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Sample records for radiant energy ii

  1. Nonimaging radiant energy device

    Winston, Roland; Ning, Xiaohui

    1993-01-01

    A nonimaging radiant energy device may include a hyperbolically shaped reflective element with a radiant energy inlet and a radiant energy outlet. A convex lens is provided at the radiant energy inlet and a concave lens is provided at the radiant energy outlet. Due to the provision of the lenses and the shape of the walls of the reflective element, the radiant energy incident at the radiant energy inlet within a predetermined angle of acceptance is emitted from the radiant energy outlet exclusively within an acute exit angle. In another embodiment, the radiant energy device may include two interconnected hyperbolically shaped reflective elements with a respective convex lens being provided at each aperture of the device.

  2. Direct conversion of infrared radiant energy for space power applications

    Finke, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    A proposed technology to convert the earth radiant energy (infrared albedo) for spacecraft power is presented. The resultant system would eliminate energy storage requirements and simplify the spacecraft design. The design and performance of a infrared rectenna is discussed.

  3. Radiant Barriers Save Energy in Buildings

    2014-01-01

    Langley Research Center needed to coat the Echo 1 satellite with a fine mist of vaporized metal, and collaborated with industry to create "radiant barrier technology." In 2010, Ryan Garrett learned about a new version of the technology resistant to oxidation and founded RadiaSource in Ogden, Utah, to provide the NASA-derived technology for applications in homes, warehouses, gymnasiums, and agricultural settings.

  4. Design of energy efficient building with radiant slab cooling

    Tian, Zhen

    2007-12-01

    Air-conditioning comprises a substantial fraction of commercial building energy use because of compressor-driven refrigeration and fan-driven air circulation. Core regions of large buildings require year-round cooling due to heat gains from people, lights and equipment. Negative environmental impacts include CO2 emissions from electric generation and leakage of ozone-depleting refrigerants. Some argue that radiant cooling simultaneously improves building efficiency and occupant thermal comfort, and that current thermal comfort models fail to reflect occupant experience with radiant thermal control systems. There is little field evidence to test these claims. The University of Calgary's Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Building, is a pioneering radiant slab cooling installation in North America. Thermal comfort and energy performance were evaluated. Measurements included: (1) heating and cooling energy use, (2) electrical energy use for lighting and equipment, and (3) indoor temperatures. Accuracy of a whole building energy simulation model was evaluated with these data. Simulation was then used to compare the radiant slab design with a conventional (variable air volume) system. The radiant system energy performance was found to be poorer mainly due to: (1) simultaneous cooling by the slab and heating by other systems, (2) omission of low-exergy (e.g., groundwater) cooling possible with the high cooling water temperatures possible with radiant slabs and (3) excessive solar gain and conductive heat loss due to the wall and fenestration design. Occupant thermal comfort was evaluated through questionnaires and concurrent measurement of workstation comfort parameters. Analysis of 116 sets of data from 82 occupants showed that occupant assessment was consistent with estimates based on current thermal comfort models. The main thermal comfort improvements were reductions in (1) local discomfort from draft and (2) vertical air temperature stratification. The

  5. Performance of Radiant Heating Systems of Low-Energy Buildings

    Sarbu, Ioan; Mirza, Matei; Crasmareanu, Emanuel

    2017-10-01

    After the introduction of plastic piping, the application of water-based radiant heating with pipes embedded in room surfaces (i.e., floors, walls, and ceilings), has significantly increased worldwide. Additionally, interest and growth in radiant heating and cooling systems have increased in recent years because they have been demonstrated to be energy efficient in comparison to all-air distribution systems. This paper briefly describes the heat distribution systems in buildings, focusing on the radiant panels (floor, wall, ceiling, and floor-ceiling). Main objective of this study is the performance investigation of different types of low-temperature heating systems with different methods. Additionally, a comparative analysis of the energy, environmental, and economic performances of floor, wall, ceiling, and floor-ceiling heating using numerical simulation with Transient Systems Simulation (TRNSYS) software is performed. This study showed that the floor-ceiling heating system has the best performance in terms of the lowest energy consumption, operation cost, CO2 emission, and the nominal boiler power. The comparison of the room operative air temperatures and the set-point operative air temperature indicates also that all radiant panel systems provide satisfactory results without significant deviations.

  6. ''Super-radiant'' states in intermediate energy nuclear physics

    Auerbach, N.

    1994-01-01

    A ''super-radiant'' state emerges when, under certain conditions, one or a few ''internal'' states acquire a large collective decay width due to the coupling to one or a few ''external'' decay channels. The rest of the internal states are ''stripped'' of their decay width and become long lived quasistationary states. The essentials of such mechanism and its possible role in intermediate energy nuclear physics are discussed in this work

  7. Radiant energy collection and conversion apparatus and method

    Hunt, A.J.

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting to alternate energy forms includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past the window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

  8. Radiant energy during infrared neural stimulation at the target structure

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Rajguru, Suhrud; Stafford, Ryan; Stock, Stuart R.

    2013-03-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) describes a method, by which an infrared laser is used to stimulate neurons. The major benefit of INS over stimulating neurons with electrical current is its spatial selectivity. To translate the technique into a clinical application it is important to know the energy required to stimulate the neural structure. With this study we provide measurements of the radiant exposure, at the target structure that is required to stimulate the auditory neurons. Flat polished fibers were inserted into scala tympani so that the spiral ganglion was in front of the optical fiber. Angle polished fibers were inserted along scala tympani, and rotating the beveled surface of the fiber allowed the radiation beam to be directed perpendicular to the spiral ganglion. The radiant exposure for stimulation at the modiolus for flat and angle polished fibers averaged 6.78+/-2.15 mJ/cm2. With the angle polished fibers, a 90º change in the orientation of the optical beam from an orientation that resulted in an INS-evoked maximum response, resulted in a 50% drop in the response amplitude. When the orientation of the beam was changed by 180º, such that it was directed opposite to the orientation with the maxima, minimum response amplitude was observed.

  9. Energy efficiency and indoor thermal perception. A comparative study between radiant panel and portable convective heaters

    Ali, Ahmed Hamza H.; Morsy, Mahmoud Gaber [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Assiut University, Assiut, 71516 (Egypt)

    2010-11-15

    This study investigates experimentally the thermal perception of indoor environment for evaluating the ability of radiant panel heaters to produce thermal comfort for space occupants as well as the energy consumption in comparison with conventional portable natural convective heaters. The thermal perception results show that, compared with conventional convection heater, a radiantly heated office room maintains a lower ambient air temperature while providing equal levels of thermal perception on the thermal dummy head as the convective heater and saves up to 39.1% of the energy consumption per day. However, for human subjects' vote experiments, the results show that for an environmentally controlled test room at outdoor environment temperatures of 0C and 5C, using two radiant panel heaters with a total capacity of 580 W leads to a better comfort sensation than the conventional portable natural convective heater with a 670 W capacity, with an energy saving of about 13.4%. In addition, for an outdoor environment temperature of 10C, using one radiant panel heater with a capacity of 290 W leads to a better comfort sensation than the conventional convection heater with a 670 W capacity, with an energy saving of about 56.7%. From the analytical results, it is found that distributing the radiant panel heater inside the office room, one on the wall facing the window and the other on the wall close to the window, provides the best operative temperature distribution within the room.

  10. Integrated application of combined cooling, heating and power poly-generation PV radiant panel system of zero energy buildings

    Yin, Baoquan

    2018-02-01

    A new type of combined cooling, heating and power of photovoltaic radiant panel (PV/R) module was proposed, and applied in the zero energy buildings in this paper. The energy system of this building is composed of PV/R module, low temperature difference terminal, energy storage, multi-source heat pump, energy balance control system. Radiant panel is attached on the backside of the PV module for cooling the PV, which is called PV/R module. During the daytime, the PV module was cooled down with the radiant panel, as the temperature coefficient influence, the power efficiency was increased by 8% to 14%, the radiant panel solar heat collecting efficiency was about 45%. Through the nocturnal radiant cooling, the PV/R cooling capacity could be 50 W/m2. For the multifunction energy device, the system shows the versatility during the heating, cooling and power used of building utilization all year round.

  11. Influence of increment thickness on radiant energy and microhardness of bulk-fill resin composites.

    Karacolak, Gamze; Turkun, L Sebnem; Boyacioglu, Hayal; Ferracane, Jack L

    2018-03-30

    Determining the energy transferred at the bottom of eleven bulk-fill resin composites, comparing top and bottom microhardness's and evaluating the correlation between microhardness and radiant energy were aimed. Samples were placed over the bottom sensor of a visible light transmission spectrophotometer and polymerized for 20 s. The bottom and top Knoop microhardness were measured. Paired t-test and correlation analysis were used for statistics (p≤0.05). In all groups, the bottom radiant energy decreased significantly with increasing thickness. For groups of Aura 2 mm, X-tra Fil 2 and 4 mm, SDR 2 and 4 mm, X-tra Base 2 mm no significant difference was found between top and bottom microhardness. For the bottom levels of Aura, X-tra Fil, Filtek Bulk-Fill Posterior, SDR, X-tra Base groups no significant difference was found between the microhardness's of 2 and 4 mm thicknesses. For X-tra Fil, Tetric Evo Ceram Bulk-Fill, Filtek Bulk-Fill Flowable and Z100 groups radiant energy affected positively the microhardness.

  12. Effects of Floor Covering Resistance of a Radiant Floor on System Energy and Exergy Performances

    Kazanci, Ongun Berk; Shukuya, Masanori; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2016-01-01

    Floor covering resistance (material and thickness) can be influenced by subjective choices (architectural design, interior design, texture, etc.) with significant effects on the performance of a radiant heating and cooling system. To study the effects of floor covering resistance on system...... performance, a water-based radiant floor heating and cooling system (dry, wooden construction) was considered to be coupled to an air-to-water heat pump, and the effects of varying floor covering resistances (0.05 m2K/W, 0.09 m2K/W and 0.15 m2K/W) on system performance were analyzed in terms of energy...... and exergy. In order to achieve the same heating and cooling outputs, higher average water temperatures are required in the heating mode (and lower temperatures in the cooling mode) with increasing floor covering resistance. These temperature requirements decrease the heat pump’s performance (lower...

  13. Radiant Research. Institute for Energy Technology 1948-98

    Njoelstad, Olav

    1999-01-01

    Institutt for Atomenergi (IFA), or Institute for Atomic Energy, at Kjeller, Norway, was founded in 1948. The history of the institute as given in this book was published in 1999 on the occasion of the institute's 50th anniversary. The scope of the institute was to do research and development as a foundation for peaceful application of nuclear energy and radioactive substances in Norway. The book tells the story of how Norway in 1951 became the first country after the four superpowers and Canada to have its own research reactor. After the completion of the reactor, the institute experienced a long and successful period and became the biggest scientific and technological research institute in Norway. Three more reactors were built, one in Halden and two at Kjeller. Plans were developed to build nuclear powered ships and nuclear power stations. It became clear, however, in the 1970s, that there was no longer political support for nuclear power in Norway, and it was necessary for the institute to change its research profile. In 1980, the institute changed its name to Institutt for energiteknikk (IFE), or Institute for energy technology, to signal the broadened scope. The book describes this painful but successful readjustment and shows how IFE in the 1980s and 1990s succeeded in using its special competence from the nuclear field to establish special competence in new research fields with great commercial potential

  14. Energy flow and thermal comfort in buildings: Comparison of radiant and air-based heating & cooling systems

    Le Dréau, Jérôme

    is based on both radiation and convection. This thesis focuses on characterizing the heat transfer from the terminal towards the space and on the parameters influencing the effectiveness of terminals. Therefore the comfort conditions and energy consumption of four types of terminals (active chilled beam...... losses, and an air-based terminal might be more energy-efficient than a radiant terminal (in terms of delivered energy). Regarding comfort, a similar global level has been observed for the radiant and air-based terminals in both numerical and experimental investigations. But the different terminals did...... not achieve the same uniformity in space. The active chilled beam theoretically achieves the most uniform comfort conditions (when disregarding the risk of draught), followed by the radiant ceiling. The least uniform conditions were obtained with the cooled floor due to large differences between the sitting...

  15. Energy flow and thermal comfort in buildings: Comparison of radiant and air-based heating & cooling systems

    Le Dréau, Jérôme

    Heating and cooling terminals can be classified in two main categories: convective terminals (e.g air conditioning, active chilled beam, fan coil) and radiant terminals. The two terminals have different modes of heat transfer: the first one is mainly based on convection, whereas the second one...... is based on both radiation and convection. This thesis focuses on characterizing the heat transfer from the terminal towards the space and on the parameters influencing the effectiveness of terminals. Therefore the comfort conditions and energy consumption of four types of terminals (active chilled beam...... losses, and an air-based terminal might be more energy-efficient than a radiant terminal (in terms of delivered energy). Regarding comfort, a similar global level has been observed for the radiant and air-based terminals in both numerical and experimental investigations. But the different terminals did...

  16. Solar–terrestrial radiant-energy regimes and temperature anomalies of natural and artificial turfs

    Jim, C.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Solar and terrestrial radian energy regimes affect temperature response of sports turfs. • Adjacent natural and artificial turfs were monitored with replications on sunny days. • Artificial turf has meager albedo, low specific heat and moisture to augment warming. • Artificial turf surface and substrate reach 70 °C but cool down effectively at night. • Artificial turf may induce heat stress on athletes in hot summer afternoon. - Abstract: Artificial turf can develop unusually high surface temperature on hot sunny days. Solar and terrestrial radiant energy regimes as key determinants of thermal performance deserve detailed investigation. This study evaluated six components of the radiant-energy environment of a natural turf (NT) and a contiguous artificial turf (AT) sports fields in Hong Kong: direct solar, reflected solar, net solar, sky thermal, ground thermal, and net thermal. Temperature was monitored at five positions: air at 150 cm, 50 cm and 15 cm height, turf surface, and substrate. The experiment included four replications, namely two summer sunny days, and two duplicated instrument sets at each turf site. The two sites reacted very differently to the same intense daily sum of solar radiation input of 23.70 MW m −2 with 9 h of bright sunshine (>120 W m −2 ), and daily sum of sky thermal radiation input of 38.59 MW m −2 . The maximum direct solar radiation reached 976.1 W m −2 at 1245 h. NT albedo of 0.23 vis-à-vis AT of merely 0.073, and higher moisture content and specific heat of NT materials, presented critical differences. The hydrophobic and generally dry plastic (polyethylene) pile-fibers and black rubber-granule infill materials have low specific heat. Intense incoming shortwave and longwave radiation absorbed readily by AT materials raised turf surface temperature to 70.2 °C and substrate 69.3 °C, in comparison with <40 °C at NT. A cascading warming effect was triggered, beginning with low albedo, high net solar

  17. Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Data Products for Climate Research

    Kato, Seiji; Loeb, Norman G.; Rutan, David A.; Rose, Fred G.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project integrates CERES, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and geostationary satellite observations to provide top-of-atmosphere (TOA) irradiances derived from broadband radiance observations by CERES instruments. It also uses snow cover and sea ice extent retrieved from microwave instruments as well as thermodynamic variables from reanalysis. In addition, these variables are used for surface and atmospheric irradiance computations. The CERES project provides TOA, surface, and atmospheric irradiances in various spatial and temporal resolutions. These data sets are for climate research and evaluation of climate models. Long-term observations are required to understand how the Earth system responds to radiative forcing. A simple model is used to estimate the time to detect trends in TOA reflected shortwave and emitted longwave irradiances.

  18. Numerical study of influence of different dispersed components of crystal cloud on transmission of radiant energy

    Shefer, Olga

    2017-11-01

    The calculated results of the transmission of visible and infrared radiation by an atmosphere layer involving ensembles of large preferentially oriented crystals and spherical particles are presented. To calculate extinction characteristics, the physical optics method and the Mie theory are applied. Among all atmospheric particles, both the small particles that are commensurable with the wavelength of the incident radiation and the large plates and the columns are distinguished by the most pronounced dependence of the transmission on spectra of radiant energy. The work illustrates features of influence of parameters of the particle size distribution, particle aspect ratios, orientation and particle refractive index, also polarization state of the incident radiation on the transmission. The predominant effect of the plates on the wavelength dependence of the transmission is shown. A separated and cooperative contributes of the large plates and the small volume shape particles to the common transmission by medium are considered.

  19. The Influence of a Radiant Panel System with Integrated Phase Change Material on Energy Use and Thermal Indoor Environment

    Nielsen, Lin Flemming; Bourdakis, Eleftherios; Kazanci, Ongun Berk

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the effect on energy use and thermal comfort when combining microencapsulated phase change material (PCM) with radiant ceiling panels in a two-person office. The performance of the system was studied during the cooling season in the climates of Copenhagen, Denmark, and Rome...

  20. Extinction of radiant energy by large atmospheric crystals with different shapes

    Shefer, Olga

    2016-01-01

    The calculated results of extinction characteristics of visible and infrared radiation for large semi-transparent crystals are obtained by hybrid technique, which is a combination of the geometric optics method and the physical optics method. Energy and polarization characteristics of the radiation extinction in terms of the elements of the extinction matrix for individual large crystals and ensemble of crystals are discussed. Influences of particle shapes, aspect ratios, parameters of size distribution, complex refractive index, orientation of crystals, wavelength, and the polarization state of an incident radiation on the extinction are illustrated. It is shown that the most expressive and stable features of energy and polarization characteristics of the extinction are observed in the midinfrared region, despite the fact that the ice particles significantly absorb the radiant energy of this spectrum. It is demonstrated that the polarized extinction characteristics can reach several tens of percent at IR wavelengths. For the large crystals, the conditions of occurrence of the spectral behavior of the extinction coefficient in the visible, near-IR, and mid-IR wavelength ranges are determined. - Highlights: • Method of physical optics is used at coherent sum of diffracted and refracted fields. • The extinction characteristics in terms of elements of extinction matrix are obtained. • Influence of shapes and sizes of large particles on the extinction is evaluated. • Conditions of occurrence of extinction features are determined.

  1. Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES), a Review: Past, Present and Future

    Smith, G. L.; Priestley, K. J.; Loeb, N. G.; Wielicki, B. A.; Charlock, T. P.; Minnis, P.; Doelling, D. R.; Rutan, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) project s objectives are to measure the reflected solar radiance (shortwave) and Earth-emitted (longwave) radiances and from these measurements to compute the shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and the surface and radiation divergence within the atmosphere. The fluxes at TOA are to be retrieved to an accuracy of 2%. Improved bidirectional reflectance distribution functions (BRDFs) have been developed to compute the fluxes at TOA from the measured radiances with errors reduced from ERBE by a factor of two or more. Instruments aboard the Terra and Aqua spacecraft provide sampling at four local times. In order to further reduce temporal sampling errors, data are used from the geostationary meteorological satellites to account for changes of scenes between observations by the CERES radiometers. A validation protocol including in-flight calibrations and comparisons of measurements has reduced the instrument errors to less than 1%. The data are processed through three editions. The first edition provides a timely flow of data to investigators and the third edition provides data products as accurate as possible with resources available. A suite of cloud properties retrieved from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) by the CERES team is used to identify the cloud properties for each pixel in order to select the BRDF for each pixel so as to compute radiation fluxes from radiances. Also, the cloud information is used to compute radiation at the surface and through the atmosphere and to facilitate study of the relationship between clouds and the radiation budget. The data products from CERES include, in addition to the reflected solar radiation and Earth emitted radiation fluxes at TOA, the upward and downward shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes at the surface and at various levels in the atmosphere. Also at the surface the photosynthetically active radiation

  2. Climate Model Evaluation using New Datasets from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES)

    Loeb, Norman G.; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Doelling, David R.

    2008-01-01

    There are some in the science community who believe that the response of the climate system to anthropogenic radiative forcing is unpredictable and we should therefore call off the quest . The key limitation in climate predictability is associated with cloud feedback. Narrowing the uncertainty in cloud feedback (and therefore climate sensitivity) requires optimal use of the best available observations to evaluate and improve climate model processes and constrain climate model simulations over longer time scales. The Clouds and the Earth s Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a satellite-based program that provides global cloud, aerosol and radiative flux observations for improving our understanding of cloud-aerosol-radiation feedbacks in the Earth s climate system. CERES is the successor to the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), which has widely been used to evaluate climate models both at short time scales (e.g., process studies) and at decadal time scales. A CERES instrument flew on the TRMM satellite and captured the dramatic 1998 El Nino, and four other CERES instruments are currently flying aboard the Terra and Aqua platforms. Plans are underway to fly the remaining copy of CERES on the upcoming NPP spacecraft (mid-2010 launch date). Every aspect of CERES represents a significant improvement over ERBE. While both CERES and ERBE measure broadband radiation, CERES calibration is a factor of 2 better than ERBE. In order to improve the characterization of clouds and aerosols within a CERES footprint, we use coincident higher-resolution imager observations (VIRS, MODIS or VIIRS) to provide a consistent cloud-aerosol-radiation dataset at climate accuracy. Improved radiative fluxes are obtained by using new CERES-derived Angular Distribution Models (ADMs) for converting measured radiances to fluxes. CERES radiative fluxes are a factor of 2 more accurate than ERBE overall, but the improvement by cloud type and at high latitudes can be as high as a factor of 5

  3. Radiant Energy Measurements from a Scaled Jet Engine Axisymmetric Exhaust Nozzle for a Baseline Code Validation Case

    Baumeister, Joseph F.

    1994-01-01

    A non-flowing, electrically heated test rig was developed to verify computer codes that calculate radiant energy propagation from nozzle geometries that represent aircraft propulsion nozzle systems. Since there are a variety of analysis tools used to evaluate thermal radiation propagation from partially enclosed nozzle surfaces, an experimental benchmark test case was developed for code comparison. This paper briefly describes the nozzle test rig and the developed analytical nozzle geometry used to compare the experimental and predicted thermal radiation results. A major objective of this effort was to make available the experimental results and the analytical model in a format to facilitate conversion to existing computer code formats. For code validation purposes this nozzle geometry represents one validation case for one set of analysis conditions. Since each computer code has advantages and disadvantages based on scope, requirements, and desired accuracy, the usefulness of this single nozzle baseline validation case can be limited for some code comparisons.

  4. Numerical Modeling of Conjugate Thermogravitational Convection in a Closed System with a Radiant Energy Source in Conditions of Convective-Radiative Heat Exchange at the External Boundary

    Nee Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling of conjugate natural convection in a closed rectangular cavity with a radiant energy source in conditions of convective-radiative heat exchange at the external boundary was conducted. The radiant energy distribution was set by the Lambert’s law. Conduction and convection processes analysis showed that the air masses flow pattern is modified slightly over the time. The temperature increases in the gas cavity, despite the heat removal from the one of the external boundary. According to the results of the integral heat transfer analysis were established that the average Nusselt number (Nuav increasing occurs up to τ = 200 (dimensionless time. Further Nuav has changed insignificantly due to the temperature field equalization near the interfaces “gas – wall”.

  5. National Energy Plan II

    None

    1979-01-01

    This volume contains the Administration's second National Energy Plan, as required by section 801 of the Department of Energy Organization Act (Public Law 95-91). A second volume will contain an assessment of the environmental trends associated with the energy futures reported here. Detailed appendices to the Plan will be published separately. The eight chapters and their subtitles are: Crisis and Uncertainty in the World Energy Future (The Immediate Crisis and the Continuing Problem, The Emergence of the Energy Problem, The Uncertainties of the World Energy Future, World Oil Prices, Consequences for the U.S.); The U.S. Energy Future: The Implications for Policy (The Near-, Mid-, and Long-Term, The Strategy in Perspective); Conservation (Historical Changes in Energy Use, Post-Embargo Changes - In Detail, Conservation Policies and Programs, The Role of Conservation); Oil and Gas (Oil, Natural Gas); Coal and Nuclear (Coal, Nuclear, Policy for Coal and Nuclear Power); Solar and Other Inexhaustible Energy Sources (Solar Energy, Geothermal, Fusion, A Strategy for Inexhaustible Resources); Making Decisions Promptly and Fairly (Managing Future Energy Crises: Emergency Planning, Managing the Current Shortfall: The Iranian Response Plan, Managing the Long-Term Energy Problem: The Institutional Framework, Fairness in Energy Policy, Public Participation in the Development of Energy Policy); and NEP-II and the Future (The Second National Energy Plan and the Nation's Energy Future, The Second National Energy Plan and the Economy, Employment and Energy Policy, The Second National Energy Plan and Individuals, The Second National Energy Plan and Capital Markets, and The Second National Energy Plan and the Environment). (ERA citation 04:041097)

  6. Modeling the transmitted and stored energy in multilayer protective clothing under low-level radiant exposure

    Su, Yun; He, Jiazhen; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A numerical model from heating source to skin tissues through multilayer fabric system is developed. • The numerical model is comprehensively validated with experimental data. • The model is used to investigate the relationship between the transmitted and stored energy and the influencing factors. - Abstract: A finite difference model was introduced to simulate the transmitted and stored energy in firefighters' protective clothing exposed to low-level thermal radiation. The model domain consists of a three-layer fire-resistant fabric system (outer shell, moisture barrier, and thermal liner), the human skin, and the air gap between clothing and the skin. The model accounted for the relationship between the transmitted heat during the exposure and the discharged heat during the cooling-down period. The numerical model predictions were compared with experimental data. Additionally, the parameters that affect the transmitted and stored energy of protective clothing were investigated. The results demonstrate that for the typical multilayer firefighter protective clothing, the transmitted heat during exposure and the discharged heat after exposure totally determine the skin burn under low-level heat exposure, especially for third-degree skin burns. The findings obtained in this study can be used to engineer fabric systems that provide better protection for the stored thermal burn.

  7. Radiant energy dissipation during final storage of high-level radioactive waste in rock salt

    Ramthun, H.

    1981-08-01

    A final disposal concept is assumed where the high-active waste from 1400 t of uranium, remaining after conditioning, is solidified in borosilicate glass and distributed in 1.760 waste casks. These containers 1.2 m in height and 0.3 m in diameter are to be buried 10 years after the fuel is removed from the reactor in the 300 m deep boreholes of a salt dome. For this design the mean absorbed dose rates are calculated in the glass die (3.9 Gy/s), the steel mantle (0.26 Gy/s) and in the salt rock (0.12 Gy/s at a distance of 1 cm and 0.034 Gy/s at a distance of 9 cm from the container surface) valid at the beginning of disposal. The risk involved with these amounts of stored lattice energy is shortly discussed. (orig.) [de

  8. A determination of the absolute radiant energy of a Robertson-Berger meter sunburn unit

    DeLuisi, John J.; Harris, Joyce M.

    Data from a Robertson-Berger (RB) sunburn meter were compared with concurrent measurements obtained with an ultraviolet double monochromator (DM), and the absolute energy of one sunburn unit measured by the RB-meter was determined. It was found that at a solar zenith angle of 30° one sunburn unit (SU) is equivalent to 35 ± 4 mJ cm -2, and at a solar zenith angle of 69°, one SU is equivalent to 20 ± 2 mJ cm -2 (relative to a wavelength of 297 nm), where the rate of change is non-linear. The deviation is due to the different response functions of the RB-meter and the DM system used to simulate the response of human skin to the incident u.v. solar spectrum. The average growth rate of the deviation with increasing solar zenith angle was found to be 1.2% per degree between solar zenith angles 30 and 50° and 2.3% per degree between solar zenith angles 50 and 70°. The deviations of response with solar zenith angle were found to be consistent with reported RB-meter characteristics.

  9. Mathematical modelling, variational formulation and numerical simulation of the energy transfer process in a gray plate in the presence of a thermal radiant source

    Gama, R.M.S. da.

    1992-05-01

    The energy transfer process in a gray, opaque and rigid plate, heated by an external thermal radiant source, is considered. The source is regarded as a spherical black body, with radius a (a → 0) and uniform heat generation, placed above the plate. A mathematical model is constructed, assuming that the heat transfer from/to the plate takes place by thermal radiation. The obtained mathematical model is nonlinear. Is presented a suitable variational principle which is employed for simulating some particular cases. (author)

  10. Radiant cooling of an enclosure

    Chebihi, Abdeslam; Byun, Ki-Hong; Wen Jin; Smith, Theodore F.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the potential for radiant cooling using the atmospheric sky window and to evaluate the desired characteristics of a radiant cooling material (RCM) applied to the ceiling window of a three-dimensional enclosure. The thermal characteristics of the system are governed by the geometry, ambient temperature, sky radiative temperature, amount of solar energy and its direction, heat transfer modes, wall radiative properties, and radiative properties of the RCMs. A semi-gray band analysis is utilized for the solar and infrared bands. The radiosity/irradiation method is used in each band to evaluate the radiant exchanges in the enclosure. The radiative properties for the RCM are varied in a parametric study to identify the desired properties of RCMs. For performance simulation of real RCMs, the radiative properties are calculated from spectral data. The desired solar property is a high reflectance for both opaque and semi-transparent RCMs. For a semi-transparent RCM, a low value of the solar transmittance is preferred. The desired infrared property is a high emittance for an opaque RCM. For a semi-transparent RCM, a high infrared transmittance is desired, and the emittance should be greater than zero

  11. Radiant heating of petroleum reservoirs; Aquecimento radiante de reservatorios petroliferos

    Sidrim, Fernando A.C.

    1990-12-31

    This work presents a proposal of a simplified model for the enhanced oil recovery process through radiant heating of oil reservoirs. The resulting continuity, energy and motion equations were solved analytically for the prediction of the increase in well flow rates. The heat loss to adjacent formations and the necessary for the establishment of the temperature profile,which are transient terms of energy equation, have been neglected. Also, no temperature gradient in the axial direction has been modelled as a cylindrical wave propagating in a loss medium. It is concluded that: the inclusion of a radial conduction term in the energy equation led to higher flow rates than the ones predicted by the literature existing solution; if the absorption coefficient is too large, it is profitable to dry the reservoir around the well bore; the transient terms in the energy equation are significant for extended periods of well production. 47 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Radiant Floor Cooling Systems

    Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2008-01-01

    In many countries, hydronic radiant floor systems are widely used for heating all types of buildings such as residential, churches, gymnasiums, hospitals, hangars, storage buildings, industrial buildings, and smaller offices. However, few systems are used for cooling.This article describes a floor...... cooling system that includes such considerations as thermal comfort of the occupants, which design parameters will influence the cooling capacity and how the system should be controlled. Examples of applications are presented....

  13. Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) algorithm theoretical basis document. volume 2; Geolocation, calibration, and ERBE-like analyses (subsystems 1-3)

    Wielicki, B. A. (Principal Investigator); Barkstrom, B. R. (Principal Investigator); Charlock, T. P.; Baum, B. A.; Green, R. N.; Minnis, P.; Smith, G. L.; Coakley, J. A.; Randall, D. R.; Lee, R. B., III

    1995-01-01

    The theoretical bases for the Release 1 algorithms that will be used to process satellite data for investigation of the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) are described. The architecture for software implementation of the methodologies is outlined. Volume 2 details the techniques used to geolocate and calibrate the CERES scanning radiometer measurements of shortwave and longwave radiance to invert the radiances to top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) and surface fluxes following the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) approach, and to average the fluxes over various time and spatial scales to produce an ERBE-like product. Spacecraft ephemeris and sensor telemetry are used with calibration coefficients to produce a chronologically ordered data product called bidirectional scan (BDS) radiances. A spatially organized instrument Earth scan product is developed for the cloud-processing subsystem. The ERBE-like inversion subsystem converts BDS radiances to unfiltered instantaneous TOA and surface fluxes. The TOA fluxes are determined by using established ERBE techniques. Hourly TOA fluxes are computed from the instantaneous values by using ERBE methods. Hourly surface fluxes are estimated from TOA fluxes by using simple parameterizations based on recent research. The averaging process produces daily, monthly-hourly, and monthly means of TOA and surface fluxes at various scales. This product provides a continuation of the ERBE record.

  14. Influence of radiant energy exchange on the determination of convective heat transfer rates to Orbiter leeside surfaces during entry

    Throckmorton, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Temperatures measured at the aerodynamic surface of the Orbiter's thermal protection system (TPS), and calorimeter measurements, are used to determine heating rates to the TPS surface during atmospheric entry. On the Orbiter leeside, where convective heating rates are low, it is possible that a significant portion of the total energy input may result from solar radiation, and for the wing, cross radiation from the hot (relatively) Orbiter fuselage. In order to account for the potential impact of these sources, values of solar- and cross-radiation heat transfer are computed, based upon vehicle trajectory and attitude information and measured surface temperatures. Leeside heat-transfer data from the STS-2 mission are presented, and the significance of solar radiation and fuselage-to-wing cross-radiation contributions to total energy input to Orbiter leeside surfaces is assessed.

  15. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF CEILING RADIANT COOLING SYSTEM IN COMPOSITE CLIMATE

    Sharma, Anuj [Malaviya National Institute of Technology (MNIT), Jaipur, India; Mathur, Jyotirmay [Malaviya National Institute of Technology (MNIT), Jaipur, India; Bhandari, Mahabir S [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Radiant cooling systems are proving to be an energy efficient solution due to higher thermal capacity of cooling fluid especially for the buildings that require individual zone controls and where the latent loads are moderate. The Conventional air conditioners work at very low temperature i.e.5-8 c (refrigerant evaporator inlet) while the radiant cooling systems, also referred as high temperature cooling system, work at high temperatures i.e. 14-18 c. The radiant cooling systems can maintain lower MRT (Mean Radiant Temperature) as ceiling panels maintain uniform temperature gradient inside room and provide higher human comfort. The radiant cooling systems are relatively new systems and their operation and energy savings potential are not quantified for a large number of buildings and operational parameters. Moreover, there are only limited numbers of whole building simulation studies have been carried out for these systems to have a full confidence in the capability of modelling tools to simulate these systems and predict the impact of various operating parameters. Theoretically, savings achieve due to higher temperature set point of chilled water, which reduces chiller-running time. However, conventional air conditioner runs continuously to maintain requisite temperature. In this paper, experimental study for performance evaluation of radiant cooling system carried out on system installed at Malaviya National Institute of Technology Jaipur. This paper quantifies the energy savings opportunities and effective temperature by radiant cooling system at different chilled water flow rates and temperature range. The data collected/ analysed through experimental study will used for calibration and validation of system model of building prepared in building performance simulation software. This validated model used for exploring optimized combinations of key parameters for composite climate. These optimized combinations will used in formulation of radiant cooling system

  16. Radiant absorption characteristics of corrugated curved tubes

    Đorđević Milan Lj.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of modern paraboloidal concentrators for conversion of solar radiation into heat energy requires the development and implementation of compact and efficient heat absorbers. Accurate estimation of geometry influence on absorption characteristics of receiver tubes is an important step in this process. This paper deals with absorption characteristics of heat absorber made of spirally coiled tubes with transverse circular corrugations. Detailed 3-D surface-to-surface Hemicube method was applied to compare radiation performances of corrugated and smooth curved tubes. The numerical results were obtained by varying the tube curvature ratio and incident radiant heat flux intensity. The details of absorption efficiency of corrugated tubes and the effect of curvature on absorption properties for both corrugated and smooth tubes were presented. The results may have significance to further analysis of highly efficient heat absorbers exposed to concentrated radiant heating. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 42006

  17. Radiant exchange in partially specular architectural environments

    Beamer, C. Walter; Muehleisen, Ralph T.

    2003-10-01

    The radiant exchange method, also known as radiosity, was originally developed for thermal radiative heat transfer applications. Later it was used to model architectural lighting systems, and more recently it has been extended to model acoustic systems. While there are subtle differences in these applications, the basic method is based on solving a system of energy balance equations, and it is best applied to spaces with mainly diffuse reflecting surfaces. The obvious drawback to this method is that it is based around the assumption that all surfaces in the system are diffuse reflectors. Because almost all architectural systems have at least some partially specular reflecting surfaces in the system it is important to extend the radiant exchange method to deal with this type of surface reflection. [Work supported by NSF.

  18. Thermal model of attic systems with radiant barriers

    Wilkes, K.E.

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes the first phase of a project to model the thermal performance of radiant barriers. The objective of this phase of the project was to develop a refined model for the thermal performance of residential house attics, with and without radiant barriers, and to verify the model by comparing its predictions against selected existing experimental thermal performance data. Models for the thermal performance of attics with and without radiant barriers have been developed and implemented on an IBM PC/AT computer. The validity of the models has been tested by comparing their predictions with ceiling heat fluxes measured in a number of laboratory and field experiments on attics with and without radiant barriers. Cumulative heat flows predicted by the models were usually within about 5 to 10 percent of measured values. In future phases of the project, the models for attic/radiant barrier performance will be coupled with a whole-house model and further comparisons with experimental data will be made. Following this, the models will be utilized to provide an initial assessment of the energy savings potential of radiant barriers in various configurations and under various climatic conditions. 38 refs., 14 figs., 22 tabs.

  19. A full-scale experimental set-up for assessing the energy performance of radiant wall and active chilled beam for cooling buildings

    Le Dreau, Jerome; Heiselberg, Per; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2015-01-01

    in decreasing the cooling need of the radiant wall compared to the active chilled beam. It has also been observed that the type and repartition of heat load have an influence on the cooling demand. Regarding the comfort level, both terminals met the general requirements, except at high solar heat gains......: overheating has been observed due to the absence of solar shading and the limited cooling capacity of the terminals. No local discomfort has been observed although some segments of the thermal manikin were slightly colder....

  20. Performance evaluation of radiant cooling system application on a university building in Indonesia

    Satrio, Pujo; Sholahudin, S.; Nasruddin

    2017-03-01

    The paper describes a study developed to estimate the energy savings potential of a radiant cooling system installed in an institutional building in Indonesia. The simulations were carried out using IESVE to evaluate thermal performance and energy consumption The building model was calibrated using the measured data for the installed radiant system. Then this calibrated model was used to simulate the energy consumption and temperature distribution to determine the proportional energy savings and occupant comfort under different systems. The result was radiant cooling which integrated with a Dedicated Outside Air System (DOAS) could make 41,84% energy savings compared to the installed cooling system. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation showed that a radiant system integrated with DOAS provides superior human comfort than a radiant system integrated with Variable Air Volume (VAV). Percentage People Dissatisfied was kept below 10% using the proposed system.

  1. Radiant recuperator modelling and design

    Knežević Suzana D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recuperators are frequently used in glass production and metallurgical processes to preheat combustion air by heat exchange with high temperature flue gases. Mass and energy balances of a 15 m high, concurrent radiant recuperator used in a glass fiber production process are given. The balances are used: for validation of a cell modeling method that predicts the performance of different recuperator designs, and for finding a simple solution to improve the existing recuperator. Three possible solutions are analyzed: to use the existing recuperator as a countercurrent one, to add an extra cylinder over the existing construction, and to make a system that consists of a central pipe and two concentric annular ducts. In the latter, two air streams flow in opposite directions, whereas air in the inner annular passage flows concurrently or countercurrently to flue gases. Compared with the concurrent recuperator, the countercurrent has only one drawback: the interface temperature is higher at the bottom. The advantages are: lower interface temperature at the top where the material is under maximal load, higher efficiency, and smaller pressure drop. Both concurrent and countercurrent double pipe-in-pipe systems are only slightly more efficient than pure concurrent and countercurrent recuperators, respectively. Their advantages are smaller interface temperatures whereas the disadvantages are their costs and pressure drops. To implement these solutions, the average velocities should be: for flue gas around 5 m/s, for air in the first passage less than 2 m/s, and for air in the second passage more than 25 m/s. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. EE 33027

  2. Radiant Heating and Cooling Systems. Part one

    Kim, Kwan Woo; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2015-01-01

    The use of radiant heating systems has several thousand years of history.1,2 The early stage of radiant system application was for heating purposes, where hot air from flue gas (cooking, fires) was circulated under floors or in walls. After the introduction of plastic piping water-based radiant...

  3. Energy paper II: Nuclear energy revival

    Anonymous

    2008-01-01

    ESI Energy paper is called 'Issue Paper' awarded by think-tank Energy Security Institute. The second issue focuses on the energy security of countries from the perspective of Renaissance of construction of nuclear power plants. Topicality is documented by fluctuations in fossil fuel prices on the world commodity markets and by extortionate potential, disposed by their main producers. The Slovak Republic is actively engaged into international dialogue on the need for the development of nuclear energy.

