WorldWideScience

Sample records for radiation application research

  1. Applications of EPR in radiation research

    CERN Document Server

    Lund, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Applications of EPR in Radiation Research is a multi-author contributed volume presented in eight themes: I. Elementary radiation processes (in situ and low temperature radiolysis, quantum solids); II: Solid state radiation chemistry (crystalline, amorphous and heterogeneous systems); III: Biochemistry, biophysics and biology applications (radicals in biomaterials, spin trapping, free-radical-induced DNA damage); IV: Materials science (polymeric and electronic materials, materials for treatment of nuclear waste, irradiated food); V: Radiation metrology (EPR-dosimetry, retrospective and medical

  2. Application of research reactors for radiation education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yasuo; Harasawa, Susumu; Hayashi, Shu A.; Tomura, Kenji; Matsuura, Tatsuo; Nakanishi, Tomoko M.; Yamamoto, Yusuke

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear research Reactors are, as well as being necessary for research purposes, indispensable educational tools for a country whose electric power resources are strongly dependent on nuclear energy. Both large and small research reactors are available, but small ones are highly useful from the viewpoint of radiation education. This paper oders a brief review of how small research reactors can, and must, be used for radiation education for high school students, college and graduate students, as well as for the public. (author)

  3. Application of research reactors for radiation education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Yasuo [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology; Harasawa, Susumu; Hayashi, Shu A.; Tomura, Kenji; Matsuura, Tatsuo; Nakanishi, Tomoko M.; Yamamoto, Yusuke

    1999-09-01

    Nuclear research Reactors are, as well as being necessary for research purposes, indispensable educational tools for a country whose electric power resources are strongly dependent on nuclear energy. Both large and small research reactors are available, but small ones are highly useful from the viewpoint of radiation education. This paper oders a brief review of how small research reactors can, and must, be used for radiation education for high school students, college and graduate students, as well as for the public. (author)

  4. Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1995-01-01

    The medical projects employing synchrotron radiation as discussed in this paper are, for the most part, still in their infancies and no one can predict the direction in which they will develop. Both the basic research and applied medical programs are sure to be advanced at the new facilities coming on line, especially the ESRF and Spring- 8. However, success is not guaranteed. There is a lot of competition from advances in conventional imaging with the development of digital angiography, computed tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound. The synchrotron programs will have to provide significant advantages over these modalities in order to be accepted by the medical profession. Advances in image processing and potentially the development of compact sources will be required in order to move the synchrotron developed imaging technologies into the clinical world. In any event, it can be expected that the images produced by the synchrotron technologies will establish ''gold standards'' to be targeted by conventional modalities. A lot more work needs to be done in order to bring synchrotron radiation therapy and surgery to the level of human studies and, subsequently, to clinical applications

  5. Radiation applications research and facilities in AECL Research Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iverson, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    In the 60's and 70's Atomic Energy of Canada had a very active R and D program to discover and develop applications of ionizing radiation. Widespread interest in the use of radiation for food processing and the possibility of developing reliable and competitive machine sources of radiation hold out the promise of a major increase in industrial use of radiation. In March 1985 a new branch, Radiation Applications Research, began operations with the objective of working closely with industry to develop and assist the introduction of new uses of ionizing radiation. The Branch is equipped with appropriate analytical equipment including HPLC (high performance liquid chromatograph) and GC/MS (gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer) as well as a Gammacell 220 and an I-10/1, one kilowatt 10 MeV electron accelerator. The accelerator is located in a specially designed facility equipped for experimental irradiation of the test quantities of packaged products as well as solids, liquids and gases in various configurations. A conveyor system moves the packaged products from the receiving area, through a maze, past the electron beam at a controlled rate and finally to the shipping area. Other necessary capabilities, such as gamma and electron dosimetry and a microbiology laboratory, have also been developed. Initial projects in areas ranging from food through environmental and industrial applications have been assessed and the most promising have been selected for further work. As an example, the use of charcoal absorbent beds to concentrate the components of gas or liquid waste streams requiring treatment is showing promise as a method of significantly reducing the cost of radiation treatment for some effluents. A number of other projects are described. (author)

  6. Radiation applications research and facilities in AECL research company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, S. L.

    In the 60's and 70's Atomic Energy of Canada had a very active R&D program to discover and develop applications of ionizing radiation. Out of this grew the technology underlying the company's current product line of industrial irradiators. With the commercial success of that product line the company turned its R&D attention to other activities. Presently, widespread interest in the use of radiation for food processing and the possibility of developing reliable and competitive machine sources of radiation hold out the promise of a major increase in industrial use of radiation. While many of the applications being considered are straightforward applications of existing knowledge, others depend on more subtle effects including combined effects of two or more agents. Further research is required in these areas. In March 1985 a new branch, Radiation Applications Research, began operations with the objective of working closely with industry to develop and assist the introduction of new uses of ionizing radiation. The Branch is equipped with appropriate analytical equipment including HPLC (high performance liquid chromatograph) and GC/MS (gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer) as well as a Gammacell 220 and an I-10/1, one kilowatt 10 MeV electron accelerator. The accelerator is located in a specially designed facility equipped for experimental irradiation of test quantities of packaged products as well as solids, liquids and gases in various configurations. A conveyor system moves the packaged products from the receiving area, through a maze, past the electron beam at a controlled rate and finally to the shipping area. Other necessary capabilities, such as gamma and electron dosimetry and a microbiology laboratory, have also been developed. Initial projects in areas ranging from food through environmental and industrial applications have been assessed and the most promising have been selected for further work. As an example, the use of charcoal adsorbent beds to concentrate

  7. Research progress and application prospect of radiation-resistant prokaryotic microbe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei; Zhu Jing; Zhang Zhidong; Tang Qiyong; Chen Ming

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-resistant microbe is becoming the research hotspot because of its special life phenomenon and physiological mechanism. Radiation-resistant bacteria are one kind of the most studied radiation-resistant microbe. This article summarized some aspects of the research on radiation-resistant bacteria, including the radiation resistant bacteria resources, and discussed its potential application prospects in the environmental engineering, biotechnology, human health, military and space et al. (authors)

  8. Report on the actual state of the basic, applied research and industrial applications of the radiation in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez V, H.

    1991-07-01

    In this report the main works of basic, applied research and industrial applications that are carried out in Mexico, about radiations (radiation chemistry, technology, applications, use and isotope production, etc.): infrastructure, radiation sources, groups and research programs are presented. (Author)

  9. Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1997-08-01

    In the relatively short time that synchrotrons have been available to the scientific community, their characteristic beams of UV and X-ray radiation have been applied to virtually all areas of medical science which use ionizing radiation. The ability to tune intense monochromatic beams over wide energy ranges clearly differentiates these sources from standard clinical and research tools. The tunable spectrum, high intrinsic collimation of the beams, polarization and intensity of the beams make possible in-vitro and in-vivo research and therapeutic programs not otherwise possible. From the beginning of research operation at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), many programs have been carrying out basic biomedical research. At first, the research was limited to in-vitro programs such as the x-ray microscope, circular dichroism, XAFS, protein crystallography, micro-tomography and fluorescence analysis. Later, as the coronary angiography program made plans to move its experimental phase from SSRL to the NSLS, it became clear that other in-vivo projects could also be carried out at the synchrotron. The development of SMERF (Synchrotron Medical Research Facility) on beamline X17 became the home not only for angiography but also for the MECT (Multiple Energy Computed Tomography) project for cerebral and vascular imaging. The high energy spectrum on X17 is necessary for the MRT (Microplanar Radiation Therapy) experiments. Experience with these programs and the existence of the Medical Programs Group at the NSLS led to the development of a program in synchrotron based mammography. A recent adaptation of the angiography hardware has made it possible to image human lungs (bronchography). Fig. 1 schematically depicts the broad range of active programs at the NSLS

  10. Research on medical applications of radioisotopes and radiation in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Australian Atomic Energy Commission (AAEC) produces and distributes commercially in Australia and abroad a range of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals for medical applications. The AAEC carries out research and development on new and improved processes and procucts is collaboration with medical specialists in hospitals and research workers in other organisations. Examples of these processes and products are: a gel generator for production of 99m Tc; radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis of tumours and brain disease and therapy for arthritis; 64 Cu for study of copper metabolism; and monoclonal antibodies for tumour diagnosis and therapy. New medical applications in Australia of neutron irradiation include the measurement of total body nitrogen and neutron capture in boron-labelled compounds in vivo for melanoma therapy. (author)

  11. Progress in two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and application in radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhidong; Chen Xiaohua

    2003-01-01

    Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is the key separation technique in proteomics research, which is designed by protein character: molecular weight and PI. Some progress has been made in disease mechanism detection, tumor indicator research and drug development. This technique also has some potential application in radiation research

  12. PROTON RADIATION THERAPY: CLINICAL APPLICATION OPPORTUNITIES AND RESEARCH PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Zabelin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is the review of literature concerning use of proton beam therapy in treatment of oncology. The staticized data on comparison of effi ciency of this method at an eye melanoma are lit. Advantages of proton therapy on the level of local control and depression of frequency of development of the radio induced cataract are refl ected in the provided data. In evident material the technology of preparation and carrying out radiation of an eye is shortly covered with a fascicle of protons. The experience of use of proton therapy of tumors of a skull base got for the last several decades, showed good results. Physical properties of a fascicle of protons allow to achieve the maximum dose conformality, having lowered, thereby, a radial load on the next crucial anatomical structures. The presented material on an oncopediatrics shows insuffi cient knowledge of scientists concerning advantage of a fascicle of protons over modern methods of photon radiation. There are only preliminary clinical results concerning generally of treatment of cranyopharyngiomas. At cancer therapy of a mammary gland, proton therapy showed the best local control of postoperative recurrent tumors, and also depression of a dose load on the contralateral party. The available results of the retrospective analysis of clinical data in the University medical center of Lome Linda, testify to advantages of proton therapy of the localized prostate cancer. The lack of a biochemical recurrence and a local tumoral progression within 5 years after radiation was shown. The data obtained from experience of use of proton radiation therapy with passively scattered fascicle for cancer therapy of a prostate at an early stage showed the admixed results in comparison with modern methods of radiation therapy with the modulated intensity. In treatment of non-small cell cancer of mild advantage of proton therapy aren’t absolutely proved yet. There are data on extreme toxicity of a combination

  13. Report of the summative evaluation by the advisory committee on research for radiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) set up an Advisory Committee on Research for Radiation Applications in accordance with the 'Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations. The Advisory Committee on Research for Radiation Applications evaluated the adequacy of the plans of research for radiation applications to be succeeded from JAERI to a new research institute which will be established by integration of JAERI and the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). The Advisory Committee consisted of nine specialists from outside the JAERI conducted its activities from June 2004 to August 2004. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advanced and of the oral presentations made at the Advisory Committee meeting which was held on July 29, 2004, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Advisory Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on December 1, 2004. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Advisory Committee on Research for Radiation Applications. (author)

  14. [Radiation protection in medical research : Licensing requirement for the use of radiation and advice for the application procedure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkov, V; Klammer, H; Brix, G

    2017-07-01

    In Germany, persons who are to be exposed to radiation for medical research purposes are protected by a licensing requirement. However, there are considerable uncertainties on the part of the applicants as to whether licensing by the competent Federal Office for Radiation Protection is necessary, and regarding the choice of application procedure. The article provides explanatory notes and practical assistance for applicants and an outlook on the forthcoming new regulations concerning the law on radiation protection of persons in the field of medical research. Questions and typical mistakes in the application process were identified and evaluated. The qualified physicians involved in a study are responsible for deciding whether a license is required for the intended application of radiation. The decision can be guided by answering the key question whether the study participants would undergo the same exposures regarding type and extent if they had not taken part in the study. When physicians are still unsure about their decision, they can seek the advisory service provided by the professional medical societies. Certain groups of people are particularly protected through the prohibition or restriction of radiation exposure. A simplified licensing procedure is used for a proportion of diagnostic procedures involving radiation when all related requirements are met; otherwise, the regular licensing procedure should be used. The new radiation protection law, which will enter into force on the 31st of december 2018, provides a notification procedure in addition to deadlines for both the notification and the licensing procedures. In the article, the authors consider how eligible studies involving applications of radiation that are legally not admissible at present may be feasible in the future, while still ensuring a high protection level for study participants.

  15. Selected finelings on current research into applications of ionizing radiation in food industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salkova, Z.

    1979-01-01

    A review is presented of research of the application of ionizing radiation in the food industry, mainly for the inhibition of potato and onion germination and for radappertization of soft fruits. Current laws governing the irradiation of food are described and the current knowledge of the practical application of the new technology is indicated. (author)

  16. Proceedings of the Scientific Meeting on Research and Development of Isotopes Application and Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singgih Sutrisno; Sofyan Yatim; Pattiradjawane, EIsje L.; Ismachin, Moch; Mugiono; Marga Utama; Komaruddin Idris

    2004-02-01

    The Proceedings of Scientific Meeting on Research and Development of Isotopes Application and Radiation has been presented on February 17-18, 2004 in Jakarta. The aims of the Meeting is to disseminate the results of research on application of nuclear techniques on agricultural, animal, industry, hydrology and environment. There were 4 invited papers and 38 papers from BATAN participants as well as outside. The articles are indexing separately. (PPIN)

  17. The application of microbeam in the research on radiation-induced bystander effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Jie; Han Ling

    2002-01-01

    There has been more and more attention to the phenomenon known as radiation-induced bystander effects, which will have a tremendous effect on the research in low -dose radiation biological effects. However, due to the stochastic nature of energy deposition and the random position of tracts, direct evidence for bystander effects and exact results of single particle interacts with a cell cannot be provided by using conventional broad-field irradiation. The availability of microbeam, especially the single particle microbeam in the world, whereby individual cells or precise location of cells can be irradiated with either a single or an exact number of particles provides a useful tool for the research on radiation-induced bystander effects. The author describes the radiation -induced bystander effect and the application of microbeam in the research on it

  18. Functional genetic research for radiation and drug resistant adenocarcinoma and its application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kug Chan; Jung, Il Lae; Chul, Shin Byung; Kook, Park Hyo; Lee, Hee Min

    2012-01-15

    The work scope of 'Functional genetic research for radiation and drug resistant adenocarcinoma and its application' had contained the research about effect of transgelin(SM22a), neurotensin, metallothionein-1G transgelin-2 genes on the cell death triggered ionizing radiation, cisplatin, MMS, luteolin and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}(toxic agents), which are highly expressed in radiation-induced mutant cells. In this study, to elucidate the role of these proteins in the ionizing radiation (toxic chemicals)-induced cell death, we utilized sensed (or antisense, small interference RNA) cells, which overexpress (or down-regulate) RNAs associated with these proteins biosynthesis, and investigated the effects of these genes on the cytotoxicity caused by ionizing radiation, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and toxic chemicals. We also investigated the functions of downstream target genes of transgelin such as IGF-1Rβ/PI3K/AKT pathway and transgelin/metallothioneine in A-549 and HepG2 cells because such target genes are able to potentiate the cell-killing or cell protecting effects against radiation.

  19. Functional genetic research for radiation and drug resistant adenocarcinoma and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kug Chan; Jung, Il Lae; Chul, Shin Byung; Kook, Park Hyo; Lee, Hee Min

    2012-01-01

    The work scope of 'Functional genetic research for radiation and drug resistant adenocarcinoma and its application' had contained the research about effect of transgelin(SM22a), neurotensin, metallothionein-1G transgelin-2 genes on the cell death triggered ionizing radiation, cisplatin, MMS, luteolin and H 2 O 2 (toxic agents), which are highly expressed in radiation-induced mutant cells. In this study, to elucidate the role of these proteins in the ionizing radiation (toxic chemicals)-induced cell death, we utilized sensed (or antisense, small interference RNA) cells, which overexpress (or down-regulate) RNAs associated with these proteins biosynthesis, and investigated the effects of these genes on the cytotoxicity caused by ionizing radiation, H 2 O 2 and toxic chemicals. We also investigated the functions of downstream target genes of transgelin such as IGF-1Rβ/PI3K/AKT pathway and transgelin/metallothioneine in A-549 and HepG2 cells because such target genes are able to potentiate the cell-killing or cell protecting effects against radiation

  20. Charms of radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inokuti, Mitio

    2005-01-01

    Most of my professional efforts over nearly five decades have been devoted to radiation research, that is, studies of the physical, chemical, and biological actions of high-energy radiation on matter. (By the term high-energy radiation'' I mean here x rays, γ rays, neutrons, and charged particles of high enough energies to produce ionization in manner. I exclude visible light, infrared waves, microwaves, and sound waves.) Charms of radiation research lie in its interdisciplinary character, although my training was in basic physics, the scope of my interest has gradually increased to cover many other areas, to my deep satisfaction. High-energy radiation is an important component of the universe, and of our environment. It often provides an effective avenue for characterizing matter and understanding its behavior. Near Earth's surface this radiation is normally present in exceptionally low quantity, and yet it plays a significant role in some atmospheric phenomena such as auroras, and also in the evolution of life. The recent advent of various devices for producing high-energy radiation has opened up the possibility of many applications, including medical and industrial uses. I have worked on some aspects of those uses. At every opportunity to address a broad audience I try to convey a sense of intellectual fun, together with some of the elements of the basic science involved. A goal of radiation education might be to make the word radiation'' as common and familiar as words such as ''fire'' and electricity'' through increased usage. (author)

  1. Charms of radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inokuti, M.

    2005-01-01

    Most of my professional efforts over nearly five decades have been devoted to radiation research, that is, studies of the physical, chemical, and biological actions of high-energy radiation on matter. (By the term 'high-energy radiation' I mean here x rays, .GAMMA. rays, neutrons, and charged particles of high enough energies to produce ionization in matter. I exclude visible light, infrared waves, microwaves, and sound waves.) Charms of radiation research lie in its interdisciplinary character; although my training was in basic physics, the scope of my interest has gradually increased to cover many other areas, to my deep satisfaction. High-energy radiation is an important component of the universe, and of our environment. It often provides an effective avenue for characterizing matter and understanding its behavior. Near Earth's surface this radiation is normally present in exceptionally low quantity, and yet it plays a significant role in some atmospheric phenomena such as auroras, and also in the evolution of life. The recent advent of various devices for producing high-energy radiation has opened up the possibility of many applications, including medical and industrial uses. I have worked on some aspects of those uses. At every opportunity to address a broad audience I try to convey a sense of intellectual fun, together with some of the elements of the basic science involved. A goal of radiation education might be to make the word 'radiation' as common and familiar as words such as 'fire' and 'electricity' through increased usage

  2. Application of radiation nowadays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habibah Adnan

    2009-01-01

    Despite of scientist know about radiation since 1890, but they have successfully developed many of application to help human life. Now, we can see that radiation was applied in medical, academic, industrial, and generating electricity. Besides that, radiations also have other applications that can help in agriculture activities, archaeology, legislation, geology, space exploration and many more. In hospital, doctor use nuclear medicine to trace, monitor and save almost thousands of people every year. According to research, 7 out of 10 American citizens had already use this services at least once in their life. Universities, college, secondary school, research center also use nuclear material in their laboratory. For example, through research, radiation can help in plants study, agriculture technique, soils study and others. Industrial sector are one sector that applied radiation widely. For example, radiation can kill almost 80 % bacteria or dangerous microorganism in food or export products. Nowadays, radiation cannot be curtailed although it can give more benefit more than risk. It depends on how we manage it.

  3. Advances on research, development and applications of SSNTDs in radiation protection at AEOI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabi, M.

    1991-01-01

    Iran is one of the countries which started early in 1967 on research into, and the development and application to radiation protection of solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). Since then extensive efforts have been made at the National Radiation Protection Department (NRPD) in the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) on national development and international cooperation to promote the application of SSNTDs in this field. These include: efficient track registration of alphas, recoils and fission fragments in different SSNTD materials; advances and new findings on chemical and electrochemical etching (ECE); the introduction of new neutron personnel dosimeters such as the 237 Np/10 μm polycarbonate combination (PC) foils coupled with a spark counting technique; ECE of recoils; Neutriran Albedo Neutron Personnel Dosimetry; neutron depth dose measurements in particular at air-tissue and bone-tissue interfaces; neutron contamination measurements in high energy x-ray beams of medical accelerators; development of a nationwide indoor radon monitoring program and spectrometry of radon daughters in PC; the discovery of some new phenomena in ECE; education and training. Some of these are presented and discussed in this paper. (author)

  4. Synchrotron radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markus, N.

    1995-01-01

    In the many varied application fields of accelerators, synchrotron radiation ranks as one of the most valuable and widely useful tools. Synchrotron radiation is produced in multi-GeV electron synchrotrons and storage rings, and emerges tangentially in a narrow vertical fan. Synchrotron radiation has been used extensively for basic studies and, more recently, for applied research in the chemical, materials, biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. Initially, the radiation was a byproduct of high energy physics laboratories but the high demand soon resulted in the construction of dedicated electron storage rings. The accelerator technology is now well developed and a large number of sources have been constructed, with energies ranging from about 1.5 to 8 GeV including the 6 GeV European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) source at Grenoble, France. A modern third-generation synchrotron radiation source has an electron storage ring with a complex magnet lattice to produce ultra-low emittance beams, long straights for 'insertion devices', and 'undulator' or 'wiggler' magnets to generate radiation with particular properties. Large beam currents are necessary to give high radiation fluxes and long beam lifetimes require ultra high vacuum systems. Industrial synchrotron radiation research programmes use either Xray diffraction or spectroscopy to determine the structures of a wide range of materials. Biological and pharmaceutical applications study the functions of various proteins. With this knowledge, it is possible to design molecules to change protein behaviour for pharmaceuticals, or to configure more active proteins, such as enzymes, for industrial processes. Recent advances in molecular biology have resulted in a large increase in protein crystallography studies, with researchers using crystals which, although small and weakly diffracting, benefit from the high intensity. Examples with commercial significance include the study of

  5. Radiation application for synthesis of advanced materials and the related research on polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seguchi, T.

    1996-01-01

    The irradiation effects of polymers was studied in the wide temperature range from very low temperature to high temperature under vacuum or oxygen free atmosphere.The chemical reactions for polymers showed a rather large difference depending on irradiation temperature in quality and/or quantity. The dependence is though to be the difference in molecular motion of polymers during irradiation. The clear difference on irradiation temperature was observed for polytetrafluoroethylene(PTFE) and polystyrene(PS). For other polymers, the irradiation temperature effects are observed, which may be expanding to develop new products. The newly developed technology in radiation application is the curing of polymer fiber as ceramic fiber precursor. The silicon carbide(SiC) fiber is synthesized from silicon containing polymer of polycarbosilane(PCS) fiber by the pyrolysis at high temperature of 1200 deg or more. As the melting temperature of PCS is about 230 deg, the fiber must be cured to not melt down during the pyrolysis. The purpose of this work was the radiation crosslinking of PCS fiber without oxygen contamination. The basic research was carried out using gamma-rays irradiation under vacuum, where the fundamental data were obtained such as the yield of active sites and the reactivity with oxygen and the decomposed gases. The SiC fiber obtained from the radiation cured PCS fiber has a high tensile strength of 3GPa and high heat-resistance up to 1700 deg. The heat resistance of SiC fiber obtained from ordinary processing is about 1200 deg. This technology was transferred to a company and the product is supplied to the market. The silicon nitride(Si 3 N 4 ) fibre was also synthesized from radiation cured PCS fiber by the pyrolysis in ammonia gas atmosphere

  6. Microtron for radiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, H.C.; Ramamurthi, S.S.

    1993-01-01

    The electron accelerator called microtron is a powerful tool for research, medical and industrial applications which need electron beam in energy range of few tens of MeV. Either electron beam from microtron is directly used for radiation applications or electron beam is utilized to produce x-rays or neutrons which are eventually used for radiation applications. After considering the vast potential, lower cost, simpler construction and excellent quality of electron beam from microtron, it was decided to develop this machine at Centre for Advanced Technology (CAT). The microtrons in two standard models have been developed which will cover all the above mentioned applications except free electron lasers. The microtron of model 1 provides electron beam of 20 MeV, 15/30 mA and that of model 2 provides electron beam of 8/12 MeV, 50/30 mA. (author). 2 figs., 1 tab

  7. Radiation degradation of poly(olefin sulphone)s - Fundamental research to practical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowden, M.J.; O'Donnell, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The degradation of poly(olefin sulphone)s by high energy radiation, particularly by γ-rays and electron beams, provides an example of the application of fundamental science to high technology industry. Scientific interest in the radiation degradation of these polymers was first aroused by the discovery that they underwent highly specific bond scission in the backbone chain as the primary result of absorption of high energy radiation and in fact they were the first polymers in which such an effect had been demonstrated. This conclusion was initially based mainly on evidence from electron spin resonance spectroscopy and was subsequently verified by studies of molecular weight changes. These studies showed that the poly(olefin sulphone)s not only degraded by main chain scission but were also among the most radiation-sensitive polymers known. The extremely high sensitivity of poly(olefin sulphone)s to radiation-induced main-chain scission has found application in the field of microelectronics. Electron beam writing on poly(olefin sulphone) films is used to produce lithographic masks for the manufacture of integrated circuits on silicon wafers. Poly(1-butene sulphone) (PBS) is currently used in the production of a substantial proportion of the masks for the industry. The fundamental aspects of the radiation degradation of poly(olefin sulphone)s and the practical applications to high technology are reviewed. (author)

  8. Review of domestic radiation biology research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Chun; Song Lingli; Ai Zihui

    2011-01-01

    Radiation biology research in China during the past ten years are reviewed. It should be noticed that radiation-biology should focus on microdosimetry, microbeam application, and radiation biological mechanism. (authors)

  9. Report on the actual state of the basic, applied research and industrial applications of the radiation in Mexico; Informe sobre el estado actual de la investigacion basica, aplicada y aplicaciones industriales de la radiacion en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez V, H

    1991-07-15

    In this report the main works of basic, applied research and industrial applications that are carried out in Mexico, about radiations (radiation chemistry, technology, applications, use and isotope production, etc.): infrastructure, radiation sources, groups and research programs are presented. (Author)

  10. Radiation acoustics and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyamshev, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a new branch of acoustics, developing on the boundary of acoustics, nuclear physics, elementary particles and high-energy physics. Its fundamentals are laying in the research of acoustical effects due to the interaction of penetrating radiation with matter. The study of radiation-acoustical effects leads to the new opportunities in the penetration radiation research (acoustical detection, radiation-acoustical dosimetry), study of the physical parameters of matter, in a solution of some applied problems of nondestructive testing, and also for the radiation-acoustical influence on physical and chemical structure of the matter. Results of theoretical and experimental investigations are given. Different mechanisms of the sound generation by penetrating radiation of liquids and solids are considered. Some applications - the radiation acoustical microscopy and visualisation, the acoustical detection of high energy X-ray particles and possibility of using of high energy neutrino beams in geoacoustics - are discussed

  11. Solid state radiation chemistry. Features important in basic research and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorski, Z.P.

    1998-01-01

    The basic research of chemical radiation effects has been mostly proceeded in aqueous systems. When one turns from aqueous to the 'dry solute' systems, reactions are running in a very different way. The examined compound, previously the solute, becomes then the only constituent of the system, absorbing all ionising energy. Majority of dosimeters and of radiation processed systems is solid: these are crystalline or rigid substances of high viscosity, sometimes of complicated phase-compositions being no longer homogenous like liquids. Main features of the solid (and rigid) state radiation chemistry is to be discussed in five parts: I. Character of absorption process. Absorption of radiation is in all media heterogenous on the molecular level, i.e. with formation of single- and multi-ionisation spurs. The yield of the latters is 15-25% of the total ionisations, depending on the system, even at low LET radiation. In spite of random distribution of initial ionisations, the single-ionisation spurs can turn rapidly into specifically arranged, temporal localisations. The variety of spur reactions is usually more complicated than that in aqueous systems. II. Character of transients. Intermediates in solid state radiation chemistry exhibit very different transport properties: from free electrons moving fast and far, to electrons changing the position by different physicochemical mechanisms, to easy movable H-atoms, and to practically unmovable, only vibrating, new fragments of a lattice or glass. III. Paramagnetic intermediates. Radicals living for microseconds in liquids, when created and trapped in a solid matrix are usually very stable, e.g. they can have a difference of half-life times of 12 orders of magnitude, however their chemical composition remais identical. (author)

  12. Applications of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Developments in standard applications and brand new nuclear technologies, with high impact on the future of the agriculture, medicine, industry and the environmental preservation. The Radiation Technology Center (CTR) mission is to apply the radiation and radioisotope technologies in Industry, Health, Agriculture, and Environmental Protection, expanding the scientific knowledge, improving human power resources, transferring technology, generating products and offering services for the Brazilian society. The CTR main R and D activities are in consonance with the IPEN Director Plan (2011-2013) and the Applications of Ionizing Radiation Program, with four subprograms: Irradiation of Food and Agricultural Products; Radiation and Radioisotopes Applications in Industry and Environment; Radioactive Sources and Radiation Applications in Human Health; and Radioactive Facilities and Equipment for the Applications of Nuclear Techniques

  13. Applications of ionizing radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    Developments in standard applications and brand new nuclear technologies, with high impact on the future of the agriculture, medicine, industry and the environmental preservation. The Radiation Technology Center (CTR) mission is to apply the radiation and radioisotope technologies in Industry, Health, Agriculture, and Environmental Protection, expanding the scientific knowledge, improving human power resources, transferring technology, generating products and offering services for the Brazilian society. The CTR main R and D activities are in consonance with the IPEN Director Plan (2011-2013) and the Applications of Ionizing Radiation Program, with four subprograms: Irradiation of Food and Agricultural Products; Radiation and Radioisotopes Applications in Industry and Environment; Radioactive Sources and Radiation Applications in Human Health; and Radioactive Facilities and Equipment for the Applications of Nuclear Techniques.

  14. Polymerization by radiation. Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, M.; Fernandez Miranda, J.

    1997-01-01

    Achieved results of the research work done in the field of radiation polymerization are summarized. Developing new chromatographic matrices, the radiation grafting of Glycidyl methacrylate on the surface of Low Density Polyethylene beads was studied. The dependence of both, the grafted degree and width of the grafted layer, with the radiation dose applied, is presented

  15. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1992-01-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic X-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become incrasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of X-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved. (orig.)

  16. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved

  17. Radiation Protection Research: Radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desaintes, C.

    2000-01-01

    The main objectives of research in the field of radiobiology and epidemiology performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are (1) to study cancer mortality in nuclear workers in Belgium; to document the feasibility of retrospective cohort studies in Belgium; (2) to participate in the IARC study; (3) to elucidate the molecular basis of the effects of ionising radiation in the mammalian embryo during the early phases of its development; (4) to assess the genetic risk of maternal exposure to ionizing radiation; (5) to elucidate the cellular mechanisms leading to brain damage after prenatal irradiation; (6) to advise authorities and to provide the general population with adequate information concerning the health risk arising from radiation exposure. Progress and major achievements in these topical areas in 1999 are reported

  18. Radiation Protection Research: Radiobiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desaintes, C

    2000-07-01

    The main objectives of research in the field of radiobiology and epidemiology performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are (1) to study cancer mortality in nuclear workers in Belgium; to document the feasibility of retrospective cohort studies in Belgium; (2) to participate in the IARC study; (3) to elucidate the molecular basis of the effects of ionising radiation in the mammalian embryo during the early phases of its development; (4) to assess the genetic risk of maternal exposure to ionizing radiation; (5) to elucidate the cellular mechanisms leading to brain damage after prenatal irradiation; (6) to advise authorities and to provide the general population with adequate information concerning the health risk arising from radiation exposure. Progress and major achievements in these topical areas in 1999 are reported.

  19. Industrial applications of radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallien, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation processing refers to the use of ionizing radiation to initiate chemical or biological changes in various materials as a substitute for conventional thermal or chemical processes. The method was inroduced in the industrial field 30 years ago and is now being widely used for numerous applications, among which industrial radiography, polymer modification, sterilization or decontamination, and food preservation. Both electron beam accelerators and gamma sources can be used, depending mainly of the amount of radiation and the penetration required. Radiation processing presents an increasing economical importance; in 1986 the market volume of ionized products ranged 3 billion $ [fr

  20. Application of radioactive substances in research in nuclear medicine: current trends and radiation exposure to the study subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minkov, V.; Schwarz, E.R.; Bauer, B.; Nosske, D.; Erzberger, A.; Brix, G.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: Analysis of the application of radioactive substances in research in the field of nuclear medicine in human beings and of the resulting radiation exposure to study subjects. Methods: Assessment of applications for approval submitted in accordance with Paragraph 41 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance, evaluated by the Federal office for Radiation Protection together with the Federal Institute for Pharmaceuticals and Medical Products, within the period from 1997 to 1999. Results: The focus of the studies on the diagnostic application of radioactive substances in medicine evaluated has, since 1998, shifted from oncological to neurological and psychological aspects, while, at the same time, the number of PET studies increased constantly The proportion of healthy study subjects included in the diagnostic studies increased from 7 to 22%. The number of therapeutic applications of radioactive substances has, since 1997, undergone a three-fold increase, and in the process of this, the focus of attention lay within the area of radioimmuno-therapy and endovascular brachytherapy. The effective dose was, among up to 49% of the investigated healthy study subjects higher than 5 mSv, and among up to 6% of these subjects was at levels of over 20 mSv. Up to 22% of the patients received, within the scope of diagnostic studies, an effective dose of between 20 and 50 mSv. An exceeding of the 50 mSv limit occurred among up to 3% of the patients. Conclusions: In spite of the increasing numbers of PET applications, conventional nuclear medicine has maintained its importance in the field of medical research. Further developments in the areas of radiochemistry and molecular biology led to an increase in the importance of radio-immuno therapy. The evaluation of new radiopharmaceuticals and the extension of basic biomedical research, resulted in an increase in the proportion of healthy study subjects included in the studies. The radiation exposure among subjects resulting directly from

  1. Radiation chemistry and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majima, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    Effects of radiation to human body have been seriously discussed nowadays. These are important issues for the realization of sustainable society. It should be emphasized that various reactive intermediates generated by radiation play important roles in each cases. Radiation chemical studies will provide various reaction-mechanistic aspects on these important issues. Our research group has continuously carried out reaction-mechanistic studies using radiation chemical methods. From these studies, we have obtained a variety of results on basic molecular systems, reactions, materials that are close to practical application, biological systems and so on. Reactive species are generated from the radiation reactions in solution, and can be used as one-electron oxidative and reductive reagent to give selectively radical cation and anion of solute molecules such as various organic and inorganic molecules. Therefore, the radiation chemistry has contributed significantly to chemistry in which one-electron oxidation and reduction play the important role. The kinetics of such redox processes and the following reduction play the important role. The kinetics of such redox processes and the following reactions can be studied in real time with the transition absorption measurement by the pulse radiolysis technique. Even though the target compounds cannot be oxidized and reduced in chemical or electrochemical oxidation and reduction, their one-electron redox can be performed by the electron beam radiation. Therefore, radiation chemistry is very useful technique for basic science. Moreover, application potentials of radiation chemistry are so high for various research subjects. Moreover, application potentials of radiation chemistry are so high for various research subjects

  2. Radiation protection research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanmarcke, H

    2002-04-01

    The objectives of the research in the field of radiation protection research performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are (1) to elaborate and to improve methods and guidelines for the evaluation of restoration options for radioactively contaminated sites; (2) to develop, test and improve biosphere models for the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal in near-surface or geological repositories; (3) to asses the impact of releases from nuclear or industrial installations; (4) to increase capabilities in mapping and surveying sites possibly or likely contaminated with enhanced levels of natural radiation; (5) to identify non nuclear industries producing NORM waste, to make an inventory of occurring problems and to propose feasible solutions or actions when required; (6) to maintain the know-how of retrospective radon measurements in real conditions and to assess radon decay product exposure by combining these techniques. Main achievements in these areas for 2001 are summarised.

  3. Radiation protection research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanmarcke, H.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of the research in the field of radiation protection research performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are (1) to elaborate and to improve methods and guidelines for the evaluation of restoration options for radioactively contaminated sites; (2) to develop, test and improve biosphere models for the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal in near-surface or geological repositories; (3) to asses the impact of releases from nuclear or industrial installations; (4) to increase capabilities in mapping and surveying sites possibly or likely contaminated with enhanced levels of natural radiation; (5) to identify non nuclear industries producing NORM waste, to make an inventory of occurring problems and to propose feasible solutions or actions when required; (6) to maintain the know-how of retrospective radon measurements in real conditions and to assess radon decay product exposure by combining these techniques. Main achievements in these areas for 2001 are summarised

  4. Research in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, J.

    1974-01-01

    In the survey the author discusses phenomena which are unique to radiation chemistry, as well as those in which radiation chemistry research plays a principal role. Works in this field such as spur phenomena and effects of scavengers in the radiolysis of water and liquid alkane, intraspur effects in styrene and polymerization of styrene at high dose rates are presented. The problem of the missing hydrogen atoms in irradiated alkanes needs answer and sensitization of crosslinking reactions may involve some unique aspects of radiation chemistry. Pairwise trapping of radicals in irradiated n-hydrocarbons have been observed in ESP-spectra. A well defined spectrum of radical pairs when the crystals of n-eicosane is irradiated and observed at 77 deg K. The nature of the spectrum, its changes with temperature and the effect of LET is discussed in the paper. (M.S.)

  5. High technology for radiation application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Toshiyuki

    2005-03-01

    Fundamentals of radiations, radioactivity, and their applications in recent industrial, medical, agricultural and various research fields are reviewed. The book begins with historical description regarding to discovery of radiation at the end of 19th century and the exploration into the inside of an atom utilizing the radiation discovered, discovery of the neutron which finally leaded to nuclear energy liberation. Developments of radiation sources, including nuclear reactors, and charged-particle accelerators follow with simultaneous description on radiation measurement or detection technology. In medical fields, X-ray diagnosis, interventional radiology (IVR), nuclear medicine (PET and others), and radiation therapy are introduced. In pharmaceutical field, synthesis of labeled compounds and tracer techniques are explained. In industrial application, radiation-reinforced wires and heat-resistant cables whose economic effect can be estimated to amount to more than 10 12 yen, radiation mutation, food irradiation, and applied accelerators such as polymer modifications, decomposition of environmentally harmful substances, and ion-implantations important in semiconductor device fabrication. Finally, problems relating to general public such as radiation education and safety concept are also discussed. (S. Ohno)

  6. Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The last day of March 1978 marked the completion of the first 3 years of operation of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. RERF was established on 1 April 1975 as successor to the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission which had been in continuous operation since 1947. This record of the first 3 years of operation consists of selected reports and other documents prepared in the course of conducting the business of RERF and includes a brief history, a late radiation effects that might be conducted at RERF. The wisdom and thought given to the research program and its operation by the Scientific Council and the Board of Directors is reflected in the minutes of their meetings which are included in the Appendix. (Mori, K.)

  7. Researches and Applications of ESR Dosimetry for Radiation Accident Dose Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, K.; Guo, L.; Cong, J.B.; Sun, C.P.; Hu, J.M.; Zhou, Z.S.; Wang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, X.; Shi, Y.M.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work was to establish methods suitable for practical dose assessment of people involved in ionising radiation accidents. Some biological materials of the human body and materials possibly carried or worn by people were taken as detection samples. By using electron spin resonance (ESR) techniques, the basic dosimetric properties of selected materials were investigated in the range above the threshold dose of human acute haemopoietic radiation syndrome. The dosimetric properties involved included dose response properties of ESR signals, signal stabilities, distribution of background signals, the lowest detectable dose value, radiation conditions, environmental effects on the detecting process, etc. Several practical dose analytical indexes and detecting methods were set up. Some of them (bone, watch glass and tooth enamel) had also been successfully used in the dose assessment of people involved in three radiation accidents, including the Chernobyl reactor accident. This work further proves the important role of ESR techniques in radiation accident dose estimation. (author)

  8. Studies on application of radiation and radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Rok; Lee, Ji Bok; Lee, Yeong Iil; Jin, Joon Ha; Beon, Myeong Uh; Park, Kyeong Bae; Han, Heon Soo; Jeong, Yong Sam; Uh, Jong Seop; Kang, Kyeong Cheol; Cho, Han Ok; Song, Hui Seop; Yoon, Byeong Mok; Jeon, Byeong Jin; Park, Hong Sik; Kim, Jae Seong; Jeong, Un Soo; Baek, Sam Tae; Cho, Seong Won; Jeon, Yeong Keon; Kim, Joon Yeon; Kwon, Joong Ho; Kim, Ki Yeop; Yang, Jae Seung; No, Yeong Chang; Lee, Yeong Keun; Shin, Byeong Cheol; Park, Sang Joon; Hong, Kwang Pyo; Cho, Seung Yeon; Kang, Iil Joon; Cho, Seong Ki; Jeong, Yeong Joo; Park, Chun Deuk; Lee, Yeong Koo; Seo, Chun Ha; Han, Kwang Hui; Shin, Hyeon Young; Kim, Jong Kuk; Park, Soon Chul; Shin, In Cheol; Lee, Sang Jae; Lee, Ki Un; Lim, Yong Taek; Park, Eung Uh; Kim, Dong Soo; Jeon, Sang Soo

    1993-05-01

    With the completion of construction of KMRR, the facility and technology of radiation application will be greatly improved. This study was performed as follows; (1) Studies on the production and application of radioisotopes. (2) The development of radiation processing technology. (3) The application of Irradiation techniques for food preservation and process improvement. (4) Studies on the radiation application for the development of genetic resources (5) Development of the radioisotope (RI) production facilities for Korea Multipurpose Research Reactor (KMRR)

  9. Application of the Ionizing Radiations Regulations 1985 to a research establishment in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashton, I.; Walker, J.M.G.

    1988-01-01

    Three important reasons for the UK Health and Safety Executive to embark on the preparation of the Ionising Radiation Regulations were: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 26 revised the basic recommendations for radiation protection on which national provisions are based; As members of the European Commission the UK is bound by the Euratom Directives to align its national legislation with other member states. The Directives lay down the basic safety standards for the health protection of the general public and workers against the dangers of ionising radiation; The UK Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 allows outdated legislation to be progressively replaced by a system of regulations and approved codes of practice designed to maintain or improve the standards of health, safety and welfare in the workplace

  10. Application of radiation in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naiyyum Choudhury; Najmul Alam Chowdhury; Feroza Akhtar [Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2001-03-01

    Radiation technology offers a very wide scope for utilisation and commercial exploitation in various field. All over the world, this technology is being favourably considered for different applications like radiation sterilisation of medical products, preservation of food by controlling the physiological processes for extending shelf-life and eradication of microbial and insect pests, radiation processing of polymeric materials and treatment of sewage sludge. Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission has taken radiation processing programmes in a big way right from its inception. This paper describes the studies carried out by various research groups in Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission mainly using Cobalt-60 gamma radiation. The investigation covers medical sterilisation, food preservation and development and modification of polymeric materials by gamma radiation. Both food preservation and radiation sterilisation of medical products are now being commercially carried out in the Gammatech facility as a joint venture company of BAEC and a private entrepreneur. Bangladesh is soon going to establish a full-fledged Tissue Bank to cater the needs of various tissue allografts for surgical replacement. Recently Government of Bangladesh has allocated US$ 1.00 million for strengthening of the Tissue Banking Laboratory. BAEC has made quite a good research contribution on vulcanization of natural rubber latex, wood plastic composites, surface coating curing, polymer modification etc. As a result of successful achievement of R and D activities in all these projects, a pilot plant project involving about US$ 4.00 million is under implementation at the Atomic energy Research Establishment campus of BAEC. In addition a project on 'National Polymer Centre' at a cost of US$ 2.00 million has already been approved. It is expected that work on radiation processing including commercialization will be accelerated with the implementation of these projects. The impact of radiation

  11. Application of radiation in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naiyyum Choudhury; Najmul Alam Chowdhury; Feroza Akhtar

    2001-01-01

    Radiation technology offers a very wide scope for utilisation and commercial exploitation in various field. All over the world, this technology is being favourably considered for different applications like radiation sterilisation of medical products, preservation of food by controlling the physiological processes for extending shelf-life and eradication of microbial and insect pests, radiation processing of polymeric materials and treatment of sewage sludge. Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission has taken radiation processing programmes in a big way right from its inception. This paper describes the studies carried out by various research groups in Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission mainly using Cobalt-60 gamma radiation. The investigation covers medical sterilisation, food preservation and development and modification of polymeric materials by gamma radiation. Both food preservation and radiation sterilisation of medical products are now being commercially carried out in the Gammatech facility as a joint venture company of BAEC and a private entrepreneur. Bangladesh is soon going to establish a full-fledged Tissue Bank to cater the needs of various tissue allografts for surgical replacement. Recently Government of Bangladesh has allocated US$ 1.00 million for strengthening of the Tissue Banking Laboratory. BAEC has made quite a good research contribution on vulcanization of natural rubber latex, wood plastic composites, surface coating curing, polymer modification etc. As a result of successful achievement of R and D activities in all these projects, a pilot plant project involving about US$ 4.00 million is under implementation at the Atomic energy Research Establishment campus of BAEC. In addition a project on 'National Polymer Centre' at a cost of US$ 2.00 million has already been approved. It is expected that work on radiation processing including commercialization will be accelerated with the implementation of these projects. The impact of radiation processing

  12. Application of radiation in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhury, Naiyyum; Chowdhury, Najmul Alam; Akhtar, Feroza [Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2001-03-01

    Radiation technology offers a very wide scope for utilisation and commercial exploitation in various field. All over the world, this technology is being favourably considered for different applications like radiation sterilisation of medical products, preservation of food by controlling the physiological processes for extending shelf-life and eradication of microbial and insect pests, radiation processing of polymeric materials and treatment of sewage sludge. Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission has taken radiation processing programmes in a big way right from its inception. This paper describes the studies carried out by various research groups in Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission mainly using Cobalt-60 gamma radiation. The investigation covers medical sterilisation, food preservation and development and modification of polymeric materials by gamma radiation. Both food preservation and radiation sterilisation of medical products are now being commercially carried out in the Gammatech facility as a joint venture company of BAEC and a private entrepreneur. Bangladesh is soon going to establish a full-fledged Tissue Bank to cater the needs of various tissue allografts for surgical replacement. Recently Government of Bangladesh has allocated US$ 1.00 million for strengthening of the Tissue Banking Laboratory. BAEC has made quite a good research contribution on vulcanization of natural rubber latex, wood plastic composites, surface coating curing, polymer modification etc. As a result of successful achievement of R and D activities in all these projects, a pilot plant project involving about US$ 4.00 million is under implementation at the Atomic energy Research Establishment campus of BAEC. In addition a project on 'National Polymer Centre' at a cost of US$ 2.00 million has already been approved. It is expected that work on radiation processing including commercialization will be accelerated with the implementation of these projects. The impact of radiation processing

  13. Proceedings of the international conference on radiation biology and clinical applications: a molecular approach towards innovations in applied radiobiology and a workshop on strategies in radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-10-01

    Innovations in radiotherapy approaches to cancer and radiation biology research is of growing interest in radiation researchers to conduct preclinical studies at their centers and translating the results as soon as possible to clinical radiotherapy practice. Recent papers have greatly enriched the current knowledge of radiation oncology, especially radiobiology and molecular oncology, and this has radically changed the oncology practice in radiation therapy in just a few years. The conference theme highlights the molecular and cellular responses within tissue and higher levels of mammalian biological organization. New experimental radiobiology research to underpin current and future regulatory decisions setting workplace exposure limits. To develop rapid, high-precision analytical methods that assess radiation exposure doses from clinical samples and thus aid in the triage and medical management of radiological casualties. Innovative approaches to improve the accuracy, dose range, ease of use, and speed of classical biodosimetry. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  14. Synchrotron-radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    The use of radiation from synchrotron sources has started a renaissance in materials, physics, chemistry, and biology. Synchrotron radiation has advantages over conventional x rays in that its source brightness is a thousand times greater throughout a continuous energy spectrum, and resonances are produced with specific electron energy levels. Two major synchrotron radiation sources are operated by DOE: the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory at SLAC, and the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven

  15. Radiation Protection Research Needs Workshop: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewji, Shaheen A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Davis, Jason [Oak Ridge Associated Univ., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hertel, Nolan E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Abelquist, Eric [Oak Ridge Associated Univ., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    In order to protect humans and the environment when using ionizing radiation for the advancement and benefit of society, accurately quantifying radiation and its potential effects remains the driver for ensuring the safety and secure use of nuclear and radiological applications of technology. In the realm of radiation protection and its various applications with the nuclear fuel cycle, (nuclear) medicine, emergency response, national defense, and space exploration, the scientific and research needs to support state and federal radiation protection needs in the United States in each of these areas are still deficient.

  16. Radiation synthesis and modification of polymers for biomedical applications. Final results of a co-ordinated research project. 1996-2000

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Radiation techniques are being used for synthesis of hydrogels, functional polymers, interpenetrating systems, chemical modification of surfaces, immobilization of bioactive materials, synthesis of functional micro- and nanospheres and processing of naturally derived biomaterials. Potential medical applications of these biomaterials include implants, topical dressings, treatment devices and drug delivery systems. Biotechnological applications include diagnostic assays, separation and purification systems, immobilized enzyme and cell bioprocesses and cell culture surfaces. The main objective of the CRP on The use of Radiation Processing to Prepare Biomaterials for Application in Medicine was to co-ordinate the research carried out in the participating countries, to ensure that different research programmes complement each other and the information exchange is available to all. Furthermore, the objective was to expand the use of ionizing radiation in two major areas: synthesis of polymers and gels for medical a...

  17. Historical review of radiation research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindell, B. [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-09-01

    The presentation reviews the history of radiation research beginning with the first findings and attempts for modelling of harmful effects of radiation, followed by the contamination of the environment, use of radiation epidemiology and concluding with the question of cancer generation. (26 refs.).

  18. Report of the evaluation by the ad hoc review committee on radiation application research. In-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Radiation Application Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the adequacy of the R and D programs to be implemented for five years starting in Fiscal Year 2002 at Department of Material Development, at Department of Ion-Beam-Applied Biology and at Advanced Radiation Technology Center in Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of ten specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from May to July 2001. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on June 25, 2001, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on July 12, 2001. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Radiation Application Research. (author)

  19. Industrial application of radiation curing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1994-12-31

    The contents are advantages of radiation processes - a solvent-free system, less energy consumative, higher production rate, processability at ambient temperature; electron beams vs. ultraviolet curing; applications -broad spectrum of markets use radiation curable materials.

  20. Industrial application of radiation curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashi Sasaki

    1993-01-01

    The contents are advantages of radiation processes - a solvent-free system, less energy consumative, higher production rate, processability at ambient temperature; electron beams vs. ultraviolet curing; applications -broad spectrum of markets use radiation curable materials

  1. Case studies in the application of probabilistic safety assessment techniques to radiation sources. Final report of a coordinated research project 2001-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-04-01

    Radiation sources are used worldwide in many industrial and medical applications. In general, the safety record associated with their use has been very good. However, accidents involving these sources have occasionally resulted in unplanned exposures to individuals. When assessed prospectively, this type of exposure is termed a 'potential exposure'. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has recommended the assessment of potential exposures that may result from radiation sources and has suggested that probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) techniques may be used in this process. Also, Paragraph 2.13 of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) requires that the authorization process for radiation sources include an assessment of all exposures, including potential exposures, which may result from the use of a radiation source. In light of the ICRP's work described above, and the possibility that PSA techniques could be used in exposure assessments that are required by the BSS, the IAEA initiated a coordinated research project (CRP) to study the benefits and limitations of the application of PSA techniques to radiation sources. The results of this CRP are presented in this publication. It should be noted that these results are based solely on the work performed, and the conclusions drawn, by the research teams involved in this CRP. It is intended that international organizations involved in radiation protection will review the information in this report and will take account of it during the development of guidance and requirements related to the assessment of potential exposures from radiation sources. Also, it is anticipated that the risk insights obtained through the studies will be considered by medical practitioners, facility staff and management, equipment designers, and regulators in their safety management and risk evaluation activities. A draft

  2. Radiation safety research information database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukawa, Masae; Miyamoto, Kiriko; Takeda, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Noriko; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2004-01-01

    National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan began to construct Radiation Safety Research Information Database' in 2001. The research information database is of great service to evaluate the effects of radiation on people by estimating exposure dose by determining radiation and radioactive matters in the environment. The above database (DB) consists of seven DB such as Nirs Air Borne Dust Survey DB, Nirs Environmental Tritium Survey DB, Nirs Environmental Carbon Survey DB, Environmental Radiation Levels, Abe, Metabolic Database for Assessment of Internal Dose, Graphs of Predicted Monitoring Data, and Nirs nuclear installation environment water tritium survey DB. Outline of DB and each DB are explained. (S.Y.)

  3. Radiation measurements and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, H.C.; Rogers, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    This 1990 symposium was the seventh in a series of meetings which began in 1964. The 300 participants from 23 countries and the 65 oral and 77 poster presentations were more than double the size of the 1985 symposium. Some of this increase derived from the broadened scope of the program. Previous meetings emphasized X-rays and gamma-rays, but it has been increasingly clear that distinction from other forms of radiation (i.e., electrons, alpha-particles and neutrons) was contrived. This broadening led to papers in fields such as ''airport'' monitors and arms control. However, most of the increase in size of the symposium is simply a reflection of the vigorous activity, both academic and industrial in radiation measurements and their many applications. The papers in these Proceedings are arranged by major topic without regard to whether the paper was invited or contributed, oral or poster. Discussion, although an important part of the meeting, was not recorded and therefore is not included in the Proceedings

  4. Space Radiation Research at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John

    2016-01-01

    The harmful effects of space radiation on astronauts is one of the most important limiting factors for human exploration of space beyond low Earth orbit, including a journey to Mars. This talk will present an overview of space radiation issues that arise throughout the solar system and will describe research efforts at NASA aimed at studying space radiation effects on astronauts, including the experimental program at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent work on galactic cosmic ray simulation at ground based accelerators will also be presented. The three major sources of space radiation, namely geomagnetically trapped particles, solar particle events and galactic cosmic rays will be discussed as well as recent discoveries of the harmful effects of space radiation on the human body. Some suggestions will also be given for developing a space radiation program in the Republic of Korea.

