WorldWideScience

Sample records for radiated fields laboratory

  1. Accreditation of laboratories in the field of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galjanic, S.; Franic, Z.

    2005-01-01

    This paper gives a review of requirements and procedures for the accreditation of test and calibration laboratories in the field of radiation protection, paying particular attention to Croatia. General requirements to be met by a testing or calibration laboratory to be accredited are described in the standard HRN EN ISO/IEC 17025, General requirements for the competence of testing and calibration laboratories. The quality of a radiation protection programme can only be as good as the quality of the measurements made to support it. Measurement quality can be assured by participation in measurement assurance programmes that evaluate the appropriateness of procedures, facilities, and equipment and include periodic checks to assure adequate performance. These also include internal consistency checks, proficiency tests, intercomparisons and site visits by technical experts to review operations. In Croatia, laboratories are yet to be accredited in the field of radiation protection. However, harmonisation of technical legislation with the EU legal system will require some changes in laws and regulations in the field of radiation protection, including the ones dealing with the notification of testing laboratories and connected procedures. Regarding the notification procedures for testing laboratories in Croatia, in the regulated area, the existing accreditation infrastructure, i.e. Croatian Accreditation Agency is ready for its implementation, as it has already established and further developed a consistent accreditation system, compatible with international requirements and procedures.(author)

  2. Experiences in Accreditation of Laboratories in the Field of Radiation Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franic, Z.; Galjanic, S.; Krizanec, D.

    2011-01-01

    Efficient interaction of technical legislation, metrology, standardization and accreditation within the system of quality infrastructure is precondition for assurance of safety of goods and services as well as protection of humans and environment. In the paper importance of quality infrastructure on national and international levels is presented while special interest is paid to accreditation. Current situation regarding the accreditation of laboratories in the field of radiation science is presented. Regarding this field, in Croatia three laboratories are accredited by Croatian Accreditation Agency: 1. Laboratory for Radioecology, Rudjer Boskovic Institute (Scope: Measurement of radionuclide content in environmental samples and commodities - Including foodstuffs and drinking water) 2. EKOTEH Dozimetrija Ltd., Department for Radiation Protection (Scope: Testing in the scope of ionizing and nonionizing radiation) 3. Radiation Protection Unit, Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health (Scope: Determination of radioactivity). (author)

  3. NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a NASA funded facility, delivering heavy ion beams to a target area where scientists...

  4. Influence of ambient meteorology on the accuracy of radiation measurements: insights from field and laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Sandro M.; Pietsch, Helga; Baumgartner, Dietmar J.; Rieder, Harald E.

    2016-04-01

    A precise knowledge of the surface energy budget, which includes the solar and terrestrial radiation fluxes, is needed to accurately characterize the global energy balance which is largely determining Earth's climate. To this aim national and global monitoring networks for surface radiative fluxes have been established in recent decades. The most prominent among these networks is the so-called Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) operating under the auspices of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) (Ohmura et al., 1998). National monitoring networks such as the Austrian RADiation Monitoring Network (ARAD), which has been established in 2010 by a consortium of the Central Agency of Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG), the University of Graz, the University of Innsbruck, and the University of Natural Resources and Applied Sciences, Vienna (BOKU), orient themselves on BSRN standards (McArthur, 2005). ARAD comprises to date five sites (Wien Hohe Warte, Graz/University, Innsbruck/University, Kanzelhöhe Observatory and Sonnblick (which is also a BSRN site)) and aims to provide long-term monitoring of radiation budget components at highest accuracy and to capture the spatial patterns of radiation climate in Austria (Olefs et al., 2015). Given the accuracy requirement for the local monitoring of radiative fluxes instrument offsets, triggered by meteorological factors and/or instrumentation, pose a major challenge in radiation monitoring. Within this study we investigate effects of ambient meteorology on the accuracy of radiation measurements performed with pyranometers contained in various heating/ventilation systems (HV-systems), all of which used in regular operation within the ARAD network. We focus particularly on instrument offsets observed following precipitation events. To quantify pyranometer responses to precipitation we performed a series of controlled laboratory experiments as well as targeted field campaigns in 2015 and 2016. Our results indicate

  5. Characterization of the radiation field of a 137Cs source in a calibration laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, E.F.; Freitas, C.; Freire, D.; Almeida, C.E.

    2001-01-01

    Due to the broad range of radiation levels found in practice, the calibration of radiation detector requires that the laboratory have a large range of values of air kerma rates for a reference distance to the source, in order to allow the calibration of all scales. The dosimetry performed for open beam and with the different attenuators has shown deviations smaller than 5% in relation to the data supplied by the manufacturer that is acceptable. These results are in accordance with the recommendations of the ISO/DIS 4037-2

  6. Radiation detectors laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez J, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    The National Institute for Nuclear Research has established a Radiation detector laboratory that has the possibility of providing to the consultants on the handling and applications of the nuclear radiation detectors. It has special equipment to repair the radiation detectors used in spectroscopy as the hyper pure Germanium for gamma radiation and the Lithium-silica for X-rays. There are different facilities in the laboratory that can become useful for other institutions that use radiation detectors. This laboratory was created to satisfy consultant services, training and repairing of the radiation detectors both in national and regional levels for Latin America. The laboratory has the following sections: Nuclear Electronic Instrumentation; where there are all kind of instruments for the measurement and characterization of detectors like multichannel analyzers of pulse height, personal computers, amplifiers and nuclear pulse preamplifiers, nuclear pulses generator, aleatories, computer programs for radiation spectra analysis, etc. High vacuum; there is a vacuum escape measurer, two high vacuum pumps to restore the vacuum of detectors, so the corresponding measurers and the necessary tools. Detectors cleaning; there is an anaerobic chamber for the detectors handling at inert atmosphere, a smoke extraction bell for cleaning with the detector solvents. Cryogenic; there are vessels and tools for handling liquid nitrogen which is used for cooling the detectors when they required it. (Author)

  7. Radiation detectors laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez J, F.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation detectors laboratory was established with the assistance of the International Atomic Energy Agency which gave this the responsibility to provide its services at National and regional level for Latin America and it is located at the ININ. The more expensive and delicate radiation detectors are those made of semiconductor, so it has been put emphasis in the use and repairing of these detectors type. The supplied services by this laboratory are: selection consultant, detectors installation and handling and associated systems. Installation training, preventive and corrective maintenance of detectors and detection systems calibration. (Author)

  8. Radiation carcinogenesis, laboratory studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shellabarger, C.J.

    1974-01-01

    Laboratory studies on radioinduced carcinogenesis are reviewed. Some topics discussed are: radioinduced neoplasia in relation to life shortening; dose-response relationships; induction of skin tumors in rats by alpha particles and electrons; effects of hormones on tumor response; effects of low LET radiations delivered at low dose-rates; effects of fractionated neutron radiation; interaction of RBE and dose rate effects; and estimates of risks for humans from animal data. (U.S.)

  9. Laboratory operation during radiation emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunata, M.; Prouza, Z.; Tecl, J.

    2009-01-01

    During radiation emergency, a special operation mode of laboratories of the Radiation Monitoring Network (hereinafter RMN) is expected. The principal factors differing the emergency mode from the normal one are the following: - significantly higher amount of analyzed samples; - high activities of the majority of the samples; - higher risk of personal and equipment contamination; - higher working and psychological demands on laboratory staff. The assuring of the radiation protection requirements of laboratory staff has to be the primary objective, nevertheless the risk of equipment contamination and of samples cross- contamination of course have to be as well taken into consideration. The presentation describes the experience of the RMN Central Laboratory of the National Radiation Protection Institute in Prague (SURO) which was obtained during realization of field tests, in which a radioactive matter was released. These tests allow us to evaluate the source term or radioactivity dispersal balance based on various detection methods with the aim to estimate exposure of the afflicted persons. Tests provided to simulate emergency working conditions in Central Laboratory - high number of contaminated samples, which have to be analyzed in a short time (short half-time of used radionuclide 99m Tc) using sophisticated laboratory techniques (gamma spectrometers, aerosols collectors, etc.). The testing shows the availability of the SURO laboratory to work during the radiation emergency and to participate on its determination. The suitable settings and the ideal number of staff have been found. The average analysis time was approximately 1 minute per sample and the sample results were available just a few minutes after the counting. Moreover, the settings avoided any danger and kept both the crew and the samples safe and secure from contamination. (authors)

  10. Laboratory operation during radiation emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunata, M.; Tecl, J.; Prouza, Z.

    2008-01-01

    During radiation emergency, a special operation mode of laboratories of the Radiation Monitoring Network (hereinafter RMN) is expected. The principal factors differing the emergency mode from the normal one are the following: - significantly higher amount of analyzed samples; - high activities of the majority of the samples; - higher risk of personal and equipment contamination; - higher working and psychological demands on laboratory staff. The assuring of the radiation protection requirements of laboratory staff has to be the primary objective, nevertheless the risk of equipment contamination and of samples cross- contamination of course have to be as well taken into consideration. The presentation describes the experience of the RMN Central Laboratory of the National Radiation Protection Institute in Prague (SURO) which was obtained during realization of field tests, in which a radioactive matter was released. These tests allow us to evaluate the source term or radioactivity dispersal balance based on various detection methods with the aim to estimate exposure of the afflicted persons. Tests provided to simulate emergency working conditions in Central Laboratory -high number of contaminated samples, which have to be analyzed in a short time (short half-time of used radionuclide 99m Tc) using sophisticated laboratory techniques (gamma spectrometers, aerosols collectors, etc.). The testing shows the availability of the SURO laboratory to work during the radiation emergency and to participate on its determination. The suitable settings and the ideal number of staff have been found. The average analysis time was approximately 1 minute per sample and the sample results were available just a few minutes after the counting. Moreover, the settings avoided any danger and kept both the crew and the samples safe and secure from contamination. (authors)

  11. Virtual laboratory for radiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiftikci, A.; Kocar, C.; Tombakoglu, M.

    2009-01-01

    Simulation of alpha, beta and gamma radiation detection and measurement experiments which are part of real nuclear physics laboratory courses was realized with Monte Carlo method and JAVA Programming Language. As being known, establishing this type of laboratories are very expensive. At the same time, highly radioactive sources used in some experiments carries risk for students and also for experimentalists. By taking into consideration of those problems, the aim of this study is to setup a virtual radiation laboratory with minimum cost and to speed up the training of radiation physics for students with no radiation risk. Software coded possesses the nature of radiation and radiation transport with the help of Monte Carlo method. In this software, experimental parameters can be changed manually by the user and experimental results can be followed synchronous in an MCA (Multi Channel Analyzer) or an SCA (Single Channel Analyzer). Results obtained in experiments can be analyzed by these MCA or SCA panels. Virtual radiation laboratory which is developed in this study with reliable results and unlimited experimentation capability seems as an useful educational material. Moreover, new type of experiments can be integrated to this software easily and as a result, virtual laboratory can be extended.

  12. Laboratory-field experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, N.R.

    1981-01-01

    A discussion is given about Eberline Corporation's participation in decontamination projects, problems encountered, and solutions to these problems. Over a 30-year period Eberline has established a reputation for radiation protection services and instrumentation. The production of instruments began in 1952, and Eberline has provided radiochemistry, dosimetry, and environmental monitoring services since 1960

  13. Intercomparison exercise on external gamma dose rate under field conditions at the laboratory of natural radiation (Saelices el Chico, Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez-Villanueva, J. L.; Sainz-Fernandez, C.; Fuente-Merino, I.; Saez-Vergara, J. C.; Correa-Garce, E.; Quindos-Poncela, L. S.

    2013-01-01

    The last nuclear accident in Fukushima nuclear power plant has increased the necessity for measuring radiation in the environment. Therefore, radiation monitors providing results traceable throughout the country become essential and it is very important to test them under the same environmental conditions. The first intercomparison of natural radioactivity under field conditions was held in Saelices el Chico (Salamanca, Spain) in May 2011, including an exercise on environmental dose rate. This article presents the results achieved by 19 instruments belonging to 12 institutions from 7 different countries. The tested detectors are proportional counters, ionisation chambers, Geiger-Mueller and scintillators measuring dose rate in three stations with reference values from 110 to 1800 nGy h -1 All the results were given in terms of air kerma (nGy h -1 ) and the measurements show agreement within 25 % in all the sites. Evaluation criteria based on accuracy and statistical uncertainty were also carried out and 25 % of participants passed the test in all sites. (authors)

  14. LAWRENCE RADIATION LABORATORY COUNTING HANDBOOK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Group, Nuclear Instrumentation

    1966-10-01

    The Counting Handbook is a compilation of operational techniques and performance specifications on counting equipment in use at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Berkeley. Counting notes have been written from the viewpoint of the user rather than that of the designer or maintenance man. The only maintenance instructions that have been included are those that can easily be performed by the experimenter to assure that the equipment is operating properly.

  15. Workplace photon radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, P.H.; Bartlett, D.T.; Ambrosi, P.

    1999-01-01

    The knowledge of workplace radiation fields is essential for measures in radiation protection. Information about the energy and directional distribution of the incident photon radiation was obtained by several devices developed by the National Radiation Protection Board, United Kingdom, by the Statens Stralskyddsinstitut, Sweden, together with EURADOS and by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany. The devices are described and some results obtained at workplaces in nuclear industry, medicine and science in the photon energy range from 20 keV to 7 MeV are given. (author)

  16. Effects of the Gamma radiation on laboratory and field attractiveness of virgin females of the carob moth Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouda Mediouni, B.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the effects of Gamma radiation on the attractiveness of the virgin females of the carob moth, Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller, under laboratory and field conditions. Four Gamma radiation doses (200, 300, 400, 500 Gy) in addition to the control were studied. We examined also the effects of the age of irradiated females on their attractiveness; in particular, females 24, 48 and 72 hours old were studied. Laboratory studies showed that females' attractiveness decreased with increasing irradiation dose. At 500 Gray, 32 males were caught per week per trap against 97 males per week/trap for the control. For the doses 200, 300 and 400 Gray, the mean number of males per trap per week was 52, 51 and 50 respectively. On the other hand, for 24 hours old virgin females, the weekly mean number of caught males per trap was 63 while for 48 and 72 old females, the mean number of caught males per trap per week was 54 and 50 respectively. For field studies, results showed that irradiated females were able to attract wild males. Moreover, their attractiveness was better than the synthetic lure.

  17. Research Laboratory of Mixed Radiation Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Two main topics of the research work in the Laboratory of Mixed Radiation Dosimetry in 2001 were: development of recombination methods for dosimetry of mixed radiation fields and maintenance and development of unique in Poland reference neutron fields. Additionally research project on internal dosimetry were carried out in collaboration with Division of Radiation Protection Service. RECOMBINATION METHODS Recombination methods make use of the fact that the initial recombination of ions in the gas cavity of the ionization chamber depends on local ionization density. The later can be related to linear energy transfer (LET) and provides information on radiation quality of the investigated radiation fields. Another key feature of the initial recombination is that it does not depend of dose rate. Conditions of initial (local) recombination can be achieved in specially designed high pressure tissue-equivalent ionization chambers, called the recombination chambers. They are usually parallel-plate ionization chambers filled with a tissue-equivalent gas mixture under a pressure of order 1 MPa. The spacing between electrodes is of order of millimeters. At larger spacing, the volume recombination limits the maximum dose rate at which the chamber can be properly operated. The output of the chamber is the ionization current (or collected charge) as a function of collecting voltage. All the recombination methods require the measurement of the ionization current (or charge) at least at two values of the collecting voltage applied to the chamber. The highest voltage should provide the conditions close to saturation (but below discharge or multiplication). The ionization current measured at maximum applied voltage is proportional to the absorbed dose, D, (some small corrections for lack of saturation can be introduced when needed). Measurements at other voltages are needed for the determination of radiation quality. The total dose equivalent in a mixed radiation field is

  18. Food chain effects of sublethal ultraviolet radiation on subarctic .i.Daphnia pulex./i. - a field and laboratory study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zellmer, I.D.; Arts, M.T.; Šustr, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 167, 1-4 (2006), s. 515-531 ISSN 0003-9136 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6066911 Keywords : UV radiation * Daphnia * enzymes Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.362, year: 2006

  19. ITRAP - International laboratory and field test site exercise for radiation detection instruments and monitoring systems at border crossings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, P.; Schmitzer, C.; Duftschmid, K.E.; Arlt, R.

    2001-01-01

    Illicit trafficking in nuclear materials has become more and more a problem, due to the circulation of a high number of radioactive sources and the big amount of nuclear material. The IAEA database counts at present more than 300 verified cases. The endangering cased thereby ranges from possible health defect for the publication to terrorists activities and production of nuclear weapons. In addition to the primary criminal reasons the illegal disposal of radioactive sources as salvage, scrap and others show a further problem, which has lead to severe accidents and lethal effects in the past (e.g. Goiana, Mexico). Some countries have already under taken countermeasures (e.g. Monitoring at the Finnish-Russian and German- Polish border, border monitoring in Italy). The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has reacted on this actual problem by setting up a new program to fight against nuclear criminality and has suggested a pilot study for the practical test of border monitoring systems. Co-ordinated by the Federal Ministry of Economy and Labour the Austrian Government financed the pilot study ITRAP (Illicit Trafficking Radiation Detection Assessment Program) carried out by the Austrian Research Centers Seibersdorf (ARCS). Aim of the study was to work out the technical requirements and the practicability of an useful monitoring system at border crossings. The results of the study will be offered by the IAEA to the member states as international recommendations for border monitoring systems

  20. Radiation safety requirements for radionuclide laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In accordance with the section 26 of the Finnish Radiation Act (592/91) the safety requirements to be taken into account in planning laboratories and other premises, which affect safety in the use of radioactive materials, are confirmed by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety. The guide specifies the requirements for laboratories and storage rooms in which radioactive materials are used or stored as unsealed sources. There are also some general instructions concerning work procedures in a radionuclide laboratory

  1. Evaluate existing radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldrich, J.M.; Haggard, D.L.; Endres, G.W.R.; Fix, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    Knowledge of the spectrum of energies for beta, gamma, and neutron radiation experienced in the field is crucial to the proper interpretation of personnel dose. Calibration sources and techniques are determined on the basis of their relationship to field exposure. Selected techniques were used to obtain neutron, photon, and beta energy spectra data at several Hanford locations. Four neutron energy spectra and dose measurement methods were used: (1) multisphere spectrometer system; (2) tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC); (3) RASCAL (9'' to 3'' sphere ratios); and (4) helium-3 neutron spectrometer. Gamma spectroscopy was done using standard techniques. A specially designed TLD dosimeter was used to obtain beta spectrum measurements. The design and use of each of these instruments is described in the body of this report. Data collected and analyzed for each of the Hanford locations are included

  2. Conception of CTMSP ionizing radiation calibration laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Raimundo Dias da; Kibrit, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    The present paper describes the implantation process of an ionizing radiation calibration laboratory in a preexistent installation in CTMSP (bunker) approved by CNEN to operate with gamma-ray for non destructive testing. This laboratory will extend and improve the current metrological capacity for the attendance to the increasing demand for services of calibration of ionizing radiation measuring instruments. Statutory and regulatory requirements for the licensing of the installation are presented and deeply reviewed. (author)

  3. National Laboratory of Synchrotron Radiation: technologic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C.E.T.G. da; Rodrigues, A.R.D.

    1987-01-01

    The technological or industrial developments based on the accumulated experience by research group of condensed matter physics, in Brazil, are described. The potential of a National Laboratory of Synchrotron Radiation for personnel training, absorption and adaptation of economically important technologies for Brazil, is presented. Examples of cooperations between the Laboratory and some national interprises, and some industrial applications of the synchrotron radiation are done. (M.C.K.) [pt

  4. Standards in radiation protection at the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czap, L.; Pernicka, F.; Matscheko, G.; Andreo, P.

    1999-01-01

    Approximately 90% of the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs) provide users with calibrations of radiation protection instruments, and the Agency is making every necessary effort to insure that SSDLs measurements in radiation protection are traceable to Primary Standards. The IAEA provides traceable calibrations of ionization chambers in terms of air kerma at radiation protection levels and ambient dose equivalent calibrations. SSDLs are encouraged to use the calibrations available from the Agency to provide traceability for their radiation protection measurements. Measurements on diagnostic X ray generators have become increasingly important in radiation protection and some SSDLs are involved in such measurements. The IAEA has proper radiation sources available to provide traceable calibrations to the SSDLs in this field, including an X ray unit specifically for mammography dedicated to standardization procedures. The different photon beam qualities and calibration procedures available in the Agency's Dosimetry Laboratory will be described. (author)

  5. Radiation hydrodynamics in the laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    This report contains a collection of five preprints devoted to the subject of laser induced phenomena of radiation hydrodynamics. These preprints cover approximately the contents of the presentations made by the MPQ experimental laser-plasma group at the 17th European Conference on Laser Interaction with Matter (ECLIM), Rome, November 18-22, 1985. (orig.)

  6. National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Pulsed Field Program is located in Northern New Mexico at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The user program is designed to provide researchers with a balance of...

  7. Thirty-sixth Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture on radiation protection and measurements--from the field to the laboratory and back: the what ifs, wows, and who cares of radiation biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Antone L

    2013-11-01

    My scientific journey started at the University of Utah chasing fallout. It was on everything, in everything, and was distributed throughout the ecosystem. This resulted in radiation doses to humans and caused me great concern. From this concern I asked the question, "Are there health effects from these radiation doses and levels of radioactive contamination?" I have invested my scientific career trying to address this basic question. While conducting research, I got acquainted with many of the What ifs of radiation biology. The major What if in my research was, "What if we have underestimated the radiation risk for internally-deposited radioactive material?" While conducting research to address this important question, many other What ifs came up related to dose, dose rate, and dose distribution. I also encountered a large number of Wows. One of the first was when I went from conducting environmental fallout studies to research in a controlled laboratory. The activity in fallout was expressed as pCi L⁻¹, whereas it was necessary to inject laboratory animals with μCi g⁻¹ body weight to induce measurable biological changes, chromosome aberrations, and cancer. Wow! That is seven to nine orders of magnitude above the activity levels found in the environment. Other Wows have made it necessary for the field of radiation biology to make important paradigm shifts. For example, one shift involved changing from "hit theory" to total tissue responses as the result of bystander effects. Finally, Who cares? While working at U.S. Department of Energy headquarters and serving on many scientific committees, I found that science does not drive regulatory and funding decisions. Public perception and politics seem to be major driving forces. If scientific data suggested that risk had been underestimated, everyone cared. When science suggested that risk had been overestimated, no one cared. This result-dependent Who cares? was demonstrated as we tried to generate interactions

  8. Ambient environmental radiation monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindeken, C.L.; White, J.H.; Toy, A.J.; Sundbeck, C.W.

    1975-01-01

    Thermoluminescence dosimetry is the principal means of measuring ambient γ radiation at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. These dosimeters are used at 12 perimeter locations and 41 locations in the off-site vicinity of the Laboratory, and are exchanged quarterly. Control dosimeters are stored in a 75-mm-thick lead shield located out-of-doors to duplicate temperature cycling of field dosimeters. Effect of dosimeter response to radiation in the shield is determined each quarter. Calibration irradiations are made midway through the exposure cycle to compensate for signal fading. Terrestrial exposure rates calculated from the activities of naturally occurring uranium, thorium, and potassium in Livermore Valley soils vary from 3 to 7 μR/hr. Local inferred exposure rates from cosmic radiation are approximately 4 μR/hr. TLD measurements are in good agreement with these data. Off-site and site perimeter data are compared, and differences related to Laboratory operations are discussed

  9. Activity report of Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-11-01

    Since 1980s, the Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SRL) has been promoting the 'Super-SOR' project, the new synchrotron radiation facility dedicated to sciences in vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray regions. The University of Tokyo considered the project as one of the most important future academic plans and strongly endorsed to construct the new facility with an electron storage ring of third generation type in the Kashiwa campus. During last year, the design of the accelerator system was slightly modified to obtain stronger support of the people in the field of bio-sciences, such as medicine, pharmacy, agriculture, etc. The energy of the storage ring was increased to 2.4 GeV, which is determined to obtain undulator radiation with sufficient brightness in X-ray region for the protein crystallography experiments. The value was also optimised to avoid considerable degradation of undulator radiation in the VUV and soft X-ray regions. However, in October last year, the president office of the University found out that the promotion of the project was very difficult for financial reasons. The budget for the new facility project is too big to be supported by a single university. The decision was intensively discussed by the International Review Committee on the Institute for Solid State Physics (ISSP), which was held at ISSP from November 14 to 16. The committee understood that the restructuring of the University system in Japan would overstrain the financial resources of the University of Tokyo and accepted the decision by the University. Presently, SRL has inclined to install beamlines using undulator radiation in other SR facilities instead of constructing a facility with a light source accelerator. At new beamlines, SRL will promote advanced materials sciences utilizing high brilliance and small emittance of synchrotron radiation which have been considered in the Super-SOR project. They are those such as microscopy and time-resolved experiments, which will only be

  10. Quality of radiation field imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petr, I.

    1988-01-01

    The questions were studied of the quality of imaging the gamma radiation field and of the limits of the quality in directional detector scanning. A resolution angle was introduced to quantify the imaging quality, and its relation was sought with the detection effective half-angle of the directional detector. The resolution angle was defined for the simplest configuration of the radiation field consisting of two monoenergetic gamma beams in one plane. It was shown that the resolution angle decreases, i.e., resolution in imaging the radiation field is better, with the effective half-angle of the directional detector. It was also found that resolution of both gamma beams deteriorated when the beams were surrounded with an isotropic background field. If the beams are surrounded with a background field showing general distribution, the angle size will be affected not only by the properties of the detector but also by the distribution of the ambient radiation field and the method of its scanning. The method described can be applied in designing a directional detector necessary for imaging the presumed radiation field in the required quality. (Z.M.). 4 figs., 3 refs

  11. Code of practice for safety in laboratory - non ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramli Jaya; Mohd Yusof Mohd Ali; Khoo Boo Huat; Khatijah Hashim

    1995-01-01

    The code identifies the non-ionizing radiation encountered in laboratories and the associated hazards. The code is intended as a laboratory standard reference document for general information on safety requirements relating to the usage of non-ionizing radiations in laboratories. The nonionizing radiations cover in this code, namely, are ultraviolet radiation, visible light, radio-frequency radiation, lasers, sound waves and ultrasonic radiation. (author)

  12. Radiation and Health Technology Laboratory Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goles, Ronald W.; Johnson, Michelle Lynn; Piper, Roman K.; Peters, Jerry D.; Murphy, Mark K.; Mercado, Mike S.; Bihl, Donald E.; Lynch, Timothy P.

    2003-07-15

    The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a) performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE and commercial nuclear sites and research and characterization programs sponsored through the commercial sector. The laboratory is located in the 318 Building of the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The facility contains five major exposure rooms and several laboratories used for exposure work preparation, low-activity instrument calibrations, instrument performance evaluations, instrument maintenance, instrument design and fabrication work, thermoluminescent and radiochromic Dosimetry, and calibration of measurement and test equipment (M&TE). The major exposure facilities are a low-scatter room used for neutron and photon exposures, a source well room used for high-volume instrument calibration work, an x-ray facility used for energy response studies, a high-exposure facility used for high-rate photon calibration work, a beta standards laboratory used for beta energy response studies and beta reference calibrations and M&TE laboratories. Calibrations are routinely performed for personnel dosimeters, health physics instrumentation, photon and neutron transfer standards alpha, beta, and gamma field sources used throughout the Hanford Site, and a wide variety of M&TE. This report describes the standards and calibrations laboratory.

  13. Occupational radiation exposures in research laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaccari, S.; Papotti, E.; Pedrazzi, G.

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive sources are widely used in many research activities at University centers. In particular, the activities concerning use of sealed form ( 57 Co in Moessbauer application) and unsealed form ( 3 H, 14 C, 32 P in radioisotope laboratories) are analyzed. The radiological impact of these materials and potential effective doses to researchers and members of the public were evaluated to show compliance with regulatory limits. A review of the procedures performed by researchers and technicians in the research laboratories with the relative dose evaluations is presented in different situations, including normal operations and emergency situations, for example the fire. A study of the possible exposure to radiation by workers, restricted groups of people, and public in general, as well as environmental releases, is presented. (authors)

  14. Occupational radiation exposures in research laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaccari, S.; Papotti, E. [Parma Univ., Health Physics (Italy); Pedrazzi, G. [Parma Univ., Dept. of Public Health (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Radioactive sources are widely used in many research activities at University centers. In particular, the activities concerning use of sealed form ({sup 57}Co in Moessbauer application) and unsealed form ({sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 32}P in radioisotope laboratories) are analyzed. The radiological impact of these materials and potential effective doses to researchers and members of the public were evaluated to show compliance with regulatory limits. A review of the procedures performed by researchers and technicians in the research laboratories with the relative dose evaluations is presented in different situations, including normal operations and emergency situations, for example the fire. A study of the possible exposure to radiation by workers, restricted groups of people, and public in general, as well as environmental releases, is presented. (authors)

  15. Review of radiation safety in the cardiac catheterization laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, L.W.; Moore, R.J.; Balter, S.

    1992-01-01

    With the increasing use of coronary arteriography and interventional procedures, radiation exposure to patients and personnel working in cardiac catheterization laboratories has increased. Proper technique to minimize both patient and operator exposure is necessary. A practical approach to radiation safety in the cardiac catheterization laboratory is presented. This discussion should be useful to facilities with well-established radiation safety programs as well as facilities that require restructuring to cope with the radiation environment in a modern cardiac catheterization laboratory

  16. Characteristics of the radiation prevention metrology laboratory 'Cajavec' - Banjaluka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomljenovic, I.; Ninkovic, M.; Kolonic, Dz.

    2004-01-01

    Radiation metrology laboratory built in the factory 'Cajavec' in Banja Luka, planed for gauge the detectors of ionization radiation. Laboratory as part of the large factory building , thus projected and formed according to positive radiation principles. Walls are constructed of basic concrete, main entrance of lead, approaching the radiation bench from the back side. Sound and light signal system connected with dosemeter for showing mini dose of radiation creating conditions for safe work of the dosemeterists. (author) [sr

  17. Radiation protection in clinical chemical laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, K.

    1980-01-01

    In the clinical-chemical laboratory, the problems of the personal radiation protection can be handled relatively simply. Important conditions are certain requirements as far as the building is concerned and the keeping to protection measures to invoid ingestion, inhalation, and resorption of open radioactive substances. Very intensive attention must be paid to a clean working technique in order to be able to exclude the danger of contamination which is very disturbing during the extremely sensitive measurements. The higgest problem in the handling of open radioactive substances, however, is in our opinion the waste management because it requires which space and personnel this causing high costs. Furthermore, since 1 January 1979, the permission for the final storage of radioactive waste in the shut down mine ASSE was taken back from the county collection places and it cannot be said yet if and when this permission will be given again. (orig./HP) [de

  18. 1994 activity report: Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantwell, K.; Dunn, L.

    1994-01-01

    The SSRL facility delivered 89% of the scheduled user beam to 25 experimental stations during 6.5 months of user running. Users from private industry were involved in 31% of these experiments. The SPEAR accelerator ran very well with no major component failures and an unscheduled down time of only 2.9%. In addition to this increased reliability, there was a significant improvement in the stability of the beam. The enhancements to the SPEAR orbit as part of a concerted three-year program were particularly noticeable to users. The standard deviation of beam movement (both planes) in the last part of the run was 80 microns, major progress toward the ultimate goal of 50-micron stability. This was a significant improvement from the previous year when the movement was 400 microns in the horizontal and 200 microns in the vertical. A new accelerator Personal Protection System (PPS), built with full redundancy and providing protection from both radiation exposure and electrical hazards, was installed in 1994. It is not possible to describe in this summary all of the scientific experimentation which was performed during the run. However, the flavor of current research projects and the many significant accomplishments can be realized by the following highlights: A multinational collaboration performed several experiments involving x-ray scattering from nuclear resonances; Studies related to nuclear waste remediation by groups from Los Alamos National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratories continued in 1994; Diffraction data sets for a number of important protein crystals were obtained; During the past two years a collaboration consisting of groups from Hewlett Packard, Intel, Fisons Instruments and SSRL has been exploring the utility of synchrotron radiation for total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TRXRF); and High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission experiments have continued to generate exciting new results from highly correlated and magnetic materials

  19. 1994 activity report: Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K.; Dunn, L. [eds.

    1994-01-01

    The SSRL facility delivered 89% of the scheduled user beam to 25 experimental stations during 6.5 months of user running. Users from private industry were involved in 31% of these experiments. The SPEAR accelerator ran very well with no major component failures and an unscheduled down time of only 2.9%. In addition to this increased reliability, there was a significant improvement in the stability of the beam. The enhancements to the SPEAR orbit as part of a concerted three-year program were particularly noticeable to users. The standard deviation of beam movement (both planes) in the last part of the run was 80 microns, major progress toward the ultimate goal of 50-micron stability. This was a significant improvement from the previous year when the movement was 400 microns in the horizontal and 200 microns in the vertical. A new accelerator Personal Protection System (PPS), built with full redundancy and providing protection from both radiation exposure and electrical hazards, was installed in 1994. It is not possible to describe in this summary all of the scientific experimentation which was performed during the run. However, the flavor of current research projects and the many significant accomplishments can be realized by the following highlights: A multinational collaboration performed several experiments involving x-ray scattering from nuclear resonances; Studies related to nuclear waste remediation by groups from Los Alamos National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratories continued in 1994; Diffraction data sets for a number of important protein crystals were obtained; During the past two years a collaboration consisting of groups from Hewlett Packard, Intel, Fisons Instruments and SSRL has been exploring the utility of synchrotron radiation for total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TRXRF); and High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission experiments have continued to generate exciting new results from highly correlated and magnetic materials.

  20. Solar Radiation Research Laboratory | Energy Systems Integration Facility |

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) has been collecting continuous measurements of basic solar continuous operation. More than 75 instruments contribute to the Baseline Measurement System by recording

  1. Activity report of Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-11-01

    After moved from Tanashi to Kashiwa Campus in the spring of 2000, the Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SRL) has been promoting the High-brilliance Light Source project, Super SOR project, in cooperation with the nationwide user group as well as with the users of the University of Tokyo. In May of 2001, the project has met with a dramatic progress. The Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture organized the Advisory Board and started to discuss the future synchrotron radiation facilities in EUV and SX regime in Japan. Based on extensive discussion, they proposed the new facility consisting of a 1.8 GeV storage ring of 3rd generation type. The University of Tokyo approved to construct the proposed facility in the Kashiwa campus. The plan is supported not only by researchers in academic institutions but also bio- and chemical-industries. We strongly hope the plan will be realized in near future. On the other hand, SRL maintains a branch laboratory in the Photon Factory (PF) High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) at Tsukuba with a Revolver undulator, two beamlines and three experimental stations (BL-18A, 19A and 19B), which are and fully opened to the outside users. In the fiscal year of 2001, the operation time of the beamlines was more than 5000 hours and the number of the users was about 200. The main scientific interests and activities in the SRL at KEK-PF are directed to the electronic structures of new materials with new transport, magnetic and optical properties. The electronic structures of solid surfaces and interfaces are also intensively studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and photoelectron microscopy. The accelerator group of SRL is carrying out research works of the accelerator physics and developing the accelerator-related technology, many parts of which will be directly applied to the new light source project. This report contains the activities of the staff members of SRL and users of the three beamlines in FY2001. The status of

  2. Hydrogen Field Test Standard: Laboratory and Field Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Jodie G.; Wright, John D.

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed a prototype field test standard (FTS) that incorporates three test methods that could be used by state weights and measures inspectors to periodically verify the accuracy of retail hydrogen dispensers, much as gasoline dispensers are tested today. The three field test methods are: 1) gravimetric, 2) Pressure, Volume, Temperature (PVT), and 3) master meter. The FTS was tested in NIST's Transient Flow Facility with helium gas and in the field at a hydrogen dispenser location. All three methods agree within 0.57 % and 1.53 % for all test drafts of helium gas in the laboratory setting and of hydrogen gas in the field, respectively. The time required to perform six test drafts is similar for all three methods, ranging from 6 h for the gravimetric and master meter methods to 8 h for the PVT method. The laboratory tests show that 1) it is critical to wait for thermal equilibrium to achieve density measurements in the FTS that meet the desired uncertainty requirements for the PVT and master meter methods; in general, we found a wait time of 20 minutes introduces errors methods, respectively and 2) buoyancy corrections are important for the lowest uncertainty gravimetric measurements. The field tests show that sensor drift can become a largest component of uncertainty that is not present in the laboratory setting. The scale was calibrated after it was set up at the field location. Checks of the calibration throughout testing showed drift of 0.031 %. Calibration of the master meter and the pressure sensors prior to travel to the field location and upon return showed significant drifts in their calibrations; 0.14 % and up to 1.7 %, respectively. This highlights the need for better sensor selection and/or more robust sensor testing prior to putting into field service. All three test methods are capable of being successfully performed in the field and give equivalent answers if proper sensors without drift are

  3. Graphene Field Effect Transistor for Radiation Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mary J. (Inventor); Chen, Zhihong (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to a graphene field effect transistor-based radiation sensor for use in a variety of radiation detection applications, including manned spaceflight missions. The sensing mechanism of the radiation sensor is based on the high sensitivity of graphene in the local change of electric field that can result from the interaction of ionizing radiation with a gated undoped silicon absorber serving as the supporting substrate in the graphene field effect transistor. The radiation sensor has low power and high sensitivity, a flexible structure, and a wide temperature range, and can be used in a variety of applications, particularly in space missions for human exploration.

  4. Radiation safety requirements for radionuclide laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The guide lays down the requirements for laboratories and storage rooms in which radioactive substances are used or stored as unsealed sources. In addition, some general instructions concerning work in radionuclide laboratories are set out

  5. Radiation safety requirements for radionuclide laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The guide lays down the requirements for laboratories and storage rooms in which radioactive substances are used or stored as unsealed sources. In addition, some general instructions concerning work in radionuclide laboratories are set out.

  6. Establishment of 137Cs radiation fields for instrument calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, M. da P.P.; Caldas, L.V.E.; Xavier, M.

    1988-09-01

    In order to study the energy dependence of clinical dosemeters, systems constituted of ionization chambers connected to special electrometers, many times their calibration with the gamma radiation of 137 Cs is necessary. In this case, the radiation field characterization is fundamental. The source used presents and activity of 38,8 Tbq and belongs to the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. Dosimetric films, gammagraphy films, ionization chambers and Lucite phantons were used. At the calibration distance, 80 cm (detector-source detection), the homogeneity of a 10 X 10 cm 2 radiation field was equal 68%. (author) [pt

  7. Matter and Radiation in Strong Magnetic Fields of Neutron Stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, D

    2006-01-01

    Neutron stars are found to possess magnetic fields ranging from 10 8 G to 10 15 G, much larger than achievable in terrestrial laboratories. Understanding the properties of matter and radiative transfer in strong magnetic fields is essential for the proper interpretation of various observations of magnetic neutron stars, including radio pulsars and magnetars. This paper reviews the atomic/molecular physics and condensed matter physics in strong magnetic fields, as well as recent works on modeling radiation from magnetized neutron star atmospheres/surface layers

  8. Laboratory and field based evaluation of chromatography ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA) is an on-line ion-chromatography-based instrument designed for speciation of the inorganic gas and aerosol ammonium-nitrate-sulfate system. Previous work to characterize the performance of the MARGA has been primarily based on field comparison to other measurement methods to evaluate accuracy. While such studies are useful, the underlying reasons for disagreement among methods are not always clear. This study examines aspects of MARGA accuracy and precision specifically related to automated chromatography analysis. Using laboratory standards, analytical accuracy, precision, and method detection limits derived from the MARGA chromatography software are compared to an alternative software package (Chromeleon, Thermo Scientific Dionex). Field measurements are used to further evaluate instrument performance, including the MARGA’s use of an internal LiBr standard to control accuracy. Using gas/aerosol ratios and aerosol neutralization state as a case study, the impact of chromatography on measurement error is assessed. The new generation of on-line chromatography-based gas and particle measurement systems have many advantages, including simultaneous analysis of multiple pollutants. The Monitor for Aerosols and Gases in Ambient Air (MARGA) is such an instrument that is used in North America, Europe, and Asia for atmospheric process studies as well as routine monitoring. While the instrument has been evaluat

  9. Strengthening of an advanced automated radiation laboratory. Hungary. Terminal report project findings and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    An Advanced Automated Radiation Laboratory was completed; the hardware and software bases are now suitable for up-to-date kinetical measurements in radiation chemistry and technology both for Hungarian experts and for specialists from abroad. It would be possible and useful e.g. to organize further training courses in the field of radiation chemistry and technology by the IAEA and/or the UNDP, as well as to send fellows from developing countries for practical research work or other purposes (TCDC)

  10. A method for characterizing photon radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whicker, J.J.; Hsu, H.H.; Hsieh, F.H.; Borak, T.B.

    1999-01-01

    Uncertainty in dosimetric and exposure rate measurements can increase in areas where multi-directional and low-energy photons (< 100 keV) exist because of variations in energy and angular measurement response. Also, accurate measurement of external exposures in spatially non-uniform fields may require multiple dosimetry. Therefore, knowledge of the photon fields in the workplace is required for full understanding of the accuracy of dosimeters and instruments, and for determining the need for multiple dosimeters. This project was designed to develop methods to characterize photon radiation fields in the workplace, and to test the methods in a plutonium facility. The photon field at selected work locations was characterized using TLDs and a collimated NaI(Tl) detector from which spatial variations in photon energy distributions were calculated from measured spectra. Laboratory results showed the accuracy and utility of the method. Field measurement results combined with observed work patterns suggested the following: (1) workers are exposed from all directions, but not isotropically, (2) photon energy distributions were directionally dependent, (3) stuffing nearby gloves into the glovebox reduced exposure rates significantly, (4) dosimeter placement on the front of the chest provided for a reasonable estimate of the average dose equivalent to workers' torsos, (5) justifiable conclusions regarding the need for multiple dosimetry can be made using this quantitative method, and (6) measurements of the exposure rates with ionization chambers pointed with open beta windows toward the glovebox provided the highest measured rates, although absolute accuracy of the field measurements still needs to be assessed

  11. International intercomparison of environmental dosimeters under field and laboratory conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesell, T.F.; de Planque Burke, G.; Becker, K.

    1975-04-01

    Based on the results of a pilot study at ORNL in 1973, a more comprehensive international intercomparison of integrating dosimeters for the assessment of external penetrating environmental radiation fields was carried out. Forty-one laboratories from eleven countries participated in this study. A total of 56 sets of six detectors each were mailed to and from Houston, Texas, where they were exposed for three months (July to September 1974) as follows: two in an unprotected space out-of-doors 1 m above ground; two in an air-conditioned shielded area with a known, low exposure rate; and two with the second group, but with an additional exposure to 30 mR. Evaluation of the dosimeters provides information on the calibration precision, the accuracy of field measurement, and transit exposure. Results are discussed. (U.S.)

  12. Light source for synchrotron radiation x-ray topography study at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (BSRL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jiyong; Jiang Jianhua; Tian Yulian

    1992-01-01

    Characteristics of the synchrotron radiation source for X-ray topography study at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (BSRL) is described, local geometrical resolution of topographies is discussed, and the diffracting intensities of white beam topography is given

  13. Radiation monitoring programme in a university hot laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillander, M.; Heinonen, O.J.

    1979-01-01

    The Department of Radiochemistry in the University of Helsinki is the only institute teaching radiochemistry at the university level in Finland. The research programme of the Deparment must therefore include the uses of radiation and radionuclides in many branches of science. The students must receive adequate instruction in radiation protection for safe work in laboratories. This also has the educational benefit that the radiochemists will subsequently be able to observe the necessary safety precautions when employing ionizing radiation professionally. The Department of Radiochemistry consists of the following laboratories: a radiotracer laboratory, a neutron/electron and a gamma irradiation laboratory, an environmental low activity level laboratory, a whole-body counting laboratory, a reactor chemistry laboratory and a waste-treatment facility. The radiation protection organization of the Department is presented. Various methods of monitoring, including advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the reactor chemistry laboratory where transuranic elements are utilized. These elements are highly radiotoxic and their monitoring in most cases requires destructive analysis. Different methods of determining external and internal doses are evaluated with regard to sensitivity and accuracy. Detection limits for radionuclides utilized in the laboratory are presented for different measurement systems, including non-destructive monitoring, spectrometry after chemical analysis, liquid scintillation counting and low-energy gamma spectrometry using a CsI-NaI scintillation detector. The guidelines laid down in the IAEA Safety Series Manuals are discussed in the light of practical experience. (author)

  14. Waste water management in radiation medicine laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Miaofa

    1990-01-01

    A new building has been used since 1983 in the department of radiation medicine of Suzhou Medical College. Management, processing facilities, monitoring, discharge and treatment of 147 Pm contaminated waste water are reported

  15. Gravitational radiation resistance, radiation damping and field fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, G.

    1981-01-01

    Application is made of two different generalised fluctuation-dissipation theorems and their derivations to the calculation of the gravitational quadrupole radiation resistance using the radiation-reaction force given by Misner, Thorne and Wheeler (Gravitation (San Francisco: Freeman) ch 36,37 (1973)) and the usual tidal force on one hand and the tidal force and the free gravitational radiation field on the other hand. The quantum-mechanical version (including thermal generalisations) of the well known classical quadrupole radiation damping formula is obtained as a function of the radiation resistance. (author)

  16. Experimental microdosimetry in high energy radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurny, F.; Bednar, J.; Vlcek, B.; Bottollier-Depois, J.-F.; Molokanov, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    correspond to the interactions of secondary panicles created by primary radiation are close to the sensitive volume of the equipment. The comparison of both methods was performed in the field on board aircraft and in high energy reference fields. it was found that the microdosimetric distributions observed agreed at least qualitatively, a quantitative agreement of integral dosimetric values was found as well. The measurements in proton beams were performed in several points along the Bragg curve. Actually, we were able to observe the influence of primary beam contamination due to the filtration as well as due to the secondary particle created during the penetration of beams in the phantome. The relevance of such data for the radiotherapy application of high energy protons is evident. It was proved that both method can give relevant and useful information on the microdosimetric distributions in complex beams and fields of high energy panicles. The further development of this approach is in progress in our laboratories. (author)

  17. An overview of the facilities of the Ionizing Radiation Laboratory, South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostert, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    The Ionising Radiation Laboratory (IRL) of the CSIR-National Metrology Laboratory (NML) in South Africa was recently accepted as a member of the IAEA SSDL network. This article gives a very brief overview of the services and facilities provided by this laboratory. The NML has the responsibility to realize and maintain the national measuring standards in South Africa. In the field of ionizing radiation, this function is performed by the IRL. The IRL provides traceability through its calibration and measurement services for regulatory authorities, institutions providing radiation therapy services such as hospitals and other oncology centres, radiation protection service providers such as the South African Bureau of Standards (SABS), the radiation protection industry in general and to companies providing industrial quality assurance services. These services also extend to a number of countries in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) which do not currently have metrology facilities of their own

  18. National Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation Metrology - Brazilian CNEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The activities of the Brazilian National Laboratory of Ionizing Radiations Metrology are described. They include research and development of metrological techniques and procedures, the calibration of area radiation monitors, clinical dosemeters and other instruments and the preparation and standardization of reference radioactive sources. 4 figs., 13 tabs

  19. Quantization of the Radiation Field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    field,quantization,Lamb shift. Avinash Khare ... actions as well as for theories beyond like grand unified theories. Further, the same ... cules as well as condensed matter physics, not to men- tion their ... of an electromagnetic field by a moving electron, and of the reaction of this field on the electron have not yet been touched.".

  20. Secondary standards laboratories for ionizing radiation calibrations: the national laboratory interests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberson, P.L.; Campbell, G.W.

    1984-11-01

    The national laboratories are probable candidates to serve as secondary standards laboratories for the federal sector. Representatives of the major Department of Energy laboratories were polled concerning attitudes toward a secondary laboratory structure. Generally, the need for secondary laboratories was recognized and the development of such a program was encouraged. The secondary laboratories should be reviewed and inspected by the National Bureau of Standards. They should offer all of the essential, and preferably additional, calibration services in the field of radiological health protection. The selection of secondary laboratories should be based on economic and geographic criteria and/or be voluntary. 1 ref., 2 tabs

  1. Secondary calibration laboratory for ionizing radiation laboratory accreitation program National Institute of Standards and Technology National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the procedures and requirements for accreditation under the Secondary Calibration Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Program (SCLIR LAP). The requirements for a quality system, proficiency testing and the onsite assessment are discussed. The purpose of the accreditation program is to establish a network of secondary calibration laboratories that can provide calibrations traceable to the primary national standards.

  2. Secondary calibration laboratory for ionizing radiation laboratory accreitation program National Institute of Standards and Technology National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the procedures and requirements for accreditation under the Secondary Calibration Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Program (SCLIR LAP). The requirements for a quality system, proficiency testing and the onsite assessment are discussed. The purpose of the accreditation program is to establish a network of secondary calibration laboratories that can provide calibrations traceable to the primary national standards

  3. Study of detectors in beta radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, M. da P.P.; Xavier, M.; Caldas, L.V.E.

    1987-01-01

    Several commercial detectors used with gamma or X radiation are studied. Their sensibility and energetic dependence are analysed in exposures of beta radiation fields. A comparative evaluation with the reference detector (the extrapolation chamber) is presented. (M.A.C.) [pt

  4. Laboratory of research for environmental radiation and its dosimetry in the ININ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez S, B.M.

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this work are to learn on the methodology that should be continued for the investigation of such a specialized topic as it is a radiation laboratory and to develop the executive project of a building that contains laboratories focused to the investigation of the radiation levels in the environment and their dosimetry. The National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ), is the place where are carried out many of the investigations related to the field of the physics and chemistry in Mexico besides being the center of nuclear research more important of Latin America and it is for that reason that here is proposed the Laboratory of Low Radiation and its Dosimetry, since the Institute accounts with the whole infrastructure and necessary safety for this type of laboratories. (Author)

  5. Quality assurance in field radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, W.P.

    1985-01-01

    In most cases, an ion chamber radiation measuring instrument is calibrated in a uniform gamma radiation field. This results in a uniform ionization field throughout the ion chamber. Measurement conditions encountered in the field often produce non-uniform ionization fields within the ion chamber, making determination of true dose rates to personnel difficult and prone to error. Extensive studies performed at Hanford have provided appropriate correction factors for use with one type of ion chamber instrument, the CP. Suitable corrections are available for the following distinct measurement circumstances: (1) contact measurements on large beta and gamma sources, (2) contact measurements on small beta and gamma sources, (3) contact measurements on small-diameter cylinders, (4) measurements in small gamma beams, and (5) measurements at a distance from large beta sources. Recommendations are made for the implementation of these correction factors, in the interest of improved quality assurance in field radiation measurements. 12 references, 10 figures

  6. Laboratory and Field Investigations of Small Crater Repair Technologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Priddy, Lucy P; Tingle, Jeb S; McCaffrey, Timothy J; Rollings, Ray S

    2007-01-01

    .... This airfield damage repair (ADR) investigation consisted of laboratory testing of selected crater fill and capping materials, as well as full-scale field testing of small crater repairs to evaluate field mixing methods, installation...

  7. Role of secondary standard dosimetry laboratory in radiation protection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, Sohaila; Ali, Noriah Mohd.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The radiation dosimetry program is an important element of operational radiation protection. Dosimetry data enable workers and radiation protection professionals to evaluate and control work practices to eliminate unnecessary exposure to ionizing radiation. The usefulness of the data produced however depends on its quality and traceability. The emphasis of the global dosimetry program is focused through the IAEA/WHO network of secondary standard dosimetry laboratories (SSDLs), which aims for the determination of SI quantities through proper traceable calibration of radiation protection equipment. The responsibility of SSDL-NUCLEAR MALAYSIA to guarantee a reliable dosimetry service, which is traceable to international standards, is elucidated. It acts as the basis for harmonized occupational radiation monitoring in Malaysia.

  8. Trends in instrumentation for environmental radiation measurements at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiebert, R.D.; Wolf, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Recent instruments developed to fulfill radiation monitoring needs at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory are described. Laboratory instruments that measure tritium gas effluents alone, or in the presence of activated air from D-T fusion reactors are discussed. Fully portable systems for gamma, x-ray, and alpha analyses in the field are described. Also included are descriptions of survey instruments that measure low levels of transuranic contaminants and that measure pulsed-neutron dose rates

  9. Ranking protective coatings: Laboratory vs. field experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Jeffrey A.; Connor, William B.

    1994-12-01

    Environmentally protective coatings are used on a wide range of gas turbine components for survival in the harsh operating conditions of engines. A host of coatings are commercially available to protect hot-section components, ranging from simple aluminides to designer metallic overlays and ceramic thermal barrier coatings. A variety of coating-application processes are available, and they range from simple pack cementation processing to complex physical vapor deposition, which requires multimillion dollar facilities. Detailed databases are available for most coatings and coating/process combinations for a range of laboratory tests. Still, the analysis of components actually used in engines often yields surprises when compared against predicted coating behavior from laboratory testing. This paper highlights recent work to develop new laboratory tests that better simulate engine environments. Comparison of in-flight coating performance as well as industrial and factory engine testing on a range of hardware is presented along with laboratory predictions from standard testing and from recently developed cyclic burner-rig testing.

  10. Galactic cosmic ray simulation at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.; Schimmerling, Walter; Slaba, Tony C.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Badavi, Francis F.; Baiocco, Giorgio; Benton, Eric; Bindi, Veronica; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Boothman, David A.; Borak, Thomas B.; Britten, Richard A.; Curtis, Stan; Dingfelder, Michael; Durante, Marco; Dynan, William S.; Eisch, Amelia J.; Elgart, S. Robin; Goodhead, Dudley T.; Guida, Peter M.; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Hellweg, Christine E.; Huff, Janice L.; Kronenberg, Amy; La Tessa, Chiara; Lowenstein, Derek I.; Miller, Jack; Morita, Takashi; Narici, Livio; Nelson, Gregory A.; Norman, Ryan B.; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Patel, Zarana S.; Reitz, Guenther; Rusek, Adam; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Scott-Carnell, Lisa A.; Semones, Edward; Shay, Jerry W.; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav A.; Sihver, Lembit; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Story, Michael D.; Turker, Mitchell S.; Uchihori, Yukio; Williams, Jacqueline; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2017-01-01

    Most accelerator-based space radiation experiments have been performed with single ion beams at fixed energies. However, the space radiation environment consists of a wide variety of ion species with a continuous range of energies. Due to recent developments in beam switching technology implemented at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), it is now possible to rapidly switch ion species and energies, allowing for the possibility to more realistically simulate the actual radiation environment found in space. The present paper discusses a variety of issues related to implementation of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) simulation at NSRL, especially for experiments in radiobiology. Advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to developing a GCR simulator are presented. In addition, issues common to both GCR simulation and single beam experiments are compared to issues unique to GCR simulation studies. A set of conclusions is presented as well as a discussion of the technical implementation of GCR simulation. PMID:26948012

  11. Toward a direct comparison of field and laboratory goniometer measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dangel, S.; Verstraete, M.; Schopfer, J.; Kneubuehler, M.; Schaepman, M.E.; Itten, K.I.

    2005-01-01

    Field and laboratory goniometers are widely used in the remote sensing community to assess spectrodirectional reflection properties of selected targets. Even when the same target and goniometer system are used, field and laboratory results cannot directly be compared due to inherent differences,

  12. Radiation detectors laboratory; Laboratorio de detectores de radiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez J, F.J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    The Radiation detectors laboratory was established with the assistance of the International Atomic Energy Agency which gave this the responsibility to provide its services at National and regional level for Latin America and it is located at the ININ. The more expensive and delicate radiation detectors are those made of semiconductor, so it has been put emphasis in the use and repairing of these detectors type. The supplied services by this laboratory are: selection consultant, detectors installation and handling and associated systems. Installation training, preventive and corrective maintenance of detectors and detection systems calibration. (Author)

  13. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1992 activity report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantwell, K.

    1993-01-01

    Under SLAC's supervision, the SPEAR ring and injector system were operated for the first time in a truly dedicated mode for user experimentation. In October, SSRL became a division of SLAC. With that organizational change, SSRL became fully responsible for the operation, maintenance and improvement of SPEAR and its injection accelerators. At the same time, other radiation sources were studied. Free electron lasers providing enormous peak brightnesses and time average brightnesses about two orders of magnitude greater than the machines presently being constructed or commissioned were the object of one line of analysis. Ultra-short pulse beams at lower photons energies were also studied. These, as well, are described in Chapter 2. Significant gains were also made on the beam lines. Perhaps the most dramatic was the introduction of YB 66 crystals into the Jumbo monochromator, as described in Chapter 3. Looking to the future, SSRL held a workshop on Fourth Generation Light Sources in February and two workshops in conjunction with the Users Meeting. The impact of the high quality running is demonstrated by the many high quality experimental programs performed on SPEAR during the year. These are described in Chapter 6

  14. Electron equilibrium for parallel plate ionization chambers in gamma radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldas, L.; Albuquerque, M. da P.P.