  4. Radiant floor cooling coupled with dehumidification systems in residential buildings: A simulation-based analysis

    Zarrella, Angelo; De Carli, Michele; Peretti, Clara

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The floor radiant cooling in a typical apartment is analyzed. • Dehumidification devices, fan-coil and mechanical ventilation are compared. • The results are analyzed in terms of both thermal comfort and energy consumption. • The energy consumption of the dehumidifiers is higher than that of other systems. • The mechanical ventilation decreases the moisture level better than other systems. - Abstract: The development of radiant cooling has stimulated an interest in new systems based on coupling ventilation with radiant cooling. However, radiant cooling systems may cause condensation to form on an active surface under warm and humid conditions during the cooling season. This phenomenon occurs when surface temperature falls below dew point. To prevent condensation, air humidity needs to be reduced with a dehumidification device or a mechanical ventilation system. There are two main options to achieve this. The first is to use dehumidification devices that reduce humidity, but are not coupled with ventilation, i.e. devices that handle room air and leave air change to infiltrations. The second is to combine a mechanical ventilation system with dehumidifying finned coils. This study analyzes the floor radiant cooling of a typical residential apartment within a multi-storey building in three Italian climate zones by means of a detailed simulation tool. Five systems were compared in terms of both indoor thermal comfort and energy consumption: radiant cooling without dehumidification; radiant cooling with a soft dehumidification device; radiant cooling with a dehumidification device which also supplies sensible cooling; radiant cooling coupled with fan coils; and radiant cooling with a mechanical ventilation system which dehumidifies and cools

  5. Energy determination at BEPC-II

    Achasov, M.N.; Blinov, V.E.; Bogomyagkov, A.V.; Fu ChengDong; Harris, F.A.; Kaminsky, V.V.; Liu, Q.; Mo Xiaohu; Muchnoi, N.Yu.; Nikitin, S.A.; Nikolaev, I.B.; Qin Qing; Qu Huamin; Olsen, S.L.; Pyata, E.E.; Shamov, A.G.; Shen, C.P.; Varner, G.S.; Wang Yifang; Xu Jinqiang

    2009-01-01

    The BEPC-II collider beam energy calibration system is discussed. The system is based on the Compton backscattering method. The expected precision of the electron and positron beam energy ε determination is δε/ε∼3.10 -5 .

  6. Radiant zone heated particulate filter

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2011-12-27

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter including an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A radiant zoned heater includes N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones includes M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones, restricts exhaust gas flow in a portion of the PM filter that corresponds to the selected one of the N zones, and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

  7. Subjective evaluation of different ventilation concepts combined with radiant heating and cooling

    Krajcik, Michal; Tomasi, Roberta; Simone, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Sixteen subjects evaluated the indoor environment in four experiments with different combinations of ventilation and radiant heating/cooling systems. Two test setups simulated a room in a low energy building with a single occupant during winter. The room was equipped either by a ventilation system...... supplying warm air space heating or by a combination of radiant floor heating and mixing ventilation system. Next two test setups simulated an office room with two occupants during summer, ventilated and cooled by a single displacement ventilation system or by a radiant floor cooling combined...

  8. Advanced radiant combustion system. Final report, September 1989--September 1996

    Sullivan, J.D.; Carswell, M.G.; Long, F.S.

    1996-09-01

    Results of the Advanced Radiant Combustion System (ARCS) project are presented in this report. This work was performed by Alzeta Corporation as prime contractor under a contract to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technologies as part of a larger DOE program entitled Research Program for Advanced Combustion Systems. The goals of the Alzeta ARCS project were to (a) Improve the high temperature performance characteristics of porous surface ceramic fiber burners, (b) Develop an Advanced Radiant Combustion System (ARCS) that combines combustion controls with an advanced radiant burner, and (c) Demonstrate the advanced burner and controls in an industrial application. Prior to the start of this project, Alzeta had developed and commercialized a porous surface radiant burner, the Pyrocore{trademark} burner. The product had been commercially available for approximately 5 years and had achieved commercial success in a number of applications ranging from small burners for commercial cooking equipment to large burners for low temperature industrial fluid heating applications. The burner was not recommended for use in applications with process temperatures above 1000{degrees}F, which prevented the burner from being used in intermediate to high temperature processes in the chemical and petroleum refining industries. The interest in increasing the maximum use temperature of the burner was motivated in part by a desire to expand the number of applications that could use the Pyrocore product, but also because many of the fluid sensitive heating applications of interest would benefit from the distributed flux characteristic of porous surface burners. Background information on porous surface radiant burners, and a discussion of advantages that would be provided by an improved product, are presented in Section 2.

  9. Experimental evaluation of an active solar thermoelectric radiant wall system

    Liu, ZhongBing; Zhang, Ling; Gong, GuangCai; Han, TianHe

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel active solar thermoelectric radiant wall are proposed and tested. • The novel wall can control thermal flux of building envelope by using solar energy. • The novel wall can eliminate building envelop thermal loads and provide cooling capacity for space cooling. • Typical application issues including connection strategies, coupling with PV system etc. are discussed. - Abstract: Active solar thermoelectric radiant wall (ASTRW) system is a new solar wall technology which integrates thermoelectric radiant cooling and photovoltaic (PV) technologies. In ASTRW system, a PV system transfers solar energy directly into electrical energy to power thermoelectric cooling modes. Both the thermoelectric cooling modes and PV system are integrated into one enclosure surface as radiant panel for space cooling and heating. Hence, ASTRW system presents fundamental shift from minimizing building envelope energy losses by optimizing the insulation thickness to a new regime where active solar envelop is designed to eliminate thermal loads and increase the building’s solar gains while providing occupant comfort in all seasons. This article presents an experimental study of an ASTRW system with a dimension of 1580 × 810 mm. Experimental results showed that the inner surface temperature of the ASTRW is 3–8 °C lower than the indoor temperature of the test room, which indicated that the ASTRW system has the ability to control thermal flux of building envelope by using solar energy and reduce the air conditioning system requirements. Based on the optimal operating current of TE modules and the analysis based upon PV modeling theories, the number and type of the electrical connections for the TE modules in ASTRW system are discussed in order to get an excellent performance in the operation of the ASTRW system

  10. PBFA II energy storage section design

    Wilson, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    PBFA II will be the second thirty-six module accelerator built at Sandia National Laboratories for particle beam fusion feasibility studies. Each module of the machine will deliver 2.8 terawatts to a central experimental chamber. The total power delivered (100 terawatts) is expected to permit ignition scaling studies beginning in 1986. The PBFA II energy storage system consists of thirty-six 6.0 mv, 400 kj. Marx generators with their high voltage trigger and charging systems, and electromechanical output switching system. The paper describes the current design of this section of the machine. Constraints imposed by the existing tank and building are presented, as they relate to locating support systems in the oil section of PBFA II. The charging system and output switches have been designed and are described. A conceptual design for the Marx triggering system is also presented. Additional hardware (monitors, grounding connections, etc.) is discussed briefly with design details given where available

  11. Radiant Heat Transfer in Reusable Surface Insulation

    Hughes, T. A.; Linford, R. M. F.; Chmitt, R. J.; Christensen, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    During radiant testing of mullite panels, temperatures in the insulation and support structure exceeded those predicted on the basis of guarded hot plate thermal conductivity tests. Similar results were obtained during arc tunnel tests of mullite specimens. The differences between effective conductivity and guarded hot plate values suggested that radiant transfer through the mullite was occurring. To study the radiant transport, measurements were made of the infrared transmission through various insulating materials and fibers of interest to the shuttle program, using black body sources over the range of 780 to 2000 K. Experimental data were analyzed and scattering coefficients were derived for a variety of materials, fiber diameters, and source temperature.

  12. Exergy metrication of radiant panel heating and cooling with heat pumps

    Kilkis, Birol

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Rational Exergy Management Model analytically relates heat pumps and radiant panels. ► Heat pumps driven by wind energy perform better with radiantpanels. ► Better CO 2 mitigation is possible with wind turbine, heat pump, radiant panel combination. ► Energy savings and thermo-mechanical performance are directly linked to CO 2 emissions. - Abstract: Radiant panels are known to be energy efficient sensible heating and cooling systems and a suitable fit for low-exergy buildings. This paper points out the little known fact that this may not necessarily be true unless their low-exergy demand is matched with low-exergy waste and alternative energy resources. In order to further investigate and metricate this condition and shed more light on this issue for different types of energy resources and energy conversion systems coupled to radiant panels, a new engineering metric was developed. Using this metric, which is based on the Rational Exergy Management Model, true potential and benefits of radiant panels coupled to ground-source heat pumps were analyzed. Results provide a new perspective in identifying the actual benefits of heat pump technology in curbing CO 2 emissions and also refer to IEA Annex 49 findings for low-exergy buildings. Case studies regarding different scenarios are compared with a base case, which comprises a radiant panel system connected to a natural gas-fired condensing boiler in heating and a grid power-driven chiller in cooling. Results show that there is a substantial CO 2 emission reduction potential if radiant panels are optimally operated with ground-source heat pumps driven by renewable energy sources, or optimally matched with combined heat and power systems, preferably running on alternative fuels.

  13. Ten questions about radiant heating and cooling systems

    Rhee, Kyu-Nam; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Kim, Kwang Woo

    2017-01-01

    studies on RHC systems in terms of comfort, heat transfer analysis, energy simulation, control strategy, system configurations and so on. Many studies have demonstrated that the RHC system is a good solution to improve indoor environmental quality while reducing building energy consumption for heating......Radiant heating and cooling (RHC) systems are being increasingly applied not only in residential but also in non-residential buildings such as commercial buildings, education facilities, and even large scale buildings such as airport terminals. Furthermore, with the combined ventilation system used...

  14. Results from radiant treatment in no Hodgkin's lymphomas of adults

    Alert, J.; Rodriguez, E.; Mesa, E.; Diaz, C.

    1982-01-01

    From 1973 to 1979, at the Institute of Oncology and Radiobiology, Havana City, 91 adults were irradiated because they underwent no Hodgkin's lymphomas at Stage I (located) and Stage II (regional extension) to whom radiant treatment was the basic therapeutic selection, with single or multiple fields and dose ranging between 3 500 and 4 000 rads-tumor, and some of them at Stage III, where primary treatment was chemotherapy. Present survival for all of them after 3 and 5 years is 55.7% and 54.7%, with 84.4% for patients at Stage I, 55.8% and 52.4% for Stage II and 33.8% for Stage III. Survival was similar for both sexes; in the same way ganglionar processes and those of extraganglionar localization presented no significant survival differences. Only to 7 patients (7.7%) modular forms were diagnosed. (author)

  15. Airflow and Heat Transfer in the Slot-Vented Room with Radiant Floor Heating Unit

    Xiang-Long Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiant floor heating has received increasing attention due to its diverse advantages, especially the energy saving as compared to the conventional dwelling heating system. This paper presents a numerical investigation of airflow and heat transfer in the slot-vented room with the radiant floor heating unit. Combination of fluid convection and thermal radiation has been implemented through the thermal boundary conditions. Spatial distributions of indoor air temperature and velocity, as well as the heat transfer rates along the radiant floor and the outer wall, have been presented and analyzed covering the domains from complete natural convection to forced convection dominated flows. The numerical results demonstrate that the levels of average temperature in the room with lateral slot-ventilation are higher than those without slot-ventilation, but lower than those in the room with ceiling slot-ventilation. Overall, the slot-ventilation room with radiant floor heating unit could offer better indoor air quality through increasing the indoor air temperature and fresh air exchanging rate simultaneously. Concerning the airborne pollutant transports and moisture condensations, the performance of radiant floor heating unit will be further optimized in our future researches.

  16. Numerical Model and Experimental Analysis of the Thermal Behavior of Electric Radiant Heating Panels

    Giovanni Ferrarini

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Electric radiant heating panels are frequently selected during the design phase of residential and industrial heating systems, especially for retrofit of existing buildings, as an alternative to other common heating systems, such as radiators or air conditioners. The possibility of saving living and working space and the ease of installation are the main advantages of electric radiant solutions. This paper investigates the thermal performance of a typical electric radiant panel. A climatic room was equipped with temperature sensors and heat flow meters to perform a steady state experimental analysis. For the dynamic behavior, a mathematical model was created and compared to a thermographic measurement procedure. The results showed for the steady state an efficiency of energy transformation close to one, while in a transient thermal regime the time constant to reach the steady state condition was slightly faster than the typical ones of hydronic systems.

  17. Electric radiant heating : a hot profitable idea

    Lemieux, G. [Britech Corp., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2006-09-15

    Due to the high cost of heating oil, natural gas and propane, floor mounted radiant heating systems are now proving to be a cost effective method of heating homes. The systems provide evenly distributed heat across the entire floor area. Unlike hydronic floor systems, radiant floor systems require no maintenance, and are easy to control because no mechanical rooms or boilers are required. The system is comprised of a series of resistant heating cables, a thermostat, and a solid state relay. The cables are installed in a poured concrete pad. Separate temperature control devices are used to heat individual areas of floorspace. Building automation systems can also control the heating system by using simple ambient air- and floor-mounted sensors in conjunction with relays to energize the heating cables. The cost of thermostats and heating cables to heat a standard 2000 square foot home are estimated at $9000.00, with an additional 64 hours of installation costs. It was noted that the systems may prove to be less costly in the long-term than hydronic systems, which require additional boilers, pumps and water treatments. Electric radiant heating can be an even more cost-effective application when used with thermal storage heating applications that use lower-cost off-peak electricity to generate and store heat in concrete floor slabs or ceramic bricks contained in insulated cabinets. It was concluded that radiant heating systems are a viable and cost-effective alternative to expensive hydronic systems, which are costly to install and maintain. 4 figs.

  18. Measurement of radiant properties of ceramic foam

    Hoornstra, J.; Turecky, M.; Maatman, D.

    1994-07-01

    An experimental facility is described for the measurement of the normal spectral and total emissivity and transmissivity of semi-transparent materials in the temperature range of 600 C to 1200 C. The set-up was used for the measurement of radiation properties of highly porous ceramic foam which is used in low NO x radiant burners. Emissivity and transmissivity data were measured and are presented for coated and uncoated ceramic foam of different thicknesses. (orig.)

  19. The effects of different footprint sizes and cloud algorithms on the top-of-atmosphere radiative flux calculation from the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES instrument on Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP

    W. Su

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Only one Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES instrument is onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP and it has been placed in cross-track mode since launch; it is thus not possible to construct a set of angular distribution models (ADMs specific for CERES on NPP. Edition 4 Aqua ADMs are used for flux inversions for NPP CERES measurements. However, the footprint size of NPP CERES is greater than that of Aqua CERES, as the altitude of the NPP orbit is higher than that of the Aqua orbit. Furthermore, cloud retrievals from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, which are the imagers sharing the spacecraft with NPP CERES and Aqua CERES, are also different. To quantify the flux uncertainties due to the footprint size difference between Aqua CERES and NPP CERES, and due to both the footprint size difference and cloud property difference, a simulation is designed using the MODIS pixel-level data, which are convolved with the Aqua CERES and NPP CERES point spread functions (PSFs into their respective footprints. The simulation is designed to isolate the effects of footprint size and cloud property differences on flux uncertainty from calibration and orbital differences between NPP CERES and Aqua CERES. The footprint size difference between Aqua CERES and NPP CERES introduces instantaneous flux uncertainties in monthly gridded NPP CERES measurements of less than 4.0 W m−2 for SW (shortwave and less than 1.0 W m−2 for both daytime and nighttime LW (longwave. The global monthly mean instantaneous SW flux from simulated NPP CERES has a low bias of 0.4 W m−2 when compared to simulated Aqua CERES, and the root-mean-square (RMS error is 2.2 W m−2 between them; the biases of daytime and nighttime LW flux are close to zero with RMS errors of 0.8 and 0.2 W m−2. These uncertainties are within the uncertainties of CERES ADMs

  20. Electric radiant heating or, why are plumbers getting our work?

    Lemieux, G. [Britech, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2009-02-15

    Electric radiant heating (ERH) technologies are now being installed in floors as a means of reducing heating costs. The radiant installations have seen a large increase in sales over the last decade, and are now being used in commercial applications. Sales of hydronic ERH systems have increased by 24 per cent over the last year. ERH systems are energy efficient and do not cause drafts. The systems consist of resistant heating cables installed within the floors of a room. The cables are supplied as loose cables and tracks with predetermined spacings or rugged, heavier cable that can be stapled onto wooden subfloors. Program temperature setbacks can be applied on a room-by-room basis. Electric thermal storage systems allow building owners to store heat in the floors and are ideal for use in combination with time-of-use electric metering. Some electric utilities are now promoting the use of electric thermal storage in order to reduce demand during peak times. Thermostats used with the systems should have floor sensors and ambient air sensors to control space heating in conjunction with the floor sensor. It was concluded that electrical contractors who gain knowledge in the application and installation of the systems will tap into a growing revenue stream. 5 figs.

  1. Electric radiant heating or, why are plumbers getting our work?

    Lemieux, G.

    2009-01-01

    Electric radiant heating (ERH) technologies are now being installed in floors as a means of reducing heating costs. The radiant installations have seen a large increase in sales over the last decade, and are now being used in commercial applications. Sales of hydronic ERH systems have increased by 24 per cent over the last year. ERH systems are energy efficient and do not cause drafts. The systems consist of resistant heating cables installed within the floors of a room. The cables are supplied as loose cables and tracks with predetermined spacings or rugged, heavier cable that can be stapled onto wooden subfloors. Program temperature setbacks can be applied on a room-by-room basis. Electric thermal storage systems allow building owners to store heat in the floors and are ideal for use in combination with time-of-use electric metering. Some electric utilities are now promoting the use of electric thermal storage in order to reduce demand during peak times. Thermostats used with the systems should have floor sensors and ambient air sensors to control space heating in conjunction with the floor sensor. It was concluded that electrical contractors who gain knowledge in the application and installation of the systems will tap into a growing revenue stream. 5 figs

  2. Dynamic heat transfer modeling and parametric study of thermoelectric radiant cooling and heating panel system

    Luo, Yongqiang; Zhang, Ling; Liu, Zhongbing; Wang, Yingzi; Wu, Jing; Wang, Xiliang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Dynamic model of thermoelectric radiant panel system is established. • The internal parameters of thermoelectric module are dynamically calculated in simulation. • Both artificial neural networks model and system model are verified through experiment data. • Optimized system structure is obtained through parametric study. - Abstract: Radiant panel system can optimize indoor thermal comfort with lower energy consumption. The thermoelectric radiant panel (TERP) system is a new and effective prototype of radiant system using thermoelectric module (TEM) instead of conventional water pipes, as heat source. The TERP can realize more stable and easier system control as well as lower initial and operative cost. In this study, an improved system dynamic model was established by combining analytical system model and artificial neural networks (ANN) as well as the dynamic calculation functions of internal parameters of TEM. The double integral was used for the calculation of surface average temperature of TERP. The ANN model and system model were in good agreement with experiment data in both cooling and heating mode. In order to optimize the system design structure, parametric study was conducted in terms of the thickness of aluminum panel and insulation, as well as the arrangement of TEMs on the surface of radiant panel. It was found through simulation results that the optimum thickness of aluminum panel and insulation are respectively around 1–2 mm and 40–50 mm. In addition, TEMs should be uniformly installed on the surface of radiant panel and each TEM should stand at the central position of a square-shaped typical region with length around 0.387–0.548 m.

  3. North America - The Energy Picture II

    2006-01-01

    investment include: o Energy savings projects o Renewable energy projects (geothermal, wind and micro - hydraulics Future Infrastructure... Servicio Público de Energía Eléctrica or LSPEE) was amended to allow private participation in generation activities. Article 3 of this Act lists

  4. Use of local convective and radiant cooling at warm environment

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Krejcirikova, Barbora; Kaczmarczyk, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The effect of four local cooling devices (convective, radiant and combined) on SBS symptoms reported by 24 subjects at 28 ˚C and 50% RH was studied. The devices studied were: (1) desk cooling fan, (2) personalized ventilation providing clean air, (3) two radiant panels and (4) two radiant panels...... and with radiant panel with attached fans, which also helped people to feel less fatigue. The SBS symptoms increased the most when the cooling fan, generating movement of polluted room air, was used....

  5. Compact Energy Conversion Module, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This STTR project delivers a compact vibration-based Energy Conversion Module (ECM) that powers sensors for purposes such as structural health monitoring (SHM). NASA...

  6. Study on coal char ignition by radiant heat flux.

    Korotkikh, A. G.; Slyusarskiy, K. V.

    2017-11-01

    The study on coal char ignition by CO2-continuous laser was carried out. The coal char samples of T-grade bituminous coal and 2B-grade lignite were studied via CO2-laser ignition setup. Ignition delay times were determined at ambient condition in heat flux density range 90-200 W/cm2. The average ignition delay time value for lignite samples were 2 times lower while this difference is larger in high heat flux region and lower in low heat flux region. The kinetic constants for overall oxidation reaction were determined using analytic solution of simplified one-dimensional heat transfer equation with radiant heat transfer boundary condition. The activation energy for lignite char was found to be less than it is for bituminous coal char by approximately 20 %.

  7. A RADIANT AIR-CONDITIONING SYSTEM USING SOLAR-DRIVEN

    S. A. ABDALLA

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Every air-conditioning system needs some fresh air to provide adequate ventilation air required to remove moisture, gases like ammonia and hydrogen sulphide, disease organisms, and heat from occupied spaces. However, natural ventilation is difficult to control because urban areas outside air is often polluted and cannot be supplied to inner spaces before being filtered. Besides the high electrical demand of refrigerant compression units used by most air-conditioning systems, and fans used to transport the cool air through the thermal distribution system draw a significant amount of electrical energy in comparison with electrical energy used by the building thermal conditioning systems. Part of this electricity heats the cooled air; thereby add to the internal thermal cooling peak load. In addition, refrigerant compression has both direct and indirect negative effects on the environment on both local and global scales. In seeking for innovative air-conditioning systems that maintain and improve indoor air quality under potentially more demanding performance criteria without increasing environmental impact, this paper presents radiant air-conditioning system which uses a solar-driven liquid desiccant evaporative cooler. The paper describes the proposed solar-driven liquid desiccant evaporative cooling system and the method used for investigating its performance in providing cold water for a radiant air-conditioning system in Khartoum (Central Sudan. The results of the investigation show that the system can operate in humid as well as dry climates and that employing such a system reduces air-conditioning peak electrical demands as compared to vapour compression systems.

  8. Caspian energy phase II: Beyond 2005

    Shaffer, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the major factors that will shape the second phase of Caspian oil and natural gas export. The article compares the prospects of the post-2005 period with the Caspian energy developments in the first decade and a half after independence. This article claims: One, political considerations will continue to play an important role in the decisions on export routes for and participants in Caspian energy production and export projects. However, those political considerations will produce different policies in phase two of Caspian energy production than they did in the first phase. Second, the relative influence and interest in the Caspian region of various global and regional powers have changed significantly from Caspian energy phase one to phase two. Third, the producers in the region are not as anxious for foreign investment as they were earlier. The major resources that will be developed in Caspian phase two are: new production of Azerbaijan's natural gas, extension to new markets and expansion of capacity of existing gas export routes; new production projects for Turkmenistan's natural gas and new pipelines; and additional Kazakhstani oil production and natural gas increased production and initiation of export.

  9. Surface radiant flux densities inferred from LAC and GAC AVHRR data

    Berger, F.; Klaes, D.

    To infer surface radiant flux densities from current (NOAA-AVHRR, ERS-1/2 ATSR) and future meteorological (Envisat AATSR, MSG, METOP) satellite data, the complex, modular analysis scheme SESAT (Strahlungs- und Energieflüsse aus Satellitendaten) could be developed (Berger, 2001). This scheme allows the determination of cloud types, optical and microphysical cloud properties as well as surface and TOA radiant flux densities. After testing of SESAT in Central Europe and the Baltic Sea catchment (more than 400scenes U including a detailed validation with various surface measurements) it could be applied to a large number of NOAA-16 AVHRR overpasses covering the globe.For the analysis, two different spatial resolutions U local area coverage (LAC) andwere considered. Therefore, all inferred results, like global area coverage (GAC) U cloud cover, cloud properties and radiant properties, could be intercompared. Specific emphasis could be made to the surface radiant flux densities (all radiative balance compoments), where results for different regions, like Southern America, Southern Africa, Northern America, Europe, and Indonesia, will be presented. Applying SESAT, energy flux densities, like latent and sensible heat flux densities could also be determined additionally. A statistical analysis of all results including a detailed discussion for the two spatial resolutions will close this study.

  10. Fixed, low radiant exposure vs. incremental radiant exposure approach for diode laser hair reduction: a randomized, split axilla, comparative single-blinded trial.

    Pavlović, M D; Adamič, M; Nenadić, D

    2015-12-01

    Diode lasers are the most commonly used treatment modalities for unwanted hair reduction. Only a few controlled clinical trials but not a single randomized controlled trial (RCT) compared the impact of various laser parameters, especially radiant exposure, onto efficacy, tolerability and safety of laser hair reduction. To compare the safety, tolerability and mid-term efficacy of fixed, low and incremental radiant exposures of diode lasers (800 nm) for axillary hair removal, we conducted an intrapatient, left-to-right, patient- and assessor-blinded and controlled trial. Diode laser (800 nm) treatments were evaluated in 39 study participants (skin type II-III) with unwanted axillary hairs. Randomization and allocation to split axilla treatments were carried out by a web-based randomization tool. Six treatments were performed at 4- to 6-week intervals with study subjects blinded to the type of treatment. Final assessment of hair reduction was conducted 6 months after the last treatment by means of blinded 4-point clinical scale using photographs. The primary endpoint was reduction in hair growth, and secondary endpoints were patient-rated tolerability and satisfaction with the treatment, treatment-related pain and adverse effects. Excellent reduction in axillary hairs (≥ 76%) at 6-month follow-up visit after receiving fixed, low and incremental radiant exposure diode laser treatments was obtained in 59% and 67% of study participants respectively (Z value: 1.342, P = 0.180). Patients reported lower visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score on the fixed (4.26) than on the incremental radiant exposure side (5.64) (P diode laser treatments were less painful and better tolerated. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  11. The Bogoliubov free energy functional II

    Napiórkowski, Marcin; Reuvers, Robin; Solovej, Jan Philip

    2018-01-01

    We analyse the canonical Bogoliubov free energy functional at low temperatures in the dilute limit. We prove existence of a first order phase transition and, in the limit $a_0\\to a$, we determine the critical temperature to be $T_{\\rm{c}}=T_{\\rm{fc}}(1+1.49(\\rho^{1/3}a))$ to leading order. Here, $T......_{\\rm{fc}}$ is the critical temperature of the free Bose gas, $\\rho$ is the density of the gas, $a$ is the scattering length of the pair-interaction potential $V$, and $a_0=(8\\pi)^{-1}\\widehat{V}(0)$ its first order approximation. We also prove asymptotic expansions for the free energy. In particular, we recover the Lee...

  12. Symmetry energy II: Isobaric analog states

    Danielewicz, Pawel; Lee, Jenny

    2014-02-01

    Using excitation energies to isobaric analog states (IAS) and charge invariance, we extract nuclear symmetry coefficients, representing a mass formula, on a nucleus-by-nucleus basis. Consistently with charge invariance, the coefficients vary weakly across an isobaric chain. However, they change strongly with nuclear mass and range from aa˜10 MeV at mass A˜10 to aa˜22 MeV at A˜240. Variation with mass can be understood in terms of dependence of nuclear symmetry energy on density and the rise in importance of low densities within nuclear surface in smaller systems. At A≳30, the dependence of coefficients on mass can be well described in terms of a macroscopic volume-surface competition formula with aaV≃33.2 MeV and aaS≃10.7 MeV. Our further investigation shows, though, that the fitted surface symmetry coefficient likely significantly underestimates that for the limit of half-infinite matter. Following the considerations of a Hohenberg-Kohn functional for nuclear systems, we determine how to find in practice the symmetry coefficient using neutron and proton densities, even when those densities are simultaneously affected by significant symmetry-energy and Coulomb effects. These results facilitate extracting the symmetry coefficients from Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (SHF) calculations, that we carry out using a variety of Skyrme parametrizations in the literature. For the parametrizations, we catalog novel short-wavelength instabilities. In our further analysis, we retain only those parametrizations which yield systems that are adequately stable both in the long- and short-wavelength limits. In comparing the SHF and IAS results for the symmetry coefficients, we arrive at narrow (±2.4 MeV) constraints on the symmetry-energy values S(ρ) at 0.04≲ρ≲0.13 fm. Towards normal density the constraints significantly widen, but the normal value of energy aaV and the slope parameter L are found to be strongly correlated. To narrow the constraints, we reach for the

  13. Radiant non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.

    2017-10-31

    A radiant, non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot exhaust gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is positioned adjacent to the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot exhaust gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is positioned outside of flue gas flow path for a relatively large residence time.

  14. Validation of the uncertainty budget for soft X-ray radiant power measurement using a cryogenic radiometer

    Rabus, H.; Klein, R.; Scholze, F.; Thornagel, R.; Ulm, G.

    2002-01-01

    The cryogenic radiometer SYRES, a thermal detector based on the electrical substitution principle, has been used as the primary detector standard for radiant power measurement in the ultraviolet, vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray spectral ranges. In order to investigate the possibility of radiant energy being deposited in its absorber cavity without being transformed into heat when detecting soft X-rays, SYRES has been directly compared with the electron storage ring BESSY 1, a primary radiometric source standard of calculable spectral radiant power. To this end, the integral radiant power emitted by the storage ring,into a solid angle defined by a high-precision aperture was measured with SYRES. The experiments were conducted at two nominal energies of the circulating electrons, 800 MeV and 340 MeV, to study the influence of the different spectral distributions of the synchrotron radiation. For the original graphite-coated cavity absorber, significant discrepancies were found which could be traced back to the ablation of the graphite coating from the copper cavity body. In the case of the new gold-coated cavity absorber, the calculated and measured values of the radiant power agreed in all experiments within the combined relative uncertainties of typically 2.5 x 10 -3 (k = 1). (author)

  15. Energy Levels, wavelengths and hyperfine structure measurements of Sc II

    Hala, Fnu; Nave, Gillian

    2018-01-01

    Lines of singly ionized Scandium (Sc II) along with other Iron group elements have been observed [1] in the region surrounding the massive star Eta Carinae [2,3] called the strontium filament (SrF). The last extensive analysis of Sc II was the four-decade old work of Johansson & Litzen [4], using low-resolution grating spectroscopy. To update and extend the Sc II spectra, we have made observation of Sc/Ar, Sc/Ne and Sc/Ge/Ar hollow cathode emission spectrum on the NIST high resolution FT700 UV/Vis and 2 m UV/Vis/IR Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS). More than 850 Sc II lines have been measured in the wavelength range of 187 nm to 3.2 μm. connecting a total of 152 energy levels. The present work also focuses to resolve hyperfine structure (HFS) in Sc II lines. We aim to obtain accurate transition wavelengths, improved energy levels and HFS constants of Sc II. The latest results from work in progress will be presented.Reference[1] Hartman H, Gull T, Johansson S and Smith N 2004 Astron. Astrophys. 419 215[2] Smith N, Morse J A and Gull T R 2004 Astrophys. J. 605 405[3] Davidson K and Humphreys R M 1997 Annu. Rev. Astron. Astrophys. 35[4] Johansson S and Litzén U 1980 Phys. Scr. 22 49

  16. Numerical analysis of diffuse ceiling ventilation and its integration with a radiant ceiling system

    Zhang, Chen; Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Chen, Qingyan

    2017-01-01

    A novel system combining diffuse ceiling ventilation and radiant ceiling was proposed recently, with the aim of providing energy efficient and comfort environment to office buildings. Designing of such a system is challenging because of complex interactions between the two subsystems and a large ......-uniformity air distribution and further led to the draught problem in the occupied zone. This system was recommended to apply in the small offices instead of large, open spaces....

  17. Error analysis of thermocouple measurements in the Radiant Heat Facility

    Nakos, J.T.; Strait, B.G.

    1980-12-01

    The measurement most frequently made in the Radiant Heat Facility is temperature, and the transducer which is used almost exclusively is the thermocouple. Other methods, such as resistance thermometers and thermistors, are used but very rarely. Since a majority of the information gathered at Radiant Heat is from thermocouples, a reasonable measure of the quality of the measurements made at the facility is the accuracy of the thermocouple temperature data

  18. Simplified Building Thermal Model Used for Optimal Control of Radiant Cooling System

    Lei He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MPC has the ability to optimize the system operation parameters for energy conservation. Recently, it has been used in HVAC systems for saving energy, but there are very few applications in radiant cooling systems. To implement MPC in buildings with radiant terminals, the predictions of cooling load and thermal environment are indispensable. In this paper, a simplified thermal model is proposed for predicting cooling load and thermal environment in buildings with radiant floor. In this thermal model, the black-box model is introduced to derive the incident solar radiation, while the genetic algorithm is utilized to identify the parameters of the thermal model. In order to further validate this simplified thermal model, simulated results from TRNSYS are compared with those from this model and the deviation is evaluated based on coefficient of variation of root mean square (CV. The results show that the simplified model can predict the operative temperature with a CV lower than 1% and predict cooling loads with a CV lower than 10%. For the purpose of supervisory control in HVAC systems, this simplified RC thermal model has an acceptable accuracy and can be used for further MPC in buildings with radiation terminals.

  19. Radiant heat testing of the H1224A shipping/storage container

    Harding, D.C.; Bobbe, J.G.; Stenberg, D.R.; Arviso, M.

    1994-05-01

    H1224A weapons containers have been used for years by the Departments of Energy and Defense to transport and store W78 warhead midsections. Although designed to protect the midsections only from low-energy impacts, a recent transportation risk assessment effort has identified a need to evaluate the container`s ability to protect weapons in more severe accident environments. Four radiant heat tests were performed: two each on an H1224A container (with a Mk12a Mod 6c mass mock-up midsection inside) and two on a low-cost simulated H1224A container (with a hollow Mk12 aeroshell midsections inside). For each unit tested, temperatures were recorded at numerous points throughout the container and midsection during a 4-hour 121{degrees}C (250{degrees}F) and 30-minute 1010{degrees}C (1850{degrees}F) radiant environment. Measured peak temperatures experienced by the inner walls of the midsections as a result of exposure to the high-temperature radiant environment ranged from 650{degrees} C to 980{degrees} C (1200{degrees} F to 1800{degrees}F) for the H1224A container and 770 {degrees} to 990 {degrees}C (1420{degrees} F to 1810{degrees}F) for the simulated container. The majority of both containers were completely destroyed during the high-temperature test. Temperature profiles will be used to benchmark analytical models and predict warhead midsection temperatures over a wide range of the thermal accident conditions.

  20. Analysis of excimer laser radiant exposure effect toward corneal ablation volume at LASIK procedure

    Adiati, Rima Fitria; Rini Rizki, Artha Bona; Kusumawardhani, Apriani; Setijono, Heru; Rahmadiansah, Andi

    2016-11-01

    LASIK (Laser Asissted In Situ Interlamelar Keratomilieusis) is a technique for correcting refractive disorders of the eye such as myopia and astigmatism using an excimer laser. This procedure use photoablation technique to decompose corneal tissues. Although preferred due to its efficiency, permanency, and accuracy, the inappropriate amount radiant exposure often cause side effects like under-over correction, irregular astigmatism and problems on surrounding tissues. In this study, the radiant exposure effect toward corneal ablation volume has been modelled through several processes. Data collecting results is laser data specifications with 193 nm wavelength, beam diameter of 0.065 - 0.65 cm, and fluence of 160 mJ/cm2. For the medical data, the myopia-astigmatism value, cornea size, corneal ablation thickness, and flap data are taken. The first modelling step is determining the laser diameter between 0.065 - 0.65 cm with 0.45 cm increment. The energy, power, and intensity of laser determined from laser beam area. Number of pulse and total energy is calculated before the radiant exposure of laser is obtained. Next is to determine the parameters influence the ablation volume. Regression method used to create the equation, and then the spot size is substituted to the model. The validation used is statistic correlation method to both experimental data and theory. By the model created, it is expected that any potential complications can be prevented during LASIK procedures. The recommendations can give the users clearer picture to determine the appropriate amount of radiant exposure with the corneal ablation volume necessary.

  1. Prediction of radiant heat flux from horizontal propane jet fire

    Zhou, Kuibin; Liu, Jiaoyan; Jiang, Juncheng

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Line source model for the radiant heat flux from horizontal jet fire is proposed. • A review on the difference between horizontal and vertical jet fires is conducted. • Effects of lift-off distance and flame shape are discussed for the line source model. • Line source model gives encouraging results relative to the validity of model system. - Abstract: Jet fires are often reported to occur in process industry with lots of hazardous heat energy released. A line source model describing the flame emissive power and subsequent heat flux radiated from a horizontal propane jet fire is evaluated through a testing against experimental fire data and comparison against other models. By a review on the jet flame behavior, the correlations of the lift-off distance, flame length and radiative fraction are proposed to close the line source model in theory. It is found that the fuel jet direction holds a considerable effect on the flame behavior by comparison between horizontal and vertical jet fires. Results indicate that the lift-off distance and the flame shape influence the model prediction to some extent. Comparison of model predictions against data collected in the near field and predictions from the point source model and multipoint source model gives encouraging results relative to the validity of model system.

  2. Radiant{trademark} Liquid Radioisotope Intravascular Radiation Therapy System

    Eigler, N.; Whiting, J.; Chernomorsky, A.; Jackson, J.; Knapp, F.F., Jr.; Litvack, F.

    1998-01-16

    RADIANT{trademark} is manufactured by United States Surgical Corporation, Vascular Therapies Division, (formerly Progressive Angioplasty Systems). The system comprises a liquid {beta}-radiation source, a shielded isolation/transfer device (ISAT), modified over-the-wire or rapid exchange delivery balloons, and accessory kits. The liquid {beta}-source is Rhenium-188 in the form of sodium perrhenate (NaReO{sub 4}), Rhenium-188 is primarily a {beta}-emitter with a physical half-life of 17.0 hours. The maximum energy of the {beta}-particles is 2.1 MeV. The source is produced daily in the nuclear pharmacy hot lab by eluting a Tungsten-188/Rhenium-188 generator manufactured by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Using anion exchange columns and Millipore filters the effluent is concentrated to approximately 100 mCi/ml, calibrated, and loaded into the (ISAT) which is subsequently transported to the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The delivery catheters are modified Champion{trademark} over-the-wire, and TNT{trademark} rapid exchange stent delivery balloons. These balloons have thickened polyethylene walls to augment puncture resistance; dual radio-opaque markers and specially configured connectors.

  3. Validation of the uncertainty budget for soft X-ray radiant power measurement using a cryogenic radiometer

    Rabus, H; Scholze, F; Thornagel, R; Ulm, G

    2002-01-01

    The cryogenic radiometer SYRES, a thermal detector based on the electrical substitution principle, has been used as the primary detector standard for radiant power measurement in the ultraviolet, vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray spectral ranges. In order to investigate the possibility of radiant energy being deposited in its absorber cavity without being transformed into heat when detecting soft X-rays, SYRES has been directly compared with the electron storage ring BESSY 1, a primary radiometric source standard of calculable spectral radiant power. To this end, the integral radiant power emitted by the storage ring,into a solid angle defined by a high-precision aperture was measured with SYRES. The experiments were conducted at two nominal energies of the circulating electrons, 800 MeV and 340 MeV, to study the influence of the different spectral distributions of the synchrotron radiation. For the original graphite-coated cavity absorber, significant discrepancies were found which could be traced back to th...

  4. Growth and solar energy conversion of Azolla sp., cultivated under four solar irradiance flux density; Crescimento e conversao da energia solar de Azolla sp. cultivada em quatro densidades do fluxo radiante

    Carvalho, E.F. de [Acre Univ., Rio Branco, AC (Brazil); Lopes, N.F. [Vicosa Univ., MG (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Vegetal

    1994-02-01

    Growth and solar energy conversion were studied in three Azolla species grown under four levels (30, 50, 70 and 100%) of solar radiation incidence under outdoor conditions. Under full sunlight, the specie A. microphylla showed higher crop growth rate, relative growth rate, net assimilation rate and efficiency of solar energy conversion than the other ones. (author). 8 figs., 23 refs.

  5. Experimental and Numerical Study of the Radiant Induction-Unit and the Induction Radiant Air-Conditioning System

    Qiang Si

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we proposed the novel air-conditioning system which combined induction ventilation and radiant air-conditioning. The indoor terminal device is the radiant induction-unit (RIDU. The RIDU is the induction unit combined with the pore radiant panel on which the copper pipes with rigid aluminum diffusion fins are installed. The two-stage evaporator chiller with the non-azeotropic mixture refrigerant is utilized in the system to reduce the initial investment in equipment. With the performance test and the steady state heat transfer model based on the theory of radiative heat transfer, the relationship between the induction ratio of the RIDU and the characteristic of the air supply was studied. Based on this, it is verified that the RIDU has a lower dew-point temperature and better anti-condensation performance than a traditional plate-type radiant panel. The characteristics of the radiation and convection heat transfer of the RIDU were studied. The total heat exchange of the RIDU can be 16.5% greater than that of the traditional plate-type radiant terminal.