  5. Industrial applications of radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puig, Jean Rene

    1959-01-01

    The status of industrial applications of radiation chemistry as it stands 6 months after the second Geneva international conference is described. The main features of the interaction of ionizing radiations with matter are briefly stated and a review is made of the best studied and the more promising systems of radiation chemistry. The fields of organics, plastics, heterogeneous catalysis are emphasized. Economies of radiation production and utilization are discussed. Reprint of a paper published in Industries atomiques - no. 5-6, 1959

  6. Biomedical applications of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosiak, J.M.; Pietrzak, M.

    1997-01-01

    Application of ionizing radiation for sterilization of medical devices, hygienization of cosmetics products as well as formation of biomaterials have been discussed. The advantages of radiation sterilization over the conventional methods have been indicated. The properties of modern biomaterials, hydrogels as well as some ways of their formation and modification under action of ionizing radiation were presented. Some commercial biomaterials of this kind produced in accordance with original Polish methods by means of radiation technique have been pointed out. (author)

  7. Application of Radiation in Nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewska, D.K.; Chmielewski, A.G.; Michalik, J.

    2005-01-01

    The Nanotechnology is one of the fastest growing new areas in science and engineering. The subject arises from the convergence of electronics, physics, chemistry, biology and materials science to create new functional systems of nano-scale dimensions. Nanotechnology deals with science and technology associated with dimensions in the range of 0.1 to 100 nm. The ability to fabricate structures with nano-metric precision is of fundamental importance to any exploitation of nanotechnology. Nanotechnology is predicted to have a major impact on the manufacturing technology in 20 to 30 years from now. The ability to fabricate structures with nano-metric precision is of fundamental importance to any exploitation of nanotechnology. The potential of combining radiation effects with nano-materials has been recognized from the very early stages of nano-science research. In the many uses of nano- structures, and nano-particles in particular, from catalysis, bio-sensing, nano-electronics, magnetic applications including separations, mechano-chemical conversion, and to molecular computing, radiation can play a significant role. The use of radiation, UV beam, electron-beam, or focused ion-beam is clearly central to the fabrication of the nanostructured systems. The relative advantages and deficiencies of each of them are still to be clarified as the technology advances. Whether UV or electron beam will lead to the highest resolution is still debated but it is clear that these techniques offer unmatched reproducibility and very narrow size distribution. Other studies concern formation and synthesis of nano-particles and nano-composites. Radiation synthesis of copper, silver and other metals' nanoparticles is studied. Metal and salt-polymer composites are synthesized by this method. Metal sulphide semiconductors of nano-metric matrices are prepared using gamma irradiation of a suitable solution of monomer, sulphur and metal sources. These products find application in photoluminescent

  8. Application of pulsed multi-ion irradiations in radiation damage research: A stochastic cluster dynamics simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Tuan L.; Nazarov, Roman; Kang, Changwoo; Fan, Jiangyuan

    2018-07-01

    Under the multi-ion irradiation conditions present in accelerated material-testing facilities or fission/fusion nuclear reactors, the combined effects of atomic displacements with radiation products may induce complex synergies in the structural materials. However, limited access to multi-ion irradiation facilities and the lack of computational models capable of simulating the evolution of complex defects and their synergies make it difficult to understand the actual physical processes taking place in the materials under these extreme conditions. In this paper, we propose the application of pulsed single/dual-beam irradiation as replacements for the expensive steady triple-beam irradiation to study radiation damages in materials under multi-ion irradiation.

  9. Biological Research for Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kug Chan; Jung, Il Lae; Choi, Yong Ho; Kim, Jin Sik; Moon, Myung Sook; Byun, Hee Sun; Phyo, Ki Heon; Kim, Sung Keun

    2005-04-01

    The work scope of 'Biological Research for the Radiation Protection' had contained the research about ornithine decarboxylase and its controlling proteins, thioredoxin, peroxiredoxin, S-adenosymethionine decarboxylase, and glutamate decarboxylase 67KD effect on the cell death triggered ionizing radiation and H 2 O 2 (toxic agents). In this study, to elucidate the role of these proteins in the ionizing radiation (or H 2 O 2 )-induced apoptotic cell death, we utilized sensesed (or antisensed) cells, which overexpress (or down-regulate) RNAs associated with these proteins biosynthesis, and investigated the effects of these genes on the cytotoxicity caused by ionizing radiation and H 2 O 2 (or paraquat). We also investigated whether genisteine(or thiamine) may enhance the cytotoxic efficacy of tumor cells caused by ionizing radiation (may enhance the preventing effect radiation or paraquat-induced damage) because such compounds are able to potentiate the cell-killing or cell protecting effects. Based on the above result, we suggest that the express regulation of theses genes have potentially importance for sensitizing the efficiency of radiation therapy of cancer or for protecting the radiation-induced damage of normal cells

  10. Synchrotron X-radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabler, M.N.; Nagel, D.J.; Skelton, E.F.

    1990-05-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has been involved in the exploitation of X rays since the 1920s. The report gives a brief description of the generation and characteristics of synchrotron radiation, and review highlights of current research. Research examples include soft-X-ray optics, semiconductor surface passivation, surface electron dynamics, space-charge dynamics on silicon, photochemistry on GaAs, local atomic structure, crystal structures from X-ray diffraction. The report then discusses emerging research opportunities

  11. Radiation technology in emerging industrial applications. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In many industrial applications radiation processing has proven to be a technology of choice either because of its economic competitiveness or its technical superiority. Although the chemical effects of ionizing radiation have been known for more than a century, its industrial applications became possible only after the availability of reliable gamma sources and powerful electron accelerators during the last couple of decades.The programmes of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in radiation processing are implemented through the Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications and the Department of Technical Co-operation. The IAEA has been active in this field for many years, contributing to new developments, training, promotion and transfer of technology. In September 1997, the IAEA held an international symposium in Zakopane, Poland on the 'Use of radiation technology for the conservation of environment' where the status of current developments and of applications of radiation processing in the control of environmental pollution was reviewed (IAEA-TECDOC-1023, 1998). Recent developments and achievements in various aspects of radiation processing have been assessed continuously through the organization of consultants meetings, advisory group meetings and research co-ordination meetings. Worldwide growing interest in the use of radiation technology in various new industrial applications, as exemplified by the reports and presentations made at these meetings, has led the IAEA to organize a symposium to cover every aspect of radiation processing and, exclusively, the emerging industrial applications of radiation technology. The International Symposium on Radiation Technology in Emerging Industrial Applications was convened in November 2000 in Beijing, China. Its main purpose was to bring scientists,technologists, industrialists and regulatory authorities together with a view of exchanging information and reviewing the status of current developments and

  12. Radiation technology in emerging industrial applications. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-09-01

    In many industrial applications radiation processing has proven to be a technology of choice either because of its economic competitiveness or its technical superiority. Although the chemical effects of ionizing radiation have been known for more than a century, its industrial applications became possible only after the availability of reliable gamma sources and powerful electron accelerators during the last couple of decades.The programmes of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in radiation processing are implemented through the Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications and the Department of Technical Co-operation. The IAEA has been active in this field for many years, contributing to new developments, training, promotion and transfer of technology. In September 1997, the IAEA held an international symposium in Zakopane, Poland on the 'Use of radiation technology for the conservation of environment' where the status of current developments and of applications of radiation processing in the control of environmental pollution was reviewed (IAEA-TECDOC-1023, 1998). Recent developments and achievements in various aspects of radiation processing have been assessed continuously through the organization of consultants meetings, advisory group meetings and research co-ordination meetings. Worldwide growing interest in the use of radiation technology in various new industrial applications, as exemplified by the reports and presentations made at these meetings, has led the IAEA to organize a symposium to cover every aspect of radiation processing and, exclusively, the emerging industrial applications of radiation technology. The International Symposium on Radiation Technology in Emerging Industrial Applications was convened in November 2000 in Beijing, China. Its main purpose was to bring scientists,technologists, industrialists and regulatory authorities together with a view of exchanging information and reviewing the status of current developments and

  13. Radiation synthesis and modification of polymers for biomedical applications. Final results of a co-ordinated research project. 1996-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-12-01

    Radiation techniques are being used for synthesis of hydrogels, functional polymers, interpenetrating systems, chemical modification of surfaces, immobilization of bioactive materials, synthesis of functional micro- and nanospheres and processing of naturally derived biomaterials. Potential medical applications of these biomaterials include implants, topical dressings, treatment devices and drug delivery systems. Biotechnological applications include diagnostic assays, separation and purification systems, immobilized enzyme and cell bioprocesses and cell culture surfaces. The main objective of the CRP on The use of Radiation Processing to Prepare Biomaterials for Application in Medicine was to co-ordinate the research carried out in the participating countries, to ensure that different research programmes complement each other and the information exchange is available to all. Furthermore, the objective was to expand the use of ionizing radiation in two major areas: synthesis of polymers and gels for medical and biotechnological applications, and modification of surfaces to achieve a specific functionality and/or to immobilize bioactive materials. This publication contains 10 reports of participants; each of the reports has been indexed separately.

  14. Radiation synthesis and modification of polymers for biomedical applications. Final results of a co-ordinated research project. 1996-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-12-01

    Radiation techniques are being used for synthesis of hydrogels, functional polymers, interpenetrating systems, chemical modification of surfaces, immobilization of bioactive materials, synthesis of functional micro- and nanospheres and processing of naturally derived biomaterials. Potential medical applications of these biomaterials include implants, topical dressings, treatment devices and drug delivery systems. Biotechnological applications include diagnostic assays, separation and purification systems, immobilized enzyme and cell bioprocesses and cell culture surfaces. The main objective of the CRP on The use of Radiation Processing to Prepare Biomaterials for Application in Medicine was to co-ordinate the research carried out in the participating countries, to ensure that different research programmes complement each other and the information exchange is available to all. Furthermore, the objective was to expand the use of ionizing radiation in two major areas: synthesis of polymers and gels for medical and biotechnological applications, and modification of surfaces to achieve a specific functionality and/or to immobilize bioactive materials. This publication contains 10 reports of participants; each of the reports has been indexed separately

  15. Atomic physics research with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crasemann, B.

    1981-01-01

    Applications of synchrotron radiation to research in high-energy atomic physics are summarized. These lie in the areas of photoelectron spectrometry, photon scattering, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, time-resolved measurements, resonance spectroscopy and threshold excitation, and future, yet undefined studies

  16. Biomedical applications of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatek, W.M.; Galka, M.; Hanson, A.L.; Paluszkiewicz, Cz.; Cichocki, T.

    2001-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation techniques application in medical diagnostics have been presented especially for: trace element analysis in tissues, elemental mapping, chemical speciation at trace levels, chemical structure determination. Presented techniques are very useful for early cancer discovery

  17. Industrial applications of radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, K.S.S.

    2012-01-01

    During the past one decade, Radiation Technology applications utilizing gamma radiation and high energy electrons have made a big way into the Indian industry bringing quality and value-added products in a more environment-friendly way. While radiation sterilization of health care products, hygienization of food materials, modification of polymer materials etc. are established as successful processes world wide including India, new applications are emerging especially in the field of environmental remediation. Two types of installations viz. gamma irradiators and high energy electron accelerators are in use right now to carry out such applications. The aim of the talk is to put forward before the audience about the potential applications developed in India and abroad, role of Department of Atomic Energy and current status of radiation processing for industrial utilization

  18. Radiation chemistry in development and research of radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Rui

    2010-01-01

    During the establishment and development of radiation biology, radiation chemistry acts like bridge which units the spatial and temporal insight coming from radiation physics with radiation biology. The theory, model, and methodology of radiation chemistry play an important role in promoting research and development of radiation biology. Following research development of radiation biology effects towards systems radiation biology the illustration and exploration both diversity of biological responses and complex process of biological effect occurring remain to need the theory, model, and methodology come from radiation chemistry. (authors)

  19. Radiation protection in medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacc, R.A.; Rubiolo, J.; Herrero, F.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The goal of this paper is to identify the areas in which radiation protection is actually needed and the relative importance of protection measures. A correlation between the different medical applications of the ionizing radiations and the associated risks, mainly due to ignorance, has been a constant throughout the history of mankind. At the beginning, the accidents were originated in research nuclear laboratories working on the atomic bomb, while the incidents occurred in medical areas because of virtual ignorance of the harmful effects on humans. The 60's were characterized by the oil fever, which produced innumerable accidents due to the practice of industrial radiography; in the 70's the use of radiations on medical applications was intensified, to such and extent that a new type of victim appeared: the patient. Unfortunately, during 80's and 90's the number of accidents in different medical practices has increased, projecting the occurred in Zaragoza (Spain) on 1990 with a linear accelerator for radiotherapy treatments. In some developed countries, foreseeing the probability of producing biological effects as a result of different radiology practices, more strict security rules are adopted to guarantee the application of the three principles of the radioprotection: justification, optimization and limitation of individual dose. In this way, in the U.S.A., the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organization (JCAHO), favors a vigilance politics in the different departments of Radiodiagnostic and Nuclear Medicine to secure an effective management in security, communications and quality control, in which the medical physicists play an important role. One of the requirements for example is to attach the value of entrance exposition dose in the radiological diagnostic report. So, the doses in the different organs are compared with the tabulated doses. Basically, a quality control programme is designed to minimize the risks for patients

  20. Economical scale of radiation applications in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Kume, Tamikazu; Makuuchi, Keizo; Takeshita, Hidefumi

    2000-01-01

    As a scale to quantify actual state of a thing, person, material and money are used in general, and money or economical scale has been frequently investigated on radiation application. As some investigations on annual sales (economical scale) of tire for car and germination protection of tomato had been tried to estimate in Japan, they were carried out only partially but not in general. On the other hand, in U.S.A. some general investigations were carried out, to report 421 billion dollars for nuclear energy application where its 80% was occupied by radiation application and remained 20 % was energy application (electricity). Therefore, JAERI established a special group (radiation frontier research group) aiming to investigate economical scale of radiation application in Japan to industrial, agricultural and medical field in general under cooperation of universities and private companies by receiving trust of the Science and Technology Agency. Here were described on basic concept on the investigation, its results, and total image on economical scale of radiation application and its comparison with that of energy application. (G.K.)

  1. LifeSat - Radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Spaceflight crews will be exposed to levels of radiation which exceed those experienced on the ground. In order to reduce the uncertainty in the evaluation of risks it is necessary to validate the responses of biological systems in space under conditions which simulate exposure levels expected during exploration class missions. The LifeSat system provides the experimental capabilities to satisfy these goals. Specifically, LifeSat is capable of long duration flights of up to 60 days, is able to fly directly into trapped radiation belts and in circular or eccentric polar orbits, has the ability to provide artificial gravity and imposes fewer restrictions than the STS on the use of hazardous materials such as chemical fixatives. These features along with reference missions and experiments are discussed with respect to radiation research goals

  2. Microdosimetric studies using a Filtered Fast Neutron Irradiation System of research reactor to application in radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Pedro Pereira

    2007-01-01

    In this work, microdosimetric measurements were performed using a Wall-less Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter - TEPC with spherical cavity with an inner diameter of 1.27 cm. The TEPC was tilled with pure propane gas, C 3 H 8 at 5.6 kPa (42 Torr) pressure, which is equivalent to 1.3 μm in diameter of unit density tissue. The microdosimetric measurement device was irradiated with fast neutron radiation from Texas A and M University Nuclear Science Center research reactor, in College Station, Texas. The fast neutron beams were emitted with three different power values, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 kW. during 1h for both high gain and low gain, totalizing two hours for each power with 0.0083 Gy/min of dose rate. The neutron was filtered using the heavily filtered fast neutron irradiation system (FNIS). from Nuclear Science Center, to obtain a decrease of neutron radiation contamination by gamma ray and so, to gain the neutron microdosimetric spectra as. frequency distribution of lineal energy, dose distribution of lineal energy with good precision, and another quantities as frequency-mean of lineal energy, dose- mean of lineal energy, absorbed dose, equivalent dose and average quality factor of fast neutron. The obtained results were satisfactory, with the neutron microdosimetric spectra showing a gamma ray contamination under 5 %, especially to dose distribution of lineal energy. The results obtained in this work were in agreement when compared with another results from scientific literature, which used another procedure to reduce the neutron contamination by gamma ray. (author)

  3. The 'new' Radiation Protection Ordinance - marking the difference between application of 'radioactive substances in medical research' (Section 41 StrlschV) and 'radioactive substances or ionizing radiation in medicine and dental medicine' (Section 42 StrlschV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedern, P.

    1983-01-01

    The main differences in the provisions are to be found under the following aspects: - Observation of dose limits; - Necessity of physical radiation protection surveillance; - Obligation to apply for approval in individual cases; - Selection of test persons/patients; - Scope of conditions governing approval; - Obligation to inform about hazards. The unambiguous definition of procedures and purposes allowed in the field of medical research, and of those in the field of medical therapy (including dental medicine) is of crucial importance, due to its significance with regard to radiation protection, civil law and penal law. Marking the limits between these two fields subject to supervision is a precondition allowing the proper application of relevant laws in the field of use and handling of radioactive substances or ionizing radiation for medical purposes. (orig./HSCH) [de

  4. Synchrotron radiation use in some researchs in program in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caticha-Ellis, S.

    1983-01-01

    Physical and biological applications of the synchrotron radiation in some pure and applied research programs in progress in Brazil are presented, in special those related with crystallografic research. (L.C.) [pt

  5. Research and Application of Radiation Processed Polymers to Enhance Oil Recovery in Petroleum Industry - Current Status and Prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Hai; Nguyen Trong Hoanh Phong; Le Van Toan; Nguyen Ly Lan; Nguyen Tan Man; Le Dinh Lang; Nguyen Van Toan; Pham Anh Tuan

    2011-01-01

    The preparation of polymers for enhanced oil recovery has been carried out by radiation copolymerization method involving two monomers of acrylamide and N-vinyl-2- pyrrolidone, and N-methylpyrrolidone used as an anti-gel agent. The properties and oil recovery efficiency of polymer solution was discussed. The studied polymer dissolved in water and in saline water. They have non-precipitating behavior in hard brines at high temperature (>120 o C) and their viscosity decreased 20% after heating 30 days at 120 o C. Evaluation of oil recovery efficiency has been carried out at Laboratory model of reservoir of oil wells were submerged, the obtained results shown that the recovery yield of oil enhanced higher than 10% in the reservoir temperature and pressure conditions. The experimental results also shown that studied polymer products are applying in effect for submerged oil wells. These studied polymers have been being planned for application in pilot scale on the White Tiger oil field one of the big oil fields in this country. (author)

  6. Industrial applications of radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabharwal, Sunil

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, radiation processing has emerged as an alternative to conventional technologies such as thermal and chemical processing for many industrial applications. The industry is expanding at a fast rate all over the world. The actual industrial benefits on commercial basis, however, depends on the need of the individual society and may vary from country to country. In India, the applications of radiation technology have been found in areas of health care, agriculture, food preservation, industry and environment. Both gamma radiation and electron beam accelerators are being utilized for this purpose. Presently, 6 commercial gamma irradiators housing about 1.5 million curie 60 Co and an annual turnover of over US$ 2 million and 3 commercial electron beam (EB) accelerators with installed capacity of 185 kW are commercially operating in India. The new areas being explored include use of electron beam irradiation for surface treatment, radiation processed membranes for a variety of applications and radiation processing of natural polymers. In the present paper, the current status of this program, especially the recent developments and future direction of radiation processing technology is reviewed. (author)

  7. Applications of Radiation Processing in Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abad, Lucille V.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation processing has long been known as commercially viable technology that can be beneficially used to enhance the characteristics of many materials. Several gamma irradiators and electron beam accelerators are operating worldwide which are utilized for various established industrial applications. These could be used for the following processes: a) radiation crosslinking e.g. crosslinking of wires and cables, heat shrinkable film and tube productions, manufacture of plastic bags and tubings for medical products, pre-curing of automobile tire components, curing of polymeric coatings, etc. b) radiation degradation e.g. Scrap Teflon (Polytetraflouroethylene) to form powders, disinfestations and pasteurization of agricultural products, sterilization of medical products, etc.; and c) radiation grafting e.g. grafted non-woven fabrics for metal adsorbent. Emerging applications for radiation processing include grafted membranes for fuel cell, electrodes, cell sheet for tissue engineering, nanoparticle production, polymer composite synthesis, and fibrous catalyst for biodiesel production. Current researches at the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute consist of crosslinking of natural and synthetic polymers for medical application e.g. wound dressing, hemostats, and bioimplants for vesicouretal reflux (VUR); grafting of natural and synthetic fabrics for metal adsorbents; and radiation degradation of carrageenan as plant growth promoter. (author)

  8. Radiation biodosimetry: Applications for spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, W. F.; Miller, A. C.; Grace, M. B.; McLeland, C. B.; Luo, L.; Muderhwa, J. M.; Miner, V. L.; Prasanna, P. G. S.

    The multiparametric dosimetry system that we are developing for medical radiological defense applications could be adapted for spaceflight environments. The system complements the internationally accepted personnel dosimeters and cytogenetic analysis of chromosome aberrations, considered the best means of documenting radiation doses for health records. Our system consists of a portable hematology analyzer, molecular biodosimetry using nucleic acid and antigen-based diagnostic equipment, and a dose assessment management software application. A dry-capillary tube reagent-based centrifuge blood cell counter (QBC Autoread Plus, Beckon Dickinson Bioscience) measures peripheral blood lymphocytes and monocytes, which could determine radiation dose based on the kinetics of blood cell depletion. Molecular biomarkers for ionizing radiation exposure (gene expression changes, blood proteins) can be measured in real time using such diagnostic detection technologies as miniaturized nucleic acid sequences and antigen-based biosensors, but they require validation of dose-dependent targets and development of optimized protocols and analysis systems. The Biodosimetry Assessment Tool, a software application, calculates radiation dose based on a patient's physical signs and symptoms and blood cell count analysis. It also annotates location of personnel dosimeters, displays a summary of a patient's dosimetric information to healthcare professionals, and archives the data for further use. These radiation assessment diagnostic technologies can have dual-use applications supporting general medical-related care.

  9. Activities in biological radiation research at the AGF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The AGF is working on a wide spectrum of biological radiation research, with the different scientific disciplines contributing different methodologies to long-term research projects. The following fields are studied: 1. Molecular and cellular modes of action of radiation. 2. Detection and characterisation of biological radiation damage, especially in humans. 3. Medical applications of radiation effects. 4. Concepts and methods of radiation protection. The studies will lead to suggestions for radiation protection and improved radiotherapy. They may also contribute to the development of environmental protection strategies. (orig./MG) [de

  10. Application Technology Research Unit

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — To conduct fundamental and developmental research on new and improved application technologies to protect floricultural, nursery, landscape, turf, horticultural, and...

  11. THE ROLE OF RADIATION ACCIDENTS AND INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS OF IONIZING RADIATION SOURCES IN THE PROBLEM OF RADIATION DAMAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Кіхтенко, Ігор Миколайович

    2016-01-01

    Subject of research – the relevance of radiation damage at modern development of industry and medicine. In the world of radiation sources used in different fields of practice and their application in the future will increase, which greatly increases the likelihood of injury in a significant contingent of people.Research topic – the definition of the role of nuclear energy and the industrial use of ionizing radiation sources in the problem of radiation damage. The purpose of research – identif...

  12. Research of radiation-resistant microbial organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dongho; Lim, Sangyong; Joe, Minho; Park, Haejoon; Song, Hyunpa; Im, Seunghun; Kim, Haram; Kim, Whajung; Choi, Jinsu; Park, Jongchun

    2012-01-15

    Many extremophiles including radiation-resistant bacteria Deinococcus radiodurans have special characteristics such as novel enzymes and physiological active substances different from known biological materials and are being in the spotlight of biotechnology science. In this research, basic technologies for the production of new genetic resources and microbial strains by a series of studies in radiation-resistant microbial organisms were investigated and developed. Mechanisms required for radiation-resistant in Deinococcus radiodurans were partly defined by analyzing the function of dinB, pprI, recG, DRA{sub 0}279, pprM, and two-component signal transduction systems. To apply genetic resource and functional materials from Deinococcus species, omics analysis in response to cadmium, construction of macroscopic biosensor, and characterization of carotenoids and chaperon protein were performed. Additionally, potential use of D. geothermalis in monosaccharide production from non-biodegradable plant materials was evaluated. Novel radiation resistant yeasts and bacteria were isolated and identified from environmental samples to obtain microbial and genomic resources. An optimal radiation mutant breeding method was set up for efficient and rapid isolation of target microbial mutants. Furthermore, an efficient ethanol producing mutant strain with high production yield and productivity was constructed using the breeding method in collaboration with Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology. Three Deinococcal bioindicators for radiation dosage confirmation after radiation sterilization process were developed. These results provide a comprehensive information for novel functional genetic elements, enzymes, and physiological active substances production or application. Eventually, industrial microbial cell factories based on radiation resistant microbial genomes can be developed and the technologies can be diffused to bioindustry continuously by this project.

  13. Research of radiation-resistant microbial organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dongho; Lim, Sangyong; Joe, Minho; Park, Haejoon; Song, Hyunpa; Im, Seunghun; Kim, Haram; Kim, Whajung; Choi, Jinsu; Park, Jongchun

    2012-01-01

    Many extremophiles including radiation-resistant bacteria Deinococcus radiodurans have special characteristics such as novel enzymes and physiological active substances different from known biological materials and are being in the spotlight of biotechnology science. In this research, basic technologies for the production of new genetic resources and microbial strains by a series of studies in radiation-resistant microbial organisms were investigated and developed. Mechanisms required for radiation-resistant in Deinococcus radiodurans were partly defined by analyzing the function of dinB, pprI, recG, DRA 0 279, pprM, and two-component signal transduction systems. To apply genetic resource and functional materials from Deinococcus species, omics analysis in response to cadmium, construction of macroscopic biosensor, and characterization of carotenoids and chaperon protein were performed. Additionally, potential use of D. geothermalis in monosaccharide production from non-biodegradable plant materials was evaluated. Novel radiation resistant yeasts and bacteria were isolated and identified from environmental samples to obtain microbial and genomic resources. An optimal radiation mutant breeding method was set up for efficient and rapid isolation of target microbial mutants. Furthermore, an efficient ethanol producing mutant strain with high production yield and productivity was constructed using the breeding method in collaboration with Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology. Three Deinococcal bioindicators for radiation dosage confirmation after radiation sterilization process were developed. These results provide a comprehensive information for novel functional genetic elements, enzymes, and physiological active substances production or application. Eventually, industrial microbial cell factories based on radiation resistant microbial genomes can be developed and the technologies can be diffused to bioindustry continuously by this project

  14. Application of PIN diodes in Physics Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez-Jimenez, F. J.; Mondragon-Contreras, L.; Cruz-Estrada, P.

    2006-01-01

    A review of the application of PIN diodes as radiation detectors in different fields of Physics research is presented. The development and research in semiconductor technology, the use of PIN diodes in particle counting, X-and γ-ray spectroscopy, medical applications and charged particle spectroscopy are considered. Emphasis is made in the activities realized in the different research and development Mexican institutions dealing with this kind of radiation detectors

  15. Earth Radiation Budget Research at the NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G. Louis; Harrison, Edwin F.; Gibson, Gary G.

    2014-01-01

    In the 1970s research studies concentrating on satellite measurements of Earth's radiation budget started at the NASA Langley Research Center. Since that beginning, considerable effort has been devoted to developing measurement techniques, data analysis methods, and time-space sampling strategies to meet the radiation budget science requirements for climate studies. Implementation and success of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) was due to the remarkable teamwork of many engineers, scientists, and data analysts. Data from ERBE have provided a new understanding of the effects of clouds, aerosols, and El Nino/La Nina oscillation on the Earth's radiation. CERES spacecraft instruments have extended the time coverage with high quality climate data records for over a decade. Using ERBE and CERES measurements these teams have created information about radiation at the top of the atmosphere, at the surface, and throughout the atmosphere for a better understanding of our climate. They have also generated surface radiation products for designers of solar power plants and buildings and numerous other applications

  16. Radiation surveillance procedure during veterinary application of radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaldeep; Bhaktivinayagam, A.; Singh, Sanjay Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Radioisotopes have found wide applications in the field of biomedical veterinary nuclear medicine and research. Radiation safety issues during internal administration of radioisotopes to laboratory animals, unlike human use, are far more challenging and requires stringent, well planned and an organized system of radiation protection in the animal house facility. In this paper, we discuss our experience during veterinary research experiments involving use, handling and administration of liquid sources of 131 I. With extensive radiation protection surveillance and application of practical and essential radiation safety and hygiene practices, the radiation exposure and contamination levels during the veterinary application of isotopes can be kept ALARA

  17. Maintenance, operation, and research (radiation) zones (MORZ) application model - a design and operation tool for intelligent buildings with application to the advanced neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapira, H.B.; Brown, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a user-friendly application tool to assist in the design, operation and maintenance of large buildings/facilities charged with complex/extensive/elaborate activities. The model centers around a specially designed, easy-access data base containing essentially all the relevant information about the facility. Our first test case is the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) research reactor to be constructed as a center for neutron research

  18. Diverse applications of radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, R.

    1998-01-01

    Radiation chemistry began as early radiotherapists needed a reliable and appropriate dosimeter. The iron sulphate dosimeter, using ferrous iron in sulphuric acid and oxidation by irradiation, was a nasty brew of chemicals but it was sensitive, reliable and conveniently had the same density as human tissue. Water irradiation chemistry studies were driven by the need to understand the fundamental processes in radiotherapy; to control the corrosion problems in the cooling/ heat exchange systems of nuclear reactors and to find stable solvents and reagents for use in spent fuel element processing. The electrical and mechanical stability of materials in high radiation fields stimulated the attention of radiation chemists to the study of defects in solids. The coupled use of radiation and Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) enabled the identity of defect structures to be probed. This research led to the development of the sensitive Thermoluminescent Dosimeters, TLD's and a technique for dating of archaeological pottery artefacts. Radiation chemistry in the area of medicine is very active with fundamental studies of the mechanism of DNA strand breakage and the development of radiation sensitisers and protectors for therapeutic purposes. The major area of polymer radiation chemistry is one which Australia commands great international respect

  19. Radiation hazards from medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beekman, Z.M.

    1981-01-01

    An introduction is presented on the radiation hazards connected with biomedical radiography and nuclear medicine. The frequency of radiodiagnostic efforts was rather high in the Netherlands. This was reduced considerably by abolishing the thorax screening of the population. About diagnostic nuclear medicine less can be said because far fewer numerical data are available. An exposition of genetically and somatically significant doses and how to compute them is given. The drawing up of a profit versus risk evaluation for medical applications of ionizing radiations is recommended. (Auth.)

  20. Research and application of fuzzy subtractive clustering model on tensile strength of radiation vulcanization for nitrile-butadiene rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Duwen; Wang Hong; Zhu Nankang

    2010-01-01

    By use of fuzzy subtractive clustering model, the relationship between tensile strength of radiation vulcanization of NBRL (Nitrile-butadiene rubber latex) and irradiation parameters have been investigated. The correlation coefficient was calculated to be 0.8222 in the comparison of experimental data to the predicted data. It was obvious that fuzzy model identification method is not only high precision with small computation, but also easy to be used. It can directly supply the evolution of tensile strength of NBR by fuzzy modeling method in radiation vulcanization process for nitrile-butadiene rubber. (authors)

  1. Radiation protection in medical research. Licensing requirement for the use of radiation and advice for the application procedure; Strahlenschutz in der medizinischen Forschung. Genehmigungsbeduerftigkeit von Strahlenanwendungen und Hinweise zum Antragsverfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minkov, V.; Klammer, H.; Brix, G. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Abteilung fuer medizinischen und beruflichen Strahlenschutz, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2017-07-15

    In Germany, persons who are to be exposed to radiation for medical research purposes are protected by a licensing requirement. However, there are considerable uncertainties on the part of the applicants as to whether licensing by the competent Federal Office for Radiation Protection is necessary, and regarding the choice of application procedure. The article provides explanatory notes and practical assistance for applicants and an outlook on the forthcoming new regulations concerning the law on radiation protection of persons in the field of medical research. Questions and typical mistakes in the application process were identified and evaluated. The qualified physicians involved in a study are responsible for deciding whether a license is required for the intended application of radiation. The decision can be guided by answering the key question whether the study participants would undergo the same exposures regarding type and extent if they had not taken part in the study. When physicians are still unsure about their decision, they can seek the advisory service provided by the professional medical societies. Certain groups of people are particularly protected through the prohibition or restriction of radiation exposure. A simplified licensing procedure is used for a proportion of diagnostic procedures involving radiation when all related requirements are met; otherwise, the regular licensing procedure should be used. The new radiation protection law, which will enter into force on the 31st of december 2018, provides a notification procedure in addition to deadlines for both the notification and the licensing procedures. In the article, the authors consider how eligible studies involving applications of radiation that are legally not admissible at present may be feasible in the future, while still ensuring a high protection level for study participants. (orig.) [German] Personen, bei denen Strahlenanwendungen zum Zweck der medizinischen Forschung durchgefuehrt

  2. Synchrotron radiation facilities for chemical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Yoshihiko

    1995-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) research is of great importance in understanding radiation chemistry, physics, and biology. It is also clearly recognized in the international chemical community that chemical applications of SR are greatly advanced and divided into 1) Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics Studies-Gases, Surfaces, and Condensed Matter- , 2) Radiation Chemistry and Photochemistry, 3) X-ray Structural and XAFS Studies-Crystals, Surfaces, and Liquids- , 4) Analytical Chemistry, and 5) Synthesis or R and D of New Materials. In this paper, a survey is given of recent advances in the application of SR to the chemistry of excitation and ionization of molecules, i.e., SR chemistry, in the wavelength region between near-ultraviolet and hard X-rays. The topics will be chosen from those obtained at some leading SR facilities. (J.P.N.)

  3. Multibeam radiation therapy treatment application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manens, J.P.; Le Gall, G.; Chenal, C.; Ben Hassel, M.; Fresne, F.; Barillot, C.; Gibaud, B.; Lemoine, D.; Bouliou, A.; Scarabin, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    A software package has been developed for multibeam radiation therapy treatment application. We present in this study a computer-assisted dosimetric planning procedure which includes: i), an analytical stage for setting up the large volume via 2D and 3D displays; ii), a planning stage for issue of a treatment strategy including dosimetric simulations; and iii), a treatment stage to drive the target volume to the radiation unit isocenter. The combined use of stereotactic methods and multimodality imagery ensures spatial coherence and makes target definition and cognition of structure environment more accurate. The dosimetric planning suited to the spatial reference (the stereotactic frame) guarantees optimal distribution of the dose, computed by the original 3D volumetric algorithm. A computer-driven chair-framework cluster was designed to position the target volume at the radiation unit isocenter [fr

  4. Nuclear radiation application to nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakarvarti, S.K.

    2012-01-01

    Out of the numerous uses and applications of nuclear radiation, in particular heavy ions, the interaction of radiation with materials have culminated into a gamut of fine tools and technologies for taming the synergetic potential of the interaction. One such field of the immense importance is nanotechnology through nuclear radiation via use of ion-crafted polymeric membranes- so called 'Template Synthesis'. This talk will be addressed to the users of membranes - organic (polymeric) in general, formed through irradiation of polymeric foils with heavy and energetic ions followed by chemical processing leading finally to what is known as 'Track Etch Membranes (TEMs)', and present the review of the innovative uses of these membranes from filtration to electro-kinetic based applications and nano-/micro fabrication of devices- the potent aspect of emerging technologies. The emphasis would be on the dependence of useful and novel usages including applications in nano devices' fabrication. A membrane, with its most comprehensive and clear definition, is an intervening phase separating two phases and/or acting as an active or passive barrier to the transport of matter between phases. The very existence of a membrane relies upon the functionality domain of the pores contained therein. The geometrical traits and morphology of the pore ensembles dictate the applications, which any membrane can serve to. There are variety of membranes being developed and used in myriad of applications in diverse fields of science and technology. The range of commercially available membrane materials is quiet diverse and varies widely in terms of composition, and physical structure. The creation of pores, whether through natural self-assembling phenomenon or man-made processes, might itself be an issue of interest but these are the pore-traits which are fundamentally more important, whether the membrane is being used for sieving-one of the ever most important applications the mankind has been

  5. Applications of radiation processing: SRI experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajput, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Shriram Applied Radiation Centre (SARC) is a part of Shriram Institute for Industrial Research (SRI), and was established in 1986, in collaboration with Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT), Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB). SARC was established with a objective to popularize the radiation processing technology for various applications. SARC is a fully automatic, computerized plant setup as per the design and norms of BRIT/AERB for round the clock fail safe operations. The capacity of SARC Irradiator is 800 kCi of Cobalt -60 source which can process up to 10,000 cubic meters of material (0.1g/cc) at 25 kGy level

  6. Radiation chemistry and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    In recent years considerable progress has been made in understanding the fundamental chemical reactions that occur when materials are irradiated. This has followed from the development of new techniques for studying these reactions. The International Atomic Energy Agency held a Panel on Radiation Chemistry in Vienna on 17-21 April 1967, to review the current status of various sources, new techniques in radiation chemistry, and their applications. The main sources mentioned by the Panel were isotope sources, electron accelerators, and chemonuclear reactors. Among the basic techniques discussed were pulsed radiolysis, flash photolysis, fast ESR methods, irradiation at liquid helium temperatures, electric discharge methods and far ultra-violet methods. Interesting industrial applications were discussed, such as the development of wood-plastic combinations, and a paper was given on the curing of paints and thin films Refs, figs and tabs

  7. Radiation applications of physical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talrose, V.L.

    1993-01-01

    Many chemical energy problems have a physical chemistry nature connected with chemical kinetics and thermodynamics. In our country, the development in this field is associated with the name N.N. Semenov, who was involved in a large number of fundamental and applied physical chemistry problems.Energy development during the last decades created or sharpened new problems. Our new Institute, the Institute of Energy problems of Chemical Physics, USSR Academy of Sciences, is dealing with some of them. The present article is an overview of our work on radiation applications. Examples of the use of radiation in power industry (such as coal gasification), tire production, mechanical joints, metal powder production and sterilization of pharmaceutical products are given. Methods and problems involved in these applications are discussed and the great potential for vast utilization is demonstrated. (authors)

  8. Biological research for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kug Chan; Shim, Hae Won; Oh, Tae Jeong; Park, Seon Young; Lee, Kang Suk

    2000-04-01

    The work scope of Biological research for the radiation protection had contained the search of biological microanalytic methods for assessing the health effect by {gamma}-radiation and toxic agents, the standardization of human T-lymphocyte cell culture and polymerase chain reaction, T-cell clonal assay, and the quantification of mutation frequency in the hypoxanthine (guanine) phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene locus by single exposure or combined exposure. Especially, the polymerase chain reaction methods using reverse transcriptase has been developed to analyze the mutant gene induced by {gamma}-radiation and chemical (pentachlorophenol) agent exposure, and to investigate the point mutations in the HPRT gene locus of T-lymphocytes. The HPRT T-cell clonal assay revealed that it could not differentiate {gamma}-irradiation from pentachlorophenol, because the frequency of somatic mutations induced by both damaging agents increased in a dose-dependent manner. The analysis of DNA sequence alterations of HPRT mutant clones clearly showed that both damaging agents induced different mutational spectra in the HPRT locus of T-cells. The large deletions, which account for 75 percent of the analyzed mutants, are characteristic mutations induced by {gamma}-irradiation. By contrast, point mutations such as base substitutions and insertion, come up to 97 percent in the case of pentachlorophenol-treated cells. The point mutation frequencies at 190 base pair and 444 base pair positions are 3-6 folds as high as in those at other mutation positions. It may be that these mutation sites are hot spots induced by pentachlorophenol. These results suggest that the HPRT mutation spectrum can be used as a potential bio marker for assessing a specific environmental risk. (author)

  9. Biological research for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kug Chan; Shim, Hae Won; Oh, Tae Jeong; Park, Seon Young; Lee, Kang Suk

    2000-04-01

    The work scope of Biological research for the radiation protection had contained the search of biological microanalytic methods for assessing the health effect by γ-radiation and toxic agents, the standardization of human T-lymphocyte cell culture and polymerase chain reaction, T-cell clonal assay, and the quantification of mutation frequency in the hypoxanthine (guanine) phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene locus by single exposure or combined exposure. Especially, the polymerase chain reaction methods using reverse transcriptase has been developed to analyze the mutant gene induced by γ-radiation and chemical (pentachlorophenol) agent exposure, and to investigate the point mutations in the HPRT gene locus of T-lymphocytes. The HPRT T-cell clonal assay revealed that it could not differentiate γ-irradiation from pentachlorophenol, because the frequency of somatic mutations induced by both damaging agents increased in a dose-dependent manner. The analysis of DNA sequence alterations of HPRT mutant clones clearly showed that both damaging agents induced different mutational spectra in the HPRT locus of T-cells. The large deletions, which account for 75 percent of the analyzed mutants, are characteristic mutations induced by γ-irradiation. By contrast, point mutations such as base substitutions and insertion, come up to 97 percent in the case of pentachlorophenol-treated cells. The point mutation frequencies at 190 base pair and 444 base pair positions are 3-6 folds as high as in those at other mutation positions. It may be that these mutation sites are hot spots induced by pentachlorophenol. These results suggest that the HPRT mutation spectrum can be used as a potential bio marker for assessing a specific environmental risk. (author)

  10. Research of the radiation effects distributing rule for electron element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Yanyin

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the theory of testing way for statistical distribution is researched, and using the irradiation date on trial, application of Shapiro-wilk and construct way to radiation reinforce element checking and accepting is explained and authenticated. (authors)

  11. Radiation Detection for Homeland Security Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, James

    2008-05-01

    In the past twenty years or so, there have been significant changes in the strategy and applications for homeland security. Recently there have been significant at deterring and interdicting terrorists and associated organizations. This is a shift in the normal paradigm of deterrence and surveillance of a nation and the `conventional' methods of warfare to the `unconventional' means that terrorist organizations resort to. With that shift comes the responsibility to monitor international borders for weapons of mass destruction, including radiological weapons. As a result, countries around the world are deploying radiation detection instrumentation to interdict the illegal shipment of radioactive material crossing international borders. These efforts include deployments at land, rail, air, and sea ports of entry in the US and in European and Asian countries. Radioactive signatures of concern include radiation dispersal devices (RDD), nuclear warheads, and special nuclear material (SNM). Radiation portal monitors (RPMs) are used as the main screening tool for vehicles and cargo at borders, supplemented by handheld detectors, personal radiation detectors, and x-ray imaging systems. This talk will present an overview of radiation detection equipment with emphasis on radiation portal monitors. In the US, the deployment of radiation detection equipment is being coordinated by the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office within the Department of Homeland Security, and a brief summary of the program will be covered. Challenges with current generation systems will be discussed as well as areas of investigation and opportunities for improvements. The next generation of radiation portal monitors is being produced under the Advanced Spectroscopic Portal program and will be available for deployment in the near future. Additional technologies, from commercially available to experimental, that provide additional information for radiation screening, such as density imaging equipment, will

  12. Environmental application of radiation grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamada, Masao

    2007-01-01

    Adsorbent having high selectivity against a certain metal ion was synthesized by means of radiation-induced graft polymerization for the purpose of environmental application. The resulting adsorbents were utilized for the removal of toxic metal from scallop waste and the collection of uranium from seawater. As a novel application of grafting, the biodegradability of poly-hydroxybutylate was controlled by grafting. The biodegradability could be depressed by the graft chain and then recovered by external stimuli such as thermal and chemical treatments. (author)

  13. Common strategic research agenda for radiation protection in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Reflecting the change in funding strategies for European research projects, and the goal to jointly improve medical radiation protection through sustainable research efforts, five medical societies involved in the application of ionising radiation (European Association of Nuclear Medicine, EANM; European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics. EFOMP; European Federation of Radiographer Societies, EFRS; European Society of Radiology, ESR; European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology, ESTRO) have identified research areas of common interest and developed this first edition of the Common Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) for medical radiation protection. The research topics considered necessary and most urgent for effective medical care and efficient in terms of radiation protection are summarised in five main themes: 1. Measurement and quantification in the field of medical applications of ionising radiation 2. Normal tissue reactions, radiation-induced morbidity and long-term health problems 3. Optimisation of radiation exposure and harmonisation of practices 4. Justification of the use of ionising radiation in medical practice 5. Infrastructures for quality assurance The SRA is a living document; thus comments and suggestions by all stakeholders in medical radiation protection are welcome and will be dealt with by the European Alliance for Medical Radiation Protection Research (EURAMED) established by the above-mentioned societies. • Overcome the fragmentation of medical radiation protection research in Europe • Identify research areas of joint interest in the field of medical radiation protection • Improve the use of ionising radiation in medicine • Collect stakeholder feedback and seek consensus • Emphasise importance of clinical translation and evaluation of research results.

  14. Occupational radiation exposures in research laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaccari, S.; Papotti, E.; Pedrazzi, G.

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive sources are widely used in many research activities at University centers. In particular, the activities concerning use of sealed form ( 57 Co in Moessbauer application) and unsealed form ( 3 H, 14 C, 32 P in radioisotope laboratories) are analyzed. The radiological impact of these materials and potential effective doses to researchers and members of the public were evaluated to show compliance with regulatory limits. A review of the procedures performed by researchers and technicians in the research laboratories with the relative dose evaluations is presented in different situations, including normal operations and emergency situations, for example the fire. A study of the possible exposure to radiation by workers, restricted groups of people, and public in general, as well as environmental releases, is presented. (authors)

  15. Occupational radiation exposures in research laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaccari, S.; Papotti, E. [Parma Univ., Health Physics (Italy); Pedrazzi, G. [Parma Univ., Dept. of Public Health (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Radioactive sources are widely used in many research activities at University centers. In particular, the activities concerning use of sealed form ({sup 57}Co in Moessbauer application) and unsealed form ({sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 32}P in radioisotope laboratories) are analyzed. The radiological impact of these materials and potential effective doses to researchers and members of the public were evaluated to show compliance with regulatory limits. A review of the procedures performed by researchers and technicians in the research laboratories with the relative dose evaluations is presented in different situations, including normal operations and emergency situations, for example the fire. A study of the possible exposure to radiation by workers, restricted groups of people, and public in general, as well as environmental releases, is presented. (authors)

  16. Research on radiation effect and radiation protection at JAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kimiaki

    2007-01-01

    Researches on radiation effect and radiation protection at JAEA have been carried out in different sections. In recent years, the organizations were rearranged to attain better research circumstances, and new research programs started. At present, radiation effect studies focus on radiation effect mechanisms at atomic, molecular and cellular levels including simulation studies, and protection studies focus on dosimetry for conditions difficult to cover with currently used methods and data as well as the related basic studies. The outlines of the whole studies and also some descriptions on selected subjects will be given in this paper. (author)

  17. Computer applications in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, P.R.; Moores, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    Computer applications in general and diagnostic radiology in particular are becoming more widespread. Their application to the field of radiation protection in medical imaging, including quality control initiatives, is similarly becoming more widespread. Advances in computer technology have enabled departments of diagnostic radiology to have access to powerful yet affordable personal computers. The application of databases, expert systems and computer-based learning is under way. The executive information systems for the management of dose and QA data that are under way at IRS are discussed. An important consideration in developing these pragmatic software tools has been the range of computer literacy within the end user group. Using interfaces have been specifically designed to reflect the requirements of many end users who will have little or no computer knowledge. (Author)

  18. Radiation protection in medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldonado M, H.

    2008-12-01

    The justification of the practices is the fundamental principle on which rests the peaceful use of ionizing radiations. They actually contain as aspirations to improve the quality of people's lives, contributing to sustainable development through environmental protection, so that the sources security and the individuals protection will be conditions which are not and should can not be operated. For medical applications is a highly illustrative example of this, since both for the diagnosis and therapy, the goal is to achieve what is sought for the white tissue, secured the least possible damage to the neighboring tissues so that in turn reduce the negative effects for the patient. As a basis for achieving the above, it is essential to have qualified personnel in all areas incidents, for example users, workers, officials and staff members. There are a variety of specialists in the field of medical applications as, nuclear chemistry, nuclear engineering, radiation protection, medical physics, radiation physics and others. Among the human resource in the country must make up the majority are medical radiologists, highlighting gaps in the number of radiotherapy and nuclear medicine but specially in the medical physics, who is in some way from a special viewpoint of the formal school, new to the country. This is true for the number of facilities which are in the country. The radiation protection responsibilities in medical applications focus primarily on two figures: the radiology safety manager, who is primarily dedicated to the protection of occupationally exposed personnel and the public, and the medical physicist whose functions are geared towards the radiological protection of the patient. The principal legislation in the medical applications area has been enacted and is monitored by the Health Secretary and National Commission on Nuclear Safety and Safeguards, entities that have reached agreements to avoid overlap and over-regulation. Medical applications in the

  19. Radiation in perspective applications, risks and protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Everyone on earth is exposed to natural radiation. Radiation produced artificially is no different, either in kind or in effect, from that originating naturally. Although radiation has many beneficial applications, throughout medicine, industry and research, it can be harmful to human beings who must be adequately protected from unnecessary or excessive exposures. For this purpose, a thorough system of international principles and standards and stringent national legislations have been put in place. Yet radiation continues to be the subject of much public fear and controversy. This clearly written report, intended for the nonspecialist reader, aims to contribute to an enlightened debate on this subject by presenting the most up-to-date and authoritative material on sources, uses and affects of radiation, and ways in which people are protected from its risks. It discusses the development of radiation protection measures, its internationally agreed principles, and also addresses social and economic issues such as ethical questions, risk perceptions, risk comparisons, public participation in decision-making and the cost of protection. (author)

  20. Radiation Research Department annual report 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjaer. A.; Nielsen, S.P.

    2003-06-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Radiation Research Department in 2002. The departments research and development activities are organized in two research programmes: 'Radiation Physics' and 'Radioecology and Tracer Studies'. In addition the department is responsible for the task 'Dosimetry'. Lists of publications, committee memberships and staff members are included. (au)

  1. Applications of radiation technology and isotopes in industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machi, Sueo [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1994-12-31

    This paper reports the current status of applications of radiation technology and radioisotopes in industries, environmental conservation and medical products. The topics discussed are radiation processing - features and advantages, radiation sources, polymeric products, radiation cross-linking and grafting of polymers, radiation curing of surface coating, new developments; sterilization of medical products, applications for environmental protection i.e. cleaning the flue gases, disinfection of sewage and its recycling; nucleonic control system (NCS); major mechanisms of implementation of the Agency`s programme for technology transfer - research contract programme, model projects and technical cooperation projects.

  2. Applications of radiation technology and isotopes in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sueo Machi

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports the current status of applications of radiation technology and radioisotopes in industries, environmental conservation and medical products. The topics discussed are radiation processing - features and advantages, radiation sources, polymeric products, radiation cross-linking and grafting of polymers, radiation curing of surface coating, new developments; sterilization of medical products, applications for environmental protection i.e. cleaning the flue gases, disinfection of sewage and its recycling; nucleonic control system (NCS); major mechanisms of implementation of the Agency's programme for technology transfer - research contract programme, model projects and technical cooperation projects

  3. Calibration services for medical applications of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWerd, L.A.

    1993-12-31

    Calibration services for the medical community applications of radiation involve measuring radiation precisely and having traceability to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Radiation therapy applications involve the use of ionization chambers and electrometers for external beams and well-type ionization chamber systems as well as radioactive sources for brachytherapy. Diagnostic x-ray applications involve ionization chamber systems and devices to measure other parameters of the x-ray machine, such as non-invasive kVp meters. Calibration laboratories have been established to provide radiation calibration services while maintaining traceability to NIST. New radiation applications of the medical community spur investigation to provide the future calibration needs.

  4. Calibration services for medical applications of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWerd, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    Calibration services for the medical community applications of radiation involve measuring radiation precisely and having traceability to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Radiation therapy applications involve the use of ionization chambers and electrometers for external beams and well-type ionization chamber systems as well as radioactive sources for brachytherapy. Diagnostic x-ray applications involve ionization chamber systems and devices to measure other parameters of the x-ray machine, such as non-invasive kVp meters. Calibration laboratories have been established to provide radiation calibration services while maintaining traceability to NIST. New radiation applications of the medical community spur investigation to provide the future calibration needs

  5. Use of synchrotron radiation in radiation biology research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takeshi

    1981-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) holds great expectation as a new research tool in the new areas of material science, because it has the continuous spectral distribution from visible light to X-ray, and its intensity is 10 2 to 10 3 times as strong as that of conventional radiation sources. In the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, a synchrotron radiation experimental facility has been constructed, which will start operation in fiscal 1982. With this SR, the photons having the wavelength in undeveloped region from vacuum ultraviolet to soft X-ray are obtained as intense mono-wavelength light. The SR thus should contribute to the elucidation of the fundamentals in the biological action of radiation. The following matters are described: synchrotron radiation, experimental facility using SR, electron storage ring, features of SR, photon factory plan and synchrotron radiation experimental facility, utilization of SR in radiation biology field. (J.P.N.)

