WorldWideScience

Sample records for radiation biology estudos

  1. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  2. Radiation chemistry comes before radiation biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Peter; Wardman, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This article seeks to illustrate some contributions of radiation chemistry to radiobiology and related science, and to draw attention to examples where radiation chemistry is central to our knowledge of specific aspects. Radiation chemistry is a mature branch of radiation science which is continually evolving and finding wider applications. This is particularly apparent in the study of the roles of free radicals in biology generally, and radiation biology specifically. The chemical viewpoint helps unite the spatial and temporal insight coming from radiation physics with the diversity of biological responses. While historically, the main application of radiation chemistry of relevance to radiation biology has been investigations of the free-radical processes leading to radiation-induced DNA damage and its chemical characterization, two features of radiation chemistry point to its wider importance. First, its emphasis on quantification and characterization at the molecular level helps provide links between DNA damage, biochemical repair processes, and mutagenicity and radiosensitivity. Second, its central pillar of chemical kinetics aids understanding of the roles of 'reactive oxygen species' in cell signalling and diverse biological effects more generally, and application of radiation chemistry in the development of drugs to enhance radiotherapy and as hypoxia-specific cytotoxins or diagnostic agents. The illustrations of the broader applications of radiation chemistry in this article focus on their relevance to radiation biology and demonstrate the importance of synergy in the radiation sciences. The past contributions of radiation chemistry to radiation biology are evident, but there remains considerable potential to help advance future biological understanding using the knowledge and techniques of radiation chemistry.

  3. Integrative Radiation Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen [New York University School of Medicine, NY (United States)

    2015-02-27

    We plan to study tissue-level mechanisms important to human breast radiation carcinogenesis. We propose that the cell biology of irradiated tissues reveals a coordinated multicellular damage response program in which individual cell contributions are primarily directed towards suppression of carcinogenesis and reestablishment of homeostasis. We identified transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ) as a pivotal signal. Notably, we have discovered that TGFβ suppresses genomic instability by controlling the intrinsic DNA damage response and centrosome integrity. However, TGFβ also mediates disruption of microenvironment interactions, which drive epithelial to mesenchymal transition in irradiated human mammary epithelial cells. This apparent paradox of positive and negative controls by TGFβ is the topic of the present proposal. First, we postulate that these phenotypes manifest differentially following fractionated or chronic exposures; second, that the interactions of multiple cell types in tissues modify the responses evident in this single cell type culture models. The goals are to: 1) study the effect of low dose rate and fractionated radiation exposure in combination with TGFβ on the irradiated phenotype and genomic instability of non-malignant human epithelial cells; and 2) determine whether stromal-epithelial interactions suppress the irradiated phenotype in cell culture and the humanized mammary mouse model. These data will be used to 3) develop a systems biology model that integrates radiation effects across multiple levels of tissue organization and time. Modeling multicellular radiation responses coordinated via extracellular signaling could have a significant impact on the extrapolation of human health risks from high dose to low dose/rate radiation exposure.

  4. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1993-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood biological fingerprint'' of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

  5. Radiation biology of mosquitoes

    OpenAIRE

    Knols Bart GJ; Parker Andrew G; Helinski Michelle EH

    2009-01-01

    Abstract There is currently renewed interest in assessing the feasibility of the sterile insect technique (SIT) to control African malaria vectors in designated areas. The SIT relies on the sterilization of males before mass release, with sterilization currently being achieved through the use of ionizing radiation. This paper reviews previous work on radiation sterilization of Anopheles mosquitoes. In general, the pupal stage was irradiated due to ease of handling compared to the adult stage....

  6. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

  7. Radiation biology of mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knols Bart GJ

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is currently renewed interest in assessing the feasibility of the sterile insect technique (SIT to control African malaria vectors in designated areas. The SIT relies on the sterilization of males before mass release, with sterilization currently being achieved through the use of ionizing radiation. This paper reviews previous work on radiation sterilization of Anopheles mosquitoes. In general, the pupal stage was irradiated due to ease of handling compared to the adult stage. The dose-response curve between the induced sterility and log (dose was shown to be sigmoid, and there was a marked species difference in radiation sensitivity. Mating competitiveness studies have generally been performed under laboratory conditions. The competitiveness of males irradiated at high doses was relatively poor, but with increasing ratios of sterile males, egg hatch could be lowered effectively. Males irradiated as pupae had a lower competitiveness compared to males irradiated as adults, but the use of partially-sterilizing doses has not been studied extensively. Methods to reduce somatic damage during the irradiation process as well as the use of other agents or techniques to induce sterility are discussed. It is concluded that the optimal radiation dose chosen for insects that are to be released during an SIT programme should ensure a balance between induced sterility of males and their field competitiveness, with competitiveness being determined under (semi- field conditions. Self-contained 60Co research irradiators remain the most practical irradiators but these are likely to be replaced in the future by a new generation of high output X ray irradiators.

  8. Radiation biology of mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helinski, Michelle E H; Parker, Andrew G; Knols, Bart G J

    2009-11-16

    There is currently renewed interest in assessing the feasibility of the sterile insect technique (SIT) to control African malaria vectors in designated areas. The SIT relies on the sterilization of males before mass release, with sterilization currently being achieved through the use of ionizing radiation. This paper reviews previous work on radiation sterilization of Anopheles mosquitoes. In general, the pupal stage was irradiated due to ease of handling compared to the adult stage. The dose-response curve between the induced sterility and log (dose) was shown to be sigmoid, and there was a marked species difference in radiation sensitivity. Mating competitiveness studies have generally been performed under laboratory conditions. The competitiveness of males irradiated at high doses was relatively poor, but with increasing ratios of sterile males, egg hatch could be lowered effectively. Males irradiated as pupae had a lower competitiveness compared to males irradiated as adults, but the use of partially-sterilizing doses has not been studied extensively. Methods to reduce somatic damage during the irradiation process as well as the use of other agents or techniques to induce sterility are discussed. It is concluded that the optimal radiation dose chosen for insects that are to be released during an SIT programme should ensure a balance between induced sterility of males and their field competitiveness, with competitiveness being determined under (semi-) field conditions. Self-contained 60Co research irradiators remain the most practical irradiators but these are likely to be replaced in the future by a new generation of high output X ray irradiators.

  9. Radiation biology of mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helinski, Michelle EH; Parker, Andrew G; Knols, Bart GJ

    2009-01-01

    There is currently renewed interest in assessing the feasibility of the sterile insect technique (SIT) to control African malaria vectors in designated areas. The SIT relies on the sterilization of males before mass release, with sterilization currently being achieved through the use of ionizing radiation. This paper reviews previous work on radiation sterilization of Anopheles mosquitoes. In general, the pupal stage was irradiated due to ease of handling compared to the adult stage. The dose-response curve between the induced sterility and log (dose) was shown to be sigmoid, and there was a marked species difference in radiation sensitivity. Mating competitiveness studies have generally been performed under laboratory conditions. The competitiveness of males irradiated at high doses was relatively poor, but with increasing ratios of sterile males, egg hatch could be lowered effectively. Males irradiated as pupae had a lower competitiveness compared to males irradiated as adults, but the use of partially-sterilizing doses has not been studied extensively. Methods to reduce somatic damage during the irradiation process as well as the use of other agents or techniques to induce sterility are discussed. It is concluded that the optimal radiation dose chosen for insects that are to be released during an SIT programme should ensure a balance between induced sterility of males and their field competitiveness, with competitiveness being determined under (semi-) field conditions. Self-contained 60Co research irradiators remain the most practical irradiators but these are likely to be replaced in the future by a new generation of high output X ray irradiators. PMID:19917076

  10. Radiation Physics, Biophysics and Radiation Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, H. H.; Hall, E. J.

    1978-02-01

    Research under Contract EY-76-C-02-3243 has been carried out in the area of Radiation Physics, Biophysics and Radiation Biology. During the period of this contract the major accomplishments include, in Physics, the refinement of tissue equivalent dosimetry, the formulation of the concepts of microdosimetry, the development of apparatus used in microdosimetry, and the development of ionization chambers with internal gas multiplication. Principal contributions in Radiobiology have included the determination of RBE and OER as a function·of neutron energy, the study of combined effects of radiation and a variety of other agents, and the investigation of the transformation of cells in tissue culture. Theoretical research centered around the development of the theoretical framework of microdosimetry and the establishment of the Theory of Dual Radiation Action. In a cooperative effort with Brookhaven National Laboratory, a major accelerator facility dedicated exclusively to Radiobiology and Radiation Physics, has been developed. Members of the laboratory have performed extensive. service to national and international organizations.

  11. Biological physics and synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filhol, J.M.; Chavanne, J. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France); Weckert, E. [Hasylab at Desy, Hamburg (Germany)] [and others

    2001-07-01

    This conference deals with the applications of synchrotron radiation to current problems in biology and medicine. Seven sessions take stock on the subject: sources and detectors; inelastic scattering and dynamics; muscle diffraction; reaction mechanisms; macromolecular assemblies; medical applications; imaging and spectroscopy. The document presents the papers abstracts. (A.L.B.)

  12. Biology relevant to space radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-30

    There are only very limited data on the health effects to humans from the two major components of the radiations in space, namely protons and heavy ions. As a result, predictions of the accompanying effects must be based either on (1) data generated through studies of experimental systems exposed on earth at rates and fluences higher than those in space, or (2) extrapolations from studies of gamma and x rays. Better information is needed about the doses, dose rates, and the energy and LET spectra of the radiations at the organ level that are anticipated to be encountered during extended space missions. In particular, there is a need for better estimates of the relationship between radiation quality and biological effects. In the case of deterministic effects, it is the threshold that is important. The possibility of the occurrence of a large solar particle event (SPE) requires that such effects be considered during extended space missions. Analyses suggest, however, that it is feasible to provide sufficient shielding so as to reduce such effects to acceptable levels, particularly if the dose rates can be limited. If these analyses prove correct, the primary biological risks will be the stochastic effects (latent cancer induction). The contribution of one large SPE to the risk of stochastic effects while undesirable will not be large in comparison to the potential total dose on a mission of long duration.

  13. Development of radiation biological dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chul Koo; Kim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Yun Sil; Son, Young Sook; Kim, Soo Kwan; Jang, Won Suk; Le, Sun Joo; Jee, Young Heun; Jung, Woo Jung

    1999-04-01

    Up until now, only a few methods have been developed for radiation biological dosimetry such as conventional chromosome aberration and micronucleus in peripheral blood cell. However, because these methods not only can be estimated by the expert, but also have a little limitation due to need high technique and many times in the case of radiation accident, it is very difficult to evaluate the absorbed dose of victims. Therefore, we should develop effective, easy, simple and rapid biodosimetry and its guideline (triage) to be able to be treated the victims as fast as possible. We established the premature chromosome condensation assay and apoptotic fragment assay which was the significant relationship between dose and cell damages to evaluate the irradiation dose as correct and rapid as possible using lymphocytes and crypt cells, and compared with conventional chromosome aberration assay and micronuclei assay.

  14. Biological research for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kug Chan; Shim, Hae Won; Oh, Tae Jeong; Park, Seon Young; Lee, Kang Suk

    2000-04-01

    The work scope of Biological research for the radiation protection had contained the search of biological microanalytic methods for assessing the health effect by {gamma}-radiation and toxic agents, the standardization of human T-lymphocyte cell culture and polymerase chain reaction, T-cell clonal assay, and the quantification of mutation frequency in the hypoxanthine (guanine) phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene locus by single exposure or combined exposure. Especially, the polymerase chain reaction methods using reverse transcriptase has been developed to analyze the mutant gene induced by {gamma}-radiation and chemical (pentachlorophenol) agent exposure, and to investigate the point mutations in the HPRT gene locus of T-lymphocytes. The HPRT T-cell clonal assay revealed that it could not differentiate {gamma}-irradiation from pentachlorophenol, because the frequency of somatic mutations induced by both damaging agents increased in a dose-dependent manner. The analysis of DNA sequence alterations of HPRT mutant clones clearly showed that both damaging agents induced different mutational spectra in the HPRT locus of T-cells. The large deletions, which account for 75 percent of the analyzed mutants, are characteristic mutations induced by {gamma}-irradiation. By contrast, point mutations such as base substitutions and insertion, come up to 97 percent in the case of pentachlorophenol-treated cells. The point mutation frequencies at 190 base pair and 444 base pair positions are 3-6 folds as high as in those at other mutation positions. It may be that these mutation sites are hot spots induced by pentachlorophenol. These results suggest that the HPRT mutation spectrum can be used as a potential bio marker for assessing a specific environmental risk. (author)

  15. Biological improvement of radiation resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, K. J.; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, S. J

    2000-08-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of gene action related to the radiation resistance in microorganisms could be essentially helpful for the development of radiation protectants and hormeric effects of low dose radiation. This book described isolation of radiation-resistant microorganisms, induction of radiation-resistant and functionally improved mutants by gamma-ray radiation, cloning and analysis of the radiation resistance related genes and analysis of the expressed proteins of the radiation resistant related genes.

  16. Biological basis of radiation protection needs rejuvenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paunesku, Tatjana; Haley, Benjamin; Brooks, Antone; Woloschak, Gayle E

    2017-10-01

    Human beings encounter radiation in many different situations - from proximity to radioactive waste sites to participation in medical procedures using X-rays etc. Limits for radiation exposures are legally regulated; however, current radiation protection policy does not explicitly acknowledge that biological, cellular and molecular effects of low doses and low dose rates of radiation differ from effects induced by medium and high dose radiation exposures. Recent technical developments in biology and medicine, from single cell techniques to big data computational research, have enabled new approaches for study of biology of low doses of radiation. Results of the work done so far support the idea that low doses of radiation have effects that differ from those associated with high dose exposures; this work, however, is far from sufficient for the development of a new theoretical framework needed for the understanding of low dose radiation exposures. Mechanistic understanding of radiation effects at low doses is necessary in order to develop better radiation protection policy.

  17. Biological effects of microwave radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varetskiy, V.V.; Dyachenko, V.N.; Rudnev, M.I.; Galich, L.N.; Bassen, Kh.

    1985-10-01

    Modeling of the conditions under which electromagnetic waves (EMW) affect biological subjects is often accomplished by using anechoic chambers which make it possible to simulate the propagation and interaction electromagnetic waves with biological objects in a well-defined field. On the basis of the results of measurements, it was established that the distribution of flux density in an anechoic chamber 2.5 x 2.5 x 2.5 m in size, made of absorbent ferrite materials is a good simulation of the zone of a defined field and its high homogeneity on an area of the irradiation zone approximately 1 m/sup 2/. The quantity 0.3 W/kg obtained by direct measurement in the center of the stomach of a rat phantom coincides well with the reading of mean specific rate of absorption in the rat when the calorimetric method is used (0.27 W/kg). The data obtained with the phantom and rat carcass demonstrate that there is a great deal of inhomogeneity in the distribution of absorption of electromagnetic energy in the center of an actual biological subject and a simulation of it. Thus, specific absorption rate in the head of the phantom is two times greater than in the stomach, while in the head of the rat carcass it decreases from the center to the edge by a factor of approximately 2. Within the bounds of the measurement error, no effect of the glass electrodes and the liquid drainage conductors used to record electrical activity of the brain was observed on the distribution of the field within the head of either the phantom or the rat. This suggests that they may be used in experiments where biological subjects are directly exposed to non-ionizing radiation.

  18. Radiation biology for pediatric radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Eric J. [Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2009-02-15

    The biological effects of radiation result primarily from damage to DNA. There are three effects of concern to the radiologist that determine the need for radiation protection and the dose principle of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable). (1) Heritable effects. These were thought to be most important in the 1950s, but concern has declined in recent years. The current ICRP risk estimate is very small at 0.2%/Sv. (2) Effects on the developing embryo and fetus include weight retardation, congenital anomalies, microcephaly and mental retardation. During the sensitive period of 8 to 15 weeks of gestation, the risk estimate for mental retardation is very high at 40%/Sv, but because it is a deterministic effect, there is likely to be a threshold of about 200 mSv. (3) Carcinogenesis is considered to be the most important consequence of low doses of radiation, with a risk of fatal cancer of about 5%/Sv, and is therefore of most concern in radiology. Our knowledge of radiation carcinogenesis comes principally from the 60-year study of the A-bomb survivors. The use of radiation for diagnostic purposes has increased dramatically in recent years. The annual collective population dose has increased by 750% since 1980 to 930,000 person Sv. One of the principal reasons is the burgeoning use of CT scans. In 2006, more than 60 million CT scans were performed in the U.S., with about 6 million of them in children. As a rule of thumb, an abdominal CT scan in a 1-year-old child results in a life-time mortality risk of about one in a thousand. While the risk to the individual is small and acceptable when the scan is clinically justified, even a small risk when multiplied by an increasingly large number is likely to produce a significant public health concern. It is for this reason that every effort should be made to reduce the doses associated with procedures such as CT scans, particularly in children, in the spirit of ALARA. (orig.)

  19. The importance of microdosimetry for radiation biology and radiation protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barendsen, G.W.

    1967-01-01

    In this contribution several features will be discussed of relations between biological effects produced by ionizing radiations and the spatial distributions of energy deposition of these radiations. Effects produced by high-LET radiations are generally found to be less dependent on dose-rate,

  20. Postgraduate studies in radiation biology in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trott, K.R. [Department of Radiation Biology, Univ. of London (United Kingdom); Lohmann, P.H.M.; Zeeland, A.A. van [Institute of Radiation Genetics and Environmental Mutagenesis, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden (Netherlands); Natarajan, A.T. [Institute of Radiation Genetics and Environmental Mutagenesis, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden (Netherlands)]|[Interuniversity Research Inst. for Radiopathology and Radiation Protection (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], [Leiden Univ., Leiden (Netherlands); Schibilla, H.; Chadwick, K. [European Commission, ERPET Action, Brussels (Belgium); Kellerer, A.M. [Institute of Radiobiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich (Germany); Steinhaeusler, F. [Institute of Physics and Biophysics, Univ. of Salzburg (Austria)

    1998-10-01

    The present system of radiobiological research in universities and research centres is no longer able to train radiobiologists who have a comprehensive understanding of the entire field of radiation biology including both `classical` and molecular radiation biology. However, such experts are needed in view of the role radiation protection plays in our societies. No single institution in Europe could now run a 1-year, full-time course which covers all aspects of the radiobiological basis of radiation protection. Therefore, a cooperative action of several universities from different EU member states has been developed and is described herein. (orig.) With 1 tab.

  1. Radiation biology of medical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Kelsey, Charles A; Sandoval, Daniel J; Chambers, Gregory D; Adolphi, Natalie L; Paffett, Kimberly S

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a thorough yet concise introduction to quantitative radiobiology and radiation physics, particularly the practical and medical application. Beginning with a discussion of the basic science of radiobiology, the book explains the fast processes that initiate damage in irradiated tissue and the kinetic patterns in which such damage is expressed at the cellular level. The final section is presented in a highly practical handbook style and offers application-based discussions in radiation oncology, fractionated radiotherapy, and protracted radiation among others. The text is also supplemented by a Web site.

  2. Biological effects of high LET radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Masami [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    1997-03-01

    Biological effect of radiation is different by a kind of it greatly. Heavy ions were generally more effective in cell inactivation, chromosome aberration induction, mutation induction and neoplastic cell transformation induction than {gamma}-rays in SHE cells. (author)

  3. Impact of Radiation Biology on Fundamental Insights in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlow, Richard B.

    1982-07-27

    Research supported by OHER [Office of Health and Environmental Research] and its predecessors has as one of its major goals an understanding of the effects of radiation at low doses and dose rates on biological systems, so as to predict their effects on humans. It is not possible to measure such effects directly. They must be predicted from basic knowledge on how radiation affects cellular components such as DNA and membranes and how cells react to such changes. What is the probability of radiation producing human mutations and what are the probabilities of radiation producing cancer? The end results of such studies are radiation exposure standards for workers and for the general population. An extension of these goals is setting standards for exposure to chemicals involved in various energy technologies. This latter problem is much more difficult because chemical dosimetry is a primitive state compared to radiation dosimetry.

  4. Impact of Radiation Biology on Fundamental in Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, Richard B.

    1983-01-20

    Research supported by OHER and its predecessors has as one of its major goals an understanding of the effects of radiation at low doses and dose rates on biological systems, so as to predict their effects on humans. It is not possible to measure such effects directly. They must be predicted from basic knowledge on how radiation affects cellular components such as DNA and membranes and how cells react to such changes. What is the probability of radiation producing human mutations and what are the probabilities of radiation producing cancer? The end results of such studies are radiation exposure standards for workers and for the general population. An extension of these goals is setting standards for exposure to chemicals involved in various energy technologies. This latter problem is much more difficult because chemical dosimetry is is a primitive state compared to radiation dosimetry.

  5. Biological countermeasures in space radiation health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann R.; Todd, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to the types of ionizing radiation encountered during space travel may cause a number of health-related problems, but the primary concern is related to the increased risk of cancer induction in astronauts. The major types of radiation considered to be of importance during space travel are protons and particles of high atomic number and high energy (HZE particles). It is now clear that biological countermeasures can be used to prevent or reduce the levels of biological consequences resulting from exposure to protons or HZE particles, including the induction of cancer, immunosuppression and neurological defects caused by these types of ionizing radiation. Research related to the dietary additions of agents to minimize the risks of developing health-related problems which can result from exposure to space radiations is reviewed.

  6. Flow Cytometry Techniques in Radiation Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    FORCES RAOIOSIOLOGY Toxicology Letters, 43 (1988) 219-233 RESEARCH IMSTITUTE 219Elsevier SCIENTIFIC REPORTSR88-42 TXL 02046 Flow cytometry techniques ...in radiation biology Kenneth F. McCarthy and Martha L. Hale Radiation Biochemistry Department, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda...marrow hematopoietic cells [2,31. In the past, ef- forts to isolate the HSC used physical techniques such as density gradient centrifugation in isotonic

  7. Breast cancer biology for the radiation oncologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, Jonathan [Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Small, William [Loyola Univ. Chicago, Maywood, IL (United States). Stritch School of Medicine, Cardianl Bernardin Cancer Center; Woloschak, Gayle E. (ed.) [Northwestern Univ. Feinberg, Chicago, IL (United States). School of Medicine

    2015-10-01

    This is the first textbook of its kind devoted to describing the biological complexities of breast cancer in a way that is relevant to the radiation oncologist. Radiation Oncology has long treated breast cancer as a single biological entity, with all treatment decisions being based on clinical and pathologic risk factors. We are now beginning to understand that biological subtypes of breast cancer may have different risks of recurrence as well as different intrinsic sensitivity to radiotherapy. Multi-gene arrays that have for years been used to predict the risk of distant recurrence and the value of systemic chemotherapy may also have utility in predicting the risk of local recurrence. Additionally, the targeted agents used to treat breast cancer may interact with radiotherapy in ways that can be beneficial or undesirable. All of these emerging issues are extensively discussed in this book, and practical evidence-based treatment recommendations are presented whenever possible.

  8. Biological research for the radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Chan Kug; Shim, Hae Won; Jung, Il Lae; Byun, Hee Sun; Moon, Myung Sook; Cho, Hye Jeong; Kim, Jin Sik

    2003-04-01

    The work scope of 'Biological Research for the Radiation Protection' had contained the research about polyamine effect on cell death triggered ionizing radiation, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and toxic agents. In this paper, to elucidate the role of polyamines as mediator in lysosomal damage and stress(H{sub 2}O{sub 2})- induced apoptosis, we utilized {alpha}-DiFluoroMethylOrnithine (DFMO), which inhibited ornithine decarboxylase and depleted intracellular putrescine, and investigated the effects of polyamine on the apoptosis caused by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, ionizing radiation and paraquat. We also showed that MGBG, inhibitor of polyamine biosynthesis, treatment affected intracellular redox steady states, intracellular ROS levels and protein oxidation. Thereafter we also investigated whether MGBG may enhance the cytotoxic efficacy of tumor cells caused by ionizing radiation or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} because such compounds are able to potentiate the cell-killing effects. In addition, ceruloplasmin and thioredoxin, possible antioxidant proteins, were shown to have protective effect on radiation- or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}(or chemicals)-induced macromolecular damage or cell death.

  9. Biological Sensors for Solar Ultraviolet Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André P. Schuch

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Solar ultraviolet (UV radiation is widely known as a genotoxic environmental agent that affects Earth ecosystems and the human population. As a primary consequence of the stratospheric ozone layer depletion observed over the last decades, the increasing UV incidence levels have heightened the concern regarding deleterious consequences affecting both the biosphere and humans, thereby leading to an increase in scientific efforts to understand the role of sunlight in the induction of DNA damage, mutagenesis, and cell death. In fact, the various UV-wavelengths evoke characteristic biological impacts that greatly depend on light absorption of biomolecules, especially DNA, in living organisms, thereby justifying the increasing importance of developing biological sensors for monitoring the harmful impact of solar UV radiation under various environmental conditions. In this review, several types of biosensors proposed for laboratory and field application, that measure the biological effects of the UV component of sunlight, are described. Basically, the applicability of sensors based on DNA, bacteria or even mammalian cells are presented and compared. Data are also presented showing that on using DNA-based sensors, the various types of damage produced differ when this molecule is exposed in either an aqueous buffer or a dry solution. Apart from the data thus generated, the development of novel biosensors could help in evaluating the biological effects of sunlight on the environment. They also emerge as alternative tools for using live animals in the search for protective sunscreen products.

  10. Biological applications of synchrotron radiation infrared spectromicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelli, Augusto; Cricenti, Antonio; Kwiatek, Wojciech M; Petibois, Cyril

    2012-01-01

    Extremely brilliant infrared (IR) beams provided by synchrotron radiation sources are now routinely used in many facilities with available commercial spectrometers coupled to IR microscopes. Using these intense non-thermal sources, a brilliance two or three order of magnitude higher than a conventional source is achievable through small pinholes (infrared biological imaging covers a wide range of fundamental issues and applied researches such as cell imaging or tissue imaging. Molecular maps with a spatial resolution down to the diffraction limit may be now obtained with a synchrotron radiation IR source also on thick samples. Moreover, changes of the protein structure are detectable in an IR spectrum and cellular molecular markers can be identified and used to recognize a pathological status of a tissue. Molecular structure and functions are strongly correlated and this aspect is particularly relevant for imaging. We will show that the brilliance of synchrotron radiation IR sources may enhance the sensitivity of a molecular signal obtained from small biosamples, e.g., a single cell, containing extremely small amounts of organic matter. We will also show that SR IR sources allow to study chemical composition and to identify the distribution of organic molecules in cells at submicron resolution is possible with a high signal-to-noise ratio. Moreover, the recent availability of two-dimensional IR detectors promises to push forward imaging capabilities in the time domain. Indeed, with a high current synchrotron radiation facility and a Focal Plane Array the chemical imaging of individual cells can be obtained in a few minutes. Within this framework important results are expected in the next years using synchrotron radiation and Free Electron Laser (FEL) sources for spectro-microscopy and spectral-imaging, alone or in combination with Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy methods to study the molecular composition and dynamic changes in samples of biomedical interest

  11. II. Biological studies of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.H.

    1948-05-24

    With the completion of the 184 inch cyclotron in Berkeley and the successful construction of a deflector system, it was possible to bring the 190 Mev deuteron and the 380 Mev alpha beams out into the air and to begin a study of the effects of high-energy deuteron beams by direct irradiation of biological specimens. The direct biological use of deuteron beams was attempted earlier in Berkeley by Marshak, MacLeish, and Walker in 1940. These and other investigators have been aware for some time of the potential usefulness of high energy particle beams for radio-biological studies and their suitability for biological investigations. R.R. Wilson advanced the idea of using fast proton beams to deliver radiation and intervening tissues. R.E. Zirkle pointed out that such particle beams may be focused or screened until a cross-section of the beam is small enough to study effects of irradiation under the microscope on single cells or on parts of single cells. This article gives an overview of the radiological use of high energy deuteron beams, including the following topics: potential uses of high energy particle beams; experiments on the physical properties of the beam; lethal effect of the deuteron beam on mice.

  12. Radiation Biology Irradiator Dose Verification Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Kurt H; Kunugi, Keith A; Hammer, Clifford G; Culberson, Wesley S; DeWerd, Larry A

    2016-02-01

    Interest in standardized dosimetry for radiobiological irradiators has expanded over the last decade. At a symposium held at NIST, "The Importance of Standardization of Dosimetry in Radiobiology", a set of 12 criteria necessary for adequate irradiation was developed by the authors. Here we report on our review of dosimetry methods from various peer-reviewed publications and found that none of them satisfied all 12 criteria set forth by the authors of the NIAD/NCI/NIST proceedings. The inadequate reporting of dosimetry methods in the literature raises questions regarding the accuracy of the dose delivered to animal test subjects and the resulting experimental results. For this reason, we investigated the level of accuracy of dose delivery in radiation biology studies. We performed an irradiator output verification study of 12 radiation biology laboratories (7 gamma and 5 X-ray units) using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) mouse phantoms and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) readouts at the University of Wisconsin Medical Radiation Research Center (UWMRRC). The laboratories housing each of these irradiators were asked to deliver specific doses to individual mouse phantoms. Simultaneously, mouse phantoms at the UWMRRC were irradiated with NIST-traceable reference beams representative of the subject laboratories' beam energies. The irradiated mouse phantoms were returned from the various institutions to the UWMRRC and the TLDs were processed, with their measured dose response compared to the known dose response of the calibration phantom TLDs. Of the five facilities using X-ray irradiators, only one delivered an output within 5% of the target dose. The dose differences for the other four X-ray irradiators ranged from 12 to 42%. These results indicate the potential need for standardization of dose determination and additional oversight of radiobiology investigations.

  13. Topical Day on Biological Effects of Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baatout, S.; Jacquet, P.

    1997-05-15

    The topical day has been focussed on the potential effects of ionizing radiation on human health. A general overview on molecular and biophysical aspects of radiation, its effects on cells and organisms, and the contribution of radiobiology to radiation protection and risk assessment is given. The genetic effects of radiation and its effects on the developing organism, the effects of radiation on the cell cycle and the mechanisms of radiation induced apoptosis were also discussed.

  14. Radiations from GSM Base Stations and its Biological Effects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    electromagnetic exposure in the microwave range and radiofrequency (RF) radiation on exposed organisms and humans (Markov and Kostarakis,. 2007). While several studies have indicated that exposure of biological systems to low level RF radiation caused adverse biological effects, other studies have indicated that at ...

  15. A Paradigm Shift in Low Dose Radiation Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Alatas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available When ionizing radiation traverses biological material, some energy depositions occur and ionize directly deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA molecules, the critical target. A classical paradigm in radiobiology is that the deposition of energy in the cell nucleus and the resulting damage to DNA are responsible for the detrimental biological effects of radiation. It is presumed that no radiation effect would be expected in cells that receive no direct radiation exposure through nucleus. The risks of exposure to low dose ionizing radiation are estimated by extrapolating from data obtained after exposure to high dose radiation. However, the validity of using this dose-response model is controversial because evidence accumulated over the past decade has indicated that living organisms, including humans, respond differently to low dose radiation than they do to high dose radiation. Moreover, recent experimental evidences from many laboratories reveal the fact that radiation effects also occur in cells that were not exposed to radiation and in the progeny of irradiated cells at delayed times after radiation exposure where cells do not encounter direct DNA damage. Recently, the classical paradigm in radiobiology has been shifted from the nucleus, specifically the DNA, as the principal target for the biological effects of radiation to cells. The universality of target theory has been challenged by phenomena of radiation-induced genomic instability, bystander effect and adaptive response. The new radiation biology paradigm would cover both targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation. The mechanisms underlying these responses involve biochemical/molecular signals that respond to targeted and non-targeted events. These results brought in understanding that the biological response to low dose radiation at tissue or organism level is a complex process of integrated response of cellular targets as well as extra-cellular factors. Biological understanding of

  16. Biology of Extreme Radiation Resistance: The Way of Deinococcus radiodurans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisko, Anita; Radman, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is a champion of extreme radiation resistance that is accounted for by a highly efficient protection against proteome, but not genome, damage. A well-protected functional proteome ensures cell recovery from extensive radiation damage to other cellular constituents by molecular repair and turnover processes, including an efficient repair of disintegrated DNA. Therefore, cell death correlates with radiation-induced protein damage, rather than DNA damage, in both robust and standard species. From the reviewed biology of resistance to radiation and other sources of oxidative damage, we conclude that the impact of protein damage on the maintenance of life has been largely underestimated in biology and medicine. PMID:23818498

  17. Decrease in radiation-induced biological effects due to prior radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Ken; Ohnishi, Takeo [Nara Medical Univ., Nara (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    We are constantly exposed to environmental radiation. ICRP recommends annual limitations of radiation exposure of 1 and 50 mSv for the general public and for radiation workers, respectively. Initially, there were doubts about different limitations between the two groups based on radiation sensitivity. Regarding the dose/effect relationship, two discrepant hypotheses are the linear no-threshold theory and non-linear with threshold theory, which form the basis of the current radiation protection programs. The radioadaptive response fully occurs near the range of natural radiation and radiation-related working area. This response is a biological defense mechanism in which low dose and low dose-rate irradiation elicits cellular resistance to the genotoxic effects of subsequent irradiation. However, its molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. This article reviews the trends in research and our recent findings on decreases in radiation-induced biological effects due to prior radiation exposure.

  18. Biological effect of radiation on human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Sil; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Su Jae [and others

    2000-04-01

    1. Adaptive response when 0.01 Gy was preirradiated before high challenging dose is induced in normal cell types such normal lymphocytes, primary keratinocytes, and L929 fibroblast cells but not in neoplastic cells such as L5178Y lymphoma cells, EL-4 lymphoma cells and 308 papilloma cells. 2. Heat shock protein (HSP) 25 and inducible HSP70 is responsible for the induction of adaptive response and radioresistance - cell cycle regulation, antiapoptotic molecule and PKC activation were involved. 3. Apoptosis was induced at most 5. hrs after irradiation in primary keratinocytes, in v-rasHa transformed keratinocytes, the maximum interval was 16 hrs, and in 308 papilloma cells, the maximum was 48 hrs. 4. PKC response by radiation is correlated with induction of apoptosis. 5. Rapid induction PKCdelta in primary keratinocytes and no response of PKC epsilon may involved in radiation induced apoptosis. 6. The rate of resorption was increased when radiation was given at 2.5 days after gestation. Early death including foetal death were highly expressed when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. There are no difference in incidence of late death including embryonic death. 7. 2 Gy is the most effective dose in radiation induced teratogenesis in mouse model. 8. Growth retardation and small head was present when radiation was given at 5.5, 7.5, 11.5 and 15.5 days after gestation and small head showed high incidence at 11.5 days after gestation. 9. External malformation, internal malformation and skeletal malformation was induced when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. 10. OGG1-mutated cells induced radiosensitive by G2/M cell cycle arrest. 11. Radiation induced G2/M phase cell cycle and correlated with radiosensitivity. 12. PKCalpha induced differentiation. 13. Radiation exposed cells showed carcinogenic effect. 14. Organ specific radiosensitivity was shown and protein expression was involved.

  19. AINSE conference on radiation biology and chemistry. Conference handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The conference handbook contains 60 oral and poster presentations dealing with recent advances in radiation chemistry applied to biological studies, radiopharmaceuticals, radiosensitizers as well as to solid state chemical physics.

  20. European activities in space radiation biology and exobiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horneck, G. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Koeln (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    In view of the space station era, the European Space Agency has initiated a review and planning document for space life sciences. Radiation biology includes dosimetry of the radiation field and its modification by mass shielding, studies on the biological responses to radiation in space, on the potential impact of space flight environment on radiation effects, and assessing the radiation risks and establishing radiation protection guidelines. To reach a better understanding of the processes leading to the origin, evolution and distribution of life, exobiological activities include the exploration of the solar system, the collection and analysis of extraterrestrial samples and the utilization of space as a tool for testing the impact of space environment on organics and resistant life forms. (author)

  1. Biological Bases for Radiation Adaptive Responses in the Lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Bobby R. [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lin, Yong [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wilder, Julie [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Belinsky, Steven [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Our main research objective was to determine the biological bases for low-dose, radiation-induced adaptive responses in the lung, and use the knowledge gained to produce an improved risk model for radiation-induced lung cancer that accounts for activated natural protection, genetic influences, and the role of epigenetic regulation (epiregulation). Currently, low-dose radiation risk assessment is based on the linear-no-threshold hypothesis, which now is known to be unsupported by a large volume of data.

  2. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1994-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a blend of physics, chemistry and biology and epitomizes the multidisciplinary approach towards understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. To an increasing extent, the focus of attention is on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights from the past year are briefly described.

  3. Biological effects and mechanisms of shortwave radiation: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao; Peng, Rui-Yun

    2017-01-01

    With the increasing knowledge of shortwave radiation, it is widely used in wireless communications, radar observations, industrial manufacturing, and medical treatments. Despite of the benefits from shortwave, these wide applications expose humans to the risk of shortwave electromagnetic radiation, which is alleged to cause potential damage to biological systems. This review focused on the exposure to shortwave electromagnetic radiation, considering in vitro, in vivo and epidemiological results that have provided insight into the biological effects and mechanisms of shortwave. Additionally, some protective measures and suggestions are discussed here in the hope of obtaining more benefits from shortwave with fewer health risks.

  4. Request for Travel Funds for Systems Radiation Biology Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen [NYU School of Medicine

    2014-03-22

    The 3rd International Systems Radiation Biology Workshop brought together the major European, US and Japanese research programs on radiation risk as well as selected experts representing systems biological approaches to discuss how the new methodologies could be best exploited for low dose research. A significant part of the workshop was devoted to discussions organised as breakout group sessions. To facilitate discussions number of participants was limited to 60 persons. To achieve the goals of this symposium in this international conference, support from DOE is vital. Hence, this proposal requested support in the amount of $15,000 to cover the travel expenses of international experts and radiation biology scientists from the United States. This supporting mechanism was clearly identified to the selected US participants as a conference support award from the DOE (See attached PDF). The workshop was an outstanding opportunity to strengthen interactions between leading experts in the emerging areas of radiation sciences, and will also provide opportunities for younger scientists to meet with experts and discuss their results. This workshop was designed to endorse active engagement in international collaboration. A major objective of this conference was to effectively communicate research results, in order to ensure that current thinking reflects sound science of radiation biology. Further, this international event addressed the use and success of scientific initiatives in radiation biology for policymakers, standard-setters, and the general public.

  5. The Biological Effects of Nonionizing Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-29

    described by K.Ao Wickersheim and R.V. Alves. The sensor is a europium-activated gadolinium oxysulfide phosphor that emits two sharp fluorescent lines when...nodules were heated with u-sound, I to 3 MHz, applied to the skin, with or without chemo- therapy or radiotherapy . The depth to which the... radiotherapy and heat were given together. -11- _ _ _ _ _____ ____i C-12-81 III. PRE-THERMAL EFFECTS ON NONIONIZING RADIATIONS (1) Pre-Thermal

  6. Advances in the biological effects of terahertz wave radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Hao, Yan-Hui; Peng, Rui-Yun

    2014-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) band lies between microwave and infrared rays in wavelength and consists of non-ionizing radiation. Both domestic and foreign research institutions, including the army, have attached considerable importance to the research and development of THz technology because this radiation exhibits both photon-like and electron-like properties, which grant it considerable application value and potential. With the rapid development of THz technology and related applications, studies of the biological effects of THz radiation have become a major focus in the field of life sciences. Research in this field has only just begun, both at home and abroad. In this paper, research progress with respect to THz radiation, including its biological effects, mechanisms and methods of protection, will be reviewed.

  7. Prototype Biology-Based Radiation Risk Module Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, Douglas; Clayton, Ronald G.; Patel, Zarana; Hu, Shaowen; Huff, Janice

    2015-01-01

    Biological effects of space radiation and risk mitigation are strategic knowledge gaps for the Evolvable Mars Campaign. The current epidemiology-based NASA Space Cancer Risk (NSCR) model contains large uncertainties (HAT #6.5a) due to lack of information on the radiobiology of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and lack of human data. The use of experimental models that most accurately replicate the response of human tissues is critical for precision in risk projections. Our proposed study will compare DNA damage, histological, and cell kinetic parameters after irradiation in normal 2D human cells versus 3D tissue models, and it will use a multi-scale computational model (CHASTE) to investigate various biological processes that may contribute to carcinogenesis, including radiation-induced cellular signaling pathways. This cross-disciplinary work, with biological validation of an evolvable mathematical computational model, will help reduce uncertainties within NSCR and aid risk mitigation for radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  8. Study of complex molecules of biological interest with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prince, K.C. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14–km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, in Area Science Park, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Molecular Model Discovery Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Melbourne, Victoria, 3122 (Australia); Bolognesi, P., E-mail: paola.bolognesi@cnr.it [CNR-ISM, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Via Salaria Km. 29,300, Monterotondo (Roma) (Italy); Feyer, V. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14–km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Research Center Jülich, Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-6), 52425 Jülich (Germany); Plekan, O. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14–km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Avaldi, L. [CNR-ISM, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Via Salaria Km. 29,300, Monterotondo (Roma) (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Synchrotron radiation and synchrotron based spectroscopic techniques have found important applications in the study of isolated molecular species of biological interest. In this paper, some examples of spectroscopic and dynamic studies of amino acids and small peptides, nucleobases and pharmaceuticals are reviewed. Opportunities offered by the advent of new radiation sources combined with novel methods for the production of beams of these molecules are also discussed.

  9. Space Radiation and Manned Mission: Interface Between Physics and Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, Tom

    2012-07-01

    The natural radiation environment in space consists of a mixed field of high energy protons, heavy ions, electrons and alpha particles. Interplanetary travel to the International Space Station and any planned establishment of satellite colonies on other solar system implies radiation exposure to the crew and is a major concern to space agencies. With shielding, the radiation exposure level in manned space missions is likely to be chronic, low dose irradiation. Traditionally, our knowledge of biological effects of cosmic radiation in deep space is almost exclusively derived from ground-based accelerator experiments with heavy ions in animal or in vitro models. Radiobiological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation are subjected to modulations by various parameters including bystander effects, adaptive response, genomic instability and genetic susceptibility of the exposed individuals. Radiation dosimetry and modeling will provide conformational input in areas where data are difficult to acquire experimentally. However, modeling is only as good as the quality of input data. This lecture will discuss the interdependent nature of physics and biology in assessing the radiobiological response to space radiation.

  10. Understanding low radiation background biology through controlled evolution experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Nathanael; Breton, Vincent; Sarramia, David; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore; Biron, David G

    2017-08-01

    Biological experiments conducted in underground laboratories over the last decade have shown that life can respond to relatively small changes in the radiation background in unconventional ways. Rapid changes in cell growth, indicative of hormetic behaviour and long-term inheritable changes in antioxidant regulation have been observed in response to changes in the radiation background that should be almost undetectable to cells. Here, we summarize the recent body of underground experiments conducted to date, and outline potential mechanisms (such as cell signalling, DNA repair and antioxidant regulation) that could mediate the response of cells to low radiation backgrounds. We highlight how multigenerational studies drawing on methods well established in studying evolutionary biology are well suited for elucidating these mechanisms, especially given these changes may be mediated by epigenetic pathways. Controlled evolution experiments with model organisms, conducted in underground laboratories, can highlight the short- and long-term differences in how extremely low-dose radiation environments affect living systems, shining light on the extent to which epimutations caused by the radiation background propagate through the population. Such studies can provide a baseline for understanding the evolutionary responses of microorganisms to ionizing radiation, and provide clues for understanding the higher radiation environments around uranium mines and nuclear disaster zones, as well as those inside nuclear reactors.

  11. DEGRO 2009. Radiation oncology - medical physics - radiation biology. Abstracts; DEGRO 2009. Radioonkologie - Medizinische Physik - Strahlenbiologie. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-06-15

    The special volume of the journal covers the abstracts of the DEGRO 2009 meeting on radiation oncology, medical physics, and radiation biology, covering the following topics: seldom diseases, gastrointestinal tumors, radiation reactions and radiation protection, medical care and science, central nervous system, medical physics, the non-parvicellular lung carcinomas, ear-nose-and throat, target-oriented radiotherapy plus ''X'', radio-oncology - young academics, lymphomas, mammary glands, modern radiotherapy, life quality and palliative radiotherapy, radiotherapy of the prostate carcinoma, imaging for planning and therapy, the digital documentation in clinics and practical experiences, NMR imaging and tomography, hadrons - actual status in Germany, urinal tract oncology, radiotoxicity.

  12. The interaction between Terahertz radiation and biological tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smye, S W; Chamberlain, J M; Fitzgerald, A J; Berry, E

    2001-09-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation occupies that region of the electromagnetic (EM) spectrum between approximately 0.3 and 20 THz. Recent advances in methods of producing THz radiation have stimulated interest in studying the interaction between radiation and biological molecules and tissue. Given that the photon energies associated with this region of the spectrum are 2.0 x 10(-22) to 1.3 x 10(-20) J, an analysis of the interactions requires an understanding of the permittivity and conductivity of the medium (which describe the bulk motions of the molecules) and the possible transitions between the molecular energy levels. This paper reviews current understanding of the interactions between THz radiation and biological molecules, cells and tissues. At frequencies below approximately 6 THz. the interaction may be understood as a classical EM wave interaction (using the parameters of permittivity and conductivity), whereas at higher frequencies. transitions between different molecular vibrational and rotational energy levels become increasingly important and are more readily understood using a quantum-mechanical framework. The latter is of particular interest in using THz to probe transitions between different vibrational modes of deoxyribonucleic acid. Much additional experimental work is required in order to fully understand the interactions between THz radiation and biological molecules and tissue.

  13. Cell phone radiation exposure on brain and associated biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesari, Kavindra Kumar; Siddiqui, Mohd Haris; Meena, Ramovatar; Verma, H N; Kumar, Shivendra

    2013-03-01

    Wireless technologies are ubiquitous today and the mobile phones are one of the prodigious output of this technology. Although the familiarization and dependency of mobile phones is growing at an alarming pace, the biological effects due to the exposure of radiations have become a subject of intense debate. The present evidence on mobile phone radiation exposure is based on scientific research and public policy initiative to give an overview of what is known of biological effects that occur at radiofrequency (RF)/ electromagnetic fields (EMFs) exposure. The conflict in conclusions is mainly because of difficulty in controlling the affecting parameters. Biological effects are dependent not only on the distance and size of the object (with respect to the object) but also on the environmental parameters. Health endpoints reported to be associated with RF include childhood leukemia, brain tumors, genotoxic effects, neurological effects and neurodegenerative diseases, immune system deregulation, allergic and inflammatory responses, infertility and some cardiovascular effects. Most of the reports conclude a reasonable suspicion of mobile phone risk that exists based on clear evidence of bio-effects which with prolonged exposures may reasonably be presumed to result in health impacts. The present study summarizes the public issue based on mobile phone radiation exposure and their biological effects. This review concludes that the regular and long term use of microwave devices (mobile phone, microwave oven) at domestic level can have negative impact upon biological system especially on brain. It also suggests that increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role by enhancing the effect of microwave radiations which may cause neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. The Space Radiation: Nature, Biological Effects and Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradian, Kh.

    The latest findings in origin, biological effects and shielding of the space ionizing radiation (SIR) are reviewed. It is stressed that after the impending implementation of artificial gravity, SIR could become the most serious concern for deep space travelers. SIR is more effective in induction of the genome- and cell-associated damages, compared with the conventional radioactive sources. The shielding of SIR is augmented due to the secondary spallation δ-radiation and possible cooperation with weightlessness and other negative impacts of a space flight. The panspermia concept postulating the existence of living organisms, e.g. bacterial spores, in space and their natural interplanetary transportation is discussed.

  15. Enhancements in biologically effective ultraviolet radiation following volcanic eruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelmann, A M; Ackerman, T P; Turco, R P

    1992-09-03

    Aerosols injected into the stratosphere by large volcanic eruptions may induce ozone destruction through processes including heterogeneous chemical reactions. The effect of ozone reductions on surface ultraviolet irradiation is not obvious, however, because aerosols also increase the reflection of sunlight. Here we use a radiative transfer model to estimate the changes in biologically effective ultraviolet radiation (UV-BE) at the Earth's surface produced by the El Chichón (1982) and Mount Pinatubo (1991) eruptions. We find that in both cases surface UV-BE intensity can increase because the effect of ozone depletion outweighs the increased scattering.

  16. Biological mechanisms of radiation effects; Biologische Mechanismen der Strahlenwirkung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, S.; Doerr, W. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, ATRAB - Angewandte und Translationale Radiobiologie, Univ.-Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Wien (Austria)

    2017-07-15

    Exposure to ionizing radiation for diagnostic purposes is inevitable in modern medicine. The therapeutic application of irradiation is highly effective against cancer; however, this implies exposure of normal tissue structures to significant doses of radiation. Diagnostic or therapeutic exposure to ionizing radiation can result in tissue changes and tumor induction in the long term. Knowledge of the biological mechanisms underlying these effects is essential for individualization of the application. This article examines the biological mechanisms at the tissue and molecular level, the clinical manifestation of radiation effects, dose-dependence of the risk and the temporal progression as well as influencing factors. The time course of the reaction of tissues to radiation exposure extends over wide ranges up to many decades. The effects of radiation on tissues are classified into early and late and their pathobiology is significantly different. Various factors (R) influencing the clinical manifestation of radiation effects have been identified related to the exposure pattern. The radiation tolerance of normal tissue structures regarding the induction of functional deficits shows great variation but always has a threshold value, which is usually not exceeded in diagnostic procedures. The risk of a radiation-induced fatal malignancy (total body exposure 5%/Gy) for a medical administration of radiation must be considered as very low in comparison to the natural risks. Informed consent of patients must reflect this in a balanced way. (orig.) [German] Eine Exposition mit ionisierender Strahlung fuer diagnostische Zwecke ist in der modernen Medizin unumgaenglich. Bei einer Tumorerkrankung ist die therapeutische Anwendung dieser Strahlung hoch effektiv. Dies impliziert immer eine Exposition normaler Gewebestrukturen mit signifikanten Strahlendosen. Die diagnostische oder therapeutische Exposition mit ionisierender Strahlung kann langfristig zu Gewebeveraenderungen und

  17. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1993-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood ``biological fingerprint`` of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

  18. Environmental mutagenesis and radiation biology: The legacy of William Morgan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jeffrey L

    2017-12-01

    A symposium entitled Environmental Mutagenesis and Radiation Biology was held on September 27, 2016 to honor the memory of Dr. William F. Morgan who passed away unexpectedly on November 13, 2015. The speakers presented the latest reviews on homologous recombination repair, induced genetic instability, bystander effects, and risk estimate development. Their presentations are presented following the introduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) survey of radiation biology educators in U.S. and Canadian radiation oncology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstein, Barry S; Held, Kathryn D; Rockwell, Sara; Williams, Jacqueline P; Zeman, Elaine M

    2009-11-01

    To obtain, in a survey-based study, detailed information on the faculty currently responsible for teaching radiation biology courses to radiation oncology residents in the United States and Canada. In March-December 2007 a survey questionnaire was sent to faculty having primary responsibility for teaching radiation biology to residents in 93 radiation oncology residency programs in the United States and Canada. The responses to this survey document the aging of the faculty who have primary responsibility for teaching radiation biology to radiation oncology residents. The survey found a dramatic decline with time in the percentage of educators whose graduate training was in radiation biology. A significant number of the educators responsible for teaching radiation biology were not fully acquainted with the radiation sciences, either through training or practical application. In addition, many were unfamiliar with some of the organizations setting policies and requirements for resident education. Freely available tools, such as the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Radiation and Cancer Biology Practice Examination and Study Guides, were widely used by residents and educators. Consolidation of resident courses or use of a national radiation biology review course was viewed as unlikely by most programs. A high priority should be given to the development of comprehensive teaching tools to assist those individuals who have responsibility for teaching radiation biology courses but who do not have an extensive background in critical areas of radiobiology related to radiation oncology. These findings also suggest a need for new graduate programs in radiobiology.

  20. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1991--November 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

  1. Breast Cancer Biology: Clinical Implications for Breast Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Janet K; Jagsi, Reshma; Woodward, Wendy A; Ho, Alice

    2018-01-01

    Historically, prognosis and treatment decision making for breast cancer patients have been dictated by the anatomic extent of tumor spread. However, in recent years, "breast cancer" has proven to be a collection of unique phenotypes with distinct prognoses, patterns of failure, and treatment responses. Recent advances in biologically based assays and targeted therapies designed to exploit these unique phenotypes have profoundly altered systemic therapy practice patterns and treatment outcomes. Data associating locoregional outcomes with tumor biology are emerging. However, the likelihood of obtaining level I evidence for fundamental radiation therapy questions within each of the specific subtypes in the immediate future is low. As such, this review aims to summarize the existing data and provide practical context for the incorporation of breast tumor biology into clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together

  3. The biological effects of ionising radiation on Crustaceans: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, Neil; Lerebours, Adélaïde [Institute of Marine Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Ferry Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO4 9LY (United Kingdom); Smith, Jim T. [School of Earth & Environmental Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Burnaby Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO1 3QL (United Kingdom); Ford, Alex T., E-mail: alex.ford@port.ac.uk [Institute of Marine Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Ferry Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO4 9LY (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We comprehensively review the effects of ionising radiation in crustaceans. • Current environmental radioprotection levels found to be inadequate in some cases. • Mutation is shown to be a sensitive endpoint of radiation exposure. • Lowest observed effect dose rate varies by orders of magnitude. - Abstract: Historic approaches to radiation protection are founded on the conjecture that measures to safeguard humans are adequate to protect non-human organisms. This view is disparate with other toxicants wherein well-developed frameworks exist to minimise exposure of biota. Significant data gaps for many organisms, coupled with high profile nuclear incidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima, have prompted the re-evaluation of our approach toward environmental radioprotection. Elucidating the impacts of radiation on biota has been identified as priority area for future research within both scientific and regulatory communities. The crustaceans are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems, comprising greater than 66,000 species of ecological and commercial importance. This paper aims to assess the available literature of radiation-induced effects within this subphylum and identify knowledge gaps. A literature search was conducted pertaining to radiation effects on four endpoints as stipulated by a number of regulatory bodies: mortality, morbidity, reproduction and mutation. A major finding of this review was the paucity of data regarding the effects of environmentally relevant radiation doses on crustacean biology. Extremely few studies utilising chronic exposure durations or wild populations were found across all four endpoints. The dose levels at which effects occur was found to vary by orders of magnitude thus presenting difficulties in developing phyla-specific benchmark values and reference levels for radioprotection. Based on the limited data, mutation was found to be the most sensitive endpoint of radiation exposure, with mortality the least sensitive

  4. Towards Space Exploration of Moon, Mars Neos: Radiation Biological Basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, Christine; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Guenther

    2016-07-01

    Radiation has emerged as the most critical issue to be resolved for long-term missions both orbital and interplanetary. Astronauts are constantly exposed to galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) of various energies with a low dose rate. Primarily late tissue sequels like genetic alterations, cancer and non-cancer effects, i.e. cataracts and degenerative diseases of e.g. the central nervous system or the cardiovascular system, are the potential risks. Cataracts were observed to occur earlier and more often in astronauts exposed to higher proportions of galactic ions (Cucinotta et al., 2001). Predictions of cancer risk and acceptable radiation exposure in space are subject to many uncertainties including the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of space radiation especially heavy ions, dose-rate effects and possible interaction with microgravity and other spaceflight environmental factors. The initial cellular response to radiation exposure paves the way to late sequelae and starts with damage to the DNA which complexity depends on the linear energy transfer (LET) of the radiation. Repair of such complex DNA damage is more challenging and requires more time than the repair of simple DNA double strand breaks (DSB) which can be visualized by immunofluorescence staining of the phosphorylated histone 2AX (γH2AX) and might explain the observed prolonged cell cycle arrests induced by high-LET in comparison to low-LET irradiation. Unrepaired or mis-repaired DNA DSB are proposed to be responsible for cell death, mutations, chromosomal aberrations and oncogenic cell transformation. Cell killing and mutation induction are most efficient in an LET range of 90-200 keV/µm. Also the activation of transcription factors such as Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) and gene expression shaping the cellular radiation response depend on the LET with a peak RBE between 90 and 300 keV/µm. Such LET-RBE relationships were observed for cataract and cancer induction by heavy ions in laboratory animals

  5. Biological wound dressings sterilized with gamma radiation: Mexican clinical experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pardo, M. E.; Ley-Chávez, E.; Reyes-Frías, M. L.; Rodríguez-Ferreyra, P.; Vázquez-Maya, L.; Salazar, M. A.

    2007-11-01

    Biological wound dressings sterilized with gamma radiation, such as amnion and pig skin, are a reality in Mexico. These tissues are currently processed in the tissue bank and sterilized in the Gamma Industrial Irradiation Plant; both facilities belong to the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) (National Institute of Nuclear Research). With the strong support of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the bank was established at the ININ and the Mexican Ministry of Health issued its sanitary license on July 7, 1999. The Quality Management System of the bank was certified by ISO 9001:2000 on August 1, 2003; the scope of the system is "Research, Development and Processing of Biological Tissues Sterilized with Gamma Radiation". At present, more than 150 patients from 16 hospitals have been successfully treated with these tissues. This paper presents a brief description of the tissue processing, as well as the present Mexican clinical experience with children and adult patients who underwent medical treatment with radiosterilized amnion and pig skin, used as biological wound dressings on burns and ocular surface disorders.

  6. Stochastic Effects in Computational Biology of Space Radiation Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Pluth, Janis; Harper, Jane; O'Neill, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Estimating risk from space radiation poses important questions on the radiobiology of protons and heavy ions. We are considering systems biology models to study radiation induced repair foci (RIRF) at low doses, in which less than one-track on average transverses the cell, and the subsequent DNA damage processing and signal transduction events. Computational approaches for describing protein regulatory networks coupled to DNA and oxidative damage sites include systems of differential equations, stochastic equations, and Monte-Carlo simulations. We review recent developments in the mathematical description of protein regulatory networks and possible approaches to radiation effects simulation. These include robustness, which states that regulatory networks maintain their functions against external and internal perturbations due to compensating properties of redundancy and molecular feedback controls, and modularity, which leads to general theorems for considering molecules that interact through a regulatory mechanism without exchange of matter leading to a block diagonal reduction of the connecting pathways. Identifying rate-limiting steps, robustness, and modularity in pathways perturbed by radiation damage are shown to be valid techniques for reducing large molecular systems to realistic computer simulations. Other techniques studied are the use of steady-state analysis, and the introduction of composite molecules or rate-constants to represent small collections of reactants. Applications of these techniques to describe spatial and temporal distributions of RIRF and cell populations following low dose irradiation are described.

  7. Advances in radiation biology: Relative radiation sensitivities of human organ systems. Volume 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lett, J.T.; Altman, K.I.; Ehmann, U.K.; Cox, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    This volume is a thematically focused issue of Advances in Radiation Biology. The topic surveyed is relative radiosensitivity of human organ systems. Topics considered include relative radiosensitivities of the thymus, spleen, and lymphohemopoietic systems; relative radiosensitivities of the small and large intestine; relative rediosensitivities of the oral cavity, larynx, pharynx, and esophagus; relative radiation sensitivity of the integumentary system; dose response of the epidermal; microvascular, and dermal populations; relative radiosensitivity of the human lung; relative radiosensitivity of fetal tissues; and tolerance of the central and peripheral nervous system to therapeutic irradiation.

  8. Cerenkov Radiation: A Multi-functional Approach for Biological Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaowei; Wang, Jing; Cheng, Zhen

    2014-02-01

    Cerenkov radiation (CR) has been used in various biological research fields, which has aroused lots of attention in recent years. Combining optical imaging instruments and most of nuclear medicine imaging or radiotherapy probes, the CR was developed as a new imaging modality for biology studies, called Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI). On the other hand, it was novelly used as an internal excitation source to activate some fluorophores for energy transfer imaging. However, it also has some shortages such as relatively weak luminescence intensity and low penetration in tissue. Thus some scientific groups demonstrated to optimize the CLI and demonstrated it to three-dimension tomography. In this article, we elaborate on its principle, history, and applications and discuss a number of directions for technical improvements. Then concluded some advantages and shortages of CR and discuss some prospects of it.

  9. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF MICROWAVE RADIATION ON BRAIN TISSUE IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Đinđić

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to microwave radiation induces multiple organ dysfunctions, especially in CNS.The aim of this work was investigation of biological effects of microwave radiation on rats' brain and determination of increased oxidative stress as a possible pathogenetic's mechanism.Wis tar rats 3 months old were divided in experimental (4 female and 4 male animal and control group (5 female and 4 male. This experimental group was constantly exposed to a magnetic field of 5 mG. We simulated using of mobile phones 30 min every day. The source of NIR emitted MF that was similar to mobile phones at 900 MHz. The rats were killed after 2 months. Biological effects were determined by observation of individual and collective behavior and body mass changes. Lipid per oxidation was determined by measuring quantity of malondialdehyde (MDA in brain homogenate.The animals in experimental group exposed to EMF showed les weight gain. The most important observations were changing of basic behavior models and expression of aggressive or panic behavior. The content of MDA in brain tissue is singificantly higher (1.42 times in rats exposed to electromagnetic fields (3,82±0.65 vs. control 2.69±0.42 nmol/mg proteins, p<0.01.Increased oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation after exposition in EM fields induced disorders of function and structure of brain.

  10. Radiation degradation of carbohydrates and their biological activities for plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kume, T.; Nagasawa, N.; Matsuhashi, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment] [and others

    2000-03-01

    Radiation effects on carbohydrates such as chitosan, sodium alginate, carrageenan, cellulose, pectin have been investigated to improve the biological activities. These carbohydrates were easily degraded by irradiation and induced various kinds of biological activities such as anti-bacterial activity, promotion of plant growth, suppression of heavy metal stress, phytoalexins induction. Pectic fragments obtained from degraded pectin induced the phytoalexins such as glyceollins in soybean and pisatin in pea. The irradiated chitosan shows the higher elicitor activity for pisatin than that of pectin. For the plant growth promotion, alginate derived from brown marine algae, chitosan and ligno-cellulosic extracts show a strong activity. Kappa and iota carrageenan derived from red marine algae can promote growth of rice and the highest effect was obtained with kappa irradiated at 100 kGy. Some radiation degraded carbohydrates suppressed the damage of heavy metals on plants. The effects of irradiated carbohydrates on transportation of heavy metals have been investigated by PETIS (Positron Emitting Tracer Imaging System) and autoradiography using {sup 48}V and {sup 62}Zn. (author)

  11. Radioprotection, biological effects of the radiations and security in the handling of radioactive material

    CERN Document Server

    Teran, M

    2000-01-01

    The development of the philosophy of the radioprotection is dependent on the understanding of the effects of the radiation in the man. Behind the fact that the radiation is able to produce biological damages there are certain factors with regard to the biological effects of the radiations that determine the boarding of the radioprotection topics.

  12. Biological effects of low levels of radiation exposure. [Radiation hazards to man from radioactive consumer products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casarett, G.W.

    1977-01-01

    Some general perspective is provided concerning the orders of radiation dose equivalent levels associated with exposure of human populations to ionizing radiations from consumer products. This is followed by considerations of the biological effects and risks of low levels of radiation exposure. Some consumer products emit low-LET (i.e., low linear energy transfer) radiations beyond their confines and these penetrating radiations can result virtually in whole-body irradiation, while in the case of other products the radiation to tissue consists mainly of the high-LET alpha particles which penetrate tissue only shallowly and close to the products. There are some radiation-emitting consumer products which are in such widespread use in the United States that large numbers of people are irradiated by them. Some of these products may irradiate on the order of 10/sup 6/ to 10/sup 8/ people to average annual whole-body or gonadal dose equivalents varying over a range on the order of 1 to 10 millirem (mrem). These include television receivers, time pieces with radium-containing dials, gas and aerosol detectors, and building and road construction materials. On the order of 10/sup 4/ people may be irradiated by vacuum high voltage switches to 30 mrem or from electron microscopes to 300 mrem average annual whole-body or gonadal dose equivalent. Smaller annual whole-body or gonadal dose equivalents, of the order of less than 1 microrem (..mu..rem) to 1 mrem, may be received by many people from cold cathode gas discharge tubes, airport x-ray inspection systems, time pieces with dials containing tritium or /sup 147/Pm, and other sources. Possible health hazards are discussed.

  13. Low-level radiation: biological interactions, risks, and benefits. A bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-09-01

    The bibliography contains 3294 references that were selected from the Department of Energy's data base (EDB). The subjects covered are lower-level radiation effects on man, environmental radiation, and other biological interactions of radiation that appear to be applicable to the low-level radiation problem.

  14. Study on the radiation-induced biological responses based on the analysis of metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Sungkee; Jung, Uhee; Park, Haeran; Roh, Changhyun; Shin, Heejune; Ryu, Dongkyoung

    2013-01-15

    1. Objectives □ Establishment of basis of biological radiation response study by metabolite analysis 2. Project results □ Establishment of analytical basis of radiation-responsive metabolites in biological samples - Large scale collection of tissue samples from irradiated animal for radiation metabolomics research - Establishment of mass spectromety (GC MS, LC MS-MS) analysis methods of biological samples - 3 Standard Operation Protocols (SOP) for ultra high resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS, Q-TOF MS) analysis of metabolites from biological samples - Establishment of database for radiation metabolites □ Basic research on radiation-responsive metabolites and the interpretation of their functions - Validation of spermidine as a candidate biomarker of acute radiation response in mouse blood - Verification of 5 radiation-responsive steroid hormones and alteration of their metabolic enzyme activities in mouse blood - Verification of 13 radiation-responsive amino acids (related to oxidative stress, neurotransmission, energy metabolism) in regional mouse brain -Verification of 10 radiation-responsive amino acids (related to oxidative stress, neurotransmission, energy metabolism) in regional mouse brain - Verification of 74 radiation-responsive metabolites in whole rat brain by ultra high resolution FT-ICR MS and Q-TOF MS analysis 3. Expected benefits and plan of application □ Establishment of research basis of radiation metabolomics in Korea □ Provision of core technology in radiation bioscience and safety field by application of radiation metabolomics results to the technology development in radiation biodosimetry, and radiation response evaluation and modulation.