  6. Wavelengths, energy levels and hyperfine structure of Mn II and Sc II.

    Nave, Gillian; Pickering, Juliet C.; Townley-Smith, Keeley I. M.; Hala, .

    2015-08-01

    For many decades, the Atomic Spectroscopy Groups at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Imperial College London (ICL) have measured atomic data of astronomical interest. Our spectrometers include Fourier transform (FT) spectrometers at NIST and ICL covering the region 1350 Å to 5.5 μm and a 10.7-m grating spectrometer at NIST covering wavelengths from 300 - 5000 Å. Sources for these spectra include high-current continuous and pulsed hollow cathode (HCL) lamps, Penning discharges, and sliding spark discharges. Recent work has focused on the measurement and analysis of wavelengths, energy levels, and hyperfine structure (HFS) constants for iron-group elements. The analysis of FT spectra of Cr I, Mn I, and Mn II is being led by ICL and is described in a companion poster [1]. Current work being led by NIST includes the analysis of HFS in Mn II, analysis of Mn II in the vacuum ultraviolet, and a comprehensive analysis of Sc II.Comprehensive HFS constants for Mn II are needed for the interpretation of stellar spectra and incorrect abundances may be obtained when HFS is omitted. Holt et al. [2] have measured HFS constants for 59 levels of Mn II using laser spectroscopy. We used FT spectra of Mn/Ni and Mn/Cu HCLs covering wavelength ranges from 1350 Å to 5.4 μm to confirm 26 of the A constants of Holt et al. and obtain values for roughly 40 additional levels. We aim to obtain HFS constants for the majority of lines showing significant HFS that are observed in chemically-peculiar stars.Spectra of Sc HCLs have been recorded from 1800 - 6700 Å using a vacuum ultraviolet FT spectrometer at NIST. Additional measurements to cover wavelengths above 6700 Å and below 1800 Å are in progress. The spectra are being analyzed by NIST and Alighar Muslim University, India in order to derive improved wavelengths, energy levels, and hyperfine structure parameters.This work was partially supported by NASA, the STFC and PPARC (UK), the Royal Society of the UK

  7. Beam Commissioning of the PEP-II High Energy Ring

    Wienands, U.; Anderson, S.; Assmann, R.; Bharadwaj, V.; Cai, Y.; Clendenin, J.; Corredoura, P.; Decker, F.J.; Donald, M.; Ecklund, S.; Emma, P.; Erickson, R.; Fox, J.; Fieguth, T.; Fisher, A.; Heifets, S.; Hill, A.; Himel, T.; Iverson, R.; Johnson, R.; Judkins, J.; Krejcik, P.; Kulikov, A.; Lee, M.; Mattison, T.; Minty, M.; Nosochkov, Y.; Phinney, N.; Placidi, M.; Prabhakar, S.; Ross, M.; Smith, S.; Schwarz, H.; Stanek, M.; Teytelman, D.; Traller, R.; Turner, J.; Zimmermann, F.; Barry, W.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Corlett, J.; Decking, W.; Furman, M.; Nishimura, H.; Portmann, G.; Rimmer, R.; Zholents, A.; Zisman, M.; Kozanecki, W.; Hofmann, A.; Zotter, B.; Steier, C.; Bialowons, W.; Lomperski, M.; Lumpkin, A.; Reichel, I.; Safranek, J.; Smith, V.; Tighe, R.; Sullivan, M.; Byrd, J.; Li, D.

    1998-01-01

    The PEP-II High Energy Ring (HER), a 9 GeV electron storage ring, has been in commissioning since spring 1997. Initial beam commissioning activities focused on systems checkout and commissioning and on determining the behavior of the machine systems at high beam currents. This phase culminated with the accumulation of 0.75 A of stored beam-sufficient to achieve design luminosity--in January 1998 after 3.5 months of beam time. Collisions with the 3 GeV positron beam of the Low Energy Ring (LER) were achieved in Summer of 1998. At high beam currents, collective instabilities have been seen. Since then, commissioning activities for the HER have shifted in focus towards characterization of the machine and a rigorous program to understand the machine and the beam dynamics is presently underway

  8. Beam energy loss to parasitic modes in SPEAR II

    Allen, M.A.; Paterson, J.M.; Rees, J.R.; Wilson, P.B.

    1975-01-01

    The energy loss due to the excitation of parasitic modes in the SPEAR II rf cavities and vacuum chamber components was measured by observing the shift in synchronous phase angle as a function of circulating beam current and accelerating cavity voltage. The resulting parasitic mode loss resistance is 5 M OMEGA at a bunch length of 6.5 cm. The loss resistance varies with bunch length sigma/sub z/ approximately as exp(-0.3 sigma/sub z/). If the measured result is compared with reasonable theoretical predictions, it may be inferred that the major portion of the parasitic loss takes place in ring vacuum components rather than in the rf cavities. (auth)

  9. Trends in the energy market after World War II (WW II)

    Swart, K.

    1992-01-01

    After WW II, trends developed in the energy markets that continued virtually unbroken till 1972. The main trend was the strong growth of oil as a percentage of total energy consumed. Not only did oil monopolise the rapidly growing transportation market but it also penetrated rapidly into the stationary energy market. In the second half of the sixties, after the discovery of the Groningen Gas field, pipeline natural gas took a sizable share of the domestic and commercial energy market in Western Europe. This market was mainly fed by gas from Groningen, the North Sea and Russia. Another trend was the steady growth of electricity as a percentage of the stationary market partly based on nuclear energy. Coal was the loser. This rather steady development was upset by the first oil crisis in 1972. This crisis was a political crisis which had little to do with the physical availability of crude oil. Between 1972 and the present, periods of reasonable price stability were interrupted by violent swings in the price of oil and gas. Moreover, during this period the environmental movement became a major influence in the energy field. Notwithstanding the generally unstable market, some new trends developed after 1972 and some old ones continued. Will these trends continue long enough to be useful for making a scenario for the future? The forecaster should not assume that the development of energy consumption in the USA, Western Europe and Japan will continue to be of overwhelming importance. Developments in South East Asia and Eastern Europe should be watched very carefully. There are reasons to believe that at a certain stage in economic development, transportation demand shoots up much faster than economic growth, leading to a rapid demand growth for distillate oil. Of importance is also how will the rapidly developing countries generate their increasing demand for electricity and how will they fuel their industry? There can be little doubt that in the rich countries

  10. Radiant smiles everywhere - before the Chernobyl accident

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    The business reports presented by the Federal German electric utilities for 1985 are almost all simply brillant. Electricity consumption has been going up, some of the utilities even can boast about rates kept constant over the year. But before the printed business reports could be presented to the meetings of shareholders, a nasty cloud threw a dark shadow over all the brilliant results. The Chernobyl accident made some of the hymns over the nuclear electricity increases and nuclear power in general sound rather queer. Could we do without this energy source. Substituting nuclear power would yearly require: 28 million t of oil, or 41 million t of hard coal, or 142 million t of browncoal, or 38 thousand million cubic metres of natural gas. Extrapolating current conditions and assuming best achievements, renewable energy sources might be able to meet 6 p.c. of the primary energy demands by the year 2000. (orig./HP) [de

  11. Performance analysis on solar-water compound source heat pump for radiant floor heating system

    曲世林; 马飞; 仇安兵

    2009-01-01

    A solar-water compound source heat pump for radiant floor heating (SWHP-RFH) experimental system was introduced and analyzed. The SWHP-RFH system mainly consists of 11.44 m2 vacuum tube solar collector,1 000 L water tank assisted 3 kW electrical heater,a water source heat pump,the radiant floor heating system with cross-linked polyethylene (PE-X) of diameter 20 mm,temperature controller and solar testing system. The SWHP-RFH system was tested from December to February during the heating season in Beijing,China under different operation situations. The test parameters include the outdoor air temperature,solar radiation intensity,indoor air temperature,radiation floor average surface temperature,average surface temperature of the building envelope,the inlet and outlet temperatures of solar collector,the temperature of water tank,the heat medium temperatures of heat pump condenser side and evaporator side,and the power consumption includes the water source heat pump system,the solar source heat pump system,the auxiliary heater and the radiant floor heating systems etc. The experimental results were used to calculate the collector efficiency,heat pump dynamic coefficient of performance (COP),total energy consumption and seasonal heating performance during the heating season. The results indicate that the performance of the compound source heat pump system is better than that of the air source heat pump system. Furthermore,some methods are suggested to improve the thermal performance of each component and the whole SWHP-RFH system.

  12. HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    Moir, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    The HYLIFE-II inertial fusion power plant design study uses a liquid fall, in the form of jets, to protect the first structural wall from neutron damage, x rays, and blast to provide a 30-y lifetime. HYLIFE-I used liquid lithium. HYLIFE-II avoids the fire hazard of lithium by using a molten salt composed of fluorine, lithium, and beryllium (Li 2 BeF 4 ) called Flibe. Access for heavy-ion beams is provided. Calculations for assumed heavy-ion beam performance show a nominal gain of 70 at 5 MJ producing 350 MJ, about 5.2 times less yield than the 1.8 GJ from a driver energy of 4.5 MJ with gain of 400 for HYLIFE-I. The nominal 1 GWe of power can be maintained by increasing the repetition rate by a factor of about 5.2, from 1.5 to 8 Hz. A higher repetition rate requires faster re-establishment of the jets after a shot, which can be accomplished in part by decreasing the jet fall height and increasing the jet flow velocity. In addition, although not adequately considered for HYLIFE-I, there is liquid splash that must be forcibly cleared because gravity is too slow, at higher repetition rates than 1 Hz. Splash removal is accomplished in the central region by oscillating jet flows. The cost of electricity is estimated to be 0.09 $/kW·h in constant 1988 dollars, about twice that of future coal and light water reactor nuclear power. The driver beam cost is about one-half the total cost, that is, a zero cost driver would give a calculated cost of electricity of 0.045 $/kWh

  13. HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    Moir, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    The HYLIFE-II inertial fusion power plant design study uses a liquid fall, in the form of jets, to protect the first structural wall from neutron damage, x rays, and blast to provide a 30-y lifetime. HYLIFE-I used liquid lithium. HYLIFE-II avoids the fire hazard of lithium by using a molten salt composed of fluorine, lithium, and beryllium (Li 2 BeF 4 ) called Flibe. Access for heavy-ion beams is provided. Calculations for assumed heavy-ion beam performance show a nominal gain of 70 at 5 MJ producing 350 MJ, about 5.2 times less yield than the 1.8 Gj from a driver energy of 4.5 MJ with gain of 400 for HYLIFE-I. The nominal 1 GWe of power can be maintained by increasing the repetition rate by a factor of about 5.2, from 1.5 to 8Hz. A higher repetition rate requires faster re-establishment of the jets after a shot, which can be accomplished in part by decreasing the jet fall height and increasing the jet flow velocity. In addition, although not adequately considered for HYLIFE-I, there is liquid splash that must be forcibly cleared because gravity is too slow, at higher repetition rates than 1 Hz. Splash removal is accomplished in the central region by oscillating jet flows. The cost of electricity is estimated to be 0.09 $/kW·h in constant 1988 dollars, about twice that of future coal and light water reactor nuclear power. The driver beam cost is about one-half the total cost, that is, a zero cost driver would give a calculated cost of electricity of 0.045 $/kWh

  14. 77 FR 48138 - Topaz Solar Farms LLC; High Plains Ranch II, LLC; Bethel Wind Energy LLC; Rippey Wind Energy LLC...

    2012-08-13

    ... Ranch II, LLC; Bethel Wind Energy LLC; Rippey Wind Energy LLC; Pacific Wind, LLC; Colorado Highlands Wind, LLC; Shooting Star Wind Project, LLC; Notice of Effectiveness of Exempt Wholesale Generator or... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket Nos. EG12-63-000; EG12-64-000...

  15. Load calculations of radiant cooling systems for sizing the plant

    Bourdakis, Eleftherios; Kazanci, Ongun Berk; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was, by using a building simulation software, to prove that a radiant cooling system should not be sized based on the maximum cooling load but at a lower value. For that reason six radiant cooling models were simulated with two control principles using 100%, 70% and 50......% of the maximum cooling load. It was concluded that all tested systems were able to provide an acceptable thermal environment even when the 50% of the maximum cooling load was used. From all the simulated systems the one that performed the best under both control principles was the ESCS ceiling system. Finally...... it was proved that ventilation systems should be sized based on the maximum cooling load....

  16. Cooling load calculation by the radiant time series method - effect of solar radiation models

    Costa, Alexandre M.S. [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (UEM), PR (Brazil)], E-mail: amscosta@uem.br

    2010-07-01

    In this work was analyzed numerically the effect of three different models for solar radiation on the cooling load calculated by the radiant time series' method. The solar radiation models implemented were clear sky, isotropic sky and anisotropic sky. The radiant time series' method (RTS) was proposed by ASHRAE (2001) for replacing the classical methods of cooling load calculation, such as TETD/TA. The method is based on computing the effect of space thermal energy storage on the instantaneous cooling load. The computing is carried out by splitting the heat gain components in convective and radiant parts. Following the radiant part is transformed using time series, which coefficients are a function of the construction type and heat gain (solar or non-solar). The transformed result is added to the convective part, giving the instantaneous cooling load. The method was applied for investigate the influence for an example room. The location used was - 23 degree S and 51 degree W and the day was 21 of January, a typical summer day in the southern hemisphere. The room was composed of two vertical walls with windows exposed to outdoors with azimuth angles equals to west and east directions. The output of the different models of solar radiation for the two walls in terms of direct and diffuse components as well heat gains were investigated. It was verified that the clear sky exhibited the less conservative (higher values) for the direct component of solar radiation, with the opposite trend for the diffuse component. For the heat gain, the clear sky gives the higher values, three times higher for the peek hours than the other models. Both isotropic and anisotropic models predicted similar magnitude for the heat gain. The same behavior was also verified for the cooling load. The effect of room thermal inertia was decreasing the cooling load during the peak hours. On the other hand the higher thermal inertia values are the greater for the non peak hours. The effect

  17. Photosynthetic utilization of radiant energy by CAM Dendrobium flowers

    Khoo, G.H.; Hew, C.S.; He, J.

    1997-01-01

    14 CO 2 fixation was observed in orchid Dendrobium flowers; its rate decreased with the flower development. Chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence in different developmental stages of flowers was compared to other green plant parts (leaf, inflorescence stalk, and fruit capsule). The photochemical efficiency of photosystem 2 (PS2) (Fv/Fm) of a leaf was 14-21 % higher than that of a mature flower perianth (sepal, petal, and labellum) which had a much lower total Chl content and Chl a/b ratio. A higher quantum yield of PS2 (ΦPS2) than in the mature flowers was observed in all green parts. Flower sepals had higher Chl content, Chl a/b ratio, and Fv/Fm values than the petal and labellum. During flower development the Chl content, Chl a/b ratio, Fv/Fm, and qN decreased while ΦPS2 and qP remained constant. An exposure of developing flowers to irradiances above 50 µmol m -2 s -1 resulted in a very drastic drop of ΦPS2 and qP, and a coherent increase of qN as compared to other green plant organs. A low saturation irradiance (PFD of 100 µmol m -2 s -1 ) and the increase in qN in the flower indicate that irradiation stress may occur since there is no further protection when the flower is exposed to irradiances above 100 µmol m -2 s -1 . A low Chl/carotenoid ratio in mature flower perianth as a consequence of Chl content reduction in the course of flower development suggests a relief of irradiation stress via this mean. (author)

  18. Electric radiant heating: A hot item in home comfort

    Lemieux, G. [Britech Corp., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2003-12-01

    Electric radiant heating as a floor warming system and its growing popularity in home comfort are discussed. Price can be as low as $2.00 per square foot; cost of operation may be as little as 30 cents per square foot per year, depending on time of use and local hydro rates. The use of radiant cable heating is said to have surged in popularity; it provides the same warmth and comfort as more expensive hydronic systems. Radiant cable is simple and inexpensive to install since unlike hydronic systems, it requires no complicated mechanical system with boiler, heat exchanger, valves, pumps and extensive controls. Nevertheless, prospective end users are warned to make sure that the cable is sturdy, tough, has multiple layers of protection with a thick grounding system and conductor core. In addition to heating floors, electric heating cables can also be used for snow and ice control and for melting in driveways and gutters. In these type of installations heavy duty cables are used which are installed under asphalt, concrete or interlocking stones. Thirty watts per square foot per hour is the typical requirement for melting snow and ice. Based on average electricity prices in Ontario, melting snow on an 800 square foot driveway would cost about $2.20 per hour. Assuming five hours for the system to clear the driveway, installing a heating system under the driveway could be an economically viable solution for the home owner, providing freedom from ice, the inconvenience of shovelling snow, and saving time and money.

  19. Radiant heat exchange measurements for Tore Supra

    Chatain, D.; Disdier, F.; Gauthier, A.; Raffin, M.; Renaud, M.

    1984-03-01

    In order to minimize the energy consumption of the low temperature cryogenic system connected to the superconducting magnet of TORE-SUPRA, heat exchange from thermal radiation between the vacuum vessels and the thermal shields has been studied. Accordingly large scale cold and hot walls of T.S. have been simulated in a model with reduced dimensions. In this model, the experiment consists in the measurement of the thermal radiated power between two concentric cylindrical surfaces of stainless steel under vacuum conditions. The temperature of the external cylinder was kept constant at 80 K. The internal cylinder was bakeable up to 250 0 C. Various surface treatments were applied on the two cylinders (mechanical polishing and metal deposition of Al, Ag, Ni) [fr

  20. Absolute radiant power measurement for the Au M lines of laser-plasma using a calibrated broadband soft X-ray spectrometer with flat-spectral response.

    Troussel, Ph; Villette, B; Emprin, B; Oudot, G; Tassin, V; Bridou, F; Delmotte, F; Krumrey, M

    2014-01-01

    CEA implemented an absolutely calibrated broadband soft X-ray spectrometer called DMX on the Omega laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) in 1999 to measure radiant power and spectral distribution of the radiation of the Au plasma. The DMX spectrometer is composed of 20 channels covering the spectral range from 50 eV to 20 keV. The channels for energies below 1.5 keV combine a mirror and a filter with a coaxial photo-emissive detector. For the channels above 5 keV the photoemissive detector is replaced by a conductive detector. The intermediate energy channels (1.5 keV power measurements with the new MLM channel and with the usual channel composed of a thin titanium filter and a coaxial detector (without mirror) are compared. All elements of the channel have been calibrated in the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany's National Metrology Institute, at the synchrotron radiation facility BESSY II in Berlin using dedicated well established and validated methods.

  1. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary

    1981-05-01

    Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

  2. Energy history chronology from World War II to the present

    Dean, P.C.

    1982-08-01

    This report provides a basic guide to the major Presidential, Legislative, Judicial, and Federal agency actions relating to energy policy, research, development, and regulation in recent years. The chronology is arranged synoptically, allowing users to reference easily the historical context in which each event occurred. Summaries of Presidential, Legislative, and Judicial actions relating to energy, rosters of federal energy officials, and a genealogy of federal energy agencies are also provided in separate appendices. The Energy History Chronology was prepared in conjunction with the History Division's series of pamphlets on the Institutional Origins of the Department of Energy. The series includes concise histories of the Department of Energy, the Energy Research and Development Administration, the Federal Energy Administration, and the Atomic Energy Commission. All significant events and achievements noted in the institutional history are also listed.

  3. World Energy Data System (WENDS). Volume II. Country data, CZ-KS

    None

    1979-06-01

    The World Energy Data System contains organized data on those countries and international organizations that may have critical impact on the world energy scene. Included in this volume, Vol. II, are Czechoslovakia, Denmark, Egypt, Finland, France, Germany (East), Germany (West), Greece, Guinea, India, Indonesia, Iran, Italy, Japan, and Korea (South). The following topics are covered for most of the countries: economic, demographic, and educational profiles; energy policy; indigenous energy resources and uses; forecasts, demand, exports, imports of energy supplies; environmental considerations of energy use; power production facilities; energy industries; commercial applications of energy; research and development activities of energy; and international activities.

  4. Radiant science, dark politics: a memoir of the nuclear age

    Kamen, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    The reviewer describes Radiant Science, Dark Politics: A Memoir of the Nuclear Age in contrast to a memoir by James R. Killian, Jr., a contemporary of Kamen. Kamen, co-discoverer of carbon-14 and a valued member of the Berkeley Radiation Laboratory, was fired in 1944 and blackballed as a security risk. Rehabilitated by the end of the war, his continued fight against political injustice through the McCarthy era colors the book and, for the reviewer, makes it self-serving. Kamen's later scientific work reflected his desire to work alone rather than in collaboration

  5. Radiant coolers - Theory, flight histories, design comparisons and future applications

    Donohoe, M. J.; Sherman, A.; Hickman, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    Radiant coolers have been developed for application to the cooling of infrared detectors aboard NASA earth observation systems and as part of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program. The prime design constraints for these coolers are the location of the cooler aboard the satellite and the satellite orbit. Flight data from several coolers indicates that, in general, design temperatures are achieved. However, potential problems relative to the contamination of cold surfaces are also revealed by the data. A comparison among the various cooler designs and flight performances indicates design improvements that can minimize the contamination problem in the future.

  6. An experimental study about effect of far infrared radiant ceramics on efficient methane fermentation

    Oda, A.; Yamazaki, M.; Oida, A.

    2003-01-01

    Methane fermentation, well known as one of the methods for organic wastes treatment, has been used as an energy production process in order to produce a gaseous fuel. But methane fermentation has some problems to be solved about gas production rate and volatile solids reduction efficiency. Simple methods to improve these problems are needed. In this study, we focused on far infrared radiant ceramics as a stimulating substance to activate methanogenic bacteria. Firstly, through the experiment of one batch fermentation, it was confirmed that the ceramics in the fermenter caused increase of total gas production. Next, even through the experiment of continuous fermentation, same stimulating effect was confirmed. It was considered that this effect was caused not only by a function of bio-contactor of the ceramics but also by far infrared radiation from ceramics. (author)

  7. Energy efficiency of electrical infrared heating elements

    Brown, K.J.; Farrelly, R.; O’Shaughnessy, S.M.; Robinson, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Characterization of the radiant energy efficiency of infrared heating elements. • Performed for a commercially available ceramic heater element for two cases. • Total radiant power and net radiant efficiency is computed. • Radiant efficiencies are strongly dependant on the input power to the element. • In-plane efficiencies depend on the distance from the heater. - Abstract: A measurement system has been designed to characterize the radiant energy efficiency of infrared heating elements. The system also allows for measurement of the radiant heat flux distribution emitted from radiant heater assemblies. To facilitate these, a 6-axis robotic arm is fitted with a Schmidt–Boelter radiant heat flux gauge. A LabVIEW interface operates the robot and positions the sensor in the desired location and subsequently acquires the desired radiant heat flux measurement. To illustrate the functionality of the measurement system and methodology, radiant heat flux distributions and efficiency calculations are performed for a commercially available ceramic heater element for two cases. In the first, a spherical surface is traced around the entire heater assembly and the total radiant power and net radiant efficiency is computed. In the second, 50 cm × 50 cm vertical planes are traced parallel to the front face of the heater assembly at distances between 10 cm and 50 cm and the in-plane power and efficiencies are computed. The results indicate that the radiant efficiencies are strongly dependant on the input power to the element and, for the in-plane efficiencies, depend on the distance from the heater.

  8. A High Energy and High Efficiency Spectral Shaping Single Frequency Fiber Laser, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR phase II project proposes a single frequency high energy fiber laser system for coherent Lidar systems for remote sensing. Current state-of-art...

  9. Energy transfer in isolated LHC II studied by femtosecond pump-probe technique

    Yang Yi; Liu Yuan; Liu Wei Min; Zhu Rong Yi; Qian Shi Xiong; Xu Chun He

    2003-01-01

    Excitation energy transfer in the isolated light-harvesting chlorophyll (Chl)-a/b protein complex of photosystem II (LHC II) was studied by the one-colour pump-probe technique with femtosecond time resolution. After exciting Chl-b by 638nm beam, the dynamic behaviour shows that the ultrafast energy transfer from Chl-b at positions of B2, B3, and B5 to the corresponding Chl-a molecules in monomeric subunit of LHC II is in the time scale of 230fs. While with the excitation of Chl-a at 678nm, the energy transfer between excitons of Chl-a molecules has the lifetime of about 370 fs, and two other slow decay components are due to the energy transfer between different Chl-a molecules in a monomeric subunit of LHC II or in different subunits, or due to change of molecular conformation. (20 refs).

  10. Two photon absorption energy transfer in the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHC-II) modified with organic boron dye

    Chen, Li; Liu, Cheng; Hu, Rui; Feng, Jiao; Wang, Shuangqing; Li, Shayu; Yang, Chunhong; Yang, Guoqiang

    2014-07-01

    The plant light-harvesting complexes of photosystem II (LHC-II) play important roles in collecting solar energy and transferring the energy to the reaction centers of photosystems I and II. A two photon absorption compound, 4-(bromomethyl)-N-(4-(dimesitylboryl)phenyl)-N-phenylaniline (DMDP-CH2Br), was synthesized and covalently linked to the LHC-II in formation of a LHC-II-dye complex, which still maintained the biological activity of LHC-II system. Under irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses at 754 nm, the LHC-II-dye complex can absorb two photons of the laser light effectively compared with the wild type LHC-II. The absorbed excitation energy is then transferred to chlorophyll a with an obvious fluorescence enhancement. The results may be interesting and give potentials for developing hybrid photosystems.

  11. Integrated visions (part II): Envisioning Sustainable Energy Landscapes

    Stremke, S.; Koh, J.; Neven, C.T.; Boekel, A.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Climate change and resource depletion are driving the transition to renewable energy sources. Both the supply of renewables and the demand for energy are influenced by the physical environment and therefore concern spatial planning and landscape design. Envisioning the longterm development

  12. The STAR beam energy scan phase II physics and upgrades

    Yang, C.; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, Jana; Chaloupka, P.; Federič, Pavol; Rusňák, Jan; Rusňáková, O.; Šimko, Miroslav; Šumbera, Michal; Vértési, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 967, č. 11 (2017), s. 800-803 ISSN 0375-9474 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG15001; GA MŠk LM2015054 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : STAR collaboration * BES-II * detector upgrade * QCD phase diagram * physics oppotrunity Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics Impact factor: 1.916, year: 2016

  13. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Subpart A of... - Flooring Radiant Tester Schematic Side Elevation

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flooring Radiant Tester Schematic Side Elevation 3 Figure 3 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION.... 1209, Subpt. A, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Subpart A of Part 1209—Flooring Radiant Tester Schematic Side...

  14. Human response to local convective and radiant cooling in a warm environment

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Krejcirikova, Barbora; Kaczmarczyk, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The response of 24 human subjects to local convective cooling, radiant cooling, and combined radiant and convective cooling was studied at 28°C and 50% relative humidity. The local cooling devices used were (1) a tabletop cooling fan, (2) personalized ventilation providing a stream of clean air, (3...

  15. Fingerprinting dark energy. II. Weak lensing and galaxy clustering tests

    Sapone, Domenico; Kunz, Martin; Amendola, Luca

    2010-01-01

    The characterization of dark energy is a central task of cosmology. To go beyond a cosmological constant, we need to introduce at least an equation of state and a sound speed and consider observational tests that involve perturbations. If dark energy is not completely homogeneous on observable scales, then the Poisson equation is modified and dark matter clustering is directly affected. One can then search for observational effects of dark energy clustering using dark matter as a probe. In this paper we exploit an analytical approximate solution of the perturbation equations in a general dark energy cosmology to analyze the performance of next-decade large-scale surveys in constraining equation of state and sound speed. We find that tomographic weak lensing and galaxy redshift surveys can constrain the sound speed of the dark energy only if the latter is small, of the order of c s < or approx. 0.01 (in units of c). For larger sound speeds the error grows to 100% and more. We conclude that large-scale structure observations contain very little information about the perturbations in canonical scalar field models with a sound speed of unity. Nevertheless, they are able to detect the presence of cold dark energy, i.e. a dark energy with nonrelativistic speed of sound.

  16. New levels of Ta II with energies higher than 72,000 cm−1

    Uddin, Zaheer; Windholz, Laurentius

    2014-01-01

    We studied the hyperfine structure of Tantalum lines appearing in a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrum. Hundreds of lines of Ta in this spectrum are still unclassified; most of them, especially in the UV region, belong to Ta II. When investigating such lines we found 14 new levels of Ta II. These new levels are the highest-lying known Ta II levels and do not belong to the already known configurations. - Highlights: • We report the discovery of 14 even energy levels of the first ion of Tantalum (Ta II). • Their energy ranges from 72,000 to 81,000 cm −1 . • For comparison, up to now only even levels between 0 and 44,000 cm −1 were known. • These levels belong to up to now unknown electron configurations. • With help of these levels, approximately 100 spectral lines of Ta II can be classified

  17. Energy Efficient LED Spectrally Matched Smart Lighting, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Innovative Imaging and Research and the University of Houston Clear Lake have teamed to develop a widely extensible, affordable, energy efficient, smart lighting...

  18. Phoenix II energy extraction and angular multiplexing experiments

    Hoffman, J.M.; Hays, G.N.

    1981-08-01

    The energy extraction efficiency as a function of input intensity has been determined from a large-volume HF amplifier. For an input intensity of 4 x 10 6 W/cm 2 , 1080 Joules was extracted from the amplifier. This corresponded to an energy extraction efficiency of 0.90. At the highest H 2 /F 2 /O 2 pressures used, 1700 Joules was obtained from this system when used in an oscillator configuration. These results also show evidence that energy extraction at low input intensities in large-volume HF amplifiers is strongly influenced by parasitic oscillations. The results also indicate that, for a long-pulse HF amplifier (60-nsec electron beam), the timing between the amplifier and oscillator to achieve optimum operating conditions is not very critical. This same amplifier, used in conjunction with a short-pulse, good-beam-quality oscillator-preamplifier chain, has also been used to evaluate pulse compression using angular multiplexing. Using two sequential 24-nsec pulses, the essential elements of angular multiplexing have been evaluated as a function of interpulse separation time. Included are energy extraction efficiency, overall temporal pulse distortion, leading-edge contrast-ratio distortion, and suppression of amplified spontaneous emission relative to a single, long-duration input pulse. For appropriate interpulse delay time, we show that distortionless amplification is possible with energy-extraction efficiency the same as is obtained using a single input beam having a pulse width equal to the duration of the amplifier gain

  19. Radiant-and-plasma technology for coal processing

    Vladimir Messerle

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiant-and-plasma technology for coal processing is presented in the article. Thermodynamic computation and experiments on plasma processing of bituminous coal preliminary electron-beam activated were fulfilled in comparison with plasma processing of the coal. Positive influence of the preliminary electron-beam activation of coal on synthesis gas yield was found. Experiments were carried out in the plasma gasifier of 100 kW power. As a result of the measurements of material and heat balance of the process gave the following integral indicators: weight-average temperature of 2200-2300 K, and carbon gasification degree of 82,4-83,2%. Synthesis gas yield at thermochemical preparation of raw coal dust for burning was 24,5% and in the case of electron-beam activation of coal synthesis gas yield reached 36,4%, which is 48% higher.

  20. Methods of total spectral radiant flux realization at VNIIOFI

    Ivashin, Evgeniy; Lalek, Jan; Rybczyński, Andrzej; Ogarev, Sergey; Khlevnoy, Boris; Dobroserdov, Dmitry; Sapritsky, Victor

    2018-02-01

    VNIIOFI carries out works on realization of independent methods for realization of the total spectral radiant flux (TSRF) of incoherent optical radiation sources - reference high-temperature blackbodies (BB), halogen lamps, and LED with quasi-Lambert spatial distribution of radiance. The paper describes three schemes for measuring facilities using photometers, spectroradiometers and computer-controlled high class goniometer. The paper describes different approaches for TSRF realization at the VNIIOFI National radiometric standard on the basis of high-temperature BB and LED sources, and gonio-spectroradiometer. Further, they are planned to be compared, and the use of fixed-point cells (in particular, based on the high-temperature δ(MoC)-C metal-carbon eutectic with a phase transition temperature of 2583 °C corresponding to the metrological optical “source-A”) as an option instead of the BB is considered in order to enhance calibration accuracy.

  1. 78 FR 28836 - Arlington Valley Solar Energy II, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    2013-05-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. ER13-1430-000] Arlington Valley Solar Energy II, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request..., of Arlington Valley Solar Energy II, LLC's application for market-based rate authority, with an...

  2. 76 FR 61687 - NextEra Energy Montezuma II Wind, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    2011-10-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. ER11-4677-000] NextEra Energy Montezuma II Wind, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request... of NextEra Energy Montezuma II Wind, LLC's application for market-based rate authority, with an...

  3. Finite-elements modeling of radiant heat transfers between mobile surfaces; Modelisation par elements finis de transferts radiatifs entre surfaces mobiles

    Daurelle, J V; Cadene, V; Occelli, R [Universite de Provence, 13 - Marseille (France)

    1997-12-31

    In the numerical modeling of thermal industrial problems, radiant heat transfers remain difficult to take into account and require important computer memory and long computing time. These difficulties are enhanced when radiant heat transfers are coupled with finite-elements diffusive heat transfers because finite-elements architecture is complex and requires a lot of memory. In the case of radiant heat transfers along mobile boundaries, the methods must be optimized. The model described in this paper concerns the radiant heat transfers between diffuse grey surfaces. These transfers are coupled with conduction transfers in the limits of the diffusive opaque domain. 2-D and 3-D geometries are analyzed and two configurations of mobile boundaries are considered. In the first configuration, the boundary follows the deformation of the mesh, while in the second, the boundary moves along the fixed mesh. Matter displacement is taken into account in the term of transport of the energy equation, and an appropriate variation of the thermophysical properties of the transition elements between the opaque and transparent media is used. After a description of the introduction of radiative limit conditions in a finite-elements thermal model, the original methods used to optimize calculation time are explained. Two examples of application illustrate the approach used. The first concerns the modeling of radiant heat transfers between fuel rods during a reactor cooling accident, and the second concerns the study of heat transfers inside the air-gap of an electric motor. The method of identification of the mobile surface on the fixed mesh is described. (J.S.) 12 refs.

  4. Finite-elements modeling of radiant heat transfers between mobile surfaces; Modelisation par elements finis de transferts radiatifs entre surfaces mobiles

    Daurelle, J.V.; Cadene, V.; Occelli, R. [Universite de Provence, 13 - Marseille (France)

    1996-12-31

    In the numerical modeling of thermal industrial problems, radiant heat transfers remain difficult to take into account and require important computer memory and long computing time. These difficulties are enhanced when radiant heat transfers are coupled with finite-elements diffusive heat transfers because finite-elements architecture is complex and requires a lot of memory. In the case of radiant heat transfers along mobile boundaries, the methods must be optimized. The model described in this paper concerns the radiant heat transfers between diffuse grey surfaces. These transfers are coupled with conduction transfers in the limits of the diffusive opaque domain. 2-D and 3-D geometries are analyzed and two configurations of mobile boundaries are considered. In the first configuration, the boundary follows the deformation of the mesh, while in the second, the boundary moves along the fixed mesh. Matter displacement is taken into account in the term of transport of the energy equation, and an appropriate variation of the thermophysical properties of the transition elements between the opaque and transparent media is used. After a description of the introduction of radiative limit conditions in a finite-elements thermal model, the original methods used to optimize calculation time are explained. Two examples of application illustrate the approach used. The first concerns the modeling of radiant heat transfers between fuel rods during a reactor cooling accident, and the second concerns the study of heat transfers inside the air-gap of an electric motor. The method of identification of the mobile surface on the fixed mesh is described. (J.S.) 12 refs.

  5. Interactions among energy consumption, economic development and greenhouse gas emissions in Japan after World War II

    The long-term dynamic changes in the triad, energy consumption, economic development, and Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, in Japan after World War II were quantified, and the interactions among them were analyzed based on an integrated suite of energy, emergy and economic indices...

  6. Catalytic Science and Technology in Sustainable Energy II

    Wang, Yuxin; Xiao, Feng-Shou; Seshan, Kulathu K.

    2017-01-01

    This special issue of Catalysis Today results from four sessions, under the collective theme "Catalysis in Sustainable Energy", of the 2ndInternational Symposium on Catalytic Science and Technology in Sustainable Energy and Environment, held in Tianjin, China during October 12-14, 2016. This bien...... whom the special issue would not have been possible. As the organizer of the EECAT 2016, Y Li expresses his special gratitude to the sponsors, especially Haldor Topsoe and Synfuels China, the participants and the co-organizers for their great contribution to the success of EECAT 2016....

  7. Provisions relating to Nuclear Energy. II - International Conventions

    This book published by the Portuguese Junta de Energia Nuclear (Nuclear Energy Commission) reproduces in Portuguese and in the original language (English or French), texts of a series of international conventions in the nuclear field and the Statutes of international nuclear organisations and undertakings. The following are among the texts included: the Statutes of the IAEA, NEA, Eurochemic; the Euratom Treaty; the Tlatelolco Treaty; the co-operation agreement between Portugal and the United States on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. (NEA) [fr

  8. Identification of new fluorescence processes in the UV spectra of cool stars from new energy levels of Fe II and Cr II

    Johansson, Sveneric; Carpenter, Kenneth G.

    1988-01-01

    Two fluorescence processes operating in atmospheres of cool stars, symbiotic stars, and the Sun are presented. Two emission lines, at 1347.03 and 1360.17 A, are identified as fluorescence lines of Cr II and Fe II. The lines are due to transitions from highly excited levels, which are populated radiatively by the hydrogen Lyman alpha line due to accidental wavelength coincidences. Three energy levels, one in Cr II and two in Fe II, are reported.

  9. On the Origin of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays II

    Fowler, T K; Colgate, S; Li, H; Bulmer, R H; Pino, J

    2011-03-08

    We show that accretion disks around Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) could account for the enormous power in observed ultra high energy cosmic rays {approx}10{sup 20} eV (UHEs). In our model, cosmic rays are produced by quasi-steady acceleration of ions in magnetic structures previously proposed to explain jets around Active Galactic Nuclei with supermassive black holes. Steady acceleration requires that an AGN accretion disk act as a dynamo, which we show to follow from a modified Standard Model in which the magnetic torque of the dynamo replaces viscosity as the dominant mechanism accounting for angular momentum conservation during accretion. A black hole of mass M{sub BH} produces a steady dynamo voltage V {proportional_to} {radical}M{sub BH} giving V {approx} 10{sup 20} volts for M{sub BH} {approx} 10{sup 8} solar masses. The voltage V reappears as an inductive electric field at the advancing nose of a dynamo-driven jet, where plasma instability inherent in collisionless runaway acceleration allows ions to be steadily accelerated to energies {approx} V, finally ejected as cosmic rays. Transient events can produce much higher energies. The predicted disk radiation is similar to the Standard Model. Unique predictions concern the remarkable collimation of jets and emissions from the jet/radiolobe structure. Given MBH and the accretion rate, the model makes 7 predictions roughly consistent with data: (1) the jet length; (2) the jet radius; (3) the steady-state cosmic ray energy spectrum; (4) the maximum energy in this spectrum; (5) the UHE cosmic ray intensity on Earth; (6) electron synchrotron wavelengths; and (7) the power in synchrotron radiation. These qualitative successes motivate new computer simulations, experiments and data analysis to provide a quantitative verification of the model.

  10. Evaluation of Various Retrofitting Concepts of Building Envelope for Offices Equipped with Large Radiant Ceiling Panels by Dynamic Simulations

    Sabina Jordan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve significant savings in energy and an improved level of thermal comfort in retrofitted existing buildings, specific retrofitting concepts that combine new technologies and design need to be developed and implemented. Large radiant surfaces systems are now among the most promising future technologies to be used both in retrofitted and in new low-energy buildings. These kinds of systems have been the topic of several studies dealing with thermal comfort and energy utilization, but some specific issues concerning their possible use in various concepts for retrofitting are still poorly understood. In the present paper, some results of dynamic simulations, with the transient system simulation tool (TRNSYS model, of the retrofitted offices equipped with radiant ceiling panels are presented and thoroughly analysed. Based on a precise comparison of the results of these simulations with actual measurements in the offices, certain input data for the model were added, so that the model was consequently validated. The model was then applied to the evaluation of various concepts of building envelopes for office retrofitting. By means of dynamic simulations of indoor environment it was possible to determine the benefits and limitations of individual retrofitting concepts. Some specific parameters, which are relevant to these concepts, were also identified.