  6. The status and prospects of radiation application technology in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung-Kee, Jo

    2010-01-01

    Full text : This article describes the Nuclear age in Korea which began in 1959 when Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) was first established. Since then, Korea became one of the leading countries in the world nuclear technology and industry. In Korea, 20 nuclear power plants are currently in operation, which produced 34.1% of total electricity in 2009. Furthermore, 8 nuclear power plants are under construction. Eventually, Korea succeeded in exporting nuclear power plant to United Arab Emirates and research reactor to Jordan in 2009. The nuclear application can be divided into two fields. The first one is nuclear power production, and the other is radiation application. Due to the governmental promotion policy, the research activity on radiation and RI application is greatly rising in Korea. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS) are two leading research institutes in this field. KAERI is conducting RI production and neutron research by using research reactor, and radiation application research such as radiation processing, biotechnological and agricultural application, and cyclotron application. KIRAMS is dedicated to the research on the medical application of radiation. Advanced Radiation Technology Institute (ARTI), constructed in 2006 as a sub organization of KAERI, is a major research institute for radiation application to material engineering, agriculture, biotechnology, environmental technology, and cyclotron beam application. ARTI is equipped with various radiation facilities such as Co-60 irradiation facility (490 kCi and 3 kCi), gamma phytotron, gamma cell, electron beam irradiator, ion implanter, and 30 MeV cyclotron. In material engineering field, new industrial and biomedical materials (carbon fiber filament, composite electrolyte, fuel cell membrane, hydrogels) are developed by radiation processing of polymer materials. In agricultural area, new plant varieties

  7. Environmental gamma radiation levels around various DAE research centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takale, R.A.; Swarnakar, M.; Shetty, P.G.; Sahu, S.K.; Pandit, G.G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the gamma radiation levels of four research centres viz. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Trombay; Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Kolkata; Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore; and an industry Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT), Vashi. BARC is India's premier nuclear research facility and is a multi-disciplinary research centre with extensive infrastructure for advanced research and development (R and D). IGCAR, Kalpakkam is engaged in scientific research and advanced engineering programme towards the development of Fast Breeder Reactor technology. VECC Kolkata is dedicated to carry out frontier R and D in the fields of Accelerator Science and Technology, Nuclear Science (Theoretical and Experimental), and Material Science etc. RRCAT, Indore has rapidly grown into a premier institute for R and D in lasers, accelerators and their applications. BRIT, Vashi unit is involved in production, development, and supply of radioisotope based products and provision of isotope applications, radiation processing, radio analytical services etc. With an objective to keep a watch on the prevailing environmental background gamma radiation level around all the DAE installations, routine monitoring programme are being carried out using the Thermo Luminescent Dosimeters (TLDs). TLDs provide the simple, inexpensive and precise measurement of small, integrated, external gamma radiation dose rate. The general practice of this programme is to observe the outdoor gamma radiation levels. This paper summarizes the methodology and gamma radiation levels of four research centres viz. BARC, IGCAR, VECC, RRCAT and an industry BRIT, Vashi

  8. Research on transition undulator radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Shuzhuang; Dai Zhimin; Zhao Xiaofeng

    2000-01-01

    The theory of transition undulator radiation was described first, then the properties of infrared and far-infrared transition undulator radiation of SSRF U9.0 were explored by the methods of analytical treatment and numerical simulation, and the influence of beam energy spread, emittance, and magnetic field errors on transition undulator radiation was given also. It was shown that the flux density of the infrared and far-infrared transition undulator radiation of the SSRF U9.0 was high (e.g., the maximum flux density might reach 35 x 10 13 photons/(s·mrad 2 ·BW), collecting angle φ = 0.23 mrad, and the effects of beam energy spread, emittance and magnetic field errors on the radiation flux density were small

  9. Activities of RADA in promotion of radiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanase, M.; Funayama, Y.; Tanaka, O.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation Application Development Association (RADA) was established to promote the applications of radiation in 1968. Among the activities of RADA, we have five works directly to promote the application of radiation to the public. One of them is to publish a quarterly journal 'Radiation and Industries' which carries comprehensive articles on timely topics of radiation-based applications, patent information etc. And also RADA organizes the Radiation Process Symposium, which has been held every other year strictly, for exchange of information on radiation applications. The symposium started in 1985, where researchers and engineers in various and wide fields have been discussed on the radiation applications to industries. As the third, RADA distributes beautiful ornaments, which were produced by gamma-ray irradiation of crystals, glass and pearls, to promote better understanding of radiation. We also have taken charge of two businesses contracted with the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). One is to hold seminars on radiation and nuclear energy for teachers of primary, junior high and senior high schools to enhance their understanding about radiation and nuclear energy, and to facilitate the use in their classrooms of such knowledge concerning energy, environment and their effects on our lives. The other is to facilitate the transfer of technologies of radiation application in the realms of industry, agriculture, medical treatment, etc. through dispatching of experts, releasing data on radiation applications, and organizing technical seminars. Recently, we arranged an opportunity to use neutrons from research reactors through trial experiments for transferring the technology to industries. (author)

  10. Applications of synchrotron radiation in Biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bemski, G.

    1983-01-01

    A short introduction to the generation of the synchrotron radiation is made. Following, the applications of such a radiation in biophysics with emphasis to the study of the hemoglobin molecule are presented. (L.C.) [pt

  11. Medical applications in a nuclear research centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhavere, F.; Eggermont, G.

    2001-01-01

    In these days of public aversion to nuclear power, it can be important to point at the medical applications of ionising radiation. Not only the general public, but also the authorities and research centres have to be aware of these medical applications, which are not without risk for public health. Now that funding for nuclear research is declining, an opening to the medical world can give new opportunities to a nuclear research centre. A lot of research could be done where the tools developed for the nuclear power world are very useful. Even new applications for the research reactors like BNCT (boron neutron capture therapy) can be envisaged for the near future. In this contribution an overview will be given of the different techniques used in the medical world with ionising radiation. The specific example of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre will be given where the mission statement was changed to include a certain number of medical research topics. (authors)

  12. Research reactors: design, safety requirements and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Abobaker Mohammed Rahmtalla

    2014-09-01

    There are two types of reactors: research reactors or power reactors. The difference between the research reactor and energy reactor is that the research reactor has working temperature and fuel less than the power reactor. The research reactors cooling uses light or heavy water and also research reactors need reflector of graphite or beryllium to reduce the loss of neutrons from the reactor core. Research reactors are used for research training as well as testing of materials and the production of radioisotopes for medical uses and for industrial application. The difference is also that the research reactor smaller in terms of capacity than that of power plant. Research reactors produce radioactive isotopes are not used for energy production, the power plant generates electrical energy. In the world there are more than 284 reactor research in 56 countries, operates as source of neutron for scientific research. Among the incidents related to nuclear reactors leak radiation partial reactor which took place in three mile island nuclear near pennsylvania in 1979, due to result of the loss of control of the fission reaction, which led to the explosion emitting hug amounts of radiation. However, there was control of radiation inside the building, and so no occurred then, another accident that lead to radiation leakage similar in nuclear power plant Chernobyl in Russia in 1986, has led to deaths of 4000 people and exposing hundreds of thousands to radiation, and can continue to be effect of harmful radiation to affect future generations. (author)

  13. International cooperation in the field of radiation application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Shoichi

    1993-01-01

    Bilateral and multilateral research cooperations have been implemented at TRCRE, JAERI, producing favourable results in the field of radiation application. Frameworks and some achievements are described and the significance of the international cooperation is discussed. (Author)

  14. Radiation Research Department annual report 2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majborn, Benny; Damkjær, A.; Nielsen, Sven Poul

    2004-01-01

    This report presents a summary of the work of the Radiation Research Department in 2003. The main research areas were dosimetry, nuclear emergency preparedness, radioecology, and radioanalytical techniques. List of publications, committee memberships andstaff members are included....

  15. Radiation Research Department annual report 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjaer, A.; Nielsen, S.P. (eds.)

    2004-06-01

    This report presents a summary of the work of the Radiation Research Department in 2003. The main research areas were dosimetry, nuclear emergency preparedness, radioecology, and radioanalytical techniques. Lists of publications, committee memberships and staff members are included. (au)

  16. Environmental radiation monitoring around the research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Lee, Hyun Duk; Kim, Sam Rang; Choi, Yong Ho; Kim, Jeong Moo; Lee, Myeon Joo; Lee, Myeong Ho; Hong, Kwang Hee; Lim, Moon Ho; Lee, Won Yoon; Park, Do Won; Choi, Sang Do

    1993-04-01

    Environmental radiation monitoring was carried out measurement of environmental radiation and environmental radioactivity analysis around KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul research reactor. The results of environmental radiation monitoring around KAERI nuclear facilities and Seoul research reactor are the follows : The average level of environmental radiation dose measured by NaI scintillation counter and accumulated radiation dose by TLD was almost same level compared with the past years. Gross α, β radioactivity in environmental sample was not found abnormal data. γ-radionuclides in water samples were not detected. But only radionuclide K-40, which is natural radionuclide, was detected in the all samples and Cs-137 was detected in the surface soil and discharge sediment. The average level of environmental radiation dose around Seoul research reactor was almost same level compared with the past years, and Be-7 and Cs-137 were detected in some surface soil and discharge sediment by γ-spectrometry. (Author)

  17. Research attitudes and experiences of radiation therapists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scutter, Sheila; Halkett, Georgia

    2003-01-01

    An important factor in professional status is the ongoing development of the area as a result of research findings. However, involvement by radiation therapists in research, publication and higher degree study is limited. The aim of the current study was to investigate the attitudes of radiation therapists towards research, and to investigate the major factors contributing to their limited participation in research. To achieve this, an anonymous questionnaire was developed and distributed to radiation therapists working at the Royal Adelaide Hospital (RAH). The study found that radiation therapists at the RAH are interested in research but there are several factors that limit their involvement. These factors include limited knowledge about research processes, lack of support and lack of time to undertake research. Copyright (2003) Australian Institute of Radiography

  18. Development trend of radiation biology research-systems radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Rui

    2010-01-01

    Radiation biology research has past 80 years. We have known much more about fundamentals, processes and results of biology effects induced by radiation and various factors that influence biology effects wide and deep, however many old and new scientific problems occurring in the field of radiation biology research remain to be illustrated. To explore and figure these scientific problems need systemic concept, methods and multi dimension view on the base of considerations of complexity of biology system, diversity of biology response, temporal and spatial process of biological effects during occurrence, and complex feed back network of biological regulations. (authors)

  19. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.8--radiation research and its application sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 12 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the eighth one, the content is about radiation research and its application sub-volume

  20. Research and development of radiation utilizations in 1981 at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    There is the field of radiation utilization such as the application of the effect of radiation on matters and the techniques of measurement and analysis utilizing the properties of radiation, in addition to the use of atomic energy as heat or electric power. The fields of application of radiation utilization are very wide, and are closely related to the health and daily life of people. The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has performed the research and development on radiation utilization regarding radiochemistry, the application of irradiation, and the production and industrial utilization of radioisotopes. Also, the research of the radiation resistance of organic materials used for nuclear facilities, the development of organic materials, and the production of tritium have become necessary. In this booklet, the recent results of radiation utilization in the JAERI are summarized. The research and development of ion exchange membranes, organic glasses, the fixation of living body activators and water paints, the techniques of utilizing irradiation, the techniques of radioisotope productions and utilization, and the techniques related to the development of atomic energy are reported. (Kako, I.)

  1. Radiation Biomarker Research Using Mass Spectrometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bach, Stephan B; Hubert, Walter

    2007-01-01

    .... This review is intended to give an overview of mass spectrometry and its application to biological systems and biomarker discovery and how that might relate to relevant radiation dosimetry studies...

  2. Emerging applications of radiation processing. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 160 gamma irradiators and 1200 electron accelerator based processing units are in operation worldwide. In recent years the IAEA has prepared a directory of industrial gamma irradiators and held several meetings on developments in radiation technology applications. Developments involving the engineering of new sources (both isotope and electrical), high power accelerator applications, etc. have been reported recently, making a review and evaluation of this progress timely. Therefore the IAEA organized a technical meeting in Vienna, Austria, from 28 to 30 April 2003 to review the present situation and the potential contribution of radiation technology to sustainable development. Engineering developments and other features of radiation sources, both isotope and accelerator, were discussed. Recent research has concentrated on three fields: medical and food products, polymers, and environmental pollution control. The stability of radiation sterilized medical implants, as well as the uses of radiation processing for sterilization or decontamination of pharmaceuticals and pharmaceutical raw materials, radiation synthesis and modification of polymers for biomedical applications have been studied. Since separation and enrichment technologies play an important role in product recovery and pollution control, the possibility of radiation synthesis of stimuli-responsive membranes, hydrogels and adsorbents is being investigated. Finally, aside from the technologies for flue gas and wastewater treatment already in use, further research is ongoing on the treatment of organic contaminants in both gaseous and liquid phases. Environmental applications, which also offer new opportunities, should be carefully reviewed to reflect existing regulations and current knowledge. The increasingly serious problem of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) emissions may be solved in part by the application of radiation technology. This is being studied on a pilot scale for the removal of

  3. Emerging applications of radiation processing. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 160 gamma irradiators and 1200 electron accelerator based processing units are in operation worldwide. In recent years the IAEA has prepared a directory of industrial gamma irradiators and held several meetings on developments in radiation technology applications. Developments involving the engineering of new sources (both isotope and electrical), high power accelerator applications, etc. have been reported recently, making a review and evaluation of this progress timely. Therefore the IAEA organized a technical meeting in Vienna, Austria, from 28 to 30 April 2003 to review the present situation and the potential contribution of radiation technology to sustainable development. Engineering developments and other features of radiation sources, both isotope and accelerator, were discussed. Recent research has concentrated on three fields: medical and food products, polymers, and environmental pollution control. The stability of radiation sterilized medical implants, as well as the uses of radiation processing for sterilization or decontamination of pharmaceuticals and pharmaceutical raw materials, radiation synthesis and modification of polymers for biomedical applications have been studied. Since separation and enrichment technologies play an important role in product recovery and pollution control, the possibility of radiation synthesis of stimuli-responsive membranes, hydrogels and adsorbents is being investigated. Finally, aside from the technologies for flue gas and wastewater treatment already in use, further research is ongoing on the treatment of organic contaminants in both gaseous and liquid phases. Environmental applications, which also offer new opportunities, should be carefully reviewed to reflect existing regulations and current knowledge. The increasingly serious problem of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) emissions may be solved in part by the application of radiation technology. This is being studied on a pilot scale for the removal of

  4. Application of radiation and isotopes in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrzej, G. Chmielewski

    2006-01-01

    Full text: A vast variety of nuclear techniques is available for industrial, environmental, medical and research applications. Sealed or open radioisotope sources are applied as radiotracer in the system, in nucleonic gauges, in non destructive testing and in nuclear analytical techniques. Beside of isotopes X-ray tubes and accelerators operated in e-/X mode as a source of radiation are applied as well. These methods are used for process and material control, non-destructive evaluation of wells, castings and assembled machinery help to make industrial processes safer and more cost effective. For natural resource exploration radiotracers (RTT), sealed sources and nucleonic gauges (NCS) are used in the oil industry, in mineral processing and waste water treatment plants. Radioisotopes make important contributions in several sectors of economic significance including medicine industry, agriculture, structural safety and research. They are generally produced in research reactors or cyclotrons. More than 150 different radioisotopes in different forms are in use for various applications. Non-destructive testing (NDT) is essential for quality assurance of various products in diverse industries and construction projects apart from well established NDT protocols for industrial components, machinery and chemical pipelines, new techniques and applications, such as digital radiography for ecological safety, online inspection of concrete structures and pipe corrosion, are being developed. The new applications concern cargo inspection where Co 60 or e-/X sources are used. Radioisotopes are applied as radiotracers in industry and environment. Oil fields and refineries, chemical and metallurgical industries and wastewater purification installations are the end users benefiting from radioisotope techniques. Radioisotope techniques (radiotracers, gamma scanning, tomography and single particle tracking) are extensively used to identify and quantify multiphase reactors (phase hold

  5. Radiation related basic cancer research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Yoo, Young Do; Hong, Seok Il

    2000-04-01

    We studied the mechanism of radiation-induced apoptosis, the factors involved signaling, and the establishment of radiation-resistant cell lines in this study. During the TGF beta-stimulated epithelial mesenchymal transition(EMT), actin rearrangement occurred first and fibronectin matrix assembly followed. These two events were considered independent since cytochalasin-D did not inhibit TGF stimulated matrix assembly and fibronectin supplementation did not induce EMT. During EMT, alpha 5 beta 1 integrin and alpha v integrin have increased but MMP activation was not accompanied, which suggest that induction of extracellular matrix and activation of integrins may be main contributor for the EMT. Serum depriving induced apoptosis of HUVECs was prevented by vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF) and PMA. The apoptosis prevention by VEGF and PMA were conformed by DNA fragmentation assay. The p53 expression level was down regulated by VEGF and PMA compared with serum deprived HUVECs. However, VEGF and PMA induces c-Myc expression level on these cells. We made the 5 radiation-resistant clones from breast, lung and cervical cancer cells. More than 70%, 100% and 50% increased resistance was detected in breast cancer cells, lung cancer cells, and cervical cells, respectively. We carried out differential display-PCR to clone the radiation-resistant genes. 9 out of 10 genes were analyzed their sequence

  6. Radiation related basic cancer research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Yoo, Young Do; Hong, Seok Il [and others

    2000-04-01

    We studied the mechanism of radiation-induced apoptosis, the factors involved signaling, and the establishment of radiation-resistant cell lines in this study. During the TGF beta-stimulated epithelial mesenchymal transition(EMT), actin rearrangement occurred first and fibronectin matrix assembly followed. These two events were considered independent since cytochalasin-D did not inhibit TGF stimulated matrix assembly and fibronectin supplementation did not induce EMT. During EMT, alpha 5 beta 1 integrin and alpha v integrin have increased but MMP activation was not accompanied, which suggest that induction of extracellular matrix and activation of integrins may be main contributor for the EMT. Serum depriving induced apoptosis of HUVECs was prevented by vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF) and PMA. The apoptosis prevention by VEGF and PMA were conformed by DNA fragmentation assay. The p53 expression level was down regulated by VEGF and PMA compared with serum deprived HUVECs. However, VEGF and PMA induces c-Myc expression level on these cells. We made the 5 radiation-resistant clones from breast, lung and cervical cancer cells. More than 70%, 100% and 50% increased resistance was detected in breast cancer cells, lung cancer cells, and cervical cells, respectively. We carried out differential display-PCR to clone the radiation-resistant genes. 9 out of 10 genes were analyzed their sequence.

  7. Atomic physics research with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crasemann, B.; Wuilleumier, F.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter discusses applications of synchrotron light in atomic and molecular physics. Use of the radiation from storage rings has expanded and lent access to new areas of absorption and photoemission spectroscopy and scattering experiments. Techniques applied in connection with synchrotron radiation are discussed including absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray scattering. Problem areas that are being studied by the techniques mentioned above are discussed. Synchrotron radiation has provided the means for measuring the threshold-excitation and interference effects that signal the breakdown of the two-step model of atomic excitation/deexcitation. Synchrotron radiation provides more means of excited-state photoionization measurements

  8. Radiation Research Department annual report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjaer, A.; Nielsen, S.P. (eds.)

    2003-06-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Radiation Research Department in 2002. The departments research and development activities are organized in two research programmes: 'Radiation Physics' and 'Radioecology and Tracer Studies'. In addition the department is responsible for the task 'Dosimetry'. Lists of publications, committee memberships and staff members are included. (au)

  9. Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases

  10. Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-04-01

    The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  11. Research status on radiation hormesis at CRIEPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Sadao

    1996-01-01

    In 1982, Thomas D. Luckey, Prof. Emeritus, University of Missouri published a paper on radiation hormesis. His emphasis was on the beneficial effects of low-level radiation contributing to a healthy body, longer life, vitalization, etc. Radiation hormesis research by the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry in Japan was initiated on the rationale that if Luckey's claim were true, radiation management in Japan was extremely erroneous and the research institutes had to determine the truth. Obtaining many test results from some human data and various animal experiments on the health effects of low-level radiation that support the radiation hormesis hypothesis, the Central Research Institute decided to expand their research activities into a collaborative testing program with 14 universities and 2 other institutes on various subjects. The subjects in which they are now interested are as follows: 1. enhancement of molecular biological activities such as gene repair and apoptosis by low-level radiation; 2. enhancement of the immune system such as the ratio of Helper T cell/Suppressor T cell by low-level radiation; 3. rejuvenation such as cell membrane permeability, superoxide dismutase activity, and the therapy of old-age diseases such as diabetes and high blood pressure

  12. Bioterrorism and radiation. What to do? What research is needed?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.N.; Tofilon, P.

    2003-01-01

    Radiological and nuclear terrorism has emerged as a major concern. Often included within the broad category of bioterrorism, the response to the intentional exposure of populations to radiation requires governmental agencies, law enforcement agencies, policy-makers, experts in radiation medicine and radiation biology and an educated citizenry. Emerging knowledge of normal tissue injury following radiation will provide important areas for research, as outlined in a recent Radiation Research Program (RRP) Workshop from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) (Stone HB, Rad Res 157:204- 223, 2002). Such research involves radiation biology and wound healing and may ultimately provide strategies for pre-exposure radioprotectors as well as post-exposure strategies to prevent serious normal tissue damage. Radiation in the Moderate Dose range, defined as 1-10 Gy, applies to radiological and nuclear terrorism and also to clinical radiation therapy. (RRP Moderate Dose Radiation Workshop, Coleman CN, Rad Res, in press 2003). New approaches such as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) will expose more tissues to low doses of radiation. Strategies for developing agents for normal tissue targets (Tofilon). The successful application of radiotherapy as a cancer treatment modality is severely constrained by the risk for normal tissue injury. Because approximately half of all cancer patients receive radiation treatment, the ability to selectively protect normal tissue would be of obvious clinical benefit. In addition to cancer therapy, current geopolitical circumstances reinforce the need for generating agents that protect against the consequences of environmental radiation exposure, accidental or intentional. Currently, there are relatively few available agents with the potential to reduce or eliminate radiation-induced normal tissue injury after clinical and/or environmental exposure. A goal of the Radiation Research Program is to identify and develop novel radioprotectors

  13. Practical radiation shielding for biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, R.C.; Reginatto, M.; Party, E.; Gershey, E.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on calculations which exist for estimating shielding required for radioactivity; however, they are often not applicable for the radionuclides and activities common in biomedical research. A variety of commercially available Lucite shields are being marketed to the biomedical community. Their advertisements may lead laboratory workers to expect better radiation protection than these shields can provide or to assume erroneously that very weak beta emitters require extensive shielding. The authors have conducted a series of shielding experiments designed to simulate exposures from the amounts of 32 P, 51 Cr and 125 I typically used in biomedical laboratories. For most routine work, ≥0.64 cm of Lucite covered with various thicknesses of lead will reduce whole-body occupational exposure rates of < 1mR/hr at the point of contact

  14. Application of radioprotectors in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kljajic, R.R.; Masic, Z.S.

    2000-01-01

    Application of the ionizing radiation in almost all the fields of human activities enlarged the knowledge of their harming influence on the living beings. At the same time there have been many investigations of different chemical means that could successfully be used in protection from radiation. Until today several hundreds of different chemical compounds have been considered to be a potential chemical radioprotector. Analyzing the results of investigating great number of potential radioprotective compounds, it can be said that those containing sulfur provide the most effective protection. That are aminothiols, aminodisulphides, derivatives of thiourea, thiosulphuric and thiophosphate acid, dithiocarbamates, thiazolines, some of biogen amines and their derivates. Among the investigated compounds there is a certain number that, under some circumstances, has shown a protective effect on the experimental animals. In the work comparative investigation of the protective effect of cistaphosa (WR-638) and gamaphosa (WR-2721) have been researched on the big experimental animals, radiated with a high level of X-radiation. Well protective influence of both radioprotectors has been proven but gamafos showed higher efficiency. (author)

  15. Regulation for radiation protection in applications of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonawane, Avinash U.

    2016-01-01

    Applications of ionising radiation in multifarious field are increasing in the country for the societal benefits. The national regulatory body ensures safety and security of radiation sources by enforcing provisions in the national law and other relevant rules issued under the principle law. In addition, the enforcement of detailed requirements contained in practice specific safety codes and standard and issuance of safety directives brings effectiveness in ensuring safe handling and secure management of radiation sources. The regulatory requirements for control over radiation sources throughout their life-cycle have evolved over the years from experience gained. Nevertheless, some of the regulatory activities which require special attention have been identified such as the development of regulation to deal with advance emerging radiation technology in applications of radiation in medicine and industry; sustaining continuity in ensuring human resource development programme; inspections of category 3 and 4 disused sources and their safe disposal; measures for controlling transboundary movement of radiation sources. The regulatory measures have been contemplated and are being enforced to deal with the above issues in an effective manner. The complete involvement of the management of radiation facilities, radiation workers and their commitment in establishing and maintaining safety and security culture is essential to handle the radiation sources safely and efficiently at all times

  16. Innovative Applications in Radiation Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vroom, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    Prior to acquisition by Tyco International, Raychem Corporation initiated several programs to develop new products, reduce the production cost of existing products and identify new market areas that would utilize the skills available in the company in the area of radiation chemistry and radiation technology. Several areas were considered including radiation initiation of specific chemical reactions in polymers at high temperatures, the use of purpose built irradiation equipment for low cost production of specific high volume products and environmental remediation of ground or waste water. In this regard, the Corporation supported a program to improve how material is processed through an electron accelerator and to develop specific equipment to utilize these improvements. The goal was to make the radiation process a single entity as opposed to an accelerator and a material handling system. This paper discusses some of the developments from this program. In the area of radiation induced chemical reactions in polymers at elevated temperatures, a robust accelerator was developed that would allow the irradiation of polymeric materials in the melt as they exited forming equipment such as plastics extruders. Here the goal was to have a low energy, self shielded accelerator in the 300 KeV to 500 KeV range in which extruded polymeric material could be immediately processed in a single pass at melt temperature before it was cooled and allowed to encounter any surfaces. Two machines that met these criteria were constructed and will be discussed. Several of the innovations coming from the high processing temperature, single pass accelerator project were incorporated into the development of purpose built machines to process specific existing products such as wire and heat shrink tubing. Here the goal was to have machines with the minimum acceptable electron energy and compact shielding to reduce cost and foot print. Beam scanning technology developed will be discussed. A major

  17. Applications of Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to 'seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world.' One way this objective is achieved is through the publication of a range of technical series. Two of these are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III.A.6 of the IAEA Statute, the safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property'. The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are written primarily in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own programmes. The principal users are the regulatory bodies in Member States and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series comprises reports designed to encourage and assist R and D on, and application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia, and government officials, among others. This information is presented in guides, reports on technology status and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series complements the IAEA Safety Standards Series. The purpose of the earlier publication, The Application of Research Reactors, IAEA-TECDOC-1234, was to present descriptions of the typical forms of research reactor use. The necessary criteria to enable an application to be performed were outlined for each one, and, in many cases, the minimum as well as the desirable requirements were given. This revision of the publication over a decade later maintains the original purpose and now specifically takes into account the changes in service requirements demanded by the relevant stakeholders. In particular, the significant improvements in

  18. Synchrotron radiation and industrial research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, R.P.

    1995-01-01

    Fundamental studies on the properties of many different materials are of prime importance to most industrial concerns. For Unilever, solids (crystalline and amorphous), soft solids and complex fluids are the materials of primary interest. Synchrotron radiation has proved of great value for the analysis of a variety of such materials, because the intense and highly collimated radiation source has enabled us to obtain structural information rapidly as well as in time-resolved mode. In this paper are outlined the types of materials problems faced, and how we use different techniques to elucidate structure (both short and long range order) in zeolites, amorphous solids, as well as in biomaterials such as skin and hair containing lipid phases. Both equilibrium and time-resolved studies are described. (orig.)

  19. Radiation research: the European programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, G.B.

    1985-01-01

    A summary is given of an oral presentation on the European Community's Radiation Protection Programme. Aspects of the programme discussed included its development which began 25 years ago, the administrative structure, the financial success and the funding for 1985/89. Finally, the six subject sectors of the programme were discussed, giving a broad description of where the emphases had been laid and how each sector had fared. (U.K.)

  20. Impact of radiation research on clinical trials in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, P.; Van Ess, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    The authors present an outline review of the history of the formation of the cooperative group called International Clinical Trials in Radiation Oncology (ICTRO), and the following areas are briefly discussed together with some projections for the direction of clinical trials in radiation oncology into the 1990s:- radiosensitizers, radioprotectors, and their combination, drug-radiation interactions, dose/time/fractionation, hyperthermia, biological response modifiers and radiolabelled antibodies, high LET, particularly neutron therapy, large field irradiation and interoperative irradiation, research studies on specific sites. (U.K.)

  1. Radiation methods in research of ancient monuments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cechak, T.; Gerndt, J.; Kubelik, M.; Musilek, L.; Pavlik, Milan

    2000-01-01

    A 'Laboratory of Quantitative Methods in Monument Research' is being built at the CTU Prague. Its primary orientation is the investigation of historic architecture, although other objects of art can also be investigated. In the first phase, two radiation methods are being established, but it is set up in such a way, that various other methods can readily be added in its future development. The radiation methods chosen for the initial development of the laboratory are: thermoluminescence dating and X-ray fluorescence analysis. The design of the automated TL-reader, built in our laboratories, is adjusted for the purpose of dating of historic brick architecture (which, of course, does not exclude applications for ceramics and other materials). The investigation of renaissance architecture in southern Bohemia and Moravia is under preparation as the first large campaign of this kind in the Czech Republic. Radionuclide X-ray fluorescence analysis has been chosen as the basic analytical method in the laboratory. The possibility of analyses of paintings and fired building materials (bricks, roof tiles) have been investigated. The first results in both the areas are very promising

  2. Medical applications with synchrotron radiation in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, T.; Itai, Y. [Univ. of Tsukuba, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba (Japan); Hyodo, K.; Ando, M. [KEK, Tsukuba (Japan); Akatsuka, T. [Yamagata Univ., Faculty of Engineering, Yamagata (Japan); Uyama, C. [National Cardiovascular Centre, Suita (Japan)

    1998-05-01

    In Japan, various medical applications of synchrotron X-ray imaging, such as angiography, monochromatic X-ray computed tomography (CT), radiography and radiation therapy, are being developed. In particular, coronary arteriography (CAG) is quite an important clinical application of synchrotron radiation. Using a two-dimensional imaging method, the first human intravenous CAG was carried out at KEK in May 1996; however, further improvements of image quality are required in clinical practice. On the other hand, two-dimensional aortographic CAG revealed canine coronary arteries as clearly as those on selective CAG, and coronary arteries less than 0.2 mm in diameter. Among applications of synchrotron radiation to X-ray CT, phase-contrast X-ray CT and fluorescent X-ray CT are expected to be very interesting future applications of synchrotron radiation. For actual clinical applications of synchrotron radiation, a medical beamline and a laboratory are now being constructed at SPring-8 in Harima. 55 refs.

  3. Overview of radiation effects research in photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Robert C.; Cohn, Lewis M.; Taylor, Edward W.; Greenwell, Roger A.

    1995-05-01

    A brief overview of ongoing radiation effects research in photonics is presented focusing on integrated optic and acousto-optic components. A short summary of radiation-induced effects in electro-optic modulators, detector arrays, and other photonic technologies is presented along with extensive references. The coordinated radiation effects studies among researchers within the Tri-Service Organizations and international experimental teams are beginning to demonstrate consistent measurements of radiation-induced effects in photonic components and confirming earlier reported data. This paper will present an overview of these coordinated investigations and focus on key research being conducted with the AFMC Phillips Laboratory, Naval Research Laboratory, Defence Nuclear Agency, NATO Nuclear Effects Task Group, and the Tri-Service Photonics Coordinating Committee.

  4. Ionizing radiations: medical and industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, H.

    1994-01-01

    Medical diagnosis with X-rays is the best known use of ionizing radiations on account of its wide diffusion (about 57 500 units in France). Other medical applications of artificial radionuclides involving a smaller number of installations are also well known, i.e. gamma teletherapy (167 units), brachytherapy (119 units) or therapy using unsealed sources (257 units). The industrial uses of ionising radiation, the diversity of which is very large, are generally less well known. The use of X- and gamma rays for non-destructive testing or food preservation and the use of tracers have some notoriety, but few people know that radioactive sources are involved in the measurement of parameters controlling industrial processes. The number of persons authorized to hold, use and/or sell artificial radionuclides amounts to about 4 800, all applications included. Approximately 650 of them are involved in therapy and 500 in medical research. The aim of this paper, which is not exhaustive, is to review a few typical applications of radionuclides both in the medical and industrial fields. It also supplies data both on the number of people authorized to use each technique and the radionuclides involved. (author). 10 tabs

  5. Radiation, chemicals, and occupational health research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation protection and its interplay with physical research programs are described. Differences and similarities between problems in health protection for chemicals and for radiation are discussed. The importance of dosimetry in radiation work and its relevance to chemicals are cited. A collaborative program between physical and biological scientists on the toxicity of metals is briefly described. It serves as an example of new research directed toward the development of fundamental concepts and principles as a basis for understanding and controlling occupational and population exposures to chemicals. 12 references, 4 figures

  6. Application of synchrotron radiation in archaeology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakai, Izumi [Science University of Tokyo, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Chemistry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    This paper reports current status of archaeological application of synchrotron radiation (SR). The advantages of SR in archaeological research and various application possibilities of X-ray powder diffraction (XPD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analyses of objects and materials of cultural heritage value are demonstrated through a number of case studies from literatures. They include XPD characterizations of Egyptian cosmetic powder, Attic Black Gloss, and pigments in Gothic altarpieces, provenance analysis of Old-Kutani china wares by high energy XRF, and XAFS analyses to reveal to origin of red color in Satsuma copper-ruby glass and role of iron in Maya blue. (author)

  7. Radiation chemistry; principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, F.; Rodgers, M.A.J.

    1994-01-01

    The book attempts to present those fields of radiation chemistry which depend on the principles of radiation chemistry. The first four chapters are some prelude about radiation chemistry principles with respect to how ionizing radiation interacts with matter, and primary results from these interactions and, which kinetic laws are followed by these primary interactions and which equipment for qualitative studies is necessary. Following chapters included principles fields of radiation chemistry. The last six chapters discussed of principle of chemistry from physical and chemical point of view. In this connection the fundamentals of radiation on biological system is emphasised. On one hand, the importance of it for hygiene and safety as neoplasms therapy is discussed. on the other hand, its industrial importance is presented

  8. Occupational applications of ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, P.

    1987-01-01

    A large population of workers are exposed to ultraviolet radiation in various occupational environments which often necessitates protection. Since ultraviolet radiation may create other environmental problems an occupational hazard- and protection evaluation can be complicated. Threshold Limit Values adopted by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) on ultraviolet radiation are used in most countries as guidelines for risk assessment and control measures. This review addresses the levels of ultraviolet radiation met in occupational environments, its measurement and evaluation, and discusses different protection methods. Ultraviolet lasers are beginning to find their way into industrial processes but are still limited in number and they will not be covered here. Emphasis is on broad band incoherent radiation in high risk environments such as welding, and on the evaluation of protective eyewear, see-through curtains and plastics. Other occupational risks associated with the emission of ultraviolet radiation are discussed

  9. Practical applications of coherent transition radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    The predictable nature of transition radiation (TR) emissions has been demonstrated under a wide variety of experimental conditions. The reliable character of TR allows the design of specific practical applications that use emissions from the optical to the x-ray spectral regions. Applications often can be enhanced by the spatial coherence of TR, and some have become highly developed. New applications may be developed through the use of other related radiation mechanisms. 20 refs., 3 figs

  10. Radiation protection in medical and biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuente Puch, A.E. de la

    2013-01-01

    The human exposure to ionizing radiation in the context of medical and biomedical research raises specific ethical challenges whose resolution approaches should be based on scientific, legal and procedural matters. Joint Resolution MINSAP CITMA-Regulation 'Basic Standards of Radiation Safety' of 30 November 2001 (hereafter NBS) provides for the first time in Cuba legislation specifically designed to protect patients and healthy people who participate in research programs medical and biomedical and exposed to radiation. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the need to develop specific requirements for radiation protection in medical and biomedical research, as well as to identify all the institutions involved in this in order to establish the necessary cooperation to ensure the protection of persons participating in the investigation

  11. Teledosimetry and its application in radiation hygiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, J.

    1975-01-01

    The principle and application is dealt with of teledosimetry, a new method of telemetric transfer of data on the flux density of ionizing radiation. A teledosimetric apparatus is described consisting of a transmitter with a halogen GM tube and a receiver with an evaluation device. Two cases of the application of teledosimetry in radiation hygiene practice are reported. The new method makes possible the monitoring of personnel working with radiation, the testing of the efficiency of radiation protection, and a reduction of doses to personnel in the process studied. (author)

  12. Research priorities for occupational radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The Subpanel on Occupational Radiation Protection Research concludes that the most urgently needed research is that leading to the resolution of the potential effects of low-level ionizing radiation. This is the primary driving force in setting appropriate radiation protection standards and in directing the emphasis of radiation protection efforts. Much has already been done in collecting data that represents a compendium of knowledge that should be fully reviewed and understood. It is imperative that health physics researchers more effectively use that data and apply the findings to enhance understanding of the potential health effects of low-level ionizing radiation and improve the risk estimates upon which current occupational radiation protection procedures and requirements depend. Research must be focused to best serve needs in the immediate years ahead. Only then will we get the most out of what is accomplished. Beyond the above fundamental need, a number of applied research areas also have been identified as national priority issues. If effective governmental focus is achieved on several of the most important national priority issues, important occupational radiation protection research will be enhanced, more effectively coordinated, and more quickly applied to the work environment. Response in the near term will be enhanced and costs will be reduced by: developing microprocessor-aided open-quotes smartclose quotes instruments to simplify the use and processing of radiation data; developing more sensitive, energy-independent, and tissue-equivalent dosimeters to more accurately quantify personnel dose; and developing an improved risk assessment technology base. This can lead to savings of millions of dollars in current efforts needed to ensure personnel safety and to meet new, more stringent occupational guidelines

  13. EURADOS strategic research agenda: vision for dosimetry of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruehm, W.; Woda, C.; Fantuzzi, E.; Harrison, R.; Schuhmacher, H.; Neumaier, S.; Vanhavere, F.; Alves, J.; Bottollier Depois, J.F.; Fattibene, P.; Knezevic, Z.; Miljanic, S.; Lopez, M. A.; Mayer, S.; Olko, P.; Stadtmann, H.; Tanner, R.

    2016-01-01

    Since autumn 2012, the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) has been developing its Strategic Research Agenda (SRA), which is intended to contribute to the identification of future research needs in radiation dosimetry in Europe. The present article summarises-based on input from EURADOS Working Groups (WGs) and Voting Members-five visions in dosimetry and defines key issues in dosimetry research that are considered important for the next decades. The five visions include scientific developments required towards (a) updated fundamental dose concepts and quantities, (b) improved radiation risk estimates deduced from epidemiological cohorts, (c) efficient dose assessment for radiological emergencies, (d) integrated personalised dosimetry in medical applications and (e) improved radiation protection of workers and the public. The SRA of EURADOS will be used as a guideline for future activities of the EURADOS WGs. A detailed version of the SRA can be downloaded as a EURADOS report from the EURADOS web site (www.eurados.org). (authors)

  14. People involved in radiation research and protection - an historical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toussaint, L.F.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The lives of selected people involved in radiation research are covered in two parts: 1. history of radiation and radioactivity; and 2. historical aspects of radiation and radiation protection in Western Australia. History of radiation/radioactivity: The background of some of the key people involved in early radiation research is discussed. These include Rontgen and Becqucrel who undertook early research into X-rays and radioactivity respectively. As well as the radiation hazards which early radiation scientists faced, there were also social pressures, as exemplified by the life of women such as Marie Curie, particularly after the death of her husband Pierre. Despite this being the time of the so-called 'beautiful years' in Europe, where there was a friendly exchange of ideas between scientists from various countries, there were also protracted disagreements. Some of the scientific findings of the Curies' daughter (Irene Joliot-Curie) and husband (Frederic Joliot-Curie) were vigorously disputed by Lisa Meitner (and colleague Otto Hahn) in Vienna. The 'beautiful years' came to an end when politics intruded and scientists such as Lisa Meitner had to flee from persecution. The splitting of the atom and realisation (by Leo Szilard) that a chain reaction was possible, led to political barriers being erected around scientists. With Europe poised for war, the implication of this science for warfare application was cause for concern among many of the normally free thinking and co-operative scientists. Secrecy now prevailed.

  15. Advanced radiation chemistry research: Current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    Radiation chemistry is a branch of chemistry that studies chemical transformations in materials exposed to high-energy radiations. It is based on the use of ionizing radiation as the initiator or catalyst in chemical reactions. The most significant advantage of radiation chemistry lies in its ability to be used in the production and study of almost any reactive atomic and molecular species playing a part in chemical reaction, synthesis, industrial processes, or in biological systems. Over the the last few years a number of meetings have taken place, under the auspices of the IAEA, in order to evaluate recent developments in radiation chemistry as well as the trends indicated by the results obtained. Radiation chemists from different countries have participated at these meetings. The present publication, a companion to the previous publication - New Trends and Development in Radiation Chemistry, IAEA-TECDOC-527 (1989) - includes some of the important contributions presented at these meetings. It is hoped that it will provide a useful overview of current activities and of emerging trends in this field, thus promoting better understanding of potential contributions of radiation chemistry to other fields of knowledge as well as to practical applications in industry, medicine and agriculture. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. Advanced radiation chemistry research: Current status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    Radiation chemistry is a branch of chemistry that studies chemical transformations in materials exposed to high-energy radiations. It is based on the use of ionizing radiation as the initiator or catalyst in chemical reactions. The most significant advantage of radiation chemistry lies in its ability to be used in the production and study of almost any reactive atomic and molecular species playing a part in chemical reaction, synthesis, industrial processes, or in biological systems. Over the the last few years a number of meetings have taken place, under the auspices of the IAEA, in order to evaluate recent developments in radiation chemistry as well as the trends indicated by the results obtained. Radiation chemists from different countries have participated at these meetings. The present publication, a companion to the previous publication - New Trends and Development in Radiation Chemistry, IAEA-TECDOC-527 (1989) - includes some of the important contributions presented at these meetings. It is hoped that it will provide a useful overview of current activities and of emerging trends in this field, thus promoting better understanding of potential contributions of radiation chemistry to other fields of knowledge as well as to practical applications in industry, medicine and agriculture. Refs, figs and tabs.

  17. Antiproton radiation found effective in cancer research

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "An international collaboration of scientists has completed the first ever antiproton beam experiments designed to reveal the biological effectiveness of antiproton radiation in terminating cells used for cancer research...PBar Labs assembled the collaboration at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva) to perform the measurements" (1 page).

  18. Radiation Protection Research: Radiological Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeevaert, T.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's research in the field of radiological impact assessment are (1) to elaborate and to improve methods and guidelines for the evaluation of restoration options for contaminated sites; (2) to develop, test and improve biosphere models for the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal in near-surface or geological repositories; (3) to asses the impact of releases from nuclear or industrial installations. Main achievements in these areas for 2000 are summarised

  19. Radiation protection at the Cadarache research center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2015-01-01

    This article recalls the French law about radiation protection and its evolution due to the implementation of the 2013/59-EURATOM directive that separates the missions of counsel from the more operative missions of the person appointed as 'competent in radiation protection'. The organisation of the radiation protection of the Cadarache research center is presented. The issue of sub-contracting and the respect of an adequate standard of radioprotection is detailed since 2 facilities operated by AREVA are being dismantled on the site. (A.C.)

  20. Research plan for external radiation protection research 1994/95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    A broad outline of the research financed by the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute but performed outside the Institute. The fiscal year 94/95 is the last year of a three year research plan, and has a budget of about 21 MSEK (close to 3 MUSD). 9.5 MSEK is spent on research connected to nuclear power, 4.1 MSEK on other radiation protection and 3.3 MSEK on participation in the research program of the European Union. Short descriptions of the different areas are given in the report

  1. The industrial applications of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This report presents all industrial applications of ionizing radiations in France, for food preservation, radiosterilization of drugs, medical materials and cosmetic products, for radiation chemistry of polymers. This report also describes the industrial plants of irradiation (electron, cobalt 60). Finally, it explains the legal and safety aspects

  2. Nuclear radiation applications in hydrological investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, S.M.

    1978-01-01

    The applications of radiation sources for the determination of water and soil properties in hydrological investigations are many and varied. These include snow gauging, soil moisture and density determinations, measurement of suspended sediment concentrations in natural streams and nuclear well logging for groundwater exploitation. Besides the above, many radiation physics aspects play an important role in the development of radiotracer techniques, particularly in sediment transport studies. The article reviews the above applications with reference to their limitations and advantages. (author)

  3. Development of medical application methods using radiation. Radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, S. M.; Kim, E.H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lim, S. J.; Choi, T. H.; Hong, S. W.; Chung, H. Y.; No, W. C.; Oh, B. H.; Hong, H. J.

    1999-04-01

    In this project, we studied following subjects: 1. development of monoclonal antibodies and radiopharmaceuticals 2. clinical applications of radionuclide therapy 3. radioimmunoguided surgery 4. prevention of restenosis with intracoronary radiation. The results can be applied for the following objectives: 1) radionuclide therapy will be applied in clinical practice to treat the cancer patients or other diseases in multi-center trial. 2) The newly developed monoclonal antibodies and biomolecules can be used in biology, chemistry or other basic life science research. 3) The new methods for the analysis of therapeutic effects, such as dosimetry, and quantitative analysis methods of radioactivity, can be applied in basic research, such as radiation oncology and radiation biology

  4. Development of medical application methods using radiation. Radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, S. M.; Kim, E.H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lim, S. J.; Choi, T. H.; Hong, S. W.; Chung, H. Y.; No, W. C. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul, (Korea, Republic of); Oh, B. H. [Seoul National University. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, H. J. [Antibody Engineering Research Unit, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    In this project, we studied following subjects: 1. development of monoclonal antibodies and radiopharmaceuticals 2. clinical applications of radionuclide therapy 3. radioimmunoguided surgery 4. prevention of restenosis with intracoronary radiation. The results can be applied for the following objectives: (1) radionuclide therapy will be applied in clinical practice to treat the cancer patients or other diseases in multi-center trial. (2) The newly developed monoclonal antibodies and biomolecules can be used in biology, chemistry or other basic life science research. (3) The new methods for the analysis of therapeutic effects, such as dosimetry, and quantitative analysis methods of radioactivity, can be applied in basic research, such as radiation oncology and radiation biology.

  5. 2010 Gordon Research Conference On Radiation Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlando, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 Gordon Conference on Radiation Chemistry will present cutting edge research regarding the study of radiation-induced chemical transformations. Radiation Chemistry or 'high energy' chemistry is primarily initiated by ionizing radiation: i.e. photons or particles with energy sufficient to create conduction band electrons and 'holes', excitons, ionic and neutral free radicals, highly excited states, and solvated electrons. These transients often interact or 'react' to form products vastly different than those produced under thermal equilibrium conditions. The non-equilibrium, non-thermal conditions driving radiation chemistry exist in plasmas, star-forming regions, the outer solar system, nuclear reactors, nuclear waste repositories, radiation-based medical/clinical treatment centers and in radiation/materials processing facilities. The 2010 conference has a strong interdisciplinary flavor with focus areas spanning (1) the fundamental physics and chemistry involved in ultrafast (atto/femtosecond) energy deposition events, (2) radiation-induced processes in biology (particularly spatially resolved studies), (3) radiation-induced modification of materials at the nanoscale and cosmic ray/x-ray mediated processes in planetary science/astrochemistry. While the conference concentrates on fundamental science, topical applied areas covered will also include nuclear power, materials/polymer processing, and clinical/radiation treatment in medicine. The Conference will bring together investigators at the forefront of their field, and will provide opportunities for junior scientists and graduate students to present work in poster format or as contributors to the Young Investigator session. The program and format provides excellent avenues to promote cross-disciplinary collaborations.

  6. Research needs and opportunities in radiation chemistry workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbara, Paul F

    1998-04-19

    There is a growing urgency for forefront basic research on ionizing radiation-induced chemical reactions, due to the relevance of these reactions in such areas of critical national need as environmental waste management, environmental remediation, nuclear energy production, and medical diagnosis and radiation therapy. Fortunately, the emergence of new theoretical and experimental tools for the study of radiation-induced chemical and physical processes, i.e. Radiation Chemistry, makes future progress quite promising. Nevertheless, a recent decline in he number of young investigators in radiation chemistry, as well as a natural obsolescence of large research facilities in radiation chemistry are serious obstacles to further progress. Understanding radiation-induced processes is of vital significance in such diverse fields as waste remediation in environmental cleanup, radiation processing of polymers and food, medical diagnosis and therapy, catalysis of chemical reactions, environmentally benign synthesis, and nuclear energy production. Radiation chemistry provides for these fields fundamental quantitative data, such as reaction rate coefficients, diffusion coefficients, radiation chemical yields, etc. As well as providing useful quantitative information of technological and medical importance, radiation chemistry is also a valuable tool for solving fundamental problems in chemistry and in material sciences. Exploiting the many facets of radiation chemistry requires a thorough and comprehensive understanding of the underlying chemical and physical processes. An understanding of the structure and dynamics of “tracks” produced by ionizing radiation is a central issue in the field. There is a continuing need to study the ultrafast processes that link the chemistry and physics of radiation-induced phenomena. This is especially true for practically important, but less well understood, nonstandard environments such as interfacial systems, supercritical media, and

  7. Radiation monitoring in high energy research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyajima, Mitsuhiro

    1975-01-01

    In High Energy Physics Research Laboratory, construction of high energy proton accelerator is in progress. The accelerator is a cascaded machine comprising Cockcroft type (50 keV), linac (20 MeV), booster synchrotron (500 MeV), and synchrotron (8-12 GeV). Its proton beam intensity is 1x10 13 photons/pulse, and acceleration is carried out at the rate of every 2 minutes. The essential problems of radiation control in high energy accelerators are those of various radiations generated secondarily by proton beam and a number of induced radiations simultaneously originated with such secondary particles. In the Laboratory, controlled areas are divided into color-coded four regions, red, orange, yellow and green, based on each dose-rate. BF 3 counters covered with thick paraffin are used as neutron detectors, and side-window GM tubes, NaI (Tl) scintillators and ionization chambers as γ-detectors. In red region, however, ionization chambers are applied to induced radiation detection, and neutrons are not monitored. NIM standards are adopted for the circuits of all above monitors considering easy maintenance, economy and interchangeability. Notwithstanding the above described systems, these monitors are not sufficient to complete the measurement of whole radiations over wide energy region radiated from the accelerators. Hence separate radiation field measurement is required periodically. An example of the monitoring systems in National Accelerator Laboratory (U.S.) is referred at the last section. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  8. Research projects in radiobiology and radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-04-15

    Of the research projects sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency quite a large number are concerned with the biological effects of ionizing radiation. That itself, of course, is a very wide field covering such subjects as the nature and mechanism of radiation damage, genetic mutations, the varying radiosensitivity of different organisms, ways of modifying the natural sensitivity or resistance, and biological and chemical means of protection. In all these branches of enquiry, the Agency has awarded research contracts to scientific institutes or laboratories in different countries

  9. Research projects in radiobiology and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-01-01

    Of the research projects sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency quite a large number are concerned with the biological effects of ionizing radiation. That itself, of course, is a very wide field covering such subjects as the nature and mechanism of radiation damage, genetic mutations, the varying radiosensitivity of different organisms, ways of modifying the natural sensitivity or resistance, and biological and chemical means of protection. In all these branches of enquiry, the Agency has awarded research contracts to scientific institutes or laboratories in different countries

  10. Synchrotron radiation and prospects of its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulipanov, G; Skrinskii, A

    1981-04-01

    Current and prospective applications are described of synchrotron radiation resulting from the motion of high-energy electrons or positrons in a magnetic field and covering a wide spectral range from the infrared to X-ray. The advantages of the synchrotron radiation include a big source luminance, a small angular divergence, the possibility of calculating the absolute intensity and the spectral distribution of the radiation. Special storage rings are most suitable as a source. Synchrotron radiation is applied in X-ray microscopy, energy diffractometry, atomic and molecular spectroscopy, in the structural analysis of microcrystals, very rapid diffractometry of biological objects and crystals, and in Moessbauer spectroscopy. The prospective applications include uses in metrology, medicine, X-ray lithography, elemental analysis, molecular microsurgery, and in radiation technology.

  11. Ionizing radiation sources used in medical applications in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, A.M.C.; Carlos, M.T.; Cruz, L.R.F.; Domingues, C.; Farias, J.T.; Ferreira, R.; Figueiredo, L.; Peixoto, J.E.; Oliveira, S.M.V.; Drexler, G.

    1991-02-01

    Preliminary data about ionizing radiation sources used in medical applications and obtained through a national programme by IRD/CNEN together with Brazilian health authorities are presented. The data presentation follows, as close as possible, recommendations given by the United Nations Scientific Committee on Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). This programme has two main aims: First: to contribute for research in the field of ionizing radiation effects and risks including information about equipment quality control and procedures adopted by professionals working in Radiation Medicine. Second: to investigate the radiation protection status in Brazil, in order to give assistance to Brazilian health authorities for planning regional radiation programmes and training programmes for medical staffs. (F.E.). 13 refs, 19 figs, 34 tabs

  12. Roles of radiation chemistry in development and research of radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Rui

    2009-01-01

    Radiation chemistry acts as a bridge connecting radiation physics with radiation biology in spatial and temporal insight. The theory, model, and methodology coming from radiation chemistry play an important role in the research and development of radiation biology. The chemical changes induced by ionizing radiation are involved not only in early event of biological effects caused by ionizing radiation but in function radiation biology, such as DNA damage and repair, sensitive modification, metabolism and function of active oxygen and so on. Following the research development of radiation biology, systems radiation biology, accurate quality and quantity of radiation biology effects need more methods and perfect tools from radiation chemistry. (authors)

  13. Photonic Microresonator Research and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chremmos, Ioannis; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos

    2010-01-01

    Photonic Microresonator Research and Applications explores advances in the fabrication process that enable nanometer waveguide separations. The technology surrounding the design and fabrication of optical microresonators has matured to a point where there is a need for commercialization. Consequently, there is a need for device research involving more advanced architectures and more esoteric operating princples. This volume discusses these issues, while also: Showing a reader how to design and fabricate microresonators Discussing microresonators in photonic crystals, microsphere circuits, and sensors, and provides application oriented examples Covering the latest in microresonator research with contributions from the leading researchers Photonic Microresonator Research and Applications would appeal to researchers and academics working in the optical sciences.

  14. Internet applications in radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, P.; Geisse, C.; Wuest, E.

    1998-01-01

    As a means of effective communication the Internet is presently becoming more and more important in German speaking countries, too. Its possibilities to exchange and to obtain information efficiently and rapidly are excellent. Internet and email access are available now in most institutions for professional use. Internet services of importance to radiation safety professionals are described. (orig.) [de

  15. Application of Improved Radiation Modeling to General Circulation Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael J Iacono

    2011-04-07

    This research has accomplished its primary objectives of developing accurate and efficient radiation codes, validating them with measurements and higher resolution models, and providing these advancements to the global modeling community to enhance the treatment of cloud and radiative processes in weather and climate prediction models. A critical component of this research has been the development of the longwave and shortwave broadband radiative transfer code for general circulation model (GCM) applications, RRTMG, which is based on the single-column reference code, RRTM, also developed at AER. RRTMG is a rigorously tested radiation model that retains a considerable level of accuracy relative to higher resolution models and measurements despite the performance enhancements that have made it possible to apply this radiation code successfully to global dynamical models. This model includes the radiative effects of all significant atmospheric gases, and it treats the absorption and scattering from liquid and ice clouds and aerosols. RRTMG also includes a statistical technique for representing small-scale cloud variability, such as cloud fraction and the vertical overlap of clouds, which has been shown to improve cloud radiative forcing in global models. This development approach has provided a direct link from observations to the enhanced radiative transfer provided by RRTMG for application to GCMs. Recent comparison of existing climate model radiation codes with high resolution models has documented the improved radiative forcing capability provided by RRTMG, especially at the surface, relative to other GCM radiation models. Due to its high accuracy, its connection to observations, and its computational efficiency, RRTMG has been implemented operationally in many national and international dynamical models to provide validated radiative transfer for improving weather forecasts and enhancing the prediction of global climate change.

