation effect on the leakage current was also determined. It was found that while the capacitance increased during irradiation, the equivalent series resistance and the open-circuit voltage decreased slightly during irradiation. Changes in these properties were not permanent s was evident from post-irradiation measurements. The leakage current did not show any significant change with radiation. The results indicate that chemical double layer capacitors can be suitably used as backup power source in electronic equipment operating in a radiation environment with total fluences up to 4.05 x 10 14 n/cm 2

  2. Physical and chemical changes in water pollutants caused by ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, K.

    1978-01-01

    Ionization and excitation as primary effects of ionizing radiation form secondary activated intermediary products (H and OH radicals and hydrated electrons esub(aq) - ) in water systems, which act on all in substances present in water. Physical and chemical changes speeding the sludge sedimentation in waste-water show complex dependences. It is, however, possible to prove them even at low radiation doses (0.07 to 0.35 kJ/kg). Chemical effects can be observed at higher radiation doses (1 to 10 kJ/kg) and are based on oxidative destruction of pollutants. Some of these reactions may be based on chain mechanisms (phenol oxidizing in water), but there are limited chances for application of these chain mechanisms in waste-water systems. Slight damage of biologically important macromolecules leads to changes, or even stops biological processes. Therefore, biological effects of ionizing radiation have the most remarkable impact. The utilization of these reactions in water management may be possible in suppressing biological ochration (ochre sedimentation) in wells and for ensuring hygienic conditions of sludge in waste-water processing for agrotechnical purposes. (author)

  3. Radiation: Rational use of diagnostic imaging studies in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are to recognize the biological effects of radiation; explain the action of ionizing radiation on the cell; list the main sources of ionizing radiation; to indicate imaging studies considering the danger of radiation; select the method of imaging saving radiation; rational use of imaging studies without repeating exams. [es

  4. Chemical and optical changes in freshwater dissolved organic matter exposed to solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osburn, C.L.; Morris, D.P.; Thorn, K.A.; Moeller, R.E.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the chemical and optical changes in the dissolved organic matter (DOM) from two freshwater lakes and a Sphagnum bog after exposure to solar radiation. Stable carbon isotopes and solid-state 13C-NMR spectra of DOM were used together with optical and chemical data to interpret results from experimental exposures of DOM to sunlight and from seasonal observations of two lakes in northeastern Pennsylvania. Solar photochemical oxidation of humic-rich bog DOM to smaller LMW compounds and to DIC was inferred from losses of UV absorbance, optical indices of molecular weight and changes in DOM chemistry. Experimentally, we observed a 1.2??? enrichment in ??13C and a 47% loss in aromatic C functionality in bog DOM samples exposed to solar UVR. Similar results were observed in the surface waters of both lakes. In late summer hypolimnetic water in humic Lake Lacawac, we observed 3 to 4.5??? enrichments in ??13C and a 30% increase in aromatic C relative to early spring values during spring mixing. These changes coincided with increases in molecular weight and UV absorbance. Anaerobic conditions of the hypolimnion in Lake Lacawac suggest that microbial metabolism may be turning over allochthonous C introduced during spring mixing, as well as autochthonous C. This metabolic activity produces HMW DOM during the summer, which is photochemically labile and isotopically distinct from allochthonous DOM or autochthonous DOM. These results suggest both photooxidation of allochthonous DOM in the epilimnion and autotrophic production of DOM by bacteria in the hypolimnion cause seasonal trends in the UV absorbance of lakes.

  5. Studies on radiation processing -Studies on application of radiation and radioisotopes-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Joon Ha; Yoon, Byeong Mok; Kim, Ki Yeop; Nho, Yeong Chang; Lee, Yeong Keun; Park, Soon Cheol; Na, Bong Joo; Kim, Jae Ho

    1994-08-01

    Radiation-grafting of acrylic acid onto LDPE was carried out by both simultaneous irradiation and pre-irradiation techniques. The effects of metal salts, and sulfuric acid addition, and solvent effect on enhancement of grafting yield were evaluated. The dose distributions of the Co-60 gamma irradiation facility and electron beam accelerator were measured using chemical dosimeters and CTA film dosimeters, respectively. An appropriate base PP was selected, and the effects of addition of various additives on the radiation resistance of the polymer. An air distillation column was examined using a Co-60 source to identify the origin of the malfunction of the column. (Author)

  6. Study on radiation-inducible genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sang Yong; Kim, Dong Ho; Joe, Min Ho; Song, Hyu Npa

    2012-01-01

    Transcription of previously identified radiation-inducible genes, uscA and cyoA, was examined responding to radiation. The putative promoter regions of both genes were cloned into pRS415 vector containing lacZ, and the core promoter region necessary for radiation response were determined through promoter deletion method. To investigate the role of uscA, which is assumed to be small RNA related with radiation response, a deletion mutant strain of uscA was constructed. However, uscA deletion did not affect bacterial survival against radiation exposure. The use of bacteria as anticancer agents has attracted interest. In this study, we tried to develop tumor targeting bacteria in which the radiation-inducible promoter activate a transgene encoding a cytotoxic protein. For outward secretion of anticancer protein produced inside bacteria, the N-terminal 140 amino acid of SspH1 was found to function as a secretion signal peptide. To create an attenuated tumor-targeting bacteria, Salmonella ptsI mutant strain was constructed, and we found that its virulence decreased. Finally, the tumor-targeting ability of ptsI mutant was verified by the use of in-vivo imaging analysis

  7. Study on radiation-inducible genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Yong; Kim, Dong Ho; Joe, Min Ho; Song, Hyu Npa

    2012-01-15

    Transcription of previously identified radiation-inducible genes, uscA and cyoA, was examined responding to radiation. The putative promoter regions of both genes were cloned into pRS415 vector containing lacZ, and the core promoter region necessary for radiation response were determined through promoter deletion method. To investigate the role of uscA, which is assumed to be small RNA related with radiation response, a deletion mutant strain of uscA was constructed. However, uscA deletion did not affect bacterial survival against radiation exposure. The use of bacteria as anticancer agents has attracted interest. In this study, we tried to develop tumor targeting bacteria in which the radiation-inducible promoter activate a transgene encoding a cytotoxic protein. For outward secretion of anticancer protein produced inside bacteria, the N-terminal 140 amino acid of SspH1 was found to function as a secretion signal peptide. To create an attenuated tumor-targeting bacteria, Salmonella ptsI mutant strain was constructed, and we found that its virulence decreased. Finally, the tumor-targeting ability of ptsI mutant was verified by the use of in-vivo imaging analysis.

  8. Enhancement of chemically induced reactive oxygen species production and DNA damage in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells by 872 MHz radiofrequency radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luukkonen, Jukka [Department of Environmental Science, University of Kuopio, Bioteknia 2, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland)], E-mail: Jukka.Luukkonen@uku.fi; Hakulinen, Pasi; Maeki-Paakkanen, Jorma [Department of Environmental Health, National Public Health Institute, P.O. Box 95, FI-70701 Kuopio (Finland); Juutilainen, Jukka; Naarala, Jonne [Department of Environmental Science, University of Kuopio, Bioteknia 2, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2009-03-09

    The objective of the study was to investigate effects of 872 MHz radiofrequency (RF) radiation on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and DNA damage at a relatively high SAR value (5 W/kg). The experiments also involved combined exposure to RF radiation and menadione, a chemical inducing intracellular ROS production and DNA damage. The production of ROS was measured using the fluorescent probe dichlorofluorescein and DNA damage was evaluated by the Comet assay. Human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were exposed to RF radiation for 1 h with or without menadione. Control cultures were sham exposed. Both continuous waves (CW) and a pulsed signal similar to that used in global system for mobile communications (GSM) mobile phones were used. Exposure to the CW RF radiation increased DNA breakage (p < 0.01) in comparison to the cells exposed only to menadione. Comparison of the same groups also showed that ROS level was higher in cells exposed to CW RF radiation at 30 and 60 min after the end of exposure (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). No effects of the GSM signal were seen on either ROS production or DNA damage. The results of the present study suggest that 872 MHz CW RF radiation at 5 W/kg might enhance chemically induced ROS production and thus cause secondary DNA damage. However, there is no known mechanism that would explain such effects from CW RF radiation but not from GSM modulated RF radiation at identical SAR.

  9. Enhancement of chemically induced reactive oxygen species production and DNA damage in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells by 872 MHz radiofrequency radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luukkonen, Jukka; Hakulinen, Pasi; Maeki-Paakkanen, Jorma; Juutilainen, Jukka; Naarala, Jonne

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate effects of 872 MHz radiofrequency (RF) radiation on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and DNA damage at a relatively high SAR value (5 W/kg). The experiments also involved combined exposure to RF radiation and menadione, a chemical inducing intracellular ROS production and DNA damage. The production of ROS was measured using the fluorescent probe dichlorofluorescein and DNA damage was evaluated by the Comet assay. Human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were exposed to RF radiation for 1 h with or without menadione. Control cultures were sham exposed. Both continuous waves (CW) and a pulsed signal similar to that used in global system for mobile communications (GSM) mobile phones were used. Exposure to the CW RF radiation increased DNA breakage (p < 0.01) in comparison to the cells exposed only to menadione. Comparison of the same groups also showed that ROS level was higher in cells exposed to CW RF radiation at 30 and 60 min after the end of exposure (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). No effects of the GSM signal were seen on either ROS production or DNA damage. The results of the present study suggest that 872 MHz CW RF radiation at 5 W/kg might enhance chemically induced ROS production and thus cause secondary DNA damage. However, there is no known mechanism that would explain such effects from CW RF radiation but not from GSM modulated RF radiation at identical SAR

  10. The use of isotopes and radiation in studies of pesticides, pesticide residues and agricultural pollution. Part of a coordinated programme of isotopic tracer-aided studies of the fate of foreign chemical residues in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breccia Fratadocchi, A.

    1975-12-01

    Metabolic pathway and biological activity of juvenile hormone (J.H.) and juvenile hormone analogues (J.H.A.). Studies were carried out with 14 C-leucine, 14 C-uracil, 14 C-juvenile hormone analogues (JHA), mainly Altozar (ethyl-3, 7, 11-trimethyl dodeca-2, 4-dienoathe) and Altosid (isopropyl-11-metoxy-3, 7, 11-trimethyl-dodeca-2,4-dienoathe), and with ( 14 C) or ( 3 H)-farnesyl methyl ether. Incorporation of 14 C-leucine into protein decreased progressively from crude homogenate to microsome-free subcellular fractions. In RNA biosynthesis the uridine incorporation showed a different behaviour pattern. In the crude homogenate in the presence of RNA-polymerase the incorporation of uridine-2- 14 C was lower in presence of J.H. or J.H.A. (particularly Altosid sup(R))than in the test control in agreement with the genetic effects of J.H. In the mitochondria-free subcellular fraction the incorporation of uridine-2- 14 C increased in the presence of J.H. and Altozar and decreased with Altosid, compared with the control, but in all these cases incorporation was higher than in the crude homogenate. The reduced incorporation of uridine-2- 14 C into RNA and leucine-U- 14 C into proteins in the presence of Altosid or Altozar indicates a genetic action of these compounds comparable to that of natural J.H. but slightly more efficient

  11. Analytical model of chemical phase and formation of DSB in chromosomes by ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barilla, Jiří; Lokajíček, Miloš; Pisaková, Hana; Simr, Pavel

    2013-03-01

    Mathematical analytical model of the processes running in individual radical clusters during the chemical phase (under the presence of radiomodifiers) proposed by us earlier has been further developed and improved. It has been applied to the data presented by Blok and Loman characterizing the oxygen effect in SSB and DSB formation (in water solution and at low-LET radiation) also in the region of very small oxygen concentrations, which cannot be studied with the help of experiments done with living cells. In this new analysis the values of all reaction rates and diffusion parameters known from literature have been made use of. The great increase of SSB and DSB at zero oxygen concentration may follow from the fact that at small oxygen concentrations the oxygen absorbs other radicals while at higher concentrations the formation of oxygen radicals prevails. It explains the double oxygen effect found already earlier by Ewing. The model may be easily extended to include also the effects of other radiomodifiers present in medium during irradiation.

  12. Analytical model of chemical phase and formation of DSB in chromosomes by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barilla, Jiři; Simr, Pavel; Lokajíček, Miloš; Pisaková, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical analytical model of the processes running in individual radical clusters during the chemical phase (under the presence of radiomodifiers) proposed by us earlier has been further developed and improved. It has been applied to the data presented by Blok and Loman characterizing the oxygen effect in SSB and DSB formation (in water solution and at low-LET radiation) also in the region of very small oxygen concentrations, which cannot be studied with the help of experiments done with living cells. In this new analysis the values of all reaction rates and diffusion parameters known from literature have been made use of. The great increase of SSB and DSB at zero oxygen concentration may follow from the fact that at small oxygen concentrations the oxygen absorbs other radicals while at higher concentrations the formation of oxygen radicals prevails. It explains the double oxygen effect found already earlier by Ewing. The model may be easily extended to include also the effects of other radiomodifiers present in medium during irradiation.

  13. Effect Of GAMMA Radiation On Antimicrobial Activity And Chemical Constituents Of Marjoram (Majorana Hortensis Essential Oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GALAL, Y.G.M.; EL-GHANDOUR, I.A.; ABOU SEER, A.M.M.; DESOUKY, E.M.; ARAFA, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Field experiment was set up to study the response of marjoram plant grown on sandy soil and inoculated with Bradyrhizobium sp. and/or B. polymixa in combination with organic fertilizers. The extracted oil was irradiated with gamma irradiation at doses of 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 kGy. The chemical constituents of the essential oils were analyzed by GC-Ms techniques after exposure to gamma radiation. The gamma irradiated essential oils of marjoram were tested for their antimicrobial activities against some pathogenic microorganisms i.e. Klebsiella pneumoniae, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enteritidis, Pseudomonas citri, Fusarium oxysporum, Aspergillus niger, Trichoderma viride and Aspergillus flavus. Extracted oil was the best when soil was treated with faba bean straw and inoculated with B. polymixa + Bradyrhizobium sp. Similarly, the extracted oil from plant cultivated in soil treated with sheep manure in combination with B. polymixa recorded the highest value. Results also revealed that gamma irradiation doses increased the antimicrobial activity with different magnitudes. The essential oil extracted from herb exposed to 30 kGy was found to be the most active antimicrobial with slight increases in the main components.

  14. Radiation-induced heart injury. Radiopathological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Y; Niibe, H [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine

    1975-11-01

    In order to identify radiation-induced heart injury and to differentiate it from heart disease, an attempt was made to clarify post-irradiation heart injury by investigating the histological changes which occur during the interval between the irradiation and the time of demonstrable histological changes. A study was made of 83 autopsies in which most of the primary neoplasms were breast cancers, lung cancers and mediastinal tumors. In 43 of these autopsies the heart had been irradiated. Sixty eight dd-strain mice were also used for microautoradiographic study. Histological changes in the heart were observed in 27 of the 43 cases receiving irradiation. The limit of the tolerance dose to the heart for indicating histological changes was 1220 ret in humans. The latent period without histological changes was 2.7 months after initiation of radiation therapy. Greater heart injury was observed after re-irradiation or after the combined therapy of radiation and chemotherapy especially mitomycin (MMC). The histological findings after treatment with MMC were similar to those of radiation-induced heart injury. Results of the study indicate that the damage is secondary to radiation-induced changes of the vascula connective tissue.

  15. Clinical and experimental studies on radiation proctitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honke, Yoshifumi

    1988-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies were performed to clarify the mechanism of developing radiation proctitis. The results were as follows; (1) In the clinical study with 38 uterine cervix cancer patients, who received radiotherapy, diarrhea was observed in 44.7% at the acute stage, while rectal bleeding in 36.7% about 1 year after radiation. However, no clinical correlation was observed between diarrhea and rectal bleeding. (2) Colon fiberscopic examination revealed little change at the acute stage. However, erosion, ulcer and remarkable redness were found at the late stage. By the magnified fiberscope, unit degeneration was found in 72.8% at the acute stage. (3) Concerning the histopathological changes, edema and inflammatory change were observed immediately after irradiation. Fibrosis was observed in 83.3% at the late stage. (4) The number of the immunoglobulin containing cells decreased by radiation. However, its recovered as time passed after radiation. (5) In experimental study with rats by microangiography, there were ramarkable changes of the small vessels, such as bending, tortuosity and capillary hyperplasia at the acute stage. However, these changes returned to normal soon. At the late stage, decreased number of blood vessels were observed. The above results indicated that rectal bleeding after exposure to radiation are developed by secondary circulation abnormality caused by fibrosis of the perivascular tissues. (author) 52 refs

  16. Study on the stability of the Maytenus aquifolium Martius chemical components submitted to ionizing radiation (X-ray and {gamma}); Estudo da estabilidade dos componentes quimicos de Maytenus aquifolium Martius frente a radiacao ionizante (X e {gamma})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Patricia

    1995-07-01

    The interest for medicinal plants has raised again in the last decades, after overcoming a declination period caused by the advances in the researches and development of the synthetic drugs industries. This growing interest has been stimulated mainly by searching cheap and accessible alternative therapies. However, in order to have natural products based treatment in an efficient and safety way, it is necessary to guarantee the plant authenticity, finding adulterations and to assure a low level of microbiological contaminations to avoid damages to consumer's health. The decontamination method should be chosen for eliminating or reduce the microorganisms level without loss of the plant active constituents that would destroy its therapeutic action. At the present work, the possibility of using {gamma} and X electromagnetic radiations to sterilize a Brazilian medicinal plant (Maytenus aquifolium Martius, Celastraceae), which shows anti-ulcer activity, was studied by accomplishing its actives constituent behavior, the triterpenes friedeline and friedelan-3-ol and the phenolic compounds by spectrophotometric techniques (UV-Vis.), high resolution gas chromatography (HRGC) and high resolution gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HRGC-MS). (author)

  17. Alpha particle response study of polycrstalline diamond radiation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Amit; Topkar, Anita [Electronics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Chemical vapor deposition has opened the possibility to grow high purity synthetic diamond at relatively low cost. This has opened up uses of diamond based detectors for wide range of applications. These detectors are most suitable for harsh environments where standard semiconductor detectors cannot work. In this paper, we present the fabrication details and performance study of polycrystalline diamond based radiation detector. Effect of different operating parameters such as bias voltage and shaping time for charge collection on the performance of detector has been studied.

  18. Electro Thermal Chemical Gun Technology Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Diamond, P

    1999-01-01

    .... Michael Stroscio. Electro Thermal Chemical (ETC) gun technology refers to the use of plasma devices in place of traditional chemical ignitors to initiate the burning of high energy propellants in a controlled manner...

  19. Application of chemical mutagens and radiation in breeding buckwheat for larger seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseeva, E.S.

    1988-01-01

    Full text: In 1974, seeds of the Viktoriya variety of buckwheat were treated with 20-30 krad gamma radiation and chemical mutagens in the Biophysics Department of the Kishinev Agricultural Institute. For the chemical mutagen treatment, we used N-ethylnitroso-urea NEH (0.025 and 0.012%), N-methylnitroso-urea NMH (0.01 and 0.005%), ethylenimine EI (0.01 and 0.005%), dimethyl sulphate DMS (0.01 and 0.005%) and 1.4-bis-diazoacetyl butane DAB (0.01 and 0.05%). Since some investigators think that different results are produced by changing the order of the treatment, we treated seeds with chemical mutagens before and after irradiation and this was followed by drying. A total of 2400 seeds were treated. Selection started with M 2 seeds produced by M 1 plants. The thousand seed weight of the best ones ranged from 40.7 to 47.8 g, which was 11.9-18.7 g heavier than the control. The large seed size thus selected was heritable. Since larger seeds are very important for the creation of high yielding varieties buckwheat, only families with these characteristics were selected for further work. We observed even some further increase in seed weight in the next generation. It was observed that when planting large seeds, after six days of growth the cotyledons were significantly larger than in the control plants. This characteristic was used in selecting for a high yielding large-seed variety of buckwheat. The plants were selected twice: once for development of large cotyledon leaves and the second time for plant yield. In the fourth generation, the families thus obtained continued to be studied in greenhouse experiments and the same time be propagated under field conditions. The seeds of these families were then combined and under the name Podolyanka in 1976 were subjected to competitive variety testing. Following the competitive variety testing the mutant variety Podolyanka was released in 1984. It is high yielding (2950 kg/ha), has a short vegetation period (matures 17-18 days

  20. A Comparison Study of the Removal of Selected Pharmaceuticals in Waters by Chemical Oxidation Treatments

    OpenAIRE

    F. Javier Benitez; Juan Luis Acero; Francisco J. Real; Gloria Roldan; Francisco Casas

    2011-01-01

    The degradation of selected pharmaceuticals in some water matrices was studied by using several chemical treatments. The pharmaceuticals selected were the beta-blocker metoprolol, the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory naproxen, the antibiotic amoxicillin, and the analgesic phenacetin; and their degradations were conducted by using UV radiation alone, ozone, Fenton-s reagent, Fenton-like system, photo-Fenton system, and combinations of UV radiation and ozone with H2O2, TiO2, ...