  11. Nuclear-Recoil Energy Scale in CDMS II Silicon Dark-Matter Detectors

    Agnese, R.; et al.

    2018-03-07

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment aims to detect dark matter particles that elastically scatter from nuclei in semiconductor detectors. The resulting nuclear-recoil energy depositions are detected by ionization and phonon sensors. Neutrons produce a similar spectrum of low-energy nuclear recoils in such detectors, while most other backgrounds produce electron recoils. The absolute energy scale for nuclear recoils is necessary to interpret results correctly. The energy scale can be determined in CDMS II silicon detectors using neutrons incident from a broad-spectrum $^{252}$Cf source, taking advantage of a prominent resonance in the neutron elastic scattering cross section of silicon at a recoil (neutron) energy near 20 (182) keV. Results indicate that the phonon collection efficiency for nuclear recoils is $4.8^{+0.7}_{-0.9}$% lower than for electron recoils of the same energy. Comparisons of the ionization signals for nuclear recoils to those measured previously by other groups at higher electric fields indicate that the ionization collection efficiency for CDMS II silicon detectors operated at $\\sim$4 V/cm is consistent with 100% for nuclear recoils below 20 keV and gradually decreases for larger energies to $\\sim$75% at 100 keV. The impact of these measurements on previously published CDMS II silicon results is small.

  12. X-ray energy selected imaging with Medipix II

    Ludwig, J.; Zwerger, A.; Benz, K.-W.; Fiederle, M.; Braml, H.; Fauler, A.; Konrath, J.-P.

    2004-01-01

    Two different X-ray tube accelerating voltages (60 and 70 kV) are used for diagnosis of front teeth and molars. Different energy ranges are necessary as function of tooth thickness to obtain similar contrast for imaging. This technique drives the costs for the X-ray tube up and allows for just two optimized settings. Energy range selection for the detection of the penetrating X-rays would overcome these severe setbacks. The single photon counting chip MEDIPIX2 http://www.cern.ch/medipix exhibits exactly this feature. First simulations and measurements have been carried out using a dental X-ray source. As a demonstrator a real tooth has been used with different cavities and filling materials. Simulations showed in general larger improvements as compared to measurements regarding SNR and contrast: A beneficial factor of 4% wrt SNR and 25% for contrast, measurements showed factors of 2.5 and up to 10%, respectively

  13. X-ray energy selected imaging with Medipix II

    Ludwig, J.; Zwerger, A.; Benz, K.-W.; Fiederle, M.; Braml, H.; Fauler, A.; Konrath, J.-P.

    2004-09-01

    Two different X-ray tube accelerating voltages (60 and 70kV) are used for diagnosis of front teeth and molars. Different energy ranges are necessary as function of tooth thickness to obtain similar contrast for imaging. This technique drives the costs for the X-ray tube up and allows for just two optimized settings. Energy range selection for the detection of the penetrating X-rays would overcome these severe setbacks. The single photon counting chip MEDIPIX2 http://www.cern.ch/medipix exhibits exactly this feature.First simulations and measurements have been carried out using a dental X-ray source. As a demonstrator a real tooth has been used with different cavities and filling materials. Simulations showed in general larger improvements as compared to measurements regarding SNR and contrast: A beneficial factor of 4% wrt SNR and 25% for contrast, measurements showed factors of 2.5 and up to 10%, respectively.

  14. Mechanisms of energy transfer and conversion in plant Light-Harvesting Complex II

    Barros, Tiago Ferreira de

    2009-09-24

    The light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHC-II) is the major antenna complex in plant photosynthesis. It accounts for roughly 30% of the total protein in plant chloroplasts, which makes it arguably the most abundant membrane protein on Earth, and binds about half of plant chlorophyll (Chl). The complex assembles as a trimer in the thylakoid membrane and binds a total of 54 pigment molecules, including 24 Chl a, 18 Chl b, 6 lutein (Lut), 3 neoxanthin (Neo) and 3 violaxanthin (Vio). LHC-II has five key roles in plant photosynthesis. It: (1) harvests sunlight and transmits excitation energy to the reaction centres of photosystems II and I, (2) regulates the amount of excitation energy reaching each of the two photosystems, (3) has a structural role in the architecture of the photosynthetic supercomplexes, (4) contributes to the tight appression of thylakoid membranes in chloroplast grana, and (5) protects the photosynthetic apparatus from photo damage by non photochemical quenching (NPQ). A major fraction of NPQ is accounted for its energy-dependent component qE. Despite being critical for plant survival and having been studied for decades, the exact details of how excess absorbed light energy is dissipated under qE conditions remain enigmatic. Today it is accepted that qE is regulated by the magnitude of the pH gradient ({delta}pH) across the thylakoid membrane. It is also well documented that the drop in pH in the thylakoid lumen during high-light conditions activates the enzyme violaxanthin de-epoxidase (VDE), which converts the carotenoid Vio into zeaxanthin (Zea) as part of the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, studies with Arabidopsis mutants revealed that the photosystem II subunit PsbS is necessary for qE. How these physiological responses switch LHC-II from the active, energy transmitting to the quenched, energy-dissipating state, in which the solar energy is not transmitted to the photosystems but instead dissipated as heat, remains unclear and is the

  15. Radiometric measurements of wall temperatures in the 800 K to 1150 K range for a quartz radiant heating tube

    Blevins, L.G.; Sivathanu, Y.R.; Gore, J.P.; Shahien, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    Many industrial applications require heat transfer to a load in an inert environment, which can be achieved by using gas-fired radiant tubes. A radiant tube consists of a flame confined in a cylindrical metal or ceramic chamber. The flame heats the tube wall, which in turn radiates to the load. One important characteristic of radiant heating tubes is wall temperature uniformity. Numerical models of radiant tubes have been used to predict wall temperatures, but there is a lack of experimental data for validation. Recently, Namazian et al., Singh and Gorski, and Peters et al. have measured wall temperature profiles of radiant tubes using thermocouples. 13 refs., 3 figs

  16. Solar hybrid cooling system for high-tech offices in subtropical climate - Radiant cooling by absorption refrigeration and desiccant dehumidification

    Fong, K.F.; Chow, T.T.; Lee, C.K.; Lin, Z.; Chan, L.S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A solar hybrid cooling system is proposed for high-tech offices in subtropical climate. → An integration of radiant cooling, absorption refrigeration and desiccant dehumidification. → Year-round cooling and energy performances were evaluated through dynamic simulation. → Its annual primary energy consumption was lower than conventional system up to 36.5%. → The passive chilled beams were more energy-efficient than the active chilled beams. - Abstract: A solar hybrid cooling design is proposed for high cooling load demand in hot and humid climate. For the typical building cooling load, the system can handle the zone cooling load (mainly sensible) by radiant cooling with the chilled water from absorption refrigeration, while the ventilation load (largely latent) by desiccant dehumidification. This hybrid system utilizes solar energy for driving the absorption chiller and regenerating the desiccant wheel. Since a high chilled water temperature generated from the absorption chiller is not effective to handle the required latent load, desiccant dehumidification is therefore involved. It is an integration of radiant cooling, absorption refrigeration and desiccant dehumidification, which are powered up by solar energy. In this study, the application potential of the solar hybrid cooling system was evaluated for the high-tech offices in the subtropical climate through dynamic simulation. The high-tech offices are featured with relatively high internal sensible heat gains due to the intensive office electric equipment. The key performance indicators included the solar fraction and the primary energy consumption. Comparative study was also carried out for the solar hybrid cooling system using two common types of chilled ceilings, the passive chilled beams and active chilled beams. It was found that the solar hybrid cooling system was technically feasible for the applications of relatively higher cooling load demand. The annual primary energy

  17. Analysis of directional radiative behavior and heating efficiency for a gas-fired radiant burner

    Li, B.X.; Lu, Y.P.; Liu, L.H.; Kudo, K.; Tan, H.P.

    2005-01-01

    For the purpose of energy conservation and uniform heating of object surface, a gas-fired porous radiant burner with a bundle of reflecting tubes is developed. A physical model is developed to simulate the directional radiative behavior of this heating device, in which the Monte Carlo method based on the concept of radiation distribution factor is used to compute the directional radiative behavior. The effects of relating parameters on the directional behavior of radiative heating and the heating efficiency are analyzed. With the increase of the length-to-radius ratio of tube, the radiation heating efficiency decreases, but the radiation energy incident on the object surface is more collimated. The radiation heating efficiency increases with the specular reflectivity. With the increase in length of tube segment with specular reflective surface, the radiation heating efficiency increases, but the extent of concentration and collimation of radiative energy decreases. For real design of the heating device, some trade-offs are needed to balance the radiation heating efficiency and the uniformity of radiative heating of object surface

  18. Multiphoton production at high energies in the standard model. II

    Mahlon, G.

    1993-01-01

    We examine multiphoton production in the electroweak sector of the standard model in the high-energy limit using the equivalence theorem in combination with spinor helicity techniques. We utilize currents consisting of a charged scalar, spinor, or vector line that radiates n photons. Only one end of the charged line is off shell in these currents, which are known for the cases of like-helicity and one unlike-helicity photons. We obtain a wide variety of helicity amplitudes for processes involving two pairs of charged particles by considering combinations of four currents. We examine the situation with respect to currents which have both ends of the charged line off shell, and present solutions for the case of like-helicity photons. These new currents may be combined with two of the original currents to produce additional amplitudes involving Higgs bosons, longitudinal Z, or neutrino pairs

  19. Biotechnology in China II. Chemicals, energy and environment

    Tsao, G.T. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Lab. Renewable Resources Engineering; Ouyang, Pingkai [Nanjing Univ. of Technology (China). College of Life Science and Pharmaceutical Engineering; Chen, Jian (eds.) [Jiangnan Univ., Wuxi (China). School of Biotechnology

    2010-07-01

    The biochemical engineering and biotechnology is now becoming the most important industry all over the world. China, as a country that has more than 1.3 billion people, has become one of the fastest growing countries in the world during the last several decades. Both the Chinese government and companies pay more and more attention on the research and the application of biotechnology. In the 11th five-year plan (2006-2010), Chinese government unprecedented enhanced the support on the biotechnology in both policy and finance. Currently, the biotechnology gains the most R and D funding in China. With the great support and the increasingly frequent exchanges from abroad, the biotechnology in China becomes more and more important in the world. In recognition of the enormous advances in biotechnology in China, we are pleased to present the second volume of Advances in Biochemical Engineering/ Biotechnology: Biotechnology in China II, edited by P. K. Ouyang, J. Chen and G. T. Tsao, relatively soon after the introduction of the first volume of this multivolume comprehensive books. Since the previous volume was extremely well accepted by the scientific community, we have maintained the overall goal of creating a number of chapters, each devoted to a certain topic by several Chinese research groups working in the field, which provide scientists in academia and public institutions with a well-balanced and comprehensive overview of this growing field in China. We have fully revised the volume and expanded it from bioreaction, bioseparation and bioremediation to more extensive issues in order to cover all recent developments in China into account as much as possible. The new volume of Advances in Biochemical Engineering/Biotechnology: Biotechnology in China II is a comprehensive description of the state-of-the-art in China, and a guide to the understanding the work of Chinese biochemical engineering and biotechnology researchers. It is specifically directed to microbiologists

  20. Is There Excitation Energy Transfer between Different Layers of Stacked Photosystem-II-Containing Thylakoid Membranes?

    Farooq, Shazia; Chmeliov, Jevgenij; Trinkunas, Gediminas; Valkunas, Leonas; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2016-04-07

    We have compared picosecond fluorescence decay kinetics for stacked and unstacked photosystem II membranes in order to evaluate the efficiency of excitation energy transfer between the neighboring layers. The measured kinetics were analyzed in terms of a recently developed fluctuating antenna model that provides information about the dimensionality of the studied system. Independently of the stacking state, all preparations exhibited virtually the same value of the apparent dimensionality, d = 1.6. Thus, we conclude that membrane stacking does not affect the efficiency of the delivery of excitation energy toward the reaction centers but ensures a more compact organization of the thylakoid membranes within the chloroplast and separation of photosystems I and II.

  1. 75 FR 62530 - Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC; Laredo Ridge Wind, LLC; RRI Energy West, Inc.; Goshen Phase II LLC...

    2010-10-12

    ... Ridge Wind, LLC; RRI Energy West, Inc.; Goshen Phase II LLC; Solar Partners I, LLC; Solar Partners II, LLC; Solar Partners VIII, LLC; Notice of Effectiveness of Exempt Wholesale Generator Status October 1... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. EG10-48-000; EG10-51-000...

  2. Calibration of the Accuscan II IN Vivo System for High Energy Lung Counting

    Ovard R. Perry; David L. Georgeson

    2011-07-01

    This report describes the April 2011 calibration of the Accuscan II HpGe In Vivo system for high energy lung counting. The source used for the calibration was a NIST traceable lung set manufactured at the University of Cincinnati UCLL43AMEU & UCSL43AMEU containing Am-241 and Eu-152 with energies from 26 keV to 1408 keV. The lung set was used in conjunction with a Realistic Torso phantom. The phantom was placed on the RMC II counting table (with pins removed) between the v-ridges on the backwall of the Accuscan II counter. The top of the detector housing was positioned perpendicular to the junction of the phantom clavicle with the sternum. This position places the approximate center line of the detector housing with the center of the lungs. The energy and efficiency calibrations were performed using a Realistic Torso phantom (Appendix I) and the University of Cincinnati lung set. This report includes an overview introduction and records for the energy/FWHM and efficiency calibration including performance verification and validation counting. The Accuscan II system was successfully calibrated for high energy lung counting and verified in accordance with ANSI/HPS N13.30-1996 criteria.

  3. An experimental study of thermal comfort at different combinations of air and mean radiant temperature

    Simone, Angela; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2009-01-01

    It is often discussed if a person prefers a low air temperature (ta) and a high mean radiant temperature (tr), vice-versa or it does not matter as long as the operative temperature is acceptable. One of the hypotheses is that it does not matter for thermal comfort but for perceived air quality......, a lower air temperature is preferred. This paper presents an experimental study with 30 human subjects exposed to three different combinations of air- and mean radiant temperature with an operative temperature around 23 °C. The subjects gave subjective evaluations of thermal comfort and perceived air...... quality during the experiments. The PMV-index gave a good estimation of thermal sensation vote (TSV) when the air and mean radiant temperature were the same. In the environment with different air- and mean radiant temperatures, a thermal comfort evaluation shows an error up to 1 scale unit on the 7-point...

  4. Ignition of Cellulosic Paper at Low Radiant Fluxes

    White, K. Alan

    1996-01-01

    The ignition of cellulosic paper by low level thermal radiation is investigated. Past work on radiative ignition of paper is briefly reviewed. No experimental study has been reported for radiative ignition of paper at irradiances below 10 Watts/sq.cm. An experimental study of radiative ignition of paper at these low irradiances is reported. Experimental parameters investigated and discussed include radiant power levels incident on the sample, the method of applying the radiation (focussed vs. diffuse Gaussian source), the presence and relative position of a separate pilot ignition source, and the effects of natural convection (buoyancy) on the ignition process in a normal gravity environment. It is observed that the incident radiative flux (in W/sq.cm) has the greatest influence on ignition time. For a given flux level, a focussed Gaussian source is found to be advantageous to a more diffuse, lower amplitude, thermal source. The precise positioning of a pilot igniter relative to gravity and to the fuel sample affects the ignition process, but the precise effects are not fully understood. Ignition was more readily achieved and sustained with a horizontal fuel sample, indicating the buoyancy plays a role in the ignition process of cellulosic paper. Smoldering combustion of doped paper samples was briefly investigated, and results are discussed.

  5. Design and construction of a regenerative radiant tube burner

    Henao, Diego Alberto; Cano C, Carlos Andres; Amell Arrieta, Andres A.

    2002-01-01

    The technological development of the gas industry in Colombia, aiming at efficient and safe use of the natural gas, requires the assimilation and adaptation of new generation, technologies for this purpose in this article results are presented on the design, construction and characterization of a prototype of a burner of regenerative radiant robe with a thermal power of 9,94 kW and a factor of air 1,05. This system takes advantage of the high exit temperature of the combustion smokes, after they go trough a metallic robe where they transfer the heat by radiation, to heat a ceramic channel that has the capacity to absorbing a part of the heat of the smokes and then transferring them to a current of cold air. The benefits of air heating are a saving in fuel, compared with other processes that don't incorporate the recovery of heat from the combustion gases. In this work it was possible to probe a methodology for the design of this type of burners and to reach maximum temperatures of heating of combustion air of 377,9 centigrade degrees, using a material available in the national market, whose regenerative properties should be studied in depth

  6. Automatic drawing and CAD actualization in processing data of radiant sampling in physics prospect

    Liu Jinsheng

    2010-01-01

    In this paper discussed a method of processing radiant sampling data with computer. By this method can get expain the curve of radiant sampling data, and we can combine mineral masses and analyse and calculate them, then record the result on Notebook. There are many merites of this method: easy to learn, simple to use, high efficient. It adapts to all sorts of mines. (authors)

  7. Automatic drawing and cad actualiztion in processing data of radiant sampling in physics prospect

    Liu Jinsheng

    2010-01-01

    In this paper discussed a method of processing radiant sampling data with computer. By this method can get explain the curve of radiant sampling data, and we can combine mineral masses and analyses and calculate them, then record the result on Notebook. There are many merites of this method: easy to learn, simple to use, high efficient. It adapts to all sorts of mines. (authors)

  8. General Relativistic Radiant Shock Waves in the Post-Quasistatic Approximation

    H, Jorge A Rueda [Centro de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101, Venezuela Escuela de Fisica, Universidad Industrial de Santander, A.A. 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Nunez, L A [Centro de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101, Venezuela Centro Nacional de Calculo Cientifico, Universidad de Los Andes, CeCalCULA, Corporacion Parque Tecnologico de Merida, Merida 5101, Venezuela (Venezuela)

    2007-05-15

    An evolution of radiant shock wave front is considered in the framework of a recently presented method to study self-gravitating relativistic spheres, whose rationale becomes intelligible and finds full justification within the context of a suitable definition of the post-quasistatic approximation. The spherical matter configuration is divided into two regions by the shock and each side of the interface having a different equation of state and anisotropic phase. In order to simulate dissipation effects due to the transfer of photons and/or neutrinos within the matter configuration, we introduce the flux factor, the variable Eddington factor and a closure relation between them. As we expected the strong of the shock increases the speed of the fluid to relativistic ones and for some critical values is larger than light speed. In addition, we find that energy conditions are very sensible to the anisotropy, specially the strong energy condition. As a special feature of the model, we find that the contribution of the matter and radiation to the radial pressure are the same order of magnitude as in the mant as in the core, moreover, in the core radiation pressure is larger than matter pressure.

  9. General Relativistic Radiant Shock Waves in the Post-Quasistatic Approximation

    H, Jorge A Rueda; Nunez, L A

    2007-01-01

    An evolution of radiant shock wave front is considered in the framework of a recently presented method to study self-gravitating relativistic spheres, whose rationale becomes intelligible and finds full justification within the context of a suitable definition of the post-quasistatic approximation. The spherical matter configuration is divided into two regions by the shock and each side of the interface having a different equation of state and anisotropic phase. In order to simulate dissipation effects due to the transfer of photons and/or neutrinos within the matter configuration, we introduce the flux factor, the variable Eddington factor and a closure relation between them. As we expected the strong of the shock increases the speed of the fluid to relativistic ones and for some critical values is larger than light speed. In addition, we find that energy conditions are very sensible to the anisotropy, specially the strong energy condition. As a special feature of the model, we find that the contribution of the matter and radiation to the radial pressure are the same order of magnitude as in the mant as in the core, moreover, in the core radiation pressure is larger than matter pressure

  10. Ocean Thermal Energy Conservation (OTEC) power system development (PDS) II. Preliminary design report

    1979-08-10

    This report documents the results and conclusions of the PDS II, Phase I, preliminary design of a 10 MWe OTEC power system, using enhanced plate type heat exchangers, and of representative 0.2 MWe test articles. It further provides the documentation (specifications, drawings, trade studies, etc.) resulting from the design activities. The data and discussions of the technical concepts are organized to respond to the PDS II, Phase II proposal evaluation criteria. This volume, which specifically addresses the three evaluation categories (heat exchangers, rotating machinery, and power system configuration and performance) is an integral part of the Phase II plans (proposal) which describe the technical approach to delivering test articles to OTEC-1. In addition, there is a section which addresses power system cost and net energy analysis and another which discusses the results of stainless steel feasibility studies. Supporting documentation is contained in two appendix volumes.

  11. Incremental binding free energies of aluminum (III) vs. magnesium (II) complexes

    Mercero, Jose M.; Mujika, Jon I.; Matxain, Jon M.; Lopez, Xabier; Ugalde, Jesus M.

    2003-01-01

    A sequential ligand addition to the aluminum (III) cation has been studied using the B3LYP functional and a combined all-electron/pseudopotentials basis set. The aluminum complexes are compared with analogous magnesium (II) complexes. Different thermodynamical data, such as incremental binding energies, enthalpies, entropies and free energies, are presented for these addition reactions. While the magnesium (II) cation can only accommodate three negatively charged ligands, aluminum (III) accommodates four even after including bulk solvent effects. The main differences between both cations complexing with the neutral ligands, is that aluminum (III) is not able to form complexes with methanol until the number of methanol ligands is equal to 3. Magnesium (II) prefers to bind methanol and formamide when the number of ligands is small, while aluminum prefers formamide. For the largest complexes both cations prefer to bind water

  12. Radiant heat increases piglets’ use of the heated creep area on the critical days after birth

    Larsen, Mona Lilian Vestbjerg; Thodberg, Karen; Pedersen, Lene Juul

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate how piglets’ use of a creep area is affected by using radiant heat compared to an incandescent light bulb. It was hypothesised that radiant heat would increase the use of the creep area. Twenty litters were randomly assigned to one of two heat sources...... in the creep area: (1) an incandescent light bulb (STANDARD, n=10) or (2) a radiant heat source (RADIANT, n=10) with five of each type of heat source in each of two batches. Observations on piglets’ position in the pen were made by scan sampling every ten minutes in a 4-hour period from 1100 to 1500 h on day 1......–7, 14 and 21 post partum. A higher percentage of piglets in the creep area was seen for RADIANT litters compared to STANDARD litters on day 2 (P=0.002) and day 3 (P=0.005), and percentage of piglets in the creep area increased for RADIANT litters from day 1 to 2 (P

  13. Energy analysis of batteries in photovoltaic systems. Part II: Energy return factors and overall battery efficiencies

    Rydh, Carl Johan; Sanden, Bjoern A.

    2005-01-01

    Energy return factors and overall energy efficiencies are calculated for a stand-alone photovoltaic (PV)-battery system. Eight battery technologies are evaluated: lithium-ion (nickel), sodium-sulphur, nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal hydride, lead-acid, vanadium-redox, zinc-bromine and polysulphide-bromide. With a battery energy storage capacity three times higher than the daily energy output, the energy return factor for the PV-battery system ranges from 2.2 to 10 in our reference case. For a PV-battery system with a service life of 30 yr, this corresponds to energy payback times between 2.5 and 13 yr. The energy payback time is 1.8-3.3 yr for the PV array and 0.72-10 yr for the battery, showing the energy related significance of batteries and the large variation between different technologies. In extreme cases, energy return factors below one occur, implying no net energy output. The overall battery efficiency, including not only direct energy losses during operation but also energy requirements for production and transport of the charger, the battery and the inverter, is 0.41-0.80. For some batteries, the overall battery efficiency is significantly lower than the direct efficiency of the charger, the battery and the inverter (0.50-0.85). The ranking order of batteries in terms of energy efficiency, the relative importance of different battery parameters and the optimal system design and operation (e.g. the use of air conditioning) are, in many cases, dependent on the characterisation of the energy background system and on which type of energy efficiency measure is used (energy return factor or overall battery efficiency)

  14. Online beam energy measurement of Beijing electron positron collider II linear accelerator

    Wang, S.; Iqbal, M.; Liu, R.; Chi, Y.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes online beam energy measurement of Beijing Electron Positron Collider upgraded version II linear accelerator (linac) adequately. It presents the calculation formula, gives the error analysis in detail, discusses the realization in practice, and makes some verification. The method mentioned here measures the beam energy by acquiring the horizontal beam position with three beam position monitors (BPMs), which eliminates the effect of orbit fluctuation, and is much better than the one using the single BPM. The error analysis indicates that this online measurement has further potential usage such as a part of beam energy feedback system. The reliability of this method is also discussed and demonstrated in this paper.

  15. Simulation model for wind energy storage systems. Volume II. Operation manual. [SIMWEST code

    Warren, A.W.; Edsinger, R.W.; Burroughs, J.D.

    1977-08-01

    The effort developed a comprehensive computer program for the modeling of wind energy/storage systems utilizing any combination of five types of storage (pumped hydro, battery, thermal, flywheel and pneumatic). An acronym for the program is SIMWEST (Simulation Model for Wind Energy Storage). The level of detail of SIMWEST is consistent with a role of evaluating the economic feasibility as well as the general performance of wind energy systems. The software package consists of two basic programs and a library of system, environmental, and load components. Volume II, the SIMWEST operation manual, describes the usage of the SIMWEST program, the design of the library components, and a number of simple example simulations intended to familiarize the user with the program's operation. Volume II also contains a listing of each SIMWEST library subroutine.

  16. PIC Simulations in Low Energy Part of PIP-II Proton Linac

    Romanov, Gennady

    2014-07-01

    The front end of PIP-II linac is composed of a 30 keV ion source, low energy beam transport line (LEBT), 2.1 MeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and medium energy beam transport line (MEBT). This configuration is currently being assembled at Fermilab to support a complete systems test. The front end represents the primary technical risk with PIP-II, and so this step will validate the concept and demonstrate that the hardware can meet the specified requirements. SC accelerating cavities right after MEBT require high quality and well defined beam after RFQ to avoid excessive particle losses. In this paper we will present recent progress of beam dynamic study, using CST PIC simulation code, to investigate partial neutralization effect in LEBT, halo and tail formation in RFQ, total emittance growth and beam losses along low energy part of the linac.

  17. Thermodynamic Stability of Ice II and Its Hydrogen-Disordered Counterpart: Role of Zero-Point Energy.

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Yagasaki, Takuma; Tanaka, Hideki

    2016-03-03

    We investigate why no hydrogen-disordered form of ice II has been found in nature despite the fact that most of hydrogen-ordered ices have hydrogen-disordered counterparts. The thermodynamic stability of a set of hydrogen-ordered ice II variants relative to ice II is evaluated theoretically. It is found that ice II is more stable than the disordered variants so generated as to satisfy the simple ice rule due to the lower zero-point energy as well as the pair interaction energy. The residual entropy of the disordered ice II phase gradually compensates the unfavorable free energy with increasing temperature. The crossover, however, occurs at a high temperature well above the melting point of ice III. Consequently, the hydrogen-disordered phase does not exist in nature. The thermodynamic stability of partially hydrogen-disordered ices is also scrutinized by examining the free-energy components of several variants obtained by systematic inversion of OH directions in ice II. The potential energy of one variant is lower than that of the ice II structure, but its Gibbs free energy is slightly higher than that of ice II due to the zero-point energy. The slight difference in the thermodynamic stability leaves the possibility of the partial hydrogen-disorder in real ice II.

  18. Vacuum system design for the PEP-II B Factory High-Energy Ring

    Perkins, C.; Bostic, D.; Daly, E.

    1994-06-01

    The design of the vacuum system for the PEP-II B Factory High-Energy Ring is reviewed. The thermal design and vacuum requirements are particularly challenging in PEP-II due to high stored beam currents up to 3.0 amps in 1658 bunches. The vacuum chambers for the HER arcs are fabricated by electron beam welding extruded copper sections up to 6 m long. Design of these chambers and the vacuum PumPing configuration is described with results from vacuum and thermal analyses

  19. Tunnel effect wave energy detection

    Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Waltman, Steven B. (Inventor); Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for measuring gravitational and inertial forces, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy acting on an object or fluid in space provide an electric tunneling current through a gap between an electrode and that object or fluid in space and vary that gap with any selected one of such forces, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy acting on that object or fluid. These methods and apparatus sense a corresponding variation in an electric property of that gap and determine the latter force, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy in response to that corresponding variation, and thereby sense or measure such parameters as acceleration, position, particle mass, velocity, magnetic field strength, presence or direction, or wave or radiant energy intensity, presence or direction.

  20. On the physics of power, energy and economics of renewable electric energy sources - Part II

    Skoglund, Annika; Leijon, Mats; Waters, Rafael; Rehn, Alf; Lindahl, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    Renewable Energy Technologies (RETs) are often recognized as less competitive than traditional electric energy conversion systems. Obstacles with renewable electric energy conversion systems are often referred to the intermittency of the energy sources and the relatively high maintenance cost. However, due to an intensified discourse on climate change and its effects, it has from a societal point of view, become more desirable to adopt and install CO 2 neutral power plants. Even if this has increased the competitiveness of RETs in a political sense, the new goals for RET installations must also be met with economical viability. We propose that the direction of technical development, as well as the chosen technology in new installations, should not primarily be determined by policies, but by the basic physical properties of the energy source and the associated potential for inexpensive energy production. This potential is the basic entity that drives the payback of the investment of a specific RET power plant. With regard to this, we argue that the total electric energy conversion system must be considered if effective power production is to be achieved, with focus on the possible number of full loading hours and the Degree of Utilization. This will increase the cost efficiency and economical competitiveness of RET investments, and could enhance faster diffusion of new innovations and installations without over-optimistic subsidies. This paper elaborates on the overall problem of the economy of renewable electric energy conversion systems by studying the interface between physics, engineering and economy reported for RET power plants in different scientific publications. The core objective is to show the practical use of the Degree of Utilization and how the concept is crucial for the design and economical optimization disregarding subsidies. The results clearly indicate that the future political regulative frameworks should consider the choice of renewable energy

  1. Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Site Identification and Ranking Methodology Part II: Tidal Energy

    Kilcher, Levi [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Thresher, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tinnesand, Heidi [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Marine hydrokinetic energy is a promising and growing piece of the renewable energy sector that offers high predictability and additional energy sources for a diversified energy economy. This report investigates the market opportunities for tidal energy along the U.S. coastlines. It is part one of a two-part investigation into the United States' two largest marine hydrokinetic resources (wave and tidal). Tidal energy technology is still an emerging form of renewable energy for which large-scale grid-connected project costs are currently poorly defined. Ideally, device designers would like to know the resource conditions at economical project sites so they can optimize device designs. On the other hand, project developers need detailed device cost data to identify sites where projects are economical. That is, device design and siting are, to some extent, a coupled problem. This work describes a methodology for identifying likely deployment locations based on a set of criteria that tidal energy experts in industry, academia, and national laboratories agree are likely to be important factors for all technology types. Several factors that will affect tidal project costs and siting have not been considered here -- including permitting constraints, conflicting use, seasonal resource variability, extreme event likelihood, and distance to ports -- because consistent data are unavailable or technology-independent scoring could not be identified. As the industry continues to mature and converge around a subset of device archetypes with well-defined costs, more precise investigations of project siting that include these factors will be possible. For now, these results provide a high-level guide pointing to the regions where markets and resource will one day support commercial tidal energy projects.

  2. Modeling of hydronic radiant cooling of a thermally homeostatic building using a parametric cooling tower

    Ma, Peizheng; Wang, Lin-Shu; Guo, Nianhua

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Investigated cooling of thermally homeostatic buildings in 7 U.S. cities by modeling. • Natural energy is harnessed by cooling tower to extract heat for building cooling. • Systematically studied possibility and conditions of using cooling tower in buildings. • Diurnal ambient temperature amplitude is taken into account in cooling tower cooling. • Homeostatic building cooling is possible in locations with large ambient T amplitude. - Abstract: A case is made that while it is important to mitigate dissipative losses associated with heat dissipation and mechanical/electrical resistance for engineering efficiency gain, the “architect” of energy efficiency is the conception of best heat extraction frameworks—which determine the realm of possible efficiency. This precept is applied to building energy efficiency here. Following a proposed process assumption-based design method, which was used for determining the required thermal qualities of building thermal autonomy, this paper continues this line of investigation and applies heat extraction approach investigating the extent of building partial homeostasis and the possibility of full homeostasis by using cooling tower in one summer in seven selected U.S. cities. Cooling tower heat extraction is applied parametrically to hydronically activated radiant-surfaces model-buildings. Instead of sizing equipment as a function of design peak hourly temperature as it is done in heat balance design-approach of selecting HVAC equipment, it is shown that the conditions of using cooling tower depend on both “design-peak” daily-mean temperature and the distribution of diurnal range in hourly temperature (i.e., diurnal temperature amplitude). Our study indicates that homeostatic building with natural cooling (by cooling tower alone) is possible only in locations of special meso-scale climatic condition such as Sacramento, CA. In other locations the use of cooling tower alone can only achieve homeostasis

  3. Influence of Rotational Transform and Magnetic Shear on the Energy Content of TJ-II Plasmas

    Estrada, T.; Ascasibar, E.; Castejon, F.; Jimenez, J. A.; Lopez-Bruna, D.; Pastor, I.

    2002-01-01

    In the magnetic configuration scans performed in TJ-II stellarator, low plasma energy content is found to be related to the presence of low order rational surfaces within the confinement region in low plasma density experiments. Plasma currents of about-1 kA (mainly bootstrap driven) can substantially increase the magnetic shear in TJ-II and under these conditions the confinement is no longer deteriorated by low order rational surfaces. Experiments with higher plasma currents (OH induced currents up to +/-10 kA) show a non-symmetric dependence on the sign of the magnetic shear. Preliminary results show a substantial improvement of the confinement in the case of negative plasma current, while minor changes are observed in the plasma energy content when positive current is induced in magnetic configurations that in vacuum exclude low order rational surfaces. (Author) 12 refs

  4. Influence of Rotational Transform and Magnetic Shear on the Energy Content of TJ-II Plasmas

    Estrada, T.; Ascasibar, E.; Castejon, F.; Jimenez, J. A.; Lopez-Bruna, D.; Pastor, I.

    2002-07-01

    In the magnetic configuration scans performed in TJ-II stellarator, low plasma energy content is found to be related to the presence of low order rational surfaces within the confinement region in low plasma density experiments. Plasma currents of about-1 kA (mainly bootstrap driven) can substantially increase the magnetic shear in TJ-II and under these conditions the confinement is no longer deteriorated by low order rational surfaces. Experiments with higher plasma currents (OH induced currents up to +/-10 kA) show a non-symmetric dependence on the sign of the magnetic shear. Preliminary results show a substantial improvement of the confinement in the case of negative plasma current, while minor changes are observed in the plasma energy content when positive current is induced in magnetic configurations that in vacuum exclude low order rational surfaces. (Author) 12 refs.

  5. Research Opportunities in High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas on the NDCX-II Facility

    Barnard, John; Cohen, Ron; Friedman, Alex; Grote, Dave; Lund, Steven; Sharp, Bill; Bieniosek, Frank; Ni, Pavel; Roy, Prabir; Henestroza, Enrique; Jung, Jin-Young; Kwan, Joe; Lee, Ed; Leitner, Matthaeus; Lidia, Steven; Logan, Grant; Seidl, Peter; Vay, Jean-Luc; Waldron, Will

    2009-01-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions offer a very attractive tool for fundamental research in high energy density physics and inertial fusion energy science. These applications build on the significant recent advances in the generation, compression and focusing of intense heavy ion beams in the presence of a neutralizing background plasma. Such beams can provide uniform volumetric heating of the target during a time-scale shorter than the hydrodynamic response time, thereby enabling a significant suite of experiments that will elucidate the underlying physics of dense, strongly-coupled plasma states, which have been heretofore poorly understood and inadequately diagnosed, particularly in the warm dense matter regime. The innovations, fundamental knowledge, and experimental capabilities developed in this basic research program is also expected to provide new research opportunities to study the physics of directly-driven ion targets, which can dramatically reduce the size of heavy ion beam drivers for inertial fusion energy applications. Experiments examining the behavior of thin target foils heated to the warm dense matter regime began at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in 2008, using the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment - I (NDCX-I) facility, and its associated target chamber and diagnostics. The upgrade of this facility, called NDCX-II, will enable an exciting set of scientific experiments that require highly uniform heating of the target, using Li + ions which enter the target with kinetic energy in the range of 3 MeV, slightly above the Bragg peak for energy deposition, and exit with energies slightly below the Bragg peak. This document briefly summarizes the wide range of fundamental scientific experiments that can be carried out on the NDCX-II facility, pertaining to the two charges presented to the 2008 Fusion Energy Science Advisory Committee (FESAC) panel on High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas (HEDLP). These charges include: (1) Identify the

  6. Estimation of the adiabatic energy limit versus beta in Baseball II

    Foote, J.H.

    1976-01-01

    Several estimates of the adiabatic energy limit versus beta in Baseball II are summarized, and the calculational methods used to obtain them are described. Some estimates are based on analytic expressions; for others, particle orbits are calculated, magnetic-moment jumps are inspected, and adiabatic limits then derived. The results are sensitive to the assumed variation of the combined vacuum-plus-plasma magnetic field. The calculated adiabatic energy limit falls rapidly with beta, even for a gradual magnetic-field variation. If we assume a sharp depression in the axial profile of the combined magnetic field for a finite-beta plasma, the adiabatic limit can be further markedly reduced

  7. Linearization of the interaction principle: Analytic Jacobians in the 'Radiant' model

    Spurr, R.J.D.; Christi, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a new linearization of the Radiant radiative transfer model. Radiant uses discrete ordinates for solving the radiative transfer equation in a multiply-scattering anisotropic medium with solar and thermal sources, but employs the adding method (interaction principle) for the stacking of reflection and transmission matrices in a multilayer atmosphere. For the linearization, we show that the entire radiation field is analytically differentiable with respect to any surface or atmospheric parameter for which we require Jacobians (derivatives of the radiance field). Derivatives of the discrete ordinate solutions are based on existing methods developed for the LIDORT radiative transfer models. Linearization of the interaction principle is completely new and constitutes the major theme of the paper. We discuss the application of the Radiant model and its linearization in the Level 2 algorithm for the retrieval of columns of carbon dioxide as the main target of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) mission

  8. High energy fast neutrons from the Harwell variable energy cyclotron. II. Biologic studies in mammalian systems

    Berry, R.J.; Bance, D.A.; Barnes, D.W.H.; Cox, R.; Goodhead, D.T.; Sansom, J.M.; Thacker, J.

    1977-01-01

    A high energy fast neutron beam potentially suitable for radiotherapy has been described in a companion paper. Its biologic effects have been studied in the following experimental systems: clonal survival and mutation induction after irradiation in vitro in Chinese hamster cells and human diploid fibroblasts; survival of reproductive capacity in vivo of murine hemopoietic colony-forming cells and murine intestinal crypts after irradiation in vivo; survival of reproductive capacity in vivo after irradiation in vitro or in vivo of murine lymphocytic leukemia cells; acute intestinal death following total body irradiation of mice and guinea pigs; and hemopoietic death following total body irradiation of mice and guinea pigs. The relative biologic effectiveness of these high energy neutrons varied among the different biologic systems, and in several cases varied with the size of the radiation dose. The oxygen enhancement ratio was studied in murine lymphocytic leukemia cells irradiated under aerobic or hypoxic conditions in vitro and assayed for survival of reproductive capacity in vivo. Compared with x-rays, the potential therapeutic gain factor for these neutrons was about 1.5. This work represents a ''radiobiologic calibration'' program which it is suggested should be undertaken before new and unknown fast neutron spectra are used for experimental radiotherapy. The results are compared with biologic studies carried out at high energy fast neutron generators in the United States

  9. Energy efficient heating and ventilation of large halls

    Hojer, Ondrej; Kabele, Karel; Kotrbaty, Miroslav; Sommer, Klaus; Petras, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    This guidebook is focused on modern methods for design, control and operation of energy efficient heating systems in large spaces and industrial halls. The book deals with thermal comfort, light and dark gas radiant heaters, panel radiant heating, floor heating and industrial air heating systems. Various heating systems are illustrated with case studies. Design principles, methods and modeling tools are presented for various systems.

  10. Search for Ultra High-Energy Neutrinos with AMANDA-II

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer; Ackermann, M.