  15. Development of radiation biological dosimetry and treatment of radiation-induced damaged tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chul Koo; Kim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Yun Sil [and others

    2000-04-01

    Util now, only a few methods have been developed for radiation biological dosimetry such as conventional chromosome aberration and micronucleus in peripheral blood cell. However, because these methods not only can be estimated by the expert, but also have a little limitation due to need high technique and many times in the case of radiation accident, it is very difficult to evaluate the absorbed dose of victims. Therefore, we should develop effective, easy, simple and rapid biodosimetry and its guideline(triage) to be able to be treated the victims as fast as possible. We established the apoptotic fragment assay, PCC, comet assay, and micronucleus assay which was the significant relationship between dose and cell damages to evaluate the irradiated dose as correct and rapid as possible using lymphocytes and crypt cells, and compared with chromosome dosimetry and micronucleus assay.

  16. Effect of high linear energy transfer radiation on biological membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, D.; Srivastava, M.; Kale, R.K. [Radiation Biology Lab., Jawaharlal Nehru Univ., New Delhi (India); Sarma, A. [Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi (India)

    1998-10-01

    Cellular membranes are vital elements, and their integrity is extremely essential for the viability of the cells. We studied the effects of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation on the membranes. Rabbit erythrocytes (1 x 10{sup 7} cells/ml) and microsomes (0.6 mg protein/ml) prepared from liver of rats were irradiated with {sup 7}Li ions of energy 6.42 MeV/u and {sup 16}O ions of energy 4.25 MeV/u having maximum LET values of 354 keV/{mu}m and 1130 keV/{mu}m, respectively. {sup 7}Li- and {sup 16}O-induced microsomal lipid peroxidation was found to increase with fluence. The {sup 16}O ions were more effective than {sup 7}Li ions, which could be due to the denser energy distribution in the track and the yield of free radicals. These findings suggested that the biological membranes could be peroxidized on exposure to high-LET radiation. Inhibition of the lipid peroxidation was observed in the presence of a membrane-active drug, chlorpromazine (CPZ), which could be due to scavenging of free radicals (mainly HO. and ROO.), electron donation, and hydrogen transfer reactions. The {sup 7}Li and {sup 16}O ions also induced hemolysis in erythrocytes. The extent of hemolysis was found to be a function of time and fluence, and showed a characteristic sigmoidal pattern. The {sup 16}O ions were more effective in the lower fluence range than {sup 7}Li ions. These results were compared with lipid peroxidation and hemolysis induced by gamma-radiation. (orig.) With 7 figs., 3 tabs., 30 refs.

  17. A Hypothesis on Biological Protection from Space Radiation Through the Use of Therapeutic Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation proposes a hypothesis to use therapeutic gases in space to enhance the biological protection for astronauts from space radiation. The fundamental role in how radiation causes biological damage appears to be radiolysis, the dissociation of water by radiation. A chain of events appears to cause molecular and biological transformations that ultimately manifest into medical diseases. The hypothesis of this work is that applying medical gases may increase resistance to radiation, by possessing the chemical properties that effectively improve the radical scavenging and enhance bond repair and to induce biological processes which enhance and support natural resistance and repair mechanisms.

  18. New paradigms and future challenges in Radiation Oncology: An Update of Biological Targets and Technology*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liauw, Stanley L.; Connell, Philip P.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of radiation oncology is to exploit the biological interaction of radiation within tissue to promote tumor death while minimizing damage to surrounding normal tissue. The clinical delivery of radiation relies on principles of radiation physics that define how radiation energy is deposited in the body, as well as technology that facilitates accurate tumor targeting. This review will summarize the current landscape of recent biological and technological advances in radiation oncology, describe the challenges that exist, and offer potential avenues for improvement. PMID:23427246

  19. Current status and recommendations for the future of research, teaching, and testing in the biological sciences of radiation oncology: report of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force, executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Paul E; Anscher, Mitchell S; Barker, Christopher A; Bassetti, Michael; Bristow, Robert G; Cha, Yong I; Dicker, Adam P; Formenti, Silvia C; Graves, Edward E; Hahn, Stephen M; Hei, Tom K; Kimmelman, Alec C; Kirsch, David G; Kozak, Kevin R; Lawrence, Theodore S; Marples, Brian; McBride, William H; Mikkelsen, Ross B; Park, Catherine C; Weidhaas, Joanne B; Zietman, Anthony L; Steinberg, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In early 2011, a dialogue was initiated within the Board of Directors (BOD) of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) regarding the future of the basic sciences of the specialty, primarily focused on the current state and potential future direction of basic research within radiation oncology. After consideration of the complexity of the issues involved and the precise nature of the undertaking, in August 2011, the BOD empanelled a Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force (TF). The TF was charged with developing an accurate snapshot of the current state of basic (preclinical) research in radiation oncology from the perspective of relevance to the modern clinical practice of radiation oncology as well as the education of our trainees and attending physicians in the biological sciences. The TF was further charged with making suggestions as to critical areas of biological basic research investigation that might be most likely to maintain and build further the scientific foundation and vitality of radiation oncology as an independent and vibrant medical specialty. It was not within the scope of service of the TF to consider the quality of ongoing research efforts within the broader radiation oncology space, to presume to consider their future potential, or to discourage in any way the investigators committed to areas of interest other than those targeted. The TF charge specifically precluded consideration of research issues related to technology, physics, or clinical investigations. This document represents an Executive Summary of the Task Force report. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular biology in radiation oncology. Radiation oncology perspective of BRCA1 and BRCA2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, C.N. [Harvard Medical School (United States). Joint Center for Radiation Therapy

    1999-07-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are used to illustrate the application of molecular biology to clinical radiation oncology. Identified by linkage analysis and cloned, the structure of the genes and the numerous mutations are determined by molecular biology techniques that examine the structure of the DNA and the proteins made by the normal and mutant alleles. Mutations in the non-transcribed portion of the gene will not be found in protein structure assays and may be important in gene function. In addition to potential deleterious mutations, normal polymorphisms of the gene will also be detected, therefore not all differences in gene sequence may represent important mutations, a finding that complicates genetic screening and counseling. The localization of the protein in the nucleus, the expression in relation to cell cycle and the association with RAD51 led to the discovery that the two BRCA genes may be involved in transcriptional regulation and DNA repair. The defect in DNA repair can increase radiosensitivity which might improve local control using breast-conserving treatment in a tumor which is homozygous for the loss of the gene (i.e., BRCA1 and BRCA2 are tumor suppressor genes). This is supported by the early reports of a high rate of local control with breast-conserving therapy. Nonetheless, this radiosensitivity theoretically may also lead to increased susceptibility to carcinogenic effects in surviving cells, a finding that might not be observed for decades. The susceptibility to radiation-induced DNA damage appears also to make the cells more sensitive to chemotherapy. Understanding the role of the normal BRCA genes in DNA repair might help define a novel mechanism for radiation sensitization by interfering with the normal gene function using a variety of molecular or biochemical therapies.

  1. Radiation biology: Major advances and perspectives for radiotherapy; Biologie des radiations: avancees majeures et perspectives pour la radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joubert, A. [Societe Magelis, lotissement Bel-Air, 6, rue Frederic-Mistral, 84160 Cadenet (France); Vogin, G.; Granzotto, A. [CR-U1052, centre de recherche en cancerologie de Lyon, Inserm, batiment Cheney A, 28, rue Laennec, 69008 Lyon (France); Centre d' hadrontherapie etoile, 60, avenue Rockfeller, 69008 Lyon (France); Devic, C.; Viau, M.; Thomas, C.; Foray, N. [CR-U1052, centre de recherche en cancerologie de Lyon, Inserm, batiment Cheney A, 28, rue Laennec, 69008 Lyon (France); Maalouf, M. [CR-U1052, centre de recherche en cancerologie de Lyon, Inserm, batiment Cheney A, 28, rue Laennec, 69008 Lyon (France); Centre national d' etudes spatiales, 2, place Maurice-Quentin, 75039 Paris cedex 01 (France); Colin, C. [EA3738, faculte de medecine Lyon-Sud, 69921 Oullins (France); Service de radiologie, centre hospitalo-universitaire Lyon-Sud, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69495 Pierre-Benite (France)

    2011-08-15

    At the beginning of the 21. century, radiation biology is at a major turning point in its history. It must meet the expectations of the radiation oncologists, radiologists and the general public, but its purpose remains the same: to understand the molecular, cellular and tissue levels of lethal and carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiation in order to better protect healthy tissues and to develop treatments more effective against tumours. Four major aspects of radiobiology that marked this decade will be discussed: technological developments, the importance of signalling and repair of radiation-induced deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage, the impact of individual factor in the response to radiation and the contribution of radiobiology to better choose innovative therapies such as proton-therapy or stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). A translational radiobiology should emerge with the help of radiotherapists and radiation physicists and by facilitating access to the new radio and/or chemotherapy modalities. (authors)

  2. Functional proteomic analysis revealed ground-base ion radiations cannot reflect biological effects of space radiations of rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Yeqing; Zhao, Qian; Han, Lu

    2016-07-01

    Highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as main factor causing biological effects. Radiobiological studies during space flights are unrepeatable due to the variable space radiation environment, ground-base ion radiations are usually performed to simulate of the space biological effect. Spaceflights present a low-dose rate (0.1˜~0.3mGy/day) radiation environment inside aerocrafts while ground-base ion radiations present a much higher dose rate (100˜~500mGy/min). Whether ground-base ion radiation can reflect effects of space radiation is worth of evaluation. In this research, we compared the functional proteomic profiles of rice plants between on-ground simulated HZE particle radiation and spaceflight treatments. Three independent ground-base seed ionizing radiation experiments with different cumulative doses (dose range: 2˜~20000mGy) and different liner energy transfer (LET) values (13.3˜~500keV/μμm) and two independent seed spaceflight experiments onboard Chinese 20th satellite and SZ-6 spacecraft were carried out. Alterations in the proteome were analyzed by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry identifications. 45 and 59 proteins showed significant (pwork might provide a new evaluation method for further on-ground simulated HZE radiation experiments.

  3. Gene Expression Profiling of Biological Pathway Alterations by Radiation Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuei-Fang Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Though damage caused by radiation has been the focus of rigorous research, the mechanisms through which radiation exerts harmful effects on cells are complex and not well-understood. In particular, the influence of low dose radiation exposure on the regulation of genes and pathways remains unclear. In an attempt to investigate the molecular alterations induced by varying doses of radiation, a genome-wide expression analysis was conducted. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from five participants and each sample was subjected to 0.5 Gy, 1 Gy, 2.5 Gy, and 5 Gy of cobalt 60 radiation, followed by array-based expression profiling. Gene set enrichment analysis indicated that the immune system and cancer development pathways appeared to be the major affected targets by radiation exposure. Therefore, 1 Gy radioactive exposure seemed to be a critical threshold dosage. In fact, after 1 Gy radiation exposure, expression levels of several genes including FADD, TNFRSF10B, TNFRSF8, TNFRSF10A, TNFSF10, TNFSF8, CASP1, and CASP4 that are associated with carcinogenesis and metabolic disorders showed significant alterations. Our results suggest that exposure to low-dose radiation may elicit changes in metabolic and immune pathways, potentially increasing the risk of immune dysfunctions and metabolic disorders.

  4. Changes in biologically active ultraviolet radiation reaching the Earth's surface

    OpenAIRE

    McKenzie, Richard L.; Björn, Lars Olof; Bais, Alkiviadis; Ilyasd, Mohammad

    2003-01-01

    Since publication of the 1998 UNEP Assessment, there has been continued rapid expansion of the literature on UV-B radiation. Many measurements have demonstrated the inverse relationship between column ozone amount and UV radiation, and in a few cases long-term increases due to ozone decreases have been identified. The quantity, quality and availability of ground-based UV measurements relevant to assessing the environmental impacts of ozone changes continue to improve. Recent studies have cont...

  5. A Hypothesis on Biological Protection from Space Radiation Through the Use of New Therapeutic Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Michael P.; Ansari, Rafat R.; Nakao, Atsunori; Wink, David

    2011-01-01

    Radiation exposure to astronauts could be a significant obstacle for long duration manned space exploration because of current uncertainties regarding the extent of biological effects. Furthermore, concepts for protective shielding also pose a technically challenging issue due to the nature of cosmic radiation and current mass and power constraints with modern exploration technology. The concern regarding exposure to cosmic radiation is the biological damage it induces. As damage is associated with increased oxidative stress, it is important and would be enabling to mitigate and/or prevent oxidative stress prior to the development of clinical symptoms and disease. This paper hypothesizes a "systems biology" approach in which a combination of chemical and biological mitigation techniques are used conjunctively. It proposes using new, therapeutic, medical gases as both chemical radioprotectors for radical scavenging and biological signaling molecules for management of the body s response to exposure. From reviewing radiochemistry of water, biological effects of CO, H2, NO, and H2S gas, and mechanisms of radiation biology, it is concluded that this approach may have great therapeutic potential for radiation exposure. Furthermore, it also appears to have similar potential for curtailing the pathogenesis of other diseases in which oxidative stress has been implicated including cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic inflammatory disease, hypertension, ischemia/reperfusion injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, Parkinson s and Alzheimer s disease, cataracts, and aging.

  6. In what extent classic radiation biology can be understand at the molecular level? Biological effects of ionizing radiation and repair mechanism of double strand breaks of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utsumi, Hiroshi [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    2000-09-01

    This review revealed that classic radiation biology phenomena not based on substantial concept, such as lethal damage, sublethal damage, potentially lethal damage, recoveries from them, variation of radiation sensitivity due to cell cycle, RBE/LET relationships and mathematical expression of survival curve, can be described only at the levels of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) and its repair mechanism. Authors investigated chicken cells with DSB repair-defect, analyzed the molecular mechanisms of 'Elkind recovery' where cell survival rates are higher after fractionated irradiation than after single irradiation at a fixed dose, and showed that the phenomenon was derived from the cell revival resulting from homologous recombination repair of DSB yielded on homologous chromosome DNA. Investigations using HIMAC also revealed the molecular mechanisms of RBE/LET in those cells. Findings indicate that biological effects of ionizing radiation can be described at the molecular level.(K.H.)

  7. Issues in low dose radiation biology: the controversy continues. A perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F; Bair, William J

    2013-05-01

    Both natural and man-made sources of ionizing radiation contribute to human exposure and consequently pose a possible risk to human health. Much of this is unavoidable, e.g., natural background radiation, but as the use of radiation increases, so does the potential health risk and the public's concerns. This perspective reflects the authors' view of current issues in low dose radiation biology research, highlights some of the controversies therein, and suggests areas of future research to address both issues in low dose radiation research and the controversies. This is a critical time for the radiation sciences and the implications of future research will have a significant impact on radiation protection, medicine, national security, research and industry. The views expressed here are the authors' own and do not represent any institution, organization or funding body.

  8. Introduction to the special issue on molecular imaging in radiation biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humm, John L; Dewhirst, Mark W; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2012-04-01

    Molecular imaging is an evolving science that is concerned with the development of novel imaging probes and biomarkers that can be used to non-invasively image molecular and cellular processes. This special issue approaches molecular imaging in the context of radiation research, focusing on biomarkers and imaging methods that provide measurable signals that can assist in the quantification of radiation-induced effects of living systems at the physical, chemical and biological levels. The potential to image molecular changes in response to a radiation insult opens new and exciting opportunities for a more profound understanding of radiation biology, with the possibility of translation of these techniques to radiotherapy practice. This special issue brings together 14 reviews dedicated to the use of molecular imaging in the field of radiation research. The initial three reviews are introductory overviews of the key molecular imaging modalities: magnetic resonance, nuclear and optical. This is followed by 11 reviews each focusing on a specialist area within the field of radiation research. These include: hypoxia and perfusion, tissue metabolism, normal tissue injury, cell death and viability, receptor targeting and nanotechnology, reporter genes, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and biological dosimetry. Over the preceding decade, molecular imaging brought significant new advances to our understanding of every area of radiation biology. This special issue shows us these advances and points to the vibrant future of our field armed with these new capabilities.

  9. Basics of Radiation Biology When Treating Hyperproliferative Benign Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Rödel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available For decades, low- and moderate-dose radiation therapy (RT has been shown to exert a beneficial therapeutic effect in a multitude of non-malignant conditions including painful degenerative muscoloskeletal and hyperproliferative disorders. Dupuytren and Ledderhose diseases are benign fibroproliferative diseases of the hand/foot with fibrotic nodules and fascial cords, which determine debilitating contractures and deformities of fingers/toes, while keloids are exuberant scar formations following burn damage, surgery, and trauma. Although RT has become an established and effective option in the management of these diseases, experimental studies to illustrate cellular composites and factors involved remain to be elucidated. More recent findings, however, indicate the involvement of radiation-sensitive targets like mitotic fibroblasts/myofibroblasts as well as inflammatory cells. Radiation-related molecular mechanisms affecting these target cells include the production of free radicals to hamper proliferative activity and interference with growth factors and cytokines. Moreover, an impairment of activated immune cells involved in both myofibroblast proliferative and inflammatory processes may further contribute to the clinical effects. We here aim at briefly describing mechanisms contributing to a modulation of proliferative and inflammatory processes and to summarize current concepts of treating hyperproliferative diseases by low and moderate doses of ionizing radiation.

  10. Effect of Infrared Laser Radiation on Biological Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-06-01

    Streptococcus faecium . The deactivation obtained in 60 seconds in the CO2 beam was the equivalent to that produced by a radiation dose of 2.5 M rad...laser pulse of the order of 10-2 seconds duration if all the energy absorbed were taken up by specific vibrational modes of the irradiated molecules

  11. Biological Effects of Nonionizing Electromagnetic Radiation. Volume IV. Number 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    frying, meat cooking, pasta drying, fish thawing, microwave ovens in the United Kingdom. Two of the poultry cooking, and vacuum drying. Non-food ap...of somatic mutations for microwave radiation caused the SMR values of mice eye pigmentation . Embryos 1- to 2-hr old were ex- to be higher than the

  12. Changes in biologically active ultraviolet radiation reaching the Earth's surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Richard L; Björn, Lars Olof; Bais, Alkiviadis; Ilyasad, Mohammad

    2003-01-01

    Since publication of the 1998 UNEP Assessment, there has been continued rapid expansion of the literature on UV-B radiation. Many measurements have demonstrated the inverse relationship between column ozone amount and UV radiation, and in a few cases long-term increases due to ozone decreases have been identified. The quantity, quality and availability of ground-based UV measurements relevant to assessing the environmental impacts of ozone changes continue to improve. Recent studies have contributed to delineating regional and temporal differences due to aerosols, clouds, and ozone. Improvements in radiative transfer modelling capability now enable more accurate characterization of clouds, snow-cover, and topographical effects. A standardized scale for reporting UV to the public has gained wide acceptance. There has been increased use of satellite data to estimate geographic variability and trends in UV. Progress has been made in assessing the utility of satellite retrievals of UV radiation by comparison with measurements at the Earth's surface. Global climatologies of UV radiation are now available on the Internet. Anthropogenic aerosols play a more important role in attenuating UV irradiances than has been assumed previously, and this will have implications for the accuracy of UV retrievals from satellite data. Progress has been made inferring historical levels of UV radiation using measurements of ozone (from satellites or from ground-based networks) in conjunction with measurements of total solar radiation obtained from extensive meteorological networks. We cannot yet be sure whether global ozone has reached a minimum. Atmospheric chlorine concentrations are beginning to decrease. However, bromine concentrations are still increasing. While these halogen concentrations remain high, the ozone layer remains vulnerable to further depletion from events such as volcanic eruptions that inject material into the stratosphere. Interactions between global warming and

  13. [The indicators of biological age and accelerated aging in liquidators of the consequences of radiation accidents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchkova, E I; Alishev, N V

    2011-01-01

    The biological age (BA) of the majority of the liquidators of the consequences of the radiation accidents in the Navy and of the liquidators of the Chernobyl' APS accident exceeds the medium standard and the DBA (due BA). The index of the BA can be a characteristic of the influence of the social-hygienic factors on the health condition of the Special Risk Subunit--the liquidators of the consequences of the radiation accidents. It was established, that the radiation influence concerns to the factors dramatically increasing the BA and the rate of senescence of the liquidators of the consequences of the radiation accidents.

  14. Genomic instability and bystander effects: a paradigm shift in radiation biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F.

    2002-01-01

    A basic paradigm in radiobiology is that, following exposure to ionizing radiation, the deposition of energy in the cell nucleus and the resulting damage to DNA, the principal target, are responsible for the radiation's deleterious biological effects. Findings in two rapidly expanding fields of research--radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects--have caused us to reevaluate these central tenets. In this article, the potential influence of induced genomic instability and bystander effects on cellular injury after exposure to low-level radiation will be reviewed.

  15. Issues in Low Dose Radiation Biology: The Controversy Continues. A Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, William F.; Bair, William J.

    2013-05-01

    Both natural and man-made sources of ionizing radiation contribute to human exposure and consequently pose a risk to human health. Much of this is unavoidable, e.g., natural background radiation, and as the use of radiation in modern medicine and industry increases so does the potential health risk. This perspective reflects the author’s view of current issues in low dose radiation biology research, highlights some of the controversies therein, and suggests areas of future research to address these issues. The views expressed here are the authors own and do not represent any institution, organization or funding body.

  16. Development of technology for biological dosimetry -A study on the radiation and environmental safety-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kang Suk; Cheon, Ki Jeong; Kim, Kook Chan; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kim, Sang Bok; Kim, In Kyu; Park, Hyo Kook [Korea Atomic Energy Res. Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-01

    {alpha}-amylase showed a significant increase in its activity when exposed to radiation of 0.1 Gy. However it had no relationship with radiation dose. Enzyme activities in liver tissue showed similar changes to those in serum. Among others, changes in acid phosphatase activity were highly related to radiation dose. Of acute phase proteins in serum, CRP, ceruloplasmin and haptoglobin positively responded to radiation while albumin did negatively. ELISA proved to be an efficient method to detect changes in serum protein level. Finally the measurements of changes in APRs using ELISA could provide an useful tools for biological dosimetry. (Author).

  17. Study on biological response to space radiation and its countermeasure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jong Il; Lee, Ju Woon; Kim, Dong Ho; Kim, Jae Hun; Song, Beom Suk; Kim, Jae Kyung; Park, Jong Heum; Kim, Jin Kyu [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    The purpose is to develop the core technologies for the advanced life supporting system based on radiation technology by 2015 and to be a member of G7 in the space technology research field. And it is the final aim that contribution for establishment of the self-supporting technology and national strength by 2020. To simulate the space environment of microgravity and expose to space radiation, denervation model was established in Gamma Phytotron. The changes in microflora population in animal model was shown. The effect of simulated microgravity and long-term exposure to irradiation was investigated. In the experiment of MARS 500, crews for expedition to Mars had been served by Korean space foods (Bulgogi, Bibimbap, Seaweed soup, Mulberry beverage, Kimchi, Sujeonggwa) for 120 days, then their immunity will be examined and compared with it on the ground.

  18. Ozone depletion - Ultraviolet radiation and phytoplankton biology in Antarctic waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. C.; Prezelin, B. B.; Baker, K. S.; Bidigare, R. R.; Boucher, N. P.; Coley, T.; Karentz, D.; Macintyre, S.; Matlick, H. A.; Menzies, D.

    1992-01-01

    The near-50-percent thinning of the stratospheric ozone layer over the Antarctic, with increased passage of mid-UV radiation to the surface of the Southern Ocean, has prompted concern over possible radiation damage to the near-surface phytoplankton communities that are the bases of Antarctic marine ecosystems. As the ozone layer thinned, a 6-week study of the marginal ice zone of the Bellingshousen Sea in the austral spring of 1990 noted sea-surface and depth-dependent ratios of mid-UV irradiance to total irradiance increased, and mid-UV inhibition of photosynthesis increased. A 6-12 percent reduction in primary production associated with ozone depletion was estimated to have occurred over the course of the present study.

  19. Biological Effects of Electromagnetic Radiation. Volume II, Number 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-12-01

    unclassified ~ .~~~I4 I~~I~O Security CIas,iac.tioft A - 1140S BiOLOGiCA L. EFFECTS OF ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION A Digest of Current Lite rature and a... arma , il. M . (Em — The control was heated to the same temperature. Environ. F.ng. Sci., Howard Univ., Washington , B. C.) Both samples were then

  20. Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) of (131)I Radiation Relative to (60)Co Gamma Rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neshasteh-Riz, Ali; Mahmoud Pashazadeh, Ali; Mahdavi, Seyed Rabie

    2013-01-01

    To assess relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of (131)I radiation relative to (60)Co gamma rays in glioblastoma spheroid cells. : In this experimental study, glioblastoma spheroid cells were exposed to (131)I radiation and (60)Co gamma rays. Radiation induced DNA damage was evaluated by alkaline comet assay. Samples of spheroid cells were treated by radiation from (131)I for four different periods of time to find the dose-response equation. Spheroid cells were also exposed by 200 cGy of (60)Co gamma rays as reference radiation to induce DNA damage as endpoint. Resulted RBE of (131)I radiation relative to (60)Co gamma rays in 100 µm giloblastoma spheroid cells was equal to 1.16. The finding of this study suggests that (131)I photons and electrons can be more effective than (60)Co gamma rays to produce DNA damage in glioblastoma spheroid cells.

  1. Ionizing radiation - one of the most important link of the energetic chain in biological cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goraczko, W. [Technical Univ. Poznan, Radio- and Photochemistry Dept., Poznan (Poland)

    1999-09-01

    High (large) and low (small) doses of ionizing radiation consistently induce opposite physiologic effects in biological systems. The effects of low doses cannot be inferred by interpolation between the result from groups exposed to high doses and controls irradiated only by Natural Background Radiation. Stimulation ('bio-positive') effects by low-level doses of ionizing radiation are called radiation hormesis. It is still controversial idea, however it was found that some biological objects (yeast, seeds, animals) after gamma irradiation by low-level doses (10-50 times more NBR) can increase their development. The result of present researches demonstrate that the excitation of living system by gamma quanta (high energy) initiates prolonged secondary emission that influences biota and activates many important processes in biological systems. According to the excitation theory of bio-molecules the author suggests that gamma irradiation in low-level doses excites such molecules as DNA and proteins, and this being followed by a long-termed secondary coherent radiation. The spectral analysis of this secondary emission confirmed the contribution of the UV component to the total emission. The data obtaining by using SPC method (single photon counting) make possible a partial understanding of the radiation hormesis phenomenon and suggest closer relationship to UV emission from biological systems during mitotic processes. The experiments with humic acid (high doses) and glycine (low doses) confirm the author hypothesis that gamma-irradiated organic compounds are capable to emit secondary radiation. This secondary radiation probably plays very significant role in the intercellular communication inside the living systems. In conclusion the author proposed de-excitation processes in bio-molecules as a common denominator of UV and ionizing radiation interacting with living cells. Finally he refers to the Cerenkov radiation which is created inside the biological cells

  2. Advances in dosimetry and biological predictors of radiation-induced esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Y

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Yang Yu,1 Hui Guan,1 Yuanli Dong,1 Ligang Xing,2 Xiaolin Li2 1School of Medicine and Life Sciences, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, University of Jinan, Jinan, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China Objective: To summarize the research progress about the dosimetry and biological predictors of radiation-induced esophagitis.Methods: We performed a systematic literature review addressing radiation esophagitis in the treatment of lung cancer published between January 2009 and May 2015 in the PubMed full-text database index systems.Results: Twenty-eight eligible documents were included in the final analysis. Many clinical factors were related to the risk of radiation esophagitis, such as elder patients, concurrent chemoradiotherapy, and the intense radiotherapy regimen (hyperfractionated radiotherapy or stereotactic body radiotherapy. The parameters including Dmax, Dmean, V20, V30, V50, and V55 may be valuable in predicting the occurrence of radiation esophagitis in patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Genetic variants in inflammation-related genes are also associated with radiation-induced toxicity.Conclusion: Dosimetry and biological factors of radiation-induced esophagitis provide clinical information to decrease its occurrence and grade during radiotherapy. More prospective studies are warranted to confirm their prediction efficacy. Keywords: lung cancer, esophagitis, radiation injuries, predictors

  3. Combining Radiation Epidemiology With Molecular Biology-Changing From Health Risk Estimates to Therapeutic Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abend, Michael; Port, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    The authors herein summarize six presentations dedicated to the key session "molecular radiation epidemiology" of the ConRad meeting 2015. These presentations were chosen in order to highlight the promise when combining conventional radiation epidemiology with molecular biology. Conventional radiation epidemiology uses dose estimates for risk predictions on health. However, combined with molecular biology, dose-dependent bioindicators of effect hold the promise to improve clinical diagnostics and to provide target molecules for potential therapeutic intervention. One out of the six presentations exemplified the use of radiation-induced molecular changes as biomarkers of exposure by measuring stabile chromosomal translocations. The remaining five presentations focused on molecular changes used as bioindicators of the effect. These bioindicators of the effect could be used for diagnostic purposes on colon cancers (genomic instability), thyroid cancer (CLIP2), or head and neck squamous cell cancers. Therapeutic implications of gene expression changes were examined in Chernobyl thyroid cancer victims and Mayak workers.

  4. Ultra-short electron beams based spatio-temporal radiation biology and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme; Gauduel, Yann A

    2010-01-01

    Deeply understanding the basic mechanisms of radiation damage in vitro and on living cells, starting from the early radical and molecular processes to mutagenic DNA lesions, cell signalling, genomic instability, apoptosis, microenvironment and Bystander effects, radio sensitivity should have many practical consequences such as the customization of cancer radiotherapy or radioprotection protocols. In this context, innovative laser-plasma accelerators provide ultra-short particle beams (electrons, protons) with parameters of interest for radiation biology and medical physics. This review article approaches some complex links that exist between radiation physics of new pulsed irradiation sources and potential biomedical applications. These links concern mainly the understanding of spatio-temporal events triggered by a radiation, within a fluctuating lapse of time from the initial energy deposition to primary damages of biological interest. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Aspects on the development of radiation therapy and radiation biology since the early work of Rolf Wideroee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brahme, A. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Medical Radiation Physics

    1998-12-31

    Dr. Wideroee conceived his first idea on a `ray transformer` or betatron in 1922. During the 1950s and early 1960s Wideroee was extensively involved in the clinical developments of betatrons and he had a large number of patents on their chemical development. In the mid-1960 Wideroee took great interest in radiation biology, seeking to model the therapeutic properties and to better understand how to make the best use of radiation therapy beams. Many of Wideroee`s early publications contain the precursors of the rapid development of radiobiologically optimized treatment planning techniques that we are witnessing today. The recent developments, such as inverse treatment planning and optimization, biologically optimized therapy, modern dose delivery methods, fan- and pencil-beam therapy and scanning beam therapy are shortly reviewed.(orig./MG)

  6. Biological Effects of Nonionizing Electromagnetic Radiation. Volume 7, Number 2-4, July thru December 1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-01

    saccharomyces cerevisae tions), breaks and subsequent repair of DNA and ;A 10 V.. 7 Biological Effects of Nonioriztng Eectromagnetic Radiation VI(2-). July �...physical characteristics and posium Chairman, Max-Planck-Institut fur Festkorper- field measurement, dosimetry, electrical properties forschung, 7000...effect of millimeter- The observed characteristics of the effect of mill- band radiation of nonthermal intensity were used as imeter-band electromagnetic

  7. The importance of radiation chemistry to radiation and free radical biology (The 2008 Silvanus Thompson Memorial Lecture).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardman, P

    2009-02-01

    Biological effects of radiation are manifest over timescales extending to years. However, many chemical events are complete in milliseconds; after this time, adding oxygen to irradiated hypoxic cells no longer enhances radiosensitivity. This does not mean that damage pathways cannot be modified; the potential gain from chemical modulation of early events is as large as any associated with later pathways, and the prognostic importance of variations in levels of small molecules active in fast free radical pathways is as important as any associated with genetic make-up. Reactive oxygen species are much invoked in the wider context, but are frequently undefined and seldom measured unambiguously. Radiation chemistry has much to offer to both radiation and free radical biology. An appreciation of the interlinked parameters of time, spatial distribution and yield is well developed, as are methods to generate specific radicals in known concentrations and to monitor their reactions directly. Intense clinical interest in the 1980s in hypoxic cell radiosensitizers, developed from radiation chemical studies, has waned, but the goal of eliminating hypoxic radioresistance remains attractive. Nitric oxide may be more important than oxygen in determining hypoxic radiosensitivity, and radiation chemistry provides the tools to understand the mechanisms and the limitations of in vitro models. Imaging hypoxia in tumours relies heavily on free radical chemistry and radiolysis methods to understand the mechanistic basis for diagnostic agents. Quantitation of the chemical reactivity of free radicals is a cornerstone of radiation chemistry via the language, concepts and mathematics of chemical kinetics, which are equally applicable to understanding the molecular pathways in radiobiology.

  8. Radiation degradation of biological residues (Aflatoxins) produced in food laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogovschi, Vladimir D.; Aquino, Simone; Nunes, Thaise C.F.; Trindade, Reginaldo A.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (brazil)]. E-mails: vladrogo@yahoo.com.br; villavic@ipen.br; Zorzete, Patricia; Correa, Benedito [Universidade de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biomedicas]. E-mail: correabe@usp.br

    2007-07-01

    Some molds have the capacity to produce substances that are toxic and generally cancer-causing agents, such as aflatoxins, that stand between the most important carcinogenic substances (class one of the agents which are certainly carcinogenous for human people according to the International Agency for Research on Cancer). Aspergillus spp. is present in world-wide distribution, with predominance in tropical and subtropical regions growing in any substratum. The aim of this work is establish a minimum dose of radiation that degrades aflatoxins produced by fungi Aspergillus spp. The Aspergillus spp. colonies will be cultivated in coconut agar medium and the samples will be conditioned in appropriate bags for irradiation treatment of contaminated material and processed in the Gammacell 220 with dose of 20 kGy. (author)

  9. Medical-biological aspects of radiation effects in Daphnia magna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarapultseva, E.; Uskalova, D.; Savina, N.; Ustenko, K.

    2017-01-01

    We have shown that γ-irradiation at doses of 100 and 1000 mGy significantly compromised fecundity and reproductive success of the directly exposed D. magna. These effects were also observed among the non-exposed first-generation progeny of irradiated parents, thus implying the manifestation of transgenerational effects in Daphnia. We have also shown that compromised viability of irradiated D. magna can be attributed cytotoxic effects of irradiation. It would therefore appear that the compromised viability may be attributed to the cytotoxic effects resulted from epigenetic changes affecting some metabolic pathways involved in detoxification of free-radicals. Additionally we have analyzed more distant progeny of irradiated at doses of 10, 100 and 1000 mGy Daphnia. Our data demonstrated that multicellular crustacean D. magna represent a very useful experimental model for analyse of long-term effects of ionising radiation at the organismal level.

  10. Radiation degradation of alginate and some results of biological effect of degraded alginate on plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hien, N.Q.; Hai, L.; Luan, L.Q.; Hanh, T.T. [Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat (Viet Nam); Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Yoshii, Fumio; Makuuchi, Keizo; Kume, Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2000-03-01

    Radiation degradation yields (Gd) of alginate in aqueous solution with different concentration were determined by viscometry method. The relationship between Gd and the alginate concentration was found out as: Gd=33.5 x C{sup -0.68}, with C% (w/v) and dry alginate referred to C=100%. An empirical equation for preparing degraded alginate with the desired low viscometry average molecular weight (Mv) by radiation was proposed. Alginate extracted directly horn seaweed'Sagassum, degraded by radiation was used for field experiments and results of the biological effect on plants (tea, carrot, chrysanthemum) were presented. (author)

  11. Radiation biology of Caenorhabditis elegans: germ cell response, aging and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakashita, Tetsuya; Takanami, Takako; Yanase, Sumino; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Michiyo; Kimura, Takafumi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Ishii, Naoaki; Higashitani, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    The study of radiation effect in Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans has been carried out over three decades and now allow for understanding at the molecular, cellular and individual levels. This review describes the current knowledge of the biological effects of ionizing irradiation with a scope of the germ line, aging and behavior. In germ cells, ionizing radiation induces apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and DNA repair. Lots of molecules involved in these responses and functions have been identified in C. elegans, which are highly conserved throughout eukaryotes. Radiosensitivity and the effect of heavy-ion microbeam irradiation on germ cells with relationship between initiation of meiotic recombination and DNA lesions are discussed. In addition to DNA damage, ionizing radiation produces free radicals, and the free radical theory is the most popular aging theory. A first signal transduction pathway of aging has been discovered in C. elegans, and radiation-induced metabolic oxidative stress is recently noted for an inducible factor of hormetic response and genetic instability. The hormetic response in C. elegans exposed to oxidative stress is discussed with genetic pathways of aging. Moreover, C. elegans is well known as a model organism for behavior. The recent work reported the radiation effects via specific neurons on learning behavior, and radiation and hydrogen peroxide affect the locomotory rate similarly. These findings are discussed in relation to the evidence obtained with other organisms. Altogether, C. elegans may be a good "in vivo" model system in the field of radiation biology.

  12. Solar ultraviolet radiation from cancer induction to cancer prevention: solar ultraviolet radiation and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuorkey, Muobarak J

    2015-09-01

    Although decades have elapsed, researchers still debate the benefits and hazards of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure. On the one hand, humans derive most of their serum 25-hydroxycholecalciferol [25(OH)D3], which has potent anticancer activity, from solar UVB radiation. On the other hand, people are more aware of the risk of cancer incidence associated with harmful levels of solar UVR from daily sunlight exposure. Epidemiological data strongly implicate UV radiation exposure as a major cause of melanoma and other cancers, as UVR promotes mutations in oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes. This review highlights the impact of the different mutagenic effects of solar UVR, along with the cellular and carcinogenic challenges with respect to sun exposure.

  13. Application of biological dosimetry in accidental radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nosal, M.; Batora, I.; Kolesar, D.; Stojkovic, J. (Komenskeho Univ., Bratislava (Czechoslovakia). Lekarska Fakulta); Gaal, P.; Sklovsky, A. (Krajska Hygienicka Stanica, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia)); Cizova, O. (Sexuologicka Ambulancia KUNZ, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia))

    1982-03-01

    The case is described of accidental irradiation of a male person with /sup 137/Cs of an activity of 24.71 GBq. The first estimate induced a reasonable suspicion that the absorbed dose could be very high and life-threatening. On the other hand the clinical picture, usual laboratory examinations, findings in the fluorescent blood count, the analysis of chromosomal count of lymphocytes in the peripheral blood, the spermiogram, and the negative post-irradiation porphyrinuria suggested that the absorbed dose could be much lower than the original estimate. The results of dosimetry obtained after the reconstruction of the accident by measuring on a phantom revealed that the actual dose was very close to that presumed from the results of biological dosimetry during the first days of examination of the patient.

  14. Non-Directional Radiation Spread Modeling and Non-Invasive Estimating the Radiation Scattering and Absorption Parameters in Biological Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Makarov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article dwells on a development of new non-invasive measurement methods of optical parameters of biological tissues, which are responsible for the scattering and absorption of monochromatic radiation. It is known from the theory of radiation transfer [1] that for strongly scattering media, to which many biological tissues pertain, such parameters are parameters of diffusion approximation, as well as a scattering coefficient and an anisotropy parameter.Based on statistical modeling the paper examines a spread of non-directional radiation from a Lambert light beam with the natural polarization that illuminates a surface of the biological tissue. Statistical modeling is based on the Monte Carlo method [2]. Thus, to have the correct energy coefficient values of Fresnel reflection and transmission in simulation of such radiation by Monte Carlo method the author uses his finding that is a function of the statistical representation for the incidence of model photons [3]. The paper describes in detail a principle of fixing the power transmitted by the non-directional radiation into biological tissue [3], and the equations of a power balance in this case.Further, the paper describes the diffusion approximation of a radiation transfer theory, often used in simulation of radiation propagation in strongly scattering media and shows its application in case of fixing the power transmitted into the tissue. Thus, to represent an uneven power distribution is used an approximating expression in conditions of fixing a total input power. The paper reveals behavior peculiarities of solution on the surface of the biological tissue inside and outside of the incident beam. It is shown that the solution in the region outside of the incident beam (especially far away from it, essentially, depends neither on the particular power distribution across the surface, being a part of the tissue, nor on the refractive index of the biological tissue. It is determined only by

  15. Study of structural model of biological membranes by synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Cavalcanti, L P

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this work has been to study, from the structural point of view, the process of incorporation of various types of hydrophobic compounds into the lamellar phase of liposomes and multilayers of the zwitterionic phospholipid DPPC. X-ray diffraction and scattering techniques using synchrotron radiation, have been used to monitor changes of several bilayer systems. Thermotropic phase transitions as well as the order of the lamellar packing were studied in situ experiments. The behavior of the L beta' and L alpha phases was followed as a function of the water content in dispersions of DPPC multi lamellar vesicles with the addition of the alkaloid Ellipticine in several concentrations. The results showed a decrease in the temperature of the pre-transition as well as that of the main transition (P beta' ->L alpha). The decrease of the lamellar spacing as a function of temperature in the liquid crystalline phase leads to the description of the thermal compression coefficient in the L alpha phase. It wa...

  16. Applications of amorphous track models in radiation biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Nikjoo, H.; Goodhead, D. T.; Wilson, J. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The average or amorphous track model uses the response of a system to gamma-rays and the radial distribution of dose about an ion's path to describe survival and other cellular endpoints from proton, heavy ion, and neutron irradiation. This model has been used for over 30 years to successfully fit many radiobiology data sets. We review several extensions of this approach that address objections to the original model, and consider applications of interest in radiobiology and space radiation risk assessment. In the light of present views of important cellular targets, the role of target size as manifested through the relative contributions from ion-kill (intra-track) and gamma-kill (inter-track) remains a critical question in understanding the success of the amorphous track model. Several variations of the amorphous model are discussed, including ones that consider the radial distribution of event-sizes rather than average electron dose, damage clusters rather than multiple targets, and a role for repair or damage processing.

  17. Applications of amorphous track models in radiation biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cucinotta, F.A. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX (United States). Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center; Nikjoo, H.; Goodhead, D.T. [Medical Research Council, Harwell (United Kingdom). Radiation and Genome Stability Unit

    1999-07-01

    The average or amorphous track model uses the response of a system to gamma-rays and the radial distribution of dose about an ion`s path to describe survival and other cellular endpoints from proton, heavy ion, and neutron irradiation. This model has been used for over 30 years to successfully fit many radiobiology data sets. We review several extensions of this approach that address objections to the original model, and consider applications of interest in radiobiology and space radiation risk assessment. In the light of present views of important cellular targets, the role of target size as manifested through the relative contributions from ion-kill (intra-track) and gamma-kill (inter-track) remains a critical question in understanding the success of the amorphous track model. Several variations of the amorphous model are discussed, including ones that consider the radial distribution of event-sizes rather than average electron dose, damage clusters rather than multiple targets, and a role for repair or damage processing. (orig.)

  18. Attenuation of biologically effective UV radiation in tropical Atlantic waters measured with a biochemical DNA dosimeter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelen, P.; Obernosterer, I; Vink, A.A; Buma, A.G.J.

    A biochemical dosimeter was developed to study the attenuation of biologically effective UV radiation in marine tropical waters. Small quartz vials were used containing a solution of DNA molecules; the vials were incubated at discrete water depths. Subsequently, DNA damage was determined in these

  19. Attenuation of biologically effective UV radiation in tropical atlantic waters measured with a biochemical DNA dosimeter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelen, P.; Obernosterer, I.; Vink, A.A.; Buma, A.G.J.

    1999-01-01

    A biochemical dosimeter was developed to study the attenuation of biologically effective UV radiation in marine tropical waters. Small quartz vials were used containing a solution of DNA molecules; the vials were incubated at discrete water depths. Subsequently, DNA damage was determined in these

  20. Radiations at the physics-biology interface. Utilization of radiations for research; Les rayonnements a l`interface physique - biologie. Utilisation des rayonnements en recherche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douzou, P. [Academie des sciences (France)

    1997-12-31

    Structural biology, which study the relation between the structure of biomolecules and their function, is at the interface between physics and biology. With the help of large radiation instruments such as X ray diffraction and neutron scattering, important advancements have been accomplished in the understanding of specific biological functions and led to the development of protein engineering (such as directed mutagenesis)

  1. At the Crossroads of Cancer Stem Cells, Radiation Biology, and Radiation Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerweck, Leo E; Wakimoto, Hiroaki

    2016-03-01

    Reports that a small subset of tumor cells initiate and sustain tumor growth, are resistant to radiation and drugs, and bear specific markers have led to an explosion of cancer stem cell research. These reports imply that the evaluation of therapeutic response by changes in tumor volume is misleading, as volume changes reflect the response of the sensitive rather than the resistant tumorigenic cell population. The reports further suggest that the marker-based selection of the tumor cell population will facilitate the development of radiation treatment schedules, sensitizers, and drugs that specifically target the resistant tumorigenic cells that give rise to treatment failure. This review presents evidence that contests the observations that cancer stem cell markers reliably identify the subset of tumor cells that sustain tumor growth and that the marker-identified population is radioresistant relative to the marker-negative cells. Experimental studies show that cells and tumors that survive large radiation doses are not more radioresistant than unirradiated cells and tumors, and also show that the intrinsic radiosensitivity of unsorted colony-forming tumor cells, in combination with the fraction of unsorted tumor cells that are tumor initiating, predicts tumor radiocurability. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Integrating Biological Covariates into Gene Expression-Based Predictors of Radiation Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya P. Kamath

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of gene expression-based classifiers has resulted in a number of promising potential signatures of patient diagnosis, prognosis, and response to therapy. However, these approaches have also created difficulties in trying to use gene expression alone to predict a complex trait. A practical approach to this problem is to integrate existing biological knowledge with gene expression to build a composite predictor. We studied the problem of predicting radiation sensitivity within human cancer cell lines from gene expression. First, we present evidence for the need to integrate known biological conditions (tissue of origin, RAS, and p53 mutational status into a gene expression prediction problem involving radiation sensitivity. Next, we demonstrate using linear regression, a technique for incorporating this knowledge. The resulting correlations between gene expression and radiation sensitivity improved through the use of this technique (best-fit adjusted R2 increased from 0.3 to 0.84. Overfitting of data was examined through the use of simulation. The results reinforce the concept that radiation sensitivity is not driven solely by gene expression, but rather by a combination of distinct parameters. We show that accounting for biological heterogeneity significantly improves the ability of the model to identify genes that are associated with radiosensitivity.

  3. Bibliographical database of radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment: Part 1, through June 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straume, T.; Ricker, Y.; Thut, M.

    1988-08-29

    This database was constructed to support research in radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment. Relevant publications were identified through detailed searches of national and international electronic databases and through our personal knowledge of the subject. Publications were numbered and key worded, and referenced in an electronic data-retrieval system that permits quick access through computerized searches on publication number, authors, key words, title, year, and journal name. Photocopies of all publications contained in the database are maintained in a file that is numerically arranged by citation number. This report of the database is provided as a useful reference and overview. It should be emphasized that the database will grow as new citations are added to it. With that in mind, we arranged this report in order of ascending citation number so that follow-up reports will simply extend this document. The database cite 1212 publications. Publications are from 119 different scientific journals, 27 of these journals are cited at least 5 times. It also contains reference to 42 books and published symposia, and 129 reports. Information relevant to radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment is widely distributed among the scientific literature, although a few journals clearly dominate. The four journals publishing the largest number of relevant papers are Health Physics, Mutation Research, Radiation Research, and International Journal of Radiation Biology. Publications in Health Physics make up almost 10% of the current database.

  4. Radiation effects in interventional radiology using biological and physical dosimetry methods: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Miguel; Montoro, Alegria; Almonacid, Miguel; Ferrer, Silvia; Barquinero, Joan Francesc; Tortosa, Ricardo; Verdú, Gumersindo; Rodríguez, Pilar; Barrios, Lleonard; Villaescusa, Juan Ignacio

    2008-01-01

    Interventional radiologists and staff members are frequently exposed to protracted and fractionated low doses of ionizing radiation, which extend during all their professional activities. These exposures can derive, due to the irradiation of skin tissues and peripheral blood, in deterministic effects (radiodermitis, aged skin, hands depilation) or stochastic ones (skin and non-solid cancers incidence). Epidemiological studies of population exposed to ionizing radiation provide information of radio-induced effects. The radiation risk or radiological detriment has been estimated from a group of six exposed interventionist radiologists of the Hospital La Fe (Valencia, Spain). Dosimetry has been periodically registered from TLDs and wrist dosimeters (physical methods) and estimated through translocations in lymphocytes of peripheral blood (biological methods), by extrapolating the yield of translocations to their respective dose-effect curves. The probability of non-melanoma skin cancer and leukaemia (acute myelogenous, acute lymphocytic and chronic myelogenous leukaemia) incidence has been estimated through the software RADRISK. This software is based on a transport model from epidemiological studies of population exposed to external low-LET ionizing radiation [1]. Other non-solid carcinomas have not been considered due to their low statistical power, such as myeloid and non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The discrepancies observed between the physically recorded doses and biological estimated doses could indicate that exposed workers did not always wear their dosimeters or these dosimeters were not always exposed to the radiation field.

  5. Carbon Heavy-ion Radiation Induced Biological effects on Oryza sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Li, Xishan; Gong, Ning; Meng, Qingmei; Liu, Jiawei; Wang, Ting

    2016-07-01

    Large number of researches on rice after spaceflights indicated that rice was a favorable model organism to study biological effects induced by space radiation. The stimulative effect could often be found on rice seedlings after irradiation by low-dose energetic heavy-ion radiation. Spaceflight also could induce stimulative effect on kinds of seeds. To further understand the mechanism of low-dose radiation biological effects and the dose range, the germinated rice seeds which were irradiated by different doses of carbon heavy-ion (0, 0.02, 0.1, 0.2, 1, 2, 5, 10, 15 and 20Gy, LET=27.3keV/µm) were used as materials to study. By investigating the variation of rice phenotype under different doses, we found that 2Gy radiation dose was a dividing point of the phenotypic variation. Transmission electron microscopy was used to observe the variation of mitochondria, chloroplast, endoplasmic reticulum, ribosome and nucleus in mesophyll cell of rice apical meristem at 24 hours after radiation with different doses. The cells were not apparently physiologically damaged when the dose of radiation was less than 2Gy. The number of chloroplast did not change significantly, but the number of mitochondria was significantly increased, and gathered around in the chloroplast and endoplasmic reticulum; the obvious lesion of chloroplast and mitochondria were found at the mesophyll cells when radiation dose was higher than 2Gy. The mitochondria were swelling and appearing blurred crest. The chloroplast and mitochondrial mutation rate increased significantly (pradiation mainly occurred at three-leaf stage along with the increasing activity of antioxidase system and damages of lipid peroxidation. We also found that the relative expression of genes sdhb and aox1a which encode the key proteins in mitochondria changed differently after exposed to different doses of radiation, and the lower dose of the radiation could cause longer effect. The chlorophyll was an important organ of photosynthesis

  6. A new model for biological effects of radiation and the driven force of molecular evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takahiro; Manabe, Yuichiro; Nakajima, Hiroo; Tsunoyama, Yuichi; Bando, Masako

    We proposed a new mathematical model to estimate biological effects of radiation, which we call Whack-A-Mole (WAM) model. A special feature of WAM model is that it involves the dose rate of radiation as a key ingredient. We succeeded to reproduce the experimental data of various species concerning the radiation induced mutation frequencies. From the analysis of the mega-mouse experiments, we obtained the mutation rate per base-pair per year for mice which is consistent with the so-called molecular clock in evolution genetics, 10-9 mutation/base-pair/year. Another important quantity is the equivalent dose rate for the whole spontaneous mutation, deff. The value of deff for mice is 1.1*10-3 Gy/hour which is much larger than the dose rate of natural radiation (10- (6 - 7) Gy/hour) by several orders of magnitude. We also analyzed Drosophila data and obtained essentially the same numbers. This clearly indicates that the natural radiation is not the dominant driving force of the molecular evolution, but we should look for other factors, such as miscopy of DNA in duplication process. We believe this is the first quantitative proof of the small contribution of the natural radiation in the molecular evolution.

  7. Radiation Information for Designing and Interpreting Biological Experiments Onboard Missions Beyond Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straume, T.; Slaba, T.; Bhattacharya, S.; Braby, L. A.

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in flying biological experiments beyond low-Earth orbit (LEO) to measure biological responses potentially relevant to those expected during a human mission to Mars. Such experiments could be payloads onboard precursor missions, including unmanned private-public partnerships, as well as small low-cost spacecraft (satellites) designed specifically for biosentinel type missions. Designing such experiments requires knowledge of the radiation environment and its interactions with both the spacecraft and the experimental payload. Information is provided here that is useful for designing such experiments.

  8. A practical approach to the use of radiation in molecular biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott-Wood, G

    1998-09-01

    This Handbook is intended to provide a comprehensive overview of the use of radionuclides for molecular biological research with particular emphasis, as stated in the title, on the practical aspects of the work involved. It is endeavoured to consider the priorities of a person in a position of responsibility within an establishment who must ensure that they are adhering to relevant sections of legislation, are in possession of essential documentation and feel confident to designate areas for radionuclide usage so that ultimately work may be commenced in an informed and safe manner. It is hoped that this Handbook will be of benefit to Radiation Protection Advisers, Radiation Protection Supervisors and anyone interested in radiation protection measures applicable to themselves or others whilst undertaking this type of research

  9. Applications of Synchrotron Radiation Micro Beams in Cell Micro Biology and Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Ide-Ektessabi, Ari

    2007-01-01

    This book demonstrates the applications of synchrotron radiation in certain aspects of cell microbiology, specifically non-destructive elemental analyses, chemical-state analyses and imaging (distribution) of the elements within a cell. The basics for understanding and applications of synchrotron radiation are also described to make the contents easier to be understood for a wide group of researchers in medical and biological sciences who might not be familiar with the physics of synchrotron radiation. The two main techniques that are discussed in this book are the x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and the x-ray fine structure analysis (XAFS). Application of these techniques in investigations of several important scientific fields, such as neurodegeneration and other diseases related to cell malfunctioning, are demonstrated in this book.

  10. Whack-A-Mole Model: Towards unified description of biological effect caused by radiation-exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Manabe, Yuichiro; Tsunoyama, Yuichi; Nakajima, Hiroo; Nakamura, Issei; Bando, Masako

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel model to estimate biological effects caused by artificial radiation exposure, Whack-a-mole (WAM) model. It is important to take account of the recovery effects during the time course of the cellular reactions. The inclusion of the dose-rate dependence is essential in the risk estimation of low dose radiation, while nearly all the existing theoretical models relies on the total dose dependence only. By analyzing the experimental data of the relation between the radiation dose and the induced mutation frequency of 5 organisms, mouse, drosophila, chrysanthemum, maize and tradescantia, we found that all the data can be reproduced by WAM model. Most remarkably, a scaling function, which is derived from WAM model, consistently accounts for the observed mutation frequencies of 5 organisms. This is the first rationale to account for the dose rate dependence as well as to give a unified understanding of a general feature of organisms.

  11. Epigenetics Meets Radiation Biology as a New Approach in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Mi Yi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a disease that results from both genetic and epigenetic changes. In recent decades, a number of people have investigated the disparities in gene expression resulting from variable DNA methylation alteration and chromatin structure modification in response to the environment. Especially, colon cancer is a great model system for investigating the epigenetic mechanism for aberrant gene expression alteration. Ionizing radiation (IR could affect a variety of processes within exposed cells and, in particular, cause changes in gene expression, disruption of cell cycle arrest, and apoptotic cell death. Even though there is growing evidence on the importance of epigenetics and biological processes induced by radiation exposure in various cancer types including colon cancer, specific epigenetic alterations induced by radiation at the molecular level are incompletely defined. This review focuses on discussing possible IR-mediated changes of DNA methylation and histone modification in cancer.

  12. Epigenetics meets radiation biology as a new approach in cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joong-Gook; Park, Moon-Taek; Heo, Kyu; Yang, Kwang-Mo; Yi, Joo Mi

    2013-07-18

    Cancer is a disease that results from both genetic and epigenetic changes. In recent decades, a number of people have investigated the disparities in gene expression resulting from variable DNA methylation alteration and chromatin structure modification in response to the environment. Especially, colon cancer is a great model system for investigating the epigenetic mechanism for aberrant gene expression alteration. Ionizing radiation (IR) could affect a variety of processes within exposed cells and, in particular, cause changes in gene expression, disruption of cell cycle arrest, and apoptotic cell death. Even though there is growing evidence on the importance of epigenetics and biological processes induced by radiation exposure in various cancer types including colon cancer, specific epigenetic alterations induced by radiation at the molecular level are incompletely defined. This review focuses on discussing possible IR-mediated changes of DNA methylation and histone modification in cancer.

  13. Radiation effects analysis in a group of interventional radiologists using biological and physical dosimetry methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, M., E-mail: WEMLmirapas@iqn.upv.e [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Montoro, A.; Almonacid, M. [Radiation Protection Service, Hospital Universitario La Fe Valencia (Spain); Ferrer, S. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Barquinero, J.F. [Biological Dosimetry Service, Unit of Anthropology, Department of Animal and Vegetable Biology and Ecology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB) (Spain); Tortosa, R. [Radiation Protection Service, Hospital Universitario La Fe Valencia (Spain); Verdu, G. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Rodriguez, P. [Biological Dosimetry Service, Unit of Anthropology, Department of Animal and Vegetable Biology and Ecology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB) (Spain); Barrios, L.L. [Department of Physiology and Cellular Biology, Unit of Cellular Biology (UAB) (Spain); Villaescusa, J.I. [Radiation Protection Service, Hospital Universitario La Fe Valencia (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    Interventional radiologists and staff members are frequently exposed to protracted and fractionated low doses of ionizing radiation, which extend during all their professional activities. These exposures can derive, due to the effects of direct and scattered radiation, in deterministic effects (radiodermitis, aged skin, cataracts, telangiectasia in nasal region, vasocellular epitelioms, hands depilation) and/or stochastic ones (cancer incidence). A methodology has been proposed for estimating the radiation risk or detriment from a group of six exposed interventional radiologists of the Hospital Universitario La Fe (Valencia, Spain), which had developed general exposition symptoms attributable to deterministic effects of ionizing radiation. Equivalent doses have been periodically registered using TLD's and wrist dosimeters, H{sub p}(10) and H{sub p}(0.07), respectively, and estimated through the observation of translocations in lymphocytes of peripheral blood (biological methods), by extrapolating the yield of translocations to their respective dose-effect curves. The software RADRISK has been applied for estimating radiation risks in these occupational radiation exposures. This software is based on transport models from epidemiological studies of population exposed to external sources of ionizing radiation, such as Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors [UNSCEAR, Sources and effects of ionizing radiation: 2006 report to the general assembly, with scientific annexes. New York: United Nations; 2006]. The minimum and maximum average excess ratio for skin cancer has been, using wrist physical doses, of [1.03x10{sup -3}, 5.06x10{sup -2}], concluding that there is not an increased risk of skin cancer incidence. The minimum and maximum average excess ratio for leukemia has been, using TLD physical doses, of [7.84x10{sup -2}, 3.36x10{sup -1}], and using biological doses, of [1.40x10{sup -1}, 1.51], which is considerably higher than incidence rates, showing an

  14. Radiation effects analysis in a group of interventional radiologists using biological and physical dosimetry methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, M; Montoro, A; Almonacid, M; Ferrer, S; Barquinero, J F; Tortosa, R; Verdú, G; Rodríguez, P; Barrios, L L; Villaescusa, J I

    2010-08-01

    Interventional radiologists and staff members are frequently exposed to protracted and fractionated low doses of ionizing radiation, which extend during all their professional activities. These exposures can derive, due to the effects of direct and scattered radiation, in deterministic effects (radiodermitis, aged skin, cataracts, telangiectasia in nasal region, vasocellular epitelioms, hands depilation) and/or stochastic ones (cancer incidence). A methodology has been proposed for estimating the radiation risk or detriment from a group of six exposed interventional radiologists of the Hospital Universitario La Fe (Valencia, Spain), which had developed general exposition symptoms attributable to deterministic effects of ionizing radiation. Equivalent doses have been periodically registered using TLD's and wrist dosimeters, H(p)(10) and H(p)(0.07), respectively, and estimated through the observation of translocations in lymphocytes of peripheral blood (biological methods), by extrapolating the yield of translocations to their respective dose-effect curves. The software RADRISK has been applied for estimating radiation risks in these occupational radiation exposures. This software is based on transport models from epidemiological studies of population exposed to external sources of ionizing radiation, such as Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors [UNSCEAR, Sources and effects of ionizing radiation: 2006 report to the general assembly, with scientific annexes. New York: United Nations; 2006]. The minimum and maximum average excess ratio for skin cancer has been, using wrist physical doses, of [1.03x10(-3), 5.06x10(-2)], concluding that there is not an increased risk of skin cancer incidence. The minimum and maximum average excess ratio for leukemia has been, using TLD physical doses, of [7.84x10(-2), 3.36x10(-1)], and using biological doses, of [1.40x10(-1), 1.51], which is considerably higher than incidence rates, showing an excess radio-induced risk of

  15. [Biological, chemical, and radiation factors in the classification of medical waste].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusakov, N V; Korotkova, G I; Orlov, A Iu; Kadyrov, D E

    2011-01-01

    The current classification of medical waste does not consider the sanitary-and-chemical hazard of epidemiologically dangerous and extremely dangerous medical waste (classes B and C). According to the results of the studies performed, the authors propose the improved classification of medical waste, which makes it possible to take into account not only infectious, radiation, and toxicological, but also sanitary-and-chemical hazards (toxicity, carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and biological activity) of medical waste.

  16. Functional Genomic Investigation of the Molecular Biological Impact of Electron Beam Radiation in Lymphoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Ramani; Rani, Usha; Murugesan, Ram; Kumar, Kirushna; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Ganesan, Kumaresan

    2016-05-01

    The biological response of electron beam radiation (EBR) in tumors remains underexplored. This study describes the molecular biological and genomic impact of EBR on tumor cells. A mouse model bearing Dalton's lymphoma ascites cells was exposed to an 8-MeV pulsed electron beam, at a dose rate of 2 Gy/min using a microtron, a linear accelerator. The radiation-induced changes were assessed by histopathology, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, signaling pathway-focused reporter assays, and gene expression by microarray analysis. EBR was found to increase apoptosis and G2-M cell cycle arrest with concomitant tumor regression in vivo. The microarray data revealed that EBR induced tumor regression, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest mediated by p53, PPAR, and SMAD2/3/4 signaling pathways. Activation of interferon regulatory factor and NFkB signaling were also found upon EBR. Chemo-genomics exploration revealed the possibility of drugs that can be effectively used in combination with EBR. For the first time, an 8-MeV pulse EBR induced genomic changes, and their consequence in molecular and biological processes were identified in lymphoma cells. The comprehensive investigation of radiation-mediated responses in cancer cells also revealed the potential therapeutic features of EBR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of radio frequency identification-related radiation on in vitro biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Ismail; Hohberger, Clive; Rasmussen, R Scott; Ulrich, David A; Emond, Jean-Pierre; Gutierrez, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    The recent developments on the use of e-pedigree to identify the chain of custody of drugs suggests the use of advanced track and trace technologies such as two-dimensional barcodes and radio frequency identification (RFID) tags. RFID technology is used mainly for valuable commodities such as pharmaceutical products while incorporating additional functionalities like monitoring environmental variables to ensure product safety and quality. In its guidance for the use of RFID technologies for drugs (Compliance Policy Guide Section 400.210), the Food and Drug Administration outlined multiple parameters that would apply to any study or application using RFID. However, drugs approved under a Biologics License Application or protein drugs covered by a New Drug Application were excluded mainly due to concerns about the effects of radio frequency radiation (thermal and/or non-thermal) on biologics. Even though the thermal effects of radio frequency on biologics are relatively well understood, there are few studies in the literature about the non-thermal effects of radio frequency with regards to the protein structure integrity. In this paper, we analyze the non-thermal effects of radio frequency radiation by exposing a wide variety of biologics including biopharmaceuticals with vaccines, hormones, and immunoglobulins, as well as cellular blood products such as red blood cells and whole blood-derived platelets as well as fresh frozen plasma. In order to represent the majority of the frequency spectrum used in RFID applications, five different frequencies (13.56 MHz, 433 MHz, 868 MHz, 915 MHz, and 2.4 GHz) are used to account for the most commonly used international frequency bands for RFID. With the help of specialized radio frequency signal-generating hardware, magnetic and electromagnetic fields are created around the exposed products with power levels greater than Federal Communications Commission-regulated limits. The in vitro test results on more than 100

  18. Transient impedance changes in venous endothelial monolayers as a biological radiation dosimetry response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Fossum Young

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In March of 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and subsequent 14 m-high tsunami caused major damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan.  While cancer incidence in the radiation-exposed population is a logical concern, the complex effects of radiation on the heart and cardiovascular system are also of interest.  Immediate and early vascular radiation effects could be exploited as a dosimetry modality.  To test whether non-coronary vasculature exhibited transient perturbation in barrier function, video microscopy studies and Electric Cell Substrate Impedance Sensing technology were used to probe very subtle changes in primary human vascular endothelium.  Human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC monolayers exhibit a transient, statistically significant decrease (P = 0.017 in monolayer resistance 3 h after irradiation with 5.0 Gy of g rays.  Radiation induced perturbations in HUVEC monolayer permeability are similar in magnitude and kinetics to those observed in coronary arterial endothelium.  Therefore, at least two types of vasculature respond to radiation on ECIS arrays with an early transient disruption in permeability.  The finding supports the use of early passage HUVECs for use in bioelectric dosimetry studies of vasculature and suggests that permeability of vessels could potentially serve as a biological dosimetry tool.