  1. Cobalt-60 radiation leukemogenesis studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, T.G.; Cain, G.R.; Taylor, N.J.; Shifrine, M.; Goldman, M.

    1985-01-01

    Canine myeloblastic leukemia cells are not metabolically a homogeneous population. Isotopic ( 3 H-thymidine) and immunofluorescent labelling of blastic leukemia cells for DNA synthesis indicated that active DNA synthesis occurred in small populations (10-30%) while the remaining cells were at maturation arrest. This characteristic of reduced DNA synthesis is common to granulocytic, monocytic and megakaryoblastic leukemia. Based on allo-transplantation studies, malignancy of leukemic cells is a constitutive property of the cells. A protein factor produced by the leukemic cell is responsible for maturation arrest. Based on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the maturation arrest factor consist of several peptides. Long-term cultures of leukemic cells have been established. Molecular studies for malignant transformation are now underway. 3 figures, 2 tables

  2. Study on radiation-inducible genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sang Yong; Kim, Dong Ho; Joe, Min Ho; Park, Hae Jun; Song, Hyu Npa

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-inducible genes of E. coli, which is a model strain for bacterial study, and Salmonella, which is a typical strain for pathogenic bacteria were compared through omic analysis. Heat shock response genes and prophage genes were induced by radiation in Salmonella, not in E. coli. Among prophage genes tested, STM2628 showed the highest activation by radiation, and approximately 1 kb promoter region was turned out to be necessary for radiation response. To screen an artificial promoter showing activation by 2 Gy, the high-throughput screening method using fluorescent MUG substrate was established. The use of bacteria as anticancer agents has attracted interest. In this study, we tried to develop tumor targeting bacteria in which the radiation-inducible promoter activate a transgene encoding a cytotoxic protein. To do this, a tumor-targeting hfq Salmonella mutant strain was constructed, and we found that its virulence decreased. For outward secretion of anticancer protein produced inside bacteria, the signal peptide of SspH1 was determined and the signal peptide was proven to be able to secrete an anticancer protein. Tumor xenograft mouse model was secured, which can be used for efficiency evaluation of bacterial tumor therapy

  3. Study on radiation-inducible genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Yong; Kim, Dong Ho; Joe, Min Ho; Park, Hae Jun; Song, Hyu Npa

    2012-01-15

    Radiation-inducible genes of E. coli, which is a model strain for bacterial study, and Salmonella, which is a typical strain for pathogenic bacteria were compared through omic analysis. Heat shock response genes and prophage genes were induced by radiation in Salmonella, not in E. coli. Among prophage genes tested, STM2628 showed the highest activation by radiation, and approximately 1 kb promoter region was turned out to be necessary for radiation response. To screen an artificial promoter showing activation by 2 Gy, the high-throughput screening method using fluorescent MUG substrate was established. The use of bacteria as anticancer agents has attracted interest. In this study, we tried to develop tumor targeting bacteria in which the radiation-inducible promoter activate a transgene encoding a cytotoxic protein. To do this, a tumor-targeting hfq Salmonella mutant strain was constructed, and we found that its virulence decreased. For outward secretion of anticancer protein produced inside bacteria, the signal peptide of SspH1 was determined and the signal peptide was proven to be able to secrete an anticancer protein. Tumor xenograft mouse model was secured, which can be used for efficiency evaluation of bacterial tumor therapy.

  4. Cytogenetic damages induced in vivo in human lymphocytes by environmental chemicals or radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebulska-Wasilewska, A.

    1999-01-01

    The importance of various environmental exposures has been evident in variation in cancer incidence and mortality. Benzene is considered to be a human carcinogen, is clastogenic to rodents and humans, and it affects the immune response. Workers in various industrial plants, are exposed to benzene and benzene related compounds as a result of various activities in which benzene is processed, generated or used. Major sources of environmental exposure to benzene related compounds, continue to be active and passive smoking, auto exhaust, and driving or riding in automobiles. Benzene is of a particular interest, not only because of its known toxicity, but also because this was to be the parent compound and a model for extensive programs of metabolism of a variety of aromatic chemicals. Ionizing radiation is an unavoidable physical agent that is presented in environment, and public opinion is well aware against radiation risk and strongly against it. The aim of the presentation was comparison between cytogenetic damages induced in vivo by environmental chemicals with those of radiation. Results from biomonitoring survey on genotoxicity in human blood cells of benzene and benzene related compounds were compared to damages detected in lymphocytes of persons who had been accidentally exposed to gamma radiation. In the groups, that had been occupationally or environmentally exposed to benzene related compound, total aberration frequencies, or percent of aberrant cells ranged between 0 - 0.16 aberrations/cell or 16% of aberrant cells respectively. A multivariate regression analysis confirmed: (i) a significant association between cytogenetic damage and exposure to benzene related compound, (ii) a possible association between cytogenetic damage and cancer, (iii) a significant influence of smoking habit. In 1996 few persons were suspected of accidental exposure to gamma radiation. To estimate the absorbed doses, lymphocytes from their blood have been analyzed for the presence of

  5. Chemical effects produced by the ionizing radiation in the mercury beating heart reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo-Rojas, S.; Burillo, G.; Gonzalez-Chavez, J.L.; Vicente, L.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. In a recent paper we have shown the existence of complex modes of oscillation in the study of the extinction dynamics of the mercury beating heart reaction. It was proposed that one of the species responsible for the oscillatory movements of this reaction is the mercury(I), in anyone in their forms, either free or molecular. the formation of Hg 2 2+ from γ irradiation of 60 Co to the system Hg 0 /H 2 SO 4 (6M) allowed to elucidate the probable mechanism of reaction. The objective of this work is to study how the ionizing radiation affects the dynamics of extinction of this reaction, which is related with the existence of certain chemical species. The study was carried out in 2 ways: a) Method I: H 2 SO 4 (6M) was first irradiated and to the irradiated solution the Hg 0 was added and b) Method II: the system Hg 0 /H 2 SO 4 (6M) was irradiated. The different irradiated systems were put into reaction with Fe 0 to investigate if there were differences between the two irradiated systems and how the complex modes of oscillation of the reaction were affected. The quantity of Hg 2 2+ produced by method I is bigger than in method II. This is explained because the majority species produced by radiolysis of H 2 SO 4 are sulfate radical and H 2 O 2 that act as oxidizer agents and their potential values allow to suppose that these substances react with Hg 0 to produce Hg 2 2+ . On the other hand, by method II mercury clusters (Hg 4 3+ ) are formed as was reported by Sukhov and Ershov in pulse radiolysis of aqueous Hg 2 2+ solutions. We assume that the formation of these mercury clusters has to be observed with the decrease of the Hg 2 2+ concentration when one makes the radiolysis by method II. In general, the preliminary studies allow establishing that the ionizing radiation does not affect the extinction dynamics but it increases the half-life of this reaction

  6. Preconception care: caffeine, smoking, alcohol, drugs and other environmental chemical/radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassi, Zohra S; Imam, Ayesha M; Dean, Sohni V; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2014-09-26

    As providing health education, optimizing nutrition, and managing risk factors can be effective for ensuring a healthy outcome for women and her yet un-conceived baby, external influences play a significant role as well. Alcohol, smoking, caffeine use and other similar lifestyle factors, have now become an integral part of the daily life of most men and women, who use/misuse one or more of these harmful substances regularly despite knowledge of their detrimental effects. The adverse health outcomes of these voluntary and involuntary exposures are of even greater concern in women of child bearing age where the exposure has the potential of inflicting harm to two generations. This paper is examining the available literature for the possible effects of caffeine consumption, smoking, alcohol or exposure to chemicals may have on the maternal, newborn and child health (MNCH). A systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence was conducted to ascertain the possible impact of preconception usage of caffeine, tobacco, alcohol and other illicit drugs; and exposure to environmental chemicals and radiant on MNCH outcomes. A comprehensive strategy was used to search electronic reference libraries, and both observational and clinical controlled trials were included. Cross-referencing and a separate search strategy for each preconception risk and intervention ensured wider study capture. Heavy maternal preconception caffeine intake of >300 mg/d significantly increase the risk of a subsequent fetal loss by 31% (95% CI: 8-58%). On the other hand, preconception alcohol consumption leads to non-significant 30% increase in spontaneous abortion (RR 1.30; 95% CI: 0.85-1.97). Preconception counselling can lead to a significant decrease in the consumption of alcohol during the first trimester (OR 1.79; 95% CI: 1.08-2.97). Periconception smoking, on the other hand, was found to be associated with an almost 3 times increased risk of congenital heart defects (OR 2.80; 95% CI 1

  7. Radiation methods for purification of water, wastewater and flue gases at international chemical congress of Pacific basic societies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikaev, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    Content of report, presented at the symposium Ecological applications of ionizing radiation (water, waste water and technological waste products), which took place within the frames of the International Chemical Congress of the Pacific Ocean Region counters (the PacifiChem'95, December 17-22, 1995, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA) is briefly presented. The problems on electron-radiation purification of natural water, domestic and technological waste waters, flue gases and contaminated soils, radiation treatment of the waste water sediments, ionizing radiation sources, applied in this area of technology and economics of radiation purification methods were discussed

  8. Health effects of occupational exposure to hazardous chemicals: a comparative assessment with notes on ionizing radiation. Executive summary. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanetos, M.A.; Warling, J.C.; Marsh, G.M.

    1983-09-01

    This three-part report provides quantitative estimates of the risk of cancer and other diseases among persons exposed to hazardous substances in the workplace. The risk estimates presented are based on a comprehensive review of recent epidemiologic studies. Primary emphasis was placed on studies of workers exposed to hazardous chemicals under conditions typical of a given industry over a working lifetime. Despite finding over 100 chemicals associated with increased incidence of disease, convincing dose-response trends existed for only a few. Although there were notable exceptions (arsenic, asbestos, PAH's, etc.), it was generally impossible to estimate risk-per-unit of dose in a manner analogous to calculations which exist for radiation exposure. The principal reason for this is the lack of adequate environmental monitoring data for the specific chemicals, locations, and time periods needed to estimate individual cumulative doses. In addition to analyzing risk in terms of increased incidence of specific diseases, we also examined life expectancy and years of life lost due to cancer in four selected occupational groups via a life table model which allowed for competing risks. The resulting estimates indicated that the overall life expectancy of these groups was generally greater than that of the general population but that the workers suffered greater loss of life expectancy (LLE) due to cancer than their counterparts in the general population. Published estimates of LLE due to radiation induced cancer indicate that at doses of less than or equal to 0.5 rem/y, radiation workers are projected to suffer less LLE than any of the four non-nuclear cohorts examined. At 5 rem/y (the MPD) or higher, LLE may be greater than one or more of the cohorts examined. This is Volume I of a three volume series. 12 references

  9. Prompt radiation activation analysis, (1) Theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL Barouni, A. M.; Araddad, S. Y.; Mosbah, D. S.; Elfakhri, S. M.; Rateb, J. M.; Benghzail, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of the prompt γ following neutron capture in the reaction has been extensively developed. In this method the gamma-ray intensity is depended only upon the radiative capture cross-section and not upon the half-life of the product nucleus. The prompt gamma-ray activation analysis method stems from the radiative capture process which results in the decay of the compound nucleus by the emission of characteristic gamma radiation, either as a single photon with kinetic energy equal to the excitation energy less the recoil energy or, more likely, by a cascade of two or more photons with the same energy. The equations and the computer program required to calculate the yield, the intensity and the K χ emission probability per disintegration, are given in this study.(author)

  10. Radiation damage studies of nuclear structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barat, P.

    2012-01-01

    Maximum utilization of fuel in nuclear reactors is one of the important aspects for operating them economically. The main hindrance to achieve this higher burnups of nuclear fuel for the nuclear reactors is the possibility of the failure of the metallic core components during their operation. Thus, the study of the cause of the possibility of failure of these metallic structural materials of nuclear reactors during full power operation due to radiation damage, suffered inside the reactor core, is an important field of studies bearing the basic to industrial scientific views.The variation of the microstructure of the metallic core components of the nuclear reactors due to radiation damage causes enormous variation in the structure and mechanical properties. A firm understanding of this variation of the mechanical properties with the variation of microstructure will serve as a guide for creating new, more radiation-tolerant materials. In our centre we have irradiated structural materials of Indian nuclear reactors by charged particles from accelerator to generate radiation damage and studied the some aspects of the variation of microstructure by X-ray diffraction studies. Results achieved in this regards, will be presented. (author)

  11. Defence biochemical mechanisms of the organisms against chemical pollution and ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olinescu, Radu

    2001-01-01

    Acute exposure to high concentrations / doses of chemical pollutants and ionizing radiation usually kills giving no chance for survival, if not immediately, than later followed by specific diseases. Fortunately, this acute exposure is accidental, but chronic, low level exposure is also damaging. The involvement of pollution, especially of chemically produced, one in the etiology of several diseases is still under intensive research. Compared to other kinds of pollution (radioactive, microbiological), the chemical one seldom kills suddenly; it acts slowly, silently, by accumulation into the tissues, eventually inducing a failure of certain organ. The body is continuously adapting to low level concentrations of chemicals from environment until a certain threshold. All organisms, including humans, have a limited capacity of resisting the effects of various types of pollutants. Extensive laboratory research, demonstrated that most of damaging organic pollutants cause the formation of free radicals when they penetrate into the body and are metabolized. Free radicals are very reactive and are known to damage tissues with potentially fatal results. Substantial experimental evidence in recent years has demonstrated that all organisms are endowed with versatile, efficient antioxidant systems, that provide protection against the formation or effects of free radicals. However, the antioxidant systems are limited and when their capacity of protection is exceeded, injury resulting in illness or death occurs. In most cases, the harmful effects of chemicals on organisms depend on the biotransformation step, where free radicals are produced as byproducts of the metabolic reactions. The damaging effects of chemical pollutants are mostly restricted to an important organ depending on the way of penetration, nature of the compound and concentration. The organisms possess specific and nonspecific defense systems, which act from the exposure step, with attempt to block the entry of

  12. Radiation in complex exposure situations. Assessing health risks at low levels from concomitant exposures to radiation and chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornhardt, S.; Jung, T.; Burkart, W.

    2000-01-01

    Health effects from exposures to ionizing radiation are in general the result of complex multi-step reaction chains involving changes and responses on the level of molecules, cells, tissues and organisms. In environmental low dose exposure situations ionizing radiation only contributes a small fraction to the life-long attack on DNA by other exogenous and endogenous genotoxins. Nevertheless, efforts to assess and quantify deleterious effects at low exposure levels are directed mainly towards radiation as a single isolated agent, and rarely towards the concomitant presence of other natural and anthropogenic toxicants. Only these combined exposures may lead to observable health risk effects. In addition they might differ from those expected from simple addition of the individual risks due to interaction. The existing data base on combined effects is rudimentary, mainly descriptive and rarely covers exposure ranges large enough to make direct inferences to present day low dose exposure situations. Therefore, any risk assessment will have to consider the question whether combined effects, i.e. interaction between two or more agents will influence the health outcome from specific exposure situations in such a way that predictions derived from simple standard exposure situations would have to be revised. In view of the multitude of possible interactions between the large number of potentially harmful agents in the human environment, descriptive approaches will have to be supplemented by the use of mechanistic models for critical health endpoints such as cancer. Agents will have to be grouped depending on their physical or chemical mode of action at the molecular and cellular level, to generalize and predict the outcome of combined exposures at low exposure levels and the possibility of interactions. (author)

  13. Immunobiological, biochemical and physico-chemical characteristics of Brucella lipopolysaccharide subjected to various doses of gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dranovskaya, E.A.; Shibaeva, I.V.

    1975-01-01

    A comparative study is presented of toxicity, serological activity, some biochemical and physico-chemical properties of the highly toxic Brucella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and of preparations obtained as a result of gamma irradiation in doses of 1, 3, and 10 mrad on the antigen. The toxicity of LPS was found to decrease with increasing radiation dose. Irradiation with a dose of 3 mrad produced a marked decrease in the toxicity of the antigen without essentially changing its serological properties. The process of LPS detoxication under the effect of irradiation was accompanied by changes in certain biochemical and physico-chemical indices suggestive of a modification of the primary structure of the LPS molecule and of an impairment especially of its polysaccharide side chains. (author)

  14. Immunobiological, biochemical, and physico-chemical characteristics of Brucella lipopolysaccharide subjected to various doses of gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dranovskaya, E A; Shibaeva, I V [Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Ehpidemiologii i Mikrobiologii; Khabakpasheva, N A; Rostovtseva, N A [Institut Vaktsin i Syvorotok, Moscow (USSR)

    1975-01-01

    A comparative study is presented of toxicity, serological activity, some biochemical and physico-chemical properties of the highly toxic Brucella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and of preparations obtained as a result of gamma irradiation in doses of 1, 3, and 10 mrad on the antigen. The toxicity of LPS was found to decrease with increasing radiation dose. Irradiation with a dose of 3 mrad produced a marked decrease in the toxicity of the antigen without essentially changing its serological properties. The process of LPS detoxication under the effect of irradiation was accompanied by changes in certain biochemical and physico-chemical indices suggestive of a modification of the primary structure of the LPS molecule and of an impairment especially of its polysaccharide side chains.

  15. A method for carrying out radiolysis and chemical reactions by means of the radiations resulting from a thermonuclear reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomberg, H.J.

    1974-01-01

    The invention relates to the use of the radiations resulting from thermonuclear reactions. It deals with a method comprising a combination of thermo-chemical and radiolytic reactions for treating a molecule having a high absorption rate, by the radiations of a thermonuclear reaction. This is applicable to the dissociation of water into oxygen and hydrogen [fr

  16. The study on preservation of Nanfeng mandarin by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhifang; Luo Gui; Xiong Meihua; Chen Shule; Human Rukai; Wan Ziyu

    1988-01-01

    The Nan Feng Mandarin is a special native product to Jiangxi province in China. It's characterized by thin rind with few pits, much juice without dregs, good taste of sweet, fragrance and sour in goden color. However it can not be stored for a long time because of its thin rind and much juice. The effect of the radiation on the preservation of the Nan Feng Mandarin was studied. The results showed that when the mandarin was stored at a room temperature for 100-200 days and irradiated at a low dose of 60 Co ray, the rate of good one was up to the 80%, and 10-15% highter than that of the controlled Mandarin. But any distinct change of main chemical compositions of the irradiated Mandarin haven't been found by examining. In addition, the mechanism of the radiation on the presevation of the Nan Feng Mandarin was also discussed

  17. Study on radiation grafting reaction of MMA onto hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Bo

    1996-01-01

    The grafting reaction of MMA onto hydroxyapatite has been studied with the pre-irradiation method in air. The effects of radiation dose, monomer concentration, reaction temperature and inorganic acid on the system are observed. The grafting copolymerization is found to be controlled by the kinetics. If proper kinetic conditions are selected, a better grafting yield can be obtained. Employing weight method, burning method as well as SeM and IR analysis, it has been proved that MMA is definitely grafted onto hydroxyapatite by chemical bonds, which shows that it is possible to improve the interface of inorganic-organic composite materials and to make bioactive ceramics by using radiation induced-grafting copolymerization

  18. Changes in lymphocytes size under chronic exposure of the organism to factors of radiation and chemical origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V.V.