    2007-01-01

    A search for diffuse neutrinos with energies in excess of 10 5 GeV is conducted with AMANDA-II data recorded between 2000 and 2002. Above 10 7 GeV, the Earth is essentially opaque to neutrinos. This fact, combined with the limited overburden of the AMANDA-II detector (roughly 1.5 km), concentrates these ultra high-energy neutrinos at the horizon. The primary background for this analysis is bundles of downgoing, high-energy muons from the interaction of cosmic rays in the atmosphere. No statistically significant excess above the expected background is seen in the data, and an upper limit is set on the diffuse all-flavor neutrino flux of E 2 Φ 90%CL -7 GeV cm -2 s -1 sr -1 valid over the energy range of 2 x 10 5 GeV to 10 9 GeV. A number of models which predict neutrino fluxes from active galactic nuclei are excluded at the 90% confidence level

  11. Experimental evaluation of heat transfer coefficients between radiant ceiling and room

    Causone, Francesco; Corgnati, Stefano P.; Filippi, Marco

    2009-01-01

    The heat transfer coefficients between radiant surfaces and room are influenced by several parameters: surfaces temperature distributions, internal gains, air movements. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the heat transfer coefficients between radiant ceiling and room in typical conditions...... of occupancy of an office or residential building. Internal gains were therefore simulated using heated cylinders and heat losses using cooled surfaces. Evaluations were developed by means of experimental tests in an environmental chamber. Heat transfer coefficient may be expressed separately for radiation...

  12. Thermal Conditions in a Simulated Office Environment with Convective and Radiant Cooling Systems

    Mustakallio, Panu; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Kostov, Kalin

    2013-01-01

    velocity and turbulent intensity were measured and draft rate levels calculated in the room. Manikin-based equivalent temperature (MBET) was determined by two thermal manikins to identify the impact of the local thermal conditions generated by the studied systems on occupants’ thermal comfort. The results......The thermal conditions in a two person office room were measured with four air conditioning systems: chilled beam (CB), chilled beam with radiant panel (CBR), chilled ceiling with ceiling installed mixing ventilation (CCMV) and four desk partition mounted local radiant cooling panels with mixing...

  13. Three-dimensional simulation of super-radiant Smith-Purcell radiation

    Li, D.; Imasaki, K.; Yang, Z.; Park, Gun-Sik

    2006-01-01

    A simulation of coherent and super-radiant Smith-Purcell radiation is performed in the gigahertz regime using a three-dimensional particle-in-cell code. The simulation model supposes a rectangular grating to be driven by a single electron bunch and a train of periodic bunches, respectively. The true Smith-Purcell radiation is distinguished from the evanescent wave, which has an angle independent frequency lower than the minimum allowed Smith-Purcell frequency. We also find that the super-radiant radiations excited by periodic bunches are emitted at higher harmonics of the bunching frequency and at the corresponding Smith-Purcell angles

  14. Cooling load calculations of radiant and all-air systems for commercial buildings

    Bourdakis, Eleftherios; Bauman, Fred; Schiavon, Stefano

    The authors simulated in TRNSYS three radiant systems coupled with a 50% sized variable air volume (VAV) system and a 50% sized all-air VAV system with night ventilation. The objective of this study was to identify the differences in the cooling load profiles of the examined systems when they are......The authors simulated in TRNSYS three radiant systems coupled with a 50% sized variable air volume (VAV) system and a 50% sized all-air VAV system with night ventilation. The objective of this study was to identify the differences in the cooling load profiles of the examined systems when...

  15. Extremely high energy gamma-ray and hadron families with halo (II)

    Yamashita, S.; Ohsawa, A.; Chinellato, J.A.; Shibuya, E.H.

    1984-01-01

    The five highest energy events with the total observed energy exceeding 10 15 eV, observed by Chacaltaya emulsion chambers, are analysed and their characteristic feature are presented. Those big events are named Andromeda(halo 21,000 TeV and spots 6,140 TeV), Ursa Maior(980 TeV and 1,880 TeV), M.A.I(3,200 TeV and 1,340 TeV), M.A.II(1,300 TeV and 890 TeV) and M.A.III(5,100 TeV and 3,700 TeV). In the energy flow distributions of them, sharp peak indicating concentration of energy is found at small distance from a family center. Such concentration of energy may make a halo. If we represent the characteristic of such concentration of energy as (distance from the family center to the peak) x (energy sum within the distance), its order of magnitude becomes a few GeV.km for each big family. Comparisons are made with the simulation calculation carried out by M. Shibata. (author)

  16. Modelling Energy Loss Mechanisms and a Determination of the Electron Energy Scale for the CDF Run II W Mass Measurement

    Riddick, Thomas [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    The calibration of the calorimeter energy scale is vital to measuring the mass of the W boson at CDF Run II. For the second measurement of the W boson mass at CDF Run II, two independent simulations were developed. This thesis presents a detailed description of the modification and validation of Bremsstrahlung and pair production modelling in one of these simulations, UCL Fast Simulation, comparing to both geant4 and real data where appropriate. The total systematic uncertainty on the measurement of the W boson mass in the W → eve channel from residual inaccuracies in Bremsstrahlung modelling is estimated as 6.2 ±3.2 MeV/c2 and the total systematic uncertainty from residual inaccuracies in pair production modelling is estimated as 2.8± 2.7 MeV=c2. Two independent methods are used to calibrate the calorimeter energy scale in UCL Fast Simulation; the results of these two methods are compared to produce a measurement of the Z boson mass as a cross-check on the accuracy of the simulation.

  17. Journal of Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems - Volume II

    Neven Duić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Journal of Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems – JSDEWES is an international journal dedicated to the improvement and dissemination of knowledge on methods, policies and technologies for increasing the sustainability of development by de-coupling growth from natural resources and replacing them with knowledge based economy, taking into account its economic, environmental and social pillars, as well as methods for assessing and measuring sustainability of development, regarding energy, transport, water, environment and food production systems and their many combinations. In total 32 manuscripts were published in Volume II, all of them reviewed by at least two reviewers. The Journal of Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems would like to thank reviewers for their contribution to the quality of the published manuscripts.

  18. 16 CFR Figure 4 to Subpart A of... - Flooring Radiant Panel Tester Schematic Low Flux End, Elevation

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flooring Radiant Panel Tester Schematic Low Flux End, Elevation 4 Figure 4 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY... Standard Pt. 1209, Subpt. A, Fig. 4 Figure 4 to Subpart A of Part 1209—Flooring Radiant Panel Tester...

  19. A zero-length bellows for the PEP-II High-Energy Ring

    Nordby, M.; Daly, E.F.; Kurita, N.; Langton, J.

    1995-08-01

    Due to the beamline space constrictions and the modular design of the vacuum system, a conventional bellows can not be used everywhere in the PEP-II High-Energy Ring (HER) arcs. A zero-length ''Flex Flange'' was developed which actually performs better than a more standard bellows. The Flex Flange fits the space available while still preserving the modularity of the system. Furthermore, the design provides for an accurate match-up between adjoining octagonal copper chambers despite the large fabrication and assembly tolerances and high operational loads. Beam chamber continuity is ensured by an integral RF seal ring which is easy to install and fault-tolerant. Heating from synchrotron radiation and higher-order mode trapping is managed to ensure a robust connection despite the 3,000 mA beam current of the PEP-II HER. The Flex Flange concept is versatile and adaptable to many applications, yet economical both in space needed and cost

  20. Energy extension service pilot program evaluation report: the first year. Volume II: pilot state reports

    1979-09-01

    Volume II of the Energy Extension Service Evaluation presents a discussion of the operations of the ten EES pilot-state programs during the period from October 1, 1977 through September 30, 1978. Each of the ten pilot states - Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming - received a grant of approximately $1.1 million to develop and implement a 19-month program beginning on October 1, 1977. Volume II provides a case-study description of the operations of the pilot program in each state, with special attention given to the two programs selected in each state for more detailed study and survey research. Some survey data and analysis are presented for the emphasis programs.

  1. Heat transfer from aluminum to He II: application to superconductive magnetic energy storage

    Van Sciver, S.W.; Boom, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    Heat transfer problems associated with large scale Superconductive Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) are unique due to the proposed size of a unit. The Wisconsin design consists of a cryogenically stable magnet cooled with He II at 1.8 K. The special properties of He II (T 2 at 1.91 K and a recovery at 0.7 W/cm 2 . The advantages of operating the magnet under subcooled conditions are exemplified by improved heat transfer. The maximum at 1.89 K and 1.3 atm pressure is 2.3 W/cm 2 with recovery enhanced to 1.9 W/cm 2 . A conservative maximum heat flux of 0.5 W/cm 2 with an associated temperature difference of 0.5 K has been chosen for design. Elements of the experimental study as well as the design will be discussed

  2. Irisin is Associated with Urotensin II and Protein Energy Wasting in Hemodialysis Patients

    Wan-Yu He

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aims/Introduction: Irisin is a newly identified myokine which can promote energy expenditure. Urotensin II (UII is identified as the most potent mammalian vasoconstrictor to date. Previous studies showed that UII can aggravate insulin resistance while irisin alleviate insulin resistance. Through this study, it is our aim to elucidate if UII can induce insulin resistance and also have an association with the irisin level in hemodialysis (HD patients. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty-eight patients on maintenance hemodialysis treatment and forty healthy subjects were enrolled in this study. Blood irisin concentrations and UII concentrations were measured by ELISA and RIA respectively. The body composition was analyzed by bioelectrical impedance. Results: The serum irisin levels and UII levels were both significantly lower in HD patients in comparison to that of the healthy subjects. The serum irisin levels were lower in HD patients with protein energy wasting than those of the patients without protein energy wasting. The independent determinants of circulating Ln (irisin (the natural logarithm of irisin were UII lean body mass and patients with protein energy wasting. Conclusions: Our results are the first to provide the clinical evidence of the association among irisin, UII, and protein energy wasting. Our results hint that UII and protein energy wasting might inhibit the release or synthesis of irisin from skeletal muscles in HD patients.

  3. Critically Evaluated Energy Levels, Spectral Lines, Transition Probabilities, and Intensities of Singly Ionized Vanadium (V ii)

    Saloman, Edward B. [Dakota Consulting, Inc., 1110 Bonifant Street, Suite 310, Silver Spring, MD 20910 (United States); Kramida, Alexander [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The energy levels, observed spectral lines, and transition probabilities of singly ionized vanadium, V ii, have been compiled. The experimentally derived energy levels belong to the configurations 3 d {sup 4}, 3 d {sup 3} ns ( n  = 4, 5, 6), 3 d {sup 3} np , and 3 d {sup 3} nd ( n  = 4, 5), 3 d {sup 3}4 f , 3 d {sup 2}4 s {sup 2}, and 3 d {sup 2}4 s 4 p . Also included are values for some forbidden lines that may be of interest to the astrophysical community. Experimental Landé g -factors and leading percentages for the levels are included when available, as well as Ritz wavelengths calculated from the energy levels. Wavelengths and transition probabilities are reported for 3568 and 1896 transitions, respectively. From the list of observed wavelengths, 407 energy levels are determined. The observed intensities, normalized to a common scale, are provided. From the newly optimized energy levels, a revised value for the ionization energy is derived, 118,030(60) cm{sup −1}, corresponding to 14.634(7) eV. This is 130 cm{sup −1} higher than the previously recommended value from Iglesias et al.

  4. The PEP-II Project: Low-Energy Ring Design and Project Status

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the present status of the PEP-II project. The project comprises four major systems: Injector, High-Energy Ring (HER), Low-Energy Ring (LER), and Interaction Region (IR). We focus in detail on the design of the LER, as its parameters and requirements are most closely related to those required for the Beijing Tau-Charm Factory rings. The PEP-II LER is a high-current, 3.1-GeV positron ring mounted above the 9-GeV HER. The LER uses a wiggler located in one of its six straight sections to provide emittance control and additional damping. We describe the rather complicated IR, which must transport the LER beam into the plane of the HER, focus it to a common beam size, and separate the beams after the head-on collisions. Both permanent magnet and conventional electromagnets are used in this area. The LER lattice has now adopted a simplified non-interleaved sextupole correction scheme that has reduced the required number of sextupoles substantially. We describe the LER vacuum system, one of the most challenging subsystems in PEP-II. It employs several technologies. In the arcs, aluminum extrusions and titanium sublimation pumps are employed; the straight sections use stainless steel chambers with lumped ion pumps. In the wiggler area, an extended copper photon dump with nonevaporable getter (NEG) pumps is employed to handle the very large synchrotron radiation power. The design of the room-temperature RF system, the bunch-by-bunch longitudinal and transverse feedback systems, and some of the special diagnostics will be described briefly. The PEP-II project remains on schedule to begin commissioning of the HER in April 1997, followed by the LER a year later

  5. Testing DARKexp against energy and density distributions of Millennium-II halos

    Nolting, Chris; Williams, Liliya L.R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55454 (United States); Boylan-Kolchin, Michael [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX, 78712 (United States); Hjorth, Jens, E-mail: nolting@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: llrw@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: mbk@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: jens@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, Copenhagen, DK-2100 Denmark (Denmark)

    2016-09-01

    We test the DARKexp model for relaxed, self-gravitating, collisionless systems against equilibrium dark matter halos from the Millennium-II simulation. While limited tests of DARKexp against simulations and observations have been carried out elsewhere, this is the first time the testing is done with a large sample of simulated halos spanning a factor of ∼ 50 in mass, and using independent fits to density and energy distributions. We show that DARKexp, a one shape parameter family, provides very good fits to the shapes of density profiles, ρ( r ), and differential energy distributions, N ( E ), of individual simulated halos. The best fit shape parameter φ{sub 0} obtained from the two types of fits are correlated, though with scatter. Our most important conclusions come from ρ( r ) and N ( E ) that have been averaged over many halos. These show that the bulk of the deviations between DARKexp and individual Millennium-II halos come from halo-to-halo fluctuations, likely driven by substructure, and other density perturbations. The average ρ( r ) and N ( E ) are quite smooth and follow DARKexp very closely. The only deviation that remains after averaging is small, and located at most bound energies for N ( E ) and smallest radii for ρ( r ). Since the deviation is confined to 3–4 smoothing lengths, and is larger for low mass halos, it is likely due to numerical resolution effects.

  6. Ultrahigh-energy Cosmic Rays from Fanaroff Riley class II radio galaxies

    Rachen, Joerg; Biermann, Peter L.

    1992-08-01

    The hot spots of very powerful radio galaxies (Fanaroff Riley class II) are argued to be the sources of the ultrahigh energy component in Cosmic Rays. We present calculations of Cosmic Ray transport in an evolving universe, taking the losses against the microwave background properly into account. As input we use the models for the cosmological radio source evolution derived by radioastronomers (mainly Peacock 1985). The model we adopt for the acceleration in the radio hot spots has been introduced by Biermann and Strittmatter (1987), and Meisenheimer et al. (1989) and is based on first order Fermi theory of particle acceleration at shocks (see, e.g., Drury 1983). As an unknown the actual proportion of energy density in protons enters, which together with structural uncertainties in the hot spots should introduce no more than one order of magnitude in uncertainty: We easily reproduce the observed spectra of high energy cosmic rays. It follows that scattering of charged energetic particles in intergalactic space must be sufficiently small in order to obtain contributions from sources as far away as even the nearest Fanaroff Riley class II radio galaxies. This implies a strong constraint on the turbulent magnetic field in intergalactic space.

  7. Radiant and convective heat transfer for flow of a transparent gas in a short tube with prescribed sinusoidal wall heat flux

    de Lemos, M.J.S.

    1982-01-01

    The present analysis accounts for radiant and convective heat transfer for a transparent fluid flowing in a short tube with prescribed wall heat flux. The heat flux distribution used was of sine shape with maximum at the middle of the tube. Such a solution is the approximate one for axial power in a nuclear reactor. The solutions for the tube wall and gas bulk temperatures were obtained by successive substitutions for the wall and gas balance energy equations. The results show a decrease of 30% for the maximum wall temperature using black surface (e = 1). In this same case, the increasing in the gas temperature shows a decrease of 58%

  8. ENC 94 International Nuclear Congress - Atoms for Energy. Transactions Vol.II: Poster Papers

    1995-01-01

    The transactions have been published in 2 volumes. Volume II contains the papers, which were orally presented in 4 sessions. In Session 1 'The need for nuclear energy in different parts of the world' was discussed in 17 contributions from the US, Korea, Turkey, Yugoslavia, Finland, the Netherlands, Poland, Russia, Croatia, Belgium and Germany. The other 3 sessions covered: Safety of operating nuclear plants (54 posters); Back-end of the fuel cycle (35 posters); Do we need new reactors to improve safety and economics ? (32 Posters)

  9. On the Efficiency of Connection Charges---Part II: Integration of Distributed Energy Resources

    Munoz-Alvarez, Daniel; Garcia-Franco, Juan F.; Tong, Lang

    2017-01-01

    This two-part paper addresses the design of retail electricity tariffs for distribution systems with distributed energy resources (DERs). Part I presents a framework to optimize an ex-ante two-part tariff for a regulated monopolistic retailer who faces stochastic wholesale prices on the one hand and stochastic demand on the other. In Part II, the integration of DERs is addressed by analyzing their endogenous effect on the optimal two-part tariff and the induced welfare gains. Two DER integrat...

  10. The vacuum system for the PEP II high energy ring straight sections

    Wienands, U.; Daly, E.; Heifets, S.A.; Kulikov, A.; Kurita, N.; Nordby, M.; Perkins, C.; Reuter, E.; Seeman, J.T.; Belser, F.C.; Berg, J.; Holdener, F.R.; Kerns, J.A.; McDaniel, M.R.; Stoeffl, W.

    1995-01-01

    The six straight sections of the PEP II High Energy Ring (HER) serve various functions: lattice tuning, beam injection and abort, providing space for rf cavities, longitudinal and transverse feedback, beam diagnostics and the interaction point. A stainless steel vacuum system has been designed; prototypes are currently being built. Cooling is required due to radiation coming from the last arc dipole and resistive losses in the vacuum chamber. Although the nominal beam current of the HER is 1 A the vacuum system is designed for 3 A to provide margin and an upgrade path. 5 refs., 7 figs

  11. Calculation codes for radiant heat transfers; Les codes de calcul de rayonnement thermique

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This document reports on 12 papers about computerized simulation and modeling of radiant heat transfers and fluid flows in various industrial and domestic situations: space heating, metal industry (furnaces, boilers..), aerospace industry (turbojet engines, combustion chambers) etc.. This workshop was organized by the ``radiation`` section of the French society of thermal engineers. (J.S.)

  12. Present and projected future mean radiant temperature for three European cities

    Thorsson, Sofia; Rayner, David; Lindberg, Fredrik; Monteiro, Ana; Katzschner, Lutz; Lau, Kevin Ka-Lun; Campe, Sabrina; Katzschner, Antje; Konarska, Janina; Onomura, Shiho; Velho, Sara; Holmer, Björn

    2017-09-01

    Present-day and projected future changes in mean radiant temperature, T mrt in one northern, one mid-, and one southern European city (represented by Gothenburg, Frankfurt, and Porto), are presented, and the concept of hot spots is adopted. Air temperature, T a , increased in all cities by 2100, but changes in solar radiation due to changes in cloudiness counterbalanced or exacerbated the effects on T mrt. The number of days with high T mrt in Gothenburg was relatively unchanged at the end of the century (+1 day), whereas it more than doubled in Frankfurt and tripled in Porto. The use of street trees to reduce daytime radiant heat load was analyzed using hot spots to identify where trees could be most beneficial. Hot spots, although varying in intensity and frequency, were generally confined to near sunlit southeast-southwest facing walls, in northeast corner of courtyards, and in open spaces in all three cities. By adding trees in these spaces, the radiant heat load can be reduced, especially in spaces with no or few trees. A set of design principles for reducing the radiant heat load is outlined based on these findings and existing literature.

  13. Calculation codes for radiant heat transfers; Les codes de calcul de rayonnement thermique

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This document reports on 12 papers about computerized simulation and modeling of radiant heat transfers and fluid flows in various industrial and domestic situations: space heating, metal industry (furnaces, boilers..), aerospace industry (turbojet engines, combustion chambers) etc.. This workshop was organized by the ``radiation`` section of the French society of thermal engineers. (J.S.)

  14. Applicability of meteor radiant determination methods depending on orbit type. I. High-eccentric orbits

    Svoren, J.; Neslusan, L.; Porubcan, V.

    1993-07-01

    It is evident that there is no uniform method of calculating meteor radiants which would yield reliable results for all types of cometary orbits. In the present paper an analysis of this problem is presented, together with recommended methods for various types of orbits. Some additional methods resulting from mathematical modelling are presented and discussed together with Porter's, Steel-Baggaley's and Hasegawa's methods. In order to be able to compare how suitable the application of the individual radiant determination methods is, it is necessary to determine the accuracy with which they approximate real meteor orbits. To verify the accuracy with which the orbit of a meteoroid with at least one node at 1 AU fits the original orbit of the parent body, we applied the Southworth-Hawkins D-criterion (Southworth, R.B., Hawkins, G.S.: 1963, Smithson. Contr. Astrophys 7, 261). D0.2 the fit is rather poor and the change of orbit unrealistic. The optimal methods with the smallest values of D for given types of orbits are shown in two series of six plots. The new method of rotation around the line of apsides we propose is very appropriate in the region of small inclinations. There is no doubt that Hasegawa's omega-adjustment method (Hasegawa, I.: 1990, Publ. Astron. Soc. Japan 42, 175) has the widest application. A comparison of the theoretical radiants with the observed radiants of seven known meteor showers is also presented.

  15. Theoretical Analysis of Interferometer Wave Front Tilt and Fringe Radiant Flux on a Rectangular Photodetector

    Franz Konstantin Fuss

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a theoretical analysis of mirror tilt in a Michelson interferometer and its effect on the radiant flux over the active area of a rectangular photodetector or image sensor pixel. It is relevant to sensor applications using homodyne interferometry where these opto-electronic devices are employed for partial fringe counting. Formulas are derived for radiant flux across the detector for variable location within the fringe pattern and with varying wave front angle. The results indicate that the flux is a damped sine function of the wave front angle, with a decay constant of the ratio of wavelength to detector width. The modulation amplitude of the dynamic fringe pattern reduces to zero at wave front angles that are an integer multiple of this ratio and the results show that the polarity of the radiant flux changes exclusively at these multiples. Varying tilt angle causes radiant flux oscillations under an envelope curve, the frequency of which is dependent on the location of the detector with the fringe pattern. It is also shown that a fringe count of zero can be obtained for specific photodetector locations and wave front angles where the combined effect of fringe contraction and fringe tilt can have equal and opposite effects. Fringe tilt as a result of a wave front angle of 0.05° can introduce a phase measurement difference of 16° between a photodetector/pixel located 20 mm and one located 100 mm from the optical origin.

  16. Experimental and numerical analysis of air and radiant cooling systems in offices

    Corgnati, S. P.; Perino, M.; Fracastoro, G. V.

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses office cooling systems based on all air mixing ventilation systems alone or coupled with radiant ceiling panels. This last solution may be effectively applied to retrofit all air systems that are no longer able to maintain a suitable thermal comfort in the indoor environment, ...

  17. Evaluation of Beam Loss and Energy Depositions for a Possible Phase II Design for LHC Collimation

    Lari, L.; Assmann, R.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cerutti, F.; Doyle, E.; Ferrari, A.; Keller, L.; Lundgren, S.; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Mauri, M.; Redaelli, S.; Sarchiapone, L.; Smith, J.; Vlachoudis, V.; Weiler, T.

    2011-01-01

    The LHC beams are designed to have high stability and to be stored for many hours. The nominal beam intensity lifetime is expected to be of the order of 20h. The Phase II collimation system has to be able to handle particle losses in stable physics conditions at 7 TeV in order to avoid beam aborts and to allow correction of parameters and restoration to nominal conditions. Monte Carlo simulations are needed in order to evaluate the behavior of metallic high-Z collimators during operation scenarios using a realistic distribution of losses, which is a mix of the three limiting halo cases. Moreover, the consequences in the IR7 insertion of the worst (case) abnormal beam loss are evaluated. The case refers to a spontaneous trigger of the horizontal extraction kicker at top energy, when Phase II collimators are used. These studies are an important input for engineering design of the collimation Phase II system and for the evaluation of their effect on adjacent components. The goal is to build collimators that can survive the expected conditions during LHC stable physics runs, in order to avoid quenches of the SC magnets and to protect other LHC equipments.

  18. Evaluation of Beam Losses And Energy Deposition for a Possible Phase II Design for LHC Collimation

    Lari, L.; Bracco, C.; Assmann, R.W.; Brugger, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Mauri, M.; Redaelli, S.; Sarchiapone, L.; Vlachoudis, V.; Weiler, T.; Doyle, J.E.; Keller, L.; Lundgren, S.A.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Smith, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) beams are designed to have high stability and to be stored for many hours. The nominal beam intensity lifetime is expected to be of the order of 20h. The Phase II collimation system has to be able to handle particle losses in stable physics conditions at 7 TeV in order to avoid beam aborts and to allow correction of parameters and restoration to nominal conditions. Monte Carlo simulations are needed in order to evaluate the behavior of metallic high-Z collimators during operation scenarios using a realistic distribution of losses, which is a mix of the three limiting halo cases. Moreover, the consequences in the IR7 insertion of the worst (case) abnormal beam loss are evaluated. The case refers to a spontaneous trigger of the horizontal extraction kicker at top energy, when Phase II collimators are used. These studies are an important input for engineering design of the collimation Phase II system and for the evaluation of their effect on adjacent components. The goal is to build collimators that can survive the expected conditions during LHC stable physics runs, in order to avoid quenches of the SC magnets and to protect other LHC equipments.

  19. Status of the PEP-II B-factory high energy ring

    Wienands, U.; Reuter, E.; Bellomo, P.; Daly, E.; Fisher, A.; Gracia, J.; Kulikov, A.; Kurita, N.; Pietryka, M.; Seeman, J.T.; Taylor; Belser, C.; Bertolini, L.; Mugge, M.; Swan, J.

    1996-01-01

    The 9 GeV High Energy Ring (HER) of the PEP-II B Factory is an electron storage ring under construction at SLAC. Significant progress has been made in the last year on all systems. As of mid 1996, all 192 dipoles have been installed, with installation of the quadrupoles underway. The vacuum system, for design currents up to 3 A average, is in production using a recently commissioned e-beam welder. Beam instrumentation systems are being fabricated. The interaction region will bring the HER beam into collision with the 3 GeV beam of the Low Energy Ring; design of this section of the HER is in an advanced stage. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  20. Characteristics of infrared thermometers manufactured in Japan and calibration methods for sky radiant emittance

    Wang, X.; Horiguchi, I.; Machimura, T.

    1993-01-01

    Infrared thermometers to measure surface temperature have been increasingly adopted in recent years. The characteristics of the IR thermometer, however, are not well known.IR thermometers manufactured in Japan systematically adjust for ambient radiation based on the internal temperature of the thermometer. If, therefore, there is a large difference between the internal temperature of the IR thermometer and the apparent temperature associated with the surrounding radiation, a large error will be induced into the measured surface temperature.The purpose of our research was to determine the characteristics and measurement errors of IR thermometers. Experiments were performed with regard to the following items: (1) Measurement errors related to the internal temperature of the IR thermometer. (2) Linearity of the output signal of the IR thermometer. (3) Response of the output signal to changes in the emissivity setting. (4) Effect of sky radiant emittance on the measured surface temperature. (5) Calibration method for the terrestrial surface.The following is a summary of the results: Measurement error is affected by the internal temperature of the IR thermometer. Measurement accuracy is improved with a controlled internal temperature of 20-30°C. The measurement error becomes larger at emissivity settings under 0.7.The measurement error outdoors was not proportional to the downward longwave radiation, but to the sky radiant temperature measured by the IR thermometer. Calibration for sky radiant emittance was improved by using the difference between sky radiant temperature and air temperature.When the surface temperature measured by the infrared thermometer is plotted against the surface temperature measured by thermocouple, the sky radiant emittance error is obtained from the Y intercept. Additionally, the difference between true temperature and output of the IR thermometer for a reference plate was compared to that obtained for vegetation, and the RMS obtained was

  1. The relationship between radiant heat, air temperature and thermal comfort at rest and exercise.

    Guéritée, Julien; Tipton, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    The aims of the present work were to investigate the relationships between radiant heat load, air velocity and body temperatures with or without coincidental exercise to determine the physiological mechanisms that drive thermal comfort and thermoregulatory behaviour. Seven male volunteers wearing swimming trunks in 18°C, 22°C or 26°C air were exposed to increasing air velocities up to 3 m s(-1) and self-adjusted the intensity of the direct radiant heat received on the front of the body to just maintain overall thermal comfort, at rest or when cycling (60 W, 60 rpm). During the 30 min of the experiments, skin and rectal temperatures were continuously recorded. We hypothesized that mean body temperature should be maintained stable and the intensity of the radiant heat and the mean skin temperatures would be lower when cycling. In all conditions, mean body temperature was lower when facing winds of 3 m s(-1) than during the first 5 min, without wind. When facing winds, in all but the 26°C air, the radiant heat was statistically higher at rest than when exercising. In 26°C air mean skin temperature was lower at rest than when exercising. No other significant difference was observed. In all air temperatures, high correlation coefficients were observed between the air velocity and the radiant heat load. Other factors that we did not measure may have contributed to the constant overall thermal comfort status despite dropping mean skin and body temperatures. It is suggested that the allowance to behaviourally adjust the thermal environment increases the tolerance of cold discomfort. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of CDMS-II Surface Event Rejection Techniques and Their Extensions to Lower Energy Thresholds

    Hofer, Thomas James [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The CDMS-II phase of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search, a dark matter direct-detection experiment, was operated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory from 2003 to 2008. The full payload consisted of 30 ZIP detectors, totaling approximately 1.1 kg of Si and 4.8 kg of Ge, operated at temperatures of 50 mK. The ZIP detectors read out both ionization and phonon pulses from scatters within the crystals; channel segmentation and analysis of pulse timing parameters allowed e ective ducialization of the crystal volumes and background rejection su cient to set world-leading limits at the times of their publications. A full re-analysis of the CDMS-II data was motivated by an improvement in the event reconstruction algorithms which improved the resolution of ionization energy and timing information. The Ge data were re-analyzed using three distinct background-rejection techniques; the Si data from runs 125 - 128 were analyzed for the rst time using the most successful of the techniques from the Ge re-analysis. The results of these analyses prompted a novel \\mid-threshold" analysis, wherein energy thresholds were lowered but background rejection using phonon timing information was still maintained. This technique proved to have signi cant discrimination power, maintaining adequate signal acceptance and minimizing background leakage. The primary background for CDMS-II analyses comes from surface events, whose poor ionization collection make them di cult to distinguish from true nuclear recoil events. The novel detector technology of SuperCDMS, the successor to CDMS-II, uses interleaved electrodes to achieve full ionization collection for events occurring at the top and bottom detector surfaces. This, along with dual-sided ionization and phonon instrumentation, allows for excellent ducialization and relegates the surface-event rejection techniques of CDMS-II to a secondary level of background discrimination. Current and future SuperCDMS results hold great promise for mid- to low

  3. Scope Oriented Thermoeconomic analysis of energy systems. Part II: Formation Structure of Optimality for robust design

    Piacentino, Antonio; Cardona, Ennio

    2010-01-01

    This paper represents the Part II of a paper in two parts. In Part I the fundamentals of Scope Oriented Thermoeconomics have been introduced, showing a scarce potential for the cost accounting of existing plants; in this Part II the same concepts are applied to the optimization of a small set of design variables for a vapour compression chiller. The method overcomes the limit of most conventional optimization techniques, which are usually based on hermetic algorithms not enabling the energy analyst to recognize all the margins for improvement. The Scope Oriented Thermoeconomic optimization allows us to disassemble the optimization process, thus recognizing the Formation Structure of Optimality, i.e. the specific influence of any thermodynamic and economic parameter in the path toward the optimal design. Finally, the potential applications of such an in-depth understanding of the inner driving forces of the optimization are discussed in the paper, with a particular focus on the sensitivity analysis to the variation of energy and capital costs and on the actual operation-oriented design.

  4. Tidal energy conversion. Renewable energy; 3-3 choseki / choryu hatsuden. II. saisei kano energy ni yoru hatsuden

    Makino, T. [Tobishima Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-10-15

    There are not much examples applying tidal energy conversion, but tide and tidal current phenomena can be forecasted so correctly regardless of weather that the applying tidal energy is to be expected in the future. The largest tidal power plant is at Reims in France and install 24 Kaplan turbines each of which outlet power is 10,000kW (rotational direction is reversible) on the breakwater (750m is length). Tidal range at this place being 8.5m on an average, during the period of flowing seawater into the reservoir and on the contrary during the period of discharging seawater to the sea generation is both performed. Though there is no actual result of tidal power plant in Japan, in tidal current power system experimental generators have been installed at Kurushima channel and Naruto channel. Nihon University carried out various kinds of experiment using a Darius turbine (1.6m in dia.) at Kurushima channel and got outlet power of 3kW at the maximum (1983-`88). There are few coasts which have sufficient tide range in Japan, but there are so good many applicable coasts in China and Southeast Asia that the tidal power generation is to be expectatively. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Technical Analysis of the Hydrogen Energy Station Concept, Phase I and Phase II

    TIAX, LLC

    2005-05-04

    patterns would be most viable for an energy station, TIAX developed several criteria for selecting a representative set of technology configurations. TIAX applied these criteria to all possible technology configurations to determine an optimized set for further analysis, as shown in Table ES-1. This analysis also considered potential energy station operational scenarios and their impact upon hydrogen and power production. For example, an energy station with a 50-kWe reformer could generate enough hydrogen to serve up to 12 vehicles/day (at 5 kg/fill) or generate up to 1,200 kWh/day, as shown in Figure ES-1. Buildings that would be well suited for an energy station would utilize both the thermal and electrical output of the station. Optimizing the generation and utilization of thermal energy, hydrogen, and electricity requires a detailed look at the energy transfer within the energy station and the transfer between the station and nearby facilities. TIAX selected the Baseline configuration given in Table ES-1 for an initial analysis of the energy and mass transfer expected from an operating energy station. Phase II The purpose of this technical analysis was to analyze the development of a hydrogen-dispensing infrastructure for transportation applications through the installation of a 50-75 kW stationary fuel cell-based energy station at federal building sites. The various scenarios, costs, designs and impacts of such a station were quantified for a hypothetical cost-shared program that utilizes a natural gas reformer to provide hydrogen fuel for both the stack(s) and a limited number of fuel cell powered vehicles, with the possibility of using cogeneration to support the building heat load.

  6. Developments in Polarization and Energy Control of APPLE-II Undulators at Diamond Light Source

    Longhi, E. C.; Bencok, P.; Dobrynin, A.; Rial, E. C. M.; Rose, A.; Steadman, P.; Thompson, C.; Thomson, A.; Wang, H.

    2013-03-01

    A pair of 2m long APPLE-II type undulators have been built for the I10 BLADE beamline at Diamond Light Source. These 48mm period devices have gap as well as four moveable phase axes which provide the possibility to produce the full range of elliptical polarizations as well as linear polarization tilted through a full 180deg. The mechanical layout chosen has a 'master and slave' arrangement of the phase axes on the top and bottom. This arrangement allows the use of symmetries to provide operational ease for both changing energy using only the master phase while keeping fixed linear horizontal or circular polarization, as well as changing linear polarization angle while keeping fixed energy [1]. The design allows very fast motion of the master phase arrays, without sacrifice of accuracy, allowing the possibility of mechanical polarization switching at 1Hz for dichroism experiments. We present the mechanical design features of these devices, as well as the results of magnetic measurements and shimming from before installation. Finally, we present the results of characterization of these devices by the beamline, including polarimetry, which has been done on the various modes of motion to control energy and polarization. These modes of operation have been available to users since 2011.

  7. Developments in Polarization and Energy Control of APPLE-II Undulators at Diamond Light Source

    Longhi, E C; Bencok, P; Dobrynin, A; Rial, E C M; Rose, A; Steadman, P; Thompson, C; Thomson, A; Wang, H

    2013-01-01

    A pair of 2m long APPLE-II type undulators have been built for the I10 BLADE beamline at Diamond Light Source. These 48mm period devices have gap as well as four moveable phase axes which provide the possibility to produce the full range of elliptical polarizations as well as linear polarization tilted through a full 180deg. The mechanical layout chosen has a 'master and slave' arrangement of the phase axes on the top and bottom. This arrangement allows the use of symmetries to provide operational ease for both changing energy using only the master phase while keeping fixed linear horizontal or circular polarization, as well as changing linear polarization angle while keeping fixed energy [1]. The design allows very fast motion of the master phase arrays, without sacrifice of accuracy, allowing the possibility of mechanical polarization switching at 1Hz for dichroism experiments. We present the mechanical design features of these devices, as well as the results of magnetic measurements and shimming from before installation. Finally, we present the results of characterization of these devices by the beamline, including polarimetry, which has been done on the various modes of motion to control energy and polarization. These modes of operation have been available to users since 2011.

  8. An Overview of Power, Energy Storage, and Conversion Efforts for 2014 SBIR Phases I and II

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    Technological innovation is the overall focus of NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The program invests in the development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA's mission directorates address critical research and development needs for agency projects. NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program focuses on technological innovation by investing in development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA mission directorates address critical research needs for Agency programs. This report highlights 15 of the innovative SBIR 2014 Phase I and II projects that focus on one of NASA Glenn Research Center's six core competencies-Power, Energy Storage and Conversion. The technologies cover a wide spectrum of applications such as high-radiation-tolerant ceramic voltage isolators, development of hermetic sealing glasses for solid oxide fuel cells, rechargeable lithium metal cells, high-efficiency direct methane solid oxide fuel cell systems, Li metal protection for high-energy space batteries, isolated bidirectional direct current converters for distributed battery energy applications, and high-efficiency rad-hard ultrathin Si photovoltaic cell technology for space. Each article describes an innovation and technical objective and highlights NASA commercial and industrial applications. This report provides an opportunity for NASA engineers, researchers, and program managers to learn how NASA SBIR technologies could help their programs and projects, and lead to collaborations and partnerships between the small SBIR companies and NASA that would benefit both.

  9. BALTEX water and energy budgets in the NCEP/DOE reanalysis II

    Roads, J. [Experimental Climate Prediction Center, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); Raschke, E. [Meteorologisches Institut der Universitaet Hamburg (Germany); Rocke, B. [Institute for Coastal Research, GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Water and energy budgets from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/Dept. of Energy (NCEP/DOE) reanalysis II (NCEPRII) are described for the Baltic Sea catchment and sea (BALTEX). Annually, NCEPRII shows 0.7 mm d{sup -1} of atmospheric moisture converged into the land region with a corresponding runoff of 0.7 mm d{sup -1} to the Baltic Sea, consistent with observations. However, precipitation is too low; evaporation is too large; runoff does not have an appropriate winter minimum and spring maximum; the assimilation and surface nudging are too large. Important hydroclimatic characteristics can still be discerned. During summer, atmospheric water vapor, precipitation, evaporation, and surface and atmospheric radiative heating increase and the atmospheric radiative cooling, dry static energy convergence decrease. There are large contrasts between the sea and land; during winter sensible heat is transferred from the sea to the atmosphere and sea evaporation and precipitation are largest during the fall and winter; somewhat opposite behavior occurs over land. (orig.)

  10. Spectral energy distribution analysis of class I and class II FU Orionis stars

    Gramajo, Luciana V.; Gómez, Mercedes [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina, Laprida 854, 5000 Córdoba (Argentina); Rodón, Javier A., E-mail: luciana@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: mercedes@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: jrodon@eso.org [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile)

    2014-06-01

    FU Orionis stars (FUors) are eruptive pre-main sequence objects thought to represent quasi-periodic or recurring stages of enhanced accretion during the low-mass star-forming process. We characterize the sample of known and candidate FUors in a homogeneous and consistent way, deriving stellar and circumstellar parameters for each object. We emphasize the analysis in those parameters that are supposed to vary during the FUor stage. We modeled the spectral energy distributions of 24 of the 26 currently known FUors, using the radiative transfer code of Whitney et al. We compare our models with those obtained by Robitaille et al. for Taurus class II and I sources in quiescence periods by calculating the cumulative distribution of the different parameters. FUors have more massive disks: we find that ∼80% of the disks in FUors are more massive than any Taurus class II and I sources in the sample. Median values for the disk mass accretion rates are ∼10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} versus ∼10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for standard young stellar objects (YSOs) and FUors, respectively. While the distributions of envelope mass accretion rates for class I FUors and standard class I objects are similar, FUors, on average, have higher envelope mass accretion rates than standard class II and class I sources. Most FUors (∼70%) have envelope mass accretion rates above 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. In contrast, 60% of the classical YSO sample has an accretion rate below this value. Our results support the current scenario in which changes experimented by the circumstellar disk explain the observed properties of these stars. However, the increase in the disk mass accretion rate is smaller than theoretically predicted, although in good agreement with previous determinations.