    1989-08-01

    Parallel plate ionization chambers, designed and constructed for use in low energy X-radiation fields, were tested in gamma radiation beams ( 6 Co and 137 Cs) of two different Calibration Laboratories, in order to study the electron equilibrium occurrence and to verify the possibility of their use for the detection of the kind of radiation too. (author) [pt

  15. Astrophysical radiative shocks: From modeling to laboratory experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gonzales, N.; Stehlé, C.; Audit, E.; Busquet, M.; Rus, Bedřich; Thais, F.; Acef, O.; Barroso, P.; Bar-Shalom, A.; Bauduin, D.; Kozlová, Michaela; Lery, T.; Madouri, A.; Mocek, Tomáš; Polan, Jiří

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 24, - (2006), s. 535-540 ISSN 0263-0346 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 506350 - LASERLAB-EUROPE; European Commission(XE) 5592 - JETSET Grant - others:CNRS(FR) PNPS Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laboratory astrophysics * laser plasmas * radiative shock waves * radiative transfer Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.958, year: 2006

  16. PREFACE: Acceleration and radiation generation in space and laboratory plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, R.; Katsouleas, T.; Dawson, J. M.; Stenflo, L.

    1994-01-01

    and radiation generation in plasmas. The next section includes state-of-the-art papers on laboratory accelerators driven by lasers (Nakajima et al., Shukla, Johnson et al.), microwaves (Nishida et al., Bogomolov et al.) and by particle beams (Ogata et al.). Also in this section are theoretical papers presenting new work on synchrotron like oscillations in plasma waves (Fedele) and two types of laboratory radiation sources, FEL's (Marshall et al.) and ionization fronts (Lai et al.), and Frantzeskakis et al. described the Hamiltonian analysis of a slow-wave autonomous cyclotron buncher. Section 3 contains papers on astrophysical plasmas, with the general presentations of Colgate and Krishnan. Kazanas and Krishnan address active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Thielheim discusses general acceleration mech anisms in rotating magnetized systems. Asseo discussed Langmuir solitons in pulsars and Blackman et al. treat magnetic reconnection relativistically. Su et al. analyze the possibility of plasma wave excitation and particle acceleration by neu trinos from supernovae. Dogiel et al. on cosmic ray scattering by MHD fluctuations. The papers in Section 4 treat fusion plasmas (Dendy et al. and Lashmore-Davies et al.). Section 5, space plasmas, includes papers on acceleration processes in the magnetosphere (Anagnostopoulos and Marshall et al.) and the sun (Barletta et al.). It is evident from the Workshop and the papers collected here that this is indeed a rich field of investigations and that both the natural and laboratory plasma communities can benefit from the cross-fertilization of ideas between them. We wish to thank the authors and attendees for their contributions to the success of this workshop, Dr Philip Debenham and Dr David Sutter of the U.S. D.o.E. and Dr Charles Roberson of the U.S. O.N.R. for their financial support (Grants DE-FGO3-93ER40776 and N00014-93-1-0814), and the ECC Twinning Grant SC1*-CT92-0773. We appreciate the considerable local support from Mr Glegles and

  17. Construction and operation of an improved radiation calibration facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    Calibration of instruments used to detect and measure ionizing radiation has been conducted over the last 20 years at Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) Radiation Calibration Facility, Building 348. Growth of research facilities, projects in progress, and more stringent Department of Energy (DOE) orders which involve exposure to nuclear radiation have placed substantial burdens on the existing radiation calibration facility. The facility currently does not meet the requirements of DOE Order 5480.4 or American National Standards Institute (ANSI) N323-1978, which establish calibration methods for portable radiation protection instruments used in the detection and measurement of levels of ionizing radiation fields or levels of radioactive surface contaminations. Failure to comply with this standard could mean instrumentation is not being calibrated to necessary levels of sensitivity. The Laboratory has also recently obtained a new neutron source and gamma beam irradiator which can not be made operational at existing facilities because of geometry and shielding inadequacies. These sources are needed to perform routine periodic calibrations of radiation detecting instruments used by scientific and technical personnel and to meet BNL's substantial increase in demand for radiation monitoring capabilities. To place these new sources into operation, it is proposed to construct an addition to the existing radiation calibration facility that would house all calibration sources and bring BNL calibration activities into compliance with DOE and ANSI standards. The purpose of this assessment is to identify potential significant environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of an improved radiation calibration facility at BNL

  18. 1. Introduction. 2. Laboratory experiments. 3. Field experiments. 4. Integrated field-laboratory experiments. 5. Panel recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Some recommendations for the design of laboratory and field studies in marine radioecology are formulated. The difficulties concerning the comparability of various experimental methods used to measure the fluxes of radionuclides through marine organisms and ecosystems, and also the use of laboratory results to make predictions for the natural environment are discussed. Three working groups were established during the panel meeting, to consider laboratory experiments, field studies, and the design and execution of integrated laboratory and field studies respectively. A number of supporting papers dealing with marine radioecological experiments were presented

  19. Fiber optics in high dose radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partin, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    A review of the behavior of state-of-the-art optical fiber waveguides in high dose (greater than or equal to 10 5 rad), steady state radiation fields is presented. The influence on radiation-induced transmission loss due to experimental parameters such as dose rate, total dose, irradiation history, temperature, wavelength, and light intensity, for future work in high dose environments are given

  20. Differential Detector for Measuring Radiation Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broide, A.; Marcus, E.; Brandys, I.; Schwartz, A.; Wengrowicz, U.; Levinson, S.; Seif, R.; Sattinger, D.; Kadmon, Y.; Tal, N.

    2004-01-01

    In case of a nuclear accident, it is essential to determine the source of radioactive contamination in order to analyze the risk to the environment and to the population. The radiation source may be a radioactive plume on the air or an area on the ground contaminated with radionuclides. Most commercial radiation detectors measure only the radiation field intensity but are unable to differentiate between the radiation sources. Consequently, this limitation causes a real problem in analyzing the potential risk to the near-by environment, since there is no data concerning the contamination ratios in the air and on the ground and this prevents us from taking the required steps to deal with the radiation event. This work presents a GM-tube-based Differential Detector, which enables to determine the source of contamination

  1. Thyorid function after mantle field radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daehnert, W.; Kutzner, J.; Grimm, W.

    1981-01-01

    48 patients with malignant lymphoma received a 60 Co-radiation dose of 30 to 50 Gy using the mantle field technique. Thyroid function tests were performed 34 to 92 months after radiation therapy. One patient developed myxedema, ten (20.8%) had subclinical hypothyroidism and six (12.5%) latent hypothyroidism. The incidence of hypothyroidism after treatment of malignant lymphomas is summarized in a review of the literature. Discrepancies on the incidence of hypothyroidism were found, and their possible cause is discussed. Periodic examinations of all patients with thyroid radiation exposure are recommended. The examination can be limited to measurement of TSH concentration and palpation of the thyroid for nodules. (orig.) [de

  2. Individual Dosimetry for High Energy Radiation Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurny, F.

    1999-01-01

    The exposure of individuals on board aircraft increased interest in individual dosimetry in high energy radiation fields. These fields, both in the case of cosmic rays as primary radiation and at high energy particle accelerators are complex, with a large diversity of particle types, their energies, and linear energy transfer (LET). Several already existing individual dosemeters have been tested in such fields. For the component with high LET (mostly neutrons) etched track detectors were tested with and without fissile radiators, nuclear emulsions, bubble detectors for both types available and an albedo dosemeter. Individual dosimetry for the low LET component has been performed with thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs), photographic film dosemeters and two types of electronic individual dosemeters. It was found that individual dosimetry for the low LET component was satisfactory with the dosemeters tested. As far as the high LET component is concerned, there are problems with both the sensitivity and the energy response. (author)

  3. Laboratory investigation of fire radiative energy and smoke aerosol emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles Ichoku; J. Vanderlei Martins; Yoram J. Kaufman; Martin J. Wooster; Patrick H. Freeborn; Wei Min Hao; Stephen Baker; Cecily A. Ryan; Bryce L. Nordgren

    2008-01-01

    Fuel biomass samples from southern Africa and the United States were burned in a laboratory combustion chamber while measuring the biomass consumption rate, the fire radiative energy (FRE) release rate (Rfre), and the smoke concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and particulate matter (PM). The PM mass emission rate (RPM) was quantified from...

  4. Radiation safety. Handbook for laboratory workers in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotte, E.D.; Krueger, D.J.; Connor, K.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the Handbook is to provide a source of information on radiation safety for those who are involved in the use of ionizing radiation in the laboratory. The potential reader may be a laboratory worker in the university or biomedical setting or the safety professional who desires a basic understanding of radiation protection within the research environment. The Handbook may be used as a reference by the radiation protection specialist or Radiation Safety Officer. To this end, liberal use is made of Appendices to make the Handbook a source of reference for a wide spectrum of readership while avoiding complicating the main body of the text. Each chapter or appendix is designed to stand alone. A complete reading of the Handbook will show that topics may be covered more than once. For example, one may read about the hazards and protective measures on handling radioiodine in Chapter 5 on Practical Radiation Protection as well as in Appendix 19 on Safe Handling of 125 I. Extensive use of figures, rather than tables has been made to present data, in the belief that these produce a good visual representation to a level of precision which is sufficient for most purposes of radiation protection in laboratories. The reader must remember that this Handbook should be taken as a guide only to the applicable regulations. You must consult the appropriate state or federal regulation directly or receive advice of a qualified radiation safety professional. Also, some information in the Appendices, such as commercially available training institutions or radioactive waste brokers, may change with time. Telephone numbers are given for the reader to call directly and check the services provided

  5. Dark Field Microscopy for Analytical Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augspurger, Ashley E.; Stender, Anthony S.; Marchuk, Kyle; Greenbowe, Thomas J.; Fang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    An innovative and inexpensive optical microscopy experiment for a quantitative analysis or an instrumental analysis chemistry course is described. The students have hands-on experience with a dark field microscope and investigate the wavelength dependence of localized surface plasmon resonance in gold and silver nanoparticles. Students also…

  6. Radiation distribution sensor with optical fibers for high radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Eiji; Kimura, Atsushi; Hosono, Yoneichi; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Nakazawa, Masaharu

    1999-01-01

    Radiation distribution sensors with their feasibilities have been described in earlier works. However, due to large radiation induced transmission losses in optical fibers, especially in the visible wavelength region, it has been difficult to apply these techniques to high radiation fields. In this study, we proposed a new concept of optical fiber based radiation distribution measurements with near infrared (IR) emission. Near IR scintillators were attached to the ends of optical fibers, where the fibers were bundled and connected to an N-MOS line sensor or a cooled CCD camera. From the measurements of each area density, the radiation levels at the positions of the scintillators can be known. The linearity between the gamma dose rate at each scintillator and the registered counts has been examined. For correcting the radiation induced loss effects, we applied the Optical Time Domain Reflectometry technique to measure the loss distribution and from the results, a possibility for correction of the loss effect has been demonstrated. The applicable dose rate range was evaluated to be from 0.1 to 10 3 Gy/h. This system can be a promising tool as a flexible dose rate distribution monitor in radiation facilities like nuclear plants and accelerator facilities. (author)

  7. Design and implementation of a virtual laboratory of radiation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez T, J. R.; Morales S, J. B.

    2009-10-01

    The work involves the implementation of a virtual laboratory, this project is conducted in the Faculty of Engineering of National Autonomous University of Mexico with the name of LANUVI. It is intended that the laboratory can be used by students who have interest in the nuclear radiation knowledge as well as in its detection and attenuation, in addition serve as and introduction to nuclear systems. In the first part of project will conduct a source that can simulate the particle radiation of Alfa, beta, neutrons and gamma rays. The project will take sources used in class laboratories and elements that are dangerous but are used in different practical applications. After taking the source analyzing the particles behaviour in different media like air, animal tissue, aluminium, lead, etc. The analysis is done in different ways in order to know with which material can stop or mitigate the different types of radiation. Finally shall be measure radioactivity with different types of detectors. At this point, has the behaviour of ionization chamber but in the future is expected to make the simulation of some other radiation detectors. The mathematical models we represent the behaviour of these cases were implemented in free software. The program will be used to implement the virtual laboratory with radiation sources, detectors and different types of shields will be Blender which is a free software that is used by many users for the embodiment of games but try to use as a tool to help visualize the different equipment that is widely used in a radioactive materials laboratory. (Author)

  8. Radiation Entropy and Near-Field Thermophotovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuomin M.

    2008-08-01

    Radiation entropy was key to the original derivation of Planck's law of blackbody radiation, in 1900. This discovery opened the door to quantum mechanical theory and Planck was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1918. Thermal radiation plays an important role in incandescent lamps, solar energy utilization, temperature measurements, materials processing, remote sensing for astronomy and space exploration, combustion and furnace design, food processing, cryogenic engineering, as well as numerous agricultural, health, and military applications. While Planck's law has been fruitfully applied to a large number of engineering problems for over 100 years, questions have been raised about its limitation in micro/nano systems, especially at subwavelength distances or in the near field. When two objects are located closer than the characteristic wavelength, wave interference and photon tunneling occurs that can result in significant enhancement of the radiative transfer. Recent studies have shown that the near-field effects can realize emerging technologies, such as superlens, sub-wavelength light source, polariton-assisted nanolithography, thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems, scanning tunneling thermal microscopy, etc. The concept of entropy has also been applied to explain laser cooling of solids as well as the second law efficiency of devices that utilize thermal radiation to produce electricity. However, little is known as regards the nature of entropy in near-field radiation. Some history and recent advances are reviewed in this presentation with a call for research of radiation entropy in the near field, due to the important applications in the optimization of thermophotovoltaic converters and in the design of practical systems that can harvest photon energies efficiently.

  9. Savannah River Plant/Savannah River Laboratory radiation exposure report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, C.D.; Hyman, S.D.; Keisler, L.L.; Reeder, D.F.; Jolly, L.; Spoerner, M.T.; Schramm, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    The protection of worker health and safety is of paramount concern at the Savannah River Site. Since the site is one of the largest nuclear sites in the nation, radiation safety is a key element in the protection program. This report is a compendium of the results in 1988 of the programs at the Savannah River Plant and the Savannah River Laboratory to protect the radiological health of employees. By any measure, the radiation protection performance at this site in 1988 was the best since the beginning of operations. This accomplishment was made possible by the commitment and support at all levels of the organizations to reduce radiation exposures to ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable). The report provides detailed information about the radiation doses received by departments and work groups within these organizations. It also includes exposure data for recent years to allow Plant and Laboratory units to track the effectiveness of their ALARA efforts. Many of the successful practices and methods that reduced radiation exposure are described. A new goal for personnel contamination cases has been established for 1989. Only through continual and innovative efforts to minimize exposures can the goals be met. The radiation protection goals for 1989 and previous years are included in the report. 27 figs., 58 tabs

  10. Radiation phase of a dipole field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shunovsky, A.S.

    1998-01-01

    In the case of a dipole electromagnetic radiation, the operator of the 'radiation phase' is defined. It is shown that this operator has a discrete spectrum with eigenvalues, lying in the segment [0,2π]. Some properties of the radiation phase and polarization are discussed. Seventy years of investigation of the problem of quantum phase led to the conclusion that there is no unique quantum variable, determining universally the measured phase properties of electromagnetic radiation. The operator constructions, describing cosine and sine of the phase, could be different schemes of measurement. This fact has accurately been confirmed by a number of recent experiments. Thus, it seems to be quite plausible that the quantum phase properties of an electromagnetic radiation are determined by interaction photons with a macroscopic detecting device. It is pertinent to ask the following question. Are the quantum phase properties of radiation completely determined by such an interaction or the photons have their own inherent phase properties which might be measured even if they are modified by interaction with a detecting device? The universally recognized fact is that the vacuum state of field is degenerated with respect to phase. If a quantum radiation has its inherent phase properties, it means that the degeneration is taken off in the process of generation which is an interaction of the vacuum field with excited states of atoms or molecules. By virtue of this picture proposed in, what all one can expect is that the inherent quantum phase properties of radiation are completely determined by a source via the conservation laws, describing the generation process. Even in this way, it seems to determine a unique quantum phase of radiation. As a matter of fact, there are two conservation laws, admitting a nontrivial angular dependence

  11. The Rwanda Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Rwanda Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (RFELTP) is a 2-year public health leadership development training program that provides applied epidemiology and public health laboratory training while the trainees provide public health service to the Ministry of Health. RFELTP is hosted at the National ...

  12. Remote Laboratory and Animal Behaviour: An Interactive Open Field System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Lorenzo; Ratti, Giovannino

    2007-01-01

    Remote laboratories can provide distant learners with practical acquisitions which would otherwise remain precluded. Our proposal here is a remote laboratory on a behavioural test (open field test), with the aim of introducing learners to the observation and analysis of stereotyped behaviour in animals. A real-time video of a mouse in an…

  13. A Radiation Laboratory Curriculum Development at Western Kentucky University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barzilov, Alexander P.; Novikov, Ivan S.; Womble, Phil C.

    2009-01-01

    We present the latest developments for the radiation laboratory curriculum at the Department of Physics and Astronomy of Western Kentucky University. During the last decade, the Applied Physics Institute (API) at WKU accumulated various equipment for radiation experimentation. This includes various neutron sources (computer controlled d-t and d-d neutron generators, and isotopic 252 Cf and PuBe sources), the set of gamma sources with various intensities, gamma detectors with various energy resolutions (NaI, BGO, GSO, LaBr and HPGe) and the 2.5-MeV Van de Graaff particle accelerator. XRF and XRD apparatuses are also available for students and members at the API. This equipment is currently used in numerous scientific and teaching activities. Members of the API also developed a set of laboratory activities for undergraduate students taking classes from the physics curriculum (Nuclear Physics, Atomic Physics, and Radiation Biophysics). Our goal is to develop a set of radiation laboratories, which will strengthen the curriculum of physics, chemistry, geology, biology, and environmental science at WKU. The teaching and research activities are integrated into real-world projects and hands-on activities to engage students. The proposed experiments and their relevance to the modern status of physical science are discussed.

  14. The New High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Dresden: a Pulsed-Field Laboratory at an IR Free-Electron-Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pobell, F.; Bianchi, A. D.; Herrmannsdoerfer, T.; Krug, H.; Zherlitsyn, S.; Zvyagin, S.; Wosnitza, J.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the construction of a new high magnetic field user laboratory which will offer pulsed-field coils in the range (60 T, 500 ms, 40 mm) to (100 T, 10 ms, 20 mm) for maximum field, pulse time, and bore diameter of the coils. These coils will be energized by a modular 50 MJ/24 kV capacitor bank. Besides many other experimental techniques, as unique possibilities NMR in pulsed fields as well as infrared spectroscopy at 5 to 150 μm will be available by connecting the pulsed field laboratory to a nearby free-electron-laser facility

  15. Field electron emission spectrometer combined with field ion/electron microscope as a field emission laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shkuratov, S.I.; Ivanov, S.N.; Shilimanov, S.N.

    1996-01-01

    The facility, combining the field ion microscope, field electron emission microscope and field electron emission spectrometer, is described. Combination of three methodologies makes it possible to carry out the complete cycle of emission studies. Atom-plane and clean surface of the studied samples is prepared by means of field evaporation of the material atom layers without any thermal and radiation impact. This enables the study of atom and electron structure of clean surface of the wide range materials, the study whereof through the field emission methods was previously rather difficult. The temperature of the samples under study changes from 75 up to 2500 K. The energy resolution of the electron analyzer equals 30 MeV. 19 refs., 10 figs

  16. Neutron and photon spectrometry in mixed radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jancar, A.; Kopecky, Z.; Veskrna, M.

    2014-01-01

    Spectrometric measurements of the mixed fields of neutron and photon radiation in the workplaces with the L-R-0 research reactor located in the UJV Rez and with the Van de Graaff accelerator, located in the UTEF laboratories Prague, are presented in this paper. The experimental spectrometric measurements were performed using a newly developed digital measuring system, based on the technology of analog-digital converters with a very high sampling frequency (up to 2 GHz), in connection with organic scintillation detector, type BC-501A, and stilbene detector. The results of experimental measurements show high quality of spectrometry mixed fields of neutron and photon radiation across the wide dynamic range of measured energy. (authors)

  17. Environmental Remediation Sciences Program at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bargar, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR)-based techniques provide unique capabilities to address scientific issues underpinning environmental remediation science and have emerged as major research tools in this field. The high intensity of SR sources and x-ray photon-in/photon-out detection allow noninvasive in-situ analysis of dilute, hydrated, and chemically/structurally complex natural samples. SR x-rays can be focused to beams of micron and sub-micron dimension, which allows the study of microstructures, chemical microgradients, and microenvironments such as in biofilms, pore spaces, and around plant roots, that may control the transformation of contaminants in the environment. The utilization of SR techniques in environmental remediation sciences is often frustrated, however, by an ''activation energy barrier'', which is associated with the need to become familiar with an array of data acquisition and analysis techniques, a new technical vocabulary, beam lines, experimental instrumentation, and user facility administrative procedures. Many investigators find it challenging to become sufficiently expert in all of these areas or to maintain their training as techniques evolve. Another challenge is the dearth of facilities for hard x-ray micro-spectroscopy, particularly in the 15 to 23 KeV range, which includes x-ray absorption edges of the priority DOE contaminants Sr, U, Np, Pu, and Tc. Prior to the current program, there were only two (heavily oversubscribed) microprobe facilities in the U.S. that could fully address this energy range (one at each of APS and NSLS); none existed in the Western U.S., in spite of the relatively large number of DOE laboratories in this region

  18. Standardization of irradiation values at the Radiation Calibration Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham Van Dung; Hoang Van Nguyen; Phan Van Toan; Phan Dinh Sinh; Tran Thi Tuyet; Do Thi Phuong

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the theme is to determine dose rates around radiation facilities and sources in the NRI Radiation Calibration Laboratory. By improving equipment, calibrating a main dosemeter and carrying out experiments, the theme team received the following results: 1. The controller of a X-rays generator PY(-200 was improved. It permits to increase accuracy of radiation dose calibration up to 2-4 times; 2. The FAMER DOSEMETER 2570/1B with the ionization chamber NE 2575 C of the NRI Radiation Calibration Laboratory was calibrated at SSDL (Hanoi); 3. Dose rates at 4 positions around a high activity Co-60 source were determined; 4. Dose rates at 3 positions around a low activity Co-60 source were determined; 5. Dose rates at 3 positions around a low activity Cs-137 source were determined; 6. Dose rate at 1 position of a X-rays beam (Eaverage = 48 keV) was determined; 7. Dose rate at 1 position of a X-rays beam (Eaverage = 65 keV) was determined. (author)

  19. Recent developments in radiation field control technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, C.J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. nuclear power industry has been remarkably successful in reducing worker radiation exposures over the past ten years. There has been over a fourfold reduction in the person-rem incurred for each MW.year of electric power generated: from 1.8 in 1980, to only 0.39 person-rems in 1991 and 1992. Preliminary data for 1993 are even lower: approximately 0.37 person-rem.MW.year. Despite this substantial improvement, challenges for the industry remain. Individual exposure limits have been tightened in ICRP 60 and there will be increased requirements for special maintenance work as plants age, suggesting that vigorous efforts with be increased requirements for special maintenance work as plants age, suggesting that vigorous efforts will be required to meet the industry goals for 1995. Reducing out-of-core radiation fields offer the best chance of continuing the downward trend in exposures. To assist utilities select the most economic technology for their specific plants, EPRI has published a manual capturing worldwide operating experience with radiation-field control techniques (TR-100265). No one method will suffice, but implementing suitable combinations from this collection will enable utilities to achieve their exposure goals. Radiation reduction is generally cost-effective: outages are shorter, manpower requirements are reduced and work quality is improved. Despite the up front costs, the benefits over the following 1-3 years typically outweigh the expenses

  20. Recent developments in radiation field control technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, C.J. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The U.S. nuclear power industry has been remarkably successful in reducing worker radiation exposures over the past ten years. There has been over a fourfold reduction in the person-rem incurred for each MW.year of electric power generated: from 1.8 in 1980, to only 0.39 person-rems in 1991 and 1992. Preliminary data for 1993 are even lower: approximately 0.37 person-rem.MW.year. Despite this substantial improvement, challenges for the industry remain. Individual exposure limits have been tightened in ICRP 60 and there will be increased requirements for special maintenance work as plants age, suggesting that vigorous efforts with be increased requirements for special maintenance work as plants age, suggesting that vigorous efforts will be required to meet the industry goals for 1995. Reducing out-of-core radiation fields offer the best chance of continuing the downward trend in exposures. To assist utilities select the most economic technology for their specific plants, EPRI has published a manual capturing worldwide operating experience with radiation-field control techniques (TR-100265). No one method will suffice, but implementing suitable combinations from this collection will enable utilities to achieve their exposure goals. Radiation reduction is generally cost-effective: outages are shorter, manpower requirements are reduced and work quality is improved. Despite the up front costs, the benefits over the following 1-3 years typically outweigh the expenses.

  1. On quantization of the electromagnetic field in radiation gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burzynski, A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper contains a detailed description of quantization of the electromagnetic field (in radiation gauge) and quantization of some basic physical variables connected with radiation field as energy, momentum and spin. The dynamics of the free quantum radiation field and the field interacting with external classical sources is described. The canonical formalism is not used explicity. (author)

  2. Haemopoietic cell renewal in radiation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliedner, T. M.; Nothdurft, W.; Tibken, B.; Hofer, E.; Weiss, M.; Kindler, H.

    1994-10-01

    Space flight activities are inevitably associated with a chronic exposure of astronauts to a complex mixture of ionising radiation. Although no acute radiation consequences are to be expected as a rule, the possibility of Solar Particle Events (SPE) associated with relatively high doses of radiation (1 or more Gray) cannot be excluded. It is the responsibility of physicians in charge of the health of astronauts to evaluate before, during and after space flight activities the functional status of haemopoietic cell renewal. Chronic low level exposure of dogs indicate that daily gamma-exposure doses below about 2 cGy are tolerated for several years as far as blood cell concentrations are concerned. However, the stem cell pool may be severely affected. The maintenance of sufficient blood cell counts is possible only through increased cell production to compensate for the radiation inflicted excess cell loss. This behaviour of haemopoietic cell renewal during chronic low level exposure can be simulated by bioengineering models of granulocytopoiesis. It is possible to define a ``turbulence region'' for cell loss rates, below which an prolonged adaptation to increased radiation fields can be expected to be tolerated. On the basis of these experimental results, it is recommended to develop new biological indicators to monitor haemopoietic cell renewal at the level of the stem cell pool using blood stem cells in addition to the determination of cytokine concentrations in the serum (and other novel approaches). To prepare for unexpected haemopoietic effects during prolonged space missions, research should be increased to modify the radiation sensitivity of haemopoietic stem cells (for instance by the application of certain regulatory molecules). In addition, a ``blood stem cell bank'' might be established for the autologous storage of stem cells and for use in space activities keeping them in a radiation protected container.

  3. Particles in spherical electromagnetic radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitter, H.; Thaller, B.

    1984-03-01

    If the time-dependence of a Hamiltonian can be compensated by an appropriate symmetry transformation, the corresponding quantum mechanical problem can be reduced to an effectively stationary one. With this result we investigate the behavior of nonrelativistic particles in a spherical radiation field produced by a rotating source. Then the symmetry transformation corresponds to a rotation. We calculate the transition probabilities in Born approximation. The extension to problems involving an additional Coulomb potential is briefly discussed. (Author)

  4. Electric field deformation in diamond sensors induced by radiation defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassel, Florian; Boer, Wim de; Boegelspacher, Felix; Dierlamm, Alexander; Mueller, Thomas; Steck, Pia [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik (IEKP), Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT) (Germany); Dabrowski, Anne; Guthoff, Moritz [CERN (Switzerland)

    2016-07-01

    The BCML system is a beam monitoring device in the CMS experiment at the LHC. As detectors 32 poly-crystalline CVD diamond sensors are positioned in a ring around the beam pipe at a distance of ±1.8 m and ±14.4 m from the interaction point. The radiation hardness of the diamond sensors in terms of measured signal during operation was significantly lower than expected from laboratory measurements. At high particle rates, such as those occurring during the operation of the LHC, a significant fraction of the defects act as traps for charge carriers. This space charge modifies the electrical field in the sensor bulk leading to a reduction of the charge collection efficiency (CCE). A diamond irradiation campaign was started to investigate the rate dependent electrical field deformation with respect to the radiation damage. Besides the electrical field measurements via the Transient Current Technique, the CCE was measured. The experimental results were used to create an effective trap model that takes the radiation damage into account. Using this trap model the rate dependent electrical field deformation and the CCE were simulated with the software ''SILVACO TCAD''. This talk compares the experimental measurement results with the simulations.

  5. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (No. 8)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    This report describes research activities in Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during the one year period from April 1, 1974 through March 31, 1975. The major research field covers the following subjects: studies related to reactions of carbon monoxide and hydrogen; polymerization studies under the irradiation of high dose rate electron beams; modification of polymers; fundamental studies on polymerization, degradation, crosslinking, and grafting. (auth.)

  6. Calibration of radioprotection equipment gamma radiation at the Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation Metrology - DEN/UFPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazario, Macilene; Khoury, Helen; Hazin, Clovis

    2003-01-01

    This work presents aspects of the radioprotection equipment calibration service of the Laboratory for Metrology of Ionizing Radiations (LMRI) of the DEN/UFPE related to the calibration procedures, characteristics of the radiation beam and the evaluation of equipment calibrated in the period of 2001-2002. The LMRI-DEN/UFPE is one of the four laboratories in Brazil licensed by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission for the execution of calibration services on area, surface contamination and personal monitors used by industries, hospitals, universities and research institutes using radioactive sources

  7. Radiation dosimetry and standards at the austrian dosimetry laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitner, A.

    1984-10-01

    The Austrian Dosimetry Laboratory, established and operated in cooperation between the Austrian Research Center Seibersdorf and the Federal Office of Metrology and Surveying (Bundesamt and Eich- und Vermessungswesen) maintains the national primary standards for radiation dosimetry. Furthermore its tasks include routine calibration of dosemeters and dosimetric research. The irradiation facilities of the laboratory comprise three X-ray machines covering the voltage range from 5 kV to 420 kV constant potential, a 60 Co teletherapy unit, a circular exposure system for routine batch calibration of personnel dosemeters with four gamma ray sources ( 60 Co and 137 Cs) and a reference source system with six gamma ray sources ( 60 Co and 137 Cs). In addition a set of calibrated beta ray sources are provided ( 147 Pm, 204 Tl and 90 Sr). The dosimetric equipment consists of three free-air parallelplate ionization chambers serving as primary standards of exposure for the X-ray energy region, graphite cavity chambers with measured volume as primary standards for the gamma radiation of 137 Cs and 60 Co as well as different secondary standard ionization chambers covering the dose rate range from the natural background level up to the level of modern therapy accelerators. In addition for high energy photon and electron radiation a graphite calorimeter is provided as primary standard of absorbed dose. The principle experimental set-ups for the practical use of the standards are presented and the procedures for the calibration of the different types of dosemeters are described. (Author)

  8. X radiation qualities characterization following the standard IEC 61267 recommendations at the calibration laboratory of IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franciscatto, Priscila Cerutti

    2009-01-01

    This work presents a methodology for the X radiation qualities characterization following the new recommendations of the standard 61267 of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) to establish a new procedure for calibration of dosimetric systems used in the field of diagnostic radiology. The reference qualities radiation of IEC 61267: RQR 2 to RQR 10, RQA 2 to RQA 10, RQB 2 to RQB 10 and RQN 2 to RQN 10 were implanted at the calibration laboratory of IPEN (LCI). Their characteristics were analyzed through measurements of beam parameters such as: Practical peak voltage (PPV), specific additional filtrations for each qualities (high purity aluminum of about 99.9%), 1st and 2nd Half Value Layers, homogeneity coefficient. The inherent filtration of the X ray tube was also determined. With the establishment of these radiation qualities, the LCI will be ready to calibrate the measuring instruments of radiation in the new qualities, allowing an improvement in radiological services offered by IPEN. (author)

  9. Radiation damage of polymers in ultrasonic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anbalagan, Poornnima

    2008-07-01

    Radiation damage has always been a topic of great interest in various fields of sciences. In this work, an attempt is made to probe into the effect of subthreshold ultrasonic waves on the radiation damage created by irradiation of deuterons in polymer samples wherein the polymer samples act as model systems. Two equal volumes of radiation damage were produced in a single polymer sample wherein a standing wave of ultrasound was introduced into one. Three polymers namely, Polycarbonate, Polymethylmethacrylate and Polyvinyl chloride were used in this work. Four independent techniques were used to analyze the irradiated samples and visualize the radiation damage. Interferometric measurements give a measure of the refractive index modulation in the irradiated sample. Polymers, being transparent, do not absorb in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy shows absorption peaks in the visible region in irradiated polymer samples. Ion irradiation causes coloration of polymers. The light microscope is used to measure the absorption of white light by the irradiated polymers. Positron annihilation spectroscopy is used to obtain a measure of the open volume created by irradiation in polymers. A comparison between the irradiated region and the region exposed to ultrasonic waves simultaneously with irradiation in a polymer sample shows the polymer specific influence of the ultrasonic standing wave. (orig.)

  10. Radiation damage of polymers in ultrasonic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anbalagan, Poornnima

    2008-01-01

    Radiation damage has always been a topic of great interest in various fields of sciences. In this work, an attempt is made to probe into the effect of subthreshold ultrasonic waves on the radiation damage created by irradiation of deuterons in polymer samples wherein the polymer samples act as model systems. Two equal volumes of radiation damage were produced in a single polymer sample wherein a standing wave of ultrasound was introduced into one. Three polymers namely, Polycarbonate, Polymethylmethacrylate and Polyvinyl chloride were used in this work. Four independent techniques were used to analyze the irradiated samples and visualize the radiation damage. Interferometric measurements give a measure of the refractive index modulation in the irradiated sample. Polymers, being transparent, do not absorb in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy shows absorption peaks in the visible region in irradiated polymer samples. Ion irradiation causes coloration of polymers. The light microscope is used to measure the absorption of white light by the irradiated polymers. Positron annihilation spectroscopy is used to obtain a measure of the open volume created by irradiation in polymers. A comparison between the irradiated region and the region exposed to ultrasonic waves simultaneously with irradiation in a polymer sample shows the polymer specific influence of the ultrasonic standing wave. (orig.)

  11. Limited-field radiation for bifocal germinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafay-Cousin, Lucie; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Mabbott, Donald; Spiegler, Brenda; Drake, Jim; Bartels, Ute; Huang, Annie; Bouffet, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence, characteristics, treatment, and outcomes of bifocal germinomas treated with chemotherapy followed by focal radiation. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective review. Inclusion criteria included radiologic diagnosis of bifocal germinoma involving the pineal and neurohypophyseal region, no evidence of dissemination on spinal MRI, negative results from cerebrospinal fluid cytologic evaluation, and negative tumor markers. Results: Between 1995 and 2004, 6 patients (5 male, 1 female; median age, 12.8 years) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All had symptoms of diabetes insipidus at presentation. On MRI, 4 patients had a pineal and suprasellar mass, and 2 had a pineal mass associated with abnormal neurohypophyseal enhancement. All patients received chemotherapy followed by limited-field radiation and achieved complete remission after chemotherapy. The radiation field involved the whole ventricular system (range, 2,400-4,000 cGy) with or without a boost to the primary lesions. All patients remain in complete remission at a median follow-up of 48.1 months (range, 9-73.4 months). Conclusions: This experience suggests that bifocal germinoma can be considered a locoregional rather than a metastatic disease. Chemotherapy and focal radiotherapy might be sufficient to provide excellent outcomes. Staging refinement with new diagnostic tools will likely increase the incidence of the entity

  12. Radiation protection calibration facilities at the National Radiation Laboratory, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foote, B.J.

    1995-01-01

    The National Radiation Laboratory (NRL), serving under the Ministry of Health, provides radiation protection services to the whole of New Zealand. Consequently it performs many functions that are otherwise spread amongst several organizations in larger countries. It is the national regulatory body for radiation protection. It writes and enforces codes of safe practice, and conducts safety inspections of all workplaces using radiation. It provides a personal monitoring service for radiation workers. It also maintains the national primary standards for x-ray exposure and 60 Co air kerma. These standards are transferred to hospitals through a calibration service. The purpose of this report is to outline the primary standards facilities at NRL, and to discuss the calibration of dosemeters using these facilities. (J.P.N.)

  13. HESYRL: a dedicated synchrotron radiation laboratory in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, L.J.

    1985-01-01

    The HESYRL national synchrotron radiation laboratory was first proposed in 1977 as a conclusion of a general planning meeting on nationwide development of natural science and technology at which a topic was the application of synchrotron radiation. A study group was formed in 1978 to carry out preliminary research and prototype development work. The final approval of the project was given in April 1983 and the lab was soon founded. Designs of the main facilities and building completed in Oct 1984. The ground breaking was in Nov 1984. Manufacturing and purchasing of all the equipment and components are now in progress. The overall layout of HESYRL project is shown. the main facilities are an 800 MeV electron storage ring, a 88 meter transport line and a 240 MeV linac as the injector. Some basic considerations in the selecting of major machine parameters are discussed

  14. Radiation and detection of gravitational waves in laboratory conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogolyubov, P.N.; Pisarev, A.F.; Shavokhina, N.S.

    1981-01-01

    Two variants are proposed and analyzed for an experiment on radiation and detection of gravitational waves in laboratory conditions in the optical and superhigh frequency range (band). In the first variant the laser light is parametrically transformed to the gravitational wave in the optical-inhomogeneous medium. The gravitational flux produced is registered by the inverse parametric transformation of the gravitational to light wave. In the second variant the radiation of gravitational waves is realized through hypersonic oscillations in piezocrystals, and the reception of waves is made by the superconducting coaxial resonator in which the gravitational wave resonantly transforms into the electromag= . netic wave. The analysis performed testifies to the possibility of an experiment of this type at the present time [ru

  15. Momentum of the Pure Radiation Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehnert B.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The local momentum equation of the pure radiation field is considered in terms of an earlier elaborated and revised electromagnetic theory. In this equation the contribution from the volume force is found to vanish in rectangular geometry, and to become nonzero but negligible in cylindrical geometry. Consequently the radiated momentum is due to the Poynting vector only, as in conventional electrodynamics. It results in physically relevant properties of a photon model having an angular momentum (spin. The Poynting vector concept is further compared to the quantized momentum concept for a free particle, as represented by a spatial gradient operator acting on the wave function. However, this latter otherwise successful concept leads to difficulties in the physical interpretation of known and expected photon properties such as the spin, the negligible loss of transverse momentum across a bounding surface, and the Lorentz invariance.

  16. Development of Remote Control Laboratory for Radiation Detection via Internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Tae; Lee, Hee Bok; Yuk, Keun Chul

    2002-01-01

    The role of experiments in science education is essential for understanding the natural phenomena and principle related to a subject. Therefore, the remote control experiment via Internet is one of key solution for distance learners in science education. The remote experiments are also necessary for the time-consuming experiment which takes several days, collaborative experiment between distance learners, expensive laboratory equipment which is not usually available to students, experimental procedure which is dangerous, etc. In this study, we have developed a general method for a remote control laboratory system using internet and interface techniques. It is possible for students to learn the nuclear physics to control the real instruments and conduct physics experimentation with internet techniques. We proposed the remote control radiation measurement system as a sample application. This system could be useful for the monitoring near a nuclear power plants in order to improve the environment data credibility to the public

  17. Laboratory contamination in the early period of radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rona, E.

    1979-01-01

    Meagre records exist of the levels of contamination and human exposure encountered by those who took part in the early research on radioactive materials. In order to throw some light on the nature and extent of the problem the author presents some recollections of the conditions of the laboratories in which she worked from 1924-1940. These include the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute, the Radium Institute of Vienna and the Curie Institute. The health, radiation injuries and causes of death of some early workers are discussed. Although the effects of acute exposure were recognised early on, there was less awareness of the possible effects of chronic exposure, and lack of prompt clinical signs of injury encouraged complacency. Laboratory contamination was often seen more as a problem affecting experimental results than as a health hazard. (author)

  18. Upper bound of abutment scour in laboratory and field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Transportation, conducted a field investigation of abutment scour in South Carolina and used those data to develop envelope curves that define the upper bound of abutment scour. To expand on this previous work, an additional cooperative investigation was initiated to combine the South Carolina data with abutment scour data from other sources and evaluate upper bound patterns with this larger data set. To facilitate this analysis, 446 laboratory and 331 field measurements of abutment scour were compiled into a digital database. This extensive database was used to evaluate the South Carolina abutment scour envelope curves and to develop additional envelope curves that reflected the upper bound of abutment scour depth for the laboratory and field data. The envelope curves provide simple but useful supplementary tools for assessing the potential maximum abutment scour depth in the field setting.

  19. Radiation chemistry in the Jovian stratosphere - Laboratory simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, Gene D.; Thompson, W. R.; Sagan, Carl

    1992-01-01

    The results of the present low-pressure/continuous-flow laboratory simulations of H2/He/CH4/NH3 atmospheres' plasma-induced chemistry indicate radiation yields of both hydrocarbon and N2-containing organic compounds which increase with decreasing pressure. On the basis of these findings, upper limits of 1 million-1 billion molecules/sq cm/sec are established for production rates of major auroral-chemistry species in the Jovian stratosphere. It is noted that auroral processes may account for 10-100 percent of the total abundances of most of the observed polar-region organic species.

  20. Optimization of radiation safety conditions in radon laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibal'nik, S.P.; Koroleva, T.M.

    1990-01-01

    The study was aimed at studying working conditions of personnel, engaged in production and supply of radon solution in medical and prophylactic institutions of the Kaliningrad region for the period 1962-1988. Data on examinations carried out at radon laboratories during this period by radiological group of the Kaliningrad sanitary epidemiological station were used as a basis for the study. Positive dynamics of indicators of radiation safety of the persons working at these objects is indicated, concrete measures and ways for improving working conditions of the personnel and role of sanitary epidemiological service in solving these problems are shown. 2 refs.; 1 tab

  1. Radiation protection in a multi-disciplinary research laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donovan, E.J.B.; Jenks, G.J.; Brighton, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the measures for the protection of personnel against the hazards of ionising and non-ionising radiation at the Materials Research Laboratory (MRL) in Victoria. The paper describes MRL safety and protection policy and management, and gives brief details of procedures and problems at the working level. A comparison of MRL average annual photon doses with all Governmental Research Institutions and industry is given. The good safety record of MRL is evident and shows that the radioactive protection issues are well handled. 4 figs

  2. [Strategy Development for International Cooperation in the Clinical Laboratory Field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yoshiko; Osawa, Susumu

    2015-10-01

    The strategy of international cooperation in the clinical laboratory field was analyzed to improve the quality of intervention by reviewing documents from international organizations and the Japanese government. Based on the world development agenda, the target of action for health has shifted from communicable diseases to non-communicable diseases (NCD). This emphasizes the importance of comprehensive clinical laboratories instead of disease-specific examinations in developing countries. To achieve this goal, the World Health Organization (WHO) has disseminated to the African and Asian regions the Laboratory Quality Management System (LQMS), which is based on the same principles of the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) 15189. To execute this strategy, international experts must have competence in project management, analyze information regarding the target country, and develop a strategy for management of the LQMS with an understanding of the technical aspects of laboratory work. However, there is no appropriate pre- and post-educational system of international health for Japanese international workers. Universities and academic organizations should cooperate with the government to establish a system of education for international workers. Objectives of this education system must include: (1) training for the organization and understanding of global health issues, (2) education of the principles regarding comprehensive management of clinical laboratories, and (3) understanding the LQMS which was employed based on WHO's initiative. Achievement of these objectives will help improve the quality of international cooperation in the clinical laboratory field.

  3. Predicting bioremediation of hydrocarbons: Laboratory to field scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diplock, E.E.; Mardlin, D.P.; Killham, K.S.; Paton, G.I.

    2009-01-01

    There are strong drivers to increasingly adopt bioremediation as an effective technique for risk reduction of hydrocarbon impacted soils. Researchers often rely solely on chemical data to assess bioremediation efficiently, without making use of the numerous biological techniques for assessing microbial performance. Where used, laboratory experiments must be effectively extrapolated to the field scale. The aim of this research was to test laboratory derived data and move to the field scale. In this research, the remediation of over thirty hydrocarbon sites was studied in the laboratory using a range of analytical techniques. At elevated concentrations, the rate of degradation was best described by respiration and the total hydrocarbon concentration in soil. The number of bacterial degraders and heterotrophs as well as quantification of the bioavailable fraction allowed an estimation of how bioremediation would progress. The response of microbial biosensors proved a useful predictor of bioremediation in the absence of other microbial data. Field-scale trials on average took three times as long to reach the same endpoint as the laboratory trial. It is essential that practitioners justify the nature and frequency of sampling when managing remediation projects and estimations can be made using laboratory derived data. The value of bioremediation will be realised when those that practice the technology can offer transparent lines of evidence to explain their decisions. - Detailed biological, chemical and physical characterisation reduces uncertainty in predicting bioremediation.

  4. Comparison of leach results from field and laboratory prepared samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oblath, S.B.; Langton, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The leach behavior of saltstone prepared in the laboratory agrees well with that from samples mixed in the field using the Littleford mixer. Leach rates of nitrates and cesium from the current reference formulation saltstone were compared. The laboratory samples were prepared using simulated salt solution; those in the field used Tank 50 decontaminated supernate. For both nitrate and cesium, the field and laboratory samples showed nearly identical leach rates for the first 30 to 50 days. For the remaining period of the test, the field samples showed higher leach rates with the maximum difference being less than a factor of three. Ruthenium and antimony were present in the Tank 50 supernate in known amounts. Antimony-125 was observed in the leachate and a fractional leach rate was calculated to be at least a factor of ten less than that of 137 Cs. No 106 Ru was observed in the leachate, and the release rate was not calculated. However, based on the detection limits for the analysis, the ruthenium leach rate must also be at least a factor of ten less than cesium. These data are the first measurements of the leach rates of Ru and Sb from saltstone. The nitrate leach rates for these samples were 5 x 10 -5 grams of nitrate per square cm per day after 100 days for the laboratory samples and after 200 days for the field samples. These values are consistent with the previously measured leach rates for reference formulation saltstone. The relative standard deviation in the leach rate is about 15% for the field samples, which all were produced from one batch of saltstone, and about 35% for the laboratory samples, which came from different batches. These are the first recorded estimates of the error in leach rates for saltstone

  5. Virtual radiation fields for ALARA determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, T.W.

    1995-01-01

    As computing power has increased, so too has the ability to model and simulate complex systems and processes. In addition, virtual reality technology has made it possible to visualize and understand many complex scientific and engineering problems. For this reason, a virtual dosimetry program called Virtual Radiation Fields (VRF) is developed to model radiation dose rate and cumulative dose to a receptor operating in a virtual radiation environment. With the design and testing of many facilities and products taking place in the virtual world, this program facilitates the concurrent consideration of radiological concerns during the design process. Three-dimensional (3D) graphical presentation of the radiation environment is made possible through the use of IGRIP, a graphical modeling program developed by Deneb Robotics, Inc. The VRF simulation program was designed to model and display a virtual dosimeter. As a demonstration of the program's capability, the Hanford tank, C-106, was modeled to predict radiation doses to robotic equipment used to remove radioactive waste from the tank. To validate VRF dose predictions, comparison was made with reported values for tank C-106, which showed agreement to within 0.5%. Graphical information is presented regarding the 3D dose rate variation inside the tank. Cumulative dose predictions were made for the cleanup operations of tank C-106. A four-dimensional dose rate map generated by VRF was used to model the dose rate not only in 3D space but also as a function of the amount of waste remaining in the tank. This allowed VRF to predict dose rate at any stage in the waste removal process for an accurate simulation of the radiological conditions throughout the tank cleanup procedure

  6. Virtual radiation fields for ALARA determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, T.W.

    1995-12-31

    As computing power has increased, so too has the ability to model and simulate complex systems and processes. In addition, virtual reality technology has made it possible to visualize and understand many complex scientific and engineering problems. For this reason, a virtual dosimetry program called Virtual Radiation Fields (VRF) is developed to model radiation dose rate and cumulative dose to a receptor operating in a virtual radiation environment. With the design and testing of many facilities and products taking place in the virtual world, this program facilitates the concurrent consideration of radiological concerns during the design process. Three-dimensional (3D) graphical presentation of the radiation environment is made possible through the use of IGRIP, a graphical modeling program developed by Deneb Robotics, Inc. The VRF simulation program was designed to model and display a virtual dosimeter. As a demonstration of the program`s capability, the Hanford tank, C-106, was modeled to predict radiation doses to robotic equipment used to remove radioactive waste from the tank. To validate VRF dose predictions, comparison was made with reported values for tank C-106, which showed agreement to within 0.5%. Graphical information is presented regarding the 3D dose rate variation inside the tank. Cumulative dose predictions were made for the cleanup operations of tank C-106. A four-dimensional dose rate map generated by VRF was used to model the dose rate not only in 3D space but also as a function of the amount of waste remaining in the tank. This allowed VRF to predict dose rate at any stage in the waste removal process for an accurate simulation of the radiological conditions throughout the tank cleanup procedure.

  7. Pyranometer offsets triggered by ambient meteorology: insights from laboratory and field experiments

    OpenAIRE

    S. M. Oswald; H. Pietsch; D. J. Baumgartner; P. Weihs; H. E. Rieder

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates effects of ambient meteorology on the accuracy of radiation measurements performed with pyranometers contained in various heating/ventilation systems (HV-systems). It focuses particularly on instrument offsets observed following precipitation events. To quantify pyranometer responses to precipitation, a series of controlled laboratory experiments as well as two targeted field campaigns were performed in 2016. The results indicate that precipitation (as simulated by spr...

  8. Comparing sensitivity of ecotoxicological effect endpoints between laboratory and field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selck, H.; Riemann, B.; Christoffersen, K.

    2002-01-01

    multispecies field tests using tributyltin (TBT) and linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) were compared with published laboratory single-species test results and measured in situ concentrations. Extrapolation methods were evaluated by comparing predicted no-effect concentrations (PNECs), calculated by AF...

  9. The West Africa Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The West Africa Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program, a strategy to improve disease surveillance and epidemic control in West Africa. ... The program includes four countries: Burkina Faso, Mali, Niger, and Togo with an overarching goal to progressively cover all French speaking countries in West Africa ...

  10. Field Research Studying Whales in an Undergraduate Animal Behavior Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaren, R. David; Schulte, Dianna; Kennedy, Jen

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a new field research laboratory in an undergraduate animal behavior course involving the study of whale behavior, ecology and conservation in partnership with a non-profit research organization--the Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation (BOS). The project involves two weeks of training and five weekend trips on whale watch…

  11. Overview of DOE Oil and Gas Field Laboratory Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromhal, G.; Ciferno, J.; Covatch, G.; Folio, E.; Melchert, E.; Ogunsola, O.; Renk, J., III; Vagnetti, R.

    2017-12-01

    America's abundant unconventional oil and natural gas (UOG) resources are critical components of our nation's energy portfolio. These resources need to be prudently developed to derive maximum benefits. In spite of the long history of hydraulic fracturing, the optimal number of fracturing stages during multi-stage fracture stimulation in horizontal wells is not known. In addition, there is the dire need of a comprehensive understanding of ways to improve the recovery of shale gas with little or no impacts on the environment. Research that seeks to expand our view of effective and environmentally sustainable ways to develop our nation's oil and natural gas resources can be done in the laboratory or at a computer; but, some experiments must be performed in a field setting. The Department of Energy (DOE) Field Lab Observatory projects are designed to address those research questions that must be studied in the field. The Department of Energy (DOE) is developing a suite of "field laboratory" test sites to carry out collaborative research that will help find ways of improving the recovery of energy resources as much as possible, with as little environmental impact as possible, from "unconventional" formations, such as shale and other low permeability rock formations. Currently there are three field laboratories in various stages of development and operation. Work is on-going at two of the sites: The Hydraulic Fracturing Test Site (HFTS) in the Permian Basin and the Marcellus Shale Energy and Environmental Lab (MSEEL) project in the Marcellus Shale Play. Agreement on the third site, the Utica Shale Energy and Environmental Lab (USEEL) project in the Utica Shale Play, was just recently finalized. Other field site opportunities may be forthcoming. This presentation will give an overview of the three field laboratory projects.

  12. Scaling plant ultraviolet spectral responses from laboratory action spectra to field spectral weighting factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flint, S.D.; Caldwell, M.M.

    1996-01-01

    Biological spectral weighting functions (BSWF) play a key role in calculating the increase of biologically effective solar ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-BBE) due to ozone reduction, assessing current latitudinal gradients of UV-B BE . and comparing solar UV-B BE with that from lamps and filters in plant experiments. Plant UV action spectra (usually determined with monochromatic radiation in the laboratory with exposure periods on the order of hours) are often used as BSWF. The realism of such spectra for plants growing day after day in polychromatic solar radiation in the field is questionable. We tested the widely used generalized plant action spectrum since preliminary data from an action spectrum being developed with monochromatic radiation for a cultivated oat variety indicate reasonable agreement with the generalized spectrum. These tests involved exposing plants to polychromatic radiation either from a high-pressure xenon arc lamp in growth chambers or in the field under solar radiation with supplemental UV-B lamps. Different broad-spectrum combinations were achieved by truncating the spectrum at successively longer UV wavelengths with various filters. In the growth chamber experiments, the generalized plant spectrum appeared to predict plant growth responses at short (<310nm) wavelengths but not at longer wavelengths. The field experiment reinforced these conclusions, showing (in addition to the expected direct UV-B effects) both direct UV-A effects and UV-A mitigation of UV-B effects. (author)

  13. Spin and radiation in intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walser, M.W.; Urbach, D.J.; Hatsagortsyan, K.Z.; Hu, S.X.; Keitel, C.H.

    2002-01-01

    The spin dynamics and its reaction on the particle motion are investigated for free and bound electrons in intense linearly polarized laser fields. Employing both classical and quantum treatments we analytically evaluate the spin oscillation of free electrons in intense laser fields and indicate the effect of spin-orbit coupling on the motion of the electron. In Mott scattering an estimation for the spin oscillation is derived. In intense laser ion dynamics spin signatures are studied in detail with emphasis on high-order harmonic generation in the tunneling regime. First- and second-order calculations in the ratio of electron velocity and the speed of light show spin signatures in the radiation spectrum and spin-orbit effects in the electron polarization

  14. The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, 20 years of synchrotron light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantwell, K.

    1993-08-01

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is now operating as a fully dedicated light source with low emittance electron optics, delivering high brightness photon beams to 25 experimental stations six to seven months per year. On October 1, 1993 SSRL became a Division of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, rather than an Independent Laboratory of Stanford University, so that high energy physics and synchrotron radiation now function under a single DOE contract. The SSRL division of SLAC has responsibility for operating, maintaining and improving the SPEAR accelerator complex, which includes the storage ring and a 3 GeV injector. SSRL has thirteen x-ray stations and twelve VUV/Soft x-ray stations serving its 600 users. Recently opened to users is a new spherical grating monochromator (SGM) and a multiundulator beam line. Circularly polarized capabilities are being exploited on a second SGM line. New YB 66 crystals installed in a vacuum double-crystal monochromator line have sparked new interest for Al and Mg edge studies. One of the most heavily subscribed stations is the rotation camera, which has been recently enhanced with a MAR imaging plate detector system for protein crystallography on a multipole wiggler. Under construction is a new wiggler-based structural molecular biology beam line with experimental stations for crystallography, small angle scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Plans for new developments include wiggler beam lines and associated facilities specialized for environmental research and materials processing

  15. Reference radiation fields - Simulated workplace neutron fields - Part 2: Calibration fundamentals related to the basic quantities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    ISO 8529-1, ISO 8529-2 and ISO 8529-3, deal with the production, characterization and use of neutron fields for the calibration of personal dosimeters and area survey meters. These International Standards describe reference radiations with neutron energy spectra that are well defined and well suited for use in the calibration laboratory. However, the neutron spectra commonly encountered in routine radiation protection situations are, in many cases, quite different from those produced by the sources specified in the International Standards. Since personal neutron dosimeters, and to a lesser extent survey meters, are generally quite energy dependent in their dose equivalent response, it might not be possible to achieve an appropriate calibration for a device that is used in a workplace where the neutron energy spectrum and angular distribution differ significantly from those of the reference radiation used for calibration. ISO 8529-1 describes four radionuclide based neutron reference radiations in detail. This part of ISO 12789 includes the specification of neutron reference radiations that were developed to closely resemble radiation that is encountered in practice

  16. Collimation system for a laboratory of primary and secondary ionizing radiation calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, S.R.; David, M.G.