    1990-01-01

    Results of the analysis of changes in peripheral blood lymphocytes size under chronic exposure to external gamma radiation and pesticide chlorofoz in combination and separately are presented. It has been found out that under exposure of animals to radiation or the pesticide it is small and big lymphocytes respectively which most significantly suffer quantitatively. Under the joint radiational-chemical exposure of the organism the number of both types of cells is reduced simultaneously

  19. Low-dose radiation attenuates chemical mutagenesis in vivo. Cross adaptation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakinuma, Shizuko; Yamauchi, Kazumi; Amasaki, Yoshiko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2009-01-01

    The biological effects of low-dose radiation are not only of social concern but also of scientific interest. The radioadaptive response, which is defined as an increased radioresistance by prior exposure to low-dose radiation, has been extensively studied both in vitro and in vivo. Here we briefly review the radioadaptive response with respect to mutagenesis, survival rate, and carcinogenesis in vivo, and introduce our recent findings of cross adaptation in mouse thymic cells, that is, the suppressive effect of repeated low-dose radiation on mutation induction by the alkylating agent N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea. (author)

  20. Radiation degradation and the consequent decrease in the efficacy of some dilute chemical decontaminant formulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamal Kishore; Dey, G.R.; Naik, D.B.; Moorthy, P.N. [Applied Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400 085 (India)

    1998-12-31

    Constituents of dilute chemical decontaminant formulations such as ascorbic acid, EDTA, picolinic acid (PA) and 2,6-pyridine dicarboxylic acid (PDCA), also known as dipicolinic acid, are highly reactive with primary species produced from water radiolysis. Picolinic acid and PDCA however, are less sensitive to radiation dose due to their aromatic nature. They also help in protecting ascorbic acid when in a mixture. The efficacy for dissolution of magnetite was found to reduce drastically on irradiation in the case of EDTA/oxalic acid/citric acid while it was unaffected in the case of picolinic acid/ascorbic acid. In the case of EDTA/ascorbic acid/citric acid or PDCA/ascorbic acid formulations, there was only a marginal effect of radiation on the efficacy of the formulations. (author)

  1. The uses of synchrotron radiation sources for elemental and chemical microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.R.; Chao, E.C.T.; Minkin, J.A.; Back, J.M.; Jones, K.W.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    1989-08-01

    Synchrotron radiation sources offer important features for the analysis of a material. Among these features is the ability to determine both the elemental composition of the material and the chemical state of its elements. For microscopic analysis synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobes now offer spatial resolutions of 10μm with minimum detection limits in the 1--10 ppM range depending on the nature of the sample and the synchrotron source used. This paper describes the properties of synchrotron radiation and their importance for elemental analysis, existing synchrotron facilities and those under construction that are optimum for SXRF microanalysis, and a number of applications including the high energy excitation of the K lines of heavy elements, microtomography, and XANES and EXAFS spectroscopies. 45 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  2. Development of polishing methods for Chemical Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide mirrors for synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, B.A.; Brown, N.J.

    1987-01-01

    Material properties of Chemical Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide (CVD SiC) make it ideal for use in mirrors for synchrotron radiation experiments. We developed methods to grind and polish flat samples of CVD SiC down to measured surface roughness values as low as 1.1 Angstroms rms. We describe the processing details, including observations we made during trial runs with alternative processing recipes. We conclude that pitch polishing using progressively finer diamond abrasive, augmented with specific water based lubricants and additives, produces superior results. Using methods based on these results, a cylindrical and a toroidal mirror, each about 100 x 300mm, were respectively finished by Continental Optical and Frank Cooke, Incorporated. WYCO Interferometry shows these mirrors have surface roughness less than 5.7 Angstroms rms. These mirrors have been installed on the LLNL/UC X-ray Calibration and Standards Facility at the Stanford Synthrotron Radiation Laboratory

  3. The uses of synchrotron radiation sources for elemental and chemical microanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.R.; Chao, E.C.T.; Minkin, J.A.; Back, J.M.; Jones, K.W.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    1990-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation sources offer important features for the analysis of a material. Among these features is the ability to determine both the elemental composition of the material and the chemical state of its elements. For microscopic analysis synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobes now offer spatial resolutions of 10 ??m with minimum detection limits in the 1-10 ppm range depending on the nature of the sample and the synchrotron source used. This paper describes the properties of synchrotron radiation and their importance for elemental analysis, existing synchrotron facilities and those under construction that are optimum for SXRF microanalysis, and a number of applications including the high energy excitation of the K lines of heavy elements, microtomography, and XANES and EXAFS spectroscopies. ?? 1990.

  4. Dosimetry studies during breast cancer radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M. O. M.

    2005-06-01

    Previous studies indicated that breast cancer is wildly spread especially in women as compared to men. It is increased after an age of thirty five years in women so it is important to study the effect of exposure to the radiation on the intact breast during the treatment of the breast suffering from cancer. In this work the scattered doses for the intact breast during the treatment of the breast suffering from cancer were measured and also the probability of inducing cancer in it is also discussed. The study was performed for a group of patients composed of twenty five females. Also the backscattered doses to the intact breast were measured for thirteen female patients. During the treatment using gamma rays from Co-60 source the two tangential fields (lateral and medial) were selected for the measurements. The results of exposure to gamma radiation for the lateral and medial fields showed that the mean scattered and backscattered doses to the intact breast were (241.26 cGY,47.49 cGY) and (371.6 cGY,385.4 cGY), respectively. Beside that the somatic risk of induced cancer to the intact breast was found to be (6 .1X10 -3 ,1.2X10 -3 ) and (9.29X10 -3 , 9.63X10 -3 ), respectively. From the results obtained it was concluded that the intact breast received small amounts of radiation doses which may lead to breast cancer for the healthy breast. The recommendations from the present study are to take care of radiation protection to the patient, and also to take care of the patient treatment conditions like temperature, pressure and humidity during the radiation exposure.(Author)

  5. Effect of physical, chemical and electro-kinetic properties of pumice samples on radiation shielding properties of pumice material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapan, Mücip; Yalçın, Zeynel; İçelli, Orhan; Kara, Hüsnü; Orak, Salim; Özvan, Ali; Depci, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Radiation shielding properties of pumice materials are studied. • The relationship between physical, chemical and electro-kinetic properties pumice samples is identified. • The photon atomic parameters are important for the absorber peculiarity of the pumices. - Abstract: Pumice has been used in cement, concrete, brick, and ceramic industries as an additive and aggregate material. In this study, some gamma-ray photon absorption parameters such as the total mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic number and electronic density have been investigated for six different pumice samples. Numerous values of energy related parameters from low energy (1 keV) to high energy (100 MeV) were calculated using WinXCom programme. The relationship between radiation shielding properties of the pumice samples and their physical, chemical and electro-kinetic properties was evaluated using simple regression analysis. Simple regression analysis indicated a strong correlation between photon energy absorption parameters and density and SiO 2 , Fe 2 O 3 , CaO, MgO, TiO 2 content of pumice samples in this study. It is found that photon energy absorption parameters are not related to electro-kinetic properties of pumice samples

  6. Study of thermal, radiation and environmental effects on serpentine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raje, Naina; Kalekar, Bhupesh B.; Dubey, K.A.

    2016-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of a material, such as particle size surface area, magnetic properties, water content, radiation and thermal stability, viscosity, porosity, are responsible for their specific applications. Serpentine is a greenish, layer structured phyllosilicate, known as magnesium hydroxy silicate. The availability of large number of hydroxyl group makes serpentine a potential candidate for nuclear shielding material. Hence present studies have been carried out to understand the stability of serpentine with the variation in thermal, radiation and environmental parameters. Serpentine samples were received from Reactor Projects Division, BARC. An accurately weighed sample was subjected to simultaneous TG - DTA - EGA measurements in air as well as inert atmosphere at the heating rate of 10 °C/min. The sample was heated from room temperature to 1000 °C with a gas flow rate of 100 mL/min in Netzsch thermal analyzer (Model STA409 PC LUXX) connected to Bruker FTIR system (Model - Tensor27) via a 1m long capillary. The sample was subjected to gamma radiation in the range of 10 - 100 kGy using 60 Co gamma source in gamma chamber and was subjected to TG measurements to understand the effect of radiation on the thermal stability of serpentine and the results are being discussed here

  7. Mathematical modeling of the radiation-chemical behavior of neptunium in HNO3. Equilibrium states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirova, M.V.

    1995-01-01

    A mathematical model of the radiation-chemical behavior of neptunium is presented for a wide range of α-and γ-irradiation doses. Equations determining the equilibrium concentrations of NP(IV), Np(V), and Np(VI) are derived for various concentrations of HNO 3 and dose rates of the ionizing irradiation. The rate constants of the reactions NP(IV) + OH, Np(IV) + NO 3 , Np(V) + NO 2 , Np(V) + H, Np(IV), and Np(V) + Np(V) are obtained by the mathematical modeling

  8. Effects of ionizing radiation in the physico-chemical characteristics of red wine Cabernet Sauvignon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Fellipe Souza da; Leiras, Anderson; Wagner, Walsan

    2014-01-01

    The oenology in the current days is increasingly aimed obtain improvements on wine quality produced without there the deterioration of characteristics of the same, using new technologies for such order. The objective of present work will be the application of the radiation ionizing in wines Cabernet Sauvignon, with the interest of analyzing its effects on physic-chemical characteristics of this wines, such as quality, aging and etc. Were analyzed the following strands: degree alcoholic; dry extract; density and absorbance with spectrometer (420, 520 and 620 nm). (author)

  9. Safe storage of premature maize ears through gamma radiation and irradiation effect on chemical composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, H.O.; Singh, N.N.; Roy, M.K.

    2003-01-01

    Marked differences were observed between unirradiated and irradiated premature ears (early dough stage) of maize during storage. Some molds were developed on the grains and deterioration set in at the peduncle and stone of maize in the unirradiated ears, whereas no such symptoms were observed in the 3 kGy irradiated ears even after 45 days of storage. Changes in chemical constituents viz. starch, protein, total sugars were observed in the ears without adversely affecting the quality traits through radiation although 100 grains weight reduced slightly. (author)

  10. Estimating the human exposure to chemical substances and radiation. Definition report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermeire, T.G.; Van Veen, M.P.

    1995-06-01

    This report aims at boosting the human exposure assessment activities of the RIVM with regard to chemical substances and radiation. It is the result of thorough discussions with RIVM-experts. The report starts with an overview of past developments in the area of human exposure assessment at the RIVM and continues describing recent projects. Major developments outside the Institute are also discussed. An attempt is made to harmonize definitions which are relevant for exposure assessment, i.e. definitions on exposure, intake, uptake and dose. Important gaps in the human exposure assessment work at the RIVM are identified, leading to proposals for future work. 2 figs., 31 refs., 3 appendices

  11. Modification of the radiation resistance of Aspergillus flavus mycelial units by some chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohyuddin, M.; Skoropad, W.P.

    1977-01-01

    Survival curves for the mycelium of Aspergillus flavus Link var. columnaris Raper and Fennell were constructed after irradiation with gamma rays in the presence of NaCl, NaBr, NaI, KCl, KBr, KI, CaCl 2 , CaBr 2 , CaI 2 , Ca(NO 3 ) 2 , NaNO 2 , NaNO 3 , KNO 2 , iodoacetic acid, iodoacetamide and vitamin K 5 . In addition iodized salt was also tested. All the chemicals tested exhibited initial toxicity at zero dose. However, most of the chemicals demonstrated a synergism when present during irradiation. Compounds containing iodine were invariably the strongest radiosensitizers. The iodine present as an admixture in salt also retained its radiosensitizing character. Sodium bromide and calcium bromide behaved in a different way. The initial toxicity was reduced along with an increase in radiation dose resulting in more survival. (orig.) [de

  12. Patterning characteristics of a chemically-amplified negative resist in synchrotron radiation lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deguchi, Kimiyoshi; Miyoshi, Kazunori; Ishii, Tetsuyoshi; Matsuda, Tadahito

    1992-01-01

    To explore the applicability of synchrotron radiation X-ray lithography for fabricating sub-quartermicron devices, we investigate the patterning characteristics of the chemically-amplified negative resist SAL601-ER7. Since these characteristics depend strongly on the conditions of the chemical amplification process, the effects of post-exposure baking and developing conditions on sensitivity and resolution are examined. The resolution-limiting factors are investigated, revealing that pattern collapse during the development process and fog caused by Fresnel diffraction, photo-electron scattering, and acid diffusion in the resist determine the resolution and the maximum aspect ratio of the lines and spaces pattern. Using the model of a swaying beam supported at one end, it is shown that pattern collapse depends on the resist pattern's flexural stiffness. Patterning stability, which depends on the delay time between exposure and baking, is also discussed. (author)

  13. New approaches to chemical reaction mechanisms by means of radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2009-01-01

    Since active species generated during radiolysis can be used as oxidative or reductive regents of various organic and inorganic compounds, radiation chemistry has been applied to wide range of research fields. We have studied charge-delocalization process in molecular systems, properties of intermediates in the excited states, mechanism of light emitting device, photo-catalyst for degradation of toxic compounds and so on by means of radiation chemistry. In the present paper, we summarize our recent research results. (author)

  14. European studies on occupational radiation exposure - ESOREX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrova, K.; Frasch, G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The ESOREX project was initiated by the European Commission in 1997. The objectives of this European study are: to provide the European Commission and the national competent radiation protection authorities with reliable information on how personal radiation monitoring, reporting and recording of dosimetric results is organized in European countries; to collect reliable and directly comparable data on individual and collective radiation exposure in all occupational sectors where radiation workers are employed. The information about the monitoring of occupational radiation exposure, the levels of individual personal doses of workers in the different work sectors, the changes and trends of these doses over a period of several years and the international comparison of these data are useful information for many stakeholders. The survey consists of two parts. Part I surveys how radiation protection monitoring, recording and reporting is arranged within each of the 30 European countries. Part II collects doses from occupational exposure of classified workers in the participating countries. For each country, information is provided on the number of workers in defined work categories and how annual individual personal doses are distributed. The summary and the conclusions provide tentative recommendations for harmonizing modifications of some of the national monitoring, reporting and recording arrangements. In all ESOREX studies a beneficial, effective and extensive information base about thirty European states has been created. The studies resulted in country reports describing the legislative, administrative, organizational and technical aspects of the national dose monitoring and recording systems for occupationally radiation exposed workers. These reports are standardized, i.e. they have as far as possible an internationally comparable structure. The dose distributions of the radiation workers and the annual average and collective doses in the various work

  15. Some chemical influence on genetic effects of ionizing radiation and biodosimetry problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosse, I.B.

    2007-01-01

    as by weak chemical mutagens or by many other factors and can change biodosimetry results. Some drugs, stress, virus diseases and so on can change biological effects of radiation too. So, many factors which are not under control can change significantly biological effects of radiation and by this way can be responsible for serious mistakes of individual biodosimetry. It is necessary to take into account that these factors are averaged over a population. That's why biological methods can be used for population radiation dose estimation but not for personal one.

  16. Effect of genes controlling radiation sensitivity on chemically induced mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, L.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of 16 different genes (rad) conferring radiation sensitivity on chemically induced reversion in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was determined. The site of reversion used was a well-defined chain initiation mutant mapping in the structural gene coding for iso-1-cytochrome c. High doses of EMS and HNO 2 resulted in decreased reversion of cyc1-131 in rad6, rad9 and rad15 strains compared to the normal RAD + strains. In addition, rad52 greatly decreased EMS reversion of cyc1-131 but had no effect on HNO 2 -induced reversion; rad18, on the other hand, increased HNO 2 -induced reversion but did not alter EMS-induced reversion. When NQO was used as the mutagen, every rad gene tested, except for rad18, had an effect on reversion; rad6, rad9, rad15, rad17, rad18, rad22, rev1, rev2, and rev3 lowered NQO reversion while rad1, rad2, rad3, rad4, rad10, rad12, and rad16 increased it compared to the RAD + strain. The effect of rad genes on chemical mutagenesis is discussed in terms of their effect on uv mutagenesis. It is concluded that although the nature of the repair pathways may differ for uv- and chemically-induced mutations in yeast, a functional repair system is required for the induction of mutation by the chemical agents NQO, EMS, and HNO 2

  17. Quantum chemical studies of estrogenic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantum chemical methods are potent tools to provide information on the chemical structure and electronic properties of organic molecules. Modern computational chemistry methods have provided a great deal of insight into the binding of estrogenic compounds to estrogenic receptors (ER), an important ...

  18. Chemical chaperones reduce ionizing radiation-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and cell death in IEC-6 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Sang; Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae-Hoon [Division of Radiotherapy, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Seongman [Division of Life Sciences, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Young-Bin, E-mail: yblim@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • UPR activation precedes caspase activation in irradiated IEC-6 cells. • Chemical ER stress inducers radiosensitize IEC-6 cells. • siRNAs that targeted ER stress responses ameliorate IR-induced cell death. • Chemical chaperons prevent cell death in irradiated IEC-6 cells. - Abstract: Radiotherapy, which is one of the most effective approaches to the treatment of various cancers, plays an important role in malignant cell eradication in the pelvic area and abdomen. However, it also generates some degree of intestinal injury. Apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is the primary pathological factor that initiates radiation-induced intestinal injury, but the mechanism by which ionizing radiation (IR) induces apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is not clearly understood. Recently, IR has been shown to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, thereby activating the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells. However, the consequences of the IR-induced activation of the UPR signaling pathway on radiosensitivity in intestinal epithelial cells remain to be determined. In this study, we investigated the role of ER stress responses in IR-induced intestinal epithelial cell death. We show that chemical ER stress inducers, such as tunicamycin or thapsigargin, enhanced IR-induced caspase 3 activation and DNA fragmentation in intestinal epithelial cells. Knockdown of Xbp1 or Atf6 with small interfering RNA inhibited IR-induced caspase 3 activation. Treatment with chemical chaperones prevented ER stress and subsequent apoptosis in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Our results suggest a pro-apoptotic role of ER stress in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, inhibiting ER stress may be an effective strategy to prevent IR-induced intestinal injury.

  19. Study on radiation-responsive epigenomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hong; Chung, Byung Yeop; Lee, Seung Sik; Moon, Yu Ran; Lee, Min Hee; Kim, Ji Hong [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    The purpose of this project is development of world-class headspring techniques of biological science for application of plant genomes/epigenomes through study on radiation- responsive epigenomes and improvement of the national competitiveness in the field of fundamental technology for biological science and industry. Research scope includes 1) Investigation of radiation-responsive epigenomes and elucidation of their relation with phenotypes, 2) Elucidation of interaction and transcription control of epigenomes and epigenetic regulators using ionizing radiation (IR), 3) Investigation of epigenome-mediated traits in plant development, differentiation and antioxidant defense using IR, and 4) Development of application techniques of radiation-responsive epigenomes for eco-monitoring and molecular breeding. Main results are as follow: Setup of conditions for chromatin immunoprecipitation in irradiated plants: investigation of aberrations in DNA methylation after treatment with different IR: elucidation of responses of epigenetic regulators to gamma rays (GR): investigation of aberrations in GR-responsive epigenetic regulators at different developmental stages: elucidation of interactive aberrations of epigenomes and epigenetic regulators after treatment of GR: comparison of functional genomes after treatment of GR or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}: elucidation of relation of epigenomes with GR-induced delay in senescence: elucidation of relation of epigenomes with GR-induced aberrations in pigment metabolism: comparison of antioxidant defense in epigenetic mutants: investigation of senescence-associated changes in epigenomes: investigation of senescence-associated changes in epigenetic regulators: comparison of aberrations in epigenomes at different dose of GR for mutation.