  16. Annual report of Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The Radiation Effects Research Foundation was established in April, 1975, as a private nonprofit Japanese Foundation supported equally by the Government of Japan through the Ministry of Health and Welfare, and the Government of the United States through the National Academy of Sciences under contract with the Energy Research and Development Administration. First, the messages from the chairman and the vice-chairman are described. In the annual report, the review of ABCC-RERF studies of atomic bomb survivors, the summary of research activities, the research projects, the technical report abstracts, the research papers published in Japanese and foreign journals, and the oral presentation and lectures, all from April 1, 1978, to March 31, 1979, are reported. Also the report from the Secretariat and the appendixes are given. The surveys and researches carried out in Hiroshima and Nagasaki have offered very valuable informations to the atomic bomb survivors. Many fears were eliminated, medical interests were given to the serious effects of the exposure to atomic bombs, and many things concerning the cancer induced by radiation were elucidated. The knowledges obtained will save many human lives in future by utilizing them for setting up the health and safety standard in the case of handling ionizing radiation. The progress in researches such as life span study, adult health study, pathology study, genetics program, special cancer program and so on is reported. (Kako, I.)

  17. Protection from potential exposures: application to selected radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    This ICRP Report begins with the general principles of radiation protection in the case of potential exposures, followed by special issues in application and compliance with regulatory aims. The rest of the report uses event trees or fault trees to derive the logical structure of six scenarios of potential exposure, i.e. two irradiators, a large research accelerator, an accelerator for industrial isotope production, an industrial radiography device using a mobile source of radiation, and finally a medical gamma radiotherapy device. (UK)

  18. Application of radiation for wastewater treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Bumsoo; Kim Jinkyu; Kim Yuri

    2006-01-01

    Electron beam processing of wastewater is non-chemical, and uses fast formation of short-lived reactive radicals that can interact with a wide range of pollutants. Such reactive radicals are strong oxidizing or reducing agents that can transform the pollutants in the liquids wastes. The first studies on the radiation treatment of wastes were carried out in the 1950s principally for disinfection. In the 1960s, these studies were extended to the purification of water and wastewater. After some laboratory research on industrial wastewaters and polluted groundwater in 1970s and 1980s, several pilot plants were built for extended research in the 1990s. The first full-scale application was reported for the purification of wastewater at the Voronezh synthetic rubber plant in Russia. Two accelerators (50 kW each) were used to convert the non-biodegradable emulsifier, 'nekal', present in the wastewater to a biodegradable form . The installation treats up to 2000 m3 of effluent per day. A pilot plant of 1000 m 3 /d for treating textile-dyeing wastewater has been constructed in Daegu, Korea with 1 MeV, 40 kW electron accelerator. High-energy irradiation produces instantaneous radiolytical transformations by energy transfer from accelerated electrons to orbital electrons of water molecules. Absorbed energy disturbs the electron system of the molecule and results in breakage of inter-atomic bonds. Hydrated electron eaq, H atom, . OH and HO 2 . radicals and hydrogen peroxide H 2 O 2 and H 2 are the most important products of the primary interactions (radiolysis products). Generally, radiation processing of wastewater has maximum efficiency at pollutant concentration less than 10 -3 mol/L (∼100 ppm). The treatment of such wastewater is simple, requires low dose (about 1 kGy or less) and gives almost complete elimination of odor, color, taste and turbidity. The radiation processing of polluted water containing specific contaminants may require creation of special conditions to

  19. Research report on radiation protection 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    In this research report on radiation protection the results achieved in 1981 of the research and development projects assisted by the Federal Minister of the Interior are made accessible above all to the scientists and engineers participating in this research program as well as to the research institutions on the field of radiation protection, to the members of the commission on radiological protection and of the commission for reactor safety and to the supervising and licensing authorities. The report is a compilation of individual reports, which are composed by the consignees respectively the recipients of the allowances themselves as a documentation of the progress of their works. Each individual report contains informations concerning the objectives of the project, works carried out, results achieved and further work planned. (orig.) [de

  20. Semiconductor radiation detectors technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this book is to educate the reader on radiation detectors, from sensor to read-out electronics to application. Relatively new detector materials, such as CdZTe and Cr compensated GaAs, are introduced, along with emerging applications of radiation detectors. This X-ray technology has practical applications in medical, industrial, and security applications. It identifies materials based on their molecular composition, not densities as the traditional transmission equipment does. With chapters written by an international selection of authors from both academia and industry, the book covers a wide range of topics on radiation detectors, which will satisfy the needs of both beginners and experts in the field.

  1. Biological research for the radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Chan Kug; Shim, Hae Won; Jung, Il Lae; Byun, Hee Sun; Moon, Myung Sook; Cho, Hye Jeong; Kim, Jin Sik

    2003-04-01

    The work scope of 'Biological Research for the Radiation Protection' had contained the research about polyamine effect on cell death triggered ionizing radiation, H 2 O 2 and toxic agents. In this paper, to elucidate the role of polyamines as mediator in lysosomal damage and stress(H 2 O 2 )- induced apoptosis, we utilized α-DiFluoroMethylOrnithine (DFMO), which inhibited ornithine decarboxylase and depleted intracellular putrescine, and investigated the effects of polyamine on the apoptosis caused by H 2 O 2 , ionizing radiation and paraquat. We also showed that MGBG, inhibitor of polyamine biosynthesis, treatment affected intracellular redox steady states, intracellular ROS levels and protein oxidation. Thereafter we also investigated whether MGBG may enhance the cytotoxic efficacy of tumor cells caused by ionizing radiation or H 2 O 2 because such compounds are able to potentiate the cell-killing effects. In addition, ceruloplasmin and thioredoxin, possible antioxidant proteins, were shown to have protective effect on radiation- or H 2 O 2 (or chemicals)-induced macromolecular damage or cell death

  2. Radiation research in AINSE-affiliated universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangster, D. R.

    1997-01-01

    The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE) has enabled research workers from its member universities to make extensive use of the (sometimes unique) radiation facilities at Lucas Heights. This has resulted in a better understanding of the action of gamma, X-ray and electron beam radiation on physical, chemical and biological systems, and of the radical and excited species which are produced. A selection of the ensuing first class publications is described. Over the years the emphasis has changed from the obtaining of a fundamental understanding of the science and the refining of the techniques to utilising these in attacking problems in other fields. Examples are given of the use of radiation chemistry techniques in metal-organic, polymer, excited state and biological chemistry. In radiation biology, the early emphasis on genetics and on the production of chromosomal aberrations by radiation has given way to molecular biology and cancer treatment studies. In all of this, AAEC/ANSTO and CSIRO have played major roles. In addition, AINSE has organised a continuing series of specialist conferences which has facilitated interaction between research groups within the universities and involved other investigators in Australia, New Zealand and the rest of the world

  3. Contemporary Trends in Radiation Oncology Resident Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Vivek; Burt, Lindsay; Gimotty, Phyllis A.; Ojerholm, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that recent resident research productivity might be different than a decade ago, and to provide contemporary information about resident scholarly activity. Methods and Materials: We compiled a list of radiation oncology residents from the 2 most recent graduating classes (June 2014 and 2015) using the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology annual directories. We queried the PubMed database for each resident's first-authored publications from postgraduate years (PGY) 2 through 5, plus a 3-month period after residency completion. We abstracted corresponding historical data for 2002 to 2007 from the benchmark publication by Morgan and colleagues (Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2009;74:1567-1572). We tested the null hypothesis that these 2 samples had the same distribution for number of publications using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. We explored the association of demographic factors and publication number using multivariable zero-inflated Poisson regression. Results: There were 334 residents publishing 659 eligible first-author publications during residency (range 0-17; interquartile range 0-3; mean 2.0; median 1). The contemporary and historical distributions were significantly different (P<.001); contemporary publication rates were higher. Publications accrued late in residency (27% in PGY-4, 59% in PGY-5), and most were original research (75%). In the historical cohort, half of all articles were published in 3 journals; in contrast, the top half of contemporary publications were spread over 10 journals—most commonly International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (17%), Practical Radiation Oncology (7%), and Radiation Oncology (4%). Male gender, non-PhD status, and larger residency size were associated with higher number of publications in the multivariable analysis. Conclusion: We observed an increase in first-author publications during training compared with historical data from the mid-2000s. These

  4. Contemporary Trends in Radiation Oncology Resident Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Vivek [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Burt, Lindsay [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Gimotty, Phyllis A. [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ojerholm, Eric, E-mail: eric.ojerholm@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that recent resident research productivity might be different than a decade ago, and to provide contemporary information about resident scholarly activity. Methods and Materials: We compiled a list of radiation oncology residents from the 2 most recent graduating classes (June 2014 and 2015) using the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology annual directories. We queried the PubMed database for each resident's first-authored publications from postgraduate years (PGY) 2 through 5, plus a 3-month period after residency completion. We abstracted corresponding historical data for 2002 to 2007 from the benchmark publication by Morgan and colleagues (Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2009;74:1567-1572). We tested the null hypothesis that these 2 samples had the same distribution for number of publications using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. We explored the association of demographic factors and publication number using multivariable zero-inflated Poisson regression. Results: There were 334 residents publishing 659 eligible first-author publications during residency (range 0-17; interquartile range 0-3; mean 2.0; median 1). The contemporary and historical distributions were significantly different (P<.001); contemporary publication rates were higher. Publications accrued late in residency (27% in PGY-4, 59% in PGY-5), and most were original research (75%). In the historical cohort, half of all articles were published in 3 journals; in contrast, the top half of contemporary publications were spread over 10 journals—most commonly International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (17%), Practical Radiation Oncology (7%), and Radiation Oncology (4%). Male gender, non-PhD status, and larger residency size were associated with higher number of publications in the multivariable analysis. Conclusion: We observed an increase in first-author publications during training compared with historical data from the mid-2000s. These

  5. Computational methods for industrial radiation measurement applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, R.P.; Guo, P.; Ao, Q.

    1996-01-01

    Computational methods have been used with considerable success to complement radiation measurements in solving a wide range of industrial problems. The almost exponential growth of computer capability and applications in the last few years leads to a open-quotes black boxclose quotes mentality for radiation measurement applications. If a black box is defined as any radiation measurement device that is capable of measuring the parameters of interest when a wide range of operating and sample conditions may occur, then the development of computational methods for industrial radiation measurement applications should now be focused on the black box approach and the deduction of properties of interest from the response with acceptable accuracy and reasonable efficiency. Nowadays, increasingly better understanding of radiation physical processes, more accurate and complete fundamental physical data, and more advanced modeling and software/hardware techniques have made it possible to make giant strides in that direction with new ideas implemented with computer software. The Center for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes (CEAR) at North Carolina State University has been working on a variety of projects in the area of radiation analyzers and gauges for accomplishing this for quite some time, and they are discussed here with emphasis on current accomplishments

  6. Geological applications of synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, C. M. B.; Cressey, G.; Redfern, S. A. T.

    1995-03-01

    Synchrotron-based, Earth sciences research carried out over the last 5 years is reviewed with special attention being given to X-ray absorption studies; X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence microprobe applications are considered more briefly. A comprehensive bibliography is included. The main part of the paper summarizes recent work carried out at the Daresbury SRS. K-edge XAS studies of glasses as models for silicate melts provide information on the local structural environments of Si, Fe 2+ and Fe 3+. By analogy with synthetic "leucites" which contain Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ in tetrahedral framework sites, it seems that many model glasses also contain both oxidation states of Fe in the network, rather than as network modifiers. The structural sites occupied by the minor elements Mn, Zn and Ti in staurolite have been identified using XAFS; Mn and Zn substitute for Fe 2+ in the tetrahedral T2 site, while Ti occupies the distorted M2 octahedral site. L-edge spectroscopy is used to identify the valencies and electronic structures of Mn and Fe in minerals and the Fe 2+:Fe 3+ ratio in a natural spinel is determined. The polarized nature of the synchrotron beam is exploited in determining the Fe X-ray absorption anisotropy in single crystal tourmaline and epidote. XRD powder studies include Rietveld-refinement structure determination and compressibility studies. Synthetic "leucites" having the stoichiometry K 2MgSi 5O 12 have distinctly different structures. The dry-synthesized form is cubic Ia3d with Si and Mg fully disordered on tetrahedral framework sites, while the hydrothermally-synthesized polymorph is monoclinic P2 1/c with Si and Mg fully disordered on, respectively, 10 and 2 tetrahedral sites. The reversible tetragonal to orthorhombic phase transition in gillespite (BaFeSi 4O 10) has been studied in a diamond anvil cell using ED detection and found to occur at 1.2 ± 0.1 GPa. The anomalous compressibility observed has been interpreted in terms of ferroelastic and

  7. Chemotherapy of radiation injuries: research perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynchev, N.

    1993-01-01

    The therapy of radiation injuries - single and combined with other physical trauma (burn or wound) - are considered. Anti-bacterial therapy of infections in irradiated mice, rats and dogs and in irradiated dogs inflicted with burns has been applied. The results demonstrate that radiation induced exogenous and endogenous infections can be treated successfully with proper antimicrobial agents. Some immunomodulators also are effective in treating endogenous infection. The synergy between antimicrobial and immuno-modulator therapy holds promise for increasing the survival of irradiated victims. The improvement of managing infections in immuno-compromised (irradiated and injured) hosts will require further research using these therapeutic modalities. (author)

  8. Biomedical research applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The biomedical research Panel believes that the Calutron facility at Oak Ridge is a national and international resource of immense scientific value and of fundamental importance to continued biomedical research. This resource is essential to the development of new isotope uses in biology and medicine. It should therefore be nurtured by adequate support and operated in a way that optimizes its services to the scientific and technological community. The Panel sees a continuing need for a reliable supply of a wide variety of enriched stable isotopes. The past and present utilization of stable isotopes in biomedical research is documented in Appendix 7. Future requirements for stable isotopes are impossible to document, however, because of the unpredictability of research itself. Nonetheless we expect the demand for isotopes to increase in parallel with the continuing expansion of biomedical research as a whole. There are a number of promising research projects at the present time, and these are expected to lead to an increase in production requirements. The Panel also believes that a high degree of priority should be given to replacing the supplies of the 65 isotopes (out of the 224 previously available enriched isotopes) no longer available from ORNL

  9. Development of Plant Application Technique of Low Dose Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jae Sung; Lim, Yong Taek (and others)

    2007-07-15

    The project was carried out to achieve three aims. First, development of application techniques of cell-stimulating effects by low-dose radiation. Following irradiation with gamma-rays of low doses, beneficial effects in crop germination, early growth, and yield were investigated using various plant species and experimental approaches. For the actual field application, corroborative studies were also carried out with a few concerned experimental stations and farmers. Moreover, we attempted to establish a new technique of cell cultivation for industrial mass-production of shikonin, a medicinal compound from Lithospermum erythrorhizon and thereby suggested new application fields for application techniques of low-dose radiation. Second, elucidation of action mechanisms of ionizing radiation in plants. By investigating changes in plant photosynthesis and physiological metabolism, we attempted to elucidate physiological activity-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation and to search for radiation-adaptive cellular components. Besides, analyses of biochemical and molecular biological mechanisms for stimulus-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation were accomplished by examining genes and proteins inducible by low-dose radiation. Third, development of functional crop plants using radiation-resistant factors. Changes in stress-tolerance of plants against environmental stress factors such as light, temperature, salinity and UV-B stress after exposed to low-dose gamma-rays were investigated. Concerned reactive oxygen species, antioxidative enzymes, and antioxidants were also analyzed to develop high value-added and environment-friendly functional plants using radiation-resistant factors. These researches are important to elucidate biological activities increased by low-dose radiation and help to provide leading technologies for improvement of domestic productivity in agriculture and development of high value-added genetic resources.

  10. Development of Plant Application Technique of Low Dose Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jae Sung; Lim, Yong Taek

    2007-07-01

    The project was carried out to achieve three aims. First, development of application techniques of cell-stimulating effects by low-dose radiation. Following irradiation with gamma-rays of low doses, beneficial effects in crop germination, early growth, and yield were investigated using various plant species and experimental approaches. For the actual field application, corroborative studies were also carried out with a few concerned experimental stations and farmers. Moreover, we attempted to establish a new technique of cell cultivation for industrial mass-production of shikonin, a medicinal compound from Lithospermum erythrorhizon and thereby suggested new application fields for application techniques of low-dose radiation. Second, elucidation of action mechanisms of ionizing radiation in plants. By investigating changes in plant photosynthesis and physiological metabolism, we attempted to elucidate physiological activity-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation and to search for radiation-adaptive cellular components. Besides, analyses of biochemical and molecular biological mechanisms for stimulus-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation were accomplished by examining genes and proteins inducible by low-dose radiation. Third, development of functional crop plants using radiation-resistant factors. Changes in stress-tolerance of plants against environmental stress factors such as light, temperature, salinity and UV-B stress after exposed to low-dose gamma-rays were investigated. Concerned reactive oxygen species, antioxidative enzymes, and antioxidants were also analyzed to develop high value-added and environment-friendly functional plants using radiation-resistant factors. These researches are important to elucidate biological activities increased by low-dose radiation and help to provide leading technologies for improvement of domestic productivity in agriculture and development of high value-added genetic resources

  11. Research Laboratory of Mixed Radiation Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Two main topics of the research work in the Laboratory of Mixed Radiation Dosimetry in 2001 were: development of recombination methods for dosimetry of mixed radiation fields and maintenance and development of unique in Poland reference neutron fields. Additionally research project on internal dosimetry were carried out in collaboration with Division of Radiation Protection Service. RECOMBINATION METHODS Recombination methods make use of the fact that the initial recombination of ions in the gas cavity of the ionization chamber depends on local ionization density. The later can be related to linear energy transfer (LET) and provides information on radiation quality of the investigated radiation fields. Another key feature of the initial recombination is that it does not depend of dose rate. Conditions of initial (local) recombination can be achieved in specially designed high pressure tissue-equivalent ionization chambers, called the recombination chambers. They are usually parallel-plate ionization chambers filled with a tissue-equivalent gas mixture under a pressure of order 1 MPa. The spacing between electrodes is of order of millimeters. At larger spacing, the volume recombination limits the maximum dose rate at which the chamber can be properly operated. The output of the chamber is the ionization current (or collected charge) as a function of collecting voltage. All the recombination methods require the measurement of the ionization current (or charge) at least at two values of the collecting voltage applied to the chamber. The highest voltage should provide the conditions close to saturation (but below discharge or multiplication). The ionization current measured at maximum applied voltage is proportional to the absorbed dose, D, (some small corrections for lack of saturation can be introduced when needed). Measurements at other voltages are needed for the determination of radiation quality. The total dose equivalent in a mixed radiation field is

  12. Radiation breeding researches in gamma field. Results of researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Toshikazu

    2006-01-01

    Abstract of radiation breeding researches and outline of gamma field in IRB (Institute of Radiation Breeding) are described. The gamma field is a circular field of 100 m radius with 88.8TBqCo-60 source at the center. The field is surrounded by a shielding dike of 8 m in height. The effects of gamma irradiation on the growing plants, mutant by gamma radiation and plant molecular biological researches using mutant varieties obtained by the gamma field are explained. For examples, Japanese pear, chrysanthemum, Cytisus, Eustoma grandiflorum, Manila grass, tea and rose are reported. The mutant varieties in the gamma field, nine mutant varieties of flower colors in chrysanthemum, evergreen mutant lines in Manila grass, selection of self-compatible mutants in tea plant, and the plants of the gamma field recently are shown. (S.Y.)

  13. Optical fibers and their applications for radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakuta, Tsunemi

    1998-01-01

    As a new method of radiation measurements, several optical methods using optical fiber sensors have been developed. One is the application of 'radio-luminescence' from the optical fiber itself such as plastic scintillating fibers. Other researches are made to develop the 'combined-sensors' by combination of optical fibers and scintillating materials. Using the time domain method of optical fiber sensors, the profile of radiation distribution along the optical fiber can be easily determined. A multi-parameter sensing system for measurement of radiation, temperature, stress, etc, are also expected using these optical fiber sensors. (author)

  14. Synchrotron radiation applications in biophysics and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burattini, E.

    1985-01-01

    The peculiar properties of synchrotron radiation are briefly summarized. A short review on the possible applications of synchrotron radiation in two important fields like Biophysics and Medicine is presented. Details are given on experiments both in progress and carried out in many synchrotron radiation facilities, all over the world, using different techniques like X-ray absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence microanalysis, X-ray microscopy and digital subtraction angiography. Some news about the photon-activation therapy are briefly reported too

  15. Synchrotron radiation: its characteristics and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blewett, J.P.; Chasman, R.; Green, G.K.

    1977-01-01

    It has been known for a century that charged particles radiate when accelerated and that relativistic electrons in the energy range between 100 MeV and several GeV and constrained to travel in circular orbits emit concentrated, intense beams with broad continuous spectra that can cover the electromagnetic spectrum from infrared through hard X-rays. Recently the possible applications of this radiation have been appreciated and electron synchrotrons and electron storage rings are now being used in many centers for studies of the properties of matter in the solid, liquid and gaseous states. A brief history is presented of ''synchrotron radiation'' as it is now called. The basic properties of this radiation are described and the world-wide distribution is indicated of facilities for its production. Particular attention is given to the proposed facility at Brookhaven which will be the first major installation to be dedicated only to the production and use of synchrotron radiation. Finally, typical examples are given of applications in the areas of radiation absorption studies, techniques based on scattering of radiation, and advances based on X-ray lithography

  16. Radiation research contracts: Biological effects of small radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hug, O.

    1959-01-01

    According to its Statute the IAEA has to fulfil a dual function - to help individual countries in solving their specific problems and to undertake tasks in the common interest of all its Member States. With this latter aim in mind the Agency has placed a number of research contracts with national research institutes. The purpose and scope of two of them is described below by the scientists responsible for their execution. The Agency has contributed to this work by putting at the institutes' disposal scientists from its own staff apparatus and financial aid.IAEA placed a research contract concerning the effects of small radiation doses on cells, in particular on nervous cells, with the Pharmacological Institute of the University of Vienna. This Institute appeared well suited to deal with the problem owing to the type of its previous research work. The Director, Prof. Franz Bruecke, and his collaborator Dr. Otto Kraupp, have long been interested in the functioning of the nervous system and in the influence of different drugs upon it. It was particularly fortunate that the electrical properties and functions of cells had been measured by a method specially developed at this Institute. From the above mentioned observations one could expect that instantaneous reactions of cells to radiation would also lead to changes of the electrical status. Consequently, this method is now being applied to the research undertaken for IAEA. Different cells of plants and animals, ranging from algae to muscle fibres of mammals, were chosen as objects. So far changes of potentials-had been observed only during irradiation with very high doses. During these investigations another useful test for small radiation doses was developed, namely the measurement of the through-flow of an artificial blood solution through the blood vessels of an intestinal loop. It was observed that a few seconds after irradiation the flow rate diminishes, and returns to its normal level only when irradiation ends

  17. Radiation research contracts: Biological effects of small radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hug, O

    1959-01-15

    According to its Statute the IAEA has to fulfil a dual function - to help individual countries in solving their specific problems and to undertake tasks in the common interest of all its Member States. With this latter aim in mind the Agency has placed a number of research contracts with national research institutes. The purpose and scope of two of them is described below by the scientists responsible for their execution. The Agency has contributed to this work by putting at the institutes' disposal scientists from its own staff apparatus and financial aid.IAEA placed a research contract concerning the effects of small radiation doses on cells, in particular on nervous cells, with the Pharmacological Institute of the University of Vienna. This Institute appeared well suited to deal with the problem owing to the type of its previous research work. The Director, Prof. Franz Bruecke, and his collaborator Dr. Otto Kraupp, have long been interested in the functioning of the nervous system and in the influence of different drugs upon it. It was particularly fortunate that the electrical properties and functions of cells had been measured by a method specially developed at this Institute. From the above mentioned observations one could expect that instantaneous reactions of cells to radiation would also lead to changes of the electrical status. Consequently, this method is now being applied to the research undertaken for IAEA. Different cells of plants and animals, ranging from algae to muscle fibres of mammals, were chosen as objects. So far changes of potentials-had been observed only during irradiation with very high doses. During these investigations another useful test for small radiation doses was developed, namely the measurement of the through-flow of an artificial blood solution through the blood vessels of an intestinal loop. It was observed that a few seconds after irradiation the flow rate diminishes, and returns to its normal level only when irradiation ends

  18. Medical application of Synchrotron Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Nishimura, Katsuyuki.

    1990-01-01

    The number of patients suffering from ischemic heart disease is also increasing rapidly in Japan. The standard method for assessing coronary artery diseases is the coronary angiography. Excellent images are taken by this method, however, it is an invasive method in which a catheter into a peripheral artery. The patients would obtain great benefit if the coronary arteries could be distinguished by intravenous injection of the contrast material. The K-edge subtraction method, which uses the K-edge discontinuity in the attenuation coefficient of the contrast material, is considered to be the most suitable method for coronary angiography by peripheral venous injection. Synchrotron Radiation (SR) is so intense that it allows selection of monochromatic X-rays, and studies on K-edge subtraction using SR has been started at some facilities. Recent activities K-edge subtraction method at the Accumulation Ring are briefly described here. (author)

  19. Polymers and electromagnetic radiation fundamentals and practical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Schnabel, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    This first book to cover the interaction of polymers with radiation from the entire electromagnetic spectrum adopts a multidisciplinary approach to bridge polymer chemistry and physics, photochemistry, photophysics and materials science. The text is equally unique in its scope, devoting equal amounts of attention to the three aspects of synthesis, characterization, and applications. The first part deals with the interaction of polymers with non-ionizing radiation in the frequency-range from sub-terahertz via infrared radiation to visible and ultraviolet light, while the second covers interaction with ionizing radiation from the extreme ultraviolet to X-ray photons. The result is a systematic overview of how both types of radiation can be used for different polymerization approaches, spectroscopy methods and lithography techniques. Authored by a world-renowned researcher and teacher with over 40 years of experience in the field, this is a highly practical and authoritative guide.

  20. Applications of nuclear techniques and research 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The application of nuclear techniques, i.e. those techniques where use is made of isotopes and radiation, continues to contribute to progress in science, technology, agriculture, industry and medicine. Nuclear applications found their way into the IAEA's activities from the very beginning, and their promotion constitutes today a substantial fraction of the IAEA's Technical Co-operation and Research Contract Programmes. The 1990 selection is opened by a review of the role and function of the IAEA's Research Contract Programme, which is one of the Agency's most effective tools for promoting and developing nuclear applications. Applications in agriculture are covered in two articles dealing respectively with issues affecting the acceptance of food irradiation by governments, the food industry and consumers and with the use of radiation to induce plant mutation, a practical tool available to plant breeders in their effort to develop better quality crops. The following article deals with a typical nuclear application in medicine, i.e. the use of radionuclides in the diagnosis of lung diseases and in investigations related to the respiratory function. The use of environmental isotopes to assess the energy potential of geothermal fields is the next subject, a good example of nuclear methods applied to the evaluation of natural resources. The 1990 review concludes with a presentation prepared by the Third World Academy of Sciences on magnetic fusion research activity in the developing countries and its connection with the IAEA's own fusion programme

  1. ICT accelerators for radiation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Shiqin; Chen Dali (Research Inst. of Automation for Machine-Building Industry, Beijing (China))

    Several ICT accelerators were designed and constructed during the past two decades and are now in use in some factories and institutes in various parts of China. The specifications, design considerations, construction specialities and information about the applications of these accelerators are given in the present paper. (author).

  2. Career opportunities in the applications of radiation and radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morganstern, K.H.

    1975-01-01

    The application of radiation and radioisotopes is finally coming into its own after a long and hesitant gestation period. Overshadowed since the inception of the ''Nuclear Age'' by nuclear power generation, this area nevertheless provides real and challenging opportunities involving many different technical specialties and professional skills. Career opportunities are becoming available in those areas involving the use of radioactive isotopes in research, medicine, and industrial process control, and the employment of large radiation outputs, from either accelerator or isotopes, for industrial process applications

  3. Regulatory aspects for nuclear and radiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duraisamy, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) is the national authority for ensuring that the use of ionizing radiation and nuclear energy does not cause any undue risk to the health of workers, members of the public and to the environment. AERB was constituted on November 15, 1983 and derives its regulatory power from the rules and notifications promulgated under the Atomic Energy Act, 1962 and the Environment (Protection) Act, 1986. AERB is provided with the necessary powers and mandate to frame safety policies, lay down safety standards and requirements for monitoring and enforcing the safety provisions. AERB follows multi-tier system for its review and assessment, safety monitoring, surveillance and enforcement. While regulating various nuclear and radiation facilities, AERB adopts a graded approach taking into account the hazard potential associated with the facilities being regulated. The regulatory process has been continuous evolving to cater to the new developments in reactor and radiation technologies. The regulatory effectiveness and efficiency of AERB have grown over the last three decades to make it into a robust organization. The radiation protection infrastructure in the country is on a sound footing and is constantly being strengthened based on experience and continued research and development. As one of its mandates AERB prescribes radiation dose limits for the occupational workers and the public, in line with the IAEA Safety Standard and ICRP recommendations. The current dose limits and the radiation safety requirements are more stringent than past. To meet the current safety standards, it is important for the facilities to have state of art radiation monitoring system and programme in place. While recognizing the current system in place, this presentation also highlights certain key radiation protection challenges associated with the implementation of radiation protection standards in the nuclear and radiation facilities especially in the areas of

  4. Irradiation Facilities of the Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kurashima

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The ion beam facility at the Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, the National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, consists of a cyclotron and three electrostatic accelerators, and they are dedicated to studies of materials science and bio-technology. The paper reviews this unique accelerator complex in detail from the viewpoint of its configuration, accelerator specification, typical accelerator, or irradiation technologies and ion beam applications. The institute has also irradiation facilities for electron beams and 60Co gamma-rays and has been leading research and development of radiation chemistry for industrial applications in Japan with the facilities since its establishment. The configuration and utilization of those facilities are outlined as well.

  5. Medical and industrial application of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajayi, I.R.

    1999-01-01

    While dosimetry is not a radiation application, accurate dosage of radiation of utmost importance for all radiation applications. For both therapeutic and industrial applications it can be matter of life and death. For this reason, great efforts have been made to ensure that radiation dosages given to patients and used in all industrial applications are as near as possible to those prescribed. The World Health Organization (WHO) and the IAEA, together with many National Standard Laboratories and with the International Bureau of Weight and Measures, have been very active and successful during the last 20 years in ascertaining that normal cobalt-60 therapy unit. For this purpose, 63 Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories have been established of which more than half are in developing countries. FRPS houses one of the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories. As accurate dosimetry is a prerequisite in radiotherapy, so it is in industrial exposures and all laboratories responsible for dosimetry have to make frequent intercomparisons with one of the Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories. The SSDL at FRPS hopes to commence this as soon as our new Harshaw 6600 TLD reader arrives. This has already been approved by the IAEA. Much high doses of radiation are used for some industrial applications, as discussed in a previous lecture, such as sterilization of rubber, and food preservation and newly developed techniques are being used for the assurance of the prescribed dose. IAEA provides assistance in this area also through the secondary standard dosimetry laboratories. The IAEA has a broad programme of assistance which includes the calibration of all instruments in the laboratories of the participants, be it for radiation protection, or high dose measurements

  6. Efficiency of application of instantaneous radiation of seeds by plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsyganov, A.R.; Gordeev, Yu.A.; Poddubnaya, O.V.

    2009-01-01

    The efficiency of application of instantaneous (impulse) radiation of seeds of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum) and oat (Avena sativa) by plasma was analyzed. Research results showed that presowing treatment of seeds with instantaneous helium radiation in course of 0,01 seconds (the total duration of seed treatment with plasmatron ion source impulses – one second). In course of the practical experiments there was proved possibility of application impulse radiation technologies in modern agricultural production. Seed germination capacity exceeded the control variants on 14%. Results of influence of applied irradiation on length of sprouts, length of roots and their germinating ability were presented. Irradiation efficiency developed in course of plant vegetation. In accordance with research results and accumulated experimental material on presowing seed treatment with impulses of low temperature helium plasma could make it possible to obtain yields with higher capacity and quality with the minimal expenses for seed treatment

  7. Scattered Radiation Emission Imaging: Principles and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Nguyen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging processes built on the Compton scattering effect have been under continuing investigation since it was first suggested in the 50s. However, despite many innovative contributions, there are still formidable theoretical and technical challenges to overcome. In this paper, we review the state-of-the-art principles of the so-called scattered radiation emission imaging. Basically, it consists of using the cleverly collected scattered radiation from a radiating object to reconstruct its inner structure. Image formation is based on the mathematical concept of compounded conical projection. It entails a Radon transform defined on circular cone surfaces in order to express the scattered radiation flux density on a detecting pixel. We discuss in particular invertible cases of such conical Radon transforms which form a mathematical basis for image reconstruction methods. Numerical simulations performed in two and three space dimensions speak in favor of the viability of this imaging principle and its potential applications in various fields.

  8. Women's viewpoints on radiation and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Tamiko

    2005-01-01

    The discoveries of X-ray by W.C. Roentgen and of radium by M. Curie were immediately followed by application of them to medical field. After the World War II, nuclear energy has been used as an energy source on the one hand, and radiations have been also applied to various familiar fields in daily life on the other hand. These are now being developed into essential technologies in our present life. However, many people in general still fear nuclear power and radiation. There are numerous cases clearly indicating a widespread rejection of anything ''nuclear'' in the society as a whole. People in radiation'' community have made great efforts to remove these unfortunate misunderstandings and negative regarding the use of radiation, but these have not been satisfied. In this paper, I would like to reexamine possible factors that have been led to the dissatisfaction and do so from a different perspective from the standpoint of women. (author)

  9. Bystander effect induced by ionizing radiation and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Feng; Tu Yu

    2009-01-01

    An indirect effect induced by ionizing radiation called bystander effect is being highly concentrated. Many domestic and foreign researchers have verified the existence of bystander effect and have got more understanding of the mechanism with advanced detection techniques and methods. So far, the research about it has expanded from a single cell to multiple cells, from the in vitro to the whole, and has extended to in vivo from in vitro, which provides powerful evidence to explain how bystander effects happen and the regulation mechanism and especially gives scientific evidence to clinical radiation oncology application in the future. (authors)

  10. Emerging applications of radiation-modified carrageenans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abad, Lucille V., E-mail: lvabad@pnri.dost.gov.ph; Aranilla, Charito T.; Relleve, Lorna S.; Dela Rosa, Alumanda M.

    2014-10-01

    The Philippines supplies almost half of the world’s processed carrageenan as ingredient for different applications. In order to maintain the country’s competitive advantage, R and D on radiation processed carrageenan with various potential applications had been undertaken. PVP-carrageenan hydrogels for wound dressing had been developed. A carrageenan-based radiation dose indicator can detect radiation dose of as low as 5 kGy. Irradiated carrageenan has also been tested as plant growth promoter. Irradiated carrageenans have been found have been found to contain some antioxidant properties which increase with increasing dose and concentration. Carboxymethyl carrageenans had also been developed that shows promising effect as super water absorbent for soil conditioner in plants.

  11. Historical review of radiation research in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, F.

    1979-01-01

    The outline of the history of radiation research in Japan is written in connection with the names of researchers. Yoshio Nishina was a pioneer, who derived the Klein-Nishina formula for the scattering of hard X-ray by free electrons. In 1935, the first nuclear experiment laboratory was constructed in the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research. Two cyclotrons, 26 in and 60 in pole face diameter, and a high voltage Cockcroft-Walton type ion accelerator were installed. Irradiation of insects and plants with fast neutrons was attempted to examine the biological effect. In August, 1945, atomic bombs exploded in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In 1950, radioisotopes were available. In early March, 1954, Bikini accident occurred. One fishing vessel was contaminated by radioactive fallout, and to investigate the effect of radioactivity, a committee consisted of investigators of physics, chemistry, medicine, biology, fisheries and geophysics was organized. The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute was established in June, 1956. Several institutions for the peaceful use of atomic energy were established. The hybrid spark chamber to image the distribution of β-emitting isotopes on a plane surface was constructed in Nagoya University. As for the national project on food irradiation, one laboratory has played the role in irradiation techniques. Researches on radiation chemistry in universities, governmental and commercial organizations have been progressing steadily, and the machines for nanosecond to picosecond pulse radiolysis are working. (Yamashita, S.)

  12. Statement about the situation of radiation research in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The Radiation Protection Association observes with profound concern the decline in radiation research in the Federal Republic of Germany. Among other consequences, this gives rise to the fear that Germany's influence on developments, decisions, and standards in international bodies is going to decline for lack of competence. Moreover, Germany will hardly be able to deal with the growing number of topical problems arising in radiation effects in cell biology and molecular biology. These aspects, and others, however, are going to be of overriding importance also in the future as by far most of the radiation exposure of persons is due to medical applications and is going to continue at least at the same level. It would therefore be desirable if the competent government agencies made available the necessary funds. A national coordinating agency yet to be established, which would be made up of representatives of the university and non-university institutions concerned, could define research goals and award research contracts within the framework of a research program. (orig.) [de

  13. World perspective of radiation and isotope application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machi, Sueo

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear technology for non-power application has been serving in contribution to sustainable development and human welfare in terms of environmental protection, human health, clean energy and food security. The paper focuses on radiation processing for manufacturing and sterilization, non-destructive testing by radiography for quality control, nucleonic control systems for process control and optimization, and tracer technology for process optimization and trouble-shooting. More specifically, the paper reports heat and chemical resistant polymers produced by radiation cross-linking, the curing of surface coatings, and recent trends in radiation sources for industrial processing including ion beam sources. It further reports radiation sterilization of medical products and radiation technology for cleaning flue gases from power stations burning coal or oil emitting air polluting substances. As agricultural applications, plant mutation breeding for improving productivity, food irradiation for safe use of foods, and controlling of insect pests replacing pesticide are mentioned. Finally, an important role of international cooperation, such as IAEA-RCA program, FNCA (Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia), and bilateral collaboration, to promote technology transfer to developing countries is stressed. (S. Ohno)

  14. Report of promotion expert commission for radiation application on 'Promotion of accelerator application study'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This is a report published on June, 1996, by promotion expert commission for radiation application of the Atomic Energy Commission. Japanese research and development in the fields of forming and application techniques of radiation beams using accelerator is at comparatively high level in the world, and it seems to be important for Japan not only to maintain these research and development level but also to contribute to creation of worldwide intelligent welfare due to scientific technology. In this report, some investigations are conducted on present state and future view of the radiation application study using accelerator, accelerator facility necessary to promote such application study and a procedure to execute its smooth application. However, objects of the study are not limited only for physical study on elementary particle and atomic nucleus, but expanded to photon, electron, positron, muon, proton, neutron, various inonic beams and RI beams for radiations, which are widely applied to industries such as materials science, material engineering, bio-and life-science, medical science, technical engineering, and so forth, and which will be expected for large contribution to development of these industries. The following items are discussed here; 1) present state and future view of radiation application study using accelerator, 2) Accelerator to be prepared and its executing method, and 3) Promotion method of the accelerator application study. (G.K.)

  15. The competent person in radiation protection: practical radiation protection for industry and research - unsealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruchet, H.

    2009-01-01

    The mission of the competent person in radiation protection has been broadly developed these last years to take an essential function in firm:study of working place, delimitation of regulated areas, monitoring of exposure, relations with authorities. The competent person in radiation protection must follow a training, defined by decree and shared in two parts: a theoretical part used as compulsory subjects and a practical part specific to the different sectors of activity (research, industry, medical centers, nuclear facilities) as well as the radiation use type. This volume corresponds to the practical module devoted to the industrial and research facilities concerned by the possession of management of sealed or unsealed sources. In accordance with the regulations stipulating that this module must allow to apply the theoretical knowledge to concrete situations in work. It includes eight chapters as following: radiation protection in industrial and research facilities, use of sources and associated risks, fitting out professional premises, evaluation of exposure, control of radiation protection; use of detection equipment and radioactive contamination and exposure measurement equipment, associated to methods and calculation tools; radioactive waste management; accidental or damaged situations management; methodology of working place analysis completed by the application to practical cases found in laboratories. (N.C.)

  16. Synchrotron radiation. Basics, methods and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobilio, Settimio; Meneghini, Carlo; Boscherini, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is today extensively used for fundamental and applied research in many different fields of science. Its exceptional characteristics in terms of intensity, brilliance, spectral range, time structure and now also coherence pushed many experimental techniques to previously un-reachable limits, enabling the performance of experiments unbelievable only few years ago. The book gives an up-to-date overview of synchrotron radiation research today with a view to the future, starting from its generation and sources, its interaction with matter, illustrating the main experimental technique employed and provides an overview of the main fields of research in which new and innovative results are obtained. The book is addressed to PhD students and young researchers to provide both an introductory and a rather deep knowledge of the field. It will also be helpful to experienced researcher who want to approach the field in a professional way.

  17. Radiation modification of polymers: fundamentals and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clough, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    When polymers were first exposed to ionizing radiation some 50 years ago, the resultant changes were found to be complex and relatively non-selective. Most importantly, irradiation was seen to give a mix of bond forming and bond breaking processes, and different polymer types were classified into two groups according to which process predominated. For polymers in the 'crosslinking' category, large industrial applications emerged within the first two decades of the initiation of this field, including heat shrink products, high performance wire insulation and tire manufacturing. There has been continuing work toward development of a wide range of new applications based on polymers and radiation, and this field remains quite active today. One approach to finding new commercial processes has been to take advantage of a variety of different radiation-induced phenomena (for example, uses for chain scission have emerged for enhancing the processing properties of various bulk polymers, for recycling of rubber, and for microlithography and LIGA). Another approach has taken advantage of progress in the science of radiation chemistry, by employing our increasing knowledge to enhance and/or reduce competing processes through the use of additives, the design of specialized resins, controlling gaseous atmospheres, varying processing conditions such as temperature, post-irradiation treatments, etc. This presentation will survey some of the exciting developments in polymer radiation processing, and will point out some of the underlying phenomena that are being manipulated to further their success. We will finish by describing progress on fundamental isotope-labeling studies of one longstanding mechanistic complexity, oxidation chemistry, which is critical in many radiation processing applications, such as retarding post-irradiation degradation problems, enhancing chain scission where desired, altering surface polarity, and providing a useful pretreatment in grafting schemes

  18. Radiation protection and dosimetry issues in the medical applications of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaz, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    The technological advances that occurred during the last few decades paved the way to the dissemination of CT-based procedures in radiology, to an increasing number of procedures in interventional radiology and cardiology as well as to new techniques and hybrid modalities in nuclear medicine and in radiotherapy. These technological advances encompass the exposure of patients and medical staff to unprecedentedly high dose values that are a cause for concern due to the potential detrimental effects of ionizing radiation to the human health. As a consequence, new issues and challenges in radiological protection and dosimetry in the medical applications of ionizing radiation have emerged. The scientific knowledge of the radiosensitivity of individuals as a function of age, gender and other factors has also contributed to raising the awareness of scientists, medical staff, regulators, decision makers and other stakeholders (including the patients and the public) for the need to correctly and accurately assess the radiation induced long-term health effects after medical exposure. Pediatric exposures and their late effects became a cause of great concern. The scientific communities of experts involved in the study of the biological effects of ionizing radiation have made a strong case about the need to undertake low dose radiation research and the International System of Radiological Protection is being challenged to address and incorporate issues such as the individual sensitivities, the shape of dose–response relationship and tissue sensitivity for cancer and non-cancer effects. Some of the answers to the radiation protection and dosimetry issues and challenges in the medical applications of ionizing radiation lie in computational studies using Monte Carlo or hybrid methods to model and simulate particle transport in the organs and tissues of the human body. The development of sophisticated Monte Carlo computer programs and voxel phantoms paves the way to an accurate

  19. Radiation research contracts: Biological effects of small radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hug, O [International Atomic Energy Agency, Division of Health, Safety and Waste Disposal, Vienna (Austria)

    1959-04-15

    To establish the maximum permissible radiation doses for occupational and other kinds of radiation exposure, it is necessary to know those biological effects which can be produced by very small radiation doses. This particular field of radiation biology has not yet been sufficiently explored. This holds true for possible delayed damage after occupational radiation exposure over a period of many years as well as for acute reactions of the organism to single low level exposures. We know that irradiation of less than 25 Roentgen units (r) is unlikely to produce symptoms of radiation sickness. We have, however, found indications that even smaller doses may produce certain instantaneous reactions which must not be neglected

  20. The current status of agricultural radiation application in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Byungyeoup; Kang, Siyong; Lee, Youngkeun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    Since the middle of 1960s agricultural radiation applications have been growing rapidly with a huge resultant influence on the Korea economy. However, most applications used by radiation technologies in agricultural areas are drawn toward to mutation breeding of crops. We have started to research new applications of agricultural areas such as microorganism mutation, mass production of medical compounds, structure modifications of genes/proteins/natural polymers and so on since the late 1990s. In mutation breeding field, around 30 plant cultivars including 16 rice, 6 sesame, 4 hibiscus, 2 soybean, 1 barley and 2 box thorn (=Chinese matrimony vine, Lyci fructus) have been developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI). Now, we are on going to establish new radiation plant breeding technologies with environmental stresses and a high quality in combination with new bio-technologies (e. g. application of tissue culture, in vitro selection, doubled haploids, molecular marker, and gene analysis, etc.) for developing high quality cultivars. The microbial applications of radiation is one of the most attractive R and D in agricultural field because microorganism can be used as a bio-controller which has some advantages such as long term controlling system, decrease in secondary environmental pollution, and tailored microbial pesticide for various crop diseases. According to the advantages as mentioned above, we have made efforts in improving the functions of microbial pesticide (e. g. selection of microorganisms for heavy metal resistant, high decomposition rate of pesticide, and control of plant pathogens etc.) by means of radiation technology. It is a common conception that a certain range of low doses of radiation can elevate the physiological activities of cells in plants and photosynthetic microorganisms, e. g. by accelerating cell proliferation, ameliorating germination and growth rates, increasing stress resistance, and improving crop yields etc. We

  1. The current status of agricultural radiation application in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Byungyeoup; Kang, Siyong; Lee, Youngkeun

    2006-01-01

    Since the middle of 1960s agricultural radiation applications have been growing rapidly with a huge resultant influence on the Korea economy. However, most applications used by radiation technologies in agricultural areas are drawn toward to mutation breeding of crops. We have started to research new applications of agricultural areas such as microorganism mutation, mass production of medical compounds, structure modifications of genes/proteins/natural polymers and so on since the late 1990s. In mutation breeding field, around 30 plant cultivars including 16 rice, 6 sesame, 4 hibiscus, 2 soybean, 1 barley and 2 box thorn (=Chinese matrimony vine, Lyci fructus) have been developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI). Now, we are on going to establish new radiation plant breeding technologies with environmental stresses and a high quality in combination with new bio-technologies (e. g. application of tissue culture, in vitro selection, doubled haploids, molecular marker, and gene analysis, etc.) for developing high quality cultivars. The microbial applications of radiation is one of the most attractive R and D in agricultural field because microorganism can be used as a bio-controller which has some advantages such as long term controlling system, decrease in secondary environmental pollution, and tailored microbial pesticide for various crop diseases. According to the advantages as mentioned above, we have made efforts in improving the functions of microbial pesticide (e. g. selection of microorganisms for heavy metal resistant, high decomposition rate of pesticide, and control of plant pathogens etc.) by means of radiation technology. It is a common conception that a certain range of low doses of radiation can elevate the physiological activities of cells in plants and photosynthetic microorganisms, e. g. by accelerating cell proliferation, ameliorating germination and growth rates, increasing stress resistance, and improving crop yields etc. We

  2. Radiation chemistry research education in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangster, D.F.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation chemistry techniques may be used to solve research problems in other fields of chemistry and biology particularly when free radicals, excited states or reduction-oxidation reactions are involved. Using pulse radiolysis, absolute kinetic rate constants can be measured. The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering is an organization jointly funded by universities, ANSTO and CSIRO. Over the past several years it has provided fares, accommodation and specialized supplementary equipment to enable PhD students and post doctoral fellows to make use of the unique electron beam and gamma irradiation facilities at the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories. It also arranges biennial conferences at which this work is presented and discussed. This talk will discuss the contribution made to the education of students in the undergraduate final year and in physical, metal-organic, organic, polymer and enzyme chemistry research

  3. Studies on the Promotion of Biological Application by Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No, Y. C.; Kuk, I. H.; Song, H. S.

    2006-03-01

    Radiation Technology (RT) has been widely used in most of all fields of industries, medical, bioresources, food and agriculture, public hygiene, and environment. Therefore, its application has been also researched in various parts. For industrialization of the developed technology, not only the application technology will be developed, but the accurate dosimetry and improvement of the services of irradiation practice should be performed as soon as possible. Evaluation of effects and reaction mechanism of biological materials by irradiation was performed in this year in the long term research planning. The researches and experiments were well performed and the good results were obtained. The results may be donated in the progress of radiation biology and the new establishment on the application of RT. Also, one of the results was the evaluation of the structural changes of biomolecules and its application in the fields of food and biotechnology industries. Advanced Radiation Technology Institute (ARTI) will be well settled down and promotion of research activity of newly established institute by the fundamental support of KAERI. And, ARTI can get the goal where the vision of the hub of RT in Asia/Pacific region by 2020

  4. Present status of application of radiation and radioisotopes in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Anwar

    1984-01-01

    Bangladesh has proceeded with the atomic energy programme in three phases: (1) research and development using radiation and radioisotopes and application of the results, (2) building the infrastructure in nuclear technology and (3) production of electricity from nuclear sources and development of associated facilities. It has entered the second phase of the programme. The following main areas of research and application were referred to: agriculture, food preservation, medical sterilization and radiation biology, medicine, non-destructive testing, isotope hydrology, elemental analysis, particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) methods, radioisotope-induced x-ray fluorescence (RIXFA) methods, flame atomic absorption spectrophotometric (AAS) methods, molecular absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, health physics, and future programme with research reactor. (Namekawa, K.)

  5. Perception of low dose radiation risks among radiation researchers in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Ki Moon; Kwon, TaeWoo; Seo, Songwon; Lee, Dalnim; Park, Sunhoo; Jin, Young Woo; Lee, Seung-Sook

    2017-01-01

    Expert's risk evaluation of radiation exposure strongly influences the public's risk perception. Experts can inform laypersons of significant radiation information including health knowledge based on experimental data. However, some experts' radiation risk perception is often based on non-conclusive scientific evidence (i.e., radiation levels below 100 millisievert), which is currently under debate. Examining perception levels among experts is important for communication with the public since these individual's opinions have often exacerbated the public's confusion. We conducted a survey of Korean radiation researchers to investigate their perceptions of the risks associated with radiation exposure below 100 millisievert. A linear regression analysis revealed that having ≥ 11 years' research experience was a critical factor associated with radiation risk perception, which was inversely correlated with each other. Increased opportunities to understand radiation effects at perception of radiation exposure. In addition, radiation researchers conceived that more scientific evidence reducing the uncertainty for radiation effects perception of radiation exposure.

  6. Intense Ion Pulses for Radiation Effects Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    induction linear accelerator that has been developed to deliver intense, up to 50 nC/pulse/mm2, sub-ns pulses of light ions with kinetic energy up to 1.2...II induction linear accelerator for intense ion beam pulses at Berkeley Lab. Figure 3. Helium current and integrated charge versus time at the...under contracts DE-AC02-205CH11231 and DE-AC52-07NA27344. JOURNAL OF RADIATION EFFECTS, Research and Engineering Vol. 35, No. 1, April 2017 158 INTENSE

  7. Synchrotron radiation research facility conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    A report is presented to define, in general outline, the extent and proportions, the type of construction, the schedule for accomplishment, and the estimated cost for a new Synchrotron Radiation Facility, as proposed to the Energy Research and Development Administration by the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The report is concerned only indirectly with the scientific and technological justification for undertaking this project; the latter is addressed explicitly in separate documents. The report does consider user requirements, however, in order to establish a basis for design development. Preliminary drawings, outline specifications, estimated cost data, and other descriptive material are included as supporting documentation on the current status of the project in this preconstruction phase

  8. EURADOS strategic research agenda: vision for dosimetry of ionising radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühm, W; Fantuzzi, E; Harrison, R; Schuhmacher, H; Vanhavere, F; Alves, J; Bottollier Depois, J F; Fattibene, P; Knežević, Ž; Lopez, M A; Mayer, S; Miljanić, S; Neumaier, S; Olko, P; Stadtmann, H; Tanner, R; Woda, C

    2016-02-01

    Since autumn 2012, the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) has been developing its Strategic Research Agenda (SRA), which is intended to contribute to the identification of future research needs in radiation dosimetry in Europe. The present article summarises-based on input from EURADOS Working Groups (WGs) and Voting Members-five visions in dosimetry and defines key issues in dosimetry research that are considered important for the next decades. The five visions include scientific developments required towards (a) updated fundamental dose concepts and quantities, (b) improved radiation risk estimates deduced from epidemiological cohorts, (c) efficient dose assessment for radiological emergencies, (d) integrated personalised dosimetry in medical applications and (e) improved radiation protection of workers and the public. The SRA of EURADOS will be used as a guideline for future activities of the EURADOS WGs. A detailed version of the SRA can be downloaded as a EURADOS report from the EURADOS website (www.eurados.org). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Role of dosimetry in radiation processing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, Kishor

    2001-01-01

    Today, radiation processing is a growing technology offering potential technological advantages as well as enhanced safety and economy. It is expanding on two fronts: the variety of applications is exploding as well as the sources of radiation. And with that comes the necessary advances in dosimetry. However, the success of the technology still depends on the assertion that the irradiated products are reliable and safe, whether they are health care products or cables and wires. And this is best assured through quality assurance programmes. The key element in QA in radiation processing is a well-characterised, reliable dosimetry that is traceable to the international measurement system. Traceability is the foundation for international acceptance of the irradiated products; and with international trade of irradiated products on the rise, it becomes absolutely critical. It is thus vital that the industry recognises this pivotal position of good dosimetry and the role a national standards laboratory plays in that connection. (author)

  10. Development of clinical application of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seoung Yul; Yoo, Hyung Jun [and others

    2000-04-01

    The aim is to develop the clinical radiation therapy techniques, which increase local control and cure rate of cancer. The contents were 1. technique of stereotactic radiotherapy 2. technique of intraoperative radiation therapy(IORT) 3. technique of fractionated radiotherapy 4. technique of 3D conformal therapy 5. chemoradiotherapy in lung cancer, rectal cancer and biliopancreatic cancer 6. network based information communication system of radiation oncology 7. animal studies for the best application of chemoradiotherapy and for elucidating mechanism of slide effect in radiotherapy. The results were 1. completion of quality assurance protocol, frame and mounting system 2. completion of applicator of IORT 3. clinical protocol of fractionated radiotherapy 4. clinical protocol of 3D conformal therapy for brain, head and neck, breast and lung cancer 5. completion of multimodality treatment protocol for lung, rectal and biliopancreatic cancer 6. completion of database system for patient information and simulation image 7. standardization of estimation for radiation induced pneumonitis in animal model. Future plans are (1) developed fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy system will be commercialized (2) developed applicator of brachytherapy for IORT will be commercialized (3) 3D conformal therapy will increase local control rate for brain tumor and decrease complications such as zerostomia after treatment for nasopharygeal cancer (4) training manpower and skills for randomized clinical trial (5) suggest possibility of clinical usefulness of oral 5-fluorouracil (6) to provide basic technique for electric chart (7) promote developing database system for image information (8) also in view of double edge sword effect of NO, it is possible to modify the NO production from irradiation to increase the tolerance to radiation.