    2003-01-01

    This work is part of a cooperation plan between the LNMRI/IRD and the LCR/UERJ, for the a primary calibration at the IRD and a secondary laboratory at the LCR, both calibrated for mammographic beams which will be part a Calibration National Network. For the mounting of the primary laboratory, the first step was to install two additional collimators in order to guarantee that the beam area over the ionization chamber to satisfy the calibration international standards. So, the collimators were constructed obeying the geometric rules, the first being of conic format and the second of the cylindrical format, therefore avoiding the effects of the scattering radiation on the edges. By using this collimation system it was possible to verify the uniformity of the radiation field incident the ionization chamber to be over 98% of the total area, guaranteeing better precision of the measurement

  17. Science outside the laboratory measurement in field science and economics

    CERN Document Server

    Boumans, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    The conduct of most of social science occurs outside the laboratory. Such studies in field science explore phenomena that cannot for practical, technical, or ethical reasons be explored under controlled conditions. These phenomena cannot be fully isolated from their environment or investigated by manipulation or intervention. Yet measurement, including rigorous or clinical measurement, does provide analysts with a sound basis for discerning what occurs under field conditions, and why. In Science Outside the Laboratory, Marcel Boumans explores the state of measurement theory, its reliability, and the role expert judgment plays in field investigations from the perspective of the philosophy of science. Its discussion of the problems of passive observation, the calculus of observation, the two-model problem, and model-based consensus uses illustrations drawn primarily from economics. Rich in research and discussion, the volume clarifies the extent to which measurement provides valid information about objects an...

  18. Contribution of the radiation hygiene laboratories network in physical protection of radiation materials in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milu, C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The Ministry of Health and Family from Romania has its own radiation protection network, including 23 radiation hygiene laboratories (RHLs), within the Institutes of Public Health-Bucharest, Iassy, Cluj-Napoca and Timisoara and the Directions of Public Health from Arges county, Bihor, Brasov, Mures, Maramures, Cluj, Sibiu, Harghita, Suceava, lassy, Bacau, Neamt, Galati, Constanta, Prahova, Dolj, Caras-Severin, Timis and Bucharest City. The RHLs network has 170 persons (physicians, physicists, engineers, chemists, biologists and technicians) and it is technically co-ordinated by the RHL in the Institute of Public Health-Bucharest. Within the local or national activities for physical protection of radioactive materials, the RHLs network closely co-operates with the Ministry of Internal Affairs (MAI) and with the nuclear regulatory authority, named the National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN). In the particular case of theft, sabotage or illicit traffic of radioactive materials, usually the MAI has the main role in the co-ordination of intervention actions of the three authorities. The RHLs network contributes by the expertise of its staff and by using its intervention facilities. The specific tasks for the RHLs network are: identification of the type and size of the radioactive material (by direct dosimetry and/or by gamma spectroscopy); dose reconstructions for the involved persons, the intervention personnel and the population; health management for overexposed persons and the medical response, including biological dosimetry and epidemiological studies. Recent special situations in this field, were: theft of some fuel (defect) tablets of natural uranium, from a production factory; the illicit traffic of radioactive materials, in transition to Western European Countries; an unauthorized decommissioning of a furnace, determining the uncontrolled dispersion of about 30 cobalt-60 sealed sources and the radiation exposure of nearly 20

  19. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, S.; Cantwell, K. [eds.

    1988-12-31

    During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.

  20. Radiation safety and quality control in the cyclotron laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.; Krause, G.; Ebadi, M.

    2006-01-01

    Radiation safety was determined to maintain quality control in the cyclotron laboratory. Based on the results of 438 runs in the Faraday cup (20 μA for 10 min), 20 runs on 18 O-water target (40 μA for 2 h) and 10 runs on 18 O-gas targets (30 μA for 45 min), we have established that occupationally exposed workers remain 10 ± 5 times below federal regulatory limits (FRLs) in the cyclotron vault, 30 ± 8 times below FRL in the radiochemistry laboratory and 200 ± 10 times below the FRL outside the cyclotron laboratory during beam operation. (The FRL for unrestricted area are <20 μSv in 1 h.) The non-occupationally exposed workers serving in offices in the vicinity of the cyclotron vault within 100 m distance remained 200 times below the FRL irrespective of beam being on or off, suggesting that routine beam operation of 40 μA for 2 h once a day during office hours is safe provided quality control and system performance measures as discussed in this report are strictly maintained. (authors)

  1. Laboratory training manual on the use of isotopes and radiation in soil-plant relations research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in co-operation with local authorities in various countries have jointly sponsored international laboratory training courses on the use of isotopes and radiation in specialized fields of agriculture. Outstanding scientists from various countries have given lectures and devised and conducted the laboratory exercises; research workers from all over the world have attended these courses. In addition, under the United Nations Expanded Programme of Technical Assistance the IAEA in co-operation with host governments has conducted similar regional courses. This laboratory manual is a natural outgrowth of these activities. The contents represents the efforts not only of the IAEA and FAO Secretariats but also of the various instructors who have participated in the courses, a Special Consultant, Victor Middelboe, and a panel of scientists who met in Vienna from 3 to 7 September 1962 and revised the initial version assembled by Hans Broeshart and Chai Moo Cho of the IAEA Secretariat. The present manual consists of two parts: a basic part which contains general information and laboratory exercises on the properties of radiation and the principles of use of radioactive tracers, and a second part which contains a series of detailed laboratory exercises in the field of soil-plant relationships. It is intended to publish at least four additional parts on the subjects of the use of isotopes and radiation in animal science, agricultural biochemistry, entomology and plant pathology. This manual, dealing with an important aspect of the peaceful application and use of atomic energy, should prove helpful not only to those working with the IAEA and FAO training programmes but to other research scientists dealing with the development and use of new information in agricultural science all over the world

  2. Laboratory and field experience with rim ditch dewatering of MFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demoz, A.; Mikula, R. [Natural Resources Canada, Devon, AB (Canada). CANMET Western Research Centre; Lahaie, R. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This PowerPoint presentation described a rim ditch method of dewatering mature fine tailings (MFT). Polymer additions were used to strengthen the MFT and to decrease the capillary suction time (CST). Laboratory and field-scale studies were conducted to demonstrate the dewatering method. The flocculants were added in a Komax inline mixer. Polymers were then injected into the tailings. The mixing processes were optimized in a series of laboratory studies and then demonstrated in the field tests. The tests showed that CST and high dewatering rates were consistently maintained using the method. MFT feeds were also consistent. Release water quality was improved using the method. The large-scale test site is now being monitored for compliance with Directive 74. tabs., figs.

  3. Alternatives to Pyrotechnic Distress Signals; Laboratory and Field Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    distance for positive identity and location. The spectral characteristics (“color”) of the light are important, as daytime and nighttime vision are most...ambient illumination. Figure 10. Laboratory setup. 5.2.1 Projector Specifications The scene projector was a Panasonic PT-AE80000U home cinema ...three were identical to lab signals: 4Hz group/interrupt in white, red, and cyan. For the field testing, experimenters mounted the signal generator

  4. Radiative Transfer Theory Verified by Controlled Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Goldstein, Dennis H.; Chowdhary, Jacek; Lompado, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of high-accuracy controlled laboratory measurements of the Stokes reflection matrix for suspensions of submicrometer-sized latex particles in water and compare them with the results of a numerically exact computer solution of the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE). The quantitative performance of the VRTE is monitored by increasing the volume packing density of the latex particles from 2 to 10. Our results indicate that the VRTE can be applied safely to random particulate media with packing densities up to 2. VRTE results for packing densities of the order of 5 should be taken with caution, whereas the polarized bidirectional reflectivity of suspensions with larger packing densities cannot be accurately predicted. We demonstrate that a simple modification of the phase matrix entering the VRTE based on the so-called static structure factor can be a promising remedy that deserves further examination.

  5. Temperature field for radiative tomato peeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuccurullo, G; Giordano, L

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays peeling of tomatoes is performed by using steam or lye, which are expensive and polluting techniques, thus sustainable alternatives are searched for dry peeling and, among that, radiative heating seems to be a fairly promising method. This paper aims to speed up the prediction of surface temperatures useful for realizing dry-peeling, thus a 1D-analytical model for the unsteady temperature field in a rotating tomato exposed to a radiative heating source is presented. Since only short times are of interest for the problem at hand, the model involves a semi-infinite slab cooled by convective heat transfer while heated by a pulsating heat source. The model being linear, the solution is derived following the Laplace Transform method. A 3D finite element model of the rotating tomato is introduced as well in order to validate the analytical solution. A satisfactory agreement is attained. Therefore, two different ways to predict the onset of the peeling conditions are available which can be of help for proper design of peeling plants. Particular attention is paid to study surface temperature uniformity, that being a critical parameter for realizing an easy tomato peeling. (paper)

  6. Bacterial Transport in Heterogeneous Porous Media: Laboratory and Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, M. E.

    2001-12-01

    A fully instrumented research site for examining field-scale bacterial transport has been established on the eastern shore of Virginia. Studies employing intact sediment cores from the South Oyster site have been performed to examine the effects of physical and chemical heterogeneity, to derive transport parameters, and to aid in the selection of bacterial strains for use in field experiments. A variety of innovative methods for tracking bacteria were developed and evaluated under both laboratory and field conditions, providing the tools to detect target cell concentrations in groundwater down to effects of physical and chemical heterogeneity on field-scale bacterial transport. The results of this research not only contribute to the development of more effective bioremediation strategies, but also have implications for a better understanding of bacterial movement in the subsurface as it relates to public health microbiology and general microbial ecology.

  7. Individual laboratory-measured discount rates predict field behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabris, Christopher F; Laibson, David; Morris, Carrie L; Schuldt, Jonathon P; Taubinsky, Dmitry

    2008-12-01

    We estimate discount rates of 555 subjects using a laboratory task and find that these individual discount rates predict inter-individual variation in field behaviors (e.g., exercise, BMI, smoking). The correlation between the discount rate and each field behavior is small: none exceeds 0.28 and many are near 0. However, the discount rate has at least as much predictive power as any variable in our dataset (e.g., sex, age, education). The correlation between the discount rate and field behavior rises when field behaviors are aggregated: these correlations range from 0.09-0.38. We present a model that explains why specific intertemporal choice behaviors are only weakly correlated with discount rates, even though discount rates robustly predict aggregates of intertemporal decisions.

  8. Pyranometer offsets triggered by ambient meteorology: insights from laboratory and field experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Sandro M.; Pietsch, Helga; Baumgartner, Dietmar J.; Weihs, Philipp; Rieder, Harald E.

    2017-03-01

    This study investigates the effects of ambient meteorology on the accuracy of radiation (R) measurements performed with pyranometers contained in various heating and ventilation systems (HV-systems). It focuses particularly on instrument offsets observed following precipitation events. To quantify pyranometer responses to precipitation, a series of controlled laboratory experiments as well as two targeted field campaigns were performed in 2016. The results indicate that precipitation (as simulated by spray tests or observed under ambient conditions) significantly affects the thermal environment of the instruments and thus their stability. Statistical analyses of laboratory experiments showed that precipitation triggers zero offsets of -4 W m-2 or more, independent of the HV-system. Similar offsets were observed in field experiments under ambient environmental conditions, indicating a clear exceedance of BSRN (Baseline Surface Radiation Network) targets following precipitation events. All pyranometers required substantial time to return to their initial signal states after the simulated precipitation events. Therefore, for BSRN-class measurements, the recommendation would be to flag the radiation measurements during a natural precipitation event and 90 min after it in nighttime conditions. Further daytime experiments show pyranometer offsets of 50 W m-2 or more in comparison to the reference system. As they show a substantially faster recovery, the recommendation would be to flag the radiation measurements within a natural precipitation event and 10 min after it in daytime conditions.

  9. Data survey about radiation protection and safety of radiation sources in research laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paura, Clayton L.; Dantas, Ana Leticia A.; Dantas, Bernardo M.

    2005-01-01

    In Brazil, different types of research using unsealed sources are developed with a variety of radioisotopes. In such activities, professionals and students involved are potentially exposed to internal contamination by 14 C, 45 Ca, 51 Cr, 3 H, 125 I, 32 P, 33 P, 35 S, 90 Sr and 99m Tc. The general objective of this work is to evaluate radiological risks associated to these practices in order to supply information for planning actions aimed to improve radiation protection conditions in research laboratories. The criteria for risk evaluation and the safety aspects adopted in this work were based on CNEN Regulation 6.02 and in IAEA and NRPB publications. The survey of data was carried out during visits to laboratories in public Universities located in the city of Rio de Janeiro where unsealed radioactive sources are used in biochemistry, biophysics and genetic studies. According to the criteria adopted in this work, some practices developed in the laboratories require evaluation of risk of internal contamination depending on the conditions of source manipulation. It was verified the need for training of users of radioactive materials in this type of laboratory. This can be facilitated by the use of basic guides for the classification of areas, radiation protection, safety and source security in research laboratories. It was also observed the need for optimization of such practices in order to minimize the contact with sources. It is recommended to implement more effective source and access controls as a way to reduce risks of individual radiation exposure and loss of radioactive materials (author)

  10. SSPM based radiation sensing: Preliminary laboratory and clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konnoff, Daniel C.; Plant, Thomas K.; Shiner, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Recent Solid State Photomultiplier (SSPM) technology has matured, reaching a performance level that is suitable for replacement of the ubiquitous photomultiplier tube in selected applications for environmental radiation monitoring, clinical dosimetry, and medical imaging purposes. The objective of this work is low signal level laboratory and high signal level clinical testing of the Hamamatsu MPPC (S10362-11-050C), Photonique SSPM (0810G1), and Voxtel SiPM (SQBF-EKAA/SQBF-EIOA) SSPMs coupled to different inorganic scintillator crystals (Prelude 420, BGO), inorganic doped glass scintillator material SiO 2 :Cu 2+ and organic BCF-12 plastic scintillating fibers, used as detector elements. Plastic Optical Fibers (POFs) and Glass Optical Fibers (GOFs) are used as signal conduits for laboratory and clinical testing. Further, reduction of electron-beam-generated Cerenkov light in optical fibers is facilitated by the inclusion of metalized air-core capillary tubing between the BCF-12 plastic scintillating fiber and the POF. In a clinical setting dose linearity, percent depth dose, and angular measurements for 6 MV/18 MV photon beams and 9 MeV electron beams are compared with and without the use of the air-core capillary tubing for BCF-12 plastic scintillating fiber. These same measurements are repeated for SiO 2 :Cu 2+ scintillator material without air-core capillary tubing.

  11. Leaching of wood ash - Laboratory and field studies; Lakning av vedaska - Laboratorie- och faeltstudier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, Per-Erik

    2012-02-15

    High forest production leads to diminishing amounts of base cations and micro nutrients in forest soils. This is due to uptake in, and harvest of, the trees. Losses can be compensated for by spreading stabilized wood ash on the forest ground, which means recycling of base cations and micro nutrients. Chemical composition of wood ash can easily be described by standard methods in the laboratory. However, this does not include the process of leaching in nature, such as which components and leaching rate for different compounds. During field conditions several factors are added, which are not available in the laboratory. After almost 10 years in the forest soils there still remains large quantities of the original product. Only 10-30 % of the wood ash products and 5 % of the lime product has been leached. In the laboratory study the leached amount was slightly larger, at the most 35 % for wood ash and 20 % for lime. Both studies indicate long time for weathering of the products in forest soils. Slower leaching rate from pellets of wood ash compared to leaching rate from crushed wood ash in the laboratory study is not verified by the field study. This indicates limited possibilities to control rates of leaching in the environment

  12. Linking Aerosol Optical Properties Between Laboratory, Field, and Model Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, S. M.; Pokhrel, R. P.; Foster, K. A.; Brown, H.; Liu, X.

    2017-12-01

    The optical properties of aerosol emissions from biomass burning have a significant impact on the Earth's radiative balance. Based on measurements made during the Fourth Fire Lab in Missoula Experiment, our group published a series of parameterizations that related optical properties (single scattering albedo and absorption due to brown carbon at multiple wavelengths) to the elemental to total carbon ratio of aerosols emitted from biomass burning. In this presentation, the ability of these parameterizations to simulate the optical properties of ambient aerosol is assessed using observations collected in 2017 from our mobile laboratory chasing wildfires in the Western United States. The ambient data includes measurements of multi-wavelength absorption, scattering, and extinction, size distribution, chemical composition, and volatility. In addition to testing the laboratory parameterizations, this combination of measurements allows us to assess the ability of core-shell Mie Theory to replicate observations and to assess the impact of brown carbon and mixing state on optical properties. Finally, both laboratory and ambient data are compared to the optical properties generated by a prominent climate model (Community Earth System Model (CESM) coupled with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5)). The discrepancies between lab observations, ambient observations and model output will be discussed.

  13. From Field to Laboratory: A New Database Approach for Linking Microbial Field Ecology with Laboratory Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebout, Leslie; Keller, R.; Miller, S.; Jahnke, L.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Ames Exobiology Culture Collection Database (AECC-DB) has been developed as a collaboration between microbial ecologists and information technology specialists. It allows for extensive web-based archiving of information regarding field samples to document microbial co-habitation of specific ecosystem micro-environments. Documentation and archiving continues as pure cultures are isolated, metabolic properties determined, and DNA extracted and sequenced. In this way metabolic properties and molecular sequences are clearly linked back to specific isolates and the location of those microbes in the ecosystem of origin. Use of this database system presents a significant advancement over traditional bookkeeping wherein there is generally little or no information regarding the environments from which microorganisms were isolated. Generally there is only a general ecosystem designation (i.e., hot-spring). However within each of these there are a myriad of microenvironments with very different properties and determining exactly where (which microenvironment) a given microbe comes from is critical in designing appropriate isolation media and interpreting physiological properties. We are currently using the database to aid in the isolation of a large number of cyanobacterial species and will present results by PI's and students demonstrating the utility of this new approach.

  14. Soil erodibility variability in laboratory and field rainfall simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Boglárka; Szabó, Judit; Jakab, Gergely; Centeri, Csaba; Szalai, Zoltán

    2017-04-01

    Rainfall simulation experiments are the most common way to observe and to model the soil erosion processes in in situ and ex situ circumstances. During modelling soil erosion, one of the most important factors are the annual soil loss and the soil erodibility which represent the effect of soil properties on soil loss and the soil resistance against water erosion. The amount of runoff and soil loss can differ in case of the same soil type, while it's characteristics determine the soil erodibility factor. This leads to uncertainties regarding soil erodibility. Soil loss and soil erodibility were examined with the investigation of the same soil under laboratory and field conditions with rainfall simulators. The comparative measurement was carried out in a laboratory on 0,5 m2, and in the field (Shower Power-02) on 6 m2 plot size where the applied slope angles were 5% and 12% with 30 and 90 mm/h rainfall intensity. The main idea was to examine and compare the soil erodibility and its variability coming from the same soil, but different rainfall simulator type. The applied model was the USLE, nomograph and other equations which concern single rainfall events. The given results show differences between the field and laboratory experiments and between the different calculations. Concerning for the whole rainfall events runoff and soil loss, were significantly higher at the laboratory experiments, which affected the soil erodibility values too. The given differences can originate from the plot size. The main research questions are that: How should we handle the soil erodibility factors and its significant variability? What is the best solution for soil erodibility determination?

  15. Laboratory and field evaluation of broiler litter nitrogen mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sistani, K R; Adeli, A; McGowen, S L; Tewolde, H; Brink, G E

    2008-05-01

    Two studies were conducted for this research. First, a laboratory incubation to quantify broiler litter N mineralization with the following treatments: two soil moisture regimes, constant at 60% water fill pore space (WFPS) and fluctuating (60-30% WFPS), three soil types, Brooksville silty clay loam, Ruston sandy loam from Mississippi, and Catlin silt loam from Illinois. Second, a field incubation study to quantify broiler litter N mineralization using similar soils and litter application rates as the laboratory incubation. Broiler litter was applied at an equivalent rate of 350 kg total N ha(-1) for both studies except for control treatments. Subsamples were taken at different timing for both experiments for NO3-N and NH4-N determinations. In the laboratory experiment, soil moisture regimes had no significant impact on litter-derived inorganic N. Total litter-derived inorganic N across all treatments increased from 23 mg kg(-1) at time 0, to 159 mg kg(-1) at 93 d after litter application. Significant differences were observed among the soil types. Net litter-derived inorganic N was greater for Brooksville followed by Ruston and Catlin soils. For both studies and all soils, NH4-N content decreased while NO3-N content increased indicating a rapid nitrification of the mineralized litter N. Litter mineralization in the field study followed the same trend as the laboratory study but resulted in much lower net inorganic N, presumably due to environmental conditions such as precipitation and temperature, which may have resulted in more denitrification and immobilization of mineralized litter N. Litter-derived inorganic N from the field study was greater for Ruston than Brooksville. Due to no impact by soil moisture regimes, additional studies are warranted in order to develop predictive relationships to quantify broiler litter N availability.

  16. Microrelief-Controlled Overland Flow Generation: Laboratory and Field Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Chu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface microrelief affects overland flow generation and the related hydrologic processes. However, such influences vary depending on other factors such as rainfall characteristics, soil properties, and initial soil moisture conditions. Thus, in-depth research is needed to better understand and evaluate the combined effects of these factors on overland flow dynamics. The objective of this experimental study was to examine how surface microrelief, in conjunction with the factors of rainfall, soil, and initial moisture conditions, impacts overland flow generation and runoff processes in both laboratory and field settings. A series of overland flow experiments were conducted for rough and smooth surfaces that represented distinct microtopographic characteristics and the experimental data were analyzed and compared. Across different soil types and initial moisture conditions, both laboratory and field experiments demonstrated that a rough soil surface experienced a delayed initiation of runoff and featured a stepwise threshold flow pattern due to the microrelief-controlled puddle filling-spilling-merging dynamics. It was found from the field experiments that a smooth plot surface was more responsive to rainfall variations especially during an initial rainfall event. However, enhanced capability of overland flow generation and faster puddle connectivity of a rough field plot occurred during the subsequent rain events.

  17. Radiation field mapping using a mechanical-electronic detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czayka, M., E-mail: mczayka@kent.ed [College of Technology, Kent State University-Ashtabula 3300 Lake Road West, Ashtabula, OH 44004 (United States); Program on Electron Beam Technology, Kent State University, P.O. Box 1028, Middlefield, OH 44062 (United States); Fisch, M. [Program on Electron Beam Technology, Kent State University, P.O. Box 1028, Middlefield, OH 44062 (United States); College of Technology, Kent State University, P.O. Box 5190, Kent, OH 44242-0001 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    A method of radiation field mapping of a scanned electron beam using a Faraday-type detector and an electromechanical linear translator is presented. Utilizing this arrangement, fluence and fluence rate measurements can be made at different locations within the radiation field. The Faraday-type detector used in these experiments differs from most as it consists of a hollow stainless steel sphere. Results are presented in two- and three-dimensional views of the radiation field.

  18. Participation of the radiation hygiene laboratories to the WHO/UNEP global environmental radiation network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milu, C.; Gheorghe, R.

    2003-01-01

    In December 1987, a WHO-UNEP meeting held at SCPRI (Service Central de protection canter Les Rayonnements Ionisantes - Le Vesinet, France) set up the basis of the international network GERMON (Global Environmental Radiation Monitoring Network) as an extension of existing network 'Global Environment Monitoring Systems' (GEMS). The accident from Chernobyl certainly was the important nuclear event influencing this decision. The aim of the GERMON network is to initiate programmes for the routine monitoring of the environmental radioactivity and to ensure a quick interchange of credible data in case of major accidental radioactive releases, as well as the development of intervention devices in the member states running such programmes. The responsibility of the Co-ordinating Collaborating Centre (CCC) has been given to the French Service Central de Protection Centre les Rayonnements Ionisants (SCPRI). In 1994, this Service became the Office de Protection Centre les Rayonnements Ionisants (OPRI). The Ministry of Health has a national network consisting of 23 radiation hygiene laboratories; 19 of these are included in the framework of county divisions of public health , and the other 4 are compartments of the regional institutes of public health. WHO designated the Institute of Public Health from Bucharest as National Contact Centre, in charge with communicating the results obtained by the national laboratories on the indicators of environmental radioactivity, according to the established methodologies. The main indicators considered are: ambient gamma dose, radioactivity of the air, of the precipitation, and of the milk. Following the measurement and transmission protocols of the CCC, the Radiation Hygiene Laboratory from the Institute of Public Health has established a methodology to be followed by the laboratories of the national network. (authors)

  19. Radiation of an electron in an electric field. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedosov, N.I.; Flesher, G.I.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of electron radiation in a field of a travelling electric wave is solved by methods of classical electrodynamics. Such a field may serve as a model of a field on the linear accelerator axis. It is shown that the total radiation power, as well as the spectral-angular distribution of the radiation energy of an electron travelling in a longitudinal electric wave coincide with radiation in a stationary uniform electric field with the strength equal to that of the wave at the point where the particle velocity becomes close to the velocity of light [ru

  20. Vacuum radiation induced by time dependent electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Many predictions of new phenomena given by strong field quantum electrodynamics (SFQED will be tested on next generation multi-petawatt laser facilities in the near future. These new phenomena are basis to understand physics in extremely strong electromagnetic fields therefore have attracted wide research interest. Here we discuss a new SFQED phenomenon that is named as vacuum radiation. In vacuum radiation, a virtual electron loop obtain energy from time dependent external electric field and radiate an entangled photon pair. Features of vacuum radiation in a locally time dependent electric field including spectrum, characteristic temperature, production rate and power are given.

  1. Vacuum radiation induced by time dependent electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bo, E-mail: zhangbolfrc@caep.cn [Department of High Energy Density Physics, Research Center of Laser Fusion, 621900, Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Laboratory of Science and Technology on Plasma Physics, Research Center of Laser Fusion, 621900, Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Zhang, Zhi-meng; Hong, Wei; He, Shu-Kai; Teng, Jian [Department of High Energy Density Physics, Research Center of Laser Fusion, 621900, Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Laboratory of Science and Technology on Plasma Physics, Research Center of Laser Fusion, 621900, Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Gu, Yu-qiu, E-mail: yqgu@caep.cn [Department of High Energy Density Physics, Research Center of Laser Fusion, 621900, Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Laboratory of Science and Technology on Plasma Physics, Research Center of Laser Fusion, 621900, Mianyang, Sichuan (China)

    2017-04-10

    Many predictions of new phenomena given by strong field quantum electrodynamics (SFQED) will be tested on next generation multi-petawatt laser facilities in the near future. These new phenomena are basis to understand physics in extremely strong electromagnetic fields therefore have attracted wide research interest. Here we discuss a new SFQED phenomenon that is named as vacuum radiation. In vacuum radiation, a virtual electron loop obtain energy from time dependent external electric field and radiate an entangled photon pair. Features of vacuum radiation in a locally time dependent electric field including spectrum, characteristic temperature, production rate and power are given.

  2. Radiation, waves, fields. Causes and effects on environment and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitgeb, N.

    1990-01-01

    The book discusses static electricity, alternating electric fields, magnetostatic fields, alternating magnetic fields, electromagnetic radiation, optical and ionizing radiation and their hazards and health effects. Each chapter presents basic physical and biological concepts and describes the common radiation sources and their biological effects. Each chapter also contains hints for everyday behaviour as well as in-depth information an specific scientific approaches for assessing biological effects; the latter are addressed to all expert readers working in these fields. There is a special chapter on the problem of so-called 'terrestrial radiation'. (orig.) With 88 figs., 31 tabs [de

  3. An example of remote maintenance in high radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pothier, N.E.; Brisbois, L.U.

    Six auxiliary low pressure small (diameter <=5.0 cm) pipes located inside the reactor vault of the Douglas Point Nuclear Generating Station failed due to fretting wear at U-bolt supports: two had worn through the wall and developed leaks, and the others had worn <= 50% through the pipe wall. Human entry into the vault was not possible because of high radiation fields; hence, hands-on repair was not possible. The pipes were repaired and resupported to prevent further fretting wear failures during February-September, 1980. The repair work was performed using custom designed and developed remotely operated tooling and closed-circuit TV viewing. Three main groups were involved in the repair work: Atomic Energy of Canada Engineering Company (AECEC) - the reactor owner; Ontario Hydro - the reactor operator; and, Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL). In this report, the contributions made by CRNL are summarized and discussed

  4. A concept for NASA's Mars 2016 astrobiology field laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beegle, Luther W; Wilson, Michael G; Abilleira, Fernando; Jordan, James F; Wilson, Gregory R

    2007-08-01

    The Mars Program Plan includes an integrated and coordinated set of future candidate missions and investigations that meet fundamental science objectives of NASA and the Mars Exploration Program (MEP). At the time this paper was written, these possible future missions are planned in a manner consistent with a projected budget profile for the Mars Program in the next decade (2007-2016). As with all future missions, the funding profile depends on a number of factors that include the exact cost of each mission as well as potential changes to the overall NASA budget. In the current version of the Mars Program Plan, the Astrobiology Field Laboratory (AFL) exists as a candidate project to determine whether there were (or are) habitable zones and life, and how the development of these zones may be related to the overall evolution of the planet. The AFL concept is a surface exploration mission equipped with a major in situ laboratory capable of making significant advancements toward the Mars Program's life-related scientific goals and the overarching Vision for Space Exploration. We have developed several concepts for the AFL that fit within known budget and engineering constraints projected for the 2016 and 2018 Mars mission launch opportunities. The AFL mission architecture proposed here assumes maximum heritage from the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). Candidate payload elements for this concept were identified from a set of recommendations put forth by the Astrobiology Field Laboratory Science Steering Group (AFL SSG) in 2004, for the express purpose of identifying overall rover mass and power requirements for such a mission. The conceptual payload includes a Precision Sample Handling and Processing System that would replace and augment the functionality and capabilities provided by the Sample Acquisition Sample Processing and Handling system that is currently part of the 2009 MSL platform.

  5. Technetium behaviour in Boom Clay - a laboratory and field study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Ilett, D.J.; Cowper, M.M.; Pilkington, N.J.; Tweed, C.J.; Williams, S.J. [AEA Technology plc, Harwell, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Canniere, P.R. de; Wang, L. [SCK.CEN, Waste and Disposal Project, Boeretang, Mol (Belgium)

    2002-07-01

    This paper describes a study of technetium solubility and migration under chemical conditions representative of those prevailing in a Boom Clay environment. Laboratory and in situ measurements yielded similar aqueous concentrations of technetium, of about 1 x 10{sup -8} mol dm{sup -3}, close to the concentrations measured for hydrated technetium(IV) oxide TcO{sub 2}.1.6H{sub 2}O in the solubility studies. From fitting the curves of the Tc concentrations as function of time, distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) values were estimated to lie between 0.8 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1} and 1.8 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}. Exposure of the system at 80 C and to {gamma}-radiation dose rates of several hundred Gy h{sup -1} resulted in only minor differences in behaviour. (orig.)

  6. Technetium behaviour in Boom Clay - a laboratory and field study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Ilett, D.J.; Cowper, M.M.; Pilkington, N.J.; Tweed, C.J.; Williams, S.J.; Canniere, P.R. de; Wang, L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a study of technetium solubility and migration under chemical conditions representative of those prevailing in a Boom Clay environment. Laboratory and in situ measurements yielded similar aqueous concentrations of technetium, of about 1 x 10 -8 mol dm -3 , close to the concentrations measured for hydrated technetium(IV) oxide TcO 2 .1.6H 2 O in the solubility studies. From fitting the curves of the Tc concentrations as function of time, distribution coefficient (K d ) values were estimated to lie between 0.8 cm 3 g -1 and 1.8 cm 3 g -1 . Exposure of the system at 80 C and to γ-radiation dose rates of several hundred Gy h -1 resulted in only minor differences in behaviour. (orig.)

  7. On-site laboratory support of Oak Ridge National Laboratory environmental restoration field activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn, J.L.E.

    1995-07-01

    A remedial investigation/feasibility study has been undertaken at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Bechtel National, Inc. and partners CH2M Hill, Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, and PEER Consultants are contracted to Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, performing this work for ORNL's Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. An on-site Close Support Laboratory (CSL) established at the ER Field Operations Facility has evolved into a laboratory where quality analytical screening results can be provided rapidly (e.g., within 24 hours of sampling). CSL capabilities include three basic areas: radiochemistry, chromatography, and wet chemistry. Radiochemical analyses include gamma spectroscopy, tritium and carbon-14 screens using liquid scintillation analysis, and gross alpha and beta counting. Cerenkov counting and crown-ether-based separation are the two rapid methods used for radiostrontium determination in water samples. By extending count times where appropriate, method detection limits can match those achieved by off-site contract laboratories. Volatile organic compounds are detected by means of gas chromatography using either headspace or purge and trap sample introduction (based on EPA 601/602). Ionic content of water samples is determined using ion chromatography and alkalinity measurement. Ion chromatography is used to quantify both anions (based on EPA 300) and cations. Wet chemistry procedures performed at the CSL include alkalinity, pH (water and soil), soil resistivity, and dissolved/suspended solids. Besides environmental samples, the CSL routinely screens health and safety and waste management samples. The cost savings of the CSL are both direct and indirect

  8. Field studies of radionuclide transport at the Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champ, D.R.; Killey, R.W.D.; Moltyaner, G.L.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the authors summarize the results of: in situ field column experiments to study the transport behaviour of several long-lived radionuclides, 4 natural gradient non-reactive radiotracer injection experiments at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) Twin Lake Tracer Test Site, and a model validation study that used data for 90 Sr from two well-defined contaminated groundwater flow systems at CRL. The paper also describes a current re-evaluation of radionuclide release and transport from a 1960 experimental burial (in a CRL sand aquifer) of glass blocks containing fission and activation products. (J.P.N.)

  9. Optical camera system for radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maki, Koichi; Senoo, Makoto; Takahashi, Fuminobu; Shibata, Keiichiro; Honda, Takuro.

    1995-01-01

    An infrared-ray camera comprises a transmitting filter used exclusively for infrared-rays at a specific wavelength, such as far infrared-rays and a lens used exclusively for infrared rays. An infrared ray emitter-incorporated photoelectric image converter comprising an infrared ray emitting device, a focusing lens and a semiconductor image pick-up plate is disposed at a place of low gamma-ray dose rate. Infrared rays emitted from an objective member are passed through the lens system of the camera, and real images are formed by way of the filter. They are transferred by image fibers, introduced to the photoelectric image converter and focused on the image pick-up plate by the image-forming lens. Further, they are converted into electric signals and introduced to a display and monitored. With such a constitution, an optical material used exclusively for infrared rays, for example, ZnSe can be used for the lens system and the optical transmission system. Accordingly, it can be used in a radiation field of high gamma ray dose rate around the periphery of the reactor container. (I.N.)

  10. Six categories of ionizing radiation quantities practical in various fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Junzheng; Zhuo Weihai

    2011-01-01

    This paper is the part of review on the evolvement of the systems for ionizing radiation quantities and units. In the paper, for better understanding and correct use of the relevant quantities of ionizing radiation, the major ionizing radiation quantities in various fields are divided into six categories. (authors)

  11. Establishment of exposure dose assessment laboratory in National Radiation Emergency Medical Center (NREMC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jae Ryong; Ha, Wi Ho; Yoon, Seok Won; Han, Eun Ae; Lee, Seung Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    As unclear industry grown, 432 of the nuclear power plants are operating and 52 of NPPs are under construction currently. Increasing use of radiation or radioisotopes in the field of industry, medical purpose and research such as non-destructive examination, computed tomography and x-ray, etc. constantly. With use of nuclear or radiation has incidence possibility for example the Fukushima NPP incident, the Goiania accident and the Chernobyl Nuclear accident. Also the risk of terror by radioactive material such as Radiological Dispersal Device(RDD) etc. In Korea, since the 'Law on protection of nuclear facilities and countermeasure for radioactive preparedness was enacted in 2003, the Korean institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences(KIRAMS) was established for the radiation emergency medical response in radiological disaster due to nuclear accident, radioactive terror and so on. Especially National Radiation Emergency Medical Center(NREMC) has the duty that is protect citizens from nuclear, radiological accidents or radiological terrors through the emergency medical preparedness. The NREMC was established by the 39-article law on physical protection of nuclear material and facilities and measures for radiological emergencies. Dose assessment or contamination survey should be performed which provide the radiological information for medical response. For this reason, the NREMC establish and re-organized dose assessment system based on the existing dose assessment system of the NREMC recently. The exposure dose could be measured by physical and biological method. With these two methods, we can have conservative dose assessment result. Therefore the NREMC established the exposure dose assessment laboratory which was re-organized laboratory space and introduced specialized equipment for dose assessment. This paper will report the establishment and operation of exposure dose assessment laboratory for radiological emergency response and discuss how to enhance

  12. Instructor qualification for radiation safety training at a national laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinoskey, P.A.

    1994-10-01

    Prior to 1993, Health Physics Training (HPT) was conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) health physics group. The job requirements specified a Masters Degree and experience. In fact, the majority of Health Physicists in the group were certified by the American Board of Health Physics. Under those circumstances, it was assumed that individuals in the group were technically qualified and the HPT instructor qualification stated that. In late 1993, the Health Physics Group at the LLNL was restructured and the training function was assigned to the training group. Additional requirements for training were mandated by the Department of Energy (DOE), which would necessitate increasing the existing training staff. With the need to hire, and the policy of reassignment of employees during downsizing, it was imperative that formal qualification standards be developed for technical knowledge. Qualification standards were in place for instructional capability. In drafting the new training qualifications for instructors, the requirements of a Certified Health Physicists had to be modified due to supply and demand. Additionally, for many of the performance-based training courses, registration by the National Registry of Radiation Protection Technologists is more desirable. Flexibility in qualification requirements has been incorporated to meet the reality of ongoing training and the compensation for desirable skills of individuals who may not meet all the criteria. The qualification requirements for an instructor rely on entry-level requirements and emphasis on goals (preferred) and continuing development of technical and instructional capabilities

  13. Laboratory and field evaluation of sterile male boll weevil competitiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGovern, W.L.

    1976-01-01

    The production of pheromone by boll weevils, Anthonomus grandis Boheman, treated with 10,000 rad of CO-60 gamma irradiation compared favorably with that of control weevils for 5 days; however, feeding (determined by frass collection) was reduced from the first day post-treatment. No direct correlation was found between production of pheromone and elimination of frass. Overwintered male boll weevils were found to produce small quantities of pheromone and the ratio of components was less attractive at the same concentration as the standard laboratory formulation of grandlure. Most healthy sterilized male weevils should be more attractive than overwintered males. Laboratory-reared sterilized male boll weevils can be as attractive to female weevils as overwintered field males. Weevils treated with busulfan (1,4-butanediol dimethanesulfonate) alone were more attractive than those treated with combinations of busulfan and hempa. In general, sterilization reduced the attractiveness of laboratory males by about 50 percent. Evidence is presented for the existence of ''super-males.''

  14. Adiabatic compression and radiative compression of magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, C.H.

    1980-01-01

    Flux is conserved during mechanical compression of magnetic fields for both nonrelativistic and relativistic compressors. However, the relativistic compressor generates radiation, which can carry up to twice the energy content of the magnetic field compressed adiabatically. The radiation may be either confined or allowed to escape

  15. Electromagnetic field, excited by monodirected X-radiation pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhemerov, A.V.; Metelkin, E.V.

    1994-01-01

    Parameters of electromagnetic field, generated in the atmosphere by monodirected pulse source of X radiation located at the altitude of approximately several kilometers have been estimated by the method of delayed potentials. The source radiation is directed towards the Earth surface. The conclusion was made that restricted areas of approximately 1 km with considerable pulse electromagnetic fields can be created on the Earth surface

  16. Radiative decay of coupled states in an external dc field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal'chikov, V.; Sokolov, Y.; Yakovlev, V.

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines two theoretical aspects of the interference of atomic states in hydrogen which comes from the application of an external electric field F to the 2s metastable state. The radiative corrections to the Bethe-Lamb formula and anisotropy contribution to the angular distribution, which arises from interference between electric-field-induced E1-radiation and forbidden M1-radiation, are analysed

  17. Radiative decay of coupled states in an external dc field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal' chikov, V. [National Research Inst. for Physical-Technical and Radiotechnical Measurements (VNIIFTRI), Mendeleevo, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Sokolov, Y. [Kurchatov Inst., Russian Research Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation); Yakovlev, V. [Moscow Engineering Physics Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    This paper examines two theoretical aspects of the interference of atomic states in hydrogen which comes from the application of an external electric field F to the 2s metastable state. The radiative corrections to the Bethe-Lamb formula and anisotropy contribution to the angular distribution, which arises from interference between electric-field-induced E1-radiation and forbidden M1-radiation, are analysed.

  18. Biochar: from laboratory mechanisms through the greenhouse to field trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiello, C. A.; Gao, X.; Dugan, B.; Silberg, J. J.; Zygourakis, K.; Alvarez, P. J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The biochar community is excellent at pointing to individual cases where biochar amendment has changed soil properties, with some studies showing significant improvements in crop yields, reduction in nutrient export, and remediation of pollutants. However, many studies exist which do not show improvements, and in some cases, studies clearly show detrimental outcomes. The next, crucial step in biochar science and engineering research will be to develop a process-based understanding of how biochar acts to improve soil properties. In particular, we need a better mechanistic understanding of how biochar sorbs and desorbs contaminants, how it interacts with soil water, and how it interacts with the soil microbial community. These mechanistic studies need to encompass processes that range from the nanometer to the kilometer scale. At the nanometer scale, we need a predictive model of how biochar will sorb and desorb hydrocarbons, nutrients, and toxic metals. At the micrometer scale we need models that explain biochar's effects on soil water, especially the plant-available fraction of soil water. The micrometer scale is also where mechanistic information is neeed about microbial processes. At the macroscale we need physical models to describe the landscape mobility of biochar, because biochar that washes away from fields can no longer provide crop benefits. To be most informative, biochar research should occur along a lab-greenhouse-field trial trajectory. Laboratory experiments should aim determine what mechanisms may act to control biochar-soil processes, and then greenhouse experiments can be used to test the significance of lab-derived mechanisms in short, highly replicated, controlled experiments. Once evidence of effect is determined from greenhouse experiments, field trials are merited. Field trials are the gold standard needed prior to full deployment, but results from field trials cannot be extrapolated to other field sites without the mechanistic backup provided

  19. Review of radiation sources, calibration facilities and simulated workplace fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacoste, V., E-mail: veronique.lacoste@irsn.f [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, BP3, Bat. 159, F-13115 Saint-Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2010-12-15

    A review on radiation sources, calibration facilities and realistic fields is presented and examples are given. The main characteristics of the fields are shortly described together with their domain of applications. New emerging fields are also mentioned and the question of needs for additional calibration fields is raised.

  20. Strong field interaction of laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pukhov, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    The Review covers recent progress in laser-matter interaction at intensities above 10 18 W cm -2 . At these intensities electrons swing in the laser pulse with relativistic energies. The laser electric field is already much stronger than the atomic fields, and any material is instantaneously ionized, creating plasma. The physics of relativistic laser-plasma is highly non-linear and kinetic. The best numerical tools applicable here are particle-in-cell (PIC) codes, which provide the most fundamental plasma model as an ensemble of charged particles. The three-dimensional (3D) PIC code Virtual Laser-Plasma Laboratory runs on a massively parallel computer tracking trajectories of up to 10 9 particles simultaneously. This allows one to simulate real laser-plasma experiments for the first time. When the relativistically intense laser pulses propagate through plasma, a bunch of new physical effects appears. The laser pulses are subject to relativistic self-channelling and filamentation. The gigabar ponderomotive pressure of the laser pulse drives strong currents of plasma electrons in the laser propagation direction; these currents reach the Alfven limit and generate 100 MG quasistatic magnetic fields. These magnetic fields, in turn, lead to the mutual filament attraction and super-channel formation. The electrons in the channels are accelerated up to gigaelectronvolt energies and the ions gain multi-MeV energies. We discuss different mechanisms of particle acceleration and compare numerical simulations with experimental data. One of the very important applications of the relativistically strong laser beams is the fast ignition (FI) concept for the inertial fusion energy (IFE). Petawatt-class lasers may provide enough energy to isochorically ignite a pre-compressed target consisting of thermonuclear fuel. The FI approach would ease dramatically the constraints on the implosion symmetry and improve the energy gain. However, there is a set of problems to solve before the FI

  1. Determination of the scattered radiation at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory of IPEN, SP, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarenga, Tallyson; Valeriano, Caio C.S.; Caldas, Linda V.E.; Federico, Claudio A.

    2016-01-01

    With the increased use of techniques using neutron radiation, there has been a considerable growth in the number of detectors for this kind of radiation. A neutron calibration laboratory with neutron radiation ("2"4"1AmBe) was designed. In practical situations of this type of laboratory, one of the main problems is related to the knowledge of scattered radiation. In order to evaluate this scattered radiation, simulations were carried out without the presence of structural elements and with the complete room. Fourteen measuring points were evaluated in different directions at various distances. (author)

  2. Underwater inspection training in intense radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Ryoichi

    2017-01-01

    Osaka Prefecture University has a large dose cobalt 60 gamma ray source of about 2 PBq, and is engaged in technological training and human resource development. It is assumed that the decommissioning underwater operation of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station would be the focus. The university aims at acquisition of the basic of underwater inspection work under radiation environment that is useful for the above purpose, radiation measurement under water, basic training in image measurement, and aims as well to evaluate the damage of imaging equipment due to radiation, and master practical knowledge for the use of inspection equipment under a large dose. In particular, it is valuable to train in the observation of Cherenkov light emitted from a large dose cobalt radiation source in water using a high sensitivity camera. The measurement of radiation dose distribution in water had difficulty in remote measurement due to water shielding effect. Although it took much time before, the method using high sensitivity camera is easy to sequentially perform two-dimensional measurement, and its utility value is large. Its effect on the dose distribution measurement of irregularly shaped sources is great. The contents of training includes the following: radiation source imaging in water, use of a laser rangefinder in water, dose distribution measurement in water and Cherenkov light measurement, judgment of equipment damage due to irradiation, weak radiation measurement, and measurement and decontamination of surface contamination. (A.O.)

  3. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1987 through March 31, 1988. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: (i) studies on surface phenomena under electron and ion irradiations and (ii) studies on radiation chemistry of high polymers and radiation dosimetry. (J.P.N.)

  4. Laboratory observation of magnetic field growth driven by shear flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intrator, T. P., E-mail: intrator@lanl.gov; Feng, Y.; Sears, J.; Weber, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, M.S. E526, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Dorf, L. [Applied Materials, Inc., Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States); Sun, X. [University of Science and Technology, Hefei (China)

    2014-04-15

    Two magnetic flux ropes that collide and bounce have been characterized in the laboratory. We find screw pinch profiles that include ion flow v{sub i}, magnetic field B, current density J, and plasma pressure. The electron flow v{sub e} can be inferred, allowing the evaluation of the Hall J×B term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohm's Law. Flux ropes that are initially cylindrical are mutually attracted and compress each other, which distorts the cylindrical symmetry. Magnetic field is created via the ∇×v{sub e}×B induction term in Ohm's Law where in-plane (perpendicular) shear of parallel flow (along the flux rope) is the dominant feature, along with some dissipation and magnetic reconnection. We predict and measure the growth of a quadrupole out-of-plane magnetic field δB{sub z}. This is a simple and coherent example of a shear flow driven dynamo. There is some similarity with two dimensional reconnection scenarios, which induce a current sheet and thus out-of-plane flow in the third dimension, despite the customary picture that considers flows only in the reconnection plane. These data illustrate a general and deterministic mechanism for large scale sheared flows to acquire smaller scale magnetic features, disordered structure, and possibly turbulence.

  5. Laboratory studies of oil spill bioremediation; toward understanding field behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, R.C.; Hinton, S.M.; Elmendorf, D.L.; Lute, J.R.; Grossman, M.J.; Robbins, W.K.; Hsu, Chang S.; Richard, B.E.; Haith, C.E.; Senius, J.D.; Minak-Bernero, V.; Chianelli, R.R.; Bragg, J.R.; Douglas, G.S.

    1993-01-01

    Oil spill remediation aims to enhance the natural process of microbial hydrocarbon biodegradation. The microbial foundations have been studied throughout this century, but the focus of most of this work has been on the degradation of well defined compounds by well defined microbial species. This paper addresses laboratory studies on crude oil biodegradation by microbial consortia obtained from oiled beaches in Prince William Sound, Alaska following the spill from the Exxon Valdez. It demonstrates that oil degradation is indeed likely to be nitrogen-limited in Prince William Sound, the different molecular classes in crude oil that are subjected to biodegradation, the identification of conserved species in the oil that can be used for assessing biodegradation and bioremediation in the field, the effectiveness of fertilizers in stimulating sub-surface biodegradation, the role of the olephilic fertilizer Inipol EAP22, and the identification of the oil-degrading microorganisms in Prince William Sound. Together, these laboratory studies provided guidance and important insights into the microbial phenomena underlying the successful bioremediation of the oiled shorelines

  6. Radiation Laboratory quarterly report, January 1, 1977--March 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-08-12

    Some of the studies in progress are: distribution of deposited energy around heavy-ion tracks; effect of trapping on the thermalization of electrons in hydrocarbon liquids; effect of field-dependent mobility on escape probability; kinetics of electron scavenging reactions; second-order optical properties of solvated electrons; model molecular orbital studies of the chemisorption of atomic hydrogen and oxygen on aluminum surfaces; calculation of sum rule moments for H/sub 2/O; early events in pulse-irradiated polar liquids; radiation chemical studies of reactions of SO/sub 4//sup -/ radicals with organic compounds; reactions of the phosphate and sulfate radicals with inorganic compounds; pulse radiolysis studies of antioxidants in fatty acid soap aggregates; spectrophotometric pulse radiolytic study of the radicals produced by reduction of cis- and trans-azobenzene; correlation of singlet energies of aromatic hydrocarbons with the rates of protonation of their anion radicals; the association rate of sodium laurylsulfate micelle-monomer equilibrium; transfer of an organic molecule between micelles in an aqueous environment; in-situ photolysis ESR study of some reactions of phosphate radicals; photochemistry of sydnones; differentiation of triplet state and biradical reactions; photoenolization of aromatic ketones; and studies of Ni(III) macrocyclic ligand complexes. (LK)

  7. The wave properties of matter and the zeropoint radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, L. de la; Cetto, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    The origin of the wave properties of matter is discussed from the point of view of stochastic electrodynamics. A nonrelativistic model of a changed particle with an effective structure embedded in the random zeropoint radiation field reveals that the field induces a high-frequency vibration on the particle; internal consistency of the theory fixes the frequency of this jittering at mc 2 /h. The particle is therefore assumed to interact intensely with stationary zeropoint waves of this frequency as seen from its proper frame of reference; such waves, identified here as de Broglie's phase waves, give rise to a modulated wave in the laboratory frame, with de Broglie's wavelength and phase velocity equal to the particle velocity. The time-independent equation that describes this modulated wave is shown to be the stationary Schroedinger equation (or the Klein-Gordon equation in the relativistic version). In a heuristic analysis applied to simple periodic cases, the quantization rules are recovered from the assumption that for a particle in a stationary state there must correspond a stationary modulation. Along an independent and complementary line of reasoning, an equation for the probability amplitude in configuration space for a particle under a general potential V(x) is constructed, and it is shown that under conditions derived from stochastic electrodynamics it reduces to Schroedinger's equation. This equation reflects therefore the dual nature of the quantum particles, by describing simultaneously the corresponding modulated wave and the ensemble of particles

  8. Radiation tolerance in the fruit fly, Drosophila Melanogaster - effects of laboratory culturing and stages in life cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vas, Iril Prima; Naik, Pramila; Kumar, Vineeth; Naik, Prathima; Patil, Rajashekar K.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation induced damages are due to direct effect of radiation energy or through free radical generation. Recent studies suggest Drosophila to be a good animal model to study radiation tolerance. The present study on female Drosophila melanogaster was conducted to observe 1. Variations in larval and adult radiation tolerance 2. Variations in laboratory culture and field populations of Drosophila. Third instar larvae were exposed to gamma radiation of 6, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 Gy in gamma chamber GC 5000 (BRT, India). Larvae of flies collected from the field were reared for two generations in the lab before irradiation. The laboratory cultured files were from stocks that were maintained for more than 1000 generations. The larvae of field populations had higher survival rate at 51% as compared to 43% in case of cultured flies and thus more resistant. The III instar larval stage (lab culture) had a LD50 of 26 Gy as compared to LD 50 of 928 Gy in case of adult flies have ∼ 160 times higher tolerance compared to humans. Prolonged rearing comparable to 'domestication' might have induced reduction in tolerance. Larval stages have a lower tolerance than adults possibly due to higher metabolic rate. Adults are post-mitotic in nature with very low rate of cell division. This may contribute to higher tolerance. This however is in contradiction to studies of midge (Chironomous) where larvae also have higher tolerance. (author)

  9. Radiation breeding researches in gamma field. Results of researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Toshikazu

    2006-01-01

    Abstract of radiation breeding researches and outline of gamma field in IRB (Institute of Radiation Breeding) are described. The gamma field is a circular field of 100 m radius with 88.8TBqCo-60 source at the center. The field is surrounded by a shielding dike of 8 m in height. The effects of gamma irradiation on the growing plants, mutant by gamma radiation and plant molecular biological researches using mutant varieties obtained by the gamma field are explained. For examples, Japanese pear, chrysanthemum, Cytisus, Eustoma grandiflorum, Manila grass, tea and rose are reported. The mutant varieties in the gamma field, nine mutant varieties of flower colors in chrysanthemum, evergreen mutant lines in Manila grass, selection of self-compatible mutants in tea plant, and the plants of the gamma field recently are shown. (S.Y.)

  10. Practice for characterization and performance of a high-dose radiation dosimetry calibration laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This practice addresses the specific requirements for laboratories engaged in dosimetry calibrations involving ionizing radiation, namely, gamma-radiation, electron beams or X-radiation (bremsstrahlung) beams. It specifically describes the requirements for the characterization and performance criteria to be met by a high-dose radiation dosimetry calibration laboratory. The absorbed-dose range is typically between 10 and 10 5 Gy. This practice addresses criteria for laboratories seeking accreditation for performing high-dose dosimetry calibrations, and is a supplement to the general requirements described in ISO/IEC 17025. By meeting these criteria and those in ISO/IEC 17025, the laboratory may be accredited by a recognized accreditation organization. Adherence to these criteria will help to ensure high standards of performance and instill confidence regarding the competency of the accredited laboratory with respect to the services it offers

  11. Leaching of saltstone: Laboratory and field testing and mathematical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, M.W.; Langton, C.A.; Oblath, S.B.; Pepper, D.W.; Wallace, R.M.; Wilhite, E.L.; Yau, W.W.F.

    1987-01-01

    A low-level alkaline salt solution will be a byproduct in the processing of high-level waste at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). This solution will be incorporated into a wasteform, saltstone, and disposed of in surface vaults. Laboratory and field leach testing and mathematical modeling have demonstrated the predictability of contaminant release from cement wasteforms. Saltstone disposal in surface vaults will meet the design objective, which is to meet drinking water standards in shallow groundwater at the disposal area boundary. Diffusion is the predominant mechanism for release of contaminants to the environment. Leach testing in unsaturated soil, at soil moisture levels above 1 wt %, has shown no difference in leach rate compared to leaching in distilled water. Field leach testing of three thirty-ton blocks of saltstone in lysimeters has been underway since January 1984. Mathematical models were applied to assess design features for saltstone disposal. One dimensional infinite-composite and semi-infinite analytical models were developed for assessing diffusion of nitrate from saltstone through a cement barrier. Numerical models, both finite element and finite difference, were validated by comparison of model predictions with the saltstone lysimeter results. Validated models were used to assess the long-term performance of the saltstone stored in surface vaults. The maximum concentrations of all contaminants released from saltstone to shallow groundwater are predicted to be below drinking water standards at the disposal area boundary. 5 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs

  12. Efficacy and safety of far infrared radiation in lymphedema treatment: clinical evaluation and laboratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Ning Fei; Feng, Shao Qing; Tong, Yun; Zhang, Ju Fang; Constantinides, Joannis; Lazzeri, Davide; Grassetti, Luca; Nicoli, Fabio; Zhang, Yi Xin

    2017-04-01

    Swelling is the most common symptom of extremities lymphedema. Clinical evaluation and laboratory analysis were conducted after far infrared radiation (FIR) treatment on the main four components of lymphedema: fluid, fat, protein, and hyaluronan. Far infrared radiation is a kind of hyperthermia therapy with several and additional benefits as well as promoting microcirculation flow and improving collateral lymph circumfluence. Although FIR therapy has been applied for several years on thousands of lymphedema patients, there are still few studies that have reported the biological effects of FIR on lymphatic tissue. In this research, we investigate the effects of far infrared rays on the major components of lymphatic tissue. Then, we explore the effectiveness and safety of FIR as a promising treatment modality of lymphedema. A total of 32 patients affected by lymphedema in stage II and III were treated between January 2015 and January 2016 at our department. After therapy, a significant decrease of limb circumference measurements was noted and improving of quality of life was registered. Laboratory examination showed the treatment can also decrease the deposition of fluid, fat, hyaluronan, and protein, improving the swelling condition. We believe FIR treatment could be considered as both an alternative monotherapy and a useful adjunctive to the conservative or surgical lymphedema procedures. Furthermore, the real and significant biological effects of FIR represent possible future applications in wide range of the medical field.