  20. Study on radiation-responsive epigenomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hong; Lee, Seung Sik; Bae, Hyung Woo; Kim, Ji Hong; Kim, Ji Eun; Cho, Eun Ju; Lee, Min Hee; Moon, Yu Ran [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    The purpose of this project is development of world-class headspring techniques of biological science for application of plant genomes/epigenomes through study on radiation- responsive epigenomes and improvement of the national competitiveness in the field of fundamental technology for biological science and industry. Research scope includes 1) Investigation of radiation-responsive epigenomes and elucidation of their relation with phenotypes, 2) Elucidation of interaction and transcription control of epigenomes and epigenetic regulators using IR, 3) Investigation of epigenome-mediated traits in plant development, differentiation and antioxidant defense using IR, and 4) Development of application techniques of radiation-responsive epigenomes for eco-monitoring and molecular breeding. Main results are as follow: practical application of ChIP in GR-treated Arabidopsis using anti-histone antibodies: mapping of DNA methylomes associated with GR-responsive transcriptomes: setup of methylated DNA quantification using HPLC: elucidation of aberrations in epigenetic regulation induced by low-dose GR using gamma phytotron: comparison of gene expression of histone-modifying enzymes after treatment of GR: elucidation of transcriptomes and physiological alterations associated with delayed senescence of drd1-6 mutant: comparison of gene expression of DNA methylation-related enzymes in GR-treated rice callus and Arabidopsis: investigation of germination capacity, low-temperature, salinity and drought stress-resistance in drd1-6 epigenetic mutant: investigation of aberrations in DNA methylation depending on dose rates of gamma radiation

  1. Study on radiation-responsive epigenomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Hong; Lee, Seung Sik; Bae, Hyung Woo; Kim, Ji Hong; Kim, Ji Eun; Cho, Eun Ju; Lee, Min Hee; Moon, Yu Ran

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this project is development of world-class headspring techniques of biological science for application of plant genomes/epigenomes through study on radiation- responsive epigenomes and improvement of the national competitiveness in the field of fundamental technology for biological science and industry. Research scope includes 1) Investigation of radiation-responsive epigenomes and elucidation of their relation with phenotypes, 2) Elucidation of interaction and transcription control of epigenomes and epigenetic regulators using IR, 3) Investigation of epigenome-mediated traits in plant development, differentiation and antioxidant defense using IR, and 4) Development of application techniques of radiation-responsive epigenomes for eco-monitoring and molecular breeding. Main results are as follow: practical application of ChIP in GR-treated Arabidopsis using anti-histone antibodies: mapping of DNA methylomes associated with GR-responsive transcriptomes: setup of methylated DNA quantification using HPLC: elucidation of aberrations in epigenetic regulation induced by low-dose GR using gamma phytotron: comparison of gene expression of histone-modifying enzymes after treatment of GR: elucidation of transcriptomes and physiological alterations associated with delayed senescence of drd1-6 mutant: comparison of gene expression of DNA methylation-related enzymes in GR-treated rice callus and Arabidopsis: investigation of germination capacity, low-temperature, salinity and drought stress-resistance in drd1-6 epigenetic mutant: investigation of aberrations in DNA methylation depending on dose rates of gamma radiation

  2. Study on radiation-responsive epigenomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Hong; Chung, Byung Yeop; Lee, Seung Sik; Moon, Yu Ran; Lee, Min Hee; Kim, Ji Hong

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this project is development of world-class headspring techniques of biological science for application of plant genomes/epigenomes through study on radiation- responsive epigenomes and improvement of the national competitiveness in the field of fundamental technology for biological science and industry. Research scope includes 1) Investigation of radiation-responsive epigenomes and elucidation of their relation with phenotypes, 2) Elucidation of interaction and transcription control of epigenomes and epigenetic regulators using ionizing radiation (IR), 3) Investigation of epigenome-mediated traits in plant development, differentiation and antioxidant defense using IR, and 4) Development of application techniques of radiation-responsive epigenomes for eco-monitoring and molecular breeding. Main results are as follow: Setup of conditions for chromatin immunoprecipitation in irradiated plants: investigation of aberrations in DNA methylation after treatment with different IR: elucidation of responses of epigenetic regulators to gamma rays (GR): investigation of aberrations in GR-responsive epigenetic regulators at different developmental stages: elucidation of interactive aberrations of epigenomes and epigenetic regulators after treatment of GR: comparison of functional genomes after treatment of GR or H 2 O 2 : elucidation of relation of epigenomes with GR-induced delay in senescence: elucidation of relation of epigenomes with GR-induced aberrations in pigment metabolism: comparison of antioxidant defense in epigenetic mutants: investigation of senescence-associated changes in epigenomes: investigation of senescence-associated changes in epigenetic regulators: comparison of aberrations in epigenomes at different dose of GR for mutation

  3. Improvement of Physico-Chemical Properties of Recycled (Elastomers /Thermoplastics) Composites using Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, M.Y.E.A.

    2013-01-01

    Recycling of ground tire rubber (GRT) not only solves the waste disposal problem and maintains environmental quality, but also saves the valuable and limited resource of fossil feedstock. The major problem in the recycling of rubber-like materials such as tires is the cross linked molecular structure of already vulcanized rubber, which not only prevents the softening and processing of waste rubber particles but also inhibits binding of the powder surface to the virgin material. Several reclamation methods have proposed to overcome these barriers, which have basically followed two main approaches: (1) the de vulcanization of cured rubber and (2) the surface modifications of waste particles. The de vulcanization of rubber causes the cleavage of crosslinks via chemical treatments, which make used rubber suitable to be reformulated and recurred into new articles. In consequence, this work is mainly aimed to prepare of de vulcanized rubber (DR) and evaluating mechanical, thermal, and morphological properties of the thermoplastic vulcanizations (TPVs) based on de vulcanized rubber blended with polypropylene, EPDM using peroxide under the effect of radiation dose and DR feed ratio. The efficiency of the compounding process has been examined by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanical and thermal behaviors of the blends composed of de vulcanized rubber (DR) , high crystalline polypropylene (PP) and EPDM in different proportions were studied. Evaluation of the mechanical and thermal properties of the developed blends, unirradiated and gamma irradiated, was carried out using tensile strength (Ts), elongation at break (Eb), hardness, TGA and DSC measurements.

  4. Synthesis and mechanistic studies of phosphoraziridines as radiation sensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perlman, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    Ethyl bis(2,2-dimethyl-1-aziridinyl)phosphinyl carbamate (AB-132) and ethyl bis(2,2-dimethyl-1-aziridinyl)phosphinate (AB-163) are potent antitumor agents which have also been demonstrated to be radiation sensitizers in experimental and clinical studies. Monophenyl aziridines and various isomers of diphenylaziridines were utilized. Optically active 2-phenyl aziridine was also employed in order to prepare diastereomerically homogeneous compounds. Para-substituted phenylaziridines were prepared as well and converted to the corresponding phosphoraziridines in order to probe electronic effects of such substituents on biological activity and chemical reactivity. The hydrolysis of 2,2-dimethylaziridine-type compounds including AB-132 and AB-163 was studied by NMR in order to gain further insight into the hydrolytic intermediates which may be responsible for the known cholinesterase inhibition and the suspected phosphorylation of radiation-damaged DNA. Comparative reactivities of the compounds prepared in this study with p-nitrobenzylpyridine were investigated so as to provide some indication of potential alkylating activity, in the hope of obtaining a correlation with biological activity. Electron spin resonance was utilized to study the effects of radiation on phosphoraziridine crystals

  5. Effects of gamma radiations with or without chemical mutagens on rose seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lata, P.

    1988-01-01

    A preliminary experiment with seeds from 4 diploids, 17 tetraploids, 2 hexaploids and 1 octoploid roses confirmed that seed collection during early autumn under climatical conditions of London, gives a high percentage of viable seeds than those collected during late autumn. Seed stratification for about 100 days enhances germination when carried out under wet, purified sand. Harmful effects of radiations were recorded on seed germination, seedling survival, growth and flowering, after 0-120 Kr exposures of gamma rays. Rose cultivars were found to be more sensitive to radiations than the Rosa spp. The LD50 for diploid R. rugosa typica was between 20-30 Kr and for allo-tetraploid cultivar Aunty Dora, it was 8 Kr. No significant effect of radiations on seedling growth was recorded. Flowering in seedlings, raised from cultivar seeds, produced flowers during the first year of germination as compared with R. spp. seedlings which flowered after 3 to 4 years of germination. Among the chemical mutagens, Hydroxylamine produced least harmful effects on seed germination and survivals than those produced by Ethyl methane sulphonate; used alone or combined with low or high doses of radiations. The average seedling heights and number of leaves per seedlings were not affected. Mutagens were responsible for bringing about a loss in colour intensity which was more frequent when radiations and mutagens were used together. Real flower colour changes were rare and were attributed to the pollinating parent or mutagen or both. Present experiments indicate that although there are initial difficulties with seed germination but the resulting seedlings with increased genetic variability can generously reward a rose breeder in introducing new roses with rare combination of desirable characters which are difficult to accomplish merely by induced somatic mutations

  6. The effect of radiation-sterilization conditions and preservation procedures on physico-chemical and biological properties of bone allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goclawska, A.D.; Kaminski, A.; Wasilewska, M.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation-sterilization of connective tissue allografts (bone including) with a dose of 35 kGy is routinely used in the Central Tissue Bank in Warsaw since 1963. This method of sterilization offers many advantages: good penetration ability, relatively low temperature rise, and possibility of sterilization of grafts in closed beforehand vials, which protects against secondary contamination. It should be kept in mind, however that high doses of ionizing radiation (in the range of 20-35 kGy) used for sterilization evoke many chemical and physical changes which may influence biological properties of grafts. These changes have been studied using various methodological approaches. Using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry it has been found that in radiation-sterilized bone two types of paramagnetic entities are generated: i/ coliagen radicals which are unstable and disappear completely in the presence of air oxygen, ii/ very stable at room temperature paramagnetic defects (centers) localized in the crystalline lattice of bone mineral. These stable paramagnetic defects have been treated as a new kind of markers and used for: a/ quantitative evaluation of remodeling process of radiation-sterilized bone allografts preserved by lyophilization or deep freezing; b/ estimation of the dose of ionizing radiation absorbed by living organism in the case of accidental exposure (skeleton serving as a dosimeter) and for control of radiation-sterilization process. The effect of radiation-sterilization and preservation procedures on bone allografts was studied using a model of heterotopically induced osteogenesis and measuring the solubility of bone collagen in vitro. It has been observed that lyophilized bone allografts irradiated at room temp. with doses of 35 and 50 kGy, respectively, were very quickly resorbed in vivo and did not induce osteogenesis, while lyophilized as well as deep-frozen matrices irradiated at -7OoC were slowly resorbed and induced de novo bone fon

  7. Time-resolved studies of direct effects of radiation on DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fielden, E.M.; O'Neill, P.; Al-Kazwini, A.

    1987-01-01

    The biological changes induced by ionising radiation are a consequence of radiation-induced chemical events taking place at times <1s. These events are strongly influenced by the presence of chemical modifiers. Since DNA is a principle target for radiation-induced cell killing, DNA-free radicals are generated by direct ionisation of DNA moieties (direct effect) and by reaction with hydroxyl radicals formed by radiolysis of the water which is in the vicinity of the DNA (indirect effect). In order to study the 'direct' effects of radiation on DNA the following model approaches are discussed:- 1) Use of the technique of pulse radiolysis to investigate in aqueous solution the interactions of deoxynucleosides with SO/sub 4//sup .-/ whereby one-electron oxidised species of the bases are generated; and 2) time resolved, radiation-induced changes to solid DNA and related macromolecules (e.g. radiation-induced luminescence) in order to obtain an understanding of charge/energy migration as a result of ionisation of DNA. The influence of chemical modifiers and of environment is discussed in terms of the properties of the radiation-induced species produced. Since the properties of base radicals produced by SO/sub 4//sup .-/ are similar to those of the base OH-adducts oxidising properties, potential similarities between the 'direct' and 'indirect' effects of radiation are presented

  8. Studies on radiation-induced graft polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omichi, Hideki

    1978-09-01

    Radiation-induced graft polymerization is used extensively to improve physical properties of polymers, but few processes are now commercialized. The reason for this is partly inadequate basic research on the reaction and partly the difficulty in developing the grafting process with large radiation source. Firstly, new techniques are proposed of studying kinetics of the graft polymerization in heterogeneous system. Based on the grafting yield, the molecular weight of graft chains, and the amount of radicals given by ESR and activation analysis, kinetic parameters are obtained and the reaction mechanism of grafting process is discussed. Secondly, the development of grafting process of poly (vinyl chloride)-butadiene is described. By study of the reaction, process design, construction and operation of the pilot plant, and economic analysis of the process, this process with 60 Co gamma ray sources is shown to be industrially promising. (author)

  9. Chemical toxicity of uranium hexafluoride compared to acute effects of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, S.A.

    1991-02-01

    The chemical effects from acute exposures to uranium hexafluoride are compared to the nonstochastic effects from acute radiation doses of 25 rems to the whole body and 300 rems to the thyroid. The analysis concludes that an intake of about 10 mg of uranium in soluble form is roughly comparable, in terms of early effects, to an acute whole body dose of 25 rems because both are just below the threshold for significant nonstochastic effects. Similarly, an exposure to hydrogen fluoride at a concentration of 25 mg/m{sup 3} for 30 minutes is roughly comparable because there would be no significant nonstochastic effects. For times t other than 30 minutes, the concentration C of hydrogen fluoride considered to have the same effect can be calculated using a quadratic equation: C = 25 mg/m{sup 3} (30 min/t). The purpose of these analyses is to provide information for developing design and siting guideline based on chemical toxicity for enrichment plants using uranium hexafluoride. These guidelines are to be similar, in terms of stochastic health effects, to criteria in NRC regulations of nuclear power plants, which are based on radiation doses. 26 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  10. Chemical toxicity of uranium hexafluoride compared to acute effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, S.A.

    1991-02-01

    The chemical effects from acute exposures to uranium hexafluoride are compared to the nonstochastic effects from acute radiation doses of 25 rems to the whole body and 300 rems to the thyroid. The analysis concludes that an intake of about 10 mg of uranium in soluble form is roughly comparable, in terms of early effects, to an acute whole body dose of 25 rems because both are just below the threshold for significant nonstochastic effects. Similarly, an exposure to hydrogen fluoride at a concentration of 25 mg/m 3 for 30 minutes is roughly comparable because there would be no significant nonstochastic effects. For times t other than 30 minutes, the concentration C of hydrogen fluoride considered to have the same effect can be calculated using a quadratic equation: C = 25 mg/m 3 (30 min/t). The purpose of these analyses is to provide information for developing design and siting guideline based on chemical toxicity for enrichment plants using uranium hexafluoride. These guidelines are to be similar, in terms of stochastic health effects, to criteria in NRC regulations of nuclear power plants, which are based on radiation doses. 26 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  11. Radiated flow of chemically reacting nanoliquid with an induced magnetic field across a permeable vertical plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mahanthesh

    Full Text Available Impact of induced magnetic field over a flat porous plate by utilizing incompressible water-copper nanoliquid is examined analytically. Flow is supposed to be laminar, steady and two-dimensional. The plate is subjected to a regular free stream velocity as well as suction velocity. Flow formulation is developed by considering Maxwell–Garnetts (MG and Brinkman models of nanoliquid. Impacts of thermal radiation, viscous dissipation, temperature dependent heat source/sink and first order chemical reaction are also retained. The subjected non-linear problems are non-dimensionalized and analytic solutions are presented via series expansion method. The graphs are plotted to analyze the influence of pertinent parameters on flow, magnetism, heat and mass transfer fields as well as friction factor, current density, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. It is found that friction factor at the plate is more for larger magnetic Prandtl number. Also the rate of heat transfer decayed with increasing nanoparticles volume fraction and the strength of magnetism. Keywords: Induced magnetic field, Nanoliquids, Heat source/sink, Series expansion method, Chemical reaction, Thermal radiation

  12. A radiopharmacological study without human radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loew, D.; Graul, E.H.; Kunkel, R.

    1984-01-01

    The development, study and control of new drugs today is hardly conceivable without nuclear medicine studies. Nuclear physicians on ethical commissions bear great responsibility in the planning and execution of such studies. In order to protect subjects and patients those nuclear techniques are therefore to be welcome which do not include exposure to radiation. Nuclear techniques used in in-vitro diagnostics (RIA) and the determination of naturally occurring nuclides incorporated in the human body belong to this category. With the aid of a clinico-pharmacological study of a new combination of diuretics it is shown that both methods supply valuable pharmacodynamic evidence. (orig.) [de

  13. Effect of the gamma radiation on the chemical, rheological, baker and microbiological properties in wheat flour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agundez A, Z.; Fernandez R, M.V.; Arce C, M.E.; Cruz Z, E.; Chernov, V.; Barboza F, M.

    2002-01-01

    The gamma radiation has been used in several places of the World as a sterilization method, preservation and pasteurization of foodstuffs, effect which is achieved due to diminishing or elimination of the microorganisms, reaching every time more acceptance, moreover eliminates the uses of toxic and carcinogenic substances, of general use, but at the present, being in the process of being totally prohibited, due to the higher risk in the human health. In this work the related results with the effects of the gamma radiation are presented, coming from a 60 Co source, in commercial wheat flour exposed to a dose of 1.0 KGy. The used dose is that allowed according to the NOM-033-SSA1-1993 standard. It was determined that the chemical characteristics of humidity, protein and ashes were not affected by radiation. The rheological properties neither suffer severe effects as consequence of radiation; the pharynographic and alveographic parameters were lightly affected by the treatment. Significant changes were detected in the percentage of water absorption and in the tolerance index to mixing. However a diminish of 10% in the development time and an increase of 13% in the stability was observed, for the irradiated samples respect to the those samples not irradiated. In relation to the alveograph parameters it was only detected a diminish of 7% in the force parameter (w) without changes in the tenacity/blowing up index ratio (P/L). The fall number diminish 11% indicating a small diminution in viscosity. The bakering properties do not turn out modified by the irradiation treatment finding a specific weight of 4.6 and 4.5 (cm 3 /g) for the control and irradiated samples, respectively. In the mesophyll analysis it was found a diminish of 96% from the original charge in control samples, observing a diminution of 74 and 25% in yeasts and mushrooms respectively. Microbiologically it was determined absence of total coliforms bacteria and faecal coliforms in the control samples and of

  14. Applying radiation approaches to the control of public risks from chemical agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    IF a hazardous agent has a threshold, prevention is the obvious measure of success. To the eyes of this author, success is also achieveable for a hazardous agent that may have no threshold and that causes its effects in a probabilistic manner. First, the technical people responsible for protection must be given a reasonable, well defined risk objective by governmental authorities. To the extent that they meet that objective (1) without unnecessarily increasing operational costs, (2) without interfering unnecessarily with operational activities, and (3) without diverting resources away from greater risks, they are successful. Considering these three qualifications, radiation protection for members of the public can hardly be presented as the panacea for other hazardous agents. It would be an error to dismiss the improvement opportunities discussed above as being of acdemic interest only. Decades of experience with radiation have demonstrated that these problems are both real adn significant. In the US the axioms discussed above are accepted as scientific fact for radiation by many policy makers, the news media and the public. For any operation the collective dose is calculated using zero dose as the lower limit of integration, the results are converted to cancer deaths using the risk coefficients, and decisions are made as though these deaths would actually occur without governmental intervention. As a result, billions of dollars and a very large number of highly skilled persons are being expended to protect against radiation doses far smaller than geographical variations in the natural radiation background. These expenditures are demanded by, and required for well-meaning, nontechnical people who have been misled. It is often stated by knowledgeable people that if the degree of protection required for radiation were also to be requested for the other hazards, human progress would come to a halt. If the radiation approaches are to be used in the control of public

  15. Chemical radiation protection of certain aspects of carbohydrate metabolism in irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelaziz, M.T.; Roushdy, H.M.; Saleh, S.; El-denshary, E.S.M.; Maklad, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    Because of the practical importance of certain compounds that exhibit protective character against lethal effects of ionizing radiation, repeated investigations have been carried out to evaluate the radioprotective efficiency of such compounds and to study the mechanism through which they manifest their radioprotective effects. The present study is an attempt to investigate the possible role which the heterocyclic nitrogenous compounds (glyoxaline and benzoglyoxaline) can play as radioprotectors against radiation-induced changes in carbohydrate metabolism. The parameters studied were, survival rate, bloodglucose level, gamma insulin level and liver glycogen concentration

  16. Chemical radiation protection of certain aspects of carbohydrate metabolism in irradiated rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelaziz, M T; Roushdy, H M; Saleh, S; El-denshary, E S.M.; Maklad, T A [National Centre for Radiation Research and Technology, Cairo (Egypt)

    1985-01-01

    Because of the practical importance of certain compounds that exhibit protective character against lethal effects of ionizing radiation, repeated investigations have been carried out to evaluate the radioprotective efficiency of such compounds and to study the mechanism through which they manifest their radioprotective effects. The present study is an attempt to investigate the possible role which the heterocyclic nitrogenous compounds (glyoxaline and benzoglyoxaline) can play as radioprotectors against radiation-induced changes in carbohydrate metabolism. The parameters studied were, survival rate, bloodglucose level, gamma insulin level and liver glycogen concentration.

  17. System chemical biology studies of endocrine disruptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Oprea, Tudor I.

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) alter hormonal balance and other physiological systems through inappropriate developmental or adult exposure, perturbing the reproductive function of further generations. While disruption of key receptors (e.g., estrogen, androgen, and thyroid) at the ligand...