  11. Development of clinical application of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seoung Yul; Yoo, Hyung Jun

    2000-04-01

    The aim is to develop the clinical radiation therapy techniques, which increase local control and cure rate of cancer. The contents were 1. technique of stereotactic radiotherapy 2. technique of intraoperative radiation therapy(IORT) 3. technique of fractionated radiotherapy 4. technique of 3D conformal therapy 5. chemoradiotherapy in lung cancer, rectal cancer and biliopancreatic cancer 6. network based information communication system of radiation oncology 7. animal studies for the best application of chemoradiotherapy and for elucidating mechanism of slide effect in radiotherapy. The results were 1. completion of quality assurance protocol, frame and mounting system 2. completion of applicator of IORT 3. clinical protocol of fractionated radiotherapy 4. clinical protocol of 3D conformal therapy for brain, head and neck, breast and lung cancer 5. completion of multimodality treatment protocol for lung, rectal and biliopancreatic cancer 6. completion of database system for patient information and simulation image 7. standardization of estimation for radiation induced pneumonitis in animal model. Future plans are 1) developed fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy system will be commercialized 2) developed applicator of brachytherapy for IORT will be commercialized 3) 3D conformal therapy will increase local control rate for brain tumor and decrease complications such as zerostomia after treatment for nasopharygeal cancer 4) training manpower and skills for randomized clinical trial 5) suggest possibility of clinical usefulness of oral 5-fluorouracil 6) to provide basic technique for electric chart 7) promote developing database system for image information 8) also in view of double edge sword effect of NO, it is possible to modify the NO production from irradiation to increase the tolerance to radiation

  12. Analytical research using synchrotron radiation based techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Shambhu Nath

    2015-01-01

    There are many Synchrotron Radiation (SR) based techniques such as X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray Fluorescence Analysis (XRF), SR-Fourier-transform Infrared (SRFTIR), Hard X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (HAXPS) etc. which are increasingly being employed worldwide in analytical research. With advent of modern synchrotron sources these analytical techniques have been further revitalized and paved ways for new techniques such as microprobe XRF and XAS, FTIR microscopy, Hard X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (HAXPS) etc. The talk will cover mainly two techniques illustrating its capability in analytical research namely XRF and XAS. XRF spectroscopy: XRF spectroscopy is an analytical technique which involves the detection of emitted characteristic X-rays following excitation of the elements within the sample. While electron, particle (protons or alpha particles), or X-ray beams can be employed as the exciting source for this analysis, the use of X-ray beams from a synchrotron source has been instrumental in the advancement of the technique in the area of microprobe XRF imaging and trace level compositional characterisation of any sample. Synchrotron radiation induced X-ray emission spectroscopy, has become competitive with the earlier microprobe and nanoprobe techniques following the advancements in manipulating and detecting these X-rays. There are two important features that contribute to the superb elemental sensitivities of microprobe SR induced XRF: (i) the absence of the continuum (Bremsstrahlung) background radiation that is a feature of spectra obtained from charged particle beams, and (ii) the increased X-ray flux on the sample associated with the use of tunable third generation synchrotron facilities. Detection sensitivities have been reported in the ppb range, with values of 10 -17 g - 10 -14 g (depending on the particular element and matrix). Keeping in mind its demand, a microprobe XRF beamline has been setup by RRCAT at Indus-2 synchrotron

  13. Radiation applications in NDT in space program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, K.

    1994-01-01

    Non-destructive testing (NDT) and evaluation play an important role in the qualification of sub-systems and components in space programme. NDT is carried out at various stages of manufacturing of components and also prior to end use to ensure a high degree of reliability. Penetrating radiations such as X-rays, γ-rays and neutrons are extensively used for the radiographic inspection of components, sub-systems and assemblies in both the launch vehicles and satellites. Both low and high energy radiations are employed for the evaluation of the above components depending on their size and nature. Real time radiography (RTR) and computed tomography (CT) are also used in certain specific applications where more detailed information is needed. Neutron radiography is employed for the inspection of pyro-devices used in separation, destruct and satellite deployment systems. Besides their use for non-destructive testing purposes, the radiation sources are also used for various special applications like solid propellant slurry flow measurement simulation of radiation environment on components used in the satellites and also for studying migration of ingredients in solid rocket motor. (author). 12 refs., 6 figs

  14. Rubber - application of radiation to tire manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, J.D.; Alliger, G.

    1979-01-01

    Since the advent of commercial accelerators during the last several years capable of producing controllable electron beams of high energy, Firestone has devoted a considerable effort to the better understanding of the possible applications of such radiation to the production of tires or tire components. A number of chemical reactions can occur when elastomeric compounds are exposed to high energy waves, but crosslinking and degradation are the most important. The degree to which the crosslinking reaction predominates depends upon the nature of the rubber, compounding ingredients and the dosage. In general then, the effects achieved by the radiation of a rubber are quite similar to those resulting from heat. However, radiation cure or precure of compounds offers the advantage that the degree of crosslinking can be better controlled. Uniform crosslinking is possible since the high speed electrons penetrate uniformly throughout the sample. Curing with heat on the other hand may result in a greater degree of crosslinking on the surface of the sample than the center because of low heat conductivity. In general, radiation can be used to advantage to crosslink partially rubber tire components so that they retain better their shape and dimension during tire assembly and final cure or vulcanization. Added advantages of radiation precure include: a reduction of material usage, substitution of synthetic for natural rubber without loss in strength and the fact that partially crosslinked components will not thin out or become displaced during construction and vulcanization of the tire. (author)

  15. Application of radiation to environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Okihiro; Machi, Sueo

    1987-01-01

    A survey was made to investigate the current applications of radiations to environmental protection. Electron irradiation is used for desulfurization and denitration of flue gas. Flue gas generated from combusted fossil fuel such as coal and oil is irradiated with electrons to oxidize sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, which are then removed to clean the flue gas. Ammonia or lime may be added before irradiation to convert sulfer dioxide and nitrogen oxides into ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate or convert sulfur dioxide into calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate. Radiations are helpful for treatment of waste water. When water is irradiated with radiations, most of the energy is absorbed by water to cause decomposition of water molecules, resulting in the production of highly reactive species such as OH radical and H atom. Contaminants then react with these species and are oxidized into carbon dioxide and water. Other methods are also available for applying radiations to water treatment. Sludge contains a large amount of organic substances that serve as fertilizer components. Thus, radiations can be used to sterilize and compost sludge. (Nogami, K.)

  16. Research and innovation in radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, A.

    1999-01-01

    In this article some relevant lines of research in radiation dosimetry are presented. In some of them innovative approaches have been recently proposed in recent years. In others innovation is still to come as it is necessary in view of the insufficiency of the actual methods and techniques. mention is made to Thermoluminescence Dosimetry an to the improvement produced by new computational methods for the analysis of the usually complex TL signals. A solid state dosimetric technique recently proposed, Optically Stimulated Luminescence, OSL, is briefly presented. This technique promises advantages over TLD for personal and environmental dosimetry. The necessity of improving the measurement characteristics of neutron personal dosemeters is commented, making reference to some very recent developments. The situation of the dosimetry in connection with radiobiology research is overviewed, commenting the controversy on the adequacy and utility of the quality absorbed dose for these activities. Finally the special problematic of internal dosimetry is discussed. (Author) 25 refs

  17. Applications and opportunities for radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Round, K.J.

    1984-01-01

    An important spin-off benefit from the nuclear industry has been the ability to produce a wide variety of ionizing radiation sources for industrial, medical and scientific applications. These sources include radionuclides produced by irradiation of target material in reactors and cyclotrons or recovered from spent fuels, and accelerators. The uses of radiation in both medicine and industry can be expected to evolve. Traditional uses such as cancer therapy will mature and in some cases be displaced by new technology. Major new applications, including food processing and waste treatment, are expected to maintain the demand for isotopes such as cobalt 60 and to stimulate the development of economical and reliable accelerator systems. (L.L.) (Tab., 2 figs.)

  18. New environmental applications of radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikaev, A.K.

    1998-01-01

    The paper is a brief review of recent data on environmental applications of radiation technology obtained with participation of the author. It includes the results of the study on combined electron-beam and ozone treatment of municipal wastewater in the aerosol flow and electron-beam purification of water from heavy metals (lead, cadmium, mercury, chromium) by two methods (in the presence of formate as an OH radical scavenger or sorbents of inorganic and plant origins)

  19. Radiation protection and safety aspects in the use of radiation in medicine, industry and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, B.C.

    1998-01-01

    While ionizing radiations have significant and indispensable uses in several fields, it must be borne in mind that it may be harmful to the radiation workers and public if used indiscriminately and without due caution. Radiation doses received by these individuals should be kept well within the recommended limits through good work practices. It is therefore necessary to ensure safety of radiation workers, patients undergoing radiation diagnosis and treatment, public and environment so that maximum benefit is derived from the use of radiation with minimum and acceptable risk. General principles of radiation protection and safety in various applications of radiations are discussed

  20. Bioenergy research advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Vijai G; Kubicek, Christian P; Saddler, Jack; Xu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Bioenergy Research: Advances and Applications brings biology and engineering together to address the challenges of future energy needs. The book consolidates the most recent research on current technologies, concepts, and commercial developments in various types of widely used biofuels and integrated biorefineries, across the disciplines of biochemistry, biotechnology, phytology, and microbiology. All the chapters in the book are derived from international scientific experts in their respective research areas. They provide you with clear and concise information on both standard and more recent bioenergy production methods, including hydrolysis and microbial fermentation. Chapters are also designed to facilitate early stage researchers, and enables you to easily grasp the concepts, methodologies and application of bioenergy technologies. Each chapter in the book describes the merits and drawbacks of each technology as well as its usefulness. The book provides information on recent approaches to graduates, post...

  1. Application of Virtual Reality to Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamela, B.; Felipe, A.; Sanchez-Mayoral, M. L.; Mreino, A.; Sarti, F.

    2004-01-01

    In order to optimize the operations and procedures in several aspects of a Nuclear Power Plants, Iberdrola Ingenieria y Consultoria (Iberinco) has been developed some projects with Virtual Reality: CIPRES, ACEWO, TILOS and SICOMORO. With the experience acquired in these projects, Iberinco has checked the utility and advantageous of Virtual Reality applications that could have a direct application to Radiation Protection. With Virtual Reality it is possible to optimize the procedures involved in several critical aspects of the Plant Management. A training program bases on Virtual Reality systems could be one of the most important application. In Emergency situations the time of reaction is very important and in order to reduce it and dose, Virtual Reality is a very important tool, that could be used for training and to guide response team actions. Finally, the reduction of dose to workers, in a NPP, and patients, in hospital, is one of the most important application of Virtual Reality. (Author) 5 refs

  2. Research and development on radiation processing in Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulatunge, S.S.; Motha, L.; Sultanbawa, Y.; Malavipathirana, S.; Silva, A de; Nanayakkara, S.; Hewajulige, I.G.N.; Silva, K.R.C de

    2008-01-01

    Research on radiation processing of natural polymer such as polysaccharides of chitosan, cellulose, carrageenan has been carried out in Sri Lanka since the year 2004. The research group have been involving in development activities on application of chitin and chitosan for wound dressing, irradiated chitosan on shelf life extension of fruits such as papaya, banana, mangoes, radiation crosslinked super-absorbent hydrogel from sodium carboxymethyl cellulose by radiation processing. Hydrogels prepared with PVA/Carrageenan/Agar has been studied on guinea pigs to determine the wound healing effect. Irradiated chitosan powder and chitosan solution was studied in vitro and found chitosan solution (1%) directly subjected to irradiation dosages even at 5 kGy was highly effective in control of anthracnose causing organism of papaya. In vivo studies with irradiated 1% chitosan solution on Rathana and red lady variety of papaya shows better control of spoilage of papaya to a considerable extent. The government of Sri Lanka (Ministry of Science and Technology and Atomic Energy Authority) is in the process of establishing the first government owned Multipurpose Gamma Irradiation Facility and it will be helpful to transfer the output of R and D in radiation processing. (author)

  3. Application of radiation in agriculture in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masrizal; Sumanggono, Riyanti; Kuswadi, Ahmad Nasroh; Arifin, Muchson; Gandanegara, Soertini [National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN), Research and Development Center for Isotopes and Radiation Technology, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    2001-03-01

    Radiation has been used in agriculture research and development in Indonesia since several decades ago, especially in fields of mutation breeding, pest control, plant nutrition, and animal health. Mutation breeding using gamma radiation has contributed several crop varieties, namely seven varieties of rice, three of soybean, and two of mungbean to national agriculture. Besides, hundreds of promising mutant lines of rice, soybean, mungbean, peanut, sorghum, horticultural crops, and industrial plants which are ready for multi-location trials. Radiation is also used for the control of insect pests, either field or storage pests. Storage pests are eradicated by lethal dosage for direct killing, while the population of field pests (especially fruit flies) is eliminated by the release of radiosterilized insects in the program of sterile insects technique (SIT). A pilot scale trial of SIT to control fruit fly is being conducted in East Java province. Lethal dosage of gamma irradiation is used as post-harvest treatment for food of such as dried spices, fresh fruits, and packed foods. Gamma radiation has been also used to sterilize culture media of Bradyrhizobium, a nitrogen fixative bacteria that is the symbiont of soybean to be used in yield improvement. In animal health, gamma radiation can be used directly or indirectly to eliminate, decrease diseases. Disease control can use irradiation to develop vaccines, and to produce the diagnostic reagent kits. Vaccines for Coccidiosis (chick) diseases have been produced and disseminated in Indonesia. (author)

  4. Application of radiation in agriculture in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masrizal; Sumanggono, Riyanti; Kuswadi, Ahmad Nasroh; Arifin, Muchson; Gandanegara, Soertini

    2001-01-01

    Radiation has been used in agriculture research and development in Indonesia since several decades ago, especially in fields of mutation breeding, pest control, plant nutrition, and animal health. Mutation breeding using gamma radiation has contributed several crop varieties, namely seven varieties of rice, three of soybean, and two of mungbean to national agriculture. Besides, hundreds of promising mutant lines of rice, soybean, mungbean, peanut, sorghum, horticultural crops, and industrial plants which are ready for multi-location trials. Radiation is also used for the control of insect pests, either field or storage pests. Storage pests are eradicated by lethal dosage for direct killing, while the population of field pests (especially fruit flies) is eliminated by the release of radiosterilized insects in the program of sterile insects technique (SIT). A pilot scale trial of SIT to control fruit fly is being conducted in East Java province. Lethal dosage of gamma irradiation is used as post-harvest treatment for food of such as dried spices, fresh fruits, and packed foods. Gamma radiation has been also used to sterilize culture media of Bradyrhizobium, a nitrogen fixative bacteria that is the symbiont of soybean to be used in yield improvement. In animal health, gamma radiation can be used directly or indirectly to eliminate, decrease diseases. Disease control can use irradiation to develop vaccines, and to produce the diagnostic reagent kits. Vaccines for Coccidiosis (chick) diseases have been produced and disseminated in Indonesia. (author)

  5. High level radiation dosimetry in biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inada, Tetsuo

    1979-01-01

    The physical and biological dosimetries relating to cancer therapy with radiation were taken up at the first place in the late intercomparison on high LET radiation therapy in Japan-US cancer research cooperative study. The biological dosimetry, the large dose in biomedical research, the high dose rate in biomedical research and the practical dosimeters for pulsed neutrons or protons are outlined with the main development history and the characteristics which were obtained in the relating experiments. The clinical neutron facilities in the US and Japan involved in the intercomparison are presented. Concerning the experimental results of dosimeters, the relation between the R.B.E. compared with Chiba (Cyclotron in National Institute of Radiological Sciences) and the energy of deuterons or protons used for neutron production, the survival curves of three cultured cell lines derived from human cancers, after the irradiation of 250 keV X-ray, cyclotron neutrons of about 13 MeV and Van de Graaff neutrons of about 2 MeV, the hatchability of dry Artemia eggs at the several depths in an absorber stack irradiated by 60 MeV proton beam of 40, 120 and 200 krad, the peak skin reaction of mouse legs observed at various sets of average and instantaneous dose rates, and the peak skin reaction versus three instantaneous dose rates at fixed average dose rate of 7,300 rad/min are shown. These actual data were evaluated numerically and in relation to the physical meaning from the viewpoint of the fundamental aspect of cancer therapy, comparing the Japanese measured values to the US data. The discussion record on the high dose rate effect of low LET particles on biological substances and others is added. (Nakai, Y.)

  6. Modern gas-avalanche radiation detectors: from innovations to applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGD) technologies allow for the conception of advanced large area radiation detectors with unprecedented spatial resolutions and sensitivities, capable of operating under very high radiation flux. After more than two decades of extensive R and D carried by large number of groups worldwide, these detector technologies have reached high level of maturity. Nowadays, they are adapted as leading instruments for a growing number of applications in particle physics and in many other fields on basic and applied research. The growing interest in MPGD technologies and their mass-production capabilities naturally motivates further developments in the field. The state-of-the-art detector concepts and technologies have been introduced and their evolution, properties and current leading applications have been reviewed. Future potential applications as well as new technology challenges have been discussed

  7. Various aspects of lyoluminescence studies in radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, H.K.

    1992-01-01

    Lyoluminescence is the emission of light during the dissolution of irradiated organic and inorganic solids in suitable solvents. This phenomenon has attracted interdisciplinary research involving radiation physics, radiation chemistry and physical chemistry. This paper presents an overall view of the various aspects of lyoluminescence studies in the field of radiation research. (author). 14 refs

  8. Basic research on cancer related to radiation associated medical researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong In; Hwang, Dae Yong; Bang, Ho Yoon

    2000-12-01

    Basic Research on Cancer related to Radiation Associated Medical Researches including 1. Establishment of animal model of colorectal cancer liver metastasis and measurement of angiogenesis, 2. Tissue expression of Tie-1 and Tie-2 in human colorectal cancer, 3. Enhancement of G2/Mphase Cell Fraction by Adenovirus-mediated p53 Gene Transfer in Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines, 4. Clinical Characteristics of the patients with Non-B Non-C Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Frequency of HBV, HCV and TTV Viremia in these Patients, 5. Significance of serum iron and ferritin in patients with stomach cancer, 6. Telomerase assay for early detection of lung cancer, 7. Study on the Usefulness of Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 Genotyping for Risk Group of Alcohol-related Cancer Screening, 8. Gene therapy using hepatoma specific promoter, 9. Study on the Influence of DNA repair gene, XRCC1 Genotypes on the Risk of Head and Neck Cancer were performed

  9. Basic research on cancer related to radiation associated medical researches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong In; Hwang, Dae Yong; Bang, Ho Yoon [and others

    2000-12-01

    Basic Research on Cancer related to Radiation Associated Medical Researches including 1. Establishment of animal model of colorectal cancer liver metastasis and measurement of angiogenesis, 2. Tissue expression of Tie-1 and Tie-2 in human colorectal cancer, 3. Enhancement of G2/Mphase Cell Fraction by Adenovirus-mediated p53 Gene Transfer in Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines, 4. Clinical Characteristics of the patients with Non-B Non-C Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Frequency of HBV, HCV and TTV Viremia in these Patients, 5. Significance of serum iron and ferritin in patients with stomach cancer, 6. Telomerase assay for early detection of lung cancer, 7. Study on the Usefulness of Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 Genotyping for Risk Group of Alcohol-related Cancer Screening, 8. Gene therapy using hepatoma specific promoter, 9. Study on the Influence of DNA repair gene, XRCC1 Genotypes on the Risk of Head and Neck Cancer were performed.

  10. Radiation research of materials using irradiation capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamrad, B.

    1976-01-01

    The methods are briefly characterized of radiation experiments on the WWR-S research reactor. The irradiation capsule installed in the reactor including the electronic instrumentation is described. Irradiated samples temperature is stabilized by an auxiliary heat source placed in the irradiation space. The electronic control equipment of the system is automated. In irradiation experiments, experimental and operating conditions are recorded by a digital measuring centre with electric typewriter and paper tape data recording and by an analog compensating recorder. The irradiation experiment control system controls irradiated sample temperature, the supply current size and the heating element temperature of the auxiliary stabilizing source, inert and technological pressures of the capsule atmosphere and the thermostat temperature of the thermocouple junctions. (O.K.)

  11. Highly sensitive microcalorimeters for radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avaev, V.N.; Demchuk, B.N.; Ioffe, L.A.; Efimov, E.P.

    1984-01-01

    Calorimetry is used in research at various types of nuclear-physics installations to obtain information on the quantitative and qualitative composition of ionizing radiation in a reactor core and in the surrounding layers of the biological shield. In this paper, the authors examine the characteristics of highly sensitive microcalorimeters with modular semiconductor heat pickups designed for operation in reactor channels. The microcalorimeters have a thin-walled aluminum housing on whose inner surface modular heat pickups are placed radially as shown here. The results of measurements of the temperature dependence of the sensitivity of the microcalorimeters are shown. The results of measuring the sensitivity of a PMK-2 microcalorimeter assembly as a function of integrated neutron flux for three energy intervals and the adsorbed gamma energy are shown. In order to study specimens with different shapes and sizes, microcalorimeters with chambers in the form of cylinders and a parallelepiped were built and tested

  12. Responsibility structure in medical radiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beekman, Z.M.

    1989-01-01

    The author discusses the various aspects of the responsibilities of physicians and clinical physicists with regard to radiation protection in medical applications of ionizing radiation. It becomes still clearer that the physician, who carries out the examination or the treatment, also has to bear the responsibility. this holds for the indication assessment as well as for optimization of the quality of the examination or treatment versus radiation burden of the patient, radiologic worker and thirds. Further it is clear that the physician in these will have to delegate specific tasks and responsibilities, whether or not in the elongated-arm construction. The clinical physicist is responsible in particular for the applications of the physical methods and watches the quality of the apparatus and methods used. As such he also is responsible for the technical workers, who take care of the preventive and corrective maintenance. The principal responsibility of the clinical physicist however lies in the field of standardization and calibration of medical-physical instruments. Besides this investigation into and development of new techniques, methods and apparatus come up, while also education and training of various profession groups involved need attention. (author). 6 refs.; 1 tab

  13. Facility - Radiation Source Features and User Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gover, A.; Abramovich, A.; Eichenbaum, A.L.; Kanter, M.; Sokolowski, J.; Yahalom, A.; Shiloh, J.; Schnitzer, I.; Pinhasi, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Recent measurements of the radiation characteristics of the tandem FEL prove .that the device operates as a high quality, tunable radiation source in the mm wave regime. Tuning range of 60% around a central frequency of 100 GHz was demonstrated by varying the tandem accelerator energy from 1 to 1.5 MeV with 1-1.5 Amp. Beam current. Fourier transform limited linewidth of Δ f/f -5 was measured in single-mode lasing operation. The FEL power in pulse operation (10μsec) was 10 kWatt. Operating the FEL at high repetition rate with 0.1 to 1 mSec pulses will make it possible to obtain high average power (1 kWatt) and narrow linewidth (10 -7 ). Based ,on these exceptional properties of the FEL as a high quality spectroscopic tool and as a source of high average power radiation, the FEL consortium, supported by a body of 10 radiation user groups from various universities and research institutes, embark on a new project for development of an Israeli FEL radiation user laboratory. The laboratory is presently in a design and building stage in the academic campus in Ariel. The FEL will be moved to this laboratory after completion of X-ray protection structure in the allocated building. In the first phase of development, the radiation user laboratory will consist of three user stations: a. Spectroscopic station (low average power). Material studies are planned in the fields of H.T.S.C., submicron semiconductor devices, gases. b. Material processing station (high average power). Experiments are planned in the fields of thin film ceramic sintering (including H.T.S.C.), functionally graded materials, surface treatment of metals, interaction with biological tissues. c. Atmospheric study station. Experiments are planned in the fields of aerosol, dust and clouds mapping, remote sensing of gases, wide-band mm wave communication The FEL experimental results and the user laboratory features will be described

  14. Research sources of ionizing radiation based on transplutonium elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radchenko, V. M.; Ryabinin, M. A.

    2010-03-01

    Scientific and technical demand stimulates an extension of the practical implementation field of TPE, requirements to their ecological safety calling for the development of such materials which could be most resistant to the environment and most suitable for the production of a wide range of sources different in their application and design. Such materials can involve pure metals of transplutonium elements and their alloys with metals of platinum group as well as their chemically stable compounds (such as silicides, carbides etc.) At SSC RIAR production processes of sources of different type and application have been implemented. Examples of the most recent developments of the sources are presented below. Presented is the analysis of the current state of issues related to designing, production and application of radionuclide research sources based on transplutonium elements. Examples of the development of the most up-to-date sources of alpha-, gamma- and neutron radiation and also fission ones are considered.

  15. Areas of research in radiation chemistry fundamental to radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    Among all the environmental hazards to which man is exposed, ionizing radiation is the most thoroughly investigated and the most responsibly monitored and controlled. Nevertheless, because of the importance of radiation in modern society from both the hazard as well as the utilitarian standpoints, much more information concerning the biological effects induced and their modification and reversal is required. Together with radiation physics, an understanding of radiation chemistry is necessary for full appreciation of biological effects of high and low energy radiations, and for the development of prophylactic, therapeutic and potentiating methods and techniques in biological organisms. The necessity of understanding the chemistry of any system, biological or not, that is to be manipulated and controlled, is so obvious as to make trivial a statement to that effect. If any natural phenomenon is to be put to our use, surely the elements of it must be studied and appreciated fully. In the preliminary statements of the various panels of this general group, the need for additional information on the basic radiation chemistry concerned in radiation-induced biological effects pervades throughout

  16. Establishing a Radiation Protection Programme for a Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, M. M.

    2014-04-01

    The nature and intensity of radiation from the operation of a research reactor depend on the type of reactor, its design features and its operational history. The protection of workers from the harmful effect of radiation must therefore be of paramount importance to any operating organization of a research reactor. This project report attempts to establish an operational radiation protection programme for a research reactor using the Ghana Research Reactor-1 as a case study. (au)

  17. Research on oligochitosan production by gamma radiation degradation techniques in pilot scale for application in disease control and growth performance of chickens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Thi Thuy; Nguyen Duy Hang; Nguyen Tan Man; Nguyen Trong Hoanh Phong; Pham Thi Sam; Nguyen Tuong Ly Lan; Le Hai; Le Huu Tu; Pham Thi Le Ha; Phan Van Anh

    2015-01-01

    Degradation of chitosan to prepare the low molecular weight chitosan has been carried out by gamma irradiation of chitosan in H_2O_2 solution. The effects of radiation dose, dose rate, ratio of CTS:H_2O and H_2O_2 concentration to the degrading efficiency of chitosan have been investigated. The obtained results showed the chitosan molecular weight reduced with the increase of radiation dose. Chitosan was irradiated at radiation dose 10 kGy in the presence of H_2O_2 1% its molecular weight achieved 45 kDa. The effect of irradiated chitosan on the growth development and the survival ratio of breeding chickens in the process were also studied. The results shown that low molecular weight chitosan supplement in diets had positive effect of the resistant ability, growth performance and reduced chick mortality. With supplement ratio of 100 mg/kg diets, chitosan 45 kDa had positive affect on growth performance of chicks, the weight of chickens increased 6% and survival ratio was 94.8% while the normal survival ratio was only 92.6%. (author)

  18. CEC radiation protection research and training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, G.B.

    1991-01-01

    The Radiation Protection Program (RPP), initiated as a consequence of the Euratom Treaty aims to promote: scientific knowledge to evaluate possible risks from low doses of natural, medical and man-made radiation; development of methods to assess radiological risks; incentive and support for cooperation between scientists of Member States; expertise in radiation protection by training scientists and the scientific basis for continual updating of the 'Basic Safety Standards', and the evolution of radiation protection concepts and practices. 3 refs

  19. Accelerators for research and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.R.

    1990-06-01

    The newest particle accelerators are almost always built for extending the frontiers of research, at the cutting edge of science and technology. Once these machines are operating and these technologies mature, new applications are always found, many of which touch our lives in profound ways. The evolution of accelerator technologies will be discussed, with descriptions of accelerator types and characteristics. The wide range of applications of accelerators will be discussed, in fields such as nuclear science, medicine, astrophysics and space-sciences, power generation, airport security, materials processing and microcircuit fabrication. 13 figs

  20. Applications of radiation within the wine industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, K.J.; Moran, G.; Boreham, D.

    2003-01-01

    The objective was to test the feasibility of taint removal in industrial wines through the use of radiation. The process used the cobalt-60 source in the McMaster University Nuclear Reactor. When wine, composed mainly of water (∼87%), alcohol (∼10%), acid (∼2%), and anthrocyanins/tannins (∼0.1%), is irradiated, water molecules are hydrolyzed generating free radicals in solution. These free radicals are oxidizing agents that will oxidize other molecules in the wine. The focus has been a specific taint introduced into 2000-2001 vintages by the Asian lady-bird beetle (Harmonia Axyridis) whose population has increased dramatically of late. This taint - thought to be a methoxy-pyrazine - is detectable by taste in 1-2 parts per trillion (ppt). Preliminary sensory evaluation has shown that radiation dramatically improves tainted wines by eliminating the lady beetle taint. Chemical tests have indicated that radiation is acting as an oxidizing agent, reducing levels of SO 2 (introduced into wines to prevent oxidation) by nearly 40-70%. Research ongoing involves the detection of the taint (the implicated methoxy-pyrazine) by mass spectrometry as a taint assessment tool, and an indicator that radiation has removed the taint

  1. Application of radioactive substances in research in nuclear medicine: current trends and radiation exposure to the study subjects; Anwendung radioaktiver Stoffe in der nuklearmedizinischen Forschung: aktuelle Trends und Strahlenexposition der Probanden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minkov, V.; Schwarz, E.R.; Bauer, B.; Nosske, D.; Erzberger, A.; Brix, G. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Inst. fuer Strahlenhygiene, Abt. fuer Medizinische Strahlenhygiene, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2001-08-01

    Aim: Analysis of the application of radioactive substances in research in the field of nuclear medicine in human beings and of the resulting radiation exposure to study subjects. Methods: Assessment of applications for approval submitted in accordance with Paragraph 41 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance, evaluated by the Federal office for Radiation Protection together with the Federal Institute for Pharmaceuticals and Medical Products, within the period from 1997 to 1999. Results: The focus of the studies on the diagnostic application of radioactive substances in medicine evaluated has, since 1998, shifted from oncological to neurological and psychological aspects, while, at the same time, the number of PET studies increased constantly The proportion of healthy study subjects included in the diagnostic studies increased from 7 to 22%. The number of therapeutic applications of radioactive substances has, since 1997, undergone a three-fold increase, and in the process of this, the focus of attention lay within the area of radioimmuno-therapy and endovascular brachytherapy. The effective dose was, among up to 49% of the investigated healthy study subjects higher than 5 mSv, and among up to 6% of these subjects was at levels of over 20 mSv. Up to 22% of the patients received, within the scope of diagnostic studies, an effective dose of between 20 and 50 mSv. An exceeding of the 50 mSv limit occurred among up to 3% of the patients. Conclusions: In spite of the increasing numbers of PET applications, conventional nuclear medicine has maintained its importance in the field of medical research. Further developments in the areas of radiochemistry and molecular biology led to an increase in the importance of radio-immuno therapy. The evaluation of new radiopharmaceuticals and the extension of basic biomedical research, resulted in an increase in the proportion of healthy study subjects included in the studies. The radiation exposure among subjects resulting directly from

  2. Radiation leakage from linac electron applicator assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keys, R.A.; Purdy, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The electron beam applicator system currently in use on the linear accelerator is constructed of light-weight fiberglass and aluminum. With an applicator in place on the accelerator, the photon collimator jaws are automatically set several centimeters greater than the electron field size projected at the patient's surface. To ensure that no regions of high dose levels exist outside the useful beam, ionization and film measurements were made to quantitate the amount of leakage radiation through the 10 cm x 10 cm and 25 cm x 25 cm applicators. In most regions, the ionization levels at the patient's surface were below 5% of the central axis dose. In one area for the 25 cm applicator, the percentage ionization was 8.5%, which could be reduced by the addition of a small piece of 1/8 inch thick lead. However, ionization levels on the outside surface of the applicator were found to be considerably higher at certain locations for the 25 cm applicator. Results for 6, 9, 12 and 20 MeV electrons are reported here

  3. Radiation monitoring at Pakistan research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A.

    1984-05-01

    Area radiation monitoring is accomplished by using Tracer Lab. radiation monitor. Personnel monitoring is carried out using film badges, TLDs (Thermoluminescent Dosimeters) and pocket dosimeters. For the evaluation of monthly accumulated doses of radiation workers film badges/TLDs and for instantaneous/short term dose measurement in higher radiation zones pocket dosimeters are used in addition to film badge/TLD. Environmental monitoring is necessary to check the PARR operation effect on background radiation level in the vicinity of PINSTECH. (A.B.). 4 refs

  4. SQUID application research in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itozaki, Hideo

    2003-01-01

    Japanese research activities using SQUIDs are reviewed in this paper. Low-T c SQUIDs are applied to multi-channel systems for magnetoencephalogram (MEG) and magnetocardiogram (MCG). High-T c SQUIDs are applied to MCG, nondestructive evaluation (NDE), SQUID microscopy, biological testing using fine magnetic markers, geological surveying, food inspection, large-scale integration (LSI) defect analysis and SQUID-NQR (nuclear quadrupole resonance). These applications of SQUIDs are being researched and developed actively and some of them are expected to be in the commercial market in the near future

  5. Biosurfactants research trends and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mulligan, Catherine N; Sharma, Sanjay K

    2014-01-01

    Green chemistry and Biosurfactant ResearchCatherine N. Mulligan, Sanjay K. Sharma, Ackmez Mudhoo,and Komal MakhijaniAmphiphilic Molecules of Microbial Origin: Classification, Characteristics, Genetic Regulations, and Pathways for BiosynthesisGunaseelan Dhanarajan and Ramkrishna SenRhamnolipids: Characteristics, Production, Applications, and AnalysisFereshteh Arab and Catherine N. MulliganSophorolipids: Characteristics, Production, and ApplicationsVivek K. Morya and Eun-Ki KimBiosurfactants and Bioemulsifiers from Marine SourcesRengathavasi Thavasi and Ibrahim M. BanatCharacterization, Production, and Applications of LipopeptidesCatherine N. MulliganBiosurfactants in the Food IndustryMarcia Nitschke and Siddhartha G.V.A.O. CostaTrehalose BiosurfactantsNelly Christova and Ivanka StoinevaBiosurfactant-Mediated Nanoparticle Synthesis: A Green and SustainableApproachVivek Rangarajan, Snigdha Majumder, and Ramkrishna SenEnhancement of Remediation Technologies with BiosurfactantsCatherine N. MulliganBiosurfactant Co...

  6. The TAC Radiation Source for Bremsstrahlung Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demir, N.

    2008-01-01

    The TAC is a project for the first Turkish radiation source and currently design study is produced with funding from the DPT (State Planning Unity). Two main part of the project will be IR-FEL and Bremsstrahlung facility. Each LINAC will provide max. electron energy of 20 MeV. The Bremsstrahlung facility at TAC will consist two of the LINAC module and will be obtained 35 MeV photon energy. This would provide a chance to investigate nuclear structure at this energy range and also some application of photonuclear physics. In this work the main parameter and plans for those of facility will be detailed

  7. Applications of microwave radiation environmental remediation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, T.R.; Helt, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    A growing number of environmental remediation technologies (e.g., drying, melting, or sintering) utilize microwave radiation as an integral part of the process. An increasing number of novel applications, such as sustaining low-temperature plasmas or enhancing chemical reactivity, are also being developed. An overview of such technologies being developed by the Department of Energy is presented. A specific example being developed at Argonne National Laboratory, microwave-induced plasma reactors for the destruction of volatile organic compounds, is discussed in more detail

  8. Research on crisis communication of nuclear and radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Yali; Zhang Ying

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient public cognition of nuclear and radiation safety and absence of effective method to handle crisis lead to common crisis events of nuclear and radiation safety, which brings about unfavorable impact on the sound development of nuclear energy exploring and application of nuclear technology. This paper, based on crisis communication theory, analyzed the effect of current situation on nuclear and radiation safety crisis, discussed how to handle crisis, and tried to explore the effective strategies for nuclear and radiation safety crisis handling. (authors)

  9. Techniques for materials research with synchrotron radiation x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, D.K.

    1983-01-01

    A brief introductory survey is presented of the properties and generation of synchrotron radiation and the main techniques developed so far for its application to materials problems. Headings are:synchrotron radiation; X-ray techniques in synchrotron radiation (powder diffraction; X-ray scattering; EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure); X-ray fluorescent analysis; microradiography; white radiation topography; double crystal topography); future developments. (U.K.)

  10. An economic benefit analysis on the cobalt-60 irradiation facility of Beijing Radiation Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Binlin

    1995-01-01

    The peculiarity, the investment and annual operating cost of the 3.7 x 10 16 Bq (MCi) cobalt-60 irradiation facility at Beijing Radiation Application Research Centre are described. Its economic benefits each year are analyzed according to several year operating practice. Some related questions on carrying out radiation processing are raised and discussed. (author)

  11. Radiation curing technology progress and its industrial applications in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukachi, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    Optics, electronics and display industries are now the driving forces for the Japanese radiation curing technology. The purpose of this paper is to overview the newly developed radiation curing technology in Japan, in particular, its industrial applications, and to present the market figures in radiation curing applications, which were surveyed by RadTech Japan in 2002 afresh. (author)

  12. Application of large radiation sources in chemical processing industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, K.

    1977-01-01

    Large radiation sources and their application in chemical processing industry are described. A reference has also been made to the present developments in this field in India. Radioactive sources, notably 60 Co, are employed in production of wood-plastic and concrete-polymer composites, vulcanised rubbers, polymers, sulfochlorinated paraffin hydrocarbons and in a number of other applications which require deep penetration and high reliability of source. Machine sources of electrons are used in production of heat shrinkable plastics, insulation materials for cables, curing of paints etc. Radiation sources have also been used for sewage hygienisation. As for the scene in India, 60 Co sources, gamma chambers and batch irradiators are manufactured. A list of the on-going R and D projects and organisations engaged in research in this field is given. (M.G.B.)

  13. Bioprocessing research for energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, C.D.; Gaden, E.L. Jr.; Humphrey, A.E.; Carta, G.; Kirwan, D.J.

    1989-04-01

    The new biotechnology that is emerging could have a major impact on many of the industries important to our country, especially those associated with energy production and conservation. Advances in bioprocessing systems will provide important alternatives for the future utilization of various energy resources and for the control of environmental hazards that can result from energy generation. Although research in the fundamental biological sciences has helped set the scene for a ''new biotechnology,'' the major impediment to rapid commercialization for energy applications is the lack of a firm understanding of the necessary engineering concepts. Engineering research is now the essential ''bridge'' that will allow the development of a wide range of energy-related bioprocessing systems. A workshop entitled ''Bioprocessing Research for Energy Applications'' was held to address this technological area, to define the engineering research needs, and to identify those opportunities which would encourage rapid implementation of advanced bioprocessing concepts.

  14. Nanotechnology research for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agee, Forrest J.; Lozano, Karen; Gutierrez, Jose M.; Chipara, Mircea; Thapa, Ram; Chow, Alice

    2009-04-01

    Nanotechnology is impacting the future of the military and aerospace. The increasing demands for high performance and property-specific applications are forcing the scientific world to take novel approaches in developing programs and accelerating output. CONTACT or Consortium for Nanomaterials for Aerospace Commerce and Technology is a cooperative nanotechnology research program in Texas building on an infrastructure that promotes collaboration between universities and transitioning to industry. The participants of the program include the US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), five campuses of the University of Texas (Brownsville, Pan American, Arlington, Austin, and Dallas), the University of Houston, and Rice University. Through the various partnerships between the intellectual centers and the interactions with AFRL and CONTACT's industrial associates, the program represents a model that addresses the needs of the changing and competitive technological world. Into the second year, CONTACT has expanded to twelve projects that cover four areas of research: Adaptive Coatings and Surface Engineering, Nano Energetics, Electromagnetic Sensors, and Power Generation and Storage. This paper provides an overview of the CONTACT program and its projects including the research and development of new electrorheological fluids with nanoladen suspensions and composites and the potential applications.

  15. DOE Research Contributions to Radiation and Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    dropdown arrow Site Map A-Z Index Menu Synopsis DOE Research Contributions to Radiation and Cancer Therapy Possible: DOE Advanced Biomedical Technology Research, page 10 Over the time span of many years, DOE's research has made many contributions to radiation and cancer therapy, including PEREGRINE and Boron Neutron

  16. 11th International Conference of Radiation Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-18

    Topics discussed in the conference included the following: Radiation Physics, Radiation Chemistry and modelling--Radiation physics and dosimetry; Electron transfer in biological media; Radiation chemistry; Biophysical and biochemical modelling; Mechanisms of DNA damage; Assays of DNA damage; Energy deposition in micro volumes; Photo-effects; Special techniques and technologies; Oxidative damage. Molecular and cellular effects-- Photobiology; Cell cycle effects; DNA damage: Strand breaks; DNA damage: Bases; DNA damage Non-targeted; DNA damage: other; Chromosome aberrations: clonal; Chromosomal aberrations: non-clonal; Interactions: Heat/Radiation/Drugs; Biochemical effects; Protein expression; Gene induction; Co-operative effects; ``Bystander'' effects; Oxidative stress effects; Recovery from radiation damage. DNA damage and repair -- DNA repair genes; DNA repair deficient diseases; DNA repair enzymology; Epigenetic effects on repair; and Ataxia and ATM.

  17. Application of radiation chemistry in materials modification and environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    thermoshrinkable tubes and types possessing '' memory effect ''. Through radiation, grafting metal adsorbents and ion exchange membranes can be developed. Radiation is early applied tool in the area of nanomaterials engineering; arrangement of atoms and ions has been performed using ion or electron beams for many years. New trends concern surface curing and development of ion track membranes and controlled release drug-delivery systems. Finally, radiation processing concerns gem stones colorization, development of high temperature resistant fibers (SiC) and semiconductor modification. Over the past few years, radiation processing technologies aimed at ensuring the safety of gaseous and liquid effluents discharged to the environment have been developed. It has been demonstrated that radiation processing based technologies for flue gas treatment (SO X and NO X removal), wastewater purification, and sludge hygienization can be effectively deployed to mitigate environmental degradation. Electron beam technology is among the most promising advanced technologies of new generation. This is a dry-scrubbing process of simultaneous SO 2 and NO x removal, where no waste except the fertilizer by-product are generated.The other possibility is application of the process for VOC removal. Tests at the pilot plant constructed at a coal-fired power station were performed with the purpose of estimating the influence of electron beam on VOCs present in flue gas, during SO 2 and NO x removal. The removal efficiencies have been ranged from 40% up to 98%. The chlorocarbons including dioxins may be removed with high efficiency as well [57, 58]. During the radiolysis of water reactive radicals of strong oxidizing or reducing properties are formed that can transform the pollutants in the liquids wastes. A large number of substances such as hard surfactants, lignin, pesticides cannot be degraded by conventional biochemical methods and thus escape from decomposition in biological treatment. Research and

  18. Status of radiation applications in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roushdy, H.M.

    1979-01-01

    A summary is given of the following applications: radiotherapy; sterilization of medical products and biological tissues; inactivation of virus; food preservation; insect control and eradication; improvement in field crops; treatment of waste waters and sewage sludge. In industry, irradiation technology has contributed to the manufacturing industries for new product developments in the plastics, textiles, wood, rubber, petroleum, concrete and chemical industries. Irradiation technology offers a fascinating outlet for developing countries for improving their condition of medical care, upgrading of their natural materials, stimulating their industrial development, decreasing their food losses and increasing their crop production. These lines would certainly contribute to their national economy and would result in an enhanced rate of development. However, transfer of radiation technology to developing countries should be undertaken in view of the actual national and regional needs and supported by an overall well studied national and regional planning for trained manpower development. The choice of a radiation source for a potential application should be based on the demand of the process, compromise between desirability and cost and quantitative data on installation, operation and maintenance conditions, and costs. The program developed and implemented by Egypt is herein presented. Facilities, organization, personnel, current and past activities, and future plans are described. (author)

  19. Research progress on space radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenjian; Dang Bingrong; Wang Zhuanzi; Wei Wei; Jing Xigang; Wang Biqian; Zhang Bintuan

    2010-01-01

    Space radiation, particularly induced by the high-energy charged particles, may cause serious injury on living organisms. So it is one critical restriction factor in Manned Spaceflight. Studies have shown that the biological effects of charged particles were associated with their quality, the dose and the different biological end points. In addition, the microgravity conditions may affect the biological effects of space radiation. In this paper we give a review on the biological damage effects of space radiation and the combined biological effects of the space radiation coupled with the microgravity from the results of space flight and ground simulation experiments. (authors)

  20. Solar Radiation Research Laboratory | Energy Systems Integration Facility |

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) has been collecting continuous measurements of basic solar continuous operation. More than 75 instruments contribute to the Baseline Measurement System by recording

  1. Proceedings of the Scientific Meeting on Application of Isotopes and Radiation: Book 2. Chemistry, Environment, Radiation Process, And Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhadi, F; Sisworo, E L; Maha, M; Ismachin, M; Hilmy, N; Sumatra, M; Mugiono,; Wandowo,; Soebianto, Y S [Center for Application of Isotopes and Radiation, National Atomic Energy Agency, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    1998-07-01

    The aim of the 10th Meeting of the Isotope and Radiation Application is to disseminate the result of research on application of nuclear techniques on agriculture, animal, biology, chemistry, environment, radiation process and industry. The meeting was held in Jakarta, 18-19 February 1998, and there were 6 invited papers and 52 papers indexed individually. This proceeding is divided by two volumes. Volume I and volume II consists of agriculture, animal, biology and chemistry, environment, radiation process and industry, respectively.(ID)

  2. Proceedings of the Scientific Meeting on Application of Isotopes and Radiation: Book 2. Chemistry, Environment, Radiation Process, And Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhadi, F.; Sisworo, E.L.; Maha, M.; Ismachin, M.; Hilmy, N.; Sumatra, M.; Mugiono; Wandowo; Soebianto, Y.S.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the 10th Meeting of the Isotope and Radiation Application is to disseminate the result of research on application of nuclear techniques on agriculture, animal, biology, chemistry, environment, radiation process and industry. The meeting was held in Jakarta, 18-19 February 1998, and there were 6 invited papers and 52 papers indexed individually. This proceeding is divided by two volumes. Volume I and volume II consists of agriculture, animal, biology and chemistry, environment, radiation process and industry, respectively.(ID)

  3. A Research Agenda for Radiation Oncology: Results of the Radiation Oncology Institute's Comprehensive Research Needs Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Brawley, Otis W. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Emory University, and American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, OR (United States); Lawton, Colleen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To promote the rational use of scarce research funding, scholars have developed methods for the systematic identification and prioritization of health research needs. The Radiation Oncology Institute commissioned an independent, comprehensive assessment of research needs for the advancement of radiation oncology care. Methods and Materials: The research needs assessment used a mixed-method, qualitative and quantitative social scientific approach, including structured interviews with diverse stakeholders, focus groups, surveys of American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) members, and a prioritization exercise using a modified Delphi technique. Results: Six co-equal priorities were identified: (1) Identify and develop communication strategies to help patients and others better understand radiation therapy; (2) Establish a set of quality indicators for major radiation oncology procedures and evaluate their use in radiation oncology delivery; (3) Identify best practices for the management of radiation toxicity and issues in cancer survivorship; (4) Conduct comparative effectiveness studies related to radiation therapy that consider clinical benefit, toxicity (including quality of life), and other outcomes; (5) Assess the value of radiation therapy; and (6) Develop a radiation oncology registry. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this prioritization exercise is the only comprehensive and methodologically rigorous assessment of research needs in the field of radiation oncology. Broad dissemination of these findings is critical to maximally leverage the impact of this work, particularly because grant funding decisions are often made by committees on which highly specialized disciplines such as radiation oncology are not well represented.

  4. A Research Agenda for Radiation Oncology: Results of the Radiation Oncology Institute’s Comprehensive Research Needs Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Bekelman, Justin E.; Brawley, Otis W.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Michalski, Jeff M.; Movsas, Benjamin; Thomas, Charles R.; Lawton, Colleen A.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To promote the rational use of scarce research funding, scholars have developed methods for the systematic identification and prioritization of health research needs. The Radiation Oncology Institute commissioned an independent, comprehensive assessment of research needs for the advancement of radiation oncology care. Methods and Materials: The research needs assessment used a mixed-method, qualitative and quantitative social scientific approach, including structured interviews with diverse stakeholders, focus groups, surveys of American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) members, and a prioritization exercise using a modified Delphi technique. Results: Six co-equal priorities were identified: (1) Identify and develop communication strategies to help patients and others better understand radiation therapy; (2) Establish a set of quality indicators for major radiation oncology procedures and evaluate their use in radiation oncology delivery; (3) Identify best practices for the management of radiation toxicity and issues in cancer survivorship; (4) Conduct comparative effectiveness studies related to radiation therapy that consider clinical benefit, toxicity (including quality of life), and other outcomes; (5) Assess the value of radiation therapy; and (6) Develop a radiation oncology registry. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this prioritization exercise is the only comprehensive and methodologically rigorous assessment of research needs in the field of radiation oncology. Broad dissemination of these findings is critical to maximally leverage the impact of this work, particularly because grant funding decisions are often made by committees on which highly specialized disciplines such as radiation oncology are not well represented.

  5. The application of radiation technology in industrial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvermann, J.

    1974-01-01

    The author makes a general survey of current applications for radiation processing such as sterilization of biological and medical supplies, crosslinking of polymers, production of durable press fabrics, radiation-cured coating, production of wood-plastic composites, radiation degradation and chemical synthesis. The adoption of radiation processing on large scale by Western Electric is presented. The trend in costs and the environmental problems has a profound effect on the future of radiation processing. (M.S.)

  6. Application of ultraviolet and infrared radiation in food

    OpenAIRE

    D Jafarpour; M Alizadeh; F Siamak

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are many uses of radiation in the food industry. Radiation can be considered as one of the new processes and usage of it can offer new features of food. This process in most food doesn’t leave any physical or sensory changes. Therefore, in this review article, the application of ultraviolet and infrared radiation in food was studied. Methods: Search by the keywords “Ultraviolet Radiation Infrared Radiation Food” in databases Pubmed, Scopus and Web of Sci...

  7. Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Enclosed are proceedings of the workshop on Internal Dosimetry held on Atlanta, Georgia in April 1992. The recommendations from the Workshop were considered by the CIRRPC Subpanel on Occupational Radiation Protection Research in identifying those areas to be undertaken by individual Federal Agencies or in cooperative efforts. This document presents summaries of the following sessions: A.1 Applications and limitations of ICRP and other metabolic models, A.2 Applications and implementation of proposed ICRP lung model, A.3 Estimates of intake from repetitive bioassay data, A.4 Chelation models for plutonium urinalysis data, B.1 Transuranium/uranium registry data, B.2 Autopsy tissue analysis, B.3 Bioassay / Whole body counting, B.4 Data base formatting and availability, C.1 An overview of calculational techniques in use today, C.2 The perfect code, C.3 Dose calculations based on individuals instead of averages, C.4 From macro dosimetry to micro dosimetry

  8. Radiation safety aspects in the use of radiation sources in industrial and heath-care applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkat Raj, V.