  13. Separation of radiation from two sources from their known radiated sum field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Tommi; Pivnenko, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a technique for complete and exact separation of the radiated fields of two sources (at the same frequency) from the knowledge of their radiated sum field. The two sources can be arbitrary but it must be possible to enclose the sources inside their own non-intersecting minimum...

  14. Results from laboratory and field testing of nitrate measuring spectrophotometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snazelle, Teri T.

    2015-01-01

    Five ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometer nitrate analyzers were evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility (HIF) during a two-phase evaluation. In Phase I, the TriOS ProPs (10-millimeter (mm) path length), Hach NITRATAX plus sc (5-mm path length), Satlantic Submersible UV Nitrate Analyzer (SUNA, 10-mm path length), and S::CAN Spectro::lyser (5-mm path length) were evaluated in the HIF Water-Quality Servicing Laboratory to determine the validity of the manufacturer's technical specifications for accuracy, limit of linearity (LOL), drift, and range of operating temperature. Accuracy specifications were met in the TriOS, Hach, and SUNA. The stock calibration of the S::CAN required two offset adjustments before the analyzer met the manufacturer's accuracy specification. Instrument drift was observed only in the S::CAN and was the result of leaching from the optical path insert seals. All tested models, except for the Hach, met their specified LOL in the laboratory testing. The Hach's range was found to be approximately 18 milligrams nitrogen per liter (mg-N/L) and not the manufacturer-specified 25 mg-N/L. Measurements by all of the tested analyzers showed signs of hysteresis in the operating temperature tests. Only the SUNA measurements demonstrated excessive noise and instability in temperatures above 20 degrees Celsius (°C). The SUNA analyzer was returned to the manufacturer at the completion of the Phase II field deployment evaluation for repair and recalibration, and the performance of the sensor improved significantly.

  15. The Electromagnetic Dipole Radiation Field through the Hamiltonian Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likar, A.; Razpet, N.

    2009-01-01

    The dipole radiation from an oscillating charge is treated using the Hamiltonian approach to electrodynamics where the concept of cavity modes plays a central role. We show that the calculation of the radiation field can be obtained in a closed form within this approach by emphasizing the role of coherence between the cavity modes, which is…

  16. Radiative heat transfer in the extreme near field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeongtae; Song, Bai; Fernández-Hurtado, Víctor; Lee, Woochul; Jeong, Wonho; Cui, Longji; Thompson, Dakotah; Feist, Johannes; Reid, M T Homer; García-Vidal, Francisco J; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2015-12-17

    Radiative transfer of energy at the nanometre length scale is of great importance to a variety of technologies including heat-assisted magnetic recording, near-field thermophotovoltaics and lithography. Although experimental advances have enabled elucidation of near-field radiative heat transfer in gaps as small as 20-30 nanometres (refs 4-6), quantitative analysis in the extreme near field (less than 10 nanometres) has been greatly limited by experimental challenges. Moreover, the results of pioneering measurements differed from theoretical predictions by orders of magnitude. Here we use custom-fabricated scanning probes with embedded thermocouples, in conjunction with new microdevices capable of periodic temperature modulation, to measure radiative heat transfer down to gaps as small as two nanometres. For our experiments we deposited suitably chosen metal or dielectric layers on the scanning probes and microdevices, enabling direct study of extreme near-field radiation between silica-silica, silicon nitride-silicon nitride and gold-gold surfaces to reveal marked, gap-size-dependent enhancements of radiative heat transfer. Furthermore, our state-of-the-art calculations of radiative heat transfer, performed within the theoretical framework of fluctuational electrodynamics, are in excellent agreement with our experimental results, providing unambiguous evidence that confirms the validity of this theory for modelling radiative heat transfer in gaps as small as a few nanometres. This work lays the foundations required for the rational design of novel technologies that leverage nanoscale radiative heat transfer.

  17. Radiation from channeled positrons in a hypersonic wave field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mkrtchyan, A.R.; Gasparyan, R.A.; Gabrielyan, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation emitted by channeled positrons in a longitudinal or transverse standing hypersonic wave field is considered. In the case of plane channeling the spectral distribution of the radiation intensity is shown to be of a resonance nature depending on the hypersound frequency

  18. Conditions's considerations of the CT radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Lucio das Chagas de; Peixoto, Jose Guilherme Pereira

    2013-01-01

    In obtaining the standardization of radiation fields in diagnostic radiology were established standards and qualities to X radiation beams, which are specified in terms of the tension in the tube, first CSR, additional filters, homogeneity coefficient or second CSR. The qualities recommended in CT (RQT), are established in IEC 61267, which is the reference for the establishment of beams in diagnostic radiology. (author)

  19. Hawking radiation of a vector field and gravitational anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Keiju; Miyamoto, Umpei

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the relation between Hawking radiation and gravitational anomalies has been used to estimate the flux of Hawking radiation for a large class of black objects. In this paper, we extend the formalism, originally proposed by Robinson and Wilczek, to the Hawking radiation of vector particles (photons). It is explicitly shown, with the Hamiltonian formalism, that the theory of an electromagnetic field on d-dimensional spherical black holes reduces to one of an infinite number of massive complex scalar fields on 2-dimensional spacetime, for which the usual anomaly-cancellation method is available. It is found that the total energy emitted from the horizon for the electromagnetic field is just (d-2) times that for a scalar field. The results support the picture that Hawking radiation can be regarded as an anomaly eliminator on horizons. Possible extensions and applications of the analysis are discussed

  20. Tomography of binomial states of the radiation field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bazrafkan, MR; Man'ko, [No Value

    2004-01-01

    The symplectic, optical, and photon-number tomographic symbols of binomial states of the radiation field are studied. Explicit relations for all tomograms of the binomial states are obtained. Two measures for nonclassical properties of these states are discussed.

  1. International cooperation in the field of radiation application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Shoichi

    1993-01-01

    Bilateral and multilateral research cooperations have been implemented at TRCRE, JAERI, producing favourable results in the field of radiation application. Frameworks and some achievements are described and the significance of the international cooperation is discussed. (Author)

  2. Effects of hypersonic field and anharmonic interactions on channelling radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, Juby; Pathak, Anand P; Goteti, L N S Prakash; Nagamani, G

    2007-01-01

    The effects of a hypersonic field on positron channelling radiation are considered. Anharmonic effects of the transverse potential induced by these longitudinal fields are incorporated and the wavefunction of the planar channelled positron is found by the solution of Dirac equation under the resonant influence of hypersound. An expression for the resonant frequency is estimated. The transition probabilities and the intensity of the channelling radiation are also calculated. It is found that the anharmonic effects change the spectral distributions considerably

  3. Maximal near-field radiative heat transfer between two plates

    OpenAIRE

    Nefzaoui, Elyes; Ezzahri, Younès; Drevillon, Jérémie; Joulain, Karl

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Near-field radiative transfer is a promising way to significantly and simultaneously enhance both thermo-photovoltaic (TPV) devices power densities and efficiencies. A parametric study of Drude and Lorentz models performances in maximizing near-field radiative heat transfer between two semi-infinite planes separated by nanometric distances at room temperature is presented in this paper. Optimal parameters of these models that provide optical properties maximizing the r...

  4. Behavior of MOSFET Amplifier in Radiation Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharshar, K.A.A.; Ashry, M.

    2000-01-01

    MOSFET type 2 N 3823 characteristics and its application as an amplifier are analyzed including the effects of gamma, electron beam 1.5 MeV 25 m A and neutron flux. The 1-V characteristics, transfer curve, and the frequency response of the amplifier, and the amplification factor(A v 0 are discussed with MOSFET circuit parameters. The drain current and the amplitude of the output signal decrease as the absorbed dose increases. The measured values of the amplified signal are attenuated by 30% and 6% after exposing the MOSFET to gamma radiation and electron beam at the same dose respectively. Also for exposure to 4x10 13 N/cm 3 neutrons decreased the measured value of the amplified signal by 73% of the initial values. The decrease in the gain of the MOSFET is due to the degradation of the transconductance. It is also noticed that percentage of the decrease depends on the type of radiation

  5. Dynamics of Charged Particles and their Radiation Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poisson, E

    2006-01-01

    an electron for very long times. Without radiation reaction, the motion of an electron in the trap is an epicycle that consists of a rapid (and small) cyclotron orbit superposed onto a slow (and large) magnetron orbit. Spohn shows that according to the Landau-Lifshitz equations, the radiation reaction produces a damping of the cyclotron motion. For reasonable laboratory situations this damping occurs over a time scale of the order of 0.1 second. This experiment might well be within technological reach. The presentation of the quantum theory is based on the nonrelativistic Abraham model, which upon quantization leads to the well-known Pauli-Fierz Hamiltonian of nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics. This theory, an approximation to the fully relativistic version of QED, has a wide domain of validity that includes many aspects of quantum optics and laser-matter interactions. I first admit that I found Spohn's presentation to be tough going. Unlike the pair of delightful books by Cohen-Tannoudji, Dupont-Roc, and Grynberg, this is not a gentle introduction to the quantum theory of a charged particle coupled to its own electromagnetic field. Instead, Spohn proceeds rather quickly through the formulation of the theory (defining the Hamiltonian and the Hilbert space) and then presents some applications (for example, he constructs the ground states of the theory, he examines radiation processes, and he explores finite-temperature aspects). There is a lot of material in the eight chapters devoted to the quantum theory, but my insufficient preparation and the advanced nature of Spohn's presentation were significant obstacles. One of the most useful resources in Spohn's book are the historical notes and literature reviews that are inserted at the end of each chapter. I discovered a wealth of interesting articles by reading these, and I am grateful that the author made the effort to collect this information for the benefit of his readers. (book review)

  6. Exposure to electromagnetic fields from smart utility meters in GB; part I) laboratory measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyman, Azadeh; Addison, Darren; Mee, Terry; Goiceanu, Cristian; Maslanyj, Myron; Mann, Simon

    2017-05-01

    Laboratory measurements of electric fields have been carried out around examples of smart meter devices used in Great Britain. The aim was to quantify exposure of people to radiofrequency signals emitted from smart meter devices operating at 2.4 GHz, and then to compare this with international (ICNIRP) health-related guidelines and with exposures from other telecommunication sources such as mobile phones and Wi-Fi devices. The angular distribution of the electric fields from a sample of 39 smart meter devices was measured in a controlled laboratory environment. The angular direction where the power density was greatest was identified and the equivalent isotropically radiated power was determined in the same direction. Finally, measurements were carried out as a function of distance at the angles where maximum field strengths were recorded around each device. The maximum equivalent power density measured during transmission around smart meter devices at 0.5 m and beyond was 15 mWm -2 , with an estimation of maximum duty factor of only 1%. One outlier device had a maximum power density of 91 mWm -2 . All power density measurements reported in this study were well below the 10 W m -2 ICNIRP reference level for the general public. Bioelectromagnetics. 2017;38:280-294. © 2017 Crown copyright. BIOELECTROMAGNETICS © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Crown copyright. BIOELECTROMAGNETICS © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Link between laboratory/field observations and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, C.R.; Foley, M.G.

    1985-10-01

    The various linkages in system performance assessments that integrate disposal program elements must be understood. The linkage between model development and field/laboratory observations is described as the iterative program of site and system characterization for development of an observational-confirmatory data base to develop, improve, and support conceptual models for site and system behavior. The program consists of data gathering and experiments to demonstrate understanding at various spatial and time scales and degrees of complexity. Understanding and accounting for the decreasing characterization certainty that arises with increasing space and time scales is an important aspect of the link between models and observations. The performance allocation process for setting performance goals and confidence levels coupled with a performance assessment approach that provides these performance and confidence estimates will resolve when sufficient characterization has been achieved. At each iteration performance allocation goals are reviewed and revised as necessary. The updated data base and appropriate performance assessment tools and approaches are utilized to identify and design additional tests and data needs necessary to meet current performance allocation goals. 9 refs

  8. The link between laboratory/field observations and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, C.R.; Foley, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The various linkages in system performance assessments that integrate disposal program elements must be understood. The linkage between model development and field/laboratory observations is described as the iterative program of site and system characterization for development of an observational-confirmatory data base. This data base is designed to develop, improve, and support conceptual models for site and system behavior. The program consists of data gathering and experiments to demonstrate understanding at various spatial and time scales and degrees of complexity. Understanding and accounting for the decreasing characterization certainty that arises with increasing space and time scales is an important aspect of the link between models and observations. The performance allocation process for setting performance goals and confidence levels, coupled with a performance assessment approach that provides these performance and confidence estimates, will determine when sufficient characterization has been achieved. At each iteration, performance allocation goals are reviewed and revised as necessary. The updated data base and appropriate performance assessment tools and approaches are utilized to identify and design additional tests and data needs necessary to meet current performance allocation goals

  9. Characterization of an extrapolation chamber and radiochromic films for verifying the metrological coherence among beta radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, Jhonny Antonio Benavente

    2011-01-01

    The metrological coherence among standard systems is a requirement for assuring the reliability of dosimetric quantities measurements in ionizing radiation field. Scientific and technologic improvements happened in beta radiation metrology with the installment of the new beta secondary standard BSS2 in Brazil and with the adoption of the internationally recommended beta reference radiations. The Dosimeter Calibration Laboratory of the Development Center for Nuclear Technology (LCD/CDTN), in Belo Horizonte, implemented the BSS2 and methodologies are investigated for characterizing the beta radiation fields by determining the field homogeneity, the accuracy and uncertainties in the absorbed dose in air measurements. In this work, a methodology to be used for verifying the metrological coherence among beta radiation fields in standard systems was investigated; an extrapolation chamber and radiochromic films were used and measurements were done in terms of absorbed dose in air. The reliability of both the extrapolation chamber and the radiochromic film was confirmed and their calibrations were done in the LCD/CDTN in 90 Sr/ 90 Y, 85 Kr and 147 Pm beta radiation fields. The angular coefficients of the extrapolation curves were determined with the chamber; the field mapping and homogeneity were obtained from dose profiles and isodose with the radiochromic films. A preliminary comparison between the LCD/CDTN and the Instrument Calibration Laboratory of the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute / Sao Paulo (LCI/IPEN) was carried out. Results with the extrapolation chamber measurements showed in terms of absorbed dose in air rates showed differences between both laboratories up to de -I % e 3%, for 90 Sr/ 90 Y, 85 Kr and 147 Pm beta radiation fields, respectively. Results with the EBT radiochromic films for 0.1, 0.3 and 0.15 Gy absorbed dose in air, for the same beta radiation fields, showed differences up to 3%, -9% and -53%. The beta radiation field mappings with

  10. A mobile radiological laboratory for rapid response to off-site radiation emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoch, D. S.; Sharma, R. C.; Mehta, D. J.; Raj, V. Venkat [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2002-07-01

    A mobile radiological laboratory (MRL) has been designed and developed primarily for providing a rapid response to radiation emergencies arising as a consequence of nuclear and/or radiological accidents. It is equipped specifically to monitor the environment and provide quick assessment of radiological hazards to the population living within a radius of 30 km around a nuclear facility. In this paper, various design features of an Indian MRL together with the details of installed equipment are presented. The MRL has been designed for a continuous outdoor operation of about two weeks. It is built on a 10.70 m long air suspension Bus Chassis and has four sections : Driver's Cabin, Main Counting Laboratory, Whole Body Monitor and Rear section housing general utilities. The electric power is provided by two diesel generators during field operation and by 230 V AC mains supply at headquarters and wherever possible. The equipment installed in the MRL includes : Alpha, beta and gamma counting systems and low and high volume air samplers for the assessment of radioactive contents in the samples of air, water, soil and vegetation; environment dose rate meters and a variety of survey meters for evaluating any potential increase in radiation levels; personal dosimeters to control external radiation exposure; personal protective equipment for avoiding skin and clothing contamination; a chair type of whole body monitor for the assessment of internal radioactive contamination of the human body, in particular, thyroidal uptake of radioiodine; an automatic weather station for recording continuously the meteorological parameters and a satellite based global positioning system to continuously track and display the geographical location of the MRL. The calibrations of the installed equipment are presently in progress. Preliminary results obtained for the methods needed for rapid detection of gamma emitters in the environment and human body, namely, in situ gamma spectrometry and

  11. New developments in pulsed fields at the US National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, L.J.; Parkin, D.M.; Rickel, D.G.; Pernambuco-Wise, P.

    1996-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a member of a consortium (with Florida State University and the University of Florida) to operate the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), with funding from the National Science Foundation and the State of Florida. Los Alamos provides unique resources for its component of NHMFL in the form of a 1.4 GW inertial storage motor-generator for high field pulsed magnets and infrastructure for fields generated by flux compression. The NHMFL provides a user facility open to all qualified users, develops magnet technology in association with the private sector, and advances science and technology opportunities. The magnets in service at Los Alamos are of three types. Starting with the pre-existing explosive flux compression capability in 1991, NHMFL added capacitor-driven magnets in December, 1992, and a 20 tesla superconducting magnet in January, 1993. The capacitor-driven magnets continue to grow in diversity and accessibility, with four magnet stations now available for several different magnet types. Two magnets of unprecedented size and strength are nearing completion of assembly and design, respectively. Under final assembly is a quasi-continuous magnet that contains 90 MJ of magnetic energy at full field, and being designed is a non-destructive 100 T magnet containing 140 MJ

  12. Development of advanced radiation monitors for pulsed neutron fields

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081895

    The need of radiation detectors capable of efficiently measuring in pulsed neutron fields is attracting widespread interest since the 60s. The efforts of the scientific community substantially increased in the last decade due to the increasing number of applications in which this radiation field is encountered. This is a major issue especially at particle accelerator facilities, where pulsed neutron fields are present because of beam losses at targets, collimators and beam dumps, and where the correct assessment of the intensity of the neutron fields is fundamental for radiation protection monitoring. LUPIN is a neutron detector that combines an innovative acquisition electronics based on logarithmic amplification of the collected current signal and a special technique used to derive the total number of detected neutron interactions, which has been specifically conceived to work in pulsed neutron fields. Due to its special working principle, it is capable of overcoming the typical saturation issues encountere...

  13. Lightweight space radiator with leakage control by internal electrostatic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.; Bankoff, S.G.; Miksis, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    An electrostatic liquid film space radiator is proposed. This will employ an internal electrostatic field to prevent leakage of the liquid-metal coolant out of a puncture. This overcomes the major disadvantage of membrane radiators, which is their vulnerability to micrometeorite impacts. Calculations show that leaks of liquid lithium at 700 degree K can easily be stopped from punctures which are several mm in diameter, with very large safety factors. The basic idea lends itself to a variety of radiator concepts, both rotating and non-rotating. Some typical film thickness and pressure calculations in the presence of an electric field are shown

  14. Radiation effects on relativistic electrons in strong external fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    The effects of radiation of high energy electron beams are a major issue in almost all types of charged particle accelerators. The objective of this thesis is both the analytical and numerical study of radiation effects. Due to its many applications the study of the self force has become a very active and productive field of research. The main part of this thesis is devoted to the study of radiation effects in laser-based plasma accelerators. Analytical models predict the existence of radiation effects. The investigation of radiation reaction show that in laser-based plasma accelerators, the self force effects lower the energy gain and emittance for moderate energies electron beams and increase the relative energy spread. However, for relatively high energy electron beams, the self radiation and retardation (radiation effects of one electron on the other electron of the system) effects increase the transverse emittance of the beam. The energy gain decreases to even lower value and relative energy spread increases to even higher value due to high radiation losses. The second part of this thesis investigates with radiation reaction in focused laser beams. Radiation effects are very weak even for high energy electrons. The radiation-free acceleration and the simple practical setup make direct acceleration in a focused laser beam very attractive. The results presented in this thesis can be helpful for the optimization of future electron acceleration experiments, in particular in the case of laser-plasma accelerators.

  15. Gravitational radiation from preheating with many fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jr, John T. Giblin; Price, Larry R.; Siemens, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Parametric resonances provide a mechanism by which particles can be created just after inflation. Thus far, attention has focused on a single or many inflaton fields coupled to a single scalar field. However, generically we expect the inflaton to couple to many other relativistic degrees of freedom present in the early universe. Using simulations in an expanding Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetime, in this paper we show how preheating is affected by the addition of multiple fields coupled to the inflaton. We focus our attention on gravitational wave production — an important potential observational signature of the preheating stage. We find that preheating and its gravitational wave signature is robust to the coupling of the inflaton to more matter fields

  16. Gravitational radiation from preheating with many fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jr, John T. Giblin [Department of Physics, Kenyon College, 201 North College Road, Gambier, OH 43022 (United States); Price, Larry R.; Siemens, Xavier, E-mail: giblinj@kenyon.edu, E-mail: larry@gravity.phys.uwm.edu, E-mail: siemens@gravity.phys.uwm.edu [Center for Gravitation and Cosmology, Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin — Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Parametric resonances provide a mechanism by which particles can be created just after inflation. Thus far, attention has focused on a single or many inflaton fields coupled to a single scalar field. However, generically we expect the inflaton to couple to many other relativistic degrees of freedom present in the early universe. Using simulations in an expanding Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetime, in this paper we show how preheating is affected by the addition of multiple fields coupled to the inflaton. We focus our attention on gravitational wave production — an important potential observational signature of the preheating stage. We find that preheating and its gravitational wave signature is robust to the coupling of the inflaton to more matter fields.

  17. Effects of ionizing radiation and steady magnetic field on erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, S. P.; Galutzov, B. P.; Kuzmanova, M. A.; Markov, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    A complex biophysical test for studying the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation has been developed. The following cell and membrane parameters have been investigated: cell size, cell shape, cell distribution by size, electrophoretic mobility, extent of hemolysis, membrane transport and membrane impedance. Gamma ray doses of 2.2 Gy and 3.3 Gy were used as ionizing radiation and steady (DC) magnetic field of 5-90 mT representing the non-ionizing radiation. Erythrocytes from humans and rats were exposed in vitro to both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. In some experiments ionizing radiation was applied in vivo as well. Each of the simultaneously studied parameters have been found to change as a function of applied radiation. The proposed test allows an estimation of the changes in the elastic, rheological and electrical parameters of cells and biological membranes. Results indicate that ionizing radiation is significantly more effective in an in vivo application, while magnetic fields are more effective when applied in vitro. Surprisingly, steady magnetic fields were found to act as protector against some harmful effects of ionizing radiation. (authors)

  18. Standardization of reference radiation field of beta for 85Kr using extrapolation chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazaroh; Fendinugroho

    2013-01-01

    Standardization of reference radiation field of beta for 85 Kr in PTKMR-BATAN Laboratory has been performed at the SDD's 30 cm by using extrapolation chamber detector, coupled with Uni dose electrometer. The result was : (8.98±3 %) mGy/h, at 95 % confidence level. The aim of standardization of reference radiation field is to support radiation protection and safety program, provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency to its Member States, included BATAN-Indonesia, especially, PTKMR. The aim of radiation protection program and safety program is to promote an internationally harmonized approach for radiation measurement in protection level, besides for calibration of radiation measuring instrument, which users spread across Indonesia, with the number of about 795 firms in the year of 2012. These benefits can be felt by workers, communities and the environment, because by calibration, measurement survey meter, pocket dosimeter and TLD to be more accurate so that the radiation dose received by radiation workers is accurate and can be ascertained in a specified period, not to exceed a predetermined NBD by BAPETEN. The aim of this calibration is appropriate with the primary objective of calibration on IAEA/TRS16:2000. (author)

  19. Radiation chemistry at the Metallurgical Laboratory, Manhattan Project, University of Chicago (1942-1947) and the Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (1947-1984)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, S.

    1989-01-01

    The events in radiation chemistry which occurred in the Manhattan Project Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory during World War II are reviewed. Research programmes from then until the present day are presented, with emphasis on pulse radiolysis studies. (UK)

  20. Costs and benefits of cold acclimation in field released Drosophila – Associating laboratory and field results.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Johannes; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; A. Hoffmann, Ary

    2008-01-01

    Physiological and evolutionary responses to thermal variation are often investigated under controlled laboratory conditions. However, this approach may fail to account for the complexity of natural environments. Here we investigated the costs and benefits of developmental or adult cold acclimation...... temperatures where cold acclimated flies were up to 36 times less likely to find a resource under warm conditions. These costs were not detected in standard laboratory tests but indicate that physiological acclimation may improve fitness only over a narrow set of thermal conditions while it may have...... using the ability of field released Drosophila melanogaster to find a resource as a proxy of fitness. Measurements were carried out on two continents across a range of temperatures. Cold acclimation improved the flies' ability to find resources at low temperatures. However, this came at a cost at higher...

  1. Field and Laboratory Studies of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggon, Matthew Mitchell

    This thesis is the culmination of field and laboratory studies aimed at assessing processes that affect the composition and distribution of atmospheric organic aerosol. An emphasis is placed on measurements conducted using compact and high-resolution Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMS). The first three chapters summarize results from aircraft campaigns designed to evaluate anthropogenic and biogenic impacts on marine aerosol and clouds off the coast of California. Subsequent chapters describe laboratory studies intended to evaluate gas and particle-phase mechanisms of organic aerosol oxidation. The 2013 Nucleation in California Experiment (NiCE) was a campaign designed to study environments impacted by nucleated and/or freshly formed aerosol particles. Terrestrial biogenic aerosol with > 85% organic mass was observed to reside in the free troposphere above marine stratocumulus. This biogenic organic aerosol (BOA) originated from the Northwestern United States and was transported to the marine atmosphere during periodic cloud-clearing events. Spectra recorded by a cloud condensation nuclei counter demonstrated that BOA is CCN active. BOA enhancements at latitudes north of San Francisco, CA coincided with enhanced cloud water concentrations of organic species such as acetate and formate. Airborne measurements conducted during the 2011 Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE) were aimed at evaluating the contribution of ship emissions to the properties of marine aerosol and clouds off the coast of central California. In one study, analysis of organic aerosol mass spectra during periods of enhanced shipping activity yielded unique tracers indicative of cloud-processed ship emissions (m/z 42 and 99). The variation of their organic fraction (f42 and f 99) was found to coincide with periods of heavy (f 42 > 0.15; f99 > 0.04), moderate (0.05 controlled organic plume emitted from the R/V Point Sur. Under sunny conditions, nucleated particles composed

  2. National Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation Metrology - Brazilian CNEN; Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    The activities of the Brazilian National Laboratory of Ionizing Radiations Metrology are described. They include research and development of metrological techniques and procedures, the calibration of area radiation monitors, clinical dosemeters and other instruments and the preparation and standardization of reference radioactive sources. 4 figs., 13 tabs.

  3. Laboratory Training Manual on the Use of Isotopes and Radiation in Entomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria).

    This publication should be useful for those who are interested in the theory and application of isotopes and radiation in agriculture and entomology. There are two main parts in the publication. Part I, entitled Basic Part, includes topics which an individual should know about radioisotopes and radiation. There are laboratory exercises included in…

  4. Pacific Northwest Laboratory plan to maintain radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higby, D.P.; Denovan, J.T.

    1982-12-01

    This document describes the radiation safety program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The practices and administrative policies of this program support the principles of ALARA (to maintain radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable). This document also describes a program to establish safety goals at PNL to help ensure that operations are conducted according to ALARA principles

  5. National Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation Metrology - Brazilian CNEN; Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    The activities of the Brazilian National Laboratory of Ionizing Radiations Metrology are described. They include research and development of metrological techniques and procedures, the calibration of area radiation monitors, clinical dosemeters and other instruments and the preparation and standardization of reference radioactive sources. 4 figs., 13 tabs.

  6. How to prepare a calibration laboratory for ionizing radiation using X rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossio, Francisco; Cardoso, Ricardo de Souza; Quaresma, Daniel da Silva; Batista Filha, Luzianete do Amaral; Peixoto, Jose Guilherme Pereira

    2013-01-01

    This work shows the main features of a system for calibration and testing of radiation detectors used in low and medium energy. It is based on pre-assembly System Laboratory of Metrology Division (DIMET) Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD) of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN). (author)

  7. Black-body radiation of noncommutative gauge fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatollahi, Amir H.; Hajirahimi, Maryam

    2006-01-01

    The black-body radiation is considered in a theory with noncommutative electRomegnetic fields; that is noncommutativity is introduced in field space, rather than in real space. A direct implication of the result on cosmic microwave background map is argued

  8. Sound power radiated by sources in diffuse fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polack, Jean-Dominique

    2000-01-01

    Sound power radiated by sources at low frequency notoriously depends on source position. We sampled the sound field of a rectangular room at 18 microphone and 4 source positions. Average power spectra were extrapolated from the reverberant field, taking into account the frequency dependent...

  9. Spherical-wave expansions of piston-radiator fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, R C; Yaghjian, A D

    1991-09-01

    Simple spherical-wave expansions of the continuous-wave fields of a circular piston radiator in a rigid baffle are derived. These expansions are valid throughout the illuminated half-space and are useful for efficient numerical computation in the near-field region. Multipole coefficients are given by closed-form expressions which can be evaluated recursively.

  10. Conception of the Instrument Calibration Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation Measurement (LACIMRI) of CTMSP - Sao Paulo, SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Raimundo Dias da; Kibrit, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    The present work describes the phases of implantation of calibration laboratory of ionizing radiation measurement instruments at the CTMSP, Sao Paulo, in a priory approved by CNEN, Brazil. That laboratory will allow and enhance the present metrological capacity for the attendance to the growing demand for calibration services of the instruments

  11. University Physics Students' Ideas of Thermal Radiation Expressed in Open Laboratory Activities Using Infrared Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Jesper; Melander, Emil; Weiszflog, Matthias; Andersson, Staffan

    2017-01-01

    Background: University physics students were engaged in open-ended thermodynamics laboratory activities with a focus on understanding a chosen phenomenon or the principle of laboratory apparatus, such as thermal radiation and a heat pump. Students had access to handheld infrared (IR) cameras for their investigations. Purpose: The purpose of the…

  12. Evaluation of Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron; Wilcox, Stephen; Stoffel, Thomas

    2015-12-23

    This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances. These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband radiometers, and a pyranometer with fixed internal shading and are all deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. Data from 32 global horizontal irradiance and 19 direct normal irradiance radiometers are presented. The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances.

  13. Visual verification of linac light and radiation fields coincidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monti, Angelo F.; Frigerio, Milena; Frigerio, Giovanna

    2003-01-01

    X-ray and light field alignment evaluation is carried out during linac quality assurance programs. In this paper, we compare the size of the light field measured by a photodiode and by a more traditional visual observation with the size of the x-ray field. The comparison between actual light field size, measured with the photodiode, and light field size measured by human eye allow us to verify the reliability of human eye in the evaluation of this parameter. The visual field is always larger than real light field; however, it agrees better with the x-ray field. It matches the light field if we take into account the 25% (± 1%) of the decrement line of the maximum central lightening; however, this method simulates better the actual field employed in radiation treatments

  14. Problems with ink skin markings for radiation field setups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endoh, Masaru; Saeki, Mituaki; Ishida, Yusei

    1982-01-01

    Ink skin markings are used in radiation therapy to aid in reproduction of treatment field setups or to indelibly outline field markings or tumors. We reported two cases of indelible ink skin for radiation field septa with minimal discomfort and dermatitis have been experienced for 6 months and above since end of radiotherapy. These indelible ink skin markings look like tattoo that will be big problems in the case of young female. We improved these problems by using of 10 percent silver nitrate instead of habitual skin ink. (author)

  15. Line radiation effects in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kerr, F.M.; Gouveia, A.; Renner, Oldřich; Rose, S. J.; Scott, H.A.; Wark, J. S.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 99, - (2006), s. 363-369 ISSN 0022-4073 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : radiation transport * plasmas * opacity effects Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.599, year: 2006

  16. Building the basis for a comprehensive radiation protection program for a multi-program laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copenhaver, E.D.

    1987-01-01

    An explicit, workplace-specific training has been developed, implemented, and documented for all radiation workers. In addition to the radiation worker personnel located at reactors, accelerators, radiochemical laboratories, and waste treatment areas, we have trained other personnel who work in areas where a lesser potential for radiological/chemical exposure exists. These workforces include construction crews, site restoration crews, contracted special services such as scoping and site characterization teams, and short-term visitors. We are developing a comprehensive, integrated approach to radiation protection training suited for a multi-purpose research laboratory. 9 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  17. Note: Measurement system for the radiative forcing of greenhouse gases in a laboratory scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Yoshiyuki [Department of Intelligent Mechanical Engineering, Fukuoka Institute of Technology, 3-30-1 Wajirohigashi, Higashiku, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    The radiative forcing of the greenhouse gases has been studied being based on computational simulations or the observation of the real atmosphere meteorologically. In order to know the greenhouse effect more deeply and to study it from various viewpoints, the study on it in a laboratory scale is important. We have developed a direct measurement system for the infrared back radiation from the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) gas. The system configuration is similar with that of the practical earth-atmosphere-space system. Using this system, the back radiation from the CO{sub 2} gas was directly measured in a laboratory scale, which roughly coincides with meteorologically predicted value.

  18. Note: Measurement system for the radiative forcing of greenhouse gases in a laboratory scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The radiative forcing of the greenhouse gases has been studied being based on computational simulations or the observation of the real atmosphere meteorologically. In order to know the greenhouse effect more deeply and to study it from various viewpoints, the study on it in a laboratory scale is important. We have developed a direct measurement system for the infrared back radiation from the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas. The system configuration is similar with that of the practical earth-atmosphere-space system. Using this system, the back radiation from the CO2 gas was directly measured in a laboratory scale, which roughly coincides with meteorologically predicted value.

  19. Radiation Induced Chemistry of Icy Surfaces: Laboratory Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudipati, Murthy S.; Lignell, Antti; Li, Irene; Yang, Rui; Jacovi, Ronen

    2011-01-01

    We will discuss laboratory experiments designed to enhance our understanding the chemical processes on icy solar system bodies, enable interpretation of in-situ and remote-sensing data, and help future missions to icy solar system bodies, such as comets, Europa, Ganymede, Enceladus etc.

  20. A proposal how to take into account inhomogeneous radiation fields in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschurlovits, M.

    1996-01-01

    External radiation fields exposing the human body inhomogenously are not considered neither in radiation protection standards nor in recent ICRU recommendations, but appear frequently in practical radiation protection. A proposal to solve this question is given taking into account both a conceptual and a metrological approach. The proposal suggests that a mean over an area of about 100 cm 2 can be taken as reference area for compliance with limits in terms of effective dose. (author)

  1. Super-Planckian far-field radiative heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Hurtado, V.; Fernández-Domínguez, A. I.; Feist, J.; García-Vidal, F. J.; Cuevas, J. C.

    2018-01-01

    We present here a theoretical analysis that demonstrates that the far-field radiative heat transfer between objects with dimensions smaller than the thermal wavelength can overcome the Planckian limit by orders of magnitude. To guide the search for super-Planckian far-field radiative heat transfer, we make use of the theory of fluctuational electrodynamics and derive a relation between the far-field radiative heat transfer and the directional absorption efficiency of the objects involved. Guided by this relation, and making use of state-of-the-art numerical simulations, we show that the far-field radiative heat transfer between highly anisotropic objects can largely overcome the black-body limit when some of their dimensions are smaller than the thermal wavelength. In particular, we illustrate this phenomenon in the case of suspended pads made of polar dielectrics like SiN or SiO2. These structures are widely used to measure the thermal transport through nanowires and low-dimensional systems and can be employed to test our predictions. Our work illustrates the dramatic failure of the classical theory to predict the far-field radiative heat transfer between micro- and nanodevices.

  2. Radiation field distribution within the room for three commonly-used interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Changcai; Zhang Lin; Min Nan; Lu Feng; Li Quantai; Deng Daping; Chen Yue; Zhu Jianguo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To detect the radiation field distribution within the room for three commonly-used interventional procedures, in order to provide basic data for the radiation protection and safe operation of staff involved in interventional radiology. Methods: The thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) were placed in different points on the horizontal plane around the interventional table and the vertical plane where the staff often stayed. Based on the selected experimental conditions, the TLDs were grouped to be irradiated. After the experiment, the TLDs were measured in the laboratory to calculate the doses of radiation field. Results: Data obtained at the same position followed basically as cardiovascular intervention > cerebrovascular intervention > liver intervention. Intervention of same type at the same position followed as high-dose group > mid-dose group > low-dose group. These results were consistent with the useful beam doses, and proportional to the fluoroscopy time. A few data with exception were due to measurement error or experimental error. Conclusions: Cerebrovascular and liver interventional procedures resulted in the relatively low radiation doses. The radiation doses at the distance of more than 3 m can be negligible. For cardiovascular interventional procedure, with the decrease of the distance from the X-ray tube, the dose decreased. In the radiation field,the operator, the first assistant and second assistant would exposed to higher dose on the standing points while patients receive lower doses in the head and feet direction. (authors)

  3. Test and evaluation of semiconductor components in mixed field radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas, Jose Patricio N.; Madi Filho, Tufic; Rodrigues, Leticia L.C.

    2009-01-01

    Silicon components have found extensive use in nuclear spectroscopy and counting, as described in many articles in the last three decades. These devices have found utility in radiation dosimetry because a diode, for instance, produces a current approximately 18000 times higher than any ionization chamber of equal sensitive volume. This reduces stringent requirements from the electronics used to amplify or integrate the current and / or allows approaching the ideal detector point for the mapping of radiation fields. For better performance, in the case of diodes, they are normally used with high inverse polarity to obtain a deeper barrier, less noise and shorter transit time. The aim of this work was the evaluation of these semiconductor components for application in ionizing radiation fields monitoring, in nuclear research reactors and radiotherapy facilities, for radiation protection and health physics purposes. Experimental configurations to analyze the performance of commercial semiconductors, such as silicon PIN Photodiodes and Silicon Surface Barrier Detectors, were developed and the performance of three different configurations of charge preamplifier with silicon components was also studied. Components were evaluated for application as neutron detectors, using some types of radiators (converters). The radiation response of these silicon components to neutron fields from nuclear research reactors IEA-R1 and IPEN-MB1 (thermal, epithermal and fast neutrons), from beam holes, experimental halls and AmBe neutron sources in laboratory was investigated. (author)

  4. Field and laboratory procedures used in a soil chronosequence study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Michael J.; Janitzky, Peter

    1986-01-01

    In 1978, the late Denis Marchand initiated a research project entitled "Soil Correlation and Dating at the U.S. Geological Survey" to determine the usefulness of soils in solving geologic problems. Marchand proposed to establish soil chronosequences that could be dated independently of soil development by using radiometric and other numeric dating methods. In addition, by comparing dated chronosequences in different environments, rates of soil development could be studied and compared among varying climates and mineralogical conditions. The project was fundamental in documenting the value of soils in studies of mapping, correlating, and dating late Cenozoic deposits and in studying soil genesis. All published reports by members of the project are included in the bibliography.The project demanded that methods be adapted or developed to ensure comparability over a wide variation in soil types. Emphasis was placed on obtaining professional expertise and on establishing consistent techniques, especially for the field, laboratory, and data-compilation methods. Since 1978, twelve chronosequences have been sampled and analyzed by members of this project, and methods have been established and used consistently for analysis of the samples.The goals of this report are to:Document the methods used for the study on soil chronosequences,Present the results of tests that were run for precision, accuracy, and effectiveness, andDiscuss our modifications to standard procedures.Many of the methods presented herein are standard and have been reported elsewhere. However, we assume less prior analytical knowledge in our descriptions; thus, the manual should be easy to follow for the inexperienced analyst. Each chapter presents one or more references of the basic principle, an equipment and reagents list, and the detailed procedure. In some chapters this is followed by additional remarks or example calculations.The flow diagram in figure 1 outlines the step-by-step procedures used to

  5. Simulations of radiative shocks and jet formation in laboratory plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velarde, P; Gonzalez, M; GarcIa-Fernandez, C; Oliva, E [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, Universidad Politcnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain) (Spain); Kasperczuk, A; Pisarczyk, T [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland) (Poland); Ullschmied, J [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, Prague (Czech Republic) (Czech Republic); Stehle, C [LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, Meudon (France) (France); Rus, B [Institute of Physics, PALS Center, Prague (Czech Republic) (Czech Republic); GarcIa-Senz, D; Bravo, E; Relano, A [Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear. Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya. Barcelona (Spain) (Spain)], E-mail: velarde@din.upm.es

    2008-05-01

    We present the simulations of two relevant hydrodynamical problems related to astrophysical phenomena performed by three different codes. The numerical results from these codes will be compared in order to test both the numerical method implemented inside them and the influence of the physical phenomena simulated by the codes. Under some conditions laser produced plasmas could be scaled to the typical conditions prevailing in astrophysical plasmas. Therefore, such similarity allows to use existing laser facilities and numerical codes suitable to a laser plasma regime, for studying astrophysical proccesses. The codes are the radiation fluid dynamic 2D ARWEN code and the 3D HERACLES, and, without radiation energy transport, a Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) code. These codes use different numerical techniques and have overlapping range of application, from laser produced plasmas to astrophysical plasmas. We also present the first laser experiments obtaining cumulative jets with a velocity higher than 100 km/s.

  6. DO TIE LABORATORY BASED ASSESSMENT METHODS REALLY PREDICT FIELD EFFECTS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediment Toxicity Identification and Evaluation (TIE) methods have been developed for both porewaters and whole sediments. These relatively simple laboratory methods are designed to identify specific toxicants or classes of toxicants in sediments; however, the question of whethe...

  7. DO TIE LABORATORY BASED METHODS REALLY REFLECT FIELD CONDITIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediment Toxicity Identification and Evaluation (TIE) methods have been developed for both interstitial waters and whole sediments. These relatively simple laboratory methods are designed to identify specific toxicants or classes of toxicants in sediments; however, the question ...

  8. 1-2 GeV synchrotron radiation facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkner, K.H.

    1985-10-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a dedicated synchrotron radiation facility optimized to generate soft x-ray and vacuum ultraviole (XUV) light using magnetic insertion devices, was proposed by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in 1982. It consists of a 1.3-GeV injection system, an electron storage ring optimized at 1.3 GeV (with the capability of 1.9-GeV operation), and a number of photon beamlines emanating from twelve 6-meter-long straight sections, as shown in Fig. 1. In addition, 24 bending-magnet ports will be avialable for development. The ALS was conceived as a research tool whose range and power would stimulate fundamentally new research in fields from biology to materials science (1-4). The conceptual design and associated cost estimate for the ALS have been completed and reviewed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), but preliminary design activities have not yet begun. The focus in this paper is on the history of the ALS as an example of how a technical construction project was conceived, designed, proposed, and validated within the framwork of a national laboratory funded largely by the DOE

  9. IAEA programme in the field of radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.; Haji-Saeid, Mohammad

    2005-01-01

    Radiation technologies applying gamma sources and electron accelerators for material modification are well-established processes. There are over 160 gamma industrial irradiators and 1300 electron industrial accelerators in operation worldwide. A new advancement in the field of radiation sources engineering is the development of high power direct e - /X conversion sources based on electron accelerators. Technologies to be developed beside environmental applications could be nanomaterials, structure engineered materials (sorbents, composites, ordered polymers, etc.) and natural polymers' processing. New products based on radiation-processed polysaccharides have already been commercialised in many countries of the East Asia and Pacific Region, especially in those being rich in natural polymers. Very important and promising applications concern environmental protection-radiation technology, being a clean and environment friendly process, helps to curb pollutants' emission as well. Industrial plants for flue gas treatment have been constructed in Poland and China. The pilot plant in Bulgaria using this technology has just started its operation. The Polish plant is equipped with accelerators of over 1 MW power, a breakthrough in radiation technology application. The industrial plant for wastewater treatment is under development in Korea and a pilot plant for sewage sludge irradiation has been in operation in India for many years. Due to recent developments, the Agency has restructured its programme and organized a Technical Meeting (TM) on 'Emerging Applications of Radiation Technology for the 21st Century' at its Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, in April 2003, to review the present situation and possible developments of radiation technology to contribute to a sustainable development. This meeting provided the basic input to launch others in the most important fields of radiation technology applications: 'Advances in Radiation Chemistry of Polymers' (Notre Dame, USA

  10. IAEA programme in the field of radiation technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.; Haji-Saeid, Mohammad

    2005-07-01

    Radiation technologies applying gamma sources and electron accelerators for material modification are well-established processes. There are over 160 gamma industrial irradiators and 1300 electron industrial accelerators in operation worldwide. A new advancement in the field of radiation sources engineering is the development of high power direct e-/X conversion sources based on electron accelerators. Technologies to be developed beside environmental applications could be nanomaterials, structure engineered materials (sorbents, composites, ordered polymers, etc.) and natural polymers' processing. New products based on radiation-processed polysaccharides have already been commercialised in many countries of the East Asia and Pacific Region, especially in those being rich in natural polymers. Very important and promising applications concern environmental protection-radiation technology, being a clean and environment friendly process, helps to curb pollutants' emission as well. Industrial plants for flue gas treatment have been constructed in Poland and China. The pilot plant in Bulgaria using this technology has just started its operation. The Polish plant is equipped with accelerators of over 1 MW power, a breakthrough in radiation technology application. The industrial plant for wastewater treatment is under development in Korea and a pilot plant for sewage sludge irradiation has been in operation in India for many years. Due to recent developments, the Agency has restructured its programme and organized a Technical Meeting (TM) on "Emerging Applications of Radiation Technology for the 21st Century" at its Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, in April 2003, to review the present situation and possible developments of radiation technology to contribute to a sustainable development. This meeting provided the basic input to launch others in the most important fields of radiation technology applications: "Advances in Radiation Chemistry of Polymers" (Notre Dame, USA

  11. Standards for radiation protection and diagnostic radiology at the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernicka, F.; Andreo, P.; Meghzifene, A.; Czap, L.; Girzikowsky, R.

    1999-01-01

    International standardization in dosimetry is essential for the successful exploitation of radiation technology. The IAEA dosimetry programme is focused into services provided to Member States through the IAEA/WHO Network of Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs), to radiotherapy centres and radiation processing facilities. Radiation protection quantities defined by ICRU and ICRP are used to relate the risk due to exposure to ionizing radiation to a single quantity, irrespective of the type of radiation, which takes into account the human body as a receptor. Two types of quantities, limiting and operational, can be related to basic physical quantities which are defined without need for considering specific aspects of radiation protection, e.g. air kerma for photons and fluence for neutrons. The use of a dosimeter for measurements in radiation protection requires a calibration in terms of a physical quantity together with a conversion from physical into protection quantities by means of a factor or a coefficient

  12. Near-field radiative heat transfer in mesoporous alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jing; Feng Yan-Hui; Zhang Xin-Xin; Huang Cong-Liang; Wang Ge

    2015-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of mesoporous material has aroused the great interest of scholars due to its wide applications such as insulation, catalyst, etc. Mesoporous alumina substrate consists of uniformly distributed, unconnected cylindrical pores. Near-field radiative heat transfer cannot be ignored, when the diameters of the pores are less than the characteristic wavelength of thermal radiation. In this paper, near-field radiation across a cylindrical pore is simulated by employing the fluctuation dissipation theorem and Green function. Such factors as the diameter of the pore, and the temperature of the material are further analyzed. The research results show that the radiative heat transfer on a mesoscale is 2∼4 orders higher than on a macroscale. The heat flux and equivalent thermal conductivity of radiation across a cylindrical pore decrease exponentially with pore diameter increasing, while increase with temperature increasing. The calculated equivalent thermal conductivity of radiation is further developed to modify the thermal conductivity of the mesoporous alumina. The combined thermal conductivity of the mesoporous alumina is obtained by using porosity weighted dilute medium and compared with the measurement. The combined thermal conductivity of mesoporous silica decreases gradually with pore diameter increasing, while increases smoothly with temperature increasing, which is in good agreement with the experimental data. The larger the porosity, the more significant the near-field effect is, which cannot be ignored. (paper)

  13. Radiation of Electron in the Field of Plane Light Wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelinsky, A.; Drebot, I.V.; Grigorev, Yu.N.; Zvonareva, O.D.; Tatchyn, R.

    2006-01-01

    Results of integration of a Lorentz equation for a relativistic electron moving in the field of running, plane, linear polarized electromagnetic wave are presented in the paper. It is shown that electron velocities in the field of the wave are almost periodic functions of time. For calculations of angular spectrum of electron radiation intensity expansion of the electromagnetic field in a wave zone into generalized Fourier series was used. Expressions for the radiation intensity spectrum are presented in the paper. Derived results are illustrated for electron and laser beam parameters of NSC KIPT X-ray generator NESTOR. It is shown that for low intensity of the interacting electromagnetic wave the results of energy and angular spectrum calculations in the frame of classical electrodynamics completely coincide with calculation results produced using quantum electrodynamics. Simultaneously, derived expressions give possibilities to investigate dependence of energy and angular Compton radiation spectrum on phase of interaction and the interacting wave intensity

  14. Topological magnetoelectric effects in microwave far-field radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezin, M.; Kamenetskii, E. O.; Shavit, R. [Microwave Magnetic Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel)

    2016-07-21

    Similar to electromagnetism, described by the Maxwell equations, the physics of magnetoelectric (ME) phenomena deals with the fundamental problem of the relationship between electric and magnetic fields. Despite a formal resemblance between the two notions, they concern effects of different natures. In general, ME-coupling effects manifest in numerous macroscopic phenomena in solids with space and time symmetry breakings. Recently, it was shown that the near fields in the proximity of a small ferrite particle with magnetic-dipolar-mode (MDM) oscillations have the space and time symmetry breakings and the topological properties of these fields are different from the topological properties of the free-space electromagnetic fields. Such MDM-originated fields—called magnetoelectric (ME) fields—carry both spin and orbital angular momenta. They are characterized by power-flow vortices and non-zero helicity. In this paper, we report on observation of the topological ME effects in far-field microwave radiation based on a small microwave antenna with a MDM ferrite resonator. We show that the microwave far-field radiation can be manifested with a torsion structure where an angle between the electric and magnetic field vectors varies. We discuss the question on observation of the regions of localized ME energy in far-field microwave radiation.

  15. Computational methods in several fields of radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paretzke, Herwig G.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Radiation dosimetry has to cope with a wide spectrum of applications and requirements in time and size. The ubiquitous presence of various radiation fields or radionuclides in the human home, working, urban or agricultural environment can lead to various dosimetric tasks starting from radioecology, retrospective and predictive dosimetry, personal dosimetry, up to measurements of radionuclide concentrations in environmental and food product and, finally in persons and their excreta. In all these fields measurements and computational models for the interpretation or understanding of observations are employed explicitly or implicitly. In this lecture some examples of own computational models will be given from the various dosimetric fields, including a) Radioecology (e.g. with the code systems based on ECOSYS, which was developed far before the Chernobyl reactor accident, and tested thoroughly afterwards), b) Internal dosimetry (improved metabolism models based on our own data), c) External dosimetry (with the new ICRU-ICRP-Voxelphantom developed by our lab), d) Radiation therapy (with GEANT IV as applied to mixed reactor radiation incident on individualized voxel phantoms), e) Some aspects of nanodosimetric track structure computations (not dealt with in the other presentation of this author). Finally, some general remarks will be made on the high explicit or implicit importance of computational models in radiation protection and other research field dealing with large systems, as well as on good scientific practices which should generally be followed when developing and applying such computational models

  16. Measurements of energetic particle radiation in transit to Mars on the Mars Science Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, C; Hassler, D M; Cucinotta, F A; Ehresmann, B; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R F; Brinza, D E; Kang, S; Weigle, G; Böttcher, S; Böhm, E; Burmeister, S; Guo, J; Köhler, J; Martin, C; Posner, A; Rafkin, S; Reitz, G

    2013-05-31

    The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft, containing the Curiosity rover, was launched to Mars on 26 November 2011, and for most of the 253-day, 560-million-kilometer cruise to Mars, the Radiation Assessment Detector made detailed measurements of the energetic particle radiation environment inside the spacecraft. These data provide insights into the radiation hazards that would be associated with a human mission to Mars. We report measurements of the radiation dose, dose equivalent, and linear energy transfer spectra. The dose equivalent for even the shortest round-trip with current propulsion systems and comparable shielding is found to be 0.66 ± 0.12 sievert.

  17. The LBL [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory] 1-2 GeV synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornacchia, M.

    1987-03-01

    A description is presented of the conceptual design of the 1 to 2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source proposed for construction at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. This facility is designed to produce ultraviolet and soft x-ray radiation. The accelerator complex consists of an injection system (linac plus booster synchrotron) and a low-emittance storage ring optimized for insertion devices. Eleven straight sections are available for undulators and wigglers, and up to 48 photon beam lines may ultimately emanate from bending magnets. Design features of the radiation source are the high brightness of the photon beams, the very short pulses (tens of picoseconds), and the tunability of the radiation

  18. Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1997-08-01

    In the relatively short time that synchrotrons have been available to the scientific community, their characteristic beams of UV and X-ray radiation have been applied to virtually all areas of medical science which use ionizing radiation. The ability to tune intense monochromatic beams over wide energy ranges clearly differentiates these sources from standard clinical and research tools. The tunable spectrum, high intrinsic collimation of the beams, polarization and intensity of the beams make possible in-vitro and in-vivo research and therapeutic programs not otherwise possible. From the beginning of research operation at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), many programs have been carrying out basic biomedical research. At first, the research was limited to in-vitro programs such as the x-ray microscope, circular dichroism, XAFS, protein crystallography, micro-tomography and fluorescence analysis. Later, as the coronary angiography program made plans to move its experimental phase from SSRL to the NSLS, it became clear that other in-vivo projects could also be carried out at the synchrotron. The development of SMERF (Synchrotron Medical Research Facility) on beamline X17 became the home not only for angiography but also for the MECT (Multiple Energy Computed Tomography) project for cerebral and vascular imaging. The high energy spectrum on X17 is necessary for the MRT (Microplanar Radiation Therapy) experiments. Experience with these programs and the existence of the Medical Programs Group at the NSLS led to the development of a program in synchrotron based mammography. A recent adaptation of the angiography hardware has made it possible to image human lungs (bronchography). Fig. 1 schematically depicts the broad range of active programs at the NSLS

  19. Radiation reaction force and unification of electromagnetic and gravitational fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, C.Y.; Goldstein, G.R.; Napier, A.

    1981-04-01

    A unified theory of electromagnetic and gravitational fields should modify classical electrodynamics such that the radiation reaction force is accounted for. The analysis leads to a five-dimensional unified theory of five variables. The theory is supported by showing that, for the case of a charged particle moving in a constant magnetic field, the radiation reaction force is indeed included. Moreover, this example shows explicitly that physical changes are associated with the fifth variable. Thus, the notion of a physical five-dimensional space should be seriously taken into consideration

  20. Construction of a synchrotron radiation research laboratory in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Takehiko

    2005-01-01

    Various obstacles encountered during the course of the construction of the synchrotron radiation facilities in Thailand are described. First background information such as the brief history, the purpose of the project, and the human resources development are mentioned. Then difficulty in promoting the new project is described. Some serious problems having emerged and been overcome in the accelerator construction are mentioned. They are non-uniform floor subsidence, the broken injection timing system, the breaking of newly built vacuum chambers, the unstable operation of the linac, and electrical shortage between layers of coils of quadrupole magnets. (author)

  1. Measuring the Earth's Magnetic Field in a Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartacci, A.; Straulino, S.