  18. Thermal radiation and chemical reaction effects on MHD free convection heat and mass transfer in a micropolar fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasacharya, D.; Mendu, Upendar

    2011-01-01

    The steady laminar free convection heat and mass transfer boundary layer flow of a thermomicropolar fluid past a non-isothermal vertical flat plate in the presence of a homogeneous first order chemical reaction and a radiation with transverse magnetic field has been reported. It has been established that the flow problem has similarity solutions when the variation in temperature of the plate and variation in concentration of the fluid are linear functions of the distance from the leading edge measured along the plate. The nonlinear governing equations of the flow along with their appropriate boundary conditions are initially cast into dimensionless forms using similarity transformations which are used to reduce the governing partial differential equations into ordinary differential equations. The resulting system of equations thus formed is then solved numerically by using the Keller-box method. The non-dimensional Nusselt number, Sherwood number and the skin friction coefficient and wall couple stress at the plate are derived, and a parametric study of the governing parameters, namely the magnetic field strength parameter, radiation parameter, chemical reaction parameter, Sherwood number profiles against to the coupling number as well as the skin friction coefficient, wall couple stress coefficient is conducted. (author)

  19. Radiation-chemical behaviour of neptunium ions in nitric acid solutions in the presence of curium-244

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolova, L.M.; Frolov, A.A.; Vasil'ev, V.Ya.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation-chemical behaviour of neptunium ions in nitric acid solutions is studied under the action of intensive internal alpha-irradiation conditioned by curium nuclides. In 0.3-1.1 mol/l solutions of nitric acid radiation-chemical oxidation of neptunium (4) and reduction of neptunium (6) is obeyed to the first order law of reaction rate in respect to neptunium concentration. Effective constants of neptunium (4) oxidation rates and neptuniumi(6) reduction rates are not dependent on neptunium ion in1tial concentration and increase with a growth of a dose rate of alpha-irradiation of solution. In equilibrium only neptunium (5) and neptunium (6) are present in solutions with HNO 3 concentration less than 1 mol/l. In more concentrated solutions equilibrium between sexa-, penta- and tetravalent neptunium forms is established. Equilibrium concentrations of neptunium valent forms are not dependent on neptunium initial oxidation state under the same initial conditions (dose rate, neptunium concentration and acidity. It is shown form experimental data that under the action of alpha-irradiation neptunium (5) both is oxidated to neptunium (6) and is reduced to neptunium (4)

  20. Protection against genetic hazards from environmental chemical mutagens: experience with ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankaranarayanan, K.

    1977-01-01

    In radiation protection, the recurrent theme is, and always has been, dose limitation whether it is for occupational workers, individual members of the public or the population as a whole. The key words are 'dose' and 'limitation'. The quantitative system of dose limitation has been achieved because of a number of conceptual developments in our understanding of the mechanism of radiation action, development of radiation dosimetry, the accumulation of a vast body of quantitative information on dose-effect relationships and the effects of various biological and physical variables that affect these relationships of data on patterns and levels of exposures likely to be encountered to make estimates of the effects expected to result from such exposures, and balancing of risks to society against the benefits derived, the latter a matter of informed judgement. The philosophy has always been to avoid all unnecessary exposures and to limit the necessary exposures (justified by the benefits expected) to as low a level as reasonably achievable, social and economic factors being taken into acccount. The introduction of the concept that the system of dose limitation to the population should be based on genetic risks has stressed the need for careful planning to ensure that our genetic heritage is not endangered. Transfer of this knowledge to the field of chemical protection is discussed. (Auth.)

  1. Study of chemical and physical properties of irradiated Guar Gum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, H. A. S.

    2012-07-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of different gamma radiation doses to decontamination of micro-organisms present in Guar Gum powder. As well as to study the effect of radiation on the chemical and physical properties of the carbohydrate components of the Gum's material. Two types of samples were used in this study (powder and liquid). All samples were collected from commercially available Guar Gum (G G), which were obtained from the company (Sudanese Guar Gum ltd). Samples putted in polyethylene tightly closed container, then irradiated by applying different doses (2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, 20,30,40,and 50 kGy) from Co-60 source at room temperature in air. And take zero kGy as control. Irradiated powder samples of (2.5, 5, 7.5, 10 kGy) were investigated for contamination by using growth media agar and the result showed that 2.5 kGy is appropriate dose to remove the contamination of the samples. And then analyzed using fourier transform infrared (FTTR) x-ray fluorescence (X RF) and spectroscopy. The FTIR spectroscopy results suggested that there were no major chemical functional group transformation during irradiation. No change occurs by using low dose as 2.5 kGy. Also evaluation impact of radiation on liquid Samples (Aqueous solutions prepared in tow concentration of 1% and 5% wv that is by exposing the samples to the same dose of gamma rays) the effect of irradiation on it were investigated by using ultra violet spectroscopy ( UV.Vis), results showed that low dose has steeply effect in solutions specially in low concentration, it was more pronoun than that in high concentration, high dose has made change similar to that it made in powder. Also for both concentrations of liquid samples and for solutions made of irradiated powder pH measured and viscosity which used in investigations of molecular weight of liquid and powder, comparing the results of impact in the form of powder with the results of effects in the solutions found that the effects of

  2. Sister chromatid exchanges in the bone marrow cells of in vivo rats induced by gamma radiation and chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez R, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    Sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in the bone marrow of in vivo rats induced by gamma radiation doses and by the chemical mutagens, mitomycin C (MMC), cyclophosphamide (CP), and sulphonate-methylmethane (SMM), were studied. The purpose was to evaluate the sensitivity and reproducibility of a simplified SCE in vivo detecting system developed in our laboratory and to compare the results obtained with those reported elsewhere. Simplification consisted in administering the amounts of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) necessary to observe the SCE, after first adsorbing the BrdU in activated carbon and then injecting it interperitoneally, into the rats. The results were a longer time in vivo ADN incorporation without convulsions in the rats, and a reduction in the time course as compared to other methods. We observed a basal rate of 3.6+-0.37 SCE/cell and that: 0.44 Gy of gamma radiation induced 7.7+-0.73 SCE/cell; 1.6 μg/g of MMC induced 8.1+-1.20 SCE/cell; 5 μg/g of CP induced 8.25+-1.5 SCE/cell, 40 μg/g of SMM induced 22.0+-5 SCE/cell and 380 μg/g of sulphonate-ethylmethane induced 8.6+-1.2 SCE/cell. This showed that all the agents were capable of inducing SCE in the bone marrow cells of rats in vivo under our conditions. We noted a greater induced efficiency for gamma radiation than the obtained by other investigators and a relatively similar efficiency in the case of chemical mutagens as reported in other studies. (author)

  3. Effects of radiation on the chemical environment surrounding waste canisters in proposed repository sites and possible effects on the corrosion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.S.

    1981-12-01

    This report explores the interaction of ionizing radiation with various environments. In particular, worst case (aqueous) environments for the proposed nuclear waste repository sites are considered. Emphasis is on the fundamental chemical and physical processes involved. The identities of possible radiolysis products (both transient and stable) have been sought through a literature search. The effect of radiation on corrosion processes is discussed. The radiation-induced chemical environment in the worst case repository sites is not well defined. Attention should therefore be given to fundamental studies exploring the interaction of such environments with components of the nuclear waste package, including the canister materials and backfills. Identification and quantification of radiolysis products would be helpful in this regard

  4. Study of radiation-destroyed wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimentov, A.S.; Shakhanova, R.K.; Stepanova, I.N.; Vysotskaya, I.F.

    1986-01-01

    The change in carbohydrate composition of aspen wood exposed to electron beam radiation (0.5 MeV, dose rates of 0-0.56 MGy) is studied. It has been found that the water-soluble polysaccharide content grows from 0.47 up to 8.54 %, and that of the non-hydrolyzed polysaccharides decreases from 49.4 down to 36.1 %. The polysaccharide total content of aspen wood goes down from 61.28 to 56.82 % with the radiation dose increasing. Consequently, the xylose, arabinose, and ramnose percentage of wood hydrolyzates increases correspondingly from 11.9 up to 15.44, from 0.66 up to 0.90, and from 0.21 up to 0.38

  5. A synchrotron radiation study of strontium titanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslen, E.N.; Spadaccini, N.; Ito, T.; Marumo, F.; Satow, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Electron deformation densities Δρ for SrTiO 3 have been determined from diffraction data measured using focused synchrotron radiation with λ = 0.7000 (2) A at the Photon Factory, KEK, Japan. Corrections for secondary extinction were estimated from the variation of diffraction intensity with path length, and checked from the λ-dependence of the strong intensities indicated by measurements using a weaker parallel beam with λ = 0.5000 (2) A. The 0.7 A study is more precise than earlier analyses with Mo Kα radiation. The difference density near the Ti nucleus is mildly anisotropic, and the Δρ topography is similar to those for closed-shell atoms in related perovskite structures. (orig.)

  6. Studies on chronic effect on radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, T.K.; Kang, T.U.; Yun, Y.S.; Chung, I.Y.; Koh, J. W.; Kim, J.W.; Ryu, Y.W.

    1983-01-01

    This experiment was carried out to evaluate the chronic harzard of Co-60 low dose irradiation on ICR mice. There is now considerable evidence from human studies that age, both at exposure to radiation and at observation for risk, can be a major determinant of radiation induced cancer risk. For this reason, ICR mice at different ages as specified below were exposed to 60 m rads/week, 500 m rads/biweek of whole body Co-60 radiation at a dose rate of 3.6 rads/min. ICR mice were irradiated during pregnant period and each period from the 1st week to the 3rd week to the 52nd week, from the 6th week to the 52nd week and from the 22nd week to the 52nd week after the birth. All the experimental mice were autopsied immediately after sacrificed at the 52nd week. And all of their major organs were examined grossly and weighed. After fixation histo-pathological preparations were made for microscopical study. Blood cells-W.B.C., R.B.C., Hb-from eye's vein were counted by hemocytometer and hemometer. (Author)

  7. Epidemiological studies of radiation workers: preliminary communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schofield, G.B.

    1982-01-01

    British Nuclear Fuels Limited has embarked on a study of the mortality data among those of its workforce who were employed prior to 1 January 1976. The study covers a total population of about 41000 current and ex-employees, but is initially concerned with a radiation worker cohort of 7500 at the Sellafield establishment where the highest radiation doses are received. Tracing of the health status of ex-employees has been undertaken using the services provided by the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys (OPCS) and the Department of Health and Social Security (DHSS) and it is expected that ultimately the level of trace will be better than 97%. Mortality data not specifically related to radiation workers are included and relate to male deaths among serving staff and pensioners during the years 1962-1978. Those observed deaths (O) are compared on an age standardized basis with those expected (E) from the general population, the ratio O/E being about 1 for all cancers and less than 1 for non-cancer deaths. This pattern is consistent with the well known 'healthy worker' effect seen in industry. (author)

  8. Studying Radiation Tolerant ICs for LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Faccio, F; Snoeys, W; Campbell, M; Casas-cubillos, J; Gomes, P

    2002-01-01

    %title\\\\ \\\\In the recent years, intensive work has been carried out on the development of custom ICs for the readout electronics for LHC experiments. As far as radiation hardness is concerned, attention has been focussed on high total dose applications, mainly for the tracker systems. The dose foreseen in this inner region is estimated to be higher than 1~Mrad/year. In the framework of R&D projects (RD-9 and RD-20) and in the ATLAS and CMS experiments, the study of different radiation hard processes has been pursued and good contacts with the manufacturers have been established. The results of these studies have been discussed during the Microelectronics User Group (MUG) rad-hard meetings, and now some HEP groups are working to develop radiation hard ICs for the LHC experiments on some of the available rad-hard processes.\\\\ \\\\In addition, a lot of the standard commercial electronic components and ASICs which are planned to be installed near the LHC machine and in the detectors will receive total doses in ...

  9. Light source for synchrotron radiation x-ray topography study at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (BSRL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jiyong; Jiang Jianhua; Tian Yulian

    1992-01-01

    Characteristics of the synchrotron radiation source for X-ray topography study at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (BSRL) is described, local geometrical resolution of topographies is discussed, and the diffracting intensities of white beam topography is given

  10. Isoparaffinic diluents for tri-n-butyl phosphate. Chemical, radiation-chemical stability, effect on tetravalent plutonium and thorium extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renard, E.V.; Pyatibratov, Yu.P.; Neumoev, N.V.; Chizhov, A.A.; Kulikov, I.A.; Gol'dfarb, Yu.Ya.; Sirotkina, I.G.; Semenova, T.I.

    1989-01-01

    By means of catalytic hydroisomerization of the n-paraffinic raw material in a reactor using alumino-platinum catalysts, there was attained a 45-90% degree of conversion of n-paraffins into branched iso-paraffins with mono- and dimethyl structure. From a batch of extensively isomerized n-paraffins, by carrying out the operations of distillation of the light (benzine) fraction, dearomatization, de-n-paraffinization and fractional distillation on a rectification column, isoparaffinic (99%) concentrates were obtained with a constant molecular weight, from iso-C 10 to isoC 15 . The solubility of plutonium and thorium nitrates in 30% solutions of TBP in iso-paraffins (mixtures of iso-paraffins with the same number of C-atoms) increases with decrease in the molecular weight of the iso-paraffin; a system with a 30% TBP in a mixture of iso-decanes practically does not stratify (∼104 g Pu/liter, 22-25 degree C). Nevertheless, a twofold increase (compared with NP) of the maximally permissible (up to the formation of the third phase) concentration, is attained when iso-paraffins are introduced into NP with a similar molecular composition in a 1:1 ratio. With respect to the main requirements demanded of diluents for radiochemical extractional operations, such as density, viscosity, boiling point, flash point, and freezing point, the chemical stability and radiation resistance, content of radioruthenium and radiozirconium, rate of stratification of two-phase systems, the synthetic iso-paraffin-containing solvents are as suitable as n-paraffins

  11. The Effect of Gamma radiation, microwave radiation, their interaction and storage on chemical composition, antinutritional factors and the activities of trypsin inhibitor and lipoxygenase of soybean seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Rahim, E A; Abdel-Fatah, O M [Dept. of Biochem., Faculty of Agric., Cairo University. (Egypt); El-Adawy, M; Badea, M Y [Food Technol. Dept., National Center for Research and Radiation Technol., Atomic Energy Authority (Egypt)

    2000-07-01

    The effect of gamma radiation, microwave radiation, interaction between them; and storage of radiated soybean seeds were investigated to find out the best treatment which had to the maximum reduction of antinutrional factors (Trypsin inhibitor and lipoxygenase activities) without significant effect on the chemical constituents. The gamma rays was used at three doses of 2.5, 5.0 and 8.0 kGy, microwave radiation was at 70 level power for 2 and 4 min; and the storage of seeds was at temperature, R.H. 50-55% for six months. The data revealed that, effects of interaction treatments were more effective than the treatment with microwave or gamma radiation alone.

  12. The Effect of Gamma radiation, microwave radiation, their interaction and storage on chemical composition, antinutritional factors and the activities of trypsin inhibitor and lipoxygenase of soybean seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Rahim, E.A.; Abdel-Fatah, O.M.; El-Adawy, M.; Badea, M.Y.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of gamma radiation, microwave radiation, interaction between them; and storage of radiated soybean seeds were investigated to find out the best treatment which had to the maximum reduction of antinutrional factors (Trypsin inhibitor and lipoxygenase activities) without significant effect on the chemical constituents. The gamma rays was used at three doses of 2.5, 5.0 and 8.0 kGy, microwave radiation was at 70 level power for 2 and 4 min; and the storage of seeds was at temperature, R.H. 50-55% for six months. The data revealed that, effects of interaction treatments were more effective than the treatment with microwave or gamma radiation alone

  13. RADIATION CHEMICAL CONVERSION OF OIL DERIVED FROM OIL-BITUMEN ROCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lala Jabbarova

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of research in the radiation processing of synthetic oil derived from oil–bitumen rock of the Balakhany deposit in Azerbaijan are presented. The study has been conducted on a 60Co gamma-source at a dose rate of P = 0.5 Gy/s and various absorbed doses of D = 43–216 kGy. Samples of synthetic oil from natural bitumen rocks have been analyzed by chromatography, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, and IR-spectroscopy, and their radiation resistance has been evaluated. The results of the study allow for both assessment of the feasibility of manufacturing petrochemicals for various applications by radiation processing and use of these materials for isolating radioactive sources to preclude their impact on the environment.

  14. Gamma radiation effects on physico-chemical parameters of apple fruit during commercial post-harvest preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafavi, Hossein Ahari; Mirmajlessi, Seyed Mahyar; Mirjalili, Seyed Mohammad; Fathollahi, Hadi; Askari, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    The physico-chemical parameters (including moisture, total soluble solids, antioxidant activity, phenolic content and firmness) of cv. Red Delicious apple subjected to γ radiation were evaluated for their ability to avoid the post-harvest blue mold caused by Penicillium expansum during cold storage. Freshly harvested apples were inoculated with P. expansum. Treated fruits were irradiated at doses of 0, 300, 600, 900 and 1200 Gy and stored at 1 °C. Apples were evaluated at three month intervals. The results showed that there was a clear link between phenolic content and antioxidant activity, so that dose range of 900 Gy and higher significantly decreased phenolic content and antioxidant activity. The moisture percent of stored apples was more responsive to irradiation (at doses of 900–1200 Gy) than storage time and pathogen. Lesion diameter of pathogen-treated non-irradiated apples was significantly increased after three months. This means that storage at low temperature is not enough to avoid blue mold growth. As dose and storage time increased firmness decreased; also pathogen accelerated softening of stored apples. This study showed conclusively that low irradiation doses (300 and 600 Gy) combined with cold storage is a way to minimize apple quality losses during nine month storage period. - Highlights: ► A suitable method to reduce apple quality losses during nine month storage period. ► Effects of γ radiation and cold storage on physico-chemical parameters of the apple. ► Potential dual benefit of low irradiation dose combined with cold storage. ► Radiation dose determination for Penicillium expansum control.

  15. Study on radiation-responsive epigenomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Sik; Lee, Seung Sik; Chung, Byung Yeoup; and others

    2013-01-15

    The purpose of this project is development of world-class head spring techniques of biological science for application of plant genomes/epigenomes through study on radiation-responsive epigenomes and improvement of the national competitiveness in the field of fundamental technology for biological science and industry. Research scope includes 1) Investigation of radiation-responsive epigenomes and elucidation of their relation with phenotypes, 2) Elucidation of interaction and transcription control of epigenomes and epigenetic regulators using IR, 3) Investigation of epigenome-mediated traits in plant development, differentiation and antioxidant defense using IR, and 4) Development of application techniques of radiation-responsive epigenomes for eco-monitoring and molecular breeding. Main results are as follow: investigation of the expression level of histone-modifying enzymes by IR; elucidation of the structural and functional changes of chaperone protein by IR; development of transgenic plant (DRD1-6); investigation of transcription control of epigenetic regulators by IR; investigation of relevance between DNA methylation and miRNA; comparison of gene expression in wild type and cmt mutant from Arabidopsis using gene chip; investigation control of epigenetic regulators in drd1-6 mutant by drought stress; development of transgenic plant using epigenetic regulators.

  16. Cell kinetic studies on radiation induced leukemogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Isamu; Suzuki, Gen; Imai, Yasufumi; Kawase, Yoshiko; Nose, Masako; Hirashima, Kunitake; Bessho, Masami

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was threefold: (1) to determine the clonal origin of radiation-induced thymic lymphoma in mice with cellular mosaicism for phosphoglycerate kinase; (2) to determine the incidence and latent period of myeloid leukemia and thymic lymphoma induced by whole-body exposure to median doses (3.0 Gy or less) in RFM/MsNrs-2 mice; and (3) to examine the influence of human recombinant interleukin-2 (hrIL-2). Thymic lymphoma was of a single cell origin. The incidence of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia and thymic lymphoma in RFM mice increased in a dose dependent fashion. Mean latent periods of both myeloid leukemia and thymic lymphoma after irradiation became shorter in proportion to radiation doses. When hrIL-2 was injected to RFM mice receiving 3.0 Gy, mean survivals were shorter in thymoma-bearing mice than the control mice. This suggested that hrIL-2 shortens the promotion step of thymoma. Administration of hrIL-2 failed to alter the incidence of myeloid leukemia or the mean survival of mice having myeloid leukemia, indicating that the protocol of hrIL-2 administration was not so sufficient as to alter the myeloid leukemogenesis. (Namekawa, K)

  17. Viscometric studies of chitosan radiation degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapado, M.; Ceausoglu, I.; Hunkeler, D.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the preliminary results, related to the viscometric studies on chitosan gamma radiation degradation. To follow the effects on the processes of chitosan transformations caused by irradiation in vacuum irradiated solutions changes of viscosity, and viscosity average molecular weight were measured The influence of absorbed dose on the chitosan molecular weight was studied using the Mark-Houwink-Sakurada equation. Various relationships for the for the determination of the intrinsic viscosity were made vias the Huggins, Kramer and Schulz- Blaschke models. The distinct decrease of intrinsic viscosity indicates that the main change scission was the dominating process

  18. Molecular activation analysis for chemical species studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Zhifang; Mao Xueying; Wang Yuqi; Sun Jingxin; Qian Qingfang; Hou Xiaolin; Zhang Peiqun; Chen Chunying; Feng Weiyu; Ding Wenjun; Li Xiaolin; Li Chunsheng; Dai Xiongxin

    2001-01-01

    The Molecular Activation Analysis (MAA) mainly refers to an activation analysis method that is able to provide information about the chemical species of elements in systems of interest, though its exact definition has remained to be assigned. Its development is strongly stimulated by the urgent need to know the chemical species of elements, because the bulk contents or concentrations are often insignificant for judging biological, environmental or geochemical effects of elements. In this paper, the features, methodology and limitation of MAA were outlined. Further, the up-to-date MAA progress made in our laboratory was introduced as well. (author)

  19. Studies on the radiation absorption characteristics of various rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, K.N.; Abdullah, S.A.; Gazzaz, M.A.