  19. Quantum solid state mechanisms of biological effects of electromagnetic radiation with emphasis on local superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achimowicz, J.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to review quantum solid state mechanisms of nonthermal (specific) bioeffects of nonionizing radiation and to present the author's own hypothesis concerning mechanisms based on biological superconductivity. Classical and quantum mechanisms of bioeffects are compared stressing the necessity of not only considering quantum absorption, transfer, and conversion of radiation energy in biological systems, but also of appropriate systems modeling. The need is stressed for developing quantum models of the biological solid state on the supramolecular level to fill the gap between molecular and cell biology. The supramolecular models of macromolecules and enzyme complexes will be reviewed. The high-temperature superconductivity problem in organic systems will be discussed with stress on the importance of system structure and the excitation quasi-particle (phonon and electron) spectra relationship. New mechanisms of enzymatic activity assuming enzyme-substrate complex electron spectrum instability induced by electron- and phonon-mediated electron-electron interaction are proposed. Since this quantum cooperative phenomenon is the possible origin of specificity and efficiency of enzyme action it is extremely sensitive to system-generated electromagnetic fields, which gives the possibility of enzymatic regulation and also may explain some nonthermal resonant bioeffects. Local superconductivity (coherent electron states) and Josephson effects as the possible mechanisms of bioeffects are discussed.

  20. Abstracts of the 28. annual meeting of the Austrian Radiation Oncology, Radiation Biology and Medical Radiation Physics Society (OeGRO 2011); Abstracts der 28. Jahrestagung der Oesterreichischen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, Radiobiologie und Medizinische Radiophysik (OeGRO 2011)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2012-06-15

    The second part of the volume includes the abstracts of the 28th annual meeting of the Austrian Radiation Oncology, Radiation Biology and Medical Radiation Physics Society (OeGRO 2011), covering the following topics: extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy; brachytherapy, hyperthermia; radiotherapy side effects; psycho-oncology in radiotherapy; head-neck carcinomas; radiation source implants for carcinoma irradiation; MRI-supported adaptive radiotherapy; CT-guided radiotherapy; mammary carcinomas; prostate carcinomas; magnetic nanoparticles for future medical applications.

  1. The REPAIR Project: Examining the Biological Impacts of Sub-Background Radiation Exposure within SNOLAB, a Deep Underground Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thome, Christopher; Tharmalingam, Sujeenthar; Pirkkanen, Jake; Zarnke, Andrew; Laframboise, Taylor; Boreham, Douglas R

    2017-10-01

    Considerable attention has been given to understanding the biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure at levels slightly above background. However, relatively few studies have been performed to examine the inverse, where natural background radiation is removed. The limited available data suggest that organisms exposed to sub-background radiation environments undergo reduced growth and an impaired capacity to repair genetic damage. Shielding from background radiation is inherently difficult due to high-energy cosmic radiation. SNOLAB, located in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, is a unique facility for examining the effects of sub-background radiation exposure. Originally constructed for astroparticle physics research, the laboratory is located within an active nickel mine at a depth of over 2,000 m. The rock overburden provides shielding equivalent to 6,000 m of water, thereby almost completely eliminating cosmic radiation. Additional features of the facility help to reduce radiological contamination from the surrounding rock. We are currently establishing a biological research program within SNOLAB: Researching the Effects of the Presence and Absence of Ionizing Radiation (REPAIR project). We hypothesize that natural background radiation is essential for life and maintains genomic stability, and that prolonged exposure to sub-background radiation environments will be detrimental to biological systems. Using a combination of whole organism and cell culture model systems, the effects of exposure to a sub-background environment will be examined on growth and development, as well as markers of genomic damage, DNA repair capacity and oxidative stress. The results of this research will provide further insight into the biological effects of low-dose radiation exposure as well as elucidate some of the processes that may drive evolution and selection in living systems. This Radiation Research focus issue contains reviews and original articles, which relate to the

  2. Worldwide forecast of the biologically effective UV radiation: UV index and daily dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalwieser, Alois W.; Schauberger, Guenther; Janouch, Michal; Nunez, Manuel; Koskela, Tapani; Berger, Daniel; Karamanian, Gabriel; Prosek, Pavel; Laska, Kamil

    2002-01-01

    Since October 1995 a global daily forecast of the UV index and the daily dose, as the irradiance of the biologically effective ultraviolet radiation, for clear sky is calculated. The Austrian model as well as the input parameters are described. By connecting the daily dose with the sensitivity of the photobiological skin types, a recommendation is given to select an appropriate sun protection factor of a sunscreen to avoid overexposure of the skin. The validation of the Austrian forecast model is done by long-term measurements of the biologically effective ultraviolet radiation. Measurements were taken from 6 different sites at 4 continents (Antarctica, Australia, America and Europe) covering the latitudinal range from 67 degree(s)N to 60 degree(s)S. By using the underestimation as criteria in the sense of radiation protection, the Austrian model shows less than 12% underestimation over the whole period for the UV index and less than 10% for the daily dose. The evaluation shows further that the forecast of the daily dose is much more influenced by the attenuation due to clouds than the UV index.

  3. Biological effects of the ionizing radiation. Press breakfast; Effets biologiques des rayonnements ionisants. Petit dejeuner de presse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flury-Herard, A. [CEA, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, DSV, 75 - Paris (France); Boiteux, S.; Dutrillaux, B. [CEA/Fontenay-aux-Roses, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, DSV, 92 (France); Toledano, M. [CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, DSV, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2000-06-01

    This document brings together the subjects discussed during the Press breakfast of 29 june 2000 on the biological effects of the ionizing radiations, with scientists of the CEA and the CNRS. It presents the research programs and provides inquiries on the NDA operating to introduce the NDA damages by ionizing radiations, the possible repairs and the repair efficiency facing the carcinogenesis. Those researches allow the scientists to define laws on radiation protection. (A.L.B.)

  4. Statistical Modeling of Radiative Transfer and Transient Characteristics for Multilayer Biological Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Makarov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Monte-Carlo method [1] already long ago proved itself as a powerful and universal tool for mathematical modelling in various areas of science and engineering. Researchers often choose this method when it is difficult to find a solution by other ways (or impossible at all, e.g. because of sophisticated analytical dependences, area of modelling or boundary conditions. Certainly, this necessarily statistical and flexible method requires significant computation time, but a continuously increasing computation capability makes it more and more attractive for a choice in specific situation.One of the promising areas to use the method of statistical modelling is description of light propagation in the turbid (scattering media. A high motivation for development of this approach is widely used lasers in biomedicine [3]. Besides, owing to its flexibility, the Monte-Carlo method is also of importance in theoretical researches, in particular, to estimate a degree of adequacy of the offered approximation methods for solving a radiative transfer equation [4].It is known that key parameters of turbid media are an absorption coefficient (characterizes absorption probability of a photon per unit of path length and a scattering coefficient (characterizes scattering probability of a photon per unit of path length. The ratio of each of the coefficients to their sum (extinction defines a probability of "death" or "survival" of a photon, respectively, in interaction with lenses. Generally, in the scattering medium there is a non-coherent radiation component, which in turbid media such as biological tissues, already at the insignificant depth becomes prevailing over the coherent one (residual of the incident laser beam [5].The author used the Monte-Carlo method to simulate optical radiation propagation in the multilayer biological tissues with their optical characteristics corresponding to the skin and subcutaneous tissues. Such a biological tissue is the absorbing

  5. [Biological effects of microwave radiation of low nonthermal intensity (regarding the maximal admissible values)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'ev, Iu G; Shafirkin, A V; Vasin, A L

    2005-01-01

    There is still much controversy in scientific approaches to setting limits of exposure to radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation in Russia, Europe and USA. The stumbling stone is recognition or denial of potential risk of biological effects from nonthermal electromagnetic radiation (to 1 mW/cm2). The authors review results of experimental investigations performed in Russia over the years since 1960s to study the direct and delayed effects of ultra-high and microwave frequencies of low non-thermal intensity EMR, and delayed negative effects in employees based on the data of several follow-up epidemiological studies. This evidence was used as a baseline for establishing the Russian limits for chronic exposure to, thresholds of harmful effects and the maximal admissible values of EMR within the above frequencies.

  6. Characterization of Radiation Fields in Biological Shields of Nuclear Power Plants for Assessing Concrete Degradationa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remec, Igor [ORNL; Rosseel, Thomas M [ORNL; Field, Kevin G [ORNL; Le Pape, Yann [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Life extensions of nuclear power plants to 60 and potentially 80 years of operation have renewed interest in long-term material degradation. One material being considered is concrete, with a particular focus on radiation-induced effects. Based on the projected neutron fluence values (E > 0.1 MeV) in the concrete biological shields of the US pressurized water reactor fleet and the available data on radiation effects on concrete, some decrease in mechanical properties of concrete cannot be ruled out during extended operation beyond 60 years. An expansion of the irradiated concrete database and a reliable determination of relevant neutron fluence energy cutoff value are necessary to ensure reliable risk assessment for extended operation of nuclear power plants.

  7. A Hypothesis on Biological Protection from Space Radiation Through the Use of New Therapeutic Gases as Medical Counter Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Michael P.; Ansari, Rafat R.; Nakao, Atsunori; Wink, David

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exposure to astronauts could be a significant obstacle for long duration manned space exploration because of current uncertainties regarding the extent of biological effects. Furthermore, concepts for protective shielding also pose a technically challenging issue due to the nature of cosmic radiation and current mass and power constraints with modern exploration technology. The concern regarding exposure to cosmic radiation is the biological damage it induces. As damage is associated with increased oxidative stress, it is important and would be enabling to mitigate and/or prevent oxidative stress prior to the development of clinical symptoms and disease. This paper hypothesizes a "systems biology" approach in which a combination of chemical and biological mitigation techniques are used conjunctively. It proposes using new, therapeutic, medical gases as both chemical radioprotectors for radical scavenging and biological signaling molecules for management of the body s response to exposure. From reviewing radiochemistry of water, biological effects of CO, H2, NO, and H2S gas, and mechanisms of radiation biology, it is concluded that this approach may have great therapeutic potential for radiation exposure. Furthermore, it also appears to have similar potential for curtailing the pathogenesis of other diseases in which oxidative stress has been implicated including cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic inflammatory disease, hypertension, ischemia/reperfusion injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, Parkinson s and Alzheimer s disease, cataracts, and aging.

  8. A hypothesis on biological protection from space radiation through the use of new therapeutic gases as medical counter measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schoenfeld Michael P

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Radiation exposure to astronauts could be a significant obstacle for long duration manned space exploration because of current uncertainties regarding the extent of biological effects. Furthermore, concepts for protective shielding also pose a technically challenging issue due to the nature of cosmic radiation and current mass and power constraints with modern exploration technology. The concern regarding exposure to cosmic radiation is biological damage that is associated with increased oxidative stress. It is therefore important and would be enabling to mitigate and/or prevent oxidative stress prior to the development of clinical symptoms and disease. This paper hypothesizes a "systems biology" approach in which a combination of chemical and biological mitigation techniques are used conjunctively. It proposes using new, therapeutic, medical gases as chemical radioprotectors for radical scavenging and as biological signaling molecules for management of the body's response to exposure. From reviewing radiochemistry of water, biological effects of CO, H2, NO, and H2S gas, and mechanisms of radiation biology, it can be concluded that this approach may have therapeutic potential for radiation exposure. Furthermore, it also appears to have similar potential for curtailing the pathogenesis of other diseases in which oxidative stress has been implicated including cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic inflammatory disease, hypertension, ischemia/reperfusion (IR injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, cataracts, and aging. We envision applying these therapies through inhalation of gas mixtures or ingestion of water with dissolved gases.

  9. Biological stress responses induced by alpha radiation exposure in Lemna minor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hoeck, A.; Horemans, N.; Van Hees, M.; Nauts, R. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN (Belgium); Knapen, D.; Blust, R. [University of Antwerp (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    To enhance the robustness of radiation protection criteria for biota, additional information on the biological impact of radionuclides on non-human biota is needed. In particular the effects of alpha emitting isotopes have been poorly studied within a radioecological contextual though they exhibit a high linear energy transfer which can cause significant biological damage when taken up by organisms. Therefore, it is not only essential to measure alpha radiation toxicity, but also try to understand the underlying mechanisms of this stressor. The current study aimed to contribute to a better knowledge of the fundamental processes regulating alpha radiation stress response mechanisms in higher plants. {sup 241}Am was primarily selected as it is an almost pure alpha emitter and, as a daughter nuclide of {sup 241}Pu, it will become one of the dominant pollutants in plutonium affected areas. The aquatic macrophyte Lemna minor has proven its value in eco-toxicological research as representative of higher aquatic plants (OECD guideline nr. 221) and will be used to analyze alpha radiation stress in plant systems. An individual growth inhibition test was set up by means of single dose-response curve in order to identify the Effective Dose Rates (EDR-values) for frond size and biomass. As the mean path length is small for alpha particles, the accumulation of the radionuclide inside species represents almost exclusively the dosimetry. Therefore, quantification of {sup 241}Am uptake and {sup 241}Am distribution were evaluated separately for roots and fronds taking the activity concentrations of growth medium into account. Taken together with the respective dose conversion coefficients from the ERICA tool, this allowed to construct an accurate dosimetric model to determine internal and external dose rates. Different standard media were tested on growth rate and biomass to analyse the amount of {sup 241}Am taken up by the plants exposed from 2.5 to 100 kBq/L. From these

  10. [Medico-biological effects of natural UV-radiation: global consequences of the destruction of the ozone layer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzhizhovskiĭ, A D; D'iakonov, A S; Belousov, V V

    1991-01-01

    The effect of UV-B-radiation of high intensity on terrestrial microorganisms, aqueous ecosystems, and plants is described. The effect of UV-B-radiation on humans and animals is discussed and quantitative evaluation of ozone layer destruction is given. It is indicated that potential changes will grow continuously, producing a significant effect on the biosphere. It is concluded that UV-B-radiation as a stimulating agent should be applied with caution in general biology and medicine and in space biology and medicine.

  11. Characterisation of radiation field for irradiation of biological samples at nuclear reactor-comparison of twin detector and recombination methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, N; Gryziński, M A; Kowalska, M; Meronka, K; Tulik, P

    2014-10-01

    Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection is involved in achieving scientific project on biological dosimetry. The project includes irradiation of blood samples in radiation fields of nuclear reactor. A simple facility for irradiation of biological samples has been prepared at horizontal channel of the nuclear reactor MARIA in NCBJ in Poland. The radiation field, composed mainly of gamma radiation and thermal neutrons, has been characterised in terms of tissue kerma using twin-detector technique and recombination chambers. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Multidisciplinary approach of early breast cancer: The biology applied to radiation oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azria David

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Early breast cancer treatment is based on a multimodality approach with the application of clinical and histological prognostic factors to determine locoregional and systemic treatments. The entire scientific community is strongly involved in the management of this disease: radiologists for screening and early diagnosis, gynecologists, surgical oncologists and radiation oncologists for locoregional treatment, pathologists and biologists for personalized characterization, genetic counselors for BRCA mutation history and medical oncologists for systemic therapies. Recently, new biological tools have established various prognostic subsets of breast cancer and developed predictive markers for miscellaneous treatments. The aim of this article is to highlight the contribution of biological tools in the locoregional management of early breast cancer.

  13. In Silico Nanodosimetry: New Insights into Nontargeted Biological Responses to Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenka Kuncic

    2012-01-01

    nontargeted responses cannot be understood in the framework of DNA-centric radiobiological models; what is needed are new physically motivated models that address the damage-sensing signalling pathways triggered by the production of reactive free radicals. To this end, we have conducted a series of in silico experiments aimed at elucidating the underlying physical processes responsible for nontargeted biological responses to radiation. Our simulation studies implement new results on very low-energy electromagnetic interactions in liquid water (applicable down to nanoscales and we also consider a realistic simulation of extranuclear microbeam irradiation of a cell. Our results support the idea that organelles with important functional roles, such as mitochondria and lysosomes, as well as membranes, are viable targets for ionizations and excitations, and their chemical composition and density are critical to determining the free radical yield and ensuing biological responses.

  14. [Experience of the development special medical technical laboratory for studies of effects caused by potent electromagnetic radiation in biologic objects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodetsky, B N; Kalyada, T V; Petrov, S V

    2015-01-01

    This article covers topics of creating special medical technical laboratory for medial and biologic studies concerning influence of potent high-frequency elecromagnetic radiation on various biologic objects. The authors gave example of such laboratory, described its construction features, purpose and main characteristics of the included devices.

  15. Monte Carlo modeling in CT-based geometries: dosimetry for biological modeling experiments with particle beam radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffenderfer, Eric S; Dolney, Derek; Schaettler, Maximilian; Sanzari, Jenine K; McDonough, James; Cengel, Keith A

    2014-03-01

    The space radiation environment imposes increased dangers of exposure to ionizing radiation, particularly during a solar particle event (SPE). These events consist primarily of low energy protons that produce a highly inhomogeneous dose distribution. Due to this inherent dose heterogeneity, experiments designed to investigate the radiobiological effects of SPE radiation present difficulties in evaluating and interpreting dose to sensitive organs. To address this challenge, we used the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation framework to develop dosimetry software that uses computed tomography (CT) images and provides radiation transport simulations incorporating all relevant physical interaction processes. We found that this simulation accurately predicts measured data in phantoms and can be applied to model dose in radiobiological experiments with animal models exposed to charged particle (electron and proton) beams. This study clearly demonstrates the value of Monte Carlo radiation transport methods for two critically interrelated uses: (i) determining the overall dose distribution and dose levels to specific organ systems for animal experiments with SPE-like radiation, and (ii) interpreting the effect of random and systematic variations in experimental variables (e.g. animal movement during long exposures) on the dose distributions and consequent biological effects from SPE-like radiation exposure. The software developed and validated in this study represents a critically important new tool that allows integration of computational and biological modeling for evaluating the biological outcomes of exposures to inhomogeneous SPE-like radiation dose distributions, and has potential applications for other environmental and therapeutic exposure simulations.

  16. Space experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CELLRAD)": Hardware and biological system tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Dilruba, Shahana; Adrian, Astrid; Feles, Sebastian; Schmitz, Claudia; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Briganti, Luca; Franz, Markus; Segerer, Jürgen; Spitta, Luis F.; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Konda, Bikash; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Günther

    2015-11-01

    One factor contributing to the high uncertainty in radiation risk assessment for long-term space missions is the insufficient knowledge about possible interactions of radiation with other spaceflight environmental factors. Such factors, e.g. microgravity, have to be considered as possibly additive or even synergistic factors in cancerogenesis. Regarding the effects of microgravity on signal transduction, it cannot be excluded that microgravity alters the cellular response to cosmic radiation, which comprises a complex network of signaling pathways. The purpose of the experiment ;Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space; (CELLRAD, formerly CERASP) is to study the effects of combined exposure to microgravity, radiation and general space flight conditions on mammalian cells, in particular Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) cells that are stably transfected with different plasmids allowing monitoring of proliferation and the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway by means of fluorescent proteins. The cells will be seeded on ground in multiwell plate units (MPUs), transported to the ISS, and irradiated by an artificial radiation source after an adaptation period at 0 × g and 1 × g. After different incubation periods, the cells will be fixed by pumping a formaldehyde solution into the MPUs. Ground control samples will be treated in the same way. For implementation of CELLRAD in the Biolab on the International Space Station (ISS), tests of the hardware and the biological systems were performed. The sequence of different steps in MPU fabrication (cutting, drilling, cleaning, growth surface coating, and sterilization) was optimized in order to reach full biocompatibility. Different coatings of the foil used as growth surface revealed that coating with 0.1 mg/ml poly-D-lysine supports cell attachment better than collagen type I. The tests of prototype hardware (Science Model) proved its full functionality for automated medium change, irradiation and fixation of cells. Exposure of

  17. Estudos sobre desenvolvimento humano no século XIX: da biologia à psicogenia Studies about human development in the 19th century: from biology to psychogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Soares de Gouvêa

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A escola historicamente erigiu-se como instituição privilegiada de formação de um extrato da população definido pelo seu pertencimento geracional, qual seja, a infância. Essa operação significou a produção e circulação de saberes voltados para compreensão dos processos de desenvolvimento individual, que sustentassem a aprendizagem escolar. É ao longo do século XIX que tais saberes constituem um campo científico específico, desde os estudos ontogenéticos, referidos à Biologia, a posterior configuração da chamada psicogenia. Busca-se neste estudo, pelo levantamento e análise das obras dos principais autores do período, resgatar o percurso de conformação do campo. Tem-se em vista compreender as permanências e os deslocamentos ocorridos no interior de tal produção, analisando a configuração de uma identidade científica. Verifica-se que, ao longo do período estudado, a embriologia, a biologia darwiniana e lamarkiana, a estatística e a antropometria constituíram-se como referências privilegiadas para a construção de um espaço de saber sobre o desenvolvimento individual, entendido como racialmente determinado.School has historically been established as a privileged institution of education offered to a part of the population defined by their generational belonging, that is, childhood. This process meant the production and circulation of knowledges directed towards the understanding of the processes of individual development, which supported school learning. It was throughout the 19th century that such knowledges turned out to be a specific scientific field from the ontogenetic studies related to Biology to the late configuration of the so-called psychogeny. By means of a survey and analysis of works by major authors of that period, this study seeks to resume the path that led to the configuration of the field. The objective is to understand the permanence and shifts occurred within such a production by examining

  18. Activation of chemical biological defense mechanisms and remission of vital oxidative injury by low dose radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaoka, K. [Okayama University Medical School, Okayama (Japan); Nomura, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Kojima, S. [Science University of Tokyo, Chiba (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    Excessive active oxygen produced in vivo by various causes is toxic. Accumulation of oxidation injuries due to excessive active causes cell and tissue injuries, inducing various pathologic conditions such as aging and carcinogenesis. On the other hand, there are chemical defense mechanisms in the body that eliminate active oxygen or repair damaged molecules, defending against resultant injury. It is interesting reports that appropriate oxidation stress activate the chemical biological defense mechanisms. In this study, to elucidate these phenomena and its mechanism by low dose radiation, we studied on the below subjects. Activation of chemical biological defense mechanisms by low dose radiation: (1) The effects radiation on lipid peroxide (LPO) levels in the organs, membrane fluidity and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were examined in rats and rabbits. Rats were irradiated with low dose X-ray over their entire bodies, and rabbits inhaled vaporized radon spring water, which primarily emitted {alpha}-ray. The following results were obtained. Unlike high dose X-ray, low dose X-ray and radon inhalation both reduced LPO levels and made the state of the SH-group on membrane-bound proteins closer to that of juvenile animals, although the sensitivity to radioactivity varied depending on the age of the animals and among different organs and tissues. The SOD activity was elevated, suggesting that low dose X-ray and radon both activate the host defensive function. Those changes were particularly marked in the organs related to immune functions of the animals which received low dose X-ray, while they were particularly marked in the brain after radon inhalation. It was also found that those changes continued for longer periods after low dose X-irradiation. (2) Since SOD is an enzyme that mediates the dismutation of O{sub 2}- to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, the question as to whether the resultant H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is further detoxicated into H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} or not must

  19. Action spectra affect variability of the climatology of biologically effective ultraviolet radiation on cloud-free days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grifoni, D; Zipoli, G; Sabatini, F; Messeri, G; Bacci, L

    2013-12-01

    Action spectrum (AS) describes the relative effectiveness of ultraviolet (UV) radiation in producing biological effects and allows spectral UV irradiance to be weighted in order to compute biologically effective UV radiation (UVBE). The aim of this research was to study the seasonal and latitudinal distribution over Europe of daily UVBE doses responsible for various biological effects on humans and plants. Clear sky UV radiation spectra were computed at 30-min time intervals for the first day of each month of the year for Rome, Potsdam and Trondheim using a radiative transfer model fed with climatological data. Spectral data were weighted using AS for erythema, vitamin D synthesis, cataract and photokeratitis for humans, while the generalised plant damage and the plant damage AS were used for plants. The daily UVBE doses for the above-mentioned biological processes were computed and are analysed in this study. The patterns of variation due to season (for each location) and latitude (for each date) resulted as being specific for each adopted AS. The biological implications of these results are briefly discussed highlighting the importance of a specific UVBE climatology for each biological process.

  20. Relative biological effectiveness of simulated solar particle event proton radiation to induce acute hematological change in the porcine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Wan, Steven X.; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Cengel, Keith A.; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for simulated solar particle event (SPE) radiation on peripheral blood cells using Yucatan minipigs and electron-simulated SPE as the reference radiation. The results demonstrated a generally downward trend in the RBE values with increasing doses of simulated SPE radiation for leukocytes in the irradiated animals. The fitted RBE values for white blood cells (WBCs), lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes and eosinophils were above 1.0 in all three radiation dose groups at all time-points evaluated, and the lower limits of the 95% confidence intervals were > 1.0 in the majority of the dose groups at different time-points, which together suggest that proton-simulated SPE radiation is more effective than electron-simulated SPE radiation in reducing the number of peripheral WBCs, lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes and eosinophils, especially at the low end of the 5–10 Gy dose range evaluated. Other than the RBE values, the responses of leukocytes to electron-simulated SPE radiation and proton-simulated SPE radiation exposure are highly similar with respect to the time-course, the most radiosensitive cell type (the lymphocytes), and the shape of the dose–response curves, which is generally log-linear. These findings provide additional evidence that electron-simulated SPE radiation is an appropriate reference radiation for determination of RBE values for the simulated SPE radiations, and the RBE estimations using electron-simulated SPE radiation as the reference radiation are not complicated by other characteristics of the leukocyte response to radiation exposure. PMID:24027300

  1. Estudo da variabilidade da radiação solar no Nordeste do Brasil Study of the variability of solar radiation in northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta A. e Silva

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A finalidade deste trabalho é avaliar as tendências das séries temporais do saldo radiação no Nordeste do Brasil, através de dados de reanálise do NCEP/NCAR referentes ao período de 1948 a 2006. As séries temporais anuais de dados observados na superfície de radiação solar global e evaporação do tanque classe "A" de duas localidades do semiárido da região de estudo, também foram utilizadas. Analisou-se a variabilidade temporal das séries temporais com base no teste não-paramétrico, de Mann-Kendall. As séries temporais do saldo de radiação exibiram reduções acentuadas entre 1948 e 1987, que foram estatisticamente significativas em níveis de 0,01 de probabilidade pelo teste de Mann-Kendall; verificou-se, entretanto, no período de 1988 a 2006, comportamento inverso, predominando tendências positivas de saldo de radiação. Os resultados também indicaram que os dados observados de radiação global e de evaporação do tanque classe "A", apresentam reduções acentuadas ao longo do período estudado estatisticamente significativos em níveis de 0,01 de probabilidade. Esses resultados sugerem a presença do fenômeno "Global dimming" sobre a região Nordeste do Brasil.The main objective of this work was to assess the tendency of time series of net radiation in the northeastern region of Brazil from the NCEP/NCAR database of the 1948-2006 period. Also, the annual time series of data observed at surface of global solar radiation and class A pan evaporation for two stations located in the semiarid area of studied region were analyzed. Long-term variability of the time series was assessed by the Mann-Kendall test. The time series of net radiation showed a reduction through the 1948-1987 period, statistically significant at the 0.01 level of probability by the Mann-Kendall test. However, the 1988 to 2006 period showed an inverse pattern in net radiation with positive trends. Results also indicate that observed data in global

  2. Combined small angle X-ray solution scattering with atomic force microscopy for characterizing radiation damage on biological macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Luca; Andriatis, Alexander; Brennich, Martha; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Chen, Shu-Wen W; Pellequer, Jean-Luc; Round, Adam

    2016-10-27

    Synchrotron radiation facilities are pillars of modern structural biology. Small-Angle X-ray scattering performed at synchrotron sources is often used to characterize the shape of biological macromolecules. A major challenge with high-energy X-ray beam on such macromolecules is the perturbation of sample due to radiation damage. By employing atomic force microscopy, another common technique to determine the shape of biological macromolecules when deposited on flat substrates, we present a protocol to evaluate and characterize consequences of radiation damage. It requires the acquisition of images of irradiated samples at the single molecule level in a timely manner while using minimal amounts of protein. The protocol has been tested on two different molecular systems: a large globular tetremeric enzyme (β-Amylase) and a rod-shape plant virus (tobacco mosaic virus). Radiation damage on the globular enzyme leads to an apparent increase in molecular sizes whereas the effect on the long virus is a breakage into smaller pieces resulting in a decrease of the average long-axis radius. These results show that radiation damage can appear in different forms and strongly support the need to check the effect of radiation damage at synchrotron sources using the presented protocol.

  3. Estudo macroscópico e histológico de reparos osteocondrais biologicamente aceitáveis Macroscopic and histological study of biologically acceptable osteochondral repairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Leão Ribeiro

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como finalidade avaliar macroscopicamente e histológicamente defeitos osteocondrais já cicatrizados, também conhecidos como reparos. Foram utilizados seis coelhos machos, adultos, albinos da raça Nova Zelândia. Defeitos cilíndricos osteocondrais de 3.2 mm de diâmetro por 4.0 mm de profundidade foram criados cirurgicamente em ambos côndilos femorais mediais. O cilindro osteocondral retirado do joelho esquerdo (defeito não tratado foi implantado no joelho direito (joelho tratado. Comparou-se macroscopicamente e histológicamente ambos tipos de defeitos após doze semanas de evolução. A avaliação macroscópica de todos os defeitos mostrou evolução para reparos denominados biologicamente aceitáveis. O termo "biologicamente aceitável" foi utilizado para definir reparos, que à observação macroscópica, se apresentaram como tecido neo-formado semelhante à fibrocartilagem, brilhante, liso, firme, em continuidade com a cartilagem adjacente. Como todos os defeitos, tratados e não tratados, eram macroscopicamente semelhantes, realizou-se um estudo histológico comparativo para averiguar qual tipo de tecido de reparação se formava em ambos defeitos. Pela análise histológica dos reparos biologicamente aceitáveis, concluiu-se que houve formação de tecido cartilaginoso hialino nos defeitos tratados com enxerto autólogo e de tecido fibrocartilaginoso nos defeitos não tratados.The aim of this study was to evaluate macroscopically and histologically healed osteochondral defects, also known as repairs. Six adult, male, New Zealander White rabbits were used. Cylindrical osteochondral defects of 3.2 mm in diameter by 4.0 mm in depth were artificially created in the load-bearing surfaces of both medial femoral condyles. The osteochondral graft collected from the left knee (untreated defect was implanted in the right knee (treated defect. Both defects were compared macroscopically ad histologically after twelve weeks

  4. Simulated studies on the biological effects of space radiation on quiescent human fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Nan; Pei, Hailong; He, Jinpeng; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Liu, Cuihua; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Li, He; Hu, Wentao; Li, Yinghui; Wang, Jufang; Wang, Tieshan; Zhou, Guangming

    2013-10-01

    High charge and energy (HZE) particles are severe risk to manned long-term outer space exploration. Studies on the biological effects of space HZE particles and the underlying mechanisms are essential to the accurate risk assessment and the development of efficient countermeasure. Since majority of the cells in human body stay quiescent (G0 phase), in this study, we established G0 cell and G1 cell models by releasing human normal embryonic lung fibroblast cells from contact inhibition and studied the radiation toxicity of various kinds of HZE particles. Results showed that all of the particles were dose-dependently lethal and G0 cells were more radioresistant than G1 cells. We also found that 53BP1 foci were induced in a LET- and fluence-dependent manner and fewer foci were induced in G0 cells than G1 cells, however, the decrease of foci in 24 h after irradiation was highly relevant to the type of particles. These results imply that even though health risk of space radiation is probably overestimated by the data obtained with exponentially growing cells, whose radiosensitivity is similar to G1 cells, the risk of space HZE particles is un-ignorable and accurate assessment and mechanistic studies should be deepened. The diverse abilities of G0 cells and G1 cells in repairing DNA damages induced by HZE particles emphasize the importance in studying the impact of HZE particles on DNA damage repair pathways.

  5. Probing droplets with biological colloidal suspensions on smart surfaces by synchrotron radiation micro- and nano-beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinaro, G.; Accardo, A.; Benseny-Cases, N.; Burghammer, M.; Castillo-Michel, H.; Cotte, M.; Dante, S.; De Angelis, F.; Di Cola, E.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Hauser, C.; Riekel, C.

    2016-01-01

    Droplets with colloidal biological suspensions evaporating on substrates with defined wetting properties generate confined environments for initiating aggregation and self-assembly processes. We describe smart micro- and nanostructured surfaces, optimized for probing single droplets and residues by synchrotron radiation micro- and nanobeam diffraction techniques. Applications are presented for Ac-IVD and β-amyloid (1-42) peptides capable of forming cross-β sheet structures. Complementary synchrotron radiation FTIR microspectroscopy addresses secondary structure formation. The high synchrotron radiation source brilliance enables fast raster-scan experiments.

  6. Probing droplets with biological colloidal suspensions on smart surfaces by synchrotron radiation micro- and nano-beams

    KAUST Repository

    Marinaro, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    Droplets with colloidal biological suspensions evaporating on substrates with defined wetting properties generate confined environments for initiating aggregation and self-assembly processes. We describe smart micro- and nanostructured surfaces, optimized for probing single droplets and residues by synchrotron radiation micro- and nanobeam diffraction techniques. Applications are presented for Ac-IVD and β-amyloid (1-42) peptides capable of forming cross-β sheet structures. Complementary synchrotron radiation FTIR microspectroscopy addresses secondary structure formation. The high synchrotron radiation source brilliance enables fast raster-scan experiments. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Physics fundamentals and biological effects of synchrotron radiation therapy; Fundamentos fisicos y efectos biologicos de la radioterapia con radiacion sincrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prezado, Y.

    2010-07-01

    The main goal of radiation therapy is to deposit a curative dose in the tumor without exceeding the tolerances in the nearby healthy tissues. For some radioresistant tumors, like gliomas, requiring high doses for complete sterilization, the major obstacle for curative treatment with ionizing radiation remains the limited tolerance of the surrounding healthy tissue. This limitation is particularly severe for brain tumors and, especially important in children, due to the high risk of complications in the development of the central nervous system. In addition, the treatment of tumors close to an organ at risk, like the spinal cord, is also restricted. One possible solution is the development of new radiation therapy techniques exploiting radically different irradiation modes and modifying, in this way, the biological equivalent doses. This is the case of synchrotron radiation therapy (SR T). In this work the three new radiation therapy techniques under development at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESR F), in Grenoble (France) will be described, namely: synchrotron stereotactic radiation therapy (Ssr), microbeam radiation therapy (MR T) and mini beam radiation therapy. The promising results in the treatment of the high grade brain tumors obtained in preclinical studies have paved the way to the clinical trials. The first patients are expected in the fall of 2010. (Author).

  8. Biological Effectiveness and Application of Heavy Ions in Radiation Therapy Described by a Physical and Biological Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Kjeld J.; Hansen, Johnny W.

    is inadequately described by an RBE-factor, whereas the complete formulation of the probability of survival must be used, as survival depends on both radiation quality and dose. The theoretical model of track structure can be used in dose-effect calculations for neutron-, high-LET, and low-LET radiation applied...... simultaneously in therapy....

  9. Validation of the Austrian forecast model for solar, biologically effective UV radiation-UV index for Vienna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalwieser, Alois W.; Schauberger, Günther

    2000-11-01

    Since October 1995, a daily forecast of the UV index, as the irradiance of the biologically effective ultraviolet radiation, for the next day is published for Austria, Europe, and world wide. The Austrian forecast model as well as the input parameters are described. By connecting the UV index with the sensitivity of the photobiological skin types, a recommendation is given to select an appropriate sun protection factor of a sunscreen to avoid overexposure of the skin. The validation of the Austrian forecast model is done by measurements of the biologically effective ultraviolet radiation collected between July 1996 and July 1998 at Vienna (48°N, 16°E), Austria. The forecast quality is evaluated by comparing the Austrian model with two statistical models used in Canada and the Netherlands. By using the underestimation of the UV index as criteria in the sense of radiation protection, the Austrian model shows a 12% underestimation over the whole year.

  10. Effects of low power microwave radiation on biological activity of Collagenase enzyme and growth rate of S. Cerevisiae yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsuhaim, Hamad S.; Vojisavljevic, Vuk; Pirogova, E.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, microwave radiation, a type/subset of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation (EMR) has been widely used in industry, medicine, as well as food technology and mobile communication. Use of mobile phones is rapidly growing. Four years from now, 5.1 billion people will be mobile phone users around the globe - almost 1 billion more mobile users than the 4.3 billion people worldwide using them now. Consequently, exposure to weak radiofrequency/microwave radiation generated by these devices is markedly increasing. Accordingly, public concern about potential hazards on human health is mounting [1]. Thermal effects of radiofrequency/microwave radiation are very well-known and extensively studied. Of particular interest are non-thermal effects of microwave exposures on biological systems. Nonthermal effects are described as changes in cellular metabolism caused by both resonance absorption and induced EMR and are often accompanied by a specific biological response. Non-thermal biological effects are measurable changes in biological systems that may or may not be associated with adverse health effects. In this study we studied non-thermal effects of low power microwave exposures on kinetics of L-lactate dehydrogenase enzyme and growth rate of yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae strains type II. The selected model systems were continuously exposed to microwave radiation at the frequency of 968MHz and power of 10dBm using the designed and constructed (custom made) Transverse Electro-Magnetic (TEM) cell [2]. The findings reveal that microwave radiation at 968MHz and power of 10dBm inhibits L-lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activity by 26% and increases significantly (15%) the proliferation rate of yeast cells.

  11. Association Between Radiation Necrosis and Tumor Biology After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Jacob A. [Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Bennett, Elizabeth E. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Xiao, Roy [Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Kotecha, Rupesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Chao, Samuel T. [Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Barnett, Gene H.; Angelov, Lilyana [Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Murphy, Erin S.; Yu, Jennifer S. [Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Ahluwalia, Manmeet S. [Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); and others

    2016-12-01

    Background: The primary dose-limiting toxicity of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is radiation necrosis (RN), which occurs after approximately 5% to 10% of treatments. This adverse event may worsen neurologic deficits, increase the frequency and cost of imaging, and necessitate prolonged treatment with steroids or antiangiogenic agents. Previous investigations have primarily identified lesion size and dosimetric constraints as risk factors for RN in small populations. We hypothesized that disease histology, receptor status, and mutational status are associated with RN. Methods and Materials: All patients presenting with brain metastasis between 1997 and 2015 who underwent SRS and subsequent radiographic follow-up at a single tertiary-care institution were eligible for inclusion. The primary outcome was the cumulative incidence of radiographic RN. Multivariate competing risks regression was used to identify biological risk factors for RN. Results: 1939 patients (5747 lesions) were eligible for inclusion; 285 patients (15%) experienced radiographic RN after the treatment of 427 (7%) lesions. After SRS, the median time to RN was 7.6 months. After multivariate analysis, graded prognostic assessment, renal pathology, lesion diameter, and the heterogeneity index remained independently predictive of RN in the pooled cohort. In subset analyses of individual pathologies, HER2-amplified status (hazard ratio [HR] 2.05, P=.02), BRAF V600+ mutational status (HR 0.33, P=.04), lung adenocarcinoma histology (HR 1.89, P=.04), and ALK rearrangement (HR 6.36, P<.01) were also associated with RN. Conclusions: In the present investigation constituting the largest series of RN, several novel risk factors were identified, including renal histology, lung adenocarcinoma histology, HER2 amplification, and ALK/BRAF mutational status. These risk factors may be used to guide clinical trial design incorporating biological risk stratification or dose escalation. Future studies determining the

  12. Master of Science (MSc) Program in Radiation Biology: An Interdepartmental Course Bridging the Gap between Radiation-Related Preclinical and Clinical Disciplines to Prepare Next-Generation Medical Scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Stephanie E; Kessel, Carmen; Wilkens, Jan J; Multhoff, Gabriele; Schmid, Thomas E; Vaupel, Peter; Trott, Klaus-Rüdiger; Berberat, Pascal; Atkinson, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Radiation biology is a highly interdisciplinary field at the interface of biology, physics, and medicine. It is characterized by rapid advances in biological and technical knowledge. The potential for using these advances to optimize medical care, radiation protection, and related fields can be exploited only with complementary activities to support the education of young academics. A small number of academic institutions have committed resources into radiation-related courses and curricula; however, few offer a comprehensive interdepartmental research and training program. At the Technical University of Munich (TUM), a full Master of Science (MSc) course in radiation biology has been established. This article describes the TUM MSc radiation biology program, discusses the scope of the field, the teaching goals, and the interdisciplinary curriculum. Detailed information on the full MSc program can be found continuously updated at www.radonc.med.tum.de/masterradiationbiology.

  13. Biosensors for Real-Time Monitoring of Radiation-Induced Biologic Effects in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, James R.; Balogh, Lajos; Majoros, Istvan; Keszler, Balazs; Myc, Andrzej; Kukowska-Latallo, Jolanta; Norris, Theodore; delaiglesia, Felix; Beeson, Nicholas W. (Compiler)

    2002-01-01

    This work seeks to develop cellular biosensors based on dendritic polymers. Nanoscale polymer structures less than 20 nm in diameter will be used as the basis of the biosensors. The structures will be designed to target into specific cells of an astronaut and be able to monitor health issues such as exposure to radiation. Multiple components can be assembled on the polymers including target directors, analytical devices (such as molecular probes), and reporting agents. The reporting will be accomplished through fluorescence signal monitoring, with the use of multispectral analysis for signal interpretation. These nanosensors could facilitate the success and increase the safety of extended space flight. The design and assembly of these devices has been pioneered at the Center for Biologic Nanotechnology in the University of Michigan. This period, synthesis of the test-bed biosensors continued. Studies were performed on the candidate fluorescent dyes to determine which might be suitable for the biosensor under development. Development continued on producing an artificial capillary bed as a tool for the use in the production of the fluorescence signal monitor. Work was also done on the in vitro multispectral analysis system, which uses the robotic microscope.

  14. Green algae in alpine biological soil crust communities: acclimation strategies against ultraviolet radiation and dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, Ulf; Holzinger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Green algae are major components of biological soil crusts in alpine habitats. Together with cyanobacteria, fungi and lichens, green algae form a pioneer community important for the organisms that will succeed them. In their high altitudinal habitat these algae are exposed to harsh and strongly fluctuating environmental conditions, mainly intense irradiation, including ultraviolet radiation, and lack of water leading to desiccation. Therefore, green algae surviving in these environments must have evolved with either avoidance or protective strategies, as well as repair mechanisms for damage. In this review we have highlighted these mechanisms, which include photoprotection, photochemical quenching, and high osmotic values to avoid water loss, and in some groups flexibility of secondary cell walls to maintain turgor pressure even in water-limited situations. These highly specialized green algae will serve as good model organisms to study desiccation tolerance or photoprotective mechanisms, due to their natural capacity to withstand unfavorable conditions. We point out the urgent need for modern phylogenetic approaches in characterizing these organisms, and molecular methods for analyzing the metabolic changes involved in their adaptive strategies.

  15. A review of projection radiography of plasma and biological objects in X-Pinch radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelkovenko, T. A., E-mail: tchel55@mail.ru; Pikuz, S. A., E-mail: pikuz@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Hammer, D. A. [Cornell University (United States)

    2016-03-15

    A review of studies on the X-pinch as a radiation source for X-ray projection shadow radiography (XPSR) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is presented. The ultimate capabilities of the techniques and ways of their achievement are considered. XPSR has been successfully used to study high-energy-density plasma objects, in particular, exploding wires and wire arrays. Using XPSR, the internal structure and dynamics of a wire explosion and wire array implosion have been investigated for the first time, which has made it possible to develop an adequate consistent theory of the processes occurring in the wire loads of generators with currents from several units of kiloamperes to a few tens of megamperes. The use of XAS for diagnostics of wire loads has allowed one for the first time to measure the parameters of matter in the wire core and plasma corona of the load. X-ray images of various biological objects have obtained, including those with the use of the phase contrast method. This review is a logical continuation of the review ''X-Pinch'' [Plasma Phys. Rep. 41, 319, 493 (2015)], in which the X-pinch as a physical object was considered.

  16. Modeling marrow damage from response data: Morphallaxis from radiation biology to benzene toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.; Hasan, J.S.

    1995-12-01

    Consensus principles from radiation biology were used to describe a generic set of nonlinear, first-order differential equations for modeling of toxicity-induced compensatory cell kinetics in terms of sublethal injury, repair, direct killing, killing of cells with unrepaired sublethal injury, and repopulation. This cellular model was linked to a probit model of hematopoietic mortality that describes death from infection and/or hemorrhage between {approximately} 5 and 30 days. Mortality data from 27 experiments with 851 doseresponse groups, in which doses were protracted by rate and/or fractionation, were used to simultaneously estimate all rate constants by maximum-likelihood methods. Data used represented 18,940 test animals distributed according to: (mice, 12,827); (rats, 2,925); (sheep, 1,676); (swine, 829); (dogs, 479); and (burros, 204). Although a long-term, repopulating hematopoietic stem cell is ancestral to all lineages needed to restore normal homeostasis, the dose-response data from the protracted irradiations indicate clearly that the particular lineage that is ``critical`` to hematopoietic recovery does not resemble stem-like cells with regard to radiosensitivity and repopulation rates. Instead, the weakest link in the chain of hematopoiesis was found to have an intrinsic radioresistance equal to or greater than stromal cells and to repopulate at the same rates. Model validation has been achieved by predicting the LD{sub 50} and/or fractional group mortality in 38 protracted-dose experiments (rats and mice) that were not used in the fitting of model coefficients.

  17. The biological effect of prolonged radiation and ways of selecting new anti-radiation drugs effective in this kind of radiation injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogozkin, V. D.; Chertkov, K. S.; Nikolov, I.

    1974-01-01

    The basic characteristics of prolonged radiation - increased tolerance of radiation injury - are attributed to cellular kinetics; as dose rate is reduced, the population rate is not disturbed, particularly that of stem cells which makes it possible for the organism to tolerate higher radiation loads. It is concluded that this effect makes approved radio protectors, whose effect contains an established cytostatic component, unsuitable for prolonged radiation. It is better to correct the stem pool formation process by either accelerating the proliferation of cells or limiting the effect of stimuli causing cells to lose colony forming properties.

  18. Simulating the Impact of the Natural Radiation Background on Bacterial Systems: Implications for Very Low Radiation Biological Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Nathanael; Biron, David G; Brown, Jeremy M C; Incerti, Sébastien; Marin, Pierre; Maigne, Lydia; Sarramia, David; Seznec, Hervé; Breton, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    At very low radiation dose rates, the effects of energy depositions in cells by ionizing radiation is best understood stochastically, as ionizing particles deposit energy along tracks separated by distances often much larger than the size of cells. We present a thorough analysis of the stochastic impact of the natural radiative background on cells, focusing our attention on E. coli grown as part of a long term evolution experiment in both underground and surface laboratories. The chance per day that a particle track interacts with a cell in the surface laboratory was found to be 6 × 10-5 day-1, 100 times less than the expected daily mutation rate for E. coli under our experimental conditions. In order for the chance cells are hit to approach the mutation rate, a gamma background dose rate of 20 μGy hr-1 is predicted to be required.

  19. Outcome of radiation biology in radiotherapy. Past and future directions; Applications cliniques des recherches en radiobiologie. Etat des lieux et perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennequin, C. [Hopital Saint-Louis, Service d' Oncologie-Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Favaudon, V. [Centre Universitaire d' Orsay, Institut Curie, Section de Recherche, Lab. Raymond-Latarjet, Unite 350 Inserm, 91 (France)

    2000-10-01

    Over the last ten years the impact of fundamental radiation biology into daily radiotherapy has been of concern chiefly to fractionation, prediction of radiation response, tumour oxygenation, intrinsic radiosensitivity including genetic approaches, and the determinants of the outcome of chemoradiotherapy combinations. Future goals will rely on sophisticated approaches, based on the progress of molecular and cellular biology and the characterization of new targets for radiation. Some of these novel advances will be discussed. (authors)

  20. Limiting radiation damage for high-brilliance biological solution scattering: practical experience at the EMBL P12 beamline PETRAIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Cy M; Graewert, Melissa A; Svergun, Dmitri I; Blanchet, Clément E

    2015-03-01

    Radiation damage is the general curse of structural biologists who use synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to investigate biological macromolecules in solution. The EMBL-P12 biological SAXS beamline located at the PETRAIII storage ring (DESY, Hamburg, Germany) caters to an extensive user community who integrate SAXS into their diverse structural biology programs. The high brilliance of the beamline [5.1 × 10(12) photons s(-1), 10 keV, 500 (H) µm × 250 (V) µm beam size at the sample position], combined with automated sample handling and data acquisition protocols, enable the high-throughput structural characterization of macromolecules in solution. However, considering the often-significant resources users invest to prepare samples, it is crucial that simple and effective protocols are in place to limit the effects of radiation damage once it has been detected. Here various practical approaches are evaluated that users can implement to limit radiation damage at the P12 beamline to maximize the chances of collecting quality data from radiation sensitive samples.

  1. Microbeam radiation therapy. Physical and biological aspects of a new cancer therapy and development of a treatment planning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartzsch, Stefan

    2014-11-05

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) is a novel treatment strategy against cancer. Highly brilliant synchrotron radiation is collimated to parallel, a few micrometre wide, planar beams and used to irradiate malignant tissues with high doses. The applied peak doses are considerably higher than in conventional radiotherapy, but valley doses between the beams remain underneath the established tissue tolerance. Previous research has shown that these beam geometries spare normal tissue, while being effective in tumour ablation. In this work physical and biological aspects of the therapy were investigated. A therapy planning system was developed for the first clinical treatments at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble (France) and a dosimetry method based on radiochromic films was created to validate planned doses with measurements on a micrometre scale. Finally, experiments were carried out on a cellular level in order to correlate the physically planned doses with the biological damage caused in the tissue. The differences between Monte Carlo dose and dosimetry are less than 10% in the valley and 5% in the peak regions. Developed alternative faster dose calculation methods deviate from the computational intensive MC simulations by less than 15% and are able to determine the dose within a few minutes. The experiments in cell biology revealed an significant influence of intercellular signalling on the survival of cells close to radiation boundaries. These observations may not only be important for MRT but also for conventional radiotherapy.

  2. Backscatter radiation at tissue-titanium interfaces; Biological effects from diagnostic 65 kVp X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosengren, B. (Department of Radiation Sciences, Uppsala University (Sweden) Dept. of Oncology, University Hospital, Bergen (Norway)); Wulff, L. (Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Central Hospital, Boden (Sweden)); Carlsson, E. (Department of Radiation Sciences, Uppsala University (Sweden)); Carlsson, J. (Department of Radiation Sciences, Uppsala University (Sweden)); Strid, K.G. (Dept. of Handicap Research, Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden)); Montelius, A. (Dept. of Hospital Physics, University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden))

    1993-01-01

    The induced secondary electrons from a metal surface by diagnostic X-rays are thought to contribute to cell damage near the tissue-metal boundaries of metal implants. Titanium implants are becoming increasingly more popular for tissue reconstructions and it is rather often desirable to take radiographs of the operated area. In this study we compared the biological effects of radiation on cultured mammalian test cells grown on titanium plates with the radiation effects on cells that were grown on plastic control plates. In order to study the acute radiation effects on cell growth it was necessary to work with rather high radiation doses (0.7-5 Gy). Photon energies, suitable for diagnostic radiography in odontology, 65 kV, were applied. We found that the cells grown on titanium plates were, in terms of the applied dose in the surrounding culture medium, more sensitive to the irradiations than the cells growing on plastic plates. The survival curve for the cells on titanium had a steeper slope, showed no shoulder in the low-dose region and looked like curves normally obtained for high LET radiation. It was not possible to resolve to what degree the titanium-dependent changes were due to an increased dose near the titanium surface or to a change in the radiobiological effectiveness. Although there was a significant decrease in cellular survival near the metal, postoperative intraoral radiography after titanium implantations need not be excluded. The maximal doses given in odontological X-ray examinations are less than 1 mGy and, if the results in this study are applied, the biological effects near the titanium implant will correspond to biological effects in soft tissue of doses less than 20 mGy which is lower than the doses that give acute effects. The risk of acute healing disturbances are significant only at much higher radiation doses. (orig.).

  3. Study of mechanical behavior of PMMA in bending and after UV irradiation and gamma radiation; Estudo do comportamento mecanico do PMMA sob flexao apos irradiacao UV e gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todt, M.L.; Kienen, V.D.; Azevedo, E.C., E-mail: helunica@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    PMMA is a polymer that has density similar to water and refractive index alike to glass. It has been used in the substitution to roofing tiles and coverages, affording to be exposed to UV radiation and gamma radiation. This paper had the objective to study the effect in the flexural proprieties of the PMMA exposed to these types of radiations and the evaluation of the wettability through a contact angle measurer. The PMMA specimens have been submitted to 1500 h of UVA radiation, 1500 h of UVC radiation and to 25kGy of gamma radiation. The results show that the PMMA. (author)

  4. 5. Conference cycle. The radiations and the Biological Sciences; 5. Ciclo de conferencias. Las radiaciones y las Ciencias Biologicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcazar G, M.; Chavez B, A

    1991-06-15

    Nuclear technologies and their development have influenced many aspects of modern life. Besides used for electricity production nuclear technologies are applied in many other fields, especially in biological sciences. In genetics and molecular biology they enable research resulting in increased food production and better food preservation. Usage in material sciences lead to new varieties of plastics or improved characteristics. Nuclear applications are used in pe troleum industries and in forecasting geothermic power. Radiobiology and radiotherapy enable diagnosis and therapy of several diseases, e.g. cancer. Nuclear technologies also contribute to preserve the environment. They offer methods to analyse as well as decrease the environmental impacts. The 5. conference cyle entitled 'The Radiations and the Biological Sciences' aims to inform students of biological sciences about new nuclear technologies applied in their field of interest.

  5. Multi-mutational model for cancer based on age-time patterns of radiation effects: 2. Biological aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.; Pierce, P.A.

    1997-09-04

    Biological properties of relevance when modeling cancers induced in the atom bomb survivors include the wide distribution of the induced cancers across all organs, their biological indistinguishability from background cancers, their rates being proportional to background cancer rates, their rates steadily increasing over at least 50 years as the survivors age, and their radiation dose response being linear. We have successfully described this array of properties with a modified Armitage-Doll model using 5 to 6 somatic mutations, no intermediate growth, and the dose-related replacement of any one of these time-driven mutations by a radiation-induced mutation. Such a model is contrasted to prevailing models that use fewer mutations combined with intervening growth. While the rationale and effectiveness of our model is compelling for carcinogenesis in the atom bomb survivors, the lack of a promotional component may limit the generality of the model for other types of human carcinogenesis.

  6. Mathematical model of biological order state or syndrome in traditional Chinese medicine: based on electromagnetic radiation within the human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jinxiang; Huang, Jinzhao

    2012-03-01

    In this study, based on the resonator model and exciplex model of electromagnetic radiation within the human body, mathematical model of biological order state, also referred to as syndrome in traditional Chinese medicine, was established and expressed as: "Sy = v/ 1n(6I + 1)". This model provides the theoretical foundation for experimental research addressing the order state of living system, especially the quantitative research syndrome in traditional Chinese medicine.

  7. A phenomenological relative biological effectiveness approach for proton therapy based on an improved description of the mixed radiation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairani, A.; Dokic, I.; Magro, G.; Tessonnier, T.; Bauer, J.; Böhlen, T. T.; Ciocca, M.; Ferrari, A.; Sala, P. R.; Jäkel, O.; Debus, J.; Haberer, T.; Abdollahi, A.; Parodi, K.

    2017-02-01

    Proton therapy treatment planning systems (TPSs) are based on the assumption of a constant relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 without taking into account the found in vitro experimental variations of the RBE as a function of tissue type, linear energy transfer (LET) and dose. The phenomenological RBE models available in literature are based on the dose-averaged LET (LET D ) as an indicator of the physical properties of the proton radiation field. The LET D values are typically calculated taking into account primary and secondary protons, neglecting the biological effect of heavier secondaries. In this work, we have introduced a phenomenological RBE approach which considers the biological effect of primary protons, and of secondary protons, deuterons, tritons (Z  =  1) and He fragments (3He and 4He, Z  =  2). The calculation framework, coupled with a Monte Carlo (MC) code, has been successfully benchmarked against clonogenic in vitro data measured in this work for two cell lines and then applied to determine biological quantities for spread-out Bragg peaks and a prostate and a head case. The introduced RBE formalism, which depends on the mixed radiation field, the dose and the ratio of the linear-quadratic model parameters for the reference radiation {{≤ft(α /β \\right)}\\text{ph}} , predicts, when integrated in an MC code, higher RBE values in comparison to LET D -based parameterizations. This effect is particular enhanced in the entrance channel of the proton field and for low {{≤ft(α /β \\right)}\\text{ph}} tissues. For the prostate and the head case, we found higher RBE-weighted dose values up to about 5% in the entrance channel when including or neglecting the Z  =  2 secondaries in the RBE calculation. TPSs able to proper account for the mixed radiation field in proton therapy are thus recommended for an accurate determination of the RBE in the whole treatment field.

  8. Optimal schedules of fractionated radiation therapy by way of the greedy principle: biologically-based adaptive boosting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanin, Leonid; Zaider, Marco

    2014-08-01

    We revisit a long-standing problem of optimization of fractionated radiotherapy and solve it in considerable generality under the following three assumptions only: (1) repopulation of clonogenic cancer cells between radiation exposures follows linear birth-and-death Markov process; (2) clonogenic cancer cells do not interact with each other; and (3) the dose response function s(D) is decreasing and logarithmically concave. Optimal schedules of fractionated radiation identified in this work can be described by the following ‘greedy’ principle: give the maximum possible dose as soon as possible. This means that upper bounds on the total dose and the dose per fraction reflecting limitations on the damage to normal tissue, along with a lower bound on the time between successive fractions of radiation, determine the optimal radiation schedules completely. Results of this work lead to a new paradigm of dose delivery which we term optimal biologically-based adaptive boosting (OBBAB). It amounts to (a) subdividing the target into regions that are homogeneous with respect to the maximum total dose and maximum dose per fraction allowed by the anatomy and biological properties of the normal tissue within (or adjacent to) the region in question and (b) treating each region with an individual optimal schedule determined by these constraints. The fact that different regions may be treated to different total dose and dose per fraction mean that the number of fractions may also vary between regions. Numerical evidence suggests that OBBAB produces significantly larger tumor control probability than the corresponding conventional treatments.

  9. THE HIGH BACKGROUND RADIATION AREA IN RAMSAR IRAN: GEOLOGY, NORM, BIOLOGY, LNT, AND POSSIBLE REGULATORY FUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karam, P. A.

    2002-02-25

    The city of Ramsar Iran hosts some of the highest natural radiation levels on earth, and over 2000 people are exposed to radiation doses ranging from 1 to 26 rem per year. Curiously, inhabitants of this region seem to have no greater incidence of cancer than those in neighboring areas of normal background radiation levels, and preliminary studies suggest their blood cells experience fewer induced chromosomal abnormalities when exposed to 150 rem ''challenge'' doses of radiation than do the blood cells of their neighbors. This paper will briefly describe the unique geology that gives Ramsar its extraordinarily high background radiation levels. It will then summarize the studies performed to date and will conclude by suggesting ways to incorporate these findings (if they are borne out by further testing) into future radiation protection standards.

  10. [Results of the studies on radiation ecology and radiation biology at the Institute of Biology of Komi Science Center of Ural division of Russian Academy of Science (on 40th anniversary of the Department of Radiation Ecology)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskaev, A I; Kudiasheva, A G; Popova, O N; Materiĭ, L D; Shuktomova, I I; Frolova, N P; Kozubov, G M; Zaĭnullin, V G; Ermakova, O V; Rakin, A O; Bashlykova, L A

    2000-01-01

    Information about the foundation and history of the Radiation Ecology Department and results of the researches on the effect of increased background radiation level on plant and animal populations, migration of radionuclides in natural biocoenosies with increased radiation level are presented.

  11. Macrophage biology plays a central role during ionizing radiation-elicited tumor response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuji Wu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is one of the major therapeutic modalities for most solid tumors. The anti-tumor effect of radiation therapy consists of the direct tumor cell killing, as well as the modulation of tumor microenvironment and the activation of immune response against tumors. Radiation therapy has been shown to promote immunogenic cells death, activate dendritic cells and enhance tumor antigen presentation and anti-tumor T cell activation. Radiation therapy also programs innate immune cells such as macrophages that leads to either radiosensitization or radioresistance, according to different tumors and different radiation regimen studied. The mechanisms underlying radiation-induced macrophage activation remain largely elusive. Various molecular players such as NF-κB, MAPKs, p53, reactive oxygen species, inflammasomes have been involved in these processes. The skewing to a pro-inflammatory phenotype thus results in the activation of anti-tumor immune response and enhanced radiotherapy effect. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of radiation-induced macrophage activation and its role in tumor response to radiation therapy is crucial for the development of new therapeutic strategies to enhance radiation therapy efficacy.

  12. Comments on the theory of radiation risk II Experiments in biology and the assessment of radiation risk

    CERN Document Server

    Neufeld, J

    1974-01-01

    For pt. I see ibid., vol. 26, no.3, 229-37 (March 1974). An experimental program and a computational program are outlined for obtaining a relationship between transfer, L. Q and linear energy using biological data for critical effects and sets of linear equations can be obtained in which the coefficients are the doses delivered in intervals of L, and the unknowns are 'biological weighting factors', lambda . From these equations one can derive lambda 's for various L's as they relate to critical effects in animals. Using value judgment and combining the calculated results with data observed on men, one can obtain a Q-L relationship which is more directly based on experimental evidence than that which is currently used. (36 refs).

  13. Paradigm Shift in Radiation Biology/Radiation Oncology—Exploitation of the “H2O2 Effect” for Radiotherapy Using Low-LET (Linear Energy Transfer Radiation such as X-rays and High-Energy Electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Ogawa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Most radiation biologists/radiation oncologists have long accepted the concept that the biologic effects of radiation principally involve damage to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA, which is the critical target, as described in “Radiobiology for the Radiologist”, by E.J. Hall and A.J. Giaccia [1]. Although the concepts of direct and indirect effects of radiation are fully applicable to low-LET (linear energy transfer radioresistant tumor cells/normal tissues such as osteosarcoma cells and chondrocytes, it is believed that radiation-associated damage to DNA does not play a major role in the mechanism of cell death in low-LET radiosensitive tumors/normal tissues such as malignant lymphoma cells and lymphocytes. Hall and Giaccia describe lymphocytes as very radiosensitive, based largely on apoptosis subsequent to irradiation. As described in this review, apoptosis of lymphocytes and lymphoma cells is actually induced by the “hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 effect”, which I propose in this review article for the first time. The mechanism of lymphocyte death via the H2O2 effect represents an ideal model to develop the enhancement method of radiosensitivity for radiation therapy of malignant neoplasms. In terms of imitating the high radiosensitivity of lymphocytes, osteosarcoma cells (representative of low-LET radioresistant cells might be the ideal model for indicating the conversion of cells from radioresistant to radiosensitive utilizing the H2O2 effect. External beam radiation such as X-rays and high-energy electrons for use in modern radiotherapy are generally produced using a linear accelerator. We theorized that when tumors are irradiated in the presence of H2O2, the activities of anti-oxidative enzymes such as peroxidases and catalase are blocked and oxygen molecules are produced at the same time via the H2O2 effect, resulting in oxidative damage to low-LET radioresistant tumor cells, thereby rendering them highly sensitive to irradiation. In this

  14. Evaluation of DNA dosimetry to assess ozone-mediated variability of biologically harmful radiation in Antarctica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, AL; Peat, HJ; Buma, AGJ

    In this study we investigated the use of a DNA dosimeter to accurately measure changes in ultraviolet B radiation (UVBR; 280-315 nm) under Antarctic ozone hole conditions. Naked DNA solution in quartz tubes was exposed to ambient solar radiation at Rothera Research Station, Antarctica, between

  15. Late health effects of radiation exposure: new statistical, epidemiological, and biological approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Peter; Stram, Daniel O

    2013-08-01

    The 2012 Conference on Radiation and Health in Kennebunkport, Maine, USA, brought together epidemiologists, statisticians, basic scientists, and clinical scientists interested in the health effects of radiation exposure due to medical, diagnostic, occupational, and non-medical sources, to review the current status of epidemiologic and clinical research on radiation exposure in relation to risk of breast, thyroid cancer, and leukemia, cardiopulmonary events, and other late effects. Topics discussed included synergy between radiation exposure and genetic background; late effects of radiation therapy in childhood cancer survivors and several other medically exposed cohorts; leukemia risk seen in Russian and Chernobyl studies, and leukemia risk from computed tomography scans in childhood. This report summarizes the presentations at the meeting and discusses their significance in light of earlier studies and of other ongoing research.

  16. Quantification of ultraviolet photon emission from interaction of charged particles in materials of interest in radiation biology research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Syed Bilal, E-mail: ahmadsb@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan); McNeill, Fiona E., E-mail: fmcneill@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Prestwich, William V., E-mail: prestwic@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Byun, Soo Hyun, E-mail: soohyun@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Seymour, Colin, E-mail: seymouc@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Mothersill, Carmel E., E-mail: mothers@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2014-01-15

    In radiation biology experiments often cells are irradiated using charged particles with the intention that only a specified number of cells are hit by the primary ion track. However, in doing so several other materials such as the cell container and the growth media etc. are also irradiated, and UV radiation emitted from these materials can potentially interact with the cells. We have hypothesized that some “bystander effects” that are thought to be chemically mediated, may be, in fact, a physical effect, where UV is interacting with non-targeted cells. Based upon our hypothesis we quantified the emission of UV from Polypropylene, Mylar, Teflon, and Cellophane which are all commonly used materials in radiation biology experiments. Additionally we measured the NIST standard materials of Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves as these powdered materials are derived from living cells. Protons accelerated up to an energy of 2.2 MeV, in a 3 MV Van de Graff accelerator, were used for irradiation. Beam current was kept to 10 nA, which corresponds to a proton fluence rate of 2.7 × 10{sup 10} protons mm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. All the materials were found to emit light at UV frequencies and intensities that were significant enough to conduct a further investigation for their biological consequences. Mylar and polypropylene are commonly used in radiation induced bystander effect studies and are considered to be non-fluorescent. However our study showed that this is not the case. Significant luminescence observed from the irradiated NIST standard reference materials for Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves verified that the luminescence emission is not restricted only to the polymeric materials that are used to contain cells. It can also occur from ion interactions within the cells as well.