    2008-01-01

    Two methods for measuring the Earth's magnetic field are described. In the former, according to Gauss, the Earth's magnetic field is compared with that of a permanent magnet; in the latter, a well-known method, the comparison is made with the magnetic field generated by a current. As all the used instruments are available off the shelf, both…

  2. About Region 3's Laboratory and Field Services at EPA's Environmental Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mission & contact information for EPA Region 3's Laboratory and Field Services located at EPA's Environmental Science Center: the Office of Analytical Services and Quality Assurance & Field Inspection Program

  3. Characterization of beta radiation fields using radiochromic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benavente, Jhonny A.; Silva, Teogenes A. da

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the response of radiochromic films for beta radiation fields in terms of absorbed dose. The reliability of the EBT model Gafchromic radiochromic film was studied. A 9800 XL model Microtek, transmission scanner, a 369 model X-Rite optical densitometer and a Mini 1240 Shimadzu UV spectrophotometer were used for measurement comparisons. Calibration of the three systems was done with irradiated samples of radiochromic films with 0.1; 0.3; 0.5; 0.8; 1.0; 1.5; 2.0; 2.5; 3.0; 3.5; 4.5 e 5.0 Gy in beta radiation field from a Sr-90/Y-90 source. Calibration was performed by establishing a correlation between the absorbed dose values and the corresponding radiochromic responses. Results showed significant differences in the absorbed dose values obtained with the three methods. Absorbed dose values showed errors from 0.6 to 4.4%, 0.3 to 31.8% and 0.2 to 47.3% for the Microtek scanner, the X-Rite Densitometer and the Shimadzu spectrophotometer, respectively. Due to the easy acquisition and use for absorbed dose measurements, the densitometer and the spectrophotometer showed to be suitable techniques to evaluate radiation dose in relatively homogeneous fields. In the case of inhomogeneous fields or for a two dimension mapping of radiation fields to identify anisotropies, the scanner technique is the most recommended. (author)

  4. Radiation degradation of biological residues (Aflatoxins) produced in food laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogovschi, Vladimir D.; Aquino, Simone; Nunes, Thaise C.F.; Trindade, Reginaldo A.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C.H.; Zorzete, Patricia; Correa, Benedito

    2007-01-01

    Some molds have the capacity to produce substances that are toxic and generally cancer-causing agents, such as aflatoxins, that stand between the most important carcinogenic substances (class one of the agents which are certainly carcinogenous for human people according to the International Agency for Research on Cancer). Aspergillus spp. is present in world-wide distribution, with predominance in tropical and subtropical regions growing in any substratum. The aim of this work is establish a minimum dose of radiation that degrades aflatoxins produced by fungi Aspergillus spp. The Aspergillus spp. colonies will be cultivated in coconut agar medium and the samples will be conditioned in appropriate bags for irradiation treatment of contaminated material and processed in the Gammacell 220 with dose of 20 kGy. (author)

  5. Radiation degradation of biological residues (Aflatoxins) produced in food laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogovschi, Vladimir D.; Aquino, Simone; Nunes, Thaise C.F.; Trindade, Reginaldo A.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (brazil)]. E-mails: vladrogo@yahoo.com.br; villavic@ipen.br; Zorzete, Patricia; Correa, Benedito [Universidade de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biomedicas]. E-mail: correabe@usp.br

    2007-07-01

    Some molds have the capacity to produce substances that are toxic and generally cancer-causing agents, such as aflatoxins, that stand between the most important carcinogenic substances (class one of the agents which are certainly carcinogenous for human people according to the International Agency for Research on Cancer). Aspergillus spp. is present in world-wide distribution, with predominance in tropical and subtropical regions growing in any substratum. The aim of this work is establish a minimum dose of radiation that degrades aflatoxins produced by fungi Aspergillus spp. The Aspergillus spp. colonies will be cultivated in coconut agar medium and the samples will be conditioned in appropriate bags for irradiation treatment of contaminated material and processed in the Gammacell 220 with dose of 20 kGy. (author)

  6. Maximal near-field radiative heat transfer between two plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefzaoui, Elyes; Ezzahri, Younès; Drévillon, Jérémie; Joulain, Karl

    2013-09-01

    Near-field radiative transfer is a promising way to significantly and simultaneously enhance both thermo-photovoltaic (TPV) devices power densities and efficiencies. A parametric study of Drude and Lorentz models performances in maximizing near-field radiative heat transfer between two semi-infinite planes separated by nanometric distances at room temperature is presented in this paper. Optimal parameters of these models that provide optical properties maximizing the radiative heat flux are reported and compared to real materials usually considered in similar studies, silicon carbide and heavily doped silicon in this case. Results are obtained by exact and approximate (in the extreme near-field regime and the electrostatic limit hypothesis) calculations. The two methods are compared in terms of accuracy and CPU resources consumption. Their differences are explained according to a mesoscopic description of nearfield radiative heat transfer. Finally, the frequently assumed hypothesis which states a maximal radiative heat transfer when the two semi-infinite planes are of identical materials is numerically confirmed. Its subsequent practical constraints are then discussed. Presented results enlighten relevant paths to follow in order to choose or design materials maximizing nano-TPV devices performances.

  7. Soil profile property estimation with field and laboratory VNIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) soil sensors have the potential to provide rapid, high-resolution estimation of multiple soil properties. Although many studies have focused on laboratory-based visible and near-infrared (VNIR) spectroscopy of dried soil samples, previous work has demonstrated ...

  8. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL's history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia's leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR's performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY '91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL's three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL's users made significant scientific progress, as described in Section V of this report

  9. Radiation degradation of biological waste (aflatoxins) produced in food laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogovschi, Vladimir Dias

    2009-01-01

    Many filamentous fungi can produce secondary metabolites, called mycotoxins, which can be found in food and agricultural products. One of the main genera of myco toxigenic fungi related to the food chain is the Aspergillus spp. There are over 400 mycotoxins described in the literature, the most common the aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2. The mycotoxins are commonly found in foods and are considered one of the most dangerous contaminants. The aflatoxin B1 is classified in group one by the International Agency of Research on Cancer. Aflatoxins resisting for more than one hour in autoclave making it necessary to other means of degradation of these toxins. This work aimed to observe the effects of gamma radiation of 60 Co and electron beams in the degradation of aflatoxins and compare the damage caused on the morphology of the Aspergillus flavus. The fungus was grown on potato dextrose agar (PDA) for 10 days and was subsequently transferred to coconut agar medium, and maintained for 14 days at 25 degree C. After this step the coconut agar was ground to become a homogeneous pasty and was irradiated with doses of 2.5, 5.0, 10 and 20 kGy. The samples used in scanning electron microscopy were irradiated with doses of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10 and 20 kGy with sources of 60 Co and electron beams. Irradiation with electron accelerator showed a slightly higher degradation to gamma radiation, reducing 29.93 %, 34.50 %, 52.63 % and 72.30 % for doses of 2.5, 5.0, 10 and 20 kGy, respectively. The Scanning Electron Microscopy showed that doses of 2.5 to 10 kGy did not cause damage to the fungus, but with a dose of 20 kGy it can be observed fungal damage to structures. (author)

  10. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K. [ed.

    1996-01-01

    For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL`s users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL`s experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year.

  11. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K. [ed.

    1987-12-31

    1986 was another year of major advances for SSRL as the ultimate capabilities of PEP as a synchrotron radiation source became more apparent and a second PEP beam line was initiated, while effective development and utilization of SPEAR proceeded. Given these various PEP developments, SSRL abandoned its plans for a separate diffraction limited ring, as they abandoned their plans for a 6--7 GeV ring of the APS type last year. It has become increasingly apparent that SSRL should concentrate on developing SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources. Consequently, initial planning for a 3 GeV booster synchrotron injector for SPEAR was performed in 1986, with a proposal to the Department of Energy resulting. As described in Chapter 2, the New Rings Group and the Machine Physics Group were combined into one Accelerator Physics Group. This group is focusing mainly on the improvement of SPEAR`s operating conditions and on planning for the conversion of PEP into a fourth generation x-ray source. Considerable emphasis is also being given to the training of accelerator physics graduate students. At the same time, several improvements of SSRL`s existing facilities were made. These are described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes new SSRL beam lines being commissioned. Chapter 5 discusses SSRL`s present construction projects. Chapter 6 discusses a number of projects presently underway in the engineering division. Chapter 7 describes SSRL`s advisory panels while Chapter 8 discusses SSRL`s overall organization. Chapter 9 describes the experimental progress reports.

  12. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantwell, K.

    1996-01-01

    For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL's users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL's experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year

  13. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL`s history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia`s leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR`s performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY `91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL`s three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL`s users made significant scientific progress, as described in Section V of this report.

  14. Effects of chlorpyrifos on individuals and populations of Daphnia pulex in the laboratory and field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeven, N. van der; Gerritsen, A.A.M.

    1997-01-01

    Effects of the insecticide chlorpyrifos (cpf) on young (laboratory. Populations of D. pulex exposed to cpf were studied in the laboratory and field. In the field, cpf was applied in

  15. A Coastal Environment Field and Laboratory Activity for an Undergraduate Geomorphology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Jean T.; Rindfleisch, Paul R.

    2006-01-01

    A field and laboratory exercise for an undergraduate geomorphology class is described that focuses on the beach. The project requires one day of fieldwork and two laboratory sessions. In the field, students measure water surface fluctuations (waves) with a pressure sensor, survey beach profiles, collect sediment samples, and observe the beach…

  16. 78 FR 47007 - National Environmental Policy Act; Santa Susana Field Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... project Web site address listed below. http://www.nasa.gov/agency/nepa/news/SSFL.html . ADDRESSES...; Santa Susana Field Laboratory AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION... Environmental Cleanup Activities for the NASA-administered portion of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL...

  17. Water Quality & Pollutant Source Monitoring: Field and Laboratory Procedures. Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This training manual presents material on techniques and instrumentation used to develop data in field monitoring programs and related laboratory operations concerned with water quality and pollution monitoring. Topics include: collection and handling of samples; bacteriological, biological, and chemical field and laboratory methods; field…

  18. Radiation field mapping in mammography units with TLDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, J.C.O.; Silva, J.O., E-mail: jonas.silva@ufg.br [Universidade Federal de Goiás (IFG), Goiânia (Brazil). Instituto de Física; Veneziani, G.R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo-SP (Brazil). Centro de Metrologia das Radiações

    2017-07-01

    Mammography is the most common imaging technique for breast cancer detection and its tracking. For dosimetry, is important to know the field intensity variation. In this work, TLD-100 were used to made a field mapping of a mammographic system from a hospital in Goiânia/GO. The maximum radiation intensity was 8 cm far from chest wall. The results obtained could be used in the optimization of the dosimetry in the equipment used in this work. (author)

  19. Further details on the applicability of Thellier paleointensity method: The effect of magnitude of laboratory field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Juan; Goguitchaichvili, Avto; Alva-Valdivia, Luis M.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime

    2006-06-01

    Twenty years after Tanaka and Kono's pioneering contribution (Tanaka and Kono, 1984), we give some new details on the effect of applied field strength during Thellier paleointensity experiments. Special attention is paid to the relation of magnitude of laboratory field and Coe's quality factors (Coe et al., 1978). Full thermoremanent magnetizations were imparted on natural samples containing low-Ti titanomagnetites of pseudo-single domain structure in a 40-μT magnetic field from 600 °C to room temperature. The samples were subjected to the routine Thellier procedure using a wide range of applied laboratory fields. Results indicate that values of laboratory fields may be accurately reproduced within 2% of standard error. The quality factors, however, decrease when the magnitude of 'ancient' field does not match to applied laboratory fields. To cite this article: J. Morales et al., C. R. Geoscience 338 (2006).

  20. Strain-induced modulation of near-field radiative transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanekar, Alok; Ricci, Matthew; Tian, Yanpei; Gregory, Otto; Zheng, Yi

    2018-06-11

    In this theoretical study, we present a near-field thermal modulator that exhibits change in radiative heat transfer when subjected to mechanical stress/strain. The device has two terminals at different temperatures separated by vacuum: one fixed and one stretchable. The stretchable side contains one-dimensional grating. When subjected to mechanical strain, the effective optical properties of the stretchable side are affected upon deformation of the grating. This results in modulation of surface waves across the interfaces influencing near-field radiative heat transfer. We show that for a separation of 100 nm, it is possible to achieve 25% change in radiative heat transfer for a strain of 10%.

  1. Occupational radiation exposure history of Idaho Field Office Operations at the INEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horan, J.R.; Braun, J.B.

    1993-10-01

    An extensive review has been made of the occupational radiation exposure records of workers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) over the period of 1951 through 1990. The focus has been on workers employed by contractors and employees of the Idaho Field Operations Office (ID) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) and does not include the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF), the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), or other operations field offices at the INEL. The radiation protection guides have decreased from 15 rem/year to 5 rem/year in 1990 for whole body penetrating radiation exposure. During these 40 years of nuclear operations (in excess of 200,000 man-years of work), a total of twelve individuals involved in four accidents exceeded the annual guidelines for exposure; nine of these exposures were received during life saving efforts on January 3, 1961 following the SL-1 reactor accident which killed three military personnel. These exposures ranged from 8 to 27 rem. Only one individual has exceeded the annual whole body penetrating radiation protection guidelines in the last 29 years

  2. Occupational radiation exposure history of Idaho Field Office Operations at the INEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horan, J.R.; Braun, J.B.

    1993-10-01

    An extensive review has been made of the occupational radiation exposure records of workers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) over the period of 1951 through 1990. The focus has been on workers employed by contractors and employees of the Idaho Field Operations Office (ID) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) and does not include the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF), the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), or other operations field offices at the INEL. The radiation protection guides have decreased from 15 rem/year to 5 rem/year in 1990 for whole body penetrating radiation exposure. During these 40 years of nuclear operations (in excess of 200,000 man-years of work), a total of twelve individuals involved in four accidents exceeded the annual guidelines for exposure; nine of these exposures were received during life saving efforts on January 3, 1961 following the SL-1 reactor accident which killed three military personnel. These exposures ranged from 8 to 27 rem. Only one individual has exceeded the annual whole body penetrating radiation protection guidelines in the last 29 years.

  3. [Dynamics of biomacromolecules in coherent electromagnetic radiation field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshcheniuk, N S; Apanasevich, E E; Tereshenkov, V I

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that induced oscillations and periodic displacements of the equilibrium positions occur in biomacromolecules in the absence of electromagnetic radiation absorption, due to modulation of interaction potential between atoms and groups of atoms forming the non-valence bonds in macromolecules by the external electromagnetic field. Such "hyperoscillation" state causes inevitably the changes in biochemical properties of macromolecules and conformational transformation times.

  4. Non-ionizing radiation exposure: electric field strength measurement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this research, the measured values are compared with the international standard recommended by ICNIRP then were also compared with previous study from several locations around Malaysia. The result shows an increase in the values of electromagnetic field radiation. The result of this study could be used for health ...

  5. Magnetic fields driven by tidal mixing in radiative stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Jérémie; Cébron, David; Schaeffer, Nathanaël; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2018-04-01

    Stellar magnetism plays an important role in stellar evolution theory. Approximatively 10 per cent of observed main sequence (MS) and pre-main-sequence (PMS) radiative stars exhibit surface magnetic fields above the detection limit, raising the question of their origin. These stars host outer radiative envelopes, which are stably stratified. Therefore, they are assumed to be motionless in standard models of stellar structure and evolution. We focus on rapidly rotating, radiative stars which may be prone to the tidal instability, due to an orbital companion. Using direct numerical simulations in a sphere, we study the interplay between a stable stratification and the tidal instability, and assess its dynamo capability. We show that the tidal instability is triggered regardless of the strength of the stratification (Brunt-Väisälä frequency). Furthermore, the tidal instability can lead to both mixing and self-induced magnetic fields in stably stratified layers (provided that the Brunt-Väisälä frequency does not exceed the stellar spin rate in the simulations too much). The application to stars suggests that the resulting magnetic fields could be observable at the stellar surfaces. Indeed, we expect magnetic field strengths up to several Gauss. Consequently, tidally driven dynamos should be considered as a (complementary) dynamo mechanism, possibly operating in radiative MS and PMS stars hosting orbital companions. In particular, tidally driven dynamos may explain the observed magnetism of tidally deformed and rapidly rotating Vega-like stars.

  6. The spectra of the standard x-ray qualities used in STUK's Radiation Metrology Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapiovaara, T.; Tapiovaara, M.; Siiskonen, T.; Hakanen, A.

    2008-02-01

    This report presents the fluence spectra of the standard x-radiation qualities used in the Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory of Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK). The spectra were measured in August 2007. The radiation qualities characterised in the report are the ISO Narrow spectrum series (ISO N10-N200, ISO 4037-1:1996) and both of the RQR-spectrum series specified by the IEC (IEC 1267:1994 and IEC 61267:2005). The measurements were made using a high purity Ge-detector and the measured pulse height spectra were corrected to fluence spectra. Spectral characteristics were computed from the spectral data and compared to the requirements in the standards and to the values given in the quality manual of the laboratory. (orig.)

  7. Guidelines for Member States concerning radiation measurement standards and Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In the early nineteen-sixties an acute need developed for higher dosimetric accuracy in radiation therapy, particularly in developing countries. This need led to the establishment of a number of dosimetry laboratories around the world, specializing in the calibration of radiation therapy dosimeters. In order to co-ordinate the provision of guidance and assistance to such laboratories, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) set up a Network of Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs) under their joint aegis, as described in the IAEA booklet 'SSDLs: Development and Trends' (1985). This publication includes detailed criteria for the establishment of these laboratories. The present guidelines deal with the functions and status of SSDLs, in particular with the need for recognition and support by the competent national authorities. (author)

  8. Technical qualification requirements and training programs for radiation protection personnel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copenhaver, E.D.; Houser, B.S.; Butler, H.M. Jr.; Bogard, J.S.; Fair, M.F.; Haynes, C.E.; Parzyck, D.C.

    1986-04-01

    This document deals with the policies and practices of the Environmental and Occupational Safety Division (EOSD) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in regard to the selection, training, qualification, and requalification of radiation protection staff assigned to reactor and nonreactor nuclear facilities. Included are personnel at facilities that: (1) operate reactors or particle accelerators; (2) produce, process, or store radioactive liquid or solid waste; (3) conduct separations operations; (4) engage in research with radioactive materials and radiation sources; and (5) conduct irradiated materials inspection, fuel fabrication, deconamination, or recovery operations. The EOSD personnel also have environmental surveillance and operational and industrial safety responsibilities related to the total Laboratory

  9. The role of the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory in the dissemination of standards for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czap, L.; Andreo, P.; Matscheko, G.

    1998-01-01

    Approximately 90% of the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs) provide users with calibrations of radiation protection instruments, and the IAEA is taking every necessary effort to insure that SSDLs measurements are traceable to Primary Standards. The Agency has proper radiation sources available to provide traceable calibrations to the SSDLs involved in measurements on diagnostic x-ray generators, including an x-ray unit specifically for mammography dedicated to standardization procedures. The different photon beam qualities and calibration procedures available in the Agency's Dosimetry Laboratory are described

  10. Ambient radiation levels in a microPET/CT research laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmento, D.M.; Rodrigues, D.L.; Sanches, M.P.; Carneiro, J.C.G.G., E-mail: janetegc@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This study focuses on initial radiological evaluation and the exposure situation related to the worker task in a micro-positron emission tomography/computed tomography laboratory (microPET/CT). Selected and calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters, TLD, of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy were used to measure room radiation levels. The detectors were placed in several selected points inside the microPET/CT laboratory and adjacent rooms. In addition, the occupationally exposed workers were monthly evaluated for external and internal exposures. In none of the selected points the dose values exceeded the radiation dose limit established for supervised area, as well as the values obtained in individual monitoring. (author)

  11. Ambient radiation levels in a microPET/CT research laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmento, D.M.; Rodrigues, D.L.; Sanches, M.P.; Carneiro, J.C.G.G.

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on initial radiological evaluation and the exposure situation related to the worker task in a micro-positron emission tomography/computed tomography laboratory (microPET/CT). Selected and calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters, TLD, of CaSO 4 :Dy were used to measure room radiation levels. The detectors were placed in several selected points inside the microPET/CT laboratory and adjacent rooms. In addition, the occupationally exposed workers were monthly evaluated for external and internal exposures. In none of the selected points the dose values exceeded the radiation dose limit established for supervised area, as well as the values obtained in individual monitoring. (author)

  12. Fruit Flies Provide New Insights in Low-Radiation Background Biology at the INFN Underground Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morciano, Patrizia; Cipressa, Francesca; Porrazzo, Antonella; Esposito, Giuseppe; Tabocchini, Maria Antonella; Cenci, Giovanni

    2018-06-04

    Deep underground laboratories (DULs) were originally created to host particle, astroparticle or nuclear physics experiments requiring a low-background environment with vastly reduced levels of cosmic-ray particle interference. More recently, the range of science projects requiring an underground experiment site has greatly expanded, thus leading to the recognition of DULs as truly multidisciplinary science sites that host important studies in several fields, including geology, geophysics, climate and environmental sciences, technology/instrumentation development and biology. So far, underground biology experiments are ongoing or planned in a few of the currently operating DULs. Among these DULs is the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), where the majority of radiobiological data have been collected. Here we provide a summary of the current scenario of DULs around the world, as well as the specific features of the LNGS and a summary of the results we obtained so far, together with other findings collected in different underground laboratories. In particular, we focus on the recent results from our studies of Drosophila melanogaster, which provide the first evidence of the influence of the radiation environment on life span, fertility and response to genotoxic stress at the organism level. Given the increasing interest in this field and the establishment of new projects, it is possible that in the near future more DULs will serve as sites of radiobiology experiments, thus providing further relevant biological information at extremely low-dose-rate radiation. Underground experiments can be nicely complemented with above-ground studies at increasing dose rate. A systematic study performed in different exposure scenarios provides a potential opportunity to address important radiation protection questions, such as the dose/dose-rate relationship for cancer and non-cancer risk, the possible existence of dose/dose-rate threshold(s) for different biological systems and

  13. Water chemistry and phytoplankton field and laboratory procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, C.O.; Simmons, M.S. (eds.)

    1979-12-01

    The purpose of this manual is to serve as a guide for persons using these techniques in water quality studies and as a written record of the methods used in this laboratory at this time. It is anticipated that the manual will be updated frequently as new methods are added and the present ones are further refined. The present methods are all used routinely and have been in regular use for a year or longer. This manual is specifically written as a guide for the collection and analysis of lake water samples from the Laurentian Great Lakes. However, all of the analytical methods are easily adapted for laboratory culture or small lake studies. The descriptions contained in this manual are designed primarily as users guides oriented to the equipment available at the Great Lakes Research Division, and as most of the methods are taken from the literature, the reader is referred to the original articles for a more detailed discussion of the methods.

  14. Effect of ultraviolet radiation on laboratory cultures of green algae and cyanobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palffy, K.; Ordog, V.; Voros, L.

    2004-01-01

    Since the discovery of the ozone hole, an increasing amount of work has been devoted to measuring the impact of the UV-radiation on living organisms. In this point of view, algae as the primer producers of aquatic ecosystems, get to the central part of the interest. The aim of the study was to study the effect of ultraviolet radiation on laboratory cultures of green algae and cyanobacteria

  15. Exercise for laboratory comparison of calibration coefficient in 137Cs beam, radiation protection - 2013/2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, T.S.; Potiens, M.P.A.; Soares, C.M.A.; Silveira, R.R.; Khoury, H.; Borges, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with the preliminary results of the second exercise of comparing the radiation monitors calibration laboratories in Brazil. The exercise involved eight laboratories and the measured quantity is the air kerma in a beam of 137 Cs for radioprotection. The exercise was conducted by the LNMRI/IRD, in a star shaped arrangement from October 2013 to July 2015. The largest deviation was 2% of the calibration coefficient that is acceptable for applications in radioprotection. (author)

  16. Correlation between Auroral kilometric radiation and field-aligned currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, J.L.; Saflekos, N.A.; Gurnett, D.A.; Potemra, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of field-aligned currents (FAC) and auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) are compared from the polar-orbiting satellites Triad and Hawkeye. The Triad observations were restricted to the evening-to-midnight local time sector (1900 to 0100 hours magnetic local time) in the northern hemisphere. This is the region in which the most intense storms of AKR are believed to originate. The Hawkeye observations were restricted to when the satellite was in the AKR emission cone in the northern hemisphere and at radial distances > or =7R/sub E/ (earth radii) to avoid local propagation cutoff effects. A(R/7R/sub E/) 2 normalization to the power flux measurements of the kilometric radiation from Hawkeye is used to take into account the radial dependence of this radiation and to scale all intensity measurements so that they are independent of Hawkeye's position in the emission cone. Integrated field-aligned current intensities from Triad are determined from the observed transverse magnetic field disturbances. There appears to be a weak correlation between AKR intensity and the integrated current sheet intensity of field-aligned currents. In general, as the intensity of auroral kilometric radiation increases so does the integrated auroral zone current sheet intensity increase. Statistically, the linear correlation coefficient between the log of the AKR power flux and the log of the current sheet intensity is 0.57. During weak AKR bursts ( - 18 W m - 2 Hz - 1 ), Triad always observed weak FAC'S ( - 1 ), and when Triad observed large FAC's (> or =0.6 A m - 1 ), the AKR intensity from Hawkeye was moderately intense (10 - 5 to 10 - 14 W m - 2 Hz - 1 ) to intense (>10 - 14 W m - 2 Hz - 1 ). It is not clear from these preliminary results what the exact role is that auroral zone field-aligned currents play in the generation or amplification of auroral kilometric radiation

  17. Image noise reduction technology reduces radiation in a radial-first cardiac catheterization laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunja, Ateka; Pandey, Yagya [Department of Veterans Affairs, Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Xie, Hui [Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC (Canada); Wolska, Beata M. [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Center for Cardiovascular Research, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Shroff, Adhir R.; Ardati, Amer K. [Department of Veterans Affairs, Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Vidovich, Mladen I., E-mail: miv@uic.edu [Department of Veterans Affairs, Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Background: Transradial coronary angiography (TRA) has been associated with increased radiation doses. We hypothesized that contemporary image noise reduction technology would reduce radiation doses in the cardiac catheterization laboratory in a typical clinical setting. Methods and results: We performed a single-center, retrospective analysis of 400 consecutive patients who underwent diagnostic and interventional cardiac catheterizations in a predominantly TRA laboratory with traditional fluoroscopy (N = 200) and a new image noise reduction fluoroscopy system (N = 200). The primary endpoint was radiation dose (mGy cm{sup 2}). Secondary endpoints were contrast dose, fluoroscopy times, number of cineangiograms, and radiation dose by operator between the two study periods. Radiation was reduced by 44.7% between the old and new cardiac catheterization laboratory (75.8 mGy cm{sup 2} ± 74.0 vs. 41.9 mGy cm{sup 2} ± 40.7, p < 0.0001). Radiation was reduced for both diagnostic procedures (45.9%, p < 0.0001) and interventional procedures (37.7%, p < 0.0001). There was no statistically significant difference in radiation dose between individual operators (p = 0.84). In multivariate analysis, radiation dose remained significantly decreased with the use of the new system (p < 0.0001) and was associated with weight (p < 0.0001), previous coronary artery bypass grafting (p < 0.0007) and greater than 3 stents used (p < 0.0004). TRA was used in 90% of all cases in both periods. Compared with a transfemoral approach (TFA), TRA was not associated with higher radiation doses (p = 0.20). Conclusions: Image noise reduction technology significantly reduces radiation dose in a contemporary radial-first cardiac catheterization clinical practice. - Highlights: • Radial arterial access has been associated with higher doses compared to femoral access. • In a radial-first cardiac catheterization laboratory (90% radial) we examined radiation doses reduction with a contemporary image

  18. Image noise reduction technology reduces radiation in a radial-first cardiac catheterization laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunja, Ateka; Pandey, Yagya; Xie, Hui; Wolska, Beata M.; Shroff, Adhir R.; Ardati, Amer K.; Vidovich, Mladen I.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Transradial coronary angiography (TRA) has been associated with increased radiation doses. We hypothesized that contemporary image noise reduction technology would reduce radiation doses in the cardiac catheterization laboratory in a typical clinical setting. Methods and results: We performed a single-center, retrospective analysis of 400 consecutive patients who underwent diagnostic and interventional cardiac catheterizations in a predominantly TRA laboratory with traditional fluoroscopy (N = 200) and a new image noise reduction fluoroscopy system (N = 200). The primary endpoint was radiation dose (mGy cm"2). Secondary endpoints were contrast dose, fluoroscopy times, number of cineangiograms, and radiation dose by operator between the two study periods. Radiation was reduced by 44.7% between the old and new cardiac catheterization laboratory (75.8 mGy cm"2 ± 74.0 vs. 41.9 mGy cm"2 ± 40.7, p < 0.0001). Radiation was reduced for both diagnostic procedures (45.9%, p < 0.0001) and interventional procedures (37.7%, p < 0.0001). There was no statistically significant difference in radiation dose between individual operators (p = 0.84). In multivariate analysis, radiation dose remained significantly decreased with the use of the new system (p < 0.0001) and was associated with weight (p < 0.0001), previous coronary artery bypass grafting (p < 0.0007) and greater than 3 stents used (p < 0.0004). TRA was used in 90% of all cases in both periods. Compared with a transfemoral approach (TFA), TRA was not associated with higher radiation doses (p = 0.20). Conclusions: Image noise reduction technology significantly reduces radiation dose in a contemporary radial-first cardiac catheterization clinical practice. - Highlights: • Radial arterial access has been associated with higher doses compared to femoral access. • In a radial-first cardiac catheterization laboratory (90% radial) we examined radiation doses reduction with a contemporary image-noise compared to

  19. HVAC systems in a field laboratory for indoor climate study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lei; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a HVAC system for a field lab. The design integrated mixing ventilation, displacement ventilation, low impulse vertical ventilation, personalized ventilation, natural ventilation, hybrid ventilation, active chilled beams, radiant ceiling and floor, and heat...... with the controlled room temperature in the range from 10 to 35 °C and relative humidity in the range from 15 to 80 %. The field lab can be used to test the performance of each system included in the field lab as well as the combined performance of two or more systems....

  20. Note on the preliminar proposal of the feasibility study for the implantation of a national laboratory of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, R.; Muniz, R.P.A.

    1983-01-01

    Some socio-economic and political aspects on the implantation of a National Laboratory of Synchrotron Radiation in Brazil are discussed. Some applications of such a radiation, including technological ones, are presented. (L.C.) [pt

  1. A laboratory and field condition comparison of life table parameters of Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseini-Tabesh Behnaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Life table studies are essential tools for understanding population dynamics. The life table parameters of Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae feeding on the host plant, Hibiscus syriacus L. were studied under laboratory (25±1°C and relative humidity of 65±5% and a photoperiod of 16L : 8D h and field conditions (23-43°C, and relative humidity of 27-95%. The data were analysed using the age-stage, two-sex life table theory. The life table studies were started with 50 and 40 nymphs in laboratory and field conditions, respectively. Under laboratory conditions, A. gossypii reared on H. syriacus had a higher survival rate, fecundity, and longevity than those reared under field conditions. When reared under field conditions, A. gossypii had a longer nymphal developmental time, shorter adult longevity, and lower fecundity than those reared under laboratory conditions. The intrinsic rate of increase (r, net reproductive rate (R0, and the finite rate of increase (λ under laboratory conditions, were higher than those obtained under field conditions. Nevertheless, there were no significant differences in the mean generation time T (days between field and laboratory conditions. In the present study, the results clearly showed that life table parameters of A. gossypii were significantly different under field and laboratory conditions. These results could help us to understand the A. gossypii population dynamics under field conditions. The results could also help us make better management decisions for economically important crops

  2. Analysis of radiation fields in tomography on diffusion gaseous sound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekman, I.N.

    1999-01-01

    Perspectives of application of equilibrium and stationary variants of diffusion tomography with radioactive gaseous sounds for spatial reconstruction of heterogeneous media in materials technology were considered. The basic attention were allocated to creation of simple algorithms of detection of sound accumulation on the background of monotonically varying concentration field. Algorithms of transformation of two-dimensional radiation field in three-dimensional distribution of radiation sources were suggested. The methods of analytical elongation of concentration field permitting separation of regional anomalies on the background of local ones and vice verse were discussed. It was shown that both equilibrium and stationary variants of diffusion tomography detect the heterogeneity of testing material, provide reduction of spatial distribution of elements of its structure and give an estimation of relative degree of defectiveness

  3. The GSF secondary standard dosimetry laboratory for photon and beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerl, H.; Nahrstedt, U.

    1986-03-01

    A brief outline of the laboratory's tasks and a detailed description of its layout and equipment is given. The laboratory contains a Co-60 irradiation unit, a Cs-137 irradiation unit, a panoramic irradiation unit for different nuclide sources, a 160- and 420 kV X-ray unit, a beta-irradiation unit and a measuring and control room. The calibration laboratory is equipped with reference and field dosemeters. (DG)

  4. Wind field forecast for accidental release of radiative materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Ling; Chen Jiayi; Cai Xuhui

    2003-01-01

    A meso-scale wind field forecast model was designed for emergency environmental assessment in case of accidental release of radiative materials from a nuclear power station. Actual practice of the model showed that it runs fast, has wind field prediction function, and the result given is accurate. With meteorological data collected from weather stations, and pre-treated by a wind field diagnostic model, the initial wind fields at different times were inputted as initial values and assimilation fields for the forecasting model. The model, in turn, worked out to forecast meso-scale wind field of 24 hours in a horizontal domain of 205 km x 205 km. And then, the diagnostic model was employed again with the forecasting data to obtain more detail information of disturbed wind field by local terrain in a smaller domain of 20.5 km x 20.5 km, of which the nuclear power station is at the center. Using observation data in January, April, July and October of 1996 over the area of Hangzhou Bay, wind fields in these 4 months were simulated by different assimilation time and number of the weather stations for a sensitive test. Results indicated that the method used here has increased accuracy of the forecasted wind fields. And incorporating diagnostic method with the wind field forecast model has greatly increased efficiency of the wind field forecast for the smaller domain. This model and scheme have been used in Environmental Consequence Assessment System of Nuclear Accident in Qinshan Area

  5. Penetrating radiation: applications at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Scott; Hunter, James; Morris, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    Los Alamos has used penetrating radiography extensively throughout its history dating back to the Manhattan Project where imaging dense, imploding objects was the subject of intense interest. This interest continues today as major facilities like DARHT1 have become the mainstay of the US Stockpile Stewardship Program2 and the cornerstone of nuclear weapons certification. Meanwhile, emerging threats to national security from cargo containers and improvised explosive devices (IEDs) have invigorated inspection efforts using muon tomography, and compact x-ray radiography. Additionally, unusual environmental threats, like those from underwater oil spills and nuclear power plant accidents, have caused renewed interest in fielding radiography in severe operating conditions. We review the history of penetrating radiography at Los Alamos and survey technologies as presently applied to these important problems.

  6. New theory of radiative energy transfer in free electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, E.

    1976-01-01

    A new theory of radiative energy transfer in free, statistically stationary electromagnetic fields is presented. It provides a model for energy transport that is rigorous both within the framework of the stochastic theory of the classical field as well as within the framework of the theory of the quantized field. Unlike the usual phenomenological model of radiative energy transfer that centers around a single scalar quantity (the specific intensity of radiation), our theory brings into evidence the need for characterizing the energy transport by means of two (related) quantities: a scalar and a vector that may be identified, in a well-defined sense, with ''angular components'' of the average electromagnetic energy density and of the average Poynting vector, respectively. Both of them are defined in terms of invariants of certain new electromagnetic correlation tensors. In the special case when the field is statistically homogeneous, our model reduces to the usual one and our angular component of the average electromagnetic energy density, when multiplied by the vacuum speed of light, then acquires all the properties of the specific intensity of radiation. When the field is not statistically homogeneous our model approximates to the usual phenomenological one, provided that the angular correlations between plane wave modes of the field extend over a sufficiently small solid angle of directions about the direction of propagation of each mode. It is tentatively suggested that, when suitably normalized, our angular component of the average electromagnetic energy density may be interpreted as a quasi-probability (general quantum-mechancial phase-space distribution function, such as Wigner's) for the position and the momentum of a photon

  7. Ways of providing radiation resistance of magnetic field semiconductor sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Bolshakova, I A; Holyaka, R; Matkovskii, A; Moroz, A

    2001-01-01

    Hall magnetic field sensors resistant to hard ionizing irradiation are being developed for operation under the radiation conditions of space and in charged particle accelerators. Radiation resistance of the sensors is first determined by the properties of semiconductor materials of sensitive elements; we have used microcrystals and thin layers of III-V semiconductors. Applying complex doping by rare-earth elements and isovalent impurities in certain proportions, we have obtained magnetic field sensors resistant to irradiation by fast neutrons and gamma-quanta. Tests of their radiation resistance were carried out at IBR-2 at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna). When exposed to neutrons with E=0.1-13 MeV and intensity of 10 sup 1 sup 0 n cm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 , the main parameter of the sensors - their sensitivity to magnetic fields - changes by no more than 0.1% up to fluences of 10 sup 1 sup 4 n cm sup - sup 2. Further improvement of radiation resistance of sensor materials is expected by ...

  8. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, (No. 26)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The annual research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during the fiscal year of 1992 (April 1, 1992 - March 31, 1993) are described. The research activities were conducted under the two research programs: the study on laser-induced organic chemical reactions and the study on basic radiation technology for functional materials. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: laser-induced organic synthesis, modification of polymer surface by laser irradiation, radiation-induced polymerization, preparation of fine particles by gamma ray irradiation, and electron beam dosimetry. The operation report of the irradiation facilities is also included. (author)

  9. Laboratory and Feasibility Study for Industrial Wastewater Effluents Treatment by Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimek, Z.; Głuszewski, W. [Centre for Radiation Research and Technology, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-07-01

    The study of wastewater treatment by radiation regarding chemical processes contribution and physical-chemical separation of highly concentrated non-organic pollutants deposited in specific industrial waste are proposed. Laboratory stand should be build and the study should be performed to confirm possible mechanism of the sedimentation process of nonorganic pollutants during separation initiated by ionizing radiation. Evaluation from technical and economical point of view of this specific radiation technology and feasibility study preparation for industrial facility will be the main output at the final stage of the project. (author)

  10. Laboratory and Feasibility Study for Industrial Wastewater Effluents Treatment by Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimek, Z.; Głuszewski, W.

    2012-01-01

    The study of wastewater treatment by radiation regarding chemical processes contribution and physical-chemical separation of highly concentrated non-organic pollutants deposited in specific industrial waste are proposed. Laboratory stand should be build and the study should be performed to confirm possible mechanism of the sedimentation process of nonorganic pollutants during separation initiated by ionizing radiation. Evaluation from technical and economical point of view of this specific radiation technology and feasibility study preparation for industrial facility will be the main output at the final stage of the project. (author)

  11. A characteristic scale in radiation fields of fractal clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiscombe, W.; Cahalan, R.; Davis, A.; Marshak, A. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The wavenumber spectrum of Landsat imagery for marine stratocumulus cloud shows a scale break when plotted on a double log plot. We offer an explanation of this scale break in terms of smoothing by horizontal radiative fluxes, which is parameterized and incorporated into an improved pixel approximation. We compute the radiation fields emerging from cloud models with horizontally variable optical depth fractal models. We use comparative spectral and multifractal analysis to qualify the validity of the independent pixel approximation at the largest scales and demonstrate it`s shortcomings on the smallest scales.

  12. Obligations and responsibilities in radiation protection in the medical field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This document briefly presents the various obligations and responsibilities of the various actors involved in or concerned by radiation protection in the medical field: the hospital administration (with respect to workers and patients), the physician (authorization and declaration, justification, optimization), the medical electro-radiology operator, the person with expertise in medical radio-physics (PSRPM), the radio-pharmacist (he is required in nuclear medicine with internal use of pharmaceutical product), the personnel with expertise in radiation protection (PCR), and other health professionals

  13. Sample tracking in an automated cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory for radiation mass casualties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.R.; Berdychevski, R.E.; Subramanian, U.; Blakely, W.F.; Prasanna, P.G.S.

    2007-01-01

    Chromosome-aberration-based dicentric assay is expected to be used after mass-casualty life-threatening radiation exposures to assess radiation dose to individuals. This will require processing of a large number of samples for individual dose assessment and clinical triage to aid treatment decisions. We have established an automated, high-throughput, cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory to process a large number of samples for conducting the dicentric assay using peripheral blood from exposed individuals according to internationally accepted laboratory protocols (i.e., within days following radiation exposures). The components of an automated cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory include blood collection kits for sample shipment, a cell viability analyzer, a robotic liquid handler, an automated metaphase harvester, a metaphase spreader, high-throughput slide stainer and coverslipper, a high-throughput metaphase finder, multiple satellite chromosome-aberration analysis systems, and a computerized sample-tracking system. Laboratory automation using commercially available, off-the-shelf technologies, customized technology integration, and implementation of a laboratory information management system (LIMS) for cytogenetic analysis will significantly increase throughput. This paper focuses on our efforts to eliminate data-transcription errors, increase efficiency, and maintain samples' positive chain-of-custody by sample tracking during sample processing and data analysis. This sample-tracking system represents a 'beta' version, which can be modeled elsewhere in a cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory, and includes a customized LIMS with a central server, personal computer workstations, barcode printers, fixed station and wireless hand-held devices to scan barcodes at various critical steps, and data transmission over a private intra-laboratory computer network. Our studies will improve diagnostic biodosimetry response, aid confirmation of clinical triage, and medical

  14. Sample tracking in an automated cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory for radiation mass casualties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, P.R.; Berdychevski, R.E.; Subramanian, U.; Blakely, W.F. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States); Prasanna, P.G.S. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States)], E-mail: prasanna@afrri.usuhs.mil

    2007-07-15

    Chromosome-aberration-based dicentric assay is expected to be used after mass-casualty life-threatening radiation exposures to assess radiation dose to individuals. This will require processing of a large number of samples for individual dose assessment and clinical triage to aid treatment decisions. We have established an automated, high-throughput, cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory to process a large number of samples for conducting the dicentric assay using peripheral blood from exposed individuals according to internationally accepted laboratory protocols (i.e., within days following radiation exposures). The components of an automated cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory include blood collection kits for sample shipment, a cell viability analyzer, a robotic liquid handler, an automated metaphase harvester, a metaphase spreader, high-throughput slide stainer and coverslipper, a high-throughput metaphase finder, multiple satellite chromosome-aberration analysis systems, and a computerized sample-tracking system. Laboratory automation using commercially available, off-the-shelf technologies, customized technology integration, and implementation of a laboratory information management system (LIMS) for cytogenetic analysis will significantly increase throughput. This paper focuses on our efforts to eliminate data-transcription errors, increase efficiency, and maintain samples' positive chain-of-custody by sample tracking during sample processing and data analysis. This sample-tracking system represents a 'beta' version, which can be modeled elsewhere in a cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory, and includes a customized LIMS with a central server, personal computer workstations, barcode printers, fixed station and wireless hand-held devices to scan barcodes at various critical steps, and data transmission over a private intra-laboratory computer network. Our studies will improve diagnostic biodosimetry response, aid confirmation of clinical triage, and

  15. Geometric morphometric differences between Panstrongylus geniculatus from field and laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Jaramillo O

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The finding of Panstrongylus geniculatus nymphs inside a house in northeastern Antioquia, Colombia, and the reports related to their increasing presence in homes suggest the need for surveillance methods for monitoring the invasion processes. We analyzed the morphological differences between a wild population and its laboratory descendants, using the techniques of geometric morphometry, with the idea that such differences might parallel those between sylvatic and synanthropic populations. The analyses over five generations showed differences in size but not in shape. Head size and wing size were both reduced from sylvatic to laboratory populations, but the decrease in head size occurred only up to the second generation while the decrease in wing size proceeded up to the fifth generation. In contrast, although a decrease in sexual size dimorphism has been proposed as a marker of colonization in human dwellings, we did not detect any significant loss of dimorphism between sexes of P. geniculatus over the five generations studied. We conclude that size changes may have a physiological origin in response to a change of ecotopes, but more than five generations may be required for the expression of permanent morphological markers of human dwellings colonization.

  16. Aedes albopictus (Skuse) males in laboratory and semi-field cages: release ratios and mating competitiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madakacherry, Odessa; Lees, Rosemary Susan; Gilles, Jeremie Roger Lionel

    2014-04-01

    To control the container-breeding mosquito and major vector of dengue and chikungunya Aedes albopictus, the sterile insect technique (SIT) is proposed as a component of integrated vector management programs in endemic areas. For the technique to be successful, released males, sterilized with 35 Gy of ionizing radiation during the pupal stage, must be able to compete for mating opportunities with wild counterparts and successfully copulate with wild females to induce sterility in the population. Any reduction in competitiveness can be compensated for by increasing the ratio of released sterile to wild males, a ratio which must be optimized for effectiveness and efficiency. Fruit fly SIT programs use field enclosures to test the competitiveness of sterile males to monitor the quality of the colony and adjust release ratios. This is laborious and time consuming, and for mosquito programs it would be advantageous if similarly useful results could be obtained by smaller scale laboratory tests, conducted on a more regular basis. In the present study we compared the competitiveness, as measured by hatching rate of resulting egg batches, of irradiated males measured in small and large laboratory cages and semi-field enclosures in a greenhouse setting, when competing in a 1:1, 3:1, and 5:1 ratio with fertile males. The sterile males were found to be equally competitive when compared to unirradiated counterparts, and a 5:1 ratio was sufficient to reduce, but not eliminate, the fertility of the female populations, irrespective of cage size. Variability in hatch rate in eggs laid by individual females and so-called indeterminate matings, when we could not be certain whether a female had mated a fertile or a sterile male, could be investigated by closer investigation of mating status and the frequency of multiple matings in Ae. albopictus. The laboratory results are encouraging for the effectiveness of the SIT using irradiated males of this species, and we support further

  17. Direct Penetrating Radiation Monitoring Systems: Technical Evaluation for Use at Area G, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Kraig; W. A. Treadaway; R. J. Wechsler

    1999-01-01

    Recent advances and commercialization of electret-ion-chamber (EIC) technology for photon measurements prompted us to consider EKs as a replacement for our TLD system. After laboratory tests indicated that both systems gave adequate results for controlled exposures, throughout 1998 we conducted field tests with paired TLDs and EICS, in LANL technical areas and in public areas. We had approximately 30 paired sampling sites at Area G. At each sampling site, we deployed three TLDs and three EICS. The EICS were contained in air-tight jars, each of which was placed in a Tyvek envelope and hung about 1 m above the ground. The dosimeters were read (and, if necessary, replaced) every three months. At the sites outside Area G, the TLD readings for the first two quarters were statistically significantly higher than those of the EICS: group average exposures were 38 and 36, compared with 33 mR (both quarters) for the EICS; during quarter 3, the EIC average (40 mR) was higher than the TLD average (34 mR); and during quarter 4, the two systems were statistically the same: EIC = 42, TLD = 41 with a p-value of 0.61. We are still evaluating these differences and performing additional laboratory studies to determine causes. At the Area G sites,we noticed that several of the TLDs gave much higher readings than their co-located EICS; we believe that the TLDs were over-responding by ∼50% to the low-energy (60-keV) gamma radiation associated with 241 Am, whereas the EICS were responding accurately. We conclude that EICS are more accurate at a wide range of gamma energies and are preferable to TLDs in environments where a significant fraction of the photons are low energy

  18. Sampling atmospheric pesticides with SPME: Laboratory developments and field study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junxia; Tuduri, Ludovic; Mercury, Maud; Millet, Maurice; Briand, Olivier; Montury, Michel

    2009-01-01

    To estimate the atmospheric exposure of the greenhouse workers to pesticides, solid phase microextraction (SPME) was used under non-equilibrium conditions. Using Fick's law of diffusion, the concentrations of pesticides in the greenhouse can be calculated using pre-determined sampling rates (SRs). Thus the sampling rates (SRs) of two modes of SPME in the lab and in the field were determined and compared. The SRs for six pesticides in the lab were 20.4-48.3 mL min -1 for the exposed fiber and 0.166-0.929 mL min -1 for the retracted fiber. In field sampling, two pesticides, dichlorvos and cyprodinil were detected with exposed SPME. SR with exposed SPME for dichlorvos in the field (32.4 mL min -1 ) was consistent with that in the lab (34.5 mL min -1 ). SR for dichlorvos in the field (32.4 mL min -1 ) was consistent with that in the lab (34.5 mL min -1 ). The trends of temporal concentration and the inhalation exposure were also obtained. - SPME was proved to be a powerful and simple tool for determining pesticides' atmospheric concentration

  19. Laboratory and field studies of guayule modified to overexpress HMGR

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report the genetic modification of guayule to overexpress the isoprenoid pathway enzyme HMGR. The rubber content of two-month old in vitro transformed plantlets showed a 65% increase in rubber over the control for one line (HMGR6), and lower resin for another (HMGR2). In field evaluations HMGR6...

  20. Deformation bands in porous carbonate grainstones: Field and laboratory observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cilona, A.; Baud, P.; Tondi, E.; Agosta, F.; Vinciguerra, S.; Rustichelli, A.; Spiers, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent field-based studies documented deformation bands in porous carbonates; these structures accommodate volumetric and/or shear strain by means of pore collapse, grain rotation and/or sliding. Microstructural observations of natural deformation bands in carbonates showed that, at advanced stages

  1. Translating laboratory compaction test results to field scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roholl, J.A.; Thienen-Visser, K. van; Breunese, J.N.

    2016-01-01

    In recent studies on the surface subsidence caused by hydrocarbon recovery of the Groningen gas field, the predicted subsidence is overestimated if results of compaction experiments are not corrected by an empirical `upscaling factor'. In order to find an explanation for this `upscaling factor', an

  2. Road traffic noise-induced sleep disturbances: a comparison between laboratory and field settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skånberg, Annbritt

    2004-10-01

    Due to the ongoing discussion about the relevance of sleep studies performed in the laboratory, the aim of this study was to assess the effects of road traffic noise exposure on sleep in laboratory and in field settings. Eighteen healthy young subjects participated in the study. They were exposed to noise from road traffic in the laboratory and exposed to the same recorded traffic noise exposure in their own homes. Their sleep was evaluated with wrist actigraphs and questionnaires on sleep. No significant increase in effects of noise on sleep in the laboratory was found. The results indicate that laboratory experiments do not exaggerate effects of noise on sleep.

  3. Annual report of Radiation Laboratory Department of Nuclear Engineering Kyoto University for fiscal 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    This publication is the collection of the papers presented research activities of Radiation Laboratory, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University during the 1993 academic/fiscal year (April, 1993 - March, 1994). The 47 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  4. Radiation chemistry in the nuclear power reactor environment: from laboratory study to practical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the work carried out at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories in underlying and applied radiation chemical research performed to optimise the processes occurring in the four aqueous systems in and around the core. The aqueous systems subject to radiolysis in CANDU reactors are Heat Transport System, Moderator, Liquid Zone Controls and End Shields.

  5. Annual report of Radiation Laboratory Department of Nuclear Engineering Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This publication is the collection of the papers presented research activities of Radiation laboratory, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University during the 1992 academic/fiscal year (April, 1992 - March, 1993). The 48 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  6. Mapping the radiation fields at a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soegaard-Hansen, Jens; Warming, Lisbeth

    1999-01-01

    The DR 3 reactor at Risoe National Laboratory is a multipurpose research reactor. It has the status of a Large European Beam facility therefor its neutron scattering spectrometers are used by many visiting scientists. As a supplement to the routine health physics monitoring programmes a special survey has been made to get more detailed information of the radiation levels in the hall and of the most important sources of the radiation. The special survey consisted of three sorts of measurements: an extra set of thermoluminescence dosimeters, a set of continuous measurements of the dose rate at selected places and spot measurements with handheld instruments around the spectrometers. Some of the results from the survey are presented. (au)

  7. Laboratory and field scale demonstration of reactive barrier systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwyer, B.P.; Marozas, D.C.; Cantrell, K.; Stewart, W.

    1996-10-01

    In an effort to devise a cost efficient technology for remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater, the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (DOE-UMTRA) Program through Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) fabricated a pilot scale research project utilizing reactive subsurface barriers at an UMTRA site in Durango, Colorado. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by placing a reactant material (in this experiment, metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. The reactive media then removes and/or transforms the contaminant(s) to regulatory acceptable levels. Experimental design and results are discussed with regard to other potential applications of reactive barrier remediation strategies at other sites with contaminated groundwater problems

  8. Vapor-phase biofiltration: Laboratory and field experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, P.J.; Bourbonais, K.A.; Peterson, L.E.; Lee, J.H.; Laakso, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    Application of vapor-phase bioreactors (VPBs) to petroleum hydrocarbons is complicated by the different mass transfer characteristics of aliphatics and aromatics. Laboratory- and pilot-scale VPB studies were conducted to evaluate treatment of soil vapor extraction (SVE) off-gas. A mixture of compost, perlite, and activated carbon was the selected medium based on pressure drop, microbial colonization, and adsorption properties. Two different pilot-scale reactors were built with a difference of 70:1 in scale. The smaller VPB's maximum effective elimination capacity (EC) was determined to be 7.2 g m -3 h -1 ; the larger unit's EC was 70% to 80% of this value. Low EC values may be attributable to a combination of mass-transfer and kinetic limitations

  9. Laboratory Experiments on Rotation and Alignment of the Analogs of Interstellar Dust Grains by Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.; Gallagher, D. L.; West, E. A.; Weingartner, J. C.; Witherow, W. K.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2004-01-01

    The processes and mechanisms involved in the rotation and alignment of interstellar dust grains have been of great interest in astrophysics ever since the surprising discovery of the polarization of starlight more than half a century ago. Numerous theories, detailed mathematical models, and numerical studies of grain rotation and alignment with respect to the Galactic magnetic field have been presented in the literature. In particular, the subject of grain rotation and alignment by radiative torques has been shown to be of particular interest in recent years. However, despite many investigations, a satisfactory theoretical understanding of the processes involved in subject, we have carried out some unique experiments to illuminate the processes involved in the rotation of dust grains in the interstellar medium. In this paper we present the results of some preliminary laboratory experiments on the rotation of individual micron/submicron-sized, nonspherical dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance evacuated to pressures of approximately 10(exp -3) to 10(exp -5) torr. The particles are illuminated by laser light at 5320 A, and the grain rotation rates are obtained by analyzing the low-frequency (approximately 0 - 100 kHz) signal of the scattered light detected by a photodiode detector. The rotation rates are compared with simple theoretical models to retrieve some basic rotational parameters. The results are examined in light of the current theories of alignment.

  10. Laboratory Experiments on Rotation of Micron Size Cosmic Dust Grains with Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.; Gallagher, D. L.; West, E.; Weingartner, J.; Witherow, W. K.

    2004-01-01

    The processes and mechanisms involved in the rotation and alignment of interstellar dust grains have been of great interest in astrophysics ever since the surprising discovery of the polarization of starlight more than half a century ago. Numerous theories, detailed mathematical models and numerical studies of grain rotation and alignment along the Galactic magnetic field have been presented in the literature. In particular, the subject of grain rotation and alignment by radiative torques has been shown to be of particular interest in recent years. However, despite many investigations, a satisfactory theoretical understanding of the processes involved in grain rotation and alignment has not been achieved. As there appears to be no experimental data available on this subject, we have carried out some unique experiments to illuminate the processes involved in rotation of dust grains in the interstellar medium. In this paper we present the results of some preliminary laboratory experiments on the rotation of individual micron/submicron size nonspherical dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance evacuated to pressures of approx. 10(exp -3) to 10(exp -5) torr. The particles are illuminated by laser light at 5320 A, and the grain rotation rates are obtained by analyzing the low frequency (approx. 0-100 kHz) signal of the scattered light detected by a photodiode detector. The rotation rates are compared with simple theoretical models to retrieve some basic rotational parameters. The results are examined in the light of the current theories of alignment.

  11. Response of Halimeda to ocean acidification: Field and laboratory evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, L.L.; Knorr, P.O.; Hallock, P.