    1984-05-01

    Radiation absorption characteristics of nine different rocks, namely, ferrugenous quartz, metabasalt, larvikite, coarse grained diorite, coarse grained granite, coarse grained alkali granite, marble, quartz mica schist, and metamorphosed rock are studied. The rocks were collected from Jeddah, Makkah, Mina and Taif areas. Special attention was given on the availability, compactness, physical formation and uniform composition in selecting the rocks. The rocks were identified by optical method and their elemental composition determined by chemical analysis. The data were used to calculate the effective atomic numbers, half value layers mass and linear attenuation coefficients. The half value layers and the linear attenuation coefficientsof these rocks were determined experimentally using Am-241, Cs-137,and Co-60 sources. The results are compared with those obtained by theoretical calculations and agrre within 10%. Most of the rocks show much higher radiation attenuation characteristics than the standard concrete. Rocks containing higher percentage of Fe, Ca, Ti, and Mn show much higher radiation absorption characteristics than concrete. Only granites are found to be almost equivalent to concrete. 12 Ref

  20. Radiation dose measurement in gastrointestinal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Elzaki, M.; Kappas, C.; Theodorou, K.

    2011-01-01

    Barium studies investigations (barium swallow, barium meal and barium enema) are the basic routine radiological examination, where barium sulphate suspension is introduced to enhance image contrast of gastrointestinal tracts. The aim of this study was to quantify the patients' radiation doses during barium studies and to estimate the organ equivalent dose and effective dose with those procedures. A total of 33 investigations of barium studies were measured by using thermoluminescence dosemeters. The result showed that the patient entrance surface doses were 12.6±10, 44.5±49 and 35.7±50 mGy for barium swallow, barium meal, follow through and enema, respectively. Effective doses were 0.2, 0.35 and 1.4 mSv per procedure for barium swallow, meal and enema respectively. Radiation doses were comparable with the previous studies. A written protocol for each procedure will reduce the inter-operator variations and will help to reduce unnecessary exposure. (authors)

  1. Methodologic assessment of radiation epidemiology studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beebe, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies of the late effects of ionizing radiation have utilized the entire spectrum of situations in which man has been exposed. These studies have provided insights into the dependence of human effects upon not only dose to target tissues but also other dimensions of exposure, host characteristics, and time following exposure. Over the past three decades studies have progressed from the mere identification of effects to their measurement. Because investigators of human effects have no control over the exposure situation, validity must be sought in the consistency of findings among independent studies and with accepted biologic principles. Because exposure may be confounded with factors that are hidden from view, bias may enter into any study of human exposure. Avoidance of bias and attainment of sufficient power to detect relationships that are real are methodologic challenges. Many methodologic issues, e.g., those associated with the definition and measurement of specific end-points, or with the selection of appropriate controls, permeate epidemiologic work in all fields. Others, especially those concerned with the measurement of exposure, the patterning of events in time after exposure, and the prediction of events beyond the scope of existing observations give radiation epidemiology its distinctive character

  2. Animal experiments to investigate biological-chemical radiation protection and the therapy of radiolesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckner, V.

    1974-01-01

    The influence of a combined therapy of radiation protection agents and erythropoetin on the radiation-induced suppression of erythropoiesis in mice is studied with the aid of the radioiron utilization test. After whole-body irradiation with 500 R, the erythropoietic system is so severely affected that erythropoetin application alone does not yield any results. AET (significant) and Cysteamin (insignificant), on the other hand, protect the bone marrow to a certain degree. The protected bone marrow provides a better base for erythropoetin therapy than the bone marrow of the irradiated and unprotected animals. Compared to the application of radiation protection agents alone, the combined therapy with AET and erythropoetin increases the radioiron incorporation in the erythrocytes by 7.5% while the therapy with Cysteamin and erythropoetin results in a 19.3% increase. In spite of these methods, however, the radioiron incorporation rate of the control animals was not reached. (BSC/AK) [de

  3. Mathematical modeling of the radiation-chemical oxidation of U(IV) in HClO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirova, M.V.

    1995-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of U(IV) oxidation in 0.5-12 M HClO 4 upon α, γ-radiolysis, based on the proposed scheme of radiation-chemical reactions, has been performed. The rate constants of the U(VI) + HO 2 , U(IV) + HO 2 , U(IV) + ClO 2 , and U(IV) + ClO 2 - reactions have been determined by the comparison of the calculated and experimental kinetic and dose curves and radiation-chemical yields of U(IV) oxidation or U(VI) formation. General equations for uranium (IV) oxidation constants at various HClO 4 concentrations, based on the analysis of the rates of particular radiation-chemical reactions composing oxidation process, have been obtained

  4. Report on NCI symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. II. Cellular and animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The point at which the common final pathway for induction of cancer by chemical carcinogens and ionizing radiation has not been identified. Although common molecular targets are suggested by recent findings about the role of oncogenes, the mechanism by which the deposition of radiation energy and the formation of adducts or other DNA lesions induced by chemicals affects the changes in the relevant targets may be quite different. The damage to DNA that plays no part in the transformation events, but that influences the stability of the genome, and therefore, the probability of subsequent changes that influence tumorigenesis may be more readily induced by some agents than others. Similarly, the degree of cytotoxic effects that disrupt tissue integrity and increase the probability of expression of initiated cells may be dependent on the type of carcinogen. Also, evidence was presented that repair of the initial lesions could be demonstrated after exposure to low-LET radiation but not after exposure to chemical carcinogens

  5. How effects of chemicals might differ from those of radiations in giving rise to genetic ill-health in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    Possible differences between the effects of the two groups of agents are considered. Two types of genetic damage are discussed. The first type involves mutational changes induced in germ cells or germ cell precursors which are then transmitted to the products of conception and to any resultant offspring and their descendants. The second kind is that damage sustained by the genome in somatic cells which is transmitted to daughter cells. Such somatic mutations are not heritable in the familiar sense, but they are transmitted to descendant cells within the body. It is concluded that a greater heterogeneity is expected in mutagenic response to chemical mutagens than to radiations in human populations, that the spectrum of mutations following chemical exposure may be quite different from that following radiation exposure, and that for many chemical agents, and in contrast to ionising radiations, one might expect a greater burden of genetic ill-health due to increased frequencies of mildly deleterious recessive and polygenic mutations. (Auth.)

  6. Report on NCI symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. II. Cellular and animal models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The point at which the common final pathway for induction of cancer by chemical carcinogens and ionizing radiation has not been identified. Although common molecular targets are suggested by recent findings about the role of oncogenes, the mechanism by which the deposition of radiation energy and the formation of adducts or other DNA lesions induced by chemicals affects the changes in the relevant targets may be quite different. The damage to DNA that plays no part in the transformation events, but that influences the stability of the genome, and therefore, the probability of subsequent changes that influence tumorigenesis may be more readily induced by some agents than others. Similarly, the degree of cytotoxic effects that disrupt tissue integrity and increase the probability of expression of initiated cells may be dependent on the type of carcinogen. Also, evidence was presented that repair of the initial lesions could be demonstrated after exposure to low-LET radiation but not after exposure to chemical carcinogens.

  7. The effect of Low-dose Gamma Radiation on the Bio-chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low-dose gamma radiation has been applied to intravenous fluids to enhance the sterility assurance levels. This study was undertaken to determine the stability of gamma irradiated 2.5 % dextrose, 2.5 % dextrose in saline, Ringers lactate and Gastrointestinal replacement fluid at doses of 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 20 kGy.

  8. On mechanism of chlorophos radiation-chemical decomposition in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilin, D.I.; Shubin, V.N.

    1992-01-01

    Quantitative indices of chlorophos decomposition in a aqueous solution and in solutions with a number of additions are studied. Chlorine ions and substances containing the carbonyl group are found among the products of gamma-irradiation of low-concentration chlorophos solutions. The data supporting the running of radiation destructive reactions of reduction nature rather than oxidation type, are presented

  9. Effects of magnetic, radiation and chemical reaction on unsteady heat and mass transfer flow of an oscillating cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rubel; Rana, B. M. Jewel; Ahmmed, S. F.

    2017-06-01

    The effects of magnetic, radiation and chemical reaction parameters on the unsteady heat and mass transfer boundary layer flow past an oscillating cylinder is considered. The dimensionless momentum, energy and concentration equations are solved numerically by using explicit finite difference method with the help of a computer programming language Compaq visual FORTRAN 6.6a. The obtained results of this study have been discussed for different values of well-known parameters with different time steps. The effect of these parameters on the velocity field, temperature field and concentration field, skin-friction, Nusselt number, streamlines and isotherms has been studied and results are presented by graphically represented by the tabular form quantitatively. The stability and convergence analysis of the solution parameters that have been used in the mathematical model have been tested.

  10. Chemical, optical and radiative characteristics of aerosols during haze episodes of winter in the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jing; Zhang, Yufen; Han, Suqin; Xiao, Zhimei; Wang, Jiao; Feng, Yinchang

    2018-05-01

    Aerosol and water vapor radiative forcings, shortwave atmospheric heating rates and longwave atmospheric cooling rates were determined based on in situ physical and chemical measurements of aerosol, associated with the Mie theory and a radiative transfer model, LOWTRAN7, during the two haze episodes in the winter of 2013 in Tianjin, China. The aerosol types considered in LOWTRAN7 included rural, urban, marine, desert and custom aerosols. The default ratio of the absorption coefficient to the extinction coefficient for urban aerosol in LOWTRAN7 was approximately double of those found in this work, implying the weaker absorption ability of aerosols in the North China Plain (NCP). Moreover, the aerosol is assumed to be evenly distributed below 1 km of planetary boundary layer (PBL) on hazy days in LOWTRAN7. If the default urban aerosol optical properties and extinction profile in LOWTRAN7 is employed directly, a larger energy imbalance between the atmosphere and surface is generated and the warming effect of the aerosol is magnified. Hence, modified urban aerosol optical properties were established to replace the corresponding parameters' database in LOWTRAN7. The aerosol extinction profiles were obtained based on a 255-m meteorological tower and observed results from the studies about Tianjin. In the NCP, the aerosol had little impact on atmospheric counter radiation. The water vapor is the crucial factor that affects atmospheric counter radiation. Both modified high shortwave heating rates and longwave cooling rates occur near the surface due to the abundance of aerosol and water vapor. The modified net atmospheric heating rate near the surface is 1.2 K d-1 on hazy days and 0.3 K d-1 on non-hazy days. Compared with the default urban aerosol optical properties and its vertical distribution in LOWTRAN7, the feedback effect of the modified urban aerosol on the boundary layer may not necessarily result in a stable lower atmosphere, but depends on the aerosol light

  11. Policy issues in setting de minimis standards for latent cancer risks of radiation and chemical carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spangler, M.

    1984-01-01

    In the fuel cycles for the development and utilization of alternative energy resources, the risk of latent cancer arises from a number of sources. Included are ionizing radiation and the carcinogenic potential of polluting chemicals present in certain fuels or in materials associated with the construction, operation, maintenance or waste treatment processes of nuclear power, fossil fuels, synfuels, biomass, and other sources of energy. One aspect of developing a carcinogen guideline policy for a consistent and effective regulatory regime to use in dealing with these assorted carcinogenic risks is the setting of de minimis quantitative standards. In this report, 11 policy issues related to the setting of such regulatory standards are identified and a brief commentary is provided. 15 references, 1 table

  12. Design of radiation-chemical devices with gamma source for sewage treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel'son, Eh.L.; Gol'din, V.A.; Breger, A.Kh.

    1981-01-01

    The semiempirical method of calculating conductivity of radiation- chemical devices (RCD) with γ-sources to purify domestic and industrial drainage waters and other processes in liquid phase systems which meet definite requirements based on taking into account the structure of the technological process, is suggested RCD of a new type is developed. It is coaxially cylindrical. A correcting coefficient which takes into account the difference in the actual time of keeping a current of drainage water in the device and its avaraged calculation value, conditioned by the longtitudinal transfer of a substance in the device, is determined. It is shown that the above RCD productivity can be considerably increased due to creating the structure of adisplacement current which provides the equality of absorbed doses in all its elements [ru

  13. Study of the radiative pion decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chuan-Hung; Geng, Chao-Qiang; Lih, Chong-Chung

    2011-01-01

    We study the radiative pion decay of π + →e + ν e γ in the light-front quark model. We also summarize the result in the chiral perturbation theory. The vector and axial-vector hadronic form factors (F V,A ) for the π→γ transition are evaluated in the whole allowed momentum transfer. In terms of these momentum dependent form factors, we calculate the decay branching ratio and compare our results with the experimental data and other theoretical predictions in the literature. We also constrain the possible size of the tensor interaction in the light-front quark model.

  14. The BNFL radiation-mortality study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clough, E.A.; Schofield, G.B.

    1982-01-01

    An overview of an epidemiological study of BNFL employees and pensioners is presented. Overall, mortality patterns are similar to those in the general population. Non-cancer deaths among serving staff are significantly below those expected from national statistics due to the healthy worker effect; pensioners are more comparable to the national population. A similar pattern is found for lung malignancy. Observed deaths due to other cancers among serving staff and pensioners approximate closely to expectation; most are due to leukaemia but there is no evidence of any increased incidence at Sellafield where radiation exposures are higher than at other BNFL sites. (U.K.)

  15. Neutron radiation damage studies on silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zheng; Chen, W.; Kraner, H.W.

    1990-10-01

    Effects of neutron radiation on electrical properties of Si detectors have been studied. At high neutron fluence (Φ n ≥ 10 12 n/cm 2 ), C-V characteristics of detectors with high resistivities (ρ ≥ 1 kΩ-cm) become frequency dependent. A two-trap level model describing this frequency dependent effect is proposed. Room temperature anneal of neutron damaged (at LN 2 temperature) detectors shows three anneal stages, while only two anneal stages were observed in elevated temperature anneal. 19 refs., 14 figs

  16. Radiation-induced chemical evolution of glycine to (Gly)2, (Gly)3, and (Gly)4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, T.; Izumi, Y.; Kamohara, M.; Nakagawa, K.; Yokoya, A.

    2006-01-01

    Recently amino acids were detected from some meteorites. Since these amino acids were found after hydrolysis, some oligopeptides were possibly formed in space. A simulation experiment of chemical evolution from Glycine (Gly) to Glycylglycine ((Gly)2) was reported by Kaneko et al. In this work, we irradiated (Gly)2 with 8 eV vacuum ultraviolet photons or with 530 eV soft X-ray photons and examined absolute values of quantum yield of radiation-induced chemical evolution from Gly2 to Glycylglycylglycine ((Gly)3) and Glycylglycylglycylglycine ((Gly)4). Thin films of (Gly)2 were prepared on quartz plate or CuBe plate with a vacuum evaporation technique. These samples were irradiated by 8 eV photons from a Xe 2 * excimer lamp or by 530 eV soft X-ray photons at SPring-8 Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Irradiated samples were analyzed with a high performance liquid chromatography HPLC. Decomposition of (Gly)2 and production of Gly, (Gly)3 and (Gly)4 were observed. Quantum yield Y was defined to be N = Y N 0 , where N is the number of produced or decomposed molecule, and N 0 is the number of (Gly)2 molecules excited by photons. Obtained results by 8 eV irradiation were summarized in Table 1. The similar magnitude of decomposition of (Gly)2 may show that yield of the primary breaking reaction upon photo-excitation is of similar magnitude. It should be noted that (Gly)3 and (Gly)4 was produced by irradiation with the yield of 10 -4 without any catalysis. For soft X-ray irradiation, yield of Gly was tentatively determined to be about 40. This largervalue than that for 8 eV irradiation may originate from large energy of incident soft X-ray photons just like a result reported by Simakov et al. We will discuss in detail at the conference. (authors)

  17. Study of radiation detectors response in standard X, gamma and beta radiation standard beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonato, Fernanda Beatrice Conceicao

    2010-01-01

    The response of 76 Geiger-Mueller detectors, 4 semiconductor detectors and 34 ionization chambers were studied. Many of them were calibrated with gamma radiation beams ( 37 Cs and 60 Co), and some of them were tested in beta radiation ( 90 Sr+ 9' 0Y e 204 Tl) and X radiation (N-60, N-80, N-100, N-150) beams. For all three types of radiation, the calibration factors of the instruments were obtained, and the energy and angular dependences were studied. For beta and gamma radiation, the angular dependence was studied for incident radiation angles of 0 deg and +- 45 deg. The curves of the response of the instruments were obtained over an angle interval of 0 deg to +- 90 deg, for gamma, beta and X radiations. The calibration factors obtained for beta radiation were compared to those obtained for gamma radiation. For gamma radiation, 24 of the 66 tested Geiger-Mueller detectors presented results for the energy dependence according to international recommendation of ISO 4037-2 and 56 were in accordance with the Brazilian ABNT 10011 recommendation. The ionization chambers and semiconductors were in accordance to national and international recommendations. All instruments showed angular dependence less than 40%. For beta radiation, the instruments showed unsatisfactory results for the energy dependence and angular dependence. For X radiation, the ionization chambers presented results for energy dependence according to the national recommendation, and the angular dependence was less than 40%. (author)

  18. Calculation and construction of radioisotopic radiation chemical installations. [Book (reference text); In Russian]. Raschet i konstruirovanie radioizotopnykh radiatsionno-khimicheskikh ustanovok

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulisha, E E

    1975-01-01

    A discussion is given of the development of radiation sources and the uses of gamma sources. The chemical and radiation characteristics of the sources are considered, and the fabrication methods are described for different types of sources used for radiation-induced chemical processes in condensed phase and in two-phase systems. Technological dosimetry, industrial and radiation safety, and economic aspects of gamma sources are examined. The text serves as a reference for physicists, chemistry technologists, engineers, and other scientific workers.

  19. Radiated chemical reaction impacts on natural convective MHD mass transfer flow induced by a vertical cone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambath, P.; Pullepu, Bapuji; Hussain, T.; Ali Shehzad, Sabir

    2018-03-01

    The consequence of thermal radiation in laminar natural convective hydromagnetic flow of viscous incompressible fluid past a vertical cone with mass transfer under the influence of chemical reaction with heat source/sink is presented here. The surface of the cone is focused to a variable wall temperature (VWT) and wall concentration (VWC). The fluid considered here is a gray absorbing and emitting, but non-scattering medium. The boundary layer dimensionless equations governing the flow are solved by an implicit finite-difference scheme of Crank-Nicolson which has speedy convergence and stable. This method converts the dimensionless equations into a system of tri-diagonal equations and which are then solved by using well known Thomas algorithm. Numerical solutions are obtained for momentum, temperature, concentration, local and average shear stress, heat and mass transfer rates for various values of parameters Pr, Sc, λ, Δ, Rd are established with graphical representations. We observed that the liquid velocity decreased for higher values of Prandtl and Schmidt numbers. The temperature is boost up for decreasing values of Schimdt and Prandtl numbers. The enhancement in radiative parameter gives more heat to liquid due to which temperature is enhanced significantly.

  20. Inventory and systematization of data on radiation-chemical contamination of rivers running along Bryansk-Belarusian 'cesium spot'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germenchuk, M.G.; Zhukova, O.M.; Bakarykava, Zh.; Popova, E.; Gorbatova, G.