  17. Quantification of ultraviolet photon emission from interaction of charged particles in materials of interest in radiation biology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Syed Bilal; McNeill, Fiona E.; Prestwich, William V.; Byun, Soo Hyun; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel E.

    2014-01-01

    In radiation biology experiments often cells are irradiated using charged particles with the intention that only a specified number of cells are hit by the primary ion track. However, in doing so several other materials such as the cell container and the growth media etc. are also irradiated, and UV radiation emitted from these materials can potentially interact with the cells. We have hypothesized that some "bystander effects" that are thought to be chemically mediated, may be, in fact, a physical effect, where UV is interacting with non-targeted cells. Based upon our hypothesis we quantified the emission of UV from Polypropylene, Mylar, Teflon, and Cellophane which are all commonly used materials in radiation biology experiments. Additionally we measured the NIST standard materials of Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves as these powdered materials are derived from living cells. Protons accelerated up to an energy of 2.2 MeV, in a 3 MV Van de Graff accelerator, were used for irradiation. Beam current was kept to 10 nA, which corresponds to a proton fluence rate of 2.7 × 1010 protons mm-2 s-1. All the materials were found to emit light at UV frequencies and intensities that were significant enough to conduct a further investigation for their biological consequences. Mylar and polypropylene are commonly used in radiation induced bystander effect studies and are considered to be non-fluorescent. However our study showed that this is not the case. Significant luminescence observed from the irradiated NIST standard reference materials for Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves verified that the luminescence emission is not restricted only to the polymeric materials that are used to contain cells. It can also occur from ion interactions within the cells as well.

  18. Occupational cosmic radiation exposure in Portuguese airline pilots: study of a possible correlation with oxidative biological markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rodrigo; Folgosa, Filipe; Soares, Paulo; Pereira, Alice S; Garcia, Raquel; Gestal-Otero, Juan Jesus; Tavares, Pedro; Gomes da Silva, Marco D R

    2013-05-01

    Several studies have sought to understand the health effects of occupational exposure to cosmic radiation. However, only few biologic markers or associations with disease outcomes have so far been identified. In the present study, 22 long- and 26 medium-haul male Portuguese airline pilots and 36 factory workers who did not fly regularly were investigated. The two groups were comparable in age and diet, were non-smokers, never treated with ionizing radiation and other factors. Cosmic radiation exposure in pilots was quantified based on direct monitoring of 51 flights within Europe, and from Europe to North and South America, and to Africa. Indirect dose estimates in pilots were performed based on the SIEVERT (Système informatisé d'évaluation par vol de l'exposition au rayonnement cosmique dans les transports aériens) software for 6,039 medium- and 1,366 long-haul flights. Medium-haul pilots had a higher cosmic radiation dose rate than long-haul pilots, that is, 3.3 ± 0.2 μSv/h and 2.7 ± 0.3 μSv/h, respectively. Biological tests for oxidative stress on blood and urine, as appropriate, at two time periods separated by 1 year, included measurements of antioxidant capacity, total protein, ferritin, hemoglobin, creatinine and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG). Principal components analysis was used to discriminate between the exposed and unexposed groups based on all the biological tests. According to this analysis, creatinine and 8OHdG levels were different for the pilots and the unexposed group, but no distinctions could be made among the medium- and the long-haul pilots. While hemoglobin levels seem to be comparable between the studied groups, they were directly correlated with ferritin values, which were lower for the airline pilots.

  19. Metformin: A Novel Biological Modifier of Tumor Response to Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koritzinsky, Marianne, E-mail: mkoritzi@uhnresearch.ca

    2015-10-01

    Over the last decade, evidence has emerged to support a role for the antidiabetic drug metformin in the prevention and treatment of cancer. In particular, recent studies demonstrate that metformin enhances tumor response to radiation in experimental models, and retrospective analyses have shown that diabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy have improved outcomes if they take metformin to control their diabetes. Metformin may therefore be of utility for nondiabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. The purpose of this review is to examine the data pertaining to an interaction between metformin and radiation, highlighting the essential steps needed to advance our current knowledge. There is also a focus on key biomarkers that should accompany prospective clinical trials in which metformin is being examined as a modifying agent with radiation therapy. Existing evidence supports that the mechanism underlying the ability of metformin to enhance radiation response is multifaceted, and includes direct radiosensitization as well as a reduction in tumor stem cell fraction, proliferation, and tumor hypoxia. Interestingly, metformin may enhance radiation response specifically in certain genetic backgrounds, such as in cells with loss of the tumor suppressors p53 and LKB1, giving rise to a therapeutic ratio and potential predictive biomarkers.

  20. Very high background radiation areas of Ramsar, Iran: preliminary biological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiassi-nejad, M; Mortazavi, S M J; Cameron, J R; Niroomand-rad, A; Karam, P A

    2002-01-01

    People in some areas of Ramsar, a city in northern Iran, receive an annual radiation absorbed dose from background radiation that is up to 260 mSv y(-1), substantially higher than the 20 mSv y(-1) that is permitted for radiation workers. Inhabitants of Ramsar have lived for many generations in these high background areas. Cytogenetic studies show no significant differences between people in the high background compared to people in normal background areas. An in vitro challenge dose of 1.5 Gy of gamma rays was administered to the lymphocytes, which showed significantly reduced frequency for chromosome aberrations of people living in high background compared to those in normal background areas in and near Ramsar. Specifically, inhabitants of high background radiation areas had about 56% the average number of induced chromosomal abnormalities of normal background radiation area inhabitants following this exposure. This suggests that adaptive response might be induced by chronic exposure to natural background radiation as opposed to acute exposure to higher (tens of mGy) levels of radiation in the laboratory. There were no differences in laboratory tests of the immune systems, and no noted differences in hematological alterations between these two groups of people.

  1. MO-F-BRCD-01: Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Updates on Clinical, Biological, and Physics/QA:SBRT (Part 1): Biological and Clinical Updates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, P

    2012-06-01

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) is an important form of cancer therapy with increasingly broad application across a spectrum of tumor types in primary and metastatic settings. In this presentation the radiation biology, clinical experience from various trials, and cautionary updates on normal tissue tolerances will be presented. The effective radiobiology of SBRT and hypofractionated courses of therapy has become more evident with the increasing reports of retrospective clinical outcomes and prospective clinical trial results. Current open multi-institutional national cooperative trials will be reviewed. Accumulating clinical experiences are yielding new insights into practical aspects of tumor and normal tissue responses to high dose per fraction treatment. Indeed, SBRT has produced profound tumoricidal and ablative effects, however there is potential for grave toxicity and this demands that clinicians be knowledgeable regarding normal tissue tolerances for various hypofractionated courses. As a final note, the technology associated with SBRT has evolved remarkably in the last decade, and procedures that originally required hours to plan, with cumbersome quality assurance methods, arduous set-up times, and long protracted deliveries can now be performed in ever shorter time periods. Given these technology improvements and recognizing the great palliative potential of hypofractionated radiation therapy to relieve cancer symptoms quickly and efficiently, a new strategy to deliver SBRT in a single session called STAT RAD is presented for discussion. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  2. Geant4-DNA simulation of DNA damage caused by direct and indirect radiation effects and comparison with biological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagrasa, Carmen; Meylan, Sylvain; Gonon, Geraldine; Gruel, Gaëtan; Giesen, Ulrich; Bueno, Marta; Rabus, Hans

    2017-09-01

    In this work we present results obtained in the frame of the BioQuaRT project. The objective of the study was the correlation between the number of radiation-induced double strand breaks (DSB) of the DNA molecule and the probability of detecting nuclear foci after targeted microbeam irradiation of cells with protons and alpha particles of different LET. The former were obtained by simulation with new methods integrated into Geant4-DNA that permit calculating the number of DSB in a DNA target model induced by direct and indirect radiation effects. A particular focus was laid in this work on evaluating the influence of different criteria applied to the simulated results for predicting the formation of a direct SSB. Indeed, these criteria have an important impact on the predicted number of DSB per particle track and its dependence with LET. Among the criteria tested in this work, the case that a direct radiation interaction leads to a strand break if the cumulative energy deposited in the backbone part of one nucleotide exceeds a threshold of 17.5 eV leads to the best agreement with the relative LET dependence of number of radiation induced foci. Further calculations and experimental data are nevertheless needed in order to fix the simulation parameters and to help interpreting the biological experimental data observed by immunofluorescence in terms of the DSB complexity.

  3. Prostate radiation in non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer provides an interesting insight into biology of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascoe Abigail C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The natural history of non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer is unknown and treatment options are limited. We present a retrospective review of 13 patients with locally advanced or high risk prostate cancer, initially treated with hormone monotherapy and then treated with prostate radiation after becoming castration refractory. Findings Median PSA response following prostate radiation was 67.4%. Median time to biochemical progression following radiotherapy was 15 months and to detection of metastatic disease was 18.5 months. Median survival from castration resistance (to date of death or November 2011 was 60 months, with median survival from RT 42 months. Conclusion Prostate radiation appears to be beneficial even in patients with potential micrometastatic disease, which supports the hypothesis that the primary tumour is important in the progression of prostate cancer. These results are an interesting addition to the literature on the biology of prostate cancer especially as this data is unlikely to be available in the future due to combined prostate radiation and androgen deprivation therapy now being the standard of care.

  4. Geant4-DNA simulation of DNA damage caused by direct and indirect radiation effects and comparison with biological data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villagrasa Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present results obtained in the frame of the BioQuaRT project. The objective of the study was the correlation between the number of radiation-induced double strand breaks (DSB of the DNA molecule and the probability of detecting nuclear foci after targeted microbeam irradiation of cells with protons and alpha particles of different LET. The former were obtained by simulation with new methods integrated into Geant4-DNA that permit calculating the number of DSB in a DNA target model induced by direct and indirect radiation effects. A particular focus was laid in this work on evaluating the influence of different criteria applied to the simulated results for predicting the formation of a direct SSB. Indeed, these criteria have an important impact on the predicted number of DSB per particle track and its dependence with LET. Among the criteria tested in this work, the case that a direct radiation interaction leads to a strand break if the cumulative energy deposited in the backbone part of one nucleotide exceeds a threshold of 17.5 eV leads to the best agreement with the relative LET dependence of number of radiation induced foci. Further calculations and experimental data are nevertheless needed in order to fix the simulation parameters and to help interpreting the biological experimental data observed by immunofluorescence in terms of the DSB complexity.

  5. Study of radiation detectors response in standard X, gamma and beta radiation standard beams; Estudo da resposta de monitores de radioprotecao em feixes padronizados de radiacao X, gama e beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonato, Fernanda Beatrice Conceicao

    2010-07-01

    The response of 76 Geiger-Mueller detectors, 4 semiconductor detectors and 34 ionization chambers were studied. Many of them were calibrated with gamma radiation beams ({sup 37}Cs and {sup 60}Co), and some of them were tested in beta radiation ({sup 90}Sr+{sup 9'}0Y e {sup 204}Tl) and X radiation (N-60, N-80, N-100, N-150) beams. For all three types of radiation, the calibration factors of the instruments were obtained, and the energy and angular dependences were studied. For beta and gamma radiation, the angular dependence was studied for incident radiation angles of 0 deg and +- 45 deg. The curves of the response of the instruments were obtained over an angle interval of 0 deg to +- 90 deg, for gamma, beta and X radiations. The calibration factors obtained for beta radiation were compared to those obtained for gamma radiation. For gamma radiation, 24 of the 66 tested Geiger-Mueller detectors presented results for the energy dependence according to international recommendation of ISO 4037-2 and 56 were in accordance with the Brazilian ABNT 10011 recommendation. The ionization chambers and semiconductors were in accordance to national and international recommendations. All instruments showed angular dependence less than 40%. For beta radiation, the instruments showed unsatisfactory results for the energy dependence and angular dependence. For X radiation, the ionization chambers presented results for energy dependence according to the national recommendation, and the angular dependence was less than 40%. (author)

  6. Study of energy dependence of portable radiation monitors used for radiodiagnostic; Estudo da dependencia energetica de monitores portateis de radiacao usados em radiodiagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potiens, Maria da Penha A.; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1999-11-01

    The objective of this work was to study the energy dependence of survey meters (ionization chambers) used for area monitoring in diagnostic Radiology systems. According to the norm ISO 4037-3 (series N, narrow beam) four radiation qualities were established, from 33 to 83 keV (medium energy) and half-value layers of 0,09 to 1,10 mm Cu. Such monitors are sent yearly to the Calibration Laboratory of Sao Paulo for the calibration. The tests were made initially at the gamma radiation fields of {sup 60} Co and after that at the ISO qualities established and the behavior of these instruments was analyzed. In the studied X radiation range most of the instruments presented around 50% of energy dependence, and in relation to the gamma radiation of {sup 60} co all instruments showed a very high energy dependence. (author) 3 refs., 4 tabs.

  7. Biological responses to current UV-B radiation in Arctic regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian; N. Mikkelsen, Teis; Ro-Poulsen, Helge

    Depletion of the ozone layer and the consequent increase in solar ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) may impact living conditions for arctic plants significantly. In order to evaluate how the prevailing UV-B fluxes affect the heath ecosystem at Zackenberg (74°30'N, 20°30'W) and other high......-arctic regions, manipulation experiments with various set-ups have been performed. Activation of plant defence mechanisms by production of UV-B absorbing compounds was significant in ambient UV-B in comparison to a filter treatment reducing the UV-B radiation. Despite the UV-B screening response, ambient UV...... (mycorrhiza) or in the biomass of microbes in the soil of the root zone. However, the composition of the soil microbial community was different in the soils under ambient and reduced UV radiation after three treatment years. These results provide new insight into the negative impact of current UV-B fluxes...

  8. Radiation-induced cardiac damage in early left breast cancer patients: risk factors, biological mechanisms, radiobiology, and dosimetric constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardaro, Angela; Petruzzelli, Maria Fonte; D'Errico, Maria Patrizia; Grimaldi, Luca; Pili, Giorgio; Portaluri, Maurizio

    2012-05-01

    Today there is general awareness of the potential damage to the heart in left-sided (more than in right-sided) breast cancer radiotherapy (RT). Historical changes in tumor and heart doses are presented here along with the impact of different RT techniques and volumes. Individual and pharmacological risk factors are also examined with respect to radiation damage. The biological mechanisms of harm are only partially understood, such as the radiobiology of heart damage due to the presence of various radiosensitive structures and their topographic heterogeneity. Furthermore, individual variability may expose patients to higher or lower risks of late cardiac damage or death. Damage mechanisms and radiobiological characteristics in heart irradiation are presented in relation to dosimetric and biological parameters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Electron paramagnetic resonance study on the ionizing radiation induced defects of the tooth enamel hydroxyapatite; Estudo por ressonancia paramagnetica eletronica de defeitos induzidos pelas radiacoes ionizantes na hidroxiapatita do esmalte dentario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Liana Macedo de

    1995-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite is the main constituent of calcified tissues. Defects induced by ionizing radiations in this biomineral can present high stability and then, these are used as biological markers in radiological accidents, irradiated food identifying and geological and archaeological dating. In this work, paramagnetic centers induced on the enamel of the teeth by environmental ionizing radiation, are investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Decay thermal kinetic presents high complexity and shows the formation of different electron ligation energy centers and structures 65 refs., 40 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Biological responses to current UV-B radiation in Arctic regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian; N. Mikkelsen, Teis; Ro-Poulsen, Helge

    Depletion of the ozone layer and the consequent increase in solar ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) may impact living conditions for arctic plants significantly. In order to evaluate how the prevailing UV-B fluxes affect the heath ecosystem at Zackenberg (74°30'N, 20°30'W) and other high-arctic regi......Depletion of the ozone layer and the consequent increase in solar ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) may impact living conditions for arctic plants significantly. In order to evaluate how the prevailing UV-B fluxes affect the heath ecosystem at Zackenberg (74°30'N, 20°30'W) and other high...

  11. Radiation oxygen biology with pulse electron paramagnetic resonance imaging in animal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redler, Gage; Elas, Martyna; Epel, Boris; Barth, Eugene D; Halpern, Howard J

    2013-01-01

    The reduced oxygen in tumors (hypoxia) generates radiation resistance and limits tumor control probability (TCP) at radiation doses without significant normal tissue complication. Modern radiation therapy delivery with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) enables complex, high-dose gradient patterns, which avoid sensitive human tissues and organs. EPR oxygen images may allow selection of more resistant parts of a tumor to which to deliver more radiation dose to enhance TCP. EPR O2 images are obtained using injected narrow-line, low relaxation rate trityl spin probes that enable pulse radiofrequency EPR O2 images of tumors in the legs of mice, rats, and rabbits, the latter exceeding 4 cm in size. Low relaxation rates of trityls have enabled novel T1-, rather than T2-, based oximetry, which provides near absolute pO2 imaging. Tomographic image formation and filtered back projection reconstruction are used to generate these images with fixed, linear stepped gradients. Images obtained both with T2 and T1 oximetric images have demonstrated the complex in vivo mechanism explaining the unexpected efficacy of TNFerade, a radiation-inducible adenoviral construct to locally produce TNF-induced vascular as well as radiation damage [1, 2]. The unexpected efficacy of large-dose radiation fractions is seen to be due to an interaction between host microvasculature and tumor cells producing a prompt (15 min) postradiation hypoxia, paralyzing tumor cell repair, and sensitizing tumors. Finally, cure of tumors treated to a single 50 % control dose shows a significant dependence on EPR O2 image hypoxic fractions, best shown with the fraction of voxels less than 10 Torr (HF10). We show that these O2 images provide a quantitative basis for measuring tumor and normal tissue response to abnormally low O2 levels. Measurements of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in a specific syngeneic mouse fibrosarcoma, FSa versus fraction of tissue voxels with pO2 less than 10

  12. Cerenkov radiation energy transfer (CRET) imaging: a novel method for optical imaging of PET isotopes in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dothager, Robin S; Goiffon, Reece J; Jackson, Erin; Harpstrite, Scott; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2010-10-11

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows sensitive, non-invasive analysis of the distribution of radiopharmaceutical tracers labeled with positron (β(+))-emitting radionuclides in small animals and humans. Upon β(+) decay, the initial velocity of high-energy β(+) particles can momentarily exceed the speed of light in tissue, producing Cerenkov radiation that is detectable by optical imaging, but is highly absorbed in living organisms. To improve optical imaging of Cerenkov radiation in biological systems, we demonstrate that Cerenkov radiation from decay of the PET isotopes (64)Cu and (18)F can be spectrally coupled by energy transfer to high Stokes-shift quantum nanoparticles (Qtracker705) to produce highly red-shifted photonic emissions. Efficient energy transfer was not detected with (99m)Tc, a predominantly γ-emitting isotope. Similar to bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), herein we define the Cerenkov radiation energy transfer (CRET) ratio as the normalized quotient of light detected within a spectral window centered on the fluorophore emission divided by light detected within a spectral window of the Cerenkov radiation emission to quantify imaging signals. Optical images of solutions containing Qtracker705 nanoparticles and [(18)F]FDG showed CRET ratios in vitro as high as 8.8±1.1, while images of mice with subcutaneous pseudotumors impregnated with Qtracker705 following intravenous injection of [(18)F]FDG showed CRET ratios in vivo as high as 3.5±0.3. Quantitative CRET imaging may afford a variety of novel optical imaging applications and activation strategies for PET radiopharmaceuticals and other isotopes in biomaterials, tissues and live animals.

  13. Highly cited German research contributions to the fields of radiation oncology, biology, and physics. Focus on collaboration and diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieder, C. [Nordland Hospital, Bodoe (Norway). Dept. of Oncology and Palliative Medicine; Tromsoe Univ. (Norway). Inst. of Clinical Medicine

    2012-10-15

    Background and purpose: Tight budgets and increasing competition for research funding pose challenges for highly specialized medical disciplines such as radiation oncology. Therefore, a systematic review was performed of successfully completed research that had a high impact on clinical practice. These data might be helpful when preparing new projects. Methods: Different measures of impact, visibility, and quality of published research are available, each with its own pros and cons. For this study, the article citation rate was chosen (minimum 15 citations per year on average). Highly cited German contributions to the fields of radiation oncology, biology, and physics (published between 1990 and 2010) were identified from the Scopus database. Results: Between 1990 and 2010, 106 articles published in 44 scientific journals met the citation requirement. The median average of yearly citations was 21 (maximum 167, minimum 15). All articles with {>=} 40 citations per year were published between 2003 and 2009, consistent with the assumption that the citation rate gradually increases for up to 2 years after publication. Most citations per year were recorded for meta-analyses and randomized phase III trials, which typically were performed by collaborative groups. Conclusion: A large variety of clinical radiotherapy, biology, and physics topics achieved high numbers of citations. However, areas such as quality of life and side effects, palliative radiotherapy, and radiotherapy for nonmalignant disorders were underrepresented. Efforts to increase their visibility might be warranted. (orig.)

  14. Local dose enhancement in radiation therapy: Monte Carlo simulation study; Reforco local de dose em radioterapia utilizando nanoparticulas: estudo por simulacao Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Laura E. da; Nicolucci, Patricia, E-mail: laura.emilia.fm@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras

    2014-04-15

    The development of nanotechnology has boosted the use of nanoparticles in radiation therapy in order to achieve greater therapeutic ratio between tumor and healthy tissues. Gold has been shown to be most suitable to this task due to the high biocompatibility and high atomic number, which contributes to a better in vivo distribution and for the local energy deposition. As a result, this study proposes to study, nanoparticle in the tumor cell. At a range of 11 nm from the nanoparticle surface, results have shown an absorbed dose 141 times higher for the medium with the gold nanoparticle compared to the water for an incident energy spectrum with maximum photon energy of 50 keV. It was also noted that when only scattered radiation is interacting with the gold nanoparticles, the dose was 134 times higher compared to enhanced local dose that remained significant even for scattered radiation. (author)

  15. Study of radiation conditions for obtaining standard beam computed tomography; Estudo das condicoes de radiacao para obtencao do feixe padrao em tomografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Lucio das Chagas de; Peixoto, Jose Guilherme Pereira, E-mail: lucio-andrade@hotmail.com [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In Brazil there is a need to expand the traceability for the calibration of cameras used in dosimetry in CT. Thus, in order to promote the expansion of the radiation conditions RQT, LNMRI disseminate this greatness. These radiation conditions may be characterized in terms of tension in the X-ray tube (PPV), the first half-value layer (1{sup st} HVL) and homogeneity coefficient (CH). The LNMRI achieved satisfactory results within the international specifications suggested by IEC 61267 and TRS 457. (author)

  16. Endodontic radiology, practice, and knowledge of radiation biology, hazard, and protection among clinical dental students and interns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Emien Enabulele

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the practice and knowledge of endodontic radiology as well as assess the knowledge of radiation biology, hazard, and protection among clinical dental students and interns. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional study of clinical dental students and interns at University of Benin and University of Benin Teaching hospital respectively. Data was collected using a questionnaire which covered practice and knowledge of endodontic radiography, knowledge of radiation biology, hazard, and protection. Data was analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 17.0. Result: Seventy participants were included in the study, 40% were final year students and 24.3% house officers. Majority (95.7% agreed that they exposed radiographs as part of endodontic treatment. Only 18.6% knew that the apices of teeth should be 3mm from the border of the X-ray film, while 24.3% knew that 3mm of periapical bone should be visible on X-ray. Less than half (31.4% knew that paralleling technique was the technique of choice for endodontic radiography and this was statistically Significant in relationship to the status of the of the respondents. A few (4.3% of the respondents had knowledge of new horizons in endodontic imaging. Half of the respondents knew that damage by X-rays is mainly due to formation of free radicals. The most frequently reported radiation hazards was reduced salivary flow, while the least reported was rampant caries. Most knew how to protect patients, themselves, and other persons while exposing radiographs. Conclusion: There is need for inclusion of endodontic radiography in the undergraduate curriculum to ensure proper and correct radiographs during endodontic procedure.

  17. Mechanisms and biological importance of photon-induced bystander responses: do they have an impact on low-dose radiation responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Masanori; Maeda, Munetoshi

    2015-03-01

    Elucidating the biological effect of low linear energy transfer (LET), low-dose and/or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation is essential in ensuring radiation safety. Over the past two decades, non-targeted effects, which are not only a direct consequence of radiation-induced initial lesions produced in cellular DNA but also of intra- and inter-cellular communications involving both targeted and non-targeted cells, have been reported and are currently defining a new paradigm in radiation biology. These effects include radiation-induced adaptive response, low-dose hypersensitivity, genomic instability, and radiation-induced bystander response (RIBR). RIBR is generally defined as a cellular response that is induced in non-irradiated cells that receive bystander signals from directly irradiated cells. RIBR could thus play an important biological role in low-dose irradiation conditions. However, this suggestion was mainly based on findings obtained using high-LET charged-particle radiations. The human population (especially the Japanese, who are exposed to lower doses of radon than the world average) is more frequently exposed to low-LET photons (X-rays or γ-rays) than to high-LET charged-particle radiation on a daily basis. There are currently a growing number of reports describing a distinguishing feature between photon-induced bystander response and high-LET RIBR. In particular, photon-induced bystander response is strongly influenced by irradiation dose, the irradiated region of the targeted cells, and p53 status. The present review focuses on the photon-induced bystander response, and discusses its impact on the low-dose radiation effect. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  18. Impact of ionizing radiation on physicochemical and biological properties of an amphiphilic macromolecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Li; Zablocki, Kyle; Lavelle, Linda; Bodnar, Stanko; Halperin, Frederick; Harper, Ike; Moghe, Prabhas V; Uhrich, Kathryn E

    2012-09-01

    An amphiphilic macromolecule (AM) was exposed to ionizing radiation (both electron beam and gamma) at doses of 25 kGy and 50 kGy to study the impact of these sterilization methods on the physicochemical properties and bioactivity of the AM. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance and gel permeation chromatography were used to determine the chemical structure and molecular weight, respectively. Size and zeta potential of the micelles formed from AMs in aqueous media were evaluated by dynamic light scattering. Bioactivity of irradiated AMs was evaluated by measuring inhibition of oxidized low-density lipoprotein uptake in macrophages. From these studies, no significant changes in the physicochemical properties or bioactivity were observed after the irradiation, demonstrating that the AMs can withstand typical radiation doses used to sterilize materials.

  19. Biological consequences of increased natural radiation background for Microtus oeconomus Pall. populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudyasheva, Alevtina G. [Radioecology Department, Institute of Biology, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Division RAS, 28 Kommunisticheskaya ul., Syktyvkar 167982, Komi Republic (Russian Federation); Shishkina, Ludmila N. [Emanuel Institute of Biochemical Physics RAS, Kosygina 4, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Shevchenko, Oksana G. [Radioecology Department, Institute of Biology, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Division RAS, 28 Kommunisticheskaya ul., Syktyvkar 167982, Komi Republic (Russian Federation)], E-mail: shevchenko@ib.komisc.ru; Bashlykova, Ludmila A.; Zagorskaya, Nadezhda G. [Radioecology Department, Institute of Biology, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Division RAS, 28 Kommunisticheskaya ul., Syktyvkar 167982, Komi Republic (Russian Federation)

    2007-09-15

    The results of long-term investigations (1981-1999) on the state of Microtus oeconomus Pall. (tundra vole) population, living under the increased natural radiation background for a long time (for more than 100 generations), are presented. Population density dynamics, morphophysiological parameters, state of the lipid peroxidation regulatory system in different tissues and the cytogenetic effects in bone marrow cells of animals have been analyzed. It is shown that tundra voles from the studied radioactively contaminated areas differ from those on natural radiation background area for the parameters measured. The results of this long-term investigation show that qualitatively new sub-populations of tundra vole on these areas have evolved, which are able to survive in radioactively contaminated environment.

  20. Impact of ionizing radiation on physicochemical and biological properties of an amphiphilic macromolecule

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Li; Zablocki, Kyle; Lavelle, Linda; Bodnar, Stanko; Halperin, Frederick; Harper, Ike; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Uhrich, Kathryn E.

    2012-01-01

    An amphiphilic macromolecule (AM) was exposed to ionizing radiation (both electron beam and gamma) at doses of 25 kGy and 50 kGy to study the impact of these sterilization methods on the physicochemical properties and bioactivity of the AM. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance and gel permeation chromatography were used to determine the chemical structure and molecular weight, respectively. Size and zeta potential of the micelles formed from AMs in aqueous media were evaluated by dynamic light s...

  1. Effects of ionizing radiation on DNA methylation: from experimental biology to clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miousse, Isabelle R; Kutanzi, Kristy R; Koturbash, Igor

    2017-05-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a ubiquitous environmental stressor with genotoxic and epigenotoxic capabilities. Terrestrial IR, predominantly a low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, is being widely utilized in medicine, as well as in multiple industrial applications. Additionally, an interest in understanding the effects of high-LET irradiation is emerging due to the potential of exposure during space missions and the growing utilization of high-LET radiation in medicine. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the effects of IR on DNA methylation, a key epigenetic mechanism regulating the expression of genetic information. We discuss global, repetitive elements and gene-specific DNA methylation in light of exposure to high and low doses of high- or low-LET IR, fractionated IR exposure, and bystander effects. Finally, we describe the mechanisms of IR-induced alterations to DNA methylation and discuss ways in which that understanding can be applied clinically, including utilization of DNA methylation as a predictor of response to radiotherapy and in the manipulation of DNA methylation patterns for tumor radiosensitization.

  2. Radiation-induced bystander effects. Mechanisms, biological implications, and current investigations at the Leipzig LIPSION facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oesterreicher, J. [Dept. of Nuclear Solid State Physics, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany); Dept. of Radiobiology and Immunology, Purkyne Military Medical Academy, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Prise, K.M.; Michael, B.D. [Gray Cancer Inst., Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Vogt, J.; Butz, T. [Dept. of Nuclear Solid State Physics, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany); Tanner, J.M. [Clinic and Polyclinic of Radiation Oncology, Martin Luther Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany)

    2003-02-01

    Background: The bystander effect is a relatively new area of radiobiological research, which is aimed at studying post-radiation changes in neighboring non-hit cells or tissues. The bystander effect of ionizing irradiation is important after low-dose irradiation in the range of up to 0.2 Gy, where a higher incidence of stochastic damage was observed than was expected from a linear-quadratic model. It is also important when the irradiation of a cell population is highly non-uniform. Objective: This review summarizes most of the important results and proposed bystander effect mechanisms as well as their impact on theory and clinical practice. The literature, in parts contradictory, is collected, the main topics are outlined, and some basic papers are described in more detail. In order to illustrate the microbeam technique, which is considered relevant for the bystander effect research, the state of the Leipzig LIPSION nanoprobe facility is described. Results: The existence of a radiation-induced bystander effect is now generally accepted. The current state of knowledge on it is summarized here. Several groups worldwide are working on understanding its different aspects and its impact on radiobiology and radiation protection. Conclusion: The observation of a bystander effect has posed many questions, and answering them is a challenging topic for radiobiology in the future. (orig.)

  3. A study on the radiation and environment safety -Development of technology for biological dosimetry-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kang Suk; Kim, Kook Chan; Kim, In Kyoo; Kim, Jin Kyoo; Chun Kee Jung; Park, Hyo Kook; Kim, Sang Bok; Park Sun Yung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    Adult rats were treated a single, whole body exposure to a dose of 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 Gy. The animals were sacrificed 6, 24, 48, 72, 96 hours following exposure. The amount of serum acute phase proteins(haptoglobin, ceruloplasmin, C-reactive protein, alpha-1 antitrypsin, alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, transferrin) were measured by competitive ELISA. In the 0.1 Gy irradiated rats, serum haptoglobin, C-reactive protein and alpha-1 antitrypsin were 400% higher and serum transferrin was 50% lower as compared to controls, 96 hours after irradiation. Ceruloplasmin increased by 400%, 24 hours after irradiation, but 96 hours after irradiation, the concentration of this protein in rat returned to normal level. On the other hand, no changes were observed in the case of alpha-1 acid glycoprotein. In the group of the 3.0 Gy irradiated rats, transferrin increased by 200%, 96 hours after irradiation. These biochemical responses to radiation did not show dose-dependent relation, but the sensitivity of the indicators was high enough to detect absorbed dose of 0.1 Gy. The above results can be applied to the measurements of acute phase reactants in human serum for the assessment of exposure doses in radiation workers and patients under radiation therapy. 39 figs, 72 refs. (Author).

  4. Effect of ionizing radiation on the physical biology of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Groberg, Sandra M; Bornstein, Sophia; Zilberman-Rudenko, Jevgenia; Schmidt, Mark; Tormoen, Garth W; Kernan, Casey; Thomas, Charles R; Wong, Melissa H; Phillips, Kevin G; McCarty, Owen J T

    2015-09-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth leading cause of cancer worldwide. Although there are numerous treatment options for HNSCC, such as surgery, cytotoxic chemotherapy, molecularly targeted systemic therapeutics, and radiotherapy, overall survival has not significantly improved in the last 50 years. This suggests a need for a better understanding of how these cancer cells respond to current treatments in order to improve treatment paradigms. Ionizing radiation (IR) promotes cancer cell death through the creation of cytotoxic DNA lesions, including single strand breaks, base damage, crosslinks, and double strand breaks (DSBs). As unrepaired DSBs are the most cytotoxic DNA lesion, defining the downstream cellular responses to DSBs are critical for understanding the mechanisms of tumor cell responses to IR. The effects of experimental IR on HNSCC cells beyond DNA damage in vitro are ill-defined. Here we combined label-free, quantitative phase and fluorescent microscopy to define the effects of IR on the dry mass and volume of the HNSCC cell line, UM-SCC-22A. We quantified nuclear and cytoplasmic subcellular density alterations resulting from 8 Gy X-ray IR and correlated these signatures with DNA and γ-H2AX expression patterns. This study utilizes a synergistic imaging approach to study both biophysical and biochemical alterations in cells following radiation damage and will aid in future understanding of cellular responses to radiation therapy.

  5. Health and biological effects of non-ionizing radiations; Effets biologiques et sanitaires des rayonnements non ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Seze, R.; Souques, M.; Aurengo, A.; Bach, V.; Burais, N.; Cesarini, J.P.; Cherin, A.; Decobert, V.; Dubois, G.; Hours, M.; Lagroye, I.; Leveque, Ph.; Libert, J.P.; Lombard, J.; Loos, N.; Mir, L.; Perrin, A.; Poulletier De Gannes, F.; Thuroczy, G.; Wiart, J.; Lehericy, St.; Pelletier, A.; Marc-Vergnes, J.P.; Douki, Th.; Guibal, F.; Tordjman, I.; Gaillot de Saintignon, J.; Collard, J.F.; Scoretti, R.; Magne, I.; Veyret, B.; Katrib, J.

    2011-07-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during this conference day on the biological and health effects of non-ionizing radiations. Sixteen presentations out of 17 are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - NMR: biological effects and implications of Directive 2004/40 on electromagnetic fields (S. Lehericy); 2 - impact of RF frequencies from mobile telephone antennas on body homeostasis (A. Pelletier); 3 - expression of stress markers in the brain and blood of rats exposed in-utero to a Wi-Fi signal (I. Lagroye); 4 - people exposure to electromagnetic waves: the challenge of variability and the contribution of statistics to dosimetry (J. Wiart); 5 - status of knowledge about electromagnetic fields hyper-sensitivity (J.P. Marc-Vergnes; 6 - geno-toxicity of UV radiation: respective impact of UVB and UVA (T. Douki); 7 - National day of prevention and screening for skin cancers (F. Guibal); 8 - UV tan devices: status of knowledge about cancer risks (I. Tordjman, and J. Gaillot de Saintignon); 9 - modulation of brain activity during a tapping task after exposure to a 3000 {mu}T magnetic field at 60 Hz (M. Souques and A. Legros); 10 - calculation of ELF electromagnetic fields in the human body by the finite elements method (R. Scoretti); 11 - French population exposure to the 50 Hz magnetic field (I. Magne); 12 - LF and static fields, new ICNIRP recommendations: what has changed, what remains (B. Veyret); 13 - risk assessment of low energy lighting systems - DELs and CFLs (J.P. Cesarini); 14 - biological effects to the rat of a chronic exposure to high power microwaves (R. De Seze); 15 - theoretical and experimental electromagnetic compatibility approaches of active medical implants in the 10-50 Hz frequency range: the case of implantable cardiac defibrillators (J. Katrib); French physicians and electromagnetic fields (M. Souques). (J.S.)

  6. EL RETO DE LA MUESTRA BIOLÓGICA EN LOS ESTUDIOS FARMACOGENÉTICOS O OBJETIVO DA MOSTRA BIOLÓGICA NOS ESTUDOS FARMACOGENÉTICOS BIOLOGICAL SAMPLE’S CHALLENGE ON PHARMACOGENETIC STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Bota i Arqué

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo parte de la constatación del importante incremento de estudios farmacológicos que lleva asociado un estudio farmacogenético sin que exista un conocimiento muy claro de sus consecuencias. Su primer reto es dilucidar si estos estudios tienen mayores implicaciones que las determinaciones de parámetros de rutina. No se puede obviar que la genética genera cierta preocupación debido, entre otros factores, al lenguaje técnico, la desinformación, las simplificaciones que generan los medios de comunicación, y su complejidad. El segundo objetivo es definir qué figura de propiedad tienen los investigadores o las empresas patrocinantes de las muestras biológicas y los datos genéticos en los estudios de farmacogenéticaEste trabalho parte da constatação do importante incremento dos estudos farmacológicos que leva associado um estudo farmacogenético sem que exista um conhecimento muito claro de suas conseqüências. Seu primeiro objetivo é esclarecer se estes estudos tem maiores implicações que as determinações de parâmetros de rotina. Não se pode considerar obvio que a genética gera certa preocupação devido, entre outros fatores, à linguagem técnica, à desinformação, às simplificações geradas pelos meios de comunicação, e sua complexidade. O segundo objetivo é definir que figura de propriedade tem os pesquisadores ou as empresas patrocinadoras das amostras biológicas e os dados genéticos nos estudos de farmacogenéticaThis work starts stating the great increase of pharmacological studies associated with pharmacogenetic studies without clear knowledge of their consequences. The first challenge is to find out whether pharmacogenetic studies have greater implications than the determination of routine parameters. We cannot obviate that genetics engenders special worries due to several factors, such as: technical language, lack of information, media simplifications and complexity. The second goal is to define

  7. Biological Dosimetry Using Micronucleus Assay in Simulated Partial-Body Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Purnami

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In radiation accidents, it is common that only several parts of the body are exposed to radiation. As a consequence there is a mixture of exposed and unexposed lymphocytes in peripheral blood cells of the samples. This phenomenon will cause the dose value estimated using the exposed lymphocytes to be lower than the actual dose. In this study, an assessment of partial body exposures using micronucleus assay by estimating the partial body dose and fraction of irradiated blood was conducted. An optimal D0 value also has been determined in this study to estimate the fraction of irradiated cells. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs from three healthy donors were irradiated in vitro with 2 Gy of X-rays. Partial radiation exposure was simulated by mixing the irradiated and non-irradiated blood in different proportions. The proportions of mixtures of blood samples irradiated in vitro were 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 %. Blood samples were then cultured and harvested based on micronuclei assay protocol. At least 2000 binucleated cells with well-preserved cytoplasm were scored for the MN frequency. Dose Estimate 5.1 software was used to calculate the dispersion index (σ2/y and normalized unit of this index (U in each proportion of bloods. The fractions of irradiated cells were calculated with CABAS (Chromosomal Aberration Calculation Software for several different D0 values (2.7; 3.8; 5.4. The results showed that D0 value at 5.4 gave the closest results to the actual proportion of irradiated bloods, while for the dose estimation the estimated doses value from all proportions in all donors were higher than the actual dose. The factor that may cause this phenomenon was that the dose response calibration curve used to predict the radiation dose was not constructed in the laboratory used. Overall it can be concluded that a biodosimetry using MN assay can be used to estimate the radiation dose in partial body exposure. In order to establish a biodosimetry using MN

  8. Radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hine, Gerald J; Hine, Gerald J

    1956-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry focuses on the advancements, processes, technologies, techniques, and principles involved in radiation dosimetry, including counters and calibration and standardization techniques. The selection first offers information on radiation units and the theory of ionization dosimetry and interaction of radiation with matter. Topics include quantities derivable from roentgens, determination of dose in roentgens, ionization dosimetry of high-energy photons and corpuscular radiations, and heavy charged particles. The text then examines the biological and medical effects of radiation,

  9. Molecular biology methods in assessing radiation-induced hereditary risks in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiuru, A. [University of Helsinki, Department of Biosciences, Division of Genetics, Helsinki (Finland)

    2004-12-01

    Effort to predict the genetic consequences for humans of exposure to ionising radiation has been one of the most important issues of human genetics over the past 60 years. To date, there has been little experimental knowledge on the genetic risks of human exposure to ionising radiation. Radiation-induced deleterious hereditary effects have not been detected in human populations - not even among the offspring of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This does not mean deleterious hereditary effects do not exist in humans, but rather that they are small and/or difficult to detect because the normal incidence of inherited abnormalities is quite high in the human population. Thus, assessment of radiation-induced hereditary risks in humans has been based on the common knowledge of human heredity and on animal experiments. However, recent data have suggested that hyper-variable tandem repeat minisatellite loci provide a useful and sensitive experimental approach for monitoring radiation-induced germline mutations in humans. In order to investigate the feasibility of the minisatellite mutation screening system in assessing radiation-induced hereditary risks in humans, we examined the amount of hereditary minisatellite mutations among the offspring of Estonian Chernobyl cleanup workers. The men studied received a median radiation dose of 109 mSv while working on the cleanup activities after the Chernobyl accident. We compared the minisatellite mutation rates of 155 children born to 147 Estonian Chernobyl cleanup workers after the accident to those of their 148 siblings born prior to it. In addition, 44 Estonian families, where the father had not been exposed to radiation, composed an additional control group. In all of these families, the paternity of the children was ascertained by using 5 minisatellite loci (APOB, HRAS, MCOB19, MCT118, and YNZ-22) in PCR-based analyses. Other 8 minisatellite loci (B6.7, CEB1, CEB15, CEB25, CEB36, MS1, MS31, and MS32) were used

  10. Changes in biologically-active ultraviolet radiation reaching the Earth's surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, R L; Aucamp, P J; Bais, A F; Björn, L O; Ilyas, M

    2007-03-01

    The Montreal Protocol is working. Concentrations of major ozone-depleting substances in the atmosphere are now decreasing, and the decline in total column amounts seen in the 1980s and 1990s at mid-latitudes has not continued. In polar regions, there is much greater natural variability. Each spring, large ozone holes continue to occur in Antarctica and less severe regions of depleted ozone continue to occur in the Arctic. There is evidence that some of these changes are driven by changes in atmospheric circulation rather than being solely attributable to reductions in ozone-depleting substances, which may indicate a linkage to climate change. Global ozone is still lower than in the 1970s and a return to that state is not expected for several decades. As changes in ozone impinge directly on UV radiation, elevated UV radiation due to reduced ozone is expected to continue over that period. Long-term changes in UV-B due to ozone depletion are difficult to verify through direct measurement, but there is strong evidence that UV-B irradiance increased over the period of ozone depletion. At unpolluted sites in the southern hemisphere, there is some evidence that UV-B irradiance has diminished since the late 1990s. The availability and temporal extent of UV data have improved, and we are now able to evaluate the changes in recent times compared with those estimated since the late 1920s, when ozone measurements first became available. The increases in UV-B irradiance over the latter part of the 20th century have been larger than the natural variability. There is increased evidence that aerosols have a larger effect on surface UV-B radiation than previously thought. At some sites in the Northern Hemisphere, UV-B irradiance may continue to increase because of continuing reductions in aerosol extinctions since the 1990s. Interactions between ozone depletion and climate change are complex and can be mediated through changes in chemistry, radiation, and atmospheric circulation

  11. Biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I am particularly happy that the Academy is bringing out this document by Professor M S. Valiathan on Ayurvedic Biology. It is an effort to place before the scientific community, especially that of India, the unique scientific opportunities that arise out of viewing Ayurveda from the perspective of contemporary science, its tools ...

  12. The mechanism of radiation protection by histamine and other biological amines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, C. van der; Bekkum, D.W. van

    1959-01-01

    The radioprotective activity of a number of biological amines, amongst them histamine and epinephrine, has been shown to be related to their pharmacological activity in mice. Pharmacological antagonists were found to counteract the protective activity of these compounds. The protective effect could

  13. Neutron-Activation Analysis of Biological Material with High Radiation Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samsahl, K.

    1966-09-15

    A method has been developed for the chemical separation and subsequent gamma-spectrometric analysis of the alkali metals, the alkaline earths, the rare earths, chromium, hafnium, lanthanum, manganese, phosphorus, scandium and silver in neutron-activated biological material. The separation steps, being fully automatic, are based on a combination of ion-exchange and partition chromatography and require 40 min.

  14. Spatio-temporal radiation biology with conventionally or laser-accelerated particles for ELIMED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristić-Fira, A.; Bulat, T.; Keta, O.; Petrović, I. [Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Romano, F.; Cirrone, P.; Cuttone, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, Catania (Italy)

    2013-07-26

    The aim of this study is to investigate the behavior of radio-resistant human malignant cells, thus enabling better understanding of radiobiological effects of ions in such a case. Radiation sources such as accelerated continuous ion beams and laser technology-based ultra short radiation sources with energy of around 10 MeV will be used. The HTB140 melanoma cells are chosen since it has been shown that they represent the limit case of cellular radio-resistance among the studied tumor cell lines. These cells are particularly interesting as they provide data on the very edge of inactivation capacity of each beam line that is tested. After exposing the cell monolayers to continuous radiations of low (γ-rays) and high (protons) linear energy transfer, the kinetics of disappearance of the phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) foci per cell will be determined. The same procedure will be performed with the pulsed high dose rate protons. Detection and quantification of γ-H2AX foci will be performed by immunohistochemical 3D time-dependent imaging analyses using laser scanning confocal microscopy. Immunoblotting will enable the follow-up of the relation between γ-H2AX and cell cycle arrest via the p53/p21 pathway. In such a way the spatio-temporal changes on sub-cellular level will be visualized, quantified and compared. These results will show whether there is a difference in the effects on cells between continuous and pulsed irradiation mode. Therefore, they will contribute to the data base that might promote pulsed sources for medical treatments of malignant growths.

  15. Biological Effects of Protracted Exposure to Ionizing Radiation: Review, Analysis, and Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-01

    During the course of handling and processing the unit, workers at Y6nke Fenix (scrap metal processing facility) were estimated to have received the...highest levels of radiation exposure. Working Area #4 at Y6nke Fenix was the area with the highest dose rate environment of 10 r/h with an occupancy factor...doses calculated for Y6nke Fenix workers were 355, 390, and 550 cGy. When these doses are normalized to the estimated reference dose of 420 cGy for

  16. SU-E-T-253: Open-Source Automatic Software for Quantifying Biological Assays of Radiation Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Detappe, A [University of Lyon (France); Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Korideck, H [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Makrigiorgos, G; Berbeco, R [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Clonogenic cell survival is a common assay for quantifying the effect of drugs and radiation. Manual counting of surviving colonies can take 30–90seconds per plate, a major limitation for large studies. Currently available automatic counting tools are not easily modified for radiation oncology research. Our goal is to provide an open-source toolkit for precise, accurate and fast analysis of biological assays in radiation oncology. Methods: As an example analysis, we used HeLa cells incubated with gadolinium nanoparticles prior to irradiation. After treatment, the cells are grown for 14days to allow for colony formation. To analyze the colony growth, we capture images of each dish for archiving and automatic computer-based analysis. A FujifilmX20 camera is placed at the top of a box setup, 20cm above the sample, which is backlit by a LED lamp placed at the bottom of the box. We use a Gaussian filter (width=1.3mm) and color threshold (19–255). The minimum size for a colony to be counted is 1mm. For this example, 20 dishes with a large range of colonies were analyzed. Each dish was counted 3 times manually by 3 different users and then compared to our counter. Results: Automatic counting of cell colonies takes an average of 7seconds, enabling the analysis process to be accelerated 4–12 times. The average precision of the automatic counter was 1.7%. The Student t-test demonstrated the non-significant differences between the two counting methods (p=0.64). The ICC demonstrated the reliability of each method with ICC>0.999 (automatic) and ICC=0.95 (manual). Conclusion: We developed an open-source automatic toolkit for the analysis of biological assays in radiation oncology and demonstrated the accuracy, precision and effort savings for clonogenic cell survival quantification. This toolkit is currently being used in two laboratories for routine experimental analysis and will be made freely available on our departmental website.

  17. Study of effects gamma radiation linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) injected; Estudo dos efeitos da radiacao gama no polietileno linear de baixa densidade (PEBLD) injetado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Ana Claudia Feitoza de

    2014-09-01

    The use of package sterilization through gamma radiation aim to reduce the microbiological contamination. The linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) can be obtained by a process in solution, suspension or gaseous phase, depending on the type of the catalyzer used, that can be heterogeneous, or homogeneous, or metallocenes Ziegler-Natta. According to the literature, the gamma radiation presents a high penetration at polymeric materials causing the appearing of scissions, reticulation, and degradation when oxygen presence. This paper were irradiated with {sup 60}Co with 2000 kCi of activity, in presence of air, samples of LLDPE injected. Utilized doses of 5, 10, 20, 50 or 100 kGy, and about 5 kGy.h{sup -1} dose rates, at room temperature. After irradiation, the samples were heated for 60 min at 100 deg C to promote recombination and annihilation of residual radicals. For characterization of PEBLD were used methods; Melt flow index, swelling, gel fraction, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), X-Ray Diffraction (DRX), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TG), Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA), rheological measurements, Scanning Electronic Microscopy and mechanical tests to identify the effects or gamma radiation in polyethylene. (author)

  18. Study of crosslinking induced by gamma radiation in mixtures of polyacrylamide anionic and water; Estudo da reticulacao induzida por radiacao gama de misturas de poliacrilamida anionica e agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcantara, M.T.S.; Brant, A.J.C.; Naime, N.; Guadagnin, H.C.; Ponce, P.; Lugao, A.B., E-mail: ablugao@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Superabsorbent hydrogels are composed of three-dimensional polymeric networks that can absorb and retain body of water hundreds of times the weight of its dry weight. The hydrogels can be crosslinked by chemical or physical. In general, chemical crosslinking is performed in the presence of reactive substances of high toxicity at elevated temperatures, may cause harmful secondary reactions to final product quality. However, ionizing radiation provides the crosslinking in the absence of chemical initiators or crosslinkers, therefore without contamination or toxicity. It also allows the realization of the reaction at low temperatures. These materials find use in several application fields, such as sanitary pads, diapers, controlled release of nutrients to the soil, separation processes, water purification systems and controlled release of drugs. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of gamma radiation in doses of 15 and 25 kGy, in reticulation system of polyacrylamide (PAAm) and water, which were characterized by swelling and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The results show the importance of the amount of water in the reticulation. It was concluded that gamma radiation has excellent potential for the synthesis of hiperabsorbent hydrogels. (author)

  19. Comparative study of PVP hydrogel obtained by reaction of fenton and gamma radiation; Estudo comparativo de hidrogel de PVP obtido por reacao de fenton e radiacao gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Mariana L.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Lugao, Ademar B., E-mail: marilsilva@hotmail.co [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) is a polymeric matrix having the capacity to absorb great quantity of water without solving and, due to this property can be used as matrix to compose a pharmaceutical controlled liberation system. In these work, PVP hydrogels were prepared solving the polymer under different concentrations (8%, 10%, 15% and 20%) in phosphate tampon solutions, promoting the reticulation through two methods: by chemical reaction (Fenton reaction), and by ionizing radiation. The objective of this study was to compare the PVP hydrogels obtained by the two types of reation analysing the gel fraction and the tumescence of the obtained samples. With the hydrogel reticulations with Fenton reaction, all the hydrogels obtained in p H 2.5 present good properties, being that by ionizing radiation only the 15 and 20% of PVP in both p H. Therefore, the comparative study was performed with samples of 15 and 20% of PVP, under tampon phosphate of p H 2.5 by reticulated by gamma radiation, for that presented equivalent properties

  20. BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE UV-RADIATION AND UV-RESOURCES IN MOSCOW (1999-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Yu. Zhdanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains the analysis of long-term measurements of erythemally weighted UV-radiation (Qer at the Meteorological Observatory of Moscow State University over the 1999-2013 period. Main features of seasonal variability of Qer as well as the Qer dependence on different geophysical parameters are studied. We showed that the average annual Qer attenuation due to cloudiness, total ozone content, and aerosols, is about 29, 30%, and 7%, respectively. The maximal loss of Qer due to cloudiness is observed in November (48%, while ozone-dependent attenuation is maximal in February-March (44%. We used the original technique to assess the UV-radiation impact on human health in Moscow. Specifically, we have identified the UV potential for the erythema formation and synthesis of vitamin D in humans with different skin types. The UV-deficiency conditions are observed for all considered skin types (1-4 during all days from November to February. The probability of the UV-optimum conditions for different skin types was assessed. It was shown, for example, that for skin type 2, the UV-optimum conditions are dominant from March to April and from September to October (maximum in September - 60%. We have also identified the periods with UV-excess conditions. For skin type 2, these conditions may exist from April to August.

  1. Studies of the ionizing radiation effects on the effluents acute toxicity due to anionic surfactants; Estudos dos efeitos da radiacao ionizante na toxicidade de efluentes que apresentam surfactantes anionicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Maria Cristina Franco de

    2004-07-01

    Several studies have shown the negative effects of surfactants, as detergents active substance, when discharged on biological sewage wastewater treatment plants. High toxicity may represent a lower efficiency for biological treatment. When surfactants are in aquatic environment they may induce a loss of grease revetment on birds (feather). Depending on the surfactant concentration, several damages to all biotic systems can happen. Looking for an alternative technology for wastewater treatment, efficient for surfactant removal, the present work applied ionizing radiation as an advanced oxidation process for affluents and effluents from Suzano Treatment Station. Such wastewater samples were submitted to radiation using an electron beam from a Dynamic Electron Beam Accelerator from Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares. In order to assess this proposed treatment efficacy, it was performed acute toxicity evaluation with two test-organisms, the crustacean Daphnia similis and the luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The studied effluents were: one from a chemical industry (IND), three from sewage plant (affluents - GG, GM and Guaio) and the last biologically treated secondary effluent (EfF), discharged at Tiete river. The applied radiation doses varied from 3 kGy to 50 kGy, being 50 kGy enough for surfactant degradation contained at industrial effluent. For GG, GM and Guaio samples, doses of 6 kGy and 10 kGy were efficient for surfactant and toxicity reduction, representing an average removal that varied from 71.80% to 82.76% and toxicity from 30% to 91% for most the effluents. The final effluent was less toxic than the others and the radiation induced an average 11% removal for anionic surfactant. The industrial effluents were also submitted to an aeration process in order to quantify the contribution of surfactant to the whole sample toxicity, once it was partially removed as foam and several fractions were evaluated for toxicity. (author)

  2. The use of biologically related model (Eclipse) for the intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning of nasopharyngeal carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Monica W K; Leung, Lucullus H T; Yu, Peter K N

    2014-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the most common treatment technique for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Physical quantities such as dose/dose-volume parameters are used conventionally for IMRT optimization. The use of biological related models has been proposed and can be a new trend. This work was to assess the performance of the biologically based IMRT optimization model installed in a popular commercial treatment planning system (Eclipse) as compared to its dose/dose volume optimization model when employed in the clinical environment for NPC cases. Ten patients of early stage NPC and ten of advanced stage NPC were selected for this study. IMRT plans optimized using biological related approach (BBTP) were compared to their corresponding plans optimized using the dose/dose volume based approach (DVTP). Plan evaluation was performed using both biological indices and physical dose indices such as tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), target coverage, conformity, dose homogeneity and doses to organs at risk. The comparison results of the more complex advanced stage cases were reported separately from those of the simpler early stage cases. The target coverage and conformity were comparable between the two approaches, with BBTP plans producing more hot spots. For the primary targets, BBTP plans produced comparable TCP for the early stage cases and higher TCP for the advanced stage cases. BBTP plans reduced the volume of parotid glands receiving doses of above 40 Gy compared to DVTP plans. The NTCP of parotid glands produced by BBTP were 8.0 ± 5.8 and 7.9 ± 8.7 for early and advanced stage cases, respectively, while those of DVTP were 21.3 ± 8.3 and 24.4 ± 12.8, respectively. There were no significant differences in the NTCP values between the two approaches for the serial organs. Our results showed that the BBTP approach could be a potential alternative approach to the DVTP approach for NPC.

  3. Development of Laser Plasma X-ray Microbeam Irradiation System and Radiation Biological Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Nishikino, Masaharu; Numasaki, Hodaka; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Teshima, Teruki; Nishimura, Hiroaki

    Laser plasma x-ray source has the features such as ultra short pulse, high brilliance, monochromaticity, and focusing ability. These features are excellent compared with conventional x-ray source. In order to apply the laser plasma x-ray source to the biomedical study and to more closely research the radiobilogical responce of the cancer cell such as radiation induced bystander effect, we have developed x-ray microbeam system using laser plasma x-ray source. The absorbed dose of laser plasma x-ray was estimated with Gafchromic EBT film and DNA double strand breaks on the cells were detected by immunofluorescence staining. When the cells were irradiated with laser plasma x-ray, the circular regions existing γ-H2AX positive cells were clearly identified. The usefulness of the laser plasma x-ray on the radiobiological study was proved in this research.

  4. Effect of radiation and fungal treatment on ligno celluloses and their biological activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, N.D.; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Kume, Tamikazu E-mail: kume@taka.jaeri.go.jp

    2000-10-01

    Effects of high-dose irradiation and fungal treatment on some kinds of lignocellulose material were investigated in order to assess the potential effects of bioactive substances on plants. Each treatment and combination of treatments significantly altered the components of lignocellulose materials. Irradiation strongly affected all plant materials, causing a series of changes in physico-chemical parameters such as solubilization during solvent extraction and losses of fibre components. By these degradations, certain biologically active substances formed and acted as antagonists of auxin-induced growth.

  5. Effects of gamma radiation and temperature on the biological assimilation and retention of /sup 137/Cs by Acheta domesticus (L. )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hook, R.I. Jr.; Herbert, E.T.

    1971-12-01

    Cesium-137 retention was determined for brown crickets, Acheta domesticus, which had been irradiated with 0, 1000, 2500 and 5000 rad gamma radiation and maintained at 20, 25 and 30 degrees C. Parameters examined for temperature and dose effects were (1) per cent /sup 137/Cs assimilated into body tissues (p2), (2) rate of isotope passage through the gut (k1) and (3) rate of elimination of assimilated /sup 137/Cs (ks). Increases in temperature and gamma dose resulted in a general decrease in per cent /sup 137/Cs assimilated pe day (p2). The first-component elimination coefficient (k1) was not significantly affected (P less than or equal to 0.05) by either temperature or dose changes. Biological elimination coefficients for assimilated /sup 137/Cs (k2) increased with increasing temperature between doses of 0 and 2500 rad. Above 2500 rads however, increases in temperature had no noticeable effects on the rate of assimilated /sup 137/Cs excretion. At higher dose levels, radiation was the dominant factor influencing the parameter k2.

  6. Convex reformulation of biologically-based multi-criteria intensity-modulated radiation therapy optimization including fractionation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Aswin L.; den Hertog, Dick; Siem, Alex Y. D.; Kaanders, Johannes H. A. M.; Huizenga, Henk

    2008-11-01

    Finding fluence maps for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can be formulated as a multi-criteria optimization problem for which Pareto optimal treatment plans exist. To account for the dose-per-fraction effect of fractionated IMRT, it is desirable to exploit radiobiological treatment plan evaluation criteria based on the linear-quadratic (LQ) cell survival model as a means to balance the radiation benefits and risks in terms of biologic response. Unfortunately, the LQ-model-based radiobiological criteria are nonconvex functions, which make the optimization problem hard to solve. We apply the framework proposed by Romeijn et al (2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 1991-2013) to find transformations of LQ-model-based radiobiological functions and establish conditions under which transformed functions result in equivalent convex criteria that do not change the set of Pareto optimal treatment plans. The functions analysed are: the LQ-Poisson-based model for tumour control probability (TCP) with and without inter-patient heterogeneity in radiation sensitivity, the LQ-Poisson-based relative seriality s-model for normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) under the LQ-Poisson model and the fractionation-corrected Probit-based model for NTCP according to Lyman, Kutcher and Burman. These functions differ from those analysed before in that they cannot be decomposed into elementary EUD or generalized-EUD functions. In addition, we show that applying increasing and concave transformations to the convexified functions is beneficial for the piecewise approximation of the Pareto efficient frontier.

  7. Convex reformulation of biologically-based multi-criteria intensity-modulated radiation therapy optimization including fractionation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Aswin L; den Hertog, Dick; Siem, Alex Y D; Kaanders, Johannes H A M; Huizenga, Henk

    2008-11-21

    Finding fluence maps for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can be formulated as a multi-criteria optimization problem for which Pareto optimal treatment plans exist. To account for the dose-per-fraction effect of fractionated IMRT, it is desirable to exploit radiobiological treatment plan evaluation criteria based on the linear-quadratic (LQ) cell survival model as a means to balance the radiation benefits and risks in terms of biologic response. Unfortunately, the LQ-model-based radiobiological criteria are nonconvex functions, which make the optimization problem hard to solve. We apply the framework proposed by Romeijn et al (2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 1991-2013) to find transformations of LQ-model-based radiobiological functions and establish conditions under which transformed functions result in equivalent convex criteria that do not change the set of Pareto optimal treatment plans. The functions analysed are: the LQ-Poisson-based model for tumour control probability (TCP) with and without inter-patient heterogeneity in radiation sensitivity, the LQ-Poisson-based relative seriality s-model for normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) under the LQ-Poisson model and the fractionation-corrected Probit-based model for NTCP according to Lyman, Kutcher and Burman. These functions differ from those analysed before in that they cannot be decomposed into elementary EUD or generalized-EUD functions. In addition, we show that applying increasing and concave transformations to the convexified functions is beneficial for the piecewise approximation of the Pareto efficient frontier.

  8. Micro-CT for anatomic referencing in PET and SPECT: radiation dose, biologic damage, and image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersemans, Veerle; Thompson, James; Cornelissen, Bart; Woodcock, Michael; Allen, Philip D; Buls, Nico; Muschel, Ruth J; Hill, Mark A; Smart, Sean C

    2011-11-01

    CT is widely used for anatomic referencing of PET and SPECT images of small animals but requires sufficiently high radiation doses capable of causing significant DNA damage. Therefore, we described the relationship between radiation dose, biologic damage, and image quality to determine whether CT can be used without significantly compromising radiotherapy and tumor development studies. The CT dose index generated by the nanoSPECT/CT system was compared with measurements using EBT2 gafchromic film. The effects of micro-CT were evaluated in 2 mouse strains that differ in sensitivity to radiation. γH2AX foci analysis to determine leukocyte, liver, and jejunum DNA damage and hematoxylin and eosin staining to investigate macroscopic jejunum damage were performed. Signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio, and scanner linearity were determined to assess image quality. For the standard settings, that is, as set by the manufacturers, EBT2 gafchromic film dosimetry showed that the nanoSPECT/CT system underestimated the absorbed dose. Moreover, significant doses were obtained, resulting in a significant increase in γH2AX formation in leukocytes, liver, and jejunum 40 min after CT, using preset parameters when compared with nonimaged controls. The jejenum response was more pronounced for the more radiosensitive strain. In contrast to leukocytes, the liver and jejunum still showed evidence of DNA damage 3 d after CT. Contrast-to-noise ratio, signal-to-noise ratio, and scanner linearity were sufficient to allow for anatomic referencing for both imaging protocols tested. Anatomic reference images can be produced with no observable DNA damage or compromising image quality using low radiographic voltage, flux, and duration.

  9. Life Sciences and Space Research 25 (2) Radiation Biology: Topical Meeting of the COSPAR Interdisciplinary Scientific Commission F of the COSPAR 29th Plenary Meeting, Washington, DC, Aug. 28-Sep. 5, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G. (Editor); Buecher, H. (Editor); Cox, A. (Editor); Todd, P. (Editor); Yang, T. C. (Editor); Worgul, B. V. (Editor); Donlon, M. (Editor); Atwell, W. (Editor); Shea, M. A. (Editor); Smart, D. F. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Papers presented on long-term exposure to ionizing radiation, obtained from the Long Duration Exposure Facility, included radiation monitoring, radiation effects, and dosimetry. Mechanisms of biological systems, especially cells, under ionizing radiation and relative biological effectiveness were compared. The role of HZE particles as agents of mutation were reported from plant, animal, and in vitro models. Data on known and predicted effects of cosmic rays and other solar radiation on biological systems included differences related to Linear Energy Transfer and heavy ion particles.