  11. Low energy ring lattice of the PEP-II asymmetric B-Factory

    Cai, Y.; Donald, M.; Helm, R.; Irwin, J.; Nosochkov, Y.; Ritson, D.M.; Yan, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Developing a lattice that contains a very low beta value at the interaction point (IP) and has adequate dynamic aperture is one of the major challenges in designing the PEP-II asymmetric B-factory. For the Low Energy Ring (LER) the authors have studied several different chromatic correction schemes since the conceptual design report (CDR). Based on these studies, a hybrid solution with local and semi-local chromatic sextupoles has been selected as the new baseline lattice to replace the local scheme in the CDR. The new design simplifies the interaction region (IR) and reduces the number of sextupoles in the arcs. Arc sextupoles are paired at π phase difference and are not interleaved. In this paper the authors describe the baseline lattice with the emphasis on the lattice changes made since the CDR

  12. Space- and time-resolved measurements of ion energy distributions by neutral beam injection in TORTUR II

    Brocken, H.J.B.M.

    1981-10-01

    A method is described for the space- and time-resolved analysis of ion energy distributions in a plasma. A well-collimated neutral hydrogen beam is used to enhance the charge-exchange processes. The method is used in the TORTUR II tokamak to study the space and time evolution of the ion temperature profile of the plasma. The analytical background and the technique are described in detail. Examples of measurements on TORTUR II are presented

  13. Excitation energy transfer between Light-harvesting complex II and Photosystem I in reconstituted membranes.

    Akhtar, Parveen; Lingvay, Mónika; Kiss, Teréz; Deák, Róbert; Bóta, Attila; Ughy, Bettina; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H

    2016-04-01

    Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII), the major peripheral antenna of Photosystem II in plants, participates in several concerted mechanisms for regulation of the excitation energy and electron fluxes in thylakoid membranes. In part, these include interaction of LHCII with Photosystem I (PSI) enhancing the latter's absorption cross-section - for example in the well-known state 1 - state 2 transitions or as a long-term acclimation to high light. In this work we examined the capability of LHCII to deliver excitations to PSI in reconstituted membranes in vitro. Proteoliposomes with native plant thylakoid membrane lipids and different stoichiometric ratios of LHCII:PSI were reconstituted and studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence emission from LHCII was strongly decreased in PSI-LHCII membranes due to trapping of excitations by PSI. Kinetic modelling of the time-resolved fluorescence data revealed the existence of separate pools of LHCII distinguished by the time scale of energy transfer. A strongly coupled pool, equivalent to one LHCII trimer per PSI, transferred excitations to PSI with near-unity efficiency on a time scale of less than 10ps but extra LHCIIs also contributed significantly to the effective antenna size of PSI, which could be increased by up to 47% in membranes containing 3 LHCII trimers per PSI. The results demonstrate a remarkable competence of LHCII to increase the absorption cross-section of PSI, given the opportunity that the two types of complexes interact in the membrane. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Freeform Lens Design for Scattering Data with General Radiant Fields

    Gutiérrez, Cristian E.; Sabra, Ahmad

    2018-05-01

    We show the existence of a lens, when its lower face is given, such that it refracts radiation emanating from a planar source, with a given field of directions, into the far field that preserves a given distribution of energies. Conditions are shown under which the lens obtained is physically realizable. It is shown that the upper face of the lens satisfies a pde of Monge-Ampère type.

  15. Super-radiant Smith–Purcell radiation from periodic line charges

    Li, D.; Hangyo, M.; Tsunawaki, Y.; Yang, Z.; Wei, Y.; Miyamoto, S; Asakawa, M.R.; Imasaki, K.

    2012-01-01

    Smith–Purcell radiation occurs when an electron passes close to the surface of a metallic grating. The radiation becomes coherent when the length of the electron bunch is smaller than the wavelength of the radiation. A train of periodic bunches can enhance the spectral intensity by changing the angular and spectral distribution of the radiation. This is called super-radiant Smith–Purcell radiation, and has been observed in experiments and particle-in-cell simulations. In this paper, we introduce a new method to study this effect by calculating the reflected waves of an incident evanescent wave from periodic line charges. The reflection coefficients are numerically computed, and the spectral distributions of the super-radiant radiation are demonstrated. These analytical results are in agreement with those obtained through part-in-cell simulations.

  16. Excitation energy transfer in ruthenium (II)-porphyrin conjugates led to enhanced emission quantum yield and 1O2 generation

    Pan, Jie; Jiang, Lijun; Chan, Chi-Fai; Tsoi, Tik-Hung; Shiu, Kwok-Keung; Kwong, Daniel W.J.; Wong, Wing-Tak; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Wong, Ka-Leung

    2017-01-01

    Porphyrins are good photodynamic therapy (PDT) agents due to its flexibility for modifications to achieve tumor localization and photo-cytotoxicity against cancer. Yet they are not perfect. In a Ru(polypyridyl)-porphyrin system, the Ru(polypyridyl) moiety improves the water solubility and cell permeability. Consider the similar excited state energies between Ru(polypyridyl) and porphyrin moieties; a small perturbation (e.g. Zn(II) metalation) would lead to a marked change in the energy migration process. In this work, we have synthesized a series of porphyrins conjugated with Ru(polypyridyl) complexes using different linkers and investigated their photophysical properties, which included singlet oxygen quantum yield and their in vitro biological properties, resulting from linker variation and porphyrin modification by Zn(II) metalation. - Graphical abstract: Four amphiphilic ruthenium(II)-porphyrin complexes were prepared that display energy transfer conversion with zinc coordination, lysosome specific target, low dark toxicity and efficient photodynamic therapy.

  17. On the Processing of Spalling Experiments. Part II: Identification of Concrete Fracture Energy in Dynamic Tension

    Lukić, Bratislav B.; Saletti, Dominique; Forquin, Pascal

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a second part of the study aimed at investigating the fracture behavior of concrete under high strain rate tensile loading. The experimental method together with the identified stress-strain response of three tests conducted on ordinary concrete have been presented in the paper entitled Part I (Forquin and Lukić in Journal of Dynamic Behavior of Materials, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40870-017-0135-1). In the present paper, Part II, the investigation is extended towards directly determining the specific fracture energy of each observed fracture zone by visualizing the dynamic cracking process with a temporal resolution of 1 µs. Having access to temporal displacement fields of the sample surface, it is possible to identify the fracture opening displacement (FOD) and the fracture opening velocity of any principle (open) and secondary (closed) fracture at each measurement instance, that may or may not lead to complete physical failure of the sample. Finally, the local Stress-FOD curves were obtained for each observed fracture zone, opposed to previous works where indirect measurements were used. The obtained results indicated a much lower specific fracture energy compared to the results often found in the literature. Furthermore, numerical simulations were performed with a damage law to evaluate the validity of the proposed experimental data processing and compare it to the most often used one in the previous works. The results showed that the present method can reliably predict the specific fracture energy needed to open one macro-fracture and suggested that indirect measurement techniques can lead to an overestimate of specific fracture energy due to the stringent assumption of linear elasticity up-to the peak and the inability of having access to the real post-peak change of axial stress.

  18. Study of thermosiphon and radiant panel passive heating systems for metal buildings

    Biehl, F.A.; Schnurr, N.M.; Wray, W.O.

    1983-01-01

    A study of passive-heating systems appropriate for use on metal buildings is being conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory, Port Hueneme, California. The systems selected for study were chosen on the basis of their appropriateness for retrofit applications, although they are also suitable for new construction: simple radiant panels that communicate directly with the building interior and a backflow thermosiphon that provides heat indirectly.

  19. Free of pollution gas - an utopia or attainable goal? Gas radiant burner with a small capacity

    Hofbauer, P.; Bornscheuer, W.

    1993-01-01

    The firm Viessmann has developed a gas radiant burner for boiler capacities up to 100 kN combusting gas with extremely low pollutant emissions. This is possible since from the reaction zone a considerable part of the combustion heat is delivered through radiation by means of a glowing special steel structure. The theoretical fundamentals are explained by means of considerations regarding the equilibrium and a reaction kinetic numerical model. (orig.) [de

  20. Effects of cryogen spray cooling and high radiant exposures on selective vascular injury during laser irradiation of human skin.

    Tunnell, James W; Chang, David W; Johnston, Carol; Torres, Jorge H; Patrick, Charles W; Miller, Michael J; Thomsen, Sharon L; Anvari, Bahman

    2003-06-01

    Increasing radiant exposure offers a means to increase treatment efficacy during laser-mediated treatment of vascular lesions, such as port-wine stains; however, excessive radiant exposure decreases selective vascular injury due to increased heat generation within the epidermis and collateral damage to perivascular collagen. To determine if cryogen spray cooling could be used to maintain selective vascular injury (ie, prevent epidermal and perivascular collagen damage) when using high radiant exposures (16-30 J/cm2). Observational study. Academic hospital and research laboratory. Twenty women with normal abdominal skin (skin phototypes I-VI). Skin was irradiated with a pulsed dye laser (wavelength = 585 nm; pulse duration = 1.5 milliseconds; 5-mm-diameter spot) using various radiant exposures (8-30 J/cm2) without and with cryogen spray cooling (50- to 300-millisecond cryogen spurts). Hematoxylin-eosin-stained histologic sections from each irradiated site were examined for the degree of epidermal damage, maximum depth of red blood cell coagulation, and percentage of vessels containing perivascular collagen coagulation. Long cryogen spurt durations (>200 milliseconds) protected the epidermis in light-skinned individuals (skin phototypes I-IV) at the highest radiant exposure (30 J/cm2); however, epidermal protection could not be achieved in dark-skinned individuals (skin phototypes V-VI) even at the lowest radiant exposure (8 J/cm2). The red blood cell coagulation depth increased with increasing radiant exposure (to >2.5 mm for skin phototypes I-IV and to approximately 1.2 mm for skin phototypes V-VI). In addition, long cryogen spurt durations (>200 milliseconds) prevented perivascular collagen coagulation in all skin types. Cryogen spurt durations much longer than those currently used in therapy (>200 milliseconds) may be clinically useful for protecting the epidermis and perivascular tissues when using high radiant exposures during cutaneous laser therapies

  1. Inverse optimal design of the radiant heating in materials processing and manufacturing

    Fedorov, A. G.; Lee, K. H.; Viskanta, R.

    1998-12-01

    Combined convective, conductive, and radiative heat transfer is analyzed during heating of a continuously moving load in the industrial radiant oven. A transient, quasi-three-dimensional model of heat transfer between a continuous load of parts moving inside an oven on a conveyor belt at a constant speed and an array of radiant heaters/burners placed inside the furnace enclosure is developed. The model accounts for radiative exchange between the heaters and the load, heat conduction in the load, and convective heat transfer between the moving load and oven environment. The thermal model developed has been used to construct a general framework for an inverse optimal design of an industrial oven as an example. In particular, the procedure based on the Levenberg-Marquardt nonlinear least squares optimization algorithm has been developed to obtain the optimal temperatures of the heaters/burners that need to be specified to achieve a prescribed temperature distribution of the surface of a load. The results of calculations for several sample cases are reported to illustrate the capabilities of the procedure developed for the optimal inverse design of an industrial radiant oven.

  2. On the modular structure of the genus-one Type II superstring low energy expansion

    D’Hoker, Eric; Green, Michael B.; Vanhove, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The analytic contribution to the low energy expansion of Type II string amplitudes at genus-one is a power series in space-time derivatives with coefficients that are determined by integrals of modular functions over the complex structure modulus of the world-sheet torus. These modular functions are associated with world-sheet vacuum Feynman diagrams and given by multiple sums over the discrete momenta on the torus. In this paper we exhibit exact differential and algebraic relations for a certain infinite class of such modular functions by showing that they satisfy Laplace eigenvalue equations with inhomogeneous terms that are polynomial in non-holomorphic Eisenstein series. Furthermore, we argue that the set of modular functions that contribute to the coefficients of interactions up to order D 10 R 4 are linear sums of functions in this class and quadratic polynomials in Eisenstein series and odd Riemann zeta values. Integration over the complex structure results in coefficients of the low energy expansion that are rational numbers multiplying monomials in odd Riemann zeta values.

  3. On the modular structure of the genus-one Type II superstring low energy expansion

    D’Hoker, Eric [Department of Physics and Astronomy,University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Green, Michael B. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics,Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Vanhove, Pierre [Institut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Le Bois-Marie, 35 route de Chartres,F-91440 Bures-sur-Yvette (France); Institut de physique théorique, Université Paris Saclay, CEA, CNRS,F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-08-11

    The analytic contribution to the low energy expansion of Type II string amplitudes at genus-one is a power series in space-time derivatives with coefficients that are determined by integrals of modular functions over the complex structure modulus of the world-sheet torus. These modular functions are associated with world-sheet vacuum Feynman diagrams and given by multiple sums over the discrete momenta on the torus. In this paper we exhibit exact differential and algebraic relations for a certain infinite class of such modular functions by showing that they satisfy Laplace eigenvalue equations with inhomogeneous terms that are polynomial in non-holomorphic Eisenstein series. Furthermore, we argue that the set of modular functions that contribute to the coefficients of interactions up to order D{sup 10}R{sup 4} are linear sums of functions in this class and quadratic polynomials in Eisenstein series and odd Riemann zeta values. Integration over the complex structure results in coefficients of the low energy expansion that are rational numbers multiplying monomials in odd Riemann zeta values.

  4. A new aberration-corrected, energy-filtered LEEM/PEEM instrument II. Operation and results

    Tromp, R.M.; Hannon, J.B.; Wan, W.; Berghaus, A.; Schaff, O.

    2013-01-01

    In Part I we described a new design for an aberration-corrected Low Energy Electron Microscope (LEEM) and Photo Electron Emission Microscope (PEEM) equipped with an in-line electron energy filter. The chromatic and spherical aberrations of the objective lens are corrected with an electrostatic electron mirror that provides independent control of the chromatic and spherical aberration coefficients C c and C 3 , as well as the mirror focal length. In this Part II we discuss details of microscope operation, how the microscope is set up in a systematic fashion, and we present typical results. - Highlights: ► The C c and C 3 aberrations of a LEEM/PEEM instrument are corrected with an electrostatic electron mirror. ► The mirror provides independent control over C c , C 3 and focal length in close agreement with theory. ► A detailed alignment procedure for the corrected microscope is given. ► Novel methods to measure C c and C 3 of the objective lens and the mirror are presented. ► We demonstrate a record spatial resolution of 2 nm

  5. The energy-dispersive reflectometer at BESSY II: a challenge for thin film analysis

    Pietsch, U; Geue, T; Neissendorfer, F; Brezsesinski, G; Symietz, C; Moehwald, H; Gudat, W

    2001-01-01

    Installed in 1999 the energy-dispersive reflectometer at the 13.2 bending magnet employs the exponentially decaying white X-ray emission spectrum of the 1.7 GeV storage ring of BESSY II outside the vacuum. Using an energy-dispersive detector specular and longitudinal-diffuse reflectivity spectra of thin films can be recorded simultaneously between 0.2 A sup - sup 1

  6. Optimum pulse duration and radiant exposure for vascular laser therapy of dark port-wine skin: a theoretical study

    Tunnell, James W.; Anvari, Bahman; Wang, Lihong V.

    2003-01-01

    Laser therapy for cutaneous hypervascular malformations such as port-wine stain birthmarks is currently not feasible for dark-skinned individuals. We study the effects of pulse duration, radiant exposure, and cryogen spray cooling (CSC) on the thermal response of skin, using a Monte Carlo based optical-thermal model. Thermal injury to the epidermis decreases with increasing pulse duration during irradiation at a constant radiant exposure; however, maintaining vascular injury requires that the radiant exposure also increase. At short pulse durations, only a minimal increase in radiant exposure is necessary for a therapeutic effect to be achieved because thermal diffusion from the vessels is minimal. However, at longer pulse durations the radiant exposure must be greatly increased. There exists an optimum pulse duration at which minimal damage to the epidermis and significant injury within the targeted vasculature occur. For example, the model predicts optimum pulse durations of approximately 1.5, 6, and 20 ms for vessel diameters of 40, 80, and 120 μm, respectively. Optimization of laser pulse duration and radiant exposure in combination with CSC may offer a means to treat cutaneous lesions in dark-skinned individuals

  7. Energy Plan Greenport Greenhouse II. Outline of the conservation options of the greenhouse concept; Energieplan Greenportkas II. Verkenning van de besparingsmogelijkheden van het kasconcept

    Kempkes, F.; Verkerke, W.; Poot, E. [Wageningen UR Glastuinbouw, Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2012-02-15

    Based on the most actual scientific and practical knowledge on energy efficient growth of tomatoes, Wageningen UR Greenhouse Horticulture developed together with the grower the greenhouse concept Greenportkas II. This concept was compared with several other energy saving research projects by means of the simulation programme Kaspro. This concept included a full LED lighting system with 50% intermediate lighting, a double glass covering with 4x AR (antireflection) coating, dehumidification by means of outside air, a single screen to prevent light emission and a special climate regulation for humidity and heating. Compared to the Greenportkas I, this lead to a saving of 28% on primary energy. In a series of talks with the entrepreneur the concept was gradually adapted. The ultimate configuration of Greenportkas II saves 70% on electricity and 25% on heat, compared to Greenportkas I [Dutch] Op basis van de meest actuele stand van zaken in het onderzoek aan energiezuinige tomatenteelt in kassen en de plannen van de ondernemer, is een concept kassysteem Greenportkas II opgesteld. Het Greenportkas II concept is vergeleken met verschillende energiebesparingsprojecten bij tomaat. Onderling vergelijk van deze projecten is bijzonder lastig omdat de uitgangspunten soms zeer sterk verschillen. In dit rapport is geprobeerd de uitgangspunten en resultaten van deze projecten, waaronder ook Greenportkas I, onderling wel vergelijkbaar te maken, door alles terug te rekenen tot inzet van primaire energie. Hiervoor is gebruik gemaakt van het simulatieprogramma Kaspro. Om te beginnen is de energiebesparing van het Greenportkas II concept berekend op basis van het eerste idee van de ondernemer. De voorgestelde systeemopbouw van de Greenportkas II was een volledig LED belichtingssysteem met 50% tussenlicht, een dubbel kasdek met 4 x AR coating, ontvochtiging met buitenlucht, een enkelvoudige scherminstallatie met een doek om de lichtuitstoot te beperken en een aangepaste klimaatregeling

  8. Copper (II)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    Valine (2 - amino - 3 – methylbutanoic acid), is a chemical compound containing .... Stability constant (Kf). Gibb's free energy. ) (. 1. −. ∆. Mol. JG. [CuL2(H2O)2] ... synthesis and characterization of Co(ii), Ni(ii), Cu (II), and Zn(ii) complexes with ...

  9. Dietary Energy Density and Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Incidence in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    Hartman, Terryl J; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Shah, Roma; Flanders, W Dana; Wang, Ying; McCullough, Marjorie L

    2016-10-01

    Dietary energy density (ED) is a measure of diet quality that estimates the amount of energy per unit of food (kilocalories per gram) consumed. Low-ED diets are generally high in fiber and fruits and vegetables and low in fat. Dietary ED has been positively associated with body mass index (BMI) and other risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer. We evaluated the associations of total dietary ED and energy-dense (high-ED) foods with postmenopausal breast cancer incidence. Analyses included 56,795 postmenopausal women from the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort with no previous history of breast or other cancers and who provided information on diet, lifestyle, and medical history in 1999. Multivariable-adjusted breast cancer incidence rate ratios (RRs and 95% CIs) were estimated for quintiles of total dietary ED and for the consumption of high-ED foods in Cox proportional hazards regression models. During a median follow-up of 11.7 y, 2509 invasive breast cancer cases were identified, including 1857 estrogen receptor-positive and 277 estrogen receptor-negative tumors. Median dietary ED was 1.5 kcal/g (IQR: 1.3-1.7 kcal/g). After adjusting for age, race, education, reproductive characteristics, and family history, high compared with low dietary ED was associated with a statistically significantly higher risk of breast cancer (RR for fifth quintile compared with first quintile: 1.20; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.36; P-trend = 0.03). The association between the amount of high-ED foods consumed and breast cancer risk was not statistically significant. We observed no differences by estrogen receptor status or effect modification by BMI, age, or physical activity. These results suggest a modest positive association between total dietary ED and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  10. Accident consequences analysis of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    Reyes, S. E-mail: reyessuarezl@llnl.gov; Latkowski, J.F.; Gomez del Rio, J.; Sanz, J

    2001-05-21

    Previous studies of the safety and environmental aspects of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design have used simplistic assumptions in order to estimate radioactivity releases under accident conditions. Conservatisms associated with these traditional analyses can mask the actual behavior of the plant and have revealed the need for more accurate modeling and analysis of accident conditions and radioactivity mobilization mechanisms. In the present work, computer codes traditionally used for magnetic fusion safety analyses (CHEMCON, MELCOR) have been applied for simulating accident conditions in a simple model of the HYLIFE-II IFE design. Here we consider a severe loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in conjunction with simultaneous failures of the beam tubes (providing a pathway for radioactivity release from the vacuum vessel towards the confinement) and of the two barriers surrounding the chamber (inner shielding and confinement building itself). Even though confinement failure would be a very unlikely event it would be needed in order to produce significant off-site doses. CHEMCON code allows calculation of long-term temperature transients in fusion reactor first wall, blanket, and shield structures resulting from decay heating. MELCOR is used to simulate a wide range of physical phenomena including thermal-hydraulics, heat transfer, aerosol physics and fusion product transport and release. The results of these calculations show that the estimated off-site dose is less than 5 mSv (0.5 rem), which is well below the value of 10 mSv (1 rem) given by the DOE Fusion Safety Standards for protection of the public from exposure to radiation during off-normal conditions.

  11. Accident consequences analysis of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    Reyes, S.; Latkowski, J. F.; Gomez del Rio, J.; Sanz, J.

    2001-05-01

    Previous studies of the safety and environmental aspects of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design have used simplistic assumptions in order to estimate radioactivity releases under accident conditions. Conservatisms associated with these traditional analyses can mask the actual behavior of the plant and have revealed the need for more accurate modeling and analysis of accident conditions and radioactivity mobilization mechanisms. In the present work, computer codes traditionally used for magnetic fusion safety analyses (CHEMCON, MELCOR) have been applied for simulating accident conditions in a simple model of the HYLIFE-II IFE design. Here we consider a severe loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in conjunction with simultaneous failures of the beam tubes (providing a pathway for radioactivity release from the vacuum vessel towards the confinement) and of the two barriers surrounding the chamber (inner shielding and confinement building itself). Even though confinement failure would be a very unlikely event it would be needed in order to produce significant off-site doses. CHEMCON code allows calculation of long-term temperature transients in fusion reactor first wall, blanket, and shield structures resulting from decay heating. MELCOR is used to simulate a wide range of physical phenomena including thermal-hydraulics, heat transfer, aerosol physics and fusion product transport and release. The results of these calculations show that the estimated off-site dose is less than 5 mSv (0.5 rem), which is well below the value of 10 mSv (1 rem) given by the DOE Fusion Safety Standards for protection of the public from exposure to radiation during off-normal conditions.

  12. Radiant heat loss, an unexploited path for heat stress reduction in shaded cattle.

    Berman, A; Horovitz, T

    2012-06-01

    Reducing thermal radiation on shaded animals reduces heat stress independently of other means of stress relief. Radiant heat exchange was estimated as a function of climate, shade structure, and animal density. Body surface portion exposed to radiant sources in shaded environments was determined by geometrical relations to determine angles of view of radiation sources (roof underside, sky, sun-exposed ground, shaded ground) on the animal's surface. The relative representation of environment radiation sources on the body surface was determined. Animal thermal radiation balance was derived from radiant heat gained from radiation sources (including surrounding animals) and that lost from the animal surface. The animal environment was assumed to have different shade dimensions and temperatures. These were summed to the radiant heat balance of the cow. The data formed served to estimate the effect of changes in intensity of radiation sources, roof and shaded surface dimensions, and animal density on radiant heat balance (Rbal) of cattle. Roof height effect was expressed by effect of roof temperature on Rbal. Roof underside temperature (35 to 75°C) effect on Rbal was reduced by roof height. If roof height were 4m, an increase in its underside temperature from 35 to 75°C would increase mean Rbal from -63 to -2 W·m⁻², whereas if roof height were 10 m, Rbal would only increase from -99 to -88 W·m⁻². A hot ground temperature increase from 35 to 65°C reduced mean Rbal heat loss from -45 to 3 W·m⁻². Increasing the surface of the shaded area had only a minor effect on Rbal and on the effect of hot ground on Rbal. Increasing shade roof height reduced the effect of roof temperature on Rbal to minor levels when height was > 8m. Increasing the roof height from 4 to 10 m decreased Rbal from -32 to -94 W·m⁻². Increasing indirect radiation from 100 to 500 W·m⁻² was associated with an increase in Rbal from -135 to +23 W·m⁻². Their combined effects were lower

  13. Modelling and Simulation of the Radiant Field in an Annular Heterogeneous Photoreactor Using a Four-Flux Model

    O. Alvarado-Rolon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on modeling and simulating the absorption and scattering of radiation in a photocatalytic annular reactor. To achieve so, a model based on four fluxes (FFM of radiation in cylindrical coordinates to describe the radiant field is assessed. This model allows calculating the local volumetric rate energy absorption (LVREA profiles when the reaction space of the reactors is not a thin film. The obtained results were compared to radiation experimental data from other authors and with the results obtained by discrete ordinate method (DOM carried out with the Heat Transfer Module of Comsol Multiphysics® 4.4. The FFM showed a good agreement with the results of Monte Carlo method (MC and the six-flux model (SFM. Through this model, the LVREA is obtained, which is an important parameter to establish the reaction rate equation. In this study, the photocatalytic oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde was carried out, and the kinetic equation for this process was obtained. To perform the simulation, the commercial software COMSOL Multiphysics v. 4.4 was employed.

  14. Blanchability and sensory quality of large runner peanuts blanched in a radiant wall oven using infrared radiation.

    Kettler, Katrina; Adhikari, Koushik; Singh, Rakesh K

    2017-10-01

    The main factors behind the growing popularity of infrared radiation heating in food processing include its energy efficiency, food quality retention and process speed, as well as the simplicity of equipment. Infrared radiation was employed as an alternative heat treatment to the conventional hot air method used in peanut blanching. The present study aimed to investigate the application of infrared heating for blanching peanuts and determine their blanchability and sensory quality under various processing conditions. The total blanchabilities (expressed as a percentage of total blanched) of the infrared radiation trials (radiant wall oven) at 343 °C for 1.5 min, 316 °C for 1.5 min, 288 °C for 1.5 min and 343 °C for 1 min did not differ significantly compared to the hot air control trials (impingement oven) at 100 °C for 30 and 20 min. All infrared trials had significantly lower (P infrared samples demonstrated the possible initiation of oxidation for the conventionally blanched sample at 18 weeks of storage at 24 °C (room temperature), with no indication of oxidation in the infrared samples stored at the same temperature. Infrared radiation peanut blanching is a viable alternative to conventional hot air blanching because of the shorter process time and longer shelf-life, as evident from the sensory storage study. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Grid-connected integrated community energy system. Phase II, Stage 2, final report. Executive summary

    1978-03-22

    The University of Minnesota Grid-ICES was divided into four identifiable programs in order to study the feasibility of each of the parts of the ICES independently. The total program involves cogeneration, fuel conversion, fuel substitution, and energy conservation by system change. This Phase II report substantiates the theory that the Basic Grid ICES is not only energy-effective, but it will become cost effective as unit operating costs adjust to supply and demand in the 1980's. The Basic Program involves the cogeneration of steam and electricity. The University of Minnesota has been following an orderly process of converting its Central Heating Plant from gas-oil to 100% coal since 1973. The first step in the transition is complete. The University is presently 100% on coal, and will begin the second step, the test burning of low Btu Western coal during the spring, summer, and fall, and high Btu Eastern coal during the high thermal winter period. The final step to 100% Western coal is planned to be completed by 1980. In conjunction with the final step a retired Northern States Power generating plant has been purchased and is in the process of being retrofitted for topping the existing plant steam output during the winter months. The Basic Plan of ICES involves the add-on work and expense of installing additional boiler capacity at Southeast Steam and non-condensing electric generating capability. This will permit the simultaneous generation of electricity and heat dependent upon the thermal requirements of the heating and cooling system in University buildings. This volume presents an overview of the Community and the ICES. (MCW)

  16. Reaction Coordinate, Free Energy, and Rate of Intramolecular Proton Transfer in Human Carbonic Anhydrase II.

    Paul, Sanjib; Paul, Tanmoy Kumar; Taraphder, Srabani

    2018-03-22

    The role of structure and dynamics of an enzyme has been investigated at three different stages of its function including the chemical event it catalyzes. A one-pot computational method has been designed for each of these stages on the basis of classical and/or quantum mechanical-molecular mechanical molecular dynamics and transition path sampling simulations. For a pair of initial and final states A and B separated by a high free-energy barrier, using a two-stage selection process, several collective variables (CVs) are identified that can delineate A and B. However, these CVs are found to exhibit strong cross-coupling over the transition paths. A set of mutually orthogonal order parameters is then derived from these CVs and an optimal reaction coordinate, r, determined applying half-trajectory likelihood maximization along with a Bayesian information criterion. The transition paths are also used to project the multidimensional free energy surface and barrier crossing dynamics along r. The proposed scheme has been applied to the rate-determining intramolecular proton transfer reaction of the well-known enzyme human carbonic anhydrase II. The potential of mean force, F( r), in the absence of the chemical step is found to reproduce earlier results on the equilibrium population of two side-chain orientations of key residue His-64. Estimation of rate constants, k, from mean first passage times for the three different stages of catalysis shows that the rate-determining step of intramolecular proton transfer occurs with k ≃ 1.0 × 10 6 s -1 , in close agreement with known experimental results.

  17. Measurements of the Electron Cloud Density in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring

    Byrd, John; De Santis, Stefano; Sonnad, Kiran; Caspers, Fritz; Kroyer, Tom; Krasnykh, Anatoly; Pivi, Mauro

    2008-06-01

    Clouds of low energy electronsin the vacuum beam pipes of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energyelectron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We have developed a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave that is independently excited and transmitted over a section of the accelerator. We infer the absolute phase shift with relatively high accuracy from the phase modulation of the transmission due to the modulation of the electron cloud density from a gap in the positively charged beam. We have used this technique for the first time to measure the average electron cloud density over a 50 m straight section in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We have also measured the variation of the density by using low field solenoid magnets to control the electrons.

  18. Forecasting energy consumption and energy related CO2 emissions in Greece. An evaluation of the consequences of the Community Support Framework II and natural gas penetration

    Christodoulakis, N.M.; Kalyvitis, S.C.; Lalas, D.P.; Pesmajoglou, S.

    2000-01-01

    This study seeks to assess the future demand for energy and the trajectory of CO2 emissions level in Greece, taking into account the impact of the Community Support Framework (CSF) II on the development process and the penetration of natural gas, which is one of the major CSF II interventions, in the energy system. Demand equations for each sector of economic activity (traded, non-traded, public and agricultural sector) and for each type of energy (oil, electricity and solid fuels) are derived. The energy system is integrated into a fully developed macroeconometric model, so that all interactions between energy, prices and production factors are properly taken into account. Energy CO2 forecasts are then derived based on alternative scenarios for the prospects of the Greek economy. According to the main findings of the paper the growth pattern of forecast total energy consumption closely follows that of forecast output showing no signs of decoupling. As regards CO2 emissions, they are expected to increase with an annual average rate, which is higher than world forecasts. 17 refs

  19. Energies of Electronic States of Ni (II) Ion in NiO-Al2O3 Catalyst Prepared by Impregnation

    Obadovic, D. Z.; Kiurski, J.; Marinkovic-Neducin, R. P.

    2007-01-01

    The behavior of NiO-Al2O3 catalysts is strongly dependent on the preparation method, as well as on pretreatment conditions. In the present work we investigated the influences of Ni(II) ion on NiO-Al2O3 catalysts properties due to the preparation by impregnation method. Based on experimental diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) data of electronic d-d transitions of Ni (II) promoter ion the energies of electronic states in spinel-like structure were calculated, and the most probable scheme of molecular orbital have been proposed

  20. Precise Wavelengths and Energy Levels for the Spectra of Cr I, Mn I, and Mn III, and Branching Fractions for the Spectra of Fe II and Cr II

    Nave, Gillian

    I propose to measure wavelengths and energy levels for the spectra of Cr I, Mn I, and Mn III covering the wavelength range 80 nm to 5500 nm, and oscillator strengths for Fe II and Cr II in the region 120 nm to 2500 nm. I shall also produce intensity calibrated atlases and linelists of the iron-neon and chromium-neon hollow cathode lamps that can be compared with astrophysical spectra. The spectra will be obtained from archival data from spectrometers at NIST and Kitt Peak National Observatory and additional experimental observations as necessary from Fourier transform (FT) and grating spectrometers at NIST. The wavelength uncertainty of the strong lines will be better than 1 part in 10^7. The radiometric calibration of the spectra will be improved in order to reduce the uncertainty of measured oscillator strengths in the near UV region and extend the wavelength range of these measurements down to 120 nm. These will complement and support the measurements of lifetimes and branching fractions by J. E. Lawler in the near UV region. An intensive effort by NIST and Imperial College London that was partly funded by previous NASA awards has resulted in comprehensive analyses of the spectra of Fe II, Cr II and Cu II, with similar analyses of Mn II, Ni II, and Sc II underway. The species included in this proposal will complete the analysis of the first two ionization stages of the elements titanium through nickel using the same techniques, and add the spectrum of Mn III - one of the most important doubly-ionized elements. The elements Cr I and Mn I give large numbers of spectral lines in spectra of cool stars and important absorption lines in the interstellar medium. The spectrum of Mn III is important in chemically peculiar stars and can often only be studied in the UV region. Analyses of many stellar spectra depend on comprehensive analyses of iron-group elements and are hampered by incomplete spectroscopic data. As a result of many decades of work by the group at the

  1. Application of roof radiant burners in large pusher-type furnaces

    A. Varga

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the application of roof flat-flame burners in the pusher-type steel slab reheating furnaces, after furnace reconstruction and replacement of conventional torch burners, with the objective to increase the efficiency of radiative heat transfer from the refractory roof to the charge. Based on observations and on measurements of the construction and process parameters under operating conditions, the advantages and disadvantages of indirectly oriented radiant heat transfer are analysed in relation to the heat transfer in classically fired furnaces.

  2. Comparison of radiant and convective cooling of office room: effect of workstation layout

    Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Rezgals, Lauris

    2014-01-01

    and compared. The room was furnished with two workstations, two laptops and two thermal manikins resembling occupants. Two heat load levels, design (65 W/m2) and usual (39 W/m2), were generated by adding heat from warm panels simulating solar radiation. Two set-ups were studied: occupants sitting......The impact of heat source location (room layout) on the thermal environment generated in a double office room with four cooling ventilation systems - overhead ventilation, chilled ceiling with overhead ventilation, active chilled beam and active chilled beam with radiant panels was measured...

  3. Sensitivity analysis of the thermal performance of radiant and convective terminals for cooling buildings

    Le Dréau, J.; Heiselberg, P.

    2014-01-01

    Heating and cooling terminals can be classified in two main categories: convective terminals (e.g. active chilled beam, air conditioning) and radiant terminals. The mode of heat transfer of the two emitters is different: the first one is mainly based on convection, whereas the second one is based...... conducted to determine the parameters influencing their thermal performance the most. The air change rate, the outdoor temperature and the air temperature stratification have the largest effect on the cooling need (maintaining a constant operative temperature). For air change rates higher than 0.5 ACH...

  4. Three dimensional modelling and numerical analysis of super-radiant harmonic emission in FEL (optical klystron)

    Gover, A.; Friedman, A.; Luccio, A.

    1986-09-01

    A full 3-D Analysis of super-radiant (bunched electron) free electron harmonic radiation is presented. A generalized form of the FEL pendulum equation was derived and numerically solved. Both spectral and phasor formulation were developed to treat the radiation in the time domain. In space the radiation field is expanded in terms of either a set of free space discrete modes or plane waves. The numerical solutions reveal some new distinctly 3-D effects to which we provide a physical explanation. 12 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs

  5. Perceived air quality, thermal comfort, and SBS symptoms at low air temperature and increased radiant temperature

    Toftum, Jørn; Reimann, Gregers Peter; Foldbjerg, P.

    2002-01-01

    source present at the low temperature. To maintain overall thermal neutrality, the low air temperature was partly compensated for by individually controlled radiant heating, and partly by allowing subjects to modify clothing insulation. A reduction of the air temperature from 23 deg.C to 18 deg.......C suggested an improvement of the perceived air quality, while no systematic effect on symptom intensity was observed. The overall indoor environment was evaluated equally acceptable at both temperatures due to local thermal discomfort at the low air temperature....

  6. Failure Investigation of Radiant Platen Superheater Tube of Thermal Power Plant Boiler

    Ghosh, D.; Ray, S.; Mandal, A.; Roy, H.

    2015-04-01

    This paper highlights a case study of typical premature failure of a radiant platen superheater tube of 210 MW thermal power plant boiler. Visual examination, dimensional measurement and chemical analysis, are conducted as part of the investigations. Apart from these, metallographic analysis and fractography are also conducted to ascertain the probable cause of failure. Finally it has been concluded that the premature failure of the super heater tube can be attributed to localized creep at high temperature. The corrective actions has also been suggested to avoid this type of failure in near future.

  7. Literarily -radiant

    Halvorsen, Finn

    2008-01-01

    The article discusses radiation emissions from various every day appliances such as mobile telephones, wireless technologic aids, networks, radios and television sets. The health risks are mentioned (tk)

  8. Progress in ETA-II magnetic field alignment using stretched wire and low energy electron beam techniques

    Griffith, L.V.; Deadrick, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Flux line alignment of the solenoidal focus magnets used on the ETA-II linear induction accelerator is a key element leading to a reduction of beam corkscrew motion. Two techniques have been used on the ETA-II accelerator to measure and establish magnet alignment. A low energy electron beam has been used to directly map magnetic field lines, and recent work has utilized a pulsed stretched wire technique to measure magnet tilts and offsets with respect to a reference axis. This paper reports on the techniques used in the ETA-II accelerator alignment, and presents results from those measurements which show that accelerator is magnetically aligned to within ∼ ± 200 microns

  9. Solar radiation and cooling load calculation for radiant systems: Definition and evaluation of the Direct Solar Load

    Causone, Francesco; Corgnati, Stefano P.; Filippi, Marco

    2010-01-01

    The study of the influence of solar radiation on the built environment is a basic issue in building physics and currently it is extremely important because glazed envelopes are widely used in contemporary architecture. In the present study, the removal of solar heat gains by radiant cooling systems...... is investigated. Particular attention is given to the portion of solar radiation converted to cooling load, without taking part in thermal absorption phenomena due to the thermal mass of the room. This specific component of the cooling load is defined as the Direct Solar Load. A simplified procedure to correctly...... calculate the magnitude of the Direct Solar Load in cooling load calculations is proposed and it is implemented with the Heat Balance method and the Radiant Time Series method. The F ratio of the solar heat gains directly converted to cooling load, in the case of a low thermal mass radiant ceiling...

  10. Use of local convective and radiant cooling at warm environment: effect on thermal comfort and perceived air quality

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Duszyk, Marcin; Krejcirikova, Barbora

    2012-01-01

    The effect of four local cooling devices (convective, radiant and combined) on thermal comfort and perceived air quality reported by 24 subjects at 28 ˚C and 50% RH was studied. The devices studied were: (1) desk cooling fan, (2) personalized ventilation providing clean air, (3) two radiant panels...... and (4) two radiant panels with one panel equipped with small fans. A reference condition without cooling was tested as well. The response of the subjects to the exposed conditions was collected by computerized questionnaires. The cooling devices significantly (pthermal comfort...... compared to without cooling. The acceptability of the thermal environment was similar for all cooling devices. The acceptability of air movement and PAQ increased when the local cooling methods were used. The best results were achieved with personalized ventilation and cooling fan. The improvement in PAQ...