    2009-01-01

    Rising atmospheric pCO2 levels are changing ocean chemistry more dramatically now than in the last 20 million years. In fact, pHvalues of the open ocean have decreased by 0.1 since the 1800s and are predicted to decrease 0.1-0.4 globally in the next 90 years. Ocean acidification will affect fundamental geochemical and biological processes including calcification and carbonate sediment production. The west Florida shelf is a natural laboratory to examine the effects of ocean acidification on aragonite production by calcareous green algae. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of crystal morphology of calcifying organisms reveals ultrastructural details of calcification that occurred at different saturation states. Comparison of archived and recent specimens of calcareous green alga Halimeda spp. from the west Florida shelf, demonstrates crystal changes in shape and abundance over a 40+ year time span. Halimeda crystal data from apical sections indicate that increases in crystal concentration and decreases in crystal width occurred over the last 40+ years. Laboratory experiments using living specimens of Halimeda grown in environments with known pH values were used to constrain historical observations. Percentages of organic and inorganic carbon per sample weight of pooled species did not significantly change. However, individual species showed decreased inorganic carbon and increased organic carbon in more recent samples, although the sample sizes were limited. These results indicate that the effect of increased pCO 2 and decreased pH on calcification is reflected in the crystal morphology of this organism. More data are needed to confirm the observed changes in mass of crystal and organic carbon. ?? Author(s) 2009.

  12. Real-time dosimetry system in catheterisation laboratory: utility as a learning tool in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto Monedero, M.; Rodriguez Cobo, C.; Pifarre Martinez, X.; Ruiz Martin, J.; Barros Candelero, J.M.; Goicolea Ruigomez, J.; Diaz Blaires, G.; Garcia Lunar, I.

    2015-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Workers at the catheter laboratory are among the most exposed to ionising radiation in hospitals. However, it is difficult to be certain of the radiation doses received by the staff, as personal dosemeters are often misused, and thus, the dose history is not reliable. Moreover, the information provided by personal dosemeters corresponds to the monthly accumulated dose, so corrective actions tends to be delayed. The purpose of this work is, on the one hand, to use a real-time dosimetry system to establish the occupational doses per procedure of workers at the catheter laboratories and, on the other hand, to evaluate its utility as a learning tool for radiation protection purposes with the simultaneous video recording of the interventions. (authors)

  13. Synchrotron radiation laboratories at the Bonn electron accelerators. a status report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormes, J.

    1987-07-01

    At the Physikalisches Institut of the University in Bonn experiments with synchrotron radiation were carried out ever since 1962. At the moment (June 1986) all work takes place in the SR-laboratory at the 2.5 GeV synchrotron. A 3.5 GeV stretcher ring (ELSA) is under construction and will come into operation at the end of 1986. This accelerator will also run as a storage ring for synchrotron radiation experiments and a laboratory to be used at this machine is also under consideration. The SR experiments which are carried out in Bonn try to take advantage of the fact that we are still using a high energy synchrotron for our work. Besides basic research also applied work is done using synchrotron radiation even as a production tool for X-ray lithography.

  14. A Computational Model of Cellular Response to Modulated Radiation Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, Stephen J., E-mail: stephen.mcmahon@qub.ac.uk [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Butterworth, Karl T. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); McGarry, Conor K. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Trainor, Colman [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); O' Sullivan, Joe M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Clinical Oncology, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Hounsell, Alan R. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Prise, Kevin M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To develop a model to describe the response of cell populations to spatially modulated radiation exposures of relevance to advanced radiotherapies. Materials and Methods: A Monte Carlo model of cellular radiation response was developed. This model incorporated damage from both direct radiation and intercellular communication including bystander signaling. The predictions of this model were compared to previously measured survival curves for a normal human fibroblast line (AGO1522) and prostate tumor cells (DU145) exposed to spatially modulated fields. Results: The model was found to be able to accurately reproduce cell survival both in populations which were directly exposed to radiation and those which were outside the primary treatment field. The model predicts that the bystander effect makes a significant contribution to cell killing even in uniformly irradiated cells. The bystander effect contribution varies strongly with dose, falling from a high of 80% at low doses to 25% and 50% at 4 Gy for AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This was verified using the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine to inhibit the bystander effect in cells exposed to different doses, which showed significantly larger reductions in cell killing at lower doses. Conclusions: The model presented in this work accurately reproduces cell survival following modulated radiation exposures, both in and out of the primary treatment field, by incorporating a bystander component. In addition, the model suggests that the bystander effect is responsible for a significant portion of cell killing in uniformly irradiated cells, 50% and 70% at doses of 2 Gy in AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This description is a significant departure from accepted radiobiological models and may have a significant impact on optimization of treatment planning approaches if proven to be applicable in vivo.

  15. A Computational Model of Cellular Response to Modulated Radiation Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, Stephen J.; Butterworth, Karl T.; McGarry, Conor K.; Trainor, Colman; O’Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a model to describe the response of cell populations to spatially modulated radiation exposures of relevance to advanced radiotherapies. Materials and Methods: A Monte Carlo model of cellular radiation response was developed. This model incorporated damage from both direct radiation and intercellular communication including bystander signaling. The predictions of this model were compared to previously measured survival curves for a normal human fibroblast line (AGO1522) and prostate tumor cells (DU145) exposed to spatially modulated fields. Results: The model was found to be able to accurately reproduce cell survival both in populations which were directly exposed to radiation and those which were outside the primary treatment field. The model predicts that the bystander effect makes a significant contribution to cell killing even in uniformly irradiated cells. The bystander effect contribution varies strongly with dose, falling from a high of 80% at low doses to 25% and 50% at 4 Gy for AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This was verified using the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine to inhibit the bystander effect in cells exposed to different doses, which showed significantly larger reductions in cell killing at lower doses. Conclusions: The model presented in this work accurately reproduces cell survival following modulated radiation exposures, both in and out of the primary treatment field, by incorporating a bystander component. In addition, the model suggests that the bystander effect is responsible for a significant portion of cell killing in uniformly irradiated cells, 50% and 70% at doses of 2 Gy in AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This description is a significant departure from accepted radiobiological models and may have a significant impact on optimization of treatment planning approaches if proven to be applicable in vivo.

  16. DOSIS & DOSIS 3D: radiation measurements with the DOSTEL instruments onboard the Columbus Laboratory of the ISS in the years 2009–2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The natural radiation environment in Low Earth Orbit (LEO differs significantly in composition and energy from that found on Earth. The space radiation field consists of high energetic protons and heavier ions from Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR, as well as of protons and electrons trapped in the Earth’s radiation belts (Van Allen belts. Protons and some heavier particles ejected in occasional Solar Particle Events (SPEs might in addition contribute to the radiation exposure in LEO. All sources of radiation are modulated by the solar cycle. During solar maximum conditions SPEs occur more frequently with higher particle intensities. Since the radiation exposure in LEO exceeds exposure limits for radiation workers on Earth, the radiation exposure in space has been recognized as a main health concern for humans in space missions from the beginning of the space age on. Monitoring of the radiation environment is therefore an inevitable task in human spaceflight. Since mission profiles are always different and each spacecraft provides different shielding distributions, modifying the radiation environment measurements needs to be done for each mission. The experiments “Dose Distribution within the ISS (DOSIS” (2009–2011 and “Dose Distribution within the ISS 3D (DOSIS 3D” (2012–onwards onboard the Columbus Laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS use a detector suite consisting of two silicon detector telescopes (DOSimetry TELescope = DOSTEL and passive radiation detector packages (PDP and are designed for the determination of the temporal and spatial variation of the radiation environment. With the DOSTEL instruments’ changes of the radiation composition and the related exposure levels in dependence of the solar cycle, the altitude of the ISS and the influence of attitude changes of the ISS during Space Shuttle dockings inside the Columbus Laboratory have been monitored. The absorbed doses measured at the end of May 2016

  17. DOSIS & DOSIS 3D: radiation measurements with the DOSTEL instruments onboard the Columbus Laboratory of the ISS in the years 2009-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Thomas; Burmeister, Sönke; Matthiä, Daniel; Przybyla, Bartos; Reitz, Günther; Bilski, Pawel; Hajek, Michael; Sihver, Lembit; Szabo, Julianna; Ambrozova, Iva; Vanhavere, Filip; Gaza, Ramona; Semones, Edward; Yukihara, Eduardo G.; Benton, Eric R.; Uchihori, Yukio; Kodaira, Satoshi; Kitamura, Hisashi; Boehme, Matthias

    2017-03-01

    The natural radiation environment in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) differs significantly in composition and energy from that found on Earth. The space radiation field consists of high energetic protons and heavier ions from Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR), as well as of protons and electrons trapped in the Earth's radiation belts (Van Allen belts). Protons and some heavier particles ejected in occasional Solar Particle Events (SPEs) might in addition contribute to the radiation exposure in LEO. All sources of radiation are modulated by the solar cycle. During solar maximum conditions SPEs occur more frequently with higher particle intensities. Since the radiation exposure in LEO exceeds exposure limits for radiation workers on Earth, the radiation exposure in space has been recognized as a main health concern for humans in space missions from the beginning of the space age on. Monitoring of the radiation environment is therefore an inevitable task in human spaceflight. Since mission profiles are always different and each spacecraft provides different shielding distributions, modifying the radiation environment measurements needs to be done for each mission. The experiments "Dose Distribution within the ISS (DOSIS)" (2009-2011) and "Dose Distribution within the ISS 3D (DOSIS 3D)" (2012-onwards) onboard the Columbus Laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS) use a detector suite consisting of two silicon detector telescopes (DOSimetry TELescope = DOSTEL) and passive radiation detector packages (PDP) and are designed for the determination of the temporal and spatial variation of the radiation environment. With the DOSTEL instruments' changes of the radiation composition and the related exposure levels in dependence of the solar cycle, the altitude of the ISS and the influence of attitude changes of the ISS during Space Shuttle dockings inside the Columbus Laboratory have been monitored. The absorbed doses measured at the end of May 2016 reached up to 286

  18. Computerized dosimetric system for studying radiation fields of afterloading apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andryushin, O.S.; Gorshkov, M.I.

    1988-01-01

    Works on designing a computerized dosimetric scanner (CODOS) for studying radiation fields of remote therapeutic apparatus, providing dosimetric data input from semiconductor transducers and ionization chambers directly into the computer memory were carried out. The basic problems were to provide reproducibility and accuracy of the initial dosimetric data, formation of the data bank on LUEhV-15M1 accelerator bremsstrahlung and electron radiation fields. An extra problem was to provide isodose curves for manual scheduling of radiotherapy. The 15 VUMS-28-025 complex based on Elektronika-60 computer was chosen as a host computer, photodiodes were used as a semiconductor detector, the 70108 rod chamber and VA-J-18 dosemeters were used as an ionization chamber. The results of studies with the CODOS system have been shown that it meets the dosimetric requirements for therapeutic apparatus

  19. Fiber optic components compatibility with the PWR containment radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuze, G.; Serre, J.

    1990-01-01

    Present and future applications of fiber optics transmission in the nuclear industrial field are emphasized. Nuclear acceptance criteria for relevant electronic equipments in terms of radiation dose rate, integrated dose and required reliability are given. Ambient conditions of PWR containment are especially considered in the present paper. Experimental results of optical fibers and end-components exposed to 60 Co gamma rays are successively shown. Main radiation response characteristics up to 10 4 Gy (with dose rates of about 100 Gy.h -1 ) of both multimodal fiber families (step index and gradient index fibers) are compared. Predominant features of pure silica core fibers are: * an efficient photobleaching with near IR light from LED and LD commonly used in transmission data links, * a radiation hardening reducing induced losses down to 10 dB.km -1 in fine fibers up to date with latest developments. Dose rate effect on induced losses is also outlined for these fibers. Optoelectronic fiber-end components radiation response is good only for special LED (AsGa) and PD (Si). Radiation behavior of complex pigtailed LDM (laser diode + photodiode + Peltier element + thermistor) is not fully acceptable and technological improvements were made. Preliminary results are given. Two applications of fiber links transmitting data in a PWR containment and a hot cell are described. Hardening levels obtained and means required are given

  20. Simulation analysis of radiation fields inside phantoms for neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Daiki; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Endo, Akira; Ohmachi, Y.; Miyahara, N.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation fields inside phantoms have been calculated for neutron irradiation. Particle and heavy-ion transport code system PHITS was employed for the calculation. Energy and size dependences of neutron dose were analyzed using tissue equivalent spheres of different size. A voxel phantom of mouse was developed based on CT images of an 8-week-old male C3H/HeNs mouse. Deposition energy inside the mouse was calculated for 2- and 10-MeV neutron irradiation. (author)

  1. Field profile tailoring in a-Si:H radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujieda, I.; Cho, G.; Conti, M.; Drewery, J.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Quershi, S.; Wildermuth, D.; Street, R.A.

    1990-03-01

    The capability of tailoring the field profile in reverse-biased a-Si:H diodes by doping and/or manipulating electrode shapes opens a way to many interesting device structures. Charge collection in a-Si:H radiation detectors is improved for high LET particle detection by inserting thin doped layers into the i-layer of the usual p-i-n diode. This buried p-i-n structure enables us to apply higher reverse-bias and the electric field is enhanced in the mid i-layer. Field profiles of the new structures are calculated and the improved charge collection process is discussed. Also discussed is the possibility of field profile tailoring by utilizing the fixed space charges in i-layers and/or manipulating electrode shapes of the reverse-biased p-i-n diodes. 10 refs., 7 figs

  2. Assessment of occupational exposure to radiofrequency fields and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, T. G.; Allen, S. G.; Blackwell, R. P.; Litchfield, I.; Mann, S. M.; Pope, J. M.; Van Tongeren, M. J. A.

    2004-01-01

    The use of personal monitors for the assessment of exposure to radiofrequency fields and radiation in potential future epidemiological studies of occupationally exposed populations has been investigated. Data loggers have been developed for use with a commercially available personal monitor and these allowed personal exposure records consisting of time-tagged measurements of electric and magnetic field strength to be accrued over extended periods of the working day. The instrumentation was worn by workers carrying out tasks representative of some of their typical daily activities at a variety of radio sites. The results indicated significant differences in the exposures of workers in various RF environments. A number of measures of exposure have been examined with a view to assessing possible exposure metrics for epidemiological studies. There was generally a good correlation between a given measure of electric field strength and the same measure of magnetic field strength. (authors)

  3. Analysis of unstable chromosome alterations frequency induced by neutron-gamma mixed field radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Vale, Carlos H.F.P.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F.; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays monitoring chromosome alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been used to access the radiation absorbed dose in individuals exposed accidental or occupationally to gamma radiation. However there are not many studies based on the effects of mixed field neutron-gamma. The radiobiology of neutrons has great importance because in nuclear factories worldwide there are several hundred thousand individuals monitored as potentially receiving doses of neutron. In this paper it was observed the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma-neutron mixed field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources 241 AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphases were analyzed for the presence of chromosome alterations by two experienced scorers. The results suggest that there is the possibility of a directly proportional relationship between absorbed dose of neutron-gamma mixed field radiation and the frequency of unstable chromosome alterations analyzed in this paper. (author)

  4. Analysis of unstable chromosome alterations frequency induced by neutron-gamma mixed field radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Vale, Carlos H.F.P.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)], e-mail: psouza@cnen.gov.br, e-mail: jodinilson@cnen.gov.br; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Genetica

    2009-07-01

    Nowadays monitoring chromosome alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been used to access the radiation absorbed dose in individuals exposed accidental or occupationally to gamma radiation. However there are not many studies based on the effects of mixed field neutron-gamma. The radiobiology of neutrons has great importance because in nuclear factories worldwide there are several hundred thousand individuals monitored as potentially receiving doses of neutron. In this paper it was observed the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma-neutron mixed field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources {sup 241}AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphases were analyzed for the presence of chromosome alterations by two experienced scorers. The results suggest that there is the possibility of a directly proportional relationship between absorbed dose of neutron-gamma mixed field radiation and the frequency of unstable chromosome alterations analyzed in this paper. (author)

  5. Deep Borehole Field Test Laboratory and Borehole Testing Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brady, Patrick V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); MacKinnon, Robert J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Heath, Jason E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Herrick, Courtney G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jensen, Richard P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gardner, W. Payton [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sevougian, S. David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jang, Je-Hun [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stein, Emily R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bauer, Stephen J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Daley, Tom [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Freifeld, Barry M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Spane, Frank A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-19

    Deep Borehole Disposal (DBD) of high-level radioactive wastes has been considered an option for geological isolation for many years (Hess et al. 1957). Recent advances in drilling technology have decreased costs and increased reliability for large-diameter (i.e., ≥50 cm [19.7”]) boreholes to depths of several kilometers (Beswick 2008; Beswick et al. 2014). These advances have therefore also increased the feasibility of the DBD concept (Brady et al. 2009; Cornwall 2015), and the current field test design will demonstrate the DBD concept and these advances. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste (DOE 2013) specifically recommended developing a research and development plan for DBD. DOE sought input or expression of interest from States, local communities, individuals, private groups, academia, or any other stakeholders willing to host a Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT). The DBFT includes drilling two boreholes nominally 200m [656’] apart to approximately 5 km [16,400’] total depth, in a region where crystalline basement is expected to begin at less than 2 km depth [6,560’]. The characterization borehole (CB) is the smaller-diameter borehole (i.e., 21.6 cm [8.5”] diameter at total depth), and will be drilled first. The geologic, hydrogeologic, geochemical, geomechanical and thermal testing will take place in the CB. The field test borehole (FTB) is the larger-diameter borehole (i.e., 43.2 cm [17”] diameter at total depth). Surface handling and borehole emplacement of test package will be demonstrated using the FTB to evaluate engineering feasibility and safety of disposal operations (SNL 2016).

  6. Investigation of Radiation Fields at Aircraft Altitudes (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, D.; Bartlett, D.; Grillmaier, R.; Heinrich, W.; Lindborg, L.; Schraube, H.; Silari, M.; Tommasino, L.; Zhou, D.

    2000-01-01

    Cosmic rays are believed to originate from several possible sources and recent research suggests that the bulk originate from the gas and dust of the interstellar medium and are accelerated by strong shock waves driven by supernova explosions. Cosmic ray particles are made up of γ98.5% hydrogen and helium and only 1.5% have charges greater than 2. Their average energy is about 1 GeV/nucleon and they lose energy through ionisation interactions and nuclear interactions with atoms of air as they penetrate deeply into the Earth's atmosphere. A very complicated radiation field develops as particles are generated by successive interaction of primary and secondary nuclei and a cascade of hadrons is produced in the atmosphere. The intensity of particles reaches a maximum at about 20 km above sea level (γ60 g.cm -2 ). The relative abundances of different particles change with depth within the atmosphere and mainly muons which are the decay products of charged mesons, reach sea level because of their weak interaction. The radiation field produced and consequently its effect on aircrew and frequent travellers is a matter of some concern. This paper outlines the results of investigations carried out to determine the characteristics of this radiation field and assess its impact on aircrew. (author)

  7. Radiation fields, dosimetry, biokinetics and biophysical models for cancer induction by ionising radiation 1996-1999. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, P.; Paretzke, H.G.; Roth, P.

    2000-01-01

    The Association Contract covers a range of research domains that are important to the Radiation Protection Research Action, especially in the areas 'Evaluation of Radiation Risks' and 'Understanding Radiation Mechanisms and Epidemiology'. Three research projects concentrate on radiation dosimetry research and two projects on the modelling of radiation carcinogenesis. The following list gives an overview on the topics and responsible scientific project leaders of the Association Contract: Study of radiation fields and dosimetry at aviation altitudes. Biokinetics and dosimetry of incorporated radionuclides. Dose reconstruction. Biophysical models for the induction of cancer by radiation. Experimental data for the induction of cancer by radiation of different qualities. (orig.)

  8. Laboratory shake flask batch tests can predict field biodegradation of aniline in the Rhine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toräng, Lars; Reuschenbach, P.; Müller, B.

    2001-01-01

    .7 degreesC, respectively. This field rate estimate was compared with results from 38 laboratory shake flask batch tests with Rhine water which averaged 1.5 day(-1) at 15 degreesC and 2.0 day(-1) at 20 degreesC. These results indicate that laboratory shake flask batch tests with low concentrations of test...

  9. Laboratory and field studies on an Indian strain of the brine shrimp Artemia

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Royan, J.P.

    The Tuticorin strain of the brine shrimp @iArtemia@@ was studied under both laboratory and field conditions. Studies on the survival of the nauplii at different temperatures and salinities revealed that the nauplii preferred a salinity of 35 ppt...

  10. Explaining differences between Bioaccumulation Measurements in laboratory and field data through use of probabilistic modeling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selck, H.; Drouillard, K.; Eisenreich, K.; Koelmans, A.A.; Palmqvist, A.; Ruus, A.; Salvito, D.; Schultz, I.; Stewart, R.; Weisbrod, A.; Brink, van den N.W.; Heuvel-Greve, van den M.J.

    2012-01-01

    In the regulatory context, bioaccumulation assessment is often hampered by substantial data uncertainty as well as by the poorly understood differences often observed between results from laboratory and field bioaccumulation studies. Bioaccumulation is a complex, multifaceted process, which calls

  11. Laboratory and field measurements of enantiomeric monoterpene emissions as a function of chemotype, light and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.; Staudt, M.; Bourgeois, I.; Williams, J.

    2014-03-01

    Plants emit significant amounts of monoterpenes into the earth's atmosphere, where they react rapidly to form a multitude of gas phase species and particles. Many monoterpenes exist in mirror-image forms or enantiomers. In this study the enantiomeric monoterpene profile for several representative plants (Quercus ilex L., Rosmarinus officinalis L., and Pinus halepensis Mill.) was investigated as a function of chemotype, light and temperature both in the laboratory and in the field. Analysis of enantiomeric monoterpenes from 19 Quercus ilex individuals from Southern France and Spain revealed four regiospecific chemotypes (genetically fixed emission patterns). In agreement with previous work, only Quercus ilex emissions increased strongly with light. However, for all three plant species no consistent enantiomeric variation was observed as a function of light, and the enantiomeric ratio of α-pinene was found to vary by less than 20% from 100 and 1000 μmol m-2 s-1 PAR (photosynthetically active radiation). The rate of monoterpene emission increased with temperature from all three plant species, but little variation in the enantiomeric distribution of α-pinene was observed with temperature. There was more enantiomeric variability between individuals of the same species than could be induced by either light or temperature. Field measurements of α-pinene enantiomer mixing ratios in the air, taken at a Quercus ilex forest in Southern France, and several other previously reported field enantiomeric ratio diel cycle profiles are compared. All show smoothly varying diel cycles (some positive and some negative) even over changing wind directions. This is surprising in comparison with variations of enantiomeric emission patterns shown by individuals of the same species.

  12. Constraining Carbonaceous Aerosol Climate Forcing by Bridging Laboratory, Field and Modeling Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, M. K.; Aiken, A. C.; Liu, S.; Saleh, R.; Cappa, C. D.; Williams, L. R.; Donahue, N. M.; Gorkowski, K.; Ng, N. L.; Mazzoleni, C.; China, S.; Sharma, N.; Yokelson, R. J.; Allan, J. D.; Liu, D.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass and fossil fuel combustion emits black (BC) and brown carbon (BrC) aerosols that absorb sunlight to warm climate and organic carbon (OC) aerosols that scatter sunlight to cool climate. The net forcing depends strongly on the composition, mixing state and transformations of these carbonaceous aerosols. Complexities from large variability of fuel types, combustion conditions and aging processes have confounded their treatment in models. We analyse recent laboratory and field measurements to uncover fundamental mechanism that control the chemical, optical and microphysical properties of carbonaceous aerosols that are elaborated below: Wavelength dependence of absorption and the single scattering albedo (ω) of fresh biomass burning aerosols produced from many fuels during FLAME-4 was analysed to determine the factors that control the variability in ω. Results show that ω varies strongly with fire-integrated modified combustion efficiency (MCEFI)—higher MCEFI results in lower ω values and greater spectral dependence of ω (Liu et al GRL 2014). A parameterization of ω as a function of MCEFI for fresh BB aerosols is derived from the laboratory data and is evaluated by field data, including BBOP. Our laboratory studies also demonstrate that BrC production correlates with BC indicating that that they are produced by a common mechanism that is driven by MCEFI (Saleh et al NGeo 2014). We show that BrC absorption is concentrated in the extremely low volatility component that favours long-range transport. We observe substantial absorption enhancement for internally mixed BC from diesel and wood combustion near London during ClearFlo. While the absorption enhancement is due to BC particles coated by co-emitted OC in urban regions, it increases with photochemical age in rural areas and is simulated by core-shell models. We measure BrC absorption that is concentrated in the extremely low volatility components and attribute it to wood burning. Our results support

  13. Inter operability of smart field devices on an open field-bus: from laboratory tests to on-site applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piguet, M.; Favennec, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents a field trial held in EDF's R and D laboratories concerning smart field instruments (sensors, I/O modules, transmitters) operating on the WorldFIP field-bus. The trial put into operation a supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system on the field-bus with available industrial field devices and software tools. The field trial enables EDF's teams to address the inter-operability issue regarding smart field devices and to prepare the forthcoming step from analog to fully digital measurement technology by evaluating new services and higher performances provided. Possible architectures for process control and on-site testing purposes have been identified. A first application for a flow-measuring rig is under way. It implements a WorldFIP field-bus based DCS with FIP/HART multiplexers, FIP and HART smart devices (sensors and actuators) and a field management system. (authors)

  14. The right choice: extremity dosemeter for different radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasik, N.; Stadtmann, H.; Kindl, P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Measurements of weakly penetrating radiation in personal dosimetry present problems in the design of suitable detectors and in the interpretation of their readings. For the measurement of the individual beta radiation dose, personal dosemeter for the fingers/tips are required. In general, the dosemeters currently used for personal monitoring of beta and low energy photon doses suffer from an energy threshold problem because the detector and/or the filter are too thick. TLDs of a standard thickness can seriously underestimate personal skin doses, especially in external fields of weakly penetrating radiation fields. LiF:Mg, Cu, P is a promising TL material which allows the production of thin detectors with sufficient sensitivity. Dosimetric properties of two different types of extremity dosemeters, designed to measure the personal dose equivalent Hp(0.07), have been compared: LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD100) and LiF:Mg, Cu, P (TLD700H). The first one consists of 100 mg.cm -2 LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD 100) chip and a 35mg. cm -2 cap, the other consists of a 7mg. cm -2 layer of LiF:Mg, Cu, P (TLD-700H) powder and a 5mg. cm -2 cap. The evaluation was done in two steps: performance tests (ISO-12794) and measurements in real workplaces. In the first step type test results for beta calibration were compared. In addition calibration for low energy photon radiation according to ISO 4037-3 was carried out. In the second step, simultaneous measurements with both types of dosemeters were performed at workplaces, where radiopharmaceuticals containing different radioisotopes are prepared and applied. Practices in these fields are characterized by handling of high activities at very small distances between source and skin. The results from the comparison of the two dosemeter types are presented and analyzed with respect to different radiation fields. Experiments showed a satisfactory sensitivity for the thinner dosemeter (TLD 700H) for detecting beta radiation at protection levels and a good

  15. Pulsed currents carried by whistlers. IV. Electric fields and radiation excited by an electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenzel, R.L.; Urrutia, J.M.; Rousculp, C.L.

    1995-01-01

    Electromagnetic properties of current pulses carried by whistler wave packets are obtained from a basic laboratory experiment. While the magnetic field and current density are described in the preceding companion paper (Part III), the present analysis starts with the electric field. The inductive and space charge electric field contributions are separately calculated in Fourier space from the measured magnetic field and Ohm's law along B 0 . Inverse Fourier transformation yields the total electric field in space and time, separated into rotational and divergent contributions. The space-charge density in whistler wave packets is obtained. The cross-field tensor conductivity is determined. The frozen-in condition is nearly satisfied, E+v e xB congruent 0. The dissipation is obtained from Poynting's theorem. The waves are collisionally damped; Landau damping is negligible. A radiation resistance for the electrode is determined. Analogous to Poynting's theorem, the transport of helicity is analyzed. Current helicity is generated by a flow of helicity between pulses traveling in opposite directions which carry opposite signs of helicity. Helicity is dissipated by collisions. These observations complete a detailed description of whistler/current pulses which can occur in various laboratory and space plasmas. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  16. Anomalous cross-field velocities in a CIV laboratory experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axnaes, I.

    1988-10-01

    The axial and radial ion velocities and the electron radial velocity are determined in coaxial plasma gun operated under critical velocity conditions. The particle celocities are determined from probe measurement together with He I 3889 AA absolute intensity measurements and the consideration of the total momentum balance of the current sheet. The ions are found move axially and the electrons radially much faster than predicted by the E/B drift in the macroscopic fields. These results agree with what can be expected from the instability processes, which has earlier been proposed to operate in these experiments. It is therefore a direct experimental demonstration that instability processes have to be invoked not only for the electron heating, but also to explain the macroscopic velocities and currents. (author)

  17. Mars' Surface Radiation Environment Measured with the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Donald M.; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Brinza, David E.; Weigle, Gerald; Böttcher, Stephan; Böhm, Eckart; Burmeister, Soenke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee; Grinspoon, David; Bullock, Mark A.; Posner, Arik; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Vasavada, Ashwin; Grotzinger, John P.; MSL Science Team; Kemppinen, Osku; Cremers, David; Bell, James F.; Edgar, Lauren; Farmer, Jack; Godber, Austin; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Wellington, Danika; McEwan, Ian; Newman, Claire; Richardson, Mark; Charpentier, Antoine; Peret, Laurent; King, Penelope; Blank, Jennifer; Schmidt, Mariek; Li, Shuai; Milliken, Ralph; Robertson, Kevin; Sun, Vivian; Baker, Michael; Edwards, Christopher; Ehlmann, Bethany; Farley, Kenneth; Griffes, Jennifer; Miller, Hayden; Newcombe, Megan; Pilorget, Cedric; Rice, Melissa; Siebach, Kirsten; Stack, Katie; Stolper, Edward; Brunet, Claude; Hipkin, Victoria; Léveillé, Richard; Marchand, Geneviève; Sánchez, Pablo Sobrón; Favot, Laurent; Cody, George; Steele, Andrew; Flückiger, Lorenzo; Lees, David; Nefian, Ara; Martin, Mildred; Gailhanou, Marc; Westall, Frances; Israël, Guy; Agard, Christophe; Baroukh, Julien; Donny, Christophe; Gaboriaud, Alain; Guillemot, Philippe; Lafaille, Vivian; Lorigny, Eric; Paillet, Alexis; Pérez, René; Saccoccio, Muriel; Yana, Charles; Armiens-Aparicio, Carlos; Rodríguez, Javier Caride; Blázquez, Isaías Carrasco; Gómez, Felipe Gómez; Hettrich, Sebastian; Malvitte, Alain Lepinette; Jiménez, Mercedes Marín; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Martín-Soler, Javier; Martín-Torres, F. Javier; Jurado, Antonio Molina; Mora-Sotomayor, Luis; Caro, Guillermo Muñoz; López, Sara Navarro; Peinado-González, Verónica; Pla-García, Jorge; Manfredi, José Antonio Rodriguez; Romeral-Planelló, Julio José; Fuentes, Sara Alejandra Sans; Martinez, Eduardo Sebastian; Redondo, Josefina Torres; Urqui-O'Callaghan, Roser; Mier, María-Paz Zorzano; Chipera, Steve; Lacour, Jean-Luc; Mauchien, Patrick; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Manning, Heidi; Fairén, Alberto; Hayes, Alexander; Joseph, Jonathan; Squyres, Steven; Sullivan, Robert; Thomas, Peter; Dupont, Audrey; Lundberg, Angela; Melikechi, Noureddine; Mezzacappa, Alissa; Berger, Thomas; Matthia, Daniel; Prats, Benito; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Genzer, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti; Haukka, Harri; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kauhanen, Janne; Kemppinen, Osku; Paton, Mark; Polkko, Jouni; Schmidt, Walter; Siili, Tero; Fabre, Cécile; Wray, James; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Poitrasson, Franck; Patel, Kiran; Gorevan, Stephen; Indyk, Stephen; Paulsen, Gale; Gupta, Sanjeev; Bish, David; Schieber, Juergen; Gondet, Brigitte; Langevin, Yves; Geffroy, Claude; Baratoux, David; Berger, Gilles; Cros, Alain; d'Uston, Claude; Forni, Olivier; Gasnault, Olivier; Lasue, Jérémie; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Maurice, Sylvestre; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Pallier, Etienne; Parot, Yann; Pinet, Patrick; Schröder, Susanne; Toplis, Mike; Lewin, Éric; Brunner, Will; Heydari, Ezat; Achilles, Cherie; Oehler, Dorothy; Sutter, Brad; Cabane, Michel; Coscia, David; Israël, Guy; Szopa, Cyril; Dromart, Gilles; Robert, François; Sautter, Violaine; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Mangold, Nicolas; Nachon, Marion; Buch, Arnaud; Stalport, Fabien; Coll, Patrice; François, Pascaline; Raulin, François; Teinturier, Samuel; Cameron, James; Clegg, Sam; Cousin, Agnès; DeLapp, Dorothea; Dingler, Robert; Jackson, Ryan Steele; Johnstone, Stephen; Lanza, Nina; Little, Cynthia; Nelson, Tony; Wiens, Roger C.; Williams, Richard B.; Jones, Andrea; Kirkland, Laurel; Treiman, Allan; Baker, Burt; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Davis, Scott; Duston, Brian; Edgett, Kenneth; Fay, Donald; Hardgrove, Craig; Harker, David; Herrera, Paul; Jensen, Elsa; Kennedy, Megan R.; Krezoski, Gillian; Krysak, Daniel; Lipkaman, Leslie; Malin, Michael; McCartney, Elaina; McNair, Sean; Nixon, Brian; Posiolova, Liliya; Ravine, Michael; Salamon, Andrew; Saper, Lee; Stoiber, Kevin; Supulver, Kimberley; Van Beek, Jason; Van Beek, Tessa; Zimdar, Robert; French, Katherine Louise; Iagnemma, Karl; Miller, Kristen; Summons, Roger; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter; Hviid, Stubbe; Johnson, Micah; Lefavor, Matthew; Lyness, Eric; Breves, Elly; Dyar, M. Darby; Fassett, Caleb; Blake, David F.; Bristow, Thomas; DesMarais, David; Edwards, Laurence; Haberle, Robert; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Kahre, Melinda; Keely, Leslie; McKay, Christopher; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William; Choi, David; Conrad, Pamela; Dworkin, Jason P.; Floyd, Melissa; Freissinet, Caroline; Garvin, James; Glavin, Daniel; Harpold, Daniel; Jones, Andrea; Mahaffy, Paul; Martin, David K.; McAdam, Amy; Pavlov, Alexander; Raaen, Eric; Smith, Michael D.; Stern, Jennifer; Tan, Florence; Trainer, Melissa; Meyer, Michael; Voytek, Mary; Anderson, Robert C.; Aubrey, Andrew; Beegle, Luther W.; Behar, Alberto; Blaney, Diana; Calef, Fred; Christensen, Lance; Crisp, Joy A.; DeFlores, Lauren; Ehlmann, Bethany; Feldman, Jason; Feldman, Sabrina; Flesch, Gregory; Hurowitz, Joel; Jun, Insoo; Keymeulen, Didier; Maki, Justin; Mischna, Michael; Morookian, John Michael; Parker, Timothy; Pavri, Betina; Schoppers, Marcel; Sengstacken, Aaron; Simmonds, John J.; Spanovich, Nicole; Juarez, Manuel de la Torre; Webster, Christopher R.; Yen, Albert; Archer, Paul Douglas; Jones, John H.; Ming, Douglas; Morris, Richard V.; Niles, Paul; Rampe, Elizabeth; Nolan, Thomas; Fisk, Martin; Radziemski, Leon; Barraclough, Bruce; Bender, Steve; Berman, Daniel; Dobrea, Eldar Noe; Tokar, Robert; Vaniman, David; Williams, Rebecca M. E.; Yingst, Aileen; Lewis, Kevin; Leshin, Laurie; Cleghorn, Timothy; Huntress, Wesley; Manhès, Gérard; Hudgins, Judy; Olson, Timothy; Stewart, Noel; Sarrazin, Philippe; Grant, John; Vicenzi, Edward; Wilson, Sharon A.; Hamilton, Victoria; Peterson, Joseph; Fedosov, Fedor; Golovin, Dmitry; Karpushkina, Natalya; Kozyrev, Alexander; Litvak, Maxim; Malakhov, Alexey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Mokrousov, Maxim; Nikiforov, Sergey; Prokhorov, Vasily; Sanin, Anton; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Varenikov, Alexey; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Clark, Benton; Wolff, Michael; McLennan, Scott; Botta, Oliver; Drake, Darrell; Bean, Keri; Lemmon, Mark; Schwenzer, Susanne P.; Anderson, Ryan B.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth; Lee, Ella Mae; Sucharski, Robert; Hernández, Miguel Ángel de Pablo; Ávalos, Juan José Blanco; Ramos, Miguel; Malespin, Charles; Plante, Ianik; Muller, Jan-Peter; Navarro-González, Rafael; Ewing, Ryan; Boynton, William; Downs, Robert; Fitzgibbon, Mike; Harshman, Karl; Morrison, Shaunna; Dietrich, William; Kortmann, Onno; Palucis, Marisa; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Williams, Amy; Lugmair, Günter; Wilson, Michael A.; Rubin, David; Jakosky, Bruce; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Frydenvang, Jens; Jensen, Jaqueline Kløvgaard; Kinch, Kjartan; Koefoed, Asmus; Madsen, Morten Bo; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Boyd, Nick; Campbell, John L.; Gellert, Ralf; Perrett, Glynis; Pradler, Irina; VanBommel, Scott; Jacob, Samantha; Owen, Tobias; Rowland, Scott; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Savijärvi, Hannu; García, César Martín; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Bridges, John C.; McConnochie, Timothy; Benna, Mehdi; Franz, Heather; Bower, Hannah; Brunner, Anna; Blau, Hannah; Boucher, Thomas; Carmosino, Marco; Atreya, Sushil; Elliott, Harvey; Halleaux, Douglas; Rennó, Nilton; Wong, Michael; Pepin, Robert; Elliott, Beverley; Spray, John; Thompson, Lucy; Gordon, Suzanne; Newsom, Horton; Ollila, Ann; Williams, Joshua; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Bentz, Jennifer; Nealson, Kenneth; Popa, Radu; Kah, Linda C.; Moersch, Jeffrey; Tate, Christopher; Day, Mackenzie; Kocurek, Gary; Hallet, Bernard; Sletten, Ronald; Francis, Raymond; McCullough, Emily; Cloutis, Ed; ten Kate, Inge Loes; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Arvidson, Raymond; Fraeman, Abigail; Scholes, Daniel; Slavney, Susan; Stein, Thomas; Ward, Jennifer; Berger, Jeffrey; Moores, John E.

    2014-01-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent from galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the martian surface for ~300 days of observations during the current solar maximum. These measurements provide insight into the radiation hazards associated with a human mission to the surface of Mars and provide an anchor point with which to model the subsurface radiation environment, with implications for microbial survival times of any possible extant or past life, as well as for the preservation of potential organic biosignatures of the ancient martian environment.

  18. Experiences and Management of Pregnant Radiation Workers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliss, Mary; Bowyer, Sonya M.; Bryant, Janet L.; Lipton, Mary S.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation workers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are divided into two classes based on whether or not they can encounter radioactive contamination in the normal course of their work. Level I workers primarily handle sealed radioactive materials such as those used to calibrate detectors. Level II workers perform benchtop chemistry. The U.S. Department of Energy has strict guidelines on the management of pregnant radiation workers. Staff members may voluntarily notify their line managers of a pregnancy and be subjected to stringent radiation exposure limits for the developing fetus. The staff member and manager develop a plan to limit and monitor radiation dose for the remainder of the pregnancy. Several examples of dose management plans and case examples of the impact of pregnancy on staff member's technical work and projects will be presented

  19. Mars' surface radiation environment measured with the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Donald M; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L; Brinza, David E; Weigle, Gerald; Böttcher, Stephan; Böhm, Eckart; Burmeister, Soenke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Cucinotta, Francis A; Kim, Myung-Hee; Grinspoon, David; Bullock, Mark A; Posner, Arik; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Vasavada, Ashwin; Grotzinger, John P

    2014-01-24

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent from galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the martian surface for ~300 days of observations during the current solar maximum. These measurements provide insight into the radiation hazards associated with a human mission to the surface of Mars and provide an anchor point with which to model the subsurface radiation environment, with implications for microbial survival times of any possible extant or past life, as well as for the preservation of potential organic biosignatures of the ancient martian environment.

  20. Upgrading the Medical Physics Calibration Laboratory Towards ISO/IEC 17025: Radiation Standards and Calibration in Diagnostic Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asmaliza Hashim; Muhammad Jamal Md Isa; Abd Aziz Mhd Ramli; Wan Hazlinda Ismail; Norhayati Abdullah; Shahrul Azlan Azizan; Siti Sara Deraman; Nor Azlin Azraai; Md Khairusalih Md Zin

    2010-01-01

    Calibration of quality control (QC) test tools used in diagnostic radiology is legally required under the Ministry of Health (MOH) requirement. The Medical Physics Calibration Laboratory of the Malaysian Nuclear Agency is the national focal point for the calibration of quality control test tools used in diagnostic radiology. The Medical Physics Calibration Laboratory has measurement traceability to primary standard dosimetry laboratory (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB)), thus providing an interface between the primary standard dosimetry laboratory and Malaysian hospitals, clinics and license class H holder. The Medical Physics Calibration Laboratory facility is comprised of a constant potential x-ray system with a capability of 160 kV tube and a series of reference and working standard ion chambers. The stability of reference and working standard ion chambers was measured using strontium-90. Dosimetric instruments used in diagnostic radiology is calibrated in terms of air kerma to comply with an International Code of Practices of dosimetry for example IAEA's Technical Report Series number 457. The new series of standard radiation qualities was established based on ISO/IEC 61267. The measurement of beam homogeneity was measured using film and ion chamber to define the field size at certain distance and kV output was measured using the spectrometer and non-invasive kVp meter. The uncertainties measurement was determined with expended uncertainties to a level of confidence of approximately 95% (coverage factor k=2). This paper describes the available facility and the effort of the Medical Physics Calibration Laboratory to upgrade the laboratory towards ISO/IEC 17025. (author)

  1. A locally designed mobile laboratory for radiation analysis and monitoring in qatar. Vol. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Leila, H.; El-Samman, H.; Mahmoud, H.

    1996-01-01

    A description of a mobile laboratory for radiation analysis and monitoring, completely designed in qatar and equipped at qatar university, is given. It consists of a van equipped with three scintillation detectors mounted on the front bumper. The detectors can monitor gamma radiations along the path of the laboratory over an angle range 120 degree. One Eberline radiation monitoring station is mounted on the roof. The laboratory is also equipped with several, and neutron survey meters in addition to some sampling equipment. All equipment used are powered with solar panels. The characteristics and performance of solar power/stabilized A C conversion is given. Data acquisition from the three scintillation detectors is performed by adding the outputs of the three detectors and storing the total as a function of time in a computer based multi-channel analyzer (MCA) operated in the MSC mode. The acquisition can be switched easily to the PHA mode to analyze gamma spectra from any possible contamination source. The laboratory was used in several environmental and possible contamination missions. Some results obtained during some of these missions are given. 4 figs

  2. A locally designed mobile laboratory for radiation analysis and monitoring in qatar. Vol. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Leila, H; El-Samman, H; Mahmoud, H [Physics Department, University of qatar, Doha (Qatar)

    1996-03-01

    A description of a mobile laboratory for radiation analysis and monitoring, completely designed in qatar and equipped at qatar university, is given. It consists of a van equipped with three scintillation detectors mounted on the front bumper. The detectors can monitor gamma radiations along the path of the laboratory over an angle range 120 degree. One Eberline radiation monitoring station is mounted on the roof. The laboratory is also equipped with several, and neutron survey meters in addition to some sampling equipment. All equipment used are powered with solar panels. The characteristics and performance of solar power/stabilized A C conversion is given. Data acquisition from the three scintillation detectors is performed by adding the outputs of the three detectors and storing the total as a function of time in a computer based multi-channel analyzer (MCA) operated in the MSC mode. The acquisition can be switched easily to the PHA mode to analyze gamma spectra from any possible contamination source. The laboratory was used in several environmental and possible contamination missions. Some results obtained during some of these missions are given. 4 figs.

  3. Electron beam irradiation: laboratory and field studies of cowpea seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, K.; Chauhan, S.K.; Prasad, T.V.; Pramod, R.; Verma, V.P.; Petwal, V.; Dwivedi, J.; Bhalla, S.

    2015-01-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) rich in protein and vitamins is emerging as one of the most important food legumes to tackle malnutrition. Pulse beetles (Callosobruchus chinensis and C. maculatus) are the pests of economic importance causing enormous losses during storage. Although various pest management strategies exist for the control of these pests, environmental concerns necessitate developing ecofriendly strategies. Electron beam (EB) irradiation has the potential to be a viable, non-chemical, residue-free strategy for management of pulse beetles during storage, but higher doses affect seed germination and viability. Hence, the present investigation was taken up to analyse the dosage effect of the irradiation on seed attributes of cowpea. Healthy cowpea seeds were irradiated with low energy electrons at different doses viz., 180, 360, 540, 720, 900, 1080, 1260, 1440 and 1620 Gy at 500 keV using the EB Accelerator facility at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore. EB irradiated seeds were tested for physiological viz., germination, seedling vigour and vigour index and biochemical parameters viz., electrical conductivity of seed leachate, seed viability/tetrazolium test and dehydrogenase activity. Germination and vigour of the irradiated seeds were evaluated as per the ISTA Rules (ISTA, 1996). Vigour index was calculated as the product of germination percentage and seedling vigour. About 3,000 irradiated seeds from each dose were grown in the field at the Experimental farm, National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources, New Delhi. Seeds harvested from 1500 individual plants of M 1 generation from each dose (50 seeds from each plant individually) were sown in next season and observed for chlorophyll mutations, if any. Results revealed that doses upto 1080 Gy (88%) did not affect the germination of cowpea seeds drastically as compared to untreated seeds (98%). Lower doses viz., 180 and 360 Gy had no impact on vigour components while higher doses (1080 Gy

  4. Twelve years of cooperation in the field of radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grapengiesser, Sten; Bennerstedt, Torkel

    2005-06-01

    SSI has pursued an international cooperation program since 1992 within the field of radiation protection and emergency preparedness for radiation accidents with the three Baltic countries as main beneficiaries. As the Baltic countries are members of the EU since May 2004, this bilateral support will now be phased out and replaced with other forms of cooperation. During the years passed, a large number of activities have been launched with a total budget of some 14 million ECU. The Baltic radiation protection authorities have played a big role in the cooperation and Baltic ministries, universities, nuclear technology installations and other industries using radiation have also been engaged in the projects. SKI, SKB, Studsvik and the Swedish nuclear power plants should be mentioned as major cooperation partners on the Swedish side. During autumn 2004 when such a large coordinated work program was coming to an end, SSI decided to hold a seminar with the purpose to follow up experiences from the work and discuss coming forms of cooperation. The seminar took place on the 18 of November 2004 and gathered some 80 participants, 29 of which from the Baltic countries. It was opened by Lars-Erik Holm, the SSI Director General, and the three Baltic countries then presented their views and impressions from the passed years of cooperation. The seminar was concluded with a panel discussion on 'How to proceed from today's situation'. The result was that SSI invited to a new coordination meeting during autumn 2005 to follow up and discuss coordination of radiation protection around the Baltic Sea together with the other Nordic radiation protection authorities.

  5. Twelve years of cooperation in the field of radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grapengiesser, Sten; Bennerstedt, Torkel

    2005-06-01

    SSI has pursued an international cooperation program since 1992 within the field of radiation protection and emergency preparedness for radiation accidents with the three Baltic countries as main beneficiaries. As the Baltic countries are members of the EU since May 2004, this bilateral support will now be phased out and replaced with other forms of cooperation. During the years passed, a large number of activities have been launched with a total budget of some 14 million ECU. The Baltic radiation protection authorities have played a big role in the cooperation and Baltic ministries, universities, nuclear technology installations and other industries using radiation have also been engaged in the projects. SKI, SKB, Studsvik and the Swedish nuclear power plants should be mentioned as major cooperation partners on the Swedish side. During autumn 2004 when such a large coordinated work program was coming to an end, SSI decided to hold a seminar with the purpose to follow up experiences from the work and discuss coming forms of cooperation. The seminar took place on the 18 of November 2004 and gathered some 80 participants, 29 of which from the Baltic countries. It was opened by Lars-Erik Holm, the SSI Director General, and the three Baltic countries then presented their views and impressions from the passed years of cooperation. The seminar was concluded with a panel discussion on 'How to proceed from today's situation'. The result was that SSI invited to a new coordination meeting during autumn 2005 to follow up and discuss coordination of radiation protection around the Baltic Sea together with the other Nordic radiation protection authorities.

  6. Twelve years of cooperation in the field of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grapengiesser, Sten; Bennerstedt, Torkel

    2005-06-01

    SSI has pursued an international cooperation program since 1992 within the field of radiation protection and emergency preparedness for radiation accidents with the three Baltic countries as main beneficiaries. As the Baltic countries are members of the EU since May 2004, this bilateral support will now be phased out and replaced with other forms of cooperation. During the years passed, a large number of activities have been launched with a total budget of some 14 million ECU. The Baltic radiation protection authorities have played a big role in the cooperation and Baltic ministries, universities, nuclear technology installations and other industries using radiation have also been engaged in the projects. SKI, SKB, Studsvik and the Swedish nuclear power plants should be mentioned as major cooperation partners on the Swedish side. During autumn 2004 when such a large coordinated work program was coming to an end, SSI decided to hold a seminar with the purpose to follow up experiences from the work and discuss coming forms of cooperation. The seminar took place on the 18 of November 2004 and gathered some 80 participants, 29 of which from the Baltic countries. It was opened by Lars-Erik Holm, the SSI Director General, and the three Baltic countries then presented their views and impressions from the passed years of cooperation. The seminar was concluded with a panel discussion on 'How to proceed from today's situation'. The result was that SSI invited to a new coordination meeting during autumn 2005 to follow up and discuss coordination of radiation protection around the Baltic Sea together with the other Nordic radiation protection authorities

  7. Field oxide radiation damage measurements in silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laakso, M [Particle Detector Group, Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States) Research Inst. for High Energy Physics (SEFT), Helsinki (Finland); Singh, P; Shepard, P F [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1993-04-01

    Surface radiation damage in planar processed silicon detectors is caused by radiation generated holes being trapped in the silicon dioxide layers on the detector wafer. We have studied charge trapping in thick (field) oxide layers on detector wafers by irradiating FOXFET biased strip detectors and MOS test capacitors. Special emphasis was put on studying how a negative bias voltage across the oxide during irradiation affects hole trapping. In addition to FOXFET biased detectors, negatively biased field oxide layers may exist on the n-side of double-sided strip detectors with field plate based n-strip separation. The results indicate that charge trapping occurred both close to the Si-SiO[sub 2] interface and in the bulk of the oxide. The charge trapped in the bulk was found to modify the electric field in the oxide in a way that leads to saturation in the amount of charge trapped in the bulk when the flatband/threshold voltage shift equals the voltage applied over the oxide during irradiation. After irradiation only charge trapped close to the interface is annealed by electrons tunneling to the oxide from the n-type bulk. (orig.).

  8. DOE Task Force meeting on Electrical Breakdown of Insulating Ceramics in a High Radiation Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, P.H.

    1991-08-01

    This volume contains the abstracts and presentation material from the Research Assistance Task Force Meeting ''Electrical Breakdown of Insulating Ceramics in a High-Radiation Field.'' The meeting was jointly sponsored by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences and the Office of Fusion Energy of the US Department of Energy in Vail, Colorado, May 28--June 1, 1991. The 26 participants represented expertise in fusion, radiation damage, electrical breakdown, ceramics, and semiconductor and electronic structures. These participants came from universities, industries, national laboratories, and government. The attendees represented eight nations. The Task Force meeting was organized in response to the recent discovery that a combination of temperature, electric field, and radiation for an extended period of time has an unexplained adverse effect in ceramics, termed radiation-enhanced electrical degradation (REED). REED occurs after an incubation period and continues to accelerate with irradiation until the ceramics can no longer be regarded as insulators. It appears that REED is irreversible and the ceramic insulators cannot be readily annealed or otherwise repaired for future services. This effect poses a serious threat for fusion reactors, which require electrical insulators in diagnostic devices, in radio frequency and neutral beam systems, and in magnetic assemblies. The problem of selecting suitable electrical insulating materials in thus far more serious than previously anticipated

  9. Application of γ field theory based calculation method to the monitoring of mine nuclear radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Yanjun; Liu Qingcheng; Liu Hongzhang; Qin Guoxiu

    2009-01-01

    In order to find the feasibility of calculating mine radiation dose based on γ field theory, this paper calculates the γ radiation dose of a mine by means of γ field theory based calculation method. The results show that the calculated radiation dose is of small error and can be used to monitor mine environment of nuclear radiation. (authors)

  10. Analysis of radiation pneumonitis outside the radiation field in breast conserving therapy for early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogo, Etsuyo; Fujimoto, Kiminori; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2002-01-01

    In a retrospective study of radiation-induced pulmonary changes for patients with breast conserving therapy for early breast cancer, we sent questionnaires to the main hospitals in Japan. In this study, we analyzed pulmonary changes after tangential whole-breast irradiation. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and risk factors for radiation pneumonitis outside the radiation field. The questionnaires included patients data, therapy data, and lung injury information between August 1999 and May 2000. On the first questionnaires, answer letters were received from 107 institutions out of 158 (67.7%). On the second questionnaires, response rate (hospitals which had radiation pneumonitis outside the radiation field) was 21.7% (23/106). We could find no risk factors of this type of pneumonitis. We suggested that lung irradiation might trigger this type of pneumonitis which is clinically similar to BOOP (bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia). It developed in 1.5-2.1% among the patients with breast conserving surgery and tangential whole-breast irradiation. And it is likely appeared within 6 months after radiotherapy. (author)

  11. Active Radiation Level Measurement on New Laboratory Instrument for Evaluating the Antibacterial Activity of Radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joh, Eunha; Park, Jang Guen

    2014-01-01

    A disc method has been widely used to measure the antibacterial effect of chemical agents. However, it is difficult to measure the antibacterial effect of radioisotopes using a disc method. A disc method is a method for diffusing a drug by placing the drug containing disc on the medium. In this method, radioisotopes are diffused on the medium and it is difficult to measure the exact effect by radiation. Thus, new laboratory equipment needs to evaluate the antibacterial activity by the radioisotopes. In this study, we measured the radiation level of radioisotopes on a new laboratory instrument using a MCNP. A disc method has been widely used to measure the antibacterial effect of chemical agents. This method uses a drug diffusion system for the measurement of anti-bacterial antibiotics. To measure the antimicrobial activity of a radioisotope, a new type of laboratory instrument is necessary to prevent the drug from spreading. The radioisotopes are used to diagnose and treat cancer. However, studies for anti-biotical use have not progressed. The radiation of radioisotopes has the effect of killing bacteria. Before this study proceeds further, it is necessary to be able to measure the antimicrobial activity of the radioisotope easily in the laboratory. However, in this study, it was possible to measure the antimicrobial activity of the radioisotope in the laboratory using a new laboratory instrument. We intend to start evaluation studies of the antibacterial activity of specific radioisotopes. In addition, it will be possible to develop research to overcome diseases caused by bacteria in the future

  12. Active Radiation Level Measurement on New Laboratory Instrument for Evaluating the Antibacterial Activity of Radioisotope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joh, Eunha; Park, Jang Guen [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    A disc method has been widely used to measure the antibacterial effect of chemical agents. However, it is difficult to measure the antibacterial effect of radioisotopes using a disc method. A disc method is a method for diffusing a drug by placing the drug containing disc on the medium. In this method, radioisotopes are diffused on the medium and it is difficult to measure the exact effect by radiation. Thus, new laboratory equipment needs to evaluate the antibacterial activity by the radioisotopes. In this study, we measured the radiation level of radioisotopes on a new laboratory instrument using a MCNP. A disc method has been widely used to measure the antibacterial effect of chemical agents. This method uses a drug diffusion system for the measurement of anti-bacterial antibiotics. To measure the antimicrobial activity of a radioisotope, a new type of laboratory instrument is necessary to prevent the drug from spreading. The radioisotopes are used to diagnose and treat cancer. However, studies for anti-biotical use have not progressed. The radiation of radioisotopes has the effect of killing bacteria. Before this study proceeds further, it is necessary to be able to measure the antimicrobial activity of the radioisotope easily in the laboratory. However, in this study, it was possible to measure the antimicrobial activity of the radioisotope in the laboratory using a new laboratory instrument. We intend to start evaluation studies of the antibacterial activity of specific radioisotopes. In addition, it will be possible to develop research to overcome diseases caused by bacteria in the future.

  13. Radiation corrections to quantum processes in an intense electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narozhny, N.B.