  10. Antiradiation UV Vaccine: UV Radiation, Biological effects, lesions and medical management - immune-therapy and immune-protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey; Maliev, Slava

    rabbits, 11-12 months old, live weight 3.5-3.7 (n=11), Balb mice, 2-3 months old, live weight 20-22 g (n=33), Wistar rats, 3-4 months old, live weight 180-220 g(n=33). The studies were approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee for ethical animal research equivalent, at each institution. Seven rabbits, ten mice, eleven Wistar rats were vaccinated with a UV antiradiation vaccine. A second group of animals was used as biological control which received vaccine but no UV Radiation and a third group of animals was used as control without any interventions. Before and after UV Radiation, Vaccination with the UV antiradiation vaccine were provided 17 days prior to UV exposure. The animals were irradiated by a DRT-1 UV generator lamp. The dose of irradiation for laboratory, experimental animals was 10-12 * Standard Erythema Dose (SED) at L=283,7 Laboratory animals were placed in to the box with ventilation. Results: Ultraviolet irradiation of the skin was performed with high doses and causes an inflammation or erythema in all experimental animals. However the grade of skin damage and inflammation was significantly different between animals protected by vaccination and non-protected, non-vaccinated animals. Animals UV-irradiated, but who did not receive the antiradiation vaccine suffered from extensive UV skin burns of second or third degree (grade 2-3). However, animals protected with the UV antiradiation vaccine demonstrated much mild forms of skin cellular injury - mainly erythema, first degree skin burns and a few small patches with second degree skin burns (grade 1-2). Discussion: The severity of skin damage depended on area of exposed skin, time and dose of UV irradiation. Skin injury could be divided into 4 major grades: 1. Faint erythema with dry desquamation. 2. Moderate to severe erythema. 3. Severe erythema with blistering, moist desquamation. 4. Toxic epidermal necrolysis. Mild doses of UV radiation and ionizing radiation can induce cell death by apoptosis and

  11. Biological image construction by using Raman radiation and Pca: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez E, J. C. [IPN, Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria de Ingenieria, Campus Guanajuato, Av. Mineral de Valenciana 200, Col. Fracc. Industrial Puerto Interior, 36275 Silao, Guanajuato (Mexico); Cordova F, T. [Universidad de Guanajuato, DIC, Departamento de Ingenieria Fisica, Loma del Bosque No. 103, Col. Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Hugo R, V., E-mail: jcmartineze@ipn.mx [Universidad de Guadalajara, Centro Universitario de Tonala, Morelos No. 180, 69584 Tonala, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: In the last years, the Raman spectroscopy (Rs) technique has had some applications in the study and analysis of biological samples, due to it is able to detect concentrations or presence of certain organic and inorganic compounds of medical interest. In this work, raw data were obtained through measurements in selected points on a square regions in order to detect specific organic / inorganic compounds on biological samples. Gold nano stars samples were prepared and coated with membrane markers (CD 10+ and CD 19+) and diluted in leukemic B lymphocytes. Each data block was evaluated independently by the method of principal component analysis (Pca) in order to find representative dimensionless values (Cp) for each Raman spectrum in a specific coordinate. Each Cp was normalized in a range of 0-255 in order to generate a representative image of 8 bits of the region under study. Data acquisition was performed with Raman microscopy system Renishaw in Via in the range of 550 to 1700 cm-1 with a 785 nm laser source, with a power of 17 m W and 15 s of exposure time were used for each spectrum. In preliminary results could detect the presence of molecular markers CD 10+ and CD 19+ with gold nano stars and discrimination between both markers. The results suggest conducting studies with specific concentrations organic and inorganic materials. (Author)

  12. Case study on the effect of cosmic radiation in embedded systems in aircraft; Estudo de caso sobre o efeito da radiacao cosmica em sistemas embarcados em aeronaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, Adriane C.M.; Pereira, Marlon A., E-mail: adriane.acm@hotmail.com, E-mail: marlon@ieav.cta.br [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Federico, Claudio A.; Goncalez, Odair L., E-mail: claudiofederico@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: odairl@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    High-energy neutrons generated from the interaction of cosmic radiation with atoms of the atmosphere, can cause adverse effects on avionics devices. These effects are referred to as 'Single Event Effects' (SEE) and may occur especially in aircraft onboard computers, from change the logic state of memory cells or functional interruptions, which could compromise flight safety. The effects of the SEE must first be evaluated and entered into the safety analysis process in order to determine the susceptibility to failures by SEE devices. SEE rate can be evaluated separately for thermal neutrons and fast neutrons with energy above 10 MeV. This paper presents an exploratory study of susceptibility to radiation to a specific type of SRAM memory, during periods of maximum and minimum solar, in situations of equatorial and polar flight in the typical flight altitude of existing aircraft and, at higher altitudes, near the maximum of Pfotzer. This study was conducted using estimates of particle flows employing the EXPACS QARM codes and evaluating the expected rate of SEE due to thermal neutrons and fast neutrons separately. The distribution in energy and the flow of neutrons inside the airplane are influenced by the total mass of the aircraft and this influence are also discussed.

  13. Study of radiation exposure profiles in interventional radiology professionals; Estudo dos perfis de exposicao a radiacao em profissionais de radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacchim Neto, Fernando A.; Alves, Allan F.F.; Alvarez, Matheus; Rosa, Maria E.D.; Miranda, Jose R.A.; Freitas, Carlos C.M. de; Moura, Regina; Pina, Diana R. de, E-mail: fernando.bacchim@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Interventional Radiology is the radiology area that provides the highest dose values to the medical staff. Recent surveys show that personal dosimeters may underestimate the radiation dose values in interventional physicians, especially in the extremities and crystalline. The objective of this work was to study the exposure levels to radiation from medical staff in different interventional radiology procedures. Therefore, thermoluminescent dosimeters type LiF: Mg, Ti (TLD-100) were used positioned in the main interventional physician and an assistant in the following locations: some inches below the crystalline, thyroid, chest, gonads, hand and foot. By comparing the values obtained with the annual reference dose levels in workers, maximum numbers of annual procedures were found. Altogether, there were 23 procedures evaluated: 10 diagnostics, 9 angioplasties and 4 stents. The maximum number of annual procedures were estimated by discounting the percentages of attenuation of radiological protection. For procedures of the type diagnosis, angioplasty and stent for the main interventionist, the maximum number of annual procedures were 641, 445 and 113 respectively, while for the interventionists assistants were 930, 1202 and 215 respectively. As each interventionist body region is subject to different levels of exposure, detailed studies of exposure in each region provide better conclusions about what actions are necessary to ensure radiological protection professionals.

  14. Low dose/low fluence ionizing radiation-induced biological effects: The role of intercellular communication and oxidative metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Edouard

    Mechanistic investigations have been considered critical to understanding the health risks of exposure to ionizing radiation. To gain greater insight in the biological effects of exposure to low dose/low fluence space radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) properties, we examined short and long-term biological responses to energetic protons and high charge (Z) and high energy (E) ions (HZE particles) in human cells maintained in culture and in targeted and non-targeted tissues of irradiated rodents. Particular focus of the studies has been on mod-ulation of gene expression, proliferative capacity, induction of DNA damage and perturbations in oxidative metabolism. Exposure to mean doses of 1000 MeV/nucleon iron ions, by which a small to moderate proportion of cells in an exposed population is targeted through the nucleus by an HZE particle, induced stressful effects in the irradiated and non-irradiated cells in the population. Direct intercellular communication via gap-junctions was a primary mediator of the propagation of stressful effects from irradiated to non-irradiated cells. Compromised prolif-erative capacity, elevated level of DNA damage and oxidative stress evaluated by measurements of protein carbonylation, lipid peroxidation and activity of metabolic enzymes persisted in the progeny of irradiated and non-irradiated cells. In contrast, progeny of cells exposed to high or low doses from 150-1000 MeV protons retained the ability to form colonies and harbored similar levels of micronuclei, a surrogate form of DNA damage, as control, which correlated with normal reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Importantly, a significant increase in the spontaneous neoplastic transformation frequency was observed in progeny of bystander mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) co-cultured with MEFs irradiated with energetic iron ions but not protons. Of particular significance, stressful effects were detected in non-targeted tissues of rats that received partial

  15. Cell Hydration as a Biomarker for Estimation of Biological Effects of Nonionizing Radiation on Cells and Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinerik Ayrapetyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available “Changes in cell hydration” have been hypothesized as an input signal for intracellular metabolic cascade responsible for biological effects of nonionizing radiation (NIR. To test this hypothesis a comparative study on the impacts of different temperature and NIR (infrasound frequency mechanical vibration (MV, static magnetic field (SMF, extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF EMF, and microwave (MW pretreated water on the hydration of barley seeds in its dormant and germination periods was performed. In dormant state temperature sensitivity (Q10 of seed hydration in distilled water (DW was less than 2, and it was nonsensitive to NIR treated DW, whereas during the germination period (48–72 hours seeds hydration exhibited temperature sensitivity Q10>2 and higher sensitivity to NIR treated DW. Obtained data allow us to suggest that the metabolic driving of intracellular water dynamics accompanied by hydrogen bonding and breaking is more sensitive to NIR-induced water structure changes in seed bathing aqua medium than the simple thermodynamic processes such as osmotic gradient driven water absorption by seeds in dormant state. Therefore, cell hydration is suggested to be a universal and extrasensitive biomarker for detection of biological effects of NIR on cells and organisms.

  16. Mechanisms of radiation-induced thymic lymphomagenesis. For molecular biology approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muto, Masahiro [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    This review described findings obtained by the analysis of prelymphoma cells with use of cell sorting and cell transplant in thymus and by marginal dilution for frequency of prelymphoma cells in thymocyte population of irradiated mice. A comparison was made between analytical results of reconstruction of T-cell receptor genes and findings on various changes accompanying carcinogenesis to get an experimental design to estimate the stages for those changes (abnormalities in p53 tumor-suppressing genes and in chromosomes) occurring in the cause of carcinogenesis. As a result, a hypothesis was presented that radiation induces the gene expression which does not occur under normal conditions to result in the genetic instability to lead to carcinogenesis. The author documented these in following chapters. Properties of pre-lymphoma cells. Frequency of prelymphoma cells in population of TL-2 positive thymocytes in irradiated individual mice. T-cell differentiation and cancer initiation. Analysis of p53 tumor-suppressing gene mutant. Analysis of chromosome aberrations. Reconstruction of gamma TCR genes and a comparison of stages of generation of chromosome aberration. cDNA subtraction. (K.H.)

  17. Study of the sensitivity of the radiation transport problem in a scattering medium; Estudo da sensibilidade do problema de transporte de radiacao em meio espalhador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, Rogerio Chaffin

    2002-03-15

    In this work, the system of differential equations obtained by the angular approach of the two-dimensional transport equation by the discrete ordinates method is solved through the formulation of finite elements with the objective of investigating the sensitivity of the outgoing flux of radiation with the incoming flux and the properties of absorption and scattering of the medium. The variational formulation for the system of differential equations of second order with the generalized boundary conditions of Neumann (third type) allows an easy implementation of the method of the finite elements with triangular mesh and approximation space of first order. The geometry chosen for the simulations is a circle with a non homogeneous circular form in its interior. The mapping of Dirichlet-Neumann is studied through various simulations involving the incoming flux, the outgoing flux and the properties of the medium. (author)

  18. Estudo de revisão dos fatores biológicos, sociais e ambientais associados com o comportamento agressivo Study review of biological, social and environmental factors associated with aggressive behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deise Daniela Mendes

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Estudar os fatores de risco relacionados ao desenvolvimento do comportamento agressivo. MÉTODO: Foi realizada uma busca em duas bases de dados eletrônicas, Medline e SciElo, por estudos retrospectivos, longitudinais e de revisão que avaliaram fatores de risco para o desenvolvimento do comportamento agressivo. RESULTADOS: Foram selecionados 11 estudos longitudinais (8 prospectivos e 3 de casos-controle e um transversal que avaliaram os fatores de risco biológicos e socioambientais relacionados ao comportamento agressivo. Cinco estudos avaliaram a expressão gênica, cinco a exposição ao tabaco, ao álcool e a cocaína no período pré-natal, um avaliou as implicações da desnutrição precoce no desenvolvimento do comportamento agressivo e um avaliou o impacto dos maus tratos na infância. CONCLUSÃO: os principais fatores biológicos encontrados foram: genéticos (baixa expressão do gene monoaminaoxidase e do gene transportador de serotonina, variações nos genes transportador e receptor de dopamina, exposição a substâncias durante o desenvolvimento intrauterino (tabaco, álcool e cocaína e nutricionais (desnutrição infantil. os principais fatores socioambientais encontrados foram: maus tratos na infância, pobreza, criminalidade e comportamento antissocial na infância, sendo que o maior nível de evidência esteve relacionado à negligência precoce. A interação entre fatores biológicos e ambientais pode ser catalisada por um ambiente hostil aumentando os riscos para o desenvolvimento de comportamentos agressivos.OBJECTIVES: To study the risk factors related to the development of aggressive behavior. METHOD: A search was carried out in two electronic databases, Medline and SciElo by retrospective studies, longitudinal and review that assessed risk factors for the development of aggressive behavior. RESULTS: There were selected 11 longitudinal studies (8 prospective and 3 case-control studies and a cross sectional

  19. Sterilization of biological tissues with ionizing radiation; Esterilizacion de tejidos biologicos con radiacion ionizante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes F, M.L.; Martinez P, M.E.; Luna Z, D. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    On June 1994, the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) and the South Central Hospital for High Specialty of PEMEX (HCSAE) began a joint work with the finality to obtain radio sterilized amniotic membranes for to be used as cover (biological bandage) in burnt patients. Subsequently the Chemistry Faculty of UNAM and the National Institute of Cardiology began to collaborate this last with interest on cardiac valves for graft. Starting from 1997, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) supports this project (MEX/7/008) whose main objective is to set up the basis to establish in Mexico a Radio sterilized Tissue Bank (amniotic membranes, skin, bones, tendons, cardiac valves, etc.) to be used with therapeutic purposes (grafts). The IAEA support has consisted in the equipment acquisition which is fundamental for the Tissue Bank performance such as an experimental irradiator, laminar flow bell, lyophilizer, vacuum sealer and special knives for tissues. Also visits to Mexico of experts have been authorized with the aim of advising to the personnel which participate in the project and scientific visits of this personnel to another tissue banks (Sri Lanka and Argentine). The establishment in Mexico of a Tissue bank will be a great benefit because it will have availability of distinct tissues for grafts and it will reduce the synthetic materials importation which is very expensive. (Author)

  20. Removal of Penicillin G and Erythromycin with Ionizing Radiation Followed by Biological Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salem, Issam; Mezni, Mohamed; Boulila, Abdennacer; Hamdi, Mokhtar; Saidi, Mouldi

    2016-10-01

    The decomposition of penicillin G and erythromycin antibiotics at concentration of 0.2 mg ml(-1) by gamma irradiation at 50 kGy followed by biological treatment with Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 was evaluated. Degradation of penicillin G and erythromycin was analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance analysis (NMR), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and chemical oxygen demand (COD). The exposure to the absorbed dose of 50 kGy caused degradation of penicillin G and erythromycin in the aqueous solution. The complete disappearance of NMR and FTIR peaks following irradiation confirmed the breakage of the β-lactam ring in penicillin G, and the decarboxylation and cleavage of the thiazolidine ring and for erythromycin, the complete destruction of the three aromatic rings. Irradiation alone removed 52.8 and 65.5 % of penicillin G and erythromycin, respectively. Further reduction to 12.6 and 14 % of the original penicillin G and erythromycin COD, respectively, was achieved using treatment of the irradiation products with C. metallidurans.

  1. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and distal edge effects of proton radiation on early damage in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Brita Singers; Bassler, Niels; Nielsen, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of the present study was to examine the RBE for early damage in an in vivo mouse model, and the effect of the increased linear energy transfer (LET) towards the distal edge of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). METHOD: The lower part of the right hind limb of CDF1 mice......, where LETd,z =1 was 3.3 keV/μm. CONCLUSIONS: Although there is a need to expand the current study to be able to calculate an exact enhancement ratio, an enhanced biological effect in vivo for early skin damage in the distal edge was demonstrated....... was irradiated with single fractions of either 6 MV photons, 240 kV photons or scanning beam protons and graded doses were applied. For the proton irradiation, the leg was either placed in the middle of a 30-mm SOBP, or to assess the effect in different positions, irradiated in 4 mm intervals from the middle...

  2. Worldwide Asian longhorned beetle eradication: An example of biological applications of noncontact microwave and ultrasound radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Mary R.

    Destructive pests such as the Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis Motsch.) (ALB) can be transported around the world via wooden packing materials used in pallets and crates, placing urban and forest resources at grave risk. A potential nondestructive technique to detect pest infestations in wooden packing materials is noncontact ultrasound technology. Noncontact ultrasound (100 kHz to 500 kHz) detection of living larvae in wood was found to be unfeasible due to inference of transmission by the tunnel air/wood interfaces in the wood. However, 100 kHz, 200 kHz, and 500 kHz ultrasound transmission through 1-in. thick wood samples of any orientation was possible. C-scan images (200 kHz) showed the location of holes drilled inside the wood and movement of a larva placed on top of the wood. The use of microwave energy to treat these wooden packing materials in the source country before transport to eradicate wood-boring pests infesting these materials was also investigated. Destruction of pests infesting wooden packing materials is required by international guidelines. Eradication of cerambycid larval infestations in laboratory-size pine and poplar lumber less than 6-in. thick (volume of 216 in3) was shown to be feasible using 2.45 GHz microwave energy. Five minutes of 1100 W radiation produced 100% mortality of cottonwood borer and ALB infestations in red pine, eastern white pine, loblolly pine, and aspen samples with moisture contents ranging from 30% to 130% of dry weight. The parameters of importance for scale up to commercial size loads include wood moisture content and energy to wood volume ratios. Lethal doses of 2.45 GHz microwave energy increased as wood moisture content increased. The proposed optimal energy to volume ratio for up to 78% moisture content wood samples is 2,812.5 J/in3. Total insect mortality occurred for all three time/power combinations (1000 W for 3 minutes, 2000 W for 1.5 minutes, or 3000 W for 1 minute) tested. Industry

  3. Chemical and biological studies of Microgramma vacciniifolia (Langsd. and Fisch.) Copel (Polypodiaceae); Estudos quimicos e biologicos de Microgramma vacciniifolia (Langsd. and Fisch.) Copel (Polypodiaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peres, Marize T.L.P.; Simionatto, Euclesio; Hess, Sonia C.; Bonani, Vanderlea F.L.; Candido, Ana C.S.; Castelli, Caroline [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Dept. de Hidraulica e Transportes; Poppi, Nilva R.; Honda, Neli K. [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Cardoso, Claudia A.L.; Faccenda, Odival [Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Dourados, MS (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica e de Computacao

    2009-07-01

    Chemical studies with aerial parts of Microgramma vacciniifolia (Langsd. and Fisch.) Copel. afforded {beta}-sitosterol, hopan-22-ol, 6-metoxiapinenin-7-O-{beta}-D-allopyranoside and a mixture containing ethyl esters of carboxylic acids. The structures of the compounds were elucidated by spectroscopy and GC-MS analysis. The total phenolics contents of the crude extract and fractions were determined by Folin-Ciocalteau method. The antioxidant activity was evaluated using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). The AcOEt fraction showed better activity in DPPH assay (9.9 {+-} 0.03 {mu}g/mL), and presented also higher contents of the total phenolic (93.60 {+-} 1.11 {mu}g/mg). Antimicrobial and allelopathic effects of the crude ethanolic extract and fractions also were evaluated. In addition, the combination of biological activities was discussed. (author)

  4. The use of biologically related model (Eclipse for the intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning of nasopharyngeal carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica W K Kan

    Full Text Available Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT is the most common treatment technique for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. Physical quantities such as dose/dose-volume parameters are used conventionally for IMRT optimization. The use of biological related models has been proposed and can be a new trend. This work was to assess the performance of the biologically based IMRT optimization model installed in a popular commercial treatment planning system (Eclipse as compared to its dose/dose volume optimization model when employed in the clinical environment for NPC cases.Ten patients of early stage NPC and ten of advanced stage NPC were selected for this study. IMRT plans optimized using biological related approach (BBTP were compared to their corresponding plans optimized using the dose/dose volume based approach (DVTP. Plan evaluation was performed using both biological indices and physical dose indices such as tumor control probability (TCP, normal tissue complication probability (NTCP, target coverage, conformity, dose homogeneity and doses to organs at risk. The comparison results of the more complex advanced stage cases were reported separately from those of the simpler early stage cases.The target coverage and conformity were comparable between the two approaches, with BBTP plans producing more hot spots. For the primary targets, BBTP plans produced comparable TCP for the early stage cases and higher TCP for the advanced stage cases. BBTP plans reduced the volume of parotid glands receiving doses of above 40 Gy compared to DVTP plans. The NTCP of parotid glands produced by BBTP were 8.0 ± 5.8 and 7.9 ± 8.7 for early and advanced stage cases, respectively, while those of DVTP were 21.3 ± 8.3 and 24.4 ± 12.8, respectively. There were no significant differences in the NTCP values between the two approaches for the serial organs.Our results showed that the BBTP approach could be a potential alternative approach to the DVTP approach for NPC.

  5. [Radiation biology of structurally different Drosophila genes. Report III. The black gene: general and molecular characteristics of its radiomutability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrov, I D; Namolovan, L N; Aleksandrova, M V

    2012-01-01

    The results of the genetic, cytogenetic and molecular analysis of the nature of heritable recessive mutations at the small black (b) gene of Drosophila melanogaster induced by different doses (5-10 Gy) of 60Co gamma-rays and 0.85 MeV fission neutrons in the mature sperms of the wild-type males from the laboratory line D32 are presented. The whole spectrum of the b mutations induced by radiation of different quality is found to be the same and consists of the two main classes such as gene/point and gene/chromosome mutations, the latter of which include the whole-genomic, infra- or inter-chromosomal rearrangements involving the b gene. The induction rate of both mutation classes is found to be increased linearly with a dose of low- and high-LET radiation and the effectiveness of neutrons is 2.7 and 4.6 as large as that of gamma-rays under the gene/point and gene/chromosome mutation induction, respectively. Essentially, the molecular alterations underlying 65 gamma-ray- and neutron-induced gene/point b mutations are found not to be detected by the PCR technique. These and other established features of the b gene radiomutability are drastically different from those of another larger vestigial gene described earlier. The nature of these differences is discussed within the framework of the current notion of different biological organization of the two genes mentioned above and of the track structure theory as well.

  6. Retrospective genetic study of germinative mutations in Str loci of individuals potentially exposed to ionizing radiation;Estudo genetico retrospectivo de mutacoes germinativas em Loci Str de individuos potencialmente expostos a radiacao ionizante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Emilia Oliveira Alves

    2010-07-01

    The Brazilian radiological accident that occurred in 1987, in Goiania, it was a terrible radiation episode. As a consequence, hundreds of people were contaminated due to the Cesium-137 radiation. Recently, many studies had shown that genome instabilities, such as, mutations, chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei formation and micro satellite instability and a delay on cellular death are usually reported on mammal cells exposed to ionizing radiation, being considered as a manly risk to humans. Mutations can be spontaneous, and the occurrence is dependent on the organism, or, induced, being associated to mutagenic exposition. Ionizing radiations are an example of physical and mutagenic agents that could harm the cell repair and could cause the development of many types of cancer. The evaluation of the biological effects of the ionizing radiation, in somatic and germ line cells, with a consequent determination of the radio-induced mutations, it is extremely important to estimate the genetic risks, manly in population exposed to radiation. The analyses of repetitive DNA sequences have been demonstrated that such sequences are prone to high rates of spontaneous mutations. The minisatellites and microsatellites have been used to demonstrate the induction of germ line mutation rates on mouse, humans, among others organisms. The aim of the present study was to analyze the frequency of microsatellite alterations to determine the mutation rates occurred in germ cells of the parents exposed to the ionizing radiation of the Cesium-137. The studied group was constitute of 10 families of individuals accidentally exposed to Cesium-137 and by the control group constituted by 645 healthy individuals who carried out paternity tests on 2009. We found only one mutation of paternal origin in the D8S1179 locus on the exposed group, being the mutation rate of 0.002. In the control group, we found 01 mutation on D16S539 loei and on D3S1358; 02 mutations on Penta E loeus; 04 mutations on D

  7. The Biological Effectiveness of Different Radiation Qualities for the Induction of Chromosome Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to Si-28-ions with energies ranging from 90 to 600 MeV/u, Ti-48-ions with energies ranging from 240 to 1000 MeV/u, or to Fe-56-ions with energies ranging from 200 to 5,000 MeV/u. The LET of the various Si beams in this study ranged from 48 to 158 keV/ m, the LET of the Ti ions ranged from 107 to 240 keV/micron, and the LET of the Fe-ions ranged from 145 to 440 keV/ m. Doses delivered were in the 10- to 200-cGy range. Dose-response curves for chromosome exchanges in cells at first division after exposure, measured using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole-chromosome probes, were fitted with linear or linear-quadratic functions. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was estimated from the initial slope of the dose-response curve for chromosome damage with respect to gamma-rays. The estimates of RBEmax values for total chromosome exchanges ranged from 4.4+/-0.4 to 31.5+/-2.6 for Fe ions, 21.4+/-1.7 to 28.3+/-2.4 for Ti ions, and 11.8+/-1.0 to 42.2+/-3.3 for Si ions. The highest RBEmax value for Fe ions was obtained with the 600 MeV/u beam, the highest RBEmax value for Ti ions was obtained 1000 MeV/u beam, and the highest RBEmax value for Si ions was obtained with the 170 MeV/u beam. For Si and Fe ions the RBEmax values increased with LET, reaching a maximum at about 180 keV/micron for Fe and about 100 keV/micron for Si, and decreasing with further increase in LET. Additional studies for low doses Si-28-ions down to 0.02 Gy will be discussed.

  8. Morpho-functional study of ionizing radiation effects on the rabbits` femoral vein; Avaliacao morfofuncional do efeito da radiacao ionizante sobre a veia femoral. Estudo experimental em coelhos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakiyama, Mauro Yoshimitsu

    1995-12-31

    In this study we evaluate the effects of the ionizing radiation on the rabbits femoral vein. The samples of femoral vein were obtained from 56 New Zealand rabbits, male with ageing from 90 to 120 days, that were divided into 4 groups of 14 animals: one control group non-irradiated and three animal groups sacrificed 2 days, 14 days and 90 days after irradiation. In the three irradiated rabbits groups, each animal received the total dose 4000 cGy (rads) divided in 10 sessions of 400 cGy, a dose equivalent that utilized on clinical therapeutic. A morpho functional study of vein samples was carried out with: light microscopy: stained by hematoxin - eosin, Masson`s tricromic, and Verhoeff. Immunohistochemical: reactions of immunoperoxidase with monoclonal mouse anti-human endothelial cell factor CD-31 and anti-human Von Willebrand factor (factor VIII), to study the vein endothelium. Histomorphometry of elastic fiber system stained by Weigert`s resorcin-fuchsin with and without prior oxidation with oxone; for the study of mature, elaunin or pre-mature and oxytalan or young elastic fibers. Electronic microscopy: transmission and scanning. With the methodology utilized we observe changes in the femoral vein of the animals submitted to irradiation in relation to the control group, thus described: there is formation of vacuoles between the endothelium and the basal membrane, called sub endothelial vacuoles, in focal areas. The factor VIII and CD-31 endothelial antigens are preserved with no changes in their functions. Focal alterations are present in the endothelial surface with disorder in the setting and orientation of the endothelial cells. there is degeneration of the elastic fibers with significant decrease in their quantity in the stage, 2 days and 14 days after irradiation. There is increase in the quantity of elastic fibers in the late stage, 90 days after irradiation, tending to normality. In this present study, the changes described are not accompanied by venous

  9. The impact of biology on risk assessment -- Workshop of the National Research Council`s board on radiation effects research. Meeting report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Grosovsky, A. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Hanawalt, P.C. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Jostes, R.F. [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (United States). Board on Radiation Effects Research; Little, J.B. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Cancer Biology; Morgan, W.F. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Oleinick, N.L. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Ullrich, R.L. [Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States). Dept. of Radiation Therapy

    1997-12-31

    The linear, nonthreshold extrapolation from a dose-response relationship for ionizing radiation derived at higher doses to doses for which regulatory standards are proposed is being challenged by some scientists and defended by others. It appears that the risks associated with exposures to doses of interest are below the risks that can be measured with epidemiologic studies. Therefore, many have looked to biology to provide information relevant to risk assessment. The workshop reported here, ``The Impact of biology on Risk Assessment,`` was planned to address the need for further information by bringing together scientists who have been working in key fields of biology and others who have been contemplating the issues associated specifically with this question. The goals of the workshop were to summarize and review the status of the relevant biology, to determine how the reported biologic data might influence risk assessment, and to identify subjects on which more data is needed.

  10. Physical and biological studies with protons and HZE particles in a NASA supported research center in radiation health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, A.; Borak, T. H.

    2001-01-01

    NASA has established and supports a specialized center for research and training (NSCORT) to specifically address the potential deleterious effects of HZE particles on human health. The NSCORT in radiation health is a joint effort between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Colorado State University (CSU). The overall scope of research encompasses a broad range of subjects from microdosimetric studies to cellular and tissue responses to initial damage produced by highly energetic protons and heavy charged particles of the type found in galactic cosmic rays (GCR) spectrum. The objectives of the microdosimetry studies are to determine the response of Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) to cosmic rays using ground based accelerators. This includes evaluation of energy loss due to the escape of high-energy delta rays and increased energy deposition due to the enhanced delta ray production in the wall of the detector. In this report major results are presented for 56Fe at 1000, 740, 600 and 400 MeV/nucleon. An assessment of DNA repair and early development of related chromosomal changes is extremely important to our overall understanding of enhanced biological effectiveness of high LET particle radiation. Results are presented with respect to the fidelity of the rejoining of double strand breaks and the implications of misrejoining. The relationship between molecular and cytogenetic measurements is presented by studying damage processing in highly heterochromatic supernumerary (correction of sypernumerary) X chromosomes and the active X-chromosome. One of the important consequences of cell's inability to handle DNA damage can be evaluated through mutation studies. Part of our goal is the assessment of potential radioprotectors to reduce the mutation yield following HZE exposures, and some promising results are presented on one compound. A second goal is the integration of DNA repair and mutation studies. Results are presented on a direct

  11. Study of gamma radiation from {sup 60}Co effects on Apis mellifera venom: biochemical, pharmacological and immunological aspects; Estudo dos efeitos da radiacao gama de {sup 60}Co na peconha de Apis mellifera: aspectos bioquimicos, farmacologicos e imunologicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Helena

    2001-07-01

    Africanized honeybees are very common insects in Brazil and frequently cause accidents followed by important immunological reactions and even deaths. Their venoms are composed of a complex mixture of substances of general biological actions. Ionizing radiation is able to modify molecular structures affecting the biological properties of proteins. It decreases toxic and enzymatic activities and so, it appears promising as a venom detoxification tool. The main objective of this work was to study the effects of gamma radiation on bee venom, regarding biochemical, pharmacological and immunological aspects. Africanized Apis mellifera whole venom (2 mg/ml) in 0.15 M NaCl solution was irradiated with 2 kGy in a {sup 60}Co source. Native and irradiated bee venoms were submitted to high performance size exclusion chromatography (Tosohaas G2000SW column), high performance reversed phase chromatography in a C-18 column under water/acetonitrile gradient, SDS-PAGE. For both venoms studies have been carried out in UV absorption spectrum, protein concentration, hemolytic activity, and PLA{sub 2} activity analysis, lethality assay (LD{sub 50}). Biodistribution studies was carried out after labelling native and irradiated bee venom with {sup 99m}Tc. The results showed that gamma radiation did not change the protein concentration nor its immunogenicity, although it could be observed that irradiated bee venom UV spectrum and SDS-PAGE profile presented differences when compared to native bee venom. This suggests that some structural alterations in bee venom components could have occurred after irradiation. HPLC-RP profiles showed that gamma radiation could have caused conformational changes, such as unfolding of molecule chains, changing their hydrophobic groups exposuring. The hemolytic and the PLA{sub 2} activities of irradiated bee venom were smaller than the native ones. The gamma radiation diminished the toxicity of bee venom, but did not abolish its bioactivity, like hemolysis

  12. Proceedings of the Symposium on the Protection Against Radiation Hazards in Space Book 1: Radiation Environment in Space. Effects of Space Radiation on Radio Sensitive Objects. Biological Effects of Space Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1962-01-01

    The realization in recent years that outer space is traversed by high-energy radiations has caused man to reevaluate the feasibility of manned or even instrumented exploration outside our atmosphere. Fortunately, it is possible to determine the nature and intensities of these radiations and to produce similar radiations on earth by means of accelerators. Thus we can learn how to attenuate them and to design capsules which afford protection against them. Of course this protection carries a weight penalty so that there is a premium on optimizing the shield design. Many groups in the United states are engaged in research to this end,and it was the purpose of this symposium to bring these groups together so that they could exchange information. To make the meeting more comprehensive, sessions on the nature of the radiations and their effects on people and things were included. However, the major part of the meeting was devoted to discussions on shielding research, comprising theoretical calculations and experiments carried out mainly with high-energy accelerators. The symposium committee feels that the aims of the symposium were met and that progress in space research program was greatly accelerated thereby.

  13. Study of ionizing radiation effects in human costal cartilage by thermogravimetry and optical coherence tomography; Estudo dos efeitos da radiacao ionizante em cartilagem costal humana por meio de termogravimetria e tomografia por coerencia optica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinho Junior, Antonio Carlos

    2012-07-01

    Tissue Banks around the world have stored human cartilages obtained from post mortem donors for use in several kinds of reconstructive surgeries. To ensure that such tissues are not contaminated, they have been sterilized with ionizing radiation. However, high doses of gamma radiation may cause undesirable changes in the tissues. In this work, we evaluated the possibility of use Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) to identify possible structural modifications caused by both preservation methods of cartilage and gamma irradiation doses. Cartilages were obtained from cadaveric donors and were frozen at -70 deg C or preserved in glycerol. Irradiation was performed by {sup 60}Co source with doses of 15, 25 and 50 kGy. Our TGA results showed that glycerolized cartilages irradiated with different doses of radiation does not presented statistical differences when compared to the control group for the dehydration rate. However, the same was not observed for deep-frozen cartilages irradiated with 15 kGy. The results of OCT associated to total optical attenuation coefficient showed that doses of 15 kGy promote cross-link between collagen fibrils, corroborating the results obtained from TGA. Moreover, total optical attenuation coefficient values are proportional to stress at break of cartilages, what will be very useful in a near future to predict the quality of the allografts, without unnecessary loss of biological tissue, once OCT is a nondestructive technique. By PS-OCT images, we found that high doses of ionizing radiation does not promote sufficient impairments to promote complete loss of tissue birefringence. Thus, TGA and OCT are techniques that can be used for tissue banks to verify tissue quality before its transplant. (author)

  14. Integration of principles of systems biology and radiation biology: toward development of in silico models to optimize IUdR-mediated radiosensitization of DNA mismatch repair-deficient (damage tolerant human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy James Kinsella

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 7 years, we have focused our experimental and computational research efforts on improving our understanding of the biochemical, molecular, and cellular processing of iododeoxyuridine (IUdR and ionizing radiation (IR induced DNA base damage by DNA mismatch repair (MMR. These coordinated research efforts, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP, brought together system scientists with expertise in engineering, mathematics, and complex systems theory and translational cancer researchers with expertise in radiation biology. Our overall goal was to begin to develop computational models of IUdR- and/or IR- induced base damage processing by MMR that may provide new clinical strategies to optimize IUdR-mediated radiosensitiztion in MMR deficient (MMR- damage tolerant human cancers. Using multiple scales of experimental testing, ranging from purified protein systems to in vitro (cellular and to in vivo (human tumor xenografts in athymic mice models, we have begun to integrate and interpolate these experimental data with hybrid stochastic biochemical models of MMR damage processing and probabilistic cell cycle regulation models through a systems biology approach. In this article, we highlight the results and current status of our integration of radiation biology approaches and computational modeling to enhance IUdR-mediated radiosensitization in MMR- damage tolerant cancers.

  15. Nanoscale analysis of unstained biological specimens in water without radiation damage using high-resolution frequency transmission electric-field system based on FE-SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2015-04-10

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been widely used to examine biological specimens of bacteria, viruses and proteins. Until now, atmospheric and/or wet biological specimens have been examined using various atmospheric holders or special equipment involving SEM. Unfortunately, they undergo heavy radiation damage by the direct electron beam. In addition, images of unstained biological samples in water yield poor contrast. We recently developed a new analytical technology involving a frequency transmission electric-field (FTE) method based on thermionic SEM. This method is suitable for high-contrast imaging of unstained biological specimens. Our aim was to optimise the method. Here we describe a high-resolution FTE system based on field-emission SEM; it allows for imaging and nanoscale examination of various biological specimens in water without radiation damage. The spatial resolution is 8 nm, which is higher than 41 nm of the existing FTE system. Our new method can be easily utilised for examination of unstained biological specimens including bacteria, viruses and protein complexes. Furthermore, our high-resolution FTE system can be used for diverse liquid samples across a broad range of scientific fields, e.g. nanoparticles, nanotubes and organic and catalytic materials. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Enzymes repair radiation injury. What they can do with the fundamental cellular components - experiments with biologically active DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meermann, H.

    1986-01-01

    A cell is able to repair radiation injury all by itself. It houses a variety of very efficient experts for this task, namely repair enzymes, which indeed can repair injuries of the fundamental cellular components, as e.g. the bases of the DNA, and even severe injuries induced by high-energy radiation, as for example X radiation, electrons, neutron, and ion beams.

  17. Relative Biological Effectiveness of Energetic Heavy Ions for Intestinal Tumorigenesis Shows Male Preponderance and Radiation Type and Energy Dependence in APC{sup 1638N/+} Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Strawn, Steve J.; Thakor, Hemang; Fan, Ziling [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology and Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Shay, Jerry W. [Department of Cell Biology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Fornace, Albert J. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology and Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Center of Excellence in Genomic Medicine Research (CEGMR), King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Datta, Kamal, E-mail: kd257@georgetown.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology and Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: There are uncertainties associated with the prediction of colorectal cancer (CRC) risk from highly energetic heavy ion (HZE) radiation. We undertook a comprehensive assessment of intestinal and colonic tumorigenesis induced after exposure to high linear energy transfer (high-LET) HZE radiation spanning a range of doses and LET in a CRC mouse model and compared the results with the effects of low-LET γ radiation. Methods and Materials: Male and female APC{sup 1638N/+} mice (n=20 mice per group) were whole-body exposed to sham-radiation, γ rays, {sup 12}C, {sup 28}Si, or {sup 56}Fe radiation. For the >1 Gy HZE dose, we used γ-ray equitoxic doses calculated using relative biological effectiveness (RBE) determined previously. The mice were euthanized 150 days after irradiation, and intestinal and colon tumor frequency was scored. Results: The highest number of tumors was observed after {sup 28}Si, followed by {sup 56}Fe and {sup 12}C radiation, and tumorigenesis showed a male preponderance, especially after {sup 28}Si. Analysis showed greater tumorigenesis per unit of radiation (per cGy) at lower doses, suggesting either radiation-induced elimination of target cells or tumorigenesis reaching a saturation point at higher doses. Calculation of RBE for intestinal and colon tumorigenesis showed the highest value with {sup 28}Si, and lower doses showed greater RBE relative to higher doses. Conclusions: We have demonstrated that the RBE of heavy ion radiation-induced intestinal and colon tumorigenesis is related to ion energy, LET, gender, and peak RBE is observed at an LET of 69 keV/μm. Our study has implications for understanding risk to astronauts undertaking long duration space missions.

  18. Disruption of SLX4-MUS81 Function Increases the Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qi [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Underwood, Tracy S.A.; Kung, Jong [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wang, Meng [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Paganetti, Harald [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Held, Kathryn D.; Hong, Theodore S.; Efstathiou, Jason A. [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Willers, Henning, E-mail: hwillers@mgh.harvard.edu [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Clinical proton beam therapy has been based on the use of a generic relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of ∼1.1. However, emerging data have suggested that Fanconi anemia (FA) and homologous recombination pathway defects can lead to a variable RBE, at least in vitro. We investigated the role of SLX4 (FANCP), which acts as a docking platform for the assembly of multiple structure-specific endonucleases, in the response to proton irradiation. Methods and Materials: Isogenic cell pairs for the study of SLX4, XPF/ERCC1, MUS81, and SLX1 were irradiated at the mid-spread-out Bragg peak of a clinical proton beam (linear energy transfer 2.5 keV/μm) or with 250 kVp x-rays, and the clonogenic survival fractions were determined. To estimate the RBE of the protons relative to cobalt-60 photons (Co60Eq), we assigned a RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.1 to x-rays to correct the physical dose measured. Standard DNA repair foci assays were used to monitor the damage responses, and the cell cycle distributions were assessed by flow cytometry. The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor olaparib was used for comparison. Results: Loss of SLX4 function resulted in an enhanced proton RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.42 compared with 1.11 for wild-type cells (at a survival fraction of 0.1; P<.05), which correlated with increased persistent DNA double-strand breaks in cells in the S/G{sub 2} phase. Genetic analysis identified the SLX4-binding partner MUS81 as a mediator of resistance to proton radiation. Both proton irradiation and olaparib treatment resulted in a similar prolonged accumulation of RAD51 foci in SLX4/MUS81-deficient cells, suggesting a common defect in the repair of DNA replication fork-associated damage. Conclusions: A defect in the FA pathway at the level of SLX4 results in hypersensitivity to proton radiation, which is, at least in part, due to impaired MUS81-mediated processing of replication forks that stall at clustered DNA damage. In vivo and clinical studies are needed to

  19. A comparison of the biological effects of 125I seeds continuous low-dose-rate radiation and 60Co high-dose-rate gamma radiation on non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongmin Wang

    Full Text Available To compare the biological effects of 125I seeds continuous low-dose-rate (CLDR radiation and 60Co γ-ray high-dose-rate (HDR radiation on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells.A549, H1299 and BEAS-2B cells were exposed to 125I seeds CLDR radiation or 60Co γ-ray HDR radiation. The survival fraction was determined using a colony-forming assay. The cell cycle progression and apoptosis were detected by flow cytometry (FCM. The expression of the apoptosis-related proteins caspase-3, cleaved-caspase-3, PARP, cleaved-PARP, BAX and Bcl-2 were detected by western blot assay.After irradiation with 125I seeds CLDR radiation, there was a lower survival fraction, more pronounced cell cycle arrest (G1 arrest and G2/M arrest in A549 and H1299 cells, respectively and a higher apoptotic ratio for A549 and H1299 cells than after 60Co γ-ray HDR radiation. Moreover, western blot assays revealed that 125I seeds CLDR radiation remarkably up-regulated the expression of Bax, cleaved-caspase-3 and cleaved-PARP proteins and down-regulated the expression of Bcl-2 proteins in A549 and H1299 cells compared with 60Co γ-ray HDR radiation. However, there was little change in the apoptotic ratio and expression of apoptosis-related proteins in normal BEAS-2B cells receiving the same treatment.125I seeds CLDR radiation led to remarkable growth inhibition of A549 and H1299 cells compared with 60Co HDR γ-ray radiation; A549 cells were the most sensitive to radiation, followed by H1299 cells. In contrast, normal BEAS-2B cells were relatively radio-resistant. The imbalance of the Bcl-2/Bax ratio and the activation of caspase-3 and PARP proteins might play a key role in the anti-proliferative effects induced by 125I seeds CLDR radiation, although other possibilities have not been excluded and will be investigated in future studies.

  20. Radiation biology of mosquitoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helinski, Michelle E. H.; Parker, Andrew G.; Knols, Bart G. J.

    2009-01-01

    There is currently renewed interest in assessing the feasibility of the sterile insect technique (SIT) to control African malaria vectors in designated areas. The SIT relies on the sterilization of males before mass release, with sterilization currently being achieved through the use of ionizing

  1. Biologically effective dose and definitive radiation treatment for localized prostate cancer: treatment gaps do affect the risk of biochemical failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanpaolo, P; Barbieri, V; Genovesi, D

    2014-08-01

    It is not clear if prolongation of definitive external radiation therapy for prostate cancer has an effect on biochemical failure. The aim of this work was to evaluate whether the biologically effective dose (BED), and in particular the duration of radiotherapy, intended as overall treatment time, has an effect on biochemical failure rates and to develop a nomogram useful to predict the 6-year probability of biochemical failure. A total of 670 patients with T1-3 N0 prostate cancer were treated with external beam definitive radiotherapy, to a total dose of 72-79.2 Gy in 40-44 fractions. The computed BED values were treated with restricted cubic splines. Variables were checked for colinearity using Spearman's test. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate freedom from biochemical relapse (FFBR) rates. The Cox regression analysis was used to identify prognostic factors of biochemical relapse in the final most performing model and to create a nomogram. Concordance probability estimate and calibration methods were used to validate the nomogram. Neoadjuvant and concomitant androgen deprivation was administered to 475 patients (70%). The median follow-up was 80 months (range 20-129 months). Overall, the 6-year FFBR rate was 88.3%. BED values were associated with higher biochemical failure risk. Age, iPSA, risk category, and days of radiotherapy treatment were independent variables of biochemical failure. A prolongation of RT (lower BED values) is associated with an increased risk of biochemical failure. The nomogram may be helpful in decision making for the individual patient.

  2. Biological Subtype Predicts Risk of Locoregional Recurrence After Mastectomy and Impact of Postmastectomy Radiation in a Large National Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, Yolanda D., E-mail: ydt2@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Uno, Hajime [Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hughes, Melissa E. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Niland, Joyce C. [Department of Biostatistics, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California (United States); Wong, Yu-Ning [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Theriault, Richard [Department of General Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Blitzblau, Rachel C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Moy, Beverly [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Breslin, Tara [Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Northwestern Lake Forest Hospital, Lake Forest, Illinois (United States); Edge, Stephen B. [Baptist Cancer Center, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Hassett, Michael J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Punglia, Rinaa S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate locoregional recurrence (LRR) after mastectomy and impact of postmastectomy radiation (PMRT) by breast cancer subtype. Methods and Materials: Between 2000 and 2009, 5673 patients with stage I to III breast carcinoma underwent mastectomy and nodal evaluation; 30% received PMRT. Isolated LRR (iLRR) and LRR were compared across groups defined by biological subtype and receipt of trastuzumab: luminal A (estrogen [ER]/progesterone [PR]+, HER2−, low/intermediate grade), luminal B (ER/PR+, HER2−, high grade), HER2 with trastuzumab, HER2 without trastuzumab, and triple negative (TN; ER−, PR−, HER2−). LRR hazard ratios (HR) were estimated with multivariable Fine and Gray models. The effect of PMRT on LRR was evaluated with Fine and Gray models stratified by propensity for PMRT. Results: With a median follow-up time of 50.1 months, there were 19 iLRR and 109 LRR events. HER2 patients with trastuzumab had no iLRR and only a single LRR. Compared with luminal A patients, TN patients had significantly greater adjusted risk of iLRR (HR 14.10; 95% CI 2.97%-66.90%), with a similar trend among luminal B (HR 4.94; 95% CI 0.94%-25.82%) and HER2 patients without trastuzumab (HR 4.41; 95% CI 0.61%-32.11%). Although PMRT reduced LRR, the effect of PMRT varied by subgroup, with the greatest and smallest effects seen among luminal A (HR 0.17; 95% CI 0.05%-0.62%) and TN patients (HR 0.59; 95% CI 0.25%-1.35%), respectively. Conclusions: TN patients had the highest risk of LRR and the least benefit from PMRT; these patients may benefit from alternative treatment strategies. In contrast, in the era of HER2-directed therapy, the role of local therapy may need to be reassessed among HER2 patients.

  3. Flow cytometric applications of tumor biology: prospects and pitfalls. [Applications in study of spontaneous dog tumors and in drug and radiation effects on cultured V79 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, M.R.; Johnson, T.S.; Tokita, N.; Gillette, E.L.

    1979-01-01

    A brief review of cytometry instrumentation and its potential applications in tumor biology is presented using our recent data. Age-distribution measurements of cells from spontaneous dog tumors and cultured cells after exposure to x rays, alpha particles, or adriamycin are shown. The data show that DNA fluorescence measurements have application in the study of cell kinetics after either radiation or drug treatment. Extensive and careful experimentation is needed to utilize the sophisticated developments in flow cytometry instrumentation.

  4. Collaborative approach in the study of the reproductive biology of the dusky grouper Epinephelus marginatus (Lowe, 1834 (Perciformes: Serranidae = Abordagem colaborativa no estudo da biologia reprodutiva da garoupa verdadeira Epinephelus marginatus (Lowe, 1834 (Perciformes: Serranidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopoldo Cavaleri Gerhardinger

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Several aspects of the reproductive biology of the dusky grouper Epinephelus marginatus were investigated using a collaborative methodology. 193 specimens of dusky groupers were obtained in collaboration with fish market personnel in the city of São Francisco do Sul, Santa Catarina State, Southern Brazil. Fish market staff were trained and encouraged to collect biological material required for reproductive studies, giving access to many specimens which otherwise would have been unavailable. E. marginatus was found to reproduce in early summer, spawning between November and December. Females reachedsexual maturity at approximately 460 mm total length. Sampled males ranged from 900-1000 mm and females from 300-960 mm in total length. No transitional (i.e. sex changing males were observed. The regression equation for the relationship between total length (TL (mm and total weight (TW (g was TW = 4.4x10-5TL2.8. Suggestions to improve the performance of future collaborative sampling projects are discussed.Diversos aspectos da biologia reprodutiva da garoupa verdadeira Epinephelus marginatus foram abordados através de uma metodologia colaborativa. Ao todo, 193 exemplares da garoupa verdadeira foram obtidas em peixarias colaboradoras no município de São Francisco do Sul, Estado de Santa Catarina, Brasil. Os funcionários das peixarias foram treinados e incentivados a realizar a coleta de todo material biológico necessário para estudos reprodutivos, possibilitando o acesso a um grande número de vísceras que teriam de outra maneira sido dispensadas. Epinephelus marginatus esteve em atividade reprodutiva no inicio do verão, com desova provável entre novembro e dezembro. Fêmeas atingiram a maturidade sexual com aproximadamente 460 mm de comprimento total. Machos variaram de 900mm a 1000 mm e fêmeas de 300 mm a 960 mm. Não foram observados machos em transição sexual. A equação de regressão da relação entre o comprimento total (CT (mm e

  5. Radiation 98 incorporating the 19th AINSE radiation chemistry conference, the 16th AINSE radiation biology conference and the 7th meeting of the Society for Free Radical Research Australasia. Conference Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    Topics covered in this conference include: protein oxidation, antioxidants, radiation chemistry, radiolabelled compounds and their use, radiation effects, radiosensitivity, radiation monitoring. The booklet contains abstracts of papers presented at the conference; 64 of them considered to be in INIS scope have been separately indexed

  6. Biochemical and pharmacological studies of native and irradiated crotamine with gamma radiation of {sup 60}Co; Estudo bioquimico e farmacologico das crotaminas nativa e irradiada com radiacao gama de {sup 60}Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitake, Malvina Boni

    2000-07-01

    Ionizing radiation can change the molecular structure and affect the biological properties of biomolecules. This has been employed to attenuate animal toxins. Crotamine is a strongly basic polypeptide from the South American rattlesnake venom, composed of 42 amino acid residues. It induces skeletal muscle spasms leading to a spastic paralysis of hind limbs in mice. The objective of this thesis was carry out biochemical and pharmacological studies of native and irradiated crotamine with {sup 60} Co. Crotamine was purified from Crotalus durissus terrificus venom by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration followed by ion exchange chromatography, using a Fast Performance Liquid Chromatography (FPLC) system. It was irradiated at 2 mg/ml in 0.15 M Na Cl with 2.0 kGy gamma radiation emitted by a {sup 60} Co source. The native and irradiated crotamine were evaluated by biochemical characterization, toxic activity (LD{sub 50} and biodistribution. The native and irradiated crotamine were labelled with 29.6 MBq of {sup 125} I using chloramine T method, and separated in a Sephadex G-50 column. Male Swiss mice (35{+-} 5 g), were injected i.p. with o.1 mL (2.4 x 10{sup 6} cpm/mouse) of {sup 125} I native crotamine or with 0.4 mL (1.3 x 10{sup 6} cpm/mouse) of {sup 125} I irradiated crotamine. At 0.08; 0.25; 0.5; 1; 2; 4; 8; 12 and 24 hours the animal were killed by ether inhalation. Blood, spleen, liver, kidneys, brain, lungs, heart, and skeletal muscle were collected in order to determine radioactivity content. The results showed that gamma radiation did not change the protein concentration, the electroforetic profile or the primary structure of the protein, although differences were shown by spectroscopic techniques. The gamma radiation diminished the toxicity of crotamine, but it did not abolish bioactivity. Biodistribution studies showed that native and irradiated crotamine have hepatic metabolism and renal elimination. The native and irradiated crotamine have affinity by skeletal

  7. The Chernobyl Tissue Bank — A Repository for Biomaterial and Data Used in Integrative and Systems Biology Modeling the Human Response to Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Geraldine; Unger, Kristian; Krznaric, Marko; Galpine, Angela; Bethel, Jackie; Tomlinson, Christopher; Woodbridge, Mark; Butcher, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The only unequivocal radiological effect of the Chernobyl accident on human health is the increase in thyroid cancer in those exposed in childhood or early adolescence. In response to the scientific interest in studying the molecular biology of thyroid cancer post Chernobyl, the Chernobyl Tissue Bank (CTB: www.chernobyltissuebank.com) was established in 1998. Thus far it is has collected biological samples from 3,861 individuals, and provided 27 research projects with 11,254 samples. The CTB was designed from its outset as a resource to promote the integration of research and clinical data to facilitate a systems biology approach to radiation related thyroid cancer. The project has therefore developed as a multidisciplinary collaboration between clinicians, dosimetrists, molecular biologists and bioinformaticians and serves as a paradigm for tissue banking in the omics era. PMID:24704918

  8. WE-E-17A-07: Patient-Specific Mathematical Neuro-Oncology: Biologically-Informed Radiation Therapy and Imaging Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, K; Corwin, D [Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Rockne, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate a method of generating patient-specific, biologically-guided radiation therapy (RT) plans and to quantify and predict response to RT in glioblastoma. We investigate the biological correlates and imaging physics driving T2-MRI based response to radiation therapy using an MRI simulator. Methods: We have integrated a patient-specific biomathematical model of glioblastoma proliferation, invasion and radiotherapy with a multiobjective evolutionary algorithm for intensity-modulated RT optimization to construct individualized, biologically-guided plans. Patient-individualized simulations of the standard-of-care and optimized plans are compared in terms of several biological metrics quantified on MRI. An extension of the PI model is used to investigate the role of angiogenesis and its correlates in glioma response to therapy with the Proliferation-Invasion-Hypoxia- Necrosis-Angiogenesis model (PIHNA). The PIHNA model is used with a brain tissue phantom to predict tumor-induced vasogenic edema, tumor and tissue density that is used in a multi-compartmental MRI signal equation for generation of simulated T2- weighted MRIs. Results: Applying a novel metric of treatment response (Days Gained) to the patient-individualized simulation results predicted that the optimized RT plans would have a significant impact on delaying tumor progression, with Days Gained increases from 21% to 105%. For the T2- MRI simulations, initial validation tests compared average simulated T2 values for white matter, tumor, and peripheral edema to values cited in the literature. Simulated results closely match the characteristic T2 value for each tissue. Conclusion: Patient-individualized simulations using the combination of a biomathematical model with an optimization algorithm for RT generated biologically-guided doses that decreased normal tissue dose and increased therapeutic ratio with the potential to improve survival outcomes for treatment of glioblastoma. Simulated T2-MRI

  9. Lung Cancer Cell Line Screen Links Fanconi Anemia/BRCA Pathway Defects to Increased Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qi; Ghosh, Priyanjali; Magpayo, Nicole [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Testa, Mauro; Tang, Shikui [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gheorghiu, Liliana [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Biggs, Peter; Paganetti, Harald [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A. [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lu, Hsiao-Ming [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Held, Kathryn D. [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Willers, Henning, E-mail: hwillers@mgh.harvard.edu [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: Growing knowledge of genomic heterogeneity in cancer, especially when it results in altered DNA damage responses, requires re-examination of the generic relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 of protons. Methods and Materials: For determination of cellular radiosensitivity, we irradiated 17 lung cancer cell lines at the mid-spread-out Bragg peak of a clinical proton beam (linear energy transfer, 2.5 keV/μm). For comparison, 250-kVp X rays and {sup 137}Cs γ-rays were used. To estimate the RBE of protons relative to {sup 60}Co (Co60eq), we assigned an RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.1 to X rays to correct the physical dose measured. Standard DNA repair foci assays were used to monitor damage responses. FANCD2 was depleted using RNA interference. Results: Five lung cancer cell lines (29.4%) exhibited reduced clonogenic survival after proton irradiation compared with X-irradiation with the same physical doses. This was confirmed in a 3-dimensional sphere assay. Corresponding proton RBE(Co60Eq) estimates were statistically significantly different from 1.1 (P≤.05): 1.31 to 1.77 (for a survival fraction of 0.5). In 3 of these lines, increased RBE was correlated with alterations in the Fanconi anemia (FA)/BRCA pathway of DNA repair. In Calu-6 cells, the data pointed toward an FA pathway defect, leading to a previously unreported persistence of proton-induced RAD51 foci. The FA/BRCA-defective cells displayed a 25% increase in the size of subnuclear 53BP1 foci 18 hours after proton irradiation. Conclusions: Our cell line screen has revealed variations in proton RBE that are partly due to FA/BRCA pathway defects, suggesting that the use of a generic RBE for cancers should be revisited. We propose that functional biomarkers, such as size of residual 53BP1 foci, may be used to identify cancers with increased sensitivity to proton radiation.

  10. Application of translocation, γ-H2AX, and Sam68 as a biological indicators for the assessment of radiation exposure in nuclear power plant workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Kwang Hee; Park, Hyung Sun; Nam, Seon Young [Korea Hydro Nuclear Power Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    This study showed that confirmation of the initial dose estimated by dicentric analysis is provided by the subsequent FISH analysis for translocation frequency and provides further evidence for the valid use of FISH as a retrospective biological dosimeter. The IAEA manual on cytogenetic dosimetry recommends a halftime value of 3 y to correct for the decrease of dicentrics in case of delayed sampling based on the patient data of Buckton. Support for this comes from the cytogenetic follow up of an individual exposed to tritium, which also indicated a decline in dicentrics with a half-time of ∼3 y. Naturally, the RBE of tritium, as well as other kinds of ionizing radiation, depends on the dose, exposure conditions, and studied parameters. The information about the RBE of tritium that is most important from an applied standpoint is that associated with the range of low doses. In our study, the dose dependence of tritium RBE was not identified because of very low dose Tritium (< 1mSv). However, The strong smooth relationship between translocation yield and age is shown in Table 2. The translocation yields reported here are only slightly lower than already published. The implication is that the increase of yield with age could be due to environmental factors, to a natural aging process or both. In addition, we confirmed that γ-H2AX and Sam68 associated with DNA damage and apoptosis, can be new biological indicators for radiation exposure. Radiation workers are exposed to ionizing radiation from various sources. Ionizing radiation produces several types of DNA lesion, including DNA base alterations, DNA. DNA cross-links, and single- and double-strand breaks. As a protocol for biological dosimetry recommended by IAEA (2001), the analysis of solid stained dicentric chromosomes has been used since the mid 1960s. The intervening years have seen great improvements bringing the technique to a point where dicentric analysis has become a routine component of the radiological

  11. Biologically relevant physical measurements in the ice-free valleys of southern Victoria Land: soil temperature profiles and ultraviolet radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienow, J. A.; Meyer, M. A.; Friedmann, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    As part of the ongoing comprehensive study of the cryptoendolithic microbial community in the ice-free valleys of southern Victoria Land, thermal properties of the soil and the ultraviolet radiation regime were measured. Although soil temperature profiles have been measured in the ice-free valleys (e.g., Cameron et al. 1970; Cameron 1972), these are the first such data from higher elevations. This is apparently the first time the ultraviolet radiation regime has been measured in the Antarctic.

  12. Establishment of Korea-Russia bilateral research collaboration for studies on biological effects of cosmic ray and space radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Juwoon; Kim, Dongho; Choi, Jongil; Song, Beomseok; Kim, Jaekyung; Kang, Oilhyun; Lee, Yoonjong; Kim, Jinhong; Jo, Minho

    2011-04-15

    {Omicron} KAERI-IBMP joint workshop on countermeasure and application researches to space environments - Sharing of state-of-the-art researches on space radiobiology using bio-satellites (BION-M1, Photon-soil) and ISS module (Bio-risk) was conducted - Sharing and discussion of state-of-the-art researches on dosimetry of space radiation and its affect on organisms were conducted. {Omicron} Making a contract on KAERI-IBMP Joint Research using Bio-risk module - Contract on KAERI-IBMP Joint Research to evaluate effect of space environment (microgravity and space radiation) on fermentative fungi (Aspergillus oryzae), Algae (Nostoc sp.), and plant seeds (rice, Arabidopsis thaliana, Brachypodium distachyon) was made in November, 2010. {Omicron} Discussion on new Joint Researches on evaluation of space radiation on organisms - Final step on Bion-M projects in terms of evaluation of physiological changes of lactic acid bacteria consumed by Mouse - Discussing new joint research on evaluation of physiological changes of primate by space radiation {Omicron} Establishment and management of the practical working group to invite a branch office of the IBMP in Korea - The system and the working group to implement cooperating researches between KAERI-IBMP on space radiation were established.

  13. Biological dosimetry of ionizing radiation by chromosomal aberration analysis; Dosimetria biologica de las radiaciones ionizantes mediante el analisis de aberraciones cromosomicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Castano, S.; Silva, A.; Navlet, J.

    1990-07-01

    Biological dosimetry consists of estimating absorbed doses for people exposed to radiation by mean biological methods. Several indicators used are based in haematological, biochemical, and cytogenetic data, although nowadays without doubt, the cytogenetic method is considered to be the most reliable. In this case, the study ol chromosomal aberrations, normally dicentric chromosomes, in peripheral lymphocytes can be related to absorbed dose through an experimental calibration curve. An experimental dose-response curve, using dicentric chromosomes analysis, X-rays at 300 kVp, 114 rad/min and temperature 37 degree celsius has been produced. Experimental data is fitted to model Y ={alpha} + {beta}{sub 1}D + {beta}{sub 2}D 2 , where Y is the number of dicentrics per cell and D the dose. The curve is compared with those produced elsewhere. (Author) 14 refs.

  14. Molecular radiation biological effect in wet protein and DNA observed in the measurements of labeled electron with muons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamine, K., E-mail: kanetada.nagamine@ucr.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Muon Science Laboratory, IMSS, KEK, Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Atomic Physics Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0191 (Japan); Torikai, E. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Kofu, Yamanashi 400-8511 (Japan); Shimomura, K. [Muon Science Laboratory, IMSS, KEK, Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Ikedo, Y. [TOYOTA CENTRAL R and D LABS, INC. 41-1, Nagakute-cho, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Schultz, J.S. [Department of Bio-Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    In a series of experimental studies of protein- and DNA-electron transfer in solid crystal and aqueous solution by the labeled electron method, the results for the wet form with 10-50% water were found to be entirely different from those for the solid form. Consistent explanations were obtained by considering the formation and reactivity of the radical that is produced in water by the muon before its thermalization. The molecular-level understandings of muon radiation effects are expected to contribute to the progress of biomedical studies, e.g. proton radiation therapy for cancer.

  15. Exploring the Link between Radiation Exposure and Multifocal Basal Cell Carcinomas in a Former Chernobyl Clean-up Worker by Combining Different Molecular Biological Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Benjamin V; Richter, Claus; Ullmann, Reinhard; Beinke, Christina; Majewski, Matthäus; Exner, Viktoria; Weisel, Guido; Abend, Michael; Port, Matthias

    2017-11-01

    Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident we report on a patient who was a clean-up worker, who subsequently developed multiple cutaneous basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). We used several methods to assess the biological long-term effects related to low-dose external and internal radiation exposure. Specifically, because BCC risk may be increased with ionizing radiation exposure, we endeavored to determine whether the multifocal BCCs were related to the patient's past clean-up work. We assessed cytogenetic changes using peripheral blood, and internal incorporation was measured with a whole-body counter. Gene expression alterations were determined and array-based comparative genomic hybridization was performed for copy number aberration analysis of available BCC samples. In 1,053 metaphase cells, the dicentric yield of 0.005 dicentrics, with acentrics/cell, was significantly increased compared to the established calibration curve (P contamination was detected with the whole-body counter. At the RNA level, two of seven genes (HNRNPA1, AGAP4/6/8) indicated internal plutonium exposure associated with the lowest dose category found in Mayak workers (>0-0.055 Gy). Relevant DNA copy number changes were only detected within the most aggressive BCC focus. Our results suggest that the examined worker had low and more recent radiation exposure with presumably internalized radionuclides that were below the detection level of a whole-body counter. The multifocal BCC could not be related to past occupational radiation exposure. The findings from our study suggest that integrating different methodologies potentially provides an improved overall assessment of individual health risks associated with or excluding occupational radiation exposure.

  16. 3. German congress for radiation oncology, radiation biology and medical physics. Proceedings; 3. Deutscher Kongress fuer Radioonkologie, Strahlenbiologie und Medizinische Physik. Vortraege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1997-11-01

    The third annual congress on radiation oncology, radiobiology and medical physics held at Leipzig brings together a great number of scientists and experts in the relevant subject fields and thus offers a forum for discussions and mutual exchange of scientific information. Topics of the congress are the knowledge obtained from empirical clinical studies, results of radiobiology research of relevance to practice, and development trends in the field of medical physics. (Orig./CB) [Deutsch] Der 3. Jahreskongress fuer Radioonkologie, Strahlenbiologie und Medizinische Physik in Leipzig fuehrt eine grosse Zahl von Wissenschaftlern der genannten Fachgebiete zum wissenschaftlichen Gedankenaustausch zusammen. Im Mittelpunkt werden die Erkenntnisse klinisch-empirischer Studien, fuer die Praxis relevante Forschungsergebnisse strahlenbiologischer Untersuchungen und neue Entwicklungstendenzen auf dem Gebiet der Medizinischen Physik stehen. (orig./MG)

  17. Predicting the biological effects of mobile phone radiation absorbed energy linked to the MRI-obtained structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstić, Dejan; Zigar, Darko; Petković, Dejan; Sokolović, Dušan; Dinđić, Boris; Cvetković, Nenad; Jovanović, Jovica; Dinđić, Nataša

    2013-01-01

    The nature of an electromagnetic field is not the same outside and inside a biological subject. Numerical bioelectromagnetic simulation methods for penetrating electromagnetic fields facilitate the calculation of field components in biological entities. Calculating energy absorbed from known sources, such as mobile phones when placed near the head, is a prerequisite for studying the biological influence of an electromagnetic field. Such research requires approximate anatomical models which are used to calculate the field components and absorbed energy. In order to explore the biological effects in organs and tissues, it is necessary to establish a relationship between an analogous anatomical model and the real structure. We propose a new approach in exploring biological effects through combining two different techniques: 1) numerical electromagnetic simulation, which is used to calculate the field components in a similar anatomical model and 2) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), which is used to accurately locate sites with increased absorption. By overlapping images obtained by both methods, we can precisely locate the spots with maximum absorption effects. This way, we can detect the site where the most pronounced biological effects are to be expected. This novel approach successfully overcomes the standard limitations of working with analogous anatomical models.