    2001-01-01

    The principle underlying the philosophy of radiation protection and safety is to ensure that there exists an appropriate standard of protection and safety for humans, without unduly limiting the benefits of the practices giving rise to exposure or incurring disproportionate costs in interventions. To realise these objectives, the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP-60) and IAEA's Safety Series (IAEA Safety Series 120, 1996) have enunciated the following criteria for the application and use of radiation: (1) justification of practices; (2) optimisation of protection; (3) dose limitation and (4) safety of sources. Though these criteria are the basic tenets of radiation protection, the radiation hazard potentials of individual applications vary and the methods to achieve the above mentioned objectives principles are different. This paper gives a brief overview of the various applications of radiation and radioactive sources in India, their radiation hazard perspective and the radiation safety measures provided to achieve the basic radiation protection philosophy. (author)

  9. The application of radiation logs to groundwater hydrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Keys, W [United States Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1967-05-15

    The drilling of exploratory holes to determine the availability of groundwater and to plan the most economical methods of water development is expensive. The only technique available at present for obtaining geological and hydrological information through the casing of pre-existing water wells and other boreholes is by radiation logging. Up to now these logging techniques have been little used in groundwater hydrology. This report describes inexpensive portable radiation logging equipment that is available or has been developed for groundwater studies in connection with a general research project on the application of borehole geophysics in groundwater hydrology. It is possible to obtain data on the following: the source, velocity, and chemical quality of groundwater; the location, extent, geometry, bulk density, porosity, permeability, and specific yield of aquifers and associated strata; and the position of casings, casing collars, leaks, perforations, and cement. The radiation logs employed include natural gamma, gamma-gamma, neutron-gamma. neutron epithermal-neutron. and radioactive tracer. The following radioisotopes are utilized: cobalt-60, plutonium-239, americium-241, and iodine-131. Typical radiation logs obtained by the various techniques are described and examples are given of practical applications of radiation logging to groundwater investigations. The applications cited are studies of perched water in basaltic rocks and associated sedimentary strata; the porosity, moisture content, and position of zones into which water was injected in volcanic tuff; the position of the interface between brine and fresh water in fine-grained carbonate rocks and associated fine clastic rocks; the interpretation of porosity from a neutron log; and the location by means of a radioactive tracer of the more permeable fracture zones in a well penetrating crystalline rock. (author)

  10. Application of radiation and radioisotopes in life science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Tomoko M.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation and Radioisotopes have been played an important role in the wide range of life science, from the field study, such as fertilizer or pesticide development or production of new species, to gene engineering researches. Many mutants through radiation have been provided to the market and the usage of radioactive tracers was an effective tool to study plant physiology. It has been granted that the contribution of radioisotopes has been accelerated the development of the gene engineering technology, which is now overwhelming all the other usages of radiation or radioisotopes. However, because of the difficulty to get social acceptance for gene modified plants, the orientation of the life science is now changing towards, so called ''post genome era''. Therefore, from the point of radiation or radioisotope usage, new application methods are needed to develop new type of researches. We present how (1) neutron activation analysis, (2) neutron radiography and (3) positron emission tomography are promising to study living plant physiology. Some of these techniques are not necessarily new methods but with a little modification, they show new aspects of plant activity. (author)

  11. Radiative heat transfer in turbulent combustion systems theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Modest, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    This introduction reviews why combustion and radiation are important, as well as the technical challenges posed by radiation. Emphasis is on interactions among turbulence, chemistry and radiation (turbulence-chemistry-radiation interactions – TCRI) in Reynolds-averaged and large-eddy simulations. Subsequent chapters cover: chemically reacting turbulent flows; radiation properties, Reynolds transport equation (RTE) solution methods, and TCRI; radiation effects in laminar flames; TCRI in turbulent flames; and high-pressure combustion systems. This Brief presents integrated approach that includes radiation at the outset, rather than as an afterthought. It stands as the most recent developments in physical modeling, numerical algorithms, and applications collected in one monograph.

  12. Research on atmospheric corrosion of steel using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, M.; Uchida, H.; Konishi, H.; Mizuki, J.

    2004-01-01

    Correlation between local structure around Cr in the protective rust layer on weathering steel and protective performance of the rust layer is presented as an example of corrosion research using synchrotron radiation which has recently been applied in various research fields as a useful tool. In addition, in situ observation of initial process of rust formation on steel is also mentioned. It was pointed out by considering the X-ray absorption fine structure spectra that the nanostructure of the protective rust layer on weathering steel primarily comprises of small Cr-goethite crystals containing surface adsorbed and/or intergranular CrO x 3-2X complex anions. This CrO x 3-2X explains the protective performance of the rust layer originated by dense aggregation of fine crystals with cation selectivity of the Cr-goethite. It is very advantageous to employ white X-rays for in situ observation of rusting process of a carbon steel covered with electrolyte thin films because rust structure might change very quickly. This in situ observation revealed the effect of ion species on the change in rust phase during wet/dry repeating. It can be said that application of synchrotron radiation on corrosion research is so useful to understand the nanostructure of surface oxides which closely relate to corrosion behavior of metals and alloys. (author)

  13. Annual Report: Hydrodynamics and Radiative Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Paul Drake

    2005-12-01

    We report the ongoing work of our group in hydrodynamics and radiative hydrodynamics with astrophysical applications. During the period of the existing grant, we have carried out two types of experiments at the Omega laser. One set of experiments has studied radiatively collapsing shocks, obtaining high-quality scaling data using a backlit pinhole and obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) Thomson-scattering data from a radiative shock. Other experiments have studied the deeply nonlinear development of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability from complex initial conditions, obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) dual-axis radiographic data using backlit pinholes and ungated detectors. All these experiments have applications to astrophysics, discussed in the corresponding papers either in print or in preparation. We also have obtained preliminary radiographs of experimental targets using our x-ray source. The targets for the experiments have been assembled at Michigan, where we also prepare many of the simple components. The above activities, in addition to a variety of data analysis and design projects, provide good experience for graduate and undergraduates students. In the process of doing this research we have built a research group that uses such work to train junior scientists.

  14. Research applications of calcium-47

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1962-01-01

    The possibility of using the isotope calcium-47 for calcium metabolism investigation was discussed. It seemed particularly suited for this purpose since it has a half-life of only 4.7 days; it is, moreover, a strong gamma-emitter which permits easy detection of very small quantities from outside the body. It was, however, produced on an experimental basis only and at a price of US $1400 per mC which was beyond the financial possibilities of almost any medical research institution or hospital. In view of IAEA's mandate to promote isotope research in the fields of radiobiology and medicine the participants asked the Agency to carry out a programme of encouraging research that might lead to cheaper methods of producing this isotope and of assisting in its practical applications in diagnosis and clinical research. The Agency took up this suggestion and the way it has pursued the project might be considered characteristic of its methods of dealing with such problems on an international scale

  15. Research applications of calcium-47

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1962-04-15

    The possibility of using the isotope calcium-47 for calcium metabolism investigation was discussed. It seemed particularly suited for this purpose since it has a half-life of only 4.7 days; it is, moreover, a strong gamma-emitter which permits easy detection of very small quantities from outside the body. It was, however, produced on an experimental basis only and at a price of US $1400 per mC which was beyond the financial possibilities of almost any medical research institution or hospital. In view of IAEA's mandate to promote isotope research in the fields of radiobiology and medicine the participants asked the Agency to carry out a programme of encouraging research that might lead to cheaper methods of producing this isotope and of assisting in its practical applications in diagnosis and clinical research. The Agency took up this suggestion and the way it has pursued the project might be considered characteristic of its methods of dealing with such problems on an international scale

  16. Application of maximum radiation exposure values and monitoring of radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    According to the Section 32 of the Radiation Act (592/91) the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety gives instructions concerning the monitoring of the radiation exposure and the application of the dose limits in Finland. The principles to be applied to calculating the equivalent and the effective doses are presented in the guide. Also the detailed instructions on the application of the maximum exposure values for the radiation work and for the natural radiation as well as the instructions on the monitoring of the exposures are given. Quantities and units for assessing radiation exposure are presented in the appendix of the guide

  17. Radiation in industrial processes;Applications reviewed at Warsaw Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-10-15

    -linking of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and poly-vinyl chloride (PVC), well known polymers derived from the ethylene group. Some papers dealt with the chain oxidation and chlorination of hydro-carbons, both of which are among the most important chemical processes in industry. The effects of radiation on coal and methanation reactions were also discussed. Another subject that came up related to the possibility of improving catalysts by irradiation. It is widely realized that some of the effects produced by ionizing radiation are likely to influence catalytic properties and attempts have been made to alter the catalytic activity of solids by exposure to nuclear radiation. A major field for the use of ionizing radiation is sterilization. The pharmaceutical industry, for example, has been in need of a method by which sensitive materials like proteins and enzymes could be sterilized without the application of heat or highly reactive chemicals. Another related subject discussed at the conference was sterilization of medical supplies like surgical instruments, hypodermic needles and rubber equipment. A further specific application considered in this connexion was sterilization of ampoules of distilled water with gamma rays, which can be of economic advantage in the industrial field. The sterilizing activity of radiation is also useful in the preservation of food and there has been intensive research in several countries on devising an effective and safe method for the treatment of food with ionizing radiations. An account of this research and of the results obtained was given at the conference, and the potentialities were evaluated. Many of the papers presented at the conference examined problems connected with the design and construction of suitable radiation sources for the varied uses in industry. Cobalt sources of different types were described in detail and their operating experience was narrated and discussed. The relative efficiency and usefulness of different radiation sources

  18. Application of circular polarized synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Tsuneaki; Kawata, Hiroshi

    1988-03-01

    The idea of using the polarizing property of light for physical experiment by controlling it variously has been known from old time, and the Faraday effect and the research by polarizing microscopy are its examples. The light emitted from the electron orbit of an accelerator has the different polarizing characteristics from those of the light of a laboratory light source, and as far as observing it within the electron orbit plane, it becomes linearly polarized light. By utilizing this property well, research is carried out at present in synchrotron experimental facilities. Recently, the technology related to the insert type light cources using permanent magnets has advanced remarkably, and circular polarized light has become to be producible. If the light like this can be obtained with the energy not only in far ultraviolet region but also to x-ray region at high luminance, new possibility should open. At the stage that the design of an insert type light source was finished, and its manufacture was started, the research on the method of evaluating the degree of circular polarization and the research on the utilization of circular polarized synchrotron radiation are earnestly carried out. In this report, the results of researches presented at the study meeting are summarized. Moreover, the design and manufacture of the beam lines for exclusive use will be carried out. (Kako, I.)

  19. Administration of ionizing radiation to human subjects in medical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Any administration of ionizing radiation to human subjects for the purposes of diagnostic or therapeutic research involving either irradiation or the administration of radionuclides, should be undertaken only after approval by an institutional ethics committee. The ethics committee should obtain advice from a person experienced in radiation protection before granting approval. The research proposal must conform to regulatory requirements relating to the use of ionizing radiation

  20. Synchrotron radiation A general overview and a review of storage rings, research facilities, and insertion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winick, H.

    1989-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation, the electromagnetic radiation given off by electrons in circular motion, is revolutionizing many branches of science and technology by offering beams of vacuum ultraviolet light and x rays of immense flux and brightness. In the past decade there has been an explosion of interest in these applications leading activity to construct new research facilities based on advanced storage rings and insertion device sources. Applications include basic and applied research in biology, chemistry, medicine, and physics plus many areas of technology. In this article we present a general overview of the field of synchrotron radiation research, its history, the present status and future prospects of storage rings and research facilities, and the development of wiggler and undulator insertion devices as sources of synchrotron radiation

  1. Quality assurance in ionizing radiation application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastkhah; Nasser.

    1995-01-01

    Quality assurance is a mean for controlling all the activities within an organization which affect the quality of the product or service. A series of international standards have been prepared which incorporate the accumulated knowledge and provide guidance on what activities within an organization should be controlled. A proposal on a quality assurance system to be implemented in ionizing radiation application centers is the primary concern of Atomic Energy Organization of Iran is represented. The Objectives were identification of quality related problems ;Comply with national and international requirements ;Controlling all activities within an organization which affects the quality and assurance of maintaining the quality within organization. In performing protection measures, risk, cost, benefit consideration, cause of problems and the classic solution are summarized in four chapters

  2. Nuclear Cross Sections for Space Radiation Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werneth, C. M.; Maung, K. M.; Ford, W. P.; Norbury, J. W.; Vera, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    The eikonal, partial wave (PW) Lippmann-Schwinger, and three-dimensional Lippmann-Schwinger (LS3D) methods are compared for nuclear reactions that are relevant for space radiation applications. Numerical convergence of the eikonal method is readily achieved when exact formulas of the optical potential are used for light nuclei (A = 16) and the momentum-space optical potential is used for heavier nuclei. The PW solution method is known to be numerically unstable for systems that require a large number of partial waves, and, as a result, the LS3D method is employed. The effect of relativistic kinematics is studied with the PW and LS3D methods and is compared to eikonal results. It is recommended that the LS3D method be used for high energy nucleon-nucleus reactions and nucleus-nucleus reactions at all energies because of its rapid numerical convergence and stability for both non-relativistic and relativistic kinematics.

  3. Establishment of comprehensive promotion plan for utilization, research and development of radiation and radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Myung; Kim, H. J.; Ham, C. H.; Yang, M. H.; Chung, W. S.; Park, K. B.; Jin, J. H.; Song, H. S.; Nho, Y. C.; Byun, M. W.; Kim, J. R.; Han, H. S.; Chung, Y. S.; Yun, P. M.; Lee, H. Y.; Seo, K. W.; Chang, S. Y.; Kee, S. R.; Lhu, S. R.; Choi, Y. S.

    1997-05-01

    This study surveys state-of-art radiation/RI industries and research organizations and their activities. The major objective of the survey is to collect useful information on the status of these industries, discuss issues concerning radiation /RI utilization. We, therefore, send questionnaires to field workers engaged in RI industries and research organizations to feedback on real field issues and problems. Considering the specificity and diversity of the radiation / RI area, six sectors are set up for its promotion. Each sector includes status analysis, active promotion measures and implementation plans. Six areas are as follows; 1) systematic developments of radiation /RI utilization technologies covers technology development for industrial applications, technology development for agricultural applications, technology development for medical applications, development of RI and radiation generators, and expansion of infra-structure for enhancement of radiation / RI utilization, and fostering radiation science. 2) activation of radiation / RI indusries 3) rationalization of radiation / RI regulation 4) international cooperation, 5) manpower development 6) finance. (author). 14 refs., 34 tabs., 5 figs

  4. Research in radiation biology, in the environment, and in radiation protection at CRNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marko, A.M.; Myers, D.K.; Ophel, I.L.; Cowper, G.; Newcombe, H.B.

    1978-01-01

    Research in radiation biology at CRNL is concerned with: evaluation of the effects of low doses of radiation upon humans and other living organisms; the development of new methods for detecting the effects of radiation exposure in large populations; the continued development of improved methods by which radiation levels can be measured accurately and reliably; and evaluation of the effects of nuclear power use upon the environment. The present report summarizes our background knowledge of radiation hazards and describes current research activities in Biology and Health Physics Division at CRNL. (author)

  5. SIMS applications in biological research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, K.E.; Burke, P.T.; Kelly, I.J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: SIMS has been utilised as a tool for biological research since the early 1970's. SIMS' abilities in isotopic detection with high sensitivity, imaging capabilities at a subcellular level, and the possibility of molecular imaging have been the main areas of interest for biological development. However, whilst hundreds of instruments are available in industrial and university laboratories for semiconductor and materials analysis, only a handful successfully perform biological research. For this reason there is generally a lack of awareness of SIMS by the biological community. Biological SIMS analysis requires a working knowledge of both biology and SIMS. Sample preparation is a critical and time consuming prerequisite for any successful biological SIMS study. In addition, for quantification to be possible a homogeneous, matrix matched standard must be available. Once these difficulties are more widely understood and overcome there will be a greater motivation for the biological community to embrace SIMS as a unique tool in their research. This paper provides an overview of some of the more successful biological SIMS application areas internationally, and summarises the types of biological SIMS requests received by ANSTO

  6. Radiation-engineered nanomaterials. The role of the IAEA in coordinating research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haji-Saeid, M.; Safrany, A.; Sampa, M.H. de O.; Ramamoorthy, N.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Radiation technologies, already established in materials processing, have properties uniquely for the creation of new functional materials on the nanoscale, both in 'top-to-bottom' and 'bottom-up' approaches. For example, controlled radiation degradation may be used for fabrication of nanoporous and nanostructured surfaces and membranes; while radiation polymerization, crosslinking and grafting could produce functional polymeric, metallic and semiconductor nanoparticles, functional nanostructured surfaces and nanocomposites. Applications for such nanostructured materials are manifold, from 3D structures, templates for nanowire fabrication, supports for purification, and proton exchange membranes, to imaging, diagnostics, targeted drug and gene delivery, wound healing and cell sheet engineering. Considering the significant potential as well as the already demonstrated successful applications in using radiation methods for synthesis and characterization of nano-sized materials as well as the interdisciplinary nature of nanotechnology, and in order to facilitate the coordination between radiation-based research groups and nanotechnology centres, the IAEA has organized a number of consultancy meetings, training courses and workshops. Additionally, a coordinated research project entitled 'Nanoscale Radiation Engineering of Advanced Materials for Potential Biomedical applications' in progress, under which 17 IAEA Member States institutions work together to develop radiolytic methodologies for synthesis of nanoparticles and nanoporous membranes; polymeric, inorganic and hybrid nanocarriers for various healthcare applications. This presentation will describe the present activities of the IAEA and plans for future supports for fostering development and application of radiation-engineered functional nanomaterials.

  7. Perception of low dose radiation risks among radiation researchers in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Songwon; Lee, Dalnim; Park, Sunhoo; Jin, Young Woo; Lee, Seung-Sook

    2017-01-01

    Expert’s risk evaluation of radiation exposure strongly influences the public’s risk perception. Experts can inform laypersons of significant radiation information including health knowledge based on experimental data. However, some experts’ radiation risk perception is often based on non-conclusive scientific evidence (i.e., radiation levels below 100 millisievert), which is currently under debate. Examining perception levels among experts is important for communication with the public since these individual’s opinions have often exacerbated the public’s confusion. We conducted a survey of Korean radiation researchers to investigate their perceptions of the risks associated with radiation exposure below 100 millisievert. A linear regression analysis revealed that having ≥ 11 years’ research experience was a critical factor associated with radiation risk perception, which was inversely correlated with each other. Increased opportunities to understand radiation effects at risk perception of radiation exposure. In addition, radiation researchers conceived that more scientific evidence reducing the uncertainty for radiation effects risk perception of radiation exposure. PMID:28166286

  8. The progress of molecular biology in radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Kang

    1989-01-01

    The recent progress in application of molecular biology techniques in the study of radiation biology is reviewed. The three sections are as follows: (1) the study of DNA damage on molecular level, (2) the molecular mechanism of radiation cell genetics, including chromosome abberation and cell mutation, (3) the study on DNA repair gene with DNA mediated gene transfer techniques

  9. Low energy accelerators for research and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandari, R.K.

    2013-01-01

    Charged particle accelerators are instruments for producing a variety of radiations under controlled conditions for basic and applied research as well as applications. They have helped enormously to study the matter, atoms, nuclei, sub-nuclear particles and their constituents, forces involved in the related phenomena etc. No other man-made instrument has been so effective in such studies as the accelerator. The large accelerator constructed so far is the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) housed in a tunnel of 27 km circumference, while a small accelerator can fit inside a room. Small accelerators accelerate charged particles such as electrons, protons, deuterons, alphas and, in general ions to low energy, generally, below several MeV. These particle beams are used for studies in nuclear astrophysics, atomic physics, material science, surface physics, bio sciences etc. They are used for ion beam analysis such as RBS, PIXE, NRA, AMS, CPAA etc. More importantly, the ion beams have important industrial applications like ion implantation, surface modification, isotope production etc. while electron beams are used for material processing, material modification, sterilization, food preservation, non destructive testing etc. In this talk, role of low energy accelerators in research and industry as well as medicine will be discussed. (author)

  10. Radiation protection in the application of ionizing radiation in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Yusof Mohamad Ali

    1987-01-01

    There is a substantial increase in the use of ionizing radiation in industry throughout the country especially in the last five years or so. With this growth in the number of users and activity of sources used, and together with the introduction of the new Atomic Energy Licensing Act (AELA) in 1984, the question of radiation safety and protection of workers and members of the public in general, can no longer be taken lightly. It has to be dealt with effectively. In this paper, a general discussion and clarification on certain practical aspects of radiation protection as recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is presented. Amongst the topics chosen are those on area monitoring, personnel monitoring, leak testing of sealed sources and training of personnel. Also presented in the paper is a brief discussion about UTN's experience in giving out radiation protection services to various agencies throughout the country. (author)

  11. A radiation research apparatus sensitive to wavelength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The apparatus described is equipped with a radiation source with a tuning device for the generation of X radiation of at least two different wavelength spectra. The detector with ionisation chamber is able to discriminate between these spectra. This is done with the aid of an auxillary electrode between the entrance window and a high voltage electrode. With a lower source of voltage this electrode has a potential equal to the high voltage electrode potential and with a higher voltage source it has a potential equal to the signal electrode potential. (Th.P.)

  12. 7. international congress of radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musilek, L.

    1984-01-01

    The congress was held in Amsterdam on July 3 to 8, 1983, with the participation of 1305 specialists from 44 countries. The number of papers came close to one thousand, most of them being posters. The congress met in 44 sessions grouped by problem areas of which there were five: A. Chemistry and Physics; B. Biology; C. Somatic and genetic effects; D. Biology and therapy of tumours; E. Dosimetry, radionuclides and technology. The congress brought out the immense quantitative growth of knowledge in the field of radiation biology and biochemistry. A general idea of the effects of radiation on organisms is yet to be attained. (Ha)

  13. Some applications of radiation chemistry to biochemistry and radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wardman, P.

    1987-01-01

    In this chapter illustrate the use of radiation chemistry as a tool in investigating biologically important radical reactions, and also outline some studies of models for radiobiological damage. Because aqueous solutions usually offer the most important matrix, an appreciation of the main features of water radiolysis will be essential. Most of the illustrations involve pulse radiolysis, and some familiarity with chemical kinetics is assumed. In addition to these and other chapters in this book, readers find the proceedings of a recent NATO Advanced Study Institute most useful. The authors shall not try to review here all the applications of radiation chemistry to biochemistry and biology, but they will illustrate, using selected examples, the main principles and practical advantages and problems. Another recent volume covers the main contributions of flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis to the chemistry of biology and medicine, complementing earlier reviews. Papers from symposia on radical processes in radiobiology and carcinogenesis, and on super-oxide dismutases, and proceedings of recent international congresses of radiation research, together with the other publications referred to above will enable the reader to gain a comprehensive overview of the role of radicals in biological processes and the contributions of radiation chemistry

  14. Radiation protection code of practice in academic and research institutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalla, A. A. M.

    2010-05-01

    The main aim of this study was to establish a code of practice on radiation protection for safe control of radiation sources used in academic and research institutes, another aim of this study was to assess the current situation of radiation protection in some of the academic and research institutes.To achieve the aims of this study, a draft of a code of practice has been developed which is based on international and local relevant recommendation. The developed code includes the following main issues: regulatory responsibilities, radiation protection program and design of radiation installations. The second aim had been accomplished by conducting inspection visits to five (A, B, C, D and E) academic and to four (F, G, H and I ) research institutes. Eight of such institutes are located in Khartoum State and the ninth one is in Madani city (Aljazeera State). The inspection activities have been carried out using a standard inspection check list developed by the regulatory authority of the Sudan. The inspection missions to the above mentioned institutes involved also evaluation of radiation levels around the premises and storage areas of radiation sources. The dose rate measurement around radiation sources locations were found to be quite low. This mainly is due to the fact that the activities of most radionuclides that are used in these institutes are quite low ( in the range of micro curies). Also ,most the x-ray machines that were found in use for scientific academic and research purposes work at low k Vp of maximum 60 k Vp. None of the radiation workers in the inspected institutes has a personal radiation monitoring device, therefor staff dose levels have not been assessed. However it was noted that in most of the academic/ research studies radiation workers are only exposed to very low levels of radiation and for a very short time that dose not exceed 1 minute, therefore the expected occupational exposure of the staff is very low. Radiation measurement in public

  15. Application of maximum radiation exposure values and monitoring of radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The guide presents the principles to be applied in calculating the equivalent dose and the effective dose, instructions on application of the maximum values for radiation exposure, and instruction on monitoring of radiation exposure. In addition, the measurable quantities to be used in monitoring the radiation exposure are presented. (2 refs.)

  16. Radiation hard diamond sensors for future tracking applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, W.; Boer, W. de; Borchi, E.

    2006-01-01

    Progress in experimental particle physics in the coming decade depends crucially upon the ability to carry out experiments in high-radiation areas. In order to perform these complex and expensive experiments, new radiation hard technologies must be developed. This paper discusses the use of diamond detectors in future tracking applications and their survivability in the highest radiation environments. We present results of devices constructed with the newest polycrystalline and single crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond and their tolerance to radiation

  17. Gamma radiation detectors for safeguards applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carchon, R.; Moeslinger, M.; Bourva, L.; Bass, C.; Zendel, M.

    2007-01-01

    The IAEA uses extensively a variety of gamma radiation detectors to verify nuclear material. These detectors are part of standardized spectrometry systems: germanium detectors for High-Resolution Gamma Spectrometry (HRGS); Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors for Room Temperature Gamma Spectrometry (RTGS); and NaI(Tl) detectors for Low Resolution Gamma Spectrometry (LRGS). HRGS with high-purity Germanium (HpGe) detectors cooled by liquid nitrogen is widely used in nuclear safeguards to verify the isotopic composition of plutonium or uranium in non-irradiated material. Alternative cooling systems have been evaluated and electrically cooled HpGe detectors show a potential added value, especially for unattended measurements. The spectrometric performance of CZT detectors, their robustness and simplicity are key to the successful verification of irradiated materials. Further development, such as limiting the charge trapping effects in CZT to provide improved sensitivity and energy resolution are discussed. NaI(Tl) detectors have many applications-specifically in hand-held radioisotope identification devices (RID) which are used to detect the presence of radioactive material where a lower resolution is sufficient, as they benefit from a generally higher sensitivity. The Agency is also continuously involved in the review and evaluation of new and emerging technologies in the field of radiation detection such as: Peltier-cooled CdTe detectors; semiconductor detectors operating at room temperature such as HgI 2 and GaAs; and, scintillator detectors using glass fibres or LaBr 3 . A final conclusion, proposing recommendations for future action, is made

  18. Anisotropic conducting films for electromagnetic radiation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Francesca; Lagally, Max G.; Rojas-Delgado, Richard

    2015-06-16

    Electronic devices for the generation of electromagnetic radiation are provided. Also provided are methods for using the devices to generate electromagnetic radiation. The radiation sources include an anisotropic electrically conducting thin film that is characterized by a periodically varying charge carrier mobility in the plane of the film. The periodic variation in carrier mobility gives rise to a spatially varying electric field, which produces electromagnetic radiation as charged particles pass through the film.

  19. Human Research Program Space Radiation Standing Review Panel (SRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woloschak, Gayle; Steinberg-Wright, S.; Coleman, Norman; Grdina, David; Hill, Colin; Iliakis, George; Metting, Noelle; Meyers, Christina

    2010-01-01

    The Space Radiation Standing Review Panel (SRP) met at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) on December 9-11, 2009 to discuss the areas of current and future research targeted by the Space Radiation Program Element (SRPE) of the Human Research Program (HRP). Using evidence-based knowledge as a background for identified risks to astronaut health and performance, NASA had identified gaps in knowledge to address those risks. Ongoing and proposed tasks were presented to address the gaps. The charge to the Space Radiation SRP was to review the gaps, evaluate whether the tasks addressed these gaps and to make recommendations to NASA s HRP Science Management Office regarding the SRP's review. The SRP was requested to evaluate the practicality of the proposed efforts in light of the demands placed on the HRP. Several presentations were made to the SRP during the site visit and the SRP spent sufficient time to address the SRP charge. The SRP made a final debriefing to the HRP Program Scientist, Dr. John B. Charles, on December 11, 2009. The SRP noted that current SRPE strategy is properly science-based and views this as the best assurance of the likelihood that answers to the questions posed as gaps in knowledge can be found, that the uncertainty in risk estimates can be reduced, and that a solid, cost-effective approach to risk reduction solutions is being developed. The current approach of the SRPE, based on the use of carefully focused research solicitations, requiring thorough peer-review and approaches demonstrated to be on the path to answering the NASA strategic questions, addressed to a broad extramural community of qualified scientists, optimally positioned to take advantage of serendipitous discoveries and to leverage scientific advances made elsewhere, is sound and appropriate. The SRP viewed with concern statements by HRP implying that the only science legitimately deserving support should be "applied" or, in some instances that the very term "research" might be

  20. Current research in Radiation Biology and Biochemistry Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarachand, U.; Singh, B.B.

    1995-01-01

    The Radiation Biology and Biochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay has been engaged in research in the frontier areas of (i) radiation biology related to tumour therapy and injury caused by free radicals; (ii) molecular basis of diseases of physiological origin; (iii) molecular aspects of chemical carcinogenesis and (iv) structure of genome and genome related functions. The gist of research and development activities carried out in the Division during the last two years are documented

  1. Current research in Radiation Biology and Biochemistry Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarachand, U; Singh, B B [eds.; Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Radiation Biology and Biochemistry Div.

    1996-12-31

    The Radiation Biology and Biochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay has been engaged in research in the frontier areas of (i) radiation biology related to tumour therapy and injury caused by free radicals; (ii) molecular basis of diseases of physiological origin; (iii) molecular aspects of chemical carcinogenesis and (iv) structure of genome and genome related functions. The gist of research and development activities carried out in the Division during the last two years are documented.

  2. Research and development of radiation utilization in 1986 at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In the peaceful utilization of atomic energy, in addition to the method of utilizing the energy obtained by nuclear fission and nuclear fusion as electric power or heat source, there is the field of utilizing radiation, in which the effect that radiation exerts on substances and the properties of radiation are used for measurement, analysis and others. The fields of utilizing radiation are diverse such as medicine, technology and agriculture, and those directly related to the health and daily life of people are many. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has positively advanced the research and development on radiation utilization, which are related to the utilization of irradiation and the production and use of radioisotopes. The former is carried out in Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, and the latter in the Isotope Division, Tokai Research Establishment. Also, the research and development on the radiation-withstanding properties of organic materials and the production techniques for tritium are advanced, and it is expected to begin the highly advanced scientific and technological research using ion beam. The research and development of polymer materials, the techniques of using irradiation, the production and utilization of radioisotopes and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  3. Application of controlled radiation-induced degradation in polymers: less exploited aspect of radiation processing of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haji Saeid, M.; Guven, O.

    2007-01-01

    Industrial use of ionizing radiation treatment has been most successful in applications related to polymeric materials. The polymer, plastics and rubber industries have benefited from the unique advantages of ionizing radiation since its inception as an industrial tool to modify their properties and manufacture novel materials with value addition to the end product. The established and emerging applications of electron beam processing of polymers are based on the well known ultimate effects of ionizing radiation on polymers namely, crosslinking, curing, grafting and chain scissioning. Radiation-induced crosslinking dominates most applications, whereas the chain scissioning effect is much less explored and currently limited to radiation-induced degradation of Teflon, cellulose and polypropylene. The controlling of radiation-induced degradation for achieving a target average molecular weight or distribution has been evaluated for some polysaccharides, biopolymers and waste inner tubes whereas mitigation of the degradative effects of radiation has been analyzed from the point of view of using certain stabilizers, copolymers and annealing at an appropriate temperature. Several new or highly specialized techniques such as positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil detection analysis and solid waste NMR spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy have been applied to the study or radiation-induced degradation. New information has been collected on the morphological changes associated with radiation-induced degradation processes, including chain scission, oxidation and free volume alteration. The IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) on Controlling of Degradation Effects in Radiation Processing of Polymers dealt with the role and importance of using ionizing radiation in controlling properties of natural and synthetic polymers through its degradative effect. This paper provides a summary of most important results

  4. Industrial radiation and radioisotope gauging techniques and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, R.P.

    1997-01-01

    The radiation and radioisotope gauging industry in the United States has primarily followed a path of development solely by the private sector. It has remained highly proprietary in nature, which is opposite to the path taken by many other countries. In other countries radiation gauge development has been controlled in large part by government-sponsored research and development, which has spawned many more publications in the open literature. Historically, some of the leaders have been Great Britain, Poland, France, Russia, and Australia. This has possibly led to the misconception that the development of this technology is being dominated by countries outside the United States. This is not a healthy situation-it would be good to see our industry begin to publish more in the open literature and to sponsor more research at universities. In efforts to promote more open-literature publication, the American Nuclear Society (ANS) sponsored a topical meeting on Industrial Radiation and Radioisotope Measurement Applications (IRRMA) in 1988 that was held again in 1992

  5. Radiation protection. Scientific fundamentals, legal regulations, practical applications. Compendium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchert, Guido; Gay, Juergen; Kirchner, Gerald; Michel, Rolf; Niggemann, Guenter; Schumann, Joerg; Wust, Peter; Jaehnert, Susanne; Strilek, Ralf; Martini, Ekkehard

    2011-06-01

    The compendium on radiation protection, scientific fundamentals, legal regulations and practical applications includes contributions to the following issues: (1) Effects and risk of ionizing radiation: fundamentals on effects and risk of ionizing radiation, news in radiation biology, advantages and disadvantages of screening investigations; (2) trends and legal regulations concerning radiation protection: development of European and national radiation protection laws, new regulations concerning X-rays, culture and ethics of radiation protection; (3) dosimetry and radiation measuring techniques: personal scanning using GHz radiation, new ''dose characteristics'' in practice, measuring techniques for the nuclear danger prevention and emergency hazard control; (4) radiation exposure in medicine: radiation exposure of modern medical techniques, heavy ion radiotherapy, deterministic and stochastic risks of the high-conformal photon radiotherapy, STEMO project - mobile CT for apoplectic stroke patients; (5) radiation exposure in technology: legal control of high-level radioactive sources, technical and public safety using enclosed radioactive sources for materials testing, radiation exposure in aviation, radon in Bavaria, NPP Fukushima-Daiichi - a status report; (6) radiation exposure in nuclear engineering: The Chernobyl accident - historical experiences or sustaining problem? European standards for radioactive waste disposal, radioactive material disposal in Germany risk assessment of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation (7) Case studies.

  6. Application of microprocessors to radiation protection measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zappe, D.; Meldes, C.

    1982-01-01

    In radiation protection measurements signals from radiation detectors or dosemeters have to be transformed into quantities relevant to radiation protection. In most cases this can only be done by taking into account various parameters (e.g. the quality factor). Moreover, the characteristics of the statistical laws of nuclear radiation emission have to be considered. These problems can properly be solved by microprocessors. After reviewing the main properties of microprocessors, some typical examples of applying them to problems of radiation protection measurement are given. (author)

  7. Radiation Synthesis and Application of Carboxymethylated Chitosan Hydrogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Young Chang

    2007-08-15

    This research proposal is to investigate radiation effect of carboxymethylated chitosan in order to obtain the crosslinked carboxymethylated chitosan. The application studies on CM-chitosan- based intelligent hydrogels will be tried too. Chitin is the most abundant natural amino polysaccharide and estimated to be produced annually almost as much as cellulose. Chitosan is the deacetylated product of chitin showing the enhanced solubility in dilute acids, further, carboxymethylated chitosan (CM-chitosan) can solve in both acidic and basic physiological media, which might be good candidates as a kind of biomedical materials. Radiation technique is an important method for modification of chitin derivatives. It includes radiation-induced degradation, grafting, and crosslinking. It was found that CM-chitosan degraded in solid state or dilute aqueous solution under irradiation, but crosslinked at paste-like sate when the concentration of CM-chitosan is more than 10%. Both degraded and crosslinked CM-chitosan have antibacterial activity, so it is essential to investigate in detail the radiation effect of CM-chitosan. Study on radiation effect of CM-chitosan in different condition is beneficial to modification of CM-chitosan by irradiation technique. However, little study was reported on radiation crosslinking and application of CM-chitosan. The radiation-closslinked CM-chitosan synthesized from chitosan was characterized by a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis. A kinetic swelling in water and the mechanical properties such as a gelation, water absorptivity, and gel strength were also investigated. For the preparation of crosslinked CM-chitosan by using gamma irradiation, the concentration of an aqueous CM-chitosan is above 10wt%. We confirmed that the gel contents was in the range of 15-63%, and when the irradiation dose was increased, the degree of gelation was decreased by disintegration of the CM-chitosan. In conclusion, we developed a new

  8. Radiation Synthesis and Application of Carboxymethylated Chitosan Hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Young Chang

    2007-08-01

    This research proposal is to investigate radiation effect of carboxymethylated chitosan in order to obtain the crosslinked carboxymethylated chitosan. The application studies on CM-chitosan- based intelligent hydrogels will be tried too. Chitin is the most abundant natural amino polysaccharide and estimated to be produced annually almost as much as cellulose. Chitosan is the deacetylated product of chitin showing the enhanced solubility in dilute acids, further, carboxymethylated chitosan (CM-chitosan) can solve in both acidic and basic physiological media, which might be good candidates as a kind of biomedical materials. Radiation technique is an important method for modification of chitin derivatives. It includes radiation-induced degradation, grafting, and crosslinking. It was found that CM-chitosan degraded in solid state or dilute aqueous solution under irradiation, but crosslinked at paste-like sate when the concentration of CM-chitosan is more than 10%. Both degraded and crosslinked CM-chitosan have antibacterial activity, so it is essential to investigate in detail the radiation effect of CM-chitosan. Study on radiation effect of CM-chitosan in different condition is beneficial to modification of CM-chitosan by irradiation technique. However, little study was reported on radiation crosslinking and application of CM-chitosan. The radiation-closslinked CM-chitosan synthesized from chitosan was characterized by a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis. A kinetic swelling in water and the mechanical properties such as a gelation, water absorptivity, and gel strength were also investigated. For the preparation of crosslinked CM-chitosan by using gamma irradiation, the concentration of an aqueous CM-chitosan is above 10wt%. We confirmed that the gel contents was in the range of 15-63%, and when the irradiation dose was increased, the degree of gelation was decreased by disintegration of the CM-chitosan. In conclusion, we developed a new

  9. Radiation protection requirements for medical application of ionizing radiation in the Republic of Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nestoroska, Svetlana; Angelovski, Goran; Shahin, Nuzi

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the regulatory infrastructure in radiation protection in the Republic of Macedonia is presented. The national radiation protection requirements for the medical application of ionizing radiation are reviewed for both occupational exposed persons and patients undergoing a medical treatment with ionizing radiation and their compliance with the international standards is considered. The gaps identified on the national level are presented and steps for overcoming such gaps are analyzed.(Author)

  10. Current research in Canada on biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marko, A.M.

    1980-05-01

    A survey of current research in Canada on the biological effects of ionizing radiation has been compiled. The list of projects has been classified according to structure (organizational state of the test system) as well as according to the type of effects. Using several assumptions, ballpark estimates of expenditures on these activities have been made. Agencies funding these research activities have been tabulated and the break-down of research in government laboratories and in academic institutions has been designated. Wherever possible, comparisons have been made outlining differences or similarities that exist between the United States and Canada concerning biological radiation research. It has been concluded that relevant research in this area in Canada is inadequate. Wherever possible, strengths and weaknesses in radiation biology programs have been indicated. The most promising course for Canada to follow is to support adequately fundamental studies of the biological effects of radiation. (auth)

  11. Radiation budget measurement/model interface research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonderhaar, T. H.

    1981-01-01

    The NIMBUS 6 data were analyzed to form an up to date climatology of the Earth radiation budget as a basis for numerical model definition studies. Global maps depicting infrared emitted flux, net flux and albedo from processed NIMBUS 6 data for July, 1977, are presented. Zonal averages of net radiation flux for April, May, and June and zonal mean emitted flux and net flux for the December to January period are also presented. The development of two models is reported. The first is a statistical dynamical model with vertical and horizontal resolution. The second model is a two level global linear balance model. The results of time integration of the model up to 120 days, to simulate the January circulation, are discussed. Average zonal wind, meridonal wind component, vertical velocity, and moisture budget are among the parameters addressed.

  12. A new era in nuclear energy science. When will radiation application receive citizenship ranking along with energy utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabata, Yoneho; Tagawa, Seiichi; Saito, Naoki; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2005-01-01

    Japan has been obtaining definite results in these decades in both fields of nuclear power generation (energy utilization) and radiation application thus contributing to a sustainable development of the world. The present special issue of 'Atom Eye' introduces (1) Japanese achievements in cooperative relationships with developing countries in the field of radiation applications, (2) history of research and development of radiation-utilization techniques in Japan, (3) present status of quantum-beam applications in life-science, medial application, and nano-technology, etc, (4) applications of high-intensity neutron source, (5) cancer therapy using high-energy heavy-ion beams, (6) radiation sterilizations, (7) radiation mutations, (8) three interviewer's reports visiting several research institutes of radiation applications in Japan, and introduction of (9) a bencher enterprise and also (10) an accelerator business. (S. Ohno)

  13. Synchrotron radiation. 4. Analyses of biological samples using synchrotron radiation. 3. Research on radiation damage to DNA using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takakura, Kaoru

    1998-01-01

    This review described how the synchrotron radiation (SR) is used to solve problems unknown hitherto in radiation biology. Historically, the target substance of UV light in bacterial death was suggested to be nucleic acid in 1930. Researches on the radiation damage to DNA were begun at around 1960 and have mainly used UV light, X-ray and γray. Soft X-ray and vacuum UV whose energy covering from several eV to scores of keV have not been used since UV and X-ray lack the energy of this range. This is one of reasons why detailed process leading to radiation-induced death, carcinogenicity and mutation has not been known hitherto. RS possesses wide range of energy, i.e., from UV to hard X-ray, of high intensity, which is helpful for studying the unknown problems. The RS studies were begun in nineteen-seventies. Those include the action spectrum studies and atomic target studies. In the former, the course of the effect, e.g., the mechanism of DNA double strand breakage, can be elucidated. In the latter, photon of known energy can be irradiated to the specified atom like phosphorus in DNA which elucidating the precise physicochemical process of the breakage. Use of RS in these studies is thought still meaningful in future. (K.H.) 62 refs

  14. External dosimetry - Applications to radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faussot, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Dosimetry is the essential component of radiation protection. It allows to determine by calculation and measurement the absorbed dose value, i.e. the energy amounts deposited in matter by ionizing radiations. It deals also with the irradiation effects on living organisms and with their biological consequences. This reference book gathers all the necessary information to understand and master the external dosimetry and the metrology of ionizing radiations, from the effects of radiations to the calibration of radiation protection devices. The first part is devoted to physical dosimetry and allows to obtain in a rigorous manner the mathematical formalisms leading to the absorbed dose for different ionizing radiation fields. The second part presents the biological effects of ionizing radiations on living matter and the determination of a set of specific radiation protection concepts and data to express the 'risk' to develop a radio-induced cancer. The third part deals with the metrology of ionizing radiations through the standardized study of the methods used for the calibration of radiation protection equipments. Some practical exercises with their corrections are proposed at the end of each chapter

  15. The Foundations of Radiation Belt Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, G. H.

    2008-12-01

    The United States undertook the launching of an artificial Earth satellite as part of its contribution to the International Geophysical Year. The Vanguard program was established to meet that commitment, and it developed a launch vehicle, ground station network, and suite of scientific payloads, including the cosmic ray experiment proposed by James A. Van Allen. Although Vanguard eventually exceeded all of its pre-stated goals, the preemptive launches of Sputniks I and II by the Soviets in October and November 1957 spurred the U.S. into a frenzy of activity, resulting in the launches of Explorers I and III in January and March of 1958. The data from those two satellites quickly revealed the lower boundary of an unexpected region of high intensity radiation trapped in the Earth's magnetic field. The original announcement in May 1958 stated that the radiation was probably composed of either protons or electrons, and that, if electrons, it was probably bremsstrahlung formed in the satellite shell. Immediately following that announcement, approval was received for what became Explorer IV, whose announced purpose was to follow up on the new discovery. Another reason for the satellite, unmentioned at the time, was its inclusion as a component of the highly classified Argos program, a covert military program to test whether the detonation of nuclear devices at high altitude would inject measurable numbers of charged particles into durable trajectories in the Earth's magnetic field. Our team at Iowa produced the satellites under the oversight of, and with assistance by, the Army Ballistic Missile Agency in Huntsville, and with the contributions of key hardware from several other government laboratories. The project was completed in the unbelievably short period of seventy-seven days from approval to launch. Launched into a higher-inclination orbit than the earlier Explorers, Explorer IV confirmed the discovery and greatly expanded our understanding of the natural

  16. Cost benefit effect of application of radiation in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazuaki Yanagisawa

    2009-01-01

    It is important for us to show accountability and transparency of nuclear funds invested to Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI, now JAEA). We have not only to simply present the R and D outputs to tax payers by the bibliometric methods as measurable as possible but also to carry out a cost benefit analysis to show quantitatively the effect of economic representation which enables to make efficient allotment of resources. The task is heavy but unavoidable. In the present work, a cost benefit effect (CBE) of application of radiation known as one of big R and D project conducted in JAERI-Takasaki Branch is focused on. After defining CBE as Market Creation Effect (MCE) / Total amounts of investment, one tried to reveal the long-term CBE as long as 44 years. It is found that 31 research items, such as radial tires, cross-linking of wires, sterilization, and sterile of melon flies were succeeded to create markets in industrial and agricultural fields. Estimated MCE of those was totaled to 1,125 million dollars (M$). On the other hand, investment was 396 M$ for personnel (4,092 man/year) and 509 M$ for research costs. It totaled as 905 M$. Therefore, CBE for application of radiation in Takasaki Branch shall be 1,125/905=1.2. The mission dictated by the Long-Range Research Plan for Nuclear settled by the Atomic Energy Commission involves a lot of R and D tasks including partly the technical difficulties as well as partly the deep uncertainties for future prospects. JAERI is a national research institute and this figure may be regarded as reasonably acceptable because of many high risk and complex tasks were conducted successfully resulting in the creation of 31 new markets. It contributed to the increase of GDP. (Author)

  17. X-rays and extreme ultraviolet radiation principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Attwood, David

    2016-01-01

    With this fully updated second edition, readers will gain a detailed understanding of the physics and applications of modern X-ray and EUV radiation sources. Taking into account the most recent improvements in capabilities, coverage is expanded to include new chapters on free electron lasers (FELs), laser high harmonic generation (HHG), X-ray and EUV optics, and nanoscale imaging; a completely revised chapter on spatial and temporal coherence; and extensive discussion of the generation and applications of femtosecond and attosecond techniques. Readers will be guided step by step through the mathematics of each topic, with over 300 figures, 50 reference tables and 600 equations enabling easy understanding of key concepts. Homework problems, a solutions manual for instructors, and links to YouTube lectures accompany the book online. This is the 'go-to' guide for graduate students, researchers and industry practitioners interested in X-ray and EUV interaction with matter.

  18. Non-food radiation technology applications of food commodities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastro, N.L. Del

    2004-01-01

    At present food irradiation is considered an effective, broad-spectrum, residue-free, mature technology. Expertise in irradiation processing exists in a network of centers around the world, some of them in developing countries like Brazil and Argentina South American region. The use of renewable resources coming from crops products is becoming attractive also for non-food applications. In this sense, a complete new approach of higher aggregated value of some commodities like soy and maize, for example, is as renewable resources to create functional polymers, mainly for innovative biodegradable packaging solutions. There is a need of innovative approaches to produce edible/biodegradable materials from natural polymeric macromolecules with adequate properties. Incipient researches pointed to the successful use of irradiation processing to obtain or modify different types of biodegradable/edible plastic materials. This new radiation technology application is particularly important for countries that are leading producers of soybean and other commodities. (Author)

  19. Non-food radiation technology applications of food commodities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastro, N.L. Del . [Center of Radiation Technology, Energy and Nuclear Research Institute (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Travessa R, 400 Cidade Universitaria, 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    At present food irradiation is considered an effective, broad-spectrum, residue-free, mature technology. Expertise in irradiation processing exists in a network of centers around the world, some of them in developing countries like Brazil and Argentina South American region. The use of renewable resources coming from crops products is becoming attractive also for non-food applications. In this sense, a complete new approach of higher aggregated value of some commodities like soy and maize, for example, is as renewable resources to create functional polymers, mainly for innovative biodegradable packaging solutions. There is a need of innovative approaches to produce edible/biodegradable materials from natural polymeric macromolecules with adequate properties. Incipient researches pointed to the successful use of irradiation processing to obtain or modify different types of biodegradable/edible plastic materials. This new radiation technology application is particularly important for countries that are leading producers of soybean and other commodities. (Author)

  20. Radiation safety status at a bio medical research centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, S.K.

    1998-01-01

    Radioisotopes are being used for biomedical research purpose at School of Life Science, Jawaharlal Nehru University for the last twenty five years. Present paper analyses the overall status of radiation safety at this Centre

  1. International radiation commissions 1896 to 2008. Research into atmospheric radiation from IMO to IAMAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolle, H.J.; Moeller, F.; London, J.

    2008-01-01

    The document covers a historical compilation on research into atmospheric radiation from 1896 to 2008. The first part is a brief history of the radiation commissions of IMO (International Meteorological Organization) and IUGG (International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics) for the period 1824 to 1948. Part 2 Covers the International Radiation Commission (IRC) of IAM (International Association of Meteorology)/IAMAS (International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences)/IAMAP (International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics); the Re-constitution of the IUGG Radiation Commision, the Officers of the International Radiation Commission of IUUG 1948-2008, and the activities of the Radiation Commision of the IUGG 1948-2008. The appendices include the Radiation Commission Members, the summaries of presented papers from 1954 and 1957, the IRC publications, and acronyms

  2. International radiation commissions 1896 to 2008. Research into atmospheric radiation from IMO to IAMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolle, H J [comp.; Moeller, F; London, J

    2008-05-15

    The document covers a historical compilation on research into atmospheric radiation from 1896 to 2008. The first part is a brief history of the radiation commissions of IMO (International Meteorological Organization) and IUGG (International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics) for the period 1824 to 1948. Part 2 Covers the International Radiation Commission (IRC) of IAM (International Association of Meteorology)/IAMAS (International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences)/IAMAP (International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics); the Re-constitution of the IUGG Radiation Commision, the Officers of the International Radiation Commission of IUUG 1948-2008, and the activities of the Radiation Commision of the IUGG 1948-2008. The appendices include the Radiation Commission Members, the summaries of presented papers from 1954 and 1957, the IRC publications, and acronyms.

  3. Applications of ionizing radiation for monuments conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chyzewski, M.; Galant, S.; Perkowski, J.

    1996-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can be used for conservation of monuments and old art objects. The irradiation of wooden and cellulose objects for disinfestation has been described. The irradiation conditions and lethal doses in respect to different species have been discussed. The different technique is the radiation consolidation of historical objects made of various materials. The method consists in radiation polymerization. The object undergoing conservation is saturated with monomer prior irradiation. The radiation polymerization results in consolidation of the object pieces and reinforcement of its material. 3 figs

  4. Application of Java technology in radiation image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Weifeng; Li Zheng; Chen Zhiqiang; Zhang Li; Gao Wenhuan

    2002-01-01

    The acquisition and processing of radiation image plays an important role in modern application of civil nuclear technology. The author analyzes the rationale of Java image processing technology which includes Java AWT, Java 2D and JAI. In order to demonstrate applicability of Java technology in field of image processing, examples of application of JAI technology in processing of radiation images of large container have been given

  5. Development and application of isotopes and radiation technology in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djaloeis, A. [DDG, Batan, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    1997-10-01

    The National Atomic Energy Agency (BATAN) of the Republic of Indonesia is the highest agency in the country, charged amongst others with the development and application of Isotopes and Radiation Technology as a tool in the search for the optimal solution of various national development problems, such as those encountered in the fields of Agriculture, Livestock, health/medicine, Industry, Environment and Energy. The acquisition and development of the scientific and technical expertise, R and D facilities/instruments and infrastructure have been achieved primarily through bilateral and multilateral collaborative activities with domestic, foreign and international institutions. On the basis of the achieved R and D results, the acquired techniques have been progressively transferred to the end-users and applied in solving scientific-technical problems in the aforementioned fields. This paper gives a brief overview of the present status and future trend of activities in the development and applications of isotopes and radiation technology in Agriculture, Livestock and Industry in Indonesia. In the field of Agriculture the research activities are focussed on obtaining and disseminating new crop varieties with desired specific characteristics and on increasing soil fertilizer efficiency. These research results and those on livestock feed supplementation formula and disease prevention have been applied in helping farmers in various parts of Indonesia to increase their productivity. In industry, irradiation technology for food preservation and sterilization has been successfully transferred to the commercial companies. The same is also true for Non-Destructive Examination, Radioactive Tracer and Radiation Based Process Monitoring Techniques. Natural and radioactive isotopes have been widely used also in hydrology, sedimentology and geothermal studies. Highlights of the results are presented and discussed

  6. Development and application of isotopes and radiation technology in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djaloeis, A.

    1997-01-01

    The National Atomic Energy Agency (BATAN) of the Republic of Indonesia is the highest agency in the country, charged amongst others with the development and application of Isotopes and Radiation Technology as a tool in the search for the optimal solution of various national development problems, such as those encountered in the fields of Agriculture, Livestock, health/medicine, Industry, Environment and Energy. The acquisition and development of the scientific and technical expertise, R and D facilities/instruments and infrastructure have been achieved primarily through bilateral and multilateral collaborative activities with domestic, foreign and international institutions. On the basis of the achieved R and D results, the acquired techniques have been progressively transferred to the end-users and applied in solving scientific-technical problems in the aforementioned fields. This paper gives a brief overview of the present status and future trend of activities in the development and applications of isotopes and radiation technology in Agriculture, Livestock and Industry in Indonesia. In the field of Agriculture the research activities are focussed on obtaining and disseminating new crop varieties with desired specific characteristics and on increasing soil fertilizer efficiency. These research results and those on livestock feed supplementation formula and disease prevention have been applied in helping farmers in various parts of Indonesia to increase their productivity. In industry, irradiation technology for food preservation and sterilization has been successfully transferred to the commercial companies. The same is also true for Non-Destructive Examination, Radioactive Tracer and Radiation Based Process Monitoring Techniques. Natural and radioactive isotopes have been widely used also in hydrology, sedimentology and geothermal studies. Highlights of the results are presented and discussed

  7. Research on environment monitoring of radiation emergency

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Y; Otani, N

    2003-01-01

    In a case of a nuclear accident at nuclear facilities, strong radiation such as g-rays and neutrons might radiate at a burst in the initial stage. For the establishment of dose estimation system for such accidents, the experiments were done using the He sup + sup 2 beam accelerated by Tandem in the W-MAST. The following results were obtained. 1) Neutron measurements using a rem counter yielded that dose equivalent was about 9.4 mSv/h at a position 100 cm from the Be target when the beam current of 15 MeV He sup 2 sup + was 0.8 mu A. Neutron measurement by means of Au and In foil activation method and by use of TLD element revealed that dose equivalents were to be 16-27 mu Sv/h for thermal neutron, and 30-41 mu Sv/h for sub-fast neutron (20 keV). Therefore, it was concluded that neutron field was mainly composed by fast neutron. 2) Linearity of the rem-counter out put vs neutron flux was valid under the condition that the count rate of the rem-counter was less than 10 kcps. 3) Computer simulation using NRESP c...