  11. Dynamic behavior of radiant cooling system based on capillary tubes in walls made of high performance concrete

    Mikeska, Tomás; Svendsen, Svend

    2015-01-01

    elements made of high performance concrete. The influence of the radiant cooling system on the indoor climate of the test room in terms of the air, surface and operative temperatures and velocities was investigated.The results show that the temperature of the room air can be kept in a comfortable range...... using cooling water for the radiant cooling system with a temperature only about 4K lower than the temperature of the room air. The relatively high speed reaction of the designed system is a result of the slim construction of the sandwich wall elements made of high performance concrete. (C) 2015...... the small amount of fresh air required by standards to provide a healthy indoor environment.This paper reports on experimental analyses evaluating the dynamic behavior of a test room equipped with a radiant cooling system composed of plastic capillary tubes integrated into the inner layer of sandwich wall...

  12. Effect of radiant heat transfer on the performance of high temperature heat exchanger

    Mori, Yasuo; Hijikata, Kunio; Yamada, Yukio

    1975-01-01

    The development of high temperature gas-cooled reactors is motivated by the consideration of the application of nuclear heat for industrial uses or direct steelmaking and chemical processes. For these purposes, reliable and efficient heat exchangers should be developed. This report analyzes the effect of radiant heat transfer on the performance of high temperature heat exchangers. The heat transfer model is as follows: the channel composed with two parallel adiabatic walls is divided with one parallel plate between the walls. Non-radiative fluid flows in the two separated channels in opposite direction. Heat transfer equations for this system were obtained, and these equations were solved by some approximate method and numerical analysis. The effect of radiation on heat transfer became larger as the radiant heat transfer between two walls was larger. In the heat exchangers of counter flow type, the thermal efficiency is controlled with three parameters, namely radiation-convection parameter, Stanton number and temperature difference. The thermal efficiency was larger with the increase of these parameters. (Iwase, T.)

  13. Numerical Simulation of the Thermal Process in a W-Shape Radiant Tube Burner

    Wang, Yi; Li, Jiyong; Zhang, Lifeng; Ling, Haitao; Li, Yanlong

    2014-07-01

    In the current work, three-dimensional mathematical models were developed for the heat transfer and combustion in a W-shape radiant tube burner (RTB) and were solved using Fluent software (ANSYS Inc., Canonsburg, PA). The standard k- ɛ model, nonpremixed combustion model, and the discrete ordinate model were used for the modeling of turbulence, combustion, and radiant heat transfer, respectively. In addition, the NO x postprocessor was used for the prediction of the NO emission. A corresponding experiment was performed for the validation of mathematical models. The details of fluid flow, heat transfer, and combustion in the RTB were investigated. Moreover, the effect of the air/fuel ratio (A/F) and air staging on the performance of RTB was studied with the reference indexes including heat efficiency, maximum temperature difference on shell wall, and NO emission at the outlet. The results indicated that a low speed zone formed in the vicinity of the combustion chamber outlet, and there were two relative high-temperature zones in the RTB, one in combustion chamber that favored the flame stability and the other from the main flame in the RTB. The maximum temperature difference was 95.48 K. As the A/F increased, the temperature increased first and then decreased. As the ratio of the primary to secondary air increased, the recirculation zone at the outlet of combustion chamber shrank gradually to disappear, and the flame length was longer and the temperature in flame decreased correspondingly.

  14. Radiative heat exchange of a meteor body in the approximation of radiant heat conduction

    Pilyugin, N.N.; Chernova, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of the thermal and dynamic destruction of large meteor bodies moving in planetary atmospheres is fundamental for the clarification of optical observations and anomalous phenomena in the atmosphere, the determination of the physicochemical properties of meteoroids, and the explanation of the fall of remnants of large meteorites. Therefore, it is important to calculate the coefficient of radiant heat exchange (which is the determining factor under these conditions) for large meteor bodies as they move with hypersonic velocities in an atmosphere. The solution of this problem enables one to find the ablation of a meteorite during its aerodynamic heating and to determine the initial conditions for the solution of problems of the breakup of large bodies and their subsequent motion and ablation. Hypersonic flow of an inviscid gas stream over an axisymmetric blunt body is analyzed with allowance for radiative transfer in a thick-thin approximation. The gas-dynamic problem of the flow of an optically thick gas over a large body is solved by the method of asymptotic joined expansions, using a hypersonic approximation and local self-similarity. An equation is obtained for the coefficient of radiant heat exchange and the peculiarities of such heat exchange for meteor bodies of large size are noted

  15. Non-uniform velocity profile mechanism for flame stabilization in a porous radiant burner

    Catapan, R.C.; Costa, M. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon, Avenida Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Oliveira, A.A.M. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitario Professor Joao David Ferreira Lima, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2011-01-15

    Industrial processes where the heating of large surfaces is required lead to the possibility of using large surface porous radiant burners. This causes additional temperature uniformity problems, since it is increasingly difficult to evenly distribute the reactant mixture over a large burner surface while retaining its stability and keeping low pollutant emissions. In order to allow for larger surface area burners, a non-uniform velocity profile mechanism for flame stabilization in a porous radiant burner using a single large injection hole is proposed and analyzed for a double-layered burner operating in open and closed hot (laboratory-scale furnace, with temperature-controlled, isothermal walls) environments. In both environments, local mean temperatures within the porous medium have been measured. For lower reactant flow rate and ambient temperature the flame shape is conical and anchored at the rim of the injection hole. As the volumetric flow rate or furnace temperature is raised, the flame undergoes a transition to a plane flame stabilized near the external burner surface. However, the stability range envelope remains the same in both regimes. (author)

  16. High-temperature process heat reactor with solid coolant and radiant heat exchange

    Alekseev, A.M.; Bulkin, Yu.M.; Vasil'ev, S.I.

    1984-01-01

    The high temperature graphite reactor with the solid coolant in which heat transfer is realized by radiant heat exchange is described. Neutron-physical and thermal-technological features of the reactor are considered. The reactor vessel is made of sheet carbon steel in the form of a sealed rectangular annular box. The moderator is a set of graphite blocks mounted as rows of arched laying Between the moderator rows the solid coolant annular layings made of graphite blocks with high temperature nuclear fuel in the form of coated microparticles are placed. The coolant layings are mounted onto ring movable platforms, the continuous rotation of which is realizod by special electric drives. Each part of the graphite coolant laying consecutively passes through the reactor core neutron cut-off zones and technological zone. In the core the graphite is heated up to the temperature of 1350 deg C sufficient for effective radiant heat transfer. In the neutron cut-off zone the chain reaction and further graphite heating are stopped. In the technological zone the graphite transfers the accumulated heat to the walls of technological channels in which the working medium moves. The described reactor is supposed to be used in nuclear-chemical complex for ammonia production by the method of methane steam catalytic conversion

  17. Providing all global energy with wind, water, and solar power, Part II: Reliability, system and transmission costs, and policies

    Delucchi, Mark A.; Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2011-01-01

    This is Part II of two papers evaluating the feasibility of providing all energy for all purposes (electric power, transportation, and heating/cooling), everywhere in the world, from wind, water, and the sun (WWS). In Part I, we described the prominent renewable energy plans that have been proposed and discussed the characteristics of WWS energy systems, the global demand for and availability of WWS energy, quantities and areas required for WWS infrastructure, and supplies of critical materials. Here, we discuss methods of addressing the variability of WWS energy to ensure that power supply reliably matches demand (including interconnecting geographically dispersed resources, using hydroelectricity, using demand-response management, storing electric power on site, over-sizing peak generation capacity and producing hydrogen with the excess, storing electric power in vehicle batteries, and forecasting weather to project energy supplies), the economics of WWS generation and transmission, the economics of WWS use in transportation, and policy measures needed to enhance the viability of a WWS system. We find that the cost of energy in a 100% WWS will be similar to the cost today. We conclude that barriers to a 100% conversion to WWS power worldwide are primarily social and political, not technological or even economic. - Research highlights: → We evaluate the feasibility of global energy supply from wind, water, and solar energy. → WWS energy can be supplied reliably and economically to all energy-use sectors. → The social cost of WWS energy generally is less than the cost of fossil-fuel energy. → Barriers to 100% WWS power worldwide are socio-political, not techno-economic.

  18. Training program for energy conservation in new-building construction. Volume II. Energy conservation technology: for the building inspector

    None

    1977-12-01

    A Model Code for Energy Conservation in New Building Construction has been developed by those national organizations primarily concerned with the development and promulgation of model codes. The technical provisions are based on ASHRAE Standard 90-75 and are intended for use by state and local officials. This training manual contains the basic information necessary to acquaint the field building inspector with the concepts of energy conservation in buildings and instructs him in the basic techniques of field inspection of energy compliance.

  19. Commercial-sector energy-consumption data-base-development project. Volume II. Survey of available energy use data

    None

    1978-04-01

    A compilation of data on energy consumption in the commercial sector that have been published elsewhere is presented. Readily available information was collected on the structural, equipment, and energy use characteristics of the following: store and other mercantile buildings; warehouses; finance, insurance, real estate, and services industries; schools and colleges; hospitals and nursing homes; and government buildings. Energy data are shown in terms of Btu/ft/sup 2/. (MCW)

  20. Morteros acumuladores con parafinas microencapsuladas para el aprovechamiento de la energía solar en suelos radiantes

    Zetola Vargas, Vicente Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Esta Tesis plantea la pregunta de si el uso de morteros con parafinas microencapsuladas combinado con colectores solares térmicos puede reducir el consumo de energías convencionales, en un sistema tradicional de suelo radiante. Se pretende contribuir al conocimiento acerca del efecto que produce en el edificio, el calor latente acumulado en suelos radiantes, utilizando morteros de cemento Portland con material de cambio de fase (PCM), en conjunto con la energía solar. Para cumplir con este pr...

  1. Thermal environment in simulated offices with convective and radiant cooling systems under cooling (summer) mode of operation

    Mustakallio, Panu; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Kostov, Kalin

    2016-01-01

    The thermal environment in a double office room and in a six-person meeting room obtained with chilled beam (CB), chilled beam with radiant panel (CBR), chilled ceiling with ceiling installed mixing ventilation (CCMV) and four desk partition-mounted local radiant cooling panels with mixing...... calculated. Manikin-based equivalent temperature (MBET) was determined by using two thermal manikins to identify the impact of the local thermal conditions generated by the studied systems on occupants' thermal perception. The results revealed that the differences in the thermal conditions achieved...

  2. Control characteristics and heating performance analysis of automatic thermostatic valves for radiant slab heating system in residential apartments

    Ahn, Byung-Cheon [Department of Building Equipment System Engineering, Kyungwon University, Seongnam City (Korea); Song, Jae-Yeob [Graduate School, Building Equipment System Engineering, Kyungwon University, Seongnam City (Korea)

    2010-04-15

    Computer simulations and experiments are carried out to research the control characteristics and heating performances for a radiant slab heating system with automatic thermostatic valves in residential apartments. An electrical equivalent R-C circuit is applied to analyze the unsteady heat transfer in the house. In addition, the radiant heat transfer between slabs, ceilings and walls in the room is evaluated by enclosure analysis method. Results of heating performance and control characteristics were determined from control methods such as automatic thermostatic valves, room air temperature-sensing method, water-temperature-sensing method, proportional control method, and On-Off control method. (author)

  3. Test of the rem-counter WENDI-II from Eberline in different energy-dispersed neutron fields

    Gutermuth, F.; Radon, T.; Fehrenbacher, G.; Siekmann, R.

    2004-03-01

    The neutron rem-counter WENDI-II from Eberline was tested in high-energy particle accelerator produced neutron fields. A radioactive 241 Am-Be(αn) source was used as a reference. The experimentally determined responses are compared to Monte-Carlo simulations of the response function done by R. H. Olsher et al. (2000). The energy spectra of the accelerator produced neutron fields were determined employing Monte-Carlo simulations, too. According to the simulations done by C. Birattari et al. (1998) and in this work these neutron fields exhibit large contributions to the ambient dose equivalent resulting from neutrons with kinetic energy of more than 20 MeV up to a few 100 MeV. The WENDI-II detector proved to show a response of approximately 3.10 9 pulses per Sievert ambient dose equivalent. Considering the experimental and statistical uncertainties the results are consistent with the assumption that the dose response of the WENDI-II reproduces quite accurately the function for the ambient dose equivalent of the ICRP 74

  4. Experimental determination of the energy levels of the antimony atom (Sb II), ions of the antimony (Sb II, Sb III), mercury (Hg IV) and cesium (Cs X)

    Arcimowicz, B.

    1993-01-01

    The thesis concerns establishing the energy scheme of the electronic levels, obtained from the analysis of the investigated spectra of antimony atom and ions (Sb I, Sb II, Sb III) and higher ionized mercury (Hg IV) and cesium (Cs X) atoms. The experimental studies were performed with optical spectroscopy methods. The spectra of the elements under study obtained in the spectral range from visible (680 nm) to vacuum UV (40 nm) were analysed. The classification and spectroscopic designation of the experimentally established 169 energy levels were obtained on the basis of the performed calculations and the fine structure analysis. The following configurations were considered: 5s 2 5p 2 ns, 5s 2 5p 2 n'd, 5s5p 4 of the antimony atom, 5s 2 5pns, 5s 2 5pn'd, 5s5p 3 of the ion Sb II, 5s 2 ns, 5s 2 n'd, 5s5p 2 of the on Sb III, 5d 8 6p of the ion Hg IV 4d 9 5s and 4d 9 5p Cs X. A reclassification was performed and some changes were introduced to the existing energy level scheme of the antimony atom, with the use of the information obtained from the absorption spectrum taken in the VUV region by the ''flash pyrolysis'' technique. The measurements of the hyperfine splittings in 19 spectral lines belonging to the antimony atom and ions additionally confirmed the assumed classification of the levels involved in these lines. The energy level scheme, obtained for Sb III, was compared to the other ones in the isoelectronic sequence starting with In I. On the basis of the analysis of the Hg IV spectrum it was proved that ground configuration of the three times ionized mercury atom is 5d 9 not 5d 8 6s as assumed until now. The fine structure, established from the analysis of the spectra of the elements under study was examined in multiconfiguration approximation. As a result of the performed calculations the fine structure parameters and wavefunctions were determined for the levels whose energy values were experimentally established in the thesis. (author). 140 refs, 22 figs, 17

  5. Energy History Chronology from World War II to the Present [1982

    Dean, P. C.

    1982-08-01

    This report provides a basic guide to the major Presidential, Legislative, Judicial, and Federal agency actions relating to energy policy, research, development, and regulation in recent years. The chronology is arranged synoptically, allowing users to reference easily the historical context in which each event occurred. Summaries of Presidential, Legislative, and Judicial actions relating to energy, rosters of federal energy officials, and a genealogy of federal energy agencies are also provided in separate appendices. The Energy History Chronology was prepared in conjunction with the History Division's series of pamphlets on the Institutional Origins of the Department of Energy. The series includes concise histories of the Department of Energy, the Energy Research and Development Administration, the Federal Energy Administration, and the Atomic Energy Commission. All significant events and achievements noted in the institutional history are also listed.

  6. Towards a uniform specification of light therapy devices for the treatment of affective disorders and use for non-image forming effects: Radiant flux.

    Aarts, M P J; Rosemann, A L P

    2018-08-01

    For treating affective disorders like SAD, light therapy is used although the underlying mechanism explaining this success remains unclear. To accelerate the research on defining the light characteristics responsible for inducing a specific effect a uniform manner for specifying the irradiance at the eye should be defined. This allows a genuine comparison between light-affect studies. An important factor impacting the irradiance at the eye are the radiant characteristics of the used light therapy device. In this study the radiant fluxes of five different light therapy devices were measured. The values were weighted against the spectral sensitivity of the five photopigments present in the human eye. A measurement was taken every five minutes to control for a potential stabilizing effect. The results show that all five devices show large differences in radiant flux. The devices equipped with blue LED lights have a much lower spectral radiant flux than the devices equipped with a fluorescent light source or a white LED. The devices with fluorescent lamps needed 30 min to stabilize to a constant radiant flux. In this study only five devices were measured. Radiant flux is just the first step to identify uniform specifications for light therapy devices. It is recommended to provide all five α-opic radiant fluxes. Preferably, the devices should come with a spectral power distribution of the radiant flux. For the devices equipped with a fluorescent lamp it is recommended to provide information on the stabilization time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Radiant heat transfers in turbojet engines. Two applications, three levels of modeling; Transferts radiatifs dans les foyers de turboreacteurs. Deux applications, trois niveaux de modelisation

    Schultz, J L; Desaulty, M [SNECMA, Centre de Villaroche, 77 - Moissy-Cramayel (France); Taine, J [Ecole Centrale de Paris, Laboratoire EM2C. CNRS, 92 - Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    1997-12-31

    Several applications linked with the dimensioning of turbojet engines require the use of modeling of radiant heat transfers. Two different applications are presented in this study: the modeling of heat transfers in the main combustion chamber, and modeling of the infrared signature of the post-combustion chamber of a military engine. In the first application, two types of radiant heat transfer modeling are presented: a global modeling based on empirical considerations and used in rapid pre-dimensioning methods, and a modeling based on a grey gases concept and combined to a ray shooting type technique allowing the determination of local radiant heat flux values. In the second application, a specific modeling of the radiant heat flux is used in the framework of a ray shooting method. Each model represents a different level of successive approximations of the radiant heat transfer adapted to flow specificities and to the performance requested. (J.S.) 16 refs.

  8. Radiant heat transfers in turbojet engines. Two applications, three levels of modeling; Transferts radiatifs dans les foyers de turboreacteurs. Deux applications, trois niveaux de modelisation

    Schultz, J.L.; Desaulty, M. [SNECMA, Centre de Villaroche, 77 - Moissy-Cramayel (France); Taine, J. [Ecole Centrale de Paris, Laboratoire EM2C. CNRS, 92 - Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    1996-12-31

    Several applications linked with the dimensioning of turbojet engines require the use of modeling of radiant heat transfers. Two different applications are presented in this study: the modeling of heat transfers in the main combustion chamber, and modeling of the infrared signature of the post-combustion chamber of a military engine. In the first application, two types of radiant heat transfer modeling are presented: a global modeling based on empirical considerations and used in rapid pre-dimensioning methods, and a modeling based on a grey gases concept and combined to a ray shooting type technique allowing the determination of local radiant heat flux values. In the second application, a specific modeling of the radiant heat flux is used in the framework of a ray shooting method. Each model represents a different level of successive approximations of the radiant heat transfer adapted to flow specificities and to the performance requested. (J.S.) 16 refs.

  9. Smart Control of Air Climatization System in Function on the Values of Mean Local Radiant Temperature

    Giuseppe Cannistraro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The hygrothermal comfort indoor conditions are defined as: those environmental conditions in which an individual exposed, expresses a state of satisfaction. These conditions cannot always be achieved anywhere in an optimal way and economically; in some cases they can be obtained only in work environments specific areas. This could be explained because of air conditioning systems designing is generally performed both on the basis of the fundamental parameters’ average values, such as temperature, velocity and relative humidity (Ta, va e φa and derived parameters such as operating temperature and mean radiant one (Top eTmr. However, in some specific cases - large open-spaces or in case of radiating surfaces - the descriptors defining indoor comfort conditions, based on average values, do not provide the optimum values required during the air conditioning systems design phase. This is largely due to the variability of real environmental parameters values compared to the average ones taken as input in the calculation. The results obtained in previous scientific papers on the thermal comfort have been the driving element of this work. It offers a simple, original and clever way of thinking about the new domotic systems for air conditioning, based on the “local mean radiant temperature.” This is a very important parameter when one wants to analyze comfort in environments characterized by the presence of radiating surfaces, as will be seen hereinafter. In order to take into account the effects of radiative exchanges in the open-space workplace, where any occupant may find themselves in different temperature and humidity conditions, this paper proposes an action on the domotic climate control, with ducts and vents air distribution placed in different zones. Comparisons were performed between the parameters values representing the punctual thermal comfort, with the Predicted Mean Vote PMV, in an environment marked by radiating surfaces (i

  10. Graphical User Interface for High Energy Multi-Particle Transport, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Computer codes such as MCNPX now have the capability to transport most high energy particle types (34 particle types now supported in MCNPX) with energies extending...

  11. Energy transfer dynamics in trimers and aggregates of light-harvesting complex II probed by 2D electronic spectroscopy

    Enriquez, Miriam M.; Zhang, Cheng; Tan, Howe-Siang, E-mail: howesiang@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Chemistry and Biological Chemistry, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Akhtar, Parveen; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H., E-mail: lambrev@brc.hu [Institute of Plant Biology, Biological Research Centre, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 521, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary)

    2015-06-07

    The pathways and dynamics of excitation energy transfer between the chlorophyll (Chl) domains in solubilized trimeric and aggregated light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) are examined using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). The LHCII trimers and aggregates exhibit the unquenched and quenched excitonic states of Chl a, respectively. 2DES allows direct correlation of excitation and emission energies of coupled states over population time delays, hence enabling mapping of the energy flow between Chls. By the excitation of the entire Chl b Q{sub y} band, energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a states is monitored in the LHCII trimers and aggregates. Global analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) spectra reveals that energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a occurs on fast and slow time scales of 240–270 fs and 2.8 ps for both forms of LHCII. 2D decay-associated spectra resulting from the global analysis identify the correlation between Chl states involved in the energy transfer and decay at a given lifetime. The contribution of singlet–singlet annihilation on the kinetics of Chl energy transfer and decay is also modelled and discussed. The results show a marked change in the energy transfer kinetics in the time range of a few picoseconds. Owing to slow energy equilibration processes, long-lived intermediate Chl a states are present in solubilized trimers, while in aggregates, the population decay of these excited states is significantly accelerated, suggesting that, overall, the energy transfer within the LHCII complexes is faster in the aggregated state.

  12. A study on the proton beam energy(50 MeV) measurement and diagnosis (II)

    Chae, Jong Suh; Lee, Dong Hoon; Kim, Yoo Suk; Park, Chan Won; Lee, Yong Min; Hong, Sung Suk; Lee, Min Yong; Lee, Ji Sub; Hah, Hang Hoh [Korea Cancer Center Hospital of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-01

    The main purpose of this project is the precise ion measurement of proton beam energy extracted at RF 25.89 MHz from the MC-50 cyclotron of SF type. There are several method for particle energy measurement. We measured the 50 MeV proton energy by using the E-{Delta}E method in 1993. And also in our experiment used range, reapproval of energy of extracted proton beam at RF 25.89 MHz was performed, which attained the same energy with the result used elastic scattering within the error range. 10 figs, 2 pix, 3 tabs, 3 refs. (Author).

  13. Where the Solar system meets the solar neighbourhood: patterns in the distribution of radiants of observed hyperbolic minor bodies

    de la Fuente Marcos, Carlos; de la Fuente Marcos, Raúl; Aarseth, Sverre J.

    2018-05-01

    Observed hyperbolic minor bodies might have an interstellar origin, but they can be natives of the Solar system as well. Fly-bys with the known planets or the Sun may result in the hyperbolic ejection of an originally bound minor body; in addition, members of the Oort cloud could be forced to follow inbound hyperbolic paths as a result of secular perturbations induced by the Galactic disc or, less frequently, due to impulsive interactions with passing stars. These four processes must leave distinctive signatures in the distribution of radiants of observed hyperbolic objects, both in terms of coordinates and velocity. Here, we perform a systematic numerical exploration of the past orbital evolution of known hyperbolic minor bodies using a full N-body approach and statistical analyses to study their radiants. Our results confirm the theoretical expectations that strong anisotropies are present in the data. We also identify a statistically significant overdensity of high-speed radiants towards the constellation of Gemini that could be due to the closest and most recent known fly-by of a star to the Solar system, that of the so-called Scholz's star. In addition to and besides 1I/2017 U1 (`Oumuamua), we single out eight candidate interstellar comets based on their radiants' velocities.

  14. A METHOD FOR EVALUATION OF NON-UNIFORM RADIANT-CONVECTIVE LOAD ON HUMAN BODY DURING MENTAL WORK

    Lenka Prokšová Zuská

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to develop a documentation for the amendment of the microclimatic part of the Czech Government Regulation, particularly in a non-uniform radiant-convective load evaluation. Changes in regulation were made based on experimental data obtained on a group of experimental individuals in a climatic chamber. One of the objectives of the climatic chamber experiments was to evaluate whether there was a possibility to use an alternative method, which utilizes a new value – stereotemperature, for the assessment. A group of 24 women was exposed to a non-uniform radiant-convective load in a climatic chamber for 1 hour during their computer work. Measurements were divided according to the globe temperature into 3 stages. The physical parameters of air were continuously measured: the air temperature, globe temperature, air velocity, radiant temperature, relative humidity, stereotemperature and physiological parameters. Thermal sensations of experimental subjects were expressed in the seven-point scale according to EN ISO 7730. The thermal sensation correlated very well with the difference of stereotemperature and the globe temperature. The stereotemperature correlated very well with the radiant temperature. In this work, the composed equations were used to develop the limit values for the thermal stress evaluation in the uniform and non-uniform thermal environment at workplaces. It is possible to determine how the body of an exposed person perceives the non-uniform climatic conditions in the indoor environment, by adding the stereotemperature to government regulations.

  15. Experimental study including subjective evaluations of mixing and displacement ventilation combined with radiant floor heating/cooling system

    Krajcik, Michal; Tomasi, Roberta; Simone, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Sixteen subjects evaluated the indoor environment in four experiments with different combinations of ventilation systems and radiant heating/cooling systems. In the first two tests, the simulated residential room was equipped either by a mixing ventilation system supplying warm air for space heat...

  16. Radiant heating tests of several liquid metal heat-pipe sandwich panels

    Camarda, C.J.; Basiulis, A.

    1983-08-01

    Integral heat pipe sandwich panels, which synergistically combine the thermal efficiency of heat pipes and the structural efficiency of honeycomb sandwich construction, were conceived as a means of alleviating thermal stress problems in the Langley Scramjet Engine. Test panels which utilized two different wickable honeycomb cores, facesheets with screen mesh sintered to the internal surfaces, and a liquid metal working fluid (either sodium or potassium) were tested by radiant heating at various heat load levels. The heat pipe panels reduced maximum temperature differences by 31 percent with sodium working fluid and 45 percent with potassium working fluid. Results indicate that a heat pipe sandwich panel is a potential, simple solution to the engine thermal stress problem. Other interesting applications of the concept include: cold plates for electronic component and circuit card cooling, radiators for large space platforms, low distortion large area structures (e.g., space antennas) and laser mirrors

  17. The Super-Radiant Mechanism and the Widths of Compound Nuclear States

    Auerbach, N

    2012-01-01

    In the introduction I will present the theory of the super-radiant mechanism as applied to various phenomena. I will then discuss the statistics of resonance widths in a many-body Fermi system with open decay channels. Depending on the strength of the coupling to the continuum such systems show deviations from the standard Porter-Thomas distribution. The deviations result from the process of increasing interaction of the intrinsic states through the common decay channels. In the limit of very strong coupling this leads to super-radiance. The results I will present are important for the understanding of recent experimental data concerning the width distribution of compound neutron resonances in nuclei.

  18. A critical examination of the validity of simplified models for radiant heat transfer analysis.

    Toor, J. S.; Viskanta, R.

    1972-01-01

    Examination of the directional effects of the simplified models by comparing the experimental data with the predictions based on simple and more detailed models for the radiation characteristics of surfaces. Analytical results indicate that the constant property diffuse and specular models do not yield the upper and lower bounds on local radiant heat flux. In general, the constant property specular analysis yields higher values of irradiation than the constant property diffuse analysis. A diffuse surface in the enclosure appears to destroy the effect of specularity of the other surfaces. Semigray and gray analyses predict the irradiation reasonably well provided that the directional properties and the specularity of the surfaces are taken into account. The uniform and nonuniform radiosity diffuse models are in satisfactory agreement with each other.

  19. Thermal Texture Selection and Correction for Building Facade Inspection Based on Thermal Radiant Characteristics

    Lin, D.; Jarzabek-Rychard, M.; Schneider, D.; Maas, H.-G.

    2018-05-01

    An automatic building façade thermal texture mapping approach, using uncooled thermal camera data, is proposed in this paper. First, a shutter-less radiometric thermal camera calibration method is implemented to remove the large offset deviations caused by changing ambient environment. Then, a 3D façade model is generated from a RGB image sequence using structure-from-motion (SfM) techniques. Subsequently, for each triangle in the 3D model, the optimal texture is selected by taking into consideration local image scale, object incident angle, image viewing angle as well as occlusions. Afterwards, the selected textures can be further corrected using thermal radiant characteristics. Finally, the Gauss filter outperforms the voted texture strategy at the seams smoothing and thus for instance helping to reduce the false alarm rate in façade thermal leakages detection. Our approach is evaluated on a building row façade located at Dresden, Germany.

  20. Radiant thinking and the use of the mind map in nurse practitioner education.

    Spencer, Julie R; Anderson, Kelley M; Ellis, Kathryn K

    2013-05-01

    The concept of radiant thinking, which led to the concept of mind mapping, promotes all aspects of the brain working in synergy, with thought beginning from a central point. The mind map, which is a graphical technique to improve creative thinking and knowledge attainment, utilizes colors, images, codes, and dimensions to amplify and enhance key ideas. This technique augments the visualization of relationships and links between concepts, which aids in information acquisition, data retention, and overall comprehension. Faculty can promote students' use of the technique for brainstorming, organizing ideas, taking notes, learning collaboratively, presenting, and studying. These applications can be used in problem-based learning, developing plans of care, health promotion activities, synthesizing disease processes, and forming differential diagnoses. Mind mapping is a creative way for students to engage in a unique method of learning that can expand memory recall and help create a new environment for processing information. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. The renewable energy development framework - II. The foundations of renewable energy development: Economic foundations of renewable energies; International foundations of renewable energies; European foundations of renewable energy development; Foundations of renewable energy development in internal law

    Combes Motel, Pascale; Thebaut, Matthieu; Loic Grard; Michallet, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    A first article analysis the reasons for the development of renewable energies (economic and environmental reasons, European commitments in terms of production objectives), how these renewable energies can be developed (acceptation by the population, administrative, technological, and financial constraints, political instruments related to market, taxes and purchase prices). A second article proposes a discussion about the way international law deals with renewable energies as far as texts as well as actors are concerned. The third article describes the European ambitions regarding renewable energies as a product of national perspectives (national action plans and projects) as well as of European perspectives (financing, integrated actions). The last article presents and comments various legal texts dealing with the development of renewable energies in France (texts concerning the right to energy, the environment law, planning tools, incentive measures)

  2. Research on the Improvement of a Natural Gas Fired Burner for the CHP Application in a Central Heating Boiler using Radiant Burner Technology

    Bieleveld, T.

    2010-08-15

    These days, the reduction of CO2 emissions from combustion devices is one of the main priorities for each design improvement. For the domestic use of the central heating boiler, Microgen Engine Corporation produces free piston Stirling engines for the Combined Heat and Power (CHP) application in these central heating boilers (Dutch: 'HRe ketel'). With CHP, the generation of electricity and heat are combined to increase overall efficiency, as heat is generally a waste product from the combustion to electric generation process. In this application, the Stirling engine, which can be defined as an external combustion engine, is heated by a natural gas fired engine-burner and cooled by a coolant flow. The heat transfer into the engine is converted into mechanical work and a heat flux from the engine. The mechanical work is used to produce electricity via a linear alternator. Heat in the flue gasses from the engine-burner is reused in a secondary burner and condensing heat exchanger. The coolant flow from the engine, after passing the secondary burner, is used for heating purposes. The heat transfer from engine-burner to the Stirling engine is analyzed and via several motivations it is found that it is favorable to improve fuel to electric conversion efficiency, for which the heat transfer efficiency of the engine-burner to the Stirling engine should be improved, as the engine design is not to be altered. From an initially developed linear free piston Stirling engine model and measurements performed at Microgen Engine Corporation, St. Petersborough, (UK), the engine power demand and engine-burner performance are found. The results are used to visualize the current energy flows of the Stirling engine and engine burner subsystem. The heat transfer to the engine is analyzed to find possible heat transfer improvements. It is concluded that heat transfer from the engine-burner to the engine can be approved if the flue losses due to convective heat transfer are

  3. Newborns' temperature submitted to radiant heat and to the Top Maternal device at birth.

    Albuquerque, Rosemeire Sartori de; Mariani, Corintio; Bersusa, Ana Aparecida Sanches; Dias, Vanessa Macedo; Silva, Maria Izabel Mota da

    2016-08-08

    to compare the axillar temperatures of newborns that are put immediately after birth in skin-to-skin contact under the Top Maternal device, as compared to those in a radiant heat crib. comparatives observational study of the case-control type about temperature of 60 babies born at the Obstetric Center and Normal Delivery Center of a public hospital of the municipality of Sao Paulo, being them: 29 receiving assistance in heated crib and 31 in skin-to skin contact, shielded by a cotton tissue placed on mother's thorax, called Top Maternal. the temperature of the babies of the skin-to-skin contact group presented higher values in a larger share of the time measures verified, as compared to those that were placed in radiant heat crib, independently from the place of birth. Differences between the two groups were not statistically significant. the study contributes to generate new knowledge, supporting the idea of keeping babies with their mothers immediately after birth protected with the Maternal Top, without harming their wellbeing, as it keeps the axillar temperature in recommendable levels. comparar a temperatura axilar dos recém-nascidos acomodados - imediatamente após o nascimento - em contato pele a pele, sob o Top Maternal, em berço de calor radiante. estudo comparativo observacional do tipo Caso-Controle sobre a temperatura de 60 bebês nascidos no Centro Obstétrico e Centro de Parto Normal de um hospital público do município de São Paulo, sendo: 29 assistidos em berço aquecido e 31 em contato pele a pele, protegidos por uma malha de algodão colocada sobre o tórax da mãe, denominada Top Maternal. a temperatura dos bebês do grupo de contato pele a pele teve maior valor na maioria dos tempos verificados comparada à dos que foram colocados em berço de calor radiante, independentemente do local de nascimento. A diferença entre os grupos não foi estatisticamente significante. o estudo contribui com a geração de um novo conhecimento que sustenta a

  4. Mapping temperature and radiant geothermal heat flux anomalies in the Yellowstone geothermal system using ASTER thermal infrared data

    Vaughan, R. Greg; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; Jaworowski, Cheryl; Heasler, Henry

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to use satellite-based thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data to measure, map, and monitor geothermal activity within the Yellowstone geothermal area to help meet the missions of both the U.S. Geological Survey Yellowstone Volcano Observatory and the Yellowstone National Park Geology Program. Specifically, the goals were to: 1) address the challenges of remotely characterizing the spatially and temporally dynamic thermal features in Yellowstone by using nighttime TIR data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and 2) estimate the temperature, geothermal radiant emittance, and radiant geothermal heat flux (GHF) for Yellowstone’s thermal areas (both Park wide and for individual thermal areas). ASTER TIR data (90-m pixels) acquired at night during January and February, 2010, were used to estimate surface temperature, radiant emittance, and radiant GHF from all of Yellowstone’s thermal features, produce thermal anomaly maps, and update field-based maps of thermal areas. A background subtraction technique was used to isolate the geothermal component of TIR radiance from thermal radiance due to insolation. A lower limit for the Yellowstone’s total radiant GHF was established at ~2.0 GW, which is ~30-45% of the heat flux estimated through geochemical (Cl-flux) methods. Additionally, about 5 km2 was added to the geodatabase of mapped thermal areas. This work provides a framework for future satellite-based thermal monitoring at Yellowstone as well as exploration of other volcanic / geothermal systems on a global scale.

  5. Solar ultraviolet and the occupational radiant exposure of Queensland school teachers: A comparative study between teaching classifications and behavior patterns.

    Downs, Nathan J; Harrison, Simone L; Chavez, Daniel R Garzon; Parisi, Alfio V

    2016-05-01

    Classroom teachers located in Queensland, Australia are exposed to high levels of ambient solar ultraviolet as part of the occupational requirement to provide supervision of children during lunch and break times. We investigated the relationship between periods of outdoor occupational radiant exposure and available ambient solar radiation across different teaching classifications and schools relative to the daily occupational solar ultraviolet radiation (HICNIRP) protection standard of 30J/m(2). Self-reported daily sun exposure habits (n=480) and personal radiant exposures were monitored using calibrated polysulphone dosimeters (n=474) in 57 teaching staff from 6 different schools located in tropical north and southern Queensland. Daily radiant exposure patterns among teaching groups were compared to the ambient UV-Index. Personal sun exposures were stratified among teaching classifications, school location, school ownership (government vs non-government), and type (primary vs secondary). Median daily radiant exposures were 15J/m(2) and 5J/m(2)HICNIRP for schools located in northern and southern Queensland respectively. Of the 474 analyzed dosimeter-days, 23.0% were found to exceed the solar radiation protection standard, with the highest prevalence found among physical education teachers (57.4% dosimeter-days), followed by teacher aides (22.6% dosimeter-days) and classroom teachers (18.1% dosimeter-days). In Queensland, peak outdoor exposure times of teaching staff correspond with periods of extreme UV-Index. The daily occupational HICNIRP radiant exposure standard was exceeded in all schools and in all teaching classifications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. LEAP Phase II, Net Energy Gain From Laser Fields in Vacuum

    Barnes, C.D.; Colby, E.R.; Plettner, T.

    2005-01-01

    The current Laser Electron Acceleration Program (LEAP) seeks to modulate the energy of an electron bunch by interaction of the electrons with a copropagating pair of crossed laser beams at 800 nm. We present an optical injector design for a LEAP cell so that it can be used to give net energy gain to an electron bunch. Unique features of the design are discussed which will allow this net energy gain and which will also provide a robust signature for the LEAP interaction

  7. LEAP Phase II, net energy gain from laser fields in vacuum

    Barnes, Christopher D.; Colby, Eric R.; Plettner, Tomas

    2002-01-01

    The current Laser Electron Acceleration Program (LEAP) seeks to modulate the energy of an electron bunch by interaction of the electrons with a copropagating pair of crossed laser beams at 800 nm. We present an optical injector design for a LEAP cell so that it can be used to give net energy gain to an electron bunch. Unique features of the design are discussed which will allow this net energy gain and which will also provide a robust signature for the LEAP interaction

  8. Problems in the implementation of energy conservation measures. II. Consumer motivation

    Phillips, P. H.

    1977-10-15

    During the course of 1975 a national survey of household attitudes to energy use and conservation was undertaken. The study suggested that while the public are generally in favor of energy conservation, they do not practice it. The study highlighted the need to do more than merely raise the level of awareness of the need for energy conservation. The energy intensive nature of our life-style was identified as a critical constraint on the implementations of effective voluntary energy conservation programs. It was suggested that our pattern of energy use is so deeply embedded in our everyday behaviors that it would take more than the presentation of information to produce the necessary changes in behavior. Some of the problems involved in attempting to motivate the consumer to conserve energy using either an extrinsic or instrinsic motivational approach are explored. A general model of the energy system is employed to illustrate that changes in the informational environment must be accompanied by changes in the institutional environment if pro-conservation attitudes are to be converted into conserving behavior. The case of personal transportation is used to indicate the need for a comprehensive package of measures which not only motivate the consumer but also facilitate and reinforce positive behavior if the dual goals of satisfying personal mobility needs and energy conservation are to be satisfied.

  9. Elastic interactions between hydrogen atoms in metals. II. Elastic interaction energies

    Shirley, A.I.; Hall, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    The fully harmonic lattice approximation derived in a previous paper is used to calculate the elastic interaction energies in the niobium-hydrogen system. The permanent-direct, permanent-indirect, induced-direct, and induced-indirect forces calculated previously each give rise to a corresponding elastic interaction between hydrogen atoms. The latter three interactions have three- and four-body terms in addition to the usual two-body terms. These quantities are calculated and compared with the corresponding two-body permanent elastic interactions obtained in the harmonic-approximation treatment of Horner and Wagner. The results show that the total induced elastic energy is approximately (1/3) the size of the total permanent elastic energy and opposite to it in sign. The total elastic energy due to three-body interactions is approximately (1/4) the size of the total two-body elastic energy, while the total four-body elastic energy is approximately 5% of the total two-body energy. These additional elastic energies are expected to have a profound effect on the thermodynamic and phase-change behavior of a metal hydride

  10. Model Solar Energy Training Program II. Final Report, July 1, 1981-June 30, 1982.

    Talcott Mountain Science Center, Avon, CT.