  18. Measurements and simulations of microscopic damage to DNA in water by 30 keV electrons: A general approach applicable to other radiation sources and biological targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Marc Benjamin; Meyer, Susann; Kunte, Hans-Jörg; Solomun, Tihomir; Sturm, Heinz

    2017-05-01

    The determination of the microscopic dose-damage relationship for DNA in an aqueous environment is of a fundamental interest for dosimetry and applications in radiation therapy and protection. We combine geant4 particle-scattering simulations in water with calculations concerning the movement of biomolecules to obtain the energy deposit in the biologically relevant nanoscopic volume. We juxtaposition these results to the experimentally determined damage to obtain the dose-damage relationship at a molecular level. This approach is tested for an experimentally challenging system concerning the direct irradiation of plasmid DNA (pUC19) in water with electrons as primary particles. Here a microscopic target model for the plasmid DNA based on the relation of lineal energy and radiation quality is used to calculate the effective target volume. It was found that on average fewer than two ionizations within a 7.5-nm radius around the sugar-phosphate backbone are sufficient to cause a single strand break, with a corresponding median lethal energy deposit being E1 /2=6 ±4 eV. The presented method is applicable for ionizing radiation (e.g., γ rays, x rays, and electrons) and a variety of targets, such as DNA, proteins, or cells.

  19. The regeneration of epidermal cells of Saintpaulia leaves as a new plant-tissue system for cellular radiation biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, F M; van der Laan, F M; Leenhouts, H P; Chadwick, K H

    1980-09-01

    Investigation of the nucleus of epidermal cells of the petioles of Saintpaulia leaves by cytofluorimetry revealed that all cells are in a non-cycling pre DNA synthesis phase. Cultivation of dissected leaves results in a synchronous regeneration process of a defined number of cells. Five days after onset of cultivation the cells reach the first mitosis. The nuclear development during the regeneration process is described. Irradiation of the leaves results in a directly visible inhibition of this regenerating capability which is used to quantify cell survival in a tissue. The data show that the radiation response has a similar shape to that of the survival of single cells in culture. This response can be observed before the first mitosis of the cells and its application as a new plant tissue system for cellular radiation research is discussed.

  20. Terahertz Radiation: A Non-contact Tool for the Selective Stimulation of Biological Responses in Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    has a 25-mm diameter aperture and a 38-ms open/ close time. To eliminate appreciable cutoff due to THz beam di- vergence , the shutter was positioned 7...hyperthermic stress [66]. Since 2.52 THz induces a tempera- ture increase in exposed Jurkat cells, we sought to determine whether THz radiation exposure...order to overcome such stress and ensuing pleotropic effects, cells utilize their cellular defense and adaptation mechanism, commonly referred to as

  1. Physical and biological interface dose effects in tissue due to X-ray-induced release of secondary radiation from metallic gold surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulla, D F; Hieber, L B; Seidenbusch, M

    1998-07-01

    Dose enhancement up to more than a factor of 100 was found in an environment of tissue-equivalent polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) close to the surface of a thin metallic gold foil. The enhancement factors were determined for heavily filtered X rays (40 to 120 kV tube potential) under backscatter conditions, using thin-film radiation detectors with sub-micrometer resolution. The secondary electrons were found to range up to some 10 microm in tissue-equivalent material. Correspondingly, enhanced biological effects could be shown in vitro, using monolayers of C3H 10T1/2 mouse embryo fibroblasts exposed in intimate contact with the gold surface. The decay of the survival curves of cells irradiated on gold was significantly steeper than for those obtained from irradiation between PMMA disks with the same dose, also giving biological evidence for significantly enhanced doses at the gold interface. The shape of the inactivation curves resembled those for high-LET radiation, lacking a pronounced shoulder at the lower doses. Quantitatively, doses of e.g. 50 mGy (80 kV X rays) in homogeneous PMMA caused about 35% cell killing and 200 mGy about 80% when the cells were irradiated at the gold surface. From a comparison of these inactivation numbers with those found for irradiation between PMMA disks, biological dose enhancement factors for the cell system considered ranged up to about a factor of 50. In addition to cell inactivation, the in vitro irradiations of C3H 10T1/2 cells adjacent to the gold surface resulted in increased rates of oncogenic transformation. A dose of 100 mGy 80 kV X rays (measured in homogeneous PMMA) caused a frequency at an inserted gold surface comparable to that obtained with a dose of about 4.5 Gy of 60Co gamma rays in homogeneous PMMA.

  2. Radiation carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1976-01-01

    The risk of iatrogenic tumors with radiation therapy is so outweighed by the benefit of cure that estimates of risk have not been considered necessary. However, with the introduction of chemotherapy, combined therapy, and particle radiation therapy, the comparative risks should be examined. In the case of radiation, total dose, fractionation, dose rate, dose distribution, and radiation quality should be considered in the estimation of risk. The biological factors that must be considered include incidence of tumors, latent period, degree of malignancy, and multiplicity of tumors. The risk of radiation induction of tumors is influenced by the genotype, sex, and age of the patient, the tissues that will be exposed, and previous therapy. With chemotherapy the number of cells at risk is usually markedly higher than with radiation therapy. Clearly the problem of the estimation of comparative risks is complex. This paper presents the current views on the comparative risks and the importance of the various factors that influence the estimation of risk.

  3. Interaction between the biological effects of high- and low-LET radiation dose components in a mixed field exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mason, Anna J.; Giusti, Valerio; Green, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    The relative biological effectiveness of two epithermal neutron sources, a reactor based source at Studsvik, Sweden, and a proton accelerator-based source in Birmingham, UK, was studied in relation to the proportional absorbed dose distribution as a function of neutron energy. Evidence for any in...

  4. The Effect of Biologically Effective Dose and Radiation Treatment Schedule on Overall Survival in Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, John M. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Ross, Rudi [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, Florida (United States); Harder, Eileen M.; Mancini, Brandon R. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Soulos, Pamela R. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Finkelstein, Steven E.; Shafman, Timothy D.; Dosoretz, Arie P. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, Florida (United States); Evans, Suzanne B.; Husain, Zain A.; Yu, James B. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Gross, Cary P. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Decker, Roy H., E-mail: roy.decker@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of biologically effective dose (BED{sub 10}) and radiation treatment schedule on overall survival (OS) in patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Using data from 65 treatment centers in the United States, we retrospectively reviewed the records of T1-2 N0 NSCLC patients undergoing SBRT alone from 2006 to 2014. Biologically relevant covariates, including dose per fraction, number of fractions, and time between fractions, were used to quantify BED{sub 10} and radiation treatment schedule. The linear-quadratic equation was used to calculate BED{sub 10} and to generate a dichotomous dose variable of <105 Gy versus ≥105 Gy BED{sub 10}. The primary outcome was OS. We used the Kaplan-Meier method, the log–rank test, and Cox proportional hazards regression with propensity score matching to determine whether prescription BED{sub 10} was associated with OS. Results: We identified 747 patients who met inclusion criteria. The median BED{sub 10} was 132 Gy, and 59 (7.7%) had consecutive-day fractions. Median follow-up was 41 months, and 452 patients (60.5%) had died by the conclusion of the study. The 581 patients receiving ≥105 Gy BED{sub 10} had a median survival of 28 months, whereas the 166 patients receiving <105 Gy BED{sub 10} had a median survival of 22 months (log–rank, P=.01). Radiation treatment schedule was not a significant predictor of OS on univariable analysis. After adjusting for T stage, sex, tumor histology, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, BED{sub 10} ≥105 Gy versus <105 Gy remained significantly associated with improved OS (hazard ratio 0.78, 95% confidence interval 0.62-0.98, P=.03). Propensity score matching on imbalanced variables within high- and low-dose cohorts confirmed a survival benefit with higher prescription dose. Conclusions: We found that dose escalation to 105 Gy BED

  5. Radiation-induced bystander effect in healthy G{sub 0} human lymphocytes: Biological and clinical significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belloni, Paola; Latini, Paolo [Department of Agrobiology and Agrochemistry, University of Tuscia, Via San Camillo De Lellis, I-01100 Viterbo (Italy); Palitti, Fabrizio, E-mail: palitti@unitus.it [Department of Agrobiology and Agrochemistry, University of Tuscia, Via San Camillo De Lellis, I-01100 Viterbo (Italy)

    2011-08-01

    To study the bystander effects, G{sub 0} human peripheral blood lymphocytes were X-irradiated with 0.1, 0.5 and 3 Gy. After 24 h, cell-free conditioned media from irradiated cultures were transferred to unexposed lymphocytes. Following 48 h of medium transfer, viability, induction of apoptosis, telomere shortening, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and micronuclei (after stimulation) were analyzed. A statistically significant decrement in cell viability, concomitant with the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, telomere shortening, increases in hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup -}) with depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH) level, and higher frequencies of micronuclei, were observed in bystander lymphocytes incubated with medium from 0.5 and 3 Gy irradiated samples, compared to lymphocytes unexposed. Furthermore, no statistically significant difference between the response to 0.5 and 3 Gy of irradiation in bystander lymphocytes, was found. However, when lymphocytes were irradiated with 0.1 Gy, no bystander effect with regard to viability, apoptosis, telomere length, and micronuclei was observed, although a high production of ROS level persisted. Radiation in the presence of the radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) suppressed oxidative stress induced by 3 Gy of X-rays with the effective elimination of bystander effects, suggesting a correlation between ROS and bystander signal formation in irradiated cells. The data propose that bystander effect might be mostly due to the reactions of radiation induced free radicals on DNA, with the existence of a threshold at which the bystander signal is not operative (0.1 Gy dose of X-rays). Our results may have clinical implications for health risk associated with radiation exposure.

  6. Study on the energy dependence of gamma radiation detectors for {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co; Estudo da dependencia energetica de detectores de radiacao gama para {sup 137}Cs e {sup 60}Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonato, Fernanda B.C.; Diniz, Raphael E.; Carvalho, Valdir S.; Vivolo, Vitor; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: fbnonato@ipen.b, E-mail: rediniz@ipen.b, E-mail: vcsouza@ipen.b, E-mail: vivolo@ipen.b, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    38 Geiger-Mueller radiation detectors and 9 ionization chambers were calibrated, viewing to study the energy dependence of the monitor response for gamma radiation fields ({sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co). The results were considered satisfactory only for ionization chambers and for some Geiger-Mueller detectors

  7. [Experimental determination of radiation scattering and absorption coefficients in a homogeneous layer of highly-dispersive biological medium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, A A; Masloboev, Iu P; Selishchev, S V; Tereshchenko, S A

    2006-01-01

    A method for experimental determination of optical characteristics of a highly-dispersive medium (radiation scattering and absorption coefficients) is described. The method is based on two mathematical models of ultrashort laser pulse propagation through a highly-dispersive medium (HDM), an axial model and a diffusion model. Milk dissolved in water was used as HDM. Dependences of optical characteristics of HDM on the concentration of milk in water are obtained. The limits of applicability of the axial and diffusion models to media with different scattering and absorption characteristics are determined.

  8. Radiation health research, 1986 - 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    A collection of 225 abstracts of radiation research sponsored by NASA during the period 1986 through 1990 is reported. Each abstract was categorized within one of four discipline areas: physics, biology, risk assessment, and microgravity. Topic areas within each discipline were assigned as follows: Physics - atomic physics, nuclear science, space radiation, radiation transport and shielding, and instrumentation; Biology - molecular biology, cellular radiation biology, tissue, organs and organisms, radioprotectants, and plants; Risk assessment - radiation health and epidemiology, space flight radiation health physics, inter- and intraspecies extrapolation, and radiation limits and standards; and Microgravity. When applicable subareas were assigned for selected topic areas. Keywords and author indices are provided.

  9. Radiation Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnárovits, L.

    Ionizing radiation causes chemical changes in the molecules of the interacting medium. The initial molecules change to new molecules, resulting in changes of the physical, chemical, and eventually biological properties of the material. For instance, water decomposes to its elements H2 and O2. In polymers, degradation and crosslinking take place. In biopolymers, e.g., DNS strand breaks and other alterations occur. Such changes are to be avoided in some cases (radiation protection), however, in other cases they are used for technological purposes (radiation processing). This chapter introduces radiation chemistry by discussing the sources of ionizing radiation (radionuclide sources, machine sources), absorption of radiation energy, techniques used in radiation chemistry research, and methods of absorbed energy (absorbed dose) measurements. Radiation chemistry of different classes of inorganic (water and aqueous solutions, inorganic solids, ionic liquids (ILs)) and organic substances (hydrocarbons, halogenated compounds, polymers, and biomolecules) is discussed in concise form together with theoretical and experimental backgrounds. An essential part of the chapter is the introduction of radiation processing technologies in the fields of polymer chemistry, food processing, and sterilization. The application of radiation chemistry to nuclear technology and to protection of environment (flue gas treatment, wastewater treatment) is also discussed.

  10. Instruments for radiation measurement in biosciences. Series 3. radioluminography. 11. Neutron imaging plate contributes to structural biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimura, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Advanced Science Research Center

    1999-11-01

    The neutron imaging plate (NIP) is an integrating detector of neutron for measuring the neutron flux by its photo-stimulated luminescence. This review with the list of references hitherto focused its application done mainly by the author to structural biology. As compared with the traditional position sensitive detector (PSD, the two-dimensionally arranged proportional counter), NIP, since it can be arranged cylindrically to surround the sample, has the data collection rate ten times as rapid as the PSD, which enabled to analyze the structure of biopolymers. There are four neutron diffractometers equipped with NIP: LADI in France which was used for the hydrogen and hydrated structures of lysozyme, BIX-II which is inappropriate for structural biology due to weak neutron intensity, BIX-LAUE with which the obtained diffraction of the above enzyme is presented in this paper and BIX-III which has the highest sensitivity and diffraction of rubredoxin is presented; all of the latter three are in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The shield against X-ray was pointed out necessary and lead plate of 1-40 mm thickness was found satisfactory. NIP, however, is not complete yet at present for structural biology but is thought promising in future. (K.H.)

  11. Study on the determination of palladium in biological samples by the method of neutron activation analysis; Estudo sobre a determinacao de paladio em amostras biologicas pelo metodo de analise por ativacao com neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcante, Cassio Queiroz

    2007-07-01

    Palladium is one of platinum group elements present in the nature at very low concentrations. However with the use of this element in the automobile catalyzers Pd became a new pollutant. Besides, Pd has been studied in the preparation of new antitumour drugs. Consequently, there is a need to determine Pd concentrations in biological and environmental samples. This study presents palladium results obtained in the analysis of biological samples and reference materials using instrumental thermal and epithermal neutron activation analysis (INAA and ENAA). The solvent extraction and solid phase extraction separation methods were also applied before ENAA. The samples analyzed in this study were, reference material BCR 723 - Palladium, Platinum and Rhodium in road dust, CCQM-P63 automotive catalyst material of the Proficiency Test and bovine tissue samples containing palladium prepared in the laboratory. Samples and palladium synthetic standard were irradiated at the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor under thermal neutron flux of about 4 x 10 12 n cm-2 s-1, during a period of 4 and 16 h for INAA and ENAA, respectively. The induced gamma activity of {sup 109}Pd to the sample and standard was measured using a hyper pure Ge detector coupled to a gamma ray spectrometer. The palladium concentration was calculated by comparative method. The gamma ray energy of {sup 109}Pd radioisotope measured was of 88.0 keV, located in a spectrum region of low energy where occurs the interference of X rays, 'Bremsstrahlung' radiations, as well as Compton effect of {sup 24}Na. The pre-separation of palladium from interfering elements by solvent extraction was performed using dimethylglyoxime complexant and chloroform as diluent. In the case of the pre separation procedure using solid reversed phase column, the palladium was retained using N,N-diethyl-N'-benzoyl thiourea complexant and eluted using ethanol. Aliquots of the resulting solutions from the pre-separations, free of

  12. Radiation Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, M

    2001-04-01

    Major achievements of SCK-CEN's Radiation Protection Department in 2000 are described. The main areas for R and D of the department remain neutron dosimetry and neutron activation analysis, safeguards information handling and non-destructive assay techniques. Further activities include low-level radioactivity measurements in environmental and biological samples and radiation protection research. Finally, achievements in decision strategy research and social sciences in nuclear research are reported.

  13. [Radiation biology of structurally different Drosophila genes. Report 2. The vestigial gene: molecular characteristics of chromosome mutations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanas'eva, K P; Aleksandrova, M V; Aleksandrov, I D; Korablinova, S V

    2012-01-01

    The results of the PCR-assay of mutation lesions at each of 16 fragments overlapping the entire vestigial (vg) gene of Drosophila melanogaster in 52 gamma-ray-, neutron- and neutron + gamma-ray-induced vg mutants having the inversion or translocation breakpoint within the vg microregion are presented. 4 from 52 mutants studied were found to have large deletions of about 200 kb covering the entire vg gene and adjacent to sca and l(2)C gene-markers as well. 23 mutants from 48 (47.9%) were found to have a wild-type gene structure showing that the exchange breakpoints are located outside of the vg gene. 25 others display the intragenic lesions of different complexity detected by PCR as the absence of(i) either one fragment or (ii) two or more (6-7) adjacent fragments and (iii) simultaneously several (i) or (i) and (ii) types separated by normal gene regions. It is important that 6 from 25 mutants have the breakpoint inside the vg gene and display the (i) or (ii) type of lesions at the gene regions containing the putative break whereas 5 others from 25 with the above lesions have the exchange breakpoint outside the vg gene. Therefore, the breakpoints underlying either inversions or translocations induced by low- and high-LET radiation are likely to be located within and outside the gene under study. Thereby, the formation of exchanges is accompanied by DNA deletions of various sizes at the exchange breakpoints. The molecular model of formation of such exchange-deletion rearrangements is elaborated and presented. Also, conception of the predominately clustered action of both low- and high-LET radiation on the germ cell genome is suggested as the summing-up of the presented results. The ability of ionizing radiation to induce the clusters of genetic alterations in the form of hidden DNA damages as well as gene/chromosome mutations is determined by the track structure and hierarchical organization of the genome. To detect the quality and frequency patterns of all

  14. Facilities for external radiation accessible for investigation on biological studies - progress report may 2004; Les installations d'irradiation externe accessibles aux etudes de biologie - etat d'avancement mai 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaillard-Lecanu, E. [CEA Fontenay aux Roses (DSV/Carmin), 92 (France); Authier, N.; Verrey, B. [CEA Valduc, Dept. Recherche sur les Materiaux Nucleaires, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France); Bailly, I. [CEA Bruyeres le Chatel, 91 (France). Dept. de Physique Theorique et Appliquee; Baldacchino, G.; Pin, S.; Pommeret, S.; Renault, J.Ph. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Recherche sur Etat Condense, les Atomes et les Molecules, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Bordy, J.M. [CEA Saclay, Dir. de la Recherche Technologique (DRT/DETECS/LNHB/LMD), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Coffigny, H. [CEA Fontenay aux Roses, Dept. de Radiobiologie et de Radiopathologie, 92 (France); Cortela, L. [CEA Grenoble, ARC-Nucleart, 38 (France); Duval, D. [CEA Saclay, Schering - CIS bio International, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Leplat, J.J. [CEA Saclay (DSV/DRR/LREG), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Poncy, J.L. [CEA Fontenay aux Roses (DSV/DRR/SRCA), 92 (France); Testard, I. [CEA Caen (DSV/DRR/LRO-LARIA), 14 - Caen (France); Thuret, J.Y. [CEA Saclay (DSV/DBJC/SBGM), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2004-07-01

    The Life Science Division of the Atomic Energy Commission is making an inventory of the various radiation sources accessible for investigation on the biological effects of ionizing radiation. In this field, a wide range of studies is being carried out at the Life Science Division, attempting to characterize the kind of lesions with their early biological consequences (on the various cell compartments) and their late biological consequences (deterministic or stochastic effects), in relation to the radiation type and dose, especially at low doses. Several experimental models are available: plants, bacteria, eukaryotic cells from yeast up to mammalian cells and in vivo studies, mostly on rodents, in order to characterize the somatic late effects and the hereditary effects. Due to the significant cost of these facilities, also to their specific properties (nature of the radiation, dose and dose rate, possible accuracy of the irradiation at the molecular level), the closeness is no longer the only criteria for biologists to make a choice. The current evolution is to set up irradiation infrastructures combining ionizing radiation sources themselves and specific tools dedicated to biological studies: cell or molecular biology laboratories, animal facilities. The purpose, in this new frame, is to provide biologists with the most suitable facilities, and, if possible, to change these facilities according to requirements in radiobiology. In this report, the basics of interactions of ionizing radiation with biological tissues are briefly introduced, followed by a presentation of some of the facilities available at the CEA for radiobiological studies. This panorama is not a comprehensive one, new data will be included as they advance, whether reporting existing facilities or if a new one is developed. (authors)

  15. Micro-organism re-growth in wastewater disinfected by UV radiation and ozone: a micro-biological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, E; Santos, A; Riesco, P

    2004-04-01

    A series of disinfection experiments using UV radiation and ozone was performed on the secondary effluent from a wastewater treatment plant at a pilot plant scale. The microbial population in the inflowing wastewater and the treated outflow water were quantified for each of the treatment modules (fecal coliforms, fecal streptococci, Salmonella spp. (presence/absence), Clostridium Sulphite-reducers, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, coliphages, nematodes, intestinal nematodes and pathogenic fungi). Treated water was stored in opaque tanks at a temperature between 20 and 22 degrees C, after which, a one-month study of the regrowth of the bacterial flora, nematodes and fungi was carried out. Clostridium Sulphite-reducers, pathogenic fungi and nematodes were the micro-organisms showing a greatest degree of resistence to UV- and Ozone-treatment. It was only concerning Clostridium and Pseudomonas abatement that significant elimination results were achieved with both technologies.

  16. [Radiation biology of structurally different Drosophila melanogaster genes. Report I. The vestigial gene: molecular characteristic of "point" mutations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrov, I D; Afanas'eva, K P; Aleksandrova, M V; Lapidus, I L

    2012-01-01

    The screening of PCR-detected DNA alterations in 9 spontaneous and 59 gamma-ray-, neutron - or neutron + gamma-ray-induced Drosophila vestigial (vg) gene/"point" mutations was carried out. The detected patterns of existence or absence of either of 16 overlapping fragments into which vg gene (15.1 kb, 8 exons, 7 introns) was divided enable us to subdivide all mutants into 4 classes: (i) PCR+ (40.7%) without the detected changes; (ii) "single-site" (33.9%) with the loss of a single fragment; (iii) partial detections (15.2%) as a loss of 2-9 adjacent fragments and (iv) "cluster" mutants (10.2%) having 2-3 independent changes of(ii) and/or (iii) classes. All spontaneous mutants except one were found to be classified as (ii) whereas radiation-induced mutants are represented by all 4 classes whose interrelation is determined by the dose and radiation quality. In particular, the efficacy of neutrons was found to be nine times as large as that of gamma-rays under the "cluster" mutant induction. Essentially, the distribution of DNA changes along the gene is uneven. CSGE-assay of PCR+-exon 3 revealed DNA heteroduplexes in 5 out of 17 PCR+-mutants studied, 2 of which had small deletions (5 and 11 b) and 3 others made transitions (A --> G) as shown by the sequencing. Therefore, gamma-rays and neutrons seem to be significant environmental agents increasing the SNP risk for the population through their action on the germ cells. The results obtained are also discussed within the framework of the track structure theory and the notion of quite different chromatin organization in somatic and germ cells.

  17. Solar ultraviolet radiation induces biological alterations in human skin in vitro: Relevance of a well-balanced UVA/UVB protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Bernerd

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous damages such as sunburn, pigmentation, and photoaging are known to be induced by acute as well as repetitive sun exposure. Not only for basic research, but also for the design of the most efficient photoprotection, it is crucial to understand and identify the early biological events occurring after ultraviolet (UV exposure. Reconstructed human skin models provide excellent and reliable in vitro tools to study the UV-induced alterations of the different skin cell types, keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and melanocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Using different in vitro human skin models, the effects of UV light (UVB and UVA were investigated. UVB-induced damages are essentially epidermal, with the typical sunburn cells and DNA lesions, whereas UVA radiation-induced damages are mostly located within the dermal compartment. Pigmentation can also be obtained after solar simulated radiation exposure of pigmented reconstructed skin model. Those models are also highly adequate to assess the potential of sunscreens to protect the skin from UV-associated damage, sunburn reaction, photoaging, and pigmentation. The results showed that an effective photoprotection is provided by broad-spectrum sunscreens with a potent absorption in both UVB and UVA ranges.

  18. Avaliação do comportamento biológico de homoenxertos valvares pulmonares descelularizados: estudo experimental em ovinos Evaluation of the biological behavior of decellularized pulmonary homografts: an experimental sheep model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Binhara Navarro

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Não havendo um substituto valvar ideal, os homoenxertos criopreservados são considerados uma boa opção, pelo excelente perfil hemodinâmico, baixa incidência de tromboembolismo, resistência a infecções e durabilidade a médio prazo. Porém, estão sujeitos à progressiva degeneração, especialmente em crianças e adultos jovens. Sua antigenicidade desencadeia uma resposta imunológica que contribui para sua degeneração, calcificação e falência. Para diminuir esta antigenicidade, desenvolveu-se o processo de descelularização. Pela ação de detergentes e enzimas, este processo remove os componentes celulares do homoenxerto, diminuindo sua imunogenicidade e, provavelmente, retardando sua degeneração. OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo, experimental e descritivo, é analisar o comportamento histológico e funcional de homoenxertos pulmonares ovinos descelularizados (H-descel por uma nova solução, composta principalmente de dodecil sulfato de sódio a 0,1% e desenvolvida na PUCPR. Para caracterizar este comportamento, serão avaliados o repovoamento celular, a ocorrência de calcificação e a função valvar ao ecocardiograma. MÉTODOS: A amostra foi constituída de oito ovinos, submetidos ao implante de H-descel em posição ortotópica, através de uma toracotomia esquerda, com auxílio de circulação extracorpórea. Os animais foram acompanhados clinicamente e por ecocardiogramas periódicos até o explante, realizados em prazos predefinidos para cada dois animais: sete, 30, 90 e 180 dias. A análise histológica foi realizada por colorações Hematoxilina-eosina, Pentacrômio de Movat e Alizarina Red. RESULTADOS: Todos os animais sobreviveram ao procedimento e atingiram seus períodos de seguimento. Não houve insuficiência ou estenose destes enxertos ao ecocardiograma. Os animais submetidos aos explantes em 90 e 180 dias tiveram significativos ganhos ponderais e estes H-descel aumentaram de diâmetro, sem

  19. Clinical, biological, histological features and treatment of oral mucositis induced by radiation therapy: a literature review; Aspectos clinicos, biologicos, histopatologicos e tratamentos propostos para a mucosite oral induzida por radioterapia: revisao da literatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonan, Paulo Rogerio Ferreti [Universidade Estadual de Montes Claros e Faculdades Unidas do Norte de Minas, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Odontologia]. E-mail: pbonan@yahoo.com; Lopes, Marcio Ajudarte; Almeida, Oslei Paes de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. de Diagnostico Oral; Alves, Fabio de Abreu [Hospital do Cancer AC Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Estomatologia

    2005-07-01

    The oral mucositis is a main side effect of radiotherapy on head and neck, initiating two weeks after the beginning of the treatment. It is characterized by sensation of local burning to intense pain, leading in several cases, to the interruption of the treatment. The purpose of this work is to review the main published studies that discuss the clinical, biological and histopathological features of oral mucositis induced by radiation therapy and to describe the main approaches recommended to prevent or to treat it. Although the clinical features of mucositis are intensively described in the literature, few studies address the histopathological alterations in oral mucositis and only recently, its biological processes have been investigated. The biological mechanisms involved in the radiation tissue damage have been only recently discussed and there is no consensus among treatment modalities. Yet, the progressive knowledge in the histopathology and biological characteristics of oral mucositis probably will lead to more effective in prevention and control strategies. (author)

  20. Estudos sobre a psicopatia

    OpenAIRE

    Peres, Kenia

    2008-01-01

    Esta dissertação é resultado de extensa pesquisa sobre a psicopatia, fenômeno psicopatológico tão recorrente no cotidiano social, porém pouco explorado, talvez pela indiscutível dificuldade técnica no manejo desses pacientes. O interesse em compreender o psicodinamismo desses indivíduos caminha paralelamente ao meu desenvolvimento profissional, tanto como pesquisadora como psicóloga clínica. Neste trabalho, utilizei além da pesquisa bibliográfica da teoria psicanalítica sobre o tema, estudos ...

  1. Study of the effect of gamma radiation on the molecule of tetracycline concerning its behavior as complexing and extracting agent; Estudo do efeito da radiacao gama sobre a molecula de tetraciclina relativamente ao seu comportamento como agente complexante e extrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade e Silva, Leonardo Gondim de

    1982-07-01

    Both solvent extraction and spectrophotometric techniques were used to show the alterations that gamma radiation causes in the behavior of tetracycline molecule as far as its extracting and complexing power are concerned. The effect of gamma radiation on the solid tetracycline molecule, benzyl alcohol and on the solution of both was examined in solvent extraction systems whose aqueous phases were made up by {sup 152} Eu-{sup 154}Eu radioactive tracer solutions and whose organic phases were constituted by tetracycline-benzyl alcohol solutions. Experiments were performed in order to determine whether or not the water used for the pre-saturation of benzyl alcohol would influence the radiolysis of tetracycline. Solvent extraction and spectrophotometry were the techniques used to obtain the necessary data. Absorption spectra of irradiated tetracycline benzyl alcohol solutions submitted to several gamma radiation doses were examined and the alterations shown by these spectra were examined. The effect of gamma radiation on the tetracycline molecule was also studied when tetracycline-benzyl alcohol solutions were irradiated under several gaseous atmospheres, namely: O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, SF{sub 6} and N{sub 2}O. The variation on the concentration of the tetracycline-benzyl alcohol solution caused by several doses of gamma radiation was determined by using the spectrophotometric technique. (author)

  2. Study on the application of gamma radiation for the utilization of the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) scraps polymerized by emulsion; Estudo da aplicacao da radiacao gama para o aproveitamento de aparas de politetrafluoroetileno (PTFE) polimerizado por emulsao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosner, Gerhardyne O.; Ikari, Carolina T.; Oliveira, Ana C.F. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Quimica e Meio Ambiente (CQMA); Faculdades Oswaldo Cruz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ferreto, Helio F.R.; Lima, Luiz F.C.P.; Lugao, Ademar B., E-mail: hferreto@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Quimica e Meio Ambiente (CQMA); Moreira, Otavio M. [Faculdades Oswaldo Cruz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents an option for the re utilization of the PTFE scraps which can be the copolymerization by grafting, in which a monomer (ethylene, 1.3-butadiene, acetylene or styrene) is added to its polymer chain. The choose technique for obtaining the grafting was the gamma radiation. The PTFE is submitted to gamma radiation doses for obtaining free radicals which the grafting will be possible. Two gamma radiation grafting methods were compared: the direct method which consists the sample irradiation in presence of monomer, and the indirect method, in which the samples are irradiated under inert atmosphere, or air, and it is added the monomer, gas or liquid. In this method samples were sent under inert atmosphere (N{sub 2}). For the PTFE-g-monomer copolymer characterization, the following techniques were used: infrared absorption spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analyses, and derivative and mass grafting percentage

  3. Potential biological indicators of multi-organ damage: Application to radiation accident victims; Bio-indicateurs potentiels d'atteinte multi-organe: application au cas des victimes d'irradiation accidentelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertho, J.M.; Souidi, M.; Gourmelon, P. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Dir. de la Radioprotection de l' Homme 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2009-09-15

    Accidental irradiations induce a complex pathological situation, difficult to assess and to treat. However, recent results describing new biological indicators of radiation-induced damages such as Flt3-ligand, citrulline and oxy-sterol concentration in the plasma, together with results obtained in large animal models of high dose irradiation, allowed a better understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms induced by uncontrolled irradiations. This conducted to leave the classical paradigm of the acute radiation syndrome, described as the association of three individual syndromes, the hematopoietic syndrome, the gastro-intestinal syndrome and the cerebrovascular syndrome, in favour of a multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, with the implication of other organs and systems. Follow-up of victims from two recent radiation accidents brings a confirmation of the usefulness of the newly described biological indicators, and also a partial confirmation of this new concept of a multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. (authors)

  4. High biologically effective dose radiation therapy using brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisei Okamoto

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the outcomes of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with biologically effective dose (BED ≥ 220 Gy of high-dose radiotherapy, using low-dose-rate (LDR brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and short-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. Material and methods : From 2005 to 2013, a total of 143 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated by radiotherapy of BED ≥ 220 Gy with a combination of LDR brachytherapy, EBRT, and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. The high-risk patients in the present study included both high-risk and very high-risk prostate cancer. The number of high-risk features were: 60 patients with 1 high-risk factor (42%, 61 patients with 2 high-risk factors (43%, and 22 patients with 3 high-risk factors (15% including five N1 disease. External beam radiotherapy fields included prostate and seminal vesicles only or whole pelvis depending on the extension of the disease. Biochemical failure was defined by the Phoenix definition. Results : Six patients developed biochemical failure, thus providing a 5-year actual biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS rate of 95.2%. Biochemical failure was observed exclusively in cases with distant metastasis in the present study. All six patients with biochemical relapse had clinical failure due to bone metastasis, thus yielding a 5-year freedom from clinical failure (FFCF rate of 93.0%. None of the cases with N1 disease experienced biochemical failure. We observed four deaths, including one death from prostate cancer, therefore yielding a cause-specific survival (CSS rate of 97.2%, and an overall survival (OS rate of 95.5%. Conclusions : High-dose (BED ≥ 220 Gy radiotherapy by LDR in combination with EBRT has shown an excellent outcome on BFFS in high-risk and very high-risk cancer, although causal relationship between BED and BFFS remain to be explained further.

  5. Effects of low intensity laser radiation on osteointegration mechanism of implants: study 'in vivo'; Efeitos da radiacao laser em baixa intensidade no mecanismo de osseointegracao de implantes: estudo 'in vivo'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blay, Alberto

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether the process of bone integration of implants placed in rabbit tibia is changed in any way if the region is radiated with laser, as compared to the time required for the bone integration process without radiation. Thirty adult male white New Zealand rabbits were submitted to implant surgery, for subsequent evaluation of the removal torque and resonance frequency. Each animal received two implants of pure titanium, one in each proximal metaphysics of the tibia, which were inserted with a 40 Ncm torque, and their initial stability was also monitored by means of a resonance frequency analyzer. The rabbits were then divided into 3 groups: one control group and two laser groups. The groups were evaluated in regard to removal torque and resonance frequency of the implants, after 3 and 6 weeks. One of the laser groups was radiated with a laser beam of a wavelength in the infrared range (830 nm) and the other group was radiated with a laser beam emitted in the visible range (680 nm). Ten radiation sessions were performed, 48 hours apart, the first of them during the immediate post-operation period. Radiation energy density was 4 J/cm{sup 2} per point, and there were two points at each side of the tibia. Results of the statistical analysis of the resonance frequency indicated that for both laser groups there was a significant difference between frequency values at the time of implant and the values obtained after 3 and 6 weeks. Furthermore, the results obtained for the removal torque of the three groups showed a statistically significant difference after a period of 6 weeks; removal torque values for the laser groups were, in the average, much greater than those of the control group. From these results it is possible to conclude that implants in rabbit tibia, that were exposed to laser radiation with wavelengths of 680 nm and 830 nm, had a better degree of bone integration than the control group.(author)

  6. Biological prevention and/or treatment strategies for radiation myelopathy. Discussion of a new perspective; Biologische Praeventions- und/oder Therapiemoeglichkeiten der Strahlenmyelopathie. Eine Diskussion neuer Perspektiven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieder, C.; Ataman, F. [Texas Univ., Houston (United States). Dept. of Experimental Radiation Oncology; Price, R.E. [Texas Univ., Houston (United States). Dept. of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery; Kian Ang, K. [Texas Univ., Houston (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    1999-09-01

    Background: Radiosensitivity of the spinal cord makes both curative first-line treatment of numerous malignancies and re-irradiation of recurrent or second tumors more difficult. This review discusses recent advances in basic research that alter the view on the pathogenesis of radiation myelopathy, possibly offering strategies for prevention and/or therapy. Results: Available data of developmental neurobiology and preclinical studies of demyelinating diseases revealed interesting insights into oligodendrocyte development, intercellular signaling pathways, and myelination processes. Current findings suggest that administration of cytokines could increase proliferation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, enhance their differentiation, upregulate synthesis of myelin constituents, and promote myelin regeneration in the adult central nervous system. Other compounds might also be able to modulate progression of pathogenic processes that eventually lead to radiation myelopathy. This offers several possible biological prevention and/or treatment strategies, which currently are being investigated in animal studies. Conclusions: Technical options as well as optimization of fractionation parameters should be given priority in the attempt to reduce iatrogenic neurotoxicity. However, rational biological strategies could offer a new perspective for many patients. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Die Strahlensensibilitaet des Rueckenmarks erschwert bei zahlreichen Tumoren eine kurative Erstbestrahlung oder eine Zweitbestrahlung von Rezidiv- oder Zweittumoren. In dieser Uebersichtsarbeit werden aktuelle Ergebnisse der Grundlagenforschung diskutiert, die unser Verstaendnis der Pathogenese der Strahlenmyelopathie veraendern und Wege zur Praevention und/oder Therapie aufzeigen koennten. Ergebnisse: Neurobiologische Daten ueber die Entwicklung des zentralen Nervensystems und praeklinische Studien bei demyelinisierenden Erkrankungen fuehrten zu interessanten Erkenntnissen bezueglich der

  7. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1970-1992: The JANUS Program Survival and Pathology Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grahn, D.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.; Williamson, F.S.; Fox, C.

    1995-02-01

    A research reactor for exclusive use in experimental radiobiology was designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory in the 1960`s. It was located in a special addition to Building 202, which housed the Division of Biological and Medical Research. Its location assured easy access for all users to the animal facilities, and it was also near the existing gamma-irradiation facilities. The water-cooled, heterogeneous 200-kW(th) reactor, named JANUS, became the focal point for a range of radiobiological studies gathered under the rubic of {open_quotes}the JANUS program{close_quotes}. The program ran from about 1969 to 1992 and included research at all levels of biological organization, from subcellular to organism. More than a dozen moderate- to large-scale studies with the B6CF{sub 1} mouse were carried out; these focused on the late effects of whole-body exposure to gamma rays or fission neutrons, in matching exposure regimes. In broad terms, these studies collected data on survival and on the pathology observed at death. A deliberate effort was made to establish the cause of death. This archieve describes these late-effects studies and their general findings. The database includes exposure parameters, time of death, and the gross pathology and histopathology in codified form. A series of appendices describes all pathology procedures and codes, treatment or irradiation codes, and the manner in which the data can be accessed in the ORACLE database management system. A series of tables also presents summaries of the individual experiments in terms of radiation quality, sample sizes at entry, mean survival times by sex, and number of gross pathology and histopathology records.

  8. Comparative evaluations of individual radiation doses at hospital environment in two decades 73-82 and 86-95; Estudo comparativo de duas decadas, 73-82 e 86-95, de monitoracao individual hospitalar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreira, Mauricio Costa; Almeida, Adelaide de [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica e Matematica; Sordi, Gian Maria A.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, Maria Concepta P.S. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas

    1996-12-31

    Individual radiation doses in two decades of Hospital das Clinicas, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo State, Brazil, are analysed. The annual values are studied according to the hospital service and specific worker categories. The workers are classified in categories A or B as recommended by ICRP 35. Three types of individual monitors (film badges, Ca So{sub 4} and Li F + Ca So{sub 4}) supplied by three distinct laboratories are compared 6 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Radiation therapy using the wildlife medicine: a reasoned obtained study in cases of literature; Utilizacao da radioterapia na medicina de animais selvagens: um estudo fundamentado em casos obtidos da literatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vettorato, Michel de Campos; Fernandes, Marco Antonio Rodrigues; Vulcano, Luis Carlos [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FMVZ/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia; Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Dermatologia e Radioterapia

    2016-03-15

    The cancer is the kind of tumor that affects both humans and animals and is responsible for more deaths worldwide. In wildlife, cancer is a problem found most often in zoo animals. Thus veterinary oncologists have researched and developed therapeutic approaches to many types of cancer over the years in both curative and palliative therapies including therein the application of radiation. The basic principle of radiotherapy is the effect of ionizing radiation on the tumor cells, causing them to death. However, its application in veterinary medicine for wildlife is not much reported in the literature, especially in Brazil. This study aims to describe and compare some of radiotherapy applications in different species of wildlife looking to improve her knowledge in veterinary medicine through a brief literature review. After the descriptions and comparisons, it is concluded that despite the number of cases taken for this study, all the cases mentioned had satisfactory results using radiation therapy and all the presented cases provided relevant information that can guide future researchers in this area, thus improving knowledge of this therapy and improve the quality of life of animals. (author)

  10. Relative biological effectiveness of carbon ions for tumor control, acute skin damage and late radiation-induced fibrosis in a mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Brita Singers; Horsman, Michael Robert; Alsner, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of the present study was to compare the biological effectiveness of carbon ions relative to x-rays between tumor control, acute skin reaction and late RIF of CDF1 mice. Material and methods. CDF1 mice with a C3H mouse mammary carcinoma implanted subcutaneously on the foot...... of the right hind limb were irradiated with single fractions of either photons, or 12 C ions using a 30-mm spread-out Bragg peak. The endpoint of the study was local control (no tumor recurrence within 90 days). For the acute skin reaction, non-tumor bearing CDF1 mice were irradiated with a comparable...... radiation scheme, and monitored for acute skin damage between Day 7 and 40. Late RIF was assessed in the irradiated mice. Results. The TCD 50 (dose producing tumor control in 50% of mice) values with 95% confi dence interval were 29.7 (25.4 – 34.8) Gy for C ions and 43.9 (39.2 – 49.2) Gy for photons...

  11. Study of the effect of ionizing radiation on properties of polyamide 6 with fibreglass reinforcement; Estudo do efeito da radiacao ionizante sobre as propriedades da poliamida 6 com reforco de fibra de vidro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Clovis

    2007-07-01

    It is each time more common the use of polymers reinforced with fibreglass in the domestic market. Between them it is used polyamide 6 that it presents good tension resistance, to the impact and the humidity absorption compared with non-reinforced, being also at the present time used in the automobile industry in parts underneath the hood, especially in the radiator frames. The aim of this work is to study the effect of ionizing radiation on properties of polyamide 6 with fibreglass reinforcement, undergone to different radiation doses. Samples were prepared and irradiated on JOB 188 accelerator with an electron beam energy of 1.5 MeV in air with different doses (100 to 600 kGy) and a dose rate of 22.61 kGy/h. Afterward the irradiation, the properties of the samples of irradiated polyamide 6 with fibreglass reinforcement were evaluated and compared with the samples non-irradiated. It evidenced that the mechanical properties flexural resistance and tension resistance increased and the resistance to the impact decreased. Regarding the thermal properties of the temperature of fusing decreased of 224,4 deg C for 212,5 deg C but the loss of mass ahead of the constant increase of the temperature also decreased. In the property of resistance to the glow wire the polyamide 6 with fibreglass reinforcement had a good performance. The images caught for Scanning Electronic Microscopy show that the irradiation provoked a good integration enters the fibreglass and polymer what was responsible for the good performance in the property of resistance to the glow wire. (author)

  12. Radiation beans characterization and implantation for study of lead equivalent individual protection device used in radiodiagnostic practices; Caracterizacao e implantacao de feixes de radiacao para estudo de dispositivos de protecao individual com equivalencia em chumbo utilizados em praticas de radiodiagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Leslie Silva

    2004-07-01

    The protective shielding (IPC) must be used by occupationally exposed professionals, patients and volunteers, in order to optimize the doses who receive due to radiological practices. International and national norms establish the methodology to be adopted for determination of the IPC attenuation. In this work, the IPC had been submitted to X-rays beams with known characteristics, standardized for determination of their attenuation equivalent thickness by comparison to an experimental lead attenuation slope. This comparison technique allowed insurance estimative of the IPC attenuation equivalent thickness in mm of lead. Thus, it was possible to verify the conformity of the attenuation equivalent thickness determined experimentally and the value of the thickness indicated by the manufacturer. To carry out this work, it was necessary the implementation of experimental setups stated in the specifics norms, the study of the X-rays beams original features and the determination of combined additional filters, in order to allow the X-ray equipment used operates in compliance with Norm IEC 61331-1 IEC. The radiation quality selected is characterized by a 100 kV voltage and a 0.25 mm of copper overall filtration. The implementation of this radiation quality it was carried through of its first and second HVL (Half Value Layer). Thus, a methodology according to the international Norms has been implemented in the laboratory. The results of the present work provide suitable and useful information about radiation beams features related to the determination techniques of the attenuation properties. Once implemented the procedures for conformity evaluation of the protection devices, it will be possible to carry out specific quality control tests, which will be helpful to manufacturers, customers, as well as authorities in the radiological protection and health areas. (author)

  13. Study of physical, chemical and structural effects caused by ionizing radiation and preservation on human costal cartilage; Estudo dos efeitos fisicos, quimicos e estruturais ocasionados pela radiacao ionizante e preservacao em cartilagem costal humana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinho Junior, Antonio Carlos

    2008-07-01

    Tissue Banks around the world have stored human cartilages obtained from cadaver donors for use in several kinds of reconstructive surgeries. To ensure that such tissues are not contaminated, they have been sterilized with ionizing radiation. However, high doses of gamma radiation may cause undesirable changes in the tissues, decreasing the mechanical properties of the grafts. In this work, we evaluate physical/chemical and structural changes in deep-frozen (-70 deg C) or high concentration of glycerol (> 98%) preserved costal cartilage, before and after sterilization by ionizing radiation at 3 different doses (15, 25 and 50 kGy). Samples of human costal cartilage were obtained from 20 cadaver donors ranging between 18 and 55 years old. A {sup 60}Co irradiator was used as irradiation source. Thermogravimetry (TG), Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and mechanical tension and compression tests were carried out to evaluate the changes in the cartilage. Regarding the thermogravimetric results, the obtained data has shown that the TG curves have the same pattern independently of the sample irradiated or not. On the other hand, non-irradiated samples showed great variability of thermogravimetric curves among different donors and for the same donor. Concerning the mechanical tests, when cartilages were irradiated with 15 kGy, their mechanical strength to tension was increased about 24%, in both deep-froze and preserved in glycerol samples. Samples deep-frozen, when irradiated with 25 and 50 kGy, presented a decrease of their mechanical behavior smaller than those preserved in high concentrations of glycerol and irradiated with the same dose. Therefore, deep-frozen cartilages can be sterilized with doses until 50 kGy and cartilages preserved in high concentrations of glycerol can be sterilized with doses until 25 kGy without significant changes in their bio-mechanical properties.(author)

  14. Cytogenetic monitoring, radiosensitivity study and adaptive response of workers exposed to low level ionizing radiation; Monitorizacao citogenetica, estudo de radiossensibilidade e resposta adaptativa em profissionais expostos a baixos niveis de radiacao ionizante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peitl Junior, Paulo

    1996-07-01

    The objectives of the present study were: To determine the frequencies of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes from individuals belonging to professionally exposed groups, under normal conditions; to determine the possible differences in radiosensitivity between the lymphocytes of technicians and controls after in vitro irradiation with gamma rays during the G{sub 1} phase of the cell cycle (radiosensitivity study), and to examine the influence of in vivo and in vitro pre-exposure to low doses of radiation on the frequency of chromosome aberrations induced in vitro by high doses (study of the adaptive response) in a group of technicians (T) compared to controls (C). (author)

  15. Study about the sensibility in vitro of different strains of Vibrio cholera 01 exposed to 60 Co gamma radiation; Estudo da sensibilidade in vitro de diferentes cepas de Vibio cholerae 01 a radiacao gama de 60Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Ivany Rodrigues de [Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servicos de Saude; Gelli, Dilma Scala; Jakabi, Miyoko [Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Secao de Microbiologia; Mastro, Nelida Lucia del [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: nlmastro@net.ipen.br

    1998-07-01

    The presence of some microorganisms in food, or the metabolites originated during their own multiplication may bring several diseases to humans: intoxications and food borne infections. Among the agents that may cause those diseases, we find Vibrio cholerae 01. In this experiment, the studies are focused on the radiosensibility in vitro of four strains of V. cholerae 01, exposed to different doses of ionizing radiation of {sup 60} Co. The results are compared with other data related to bacterial food borne diseases, including water. (author)

  16. Clinical Outcomes of Biological Effective Dose-Based Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Brain Tumors From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuyama, Tomohiko, E-mail: matsutomo_llp@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Kogo, Kasei [Kumamoto Radiosurgery Clinic, Kumamoto (Japan); Oya, Natsuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) based on biological effective dose (BED), a novel approach to deliver a fixed BED irrespective of dose fractionation, for brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 and March 2009 we treated 299 patients with 1 to 5 lesions from NSCLC (573 total brain metastases) with FSRT using Novalis. The dose fractionation schedules were individually determined to deliver a peripheral BED10 (α/β ratio = 10) of approximately 80 Gy{sub 10}. The median number of fractions was 3 (range, 2-10), the median peripheral BED10 was 83.2 Gy (range, 19.1-89.6 Gy). Patients were followed up with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies performed at 1- to 2-month intervals. The local tumor control rate and overall local progression-free and intracranial relapse-free survival were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Local control rates for all 573 lesions at 6 and 12 months were 96.3% and 94.5%, respectively. By multivariate analysis the tumor diameter was the only factor predictive of the local control rate (P=.001). The median overall survival, local progression-free survival, and intracranial relapse-free survival were 17.1, 14.9, and 4.4 months, respectively. The overall survival, local progression-free survival, and intracranial relapse-free survival rates at 6 and 12 months were 78.5% and 63.3%, 74.3% and 57.8%, and 41.0% and 21.8%, respectively. Six patients (2%) manifested progressive radiation injury to the brain even during therapy with corticosteroids; they underwent hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and follow-up MRI showed improvement. Conclusions: This study showed that BED-based FSRT for brain metastases from NSCLC is a promising strategy that may yield excellent outcomes with acceptable toxicity. Criteria must be established to determine the optimal dose fractionation for individual patients.

  17. Increased Biological Effective Dose of Radiation Correlates with Prolonged Survival of Patients with Limited-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucheng Zhu

    Full Text Available Thoracic radiotherapy (TRT is a critical component of the treatment of limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC. However, the optimal radiation dose/fractionation remains elusive. This study reviewed current evidence and explored the dose-response relationship in patients with LS-SCLC who were treated with radiochemotherapy.A quantitative analysis was performed through a systematic search of PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library. The correlations between the biological effective dose (BED and median overall survival (mOS, median progression-free survival (mPFS, 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival (OS as well as local relapse (LR were evaluated.In all, 2389 patients in 19 trials were included in this study. Among these 19 trials, seven were conducted in Europe, eight were conducted in Asia and four were conducted in the United States. The 19 trials that were included consisted of 29 arms with 24 concurrent and 5 sequential TRT arms. For all included studies, the results showed that a higher BED prolonged the mOS (R2 = 0.198, p<0.001 and the mPFS (R2 = 0.045, p<0.001. The results also showed that increased BED improved the 1-, 3-, and 5-year OS. A 10-Gy increment added a 6.3%, a 5.1% and a 3.7% benefit for the 1-, 3-, and 5-year OS, respectively. Additionally, BED was negatively correlated with LR (R2 = 0.09, p<0.001. A subgroup analysis of concurrent TRT showed that a high BED prolonged the mOS (p<0.001 and the mPFS (p<0.001, improved the 1-, 3-, and 5-year OS (p<0.001 and decreased the rate of LR (p<0.001.This study showed that an increased BED was associated with improved OS, PFS and decreased LR in patients with LS-SCLC who were treated with combined chemoradiotherapy, which indicates that the strategy of radiation dose escalation over a limited time frame is worth exploring in a prospective clinical trial.

  18. Temporal Lobe Reactions After Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy: Comparison of Relative Biological Effectiveness–Weighted Tolerance Doses Predicted by Local Effect Models I and IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillmann, Clarissa, E-mail: clarissa.gillmann@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Jäkel, Oliver [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Schlampp, Ingmar [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Karger, Christian P. [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To compare the relative biological effectiveness (RBE)–weighted tolerance doses for temporal lobe reactions after carbon ion radiation therapy using 2 different versions of the local effect model (LEM I vs LEM IV) for the same patient collective under identical conditions. Methods and Materials: In a previous study, 59 patients were investigated, of whom 10 experienced temporal lobe reactions (TLR) after carbon ion radiation therapy for low-grade skull-base chordoma and chondrosarcoma at Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany in 2002 and 2003. TLR were detected as visible contrast enhancements on T1-weighted MRI images within a median follow-up time of 2.5 years. Although the derived RBE-weighted temporal lobe doses were based on the clinically applied LEM I, we have now recalculated the RBE-weighted dose distributions using LEM IV and derived dose-response curves with Dmax,V-1 cm³ (the RBE-weighted maximum dose in the remaining temporal lobe volume, excluding the volume of 1 cm³ with the highest dose) as an independent dosimetric variable. The resulting RBE-weighted tolerance doses were compared with those of the previous study to assess the clinical impact of LEM IV relative to LEM I. Results: The dose-response curve of LEM IV is shifted toward higher values compared to that of LEM I. The RBE-weighted tolerance dose for a 5% complication probability (TD{sub 5}) increases from 68.8 ± 3.3 to 78.3 ± 4.3 Gy (RBE) for LEM IV as compared to LEM I. Conclusions: LEM IV predicts a clinically significant increase of the RBE-weighted tolerance doses for the temporal lobe as compared to the currently applied LEM I. The limited available photon data do not allow a final conclusion as to whether RBE predictions of LEM I or LEM IV better fit better clinical experience in photon therapy. The decision about a future clinical application of LEM IV therefore requires additional analysis of temporal lobe reactions in a

  19. Effects of the low-intensity red laser radiation on the fluoride uptake in enamel. A clinical trial; Avaliacao dos efeitos da radiacao laser de emissao vermelha em baixa intensidade na incorporacao de fluor no esmalte. Estudo clinico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakasone, Regina Keiko

    2004-07-01

    Fluoride has been the most important preventive method on development of the caries. This in vivo study evaluated the effects of low-intensity red laser radiation on the fluoride uptake in enamel. Ten healthy participants were recruited for this study. The two maxillary central incisors of each volunteer to be biopsied were used and divided into 4 groups: group G{sub C} (control, which was untreated; group G{sub F} (fluoride), which received topical acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) 1,23% treatment for 4 minutes; group G{sub LF} (laser + fluoride), which was irradiated with a low-intensity diode laser ({lambda}= 660 nm and dose= 6 J/cm{sup 2}) with APF application after irradiation and group G{sub FL} (fluoride + laser), which received APF before irradiation using the same parameters as G{sub LF}. The determination of fluoride was performed using a fluoride ion electrode after an acid-etch enamel biopsy. The results show a significant increase of the fluoride uptake in enamel for groups G{sub F}, G{sub LF} and G{sub FL} when compared to control group. Although a percentage increase of 57% was observed for G{sub LF} with respect to G{sub F}, there were no statistical differences among treated groups. These findings suggest that low-intensity laser radiation used before APF could be employed in the clinical practice to prevent dental caries. (author)

  20. Biodegradability and aging study of rubber films obtained by gamma radiation vulcanization processes of latex; Estudo da biodegradabilidade e envelhecimento de filmes de borracha obtidos por processos de vulcanizacao do latex por radiacao induzida de fonte gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Carlos Felipe Pinto

    2005-07-01

    The natural rubber latex (NRL) is industrially crosslinked by the conventional process of vulcanization, which uses sulphur and heat. Otherwise, the network can also be done by the alternative process with ionizing radiation. In this work the crosslinking of NRL was studied by the comparison of the conventional vulcanization system and the ionizing radiation process of {sup 60}C source. The products obtained, the irradiated latex, the irradiated latex with approximately 1% of soy lecithin and the sulphur vulcanized latex were tested by accelerated aging with ultraviolet (UV) and outdoor aging with compostage, tensile strength at break, swelling and gel fraction, fungi micro biota, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry analysis (TG and DSC). The results showed that the aging with microorganisms have a great influence in the physical properties of the samples. The thermal stability order observed showed that the sulphur vulcanized latex is more resistant, what is probably associated to a network more stable under the aging conditions. On the other hand, the irradiated latex showed intense biodegradation aspects, particularly with the presence of the soy lecithin. (author)

  1. Study of the effect of gamma radiation on some physical-mechanical properties of wood used in Brazilian cultural and artistic heritage; Estudo do efeito da radiacao gama sobre algumas propriedades fisico-mecanicas de madeiras usadas em patrimonios artisticos e culturais brasileiros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severiano, Lucio Cesar

    2010-07-01

    Wood is considered a natural composite of extreme complexity, basically composed by cellulose, lignin, hemicellulose (polyosis) and extractives. Its composition favors biological attacks from different species. In this context, several techniques have been studied and applied for disinfecting and decontaminating wood-made works of art and cultural heritage, which have been damaged by fungi, bacteria and insects. Gamma radiation emitted by unstable isotopes, such as 60- cobalt, has also been studied as an alternative to the conventional wood preservatives. So, gamma rays treatment has been shown to be efficient to the removal of infestations by insects and microorganisms in wood-made artifacts, to be fast and not to require quarantine because it does not generate toxic waste. Similar to other techniques, this process does not prevent the irradiated material of re-infestation or recontamination. In this context, the effects of relatively high disinfestation gamma radiation doses (up to 100 kGy) on cedro rosa and imbuia, two typical Brazilian wood species, are accompanied by the changes on the following attributes: apparent density, retracting, parallel compression to fibers, bending in the modulus of elasticity, hardness, shear and thermal stability. Results have shown that gamma radiation, in the studied dose range, does not promote alterations on properties of investigated wood species. In case of a re-infestation, these observations indicate that the wood species can be submitted to repeatedly irradiation processes without causing damage to their structure up to the studied dose range, in despite of radiation effects be always cumulative. (author)

  2. SU-F-T-124: Radiation Biological Equivalent Presentations OfLEM-1 and MKM Approaches in the Carbon-Ion Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsi, W; Jiang, G; Sheng, Y [Shanghai Proton and Heavy-Ion Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study the correlations of the radiation biological equivalent doses (BED) along depth and lateral distance between LEM-1 and MKM approaches. Methods: In NIRS-MKM (Microdosimetric Kinetic Model) approach, the prescribed BED, referred as C-Eq, doses aims to present the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for different energies of carbon-ions on a fixed 10% survival value of HCG cell with respect to convention X-ray. Instead of a fixed 10% survival, the BED doses of LEM-1 (Local Effect Model) approach, referred as X-Eq, aims to present the RBE over the whole survival curve of chordoma-like cell with alpha/beta ratio of 2.0. The relationship of physical doses as a function of C-Eq and X-Eq doses were investigated along depth and lateral distance for various sizes of cubic targets in water irradiated by carbon-ions. Results: At the center of each cubic target, the trends between physical and C-Eq or X-Eq doses can be described by a linear and 2nd order polynomial functions, respectively. Using fit functions can then calculate a scaling factor between C-Eq and X-Eq doses to have similar physical doses. With equalized C-Eq and X-Eq doses at the depth of target center, over- and under-estimated X-Eq to C-Eq are seen for depths before and after the target center, respectively. Near the distal edge along depth, sharp rising of RBE value is observed for X-Eq, but sharp dropping of RBE value is observed for C-Eq. For lateral locations near and just outside 50% dose level, sharp raising of RBE value is also seen for X-Eq, while only minor increasing with fast dropping for C-Eq. Conclusion: An analytical function to model the differences between the CEq and X-Eq doses along depth and lateral distance need to further investigated to explain varied clinic outcome of specific cancers using two different approaches to calculated BED doses.

  3. Health and biological effects of non-ionizing radiations. Meeting of the non-ionizing radiation section of the French radiation protection society (SFRP). Meeting review; Les effets biologiques et sanitaires des rayonnements non ionisants. Journee scientifique de la section RNI de la SFRP - Compte rendu de congres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, A.; Souques, M. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    2011-07-15

    This document makes a review of this conference day on biological and health effects of non-ionizing radiations. The program comprised three sessions with a total of 17 presentations dealing with: 1 - NMR: biological effects and implications of Directive 2004/40 on electromagnetic fields (S. Lehericy); 2 - impact of RF frequencies from mobile telephone antennas on body homeostasis (A. Pelletier); 3 - expression of stress markers in the brain and blood of rats exposed in-utero to a Wi-Fi signal (I. Lagroye); 4 - people exposure to electromagnetic waves: the challenge of variability and the contribution of statistics to dosimetry (J. Wiart); 5 - status of knowledge about electromagnetic fields hyper-sensitivity (J.P. Marc-Vergnes); 6 - geno-toxicity of UV radiation: respective impact of UVB and UVA (T. Douki); 7 - National day of prevention and screening for skin cancers (F. Guibal); 8 - UV tan devices: status of knowledge about cancer risks (I. Tordjman, and J. Gaillot de Saintignon); 9 - In vitro study of the extremely low frequencies (ELF) effect on genes expression (J.F. Collard); 10 - modulation of brain activity during a tapping task after exposure to a 3000 {mu}T magnetic field at 60 Hz (M. Souques and A. Legros); 11 - calculation of ELF electromagnetic fields in the human body by the finite elements method (R. Scoretti); 12 - French population exposure to the 50 Hz magnetic field (I. Magne); 13 - LF and static fields, new ICNIRP recommendations: what has changed, what remains (B. Vey. Veyret); 14 - risk assessment of low energy lighting systems - DELs and CFLs (J.P. Cesarini); 15 - biological effects to the rat of a chronic exposure to high power microwaves (R. De Seze); 16 - theoretical and experimental electromagnetic compatibility approaches of active medical implants in the 10-50 Hz frequency range: the case of implantable cardiac defibrillators (J. Katrib); 17 - French physicians and electromagnetic fields (M. Souques). (J.S.)

  4. Efeitos da radiação laser de dióxido de carbono em tecido ósseo: estudo macroscópico em ratos Effect of carbon dioxide laser radiation on osseous tissue: macroscopic study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter NICCOLI-FILHO

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available O laser de dióxido de carbono (CO2, pelas suas propriedades intrínsecas, tem se tornado um instrumento cirúrgico importante; entre estas podemos citar: hemostasia, redução do edema e da dor pós-operatória e esterilização do campo cirúrgico. Seu uso em tecido ósseo para realização de osteotomias ainda é questionável, principalmente devido à possibilidade de iatrogenias causadas pelo aumento da temperatura tecidual, bem como destes efeitos na área paraincisional. O propósito deste estudo foi proporcionar a confecção de um plano piloto visando analisar macroscopicamente os efeitos da radiação laser de CO2 em tíbia de rato a fim de estabelecerem-se parâmetros de segurança quanto a potência. Foram utilizados 12 ratos. Após anestesia, os ossos foram submetidos a radiação com potência de 1, 3 e 5 watts. Os animais foram sacrificados nos tempos imediatamente após, 3, 7 e 14 dias após a irradiação, visando à remoção do osso tratado. Os espécimes obtidos foram observados através de lupa estereoscópica com aumentos de 14, 25 e 40 vezes e fotografados para posterior análise. Os resultados permitiram concluir que a potência de 1 watt proporciona uma melhor qualidade de resposta à reparação e que as potências de 3 e 5 watts provocaram o atraso na cronologia de reparo.The use of CO2 laser in osseous tissue to execute osteotomies is still questionable, mainly due to the increase of temperature in the site of irradiation. The purpose of this research was to carry out a pilot study in order to analyze macroscopically the effect of CO2 laser irradiation on rat tibia and to establish security parameters regarding power. Twelve rats were submitted to irradiation with 1, 3 and 5 watts of power and were examined immediately, 3, 7 and 14 days after irradiation. The results showed better healing when irradiation was carried out with the power of 1 watt; the 3- and 5-watt powers caused delay in the chronology of healing.