  8. Research on environment monitoring of radiation emergency

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Y

    2002-01-01

    In a case of a nuclear accident at nuclear facilities, radiation such as gamma-rays and neutrons might radiate at a burst in the initial stage. For the establishment of dose estimation system for such accidents, the experiments were carried out using the Tandem/Synchrotron accelerator. The following results were obtained: (1) Measurements of the gamma-ray emission using the NaI detector together with pile up rejection system revealed that the good signals without the pile up phenomena could be obtained in case of count rate less than 7 kc/s. On assumption that energy distribution function of the gamma-rays was proportional to be E exp(- E/T sub e sub f sub f), the effective temperature T sub e sub f sub f was estimated to be 0.8 - 0.9 MeV by use of non-linear least squares. (2) Doses of gamma-rays were measured using the TLD elements shielded by Pb sheets with various widths. The effective temperature T sub e sub f sub f estimated under the same experimental conditions described in (1) was 0.6-3 MeV. In an ac...

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research (ARM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — With heavily instrumented field sites around the globe, the ARM Climate Research Facility provides the world's most comprehensive outdoor laboratory and data archive...

  10. Rotating film radiators for space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    A new class of light-weight radiators is described. This radiator consists of a thin rotating envelope that contains the working fluid. The envelope can have many shapes including redundant, foldable configurations. The working fluid, which may be a liquid or a condensable vapor, impinges on the inside surface of the radiator and is driven as a film to the periphery by centrifugal force. Heat is radiated to space by the outer surface of the envelope. Pumps located on the periphery then return the liquid to the power converter. For a 100-MW radiator operating at 800 K, specific mass approx.0.1 kg/kW and mass density approx.2 kg/m 2 may be achievable. 7 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Comparison and application study on cosmic radiation dose calculation received by air crew

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Qiang; Xu Cuihua; Ren Tianshan; Li Wenhong; Zhang Jing; Lu Xu

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To facilitate evaluation on Cosmic radiation dose received by flight crew by developing a convenient and effective measuring method. Methods: In comparison with several commonly used evaluating methods, this research employs CARI-6 software issued by FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) to measure Cosmic radiation dose for flight crew members exposed to. Results: Compared with other methods, CARI-6 is capable of providing reliable calculating results on radiation dose and applicable to all flight crew of different airlines. Conclusion: Cosmic radiation received by flight crew is on the list of occupational radiation. For a smooth running of Standards for controlling exposure to cosmic radiation of air crew, CARI software may be a widely applied tool in radiation close estimation of for flight crew. (authors)

  12. Scattered radiation from applicators in clinical electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battum, L J van; Zee, W van der; Huizenga, H

    2003-01-01

    In radiotherapy with high-energy (4-25 MeV) electron beams, scattered radiation from the electron applicator influences the dose distribution in the patient. In most currently available treatment planning systems for radiotherapy this component is not explicitly included and handled only by a slight change of the intensity of the primary beam. The scattered radiation from an applicator changes with the field size and distance from the applicator. The amount of scattered radiation is dependent on the applicator design and on the formation of the electron beam in the treatment head. Electron applicators currently applied in most treatment machines are essentially a set of diaphragms, but still do produce scattered radiation. This paper investigates the present level of scattered dose from electron applicators, and as such provides an extensive set of measured data. The data provided could for instance serve as example input data or benchmark data for advanced treatment planning algorithms which employ a parametrized initial phase space to characterize the clinical electron beam. Central axis depth dose curves of the electron beams have been measured with and without applicators in place, for various applicator sizes and energies, for a Siemens Primus, a Varian 2300 C/D and an Elekta SLi accelerator. Scattered radiation generated by the applicator has been found by subtraction of the central axis depth dose curves, obtained with and without applicator. Scattered radiation from Siemens, Varian and Elekta electron applicators is still significant and cannot be neglected in advanced treatment planning. Scattered radiation at the surface of a water phantom can be as high as 12%. Scattered radiation decreases almost linearly with depth. Scattered radiation from Varian applicators shows clear dependence on beam energy. The Elekta applicators produce less scattered radiation than those of Varian and Siemens, but feature a higher effective angular variance. The scattered

  13. Applications of Cherenkov Light Emission for Dosimetry in Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Adam Kenneth

    Since its discovery in the 1930's, the Cherenkov effect has been paramount in the development of high-energy physics research. It results in light emission from charged particles traveling faster than the local speed of light in a dielectric medium. The ability of this emitted light to describe a charged particle's trajectory, energy, velocity, and mass has allowed scientists to study subatomic particles, detect neutrinos, and explore the properties of interstellar matter. However, only recently has the phenomenon been considered in the practical context of medical physics and radiation therapy dosimetry, where Cherenkov light is induced by clinical x-ray photon, electron, and proton beams. To investigate the relationship between this phenomenon and dose deposition, a Monte Carlo plug-in was developed within the Geant4 architecture for medically-oriented simulations (GAMOS) to simulate radiation-induced optical emission in biological media. Using this simulation framework, it was determined that Cherenkov light emission may be well suited for radiation dosimetry of clinically used x-ray photon beams. To advance this application, several novel techniques were implemented to realize the maximum potential of the signal, such as time-gating for maximizing the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and Cherenkov-excited fluorescence for generating isotropic light release in water. Proof of concept experiments were conducted in water tanks to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method for two-dimensional (2D) projection imaging, three-dimensional (3D) parallel beam tomography, large field of view 3D cone beam tomography, and video-rate dynamic imaging of treatment plans for a number of common radiotherapy applications. The proposed dosimetry method was found to have a number of unique advantages, including but not limited to its non-invasive nature, water-equivalence, speed, high-resolution, ability to provide full 3D data, and potential to yield data in-vivo. Based on

  14. Applications of the Monte Carlo method in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, R.N.; Prasad, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper gives a brief introduction to the application of the Monte Carlo method in radiation protection. It may be noted that an exhaustive review has not been attempted. The special advantage of the Monte Carlo method has been first brought out. The fundamentals of the Monte Carlo method have next been explained in brief, with special reference to two applications in radiation protection. Some sample current applications have been reported in the end in brief as examples. They are, medical radiation physics, microdosimetry, calculations of thermoluminescence intensity and probabilistic safety analysis. The limitations of the Monte Carlo method have also been mentioned in passing. (author)

  15. Transition-radiation detectors for cosmic-ray research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, D.; Chicago Univ., Ill.

    1975-01-01

    Transition-radiation detectors for cosmic-ray work are described which consist of plastic foam of multiple plastic foil radiators, followed by proportional chambers. A summary of the properties of such detectors is given, and the detection and discrimination efficiencies for energetic particles are discussed. Several possible applications of such devices for studies of cosmic-ray particles in the energy region γ=E/mc 2 >10 3 are advertised

  16. [Applications of electromagnetic radiation in medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miłowska, Katarzyna; Grabowska, Katarzyna; Gabryelak, Teresa

    2014-05-08

    Recent decades have been devoted to the intense search for the response to questions related to the impact of radiation on the human body. Due to the growing fashion for a healthy lifestyle, increasing numbers of works about the alleged dangers of electromagnetic waves and diseases that they cause appeared. However, the discoveries of 20th century, and knowledge of the properties of electromagnetic radiation have allowed to broaden the horizons of the use of artificial sources of radiation in many fields of science and especially in medicine. The aim of this paper is to show that although excessive radiation or high doses are dangerous to the human body, its careful and controlled use, does not pose a threat, and it is often necessary in therapy. The possibility of using ionizing radiation in radiotherapy, isotope diagnostics or medical imaging, and non-ionizing radiation in the treatment for dermatological disorders and cancers will be presented. The unique properties of synchrotron radiation result in using it on a large scale in the diagnosis of pathological states by imaging methods.

  17. Applications of electromagnetic radiation in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Miłowska

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent decades have been devoted to the intense search for the response to questions related to the impact of radiation on the human body. Due to the growing fashion for a healthy lifestyle, increasing numbers of works about the alleged dangers of electromagnetic waves and diseases that they cause appeared. However, the discoveries of 20th century, and knowledge of the properties of electromagnetic radiation have allowed to broaden the horizons of the use of artificial sources of radiation in many fields of science and especially in medicine. The aim of this paper is to show that although excessive radiation or high doses are dangerous to the human body, its careful and controlled use, does not pose a threat, and it is often necessary in therapy. The possibility of using ionizing radiation in radiotherapy, isotope diagnostics or medical imaging, and non-ionizing radiation in the treatment for dermatological disorders and cancers will be presented. The unique properties of synchrotron radiation result in using it on a large scale in the diagnosis of pathological states by imaging methods.

  18. Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI). Strategic research agenda for low dose radiation risk research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuzer, M. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, BfS, Department of Radiation Protection and Health, Neuherberg (Germany); Auvinen, A. [University of Tampere, Tampere (Finland); STUK, Helsinki (Finland); Cardis, E. [ISGlobal, Barcelona Institute for Global Health, Barcelona (Spain); Durante, M. [Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications, TIFPA, Trento (Italy); Harms-Ringdahl, M. [Stockholm University, Centre for Radiation Protection Research, Stockholm (Sweden); Jourdain, J.R. [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, IRSN, Fontenay-aux-roses (France); Madas, B.G. [MTA Centre for Energy Research, Environmental Physics Department, Budapest (Hungary); Ottolenghi, A. [University of Pavia, Physics Department, Pavia (Italy); Pazzaglia, S. [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA), Rome (Italy); Prise, K.M. [Queens University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Quintens, R. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Sabatier, L. [French Atomic Energy Commission, CEA, Paris (France); Bouffler, S. [Public Health England, PHE, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    2018-03-15

    MELODI (Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative) is a European radiation protection research platform with focus on research on health risks after exposure to low-dose ionising radiation. It was founded in 2010 and currently includes 44 members from 18 countries. A major activity of MELODI is the continuous development of a long-term European Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) on low-dose risk for radiation protection. The SRA is intended to identify priorities for national and European radiation protection research programs as a basis for the preparation of competitive calls at the European level. Among those key priorities is the improvement of health risk estimates for exposures close to the dose limits for workers and to reference levels for the population in emergency situations. Another activity of MELODI is to ensure the availability of European key infrastructures for research activities, and the long-term maintenance of competences in radiation research via an integrated European approach for training and education. The MELODI SRA identifies three key research topics in low dose or low dose-rate radiation risk research: (1) dose and dose rate dependence of cancer risk, (2) radiation-induced non-cancer effects and (3) individual radiation sensitivity. The research required to improve the evidence base for each of the three key topics relates to three research lines: (1) research to improve understanding of the mechanisms contributing to radiogenic diseases, (2) epidemiological research to improve health risk evaluation of radiation exposure and (3) research to address the effects and risks associated with internal exposures, differing radiation qualities and inhomogeneous exposures. The full SRA and associated documents can be downloaded from the MELODI website (http://www.melodi-online.eu/sra.html). (orig.)

  19. Research issues for radiation protection for man during prolonged spaceflight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conklin, J.J.; Hagan, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    For the purpose of this article, radiation protection is defined as any physical, chemical, biological, or pharmacological modality that accomplishes the goal of protecting the astronaut from radiation hazard or increases his ability to assist other astronauts or spacecraft. Thoughtful examination of these largely operational considerations led to identification of medical and radiobiological research required to support the industrialization of near-Earth space. The scope of these research efforts involves thematic issues that have been defined after review of the available preliminary research from several scientific disciplines that relate to the problem of radiation protection in space. This article serves to highlight areas of research requiring further investigation. While certain of these needs for research are driven by the planned orbits involving small designated astronaut populations and well-defined durations that may be specific to the military, it is the use of geostationary orbits, permanent lunar basing, and the proposed Mars mission that form the primary basis for these operational considerations.

  20. Radiation protection monitoring for #betta#-radiation at the Juelich Nuclear Research Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, M.; Heinzelmann, M.

    1983-01-01

    A complete system for radiation protection monitoring also includes #betta#-radiation monitoring. This requires suitable dose rate meters, personal dosemeters and last but not least detailed information about possible radiation exposure due to #betta#-radiation. Since there are at present no suitable #betta#-dosemeters available on the market yet, a large nuclear research centre such as the KFA Juelich, where radioactive substances are being handled by more than 1600 persons, has the task of developing and deploying suitable dosemeters. The centre's accomplishments in this area are described

  1. Applications of synchrotron radiation to Chemical Engineering Science: Workshop report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This report contains extended abstracts that summarize presentations made at the Workshop on Applications of Synchrotron Radiation to Chemical Engineering Science held at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL, on April 22--23, 1991. The talks emphasized the application of techniques involving absorption fluorescence, diffraction, and reflection of synchrotron x-rays, with a focus on problems in applied chemistry and chemical engineering, as well as on the use of x-rays in topographic, tomographic, and lithographic procedures. The attendees at the workshop included experts in the field of synchrotron science, scientists and engineers from ANL, other national laboratories, industry, and universities; and graduate and undergraduate students who were enrolled in ANL educational programs at the time of the workshop. Talks in the Plenary and Overview Session described the status of and special capabilities to be offered by the Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as strategies and opportunities for utilization of synchrotron radiation to solve science and engineering problems. Invited talks given in subsequent sessions covered the use of intense infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray photon beams (as provided by synchrotrons) in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering research related to electrochemical and corrosion science, catalyst development and characterization, lithography and imaging techniques, and microanalysis

  2. Applications of synchrotron radiation to Chemical Engineering Science: Workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-07-01

    This report contains extended abstracts that summarize presentations made at the Workshop on Applications of Synchrotron Radiation to Chemical Engineering Science held at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL, on April 22--23, 1991. The talks emphasized the application of techniques involving absorption fluorescence, diffraction, and reflection of synchrotron x-rays, with a focus on problems in applied chemistry and chemical engineering, as well as on the use of x-rays in topographic, tomographic, and lithographic procedures. The attendees at the workshop included experts in the field of synchrotron science, scientists and engineers from ANL, other national laboratories, industry, and universities; and graduate and undergraduate students who were enrolled in ANL educational programs at the time of the workshop. Talks in the Plenary and Overview Session described the status of and special capabilities to be offered by the Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as strategies and opportunities for utilization of synchrotron radiation to solve science and engineering problems. Invited talks given in subsequent sessions covered the use of intense infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray photon beams (as provided by synchrotrons) in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering research related to electrochemical and corrosion science, catalyst development and characterization, lithography and imaging techniques, and microanalysis.

  3. Future trends in the application of isotopes and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glubrecht, H [Institut fuer Biophysik, Technische Universitaet Hannover (Germany)

    1977-12-15

    Expected trends for the development of new methods and different applications of isotopes in agriculture, medicine and industrial production are discussed. In agriculture stable-isotope-labelled compounds can also be applied in field studies on the fate and metabolic processes of pesticide residues, as well as in long-lasting experiments on animal nutrition. Radioactive isotopes will continue to play a predominant role in trace element investigations, especially studies on the interaction and synergism of various trace elements in soil, plants and animals. The use of radioactive-labelled substrates and reagents will also become indispensable in enzyme research. Of the many other applications of isotopes in agriculture which might develop further, one item should be mentioned: the importance of non-radioactive labelling in ecology. Two areas of radiation application in agriculture may expect some progress from the use of neutron irradiation instead of gamma rays: plant breeding and the sterile insect technique (SIT). The advantage of sterilizing male insects by neutrons instead of gamma rays has become apparent with tsetse flies, which suffer less physiological harm when exposed to moderate neutron doses and, though sterile, remain fully competitive with wild tsetse fly males. There are also considerable further developments to be expected in the medical field. In vivo radionuclide imaging, if done by scanning, can only inform on local distribution of a radioactive-labelled pharmaceutical. Dynamic studies of function and physiologic processes have to be performed by using gamma-cameras which combine spatial localization with time variation. Short-lived radioisotopes, including cyclotron-produced positron emitters, are becoming more available, and the list of industrially manufactured radiopharmaceuticals is increasing. A most important development is tomography with positron emitters using annihilation gamma radiation. One of the most successful methods in clinical

  4. TU-CD-303-02: Beyond Radiation Induced Double Strand Breaks - a New Horizon for Radiation Therapy Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S. [UNC School of Medicine (United States)

    2015-06-15

    these advances in cancer biology research will give medical physicists a new perspective in daily clinical physics practice and in future radiation therapy technological development. Furthermore, academic medical physics should continue to be an integral part of the multidisciplinary cancer research community, harnessing our newly acquired understanding of radiation effects, and developing novel cost-effective treatment strategies to better combat cancer. Learning Objectives: Understand that localized radiation can lead to non-localized secondary effects such as radiation-induced immune response, bystander effect, and abscopal effect. Understand that the non-localized radiation effects may be harnessed to improve cancer treatment. Learn examples of physics participation in multidisciplinary research to advance cancer biology. Recognize the challenges and possibilities of physics applications in cancer research. Chang: NIH 5RC2CA148487-02 and 1U54CA151652-01 Graves: IDEA award (19IB-0106) from the California Breast Cancer Research Program (CBCRP), and by NIH P01 CA67166.

  5. TU-CD-303-02: Beyond Radiation Induced Double Strand Breaks - a New Horizon for Radiation Therapy Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S.

    2015-01-01

    these advances in cancer biology research will give medical physicists a new perspective in daily clinical physics practice and in future radiation therapy technological development. Furthermore, academic medical physics should continue to be an integral part of the multidisciplinary cancer research community, harnessing our newly acquired understanding of radiation effects, and developing novel cost-effective treatment strategies to better combat cancer. Learning Objectives: Understand that localized radiation can lead to non-localized secondary effects such as radiation-induced immune response, bystander effect, and abscopal effect. Understand that the non-localized radiation effects may be harnessed to improve cancer treatment. Learn examples of physics participation in multidisciplinary research to advance cancer biology. Recognize the challenges and possibilities of physics applications in cancer research. Chang: NIH 5RC2CA148487-02 and 1U54CA151652-01 Graves: IDEA award (19IB-0106) from the California Breast Cancer Research Program (CBCRP), and by NIH P01 CA67166

  6. Prospect of radiation application in industry and agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Tamikazu

    2007-01-01

    The prospect of radiation application in industry and agriculture are described. In industry, the radiation-induced crosslinking of polymers and radiation-induced graft polymerization improved many chemical and physical properties and new functional materials were created using ion beams. In agriculture, the food irradiation improved the food hygiene and killed insect pest of fruits and vegetables. Furthermore, the sterile insect technique, mutation breeding of plants, positron imaging system for plant, sterilization of medical products, environmental conservation due to purification of flue gas and wastewater, and upgrading of natural polymer (polysaccharide etc.) have been performed. Radiation process is a clean one without use of chemical reagents. The electron beam radiation is expected to reduce the cost of radiation process compared with the gamma-ray radiation. (M.H.)

  7. Radiation repair models for clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Roger G

    2018-02-28

    A number of newly emerging clinical techniques involve non-conventional patterns of radiation delivery which require an appreciation of the role played by radiation repair phenomena. This review outlines the main models of radiation repair, focussing on those which are of greatest clinical usefulness and which may be incorporated into biologically effective dose assessments. The need to account for the apparent "slowing-down" of repair rates observed in some normal tissues is also examined, along with a comparison of the relative merits of the formulations which can be used to account for such phenomena. Jack Fowler brought valuable insight to the understanding of radiation repair processes and this article includes reference to his important contributions in this area.

  8. Application of radiation technology in starch modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Huiyuan; Peng Zhigang; Ding Zhongmin; Lu Jiajiu

    2007-01-01

    In order to commercialize the radiation modification of starch, corn starch was irradiated with different dose of 60 Co gamma radiations. Some basic physical and chemical properties of the resulted modified starch paste were measured with emphasis on the viscosity stability and tensile strength. The results indicate that irradiation of corn starch with a dose of 4-10 kGy can decrease its viscosity to 5-14 mPa·s, and the tensile strength can meet the standard set up for textile paste. In comparison with chemical modification for starch, radiation modification is simpler in technology, more convenient in operation, more stable in modification quality, and easier to control. The mechanism of radiation modification of starch was also discussed. (authors)

  9. Business applications of operations research

    CERN Document Server

    Nag, Bodhibrata

    2014-01-01

    Operations Research is a bouquet of mathematical techniques which have evolved over the last six decades, to improve the process of business decision making. Operations Research offers tools to optimize and find the best solutions to myriad decisions that managers have to take in their day to day operations or while carrying out strategic planning. Today, with the advent of operations research software, these tools can be applied by managers even without any knowledge of the mathematical techniques that underlie the solution procedures. The book starts with a brief introduction to various tools of operations research, such as linear programming, integer programming, multi-objective programming, queuing theory and network theory together with simple examples in each of the areas. Another introductory chapter on handling the operations research software, along with examples is also provided. The book intends to make the readers aware of the power and potential of operations research in addressing decision makin...

  10. Application of a universal optic data link for radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, T.; Takada, E.

    2002-01-01

    Optic Data Link (ODL) is a device to convert electric and optic signals to each other, which is used for the field of optical communications. We examined the possibility to apply ODLs to radiation measurements. The effect of ODLs on energy and timing resolution has been investigated. From the results, fundamental applicability of ODLs to radiation measurements has been demonstrated. (author)

  11. Radiation modification of LDPE sheets and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chaoshun; Zang Zhihui; Rao Zhigong; Zeng Xinmiao; Xu Ziyian; Wang Binglin

    1995-01-01

    Blend Radiation Graft (BRG), Mutual Radiation Graft (MRG) and Chemical Oxidization (CO) methods were used to modify the surface of Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) sheets in order to enhance their shear-bond strength in tension load τ (MPa). The results of different methods and their application are compared and analyzed in this paper. (author)

  12. Application of the Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) to Scattering by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Application of the Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) to Scattering by a Dust Aerosol Layer. ... Incident radiation in its journey through the atmosphere before reaching the earth surface encounters particles of different sizes and composition such as dust aerosols resulting in interactions that lead to absorption and scattering.

  13. Review of existing issues, ethics and practices in general medical research and in radiation protection research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner-Karoussou, A.

    2008-01-01

    A literature review was carried out in relation to general medical research and radiation protection research. A large number of documents were found concerning the subject of ethics in general medical research. For radiation protection research, the number of documents and the information available is very limited. A review of practices in 13 European countries concerning general medical research and radiation protection research was carried out by sending a questionnaire to each country. It was found that all countries reviewed were well regulated for general medical research. For research that involves ionising radiation, the UK and Ireland are by far the most regulated countries. For other countries, there does not seem to be much information available. From the literature review and the review of practices, a number of existing ethical issues were identified and exposed, and a number of conclusions were drawn. (authors)

  14. Radiation research and related topics in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, S.

    1974-01-01

    The polymerization and degradation reactions has been studied by the research group of Kyoto University. Different kinds of polymerization-reactions are performed at low temperature. Low temperature has induced the possibility for avoiding of side reactions and the easiness for changing reacttion phase, from gas to solid through liquid. (M.S.)

  15. Occupational exposures in industrial application of radiation during 1999-2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanaye, Suresh Shantaram; Baburajan, Sujatha; Pawar, Suresh Ganpat; Nalawade, Shailesh Krishna; Sapra, Balvinder Kaur

    2012-01-01

    Radiation sources are used in various industrial applications like industrial radiograph, industrial irradiation, industrial fluoroscopy, nucleonic gauges, well logging etc., Gamma, beta X-ray as well as neutron sources are used for various applications. Number of radiation workers in this field has increased over the years. Due to operating conditions prevailing during the exposure as well as the strength of the sources used in some of the applications, radiation protection plays an important role in this field. Analysis of doses received by radiation workers in industry provides information on trends of doses as well as adequateness of radiation protection practices followed in this sector. In India, National Occupational Dose Registry System (NODRS) of Radiological Physics and Advisory Division (RPAD), Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) maintains personnel dose information of monitored radiation workers in the country. Analysis of occupational dose data of industrial radiation workers for last 10 years, i.e., 1999-2008 has been presented in this paper. It is observed that even though there is an increase in monitored radiation workers, percentage of persons receiving radiation exposure has come down during this period. There is also a decrease in the average annual dose as well as the collective dose. Further analysis of sub-categories shows that industrial radiography operations are the main contributor for collective dose (about 77%) followed by well logging and industrial X-ray operations (about 8% each). Thus, in addition to industrial radiography attention is also to be given to operations in these areas. (author)

  16. Design research and industrial applicability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Mogens Myrup

    1997-01-01

    Imprinted paper (copies of overheads in English) on the nature of design research, the transformation process for industrial utilization and the challenges of ENDREA from industry.......Imprinted paper (copies of overheads in English) on the nature of design research, the transformation process for industrial utilization and the challenges of ENDREA from industry....

  17. Roentgen's heritage and radiation phobia, a challenge to radiation research and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.

    1996-01-01

    Present practice of applying linearity to assessing risk even from very low dose exposure of complex tissues to ionising radiation has been evaluated in terms of microdosimetric approach to energy deposition in tissues, nature of radiation and also the magnitudes of conditioning and challenging doses. This paper discusses the probability of radiation risk at quite low doses on the tissues in terms of simple mathematical terms. (author). 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  18. Isotopes and radiations in agriculture and environment research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachdev, M.S.; Sachdev, P.; Deb, D.L.

    1996-10-01

    The use of isotope and radiation techniques in agriculture and environmental research has considerably helped in meeting the challenges of increasing crop and animal production. The present compilation presents the state of the art on the use of these techniques particularly in the context of current research and development programmes in this field. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  19. Radiation Effects Research Foundation bibliography of published papers, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This issue is the bibliography of the publication by the staffs of the Radiation Effects Research Institute (RERF) in 1989. Titles in original and English language with author names are enumerated. Indexes by research areas and by author name are also attached. (J.P.N.) 62 refs

  20. Radiation Effects Research Foundation bibliography of published papers, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This issue is the bibliography of the publication by the staffs of the Radiation Effects Research Institute (RERF) in 1988. Titles in original and English language with author names are enumerated. Indeces by research areas and by author name are also attached. (J.P.N.) 99 refs

  1. Application of radiation-induced apoptosis in radiation oncology and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crompton, N.E.A.; Emery, G.C.; Ozsahin, M.; Menz, R.; Knesplova, L.; Larsson, B.

    1997-01-01

    A rapid assay of the ability of lymphocytes to respond to radiation-induced damage is presented. Age and genetic dependence of radiation response have been quantified. The assay is sensitive to low doses of radiation. Its ability to assess the cytotoxic response of blood capillaries to radiation has been evaluated. (author)

  2. Radiation Processed Materials in Products from Polymers for Agricultural Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-15

    This publication results from a technical meeting on radiation processed materials in products from polymers for agricultural applications, which was held from 8 to 12 July 2013 at the IAEA in Vienna. The meeting provided a forum for the sharing of practical experiences and lessons learned, and reviewed the recent developments in the use of radiation technologies for the preparation of environmental friendly products based on polymers for agricultural applications.

  3. Radiation Processed Materials in Products from Polymers for Agricultural Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    This publication results from a technical meeting on radiation processed materials in products from polymers for agricultural applications, which was held from 8 to 12 July 2013 at the IAEA in Vienna. The meeting provided a forum for the sharing of practical experiences and lessons learned, and reviewed the recent developments in the use of radiation technologies for the preparation of environmental friendly products based on polymers for agricultural applications

  4. Natural radiation sources fabricated from potassic chemical fertilizers and application to radiation education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Takao

    2010-01-01

    Potassic chemical fertilizers contain potassium, a small part of which is potassium-40. Since potassium-40 is a naturally occurring radioisotope, potassic chemical fertilizers are often used for demonstrations of the existence of natural radioisotopes and radiation. To fabricate radiation sources as educational tools, the compression and formation method developed by our previous study was applied to 13 brands of commercially available chemical fertilizers containing different amounts of potassium. The suitability (size, weight, and solidness) of thus fabricated sources was examined and 12 of them were selected as easy-to-use radiation sources at radiation educational courses. The radiation strength (radiation count rate measured by a GM survey meter) and potassium content of the 12 sources were examined. It was found that the count rate was wholly proportional to the percentage of potassium, and a new educational application was proposed and discussed for understanding that the substance emitting radiation must be the potassium present in the raw fertilizers. (author)

  5. Potential high efficiency solar cells: Applications from space photovoltaic research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    NASA involvement in photovoltaic energy conversion research development and applications spans over two decades of continuous progress. Solar cell research and development programs conducted by the Lewis Research Center's Photovoltaic Branch have produced a sound technology base not only for the space program, but for terrestrial applications as well. The fundamental goals which have guided the NASA photovoltaic program are to improve the efficiency and lifetime, and to reduce the mass and cost of photovoltaic energy conversion devices and arrays for use in space. The major efforts in the current Lewis program are on high efficiency, single crystal GaAs planar and concentrator cells, radiation hard InP cells, and superlattice solar cells. A brief historical perspective of accomplishments in high efficiency space solar cells will be given, and current work in all of the above categories will be described. The applicability of space cell research and technology to terrestrial photovoltaics will be discussed.

  6. Research of radiation firmness of transparent melamine-formaldehyde polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, V.V.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation properties of the transparent melamine-formaldehyde polymers offered in quality polymeric basis for making of plastic scintillators are explored in this work. Plastic scintillator is composition, that consists of polymer (polymeric basis) and organic fluorescent addition. Scintillation efficiency and light output are basic properties of plastic scintillators. Firmness to influencing of ionizing radiation is important property of scintillators. From all types of scintillators the plastic are most radiation-proof. Cured melamine-formaldehyde resin and melamine-formaldehyde resin modified by different polyol modifiers was a research object. It is shown that radiation firmness for given types of polymeric material considerably depends on composition of polymer and from technology and temperature condition of its receipt. By the method IR-spectroscopy the structural changes in melamine-formaldehyde polymers under action of irradiation were explored. The maximal falling after the irradiation was marked in intensity of luminescence, which went down to 50% from an initial level. Like the coefficients of admission for all compositions got worse of a to 30-35% level from initial one. Mechanical properties went down on 20-30%. The radiation loss of mass made less than 1% for all polymers. With the increase of temperature of curing firmness rises. Thus, on the basis of the conducted researches radiation firmness for different melamine-formaldehyde polymers is determined and processes what is going on in material under action of radiation are studied. The limited doses of irradiation for each of explored polymers are determined. (authors)

  7. Revised radiation emergency procedures at Pakistan research reactor PINSTECH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orfi, S.D.; Javed, M.; Ahmad, S.; Akhtar, K.M.; Mubarak, M.A.

    1984-12-01

    Necessary procedures have been laid down in this report to meet the radiation emergency at Pakistan Research Reactor PINSTECH. The Nuclear Safety Committee PINSTECH (NSCP) had also recommended a number of improvements in the existing procedures. Revision of the procedures was also considered necessary to incorporate into it new radiation units/limits and new emergency equipment available. Radiation emergency preparedness programme is of continuous nature. Latest developments else-where and local experience contribute to the improvement of the existing arrangements under this programme. (A.B.)

  8. Comparative researches concerning cleaning chosen construction materials surface layer using UV and IR laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napadlek, W.; Marczak, J.; Kubicki, J.; Szudrowicz, M.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents comparative research studies of cleaning out of deposits and pollution disposals on different constructional materials like; steel, cast iron, aluminium, copper by using UV and IR laser radiation of wavelength λ =1.064 μm; λ = 0.532 μm; λ = 0.355 μm and λ = 0.266 μm and also impulse laser TEA CO 2 at radiation λ = 10.6 μm were used for the experiments. Achieved experimental results gave us basic information on parameters and conditions and application of each used radiation wavelength. Each kind of pollution and base material should be individually treated, selecting the length of wave and radiation energy density. Laser microtreatment allows for broad cleaning application of the surface of constructional materials as well as may be used in future during manufacturing processes as: preparation of surface for PVD technology, galvanotechnics, cleaning of the surface of machine parts etc. (author)

  9. Radiation analysis in the major areas of marine fisheries research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murty, A.V.S.

    1975-01-01

    Radiation analysis has been a proven technique to solve, relatively easily and quickly, some of the pressing problems in marine fisheries to the utmost satisfaction. Major areas of marine fisheries research - namely, the determination of sea water characteristics, the productivity studies, the pollution effects, the population dynamics and the preservation of sea foods - wherein the radiation treatment is fully helpful are discussed in detail. The problems encountered in the marine fisheries in India in this context are also outlined. (author)

  10. Research and applications: Artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaitin, L. J.; Duda, R. O.; Johanson, P. A.; Raphael, B.; Rosen, C. A.; Yates, R. A.

    1970-01-01

    The program is reported for developing techniques in artificial intelligence and their application to the control of mobile automatons for carrying out tasks autonomously. Visual scene analysis, short-term problem solving, and long-term problem solving are discussed along with the PDP-15 simulator, LISP-FORTRAN-MACRO interface, resolution strategies, and cost effectiveness.

  11. Application of radiation sterilization to bone allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Youchen; Li Baoxing; Sun Shiquan

    2003-01-01

    With prominent features of high penetration, no temperature increases, no harm residues and easy dose control, radiation sterilization technology is widely used in the sterilization of bone allografts. During the radiation sterilization of bone allografts, the irradiation dose should be optimized to ensure sterilization of grafts and preservation of biological properties of bone. The immunogenicity of allografts is decreased by irradiation. IAEA devoted great efforts to generalization of the radiation sterilization of tissue allografts in developing countries since 1986. Tissue Bank of China Institute for Radiation Protection (CIRP) was initially established in 1988 with the support of IAEA, afterwards restructured into Shanxi Provincial Tissue Bank (SPTB). The SPTB, as the first manufacturer of the irradiated bone allografts in the country, was granted production license by the State Food and Drug Administration of China. The SPTB sponsored IAEA/RCA Training Courses, National Symposium on Bone Grafting, and National Training Course on Bone Banking. Technique of radiation sterilization for bone grafts has become popularized in China after these activities. (authors)

  12. Radiation transport Part B: Applications with examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beutler, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    In the previous sections Len Lorence has described the need, theory, and types of radiation codes that can be applied to model the results of radiation effects tests or working environments for electronics. For the rest of this segment, the author will concentrate on the specific ways the codes can be used to predict device response or analyze radiation test results. Regardless of whether one is predicting responses in a working or test environment, the procedures are virtually the same. The same can be said for the use of 1-, 2-, or 3-dimensional codes and Monte Carlo or discrete ordinates codes. No attempt is made to instruct the student on the specifics of the code. For example, the author will not discuss the details, such as the number of meshes, energy groups, etc. that are appropriate for a discrete ordinates code. For the sake of simplicity, he will restrict himself to the 1-dimensional code CEPXS/ONELD. This code along with a wide variety of other radiation codes can be obtained form the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) for a nominal handling fee

  13. Application of solid dosimeter to radiation control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimoto, Tadashi

    1988-01-01

    Individual exposure dose measuring devices are used to measure the dose of each person in facilities using radiations. Major devices of this type currently used in Japan include the film badge, thermoluminescence dosimeter, portable radiation dosimeter and fluorescent glass dosimeter. All of these devices except the portable radiation dosimeter are of a solid type. Various portable-type spatial dose rate measuring devices, generally called survey meters, are available to determine the spatial distribution of radiations. Major survey meters incorporates an ionization chamber, GM counter tube or scintillation counter, while BF 3 counting tubes are available for neutron measurement. Of these, the scintillation dosimeter is of a solid type. A new scintillation survey meter has recently been developed which incorporated a discrimination bias modulation circuit. Dosimeters incorporating an ionization chamber or a GM counter tube are generally used as portable alarms. Recently, a new solid-type alarm has been developed which incorporates a solicon radiation detector. Microcomputers are also used for self-diagnosis, data processing, automatic calibration, etc. (Nogami, K.)

  14. Disposal regulations and techniques applicable to devices using ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    L'office de Protection contre les rayonnement ionisants, being a government body under the supervision of Ministry of Health and Labour, among other different missions controls the compliance of radiation protection laws with the aim to guarantee the safe operation of equipment using ionising radiation sources. These regulations concerning competence of personnel, especially in the field of medicine or application of ionising radiation on humans, are restricted only to medical doctors (or dentists in their domain) by technical constraints dealing with design of equipment and its exploitation. At the same time regulations define conditions of permanent control in order to verify compliance of radiation protection laws

  15. Radiation protection personnel training in Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Carlos Dario; Lorenzo, Nestor Pedro de

    1996-01-01

    The RA-6 research reactor is considering the main laboratory in the training of different groups related with radiological protection. The methodology applied to several courses over 15 years of experience is shown in this work. The reactor is also involved in the construction, design, start-up and sell of different installation outside Argentina for this reason several theoretical and practical courses had been developed. The acquired experience obtained is shown in this paper and the main purpose is to show the requirements to be taken into account for every group (subjects, goals, on-job training, etc) (author)

  16. The role of IAEA in coordinating research and transferring technology in radiation chemistry and processing of polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haji-Saeid, M. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Wagramer Strasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: M.Haji-Saeid@iaea.org; Sampa, M.H.; Ramamoorthy, N. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Wagramer Strasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Gueven, O. [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Ankara (Turkey); Chmielewski, A.G. [Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2007-12-15

    The IAEA has been playing a significant role in fostering developments in radiation technology in general and radiation processing of polymers in particular, among its Member States (MS) and facilitate know-how/technology transfer to developing MS. The former is usually achieved through coordinated research projects (CRP) and thematic technical meetings, while the latter is mainly accomplished through technical cooperation (TC) projects. Coordinated research projects encourage research on, and development and practical application of, radiation technology to foster exchange of scientific and technical information. The technical cooperation (TC) programme helps Member States to realize their development priorities through the application of appropriate radiation technology. The IAEA has implemented several coordinated research projects (CRP) recently, including one on-going project, in the field of radiation processing of polymeric materials. The CRPs facilitated the acquisition and dissemination of know-how and technology for controlling of degradation effects in radiation processing of polymers, radiation synthesis of stimuli-responsive membranes, hydrogels and absorbents for separation purposes and the use of radiation processing to prepare biomaterials for applications in medicine. The IAEA extends cooperation to well-known international conferences dealing with radiation technology to facilitate participation of talented scientists from developing MS and building collaborations. The IAEA published technical documents, covering the findings of thematic technical meetings (TM) and coordinated research projects have been an important source of valuable practical information.

  17. The role of IAEA in coordinating research and transferring technology in radiation chemistry and processing of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haji-Saeid, M.; Sampa, M.H.; Ramamoorthy, N.; Gueven, O.; Chmielewski, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    The IAEA has been playing a significant role in fostering developments in radiation technology in general and radiation processing of polymers in particular, among its Member States (MS) and facilitate know-how/technology transfer to developing MS. The former is usually achieved through coordinated research projects (CRP) and thematic technical meetings, while the latter is mainly accomplished through technical cooperation (TC) projects. Coordinated research projects encourage research on, and development and practical application of, radiation technology to foster exchange of scientific and technical information. The technical cooperation (TC) programme helps Member States to realize their development priorities through the application of appropriate radiation technology. The IAEA has implemented several coordinated research projects (CRP) recently, including one on-going project, in the field of radiation processing of polymeric materials. The CRPs facilitated the acquisition and dissemination of know-how and technology for controlling of degradation effects in radiation processing of polymers, radiation synthesis of stimuli-responsive membranes, hydrogels and absorbents for separation purposes and the use of radiation processing to prepare biomaterials for applications in medicine. The IAEA extends cooperation to well-known international conferences dealing with radiation technology to facilitate participation of talented scientists from developing MS and building collaborations. The IAEA published technical documents, covering the findings of thematic technical meetings (TM) and coordinated research projects have been an important source of valuable practical information

  18. Radiation application for upgrading of bio resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Keun; Lee, Young Il; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Chun, Ki Jung; Lee, Sang Jae; Kim, Yeon Ku; Chang, Hwa Hyoung; Song, In Geun; Lee, Ki Sung; Ko, Dong Kyu; Lee, Sung Ho; Han, Gab Jin

    2000-04-01

    To degrade lignin which is the most difficult fraction to be degraded in cellulosic bio resources and reuse as valuable formats, the improved strains of edible mushroom with more highly ligno cellulolytic activity were induced by γ-ray radiation and analysed their physiological and genetical characteristics. Mnp, Lac gene related to be the above were cloned. From the base sequence analysis, it seemed that there could be specific radiation-sensitive spots on the gene of mutants. anti mutagenicity, glyceollin elicitation activity and synergistic effects with indole acetic acid were found promisingly from the extracts of their cultural byproducts. And also were the byproducts expected to be useful for the candidate of subsidiary animal feed. By the radiation mutation, it seemed to be possible to induce the improved strains of antifungal activity, too. (author)

  19. Radiation application for upgrading of bio resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Keun; Lee, Young Il; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Chun, Ki Jung; Lee, Sang Jae; Kim, Yeon Ku; Chang, Hwa Hyoung; Song, In Geun; Lee, Ki Sung; Ko, Dong Kyu; Lee, Sung Ho; Han, Gab Jin

    2000-04-01

    To degrade lignin which is the most difficult fraction to be degraded in cellulosic bio resources and reuse as valuable formats, the improved strains of edible mushroom with more highly ligno cellulolytic activity were induced by {gamma}-ray radiation and analysed their physiological and genetical characteristics. Mnp, Lac gene related to be the above were cloned. From the base sequence analysis, it seemed that there could be specific radiation-sensitive spots on the gene of mutants. anti mutagenicity, glyceollin elicitation activity and synergistic effects with indole acetic acid were found promisingly from the extracts of their cultural byproducts. And also were the byproducts expected to be useful for the candidate of subsidiary animal feed. By the radiation mutation, it seemed to be possible to induce the improved strains of antifungal activity, too. (author)

  20. Application of radiation technology in vaccines development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ho Seong

    2015-07-01

    One of the earliest methods used in the manufacture of stable and safe vaccines is the use of chemical and physical treatments to produce inactivated forms of pathogens. Although these types of vaccines have been successful in eliciting specific humoral immune responses to pathogen-associated immunogens, there is a large demand for the development of fast, safe, and effective vaccine manufacturing strategies. Radiation sterilization has been used to develop a variety of vaccine types, because it can eradicate chemical contaminants and penetrate pathogens to destroy nucleic acids without damaging the pathogen surface antigens. Nevertheless, irradiated vaccines have not widely been used at an industrial level because of difficulties obtaining the necessary equipment. Recent successful clinical trials of irradiated vaccines against pathogens and tumors have led to a reevaluation of radiation technology as an alternative method to produce vaccines. In the present article, we review the challenges associated with creating irradiated vaccines and discuss potential strategies for developing vaccines using radiation technology.

  1. Development and application of the basic principles of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyskens, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    The basic philosophy of radiation protection, i.e. to prevent non-stochastic effects and to reduce stochastic effects to an acceptable level, is realized in the internationally accepted three-stage system of dose reduction, viz. justification, ALARA and dose limits. Historical development of this three-stage system is described and the three components are worked out further. The application and applicability of the system is considered for radiation sources and accidents. Attention is also given to regulations, national policy and practice of radiation protection. (G.J.P.)

  2. Radioactive isotope and radiation applications in the German Democratic Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, J.W.; Wetzel, K.G.

    1988-01-01

    The state of the art of radioisotope and radiation applications in the GDR is reviewed. New results are discussed and the following examples of application are presented: radiometric coal ash monitors, radiotracer optimization of power stations, irradiation of waste cellulose, isotope ratios in natural gas prospection, radiographic imaging of impurities on wafer surfaces, food irradiation, tracer techniques by 15 N, radiation induced chlorination of PVC, radiotracer optimization of a caprolactame plant, ionization detectors for pollutants in the air, X-ray analyzer of pollutants in the wafer, radiation treatment of parquet in the palace of Sanssouci, and characterization of porcelain. 27 refs. (author)

  3. Application of radiation in industrial processes (Paper No. IT-01)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, T.S.

    1990-02-01

    The application of radiations both from gamma irradiation sources and electron beams has immense potential in diverse fields of industry and public health care programmes. The technical and economic effectiveness of radiation technology has been well demonstrated in different parts of the world and in India over last few years. The major applications for using this technology favourably considered all over the world include radiation sterilisation of medical products, hygienisation of sewage sludge, radiation processing of wood plastic composites, vulcanisation of natural rubber latex, cross linking of wires and cables using radiation, production of bio materials and drugs release systems and treatment of flue gases. Some of the areas which have been successfully exploited on an industrial or semi industrial scale in India and the current status of this programme is high lighted in this paper. (author). 9 refs

  4. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation. Ch. 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacomini, J.C.; Gordon, H.J.

    1991-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation has a number of properties which make it uniquely suited for medical diagnostic imaging. The radiation is intense and can be readily monochromatized. With these highly intense, mono-chromatized X-ray beams, iodine K-edge di-chromatography can yield images which greatly enhance the visualization of iodine containing structures. As this technology continues to improve, the possibility of performing diagnostic cardiac, neuroradiological, and other vascular examinations with minimally invasive peripheral venous injections of iodinated contrast agent becomes increasingly practical. (author). 10 refs.; 6 figs

  5. Radiation shielding application of lead glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathuram, R.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear medicine and radiotherapy centers equipped with high intensity X-ray or teletherapy sources use lead glasses as viewing windows to protect personal from radiation exposure. Lead is the main component of glass which is responsible for shielding against photons. It is therefore essential to check the shielding efficiency before they are put in use. This can be done by studying photon transmission through the lead glasses. The study of photon transmission in shielding materials has been an important subject in medical physics and is potential useful in the development of radiation shielding materials

  6. Advances on radiation protection dosimetry research, development and services at AEOI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabi, M.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry is the main counterpart of an effective national radiation protection program to protect radiation workers, public and the environment against harmful effects of radiation. Research and development on radiation dosimetry are of vital needs to support national dosimetry services. The National Radiation Protection Department (NRPD) of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) being a National Authority on radiation protection is also responsible for radiation dosimetry research, development and services. Some highlights of such activities at NRPD are reviewed and discussed

  7. The research reactor radiation emergency countermeasure system in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Reyoung; Choi, Geun-Sik; Lee, Wanno; Chung, Kun Ho; Kang, Mun Ja; Lee, Chang-Woo

    2010-01-01

    A disaster prevention system was established for a radiation emergency from an operation of a research reactor with a thermal power of 30 MW th in Korea. A national radiation disaster countermeasure organization was set up to cope with the radiation emergency classified into three cases whose effective doses were more than 1 mSv/h inside the nuclear facility, inside the site boundary and outside the site boundary. Its role consists of the proclamation and consequent withdrawal of a disaster, a general assessment, an emergency medical service, a field control, radiation protection, resident protection implement, an accident analysis, a security plan, a radiation environmental investigation plan and probe, a radiation environmental effect assessment, and others. The emergency planning zone (EPZ) was settled to be within a radius of 800 m, the average distance between the site boundary and the center of a research reactor in operation, as a quick and effective early countermeasure from the result of the radiation environmental effect assessment. The environmental probing zone was chosen to extend to a radius of 2 km from a research reactor according to the moving path of the radioactive cloud so that a densely populated area could be considered and would be extended to 10 km according to the radiation level of the research reactor and atmospheric diffusion. Practically, the environmental probing is implemented at 22 points inside the site and eight points outside the site considering the geography, population and the wind direction. The gamma radiation dose and atmospheric radioactivity are analyzed during an effluence, and the radioactivity of a ground surface deposit and an environmental sample are analyzed after an effluence. The environmental laboratory covers the analysis of the gamma radioisotopes, tritium, strontium, uranium, gross alpha and beta. It is estimated that the habitability can be recovered when the radiation dose rate is less than 1 mSv/h inside the

  8. Research and applications: Artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, B.; Fikes, R. E.; Chaitin, L. J.; Hart, P. E.; Duda, R. O.; Nilsson, N. J.

    1971-01-01

    A program of research in the field of artificial intelligence is presented. The research areas discussed include automatic theorem proving, representations of real-world environments, problem-solving methods, the design of a programming system for problem-solving research, techniques for general scene analysis based upon television data, and the problems of assembling an integrated robot system. Major accomplishments include the development of a new problem-solving system that uses both formal logical inference and informal heuristic methods, the development of a method of automatic learning by generalization, and the design of the overall structure of a new complete robot system. Eight appendices to the report contain extensive technical details of the work described.

  9. Main principles of radiation protection and their applications in waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devgun, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    The average exposure for an individual from such background in the United States is about 300 mrem per year with approximately 200 mrem of this coming from radon exposure alone. In addition to the natural sources of background radiation, a very small amount of the background radiation occurs due to the nuclear weapons test fallout. Manmade sources of radiation also include certain consumer products, industrial and research use of radioisotopes, medical X-rays, and radiopharmaceuticals. When all sources, natural and man-made, are taken into account, the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has estimated that the average annual dose to individuals in the US population is 360 mrem (NCRP Report No. 93). In this report the fundamental principles of radiation protection are reviewed, as well as the relevant laws and regulations in the United States and discuss application of radiation protection in radioactive waste management

  10. RADIATION CHEMISTRY 2010 GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE JULY 18-23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Orlando

    2010-07-23

    The 2010 Gordon Conference on Radiation Chemistry will present cutting edge research regarding the study of radiation-induced chemical transformations. Radiation Chemistry or 'high energy' chemistry is primarily initiated by ionizing radiation: i.e. photons or particles with energy sufficient to create conduction band electrons and 'holes', excitons, ionic and neutral free radicals, highly excited states, and solvated electrons. These transients often interact or 'react' to form products vastly different than those produced under thermal equilibrium conditions. The non-equilibrium, non-thermal conditions driving radiation chemistry exist in plasmas, star-forming regions, the outer solar system, nuclear reactors, nuclear waste repositories, radiation-based medical/clinical treatment centers and in radiation/materials processing facilities. The 2010 conference has a strong interdisciplinary flavor with focus areas spanning (1) the fundamental physics and chemistry involved in ultrafast (atto/femtosecond) energy deposition events, (2) radiation-induced processes in biology (particularly spatially resolved studies), (3) radiation-induced modification of materials at the nanoscale and cosmic ray/x-ray mediated processes in planetary science/astrochemistry. While the conference concentrates on fundamental science, topical applied areas covered will also include nuclear power, materials/polymer processing, and clinical/radiation treatment in medicine. The Conference will bring together investigators at the forefront of their field, and will provide opportunities for junior scientists and graduate students to present work in poster format or as contributors to the Young Investigator session. The program and format provides excellent avenues to promote cross-disciplinary collaborations.

  11. Secure coprocessing applications and research issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.W.

    1996-08-01

    The potential of secure coprocessing to address many emerging security challenges and to enable new applications has been a long-standing interest of many members of the Computer Research and Applications Group, including this author. The purpose of this paper is to summarize this thinking, by presenting a taxonomy of some potential applications and by summarizing what we regard as some particularly interesting research questions.

  12. Practical applications of radiative wireless power transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pflug, H.; Visser, H.J.; Keyrouz, S.

    2015-01-01

    For practical use of radiative wireless power transfer (WPT), it is necessary to design a system which is able to supply circuits with a dynamic loading characteristic. In this paper we present a practical way to obtain efficiency and dc output power characteristics of a WPT system. An Avago

  13. Radiation effects on algae and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwivedi, Rakesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The effects of radiation on algae have been summarized in this article. Today, algae are being considered to have the great potential to fulfill the demand of food, fodder, fuel and various pharmaceutical products. Red algae are particularly rich in the content of polysaccharides present in their cell wall. For isolation of these polysaccharides, separation of cells cemented together by middle lamella is essential. The gamma rays are known to bring about biochemical changes in the cell wall and cause the breakdown of the middle lamella. These rays ate also known to speed up the starch sugar inter-conversion in the cells which is very useful for the tapping the potential of algae to be used as biofuel as well as in pharmaceutical industries. Cyanobacteria, among algae and other plants are more resistant to the radiation. In some cyanobacteria the radiation treatment is known to enhance the resistance against the antibiotics. Radiation treatment is also known to enhance the diameter of cell and size of the nitrogen fixing heterocyst. (author)

  14. Radiation Application in the Environmental. Chapter 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamaliah Sharif; Khomsaton Abu Bakar; Ming, T.T.; Nor Hasimah Mohamed; Siti Fatahiyah Mohamad; Nor Azillah Fatimah Othman

    2017-01-01

    Radiation has always been a natural part of environment. It is valuable working resources for civil, chemical and environmental engineers and scientist involved with pollution control, water treatment and industrial waste treatment. Electron beam technology for environmental conservation can be achieved if we took into account the economic factors which enable it to compete with existed technology.

  15. Unjustified prenatal radiation exposure in medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas Herrera, J.; Lamadrid, A.I.; Garcia Lima, O.; Diaz Bernal, E.; Freixas, V.; Lopez Bejerano, G.; Sanchez, R.

    2001-01-01

    The exposure to the radiation ionising of pregnant women, frequently constitutes motive of preoccupation for the expectant mother and the medical professionals taken the responsibility with its attention. The protection of the embryo-fetus against the ionising radiation is of singular importance due to its special vulnerability to this agent. On the other hand the diagnosis or treatment with radiations ionising beneficial for the expectant mother, are only indirectly for the embryo-fetus that is exposed to a hazard without perceiving anything. The present paper presents the experience obtained in the clinical and dosimetric evaluation from twenty-one pregnant patients subjected to diverse radiodiagnostic procedures or nuclear medicine during the years 1999-2000. The obtained results evidence that 24% of the patients was subjected to procedures of nuclear medicine with diagnostic purposes. While the period of pregnancy of the patients ranged between 4 and 12 weeks, it could be concluded that in all the cases the doses received by the patients in the whole body did not exceed 2 mSv. When conjugating the period of pregnancy of the patients with the doses received, there is no evidence of significant risk for the embryo-fetus. Paradoxically the physicians of assistance suggested to their patients in all the cases to carry out the interruption of the pregnancy, demonstrating with this decision ignorance on the biological effects of the ionizing radiations during the prenatal exposures. (author)

  16. NASA Self-Assessment of Space Radiation Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    Space exploration involves unavoidable exposures to high-energy galactic cosmic rays whose penetration power and associated secondary radiation makes radiation shielding ineffective and cost prohibitive. NASA recognizing the possible health dangers from cosmic rays notified the U.S. Congress as early as 1959 of the need for a dedicated heavy ion accelerator to study the largely unknown biological effects of galactic cosmic rays on astronauts. Information and scientific tools to study radiation health effects expanded over the new decades as NASA exploration programs to the moon and preparations for Mars exploration were carried out. In the 1970 s through the early 1990 s a more than 3-fold increase over earlier estimates of fatal cancer risks from gamma-rays, and new knowledge of the biological dangers of high LET radiation were obtained. Other research has increased concern for degenerative risks to the central nervous system and other tissues at lower doses compared to earlier estimates. In 1996 a review by the National Academy of Sciences Space Science Board re-iterated the need for a dedicated ground-based accelerator facility capable of providing up to 2000 research hours per year to reduce uncertainties in risks projections and develop effective mitigation measures. In 1998 NASA appropriated funds for construction of a dedicated research facility and the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) opened for research in October of 2003. This year marks the 8th year of NSRL research were about 1000 research hours per year have been utilized. In anticipation of the approaching ten year milestone, funded investigators and selected others are invited to participate in a critical self-assessment of NSRL research progress towards NASA s goals in space radiation research. A Blue and Red Team Assessment format has been integrated into meeting posters and special plenary sessions to allow for a critical debate on the progress of the research and major gaps areas. Blue

  17. Supercomputer applications in nuclear research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Misako

    1992-01-01

    The utilization of supercomputers in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is mainly reported. The fields of atomic energy research which use supercomputers frequently and the contents of their computation are outlined. What is vectorizing is simply explained, and nuclear fusion, nuclear reactor physics, the hydrothermal safety of nuclear reactors, the parallel property that the atomic energy computations of fluids and others have, the algorithm for vector treatment and the effect of speed increase by vectorizing are discussed. At present Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute uses two systems of FACOM VP 2600/10 and three systems of M-780. The contents of computation changed from criticality computation around 1970, through the analysis of LOCA after the TMI accident, to nuclear fusion research, the design of new type reactors and reactor safety assessment at present. Also the method of using computers advanced from batch processing to time sharing processing, from one-dimensional to three dimensional computation, from steady, linear to unsteady nonlinear computation, from experimental analysis to numerical simulation and so on. (K.I.)