    1979-01-01

    A derivation of an asymptotic expression for the mass correction of order α to the electron propagator in an intense electromagnetic field is presented. It is used for the calculation of radiation corrections to the electron and photon elastic scattering amplitudes in the α 3 approximation. All proper diagrams contributing to the amplitudes and containing the above-mentioned correction to the propagator were considered, but not those which include vertex corrections. It is shown that the expansion parameter of the perturbation theory of quantum electrodynamics in intense fields grows not more slowly than αchi/sup 1/3/ at least for the electron amplitude, where chi = [(eF/sub μν/p/sub ν/) 2 ] 12 /m 3 , p is a momentum of the electron, and F is the electromagnetic field tensor

  14. Finite-element-analysis of fields radiated from ICRF antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Kaoru; Sugihara, Ryo.

    1984-04-01

    In several simple geometries, electromagnetic fields radiated from a loop antenna, on which a current oscillately flows across the static magnetic field B-vector 0 , are calculated by the finite element method (FEM) as well as by analytic methods in a cross section of a plasma cylinder. A finite wave number along B-vector 0 is assumed. Good agreement between FEM and the analytic solutions is obtained, which indicates the accuracy of FEM solutions. The method is applied to calculations of fields from a half-turn antenna and reasonable results are obtained. It is found that a straightforward application of FEM to problems in an anisotropic medium may bring about erroneous results and that an appropriate coordinate transformation is needed for FEM to become applicable. (author)

  15. Controlling radiation fields in siemans designed light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riess, R.; Marchl, T. [Siemens Power Generation Group, Erlangen (Germany)

    1995-03-01

    An essential item for the control of radiation fields is the minimization of the use of satellites in the reactor systems of Light Water Reactors (LWRs). A short description of the qualification of Co-replacement materials will be followed by an illustration of the locations where these materials were implemented in Siemens designed LWRs. Especially experiences in PWRs show the immense influence of reduction of cobalt sources on dose rate buildup. The corrosion and the fatique and wear behavior of the replacement materials has not created concern up to now. A second tool to keep occupational radiation doses at a low level in PWRs is the use of the modified B/Li-chemistry. This is practized in Siemens designed plants by keeping the Li level at a max. value of 2 ppm until it reaches a pH (at 300{degrees}C) of {approximately}7.4. This pH is kept constant until the end of the cycle. The substitution of cobalt base alloys and thus the removal of the Co-59 sources from the system had the largest impact on the radiation levels. Nonetheless, the effectiveness of the coolant chemistry should not be neglected either. Several years of successful operation of PWRs with the replacement materials resulted in an occupational radiation exposure which is below 0.5 man-Sievert/plant and year.

  16. EVIDOS: Individual dosimetry in mixed neutron and photon radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhavere, F.

    2006-01-01

    The EVIDOS project (partly funded by the European Commission RTD Programme: Nuclear Energy, Euratom Framework Programme V, 1998-2002, Contract No FIKR-CT-2001-00175) aimed at improving individual monitoring in mixed neutron-photon radiation fields by evaluating the performance of routine and novel personal dosimeters for mixed radiation, and by giving guidelines for deriving sufficiently accurate values of personal dose equivalent from the readings of area survey instruments and dosimeters. The main objective of EVIDOS was to evaluate different methods for individual dosimetry in mixed neutron-photon work-places in nuclear industry. This implied a determination of the capabilities and limitations of personal dosimeters and the establishment of methods to enable sufficiently accurate values of personal dose equivalent from spectrometers, area survey instruments and routine personal dosimeters. Also novel electronic personal dosimeters were investigated. To this end spectrometric and dosimetric investigations in selected representative workplaces in nuclear industry where workers can receive significant neutron doses were performed. As part of this project, a number of tasks were executed, in particular: (1) the determination of the energy and direction distribution of the neutron fluence; (2) the derivation of the (conventionally true) values of radiation protection quantities; (3) the determination of the readings of routine and innovative personal dosimeters and of area monitors; and (4) the comparison between dosimeter readings and values of the radiation protection quantities

  17. High ionization radiation field remote visualization device - shielding requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Antonio P. Rodrigues; Omi, Nelson M.; Silveira, Carlos Gaia da; Calvo, Wilson A. Pajero

    2011-01-01

    The high activity sources manipulation hot-cells use special and very thick leaded glass windows. This window provides a single sight of what is being manipulated inside the hot-cell. The use of surveillance cameras would replace the leaded glass window, provide other sights and show more details of the manipulated pieces, using the zoom capacity. Online distant manipulation may be implemented, too. The limitation is their low ionizing radiation resistance. This low resistance also limited the useful time of robots made to explore or even fix problematic nuclear reactor core, industrial gamma irradiators and high radioactive leaks. This work is a part of the development of a high gamma field remote visualization device using commercial surveillance cameras. These cameras are cheap enough to be discarded after the use for some hours of use in an emergency application, some days or some months in routine applications. A radiation shield can be used but it cannot block the camera sight which is the shield weakness. Estimates of the camera and its electronics resistance may be made knowing each component behavior. This knowledge is also used to determine the optical sensor type and the lens material, too. A better approach will be obtained with the commercial cameras working inside a high gamma field, like the one inside of the IPEN Multipurpose Irradiator. The goal of this work is to establish the radiation shielding needed to extend the camera's useful time to hours, days or months, depending on the application needs. (author)

  18. Zinc injection helps reduce radiation field buildup in BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, C.

    1991-01-01

    The injection of zinc into the reactor water of BWRs (Boiling Water Reactors) was a technique developed by General Electric (GE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to control the buildup of radiation fields from cobalt-60 on out-of-core piping. The presence of 5-10ppb zinc in the reactor water reduces the growth of oxide films on stainless steel surfaces, thereby reducing the number of sites available for the incorporation of cobalt; zinc also competes with cobalt for the sites. In September 1990, EPRI organized a workshop at the request of several US utilities to provide a forum to discuss experiences with zinc injection. The meeting focused on six main issues: the effect of zinc on radiation fields in normal water chemistry; the radiation buildup in hydrogen water chemistry, with and without zinc; the effects of zinc-65; the corrosion of fuel cladding and structural materials; the performance of zinc injection and monitoring equipment; and planning for zinc injection. (author)

  19. Study on quantities of radiation protection in medical X-rays radiation field with polyhedron phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Shuyu; Dai Guangfu; Zhang Liangan

    1997-01-01

    The author have studied tissue-equivalent material with the elemental composition recommended by report No.44 of ICRU. Three different calibration phantoms in shape have been prepared with the tissue-equivalent material in order to study the influence of the angular dependence factor R(d,α) in the radiation field of X-rays on the calibration of individual dose equivalent Hp(d). The requirement of mono-genous radiation field to calibrate several dosimeters on one phantom at the same time can be met by application of dodecahedron phantom, which is difficult on ICRU sphere. Angular dependence factor R(d,α) of 0 degree∼90 degree and conversion coefficients between individual dose equivalent Hp(0.07, α) and the exposure of radiation of different energies and different angles have been established by taking advantage of the dodecahedron. Besides, the authors have studied the variation relation between the individual dose equivalent Hp (10,α) and Hp(0.07,α) in the medical X-rays radiation field

  20. Radiation Effects and Component Hardening testing program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draper, J.V.; Weil, B.S.; Chesser, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes Phase II of the Radiation Effects and Component Hardening (REACH) testing program, performed as part of the joint collaborative agreement between the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) of Japan, Components and materials were submitted to 10 5 R/hr gamma radiation fields for 10,000 hr, producing accumulated doses of 10 9 R; most performed as expected

  1. Suppression of sound radiation to far field of near-field acoustic communication system using evanescent sound field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Ayaka; Wakatsuki, Naoto; Mizutani, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    A method of suppressing sound radiation to the far field of a near-field acoustic communication system using an evanescent sound field is proposed. The amplitude of the evanescent sound field generated from an infinite vibrating plate attenuates exponentially with increasing a distance from the surface of the vibrating plate. However, a discontinuity of the sound field exists at the edge of the finite vibrating plate in practice, which broadens the wavenumber spectrum. A sound wave radiates over the evanescent sound field because of broadening of the wavenumber spectrum. Therefore, we calculated the optimum distribution of the particle velocity on the vibrating plate to reduce the broadening of the wavenumber spectrum. We focused on a window function that is utilized in the field of signal analysis for reducing the broadening of the frequency spectrum. The optimization calculation is necessary for the design of window function suitable for suppressing sound radiation and securing a spatial area for data communication. In addition, a wide frequency bandwidth is required to increase the data transmission speed. Therefore, we investigated a suitable method for calculating the sound pressure level at the far field to confirm the variation of the distribution of sound pressure level determined on the basis of the window shape and frequency. The distribution of the sound pressure level at a finite distance was in good agreement with that obtained at an infinite far field under the condition generating the evanescent sound field. Consequently, the window function was optimized by the method used to calculate the distribution of the sound pressure level at an infinite far field using the wavenumber spectrum on the vibrating plate. According to the result of comparing the distributions of the sound pressure level in the cases with and without the window function, it was confirmed that the area whose sound pressure level was reduced from the maximum level to -50 dB was

  2. Absorbing Aerosols: Field and Laboratory Studies of Black Carbon and Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, A. C.; Flowers, B. A.; Dubey, M. K.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, absorbing aerosols are thought to be the most uncertain factor in atmospheric climate models (~0.4-1.2 W/m2), and the 2nd most important factor after CO2 in global warming (1.6 W/m2; Ramanathan and Carmichael, Nature Geoscience, 2008; Myhre, Science, 2009). While most well-recognized atmospheric aerosols, e.g., sulfate from power-plants, have a cooling effect on the atmosphere by scattering solar radiation, black carbon (BC or soot) absorbs sunlight strongly which results in a warming of the atmosphere. Dust particles are also present globally and can absorb radiation, contributing to a warmer and drier atmosphere. Direct on-line measurements of BC and hematite, an absorbing dust aerosol, can be made with the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), which measures the mass of the particles by incandescence on an individual particle basis. Measurements from the SP2 are combined with absorption measurements from the three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) at 405, 532, and 781 nm and the ultraviolet photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-UV) at 375 nm to determine wavelength-dependent mass absorption coefficients (MACs). Laboratory aerosol samples include flame-generated soot, fullerene soot, Aquadag, hematite, and hematite-containing dusts. Measured BC MAC's compare well with published values, and hematite MAC's are an order of magnitude less than BC. Absorbing aerosols measured in the laboratory are compared with those from ambient aerosols measured during the Las Conchas fire and BEACHON-RoMBAS. The Las Conchas fire was a wildfire in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico that burned over 100,000 acres during the Summer of 2011, and BEACHON-RoMBAS (Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen - Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study) is a field campaign focusing on biogenic aerosols at the Manitou Forest Observatory near Colorado Springs, CO in Summer 2011. Optical properties and size

  3. The central gamma spectrometry laboratory of the GSF Institute of Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruckerbauer, F.; Dietl, F.; Winkler, R.

    1997-01-01

    Since the middle of 1995 the WG Radioecology is operating the central gamma spectrometry laboratory of the GSF-Institute of Radiation Protection. The main scope of the laboratory is the gamma spectrometric analysis of samples within the research program of the institute and within joint programs with other institutes of the GSF research center. In the present report set-up and technical data of the measuring equipment, the central operating and data evaluation system and measures for quality assurance are described. At that time 18 semiconductor detectors are available for gamma spectrometric sample analysis which is standardized with respect to operation, evaluation algorithms, nuclide data, data safety and documentation. (orig.) [de

  4. Mixed field radiation modification of polyurethanes based on castor oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortley, A.; Bonin, H.W.; Bui, V.T.

    2006-01-01

    Polyurethane is among the polymers and polymer-based composite materials being investigated at the Royal Military College of Canada for the fabrication of leak-tight containers for the long-term disposal of radioactive waste. Due to the long aliphatic chain of the castor oil component of polyurethane, thermal curing of castor oil based polyurethane (COPU) is limited by increasing polymer viscosity. To enhance further crosslinking, COPUs were subjected to a range of doses (0.0 - 3.0 MGy) produced by the mixed ionizing radiation field of a SLOWPOKE-2 research nuclear reactor. The tensile mechanical properties of castor oil based polyurethanes (COPU), unirradiated and irradiated, were characterized by mechanical tensile tests. Increases in mechanical strength due to radiation-induced crosslinking and limitations of thermal curing were confirmed by tensile tests and changing 13 C-NMR and FTIR spectra. (author)

  5. Mixed field radiation modification of polyurethanes based on castor oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortley, A.; Bonin, H.W.; Bui, V.T. [Royal Military College of Canada, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: aba.mortley@rmc.ca

    2006-07-01

    Polyurethane is among the polymers and polymer-based composite materials being investigated at the Royal Military College of Canada for the fabrication of leak-tight containers for the long-term disposal of radioactive waste. Due to the long aliphatic chain of the castor oil component of polyurethane, thermal curing of castor oil based polyurethane (COPU) is limited by increasing polymer viscosity. To enhance further crosslinking, COPUs were subjected to a range of doses (0.0 - 3.0 MGy) produced by the mixed ionizing radiation field of a SLOWPOKE-2 research nuclear reactor. The tensile mechanical properties of castor oil based polyurethanes (COPU), unirradiated and irradiated, were characterized by mechanical tensile tests. Increases in mechanical strength due to radiation-induced crosslinking and limitations of thermal curing were confirmed by tensile tests and changing {sup 13}C-NMR and FTIR spectra. (author)

  6. Characteristics of radiation field in living environment, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, Toshi; Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Tsutsumi, Masahiro; Saito, Kimiaki; Moriuchi, Shigeru

    1990-01-01

    A series of environmental radiation survey was carried out on train lines within Tokyo metropolitan area to clarify the characteristics of radiation field in living environment. Eleven JR, 18 private and 10 subway lines were surveyed, which cover 97% of whole train lines in Tokyo district in terms of annual number of passengers. The characteristics of environmental radiation field on train lines were discussed. The mean absorbed dose rate in air due to γ-rays on the subway lines was higher than those on the JR and private lines. It is due to the difference in the radioactivity concentration and the distribution of surrounding materials as the γ-ray sources. On the other hand, the mean dose rate due to cosmic-rays on the subway lines was lower than those on the JR and private lines. It is due to the shielding effect of the upper materials such as soil or building materials of tunnels. The mean dose rates for the JR, private and subway lines were calculated using these obtained data. Though the ratio of mean dose rate of γ-rays to that of cosmic-rays for the subway lines was different from those for the JR and private lines, the sum of γ- and cosmic-ray dose rates for the JR, private and subway lines were comparable, 40∼50 nGy/h for any of them. These data will be useful for a precise and realistic evaluation of collective dose, considering the life style of the public and the variation characteristics of environmental radiation. (author)

  7. Report on a Workshop on mobile laboratories for monitoring environmental radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrasi, A,; Nemeth, I.; Zombori, P.; Urban, J.

    1992-01-01

    The international Workshop organized by the Health Physics Department of the Central Research Institute for Physics and by the Radiation Protection Department of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant was presented in this paper. The aims of the Workshop were the introduction of the mobile laboratories and the demonstration of the applied methods for monitoring environmental radiation in accidental situation. The intercomparison measurements showed that the results given by different participating laboratories (9 institutions from the middle and east European region) agreed well within an acceptable error margin. The demonstration, measurements and discussions were very useful for the participants and this could be a good basis for further developments and cooperations among the participating institutions. (author) 7 figs.; 2 tabs

  8. Laboratory astrophysics with high energy and high power lasers: from radiative shocks to young star jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diziere, A.

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory astrophysics are a rapidly developing domain of the High Energy Density Physics. It aims to recreate at smaller scales physical processes that astronomical telescopes have difficulties observing. We shall approach, in this thesis, three major subjects: 1) Jets ejected from young stars, characterized by an important collimation degree and ending with a bow shock; 2) Radiative shocks in which radiation emitted by the shock front itself plays a dominant role in its structure and 3) Accretion shocks in magnetic cataclysmic variables whose important cooling factor allows them to reach stationarity. From the conception to experimental realization, we shall attempt to reproduce in laboratory each of these processes by respecting the scaling laws linking both situations (experimental and astrophysical) established beforehand. The implementation of a large array of visible and X-ray diagnostics will finally allow to completely characterize them and calculate the dimensionless numbers that validate the astrophysical relevance. (author) [fr

  9. Field manual for ground water reconnaissance. Savannah River Laboratory National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, R.B.; Price, V.; Baucom, E.I.

    1977-01-01

    A manual is presented that is intended to direct and coordinate field operations, site selection, groundwater sample collection, and information codes for the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) contribution to the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. The manual provides public relations information for field sampling teams as well as technical direction

  10. Field manual for stream sediment reconnaissance. Savannah River Laboratory National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, R.B.; Price, V.; Baucom, E.I.

    1976-07-01

    A manual is presented that is intended to direct and coordinate field operations, site selection, stream sediment sample collection, water sample collection, and information codes for the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) contribution to the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. The manual provides public relations information for field sampling teams as well as technical direction

  11. 78 FR 55763 - National Environmental Policy Act; Santa Susana Field Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... document format at http://www.nasa.gov/agency/nepa/news/SSFL.html . The Federal Register Notice of Intent...; Santa Susana Field Laboratory AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION... Demolition and Environmental Cleanup Activities for the NASA-administered portion of the Santa Susana Field...

  12. Assessment of toxicity of heavy metal contaminated soils for Collembola in the field and laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Jie; Krogh, Paul Henning; Luo, Yongming

    2008-01-01

    We present a field and laboratory investigation of effects of increasing levels of heavy metal contamination on the biodiversity and performance of collembolans. A 40 year old pollution with Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd pollution due to Cu smelting over 40 years was investigated in a paddy field area of Zhe...

  13. Intercomparison of radiation protection instrumentation in a pulsed neutron field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caresana, M., E-mail: marco.caresana@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, CESNEF, Dipartimento di Energia, via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy); Denker, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Esposito, A. [IFNF-LNF, FISMEL, via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Ferrarini, M. [CNAO, Via Privata Campeggi, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Golnik, N. [Institute of Metrology and Biomedical Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Sw. A. Boboli 8, 02-525 Warsaw (Poland); Hohmann, E. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Radiation Metrology Section, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Leuschner, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Luszik-Bhadra, M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Manessi, G. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, L69 7ZE Liverpool (United Kingdom); Mayer, S. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Radiation Metrology Section, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ott, K. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, BESSYII, Albert-Einstein-Str.15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Röhrich, J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Silari, M. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Trompier, F. [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, F-92262 Fontenay aux Roses (France); Volnhals, M.; Wielunski, M. [Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstr. 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2014-02-11

    In the framework of the EURADOS working group 11, an intercomparison of active neutron survey meters was performed in a pulsed neutron field (PNF). The aim of the exercise was to evaluate the performances of various neutron instruments, including commercially available rem-counters, personal dosemeters and instrument prototypes. The measurements took place at the cyclotron of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH. The cyclotron is routinely used for proton therapy of ocular tumours, but an experimental area is also available. For the therapy the machine accelerates protons to 68 MeV. The interaction of the proton beam with a thick tungsten target produces a neutron field with energy up to about 60 MeV. One interesting feature of the cyclotron is that the beam can be delivered in bursts, with the possibility to modify in a simple and flexible way the burst length and the ion current. Through this possibility one can obtain radiation bursts of variable duration and intensity. All instruments were placed in a reference position and irradiated with neutrons delivered in bursts of different intensity. The analysis of the instrument response as a function of the burst charge (the total electric charge of the protons in the burst shot onto the tungsten target) permitted to assess for each device the dose underestimation due to the time structure of the radiation field. The personal neutron dosemeters were exposed on a standard PMMA slab phantom and the response linearity was evaluated.

  14. Field Deployable Gamma Radiation Detectors for DHS Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay

    2007-08-01

    Recently, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has integrated all nuclear detection research, development, testing, evaluation, acquisition, and operational support into a single office: the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO). The DNDO has specific requirements set for all commercial off-the-shelf and government off-the-shelf radiation detection equipment and data acquisition systems. This article would investigate several recent developments in field deployable gamma radiation detectors that are attempting to meet the DNDO specifications. Commercially available, transportable, handheld radio isotope identification devices (RIID) are inadequate for DHS requirements in terms of sensitivity, resolution, response time, and reach-back capability. The leading commercial vendor manufacturing handheld gamma spectrometer in the United States is Thermo Electron Corporation. Thermo Electron's identiFINDER{trademark}, which primarily uses sodium iodide crystals (3.18 x 2.54cm cylinders) as gamma detectors, has a Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum energy resolution of 7 percent at 662 keV. Thermo Electron has just recently come up with a reach-back capability patented as RadReachBack{trademark} that enables emergency personnel to obtain real-time technical analysis of radiation samples they find in the field. The current project has the goal to build a prototype handheld gamma spectrometer, equipped with a digital camera and an embedded cell phone to be used as an RIID with higher sensitivity, better resolution, and faster response time (able to detect the presence of gamma-emitting radio isotopes within 5 seconds of approach), which will make it useful as a field deployable tool. The handheld equipment continuously monitors the ambient gamma radiation, and, if it comes across any radiation anomalies with higher than normal gamma gross counts, it sets an alarm condition. When a substantial alarm level is reached, the system automatically triggers the saving of relevant

  15. Field Deployable Gamma Radiation Detectors for DHS Use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has integrated all nuclear detection research, development, testing, evaluation, acquisition, and operational support into a single office: the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO). The DNDO has specific requirements set for all commercial off-the-shelf and government off-the-shelf radiation detection equipment and data acquisition systems. This article would investigate several recent developments in field deployable gamma radiation detectors that are attempting to meet the DNDO specifications. Commercially available, transportable, handheld radio isotope identification devices (RIID) are inadequate for DHS requirements in terms of sensitivity, resolution, response time, and reach-back capability. The leading commercial vendor manufacturing handheld gamma spectrometer in the United States is Thermo Electron Corporation. Thermo Electron's identiFINDER(trademark), which primarily uses sodium iodide crystals (3.18 x 2.54cm cylinders) as gamma detectors, has a Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum energy resolution of 7 percent at 662 keV. Thermo Electron has just recently come up with a reach-back capability patented as RadReachBack(trademark) that enables emergency personnel to obtain real-time technical analysis of radiation samples they find in the field. The current project has the goal to build a prototype handheld gamma spectrometer, equipped with a digital camera and an embedded cell phone to be used as an RIID with higher sensitivity, better resolution, and faster response time (able to detect the presence of gamma-emitting radio isotopes within 5 seconds of approach), which will make it useful as a field deployable tool. The handheld equipment continuously monitors the ambient gamma radiation, and, if it comes across any radiation anomalies with higher than normal gamma gross counts, it sets an alarm condition. When a substantial alarm level is reached, the system automatically triggers the saving of relevant

  16. OH megamasers: dense gas & the infrared radiation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Zhang, JiangShui; Liu, Wei; Xu, Jie

    2018-06-01

    To investigate possible factors related to OH megamaser formation (OH MM, L_{H2O}>10L_{⊙}), we compiled a large HCN sample from all well-sampled HCN measurements so far in local galaxies and identified with the OH MM, OH kilomasers (L_{H2O}gas and the dense gas, respectively), we found that OH MM galaxies tend to have stronger HCN emission and no obvious difference on CO luminosity exists between OH MM and non-OH MM. This implies that OH MM formation should be related to the dense molecular gas, instead of the low-density molecular gas. It can be also supported by other facts: (1) OH MMs are confirmed to have higher mean molecular gas density and higher dense gas fraction (L_{HCN}/L_{CO}) than non-OH MMs. (2) After taking the distance effect into account, the apparent maser luminosity is still correlated with the HCN luminosity, while no significant correlation can be found at all between the maser luminosity and the CO luminosity. (3) The OH kMs tend to have lower values than those of OH MMs, including the dense gas luminosity and the dense gas fraction. (4) From analysis of known data of another dense gas tracer HCO^+, similar results can also be obtained. However, from our analysis, the infrared radiation field can not be ruled out for the OH MM trigger, which was proposed by previous works on one small sample (Darling in ApJ 669:L9, 2007). On the contrary, the infrared radiation field should play one more important role. The dense gas (good tracers of the star formation) and its surrounding dust are heated by the ultra-violet (UV) radiation generated by the star formation and the heating of the high-density gas raises the emission of the molecules. The infrared radiation field produced by the re-radiation of the heated dust in turn serves for the pumping of the OH MM.

  17. Characteristics of outage radiation fields around various reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verzilov, Y.; Husain, A.; Corbin, G.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Activity monitoring surveys, consisting of gamma spectroscopy and dose rate measurements, of various CANDU station components such as the reactor face, feeder cabinet, steam generators and moderator heat exchangers are often performed during shutdown in order to trend the transport of activity around the primary heat transport and moderator systems. Recently, the increased dose expenditure for work such as feeder inspection and replacement in the reactor vault has also spurred interest in improved characterization of the reactor face fields to facilitate better ALARA decision making and hence a reduction in future dose expenditures. At present, planning for reactor face work is hampered by insufficient understanding of the relative contribution of the various components to the overall dose. In addition to the increased dose expenditure for work at the reactor face, maintenance work associated with horizontal flux detectors and liquid injection systems has also resulted in elevated dose expenditures. For instance at Darlington, radiation fields in the vicinity of horizontal flux detectors (HFD) and Liquid Injection Shutdown System (LISS) nozzle bellows are trending upwards with present contact fields being in the range 16-70 rem/h and working distance fields being in the range 100-500 mrem/h. This paper presents findings based on work currently being funded by the CANDU Owners Group. Measurements were performed at Ontario Power Generation's Pickering and Darlington nuclear stations. Specifically, the following are addressed: Characteristics of Reactor Vault Fields; Characteristics of Steam Generator Fields; Characteristics of Moderator Heat Exchanger Fields. Measurements in the reactor vault were performed at the reactor face, along the length of end fittings, along the length of feeders, at the bleed condenser and at the HFD and LISS nozzle bellows. Steam generator fields were characterized at various elevations above the tube sheet, with and without the

  18. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (no.19)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1985 through March 31, 1986. The latest report, for 1984, is JAERI-M 86-051. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on surface phenomena under electron and ion irradiations; polymerization under the irradiation of electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  19. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, (no. 20)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1986 through March 31, 1987. The latest report, for 1985, is JAERI-M 87-046. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on surface phenomena under electron and ion irradiations; polymerization under the irradiation of electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  20. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1980 through March 31, 1981. The latest report, for 1980, is JAERI-M 9214. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on reactions of carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane; polymerization under the irradiation of high dose rate electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  1. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-12-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1981 through March 31, 1982. The latest report, for 1981, is JAERI-M 9856. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on reactions of carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane; polymerization under the irradiation of high dose rate electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  2. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, No. 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-11-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1978 through March 31, 1979. The latest report, for 1978, is JAERI-M 7949. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on reactions of carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane; polymerization under the irradiation of high dose rate electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  3. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, (17)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1983 through March 31, 1984. The latest report, for 1983, is JAERI-M 83-199. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on surface phenomena under electron and ion irradiations; polymerization under the irradiation of electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  4. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, (13)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-11-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1979 through March 31, 1980. The latest report, for 1979, is JAERI-M 8569. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on reactions of carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane; polymerization under the irradiation of high dose rate electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  5. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, (9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-09-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1975 through March 31, 1976. The latest report, for 1975, is JAERI-M 6260. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on reactions of carbon monoxide and hydrogen; polymerization under the irradiation of high dose rate electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and drafting. (auth.)

  6. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (no. 18)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1984 through March 31, 1985. The latest report, for 1984, is JAERI-M 84-239. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on surface phenomena under electron and ion irradiations; polymerization under the irradiation of electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  7. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, No. 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1976 through March 31, 1977. The latest report, for 1976, is JAERI-M 6702. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on reactions of carbon monoxide and hydrogen; polymerization under the irradiation of high dose rate electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (auth.)

  8. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (no. 16)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-11-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1982 through March 31, 1983. The latest report, for 1982, is JAERI-M 82-192. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on reactions of carbon monoxide, water and methane; polymerization under the irradiation of high dose rate electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  9. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, (no. 11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-10-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1977 through March 31, 1978. The latest report, for 1977, is JAERI-M 7355. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on reactions of carbon monoxide and hydrogen; polymerization under the irradiation of high dose rate electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  10. Calibrations and evaluation of the quality assurance during 1999 at the National Laboratory for ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grindborg, Jan-Erik; Israelsson, Karl-Erik; Kylloenen, Jan-Erik; Samuelson, Goeran

    2000-06-01

    The Swedish Radiation Protection Institute is the National Laboratory for the dosimetric quantities kerma, absorbed dose and dose equivalent. The activity is based on established calibration procedures and a quality assurance program for the used standards. This report gives a brief summary of the calibrations performed during 1999 and a more detailed description and analysis of the quality assurance during this year. The report makes it easier to draw conclusions about the long-term stability and possible malfunctions

  11. Techniques to maximize software reliability in radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichhorn, G.; Piercey, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    Microprocessor system failures due to memory corruption by single event upsets (SEUs) and/or latch-up in RAM or ROM memory are common in environments where there is high radiation flux. Traditional methods to harden microcomputer systems against SEUs and memory latch-up have usually involved expensive large scale hardware redundancy. Such systems offer higher reliability, but they tend to be more complex and non-standard. At the Space Astronomy Laboratory the authors have developed general programming techniques for producing software which is resistant to such memory failures. These techniques, which may be applied to standard off-the-shelf hardware, as well as custom designs, include an implementation of Maximally Redundant Software (MRS) model, error detection algorithms and memory verification and management

  12. Safety Study of the X-Ray Reference Laboratory for Radiation Protection Levels (IR-14D)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, G.

    1999-01-01

    This report is a study about the safety of the X-ray reference laboratory that has been recently constructed in the building 2 of the CIEMAT. After a brief description of the apparatus, we present the method used to calculate the exposure and absorbed dose rates in the most characteristic points of the laboratory. This method takes into account the spectral distribution of the radiation beams as a function of the accelerating voltage. The built-up factors of the absorbent materials have been considered to calculate the transmission of the radiation beams through the filters and shielding. Scattered radiations has been introduced in the calculations by means of a semiempirical method. This model supposes that multiple scattering processes give an isotropic contribution to the reflected beams and the single scattered can be described in terms of the differential cross section of Klein-Nishina. The results of this study have been applied to determine the maximum dose equivalent that the personnel of the laboratory could receive in normal operation conditions. (Author) 5 refs

  13. Potential for improved radiation thermometry measurement uncertainty through implementing a primary scale in an industrial laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmott, Jon R.; Lowe, David; Broughton, Mick; White, Ben S.; Machin, Graham

    2016-09-01

    A primary temperature scale requires realising a unit in terms of its definition. For high temperature radiation thermometry in terms of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 this means extrapolating from the signal measured at the freezing temperature of gold, silver or copper using Planck’s radiation law. The difficulty in doing this means that primary scales above 1000 °C require specialist equipment and careful characterisation in order to achieve the extrapolation with sufficient accuracy. As such, maintenance of the scale at high temperatures is usually only practicable for National Metrology Institutes, and calibration laboratories have to rely on a scale calibrated against transfer standards. At lower temperatures it is practicable for an industrial calibration laboratory to have its own primary temperature scale, which reduces the number of steps between the primary scale and end user. Proposed changes to the SI that will introduce internationally accepted high temperature reference standards might make it practicable to have a primary high temperature scale in a calibration laboratory. In this study such a scale was established by calibrating radiation thermometers directly to high temperature reference standards. The possible reduction in uncertainty to an end user as a result of the reduced calibration chain was evaluated.

  14. Radiation Testing at Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia – JPL Collaboration for Europa Lander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Ion Beam Lab.; Olszewska-Wasiolek, Maryla Aleksandra [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Gamma Irradiation Facility

    2017-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is assisting Jet Propulsion Laboratory in undertaking feasibility studies and performance assessments for the Planetary Protection aspect of the Europa Lander mission. The specific areas of interest for this project are described by task number. This white paper presents the evaluation results for Task 2, Radiation Testing, which was stated as follows: Survey SNL facilities and capabilities for simulating the Europan radiation environment and assess suitability for: A. Testing batteries, electronics, and other component and subsystems B. Exposing biological organisms to assess their survivability metrics. The radiation environment the Europa Lander will encounter on route and in orbit upon arrival at its destination consists primarily of charged particles, energetic protons and electrons with the energies up to 1 GeV. The charged particle environments can be simulated using the accelerators at the Ion Beam Laboratory. The Gamma Irradiation Facility and its annex, the Low Dose Rate Irradiation Facility, offer irradiations using Co-60 gamma sources (1.17 and 1.33 MeV), as well as Cs-137 gamma (0.661 MeV) AmBe neutron (0-10 MeV) sources.

  15. Recent developments in the field of radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrzej, G. Chmielewski

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Radiation has been discovered more than one hundred years ago. Since than, properties of radiation to modify physico-chemical properties of materials have found many applications. Radiation technologies applying gamma sources and electron accelerators for material processing are well established processes. There are over 160 gamma industrial irradiators and 1300 electron industrial accelerators in operation worldwide. They are being widely used for sterilization, food irradiation and polymer processing. New developments in the field of radiation sources engineering are compact size gamma irradiators, high power electron accelerators (medium energy range) for environmental applications and other types (high energy range) for materials' processing, with direct e-/X conversion. Future applications of low energy, inexpensive EB processing systems are foreseen. Electron beam lithography for microelectronics is a well-established technique. The already tested e-/X system equipped in an accelerator of 700 kW power opens new horizons for this kind of application. The developments described above need introduction of new computational methods that facilitate prediction of dose distribution, even in containers filled with complex products of varying densities. This technique provides good solutions for homeland security applications which may be complemented by mobile system applications. Technologies to be developed besides environmental applications could be nano materials, structure engineered materials (sorbents, the composites, ordered polymers, etc.) and natural polymers' processing. New products based on radiation processed polysaccharides have already been commercialized in many countries of the East Asia and Pacific Region, especially in those being rich in natural polymers. Very important and promising applications concern environment protection - radiation technology being a clean and environment friendly process, helps to curb pollutants' emission as

  16. Inner-shell photoionization in weak and strong radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, S.H.; Dunford, R.W.; Ederer, D.L.; Kanter, E.P.; Kraessig, B.; Young, L.

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray beams presently produced at synchrotron-radiation facilities interact weakly with matter, and the observation of double photoionization is due to electron-electron interactions. The intensities of future X-ray free-electron lasers are expected to produce double photoionization by absorption of two photons. The example of double K-shell photoionization of neon is discussed in the one- and two-photon cases. We also describe an experiment in which X rays photoionize the K shell of krypton in the presence of a strong AC field imposed by an optical laser

  17. Radiation protection in the field of environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yamin

    2003-01-01

    The relationship of radiation protection with environmental protection, the sources that may give rise to the environmental radiation contamination, and the system of radiation protection and the fundamental principles and requirements for radiation environmental management are introduced. Some special radiation protection problems faced with in the radiation environmental management are discussed. (author)

  18. Dosimeter calibration facilities and methods at the Radiation Measurement Laboratory of the Centre d'etudes nucleaires, Grenoble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudens, H. de; Herbaut, Y.; Haddad, A.; Giroux, J.; Rouillon, J.; CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38

    1975-01-01

    At the Centre d'etudes nucleaires, Grenoble, the Radiation Measurement Laboratory, which forms part of the Environmental Protection and Research Department, serves the entire Centre for purposes of dosimetry and the calibration of dose meters. The needs of radiation protection are such that one must have facilities for checking periodically the calibration of radiation-monitoring instruments and developing special dosimetry techniques. It was thought a good idea to arrange for the dosimetry and radiation protection team to assist other groups working at the Centre - in particular, the staff of the biology and radiobiology laboratories - and also bodies outside the framework of the French Commissariat a l'energie atomique. Thus, technical collaboration has been established with, for example, Grenoble's Centre hospitalier universitaire (university clinic), which makes use of the facilities and skills available at the Radiation Measurement Laboratory for solving special dosimetry problems. With the Laboratory's facilities it is possible to calibrate dose meters for gamma, beta and neutron measurements

  19. Size-dependent reactivity of magnetite nanoparticles: a field-laboratory comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindle, Andrew L.; Elwood Madden, Andrew S.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Benamara, Mourad

    2014-01-01

    Logistic challenges make direct comparisons between laboratory- and field-based investigations into the size-dependent reactivity of nanomaterials difficult. This investigation sought to compare the size-dependent reactivity of nanoparticles in a field setting to a laboratory analog using the specific example of magnetite dissolution. Synthetic magnetite nanoparticles of three size intervals, ∼6 nm, ∼44 nm, and ∼90 nm were emplaced in the subsurface of the USGS research site at the Norman Landfill for up to 30 days using custom-made subsurface nanoparticle holders. Laboratory analog dissolution experiments were conducted using synthetic groundwater. Reaction products were analyzed via TEM and SEM and compared to initial particle characterizations. Field results indicated that an organic coating developed on the particle surfaces largely inhibiting reactivity. Limited dissolution occurred, with the amount of dissolution decreasing as particle size decreased. Conversely, the laboratory analogs without organics revealed greater dissolution of the smaller particles. These results showed that the presence of dissolved organics led to a nearly complete reversal in the size-dependent reactivity trends displayed between the field and laboratory experiments indicating that size-dependent trends observed in laboratory investigations may not be relevant in organic-rich natural systems.

  20. Laboratory simulation of interplanetary ultraviolet radiation (broad spectrum) and its effects on Deinococcus radiodurans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino-Lima, Ivan Gláucio; Pilling, Sérgio; Janot-Pacheco, Eduardo; de Brito, Arnaldo Naves; Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro Gonçalves; Leitão, Alvaro Costa; Lage, Claudia de Alencar Santos

    2010-08-01

    The radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans was exposed to a simulated interplanetary UV radiation at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). Bacterial samples were irradiated on different substrates to investigate the influence of surface relief on cell survival. The effects of cell multi-layers were also investigated. The ratio of viable microorganisms remained virtually the same (average 2%) for integrated doses from 1.2 to 12 kJ m -2, corresponding to 16 h of irradiation at most. The asymptotic profiles of the curves, clearly connected to a shielding effect provided by multi-layering cells on a cavitary substrate (carbon tape), means that the inactivation rate may not change significantly along extended periods of exposure to radiation. Such high survival rates reinforce the possibility of an interplanetary transfer of viable microbes.

  1. Laboratory training manual on the use of isotopes and radiation in entomology. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The revised manual, which incorporates changes particularly regarding applied aspects, consists of 7 parts. Part 1 is divided into separate chapters on the properties of radionuclides and radiations; radiation detection and assay of radioactivity; radiation protection; tracer methodology; 15 N determination; and neutron moderation and γ-ray attentuation techniques. Part 2 is concerned with radiobiology. References and a bibliography are supplied with each part. Part 3 contains 17 mental exercises, part 4 laboratory exercises on a GM counter; a scintillation counter; contamination and decontamination; and exercises on basic utilization principles. Part 5 considers radioisotope uptake and excretion paths through the insect organism; principles of internal and external tagging; with emphasis on insect physiology and ecology; various experiments on insects, and insect sterilization using 60 Co and chemosterilants. Eight Appendices and a Glossary of some basic terms and concepts constitute parts 6 and 7, respectively

  2. Field distribution on an HVDC wall bushing during laboratory rain tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampe, W.; Wikstrom, D.; Jacobson, B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that an efficient counter-measure to suppress flashovers across HVDC wall bushings is to make their surfaces hydrophobic. This laboratory investigation reports the measured electric field along such a bushing under different environmental conditions. A significantly reduced radial field strength has been found for the hydrophobic bushing. Moreover, the total field strength distribution becomes almost independent of the prevailing dry zone. The flashover voltage for bushings with a hydrophobic surface is therefore significantly increased

  3. Determination of Soil Moisture Content using Laboratory Experimental and Field Electrical Resistivity Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Rosli, S.; Fauziah, A.; Wijeyesekera, D. C.; Ashraf, M. I. M.; Faizal, T. B. M.; Kamarudin, A. F.; Rais, Y.; Dan, M. F. Md; Azhar, A. T. S.; Hafiz, Z. M.

    2018-04-01

    The efficiency of civil engineering structure require comprehensive geotechnical data obtained from site investigation. In the past, conventional site investigation was heavily related to drilling techniques thus suffer from several limitations such as time consuming, expensive and limited data collection. Consequently, this study presents determination of soil moisture content using laboratory experimental and field electrical resistivity values (ERV). Field and laboratory electrical resistivity (ER) test were performed using ABEM SAS4000 and Nilsson400 soil resistance meter. Soil sample used for resistivity test was tested for characterization test specifically on particle size distribution and moisture content test according to BS1377 (1990). Field ER data was processed using RES2DINV software while laboratory ER data was analyzed using SPSS and Excel software. Correlation of ERV and moisture content shows some medium relationship due to its r = 0.506. Moreover, coefficient of determination, R2 analyzed has demonstrate that the statistical correlation obtain was very good due to its R2 value of 0.9382. In order to determine soil moisture content based on statistical correlation (w = 110.68ρ-0.347), correction factor, C was established through laboratory and field ERV given as 19.27. Finally, this study has shown that soil basic geotechnical properties with particular reference to water content was applicably determined using integration of laboratory and field ERV data analysis thus able to compliment conventional approach due to its economic, fast and wider data coverage.

  4. Field experience in use of radiation instruments in Cirus reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramesh, N.; Sharma, R.C.; Agarwal, S.K.; Sawant, D.K.; Yadav, R.K.B.; Prasad, S.K.

    2005-01-01

    Cirus, located at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, is a 40 MW (Th) research reactor fuelled by natural uranium, moderated by heavy water and cooled by de-mineralized light water. Graphite is used as reflector in this reactor. The reactor, commissioned in the year 1960, was in operation with availability factor of about 70% till early nineties. There after signs of ageing started surfacing up. After ageing studies, refurbishment plan was finalized and executed during the period from 1997-2002. after successful refurbishment, the reactor is in operation at full power. A wide range of radiation instruments have been used at Cirus for online monitoring of the radiological status of various process systems and environmental releases. Also, variety of survey meters, counting systems and monitors have been used by the health physics unit of the reactor for radiation hazard control. Many of these instruments, which were originally of Canadian design, have undergone changes due to obsolescence or as part of upgradation. This paper describes the experience with the radiation instruments of Cirus, bringing out their effectiveness in meeting the design intent, difficulties faced in their field use, and modifications carried out based on the performance feed back. Also, this paper highlights the areas where further efforts are needed to develop nuclear instrumentation to further strengthen monitoring and surveillance. (author)

  5. Romanian Radiation Protection Training Experience in Medical Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steliana Popescu, F.; Milu, C.; Naghi, E.; Calugareanu, L.; Stroe, F. M.

    2003-01-01

    Studies conducted by the Institute of Public Health Bucharest during the last years emphasised the need of appropriate radioprotection training in the medical field. With the assistance of the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, the Pilot Centre on Clinical Radio pathology in the Institute of Public Health-Bucharest, provided, from 2000 a 7 modular courses (40 hours each), covering the basic topics of ionizing radiation, biological and physical dosimetry, effects of exposure to ionising radiation, radioprotection concepts, planning and medical response in case of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency. The courses are opened for all health specialists, especially for occupational health physicians, focusing on health surveillance of radiation workers and medical management of overexposed workers. Each module is followed up by an examination and credits. The multidisciplinary team of instructors was trained within several train-the-trainers courses, organised by IAEA. The paper discusses the evaluation of these 3 years experience in training and its feedback impact, the aim of the program being to develop a knowledge in the spirit of the new patterns of radiological protection, both for safety and communication with the public. (Author)

  6. Reproducibility of irregular radiation fields for malignant lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mock, U.; Dieckmann, K.; Poetter, R.; Molitor, A.M.; Haverkamp, U.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation treatment for malignant lymphoma requires large field irradiation with irregular blocks according to the individual anatomy and tumor configuration. For determination of safety margins (PTV) we quantitatively analysed the accuracy of field and block placement with regard to different anatomical regions. Patients and Methods: Forty patients with malignant lymphoma were irradiated using the classical supra-/infradiaphragmatic field arrangements. Treatment was performed with 10-MeV photons and irregularly shaped, large opposing fields. We evaluated the accuracy of field and block placements during the treatment courses by comparing the regularly performed verification - with the simulation films. Deviations were determined with respect to the field edges and the central axis, along the x- and z-axis. Results: With regard to the field edges, mean deviations of 2.0 mm and 3.4 mm were found along the x- and z-axis. The corresponding standard deviations were 3.4 mm and 5.5 mm, respectively. With regard to the shielding blocks, mean displacement along the x- and z-axis was 2.2 mm and 3.8 mm. In addition, overall standard deviations of 5.7 mm (x-axis) and 7.1 mm (z-axis) were determined. During the course of time an improved accuracy of block placement was notable. Conclusion: Systematic analysis of port films gives information for a better defining safety margins in external radiotherapy. Evaluation of verification films on a regular basis improves set-up accuracy by reducing displacements. (orig.) [de

  7. The effect of the geometry on the fluorescence radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teodori, F.; Fernandez, J.E.; Molinari, V.

    2000-01-01

    In x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy a narrow photon beam is focused on the surface of the sample to stimulate the production of characteristic radiation which gives useful information about the composition of the target. Even if the interpretation of the measurement is simple, the quantification of the total emitted intensity is not straightforward because the primary photons are produced in the depth of the sample and only a fraction can reach the surface without colliding again with matter. In this work we show that the geometry of the system plays an important role in determining the properties of the 3D radiation field. By using the integral Boltzmann equation, we show that there exist a link among the source distribution, the boundary conditions, the emission points, the observation angles and the properties of the field of emitted radiation. To illustrate the influence of the geometry, the energy distribution of a continuos emission spectrum like the Compton one has been calculated, firstly. It is shown that the energy distribution of the Compton primary photons (coming out from a slab irradiated with an internal monochromatic and isotropic point source) changes with the orientation of the observation direction. Another example involves a second order effect which depends on a double collision in the specimen. It has been shown that the characteristic emission due to the photoelectric effect is accompanied by a (P,C) continuous contribution which introduces an asymmetry in the shape of the line. Computations in a 3D radiation field have shown that such asymmetry is strongly dependent on the observation direction with respect to the primary volume where the photoelectric effect is produced. This means that detection through a narrow collimator whose axis (assumed here as the observation direction) deviates from the centre of symmetry of the primary volume, will produce differently shaped characteristic lines depending on the extent and placement of the

  8. Difference in Understanding of the Need for Using Radiation in Various Fields between Students Majoring in Radiation and Non-Radiation Related Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Eun Ok [Dept. of Radiological Tecknology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    As a way of improving social receptivity of using radiation, this study looked into the difference of understanding the need of using radiation in various fields between students majoring in radiation and non-radiation related studies, who will influence public opinion in the long term. This study also provides data needed for developing efficient strategies for projects promoting the public's awareness of using radiation. Of the students in the 79 schools sampled, 24%(177) were in 4 year colleges and 146 were junior colleges in educational statistics service (http://cesi.kedi.re.kr) In November 2010 1,945 students were selected as a sample, and they were given surveys on the need of using radiation in different fields. As a result, both between students majoring in radiation and non-radiation related studies showed a high level of understanding the need for radiation in the medical field and showed a low level of understanding of the need for radiation in the agricultural field. In all 6 fields of radiation use, students majoring in radiation related studies showed higher levels of understanding for the need to use radiation than students majoring in radiation and non-radiation related studies. In each field, male students and those who have experience medical radiation and relevant education had higher level of understanding. This shows we need to improve the understanding of the cases of female students and those who have not had experiences with medical radiation and to provide relevant education through various kinds of information. The characteristics of the groups that are shown in the results of this study are considered to be helpful for efficiently for project promoting the public's awareness of using radiation.

  9. Difference in Understanding of the Need for Using Radiation in Various Fields between Students Majoring in Radiation and Non-Radiation Related Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Eun Ok

    2011-01-01

    As a way of improving social receptivity of using radiation, this study looked into the difference of understanding the need of using radiation in various fields between students majoring in radiation and non-radiation related studies, who will influence public opinion in the long term. This study also provides data needed for developing efficient strategies for projects promoting the public's awareness of using radiation. Of the students in the 79 schools sampled, 24%(177) were in 4 year colleges and 146 were junior colleges in educational statistics service (http://cesi.kedi.re.kr) In November 2010 1,945 students were selected as a sample, and they were given surveys on the need of using radiation in different fields. As a result, both between students majoring in radiation and non-radiation related studies showed a high level of understanding the need for radiation in the medical field and showed a low level of understanding of the need for radiation in the agricultural field. In all 6 fields of radiation use, students majoring in radiation related studies showed higher levels of understanding for the need to use radiation than students majoring in radiation and non-radiation related studies. In each field, male students and those who have experience medical radiation and relevant education had higher level of understanding. This shows we need to improve the understanding of the cases of female students and those who have not had experiences with medical radiation and to provide relevant education through various kinds of information. The characteristics of the groups that are shown in the results of this study are considered to be helpful for efficiently for project promoting the public's awareness of using radiation.

  10. Reference neutron radiations. Part 2: Calibration fundamentals of radiation protection devices related to the basic quantities characterizing the radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    ISO 8529 consists of the following parts, under the general title Reference neutron radiations: Part 1: Characteristics and methods of production; Part 2: Calibration fundamentals of radiation protection devices related to the basic quantities characterizing the radiation field; Part 3: Calibration of area and personal dosimeters and determination of response as a function of energy and angle of incidence. This Part 2. of ISO 8529 takes as its starting point the neutron sources described in ISO 8529-1. It specifies the procedures to be used for realizing the calibration conditions of radiation protection devices in neutron fields produced by these calibration sources, with particular emphasis on the corrections for extraneous effects (e.g., the neutrons scattered from the walls of the calibration room). In this part of ISO 8529, particular emphasis is placed on calibrations using radionuclide sources (clauses 4 to 6) due to their widespread application, with less details given on the use of accelerator and reactor sources (8.2 and 8.3). This part of ISO 8529 then leads to ISO 8529-3 which gives conversion coefficients and the general rules and procedures for calibration

  11. Verification of absorbed dose rates in reference beta radiation fields: measurements with an extrapolation chamber and radiochromic film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynaldo, S. R. [Development Centre of Nuclear Technology, Posgraduate Course in Science and Technology of Radiations, Minerals and Materials / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Benavente C, J. A.; Da Silva, T. A., E-mail: sirr@cdtn.br [Development Centre of Nuclear Technology / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Beta Secondary Standard 2 (Bss 2) provides beta radiation fields with certified values of absorbed dose to tissue and the derived operational radiation protection quantities. As part of the quality assurance, metrology laboratories are required to verify the reliability of the Bss-2 system by performing additional verification measurements. In the CDTN Calibration Laboratory, the absorbed dose rates and their angular variation in the {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y and {sup 85}Kr beta radiation fields were studied. Measurements were done with a 23392 model PTW extrapolation chamber and with Gafchromic radiochromic films on a PMMA slab phantom. In comparison to the certificate values provided by the Bss-2, absorbed dose rates measured with the extrapolation chamber differed from -1.4 to 2.9% for the {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y and -0.3% for the {sup 85}Kr fields; their angular variation showed differences lower than 2% for incidence angles up to 40-degrees and it reached 11% for higher angles, when compared to ISO values. Measurements with the radiochromic film showed an asymmetry of the radiation field that is caused by a misalignment. Differences between the angular variations of absorbed dose rates determined by both dosimetry systems suggested that some correction factors for the extrapolation chamber that were not considered should be determined. (Author)

  12. Verification of absorbed dose rates in reference beta radiation fields: measurements with an extrapolation chamber and radiochromic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynaldo, S. R.; Benavente C, J. A.; Da Silva, T. A.

    2015-10-01

    Beta Secondary Standard 2 (Bss 2) provides beta radiation fields with certified values of absorbed dose to tissue and the derived operational radiation protection quantities. As part of the quality assurance, metrology laboratories are required to verify the reliability of the Bss-2 system by performing additional verification measurements. In the CDTN Calibration Laboratory, the absorbed dose rates and their angular variation in the 90 Sr/ 90 Y and 85 Kr beta radiation fields were studied. Measurements were done with a 23392 model PTW extrapolation chamber and with Gafchromic radiochromic films on a PMMA slab phantom. In comparison to the certificate values provided by the Bss-2, absorbed dose rates measured with the extrapolation chamber differed from -1.4 to 2.9% for the 90 Sr/ 90 Y and -0.3% for the 85 Kr fields; their angular variation showed differences lower than 2% for incidence angles up to 40-degrees and it reached 11% for higher angles, when compared to ISO values. Measurements with the radiochromic film showed an asymmetry of the radiation field that is caused by a misalignment. Differences between the angular variations of absorbed dose rates determined by both dosimetry systems suggested that some correction factors for the extrapolation chamber that were not considered should be determined. (Author)

  13. Experimental determination of radiated internal wave power without pressure field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Frank M.; Paoletti, M. S.; Swinney, Harry L.; Morrison, P. J.

    2014-04-01

    We present a method to determine, using only velocity field data, the time-averaged energy flux left and total radiated power P for two-dimensional internal gravity waves. Both left and P are determined from expressions involving only a scalar function, the stream function ψ. We test the method using data from a direct numerical simulation for tidal flow of a stratified fluid past a knife edge. The results for the radiated internal wave power given by the stream function method agree to within 0.5% with results obtained using pressure and velocity data from the numerical simulation. The results for the radiated power computed from the stream function agree well with power computed from the velocity and pressure if the starting point for the stream function computation is on a solid boundary, but if a boundary point is not available, care must be taken to choose an appropriate starting point. We also test the stream function method by applying it to laboratory data for tidal flow past a knife edge, and the results are found to agree with the direct numerical simulation. The supplementary material includes a Matlab code with a graphical user interface that can be used to compute the energy flux and power from two-dimensional velocity field data.

  14. Experimental determination of radiated internal wave power without pressure field data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Frank M.; Morrison, P. J.; Paoletti, M. S.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to determine, using only velocity field data, the time-averaged energy flux (J) and total radiated power P for two-dimensional internal gravity waves. Both (J) and P are determined from expressions involving only a scalar function, the stream function ψ. We test the method using data from a direct numerical simulation for tidal flow of a stratified fluid past a knife edge. The results for the radiated internal wave power given by the stream function method agree to within 0.5% with results obtained using pressure and velocity data from the numerical simulation. The results for the radiated power computed from the stream function agree well with power computed from the velocity and pressure if the starting point for the stream function computation is on a solid boundary, but if a boundary point is not available, care must be taken to choose an appropriate starting point. We also test the stream function method by applying it to laboratory data for tidal flow past a knife edge, and the results are found to agree with the direct numerical simulation. The supplementary material includes a Matlab code with a graphical user interface that can be used to compute the energy flux and power from two-dimensional velocity field data

  15. Performance of neutron and gamma personnel dosimetry in mixed radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    From 1974 to 1980, six personnel dosimetry intercomparison studies (PDIS) were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to evaluate the performance of personnel dosimeters in a variety of neutron and gamma fields produced by operating the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) in the steady state mode with and without spectral modifying shields. A total of 58 different organizations participated in these studies which produced approximately 2000 measurements of neutron and gamma dose equivalents on anthropomorphic phantoms for five different reactor spectra. Based on these data, the relative performance of three basic types of neutron dosimeters [nuclear emulsion film, thermoluminescent (TLD), and track-etch] and two basic types of gamma dosimeters (film and TLD) in mixed radiation fields was assessed

  16. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Steel and Aluminum in Sodium Hydroxide: Field Failure and Laboratory Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Prawoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Through an investigation of the field failure analysis and laboratory experiment, a study on (stress corrosion cracking SCC behavior of steel and aluminum was performed. All samples were extracted from known operating conditions from the field failures. Similar but accelerated laboratory test was subsequently conducted in such a way as to mimic the field failures. The crack depth and behavior of the SCC were then analyzed after the laboratory test and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking was studied. The results show that for the same given stress relative to ultimate tensile strength, the susceptibility to SCC is greatly influenced by heat treatment. Furthermore, it was also concluded that when expressed relative to the (ultimate tensile strength UTS, aluminum has similar level of SCC susceptibility to that of steel, although with respect to the same absolute value of applied stress, aluminum is more susceptible to SCC in sodium hydroxide environment than steel.

  17. Potential scattering in the presence of a static magnetic field and a radiation field of arbitrary polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, G.; Zarcone, M.; Nuzzo, S.; McDowell, M. R. C.

    1982-05-01

    Expressions are obtained for the total cross sections for scattering of a charged particle by a potential in the presence of a static uniform magnetic field and a radiation field of arbitrary polarization. For a Coulomb field this is closely related to the time reverse of photoionization of a neutral atom in a magnetic field, including multiphoton effects off-resonance. The model is not applicable when the radiation energy approaches one of the quasi-Landau state separations. The effects of radiation field polarization are examined in detail.