    2005-01-01

    Inventory and systematization of the data on radioactive-chemical contamination of rivers are made. Systematization of the data on chemical and radiation contamination component of rivers was made with using the index of integrated radiation-chemical surface waters contamination (IRCCI=WCI+RCI). Chemical contamination of surface water has been estimated using water contamination index (WCI). It constitutes an integrated magnitude considering ratios of six more significant pollutants to their maximum concentration limits. In dependence on WCI surface water can be attributed to one of seven classes: from 'clean' (with WCI≤1) to 'extremely dirty' (with WCI>10). At present for estimation of radioactive contamination of surface water only comparison with Republican permissible levels are used. But it is not enough for complex estimation of water quality because it does not enable to estimate the extent of radionuclide exceeding over their permissible levels. Therefore for estimation of radioactive pollution level, water radioactive contamination index (RCI) was applied. It is a sum of ratios of main radionuclide concentrations to their permissible levels. Application of RCI enabled to compare radioactive contamination before and after the Chernobyl accident. Application of the index of integrated radiation-chemical surface water contamination enabled to obtain the most complete and impartial estimate of surface water quality of some rivers. Retrospective estimation of the water quality shows that in 1990 surface waters of some rivers should be considered as belonging to more contaminated category of quality if radiation component would have been considered. (authors)

  1. Radiation quality assurance intercomparison studies 1974--1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    The Quality Assurance Branch of the Monitoring Systems Research and Development Division at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory-Las Vegas prepares and distributes calibrated low-level radioactive solutions to Federal, State, and private laboratories involved in environmental radiation monitoring and surveillance. These solutions are used for both the calibration of counting instruments and chemical yield determinations. Since the laboratories using these samples must have confidence in their accuracy, the Quality Assurance Branch has instituted intercomparison studies with the National Bureau of Standards and with the Energy Research and Development Administration Health and Service Laboratory. The results of the studies conducted during 1974 and 1975 are described

  2. Radiation induced chemical changes in and disinfection of organic wastes suitable for supplemental feed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groneman, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has been found to disinfect organic wastes and simultaneously ease the separation of suspended solids from water. Because these effects can have important favourable impacts on the technology of upgrading organic wastes to animal feed or fertilizers, experimental studies are reported on the rationale of effects of gamma irradiation or disinfection and separation of the solid and the liquid phase of organic waste systems. The radiation inactivation of microorganisms occurs by direct and indirect action. Mechanisms of inactivation are discussed and measures are proposed how the indirect action of the radiation inactivation of microorganisms can be increased. Effects of gamma irradiation on dewatering properties of organic wastes were indirectly caused by the oxidizing OH radicals produced by the irradiation of water. OH radicals react with organic components of the solid phase which leads to their solubilisation resulting in an increase of the total organic carbon concentration in the liquid phase. Results of a mutagenicity test indicate that the solvated compounds exhibited no mutagenic activity. Microbiological case studies on the disinfection and upgrading of liquid and solid organic wastes to animal feed are discussed and the acceptance of radiation processing is evaluated. (Auth.)

  3. Radiation Fog in the US Mid-Atlantic Region: Chemical Composition, Trends, and Gas-Liquid Partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, D.

    2016-12-01

    The chemical composition of radiation fog has been studied at a rural site in central Pennsylvania over an eight year period extending through 2015. Bulk fog samples were collected with an automated Caltech Heated Rod Cloud Collector (CHRCC) and analyzed for pH, inorganic ions, organic acids, total organic carbon (TOC), and total nitrogen (TN). Over the duration of the project, 146 samples were collected and used to document chemical composition, evaluate changes over time, and to investigate partitioning between the gas and aqueous phases. Ammonium, sulfate, calcium, and nitrate were the most abundant inorganic ions while acetate and formate were the dominant organic acids. Organic acids contributed about 15% to TOC. Inorganic nitrogen accounted for the majority of TN, with only 18% of TN attributed to organic nitrogen. Overall, organic matter contributed 52% to the total mass loading of the fog samples, a value that is higher than reported for other radiation fog studies. Statistically significant decreasing trends were observed for sulfate, ammonium, chloride, nitrate, and pH. These trends coincide with reductions in emissions from fossil fuel combustion that have been documented over this time period. Seasonal trends were also detected for nitrate, ammonium, potassium, phosphate, acetate and formate which appear to be related to the agricultural growing season. Based on simultaneous measurements of gas phase ammonia and ammonium in the fog samples, significant deviations from equilibrium were found. In low pH samples, ammonium concentrations were much lower than equilibrium predicts, while the opposite occurred in high pH samples. Modeling suggested that mass transfer limitations contributed to the departure from equilibrium. Similarly, predictions of bicarbonate concentrations based on equilibrium with gas phase carbon dioxide appears to underestimate the actual amount of bicarbonate present in samples collected during this study.

  4. The effect of preplanting gamma radiation on chemical constitutents of peppermint oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eissa, A.I.; El-Kholei, S.A.; Ragab, M.A.; Abou El-Seoud, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Uniformly selected stem cuttings of peppermint (Mentha piperita L) were exposed to 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 Krad of gamma rays from a Co 60 source and subsequently grown in field. Irradiation dose of 1.0 Krad was the best stimulatory dose for enhancing herb fresh weight as it resulted in almost two folds yield as compared with control, whereas dose of 4.0 Krad did not affect plant growth. One Krad treated plants induced higher yield of essential oil as compared with other radiation treatments and control. The major chemical constitutents (menthol, menthone and menthyl acetate) were statistically affected by developmental stages, and by pre-planting irradiation treatments as expressed on the total content basis. Higher contents of menthol, menthone and menthyl acetate were found in plant cut during flowering stage. Pre-planting gamma irradiation did not seem to affect both chemical ''acid value, ester value and saponification value'' and physical properties ''specific gravity, solubility and refractive index'' of extracted mint oil

  5. Radiation and chemical stability of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buriova, M.

    2004-07-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analytical technique of low-molecular components of chemical and radiation-chemical decomposition of 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-D-glucose, 2-[ 18 F]FDG radiopharmaceutical was developed for its extended QC by HPLC with mass-spectrometric electro-spray ionisation detector (ESI MS). The analysis constituted from the LC on silica gel NH 2 bonded column combined with MS, UV-VIS, refraction index and radiometric detectors, and TLC on silica gel and high-performance TLC (HPTLC) on silica gel NH 2 bonded as at the LC column. Condition of analysis, the composition of mobile phase at HPLC and the regime of ESI MS were optimised on the maximal intensity of the signals of analytes, which were predicted for commercial 2-[ 18 F]FDG and its decomposition products. A modern LC/MS system was demonstrated to be suitable not only for identification of unknown analytes, but also for complex analysis of solutes except [ 18 F]F - . This was advantageous for the 2-[ 18 F]FDG autoradiolysis assessment about which no data were published. For comparative purposes, were used a classic TLC on silica gel with mobile phase acetonitrile: water at 95:5 v/v, and HPTLC on NH 2 modified silica gel like the LC column. Mobile phase was identical as by LC/MS method (acetonitrile: 4 mM aqueous solution of ammonium formate 80:20 v/v). Retention times of reference samples: fluorodeoxyglucose, glucose, mannose, arabinose, deoxyglucose, gluconic and glucuronic acids at HPLC were established. Equal composition of the inlet sample and mobile phase was found important to avoid increased background of the MS detector and asymmetry of the chromatographic peaks. Reference substance detectability was investigated for various detectors. Characteristic ions were established for the analytes under consideration. Optimal performance of the ESI MS detector was discovered in negative ions mode or single ion monitoring (SIM) regime. The most intensive signal was observed for all analyte

  6. Physico-chemical study on guar gum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, Nahla Mubarak

    2000-05-01

    Guar plant is an annual summer plant and it can resist diseases, pests and drought. Guar gum is used in a lot of industries. The present study deals with some physical properties of two commercial grade samples of guar gum cyamopsis tetragonoloba which where produced in 1996 and 1997 seasons (S 1 and S 2 respectively). Our analytical data are compared with those of previous workers in this area and international quality. Guar gum (S 2 ) is separated into water-insoluble components. Three fractions were obtained from the water-soluble components by fractional participation using acetone. Guar gum powder is yellowish white; the water-insoluble component is brownish white. Comparison study between gum samples (S 1 and S 2 ) and water-insoluble fraction (1) and water-soluble fractions are close to each other in their physico-properties. chemical All samples and fractions contain galactomannan polysaccharide as explained by infra-red spectra.Moisture contents for the gum samples were 5.2% and 7.8% and that for the water-insoluble fraction 4.7% while that for fraction samples were 5.2%-7.5% ash contents for the gum samples was 0.81% and 1.14% and for the water-insoluble component 0.88% while the contents in the fractions between 0.5%-0.66%. Nitrogen content determination showed that the gum samples had value of 0.678% and 0.732% and water -insoluble fraction had a value of 0.118%. The values decreased in the water-soluble fractions giving 0.049%, 0.053 and 0.056%. Water-soluble component and its fractions record the following results: pH measurements showed that the water-soluble component had pH 6.70 and 6.84 while its fractions had pH 5.90 and 7.00. Viscosity measurements showed that water-soluble fractions had intrinsic viscosity of 6.4 and 6.8 dL. g -1 . The fractions derived from water-soluble fraction had intrinsic viscosity of 6.6, 7 and 7.5 dl. g -1 . Using Mark-Howink equation, calculated average molecular weights for the water-soluble components were 7.01x10 5

  7. Study on Earth Radiation Budget mission scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dlhopolsky, R; Hollmann, R; Mueller, J; Stuhlmann, R [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerenphysik

    1998-12-31

    The goal of this study is to study optimized satellite configurations for observation of the radiation balance of the earth. We present a literature survey of earth radiation budget missions and instruments. We develop a parametric tool to simulate realistic multiple satellite mission scenarios. This tool is a modular computer program which models satellite orbits and scanning operation. We use Meteosat data sampled at three hour intervals as a database to simulate atmospheric scenes. Input variables are satellite equatorial crossing time and instrument characteristics. Regional, zonal and global monthly averages of shortwave and longwave fluxes for an ideal observing system and several realistic satellite scenarios are produced. Comparisons show that the three satellite combinations which have equatorial crossing times at midmorning, noon and midafternoon provide the best shortwave monitoring. Crossing times near sunrise and sunset should be avoided for the shortwave. Longwave diurnal models are necessary over and surfaces and cloudy regions, if there are only two measurements made during daylight hours. We have found in the shortwave inversion comparison that at least 15% of the monthly regional errors can be attributed to the shortwave anisotropic models used. (orig.) 68 refs.

  8. Study on Earth Radiation Budget mission scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dlhopolsky, R.; Hollmann, R.; Mueller, J.; Stuhlmann, R. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerenphysik

    1997-12-31

    The goal of this study is to study optimized satellite configurations for observation of the radiation balance of the earth. We present a literature survey of earth radiation budget missions and instruments. We develop a parametric tool to simulate realistic multiple satellite mission scenarios. This tool is a modular computer program which models satellite orbits and scanning operation. We use Meteosat data sampled at three hour intervals as a database to simulate atmospheric scenes. Input variables are satellite equatorial crossing time and instrument characteristics. Regional, zonal and global monthly averages of shortwave and longwave fluxes for an ideal observing system and several realistic satellite scenarios are produced. Comparisons show that the three satellite combinations which have equatorial crossing times at midmorning, noon and midafternoon provide the best shortwave monitoring. Crossing times near sunrise and sunset should be avoided for the shortwave. Longwave diurnal models are necessary over and surfaces and cloudy regions, if there are only two measurements made during daylight hours. We have found in the shortwave inversion comparison that at least 15% of the monthly regional errors can be attributed to the shortwave anisotropic models used. (orig.) 68 refs.

  9. Studies on lipid peroxidation and anti-LPO chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chongdao; Qiang Yizhong; Lao Qinhua

    1995-02-01

    The contents of lipid peroxides (LPO) in sera and tissues were determined by the modified spectrophotometry of TBA, and the effects of three chemicals on lipid peroxidation induced by radiation were observed. The items studied included: (1) the normal values of LPO of sera in rats and adults: (2) the normal values in some tissues of rats; (3) the changes of LPO levels of sera in patients with some mental diseases and patients with malignant tumours before and after local gamma irradiation exposure; (4) the changes of LPO contents of some tissues in rats after whole-body gamma irradiation exposure; (5) the changes of LPO contents of some tissues in mice after internal exposure by Th(NO 3 ) 4 solution; (6) the effects of chinonin, tannic acid and squalene on lipid peroxidation induced by irradiation. The results were as follows: (1) the LPO contents in patients with some mental diseases dramatically increased; (2) there was marked difference between the LPO levels before and after local gamma irradiation exposure in patients with malignant tumours; (3) the LPO contents in some tissues of rats remarkably increased after whole-body gamma irradiation exposure; (4) the LPO contents in some tissues of mice dramatically increased and their protein contents markedly reduced after internal exposure, showing a negative correlation between them; (5) a gradual increase in LPO contents in some tissues of mice appeared with increasing dosage of whole-body gamma irradiation exposure at dose range from 0 to 4 Gy. A linear relationship between the dose and the LPO contents was observed; (6) all three chemicals could reduce the LPO levels in liver, spleen and kidney of the irradiated mice. The efficacy of chinonin was better than that of tannic acid and squalene. (5 tabs., 1 fig.)

  10. Radiative Properties, Dynamics, and Chemical Evolution of the Smoke from the 1991 Kuwait Oil Fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, John Allan

    The oil fields in Kuwait were the scene of a massive conflagration during much of 1991 that was started by Iraqi forces during the Gulf War. At this time, approximately 4 to 5 million barrels of oil were burning each day. The climatic impacts of the fires were limited by the fact that the smoke was generally confined to the lower 6 km of the atmosphere, where its removal by precipitation processes limited its lifetime. The optical properties of the smoke were such that it was an efficient absorber of solar radiation, with a single-scattering albedo of {~ }0.6. This led to rapid warming of the plume during the daytime. Instantaneous heating rates were calculated to be up to {~}90 K day ^{-1}. Because of the vertical distribution of the heating in the plume, the upper part of the plume became unstable and a turbulent mixed-layer developed. Conversely, the lower part of the plume became stably stratified due to the heating. This led to a general decoupling of the lower boundary layer, preventing the heating experienced by the plume from reaching the ground. The general warming of the plume led to mesoscale vertical transport of the plume as a whole. This mode of vertical transport was limited because of the large horizontal extent of the region of buoyant smoke. The mesoscale vertical transport occurred at roughly the same rate as the upward mixing of smoke due to smaller-scale turbulent motions. This vertical transport, however, did not occur rapidly enough to loft the smoke into the upper troposphere before it was dispersed by wind shear and the mixing caused by solar heating of the smoke. The chemical evolution of the plume was generally somewhat slow, due to the lack of ultraviolet radiation to initiate photochemistry within the smoke plume and to the generally low concentrations of nitrogen oxides, which act as catalysts for photochemical chain reactions. Heterogeneous chemical reactions between gases and black carbon particles produced by the fires were also not

  11. Glycoalkaloids and phenolic compounds in gamma irradiated potatoes; a food irradiation study on radiation induced stress in vegetable products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergers, W.W.A.

    1980-01-01

    Irradiation is a recent preservation method. With the aid of ionizing radiation microorganisms in food can be killed or specific physiological processes in vegetable products can be influenced.

    In order to study the effects of metabolic radiation stress on quantitative chemical changes in

  12. Gamma radiation physical-chemical effects on vitamin C contents in white and red guavas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaro, Jose Daniel V.; Mansur Netto, Elias

    1995-01-01

    Guava (Psidium guajava L.) is valuable tropical fruit because its high C vitamin content. Red an white are the most common species of guava found in tropical areas. The ionizing radiation is normally used as a ripen ring retardant for longer storage periods. This work studies gamma radiation effects on the C vitamin concentration in white and red guava. Samples of juices were irradiated using a source of Cobalt-60, with doses of 1,0 2,5 and 5,0 kGy and storing periods of 0,15 and 30 days. The white guava juice showed a 49% loss in the C vitamin concentration with 5 kGy radiation dose, while the red guava juice showed 33% under the same condition. This shows that the juice of white guava is more sensitive to gamma radiations than the red guava. This results suggests a protection mechanism by colour pigments we believe is associated to the aromatic structures in the red specie. (author). 4 refs., 2 tabs

  13. Specific chemical and structural damage to proteins produced by synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weik, M; Ravelli, R B; Kryger, G; McSweeney, S; Raves, M L; Harel, M; Gros, P; Silman, I; Kroon, J; Sussman, J L

    2000-01-18

    Radiation damage is an inherent problem in x-ray crystallography. It usually is presumed to be nonspecific and manifested as a gradual decay in the overall quality of data obtained for a given crystal as data collection proceeds. Based on third-generation synchrotron x-ray data, collected at cryogenic temperatures, we show for the enzymes Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase and hen egg white lysozyme that synchrotron radiation also can cause highly specific damage. Disulfide bridges break, and carboxyl groups of acidic residues lose their definition. Highly exposed carboxyls, and those in the active site of both enzymes, appear particularly susceptible. The catalytic triad residue, His-440, in acetylcholinesterase, also appears to be much more sensitive to radiation damage than other histidine residues. Our findings have direct practical implications for routine x-ray data collection at high-energy synchrotron sources. Furthermore, they provide a direct approach for studying the radiation chemistry of proteins and nucleic acids at a detailed, structural level and also may yield information concerning putative "weak links" in a given biological macromolecule, which may be of structural and functional significance.

  14. Study of catalytic phenomena in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dran, J.C.

    1965-01-01

    Two phenomena have been studied: the action of γ rays from radio-cobalt on the adsorption and catalytic properties of ZnO and NiO in. relationship with the heterogeneous oxidation of CO, and the homogeneous catalysis by OsO 4 of the oxidation of various aqueous phase solutes by the same radiation. The prior irradiation of ZnO and of NiO does not modify their catalytic activity but generally increases the adsorption energy of -the gases CO and O 2 . The influence of the radiations appears to be connected with the presence of traces of water on ZnO and of an excess of oxygen on NiO. Osmium tetroxide which is not degraded by irradiation in acid solution, accelerates the radiolytic oxidation of certain compounds (Te IV , Pt 11 , As 111 ) in the presence of oxygen, as a result of its sensitizing effect on the oxidation by H 2 O 2 . In the case of phosphites on the other hand, OsO 4 has a protecting action under certain conditions of acidity and may suppress entirely the chain reaction which characterizes the oxidation of this solute byγ rays. A general mechanism is proposed for these phenomena. The rate constant for the OsO 4 + HO 2 reaction is calculated to be 5.7 x 10 5 l.mol -1 . sec -1 . (author) [fr

  15. Studies on radiation injury of the kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Akio

    1982-01-01

    According to many experimental reports on the radiation renal injuries, the influences of irradiation were observed not only in the irradiated kidney, but also in the contralateral kidney. However, its mechanism has not yet been demonstrated clearly. In order to clarify the mechanism of development of pathophysiological changes seen on the kidney of non-irradiated side, a study was made of function and pathological condition of a remaining kidney after the enucleation of ir radiated side kidney after irradiation. Twenty-eitht rabbits were divided into 4 groups. A: 14 rabbits were irradiated on their left kidney with 60 Co- gamma ray 50 Gy doses. B: 6 rabbits were nephrectomized of their left kidney on the first day after 50 Gy irradiation. C: 4 rabbits were nephrectomized of their left kidney on the eighth day after 50 Gy irradiation. D: 4 rabbits were simple nephrectomized. The results suggest that changes on the irradiated side of kidney bring about effect to the contra-lateral kidney at an early stage after the irradiation. (J.P.N.)

  16. Radiation and chemical interactions producing cellular and subcellular damage and their repair. Coordinated programme on improvement in radiotherapy of cancer using modifiers of radiosensitivity of cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kada, T.

    1982-01-01

    As a result of biochemical studies on the DNA repair of damages induced by ionizing radiation as well as on the radiosensitization with chemicals containing halogen atoms, it was suggested that inhibition of the post-irradiation repair by chemical factors may be useful in improving the radiotherapy. It was possbile to prepare an in vitro repair system in combination with transforming DNA of Bacillus subtilis as well as human placenta extracts; it was shown that certain radiosensitizers worked actually as repair inhibitors in this in vitro system

  17. Epidemiological studies of radiation risks (NRPB Association)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muirhead, C.R.; Kellerer, A.M.; Chmelevsky, D.