  18. Practical Applications of Reading Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Albert J.

    There are three main reasons why reading research has not had a stronger influence on what goes on in schools. The first reason is the powerful impact of social forces such as the bandwagon effect, the pendulum swing, and the prevailing climate of opinion. These factors determine to an unfortunately large degree whether or not particular research…

  19. A survey of research programs in radiation protection in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    A survey of research programs in Canada concerned with radiation protection was conducted in 1991-92 by the Joint Subcommittee on Regulatory Research (JSCRR) of the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) Advisory Committees on Radiological Protection and on Nuclear Safety. The purpose of this survey was to determine the current state of funding for this type of research in Canada. Funding for health-related radiation research in Canada is critical to establishing and maintaining a supply of trained professionals who can provide competent advice on health-related problems in radiation protection. The present report is an analysis of the information received in this survey. This survey concludes with the recommendation that the organization and definition of subprograms for the AECB Regulatory Research and Support Program should be completed as soon as possible. In this report the JSCRR should assist AECB staff in preparing a report in which priorities for research related to radiation protection are indicated. The sources of information noted at the end of the Discussion section of this report should be considered for this purpose. (author). 15 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. A survey of research programs in radiation protection in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    A survey of research programs in Canada concerned with radiation protection was conducted in 1991-92 by the Joint Subcommittee on Regulatory Research (JSCRR) of the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) Advisory Committees on Radiological Protection and on Nuclear Safety. The purpose of this survey was to determine the current state of funding for this type of research in Canada. Funding for health-related radiation research in Canada is critical to establishing and maintaining a supply of trained professionals who can provide competent advice on health-related problems in radiation protection. The present report is an analysis of the information received in this survey. This survey concludes with the recommendation that the organization and definition of subprograms for the AECB Regulatory Research and Support Program should be completed as soon as possible. In this report the JSCRR should assist AECB staff in preparing a report in which priorities for research related to radiation protection are indicated. The sources of information noted at the end of the Discussion section of this report should be considered for this purpose. (author). 15 refs., 3 tabs

  1. Clinical applications of continuous infusion chemotherapy ahd concomitant radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, C.J.; Rotman, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: theoretical basis and clinical applications of 5-FU as a radiosensitizer; treatment of hepatic metastases from gastro intestingal primaries with split course radiation therapy; combined modality therapy with 5-FU, Mitomycin-C and radiation therapy for sqamous cell cancers; treatment of bladder carcinoma with concomitant infusion chemotherapy and irradiation; a treatment of invasiv bladder cancer by the XRT/5FU protocol; concomitant radiation therapy and doxorubicin by continuous infusion in advanced malignancies; cis platin by continuous infusion with concurrent radiation therapy in malignant tumors; combination of radiation with concomitant continuous adriamycin infusion in a patient with partially excised pleomorphic soft tissue sarcoma of the lower extremeity; treatment of recurrent carcinoma of the paranasal sinuses using concomitant infusion cis-platinum and radiation therapy; hepatic artery infusion for hepatic metastases in combination with hepatic resection and hepatic radiation; study of simultaneous radiation therapy, continuous infusion, 5FU and bolus mitomycin-C; cancer of the esophagus; continuous infusion VP-16, bolus cis-platinum and simultaneous radiation therapy as salvage therapy in small cell bronchogenic carcinoma; and concomitant radiation, mitomycin-C and 5-FU infusion in gastro intestinal cancer

  2. Proceedings of the Takasaki symposium on radiation application of natural polymers in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Tamikazu; Maekawa, Yasunari

    2002-03-01

    This Takasaki symposium was annually held as the 3rd meeting for radiation processing of natural polymers through research cooperation among Asian countries. The symposium includes the presentations of research outcomes on radiation processing of starches, silk proteins and marine carbohydrates. In the researches of starch and cellulose, radiation crosslinking of biodegradable polysaccharides was achieved by modifying it to be water-soluble paste, showing the wide range of its application to wound dressing and biodegradable plastics. In silk protein researches, pulverization and water-solubilization of the irradiated silk proteins and its antibacterial properties were reported. In the researches of marine carbohydrates, it was reported that radiation-degraded chitosan and alginate showed promotion effects for plant growth, enhancement of antibacterial properties, and capability to be applied for bioadhesive materials. In addition, in estimation of economic scale of radiation application, comparisons between Japan and U.S. in medical, agricultural and industrial fields were introduced. Many domestic and foreign attendants were very interested in reports and exchanged their opinions actively. Radiation application of natural polymers are the most important subjects from the view points of resource recycling and environment protection and are good agreement with the needs of Asian countries. Outcomes of this symposium are expected to contribute the progress in radiation applications in south Asian countries as well as Japan. In the symposium we had the 63 participants consisted of 16 foreign researchers from not only bilaterally cooperated Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam, but also Indonesia and China, 28 from domestic universities, governmental institutes and companies, and 32 from JAERI. This proceeding compiles the invited and contributed papers. The 22 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  3. Application of maximum values for radiation exposure and principles for the calculation of radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-08-01

    The guide presents the definitions of equivalent dose and effective dose, the principles for calculating these doses, and instructions for applying their maximum values. The limits (Annual Limit on Intake and Derived Air Concentration) derived from dose limits are also presented for the purpose of monitoring exposure to internal radiation. The calculation of radiation doses caused to a patient from medical research and treatment involving exposure to ionizing radiation is beyond the scope of this ST Guide

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LR Roeder

    2008-12-01

    The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

  5. A research on industrial development of radiation sterilization in Sichuan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xun; Zhu Rong; Chen Jigang

    2010-01-01

    Radiation sterilization is widely applied in food processing, Pharmaceutical Manufacturing and medical instrumentation producing. As this industry offers service to related corporations, its development depends largely on the market scale of the relevant industries. This article mainly discusses the balance point between the capacity of radiation sterilization and the requirement of its market. There are less than 1% of the companies in Sichuan which using radiation sterilization for its products, broad prospects has shown in this field. The output value of radiation sterilization industry reached 0.1% of the GDP in some advanced countries (America and Japan...), under this standard, its output value in Sichuan province would be RMB1.2 hundred million, but now our capacity and scale of this industry is less than RMB40million.Research shows: there are 3 key points to make its output value reach 0.1% of the GDP in Sichuan: 1. Breaking the 'bottleneck' restrictions of capacity and Inappropriate resources distribution. 2. Promoting the technique of radiation sterilization, guiding corporation to reduce their dependence on food additive from the perspective of food safety, make effective implantation of radiation sterilization into their manufacture processes. 3. Increasing publicity for radiation sterilization, eliminating scared mentality among customer on nuclear technology, helping manufacturing corporations to establish green environmental protection brand, directing our customer to a more healthy awareness. (authors)

  6. Application of PSA techniques to synchrotron radiation source facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyasi Rao, V.V.S.; Vinod, G.; Vaze, K.K.; Sarkar, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation sources are increasingly being used in research and medical applications. Various instances of overexposure in these facilities have been reported in literature. These instances have lead to the investigation of the risks associated with them with a view to minimise the risks and thereby increasing the level of safety. In nuclear industry, Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) methods are widely used to assess the risk from nuclear power plants. PSA presents a systematic methodology to evaluate the likelihood of various accident scenarios and their possible consequences using fault/event tree techniques. It is proposed to extend similar approach to analyse the risk associated with synchrotron radiation sources. First step for such an analysis is establishing the failure criteria, considering the regulatory stipulations on acceptable limits of dose due to ionization radiation from normal as well as beam loss scenarios. Some possible scenarios considered in this study are (1) excessive Bremsstrahlung in the ring due to loss of vacuum, (2) Target failure due to excessively focused beam (3) mis-directed/mis-steered beam (4) beam loss and sky shine. Hazard analysis needs to cover the beam transfer line, storage ring and experimental beam line areas. Various safety provisions are in place to minimize the hazards from these facilities such as access control interlock systems, radiation shielding for storage ring and beam lines and safety shutters (for beam lines). Experimental beam line area is the most vulnerable locations that need to be critically analysed. There are multiple beam lines, that have different safety provisions and consequences from postulated beam strikes will also be different and this increases the complexity of analysis. Similar studies conducted for such experimental facilities have identified that the radiation safety interlock system, used to control access to areas inside ring and the hutches of beamline facilities has an

  7. Application of ionizing radiation in foods and feeds treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanis, T.

    1984-01-01

    The proceedings contain 21 papers presented at the seminar which was held in Prague on November 28, 1983. The topic of the papers was current knowledge of ionizing radiation applications for treating foodstuffs and feeds and the confrontation of the applications thereof in Czechoslovakia and elsewhere in the world. (J.P.)

  8. The national institute of radiation hygiene and the medical application of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baarli, J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper gives a review of the rules and regulations concerning medical application of radiation in Norway. It discusses the intention of the regulations, the way in which the regulations is applied and how the National Institute of Radiation Hygiene as the competent authority assures the application of the regulations. The paper furthermore gives an indication of the areas of radiation application in medicine and the number of location of X-ray equipment, nuclear medical laboratories, radiation therapy equipment, etc. The number of X-ray examinations in Norway per year are also given, together with their distribution among the various types of examinations. Summary results of a quality assurance investigation of nuclear medical laboratories are given, as well as the results of inspections of the various types of equipment used in medical diagnostics

  9. Carbon nano tubes -Buckypaper- radiation studies for medical physics application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alanazi, A.; Alkhorayef, M.; Dalton, A.; Bradley, D. A. [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, College for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Guildford, Surrey GR2 7XH (United Kingdom); Alzimami, K. [King Saud University, Department of Radiological Sciences, P. O. Box 10219, Riyadh 11433 (Saudi Arabia); Abuhadi, N., E-mail: a.alanazi@surrey.ac.uk [Jazan University, Faculty of Medical Applied Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology Department, P. O. Box 114, Jazan (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-10-15

    Radiation dosimetry underpins safe and effective clinical applications of radiation. Many materials have been used to measure the radiation dose deposited in human tissue, their radiation response requiring the application of correction factors to account for various influencing factors, including sensitivity to dose and energy dependence. In regard to the latter, account needs to be taken of difference from the effective atomic number of human tissue, soft or calcified. Graphite ion chambers and semiconductor diode detectors have been used to make measurements in phantoms but these active devices represent a clear disadvantage when considered for in vivo dosimetry. In both circumstances, dosimeters with atomic number similar to human tissue are needed. Carbon nano tubes have properties that potentially meet the demand, requiring low voltage in active devices and an atomic number similar to adipose tissue. In this study, single-wall carbon nano tubes buckypaper has been used to measure the beta particle dose deposited from a strontium-90 source, the medium displaying thermoluminescence at potentially useful sensitivity. As an example, the samples show a clear response for a dose of 2 Gy. This finding suggests that carbon nano tubes can be used as a passive dosimeter specifically for the high levels of radiation exposures used in radiation therapy. Furthermore, the finding points towards further potential applications such as for space radiation measurements, not least because the medium satisfies a demand for light but strong materials of minimal capacitance. (Author)

  10. Carbon nano tubes -Buckypaper- radiation studies for medical physics application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanazi, A.; Alkhorayef, M.; Dalton, A.; Bradley, D. A.; Alzimami, K.; Abuhadi, N.

    2015-10-01

    Radiation dosimetry underpins safe and effective clinical applications of radiation. Many materials have been used to measure the radiation dose deposited in human tissue, their radiation response requiring the application of correction factors to account for various influencing factors, including sensitivity to dose and energy dependence. In regard to the latter, account needs to be taken of difference from the effective atomic number of human tissue, soft or calcified. Graphite ion chambers and semiconductor diode detectors have been used to make measurements in phantoms but these active devices represent a clear disadvantage when considered for in vivo dosimetry. In both circumstances, dosimeters with atomic number similar to human tissue are needed. Carbon nano tubes have properties that potentially meet the demand, requiring low voltage in active devices and an atomic number similar to adipose tissue. In this study, single-wall carbon nano tubes buckypaper has been used to measure the beta particle dose deposited from a strontium-90 source, the medium displaying thermoluminescence at potentially useful sensitivity. As an example, the samples show a clear response for a dose of 2 Gy. This finding suggests that carbon nano tubes can be used as a passive dosimeter specifically for the high levels of radiation exposures used in radiation therapy. Furthermore, the finding points towards further potential applications such as for space radiation measurements, not least because the medium satisfies a demand for light but strong materials of minimal capacitance. (Author)

  11. Application of radiation vulcanized natural rubber latex in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soebianto, Y.S.; Wiwik Sofiarti; Razzak, M.T.

    1996-01-01

    The center has carried out R and D of Radiation Vulcanization Natural Rubber Latex (RVNRL) technology and introduced it to the industries since the inauguration and operation of the latex pilot plant in 1983. After years of experiences and the environmental consideration, n-butylacrylate (n-BA) has replaced CCI, as the sensitizer. Until now the introduction program shows that radiation vulcanized latex is more suitable for home industries than large industries. The obstacle of the program is the marketing of the dipped products. In spite of these problems, the introduction of this technology to the people in some undeveloped area of Java has supported the national program to improve their living standard. The problems of nitrosamine and protein allergic have turn up RVNRL to be the substitute of sulfur vulcanized latex in the future. The cooperation with a national condom manufacturer (PT Mitra Banjaran) has applied RVNRL for condom production in the large scale. Soft condoms with less probability of pinhole are obtained, but the technical problem is stickiness after pilling. Supply to a baby teat and a rubber thread manufacturer offers great advantages by not using any chemicals. In spite of the advantages, the problem of latex viscosity for dipping and the low modulus of elasticity of the threads arise. Through those input CAIR-BATAN is conducting the research and development in improving the crosslinking among the rubber particles that are supposed to be the reason of the stickiness and low modulus of elasticity. This effort is expected to be able to broaden the application of RVNRL, and it will be achieved only by the involvement of rubber chemist, rubber technologist, and radiation chemist

  12. Applications of isotopes and radiation in conservation of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the symposium was to review present knowledge of the applications of radiation, radioisotopes and nuclear methods of analysis in the monitoring and control of environmental pollution and in reducing emissions of environmentally toxic substances. The scientific programme covered a wide range of different applications of nuclear technology, such as flue gas purification, radiation processing of liquid and solid wastes, radiotracer studies and nuclear analytical techniques and their applications. The symposium was attended by 92 participants representing 31 IAEA Member States. Separate abstracts were prepared for 46 of the papers in this volume. Refs, figs and tabs

  13. Applications of Radiative Heating for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandis, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    Vehicles entering planetary atmospheres at high speeds (6 - 12 kms) experience intense heating by flows with temperatures of the order 10 000K. The flow around the vehicle experiences significant dissociation and ionization and is characterized by thermal and chemical non-equilibrium near the shock front, relaxing toward equilibrium. Emission from the plasma is intense enough to impart a significant heat flux on the entering spacecraft, making it necessary to predict the magnitude of radiative heating. Shock tubes represent a unique method capable of characterizing these processes in a flight-similar environment. The Electric Arc Shock tube (EAST) facility is one of the only facilities in its class, able to produce hypersonic flows at speeds up to Mach 50. This talk will review the characterization of radiation measured in EAST with simulations by the codes DPLR and NEQAIR, and in particular, focus on the impact these analyses have on recent missions to explore the solar system.

  14. Radiation application for upgrading of bioresources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Keun; Lee, Young Il; Song, HI Sup; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Chun, Ki Jung; Chang, Hwa Hyoung; Han, Gab Jin; Lee, Ki Sung; Kim, Soo Ki; Lee, Sung Ho; Lee, Jung Sook

    1999-04-01

    The productivity of lignocellulosic biowastes is greatly expanded along the technical improvement of agricultural industry all over the world. Among the components of biowastes, the lignin is the most difficult fraction to be degraded by mushroom. Thus, the improved strains of edible mushroom with more highly lignocellulolytic activity were induced by {gamma}-ray radiation and analysed their physiological and genetical characteristics. After cultivation of radiation induced edible mushrooms. Antimutagenicity, glyceollin elicitation activity and synergistic effects with indole acetic acid were found promisingly from the extracts of their cultural byproduct. And also were the byproducts expected to be useful for the candidate of subsidiary animal feed suggested from the analysis of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, mineral, and vitamin concentration of them.

  15. Radiation application for upgrading of bioresources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Keun; Lee, Young Il; Song, HI Sup; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Chun, Ki Jung; Chang, Hwa Hyoung; Han, Gab Jin; Lee, Ki Sung; Kim, Soo Ki; Lee, Sung Ho; Lee, Jung Sook

    1999-04-01

    The productivity of lignocellulosic biowastes is greatly expanded along the technical improvement of agricultural industry all over the world. Among the components of biowastes, the lignin is the most difficult fraction to be degraded by mushroom. Thus, the improved strains of edible mushroom with more highly lignocellulolytic activity were induced by γ-ray radiation and analysed their physiological and genetical characteristics. After cultivation of radiation induced edible mushrooms. Antimutagenicity, glyceollin elicitation activity and synergistic effects with indole acetic acid were found promisingly from the extracts of their cultural byproduct. And also were the byproducts expected to be useful for the candidate of subsidiary animal feed suggested from the analysis of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, mineral, and vitamin concentration of them

  16. Cosmetic and medical applications of ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffey, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    The social desirability of a tanned skin is apparent and many people associate a bronzed body with good health and a sense of well-being. In Northern Europe and America the lack of long periods of sunshine has led to the establishment of the suntanning industry where artificial sources of ultraviolet radiation emitting almost entirely in the UV-A region supplement sunlight exposure

  17. Industrial application of radiation disinfestation of grain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakladnoj, G.A.; Men'shenin, A.I.; Pertsovskij, E.S.; Salimov, R.A.; Cherepkov, V.G.; Krsheminskij, V.S.

    1982-01-01

    One of the main reasons for grain losses during storage is its damage by pest insects. Chemical methods widely used at present for grain decontamination have some shortcomings. In this connection a radiation method for grain disinfestation is developed and introduced in industry. First in the world experimental-industrial disinfestator on the base of electron accelerators is put into operation at Odessa port elevator

  18. Radiation immobilization of catalase and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guanghui; Ha Hongfei; Wang Xia; Wu Jilan

    1988-01-01

    Catalase was immobilized by a chemical method on porous polyacrylamide particles produced by radiation polymerization of acrylamide monomer at low temperature (-78 0 C). Activity of immobilized catalase was enhanced distinctly by joining a chemical arm to the support. The method of recovery of catalase activity on immobilized polymer was found by soaking it in certain buffer. The treatment of H 2 O 2 both in aqueous solution and alcoholic solution by using the immobilized catalase was performed. (author)

  19. From Research to Practical Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Sabine; Bødker, Keld; Tøth, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    aim to support operational managers responsible for outsourced IT activities in carrying out the concrete task of knowledge transfer planning and execution. We report from a longitudinal project conducted in a major financial company headquartered in Denmark and an offshore development center located...... in India. We identify the three main knowledge transfer challenges experienced by the case company. The identified challenges inform the design of a systematic five-step approach to the company’s knowledge transfer. Our main contribution is to illustrate how extant research can be applied to understand...... and solve a particular company’s knowledge transfer challenges in a way that fits with the company culture....

  20. The applications of microdosimetry in radiation biology study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eunhee

    2002-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms by which the ionizing radiation causes these damages, the spatial patterns of interaction and energy deposition by radiations should be explained in cellular level. All the descriptions of the physical process of radiation interaction and energy transfer in cellular or microscopic scale constitute the field of microdosimetry. The underlying motivations of microdosimetry study range from the efficient control of the radiation protection measures to the improvement of the diagnostic and therapeutic effectiveness in medical applications of radiation. The major quantity in the conventional radiation dosimetry or the macroscopic dosimetry is the 'absorbed dose' defined as the mean value of the possible energy depositions per unit mass of the target. With the microscopic targets such as cells and subcellular organelles, the average quantity can not represent the radiation actions on the targets any more because of the inhomogeneous and stochastic nature in radiation interaction with matter. The essence of microdosimetry is to study the fluctuation of energy deposition in a microscopic volume and its deviation from the mean value attributed to the inherent randomness of radiation interactions with matter

  1. Progress in radiation application to industry and agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Tamikazu

    2006-01-01

    Utilization of radiation in Japan has been actively promoted by various agencies including the Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment of JAERI (presently Japan Atomic Energy Agency: JAEA). The JAEA-Takasaki was established in April 1963 for the purpose of promoting research and development (R and D) activities with gamma rays and electron beams. The JAEA-Takasaki's activities were addressed principally to industry and agriculture. In Japan, purpose of utilization of radiation is aiming at increasing welfare and quality of life of our peoples. (author)

  2. Validation of nuclear models used in space radiation shielding applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2013-01-01

    A program of verification and validation has been undertaken to assess the applicability of models to space radiation shielding applications and to track progress as these models are developed over time. In this work, simple validation metrics applicable to testing both model accuracy and consistency with experimental data are developed. The developed metrics treat experimental measurement uncertainty as an interval and are therefore applicable to cases in which epistemic uncertainty dominates the experimental data. To demonstrate the applicability of the metrics, nuclear physics models used by NASA for space radiation shielding applications are compared to an experimental database consisting of over 3600 experimental cross sections. A cumulative uncertainty metric is applied to the question of overall model accuracy, while a metric based on the median uncertainty is used to analyze the models from the perspective of model development by examining subsets of the model parameter space.

  3. 'Beams' and 'Tracers' to trigger advanced applications of radiation and isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-03-01

    The Advisory Committee on Radiation Utilization of the Atomic Energy Commission has been studying the way to promote advanced radiation application in view of the ongoing technical innovation at present. The Committee submitted its report to the AEC on March 13. The report focused on three aspects, the practical application of radiation, research and development, and international cooperation. Each aspect was analyzed regarding its current status, the tasks to be undertaken and the measures to be introduced. The proposed measures will be reflected to the long term program of development and utilization of nuclear energy of the AEC, now being revised. In Japan, radiation has been utilized in industries, agriculture and medical application, to largely contribute to people's well-being. The status of use of radiation, the way for practical use, the application of beams and tracers, and the international cooperation are described. It is suitable to public research institutes to promote the research on which private sectors have not taken initiative in spite of the social demand, that related to the standards and criteria specified by the government, for which private sectors seek assistance, and that requires international cooperation. (Kako, I.).

  4. Clinical scientific research with ionizing radiations in Italy. Jurisprudential aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valle, G.; Frusciante, V.; Petrucelli, L.; Podagrosi, V.; Giustini, A.

    1999-01-01

    The paper reviews the laws that regulate the clinical scientific research with ionizing radiations in Italy and the effects of ICRP 62, introduced in Italy by the Minister's Decree 21/11/1997, renders invalid all previous rules and regulations which contrast with them [it

  5. Review of European research trends of low dose radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Yoshida, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    Large research projects on low dose radiation effects in Europe and US over the past decade have provided limited scientific knowledge which could underpin the validation of radiation protection systems. Recently in Europe, there have been repeated discussions and dialogues to improve the situation, and as the consequence, the circumstances surrounding low dose radiation risks are changing. In 2009, Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) was established as a trans-national organization capable of ensuring appropriate governance of research in the pursuit of a long term shared vision, and Low Dose Research towards Multidisciplinary Integration (DoReMi) network was launched in 2010 to achieve fairly short term results in order to prove the validity of the MELODI approach. It is expected to be very effective and powerful activities to facilitate the reduction of uncertainties in the understanding of low dose risks, but the regulatory requests rushing the reinforcement of radiological protection regulations based on the precautional principles are more increasing. To develop reasonable radiological protection systems based on scientific evidences, we need to accelerate to collect scientific evidences which could directly underpin more appropriate radiation protection systems even in Japan. For the purpose, we Japan need to develop from an independent standpoint and share as a multidisciplinary vision a long term and holistic research strategy which enables to enhance Japanese advantages such as low dose rate facilities and animal facilities, as soon as possible. (author)

  6. Radioprotection in the medical applications of the ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This publication presents information about of the radiological safety in the medical application of the ionizing radiation compiled in 11 chapter and 1 annex. The first four chapters are principally dedicated to technical uses in radioprotection, the external and internal irradiation and the biological radiation effects. The radioprotection principles, the individual monitoring techniques, and the radioprotection systems are developed afterwards in the followings three chapters. The second half of the document is dedicated entirely to the medical practices using ionizing radiations, specially to the radioprotection aspects in radiodiagnosis, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. The final chapter is dedicated to radiological accidents happened worldwide in the field of the medical applications of the ionizing radiations. The annex, about of the regulatory area, established a set of standards, laws, decrees and other force regulations in radiological safety, related in radiodiagnosis, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy

  7. Solid-state radiation detectors technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The book discusses the current solid state material used in advance detectors manufacturing and their pros and cons and how one can tailor them using different techniques, to get the maximum performance. The book is application oriented to radiation detectors for medical, X and gamma rays application, and good reference with in-depth discussion of detector's physics as it relates to medical application tailored for engineers and scientists.

  8. The preliminary research for biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Chang Hyun; Jung, U Hee; Park, Hae Ran [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    The purpose of this project is to elucidate the solution to the production of bioactive substance using biotransformation process from core technology of biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology. And, this strategy will provide core technology for development of drugs as new concept and category. Research scopes and contents of project include 1) The development of mutant for biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology 2) The development of host for biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology 3) The preliminary study for biosynthetic engineering of isoflavone by radiation fusion technology. The results are as follows. Isoflavone compounds(daidzein, hydroxylated isoflavone) were analyzed by GC-MS. The study of radiation doses and p-NCA high-throughput screening for mutant development were elucidated. And, it was carried out the study of radiation doses for host development. Furthermore, the study of redox partner and construction of recombinant strain for region-specific hydroxylation(P450, redox partner). In addition, the biological effect of 6,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone as an anti-obesity agent was elucidated in this study.

  9. Physics of nuclear radiations concepts, techniques and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rangacharyulu, Chary

    2013-01-01

    Physics of Nuclear Radiations: Concepts, Techniques and Applications makes the physics of nuclear radiations accessible to students with a basic background in physics and mathematics. Rather than convince students one way or the other about the hazards of nuclear radiations, the text empowers them with tools to calculate and assess nuclear radiations and their impact. It discusses the meaning behind mathematical formulae as well as the areas in which the equations can be applied. After reviewing the physics preliminaries, the author addresses the growth and decay of nuclear radiations, the stability of nuclei or particles against radioactive transformations, and the behavior of heavy charged particles, electrons, photons, and neutrons. He then presents the nomenclature and physics reasoning of dosimetry, covers typical nuclear facilities (such as medical x-ray machines and particle accelerators), and describes the physics principles of diverse detectors. The book also discusses methods for measuring energy a...

  10. Legal and technical analysis of the activities involving radiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    Activities related to radiation applications have been worldwide target of studies concerning biology, medicine, sociology, psychology and law, since prediction of the possible risks and harms associated with the use of radiation, depends on probabilities not easy to quantify, mainly in the most common low-dose situations. In Brazil, legislation generated in the last forty years did not match evolution of the scientific domains related above. This way, more recent rules not rarely conflict with older regulations, without revoking them. (author)

  11. Application of radiation technology for industry and environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sueo Machi

    1996-01-01

    The world population today is 5.7 billion and increasing by 94 million per year. In order to meet the increasing consumption of food and energy due to the tremendous population growth, unproved technologies which are environmentally friendly, are indispensable. In this context. a number of advanced technologies have been brought about by the LISC of radiation and isotopes. This paper highlights radiation technology, applications in industry, environmental conservation, and agriculture

  12. 12th Quadrennial Congress of the International Association for Radiation Research incorporating the 50th Annual Meeting of Radiation Research Society, RANZCR Radiation Oncology Annual Scientific Meeting and AINSE Radiation Science Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The 12th International Congress of Radiation Research (ICRR2003), for the first time held in the Southern Hemisphere under the auspices of the International Association of Radiation Research (IARR). The Australian affiliate of IARR is the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE). As with recent Congresses, the annual scientific meeting of the Radiation Research Society will be incorporated into the program. The Congress will be further enhanced by the integration of the annual scientific meeting of the Faculty of Radiation Oncology of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists, and the AINSE Radiation Science Conference. An exciting programme was presented with the main threads being radiation oncology, radiation biology, radiation chemistry/physics, radiation protection and the environment. Items in INIS scope have been separately indexed

  13. Radiation degradation and crosslinking of polytetrafluoroethylene and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Guozhong; Wang Mouhua; Tang Zhongfeng

    2009-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is a high-performance engineering plastic and known as a typical material of radiation degradation. PTFE can be degraded by radiation under various conditions and PTFE micro-powder is usually fabricated by a combination of radiation and milling. PTFE can also be crosslinked by irradiation in the melt state (330∼340 degree C). The materials can be applied as a special additive due to its excellent wear resistance. Crosslinked PTFE may also be applied in lithography and fuel cell membrane in the future. In this paper, history and application of PTFE degradation and crosslinking products are reviewed. (authors)

  14. Application of low dose radiation for preservation of sea foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venugopal, V.; Nair, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    Treatment of food with low doses of gamma radiation has been recognized to have two main advantages. These consist of: (1) improvement of food safety by elimination of pathogens and (2) reduction of microbial spoilage and extension of shelf life of perishable items by reducing the number of viable spoilage organisms. Studies during the last few decades have conclusively proved the beneficial effects of radiation with respect to fishery products. The three potential areas of application to fish products include: (i) radurization for shelf life extension (ii) radicidation to eliminate food borne pathogens in the products and (iii) radiation treatment to dried products to control insects

  15. Radiation application for upgrading of bioresources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Keun; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Sang Jae; Chang, Hwa Hyoung; Jang, Yu Sin; Cho, Kyu Seong; Jang, Byung Il; Chung, Hye Young; Lee, Ki Sung; Lee, Yang Han

    2003-04-01

    The recent trends of agriculture in developed countries are to restrict the using of synthetic pesticides. The alternative to the above synthetic pesticide is the development of biological control system against plant pathogenic fungi using antifungal microbes. The antifungal microbes were isolated from various sources in Korea. The mutants of which antifungal activities were improved or disappeared were induced from the above antifungal microbes by radiation. By the 2-DE analysis, the antifugal proteins were identified and the N-terminal amino acid sequences were determined. Two antifungal materials of which molecular weights were 391 Da and 369 Da, respectively, were purified and analysed. From DNA microarray analysis of Bacillus lentimorbus WJ5 and its radiation induced antifungal activity deficient(AF-) mutants, we identified commonly down-regulated genes and selected the srb gene which regained the antifungal activity of WJ5m12 (AF-) mutant. We determined the formulations of biocontrollers to prevent plant pathogenic fungi. The natural plasmid (pWJ5) of B. lentimorbus WJ5 was isolated and sequenced completely. We isolated two biodegradable biopolymer (bioflocculant) producing microbes from soil and formulated to apply wastewater process and to develop bioflocculant-antifungal microbes complex

  16. Application of radiation degraded carbohydrates for plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, T.; Nagasawa, N.; Yoshu, F.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation degraded carbohydrates such as chitosan, sodium alginate, carageenan, cellulose, pectin, etc. were applied for plant cultivation. Chitosan (poly-β -D-glucosamine) was easily degraded by irradiation and induced various kinds of biological activities such as anti-microbacterial activity, promotion of plant growth, suppression of heavy metal stress on plants, phytoalexins induction, etc. Pectic fragments obtained from degraded pectin also induced the phytoalexins such as glyceollins in soybean and pisafin in pea. The irradiated chitosan shows the higher elicitor activity for pisafin than that of pectin. For the plant growth promotion, alginate derived from brown marine algae, chitosan and ligno-cellulosic extracts show a strong activity. The hot water and ethanol extracts from EFB and sugar cane bagasse were increased by irradiation. These extracts promoted the growth of plants and suppressed the damage on barley with salt and Zn stress. The results show that the degraded polysaccharides by radiation have the potential to induce various biological activities and the products can be use for agricultural and medical fields

  17. Radiation application contributing to welfare of the nation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Ryuichi

    2005-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has been widely applied in the fields of industry, agriculture, and medicine. Now, radiation application offers great benefit to people in various ways improve quality of life, such as sterilization of disposable medical equipment, semiconductors, radiographic testing and radial tire in industry, food irradiation, sterile insect technique (SIT), mutation breeding (rice etc.) and radioisotope utilization in agriculture, diagnostic imaging, prostate cancer, FDG-PET, medical equipment, radioisotopes, radio pharmacy and contrast media in medicine. However, the benefit has not been so far estimated economically in Japan. In the present study, the concept of economic scale' was introduced as an economic measure indicating the magnitude of the market created by products manufactured by the utilization of radiation. The total economic scale of radiation application in Japan was evaluated 71b$(billion dollars, 1$=121yen) for the fiscal year of 1997. This quantification of the benefit of radiation applications will greatly contribute to radiation education and risk communication for general public. (author)

  18. Critical Issues in Radiation Protection Knowledge Management for Preserving Radiation Protection Research and Development Capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewji, Shaheen Azim

    2017-02-01

    As a hub of domestic radiation protection capabilities, Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge has a mandate to develop and actuate a formal knowledge management (KM) effort. This KM approach exceeds recruitment and training efforts but focuses on formalized strategies for knowledge transfer from outgoing subject matter experts in radiation protection to incoming generations. It is envisioned that such an effort will provide one avenue for preserving domestic capabilities to support stakeholder needs in the federal government and the nuclear industry while continuing to lead and innovate in research and development on a global scale. However, in the absence of broader coordination within the United States, preservation of radiation protection knowledge continues to be in jeopardy in the absence of a dedicated KM effort.

  19. Critical issues in radiation protection knowledge management for preserving radiation protection research and development capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewji, Shaheen Azim

    2017-01-01

    As a hub of domestic radiation protection capabilities, Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge has a mandate to develop and actuate a formal knowledge management (KM) effort. This KM approach exceeds recruitment and training efforts but focuses on formalized strategies for knowledge transfer from outgoing subject matter experts in radiation protection to incoming generations. It is envisioned that such an effort will provide one avenue for preserving domestic capabilities to support stakeholder needs in the federal government and the nuclear industry while continuing to lead and innovate in research and development on a global scale. Furthermore, in the absence of broader coordination within the United States, preservation of radiation protection knowledge continues to be in jeopardy in the absence of a dedicated KM effort.

  20. Coordinated research project on radiation sterilization and decontamination of pharmaceuticals and pharmaceutical raw materials. CRP report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Radiation processing is a very convenient tool for imparting desirable effects in materials and it has been an area of enormous interest in the last few decades. Radiation processing of synthetic and natural polymers for improving their characteristics is largely used in laboratory and industrial scale. Radiation sterilization is a well developed and established technology for many products. It is especially useful for the treatment of pharmaceuticals due to flexibility of radiation processing to be carried out at any desired temperature, sterilizability of mixed products in kits, offering simultaneous sterilization and modification of polymer based formulations. The success of radiation technology for processing of synthetic and natural polymers and treatment of pharmaceuticals has been based, to a large extent, on empirical knowledge. But now, the applications of natural polymers are being sought in knowledge-demanding areas such as pharmacy and biotechnology. Reliable analytical methods are being developed for controlling of degradation effects of radiation on polymers. Procedures and chemical formulations are being investigated enhancing or preventing degradation effects depending on the desired application of the process. The Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the use of radiation processing for sterilization or decontamination of pharmaceuticals and pharmaceutical raw materials has been completed in 2002. The overall objective of the CRP was to coordinate the research and development programmes carried out in different countries in use of radiation processing for sterilization or decontamination of pharmaceuticals and pharmaceutic raw materials. It has been concluded that in addition to well known advantages of radiation sterilization being a well developed and established technology requiring the control of only one parameter, dose, to achieve sterilization; it is especially useful for the treatment of pharmaceuticals due to flexibility of radiation

  1. Coordinated research project on radiation sterilization and decontamination of pharmaceuticals and pharmaceutical raw materials. CRP report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    Radiation processing is a very convenient tool for imparting desirable effects in materials and it has been an area of enormous interest in the last few decades. Radiation processing of synthetic and natural polymers for improving their characteristics is largely used in laboratory and industrial scale. Radiation sterilization is a well developed and established technology for many products. It is especially useful for the treatment of pharmaceuticals due to flexibility of radiation processing to be carried out at any desired temperature, sterilizability of mixed products in kits, offering simultaneous sterilization and modification of polymer based formulations. The success of radiation technology for processing of synthetic and natural polymers and treatment of pharmaceuticals has been based, to a large extent, on empirical knowledge. But now, the applications of natural polymers are being sought in knowledge-demanding areas such as pharmacy and biotechnology. Reliable analytical methods are being developed for controlling of degradation effects of radiation on polymers. Procedures and chemical formulations are being investigated enhancing or preventing degradation effects depending on the desired application of the process. The Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the use of radiation processing for sterilization or decontamination of pharmaceuticals and pharmaceutical raw materials has been completed in 2002. The overall objective of the CRP was to coordinate the research and development programmes carried out in different countries in use of radiation processing for sterilization or decontamination of pharmaceuticals and pharmaceutic raw materials. It has been concluded that in addition to well known advantages of radiation sterilization being a well developed and established technology requiring the control of only one parameter, dose, to achieve sterilization; it is especially useful for the treatment of pharmaceuticals due to flexibility of radiation

  2. Proceedings of the symposium on 'radiation research in life science'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takaji

    1993-06-01

    This report is the collection of the papers presented at the title symposium on radiation research in life science. The themes included in this report are as follows: (1) cellular aging process, (2) senescence gene and cellular immortalization, (3) molecular mechanism of replicative senescence, (4) programmed cell death during differentiation, (5) thymocyte apoptosis, (6) neuronal death, (7) apoptosis by HIV infection, (8) apoptosis and immunology, (9) radiation induced apoptosis, and so on. Separate abstract was prepared for 1 of the papers in this report. The remaining 10 papers were considered outside the subject scope of INIS. (J.P.N.)

  3. Occupational exposures in industrial application of radiation during 1999-2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanaye, S.S.; Baburajan, Sujatha; Pawar, S.G.; Nalawade, S.K.; Sapra, B.K.

    2012-01-01

    Application of radiation in industry, medicine and research sector has increase significantly over the years. In industry main applications are industrial radiography, industrial fluoroscopy, radiation processing, luminizing, nucleonic gauges. Since the strength of the source used is generally high compared to other applications as well as the operating conditions prevailing during the exposure, radiological protection plays important role in this sector. Analysis of dose data, available with National Occupational Dose Registry of RPAD, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, provides some insight into trends in occupational exposures received by industrial radiation workers. This helps in providing information on adequateness of radiation protection practices followed in the industry. This paper presents the trends in occupational exposure received by radiation workers in the industry during past 10 years (1999 to 2008). It is observed that there is a gradual increase in the occupational radiation workers during the period. The number of persons monitored as well as exposed is highest in industrial radiography compared to other sub-categories. Major contribution to collective dose is also from industrial radiography. The highest annual average as well as exposed average doses are contributed by industrial radiography. The monitored persons receiving dose d 5 mSv is 96.9% industry

  4. Radiation related basic cancer research : research for radiation induced tumor cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Hong, Seok Il; Cho, Kyung Ja; Kim, Byung Gi; Lee, Kee Ho; Nam, Myung Jin

    1999-04-01

    The radioresistant clones was established from human U251 glioblastoma cell line through intermittently exposed to 3 Gy gamma-radiation for six months. Treatment of SNU-16 cells with various doses of radiation, TNF alpha and PMA resulted in a decrease in cell viability. The results prove that cell death of SNU16 is a apoptosis mediated by caspase-3. We have examined the expression of bcl-2 and c-myc in cervical cancer specimens and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) to determine the role of coexpression of bcl-3 and c-myc during progression into cervical cancer. The frequent alterations in FHIT expression in many cervical carcinomas and their cell lines suggest that FHIT gene alterations are pla a role in cervical tumorigenesis. According to these correlation between the viability and apoptosis of RD cells, the proper range of the dosage for the investigation of differentiation potency in RD cells was assessed as 1 to 3Gy

  5. Radiation related basic cancer research : research for radiation induced tumor cell killing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Hong, Seok Il; Cho, Kyung Ja; Kim, Byung Gi; Lee, Kee Ho; Nam, Myung Jin

    1999-04-01

    The radioresistant clones was established from human U251 glioblastoma cell line through intermittently exposed to 3 Gy gamma-radiation for six months. Treatment of SNU-16 cells with various doses of radiation, TNF alpha and PMA resulted in a decrease in cell viability. The results prove that cell death of SNU16 is a apoptosis mediated by caspase-3. We have examined the expression of bcl-2 and c-myc in cervical cancer specimens and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) to determine the role of coexpression of bcl-3 and c-myc during progression into cervical cancer. The frequent alterations in FHIT expression in many cervical carcinomas and their cell lines suggest that FHIT gene alterations are pla a role in cervical tumorigenesis. According to these correlation between the viability and apoptosis of RD cells, the proper range of the dosage for the investigation of differentiation potency in RD cells was assessed as 1 to 3Gy.

  6. The research of nuclear experiment radiation environment wireless alarm device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoqiong; Wang Pan; Fang Fang

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces based on monolithic integrated circuit's nuclear experiment radiation environment wireless alarm device's software and hardware design. The system by G-M tube, high-pressured module, signal conditioning circuit, power source module, monolithic integrated circuit and wireless transmission module is composed. The device has low power consumption, high performance, high accuracy detection, easy maintenance, small size, simple operation, and other features, and has a broad application prospects. (authors)

  7. Polymer research at synchrotron radiation sources: symposium proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, T.P.; Goland, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    The twenty-two papers are arranged into eleven sessions entitled: general overviews; time-resolved x-ray scattering; studies using fluorescence, ion-containing polymers; time-resolved x-ray scattering; novel applications of synchrotron radiation; phase transitions in polymers; x-ray diffraction on polymers; recent detector advances; complementary light, x-ray and neutron studies; and neutron scattering studies. Seven of the papers are processed separately; three of the remainder have been previously processed

  8. Polymer research at synchrotron radiation sources: symposium proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, T.P.; Goland, A.N. (eds.)

    1985-01-01

    The twenty-two papers are arranged into eleven sessions entitled: general overviews; time-resolved x-ray scattering; studies using fluorescence, ion-containing polymers; time-resolved x-ray scattering; novel applications of synchrotron radiation; phase transitions in polymers; x-ray diffraction on polymers; recent detector advances; complementary light, x-ray and neutron studies; and neutron scattering studies. Seven of the papers are processed separately; three of the remainder have been previously processed. (DLC)

  9. Radiation-polymerisable paint and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassata, J.C.; Dickie, R.A.

    1974-01-01

    A paint polymerisable under the effect of a radiation is presented. The main components, excluding non-polymerisable solvent, pigment, initiator and particle charge, are as follows: about 90 to 10 parts of a saturated thermoplastic vinyl polymer of average molecular mass around 2000 to 250,000, prepared from monofunctional vinyl monomers to the extent of at least 85% by weight; about 10 to 90 parts of vinyl monomer solvent for the polymer, up to 90% by weight of the solvent consisting of monovinyl monomers and the remainder being chosen amongst divinyl, trivinyl, tetravinyl monomers and their mixtures. The average molecular weight of the thermoplastic vinyl polymer has between 5000 and 50,000 [fr

  10. Azelastine. Its clinical application for radiation dermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusawa, Mitsuhiro; Baba, Yuji; Murakami, Ryuji

    1996-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed to investigate the radioprotective effects of azelastine against radiation dermatitis for patients with head and neck cancers. The effects of azelastine were studied in 19 patients with laryngeal cancers treated by irradiation. As controls, 29 patients with laryngeal cancers treated by irradiation without the administration of azelastine were studied. All patients were irradiated using 3 MV linac X-rays. Azelastine was administered orally twice a day. Moist desquamation was observed in four of 29 control patients whereas no such moist desquamation developed after the administration of azelastine. Two cases of moist desquamation that developed before the administration of azelastine regressed during irradiation in patients placed on azelastine. Radiotherapy was completed without interruption in all patients treated with azelastine. No severe side effects were observed. Azelastine, administered orally, was a safe drug and has the potential of improving skin tolerance in irradiation therapy. (author)

  11. Applications of Indus-1 synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandedkar, R.V.

    2003-01-01

    Indus-1 is a 450 MeV electron storage ring. This is a soft X-ray and Vacuum Ultra Violet radiation source with the critical wavelength being 61 A. In this source, the first beam was stored in mid-1999 and was then made available, after initial storage and beam cleaning of the vacuum components, for beamline installation in the early 2000. Two beamlines are commissioned and are working. Other beamlines are in the advanced stage of commissioning. For Indus-1, the injection system consists of a 20 MeV classical microtron as a preinjector and a booster synchrotron that can go up to 700 MeV. For Indus-1, the injection into the storage ring is at full 450 MeV from this booster synchrotron

  12. Silicon radiation detectors: materials and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, J.T.; Haller, E.E.

    1982-10-01

    Silicon nuclear radiation detectors are available today in a large variety of sizes and types. This profusion has been made possible by the ever increasing quality and diameter silicon single crystals, new processing technologies and techniques, and innovative detector design. The salient characteristics of the four basic detector groups, diffused junction, ion implanted, surface barrier, and lithium drift are reviewed along with the silicon crystal requirements. Results of crystal imperfections detected by lithium ion compensation are presented. Processing technologies and techniques are described. Two recent novel position-sensitive detector designs are discussed - one in high-energy particle track reconstruction and the other in x-ray angiography. The unique experimental results obtained with these devices are presented

  13. TOMS as a monitor of the ultraviolet radiation environment: applications to photobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederick, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    The flux of biologically relevant ultraviolet radiation that reaches the surface of the Earth varies with the ozone amount, surface reflectivity, and cloudcover. The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) provides information relevant to all three items. A recent application of satellite-based ozone measurements has been to develop climatologies of the biologically significant UV-B radiation reaching the Earth's surface. A growing body of research suggests that UV-B radiation tends to suppress the immune system of laboratory mice. At tropical latitudes, it is likely that parasitical diseases develop most readily in people who have experienced immune system suppression from UV-B exposure. The computed distribution of surface radiation combined with information on disease incidence may clarify the role of UV-B as a suppressor of the human immune system. TOMS used in conjunction with radiative transfer calculations can provide information of relevance in photobiology

  14. Machine learning in radiation oncology theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    El Naqa, Issam; Murphy, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    ​This book provides a complete overview of the role of machine learning in radiation oncology and medical physics, covering basic theory, methods, and a variety of applications in medical physics and radiotherapy. An introductory section explains machine learning, reviews supervised and unsupervised learning methods, discusses performance evaluation, and summarizes potential applications in radiation oncology. Detailed individual sections are then devoted to the use of machine learning in quality assurance; computer-aided detection, including treatment planning and contouring; image-guided rad

  15. Toward a nomenclature and dosimetric scheme applicable to all radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rupert, C S; Latarjet, R [Texas Univ., Dallas (USA)

    1978-07-01

    An informal Joint Working Group on Radiation Quantities, consisting of representatives of the ICRU and other international organizations was initiated at the International Congress of Radiation Research in 1974. The conclusions of a meeting of the Group held in 1975 are summarised. Quantities are proposed to describe any type of radiation field in terms of the total amount of energy carried by the radiation and its distribution with respect to time, area, volume and solid angle, expressed in terms of either radiant energy (joules) or number of particles. If this general approach is agreed to by the parent organizations and others the Group will go on to recommend quantities to represent the interactions of fields with matter and to provide a dosimetric scheme usable with all types of radiation.

  16. High-energy radiation and polymers: A review of commercial processes and emerging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clough, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has been found to be widely applicable in modifying the structure and properties of polymers, and can be used to tailor the performance of either bulk materials or surfaces. Fifty years of research in polymer radiation chemistry has led to numerous applications of commercial and economic importance, and work remains active in the application of radiation to practical uses involving polymeric materials. This paper provides a survey of radiation-processing methods of industrial interest, ranging from technologies already commercially well established, through innovations in the active R and D stage which show exceptional promise for future commercial use. Radiation-processing technologies are discussed under the following categories: cross-linking of plastics and rubbers, curing of coatings and inks, heat-shrink products, fiber-matrix composites, chain-scission for processing control, surface modification, grafting, hydrogels, sterilization, natural product enhancement, plastics recycling, ceramic precursors, electronic property materials, ion-track membranes and lithography for microdevice production. In addition to new technological innovations utilizing conventional gamma and e-beam sources, a number of promising new applications make use of novel radiation types which include ion beams (heavy ions, light ions, highly focused microscopic beams and high-intensity pulses), soft X-rays which are focused, coherent X-rays (from a synchrotron) and e-beams which undergo scattering to generate patterns

  17. Research Operator Protection Optimization by the Education and Training on Radiation Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateos, J. C.; Avalos, J.; Garcia-Leon, M.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Gomez-Puerto, A.; Gomez, M.; Herrador, M.; Lejeune, J.; Luis-Simon, J.; Marquez, A.; Maranon, J.; Respaldiza, M. A.; Sanchez-Angulo, C.; Sanchez-Doblado, F.; Sarmiento, J. M.

    2004-07-01

    One of the best ways of protection to operators in any radiation practice is to provide him/her with an adequate level of education and training in radiation protection. There are many international references where this fact is pointed out and particularly it is recognized the importance of the introduction of radiation protection courses previously to their work with ionising radiation. The University of Sevilla (Spain) through its Radioisotope Service has been organizing biannually since 1995 Training Courses for Supervisors and Operators of Radioactive Installations for university investigators that use radioactive sources or radiation equipment. The courses are imparted by teachers from the university radioactive installations, hospital physicist specialists from medical physics services and medical doctors from prevention labour health service; all of them are the authors of this communication. The students are postgraduate students or teachers that need operate with ionising radiation in their research laboratories. Up to date, it has been organized 4 courses series with an average of 30 students per course. These courses are homologated by the Nuclear Security Council and let the student obtain the licence for Supervisors or Operators of Radioactive Installations in each of the following applications fields: a) Laboratories with Non-Encapsulated Sources. This application includes research activities in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Medicine and Pharmacy. b) Radiation Generator Equipment. This last one includes equipment such as X-Rays apparatus for diffraction studies in physics, chemistry and art sciences, or Particle Accelerator for atomic physics research in the National Accelerator Centre. The practical sessions of the courses are imparted in the radioactive installations of the Seville university. In this study it is described the details of the organization of the courses. (Author)

  18. Research Operator Protection Optimization by the Education and Training on Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateos, J. C.; Avalos, J.; Garcia-Leon, M.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Gomez-Puerto, A.; Gomez, M.; Herrador, M.; Lejeune, J.; Luis-Simon, J.; Marquez, A.; Maranon, J.; Respaldiza, M. A.; Sanchez-Angulo, C.; Sanchez-Doblado, F.; Sarmiento, J. M.

    2004-01-01

    One of the best ways of protection to operators in any radiation practice is to provide him/her with an adequate level of education and training in radiation protection. There are many international references where this fact is pointed out and particularly it is recognized the importance of the introduction of radiation protection courses previously to their work with ionising radiation. The University of Sevilla (Spain) through its Radioisotope Service has been organizing biannually since 1995 Training Courses for Supervisors and Operators of Radioactive Installations for university investigators that use radioactive sources or radiation equipment. The courses are imparted by teachers from the university radioactive installations, hospital physicist specialists from medical physics services and medical doctors from prevention labour health service; all of them are the authors of this communication. The students are postgraduate students or teachers that need operate with ionising radiation in their research laboratories. Up to date, it has been organized 4 courses series with an average of 30 students per course. These courses are homologated by the Nuclear Security Council and let the student obtain the licence for Supervisors or Operators of Radioactive Installations in each of the following applications fields: a) Laboratories with Non-Encapsulated Sources. This application includes research activities in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Medicine and Pharmacy. b) Radiation Generator Equipment. This last one includes equipment such as X-Rays apparatus for diffraction studies in physics, chemistry and art sciences, or Particle Accelerator for atomic physics research in the National Accelerator Centre. The practical sessions of the courses are imparted in the radioactive installations of the Seville university. In this study it is described the details of the organization of the courses. (Author)

  19. Prospect for application of umbilical cord blood to clinical treatment of radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Tingzhen; Ke Xiaoyan

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To look forward to the prospect for application of umbilical cord blood to clinical treatment of radiation sickness by analyzing the results using umbilical cord blood in laboratory experiments and clinical research. Method: The data on umbilical cord blood published in literature are reviewed. Results: The umbilical blood is rich in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, low in immunological activity of lymphocytes, expanded significantly ex vivo under selected culture condition readily available and collected easily. Conclusion: With the above advantages, the prospect for application of umbilical cord blood is encouraging, particularly in the clinical treatment of radiation sickness

  20. Radiation research and therapy in context of Agenda 21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michailov, M.Ch.; Neu, E.; Seidenbusch, W.; Weiss, D.G.; Zoepfl, H.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: An evaluation of scientific contribution concerning modern oncotherapies and basic research in context of Agenda 21 of UN is given, which demands better education, health and research. Conferences about intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) were held in Munich 1992, Lyon 1994, San Francisco 1996, Pamplona 1998, Boston 2000, Aachen 2002. Large discrepancies are evident in the oncological research (IORT, TT, PT) including basic disciplines (biophysics, physiology, radiation) between industrial and developing countries. A global realization of Agenda 21 could be essentially supported via foundation of international institutions (universities, hospitals for radiology, etc.) in all countries. Information: ICSD POB 340316, 80100 Muenchen, Germany