  5. Validation of an Austrian forecasting model for biologically effective UV radiation (UV index); Validierung des oesterreichischen Vorhersagemodells fuer die biologisch-effektive UV Strahlung (UV Index)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauberger, G.; Schmalwieser, A. [Veterinaermedizinische Univ., Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik

    1999-07-01

    Since October 1995 there has been an Austrian forecasting service for the next day's UV index for the three model domains Austria, Europe and world. This forecasting model uses spectral irradiation intensity data measured for 16 specific wavelengths, taking into account solar altitude, height above sea level and atmospheric ozone concentration. Weighting spectral irradiation intensity according to the spectral erythematous effect curve yields a measure of biologically effective UV radiation, and subsequent normalisation with respect to 25 mW{sub biol}/m-2 relates the result to the dimension figure for the UV index. The model has been validated by means of data obtained by continuous measurement with Robertson-Berger measuring devices (site of the Vienna Veterinary Hospital: 48 15 15.47'N; 16 25.98E; elevation 153 amsl). The spectral sensitivity of these instruments is approximately the same as that of the human skin to reddening. Combining the UV index with the expected UV dose for the day permits issuing recommendations for the most suitable sun protection factor in sunblock creams as a function of users' photobiological skin type. Users of the UV index are expected to have enough personal initiative to select the UV index that most closely corresponds to their local population situation. According to the principles of UV radiation protection the performance of the model is considered poor if the measured UV index is greater than the forecast index. This happens in approx. 12% of all cases. The error frequency of positive errors (forecast values greater than measured values) reflects the degree to which extinction of UV radiation through the population occurs, as the present model does not take this factor into account. [German] Seit Oktober 1995 wird in Oesterreich taeglich eine Prognose des UV-Index fuer die drei Modelldomaenen: Oesterreich, Europa und weltweit, geltend fuer den darauf folgenden Tag, erstellt. Das oesterreichische Prognosemodell

  6. Can We Advance Proton Therapy for Prostate? Considering Alternative Beam Angles and Relative Biological Effectiveness Variations When Comparing Against Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Underwood, Tracy, E-mail: tunderwood@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Moteabbed, Maryam; Zietman, Anthony; Efstathiou, Jason; Paganetti, Harald; Lu, Hsiao-Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: For prostate treatments, robust evidence regarding the superiority of either intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or proton therapy is currently lacking. In this study we investigated the circumstances under which proton therapy should be expected to outperform IMRT, particularly the proton beam orientations and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) assumptions. Methods and Materials: For 8 patients, 4 treatment planning strategies were considered: (A) IMRT; (B) passively scattered standard bilateral (SB) proton beams; (C) passively scattered anterior oblique (AO) proton beams, and (D) AO intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). For modalities (B)-(D) the dose and linear energy transfer (LET) distributions were simulated using the TOPAS Monte Carlo platform and RBE was calculated according to 3 different models. Results: Assuming a fixed RBE of 1.1, our implementation of IMRT outperformed SB proton therapy across most normal tissue metrics. For the scattered AO proton plans, application of the variable RBE models resulted in substantial hotspots in rectal RBE weighted dose. For AO IMPT, it was typically not possible to find a plan that simultaneously met the tumor and rectal constraints for both fixed and variable RBE models. Conclusion: If either a fixed RBE of 1.1 or a variable RBE model could be validated in vivo, then it would always be possible to use AO IMPT to dose-boost the prostate and improve normal tissue sparing relative to IMRT. For a cohort without rectum spacer gels, this study (1) underlines the importance of resolving the question of proton RBE within the framework of an IMRT versus proton debate for the prostate and (2) highlights that without further LET/RBE model validation, great care must be taken if AO proton fields are to be considered for prostate treatments.

  7. Study of resistance of D. radiodurans to the combined action of ionizing radiation with an electric or magnetic fields exogenous; Estudo da resistencia de D. radiodurans a acao combinada de radiacoes ionizantes com campos eletricos ou magneticos exogenos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, Georgia Reis

    2011-07-01

    The key goal in radiotherapy is to maximize damages in a tumor while minimizing them in nearby health tissues. Several strategies have been worked out toward the enhancement of cellular radiosensitivity, as the use of exogenous fields. It is studied in this work the resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans to the combined action of conventional and non conventional radiations, with external agents (electric and magnetic fields). D. radiodurans is a bacterium having an extraordinary ability to cope with lethal and mutagenic agents harmful to the DNA, particularly ionizing radiations as gammas and UV. Given its high radioresistance and fast growing, D. radiodurans has been used as solid tumors simulators. Peculiarities associated with radioresistance at the exponential and stationary phases were delineated from growing curves. By measuring survival curves information on radiosensitivity was obtained. In gamma irradiation D. radiodurans exhibited repairing shoulders of 2 and 8 kGy at the exponential and stationary phases, respectively. When gamma irradiations were combined with expositions to the electric field the repairing shoulders were reduced to 1 and 4 kGy at the exponential and stationary phases, respectively. Radioresistance was similar in both growing phases when the number of cells were approximately equalized in these two processes. On the other hand, when gamma irradiations were combined with expositions to the magnetic field the repairing shoulders were reduced to 4 and 6 kGy at the exponential and stationary phases, respectively. In irradiations with electron beams the repairing shoulder at the exponential phase was totally depleted, while at the stationary phase it was only 1 kGy. The findings of this work revealed new and important information on the radioresistance of D. radiodurans, while providing hints to the improvement of radiotherapy protocols in association with exogenous physical agents. (author)

  8. Study of radiation in fresh tomatoes (lycopersicon esculentum Mill) and in the levels of sauce lycopene; Estudo da radiacao ionizante em tomates in natura (lycopersicum esculentum Mill) e no teor de licopeno do molho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabbri, Adriana Diaz Toni

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of ionizing radiation in tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) and at the same time to evaluate the influence of irradiation on the content of lycopene in a sauce made with these fruits irradiated. For this reason tomatoes were subjected to five treatments: control, T1 (0.25 kGy), T2 (0.5 kGy), T3 (1.0 kGy) and T4 (2.0 kGy) and evaluated at 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 20 days after irradiation, for the following analysis: maturity, texture, color, soluble solids, pH, acidity and total mass. Measurements were made of lycopene in fresh tomatoes and sauce by open column chromatography according to the ripening of them. The results showed that only the mass was not significantly different (p> 0.05). Treatments 1 and 2 proved to be effective in delaying the maturation and in the maintenance of firm texture (p <0.05). While T4 caused chemical reactions in the structure of tomato, compelling it to mature earlier because of pectin degradation. The completion of a sauce made from tomatoes irradiated to 0.25 kGy, didn't show a significant difference (p> 0.05) when compared to control. However, it didn't indicate lycopene degradation, as the doses of 1.0 and 2.0 kGy. Thus we can conclude that low doses are effective for maintaining pH, firmness, delayed senescence, mass and, in addition to not degrading the major bioactive compound of tomato, lycopene, suggest a higher bioavailability of this one, depending on the radiation application. (author)

  9. Study on ionizing radiation effects in diesel and crude oil: organic compounds, hydrocarbon, sulfur and nitrogen; Estudo do efeito da radiacao ionizante em compostos organicos do diesel e do petroleo: hidrocarbonetos, sulfurados e nitrogenados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Luana dos Santos

    2014-07-01

    Petroleum is the most important energy and pollution source in the world, nowadays. New technologies in petrochemical industry aim to minimize energy spending at the process and to reduce pollution products. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds generate environmental problems; the most relevant is air pollution that affects the population health directly. The nuclear technology has been used in environmental protection through pollutants removal by free radicals produced at action of the radiation in water molecule. The objective of this study is to evaluate the radiation effects on oil and diesel, mainly in the hydrocarbons, organic sulfur, and nitrogen compounds. It was studied a molecule model of sulfur, named benzothiophene, diesel and crude oil samples. The samples were irradiated using a Co-60 source, Gammacell type. The total sulfur concentration in the samples was determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and organic compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The study of molecular model showed that 95% was degraded at 20 kGy dose rate. Irradiation at 15 kGy of absorbed dose showed some cracking in petrol hydrocarbons, however with higher doses it was observed polymerization and low efficiency of cracking. It was observed that the sulfur compounds from diesel and petroleum was efficiently reduced. The applied doses of 15 kGy and 30 kGy were the most efficient on desulfurization of petroleum, and for diesel the highest variation was observed with 30 kGy and 50 kGy of absorbed dose. The distillation and chromatographic separation using an open column with palladium chloride as stationary phase showed a preferential separation of organic sulfur compounds in petroleum. (author)

  10. Study of poly(ethylene terephthalate) - PET post consumption and its properties, when it is undergone ionizing radiation; Estudo da reciclagem do poli(tereftalato de etileno) (PET) pos-consumo e de suas propriedades, quando submetido a radiacao ionizante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Antonio Claudio dos

    2008-07-01

    The plastic materials have an important role in the life style changing, in the lives of the people and it is more and more utilized in the production and consumption by the world population. By the plastic utilization, it became possible the growth phenomenon of disposable products. As a consequence of this conjecture, the recycling of these materials becomes an obliging option of the modern society. The economy provided by the reutilization of the recycling materials is advantageous not only in consideration to the reutilization of the natural resources involved in these products, but specially for its benefit provided in which concern to the preservation of the environmental matters. Within the big universe of the plastics and plastic packaging materials, available in the current market, it was carried out, during this work, the mechanical recycling of the packagings post consumption, produced from PET polymer and more specifically, the bottles used in packagings for beverages as a whole; such as carbonated beverages, mineral water, isotonic, and so on. Thus, the aim of this work was to recycle the PET post-consumption and evaluate the effects provoked by the action of different ionizing radiation doses, in the properties of this recycled polymer, based on virgin PET. Based on the conclusive results, it was taken for granted that the effects provoked by the action of the ionizing radiation from the electron beam by electron accelerators and gamma rays emitted by {sup 60}Co source in the virgin and recycled PET polymer promoted the predominance of the scission reactions at random of the main chain, with consequent decrease of the polymer molecular weight. Such fact was corroborated by the flow index essay and intrinsic viscosity. It was also carried out, thermal analysis by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) proving the decreasing of molecular weight in the irradiated PET samples. (author)

  11. Acute biological effects of simulating the whole-body radiation dose distribution from a solar particle event using a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jolaine M; Sanzari, Jenine K; Diffenderfer, Eric S; Yee, Stephanie S; Seykora, John T; Maks, Casey; Ware, Jeffrey H; Litt, Harold I; Reetz, Jennifer A; McDonough, James; Weissman, Drew; Kennedy, Ann R; Cengel, Keith A

    2011-11-01

    In a solar particle event (SPE), an unshielded astronaut would receive proton radiation with an energy profile that produces a highly inhomogeneous dose distribution (skin receiving a greater dose than internal organs). The novel concept of using megavoltage electron-beam radiation to more accurately reproduce both the total dose and the dose distribution of SPE protons and make meaningful RBE comparisons between protons and conventional radiation has been described previously. Here, Yucatan minipigs were used to determine the effects of a superficial, SPE-like proton dose distribution using megavoltage electrons. In these experiments, dose-dependent increases in skin pigmentation, ulceration, keratinocyte necrosis and pigment incontinence were observed. Five of 18 animals (one each exposed to 7.5 Gy and 12.5 Gy radiation and three exposed to 25 Gy radiation) developed symptomatic, radiation-associated pneumonopathy approximately 90 days postirradiation. The three animals from the highest dose group showed evidence of mycoplasmal pneumonia along with radiation pneumonitis. Moreover, delayed-type hypersensitivity was found to be altered, suggesting that superficial irradiation of the skin with ionizing radiation might cause immune dysfunction or dysregulation. In conclusion, using total doses, patterns of dose distribution, and dose rates that are compatible with potential astronaut exposure to SPE radiation, animals experienced significant toxicities that were qualitatively different from toxicities previously reported in pigs for homogeneously delivered radiation at similar doses.

  12. Acute Biological Effects of Simulating the Whole-Body Radiation Dose Distribution from a Solar Particle Event Using a Porcine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jolaine M.; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Yee, Stephanie S.; Seykora, John T.; Maks, Casey; Ware, Jeffrey H.; Litt, Harold I.; Reetz, Jennifer A.; McDonough, James; Weissman, Drew; Kennedy, Ann R.; Cengel, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    In a solar particle event (SPE), an unshielded astronaut would receive proton radiation with an energy profile that produces a highly inhomogeneous dose distribution (skin receiving a greater dose than internal organs). The novel concept of using megavoltage electron-beam radiation to more accurately reproduce both the total dose and the dose distribution of SPE protons and make meaningful RBE comparisons between protons and conventional radiation has been described previously. Here, Yucatan minipigs were used to determine the effects of a superficial, SPE-like proton dose distribution using megavoltage electrons. In these experiments, dose-dependent increases in skin pigmentation, ulceration, keratinocyte necrosis and pigment incontinence were observed. Five of 18 animals (one each exposed to 7.5 Gy and 12.5 Gy radiation and three exposed to 25 Gy radiation) developed symptomatic, radiation-associated pneumonopathy approximately 90 days postirradiation. The three animals from the highest dose group showed evidence of mycoplasmal pneumonia along with radiation pneumonitis. Moreover, delayed-type hypersensitivity was found to be altered, suggesting that superficial irradiation of the skin with ionizing radiation might cause immune dysfunction or dysregulation. In conclusion, using total doses, patterns of dose distribution, and dose rates that are compatible with potential astronaut exposure to SPE radiation, animals experienced significant toxicities that were qualitatively different from toxicities previously reported in pigs for homogeneously delivered radiation at similar doses. PMID:21859326

  13. Entre o biológico e o social: um estudo sobre os Congressos Brasileiros de Epidemiologia, 1990-2002 Between biological and social factors: a study of Brazilian epidemiology congresses, 1990-2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurea Maria Zöllner Ianni

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A discussão sobre os conceitos de biológico e social na determinação do processo saúde-doença é estruturante na Saúde Coletiva no Brasil, e no campo epidemiológico. Este artigo apresenta os resultados da pesquisa qualitativa dos Anais dos Congressos Brasileiros de Epidemiologia, no período de 1990 a 2002. Tem como objetivo identificar as noções de biológico e social, neles contidos, com vistas à identificação dos pressupostos teóricos que os norteiam. Os resultados demonstraram que o conceito de social refere-se, principalmente, à esfera do 'societário', ancorado na dissociação disciplinar das ciências naturais e sociais. O biológico é atribuído à esfera individual e clínica do processo saúde-doença, raramente à esfera do coletivo, bem como um conceito portador de objetividade. Entre o biológico e o social, o ambiente aparece como categoria autônoma; o biológico aparece ainda, porém de forma embrionária, como complexo, histórico e intrinsecamente social. A análise dos resultados apontou para uma necessária redefinição de marcos teóricos que possibilitem o avanço dos conhecimentos na área e, conseqüentemente, das práticas em saúde que a Epidemiologia subsidia. O projeto de pesquisa passou pelo Comitê de Ética em Pesquisa do Instituto de Saúde SESSP, tendo sido aprovado.The discussion on the concepts of biological and social factors in the determination of the health-illness process is a basic theme in Public Health in Brazil, and in the epidemiological field. This article presents the results of a qualitative research on the records of Brazilian Epidemiology Congresses in the period between 1990 and 2002. Its objective is to identify the notions of biological and social factors, seeking to recognize the theoretical assumptions underlying them. Results demonstrated that the concept of social factor is mentioned mainly in the sphere of 'societary', anchored in the dissociation between natural and

  14. Tuberculose infantil: estudo retrospectivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boaventura Antonio dos Santos

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: A tuberculose (TB infantil permanece como uma das doenças mais prevalentes e preocupantes no mundo, sobretudo em nações em desenvolvimento, onde as taxas são ainda mais elevadas e os casos descritos subestimados pela dificuldade em se estabelecer um diagnóstico definitivo. Dessa forma, este estudo tem como objetivo descrever o perfil clínico e epidemiológico dos pacientes com TB infantil pulmonar e extrapulmonar. Métodos: Foram avaliados retrospectivamente, através de questionário, pacientes com idade de até 15 anos, internados no Serviço de Pediatria do HCPA, no período de janeiro de 2002 a setembro de 2007.   Resultados: Dos 52 pacientes incluídos, 63% apresentavam TB pulmonar. Das formas extra-pulmonares, a meningoencefalite foi a mais prevalente (22%. Comorbidades foram dectadas em 31 (60% pacientes, dos quais 15 (29% apresentavam desnutrição grave, 9 (18% HIV positivo e 7 (13% pneumopatia crônica. Das manifestações clínicas, febre e tosse estavam presentes na maioria dos pacientes. O padrão radiológico predominante foi o de consolidação pulmonar (51%. A maioria dos pacientes referia história de contato com paciente bacilífero (64%. Conclusão: A TB pulmonar representa a principal forma de apresentação clínica da TB, sendo o diagnóstico feito de forma presuntiva na maioria dos casos. O diagnóstico baseado na comprovação bacteriológica foi obtido numa minoria de pacientes, demonstrando a importância dos achados clínico-laboratoriais, história epidemiológica e vacinal para o diagnóstico. Nesse sentido, a criação de escores tem se tornado uma ferramenta de fácil acesso e com razoável acurácia para auxiliar o diagnóstico de TB em serviços de baixa complexidade, especialmente o ambulatorial.

  15. Analysis behaviour of free radicals produced by ionizing radiations in human blood by EPR for biological dosimetry in patients; Analisis del comportamiento de los radicales libre en la radiolisis de la sangre por EPR para dosimetria biologia en pacientes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, O. O.; Almanza, A.; Plazas, M. M. C.

    2006-07-01

    In this work is analyzed the biological dosimetry of the free radicals produced by ionizing radiations in human blood obtained by EPR and the biological behaviour of samples In-Vitro, with Rh: O+, in tubes with EDTA (Acid Etilen Diamino Tetracetic) the samples was extracted of the main investigator, these samples were radiated with gammas of ''60Co of a Theratron 780 between plates of PMMA to a depth of Z{sub m}ax of 0.5 cm and between doses 1 to 25 Gy. In these results the behaviors of signal the free radicals presented a increasing a their intensity depending on applied dose, of equal way are results of the biologic dosimetry displayed in sanguineous populations like. White Globules, Red. Platelets etc, to being compared with Resonance Paramagnetic Electronic (EPR). The results show changes in sanguineous populations in high doses (D>10 Gy) in the case of lymphocytes, granulocitos, macusanita, plaquetas, hemoglobina, haematocrit with change similarly in medium and low doses (D>10Gy) in linfocites, platelets, granulocytes, monocytes and the haematocrit. A sanguineous sample without radiating analyzes by EPR giving the presence of signals with values of g=2.13 2,41 in blood. For the first certain value of g authors have associated it to free radicals like: globin (Fe(IV)=0) or Cu''+ incorporated to the ceruloplasmin molecule. (Author)

  16. Interaction of radiation with matter

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nikjoo, Hooshang; Uehara, Shuzo; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    ... basis of radiological physics and radiation dosimetry. The authors first present the relevant atomic physics and then describe the interactions, emphasizing practical applications in health/medical physics and radiation biology...

  17. Study of the combined action of gamma radiation and static electric fields in human cells; Estudo da acao combinada de radiacao gama e campo eletrico estatico em celulas humanas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moron, Michelle Mendes

    2008-07-01

    The basic principle of radiotherapy is the one of maximizing damage to the tumor, while minimizing it in neighboring health tissues. Several strategies have been worked out aiming at increasing cellular radiosensitivity, and among them is the use of exogenous fields. Our goal in this work is the study in human cells of the effect resulting from the association of irradiation with exposure to exogenous static electric fields. The T47D cell line of breast cancer cells was irradiated with gammas in the 0 - 8 Gy doses range. The corresponding survival curve provided information on the radiosensitivity of this cell line. The rate of cell deaths per Gray in the 0 - 8 Gy range exhibited a maximum at 2 Gy, which corresponds to the most efficient irradiation dose. The viability of this T47D cells exposed to both gamma radiation and 1.250 V/cm static electric field (SEF) was about 12% lower than when only irradiated. The sole exposure of the cells to SEF by 24 and 72 hours didn't induce toxicity. Immunofluorescence runs carried out in irradiated normal MRC5 cell line of human lung fibroblast, without and with exposition to a SEF, have quantified the expression of the y- H2AX histone. The amount of phosphorylated histones was approximately 40% higher after irradiation with 2 Gy plus exposure to a SEF by 1 hour, showing that the electric field negatively interfered in the repairing process of the DNA double strand breaks. The flow cytometry analysis with FACS allowed the investigation of a possible interference of radiation and SEF in the cell distributions among the cellular cycle phases. It was found that in T47D cells treated with 1 and 2 Gy by 24 hours the SEF also negatively interfered in the DNA repairing process, as evidenced by the higher accumulation of cells in the S phase. Therefore, it would be possible to conclude that static and exogenous electric fields are able of negatively interfering in the cellular repair and, presumably, in DNA repair. (author)

  18. Study of bioactive compounds in spices (Syzygium aromaticum L, Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume and Myristica fragrans Houtt) processed by ionizing radiation; Estudo dos compostos bioativos em especiarias (Syzygium aromaticum L, Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume e Myristica fragans Houtt) processadas por radiacao ionizante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Renato Cesar

    2014-07-01

    Spices and aromatic herbs are divided into leaves, flowers, bud, seeds bark or dry roots from different plants and it is possible to define them as products of highly flavored vegetal origin that volatize easily when incorporated in small quantities to food products and contribute to its aroma, flavor, color or even to its preservation. Nowadays, people look for its functional properties, bioactive compounds and sensory qualities. A big problem is the reduction of the quantity of these compounds throughout the production chain from the harvest process, storage and distribution. For a long time researchers and industries have concentrated on perfecting the processes of the production chain seeking to guarantee the sanitary and food safety, preserving foodstuffs for a long period and an increase in its lifespan without drastically altering its properties. Due to homemade products and the lack of compliance with good practices in its production chain, the spices can contain a high amount of microbiology causing serious complications to the health of the consumer and the radiation processing is often used for reduce these problems. With this finding, the objectives of this work were: Analyze the oil antifungal properties of spices irradiated with average doses (2.5; 5; 7.5 and 10 kGy); Study the average doses (5 and 10 kGy) and high dose (20 and 30 kGy) effects of gamma radiation {sup 60}Co in the bioactive compounds of the spices - cloves, cinnamon and nutmeg; Identify the oils compounds; Identify the volatile compounds in the headspace of the oils and the in natura spices. Identify the compounds of the nonvolatile part of the nutmeg; Identify the chiral compounds of the cinnamon. Comparing the control samples (not irradiated) with the processed at the described doses, regarding the oil antifungal properties it was possible to verify the efficiency and later that the irradiation did not interfered in its efficiency; Regarding to the others tests in this work, the

  19. Study of the behavior of radiation detectors for mammography in standard beams using a clinical system; Estudo do comportamento de detectores de radiacao para mamografia em feixes padroes utilizando um sistema clinico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreira, Jacqueline Sales

    2014-07-01

    A mammogram is the x-ray of the breast that allows early detection of cancer, by being able to show lesions in very small early stage. But to get an early and reliable diagnosis is necessary that the mammography unit is calibrated and working properly, otherwise there may be a loss in image produced, may lead to a false diagnosis, and possible harm to the patient. So it is important to control these devices, especially in relation to the radiation produced by them. In this project, we propose a study of the behavior of ionization chambers for mammography calibrated beam patterns in a clinical system (Philips-VMI mammography, Graph Mammo AF, which operates a range of 20 to 35 kV) from Instruments Calibration Laboratory at IPEN-CNEN/SP, with the aim of determining parameters correction approaching conditions calibration conditions for clinical use. Measurements of the parameters of the beams set in mammography using simulators acrylic specially developed for these measurements were performed in order to establish a new protocol for calibration of the ionization chambers in a clinical system rather than the industrial system, or as a complement to this. (author)

  20. Study on the stability of the Maytenus aquifolium Martius chemical components submitted to ionizing radiation (X-ray and {gamma}); Estudo da estabilidade dos componentes quimicos de Maytenus aquifolium Martius frente a radiacao ionizante (X e {gamma})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Patricia

    1995-07-01

    The interest for medicinal plants has raised again in the last decades, after overcoming a declination period caused by the advances in the researches and development of the synthetic drugs industries. This growing interest has been stimulated mainly by searching cheap and accessible alternative therapies. However, in order to have natural products based treatment in an efficient and safety way, it is necessary to guarantee the plant authenticity, finding adulterations and to assure a low level of microbiological contaminations to avoid damages to consumer's health. The decontamination method should be chosen for eliminating or reduce the microorganisms level without loss of the plant active constituents that would destroy its therapeutic action. At the present work, the possibility of using {gamma} and X electromagnetic radiations to sterilize a Brazilian medicinal plant (Maytenus aquifolium Martius, Celastraceae), which shows anti-ulcer activity, was studied by accomplishing its actives constituent behavior, the triterpenes friedeline and friedelan-3-ol and the phenolic compounds by spectrophotometric techniques (UV-Vis.), high resolution gas chromatography (HRGC) and high resolution gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HRGC-MS). (author)

  1. Morphofunctional evaluation of human skin preserved in glycerol and exposed to gamma radiation: a study in athymic mice; Avaliacao morfofuncional de pele humana conservada em glicerol e submetida a radiacao gama: estudo em camundongos atimicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bringel, Fabiana de Andrade

    2011-07-01

    Extensive skin lesions expose the body to damaging agents, which makes spontaneous regeneration difficult and, in many cases, leads patient to death. In such cases, if there are no donating areas for autograft, allografts can be used. In this type of graft, tissue is processed in tissue banks, where it can be subjected to radiosterilization. According to in vitro studies, gamma radiation, in doses higher than 25 kGy, induces alterations in skin preserved in glycerol at 85%, reducing the tensile strength of irradiated tissue. Clinical observation also suggests faster integration of such graft with the receptors tissue. In order to assess if the alterations observed in vitro, would compromise in vivo use, transplants of human tissue, irradiated or not, were performed in Nude mice. The skin of the mice was subjected to macroscopic analysis, optical coherence tomography imaging, histological and biomechanical assays. It was possible to conclude that grafts irradiated with 25 kGy promoted greater initial contraction, without alteration of the final dimensions of the repair area, also displaying a faster closing of the wound. Moreover, the use of irradiated grafts (25 and 50 kGy) enabled the formation of a more organized healing process without significant effects on biomechanical properties. (author)

  2. (Biological dosimetry)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, R.J.

    1990-12-17

    The traveler attended the 1st International Conference on Biological Dosimetry in Madrid, Spain. This conference was organized to provide information to a general audience of biologists, physicists, radiotherapists, industrial hygiene personnel and individuals from related fields on the current ability of cytogenetic analysis to provide estimates of radiation dose in cases of occupational or environmental exposure. There is a growing interest in Spain in biological dosimetry because of the increased use of radiation sources for medical and occupational uses, and with this the anticipated and actual increase in numbers of overexposure. The traveler delivered the introductory lecture on Biological Dosimetry: Mechanistic Concepts'' that was intended to provide a framework by which the more applied lectures could be interpreted in a mechanistic way. A second component of the trip was to provide advice with regard to several recent cases of overexposure that had been or were being assessed by the Radiopathology and Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital General Gregorio Maranon'' in Madrid. The traveler had provided information on several of these, and had analyzed cells from some exposed or purportedly exposed individuals. The members of the biological dosimetry group were referred to individuals at REACTS at Oak Ridge Associated Universities for advice on follow-up treatment.

  3. Impurity-related point defects and gamma-radiation response of massive quartz from the Borborema pegmatite province, in Brazil; Estudo da suscetibilidade ao escurecimento por radiacao gama de quartzo roseo-leitoso da provincia pegmatitica da Borborema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Milena Ribas de [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mineral; Gonzaga, Raysa Sthefany Gomes; Guzzo, Pedro Luiz [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Minas; Barreto, Sandra de Brito [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia; Melgarejo, Joan Carles, E-mail: milaribas@hotmail.com, E-mail: raysagonzaga@hotmail.com, E-mail: pguzzo@ufpe.br, E-mail: sandrabrito@smart.net.br, E-mail: joan.carles.melgarejo.draper@ub.edu [Universidade de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. de Cristalografia, Mineralogia e Depositos Minerais

    2012-06-15

    This work has investigated the changes induced by {gamma}-radiation on impurity-related point defects in massive rose quartz from one deposit located at The Borborema Pegmatite Province (Northeast Region, in Brazil). Samples extracted from rose and colorless (milky) quartz blocks were irradiated with doses of {sup 60}Co, from 0.5 to 96 kGy. Point defects related to Al, Ge, Li and OH were measured by optical, infrared, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, prior and after irradiation. The contents of Al, Li, Ge, Fe, Ti and other impurities were measured by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry in quartz fragments exhibiting rose, pale-rose, and milky colorations. It was found that [AlO{sub 4}]{sup 0}, [AlO{sub 4}/H]{sup 0} and [GeO{sub 4}/Li]{sup 0} were generated by the dissociation of [AlO{sub 4}/Li]{sup 0} and [Li-OH] centers with doses as lower as 0.5 kGy. Above 8 kGy, the electron paramagnetic resonance signal related to [GeO{sub 4}/Li]{sup 0} decreases due to the intense mobility of Li species throughout the quartz lattice, giving rise to E'{sub 1} centers perturbed by Ge. The increase in [AlO{sub 4}]{sup 0} content with {gamma} doses and the consequent rise in the intensity of smoky color were similar for both rose and colorless quartz. Scanning electron microscopy carried out in insoluble residues obtained after chemical dissolution of each type of quartz revealed the presence of nanometric fibers only in rose specimens. These results suggested that the cause of rose color in massive quartz from Borborema Pegmatite Province is probably related to the presence of dumortierite inclusions. (author)

  4. More than a century of research of the biological effects of ionizing radiation; Mehr als ein Jahrhundert Forschung zu den biologischen Wirkungen ionisierender Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, W.U. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Strahlenbiologie

    2016-07-01

    Already shortly after the discovery of ionising radiation in 1895 it became obvious, that this type of radiation is able to cause severe health effects. In the beginning, deterministic effects were observed, like hair loss and skin burns and somewhat later stochastic effects like leukaemia and skin tumours. Soon studies started why this happens; not only because of protection against the harmful effects of ionising radiation, but also against the background of the therapeutic application of this type of radiation. The studies were initially done in animal experiments, subsequently experiments on the cellular and chromosomal level dominated, until research turned to the molecular level. It is increasingly obvious that the complete organism should be considered, because the complex interactions in the organism are not reflected on the molecular or the cellular level. In the remote future, even the inclusion of the total ecosphere may be necessary for risk considerations.

  5. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-36, 108-F Biological Laboratory, and for the 116-F-15, 108-F Radiation Crib, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2007-05-24

    The 116-F-15 waste site is the former location of the 108-F Radiation Crib that was located in the first floor of the 108-F Biological Laboratory. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  6. Electrical installations construction biology. Detecting, measuring and avoiding electric fields and radiation; Baubiologische Elektroinstallation. Elektrische Felder und Strahlung erkennen, messen und vermeiden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, H.; Erlacher, P.

    2000-07-01

    After an outline of the characteristics and effects of electric and magnetic fields and high-frequency radiation, the authors explain the threshold limit values set by constructional biologists and medical experts for fields and radiation inside domestic buildings. They describe how fields and radiation are measured and how risks can be avoided. Detailed examples are presented. [German] Es ist unbestritten, dass die elektrischen und magnetischen Felder der haeuslichen Elektroinstallation und der Telekommunikation auf den Menschen wirken. Die Folgen fuer die Gesundheit werden unterschiedlich eingeschaetzt, wobei die Autoren zu vorbeugenden Massnahmen raten. Nach einer Uebersicht ueber die Eigenschaften und Wirkungen der elektrischen und magnetischen Felder und der Hochfrequenzstrahlung erlaeutern die Autoren die von Baubiologen und Umweltmedizinern geforderten Grenzwerte fuer Felder und Strahlung in Wohngebaeuden. Sie beschreiben, wie Felder und Strahlung gemessen werden, und geben Tips und Empfehlungen zur Vermeidung von Risiken. Ausfuehrlich wird gezeigt, wie durch technische Massnahmen und bauliche Vorkehrungen bei Neu- und Altbauten eine strahlungsarme Wohnumwelt geschaffen werden kann. (orig.)

  7. Biological dose estimation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to this effect was found in at least 3 cases using biological dosimetric criteria, proving the ... The classification system described by Savage3 was used to determine the ... TABLE I. DISTANCE FROM RADIATION SOURCE, DETAILS OF CYTOGENETIC ANALYSIS AND BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL. DOSE ESTIMATIONS.

  8. Basic radiotherapy physics and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, David S; Das, Indra J; Mendonca, Marc S; Dynlacht, Joseph R

    2014-01-01

    This book is a concise and well-illustrated review of the physics and biology of radiation therapy intended for radiation oncology residents, radiation therapists, dosimetrists, and physicists. It presents topics that are included on the Radiation Therapy Physics and Biology examinations and is designed with the intent of presenting information in an easily digestible format with maximum retention in mind. The inclusion of mnemonics, rules of thumb, and reader-friendly illustrations throughout the book help to make difficult concepts easier to grasp. Basic Radiotherapy Physics and Biology is a

  9. Radiation induced sterility to control tsetse flies : the effect of ionising radiation and hybridisation on tsetse biology and the use of the sterile insect technique in integrated tsetse control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreysen, M.J.B.

    1995-01-01

    The induction of dominant lethal mutations by exposing tsetse flies as pupae or adult insects to ionising radiation and the use of hybrid sterility resulting from crosses of closely related tsetse species or subspecies, are potential methods of genetic control of tsetse flies. In this

  10. Identification of influential events concerning the Antarctic ozone hole over southern Brazil and the biological effects induced by UVB and UVA radiation in an endemic treefrog species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaglia Schuch, André; Dos Santos, Mauricio Beux; Mendes Lipinski, Victor; Vaz Peres, Lucas; Dos Santos, Caroline Peripolli; Zanini Cechin, Sonia; Jorge Schuch, Nelson; Kirsh Pinheiro, Damaris; da Silva Loreto, Elgion Lúcio

    2015-08-01

    The increased incidence of solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) due to ozone depletion has been affecting both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and it may help to explain the enigmatic decline of amphibian populations in specific localities. In this work, influential events concerning the Antarctic ozone hole were identified in a dataset containing 35 years of ozone measurements over southern Brazil. The effects of environmental doses of UVB and UVA radiation were addressed on the morphology and development of Hypsiboas pulchellus tadpole (Anura: Hylidae), as well as on the induction of malformation after the conclusion of metamorphosis. These analyzes were complemented by the detection of micronucleus formation in blood cells. 72 ozone depletion events were identified from 1979 to 2013. Surprisingly, their yearly frequency increased three-fold during the last 17 years. The results clearly show that H. pulchellus tadpole are much more sensitive to UVB than UVA light, which reduces their survival and developmental rates. Additionally, the rates of micronucleus formation by UVB were considerably higher compared to UVA even after the activation of photolyases enzymes by a further photoreactivation treatment. Consequently, a higher occurrence of malformation was observed in UVB-irradiated individuals. These results demonstrate the severe genotoxic impact of UVB radiation on this treefrog species and its importance for further studies aimed to assess the impact of the increased levels of solar UVB radiation on declining species of the Hylidae family. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of long-term ultraviolet radiation: the white form of Metridium senile (Anthozoa: Actiniaria) as a potential biological indicator for ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westholt, R.; Kestler, P.; Sicken, O.; Westheide, W.

    2001-03-01

    Genetically identical individuals of the white form of Metridium senile were kept in the laboratory for 40 months, during almost 2 years of which they were irradiated with ultraviolet (UV) radiation simulating the shape of the solar UV spectrum. The living and experimental conditions were largely matched to the conditions in the sea anemones' natural habitat on the North Sea coast. Controls were shielded from direct radiation or irradiated with only the visible range of the spectrum; for the UV tests, the UV component corresponded either to the conditions in the natural habitat or to twice or 4 times this dose. All experiments were preceded by a several-month settling-in period, and UV irradiation was always begun at a low intensity. Under these conditions UV was not lethal but produced many parameter changes, of which only those that were irreversible for the entire duration of the experiment, from September 1992 to August 1994, are described here. The body mass fell significantly in all three UV-radiation modes. All irradiated animals positioned themselves so as to be less exposed to the radiation, and all changed colour from white to brown. These responses are discussed with reference to the potential of M. senile as an indicator or monitor for UV in the northern European coastal region. Field analyses are currently being conducted to demonstrate the extent to which the present results apply to field conditions.

  12. Determination of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks for the biological dose monitoring in cardiac computerized tomography; Bestimmung von strahleninduzierten DNA-Doppelstrangbruechen zum Monitoring der biologischen Dosis in der Herz-Computertomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegener, Jasmin

    2013-11-12

    Background and aims: X-rays cause relevant DNA damage to cells. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are considered to be the most biologically significant radiation induced DNA-lesions. Recently a sensitive immunofluorescence microscopic method was developed to quantify x-ray induced DSBs as nuclear foci, even after doses as used in computed tomography. The method is based on the phosphorylation of the histone variant H2AX after formation of DSBs and distinct foci representing DSBs can be visualised. The number of foci correlates well with the delivered radiation dose. The importance of cardiac CT has increased during the last years. The radiation exposure of cardiac CT is rather high compared to other radiologic diagnostic procedures and techniques for dose-reduction receive increasing attention. In this context the purpose of this study was to determine to what extent the γ-H2AX-based method is able to measure x-ray induced DSBs in patients undergoing cardiac CT. Furthermore the objective was to evaluate whether CT-induced DSBs correlate with exposure parameters (dose length product, DLP) and to assess the influence of the scan protocols on the biological radiation damage. Materials and methods: 32 patients undergoing coronary CT angiography either using a 64-slice (n = 5: SOMATOM Sensation 64 {sup registered}) or a dual-source CT scanner (n = 27: SOMATOM Definition {sup registered}) were included in the study. Venous blood samples were taken before and 0.5 h, 2.5 h, and 24 h after the CT scan. Additional venous blood samples obtained before CT were irradiated in-vitro at various radiation doses (10 mGy, 50 mGy, 100 mGy) to obtain reference values of foci. Lymphocytes were separated and incubated with a specific γ-H2AX primary and a fluorescent secondary antibody. The number of γ-H2AX-foci was quantified using a fluorescence microscope. Every distinct focus represents one DNA-DSB. The number of radiation-induced DSBs was calculated by subtracting the foci number

  13. Twenty five years of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine - progress and priorities for future of radiation medicine and biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyka, D

    2017-12-01

    After the creation of the Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine in 1993 the Research Center for Radiation Medicine was among the first institutions to join the Academy (fig. 1). Estab lishing the Academy was among the first steps of the independent Ukrainian government and aimed to provide a high level health care for population. It was extremely needed for the minimization of Chornobyl medical consequences. This choice was related to a growing recognition of the scientific research in fulfilling the Сenter's mission - study of the effects of low dose radiation on human body and radiation protection of the exposed population.The Center entered the Academy as a potent insti tution. Director General Dr. Anatoly Romanenko and his first deputy prof. Oles Pyatak were lucky to concentrate in three institutes of the Center a talent ed workforce including director of the Institute of Clinical Radiology prof Volodymyr Bebeshko, director of the Institute of Epidemiology and Prophylaxis of radiation Injuries prof. Volodymyr Buzunov, director of the Institute of Experimental Radiology prof. Mikhail Rudnev. Drs. T. Azaren kova, S. Galkina, V. Boer, T. Treskunova were appointed as scientific secretaries. Dosimetry divi sion was headed by brilliant prof Ilya Likhtarev and his staff Drs. I. Los, V. Korzun, V. Repin, O. Pere voznikov, O. Bondarenko, V. Chumak and others.The Center met creation of the Academy with expe rienced research and clinical staff encountering 1587 members, including 272 research staff, 28 doctors of science and 98 PhDs, modern diagnostic and labo ratory equipment, 300 beds in clinical departments and construction of hospital and out patient hospi tal in Svyatoshin. Scientific staff included experi enced prof. I. Khomaziuk, prof. B. Prevarsky, prof. V. Zamostian, prof. P. Chayalo, prof. M. Omelya nets, prof. A. Prysyazhnyuk. Dr. A. Niagu, Dr. E. Stepanova, Dr. A.Chumak, Dr. V. Klymenko, Dr. D. Komarenko, M. Pilinska, L.Ovsiannikova, O. Pi rogova. were among

  14. Abordagem colaborativa no estudo da biologia reprodutiva da garoupa verdadeira Epinephelus marginatus (Lowe, 1834 (Perciformes: Serranidae - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v28i3.213 Collaborative approach in the study of the reproductive biology of the dusky grouper Epinephelus marginatus (Lowe, 1834 (Perciformes: Serranidae - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v28i3.213

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Hostim Silva

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Diversos aspectos da biologia reprodutiva da garoupa verdadeira Epinephelus marginatus foram abordados através de uma metodologia colaborativa. Ao todo, 193 exemplares da garoupa verdadeira foram obtidas em peixarias colaboradoras no município de São Francisco do Sul, Estado de Santa Catarina, Brasil. Os funcionários das peixarias foram treinados e incentivados a realizar a coleta de todo material biológico necessário para estudos reprodutivos, possibilitando o acesso a um grande número de vísceras que teriam de outra maneira sido dispensadas. Epinephelus marginatus esteve em atividade reprodutiva no inicio do verão, com desova provável entre novembro e dezembro. Fêmeas atingiram a maturidade sexual com aproximadamente 460 mm de comprimento total. Machos variaram de 900mm a 1000 mm e fêmeas de 300 mm a 960 mm. Não foram observados machos em transição sexual. A equação de regressão da relação entre o comprimento total (CT (mm e peso total (PT (g foi dada (PT = 4.4 x 10-5 CT2. 8. Sugestões são dadas ainda para o aumento da performance de futuras abordagens colaborativas de pesquisa.Several aspects of the reproductive biology of the dusky grouper Epinephelus marginatus were investigated using a collaborative methodology. 193 specimens of dusky groupers were obtained in collaboration with fish market personnel in the city of São Francisco do Sul, Santa Catarina State, Southern Brazil. Fish market staff were trained and encouraged to collect biological material required for reproductive studies, giving access to many specimens which otherwise would have been unavailable. E. marginatus was found to reproduce in early summer, spawning between November and December. Females reached sexual maturity at approximately 460 mm total length. Sampled males ranged from 900- 1000 mm and females from 300-960 mm in total length. No transitional (i.e. sex changing males were observed. The regression equation for the relationship between total

  15. Biological assay of chromatin dispersal simplified for determining absorbed dose of ionizing radiation; Ensayo biologico simplificado de dispersion de cromatina para la determinacion de dosis de radiacion ionizante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galaz, S.; Perez, G.; Stockert, J. C.; Blazquez-Castro, A.

    2011-07-01

    Currently, the production of nuclear halos chromatin dispersion methods is a good procedure for nuclear analysis by in situ hybridization (Wiegant et al., 1992, Gerdes et al. 1994), to detect apoptosis, DNA fragmentation and cell death rates in cell cultures (Fernandez et al., 2005, Enciso et al. 2006). It is customary to display the nuclear halos by fluorescence microscopy using propidium iodide, ethidium bromide or DAPI (Gerdes et al., 1994, Sestili et al. 2006). Using this technique based on a modified protocol of fast halo assay [FHA],(Sestili et al. 2006), has developed a simplified method to quantify the cytogenetic damage induced by ionizing radiation (dispersion test chromatin in agarose thin smear), which allows visualization of halos after staining for light microscopy or fluorescence and correlating the ratio: total area occuped by the halo nucleus / nucleus (halo-core index [IHN] ) with radiation dose.

  16. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Be extra careful not to spend time with children or pregnant women. Internal Radiation Therapy Makes You Give Off Radiation With systemic radiation, your body fluids ( urine , sweat, and saliva ) will give off radiation for a while. With ...

  17. Radiation enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation enteropathy; Radiation-induced small bowel injury; Post-radiation enteritis ... Radiation therapy uses high-powered x-rays, particles, or radioactive seeds to kill cancer cells. The therapy ...

  18. An introduction to radiation protection

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Alan; Beach, Karen; Cole, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The sixth edition of this established text takes the reader through the general background to the subject, the technical principles underlying the control of radiation hazards, radiation detection and measurement and the biological effects of radiation. These are followed by a consideration of radiation protection issues in the nuclear industry, the non-nuclear sector and the medical field. Further specialised topics include risk assessment, waste management and decommissioning, radiological incidents and emergencies, relevant legislation and organizational issues.

  19. Progress report on the regulatory cooperation program between the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority and the Federal Medical Biological Agency of Russia. Final report of projects and other activities completed in 2008-2009 and plans for 2010-2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roudak, S. F.; Sneve, M. K.; Kiselev, M.; Shandala, N. K.

    2011-06-15

    This report sets out the progress made in the projects and related activities carried out in the period 2008 - 2009 within the Regulatory Cooperation Program between the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority and the Federal Medical Biological Agency of Russia. The progress described follows directly from previous work carried out within the Regulatory Cooperation Program, as set out in earlier NRPA reports and in accordance with the Norwegian Government's Plan of Action to improve nuclear and radiation safety in Northwest Russia. The work was carried out by specialists of the Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Centre, with support from other Russian organisations and specialists as well as experts from the NRPA. Five main projects are described, each of which has contributed to the improvement of regulatory supervision by the FMBA over the sites operated by SevRAO in the Northwest of Russia, including the Sites for Temporary Storage at Andreyev Bay and Gremikha, and the Regional Centre for Waste Conditioning and Long-term Storage at Saida Bay. The main activities of interest include recovery and secure the safe condition of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste from inadequate storage facilities and ensuring their continued future safe storage. The topics covered by these projects include: Control of Occupational Exposure and Optimisation During Hazardous Operations through the Development of Databases on Radiation Situation and Individual Occupational Exposure (DOSEMAP). The software for a mapping database of radiation situation parameters at SevRAO Facilities has been developed. A computer scheme of workshops in new Complex facilities for the spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management, the design of which is already available, has been developed. The software for the database on individual doses to the SevRAO workers has also been developed. Two draft guidance documents have been prepared: 'Application of the database on the radiation

  20. Estudo multicasos sobre atividades inovativas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Regina Hierro Parolin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Em estudos sobre competitividade argumenta-se que as empresas necessitam de estratégias baseadas em inovações e de capacidades internas em constantes e intensas transformações, não somente nos padrões tecnológicos, mas também no encadeamento do processo de gestão das atividades inovativas, como processos dinâmicos, não lineares e diversificados, em função de múltiplos fatores dos ambientes interno e externo. Para contribuir com essas discussões, neste artigo apresenta-se um estudo multicasos em quatro indústrias de médio e grande portes, de segmentos, densidades tecnológicas e históricos com inovações diferentes entre si. Como principais resultados, salientam-se o encadeamento das atividades inovativas como parte de uma estratégia organizacional para obter resultados com inovação e a afluência de todas as pessoas, e não somente as alocadas em pesquisa e desenvolvimento, para o cumprimento dessa estratégia.

  1. A study about the effects of gamma radiation and electron beam irradiation in the detection of genetically modified maize (Zea Mays); Estudos dos efeitos da radiacao gama e de aceleradores de eletrons na deteccao de graos de milho (Zea mays) geneticamente modificado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crede, Ricardo Gandara

    2005-07-01

    The major technique to detect genetically modified organism - GMO is the polymerase chain reaction - PCR. The PCR is a method that allows the enlargement in vitro of DNA segments, using two starters ('primers') that hybridize with the opposing ribbons, in regions that match the segment to be amplified. For that, the DNA is disnatured (92-96 deg C), the 'primers' are hybridized (30 deg C a 60 deg C ) and, after that, the DNA synthesis is made with a DNA-polymerase and nucleotides (dNTPs) (72 deg C), for some repetitive cycles. The development of the PCR allowed great advances in Molecular Biology, mainly for analysis of genes, diagnosis of illnesses and pathogens, among some other examples. Currently, the PCR has been very much used for the identification of transgenic constituents in foods. In the detection of genetically modified grains, the PCR technique showed to be highly sensitive, because it allows identifying one genetically modified grain amongst a million of normal grains. Nowadays, the analysis through the PCR method is the only capable to discriminate an organism genetically modified from a not transgenic one. The identification of foods that were made of transgenic grains, as soy and maize, through the PCR technique is still controversial. Therefore the result of the test is more trustworthy when it is positive. Or either, the detection absence does not mean that the product does not have, in fact, transgenic ingredients. It happens because to detect a DNA sequence, is necessary to preserve a minimum portion of the DNA. However, what happens many times in the industrialization process is that, in the manipulation of the ingredients, the DNA can be degraded (for example, for heat or radiation) and, consequently, is not detectable any longer. This work has as a main objective the study of the viability on the use of the PCR in the detection of GMO's in radiated foods containing maize. For the irradiation of the material, a source

  2. DEGRO`98. 4th German congress on radiation oncology, biology, physics. Book of abstracts; DEGRO`98. 4. Deutscher Kongress fuer Radioonkologie, Strahlenbiologie und Medizinische Physik. Abstractband

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1998-11-01

    The special issue contains all abstracts of the congress papers and compact information on the subjects of poster sessions and refresher courses. The themes of the technical and poster sessions are: Radiation physics of brachytherapy, CT-simulation and dosimetry, positioning and verification, 3D planning, quality assurance, irradiation planning and imaging, portal imaging; radiobiology in the context of interactions in combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy, cytokine and fibrosis, radiosensitivity and repair, apoptosis, oxygen and radiation effects; CNS; Amifostine as a protective agent in radiotherapy and chemotherapy: breast cancer; upper gastro-intestinal tract; anti-inflammation and proliferation irradiation; stereotaxy; palliative treatments; head and neck cancer, irradiation techniques; hyperthermia; rectal carcinoma; urogenital tract; malignant lymphoma; eyes and orbita; cervical and corpus carcinoma; non-cat-cell bronchial carcinoma. (MG/CB) [Deutsch] Der vorliegende Sonderband legt alle Abstracts der Tagung sowie die Inhaltsangaben der Poster-Sessions und der Refresher-Kurse vor. Die Themen der Vortraege und Poster waren wie folgt: Strahlenphysik der Brachytherapie, der CT-Simulation und Dosimetrie, der Lagerung und Verifikation, der 3D-Planung, der Qualitaetssicherung, der Bestrahlungsplanung und Bildgebung und des Portal Imagings; Strahlenbiologie in Bezug auf Interaktion von Chemo- und Radiotherapie, Zytokine und Fibrose, Strahlenempfindlichkeit und Reparatur, Apoptose, Sauerstoff und Strahlenwirkung; ZNS; Amifostin als Protektor in Radio- und Chemotherapie: Mammakarzinom; oberer Gastrointestinaltrakt; entzuendungs- und antiproliferative Bestrahlung; Stereotaxie; Palliativmedizin; Kopf-Hals-Bereich; Bestrahlungstechniken; Hyperthermie; Rektum- und Analkarzinom; Urogenitaltrakt; maligne Lymphome; Auge und Orbita; Zervix- und Korpuskarzinom; nichtkleinzelliges Bronchialkarzinom. (MG)

  3. Knowledge, Attitudes and Performance of Dental Practitioners in Isfahan-Iran about Biologic Effects of Ionizing Radiation and Protection Against them in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Badrian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Increasing use of dental radiography makes necessitates of increasing awareness and appropriate performance about ionizing radiation protection. The present study was done with the aim of evaluation of awareness, attitude and performance levels of dental practitioners in the city of Isfahan about ionizing radiation and protection against them.Materials & Methods: In this descriptive-analytic study a questionnaire including questions for evaluating of awareness, attitude and performance levels and demographic information was distributed among 184 dentists in the city of Isfahan. The data were analyzed by means of student t test and Pearson correlation coefficient in SPSS software (α=0.05. Results: In the present study 73.2% of dentists had weak awareness level 25.6% and 1.2% of dentists had moderate and good awareness levels respectively. Twentyfour and 76 percent had good and apathetic attitudes. Ten and 4.5 percent of dentists have been using lead apron and thyroidal necklace for their patients respectively. Experience and awareness had significant inverse correlation with eachother (P=0.004, r =-0.218.Conclusion: According to the results of the presents study, the awareness of dentists was weak and academic education as well as post-graduate education is necessary.

  4. Electrosmog. Molecular-biological proof of the biological effects of electromagnetic fields and radiation. Scientific documentation. 2. ed.; Elektrosmog. Molekularbiologischer Nachweis ueber die biologische Wirkung elektromagnetischer Felder und Strahlen. Wissenschaftliche Dokumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, A. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany)

    2001-09-01

    The book intends to show and prove the effects of electromagnetic fields and radiation on living objects. Theoretical fundamentals are discussed, and measured results and practical experience are presented. The theory focuses on two aspects, i.e. the cell membrane and its many functions on the one hand and the field of bioreactions on the other hand, in which short-lived radicals and ions have an important role. Subjects like electricity and magnetism, nature and technology, biosignals and electrosensitivity, cell communication and the pineal gland, calcium and cancer are gone into. The author reports animal experiments, cites international research findings, points out health hazards, criticizes official limiting values and warns of uninformed handling of magnetic fields in everyday life. (orig.)

  5. Biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiations. Evidence of effect of pre-irradiation of culture medium on subsequent growth in Cyanobacterium Synechococcus lividus in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conter, A.; Planel, H.

    1986-06-28

    In order to distinguish the direct effects of low dose of ionizing radiations at the cellular level from those indirect through the culture medium, we have compared proliferation of Synechococcus lividus grown in pre-irradiated medium to proliferation of cultures grown in non-irradiated medium. A stimulation of growth was observed at the 7th day in cultures inoculated with cells selected in deceleration phase, while an inhibition occured in cultures inoculated with exponential growing cells. Addition of catalase (100 U/ml) counteracted the stimulating effect but did not change the inhibiting effect induced by pre-irradiated medium. Results demonstrated the indirect effect of low dose of irradiation, implying hydrogen peroxide, but let us to think that other radioproduced products could be also involved in the mechanism.

  6. Comparison of biological effects between continuous and intermittent exposure to GSM-900-MHz mobile phone radiation: Detection of apoptotic cell-death features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavdoula, Evangelia D; Panagopoulos, Dimitris J; Margaritis, Lukas H

    2010-07-19

    In the present study we used a 6-min daily exposure of dipteran flies, Drosophila melanogaster, to GSM-900MHz (Global System for Mobile Telecommunications) mobile phone electromagnetic radiation (EMR), to compare the effects between the continuous and four different intermittent exposures of 6min total duration, and also to test whether intermittent exposure provides any cumulative effects on the insect's reproductive capacity as well as on the induction of apoptotic cell death. According to our previous experiments, a 6-min continuous exposure per day for 5 days to GSM-900MHz and DCS-1800MHz (Digital Cellular System) mobile phone radiation, brought about a large decrease in the insect's reproductive capacity, as defined by the number of F(1) pupae. This decrease was found to be non-thermal and correlated with an increased percentage of induced fragmented DNA in the egg chambers' cells at early- and mid-oogenesis. In the present experiments we show that intermittent exposure also decreases the reproductive capacity and alters the actin-cytoskeleton network of the egg chambers, another known aspect of cell death that was not investigated in previous experiments, and that the effect is also due to DNA fragmentation. Intermittent exposures with 10-min intervals between exposure sessions proved to be almost equally effective as continuous exposure of the same total duration, whereas longer intervals between the exposures seemed to allow the organism the time required to recover and partly overcome the above-mentioned effects of the GSM exposure. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Radiation degradation of biological waste (aflatoxins) produced in food laboratory; Degradacao por radiacao de residuos biologicos (aflatoxinas) produzidos em laboratorio de alimentos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogovschi, Vladimir Dias

    2009-07-01

    Many filamentous fungi can produce secondary metabolites, called mycotoxins, which can be found in food and agricultural products. One of the main genera of myco toxigenic fungi related to the food chain is the Aspergillus spp. There are over 400 mycotoxins described in the literature, the most common the aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2. The mycotoxins are commonly found in foods and are considered one of the most dangerous contaminants. The aflatoxin B1 is classified in group one by the International Agency of Research on Cancer. Aflatoxins resisting for more than one hour in autoclave making it necessary to other means of degradation of these toxins. This work aimed to observe the effects of gamma radiation of {sup 60}Co and electron beams in the degradation of aflatoxins and compare the damage caused on the morphology of the Aspergillus flavus. The fungus was grown on potato dextrose agar (PDA) for 10 days and was subsequently transferred to coconut agar medium, and maintained for 14 days at 25 degree C. After this step the coconut agar was ground to become a homogeneous pasty and was irradiated with doses of 2.5, 5.0, 10 and 20 kGy. The samples used in scanning electron microscopy were irradiated with doses of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10 and 20 kGy with sources of {sup 60}Co and electron beams. Irradiation with electron accelerator showed a slightly higher degradation to gamma radiation, reducing 29.93 %, 34.50 %, 52.63 % and 72.30 % for doses of 2.5, 5.0, 10 and 20 kGy, respectively. The Scanning Electron Microscopy showed that doses of 2.5 to 10 kGy did not cause damage to the fungus, but with a dose of 20 kGy it can be observed fungal damage to structures. (author)

  8. Nontargeted stressful effects in normal human fibroblast cultures exposed to low fluences of high charge, high energy (HZE) particles: kinetics of biologic responses and significance of secondary radiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonon, Géraldine; Groetz, Jean-Emmanuel; de Toledo, Sonia M; Howell, Roger W; Fromm, Michel; Azzam, Edouard I

    2013-04-01

    The induction of nontargeted stressful effects in cell populations exposed to low fluences of high charge (Z) and high energy (E) particles is relevant to estimates of the health risks of space radiation. We investigated the up-regulation of stress markers in confluent normal human fibroblast cultures exposed to 1,000 MeV/u iron ions [linear energy transfer (LET) ∼151 keV/μm] or 600 MeV/u silicon ions (LET ∼50 keV/μm) at mean absorbed doses as low as 0.2 cGy, wherein 1-3% of the cells were targeted through the nucleus by a primary particle. Within 24 h postirradiation, significant increases in the levels of phospho-TP53 (serine 15), p21(Waf1) (CDKN1A), HDM2, phospho-ERK1/2, protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation were detected, which suggested participation in the stress response of cells not targeted by primary particles. This was supported by in situ studies that indicated greater increases in 53BP1 foci formation, a marker of DNA damage. than expected from the number of primary particle traversals. The effect was expressed as early as 15 min after exposure, peaked at 1 h and decreased by 24 h. A similar tendency occurred after exposure of the cell cultures to 0.2 cGy of 3.7 MeV α particles (LET ∼109 keV/μm) that targets ∼1.6% of nuclei, but not after 0.2 cGy from 290 MeV/u carbon ions (LET ∼13 keV/μm) by which, on average, ∼13% of the nuclei were hit, which highlights the importance of radiation quality in the induced effect. Simulations with the FLUKA multi-particle transport code revealed that fragmentation products, other than electrons, in cell cultures exposed to HZE particles comprise particles.

  9. Estudo morfológico das entero-anastomoses com suturas em pontos separados complementados com adesivo sintético ou biológico em coelho Morphologic study of enteroanastomosis with sutures in separated stitches supplementeds with synthetical adhesive or biological adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademir Teixeira do Amaral

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a eficácia dos adesivos de fibrina e cianoacrilato como coadjunvantes nas anastomoses de intestino delgado de coelhos. MÉTODOS: Oitenta coelhos, linhagem Nova Zelândia, machos, adultos, foram submetidos a enterectomia de 3cm e enterorrafia e distribuídos em quatro grupos: Grupo A (dois pontos eqüidistantes; Grupo B (quatro pontos eqüidistantes; Grupo C (seis pontos eqüidistantes; Grupo D (oito pontos eqüidistantes. No 14º dia de observação, os animais foram submetidos a uma laparotomia mediana para estudo macroscópico da cavidade abdominal para identificação e avaliação de aderências, deiscências e/ou fístulas. O segmento intestinal anastomosado foi retirado e feito um molde de alginato para posterior avaliação do índice de estenose. As peças retiradas foram processadas para estudo histológico e avaliação de fibras colágenas, macrófagos, neovascularização e granuloma tipo corpo estranho. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferença significante na avaliação de deiscência e fístulas com os dois adesivos entre os quatros sub-grupos. A aderência ocorreu em maior número nos sub-grupos do adesivo sintético. O índice de estenose foi maior nos animais do adesivo sintético somente nos sub-grupos com dois e oito pontos. A análise histológica mostrou que em todos os parâmetros avaliados (macrófago, neovascularização e granuloma não houve diferença significante entre os dois tipos de adesivos. Em relação a porcentagem de colágeno verificou-se que houve diferença significante somente no grupo B em que o adesivo sintético foi menor que o biológico. CONCLUSÃO: O adesivo biológico de fibrina mostra mais eficácia que o adesivo sintético como complemento de suturas nas anastomoses intestinais.PURPOSE: The aim of the research was to verify the efficacy of the fibrin or cianoacrylate glue as coadjuvant in the intestinals anastomosis of rabbits. METHODS: Eighty rabbits, lineage New Zealand, males

  10. Chitosan and radiation chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G., E-mail: a.chmielewski@ichtj.waw.p [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2010-03-15

    Chitosan as a raw material with special properties has drawn attention of scientists working in the field of radiation processing and natural polymer products development, and also of specialists working in the field of radiation protection and oncologists. Especially the applications concern reduced molecular weight chitosan which still retain its chemical structure; such form of the compound is fostering biological, physical and chemical reactivity of the product. Chitosan degrades into fragments under gamma-ray or electron beam irradiation. Antibacterial properties of the product are applied in manufacturing hydrogel for wound dressing and additional healing properties can be achieved by incorporating in the hydrogel matrix chitosan bonded silver clusters. Another possible application of chitosan is in reducing radiation damage to the radiation workers or radiation cured patients. In the case of radioisotopes oral or respiratory chitosan-based materials can be applied as chelators. Applications of chitosan in oncology are also reported.

  11. Synchrotron radiation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Steenbergen, A.

    1979-01-01

    As a result of the exponential growth of the utilization of synchrotron radiation for research in the domain of the material sciences, atomic and molecular physics, biology and technology, a major construction activity has been generated towards new dedicated electron storage rings, designed optimally for synchrotron radiation applications, also, expansion programs are underway at the existing facilities, such as DORIS, SPEAR, and VEPP. In this report the basic properties of synchrotron radiation will be discussed, a short overview will be given of the existing and new facilities, some aspects of the optimization of a structure for a synchrotron radiation source will be discussed and the addition of wigglers and undulators for spectrum enhancement will be described. Finally, some parameters of an optimized synchrotron radiation source will be given.

  12. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment. It uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and stop them from ... half of all cancer patients receive it. The radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, ...

  13. Biological effects of ionizing radiation at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels. Triennial progress report, October 15, 1977-October 14, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, C.S.

    1980-01-01

    Two major accomplishments have been achieved in the past three years with the support of this contract. Firstly, the original Zimm theory of rotor speed dependent DNA sedimentation has been tested quantitatively and found to be correct, i.e., T4c and T4D+ DNAs sedimented with S/sup 0//sub 20,w/ values as predicted by the equation of Zimm and Schumaker. Furthermore, the quantitative validity of the theory means that the size (M/sub r/) of a DNA sedimenting under speed-dependent conditions is not undefinable but rather can be uniquely obtained by the application of that theory to the data. Secondly, the viscoelastic recoil (GAMMA/sub 11/), or more accurately, the zero shear rate reduced recoil (GAMMA/sub 11, r, o/) has been shown to be a quantitative direct function of the number of intact (T4c) DNA molecules present (per ml) in solution. This demonstration made possible the measurement of a direct survival curve for intact DNA molecules (i.e., without double-strand breaks) after exposure to ionizing radiation. A /sub DNA/D/sub 37/ of 47.4 krads was obtained for the DNA of T4c coliphage irradiated in air as a solution of phage particles. It is noteworthy that this survival curve measures the number of intact DNA molecules, not the average number of breaks/molecule.

  14. Empirical evidence of the effectiveness of concept mapping as a learning intervention for nuclear medicine technology students in a distance learning radiation protection and biology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passmore, Gregory G; Owen, Mary Anne; Prabakaran, Krishnan

    2011-12-01

    Metacognitive learning strategies are based on instructional learning theory, which promotes deep, meaningful learning. Educators in a baccalaureate-level nuclear medicine technology program demonstrated that students enrolled in an online, distance learning section of an introductory radiation protection and radiobiology course performed better when traditional instruction was supplemented with nontraditional metacognitive learning strategies. The metacognitive learning strategy that was used is best known as concept mapping. The concept map, in addition to the standard homework problem assignment and opportunity for question-answer sessions, became the template for misconception identification and remediation interactions between the instructor and the student. The control group relied on traditional homework problems and question-answer sessions alone. Because students in both the "treatment" groups (i.e., students who used concept mapping) and the control group were distance learning students, all personal communications were conducted via e-mail or telephone. The final examination of the course was used to facilitate a quantitative comparison of the performance of students who used concept mapping and the performance of students who did not use concept mapping. The results demonstrated a significantly higher median final examination score for the concept mapping group than for the non-concept mapping group (z = -2.0381, P = 0.0415), with an appropriately large effect size (2.65). Concept mapping is a cognitive learning intervention that effectively enables meaningful learning and is suitable for use in the independent learner-oriented distance learning environments used by some nuclear medicine technology programs.

  15. A molecular biological study on the identification of the molecular species of DNA polymerases for repairing radiation-damaged DNA and the factors modifying the mutation rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Koichi; Inoue, Shuji [National Inst. of Health and Nutrition, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    Aiming at prevention and treatment of radiation damages, the authors have been investigating DNA damages by X-ray and its repairing mechanism, however, the molecular species of DNA polymerase which mediate the repairing could not been identified by biochemical methods using various inhibitors because of their low specificity. Therefore, in this study, anti-sense oligonucleotides for DNA polymerase {alpha}, {delta} and {epsilon} were obtained by chemical synthesis and transduced into human fibroblast cell, NB1RGB by three methods; endocytotic method, electroporation method and lipofection method. For the first method, the addition of those peptides into the cell culture at 5 {mu}M inhibited the polymerase activity by up to 30% and it was economically difficult to use at higher concentrations than it. For the electroporation method, different conditions were tested in the respects of initial potential, time constant and buffer, but the uptake of thimidine was scarcely decreased in the surviving cells, suggesting that the surviving rate would be short in the cells electroporated with those anti-sense peptides. For the lipofection method, among several cationic lipids tested, lipofectamine significantly enlarged the decrease of thymidine uptake by anti-sense {delta}, however it was considered that its application to DNA repairing is difficult because lipofectamine is strongly cytotoxic. Therefore, construction of a vector which allows to express anti-sense RNA in those cells is undertaken. (M.N.)

  16. Estimation of dose ionizing radiation exposure by biological dosimetry; Estimación de dosis de exposición a radiaciones ionizantes mediante dosimetría biológica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herranz Crespo, R.; Moreno Domene, M.; Prieto Rodríguez, M.J.; Lozano Barriuso, M.A.