    1993-01-01

    Objectives of project are: to analyse data on populations exposed to high doses of radiation, such as the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and groups of uranium miners; to examine data on populations exposed at low doses and methods for analysing such data; to perform preparatory work for the compilation of 'probability of causation' tables that are specific to EC countries and that also cover radon daughter exposures; to study the incidence and mortality from thyroid cancer in a cohort with medical exposures to 131 I; to study cancer incidence and mortality among Swedish patients given radiotherapy for skin haemangioma in childhood; and to examine the incidence of second tumours among Italian patients given radiotherapy for cancer of the head, neck, breast, endometrium, uterine cervix or thyroid. Results of the six contributions for the reporting period are presented. (R.P.) 4 refs

  18. Low level ionizing radiation and human mortality: multi-regional epidemiological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickey, R.J.; Bowers, E.J.; Spence, D.E.; Zemel, B.S.; Clelland, A.B.; Clelland, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Analyses of relationships involving environmental chemicals, background radiation, and mortality rates for diseases of the heart and several cancer categories are presented. Bivariate correlation coefficients between radiation and mortality rate were significantly negative for cancer of the lung and respiratory organs, cancer of the buccal cavity and pharynx, cancer of the digestive organs and peritoneum, total cancer and diseases of the heart. Only the correlation coefficient between background radiation and leukemia-aleukemia was positive, and that not significantly positive. Initial multivariate statistical studies support the bivariate results in that all significant regression terms that represent background radiation have been negative. Background radiation level was not a significant predictor for leukemia-aleukemia mortality rate when examined without regard to age. This preliminary work suggests that any health effects of background radiation on the diseases studied do not exceed in magnitude those of environmental chemicals. It also suggests that models implying important long-term deleterious effects of low levels of ionizing radiation on humans may be invalid. (author)

  19. Some physico-chemical characteristics of a modified histone H2b on acute radiation affection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrapunov, S.N.; Mel'nik, G.G.; Blyum, Ya.B.; Tsudzevich, B.A.; Kucherenko, N.E.

    1980-01-01

    A study was made of optical characteristics of histone H2b isolated from liver nuclei 12 h following irradiation in a dose of 0.21 C/kg. It was demonstrated that under similar conditions, the control and exposed histones H2b have different steric organization which correlates with radiation-induced modifications of lateral radicals in H2b histone molecules

  20. Correlation and regression analyses of genetic effects for different types of cells in mammals under radiation and chemical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutskaya, N.G.; Mosseh, I.B.

    2006-01-01

    Data about genetic mutations under radiation and chemical treatment for different types of cells have been analyzed with correlation and regression analyses. Linear correlation between different genetic effects in sex cells and somatic cells have found. The results may be extrapolated on sex cells of human and mammals. (authors)

  1. Report of National Cancer Institute symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. I. Common molecular mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    Some aspects of molecular mechanisms common to radiation and chemical carcinogenesis are discussed, particularly the DNA damage done by these agents. Emphasis is placed on epidemiological considerations and on dose-response models used in risk assessment to extrapolate from experimental data obtained at high doses to the effects from long-term, low-level exposures. 3 references, 6 figures. (ACR)

  2. Report of National Cancer Institute symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. I. Common molecular mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    Some aspects of molecular mechanisms common to radiation and chemical carcinogenesis are discussed, particularly the DNA damage done by these agents. Emphasis is placed on epidemiological considerations and on dose-response models used in risk assessment to extrapolate from experimental data obtained at high doses to the effects from long-term, low-level exposures. 3 references, 6 figures

  3. Background radiation study of Offa industrial area of Kwara State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of the external background radiation in Offa industrial area of Kwara State is hereby reported. An in-situ measurement using two Digilert radiation monitors at five different stations were carried out. A mean exposure rate of 0.0132mR/hr, which represents 20% elevation from the standard background radiation, was ...

  4. Various aspects of lyoluminescence studies in radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, H.K.

    1992-01-01

    Lyoluminescence is the emission of light during the dissolution of irradiated organic and inorganic solids in suitable solvents. This phenomenon has attracted interdisciplinary research involving radiation physics, radiation chemistry and physical chemistry. This paper presents an overall view of the various aspects of lyoluminescence studies in the field of radiation research. (author). 14 refs

  5. Radiation Chemistry Studies on Chemotherapeutic Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gohn, M.; Getoff, N.; Bjergbakke, Erling

    1977-01-01

    Adrenalin has been studied as a model radiation protective agent by means of pulse radiolysis in aqueous solutions. The rate constants for the reactions of adrenalin with e–aq and OH were determined : k(e–aq+ adr—NH+2)= 7.5 × 108 dm3 mol–1 s–1, k(e–aq+ adr—NH)= 2.5 × 108 dm3 mol–1 s–1, and k......(OH + adr)= 2.2 × 1010 dm3 mol–1 s–1(pH = 9.2). e–aq attacks the amino group by splitting off methylamine, whereas OH and O–aq lead to the formation of the corresponding adducts of the cyclohexadienyl type. OH radicals can also abstract an electron from an O– group at pH > 8....

  6. Radiation chemistry studies on chemotherapeutic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohn, M.; Getoff, N.; Bjergbakke, E.

    1977-01-01

    Adrenalin has been studied as a model radiation protective agent by means of pulse radiolysis in aqueous solutions. The rate constants for the reactions of adrenalin with e - sub(aq) and OH were determined: k(e - sub(aq) + adr -NH + 2 ) = 7.5 x 10 8 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 , k(e - sub(aq) + adr - NH) = 2.5 x 10 8 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 , and k(OH + adr) = 2.2 x 10 -10 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 (pH = 9.2). e - sub(aq) attacks the amino group by splitting off methylamine, whereas OH and O - sub(aq) lead to the formation of the corresponding adducts of the cyclohexadienyl type. OH radicals can also abstract an electron from an 0 - group at pH > 8. (author)

  7. Sulfate Aerosols from Non-Explosive Volcanoes: Chemical-Radiative Effects in the Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Pitari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available SO2 and H2S are the two most important gas-phase sulfur species emitted by volcanoes, with a global amount from non-explosive emissions of the order 10 Tg-S/yr. These gases are readily oxidized forming SO42− aerosols, which effectively scatter the incoming solar radiation and cool the surface. They also perturb atmospheric chemistry by enhancing the NOx to HNO3 heterogeneous conversion via hydrolysis on the aerosol surface of N2O5 and Br-Cl nitrates. This reduces formation of tropospheric O3 and the OH to HO2 ratio, thus limiting the oxidation of CH4 and increasing its lifetime. In addition to this tropospheric chemistry perturbation, there is also an impact on the NOx heterogeneous chemistry in the lower stratosphere, due to vertical transport of volcanic SO2 up to the tropical tropopause layer. Furthermore, the stratospheric O3 formation and loss, as well as the NOx budget, may be slightly affected by the additional amount of upward diffused solar radiation and consequent increase of photolysis rates. Two multi-decadal time-slice runs of a climate-chemistry-aerosol model have been designed for studying these chemical-radiative effects. A tropopause mean global net radiative flux change (RF of −0.23 W·m−2 is calculated (including direct and indirect aerosol effects with a 14% increase of the global mean sulfate aerosol optical depth. A 5–15 ppt NOx decrease is found in the mid-troposphere subtropics and mid-latitudes and also from pole to pole in the lower stratosphere. The tropospheric NOx perturbation triggers a column O3 decrease of 0.5–1.5 DU and a 1.1% increase of the CH4 lifetime. The surface cooling induced by solar radiation scattering by the volcanic aerosols induces a tropospheric stabilization with reduced updraft velocities that produce ice supersaturation conditions in the upper troposphere. A global mean 0.9% decrease of the cirrus ice optical depth is calculated with an indirect RF of −0.08 W·m−2.

  8. Postgraduate studies in radiation biology in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, K.R.; Lohmann, P.H.M.; Zeeland, A.A. van; Natarajan, A.T.; Schibilla, H.; Chadwick, K.; Kellerer, A.M.; Steinhaeusler, F.

    1998-01-01

    The present system of radiobiological research in universities and research centres is no longer able to train radiobiologists who have a comprehensive understanding of the entire field of radiation biology including both 'classical' and molecular radiation biology. However, such experts are needed in view of the role radiation protection plays in our societies. No single institution in Europe could now run a 1-year, full-time course which covers all aspects of the radiobiological basis of radiation protection. Therefore, a cooperative action of several universities from different EU member states has been developed and is described herein. (orig.)

  9. Biomass burning aerosol over the Amazon during SAMBBA: impact of chemical composition on radiative properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William; Allan, James; Flynn, Michael; Darbyshire, Eoghan; Hodgson, Amy; Liu, Dantong; O'shea, Sebastian; Bauguitte, Stephane; Szpek, Kate; Langridge, Justin; Johnson, Ben; Haywood, Jim; Longo, Karla; Artaxo, Paulo; Coe, Hugh

    2014-05-01

    Biomass burning represents one of the largest sources of particulate matter to the atmosphere, resulting in a significant perturbation to the Earth's radiative balance coupled with serious impacts on public health. Globally, biomass burning aerosols are thought to exert a small warming effect but with the uncertainty being 4 times greater than the central estimate. On regional scales, the impact is substantially greater, particularly in areas such as the Amazon Basin where large, intense and frequent burning occurs on an annual basis for several months. Absorption by atmospheric aerosols is underestimated by models over South America, which points to significant uncertainties relating to Black Carbon (BC) aerosol properties. Initial results from the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment, which took place during September and October 2012 over Brazil on-board the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft, are presented here. Aerosol chemical composition was measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a DMT Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). The physical, chemical and optical properties of the aerosols across the region will be characterized in order to establish the impact of biomass burning on regional air quality, weather and climate. The aircraft sampled a range of conditions including sampling of pristine Rainforest, fresh biomass burning plumes, regional haze and elevated biomass burning layers within the free troposphere. The aircraft sampled biomass burning aerosol across the southern Amazon in the states of Rondonia and Mato Grosso, as well as in a Cerrado (Savannah-like) region in Tocantins state. This presented a range of fire conditions, both in terms of their number, intensity, vegetation-type and their combustion efficiencies. Near-source sampling of fires in Rainforest environments suggested that smouldering combustion dominated, while flaming combustion dominated

  10. Chemical evolution studies: the radiolysis and thermal decomposition of malonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz-Castaneda, J.; Negron-Mendoza, A.; Heredia, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S.; Villafane-Barajas, S.; Frias, D.; Colin-Garcia, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the context of chemical evolution a simulation of a hydrothermal vent was performed. The thermolysis and radiolysis of malonic acid in aqueous solution were studied. The thermolysis was done by heating the samples (95 deg C) and radiolysis using gamma radiation. Products were identified by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The thermal treatment produced acetic acid and CO 2 . The radiolysis experiments yield carbon dioxide, acetic acid, and di- and tricarboxylic acids. A theoretical model of the chemical process occurring under irradiation was developed; this was able to reproduce formation of products and the consumption of malonic acid. (author)

  11. An ESR study of radiation-chemical transformation of 4,4?(5?)-di-(tert-butylcyclohexano)-18-crown-6 and its solution in 1-octanol at 77 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakurdaeva, O.A.; Nesterov, S.V.; Feldman, V.I.; Moscow State University, Moscow

    2010-01-01

    Paramagnetic products stabilized in both 4,4'(5')-di-(tert-butylcyclohexano)-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) and its solution in 1-octanol upon low temperature (77 K) X-rays irradiation were studied by ESR spectroscopy. Macrocyclic -O-C.H-CH 2 - radicals and acyclic O C(H)-C.H-O- radicals were found as main radiolysis products in neat DtBuCH18C6. Fraction of acyclic radicals resulting from the macrocycle cleavage was about 50%. No radical products resulted from t-Bu and cyclohexyl fragments were observed. It was concluded that the primary events were essentially concerned with ionization of the polyether moiety. Irradiation of frozen DtBuCH18C6 solutions in 1-octanol resulted in formation of radicals both from crown ether and alcohol. (author)

  12. Comparison of the concepts used to develop and apply occupational exposure limits for ionizing radiation and hazardous chemical substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halton, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    The rationales used by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (AC-GIH) to recommend exposure limits for 10 chemicals were reviewed. The 10 chemicals chosen were known to produce chronic disease after prolonged overexposure in the workplace. The chemicals were toluene diisocyanate, hydrogen fluoride, n-hexane, carbon disulfide, cadmium, inorganic mercury, cobalt, nitroglycerol, silica, and vinyl chloride. The rationales used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to recommend limits for workplace exposure to ionizing radiation were reviewed. The rationales used in occupational health by ACGIH were then compared with those used by ICRP in health physics. The comparison revealed a significant divergence in the underlying concepts and philosophies of the two approaches. This divergence cannot be solely attributed to differences in scientific knowledge about toxicological and radiological effects. In areas of scientific uncertainty, exposure limits for ionizing radiation are based on worst case or conservative assumptions. This approach favors human safety. Parallel approaches could not be found for any of the 10 chemicals reviewed. Other factors such as the costs incurred by industry in meeting the proposed standards played a more significant role in establishing limits for workplace chemicals than for ionizing radiation

  13. Chemical modification of high molecular weight polyethylene through gamma radiation for biomaterials applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raposo, Matheus P.; Rocha, Marisa C.G.

    2015-01-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene has been used in the medical field due to its high mechanical properties compared to the other polymers. Its main application is in the development of orthopedic implants, which requires high resistance to abrasion. One of the most used methods is the introduction of crosslinks in the polymer through gamma irradiation. In order to prevent oxidation reactions, studies have been developed using tacoferol (vitamin E) as an antioxidant for the material. The ascorbic acid (vitamin C), however, has been appointed as a viable alternative for vitamin E. In this work, a high molecular weight polyethylene grade (HMWPE) and polyethylene samples formulated with vitamin C were submitted to gamma radiation. Thermodynamic-mechanical methods and gel content determinations were used to characterize the samples obtained. The sample containing 1% of vitamin C and irradiated with 50 KGy of gamma radiation presented the highest content of crosslinks. (author)

  14. Radiation induced chemical changes in foodstuffs model reaction systems and strawberries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitfellner, F.

    1999-10-01

    In the first part of this work 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4-HBA) and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid ethyl ester (4-HBAEE) were investigated in order to elucidate the reaction mechanisms leading to final products after reaction with OH-radicals (N 2 O-saturated and aerated aqueous solutions) at various pH. Irradiation of 5*10 -4 mol l -1 solutions of 4-HBA at pH 6.0 leads to formation of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid and hydroquinone. In case of the ester neither hydroxylation nor decarboxylation products are observable. By means of pulse radiolysis it could be shown that water splitting from the ester OH-adducts is 17 times faster than from that of the acid. Therefore the main transients are phenoxyl radicals in case of the ester. At pH 10, where base catalyzed water elimination takes place, no hydroxylation products are observable either. In aerated solutions dihydroxy-compounds are formed with both substrates. In the case of 4-HBA 68 % of the OH-radicals result in 3,4-dihydroxyderivate, for 4-HBAEE these are only 25 %. Comparison of the initial degradation yields demonstrates 4-HBAEE to be 1.6-times more stable towards radiation. The second part of this work deals with radiation induced chemical changes in strawberries. Dose/concentration relationships could be obtained for 7 components, i.e. gallic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, cinnamic acid, 4-hydroxycinnamic acid, 3,4-dihydroxy-cinnamic acid, (-)-epicatechin and (+)-catechin. Linear dose relationships have been found for 4-HBA (formation) and (+)-catechin (degradation). In addition a specific radiolytically formed compound which can be used as marker for irradiation treatment of strawberries could be detected. There are strong indications that it is a radiolytic product of kaempferol, however, it could not yet be identified exactly. (author)

  15. Comparison of gamma radiation and radiomimmetic chemical, bleomycin in leukocytes from certain genetic disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraswathy, Radha

    2004-01-01

    Full text: To compare the frequency and distribution pattern of bleomycin and gamma radiation induced chromosomal aberrations in human genetic disorders. To study if the induced chromosomal break points are specific for specific human genetic disorders. Human genetics disorders such as; retinitis pigmentosa, retinoblastoma, xeroderma pigmentosa and gonadal dysgenesis were used in our study. Suitable controls were maintained. The frequency and distribution pattern of chromosomal break points in individual chromosomes were determined in lymphocytes exposed to 50r of gamma radiation and 10μg/ml of bleomycin for 3h at G2. In normal individuals none of the unirradiated leukocyte cultures of any syndrome showed any accountable number of chromosomal aberrations. The frequency of radiation induced chromosomal break points showed a non random distribution pattern and frequently clustered at some specific chromosome regions to form hot spots. Lack of linear-quadratic dose response was observed in the lymphocyte exposed to bleomycin in normal individual. The frequency of chromosomal aberrations in the whole genome for the genetic disorders were higher than the controls and a varying distribution pattern of bleomycin induced breaks per cell was observed

  16. Study of the environmental radiation in Zacatecas City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirino, L.L.; Mireles, F.; Davila, J.I.; Rios, C.; Lugo, J.F.; Pinedo, J.L.; Lopez, H.; Garcia, M.L.; Soriano, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    A study of detection of environmental radiation in the inner of an office is presented and a comparison of the results is made when the facilities are closed or aired. The used method is based on radiation detection by means of Geiger-Mueller RM 60 and RM 70 detectors with the aid of a personal computer which provides a detection method of radiation in real time. The used method in this study is suggested to detect the variation of radiation in closed or aired environments and as a surveillance system of radiation levels. The obtained results are discussed and they are compared with those obtained in another places. (Author)

  17. Influence of density on radiation-chemical yield of molecular hydrogen formed at radiolysis of aqueous solution of NaOH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafarov, Y.D.; Hajiyeva, S.R.; Ramazanova, N.K.; Aliyev, S.M.; Alasgarov, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Full text : In atom and nuclear energy the specialists knowledge about radiation-chemical yield of the initial products formed under the influence of ionizing rays on water is of great importance from the point of security. The radiation-chemical yields of molecular hydrogen have been defined according to the graph and the obtained results

  18. Lung pathology after radiotherapy. Radiation protection (Bibliographic study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellerin, A.J.F.

    1975-01-01

    The point of departure of this work is the book by Weir and Michaelson entitled 'Pulmonary Radiation Reactions', where the authors sum up present knowledge on lung reactions to ionizing radiation exposure from the anatomopathological, metabolic and chemical, functional, clinical and experimental viewpoints in turn. The aim is not to contribute anything new to lung cancerology or to specific lung radiotherapy but merely to attemps, from a survey of recent literature on the irradiated lung, to extract concrete elements liable to improve to some extent the survival conditions of patients subjected to strong lung irradiation during radiotherapy centred on the thorax. Publications over the last ten years alone are abundant and varied. Not all are mentioned since many studies and results overlap and finally some hundred of the most representative texts have been chosen. In any case the conclusion, with that of Weir and Michaelson, is that not enough radiobiological data are yet available to allow present radiotherapeutical treatments on the lung region to be improved with certainty [fr

  19. Study of material properties using channeling radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantell, R.H.; Kephart, J.O.; Klein, R.K.; Park, H.; Berman, B.L.; Datz, S.

    1986-01-01

    A possible application for channeling radiation is for investigating the properties of crystals in which the channeling occurs. In this paper we present some general considerations concerning channeling radiation as a measurement technique, and then we proceed to describe several specific examples

  20. Deep space test bed for radiation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, James H.; Adcock, Leonard; Apple, Jeffery; Christl, Mark; Cleveand, William; Cox, Mark; Dietz, Kurt; Ferguson, Cynthia; Fountain, Walt; Ghita, Bogdan; Kuznetsov, Evgeny; Milton, Martha; Myers, Jeremy; O'Brien, Sue; Seaquist, Jim; Smith, Edward A.; Smith, Guy; Warden, Lance; Watts, John

    2007-01-01

    The Deep Space Test-Bed (DSTB) Facility is designed to investigate the effects of galactic cosmic rays on crews and systems during missions to the Moon or Mars. To gain access to the interplanetary ionizing radiation environment the DSTB uses high-altitude polar balloon flights. The DSTB provides a platform for measurements to validate the radiation transport codes that are used by NASA to calculate the radiation environment within crewed space systems. It is also designed to support other exploration related investigations such as measuring the shielding effectiveness of candidate spacecraft and habitat materials, testing new radiation monitoring instrumentation, flight avionics and investigating the biological effects of deep space radiation. We describe the work completed thus far in the development of the DSTB and its current status