  18. Formation of comets by radiation pressure in the outer protosun. III. Dependence on the anisotropy of the radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hills, J.G.; Sandford, M.T. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A two-dimensional, radiation-hydrodynamic code with dust was used to study the effect of an anisotropic radiation field on the formation of comets in the outer protosun by the radiation pressure from the Sun and surrounding protostars. If the radiation field is isotropic, the results are very similar to those found earlier by analytic models. When the dust cloud is flanked on two sides by luminous walls of equal strength but with no radiation entering the cloud from the azimuthal direction (a radiation vise), most of the dust eventually squeezes out the sides of the vise. The sides are open to outward streaming radiation which carries the dust with it. However, the entrance of even a small amount of radiation from the sides causes the dust to drift inward to form the comet. The work given in this paper indicates that a highly anisotropic radiation field is not likely to prevent the formation of a comet. It distorts the shape of the inward drifting dust cloud. Initially, faster inward drift occurs along radii having the strongest inward radiation flux. This in turn causes the optical depth to increase faster along the perpendicular radii where the radiation field is the weakest. The increase in the optical depth eventually compensates for the low radiation flux, so as the cloud shrinks the radiation pressure increases faster at the surface of the cloud along those radius vectors where the radiation flux has a minimum. Although the dust cloud in the anisotropic radiation field attains a very irregular shape, eventually all parts of the cloud contract in unison and arrive at the center of the cloud at about the same time

  19. Cost comparison of laboratory methods and four field screening technologies for uranium-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douthat, D.M.; Armstrong, A.Q.

    1994-01-01

    To address the problem of characterizing uranium-contaminated surface soil at federal facilities, the Department of Energy has the development of four uranium field screening technologies, under the direction of the Uranium-in-Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) Program. These four technologies include: a long-range alpha detector a beta scintillation detector, an in situ gamma detector, and a mobile laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectrometry (LA-ICP/AES) laboratory. As part of the performance assessment for these field screening technologies, cost estimates for the development and operation of each technology were created. A cost study was conducted to compare three of the USID field screening technologies to the use of traditional field surveying equipment to adequately characterize surface soils of a one-acre site. The results indicate that the use of traditional equipment costs more than the in situ gamma detector, but less than the beta scintillation detector and LRAD. The use of traditional field surveying equipment results in cost savings of 4% and 34% over the use of the beta scintillation and LRAD technologies, respectively. A study of single-point surface soil sampling and laboratory analysis costs was also conducted. Operational costs of the mobile LA-ICP/AES laboratory were compared with operational costs of traditional sampling and analysis, which consists of collecting soil samples and conducting analysis in a radiochemical laboratory. The cost study indicates that the use of the mobile LA-ICP/AES laboratory results in cost savings of 23% and 40% over traditional field sampling and laboratory analysis conducted by characterization groups at two DOE facilities

  20. Field Measurements Indicate Unexpected, Serious Underestimation of Mussel Heart Rates and Thermal Tolerance by Laboratory Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgana Tagliarolo

    Full Text Available Attempts to predict the response of species to long-term environmental change are generally based on extrapolations from laboratory experiments that inevitably simplify the complex interacting effects that occur in the field. We recorded heart rates of two genetic lineages of the brown mussel Perna perna over a full tidal cycle in-situ at two different sites in order to evaluate the cardiac responses of the two genetic lineages present on the South African coast to temperature and the immersion/emersion cycle. "Robomussel" temperature loggers were used to monitor thermal conditions at the two sites over one year. Comparison with live animals showed that robomussels provided a good estimate of mussel body temperatures. A significant difference in estimated body temperatures was observed between the sites and the results showed that, under natural conditions, temperatures regularly approach or exceed the thermal limits of P. perna identified in the laboratory. The two P. perna lineages showed similar tidal and diel patterns of heart rate, with higher cardiac activity during daytime immersion and minimal values during daytime emersion. Comparison of the heart rates measured in the field with data previously measured in the laboratory indicates that laboratory results seriously underestimate heart rate activity, by as much as 75%, especially during immersion. Unexpectedly, field estimates of body temperatures indicated an ability to tolerate temperatures considered lethal on the basis of laboratory measurements. This suggests that the interaction of abiotic conditions in the field does not necessarily raise vulnerability to high temperatures.

  1. Comparative Studies on the Bioretention of Radionuclides under Laboratory and Field Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyraud, M.; Fowler, S.W.

    1976-01-01

    The influence of different sea water treatments on radio-isotope flux rates was tested in three species. For any one species no significant differences in 65 Zn loss rate were noted between organisms held in sea water collected in situ and in those maintained in sea water from the laboratory system. Increased sea water zinc concentration accelerated 65 Zn flux rates; however, the more rapid 65 Zn loss compared to that measured in control sea water was only significant when the concentration was increased by 100μg zinc/liter. Simultaneous laboratory and field experiments indicated that loss rates in clams and mussels were similar whether animals were held in the field or in the laboratory. Experiments in which crabs were monitored for 65 Zn loss gave conflicting results. One experiment performed during the summer indicated that crabs lost 65 Zn significantly faster in the laboratory than in the field. Another experiment performed during the winter when water temperatures were lower indicated no differences in loss rates between the two systems. Differences in radioisotope flux rate may have been related to the intermolt cycle; nevertheless, it was concluded that for certain organisms care should be exercised when applying results of laboratory experiments to the field situation. (author)

  2. The generation and amplification of intergalactic magnetic fields in analogue laboratory experiments with high power lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregori, G.; Reville, B.; Miniati, F.

    2015-11-01

    The advent of high-power laser facilities has, in the past two decades, opened a new field of research where astrophysical environments can be scaled down to laboratory dimensions, while preserving the essential physics. This is due to the invariance of the equations of magneto-hydrodynamics to a class of similarity transformations. Here we review the relevant scaling relations and their application in laboratory astrophysics experiments with a focus on the generation and amplification of magnetic fields in cosmic environment. The standard model for the origin of magnetic fields is a multi stage process whereby a vanishing magnetic seed is first generated by a rotational electric field and is then amplified by turbulent dynamo action to the characteristic values observed in astronomical bodies. We thus discuss the relevant seed generation mechanisms in cosmic environment including resistive mechanism, collision-less and fluid instabilities, as well as novel laboratory experiments using high power laser systems aimed at investigating the amplification of magnetic energy by magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. Future directions, including efforts to model in the laboratory the process of diffusive shock acceleration are also discussed, with an emphasis on the potential of laboratory experiments to further our understanding of plasma physics on cosmic scales.

  3. The effect of sucralfate on the reduction of radiation esophagitis: clinical and laboratory data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Mison; Kim, Juree; Hahm, Kibaik; Kim, Jinhong

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Sucralfate is a common ulcer healing drug. This study was conducted between June 1995 and February 1996, to verify the sucralfate effect on the reduction of esophagitis, radiation induced mucosal damage. Materials and Methods: Initially, a total of 39 patients (31 lung cancer, 8 esophageal cancer) received either sucralfate or a placebo before each meal (TID) starting the 1st day of the radiation treatment and continuing during the treatment without interruption. Patients were evaluated weekly by the same personnel using a pain scale. Subsequently, sucralfate was given 4 times daily (QID), with each meal and right before treatment, to 14 patients. Esophageal biopsies were taken from 14 patients (9 from the sucralfate group and 5 from the placebo group) on the third week of radiation treatment, when the patients usually received 2000 to 2500 cGy to the thoracic esophagus. We evaluated the change of reactive oxygen metabolites and reactive nitrogen metabolites such as NOS(constitutive and inducible form of nitric oxide synthetase) generated by irradiation. Myeloperoxidase(MPO) activities were measured spectroscopically. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBA-RS) and chemiluminescence (CL) as an index of lipid peroxidation were also measured. Results: There was a considerable reduction of severe esophagitis (≥ 4 pain scale) in patients with regular sucralfate medication compared to patients with the placebo ((6(20))(30%) vs(14(19)) (74%)). Sucralfate QID group patients showed more improvement than the TID group, with only 2 out of 14 (14%) suffering severe esophagitis. The laboratory results are shown below : Conclusion: This data confirmed that sucralfate significantly reduced severe esophagitis symptoms during the radiation therapy course, and made it easier for patients to tolerate the thoracic radiation treatment. Moreover, the laboratory data showed a significant reduction in the level of all reactive oxygen metabolites generated by the

  4. The erosion of carbonate stone by acid rain: Laboratory and field investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baedecker, P.A.; Reddy, M.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a laboratory experiment on the effects of acidic deposition on carbonate stone erosion. It can serve as the basis for an undergraduate (or pre college) experiment in environmental chemistry. Recent field investigations are described that provide measurements of carbonate stone dissolution and mechanical erosion under weathering conditions that are prevalent in the eastern US. The purpose of the laboratory work is to answer questions concerning the effects of hydrogen ion deposition on stone erosion processes that were difficult to resolve on the basis of field experiments alone

  5. Laboratory and pilot field-scale testing of surfactants for environmental restoration of chlorinated solvent DNAPLs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, R.E.; Fountain, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    This project is composed of two phases and has the objective of demonstrating surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) as a practical remediation technology at DOE sites with ground water contaminated by dense, non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), in particular, chlorinated solvents. The first phase of this project, Laboratory and Pilot Field Scale Testing, which is the subject of the work so far, involves (1) laboratory experiments to examine the solubilization of multiple component DNAPLs, e.g., solvents such as perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), by dilute surfactant solutions, and (2) a field test to demonstrate SEAR technology on a small scale and in an existing well

  6. Physical barriers formed from gelling liquids: 1. numerical design of laboratory and field experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finsterle, S.; Moridis, G.J.; Pruess, K.; Persoff, P.

    1994-01-01

    The emplacement of liquids under controlled viscosity conditions is investigated by means of numerical simulations. Design calculations are performed for a laboratory experiment on a decimeter scale, and a field experiment on a meter scale. The purpose of the laboratory experiment is to study the behavior of multiple gout plumes when injected in a porous medium. The calculations for the field trial aim at designing a grout injection test from a vertical well in order to create a grout plume of a significant extent in the subsurface

  7. GLOBAL ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION POLLUTION: RISK ASSESSMENT FROM FIELD MEASUREMENTS AND ANIMAL EXPERIMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragkopoulou, A. F.; Margaritis, L. H.

    2009-12-01

    The extended use of wireless technology throughout the globe in almost all developed and non-developed countries has forced a large number of scientists to get involved in the investigation of the effects. The major issue is that unlike other forms of radiation exposure, this “non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation” was not present throughout the evolution of life in earth and therefore there are no adaptive mechanisms evolved. All organisms are vulnerable to the possible effects of radiation depending on the actual exposure level. “Safety limits” on the power density have been proposed but ongoing research has shown that these limits are not really safe for humans, not mentioning the entire population of living creatures on earth. The so called “Electrosmog Pollution” originating from the numerous radio and TV stations, communication satellite emission, but most importantly from mobile phone mast antennas, are of major concern, because it is gradually increasing at exponential rate. Therefore the key question is, do living organisms react upon their exposure to fields of non ionizing electromagnetic radiation? To have this question answered extensive research is being performed in various laboratories. One approach of our research includes field measurements within houses and classrooms, since a considerable proportion of the population in each country is exposed to the radiation coming from the nearby mast stations, in order to make a risk assessment. The measurements showed that in many cases the actual radiation present was potentially harmful. In other words, although the measured values were below the national safety levels, nevertheless they were above the levels of other countries. Therefore it has been suggested that a new cellular network should be constructed in order to minimize radiation levels in living areas and schools. Our experimental work is focusing on the elucidation of the effects of non-ionizing EMFs on mice exposed to mobile

  8. Are laboratory derived toxicity results informative for field situations? Case study on earthworm populations contaminated with heavy metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, T.C.; Thissen, J.

    2009-01-01

    The relevance of laboratory tests on toxicants for field situations is often disputed given that laboratory tests are conducted under, next to the toxicant stress, optimal conditions which are not expected in field situations. In this paper we confront the results of laboratory tests on growth,

  9. Computerization aspects of the Health Physics' Radiation Control Program at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolecek, Elwyn H.

    1978-01-01

    Greater public awareness of the potential hazards of ionizing radiation and the more stringent governmental compliance programs have made accountability of radioactive materials an item of increasingly major concern for all radionuclide users. For low-volume (radioisotopically) organizations, manual record keeping techniques may suffice without requiring significant work-hour allocations. When considering high-volume users, the workload contingent with manual inventory is usually excessive from an employee time-allocation standpoint. Therefore, various automation systems are employed, usually with the aid of an in-house or time-purchase computer system. The computer programs developed for these systems often do not allow for future modification without major rewriting. Therefore, to facilitate in program concept, modification, and implementation the Health Physics Section at Argonne National Laboratory chose to design and code its computer program(s) and has instituted a Radiation Administrative Program (RAP) as a major component of the Section's laboratory-wide radiation control program. Coded in ANSI PL/I, RAP provides both flexibility in present concept and allowance for future growth. It requires less than 300K words of computer memory and can be easily incorporated at other organizations with minimal modifications. The modular design provides run cost benefits and versatility of report generation and modification. Through the use of this type of information processing and retrieval system, one can manipulate large amounts of radionuclide data, providing control and identification, while still maintaining commitment of computer costs and employee time at a reasonable level. (author)

  10. Personnel radiation dosimetry laboratory accreditation programme for thermoluminescent dosimeters : a proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, B.C.; Srivastava, J.K.; Iyer, P.S.; Venkatraman, G.

    1993-01-01

    Accreditation for thermoluminescent dosimeters is the process of evaluating a programme intending to use TL personnel dosimeters to measure, report and record dose equivalents received by radiation workers. In order to test the technical competence for conducting personnel dosimetry service as well as to decentralize personnel monitoring service, it has been proposed by Radiological Physics Division (RPhD) to accredit some of the laboratories, in the country. The objectives of this accreditation programme are: (i) to give recognition to competent dosimetry processors, and (ii) to provide periodic evaluation of dosimetry processors, including review of internal quality assurance programme to improve the quality of personnel dosimetry processing. The scientific support for the accreditation programme will be provided by the scientific staff from Radiological Physics Division (RPhD) and Radiation Protection Services Division (RPSD). This paper describes operational and technical requirements for the Personnel Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory Accreditation Programme for Thermoluminescent Dosimeters for Personnel Dosimetry Processors. Besides, many technical documents dealing with the TL Personnel Dosimeter System have been prepared. (author). 5 refs., 2 figs

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of muon radiation environment in China Jinping Underground Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Jian; Zeng Zhi; Liu Yue; Yue Qian; Ma Hao; Cheng Jianping

    2012-01-01

    Muon radiation background of China Jinping Underground Laboratory (CJPL) was simulated by Monte Carlo method. According to the Gaisser formula and the MUSIC soft, the model of cosmic ray muons was established. Then the yield and the average energy of muon-induced photons and muon-induced neutrons were simulated by FLUKA. With the single-energy approximation, the contribution to the radiation background of shielding structure by secondary photons and neutrons was evaluated. The estimation results show that the average energy of residual muons is 369 GeV and the flux is 3.17 × 10 -6 m -2 · s -1 . The fluence rate of secondary photons is about 1.57 × 10 -4 m -2 · s -1 , and the fluence rate of secondary neutrons is about 8.37 × 10 -7 m -2 · s -1 . The muon radiation background of CJPL is lower than those of most other underground laboratories in the world. (authors)

  12. Quality assurance for radon exposure chambers at the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory, Montgomery, Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semler, M.O.; Sensintaffar, E.L. [National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory, Montgomery, AL (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The Office of Radiation and Indoor Air, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), operates six radon exposure chambers in its two laboratories, the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory (NAREL) in Montgomery, Alabama, and the Las Vegas Facility, Las Vegas, Nevada. These radon exposure chambers are used to calibrate and test portable radon measuring instruments, test commercial suppliers of radon measurement services through the Radon Measurement Proficiency Program, and expose passive measurement devices to known radon concentrations as part of a quality assurance plan for federal and state studies measuring indoor radon concentrations. Both laboratories participate in national and international intercomparisons for the measurement of radon and are presently working with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to receive a certificate of traceability for radon measurements. NAREL has developed an estimate of the total error in its calibration of each chamber`s continuous monitors as part of an internal quality assurance program. This paper discusses the continuous monitors and their calibration for the three chambers located in Montgomery, Alabama, as well as the results of the authors intercomparisons and total error analysis.

  13. Urban and marine corrosion: Comparative behaviour between field and laboratory conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iribarren Laco, J.I.; Liesa Mestres, F.; Bilurbina Alter, L. [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica E.T.S.E.I.B. Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Cadena Villota, F. [Departamento de Materiales, Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Quito (Ecuador)

    2004-09-01

    A detailed study of the corrosion phenomena of carbon steel has been investigated in this work by means of the comparison of field and laboratory tests. Two areas of the metropolitan area of Barcelona (Spain) were selected to carry out the field tests, whereas two different solutions of sodium chloride and sodium hydrogen sulfite were used to simulate the field conditions by means of cyclic laboratory tests. The corrosion rate has been evaluated from the weight loss of the specimens and the morphology surface has been visualized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Corrosion products and contaminants have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, respectively. The penetration results can be adjusted to the Passano equation and the corrosivity degree can be assigned in accordance with ISO standards. A correlation between field and laboratory tests has been found, by comparing the specimens with the same degree of corrosion, showing the validity of the accelerated laboratory tests in order to simulate the field conditions. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Recent developments at the high-field laboratory of Tohoku University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motokawa, M.; Watanabe, K.; Miura, S.; Awaji, S.; Nojiri, H.; Mogi, I.; Mitsudo, S.; Sakon, T.

    1998-01-01

    Recent developments and experiments performed at the high-field laboratory of Tohoku University are described. We have (1) hybrid magnets which produce high fields up to 31.1 T, (2) liquid-helium-free superconducting magnets up to 11 T which are available continuously for more than a year, (3) a 20 T superconducting magnet, (4) pulsed field magnets up to 40 T by a 100 kJ bank and (5) repeating pulsed field systems up to 25 T, synchronized with a pulsed neutron source

  15. Second meeting of the Scientific Societies for the feasibility study of implantation of a synchrotron radiation national laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Feasibility study for the implantation of a national laboratory of synchrotron radiation in Brazil is discussed by several Brazilian Scientific Societies. Problems related with cost, personnel training and machine uses are presented. (L.C.) [pt

  16. Out-of-Field Cell Survival Following Exposure to Intensity-Modulated Radiation Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterworth, Karl T.; McGarry, Conor K.; Trainor, Colman; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the in-field and out-of-field cell survival of cells irradiated with either primary field or scattered radiation in the presence and absence of intercellular communication. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was determined by clonogenic assay in human prostate cancer (DU145) and primary fibroblast (AGO1552) cells following exposure to different field configurations delivered using a 6-MV photon beam produced with a Varian linear accelerator. Results: Nonuniform dose distributions were delivered using a multileaf collimator (MLC) in which half of the cell population was shielded. Clonogenic survival in the shielded region was significantly lower than that predicted from the linear quadratic model. In both cell lines, the out-of-field responses appeared to saturate at 40%-50% survival at a scattered dose of 0.70 Gy in DU-145 cells and 0.24 Gy in AGO1522 cells. There was an approximately eightfold difference in the initial slopes of the out-of-field response compared with the α-component of the uniform field response. In contrast, cells in the exposed part of the field showed increased survival. These observations were abrogated by direct physical inhibition of cellular communication and by the addition of the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine known to inhibit intercellular bystander effects. Additional studies showed the proportion of cells irradiated and dose delivered to the shielded and exposed regions of the field to impact on response. Conclusions: These data demonstrate out-of-field effects as important determinants of cell survival following exposure to modulated irradiation fields with cellular communication between differentially irradiated cell populations playing an important role. Validation of these observations in additional cell models may facilitate the refinement of existing radiobiological models and the observations considered important determinants of cell survival.

  17. Is more profound knowledge in the field of radiation nece--ssary for doctors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klener, V.

    1981-01-01

    Reasons are listed why doctors should have more profound knowledge in the field of radiation. Despite imperceptibility by human senses of ionizing radiation, the parameters characterizing irradiation can accurately be measured. The units of the said parameters are listed and characterized and the relationships are explained of the radiation dose and non-stochastic and stochastic radiation effects. (Ha)

  18. Regulatory inspections in nuclear plants in the field of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hort, M.; Fuchsova, D.

    2014-01-01

    State Office for Nuclear Safety executes state administration and performs inspections at peaceful use of nuclear energy and ionizing radiation in the field of radiation protection and nuclear safety. Inspections on radiation protection at nuclear power plants are secured by inspectors of the Department of Radiation Protection in Fuel Cycle, who work at the Regional centre Brno and Ceske Budejovice. (authors)

  19. Classical calculation of radiative lifetimes of atomic hydrogen in a homogeneous magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horbatsch, M.W.; Hessels, E.A.; Horbatsch, M.

    2005-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes of hydrogenic atoms in a homogeneous magnetic field of moderate strength are calculated on the basis of classical radiation. The modifications of the Keplerian orbits due to the magnetic field are incorporated by classical perturbation theory. The model is complemented by a classical radiative decay calculation using the radiated Larmor power. A recently derived highly accurate formula for the transition rate of a field-free hydrogenic state is averaged over the angular momentum oscillations caused by the magnetic field. The resulting radiative lifetimes for diamagnetic eigenstates classified by n,m and the diamagnetic energy shift C compare well with quantum results

  20. Scattering in an intense radiation field: Time-independent methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, L.

    1977-01-01

    The standard time-independent formulation of nonrelativistic scattering theory is here extended to take into account the presence of an intense external radiation field. In the case of scattering by a static potential the extension is accomplished by the introduction of asymptotic states and intermediate-state propagators which account for the absorption and induced emission of photons by the projectile as it propagates through the field. Self-energy contributions to the propagator are included by a systematic summation of forward-scattering terms. The self-energy analysis is summarized in the form of a modified perturbation expansion of the type introduced by Watson some time ago in the context of nuclear-scattering theory. This expansion, which has a simple continued-fraction structure in the case of a single-mode field, provides a generally applicable successive approximation procedure for the propagator and the asymptotic states. The problem of scattering by a composite target is formulated using the effective-potential method. The modified perturbation expansion which accounts for self-energy effects is applicable here as well. A discussion of a coupled two-state model is included to summarize and clarify the calculational procedures

  1. Laboratory studies of radiation-induced sterility on the onion maggot, delia antiqua (diptera: anthomyiidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwen, F.L.; Ritchey, G.; Liu, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    A dose of 4 krad was the most appropriate for sterilizing pupae of Delia antiqua (Meigen) for field release: adult emergence was not reduced, emerging female flies were sterile, and the eggs produced by normal females which had mated with males irradiated as pupae had a lower hatch than those resulting from matings with normal males. Males irradiated as 6- to 8-day-old pupae were fully competitive under laboratory conditions. Continuous scrutiny of laboratory cultures to detect reduction in adult emergence or reduced competitiveness of males is stressed

  2. GRAIN ALIGNMENT INDUCED BY RADIATIVE TORQUES: EFFECTS OF INTERNAL RELAXATION OF ENERGY AND COMPLEX RADIATION FIELD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, Thiem; Lazarian, A.

    2009-01-01

    Earlier studies of grain alignment dealt mostly with interstellar grains that have strong internal relaxation of energy which aligns the grain axis of maximum moment of inertia (the axis of major inertia) with respect to the grain's angular momentum. In this paper, we study the alignment by radiative torques for large irregular grains, e.g., grains in accretion disks, for which internal relaxation is subdominant. We use both numerical calculations and the analytical model of a helical grain introduced by us earlier. We demonstrate that grains in such a regime exhibit more complex dynamics. In particular, if initially the grain axis of major inertia makes a small angle with angular momentum, then radiative torques can align the grain axis of major inertia with angular momentum, and both the axis of major inertia and angular momentum are aligned with the magnetic field when attractors with high angular momentum (high-J attractors) are available. For alignment without high-J attractors, beside the earlier studied attractors with low angular momentum (low-J attractors), there appear new low-J attractors. In addition, we also study the alignment of grains in the presence of strong internal relaxation, but induced not by a radiation beam as in earlier studies but instead induced by a complex radiation field that can be decomposed into dipole and quadrupole components. We found that in this situation the parameter space q max , for which high-J attractors exist in trajectory maps, is more extended, resulting in the higher degree of polarization expected. Our results are useful for modeling polarization arising from aligned dust grains in molecular clouds.

  3. Trapped-Ion Quantum Logic with Global Radiation Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidt, S; Randall, J; Webster, S C; Lake, K; Webb, A E; Cohen, I; Navickas, T; Lekitsch, B; Retzker, A; Hensinger, W K

    2016-11-25

    Trapped ions are a promising tool for building a large-scale quantum computer. However, the number of required radiation fields for the realization of quantum gates in any proposed ion-based architecture scales with the number of ions within the quantum computer, posing a major obstacle when imagining a device with millions of ions. Here, we present a fundamentally different approach for trapped-ion quantum computing where this detrimental scaling vanishes. The method is based on individually controlled voltages applied to each logic gate location to facilitate the actual gate operation analogous to a traditional transistor architecture within a classical computer processor. To demonstrate the key principle of this approach we implement a versatile quantum gate method based on long-wavelength radiation and use this method to generate a maximally entangled state of two quantum engineered clock qubits with fidelity 0.985(12). This quantum gate also constitutes a simple-to-implement tool for quantum metrology, sensing, and simulation.

  4. Calibration of extremity dosemeters for gamma radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadopulos, S.B.; Gregori, B.N.; Cruzate, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    In this work the kerma conversion factor are free in air, dose equivalent H(d,0 ) are presented, they were obtained theoretical and experimentally in finger and arm for gamma radiation fields. Extremity dosemeters put on surface finger and arm phantom have been irradiated. The finger phantom is a solid cylinder of PMMA polymethylmethacrylate 19 mm diameter and 300 mm height. The arm phantom is a 73 mm external diameter cylinder with PMMA walls 2.5 mm thick fill with water and 300 mm height. The radiation sources were cobalt 60 and cesium 137 from the Regional Center of Reference (CRR) of the National Commission of Atomic Energy (CNEA) and the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN). Also in ISO wide X ray spectra W60, W110 and W200 have been irradiated. The results obtained show a good correlation with those published, they have a difference less than 7%. The factors will be applied to the evaluation of the equivalent doses coming from workers whose main irradiated zone is in the hands. (author)

  5. ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubin, Daniel [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Inst. of Oceanography; Bromwich, David H [Ohio State University; Vogelmann, Andrew M [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Verlinde, Johannes [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Russell, Lynn M [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Inst. of Oceanography

    2017-09-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE) is the most technologically advanced atmospheric and climate science campaign yet fielded in Antarctica. AWARE was motivated be recent concern about the impact of cryospheric mass loss on global sea level rise. Specifically, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) is now the second largest contributor to rising sea level, after the Greenland Ice Sheet. As steadily warming ocean water erodes the grounding lines of WAIS components where they meet the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas, the retreating grounding lines moving inland and downslope on the underlying terrain imply mechanical instability of the entire WAIS. There is evidence that this point of instability may have already been reached, perhaps signifying more rapid loss of WAIS ice mass. At the same time, the mechanical support provided by adjacent ice shelves, and also the fundamental stability of exposed ice cliffs at the ice sheet grounding lines, will be adversely impacted by a warming atmosphere that causes more frequent episodes of surface melting. The surface meltwater damages the ice shelves and ice cliffs through hydrofracturing. With the increasing concern regarding these rapid cryospheric changes, AWARE was motivated by the need to (a) diagnose the surface energy balance in West Antarctica as related to both summer season climatology and potential surface melting, and (b) improve global climate model (GCM) performance over Antarctica, such that future cryospheric projections can be more reliable.

  6. Ultrafast outflows disappear in high-radiation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, C.; Alston, W.; Parker, M. L.; Fabian, A. C.; Gallo, L. C.; Buisson, D. J. K.; Walton, D. J.; Kara, E.; Jiang, J.; Lohfink, A.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2018-05-01

    Ultrafast outflows (UFOs) are the most extreme winds launched by active galactic nuclei (AGN) due to their mildly relativistic speeds (˜0.1-0.3c) and are thought to significantly contribute to galactic evolution via AGN feedback. Their nature and launching mechanism are however not well understood. Recently, we have discovered the presence of a variable UFO in the narrow-line Seyfert 1 IRAS 13224-3809. The UFO varies in response to the brightness of the source. In this work we perform flux-resolved X-ray spectroscopy to study the variability of the UFO and found that the ionization parameter is correlated with the luminosity. In the brightest states the gas is almost completely ionized by the powerful radiation field and the UFO is hardly detected. This agrees with our recent results obtained with principal component analysis. We might have found the tip of the iceberg: the high ionization of the outflowing gas may explain why it is commonly difficult to detect UFOs in AGN and possibly suggest that we may underestimate their actual feedback. We have also found a tentative correlation between the outflow velocity and the luminosity, which is expected from theoretical predictions of radiation-pressure-driven winds. This trend is rather marginal due to the Fe XXV-XXVI degeneracy. Further work is needed to break such degeneracy through time-resolved spectroscopy.

  7. A Shared Compliance Control for Application in High Radiation Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sung Ho; Jung, Hoan Sung; Lee, Kye Hong; Kim, Young Ki; Kim, Hark Rho

    2005-01-01

    Bilateral control systems present a technical alternative for intelligent robotic systems performing dexterous tasks in unstructured environments such as a nuclear facility, outer space and underwater. A shared compliance control scheme is proposed for application in high radiation fields in which the force sensor can not be installed because of a radiation effect. A position difference between the master system and the slave system is treated as an equivalent contact force and used for an input to the compliance controller. The compliance controller is implemented by a first order low pass filter and it modifies the position of the master to the reference position. Thus the compliance control task is shared by both the human operator's direct manual control and the autonomous compliance control of the slave system. Consequently, the position of a slave system tracks well the reference position and the compliance of the slave system is autonomously controlled in a contact condition. The simulation results show the excellence of the proposed scheme

  8. Optimum Water Chemistry in radiation field buildup control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chien, C. [Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Nuclear utilities continue to face the challenGE of reducing exposure of plant maintenance personnel. GE Nuclear Energy has developed the concept of Optimum Water Chemistry (OWC) to reduce the radiation field buildup and minimize the radioactive waste production. It is believed that reduction of radioactive sources and improvement of the water chemistry quality should significantly reduce both the radiation exposure and radwaste production. The most important source of radioactivity is cobalt and replacement of cobalt containing alloy in the core region as well as in the entire primary system is considered the first priority to achieve the goal of low exposure and minimized waste production. A plant specific computerized cobalt transport model has been developed to evaluate various options in a BWR system under specific conditions. Reduction of iron input and maintaining low ionic impurities in the coolant have been identified as two major tasks for operators. Addition of depleted zinc is a proven technique to reduce Co-60 in reactor water and on out-of-core piping surfaces. The effect of HWC on Co-60 transport in the primary system will also be discussed.

  9. Field and laboratory tests on acute toxicity of cadmium to freshwater crayfish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-09-01

    Environmental regulatory standards for cadmium (EPA 1980), like those for most pollutants, are based on acute, laboratory toxicity tests of single species. Such tests can be conducted rapidly and inexpensively in comparison to acute or chronic field studies, but their validity has often been questioned. Laboratory-based criteria are subject to two criticisms: (1) chemical and physical conditions differ greatly in degree and variability from laboratory to field, and (2) species are not isolated, but live in an ecosystem of interacting taxa and biofeedback. To investigate the validity of basing field toxicity standards on laboratory data, the authors subjected the freshwater crayfish Orconectes immunis for 96 h to various levels of cadmium in laboratory aquaria and experimental ponds. The study was designed to evaluate in part the first criticism of lab-based criteria. The studies were conducted concurrently with similar short-term experiments on the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, and coincided with studies of chronic cadmium stress on fathead minnows in experimental ponds.

  10. Theory of radiative transfer in a strong magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, S [Ibaraki Univ., Mito (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1975-07-01

    A theory is presented of the radiative transfer in a magnetized plasma with the opacity determined by the Thomson scattering. The Thomson cross section in the magnetic field is highly anisotropic and polarization-dependent. In order to cope with this situation, it is found useful to deal directly with the scattering amplitude (2x2 matrix in the polarization vector space) rather than the intensity. In this way it is possible to take into account the coherent superposition of the forward multiple-scattering amplitudes as a photon propagates. The equation of transfer is established accordingly and approximate solutions are found in the limits of small and large optical thickness. The latter solution is used to find the intensity and the polarization of thermal X-rays from a magnetic dipole star. The concept of mean free path is discussed and also it is shown that the Faraday rotation naturally comes about as a result of the multiple forward scattering.

  11. System decontamination as a tool to control radiation fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riess, R.; Bertholdt, H.O. [Siemens Power Generation Group, Erlangen (Germany)

    1995-03-01

    Since chemical decontamination of the Reactor Coolant Systems (RCS) and subsystems has the highest potential to reduce radiation fields in a short term this technology has gained an increasing importance. The available decontamination process at Siemens, i.e., the CORD processes, will be described. It is characterized by using permanganic acid for preoxidation and diluted organic acid for the decontamination step. It is a regenerative process resulting in very low waste volumes. This technology has been used frequently in Europe and Japan in both RCS and subsystems. An overview will be given i.e. on the 1993 applications. This overview will include plant, scope, date of performance, system volume specal features of the process removed activities, decon factor time, waste volumes, and personnel dose during decontamination. This overview will be followed by an outlook on future developments in this area.

  12. Highlights of IAEA activities in the field of radiation application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machi, S.

    1994-01-01

    In IAEA's major programme of Nuclear Applications, the activities performed are divided into four areas: food and agriculture, industry and earth science, human health, and physical and chemical sciences. These activities involve co-operation with FAO, WHO, UNIDO and UNEP, and have close link with the technical assistance programme. About 60% of the technical assistance projects are implemented in the field of nuclear applications. The purpose of the nuclear application programme is to develop technologies useful for environmental protection and sustainable development, to support R and D programmes of developing countries, to develop new applications of nuclear techniques. Major activities in food and agriculture are the application of radiation and isotopes, controling insects, preserving food, soil fertility and crop production, and improving animal production and the use of radiation with biotechnology for plant mutation breeding aiming at environmentally friendly and sustainable food production. In the human health programme emphasis is given to nuclear medicine, cancer therapy and nutrition. Today, only 35% of all developing countries have radiotherapy facilities. Activities, therefore, focus on strengthening clinical radiotherapy in such countries. In the field of industry and earth science, flue gas cleaning by electron beams, pollution monitoring using nuclear analytical techniques, nucleonic control systems for industries, and water resource exploration are major projects assisting developing countries. As of 1994 the IAEA will launch 12 new and promising Model Projects for developing Member States which will be of benefit to their economies and raising of their standard of living. In this paper the highlights of the above mentioned IAEA activities are presented. (author)

  13. Field test of a post-closure radiation monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, S.; Christy, C.E.; Heath, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    The DOE is conducting remedial actions at many sites contaminated with radioactive materials. After closure of these sites, long-term subsurface monitoring is typically required by law. This monitoring is generally labor intensive and expensive using conventional sampling and analysis techniques. The U.S. Department of Energy's Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has contracted with Babcock and Wilcox to develop a Long-Term Post-Closure Radiation Monitoring System (LPRMS) to reduce these monitoring costs. A prototype LPRMS probe was built, and B ampersand W and FERMCO field tested this monitoring probe at the Fernald Environmental Management Project in the fall of 1994 with funding from the DOE's Office of Technology Development (EM-50) through METC. The system was used to measure soil and water with known uranium contamination levels, both in drums and in situ at depths up to 3 meters. For comparison purposes, measurements were also performed using a more conventional survey probe with a sodium iodide scintillator directly butt-coupled to detection electronics. This paper presents a description and the results of the field tests. The results were used to characterize the lower detection limits, precision and bias of the system, which allowed the DOE to judge the monitoring system's ability to meet its long-term post-closure radiation monitoring needs. Based on the test results, the monitoring system has been redesigned for fabrication and testing in a potential Phase III of this program. If the DOE feels that this system can meet its needs and chooses to continue into Phase III of this program, this redesigned full scale prototype system will be built and tested for a period of approximately a year. Such a system can be used at a variety of radioactively contaminated sites

  14. EVENT DRIVEN AUTOMATIC STATE MODIFICATION OF BNL'S BOOSTER FOR NASA SPACE RADIATION LABORATORY SOLAR PARTICLE SIMULATOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BROWN, D.; BINELLO, S.; HARVEY, M.; MORRIS, J.; RUSEK, A.; TSOUPAS, N.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed in collaboration with NASA for the purpose of performing radiation effect studies for the NASA space program. The NSRL makes use of heavy ions in the range of 0.05 to 3 GeV/n slow extracted from BNL's AGS Booster. NASA is interested in reproducing the energy spectrum from a solar flare in the space environment for a single ion species. To do this we have built and tested a set of software tools which allow the state of the Booster and the NSRL beam line to be changed automatically. In this report we will describe the system and present results of beam tests

  15. Assessment of internal and external exposure to ionizing radiation in laboratories of nuclear medicine and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamiak-Ziemba, J.; Doniec, J.; Kocznow, W.; Hawrynski, M.

    1985-01-01

    The investigations with determination of radioisotopes in urine led to detection of contamination with 99m Tc and radioactive iodine. The measurements and dosimetry of external radiation demonstrated that workers in laboratories of radioisotope diagnosis received a mean annual equivalent doses amounted less than 5% of the permissible dose for persons with occupational exposure. It was also established that external exposure was mainly responsible for this. The data about the levels of internal exposure in laboratories of nuclear medicine and radiotherapy demonstrated that introduction of a permanent central system of control of internal contamination of workers would be useless since the observation of the already accepted principles of radiological protection is sufficient for avoiding contamination. (author)

  16. Application of gamma radiation for the treatment of laboratory animal diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ley, F.J.

    1979-01-01

    The use of gamma radiation for the treatment of laboratory animal diets has proved particularly successful. The effective inactivation of microorganisms, insects and parasites etc. is well demonstrated and the absence of adverse effects on the dietary components is inferred from many years of practical use. Adequate packaging of the pelleted diets is essential to avoid recontamination after irradiation; this aspect needs particular attention. The economics of the process are such that it would not be warranted to invest in a 60 Co plant specifically for the treatment of laboratory diets. However, a throughput in the order of 1000 to 1500 tonnes per annum, as estimated to meet UK current demand, can be catered for adequately and economically in a large-scale general service facility. (author)

  17. The upper bound of abutment scour defined by selected laboratory and field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Stephen; Caldwell, Andral W.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Transportation, conducted a field investigation of abutment scour in South Carolina and used that data to develop envelope curves defining the upper bound of abutment scour. To expand upon this previous work, an additional cooperative investigation was initiated to combine the South Carolina data with abutment-scour data from other sources and evaluate the upper bound of abutment scour with the larger data set. To facilitate this analysis, a literature review was made to identify potential sources of published abutment-scour data, and selected data, consisting of 446 laboratory and 331 field measurements, were compiled for the analysis. These data encompassed a wide range of laboratory and field conditions and represent field data from 6 states within the United States. The data set was used to evaluate the South Carolina abutment-scour envelope curves. Additionally, the data were used to evaluate a dimensionless abutment-scour envelope curve developed by Melville (1992), highlighting the distinct difference in the upper bound for laboratory and field data. The envelope curves evaluated in this investigation provide simple but useful tools for assessing the potential maximum abutment-scour depth in the field setting.

  18. Mars science laboratory radiation assessment detector (MSL/RAD) modeling workshop proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Donald M.; Norbury, John W.; Reitz, Günther

    2017-08-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) (Hassler et al., 2012; Zeitlin et al., 2016) onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover (Grotzinger et al., 2012) is a sophisticated charged and neutral particle radiation analyzer developed by an international team of scientists and engineers from Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado as the leading institution, the University of Kiel and the German Aerospace Center in Cologne, Germany. RAD is a compact, powerful instrument capable of distinguishing between ionizing particles and neutral particles and providing neutron, gamma, and charged particle spectra from protons to iron as well as absorbed dose measurements in tissue-equivalent material. During the 6 month cruise to Mars, inside the MSL spacecraft, RAD served as a proxy to validate models of the radiation levels expected inside a spacecraft that future astronauts might experience (Zeitlin et al., 2013). RAD was turned on one day after the landing on August 7, 2012, exactly 100 years to the day after the discovery of cosmic rays on Earth by Victor Hess. These measurements are the first of their kind on the surface of another planet (Hassler et al., 2014), and the radiation data collected by RAD on the surface of Mars will inform projections of crew health risks and the design of protective surface habitats and other countermeasures for future human missions in the coming decades.

  19. An Update on the Hazards and Risks of Forensic Anthropology, Part II: Field and Laboratory Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lindsey G; Dabbs, Gretchen R; Spencer, Jessica R

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on potential hazards and risks to forensic anthropologists while working in the field and laboratory in North America. Much has changed since Galloway and Snodgrass published their seminal article addressing these issues. The increased number of forensic practitioners combined with new information about potential hazards calls for an updated review of these pathogens and chemicals. Discussion of pathogen hazards (Brucella, Borrelia burgdorferi, Yersinia pestis, Clostridium tetani and West Nile virus) includes important history, exposure routes, environmental survivability, early symptoms, treatments with corresponding morbidity and mortality rates, and decontamination measures. Additionally, data pertaining to the use of formaldehyde in the laboratory environment have resulted in updated safety regulations, and these are highlighted. These data should inform field and laboratory protocols. The hazards of working directly with human remains are discussed in a companion article, "An Update on the Hazards and Risks of Forensic Anthropology, Part I: Human Remains." © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  20. The Role of Laboratory Experiments in the Validation of Field Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouneyrac, Catherine; Lagarde, Fabienne; Chatel, Amelie

    2017-01-01

    The ubiquitous presence and persistency of microplastics (MPs) in aquatic environments are of particular concern, since they constitute a potential threat to marine organisms and ecosystems. However, evaluating this threat and the impacts of MP on aquatic organisms is challenging. MPs form a very...... and to what degree these complexities are addressed in the current literature, to: (1) evaluate how well laboratory studies, investigated so far, represent environmentally relevant processes and scenarios and (2) suggest directions for future research The Role of Laboratory Experiments in the Validation...... of Field Data | Request PDF. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/310360438_The_Role_of_Laboratory_Experiments_in_the_Validation_of_Field_Data [accessed Jan 15 2018]....

  1. Preliminary analysis of radiologic consequence in accident cases with radiation sources in laboratories of the Physics Department of the IEN, cyclotrons and laboratories annexed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, P.W.; Silva, J.J.G. da.

    1987-03-01

    The requirements necessaries to the elaboration of the situation of Emergency PLans of the Nuclear Engineering Institute (IEN), Brazil, in particular, cases of radiation emergency are presented. An estimate of radiation in the laboratories of the Physic Department of the IEN, in case of accident, are given. The results presented are based in some hypothesis, values of radionuclide activity furnished by Radioisotopes Division and values of activities estimated by Radiation Protection Section of the IEN in function of datas achieved with cyclotron Division. The dose calculations are done to the cases of radionuclides inhalation and immersion of person in a semi-infinite cloud of contaminants. (V.R.B.)

  2. The interface between clinicians and laboratory staff: A field study in northern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coosje J. Tuijn

    2014-07-01

    Conclusions: Hospital managers, clinicians and laboratory workers need to recognise the critical and complementary roles each professional plays and the importance of addressing the gap between them. Field application of the framework proved successful, justifying the expansion of this study to a larger geographical area to include additional healthcare institutions

  3. Field and Laboratory Evaluations of Insecticides for Southern Pine Beetle Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton L. Hastings; Jack E. Coster; [Editors

    1981-01-01

    Reports results of laboratory screenings and field studies of insecticides for use against the southern pine beetle. Preventive as webas remedial efficacywere observed, along with phytotoxicity to pine and understory hardwood species, effects of insecticides on soil microbial and mesofaunal populations, and degradation of insecticides by selected soil microbes.

  4. Studies on the survival of Ascaris suum eggs under laboratory and simulated field conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaasenbeek, C.P.H.; Borgsteede, F.H.M.

    1998-01-01

    A series of four experiments was carried out to study the survival of Ascaris suum eggs: in a pig slurry unit on a farm, in the laboratory under anaerobic conditions and different relative humidities (rH), and under simulated field conditions. Survival of eggs in the pig slurry unit was 20% after

  5. Use of a Laboratory Field Project in an Introductory Crop Science Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Robert A.

    1986-01-01

    Assesses the benefits resulting from a laboratory field project and report for agricultural students in an introductory crop science course. Student responses to evaluation statements indicated that the project helped them identify crops, understand cultural and management practices, and recognize environmental influences that affect crop…

  6. Potential effect of fiddler crabs on organic matter distribution: A combined laboratory and field experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natálio, Luís F.; Pardo, Juan C. F.; Machado, Glauco B. O.; Fortuna, Monique D.; Gallo, Deborah G.; Costa, Tânia M.

    2017-01-01

    Bioturbators play a key role in estuarine environments by modifying the availability of soil elements, which in turn may affect other organisms. Despite the importance of bioturbators, few studies have combined both field and laboratory experiments to explore the effects of bioturbators on estuarine soils. Herein, we assessed the bioturbation potential of fiddler crabs Leptuca leptodactyla and Leptuca uruguayensis in laboratory and field experiments, respectively. We evaluated whether the presence of fiddler crabs resulted in vertical transport of sediment, thereby altering organic matter (OM) distribution. Under laboratory conditions, the burrowing activity by L. leptodactyla increased the OM content in sediment surface. In the long-term field experiment with areas of inclusion and exclusion of L. uruguayensis, we did not observe influence of this fiddler crab in the vertical distribution of OM. Based on our results, we suggest that small fiddler crabs, such as the species used in these experiments, are potentially capable of alter their environment by transporting sediment and OM but such effects may be masked by environmental drivers and spatial heterogeneity under natural conditions. This phenomenon may be related to the small size of these species, which affects how much sediment is transported, along with the way OM interacts with biogeochemical and physical processes. Therefore, the net effect of these burrowing organisms is likely to be the result of a complex interaction with other environmental factors. In this sense, we highlight the importance of performing simultaneous field and laboratory experiments in order to better understanding the role of burrowing animals as bioturbators.

  7. Degradation of herbicides in shallow Danish aquifers - an integrated laboratory and field study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Mills, M.; Aamand, J.

    2001-01-01

    Degradation of pesticides in aquifers has been evaluated based on a number of co-ordinated field and laboratory studies carried out in Danish aquifers. These studies included investigations of vertical and horizontal variability in degradation rates from the vadose zone to an aquifer, the effects...

  8. Acid Rain: A Resource Guide for Classroom, Laboratory, Field, and Debate Topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoss, Frederick W.

    1987-01-01

    Provides a partially annotated bibliography of journals and book chapters which deal with acid rain. Includes selections which provide background information, ideas for introducing acid rain into science or social studies curricula, inventories of audio-visual aids, and non-print media to supplement classroom, laboratory, and field instruction.…

  9. Fate of Listeria spp. on parsley leaves grown in laboratory and field cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreux, N; Albagnac, C; Carlin, F; Morris, C E; Nguyen-The, C

    2007-11-01

    To investigate the population dynamics of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua on the aerial surfaces of parsley. Under 100% relative humidity (RH) in laboratory and regardless of the inoculum tested (10(3)-10(8) CFU per leaf), counts of L. monocytogenes EGDe, LO28, LmP60 and L. innocua CIP 80-12 tended towards approx. 10(5) CFU per leaf. Under low RH, Listeria spp. populations declined regardless to the inoculum size (10(4)-10(8) CFU per leaf). L. innocua CIP 80-12 survived slightly better than L. monocytogenes in the laboratory and was used in field cultures. Under field cultures, counts of L. innocua decreased more rapidly than in the laboratory, representing a decrease of 9 log(10) in 2 days in field conditions compared to a decrease of 4.5 log(10) in 8 days in the laboratory. Counts of L. innocua on tunnel parsley cultures were always higher (at least by 100 times) than those on unprotected parsley culture. Even with a high inoculum and under protected conditions (i.e. plastic tunnels), population of L. monocytogenes on the surface of parsley on the field would decrease by several log(10) scales within 2 days. Direct contamination of aerial surfaces of parsley with L. monocytogenes (i.e. through contaminated irrigation water) will not lead to contaminated produce unless it occurs very shortly before harvest.

  10. An Alternative Approach to Assessing Laboratory and Field Notebooks: The Data Retrieval Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, Hilary; Bedford, Alan; Thomas, Judith; Ashton, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Marking field and laboratory notebooks can be a time consuming and tedious task. This article describes a system whereby the contents of student's notebooks are assessed by testing the students on what they have included and their understanding of what has been done. It also tests the quality of the student's notes--detailed, organised notes…

  11. Practical radiation protection for radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, S.K.; Proudfoot, E.A.

    1978-01-01

    Nondestructive Testing Applications and Radiological Engineering at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory have developed radiation protection procedures, radiation work procedures, and safe practice procedures to assure safe operation for all radiographic work. The following topics are discussed: training in radiation safety; radiation exposure due to operations at Hanford; safeguards employed in laboratory radiography; field radiographic operations; and problems

  12. [Experience of the development special medical technical laboratory for studies of effects caused by potent electromagnetic radiation in biologic objects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodetsky, B N; Kalyada, T V; Petrov, S V

    2015-01-01

    This article covers topics of creating special medical technical laboratory for medial and biologic studies concerning influence of potent high-frequency elecromagnetic radiation on various biologic objects. The authors gave example of such laboratory, described its construction features, purpose and main characteristics of the included devices.

  13. Questions concerning radiation protection in the field of radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, W.; Quednau, F.; Wels, Ch.

    1987-01-01

    Based on legal regulations, guidelines, and standards valid in the German Democratic Republic 105 questions concerning radiation protection are answered covering subjects indicated by the following key words and headings: radiometric gages, radiation protection measures, working within protected areas, legal provisions, responsible staff member, radiation protection officer, operating personnel, radiation protection instructions, safe keeping of radiation sources, leak testing, unusual occurrence, transport of radioactive materials, and ceasing of operation

  14. Situation in the radiation protection field in Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco Jimenez, R.E.

    2001-01-01

    The report describes the radiation protection infrastructure in Costa Rica and makes reference to the existing legal framework. The national inventory of significant radiation sources and structure of the Ministry of Health as the national regulatory authority for radiation safety is illustrated; information is also provided on the radiation monitoring equipment available, on programme activities related to the control of radiation sources by authorization and inspection, and on technical support services. (author)

  15. Do laboratory salinity tolerances of freshwater animals correspond with their field salinity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kefford, Ben J.; Papas, Phil J.; Metzeling, Leon; Nugegoda, Dayanthi

    2004-01-01

    The degree to which laboratory derived measures of salinity tolerance reflect the field distributions of freshwater biota is uncertain. In this paper we compare laboratory-derived acute salinity tolerance (LC 50 values) of freshwater macroinvertebrates (range 5.5-76 mS/cm) and fish (range 2.7-82 mS/cm) from southeastern Australia with the salinity from which they have been collected in the field. Only 4% of the macroinvertebrates were collected at salinity levels substantially higher than their 72-h LC 50 obtained from directly transferring animals from low salinity water to the water they were tested (direct transfer LC 50 ). This LC 50 value was correlated with the maximum salinity at which a species had been collected. For common macroinvertebrates, the maximum field salinity was approximated by the direct transfer 72-h LC 50 . For adult freshwater fish, 21% of species were collected at salinities substantially greater than their acute direct transfer LC 50 and there was a weak relationship between these two variables. Although there was a weak correlation between the direct transfer LC 50 of early life stages of freshwater fish and the maximum field salinity, 58% of the field distribution were in higher than their LC 50 values. In contrast, LC 50 determined from experiments that acclimated adult fish to higher salinity (slow acclimation) provided a better indication of the field distribution: with only one fish species (7%) being in conflict with their maximum field salinity and a strong positive relationship between these variables. This study shows that laboratory measures of acute salinity tolerance can reflect the maximum salinity that macroinvertebrate and fish species inhabit and are consistent with some anecdotal observations from other studies. - Acute laboratory salinity tolerances relate to maximum salinity where organisms occur in nature

  16. Do laboratory salinity tolerances of freshwater animals correspond with their field salinity?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kefford, Ben J.; Papas, Phil J.; Metzeling, Leon; Nugegoda, Dayanthi

    2004-06-01

    The degree to which laboratory derived measures of salinity tolerance reflect the field distributions of freshwater biota is uncertain. In this paper we compare laboratory-derived acute salinity tolerance (LC{sub 50} values) of freshwater macroinvertebrates (range 5.5-76 mS/cm) and fish (range 2.7-82 mS/cm) from southeastern Australia with the salinity from which they have been collected in the field. Only 4% of the macroinvertebrates were collected at salinity levels substantially higher than their 72-h LC{sub 50} obtained from directly transferring animals from low salinity water to the water they were tested (direct transfer LC{sub 50}). This LC{sub 50} value was correlated with the maximum salinity at which a species had been collected. For common macroinvertebrates, the maximum field salinity was approximated by the direct transfer 72-h LC{sub 50}. For adult freshwater fish, 21% of species were collected at salinities substantially greater than their acute direct transfer LC{sub 50} and there was a weak relationship between these two variables. Although there was a weak correlation between the direct transfer LC{sub 50} of early life stages of freshwater fish and the maximum field salinity, 58% of the field distribution were in higher than their LC{sub 50} values. In contrast, LC{sub 50} determined from experiments that acclimated adult fish to higher salinity (slow acclimation) provided a better indication of the field distribution: with only one fish species (7%) being in conflict with their maximum field salinity and a strong positive relationship between these variables. This study shows that laboratory measures of acute salinity tolerance can reflect the maximum salinity that macroinvertebrate and fish species inhabit and are consistent with some anecdotal observations from other studies. - Acute laboratory salinity tolerances relate to maximum salinity where organisms occur in nature.

  17. Combination transition radiation in a medium excited by an electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalashnikova, Yu.S.

    1976-01-01

    The radiation emitted by a uniformly moving charged particle in a medium excited by an electromagnetic field is considered by taking into account the interaction between the electromagnetic waves and optical phonon wave. The frequencies are found, in the vicinity of which the two-wave approximation should be applied in order to determine the radiation field. It is shown that in the vicinity of these frequencies the radiation considerably differs from the Cherenkov radiation

  18. Hawking radiation of five-dimensional charged black holes with scalar fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Gang Miao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the Hawking radiation cascade from the five-dimensional charged black hole with a scalar field coupled to higher-order Euler densities in a conformally invariant manner. We give the semi-analytic calculation of greybody factors for the Hawking radiation. Our analysis shows that the Hawking radiation cascade from this five-dimensional black hole is extremely sparse. The charge enhances the sparsity of the Hawking radiation, while the conformally coupled scalar field reduces this sparsity.

  19. Radiation-induced DNA damage and repair: Argonne National Laboratory symposium, Argonne, Illinois 60439, 15 April, 1988. Symposium report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peak, M J; Peak, J G; Blazek, E R

    1988-10-01

    The Argonne National Laboratory Symposium brought together 109 scientists from five countries to discuss the molecular effects of radiation on DNA and the responses of cells to radiation exposure. Six speakers covered three general areas: (1) DNA damages caused by radiations; (2) repair of these damages in prokaryotes and eukaryotes; and (3) aminothiols as radioprotectors. In addition, a round table discussion chaired by J. Ward dealt with alkaline and neutral elution methodology.

  20. Field study to evaluate radiation doses in dental practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panzer, W.; Scheurer, C.

    1984-05-01

    An inexpensive and simple test device was developed and used in a field study to evaluate entrance dose, dose to an intra-oral film, filtration and field size under routine conditions in more than 150 dental practices. The test device consists of two films of different speed and a set of 5 thin copper filters for a filter analytical determination of the radiation quality. Dentists voluntarily participating in the study were asked to expose the test device like they usually do when examining a molar tooth. The main result was the evidence of a significant dose reduction compared to the findings of similar studies performed in 1970 and 1976. This reduction is due to a general shift to lower values and a complete disappearance of values above 45 mGy (5 R) which in 1970 were still more than 15%. In the same way the number of facilities showing insufficient filtration or collimation had decreased. Nevertheless, a large spread of dose values could still be observed, ranging from less than 0.45 mGy (50 mR) to more than 26 mGy (3 R), for the entrance dose. The most striking result, however, was that such an important parameter like the speed of the films used at the respective unit turned out to have no impact on the entrance dose. (orig./HP)