    2014-07-01

    the Biological Dosimetry Laboratory of the Radiopathology Centre, at Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, is the only national laboratory accredited by UNE-EN ISO/IEC 17025:2005, and scope to ISO 19238:2004 (Radiation protection – Performance criteria for service laboratories performing biological dosimetry by citogenetics), for dose assessment by the dycentrics assay, has great experience with more than 100 real cases analyzed, and several population studies. This paper describes experience and results from more than 20 years of work under the Reference level II Centre for the attention of irradiated and/or contaminated people. [Spanish] El Laboratorio de Dosimetría Biológica, del Centro de Radiopatología del Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, es el único en España que dispone de acreditación internacional por la norma UNE-EN ISO/IEC 17025:2005 con alcance a la norma ISO 19238:2004 (Radiationprotection – Performance criteria for service laboratories performing biological dosimetry by citogenetics), para la realización de estimaciones dosimétricas mediante la técnica de dicéntricos, dispone de amplia experiencia en su aplicación en los 110 casos reales analizados, y en diferentes estudios de poblaciones españolas. En este trabajo se describe la experiencia del laboratorio y los resultados obtenidos en los más de 20 años de funcionamiento en el Centro de Referencia de nivel II para la atención a irradiados y/o contaminados por radiaciones ionizantes.

  17. INTEGRATED FARM ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT AND BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION: A CASE STUDY IN THE CARATINGA BIOLOGICAL STATION (MINAS GERAIS STATE, BRAZIL GESTÃO AMBIENTAL DE ESTABELECIMENTOS RURAIS E CONSERVAÇÃO DA BIODIVERSIDADE: UM ESTUDO DE CASO NO ENTORNO DA ESTAÇÃO BIOLÓGICA DE CARATINGA (MG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Stachetti Rodrigues

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available

    The Caratinga Biological Station (CBS is an important preserve of the Brazilian Atlantic Rain Forest, defined as a national priority for the conservation of this highly fragmented biome and shelter to the largest existing population of the northern muriqui, the critically threatened largest monkey species of the Americas. Extensive research on the demography of this population has indicated favorable conditions for growth, pointing out the importance of promoting expansion of the locally available habitat. In the present study, rural establishments neighboring the CBS were involved in a participatory program for wildlife corridor restoration, by means of the application of a ‘System for Weighted Environmental Impact Assessment of Rural Activities’ (APOIA-NovoRural, which consists of 62 indicators integrated in five sustainability dimensions: i Landscape ecology; ii Environmental quality; iii Socio-cultural values; iv Economic values; and v Management and administration. Results regarding the Landscape ecology indicators (those most related with fauna protection attested to the adequate performance of productive activities in the studied establishments, while pointed out the need for improvements in natural habitats conservation. The Environmental Management Reports issued to the farmers included mapped recommendations for forest restoration and wildlife corridors implementation, favoring the connection of the main preserved area of CBS with the second largest forest fragment in the region.

  18. National congress of radiation protection; Congres national de radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The congress of radiation protection tackled different areas of radiation protection. The impact of ionizing radiations on environment coming from radioactive activities. The biological radiation effects, the dosimetry, the different ways of doing relative to radiation protection,the risks analysis and the communications with populations, information about accidents and the lessons learned from them are included in this congress. (N.C.)

  19. Importance of electric fields from ionized nanoparticles for radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmatov, M. L.

    2017-05-01

    A model is presented in which electric fields from ionized particles in a biological tissue enhance the biological effect of ionizing radiation. The model is based on the data on enhancing the gamma radiation effect on biological cells by static electric fields and on estimates of the typical intensities of electric fields from ionized nanoparticles in a biological tissue.

  20. Antiprotons get biological

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    After its final run in September, the first results of the Antiproton Cell Experiment (ACE) look very promising. It was the first experiment to take data on the biological effects of antiproton beams to evaluate the potential of antiprotons in radiation therapy.

  1. Biological diversity variations of pediatric acute leukemia in Brazil: contribution of immunophenotypic profiles to epidemiological studies Diversidades biológicas da leucemia aguda em crianças no Brasil: contribuição de perfis imunofenotípicos para estudos epidemiológicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria S. Pombo-de-Oliveira

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe the demographic and biological characteristics of 1,459 children with acute leukemia in Brazil to compare the effect of immunophenotypic differences with environmental factors that might be involved in the etiology of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. Combined morphological and immunological classifications were available for 96% of cases. Of these, 55% were B cell precursor ALL comprising pro-B ALL and c-ALL, 15% T-ALL and 1.6% mature B-ALL. The proportion of Bp and T-ALL differed by race with 59% of whites being Bp-ALL and 60.7% of non-whites being T-ALL. Further inspection of these data revealed that the proportions of whites in each type (Bp/T-cell ALL are almost identical in older children (60.3% and 59.3% respectively but differ substantially in younger cases (Os autores descrevem as características biológicas de 1.459 crianças com leucemias agudas no Brasil, para comparar os efeitos de diferentes perfis imunofenotípicos com fatores ambientais que podem estar associados à etiologia das leucemias linfoblásticas agudas (LLA. As classificações morfológicas e imunofenotípicas combinadas foram aplicadas em 96% dos casos. Nestes, 55% foram classificados como LLA de células B precursoras (LLA-Bp que compreendem LLA-pro-B e LLA-comum, 15% LLA-T, e 1,6% LLA-B. A proporção de LLA-Bp e LLA-T difere entre si quanto à raça, com 59% das LLA-Bp em crianças brancas, enquanto 60,7% LLA-T em crianças não-brancas. No entanto, as análises proporcionais de brancos versus não brancos para cada subtipo, quando ajustadas por idade, são semelhantes em crianças maiores de 6 anos (60,3% LLA-Bp e 59,3% LLA-T, mas diferem substancialmente em crianças menores, com 63,6% de LLA-Bp e 37,3% de LLA-T em brancos (0,0001. Estes resultados são consistentes com excesso de LLA-Bp em crianças brancas mais jovens, embora a distribuição entre LLA-Bp e LLA-T em cada região seja semelhante sem significado estatístico. As taxas de incid

  2. [Radiation biology of structurally different drosophila genes. Report IV. The black gene: sequencing of the "point" mutations and recombination mechanisms of their processing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davkova, L N; Aleksandrova, M V; Aleksandrov, I D

    2013-01-01

    As it has been ascertained in our large-scale experiments with Drosophila specific five-loci test [1], the radio- mutability of the black gene is unusual at lest in two respects: 1) fission neutrons are strangely more efficient than γ-rays in the gene/point mutation induction and 2) a lot of gene/point black mutations have the DNA alterations not detected by PCR (so-called PCR(+)-mutants). To verify the hypothesis that neutrons induce more efficiently than γ-rays the small structural DNA changes which fail to notice the PCR, sequence ana- lysis of 8 neutron-, 8 γ-ray-induced and 3 spontaneous (from instable D32 line) black gene/point PCR(+)-mutations was performed. As controls, sequences of the test-allele black1, as well as irradiated black(+32) and black(+18) alleles were analyzed. In black1 the replacement of four bases (ATCC) by an insertion (TACCTACC) at position +530 (exon 1) results in a frameshift. There were also 27 single base pair substitutions compared to the control black(+32) or black(+18) sequence. Further, 6 γ-ray- and one neutron-induced black mutants displayed the small deletions/insertions and transversion (G --> T) which led to the stop-codon in one case. These nucleotide changes thought to be the result of γ-ray-induced processing by the NHEJ, SSA or MMR repair pathways which act in the early zygote ahead of the first (gonomeric) nuclear division. Remarkably, 3 spontaneous, 2 γ-ray- and 7 neutron-induced black mutants were found to have the sequence alterations intrinsic to the black allele showing that interallelic recombination (gene conversion) seems to be a major pathway of processing of the gross DNA lesions by acting of the HR, SDSA or BIR repair systems in zygote after the gonomeric division. Substantially, the frequency of conversion events for the neutron-induced DNA lesions was found to be 3.5 time as high as for γ-ray-induced ones. The genetic impact of the radiation-induced conversion events in zygotic nucleus leading to the

  3. Light scattering reviews 8 radiative transfer and light scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kokhanovsky, Alexander A

    2013-01-01

    Light scattering review (vol 8) is aimed at the presentation of recent advances in radiative transfer and light scattering optics. The topics to be covered include: scattering of light by irregularly shaped particles suspended in atmosphere (dust, ice crystals), light scattering by particles much larger as compared the wavelength of incident radiation, atmospheric radiative forcing, astrophysical radiative transfer, radiative transfer and optical imaging in biological media, radiative transfer of polarized light, numerical aspects of radiative transfer.

  4. Biological and medical research with accelerated heavy ions at the Bevalac, 1974--1977. [Planning for use for radiotherapy and as radiation source for diagnostic radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, S. (ed.)

    1977-04-01

    The Bevalac, a versatile high-energy heavy-ion accelerator complex, has been in operation for less than two years. A major purpose for which the Bevalac was constructed was to explore the possibility of heavy-ion teams for therapy for certain forms of cancer. Significant progress has been made in this direction. The National Cancer Institute has recognized the advantages that these and other accelerated particles offer, and heavy ions have been included in a long-term plan for particle therapy that will assess by means of controlled therapeutic tests the value of various modalities. Since accelerated heavy ions became available, the possibility of other contributions, not planned, became apparent. We are developig a new diagnostic method known as heavy-ion radiography that has greatly increased sensitivity for soft-tissue detail and that may become a powerful tool for localizing early tumors and metastases. We have discovered that radioactive beams are formed from fragmentation of stable deflected beams. Use of these autoradioactive beams is just beginning; however, we know that these beams will be helpful in localizing the region in the body where therapy is being delivered. In addition, it has been demonstrated that instant implantation of the radioactive beam allows direct measurements of blood perfusion rates in inaccessible parts of the body, and such a technique may become a new tool for the study of fast hot atom reactions in biochemistry, tracer biology and nuclear medicine. The Bevalac will also be useful for the continuation of previously developed methods for the control of acromegaly, Cushing's disease and, on a research basis, advanced diabetes mellitus with vascular disease. The ability to make small bloodless lesions in the brain and elsewhere with heavy-ion beams has great potential for nervous-system studies and perhaps later for radioneurosurgery.

  5. Biological characterization of radiation exposure and dose estimates for inhaled uranium milling effluents. Annual progress report April 1, 1982-March 31, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eidson, A.F.

    1984-05-01

    The problems addressed are the protection of uranium mill workers from occupational exposure to uranium through routine bioassay programs and the assessment of accidental worker exposures. Comparisons of chemical properties and the biological behavior of refined uranium ore (yellowcake) are made to identify important properties that influence uranium distribution patterns among organs. These studies will facilitate calculations of organ doses for specific exposures and associated health risk estimates and will identify important bioassay procedures to improve evaluations of human exposures. A quantitative analytical method for yellowcake was developed based on the infrared absorption of ammonium diuranate and U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ mixtures in KBr. The method was applied to yellowcake samples obtained from six operating mills. The composition of yellowcake from the six mills ranged from nearly pure ammonium diuranate to nearly pure U/sub 3/O/sub 8/. The composition of yellowcake samples taken from lots from the same mill was only somewhat less variable. Because uranium mill workers might be exposed to yellowcake either by contamination of a wound or by inhalation, a study of retention and translocation of uranium after subcutaneous implantation in rats was done. The results showed that 49% of the implanted yellowcake cleared from the body with a half-time (T sub 1/2) in the body of 0.3 days, and the remainder was cleared with a T sub 1/2 of 11 to 30 days. Exposures of Beagle dogs by nose-only inhalation to aerosols of commercial yellowcake were completed. Biochemical indicators of kidney dysfunction that appeared in blood and urine 4 to 8 days after exposure to the more soluble yellowcake showed significant changes in dogs, but levels returned to normal by 16 days after exposure. No biochemical evidence of kidney dysfunction was observed in dogs exposed to the less soluble yellowcake form. 18 figures, 9 tables.

  6. Responses of Cell Renewal Systems to Long-term Low-Level Radiation Exposure: A Feasibility Study Applying Advanced Molecular Biology Techniques on Available Histological and Cytological Material of Exposed Animals and Men

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliedner Theodor M.; Feinendegen Ludwig E.; Meineke Viktor; Fritz Thomas E.

    2005-02-28

    First results of this feasibility study showed that evaluation of the stored material of the chronically irradiated dogs with modern molecular biological techniques proved to be successful and extremely promising. Therefore an in deep analysis of at least part of the huge amount of remaining material is of outmost interest. The methods applied in this feasibility study were pathological evaluation with different staining methods, protein analysis by means of immunohistochemistry, strand break analysis with the TdT-assay, DNA- and RNA-analysis as well as genomic examination by gene array. Overall more than 50% of the investigated material could be used. In particular the results of an increased stimulation of the immune system within the dogs of the 3mSv group as both compared to the control and higher dose groups gives implications for the in depth study of the cellular events occurring in context with low dose radiation. Based on the findings of this study a further evaluation and statistically analysis of more material can help to identify promising biomarkers for low dose radiation. A systematic evaluation of a correlation of dose rates and strand breaks within the dog tissue might moreover help to explain mechanisms of tolerance to IR. One central problem is that most sequences for dog specific primers are not known yet. The discovery of the dog genome is still under progress. In this study the isolation of RNA within the dog tissue was successful. But up to now there are no gene arrays or gene chips commercially available, tested and adapted for canine tissue. The uncritical use of untested genomic test systems for canine tissue seems to be ineffective at the moment, time consuming and ineffective. Next steps in the investigation of genomic changes after IR within the stored dog tissue should be limited to quantitative RT-PCR of tested primer sequences for the dog. A collaboration with institutions working in the field of the discovery of the dog genome could

  7. Disturbios da olfacao: estudo retrospectivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Lobato Gregorio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: O olfato, fenômeno subjetivo de grande importância, é pouco compreendido e estudado no ser humano. Médicos com maior conhecimento sobre os distúrbios desse sentido tendem a considerar a doença mais importante e manejar melhor o diagnóstico e o tratamento. Objetivo: Descrever a amostra dos pacientes com queixa principal de distúrbios do olfato e mostrar a experiência do serviço no manejo e tratamento. Delineamento: Estudo retrospectivo de coorte histórica com corte transversal. Materiais e métodos: Descrição da amostra e avaliação de resposta ao tratamento de pacientes com queixa principal de hiposmia ou anosmia atendidos no ambulatório de Rinologia no período de janeiro de 2005 a outubro de 2011. Resultados: Dos 38 pacientes com distúrbio da olfação, 68,4% dos pacientes apresentaram queixa de hiposmia e 31,5% de anosmia, com duração média de 30,8 meses. Os diagnósticos etiológicos principais foram idiopática (31,5%, rinopatia alérgica (28,9% e RSC com pólipos (10,5%. As respostas ao tratamento com corticosteroide tópico e ácido alfa-lipoico foram variáveis, assim como na literatura. Conclusão: Maior importância deve ser dada aos distúrbios do olfato na prática do otorrinolaringologista, uma vez que o diagnóstico diferencial é amplo e pode trazer grande morbidade ao paciente, com impacto na sua qualidade de vida.

  8. Principles and practice of radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, C.A.; Brady, L.W.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 76 chapters. Some of the titles are: Biologic Basis of Radiation Therapy; Radiation Immunobiology and Immunomoduation; The Staging and Classification of Cancer: A Unified Approach; External Beam Dosimetry and Treatment Planning; Intraoperative Radiation Therapy; Hyperthermia; and Clinical Applications of Electron Beam Therapy.

  9. Radiation Therapy: Professions in Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Professions in Radiation Therapy Radiation Oncologist Therapeutic Medical Physicist Radiation Therapist Dosimetrist Radiation Oncology Nurse Social Worker Dietitian Radiation Oncologist Radiation oncologists are physicians who oversee the ...

  10. Potential health effects of space radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chui-Hsu; Craise, Laurie M.

    1993-01-01

    Crewmembers on missions to the Moon or Mars will be exposed to radiation belts, galactic cosmic rays, and possibly solar particle events. The potential health hazards due to these space radiations must be considered carefully to ensure the success of space exploration. Because there is no human radioepidemiological data for acute and late effects of high-LET (Linear-Energy-Transfer) radiation, the biological risks of energetic charged particles have to be estimated from experimental results on animals and cultured cells. Experimental data obtained to date indicate that charged particle radiation can be much more effective than photons in causing chromosome aberrations, cell killing, mutation, and tumor induction. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) varies with biological endpoints and depends on the LET of heavy ions. Most lesions induced by low-LET radiation can be repaired in mammalian cells. Energetic heavy ions, however, can produce large complex DNA damages, which may lead to large deletions and are irreparable. For high-LET radiation, therefore, there are less or no dose rate effects. Physical shielding may not be effective in minimizing the biological effects on energetic heavy ions, since fragments of the primary particles can be effective in causing biological effects. At present the uncertainty of biological effects of heavy particles is still very large. With further understanding of the biological effects of space radiation, the career doses can be kept at acceptable levels so that the space radiation environment need not be a barrier to the exploitation of the promise of space.

  11. RADIATION ACOUSTICS

    OpenAIRE

    Lyamshev, L.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a new branch of acoustics. Its' fundamentals are lying in the research of acoustical effects due to the interaction of a radiation with matter. The sound excitation in liquids and solids by modulated or pulsed particle beams (electron, proton, ion beams, γ-radiation and single high-energy elementary particles) and some practical applications are discussed.

  12. Determinantes sociais e biológicos da cárie dentária em crianças de 6 anos de idade: um estudo transversal aninhado numa coorte de nascidos vivos no Sul do Brasil Effects of Social and biological factors on dental caries in 6-year-old children: a cross sectional study nested in a birth cohort in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Peres

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo foi investigar os determinantes sociais e biológicos, medidos no período perinatal e na infância, sobre a ocorrência de cárie dentária em crianças de 6 anos de idade. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado um estudo transversal de cárie dentária em 1999, em uma subamostra de 400 crianças pertencentes a uma coorte de nascidos vivos iniciada em 1993, em Pelotas, RS. Os índices e critérios de diagnóstico adotados foram os preconizados pela Organização Mundial da Saúde (1997. Os resultados do estudo de cárie foram inseridos no banco de dados da coorte, que continha informações sobre as condições sociais e de saúde coletadas ao nascimento, no primeiro, terceiro, sexto e décimo segundo meses e no sexto ano de vida da criança. O índice de cárie (ceo-d = 0 ou > 1 foi a variável dependente. Foram realizadas análises univariada e de regressão logística múltipla não condicional, tendo como base um modelo teórico hierárquico de determinação. RESULTADOS: Escolaridade materna abaixo ou igual a 8 anos, renda familiar menor que 6 salários mínimos, não freqüentar pré-escola e consumo de doces pelo menos uma vez ao dia aos 6 anos de idade foram fatores de risco à cárie. CONCLUSÕES: Os fatores de risco sociais, como baixa escolaridade materna e baixa renda familiar, não freqüentar a pré-escola e dieta inadequada são comuns à cárie dentária e outras doenças e agravos infantis, sugerindo que medidas de intervenção dirigidas a estes fatores seriam mais adequadas à prevenção da cárie do que medidas específicas.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the social and biological conditions experienced in early life and dental caries in 6-year-old children, using a life course approach. METHODS: An oral health cross-sectional study was nested in a birth cohort study initiated in Pelotas, Brazil in 1993. In 1999, a sample of 400 6-year-old children was selected

  13. Principals Of Radiation Toxicology: Important Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava; Jones, Jeffrey

    “All things are poison, and nothing is without poison; only the dose permits something not to be poisonous.” Paracelsus Key Words: Radiation Toxins (RT), Radiation Toxicants (RTc), Radiation Poisons (RP), Radiation Exposure (RE), Radiation Toxicology is the science about radiation poisons. [D.Popov et al. 2012,J.Zhou et al. 2007,] Radiation Toxins is a specific proteins with high enzymatic activity produced by living irradiated mammals. [D.Popov et al. 2012,] Radiation Toxicants is a substances that produce radiomimetics effects, adverse biological effects which specific for radiation. [D.Popov et al. 2012,] Radiation Toxic agent is specific proteins that can produce pathological biological effects specific for physical form of radiation.[D.Popov et al. 1990,2012,V. Maliev 2007] Different Toxic Substances isolated from cells or from blood or lymph circulation. [Kudriashov I. et al. 1970, D.Popov et al. 1990,2012,V. Maliev et al. 2007,] Radiation Toxins may affects many organs or specific organ, tissue, specific group of cells. [Kudriashov I. et al. 1970, D.Popov et al. 1990,2012,V. Maliev et al. 2007] For example: Radiation Toxins could induce collective toxic clinical states to include: systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS),toxic multiple organ injury (TMOI), toxic multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (TMODS),and finally, toxic multiple organ failure (TMOF). [T. Azizova et al. 2005, Konchalovsky et al., 2005, D. Popov et al 2012] However, Radiation Toxins could induce specific injury of organs or tissue and induce Acute Radiation Syndromes such as Acute Radiation Cerebrovascular Syndrome, Acute Radiation Cardiovascular Syndrome, Acute Radiation Hematopoietic Syndrome, Acute Radiation GastroIntestinal Syndrome. [ D.Popov et al. 1990, 2012, V. Maliev et al. 2007] Radiation Toxins correlates with Radiation Exposure and the dose-response relationship is a fundamental and essential concept in classic Toxicology and Radiation Toxicology.[ D.Popov et al

  14. Applications of EPR in radiation research

    CERN Document Server

    Lund, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Applications of EPR in Radiation Research is a multi-author contributed volume presented in eight themes: I. Elementary radiation processes (in situ and low temperature radiolysis, quantum solids); II: Solid state radiation chemistry (crystalline, amorphous and heterogeneous systems); III: Biochemistry, biophysics and biology applications (radicals in biomaterials, spin trapping, free-radical-induced DNA damage); IV: Materials science (polymeric and electronic materials, materials for treatment of nuclear waste, irradiated food); V: Radiation metrology (EPR-dosimetry, retrospective and medical

  15. Study of seasonal variation of the gamma radiation at Praia da Areia Preta, Guarapari, Espirito Santo, Brazil: radiometry and risk analysis; Estudo da variacao sazonal dos niveis de radiacao gama na Praia da Areia Preta, Guarapari, Espirito Santo, Brasil: radiometria e analise de risco ambiental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Jorge Costa de

    2003-07-01

    The objective of this work is the study of the natural gamma radiation at the Areia Preta Beach (APB) in Guarapari, state of Espirito Santo, Brazil. The level of this radiation is dependent on the concentration of the radioactive mineral monazite in the sand. Probable risks of the exposure to gamma radiation at the APB were evaluated by the preliminary environmental risk analysis technique. For this purpose were conducted two annual sets monitoring gamma radiation in the APB every two months and so, acquired the seasonal variation of the radioactive levels. Additional/y was investigated the granulometry of the heavy mineral fraction and also carried out electronic microscopic scanning and radiometric age dating of the monazites of the APB, the mineral separation by magnetic susceptibility, and the mineralogic determination of the sediment. In order to gain a more complete picture of the seasonal variation, and, consequently, of the risk of exposure to ionizing radiation at the APB, the radiometric variation was also studied at some other beaches in the same region. The results indicate that the highest radiometric values are measured in summer and the lowest in winter. The radiometric dating of the monazites from the APB revealed the ages of 475 and 530 Ma. The Preliminary Hazard Analysis indicates a minimum risk of excessive radioactive exposition. It would take a period of approximately 870 years of a beach fully crowded to result in one case of bad consequences due to exposure to gamma radiation. (author)

  16. Radiation hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomraning, G.C.

    1982-12-31

    This course was intended to provide the participant with an introduction to the theory of radiative transfer, and an understanding of the coupling of radiative processes to the equations describing compressible flow. At moderate temperatures (thousands of degrees), the role of the radiation is primarily one of transporting energy by radiative processes. At higher temperatures (millions of degrees), the energy and momentum densities of the radiation field may become comparable to or even dominate the corresponding fluid quantities. In this case, the radiation field significantly affects the dynamics of the fluid, and it is the description of this regime which is generally the charter of radiation hydrodynamics. The course provided a discussion of the relevant physics and a derivation of the corresponding equations, as well as an examination of several simplified models. Practical applications include astrophysics and nuclear weapons effects phenomena.

  17. Estudo dos lactobacilos no biofilme dental

    OpenAIRE

    Clarissa Cavalcanti Fatturi Parolo

    2009-01-01

    Lactobacilos são um grupo de bactérias relacionadas com cárie dental. Há falta de estudos sobre a biologia populacional dos lactobacilos na cárie dental. O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar o efeito das modificações ambientais na composição, diversidade genética dos lactobacilos e Identificar a filogenia dos Lactobacillus paracasei isolados do biofilme. Lactobacilos foram isolados em um modelo de formação de biofilme in situ antes e depois de 28 dias de exposição à solução de sacarose 20%. As co...

  18. Biological activities of radiation-degraded carrageenan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Relleve, Lorna; Dela Rosa, Alumanda; ABAD, Lucille; Aranilla, Charito; Aliganga, Anne Kathrina [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Quezon City (Philippines); Yoshii, Fumio; Kume, Tamikazu; Nagasawa, Naotsugu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    Carrageenans were irradiated in solid state to doses 50-1000 kGy in air at ambient temperature. Changes in their molecular weight and functional properties with respect to their FT-IR and UV spectra were evaluated. Irradiation of carrageenans resulted in a rapid decrease of molecular weight indicating main chain scission in their polymeric structures. Formations of some compounds were evident by new absorption peaks in their UV and FT-IR spectra and quantitative analyses of the FT-IR spectra which, in addition, support that there is a breakdown in the carrageenan structure. Irradiated carrageenans were investigated for their plant growth-promoting activity. Carrageenans were added to the nutrient solutions for rice seedlings under non-circulating hydroponics cultivation. Irradiated carrageenan induced weight gain in treated rice seedlings. Maximum weight gain was obtained with KC irradiated at 100 kGy while treatment with IC at 500 kGy. IC exhibited less growth promoting properties than KC. The growth of fungi on the roots disappeared with treatment of IC and KC irradiated at 500 kGy. Growth promotion of some leafy vegetables was also observed with application of degraded KC. The carrageenan molecule has been broken down to smaller molecule (s) or compound (s) that can be absorbed effectively as nourishment factors and anti-microbial agents by plants. (author)

  19. Acute Cerebrovascular Radiation Syndrome: Radiation Neurotoxicity , mechanisms of CNS radiation injury, advanced countermeasures for Radiation Protection of Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey; Maliev, Slava

    Key words: Cerebrovascular Acute Radiation Syndrome (Cv ARS), Radiation Neurotoxins (RNT), Neurotransmitters, Radiation Countermeasures, Antiradiation Vaccine (ArV), Antiradiation Blocking Antibodies, Antiradiation Antidote. Psychoneuroimmunology, Neurotoxicity. ABSTRACT: To review the role of Radiation Neurotoxins in triggering, developing of radiation induced central nervous system injury. Radiation Neurotoxins - rapidly acting blood toxic lethal agent, which activated after irradiation and concentrated, circulated in interstitial fluid, lymph, blood with interactions with cell membranes, receptors and cell compartments. Radiation Neurotoxins - biological molecules with high enzymatic activity and/or specific lipids and activated or modified after irradiation. The Radiation Neurotoxins induce increased permeability of blood vessels, disruption of the blood-brain barrier, blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier and developing severe disorder of blood macro- and micro-circulation. Principles of Radiation Psychoneuro-immunology and Psychoneuro-allergology were applied for determination of pathological processes developed after irradiation or selective administration of Radiation Neurotoxins to radiation naïve mammals. Effects of radiation and exposure to radiation can develop severe irreversible abnormalities of Central Nervous System, brain structures and functions. Antiradiation Vaccine - most effective, advanced methods of protection, prevention, mitigation and treatment and was used for of Acute Radiation Syndromes and elaboration of new technology for immune-prophylaxis and immune-protection against ϒ, Heavy Ion, Neutron irradiation. Results of experiments suggested that blocking, antitoxic, antiradiation antibodies can significantly reduce toxicity of Radiation Toxins. New advanced technology include active immune-prophylaxis with Antiradiation Vaccine and Antiradiation therapy that included specific blocking antibodies to Radiation Neurotoxins

  20. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1953-1970: Description of individual studies, data files, codes, and summaries of significant findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grahn, D.; Fox, C.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.

    1994-05-01

    Between 1953 and 1970, studies on the long-term effects of external x-ray and {gamma} irradiation on inbred and hybrid mouse stocks were carried out at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory. The results of these studies, plus the mating, litter, and pre-experimental stock records, were routinely coded on IBM cards for statistical analysis and record maintenance. Also retained were the survival data from studies performed in the period 1943-1953 at the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. The card-image data files have been corrected where necessary and refiled on hard disks for long-term storage and ease of accessibility. In this report, the individual studies and data files are described, and pertinent factors regarding caging, husbandry, radiation procedures, choice of animals, and other logistical details are summarized. Some of the findings are also presented. Descriptions of the different mouse stocks and hybrids are included in an appendix; more than three dozen stocks were involved in these studies. Two other appendices detail the data files in their original card-image format and the numerical codes used to describe the animal`s exit from an experiment and, for some studies, any associated pathologic findings. Tabular summaries of sample sizes, dose levels, and other variables are also given to assist investigators in their selection of data for analysis. The archive is open to any investigator with legitimate interests and a willingness to collaborate and acknowledge the source of the data and to recognize appropriate conditions or caveats.

  1. Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, James E

    2007-01-01

    Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection offers professionals and advanced students a comprehensive coverage of the major concepts that underlie the origins and transport of ionizing radiation in matter. Understanding atomic structure and the physical mechanisms of radiation interactions is the foundation on which much of the current practice of radiological health protection is based. The work covers the detection and measurement of radiation and the statistical interpretation of the data. The procedures that are used to protect man and the environment from the potential harmful effects of

  2. SOS chromotest: an indicator of damage induced to DNA by radiations, for use as a biological effect dosemeter. Le SOS chromotest: un indicateur de l'endommagement de l'ADN par les rayonnements candidat pour une utilisation comme dosimetre d'effet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laugier, J. (Etablissement Technique Central de l' Armement (ETCA), 94 - Arcueil (France))

    1994-01-01

    The biologically relevant results of the interactions of ionizing radiations in the living medium are many shorts of alterations impairing the functional integrity of the cellular macromolecules of genetical interest. It is well known that almost all the subsequent biological effects, whatever their level of integration in a complex organism, originate from these lesions. The physical dosimetry, which is based on energy deposits only, intrinsically leaves the inducing potency of radiations out of account. This makes it pertinent to score, even indirectly, the damages to the genetical stock, giving rise to a more predictive method, which happens to be goal of the so-called genotoxicity tests. The Institute Pasteur's SOS Chromotest is one of them. The first results have been satisfactory to forward the program aimed at qualifying the test as an ''effect dosimeter''. (author). 9 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Biochemistry of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walden, T.L.; Nushin, F.K.

    1990-01-01

    This volume examines the biochemical changes occurring in normal tissue after irradiation. A review of radiation chemistry is followed by an analysis of factors affecting biochemical responses and a timely discussion of radiobiology in space flight. The authors then describe the effects of radiation on lipid peroxidation, amino acids, peptides, proteins, polysaccharides, DNA, thiols, and body fluids. Close attention is given to alterations in biological mediators such as eicosanoids, cyclic nucleotides, angiotensin, histamine, polyamines, catecholamines, and serotonin and in hormones such as adrenocorticotropic hormone, testosterone, estrogens, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, thyroid hormones, insulin and glucagon, gastrin, and melatonin. Other chapters focus on changes in carbohydrate metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, protein synthesis, and serum proteins. A chapter on biological dosimeters discusses prodromal syndrome, hematological dosimeters, serum composition, urine, chromosomal aberrations, and fluorometric and immunoassays.

  4. Document sheet no.3. The sanitary effects and the medical uses of the radioactivity, the radiations, the biological effects, the medical uses; Fiche documentaire no.3. Les effets sanitaires et les usages medicaux de la radioactivite, rayonnements ionisants, les effets biologiques, les usages medicaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    In order to inform the public the ANCLI published information sheets. This sheet no.3 deals with the sanitary effects and the medical uses of the radioactivity. It presents the radiations definitions (the internal and external irradiation, the doses levels, the absorbed doses), the biological effects (deterministic effects, random effects and chronicity effects), and the medical uses (radiotherapy and monitoring of chemotherapy). (A.L.B.)

  5. Hawking radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parentani, Renaud; Spindel, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Hawking radiation is the thermal radiation predicted to be spontaneously emitted by black holes. It arises from the steady conversion of quantum vacuum fluctuations into pairs of particles, one of which escaping at infinity while the other is trapped inside the black hole horizon. It is named after the physicist Stephen Hawking who derived its existence in 1974. This radiation reduces the mass of black holes and is therefore also known as black hole evaporation.

  6. Biological computation

    CERN Document Server

    Lamm, Ehud

    2011-01-01

    Introduction and Biological BackgroundBiological ComputationThe Influence of Biology on Mathematics-Historical ExamplesBiological IntroductionModels and Simulations Cellular Automata Biological BackgroundThe Game of Life General Definition of Cellular Automata One-Dimensional AutomataExamples of Cellular AutomataComparison with a Continuous Mathematical Model Computational UniversalitySelf-Replication Pseudo Code Evolutionary ComputationEvolutionary Biology and Evolutionary ComputationGenetic AlgorithmsExample ApplicationsAnalysis of the Behavior of Genetic AlgorithmsLamarckian Evolution Genet

  7. GRAVITATIONAL RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin SALTIK

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available According to classical electromagnetic theory, an accelerated charge or system of charges radiates electromagnetic waves. In a radio transmitter antenna charges are accelerated along the antenna and release electromagnetic waves, which is radiated at the velocity of light in the surrounding medium. All of the radio transmitters work on this principle today. In this study an analogy is established between the principles by which accelerated charge systems markes radiation and the accelerated mass system, and the systems cousing gravitational radiation are investigated.

  8. Evaluation of biological effect of {sup 90}Sr beta radiation in human blood cells and dose-response curve elaboration; Avaliacao do efeito biologico da radiacao beta do {sup 90}Sr em celulas sanguineas humanas e elaboracao de curva dose-resposta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Elaine Mendes de

    2000-07-01

    Among several environmental genotoxins, ionizing radiation has been received special attention because of its mutagenic, carcinogenic and teratogenic potential. In this context, the aim of this study was evaluate the effects of {sup 90}Sr beta radiation in human cells, in view of the scarcity of literature data. For that, blood cells of five healthy donors were irradiated in vitro with doses between 0.2 and 5.0 Gy in a {sup 90}Sr source (0.2 Gy/min) and were processed for chromosome aberration analysis and for comet assay. Cytogenetic results showed that the type of structural chromosome aberrations found more frequently were acentric fragments, double minutes and dicentrics. The values of {alpha} and {beta} coefficient of linear-quadratic model used to fit dose response curves showed that {sup 90}Sr beta radiation was more efficient in induction of lesions from only one ionizing track than two independent tracks in chromosome aberration formation. Apparently, {sup 90}Sr beta radiation neither influenced the modal number of chromosome in irradiated cells nor in cell cycle kinetic of analyzed dose interval. Concerning the comet assay, there was an increase in DNA migration in a dose dependent manner, evaluated by either image analysis system (tail moment) or visual classification (DNA damage), which dose-response relation was adequately fitted to non-linear regression model. Both adopted techniques were complement in evaluating the biological effect of {sup 90}Sr beta radiation in human cells. (author)

  9. Biological drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Bertrán Suárez, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Póster Biological drugs include a wide range of medicinal products created by biological instead of chemical processes. Biological drugs can consist of proteins, nucleic acids or complex combinations of substances, or may be living entities such as cells and tissues. They are isolated from natural sources or are produced by biotechnology methods.

  10. Radiation Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, M

    2002-04-01

    Major achievements of SCK-CEN's Radiation Protection Department in 2001 are described. The main areas for R and D of the department are enviromnental remediation, emergency planning, radiation protection research, low-level radioactvity measurements, safeguards and physics measurements, decision strategy research and policy support and social sciences in nuclear research. Main achievements for 2001 in these areas are reported.

  11. The dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Bjaerngard, Bengt E; Kase, Kenneth R

    1987-01-01

    The Dosimetry of Ionizing Radiation, Volume II, attempts to fill the need for updated reference material on the field of radiation dosimetry. This book presents some broad topics in dosimetry and a variety of radiation dosimetry instrumentation and its application. The book opens with a chapter that extends and applies the concepts of microdosimetry to biological systems. This is followed by separate chapters on the state- of-the-art equipment and techniques used to determine neutron spectra; studies to determine recombination effects in ionization chambers exposed to high-intensity pulsed ra

  12. Synchrotron radiation and structural proteomics

    CERN Document Server

    Pechkova, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the current state of research in both synchrotron radiation and structural proteomics from different laboratories worldwide. The book presents recent research results in the most advanced methods of synchrotron radiation analysis, protein micro- and nano crystallography, X-ray scattering and X-ray optics, coherent X-Ray diffraction, and laser cutting and contactless sample manipulation are described in details. The book focuses on biological applications and highlights important aspects such as radiation damage and molecular modeling.

  13. Variação da radiação solar no estado do Amapá: estudo de caso em Macapá, Pacuí, Serra do Navio e Oiapoque no período de 2006 a 2008 Variation of the solar radiation over the Amapa state: a case study on Macapa, Pacui, Serra do Navio and Oiapoque during the period from 2006 to 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derivan Dutra Marques

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo foi estimar o potencial de energia solar a partir da variação da radiação solar global (RSG, no Estado do Amapá no período de 2006 a 2008. Foram utilizadas séries históricas temporais de RSG de quatro estações meteorológicas automáticas (PCD's distribuídas numa área central do Estado. Os resultados indicaram que a distribuição da RSG anual apresentou valor máximo da ordem de 4900 Wh.m-2.dia-1 sobre a estação de Macapá, devido a sua proximidade com a linha do equador. Em Serra do Navio, Pacuí e Oiapoque foram observados valores entre 4000, 4400 e 3800 Wh.m-2.dia-1, respectivamente. Conclui-se que as localidades estudadas do Amapá apresentam significativo potencial para aproveitamento fotovoltaico durante todo o ano. Este potencial sugere uma viabilidade estratégica de instalação de sistemas fotovoltaicos, tanto em sistemas urbanos consolidados quanto em comunidades remotas para geração de energia elétrica.The objective of this study was to estimate the potential of solar energy through the variation of the global solar radiation (GSR in the State of Amapá during two season's cycle (2006 to 2008. GSR historical time series were used from four collection data platforms (PCD's distributed in a central area of the state. The results indicated that the distribution of RSG showed annual peak of about 4900Wh.m-2.day-1 on the Macapá station, due to its proximity to the equator line. At Serra do Navio, Pacuí and Oiapoque cities the values observed were 4000, 4400 and 3800Wh.m-2.day-1, respectively. We conclude that the studied sites in Amapá State have significant potential for photovoltaic use during a complete annual cycle. The potential for generating electricity proved to be attractive, both for use in traditional urban systems and in isolated systems in remote communities.

  14. The NASA Radiation Health Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicogossian, A. E.; Schimmerling, W.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA program for determining the impact of cosmic radiation on health is described in terms of its long-term goal of reducing the uncertainty of radiation-model prediction to +/- 25 percent by 2010. The Space Radiation Health Program (SRHP) is intended to address fundamental issues for establishing a scientific basis for human radiation protection: (1) the prediction of the probability of biological effects from radiation; (2) the reduction of uncertainty in predicted highly charged energetic particles; and (3) the characterization of background flux from Galactic cosmic rays. Another key objective is to develop related technologies for ground- and space-based solar monitoring to predict events involving solar energetic particles. Although substantial uncertainties are involved in the prediction of such events, the SRHP is essential for determining crucial variables related to launching mass and humans into orbit.

  15. Radiation protection in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattsson, Soeren [Lund Univ., Skane Univ. Hospital Malmoe (Sweden). Medical Radiation Physics; Hoeschen, Christoph (eds.) [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen Deutsches Forschungszentrum fuer Gesundheit und Umwelt GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Addresses all aspects of radiation protection in nuclear medicine. Covers current technologies and principles. An ideal textbook for students and a ready source of information for nuclear medicine specialists and medical physics experts. One of a series of three books on the fundamentals of modern nuclear medicine (physics, safety, and imaging). This book explains clearly and in detail all aspects of radiation protection in nuclear medicine. After an introductory chapter on the general role of radiation protection, measurement quantities and units are discussed, and detectors and dosimeters, described. Radiation biology and radiation dosimetry are then addressed, with the inclusion of a chapter specifically devoted to biology and dosimetry for the lens of the eye. Discussion of radiation doses to patients and to embryos, fetuses, and children forms a central part of the book. Phantom models, biokinetic models, calculations, and software solutions are all considered, and a further chapter focuses on quality assurance and reference levels. Occupational exposure also receives detailed attention. Exposure resulting from the production, labeling, and injection of radiopharmaceuticals and from contact with patients is discussed and shielding calculations are explained. The book closes by considering exposure of the public and summarizing the ''rules of thumb'' for radiation protection in nuclear medicine. This is an ideal textbook for students and a ready source of useful information for nuclear medicine specialists and medical physics experts.

  16. Mathematical biology

    CERN Document Server

    Murray, James D

    1993-01-01

    The book is a textbook (with many exercises) giving an in-depth account of the practical use of mathematical modelling in the biomedical sciences. The mathematical level required is generally not high and the emphasis is on what is required to solve the real biological problem. The subject matter is drawn, e.g. from population biology, reaction kinetics, biological oscillators and switches, Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction, reaction-diffusion theory, biological wave phenomena, central pattern generators, neural models, spread of epidemics, mechanochemical theory of biological pattern formation and importance in evolution. Most of the models are based on real biological problems and the predictions and explanations offered as a direct result of mathematical analysis of the models are important aspects of the book. The aim is to provide a thorough training in practical mathematical biology and to show how exciting and novel mathematical challenges arise from a genuine interdisciplinary involvement with the biosci...

  17. Radiation shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemezawa, Isao; Kimura, Tadahiro [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Omori, Tetsu; Mizuochi, Akira

    1997-11-18

    A radiation shield is constituted by using a flexible bag made of a synthetic resin, a rubber plate or a composite member of them. Water is charged therein as a shielding liquid. Water injection ports are formed at the lower surface, and gas exhaustion ports are formed on the upper surface of the radiation shield. A plurality of vertical ribs made of the same material as the bag of the radiation shield are formed, integral with the bag, each at a space on the outer surface of the radiation shield. A reinforcing tube are inserted to the vertical ribs integral with the bag. The reinforcing tube may be made of an metal or non-metal material, but material having a bending strength greater than that of the bag is used. When wide surfaces are constituted in the horizontal direction as radiation shielding surfaces, a plurality of the radiation shields are used being in adjacent in the horizontal direction. The reinforcing tubes in adjacent with each other among the adjacent radiation shields are connected by connectors. (I.N.)

  18. Study of ionizing radiation as a tool for select promastigotes forms of Leishmania Amazonensis, and the megalomaniac response in experimental models; Estudo do uso da radiacao ionizante como ferramenta de selecao de formas promastigotas metaciclicas de Leishmania amazonensis, e a inducao de resposta imunologica em modelos experimentais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonetti, Franco Claudio

    2006-07-01

    Actually, millions of people around the globe are under the risk of infection by a protozoan transmitted by a bit of a sand fly. This parasite is a Leishmania spp. This causes a wide spectrum disease, since a cutaneous disease to a visceral one. The cutaneous form is the major clinical manifestation (above 90%). The ionizing radiation, produced in a {sup 60}Co font, had being successes used to promote physical-chemical transformations on different protozoan, including Leishmania spp. In previous work was determined that promastigotes forms of Leishmania amazonensis, irradiated with different doses of radiation, lost their viability maintaining, however, their immunogenicity. In this work, was studied the use of ionizing radiation as a tool for selection of meta cyclic forms of the parasite in axenic culture, for a possible efficient irradiated immuno gene production. Our results shown that cultures irradiated with 400 Gy of gamma irradiation, has 75% of metacyclic form, which are capable to produce, in vitro, an infection that is similar the natural occurrence. These irradiated parasites have their internal cellular structure modified, maintaining their external structure intact. Susceptible strain of mice immunized with leishmania irradiated with different doses had high immunoglobulin production, and maintained this production after the challenge with naive parasites. In other strains this default was similar, however in lower titles. Immunodeficient mice didn't produce immunoglobulin nor on the immunization or on the challenge. (author)

  19. Study of the radiation scattered and produced by concrete shielding of radiotherapy rooms and its effects on equivalent doses in patients' organs; Estudo da radiacao espalhada e produzida pela blindagem de concreto de salas de radioterapia e seus efeitos sobre doses equivalentes nos orgaos dos pacientes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, K.L.; Rebello, W.F.; Andrade, E.R.; Gavazza, S.; Medeiros, M.P.C.; Mendes, R.M.S.; Gomes, R.G.; Silva, M.G., E-mail: kelmo.lins@gmail.com, E-mail: rebello@ime.eb.br, E-mail: fisica.dna@gmail.com, E-mail: sergiogavazza@yahoo.com, E-mail: eng.cavaliere@gmail.com, E-mail: raphaelmsm@gmail.com, E-mail: ggrprojetos@gmail.com, E-mail: maglosilva15@gmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear; Thalhofer, J.L.; Silva, A.X., E-mail: jardellt@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Energia Nuclear; Santos, R.F.G., E-mail: raphaelfgsantos@gmail.com [Centro Universitario Anhanguera, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia

    2015-07-01

    Within a radiotherapy room, in addition to the primary beam, there is also secondary radiation due to the leakage of the accelerator head and the radiation scattering from room objects, patient and even the room's shielding itself, which is projected to protect external individuals disregarding its effects on the patient. This work aims to study the effect of concrete shielding wall over the patient, taking into account its contribution on equivalent doses. The MCNPX code was used to model the linear accelerator Varian 2100/2300 C/D operating at 18MeV, with MAX phantom representing the patient undergoing radiotherapy treatment for prostate cancer following Brazilian Institute of Cancer four-fields radiation application protocol (0°, 90°, 180° and 270°). Firstly, the treatment was patterned within a standard radiotherapy room, calculating the equivalent doses on patient's organs individually. In a second step, this treatment was modeled withdrawing the walls, floor and ceiling from the radiotherapy room, and then the equivalent doses calculated again. Comparing these results, it was found that the concrete has an average shielding contribution of around 20% in the equivalent dose on the patient's organs. (author)

  20. Miniature Active Space Radiation Dosimeter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space Micro will extend our Phase I R&D to develop a family of miniature, active space radiation dosimeters/particle counters, with a focus on biological/manned...

  1. Radiation Hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castor, J I

    2003-10-16

    The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is

  2. New sources and instrumentation for neutrons in biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teixeira, S. C. M.; Zaccai, G.; Ankner, J.

    2008-01-01

    Neutron radiation offers significant advantages for the study of biological molecular structure and dynamics. A broad and significant effort towards instrumental and methodological development to facilitate biology experiments at neutron sources worldwide is reviewed.......Neutron radiation offers significant advantages for the study of biological molecular structure and dynamics. A broad and significant effort towards instrumental and methodological development to facilitate biology experiments at neutron sources worldwide is reviewed....

  3. Study of the effect of ionizing radiation on composites of wood flour in polypropylene matrix using barium titanate as coupling agent; Estudo do efeito da radiacao ionizante em compositos de polipropileno/po de madeira usando titanato de bario como agente de acoplagem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulloa, Maritza Eliza Perez

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the effects of ionizing radiation on the properties of wood flour composites in polypropylene matrix, using barium titanate as a coupling agent and the reactive monomer tripropylene glycol diacrylate (TPDGA). An electron accelerator was used in the study as the radiation source. The physical properties of virgin compounds and of the polypropylene/wood flour composite, with and without barium titanate and TPDGA addition, were investigated. The composites were developed from the load treatment, which first consisted of incorporating additives to the wood flour reinforcement and after that, the fusion process of polypropylene and composite mixing in a 'calander'. Subsequently, the samples to be irradiated and submitted to thermal and mechanical assays were molded by injection. The mechanical properties (hardness, impact resistance and molten fluidity index (MFI)), as well as the thermal properties (HDT and Vicat) of the composites were determined. The investigated compositions consisted of polypropylene/wood flour, polypropylene/wood flour with barium titanate and polypropylene/wood flour with barium titanate and TPDGA, using different wood flour concentrations of 10 por cent, 15 por cent and 20 por cent in the polypropylene matrix. The samples were separated in groups and irradiated to doses of 10 kGy and 20 kGy in the samples of the essays of traction. Besides these doses, it was also used doses of 15 kGy and 25 kGy to be observed the behavior of the sample of the sample due to the increase of the radiation. These doses were chosen to show that with low doses the composite material presents reticulation, what represents a viable commercial option. There was a reduction of the flow rate for the composites containing wood flour, being this reduction more effective in the presence of TiBa. The superficial treatment using TPDGA monomer influence in the composite samples because it acted as a plastic additive becoming the

  4. Biological post

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, B. Suresh; Kumar, Senthil; N S Mohan Kumar; Karunakaran, J. V.

    2015-01-01

    Anterior tooth fracture as a result of traumatic injuries, is frequently encountered in endodontic practice. Proper reconstruction of extensively damaged teeth can be achieved through the fragment reattachment procedure known as ?biological restoration.? This case report refers to the esthetics and functional recovery of extensively damaged maxillary central incisor through the preparation and adhesive cementation of ?biological post? in a young patient. Biological post obtained through extra...

  5. Radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, Erik H M; CERN. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    a) Radiation damage in organic materials. This series of lectures will give an overview of radiation effects on materials and components frequently used in accelerator engineering and experiments. Basic degradation phenomena will be presented for organic materials with comprehensive damage threshold doses for commonly used rubbers, thermoplastics, thermosets and composite materials. Some indications will be given for glass, scintillators and optical fibres. b) Radiation effects in semiconductor materials and devices. The major part of the time will be devoted to treat radiation effects in semiconductor sensors and the associated electronics, in particular displacement damage, interface and single event phenomena. Evaluation methods and practical aspects will be shown. Strategies will be developed for the survival of the materials under the expected environmental conditions of the LHC machine and detectors. I will describe profound revolution in our understanding of black holes and their relation to quantum me...

  6. Modeling Space Radiation with Radiomimetic Agent Bleomycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Space radiation consists of proton and helium from solar particle events (SPE) and high energy heavy ions from galactic cosmic ray (GCR). This mixture of radiation with particles at different energy levels has different effects on biological systems. Currently, majority studies of radiation effects on human were based on single-source radiation due to the limitation of available method to model effects of space radiation on living organisms. While NASA Space Radiation Laboratory is working on advanced switches to make it possible to have a mixed field radiation with particles of different energies, the radiation source will be limited. Development of an easily available experimental model for studying effects of mixed field radiation could greatly speed up our progress in our understanding the molecular mechanisms of damage and responses from exposure to space radiation, and facilitate the discovery of protection and countermeasures against space radiation, which is critical for the mission to Mars. Bleomycin, a radiomimetic agent, has been widely used to study radiation induced DNA damage and cellular responses. Previously, bleomycin was often compared to low low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) gamma radiation without defined characteristics. Our recent work demonstrated that bleomycin could induce complex clustered DNA damage in human fibroblasts that is similar to DNA damage induced by high LET radiation. These type of DNA damage is difficult to repair and can be visualized by gamma-H2Ax staining weeks after the initial insult. The survival ratio between early and late plating of human fibroblasts after bleomycin treatment is between low LET and high LET radiation. Our results suggest that bleomycin induces DNA damage and other cellular stresses resembling those resulted from mixed field radiation with both low and high LET particles. We hypothesize that bleomycin could be used to mimic space radiation in biological systems. Potential advantages and limitations of

  7. Biological therapeutics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greenstein, Ben; Brook, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    This introductory textbook covers all the main categories of biological medicines, including vaccines, hormonal preparations, drugs for rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases, drugs...

  8. Radiation Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbatsch, Todd James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  9. New perspectives in radiation oncology: Young radiation oncologist point of view and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis; Isa, Nicolas; Kim, Michelle M; Bourgier, Celine; Marsiglia, Hugo

    2012-09-01

    To assess the role of the young radiation oncologist in the context of important recent advancements in the field of radiation oncology, and to explore new perspectives and competencies of the young radiation oncologist. Radiation oncology is a field that has rapidly advanced over the last century. It holds a rich tradition of clinical care and evidence-based practice, and more recently has advanced with revolutionary innovations in technology and computer science, as well as pharmacology and molecular biology. Several young radiation oncologists from different countries evaluated the current status and future directions of radiation oncology. For young radiation oncologists, it is important to reflect on the current practice and future directions of the specialty as it relates to the role of the radiation oncologist in the comprehensive management of cancer patients. Radiation oncologists are responsible for the radiation treatment provided to patients and its subsequent impact on patients' quality of life. Young radiation oncologists must proactively master new clinical, biological and technical information, as well as lead radiation oncology teams consisting of physicists, dosimetrists, nurses and technicians. The role of the young radiation oncologist in the field of oncology should be proactive in developing new competencies. Above all, it is important to remember that we are dealing with the family members and loved ones of many individuals during the most difficult part of their lives.

  10. Space radiation health research, 1991-1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablin, M. H. (Compiler); Brooks, C. (Compiler); Ferraro, G. (Compiler); Dickson, K. J. (Compiler); Powers, J. V. (Compiler); Wallace-Robinson, J. (Compiler); Zafren, B. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    The present volume is a collection of 227 abstracts of radiation research sponsored by the NASA Space Radiation Health Program for the period 1991-1992. Each abstract has been categorized within one of three discipline areas: Physics, Biology and Risk Assessment. Topic areas within each discipline have been assigned as follows: Physics - Atomic Physics, Theory, Cosmic Ray and Astrophysics, Experimental, Environments and Environmental Models, Solar Activity and Prediction, Experiments, Radiation Transport and Shielding, Theory and Model Development, Experimental Studies, and Instrumentation. Biology - Biology, Molecular Biology, Cellular Radiation Biology, Transformation, Mutation, Lethality, Survival, DNA Damage and Repair, Tissue, Organs, and Organisms, In Vivo/In Vitro Systems, Carcinogenesis and Life Shortening, Cataractogenesis, Genetics/Developmental, Radioprotectants, Plants, and Other Effects. Risk Assessment - Risk Assessment, Radiation Health and Epidemiology, Space Flight Radiation Health Physics, Inter- and Intraspecies Extrapolation and Radiation Limits and Standards. Section I contains refereed journals; Section II contains reports/meetings. Keywords and author indices are provided. A collection of abstracts spanning the period 1986-1990 was previously issued as NASA Technical Memorandum 4270.

  11. Radiation Induced Bystander Effect in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Chai, Yunfei; Hei K. Tom

    2009-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of biological effects in cells that are not directly traversed by radiation, but merely in the presence of cells that are. Although radiation induced bystander effects have been well defined in a variety of in vitro models using a range of endpoints including clonogenic survival, mutations, neoplastic transformation, apoptosis, micronucleus, chromosomal aberrations and DNA double strand breaks, the mechanism(s) as well as the pres...

  12. Environmental Biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BOOK I REVIEW. Environmental Biology. Man and his Environment. M D Subhash Chandran ... logy and Field Biology (Harper Collins, 1990):. "The fragmentation of ecology into specialised subdisciplines with their ... momentous events of the decade like the Earth. Summit of 1992! Despite the need to revise and update.

  13. Mesoscopic biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we present a qualitative outlook of mesoscopic biology where the typical length scale is of the order of nanometers and the energy scales comparable to thermal energy. Novel biomolecular machines, governed by coded information at the level of DNA and proteins, operate at these length scales in biological ...

  14. Computational biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Lars Røeboe; Jones, Neil; Simonsen, Jakob Grue

    2011-01-01

    Computation via biological devices has been the subject of close scrutiny since von Neumann’s early work some 60 years ago. In spite of the many relevant works in this field, the notion of programming biological devices seems to be, at best, ill-defined. While many devices are claimed or proved t...

  15. Mesoscopic biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    National Center for Biological Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research,. UAS-GKVK Campus ... In this paper we present a qualitative outlook of mesoscopic biology where the typical length scale is of the ... study of some of the design principles of these machines; in particular at the level of an individual molecule.

  16. Brain radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation - brain - discharge; Cancer-brain radiation; Lymphoma - brain radiation; Leukemia - brain radiation ... Decadron) while you are getting radiation to the brain. It may make you hungrier, cause leg swelling ...

  17. Radiation Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Giving Teens a Voice in Health Care Decisions Radiation Therapy KidsHealth > For Parents > Radiation Therapy Print A ... have many questions and concerns about it. About Radiation Therapy In radiation therapy, high-energy radiation from ...

  18. Abdominal radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation - abdomen - discharge; Cancer - abdominal radiation; Lymphoma - abdominal radiation ... When you have radiation treatment for cancer, your body goes through changes. About 2 weeks after radiation treatment starts, you might notice changes ...

  19. CONTRIBUTION TO THE STUDY OF GLOBAL RADIATION AND INSOLATION IN THE MATO GROSSO DE GOIÁS MICROREGION CONTRIBUIÇÃO AO ESTUDO DA RADIAÇÃO GLOBAL E DA INSOLAÇÃO NA MICRO-REGIÃO DO MATO GROSSO DE GOIÁS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engler José Vidigal Lobato

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    This work studies the month average of daily global solar radiation, daily relative global solar radiation, daily sunshine duration and daily relative sunshine duration, for the conditions in Goiânia county and surrounding counties, Goiás — Brazil (latitude: 16°41'S, longitude: 49°17’W GRW, and altitude: 680.00m. It's observed that: a global solar radiation is maximum in October and minimum in July; b relative global solar radiation is maximum in August and minimum in November; c sunshine duration is maximum in June and minimum in November; d relative sunshine duration is maximum in June and minimum in November. Correlation between the month average of daily relative global solar radiation and of daily sunshine duration allowed to conclude the linear equation: Kg = Ka (0.49 n/N, where the letters mean: Kg = daily global radiation (ly/day; Ka = daily solar radiation on the top of atmosphere (ly/day; n = daily duration of sunshine (hr/day; N = daily maximum duration of sunshine (hr/day. The methodology adopted was the one proposed by PRESCOTT (1940 and PENMAM (1948, as cited by BLACK et alii (1954, in order to estimate parameters ";a"; and “b”, in the equation Kg/Ka = a + b (n/N, which correlates the sunshine ratio (n/N to the relative solar, radiation (Kg/Ka by linear regression analysis. The equation found showed a correlation coefficient which was equal to 0.95 with significance at 0.1% probability level.

    O presente trabalho analisa as médias mensais de radiação solar global diária, radiação solar global relativa diária, insolação diária do Mato Grosso de Goiás. Os dados utilizados foram obtidos na Estação Evaporimétrica de lª classe, Modelo DNAEE — CPRM, localizada na Escola de Agronomia — UFG, latitude: 16°41'S, longitude 49°17'W GRW, altitude 680,00m e na Estação do Centro

  20. Estudo da radiação solar global e do índice de transmissividade (kt, externo e interno, em uma floresta de mangue em Alagoas - Brasil Study of the global solar radiation and the internal and external transmissivity index in a mangrove forest in Alagoas - Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre Santos Querino

    2011-06-01

    máximos alcançados pelo Rg, devido às variações das condições de transmissividade atmosférica. Internamente observou-se a grande dependência que a penetração dos raios solares tem do ângulo zenital solar (Z com as estações do ano, onde se constatou uma redução de até 66% entre os períodos seco e chuvoso. Verificou-se também, que até 35% da radiação incidente na copa atingiu a superfície interna do mangue, e que esse valor reduziu-se para apenas 15% no período chuvoso.Mangrove forests are of extreme social, economic and environmental importance, because they sustain a rich fauna and flora. Brazil possesses one of the largest mangrove areas in the world, which extends from the extreme north to the southern regions of the country, covering the entire coast. Due to such vast expanse, altering the state of the mangrove forests has a direct influence on the microclimate of the region. From the meteorological perspective, it is necessary to limit the exploitation of this ecosystem because the destruction of the mangrove forests exposes the surface area to direct solar radiation, thus changing the total net radiation. Therefore, one of the prime factors in understanding the availability of energy to the diverse processes of the system is knowing how the Solar Global Radiation (Rg and its components, Diffuse Radiation (Rd and Direct Radiation (R D, behave in the forest. The main objective of this research was to evaluate and compare the behavior of the Rg and it components, inside and above the mangrove forest. The solar radiation measurements are from a micrometeorological tower installed inside a mangrove forest, located at the Marechal Deodoro municipal district (15 km from Maceió, Alagoas in an environmentally protected area (APA called APA de Santa Rita. The tower was situated at 9° 42'18''S and 35°48'32"W coordinates, and operating from October 2004 to September 2005. The Rd data were collected with a CM5 Kipp and Zonnen pyranometer, which

  1. Pensamento, Teoria e Estudos Latino-americanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques de Novion

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO O presente trabalho configura como artigo inicial do Dossiê Especial – Pensamento, Teoria e Estudos Latino-americanos, organizado conjuntamente por nós, a pedido da Revista de Estudos e Pesquisas sobre as Américas (CEPPAC, do Instituto de Ciências Sociais (ICS, da Universidade de Brasília (UnB. De forma breve, este artigo apresenta a importância alcançada pelo Pensamento, pela Teoria, e, sobre tudo, pelos Estudos Latino-americanos nas últimas décadas. Em seguida, o artigo apresenta os quatorze trabalhos e uma resenha que compõem este Dossiê, resultado da contribuição de diferentes pesquisadores de distintas localidades da região, organizados em três blocos: Ciências Sociais Latino-americanas, Pensamento e Estudos. PALAVRAS CHAVE: Ciências Sociais Latino-americanas; Pensamento Latino-americanos; Teoria Latino-americana; Estudos Latino-americanos. --- RESUMEN El presente trabajo configura como articulo inicial del Dossier Especial – Pensamiento Teoría y Estudios Latinoamericanos, organizado conjuntamente por nosotros, a pedido de la Revista de Estudos e Pesquisas sobre as Américas (CEPPAC, del Instituto de Ciências Sociais (ICS, de la Universidade de Brasília (UnB. De forma breve, este articulo presenta la importancia alcanzada por el Pensamiento, por la Teoría, y, sobre todo, por los Estudios Latinoamericanos en las últimas décadas. En seguida, el articulo presenta los catorce trabajos e una reseña que componen este Dossier, resultado de la contribución de diferentes investigadores de distintas localidades de la región, organizados en tres bloques: Ciencias Sociales Latinoamericanas, Pensamiento y Estudios. PALABRAS CLAVE: Ciencias Sociales Latinoamericanas; Pensamiento Latinoamericano; Teoría Latinoamericana; Estudios Latinoamericanos. --- ABSTRACT This paper is set up as the initial article of this Special Dossier - Thought, Theory and Latin American Studies, which we organized collectively, at the request

  2. ESTUDO SOBRE O IMPACTO DOS PROCESSADORES HOSPEDEIROS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba S. B. Lopes

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Arquiteturas reconfiguráveis são dispositivos de hardware capazes de modificar sua estrutura de hardware de acordo com a aplicação a ser executada. Tais dispositivos surgiram como uma alternativa às soluções de hardware tradicionais na tentativa de equilibrar flexibilidade e desempenho. Uma das principais formas de utilização de arquiteturas reconfiguráveis corresponde a um bloco reconfigurável anexado a um processador hospedeiro. Esse processador é responsável por executar diversas tarefas críticas, incluindo o particionamento hardware/software e indicar o momento do bloco reconfigurável executar. Apesar de existirem diversas propostas de arquiteturas reconfiguráveis na literatura, pouco se estudou sobre o impacto do processador hospedeiro na arquitetura. Nesse contexto, esse artigo apresenta um estudo sobre o impacto do processador hospedeiro no desempenho da arquitetura reconfigurável híbrida. Como estudo de caso foi realizada uma avaliação sobre o uso dos processadores SPARC V8 da Sun Microsystems e Nios II da Altera como processadores hospedeiros da arquitetura reconfigurável híbrida RoSA. O objetivo deste estudo é realizar a comparação entre o desempenho desses processadores e identificar qual deles é o mais adequado para anexar a arquitetura em questão. Os resultados mostraram que foi possível alcançar até 47% de ganho de desempenho com o uso do processador Nios II em comparação ao SPARC V8, indicando o primeiro como mais adequado para a arquitetura RoSA. PALAVRAS-CHAVE: arquiteturas reconfiguráveis, processador hospedeiro, desempenho.

  3. um estudo numa escola TEIP 2

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Ana Tânia Santos

    2013-01-01

    Dissertação apresentada à Universidade Fernando Pessoa como parte dos requisitos para a obtenção do grau de Mestre em Psicologia, ramo de Psicologia Clínica e da Saúde O estudo aqui apresentado pretende contribuir para a identificação dos estilos parentais mais associados ao sucesso escolar dos alunos de uma Escola/Agrupamento TEIP. Assim, a presente investigação tem por finalidade analisar os estilos parentais percecionados por alunos com sucesso e insucesso escolar. Pretende-se,...

  4. Meu jardim secreto : um estudo de caso

    OpenAIRE

    Angélica Xavier Ono

    2017-01-01

    O presente trabalho apresenta um estudo de caso do projeto MEU JARDIM SECRETO, que foi um projeto multidisciplinar com foco em ciências, com alunos da 3º Ano do Ensino Fundamental de uma Escola Particular de Porto Alegre. Este projeto foi elaborado pelos professores dos 3ºs anos da escola supra citada. A professora, responsável pelo projeto, pretendeu trabalhar a conscientização ambiental, a extinção dos animais, poluição e reciclagem. Porém, o maior foco era salientar a importância do meio a...

  5. Electromagnetic fields in biological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, James C

    2016-01-01

    As wireless technology becomes more sophisticated and accessible to more users, the interactions of electromagnetic fields with biological systems have captured the interest not only of the scientific community but also the general public. Unintended or deleterious biological effects of electromagnetic fields and radiation may indicate grounds for health and safety precautions in their use. Spanning static fields to terahertz waves, Electromagnetic Fields in Biological Systems explores the range of consequences these fields have on the human body. With contributions by an array of experts, topics discussed include: Essential interactions and field coupling phenomena, highlighting their importance in r