    Trained personnel will be needed in the future to install solar energy heating and hot water systems, and public school vocational education teachers will be needed to train these technicians. A project to train high school vocational teachers so that they can teach their students about solar energy concepts, manufacturing techniques, testing, and…

  11. Second European study conference on molecular low energy collisions (MOLEC II)

    1978-01-01

    The conference contained 52 papers on molecular low energy collisions including nonadiabatic transitions and excited states, vibrational and rotational energy transfer, chemical reactions, dissociation and ionization, general methods, potential surfaces, electronic excitation and excited states, inelastic scattering and anisotropic potentials, chemical reactions, and Van der Waals molecules. (JFP)

  12. Ocean Thermal Energy Converstion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part B

    None

    1977-01-17

    Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC test program which may include land and floating test facilities. Volume II--Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part B provides an annotated test list and describes component tests and system tests.

  13. Grid-connected integrated community energy system. Volume II. Final report

    1977-07-01

    A preliminary feasibility analysis of a grid-connected ICES in the City of Independence, Missouri, is presented. It is found that the ICES concept can be made feasible in Independence by employing a 20-MW coal-fired boiler and turbine and using waste heat to provide the energy for heating and cooling commercial facilities with over 3 million square feet of floor space. When fully loaded thermally, the ICES results in favorable fuel utilization and energy conservation in comparison to conventional energy systems. The City of Independence is experienced with all of the institutional factors that may impact the ICES Demonstration Project.

  14. High Energy Density Li-Ion Batteries Designed for Low Temperature Applications, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The state-of-the-art Li-ion batteries do not fully meet the energy density, power density and safety requirements specified by NASA for future exploration missions....

  15. Energy-Deposition to Reduce Skin Friction in Supersonic Applications, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has drawn attention to an impending need to improve energy-efficiency in low supersonic (M<~3) platforms. Aerodynamic efficiency is the foundation of...

  16. Proceedings of the third biennial conference and workshop on wind energy conversion systems. Volume II

    Kornreich, T R [ed.

    1978-05-01

    Separate abstracts are included for 34 papers presented concerning technology development, meteorological siting considerations, multi-unit applications, and innovative and advanced systems concepts. Two papers were previously input into the energy data base.

  17. Proceedings of the 1984 workshop on high-energy excitations in condensed matter. Volume II

    Silver, R.N.

    1984-12-01

    This volume covers electronic excitations, momentum distributions, high energy photons, and a wrap-up session. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of nuclear energy study (II). Annual report on Nuclear Code Evaluation Committee

    NONE

    2001-01-01

    In the report, research results discussed in 1999 fiscal year at Nuclear Code Evaluation Committee of Nuclear Code Research Committee were summarized. Present status of Monte Carlo simulation on nuclear energy study was described. Especially, besides of criticality, shielding and core analyses, present status of applications to risk and radiation damage analyses, high energy transport and nuclear theory calculations of Monte Carlo Method was described. The 18 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  19. The exponentiated Hencky-logarithmic strain energy. Part II: Coercivity, planar polyconvexity and existence of minimizers

    Neff, Patrizio; Lankeit, Johannes; Ghiba, Ionel-Dumitrel; Martin, Robert; Steigmann, David

    2015-08-01

    We consider a family of isotropic volumetric-isochoric decoupled strain energies based on the Hencky-logarithmic (true, natural) strain tensor log U, where μ > 0 is the infinitesimal shear modulus, is the infinitesimal bulk modulus with the first Lamé constant, are dimensionless parameters, is the gradient of deformation, is the right stretch tensor and is the deviatoric part (the projection onto the traceless tensors) of the strain tensor log U. For small elastic strains, the energies reduce to first order to the classical quadratic Hencky energy which is known to be not rank-one convex. The main result in this paper is that in plane elastostatics the energies of the family are polyconvex for , extending a previous finding on its rank-one convexity. Our method uses a judicious application of Steigmann's polyconvexity criteria based on the representation of the energy in terms of the principal invariants of the stretch tensor U. These energies also satisfy suitable growth and coercivity conditions. We formulate the equilibrium equations, and we prove the existence of minimizers by the direct methods of the calculus of variations.

  20. Final report of the Multiprogram Laboratory Panel Energy Research Advisory Board. Volume II. Support studies

    Spiewak, I.; Guthrie, M.P.; Nichols, J.P.; Preston, E.L.; West, C.D.; Wilbanks, T.J.; Wilkes, B.Y.; Zerby, A.C.

    1982-09-01

    Volume II - support studies for nine national laboratories include: report of statistical data on the multiprogram laboratories; examples of national laboratory use in foreign countries; domestic models for national laboratory utilization; relationships of laboratories with industry and universities; uses of laboratories for training industrial R and D personnel; legal mandates and constraints on the national laboratories; with appendices on facts about Harwell, CEN-Saclay, TNO, Studsvik, and JAERI-Tokai; the Requirements Boards of the United Kingdom Department of Industry; impact of President's FY 1983 budget; and the PNL experiment

  1. The low energy expansion of the one-loop type II superstring amplitude

    Green, Michael B.; Green, Michael B.; Vanhove, Pierre

    2000-01-01

    The one-loop four-graviton amplitude in either of the type II superstring theories is expanded in powers of the external momenta up to and including terms of order s^4 log s R^4, where R^4 denotes a specific contraction of four linearized Weyl tensors and s is a Mandelstam invariant. Terms in this series are obtained by integrating powers of the two-dimensional scalar field theory propagator over the toroidal world-sheet as well as the moduli of the torus. The values of these coefficients match expectations based on duality relations between string theory and eleven-dimensional supergravity.

  2. Localness of energy cascade in hydrodynamic turbulence, II. Sharp spectral filter

    Aluie, Hussein [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eyink, Gregory L [JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the scale-locality of subgrid-scale (SGS) energy flux and interband energy transfers defined by the sharp spectral filter. We show by rigorous bounds, physical arguments, and numerical simulations that the spectral SGS flux is dominated by local triadic interactions in an extended turbulent inertial range. Interband energy transfers are also shown to be dominated by local triads if the spectral bands have constant width on a logarithmic scale. We disprove in particular an alternative picture of 'local transfer by nonlocal triads,' with the advecting wavenumber mode at the energy peak. Although such triads have the largest transfer rates of all individual wavenumber triads, we show rigorously that, due to their restricted number, they make an asymptotically negligible contribution to energy flux and log-banded energy transfers at high wavenumbers in the inertial range. We show that it is only the aggregate effect of a geometrically increasing number of local wavenumber triads which can sustain an energy cascade to small scales. Furthermore, nonlocal triads are argued to contribute even less to the space-average energy flux than is implied by our rigorous bounds, because of additional cancellations from scale-decorrelation effects. We can thus recover the -4/3 scaling of nonlocal contributions to spectral energy flux predicted by Kraichnan's abridged Lagrangian-history direct-interaction approximation and test-field model closures. We support our results with numerical data from a 512{sup 3} pseudospectral simulation of isotropic turbulence with phase-shift dealiasing. We also discuss a rigorous counterexample of Eyink [Physica D 78, 222 (1994)], which showed that nonlocal wavenumber triads may dominate in the sharp spectral flux (but not in the SGS energy flux for graded filters). We show that this mathematical counter example fails to satisfy reasonable physical requirements for a turbulent velocity field, which are employed in our

  3. Performance Evaluation of Radiator and Radiant Floor Heating Systems for an Office Room Connected to a Ground-Coupled Heat Pump

    Ioan Sarbu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A ground-coupled heat pump (GCHP system used to provide the space heating for an office room is a renewable, high performance technology. This paper discusses vapour compression-based HP systems, briefly describing the thermodynamic cycle calculations, as well as the coefficient of performance (COP and CO2 emissions of a HP with an electro-compressor and compares different heating systems in terms of energy consumption, thermal comfort and environmental impact. It is focused on an experimental study performed to test the energy efficiency of the radiator or radiant floor heating system for an office room connected to a GCHP. The main performance parameters (COP and CO2 emissions are obtained for one month of operation of the GCHP system, and a comparative analysis of these parameters is presented. Additionally, two numerical simulation models of useful thermal energy and the system COP in heating mode are developed using the Transient Systems Simulation (TRNSYS software. Finally, the simulations obtained from TRNSYS software are analysed and compared to the experimental data, showing good agreement and thus validating the simulation models.

  4. Workshop on energy data of developing countries. Volume II. Basic energy statistics and energy balances of developing countries, 1967 to 1977

    1979-01-01

    Extensive data on energy sources and balances are presented for Algeria, Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, Kenya, Republic of Korea, Mexico, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia, Thailand, and Venezuela. Domestic consumption, final consumption, and energy end uses by the various sectors of consumer transactions are indicated. Data are compiled on imports and exports, production, and flows of fuels (processes to provide another energy commodity).

  5. The Integration of Renewable Energy Sources into Electric Power Distribution Systems, Vol. II Utility Case Assessments

    Zaininger, H.W.

    1994-01-01

    Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: the local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics, renewable energy source penetration level, whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied, and local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kW-scale applications may be connected to three+phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and y-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms, or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. In any case, the installation of small, distributed renewable energy sources is expected to have a significant impact on local utility distribution primary and secondary system economics. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications. The

  6. Neutron stars as X-ray burst sources. II. Burst energy histograms and why they burst

    Baan, W.A.

    1979-01-01

    In this work we explore some of the implications of a model for X-ray burst sources where bursts are caused by Kruskal-Schwarzschild instabilities at the magnetopause of an accreting and rotating neutron star. A number of simplifying assumptions are made in order to test the model using observed burst-energy histograms for the rapid burster MXB 1730--335. The predicted histograms have a correct general shape, but it appears that other effects are important as well, and that mode competition, for instance, may suppress the histograms at high burst energies. An explanation is ventured for the enhancement in the histogram at the highest burst energies, which produces the bimodal shape in high accretion rate histograms. Quantitative criteria are given for deciding when accreting neutron stars are steady sources or burst sources, and these criteria are tested using the X-ray pulsars

  7. Induction of Efficient Energy Dissipation in the Isolated Light-harvesting Complex of Photosystem II in the Absence of Protein Aggregation

    Ilioaia, C.; Johnson, M.P.; Horton, P.; Ruban, A.V.

    2008-01-01

    Under excess illumination, the Photosystem II light-harvesting antenna of higher plants has the ability to switch into an efficient photoprotective mode, allowing safe dissipation of excitation energy into heat. In this study, we show induction of the energy dissipation state, monitored by

  8. Spinal Muscular Atrophy, types I and II: What are the differences in body composition and resting energy expenditure?

    Bertoli, Simona; De Amicis, Ramona; Mastella, Chiara; Pieri, Giulia; Giaquinto, Ester; Battezzati, Alberto; Leone, Alessandro; Baranello, Giovanni

    2017-12-01

    Different neuromuscular functional domains in types I and II Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMAI and SMAII) could lead to differences in body composition (BC) and resting energy expenditure (REE). Their identification could provide the key to defining appropriate strategies in clinical dietary management, but data comparing SMAI and SMAII in terms of BC and REE are not yet available. We measured total and regional fat (FM), lean (LBM), mineral (BMC) masses, body water (total, intra- and extra-cellular, TBW, ICW, ECW) and REE in a sample of SMAI and II children, matched for age and sex, and also adjusting for body size to compare these features of the two SMA phenotypes. 15 SMAI and 15 SMAII children, (M/F = 9/6 vs 9/6, age 3.6 ± 1.9 vs 3.5 ± 1.8 years, p = 0.99), confirmed genetically, were measured as follows: Anthropometric measurements [Body Weight (BW), Supine Length (SL), Arm Length (AL), Femur Length (FL), Tibia Length (TL)], Dual x-ray Energy Absorptiometry (DEXA) [total and segmental FM, LBM, FFM, and BMC], Bioelectrical impedance (BIA) [TBW, ICW, ECW] and Indirect Calorimetry (REE, respiratory quotients) were collected by the same trained dietician. BW, SL and Body Mass Index (BMI) Z-scores were calculated according to CDC Growth Charts (2000). SMA children had high percentages of FM and a lower percentage of TBW and ECW compared to the respective reference values for sex and age, whereas the BMC percentages did not differ, even splitting the two phenotypes. SMA I children had a lower BW and BMI-Z score compared to children with SMA II, but similar total and segmental FM. On the contrary, total FFM and LBM were significantly lower in SMAI (7290.0 ± 1729.1 g vs 8410.1 ± 1508.4 g; 6971.8 ± 1637.1 g vs 8041.7 ± 1427.7 g, p = 0.039, p = 0.037, respectively), particularly at the trunk level. Arm BMC also resulted significantly lower in SMAI. The measured REE values were similar (684 ± 143 kcal/day vs 703 ± 122 Kcal/day p = 0

  9. Optimisation of energy absorbing liner for equestrian helmets. Part II: Functionally graded foam liner

    Cui, L.; Forero Rueda, M.A.; Gilchrist, M.D.

    2009-01-01

    The energy absorbing liner of safety helmets was optimised using finite element modelling. In this present paper, a functionally graded foam (FGF) liner was modelled, while keeping the average liner density the same as in a corresponding reference single uniform density liner model. Use of a functionally graded foam liner would eliminate issues regarding delamination and crack propagation between interfaces of different density layers which could arise in liners with discrete density variations. As in our companion Part I paper [Forero Rueda MA, Cui L, Gilchrist MD. Optimisation of energy absorbing liner for equestrian helmets. Part I: Layered foam liner. Mater Des [submitted for publication

  10. Zero-point energies in the two-center shell model. II

    Reinhard, P.-G.

    1978-01-01

    The zero-point energy (ZPE) contained in the potential-energy surface of a two-center shell model (TCSM) is evaluated. In extension of previous work, the author uses here the full TCSM with l.s force, smoothing and asymmetry. The results show a critical dependence on the height of the potential barrier between the centers. The ZPE turns out to be non-negligible along the fission path for 236 U, and even more so for lighter systems. It is negligible for surface quadrupole motion and it is just on the fringe of being negligible for motion along the asymmetry coordinate. (Auth.)

  11. Nuclear Energy Center study. Phase II. Site suitability analysis. Final report

    Fellows, W.S.; Sharp, J.M.; Benator, B.I.

    1978-06-01

    A site screening study was conducted to identify a site or sites for detailed, site-specific study as a nuclear energy center. Using technical criteria of water requirements, geotechnical constraints, and projected load center and transmission considerations as well as environmental and institutional considerations, five potential study sites in the State of South Carolina were identified, evaluated against established criteria, and ranked according to their acceptability as potential nuclear energy center study sites. Consideration of what is ''representative'' of a site as well as the ranking score was factored into site recommendations, since the site deemed easiest to license and permit may not be the most desirable site for future study of the technical and institutional feasibility and practicality of a specific site. The sites near Lake Hartwell and the Savannah River Plant (SRP) of the Department of Energy were selected as potential study sites after consideration of the above criteria. Because the Lake Hartwell site offers the opportunity to consider institutional issues which may be more representative of other possible NEC sites, it is recommended that the Lake Hartwell site be studied to establish the feasibility and practicality of the nuclear energy concept on a site-specific basis.

  12. Experimental Determination of Third Derivative of the Gibbs Free Energy, G II

    Koga, Yoshikata; Westh, Peter; Inaba, Akira

    2010-01-01

    We have been evaluating third derivative quantities of the Gibbs free energy, G, by graphically differentiating the second derivatives that are accessible experimentally, and demonstrated their power in elucidating the mixing schemes in aqueous solutions. Here we determine directly one of the third...

  13. PIP-II Injector Test’s Low Energy Beam Transport: Commissioning and Selected Measurements

    Shemyakin, A. [Fermilab; Alvarez, M. [Fermilab; Andrews, R. [Fermilab; Carneiro, J.-P. [Fermilab; Chen, A. [Fermilab; Hanna, B. [Fermilab; Prost, L. [Fermilab; Scarpine, V. [Fermilab; D' Arcy, R. [University Coll. London; Wiesner, C. [Goethe U., Frankfurt (main)

    2016-09-16

    The PIP2IT test accelerator is under construction at Fermilab. Its ion source and Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) in its initial (straight) configuration have been commissioned to full specification parameters. This paper introduces the LEBT design and summarizes the outcome of the commissioning activities.

  14. Nuclear Energy Center study. Phase II. Site suitability analysis. Final report

    Fellows, W.S.; Sharp, J.M.; Benator, B.I.

    1978-06-01

    A site screening study was conducted to identify a site or sites for detailed, site-specific study as a nuclear energy center. Using technical criteria of water requirements, geotechnical constraints, and projected load center and transmission considerations as well as environmental and institutional considerations, five potential study sites in the State of South Carolina were identified, evaluated against established criteria, and ranked according to their acceptability as potential nuclear energy center study sites. Consideration of what is ''representative'' of a site as well as the ranking score was factored into site recommendations, since the site deemed easiest to license and permit may not be the most desirable site for future study of the technical and institutional feasibility and practicality of a specific site. The sites near Lake Hartwell and the Savannah River Plant (SRP) of the Department of Energy were selected as potential study sites after consideration of the above criteria. Because the Lake Hartwell site offers the opportunity to consider institutional issues which may be more representative of other possible NEC sites, it is recommended that the Lake Hartwell site be studied to establish the feasibility and practicality of the nuclear energy concept on a site-specific basis

  15. Lower extremity energy absorption and biomechanics during landing, part II: frontal-plane energy analyses and interplanar relationships.

    Norcross, Marc F; Lewek, Michael D; Padua, Darin A; Shultz, Sandra J; Weinhold, Paul S; Blackburn, J Troy

    2013-01-01

    Greater sagittal-plane energy absorption (EA) during the initial impact phase (INI) of landing is consistent with sagittal-plane biomechanics that likely increase anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) loading, but it does not appear to influence frontal-plane biomechanics. We do not know whether frontal-plane INI EA is related to high-risk frontal-plane biomechanics. To compare biomechanics among INI EA groups, determine if women are represented more in the high group, and evaluate interplanar INI EA relationships. Descriptive laboratory study. Research laboratory. Participants included 82 (41 men, 41 women; age = 21.0 ± 2.4 years, height = 1.74 ± 0.10 m, mass = 70.3 ± 16.1 kg) healthy, physically active volunteers. We assessed landing biomechanics with an electromagnetic motion-capture system and force plate. We calculated frontal- and sagittal-plane total, hip, knee, and ankle INI EA. Total frontal-plane INI EA was used to create high, moderate, and low tertiles. Frontal-plane knee and hip kinematics, peak vertical and posterior ground reaction forces, and peak internal knee-varus moment (pKVM) were identified and compared across groups using 1-way analyses of variance. We used a χ (2) analysis to evaluate male and female allocation to INI EA groups. We used simple, bivariate Pearson product moment correlations to assess interplanar INI EA relationships. The high-INI EA group exhibited greater knee valgus at ground contact, hip adduction at pKVM, and peak hip adduction than the low-INI EA group (P .05). Greater frontal-plane INI EA was associated with less favorable frontal-plane biomechanics that likely result in greater ACL loading. Women were more likely than men to use greater frontal-plane INI EA. The magnitudes of sagittal- and frontal-plane INI EA were largely independent.

  16. Renewable energy in pakistan: part-II mini/micro hydropower plants

    Maher, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    Part-1 of this series dealt with Wind-Energy Prospects in Pakistan. This second part gives a brief account Mini/Micro Hydro-Power Plants in Pakistan. Hydropower is well-known throughout the world and currently contributes 6-7% of total world energy-production and 20% of total world electricity generation. Most of the hydro-plants are usually designed for higher generation capacity than that which could be needed to utilize the average water-flows. Small hydro-plants are another potential source of energy among the non-conventional energy sources, which can reduce the load on conventional-energy production. Small hydropower technology is today a mature and proven technology. Civil works and installation of equipment involve simple process, which offer good opportunity to local people for employment and use locally available materials Nevertheless a small decentralized hydel plant, based on natural waterfalls is a very desirable option for geographically remote, but naturally suitable locations which are otherwise far from the national physical infrastructure. The development of Mini/Micro hydel stations in these areas, with isolated, thinly clustered, population, is a very appropriate solution to meet power-needs of such areas for lighting as well as cottage industry. The unique feature of these installations is the participation of local community to the optimum extent. The entire civil works, the intake system, power channel, forebay, penstock and power house building, as well as labour is provided by the inhabitants voluntarily. While maximum use is made of stone, with minimum use of cement, the generator, distribution wires, etc., need to be arranged from the market. The turbine is manufactured using indigenous materials. The installation-cost per KW is relatively low i.e. Rs. 25,000/- as compared to large-scale installations. There could of course be variations, in the installation-cost, depending on the market prices of the material. (author)

  17. Radiant Ceiling Panels Combined with Localized Methods for Improved Thermal Comfort of Both Patient and Medical Staff in Patient Room

    Mori, Sakura; Barova, Mariya; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov

    2012-01-01

    The objectives were to identify whether ceiling installed radiant heating panels can provide thermal comfort to the occupants in a patient room, and to determine a method for optimal thermal environment to both patient and medical staff simultaneously. The experiments were performed in a climate...... mattress were used to provide local heating for the patient. The effects of the methods were identified by comparing the manikin based equivalent temperatures. The optimal thermal comfort level for both patient and medical staff would obtained when two conventional cotton blankets were used with extra...... chamber resembling a single-bed patient room under convective air conditioning alone or combined with the ceiling installed radiant heating panels. Two thermal manikins simulated a patient lying in the bed and a doctor standing next to the patient. Conventional cotton blanket, electric blanket, electric...

  18. Effect of radiant heat at the birth site in farrowing crates on hypothermia and behaviour in neonatal piglets

    Andersen, Heidi Mai-Lis; Pedersen, Lene Juul

    2016-01-01

    It has been documented that floor heating of the farrowing area in loose housed sows improves survival of piglets significantly. However, today, the majority of farrowing pens are designed with crating of sows and slatted floor at the birth site. The aim of this study was to investigate whether...... providing radiant heat at the birth site to new-born piglets in pens with crated sows reduced hypothermia, time to first milk intake and growth of the piglets during the 1st week. Second parity Danish Landrace×Yorkshire sows (n=36) were randomly divided into two groups: Control (CG) and heat (HG......). In the area behind the sow (zone 1), two radiant heat panels were mounted above the slatted floor in the HG. The farrowings were attended, and the heaters were turned on at birth of first piglet and turned off 12 h after. Birth time, time to leave zone 1, time to first contact with udder and time to first...

  19. Experimental research on the indoor temperature and humidity fields in radiant ceiling air-conditioning system under natural ventilation

    Huang, Tao; Xiang, Yutong; Wang, Yonghong

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, the indoor temperature and humidity fields of the air in a metal ceiling radiant panel air conditioning system with fresh air under natural ventilation were researched. The temperature and humidity distributions at different height and different position were compared. Through the computation analysis of partial pressure of water vapor, the self-recovery characteristics of humidity after the natural ventilation was discussed.

  20. Solar radiation, phytoplankton pigments and the radiant heating of the equatorial Pacific warm pool

    Siegel, David A.; Ohlmann, J. Carter; Washburn, Libe; Bidigare, Robert R.; Nosse, Craig T.; Fields, Erik; Zhou, Yimei

    1995-01-01

    Recent optical, physical, and biological oceanographic observations are used to assess the magnitude and variability of the penetrating flux of solar radiation through the mixed layer of the warm water pool (WWP) of the western equatorial Pacific Ocean. Typical values for the penetrative solar flux at the climatological mean mixed layer depth for the WWP (30 m) are approx. 23 W/sq m and are a large fraction of the climatological mean net air-sea heat flux (approx. 40 W/sq m). The penetrating solar flux can vary significantly on synoptic timescales. Following a sustained westerly wind burst in situ solar fluxes were reduced in response to a near tripling of mixed layer phytoplankton pigment concentrations. This results in a reduction in the penetrative flux at depth (5.6 W/sq m at 30 m) and corresponds to a biogeochemically mediated increase in the mixed layer radiant heating rate of 0.13 C per month. These observations demonstrate a significant role of biogeochemical processes on WWP thermal climate. We speculate that this biogeochemically mediated feedback process may play an important role in enhancing the rate at which the WWP climate system returns to normal conditions following a westerly wind burst event.

  1. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF THE CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER IN A SPIRALLY COILED CORRUGATED TUBE WITH RADIANT HEATING

    Milan Đorđević

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Archimedean spiral coil made of a transversely corrugated tube was exposed to radiant heating in order to represent a heat absorber of the parabolic dish solar concentrator. The main advantage of the considered innovative design solution is a coupling effect of the two passive methods for heat transfer enhancement - coiling of the flow channel and changes in surface roughness. The curvature ratio of the spiral coil varies from 0.029 to 0.234, while water and a mixture of propylene glycol and water are used as heat transfer fluids. The unique focus of this study is on specific boundary conditions since the heat flux upon the tube external surfaces varies not only in the circumferential direction, but in the axial direction as well. Instrumentation of the laboratory model of the heat absorber mounted in the radiation field includes measurement of inlet fluid flow rate, pressure drop, inlet and outlet fluid temperature and 35 type K thermocouples welded to the coil surface. A thermal analysis of the experimentally obtained data implies taking into consideration the externally applied radiation field, convective and radiative heat losses, conduction through the tube wall and convection to the internal fluid. The experimental results have shown significant enhancement of the heat transfer rate compared to spirally coiled smooth tubes, up to 240% in the turbulent flow regime.

  2. Evolution of arbitrary moments of radiant intensity distribution for partially coherent general beams in atmospheric turbulence

    Dan, Youquan; Xu, Yonggen

    2018-04-01

    The evolution law of arbitrary order moments of the Wigner distribution function, which can be applied to the different spatial power spectra, is obtained for partially coherent general beams propagating in atmospheric turbulence using the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. A coupling coefficient of radiant intensity distribution (RID) in turbulence is introduced. Analytical expressions of the evolution of the first five-order moments, kurtosis parameter, coupling coefficient of RID for general beams in turbulence are derived, and the formulas are applied to Airy beams. Results show that there exist two types for general beams in turbulence. A larger value of kurtosis parameter for Airy beams also reveals that coupling effect due to turbulence is stronger. Both theoretical analysis and numerical results show that the maximum value of kurtosis parameter for an Airy beam in turbulence is independent of turbulence strength parameter and is only determined by inner scale of turbulence. Relative angular spread, kurtosis and coupling coefficient are less influenced by turbulence for Airy beams with a smaller decay factor and a smaller initial width of the first lobe.

  3. Mathematical Modeling of Radiant Heat Transfer in Mirror Systems Considering Deep Reflecting Surface Defects

    V. V. Leonov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When designing large-sized mirror concentrating systems (MCS for high-temperature solar power plants, one must have at disposal reasonably reliable and economical methods and tools, making it possible to analyze its characteristics, to predict them depending on the operation conditions and accordingly to choose the most suitable system for the solution of particular task.Experimental determination of MCS characteristics requires complicated and expensive experimentation, having significant limitations on interpretation of the results, as well as limitations imposed due to the size of the structure. Therefore it is of particular interest to develop a mathematical model capable of estimating power characteristics of MCS considering the influence of operating conditions, design features, roughness and other surface defects.For efficient solution of the tasks the model must ensure simulation of solar radiant flux as well as simulation of geometrical and optical characteristics of reflection surface and their interaction. In this connection a statistical mathematical model of radiation heat exchange based on use of Monte Carlo methods and Finite Element Method was developed and realized in the software complex, making it possible to determine main characteristics of the MCS.In this paper the main attention is given to definition of MCS radiation characteristics with account for deep reflecting surface defects (cavities, craters. Deep cavities are not typical for MCS, but their occurrence is possible during operation as a result of erosion or any physical damage. For example, for space technology it is primarily micrometeorite erosion.

  4. Numerical investigation on the convective heat transfer in a spiral coil with radiant heating

    Đorđević Milan Lj.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to numerically investigate the heat transfer in spiral coil tube in the laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow regimes. The Archimedean spiral coil was exposed to radiant heating and should represent heat absorber of parabolic dish solar concentrator. Specific boundary conditions represent the uniqueness of this study, since the heat flux upon the tube external surfaces varies not only in the circumferential direction, but also in the axial direction. The curvature ratio of spiral coil varies from 0.029 at the flow inlet to 0.234 at the flow outlet, while the heat transfer fluid is water. The 3-D steady-state transport equations were solved using the Reynolds stress turbulence model. Results showed that secondary flows strongly affect the flow and that the heat transfer is strongly asymmetric, with higher values near the outer wall of spiral. Although overall turbulence levels were lower than in a straight pipe, heat transfer rates were larger due to the curvature-induced modifications of the mean flow and temperature fields. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 42006

  5. Dependence of calculus retropulsion dynamics on fiber size and radiant exposure during Ho:YAG lithotripsy.

    Lee, Ho; Ryan, Robert T; Kim, Jeehyun; Choi, Bernard; Arakeri, Navanit V; Teichman, Joel M H; Welch, A J

    2004-08-01

    During pulsed laser lithotripsy, the calculus is subject to a strong recoil momentum which moves the calculus away from laser delivery and prolongs the operation. This study was designed to quantify the recoil momentum during Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy. The correlation among crater shape, debris trajectory, laser-induced bubble and recoil momentum was investigated. Calculus phantoms made from plaster of Paris were ablated with free running Ho:YAG lasers. The dynamics of recoil action of a calculus phantom was monitored by a high-speed video camera and the laser ablation craters were examined with Optical Coherent Tomography (OCT). Higher radiant exposure resulted in larger ablation volume (mass) which increased the recoil momentum. Smaller fibers produced narrow craters with a steep contoured geometry and decreased recoil momentum compared to larger fibers. In the presence of water, recoil motion of the phantom deviated from that of phantom in air. Under certain conditions, we observed the phantom rocking towards the fiber after the laser pulse. The shape of the crater is one of the major contributing factors to the diminished recoil momentum of smaller fibers. The re-entrance flow of water induced by the bubble collapse is considered to be the cause of the rocking of the phantom.

  6. Influence on living body by radiant rays produced in low power reactor

    Ogura, Isao; Nakamura, Katsuichi; Usuyama, Hideo; Usui, Akinori; Hosomi, Takashi; Yoshimura, Yoshinao; Nakai, Takahide; Egashira, Masamichi

    1984-01-01

    There is possibility of a risk that a living body is irradiated by those for slightly indifference to radiant rays, radiation source or devices of low level dose or dose rate. Accordingly, a low power reactor (UTR-KINKI) was utilized for a observation of influence by radiation of low level dose or dose rate, the rabbits were irradiated in it at output 1 w. The large influence was not expected for the low level dose rate of 1.313 Rad/hr even if they were irradiated for the several hours, but in a part of blood components a slight change was recognized. The change of M pattern in white blood corpuscle number was indicated likewise as irradiation of 500R X-ray, reported from Jacobson and others, by irradiation to about 13 Rads. In addition, lymphocyte number was increased considerably in an early stage. This fact will be useful for a recovery of an injury as mentioned by Lucky. The rabbits of alloxan diabetes mellitus and hepatitis were irradiated in the same way as above, but they scarcely showed the alterations. However, numerous rabbits can't be used in this experiment for the equipment and others. (author)

  7. A new integrating sphere design for spectral radiant flux determination of light-emitting diodes

    Hanselaer, P.; Keppens, A.; Forment, S.; Ryckaert, W. R.; Deconinck, G.

    2009-09-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED) technology is developing very quickly and may be considered an alternative for traditional light sources. However, at this moment, manufacturers and end users of LEDs are facing a rather basic but major problem. The lack of standardization regarding optical and electrical characterization of LEDs appears to compromise a successful implementation. In particular, numbers quoted for the luminous flux, and consequently for the efficacy of LEDs, are very sensitive data because they are used to impress and push the LED market. In this paper, the most was made of the typical hemispherical radiation of high-power LEDs to increase the accuracy of the flux determination using a custom-made integrating sphere. Recently developed measurement techniques such as the use of an external spectral irradiance standard and an optimized spectral irradiance detection head are combined with a very particular port geometry and a minimized baffle area. This results in a uniform spatial response distribution function (SRDF), which guarantees an accurate radiant and luminous flux determination, irrespective of the spatial intensity distribution of the LED package or luminaire. The effect of the directional response of the detector head on the SRDF has been explored. Measurements on LED devices with and without external optics are presented, illustrating the possibilities of the measurement setup.

  8. A new integrating sphere design for spectral radiant flux determination of light-emitting diodes

    Hanselaer, P; Keppens, A; Forment, S; Ryckaert, W R; Deconinck, G

    2009-01-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED) technology is developing very quickly and may be considered an alternative for traditional light sources. However, at this moment, manufacturers and end users of LEDs are facing a rather basic but major problem. The lack of standardization regarding optical and electrical characterization of LEDs appears to compromise a successful implementation. In particular, numbers quoted for the luminous flux, and consequently for the efficacy of LEDs, are very sensitive data because they are used to impress and push the LED market. In this paper, the most was made of the typical hemispherical radiation of high-power LEDs to increase the accuracy of the flux determination using a custom-made integrating sphere. Recently developed measurement techniques such as the use of an external spectral irradiance standard and an optimized spectral irradiance detection head are combined with a very particular port geometry and a minimized baffle area. This results in a uniform spatial response distribution function (SRDF), which guarantees an accurate radiant and luminous flux determination, irrespective of the spatial intensity distribution of the LED package or luminaire. The effect of the directional response of the detector head on the SRDF has been explored. Measurements on LED devices with and without external optics are presented, illustrating the possibilities of the measurement setup

  9. Generalized Lorenz models and their routes to chaos. II. Energy-conserving horizontal mode truncations

    Roy, D.; Musielak, Z.E.

    2007-01-01

    All attempts to generalize the three-dimensional Lorenz model by selecting higher-order Fourier modes can be divided into three categories, namely: vertical, horizontal and vertical-horizontal mode truncations. The previous study showed that the first method allowed only construction of a nine-dimensional system when the selected modes were energy-conserving. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that a five-dimensional model is the lowest-order generalized Lorenz model that can be constructed by the second method and that its route to chaos is the same as that observed in the original Lorenz model. It is shown that the onset of chaos in both systems is determined by a number of modes that describe the vertical temperature difference in a convection roll. In addition, a simple rule that allows selecting modes that conserve energy for each method is derived

  10. Air flow optimization for energy efficient blower of biosafety cabinet class II A2

    Ibrahim, M. D.; Mohtar, M. Z.; Alias, A. A.; Wong, L. K.; Yunos, Y. S.; Rahman, M. R. A.; Zulkharnain, A.; Tan, C. S.; Thayan, R.

    2017-04-01

    An energy efficient Biosafety Cabinet (BSC) has become a big challenge for manufacturers to develop BSC with the highest level of protection. The objective of research is to increase air flow velocity discharge from centrifugal blower. An aerodynamic duct shape inspired by the shape of Peregrine Falcon’s wing during diving flight is added to the end of the centrifugal blower. Investigation of air movement is determined by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The results showed that air velocity can be increased by double compared to typical manufactured BSC and no air recirculation. As conclusion, a novel design of aerodynamic duct shape successfully developed and proved that air velocity can be increase naturally with same impeller speed. It can contribute in increasing energy efficiency of the centrifugal blower. It is vital to BSC manufacturer and can be apply to Heating, Air Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) industries.

  11. Study to develop educational products about the fear of new energy technologies. Phase II

    DuPont, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Fear of nuclear power was found in the study sample to be widespread and far more intense than fear of any other energy source. Fears were greatest of waste disposal and accidents, with fear of what is not known being especially common. Many fears appeared to be based on lack of information. Both general and specific fears of nuclear power were significantly reduced by reading an educational booklet. After reading this booklet study subjects reported less extreme views of nuclear power, seeing it to be more similar to other energy sources. This decline in fear of nuclear power did not produce a proportionate increase in support for nuclear power as a source of electricity

  12. Extragalactic Ultra-High Energy Cosmic-Rays - Part One - Contribution from Hot Spots in Fr-II Radio Galaxies

    Rachen, J. P.; Biermann, P. L.

    1993-05-01

    The hot spots of Fanaroff-Riley class II radio galaxies, considered as working surfaces of highly collimated plasma jets, are proposed to be the dominant sources of the cosmic rays at energies above 1 EeV^a^. We apply the model of first order Fermi acceleration at strong, nonrelativistic shock waves to the hot spot region. The strength of the model has been demonstrated by Biermann & Strittmatter (1987) and by Meisenheimer et al. (1989), who explain their radio-to optical spectra and infer the physical conditions of the radiating plasma. Using synchrotron radiating electrons as a trace, we can calculate the spectrum and the maximum energy of protons accelerated under the same conditions. For simplicity, we disregard heavy nuclei, but their probable role is discussed. The normalization of proton flux injected in extragalactic space is performed by using estimates from Rawlings & Saunders (1991) for the total energy stored in relativistic particles inside the jets and radio galaxy evolution models given by Peacock (1985). We calculate the spectral modifications due to interactions of the protons with the microwave background photons in an evolving universe, following Berezinsky & Grigor'eva (1988). Constraints on the extragalactic magnetic field can be imposed, since it must permit an almost homogeneous filling of the universe with energetic protons. The observed ultra-high energy cosmic ray spectrum is reproduced in slope and flux, limited at high energies by the Greisen-cutoff at about 80 EeV. The requirements on the content of relativistic protons in jets and the constraints to the extragalactic magnetic field are consistent with common estimates. The data beyond the Greisen cutoff for protons may be explained by including heavy nuclei in our model, since they can propagate over cosmological distances up to more than 100 EeV.

  13. Imaging high energy photons with PILATUS II at the tagged photon beam at MAX-lab

    Lee, V. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia)], E-mail: leev@physics.unimelb.edu.au; Peake, D.J.; Sobott, B. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Schroeder, B. [MAX-lab, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Broennimann, Ch. [DECTRIS Ltd., Baden (Switzerland); Henrich, B. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Hansen, K. [MAX-lab, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); O' Keefe, G.J. [Centre for PET, Austin Hospital, Heidelberg, Victoria 3084 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Taylor, G.N. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Boland, M.J. [Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Thompson, M.N.; Rassool, R.P. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia)

    2009-05-21

    In photonuclear experiments precise location of the photon beam relative to the experimental sample is critical. Previously used techniques such as using photographic film to identify the position, intensity and centroid of the beam is time-consuming and a faster method is required. PILATUS is a single-photon-counting pixel detector developed at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland. It is a silicon-based, two-dimensional detector with a large dynamic range and zero readout noise. Designed as an X-ray detector, its optimal quantum efficiency is between 3 and 30 keV. This paper reports measurements carried out at the MAX-lab tagged photon facility in Lund, Sweden. The beam endpoint energy of approximately 200 MeV is far above the designed optimal energy detection range of PILATUS, and provides a critical test of the use of PILATUS under high energy conditions. The detector was placed in the photon beam and images were taken both downstream of other experiments, and in close range of a 19 mm collimator. The successful measurements demonstrate the versatility and robustness of the detector and provide an effective way of quickly and accurately monitoring beam position and profile in real time.

  14. Phase II Final Project Report SBIR Project: "A High Efficiency PV to Hydrogen Energy System"

    Slade, A; Turner, J; Stone, K; McConnell, R

    2008-09-02

    The innovative research conducted for this project contributed greatly to the understanding of generating low-cost hydrogen from solar energy. The project’s research identified two highly leveraging and complementary pathways. The first pathway is to dramatically increase the efficiency of converting sunlight into electricity. Improving solar electric conversion efficiency directly increases hydrogen production. This project produced a world record efficiency for silicon solar cells and contributed to another world record efficiency for a solar concentrator module using multijunction solar cells. The project’s literature review identified a second pathway in which wasted heat from the solar concentration process augments the electrolysis process generating hydrogen. One way to do this is to use a “heat mirror” that reflects the heat-producing infrared and transmits the visible spectrum to the solar cells; this also increases solar cell conversion efficiency. An economic analysis of this concept confirms that, if long-term concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) and solid-oxide electrolyzer cost goals can be achieved, hydrogen will be produced from solar energy cheaper than the cost of gasoline. The potential public benefits from this project are significant. The project has identified a potential energy source for the nation’s future electricity and transportation needs that is entirely “home grown” and carbon free. As CPV enter the nation’s utility markets, the opportunity for this approach to be successful is greatly increased. Amonix strongly recommends further exploration of this project’s findings.

  15. Assessing the accuracy of globe thermometer method in predicting outdoor mean radiant temperature under Malaysia tropical microclimate

    Khrit, N. G.; Alghoul, M. A.; Sopian, K.; Lahimer, A. A.; Elayeb, O. K.

    2017-11-01

    Assessing outdoor human thermal comfort and urban climate quality require experimental investigation of microclimatic conditions and their variations in open urban spaces. For this, it is essential to provide quantitative information on air temperature, humidity, wind velocity and mean radiant temperature. These parameters can be quantified directly except mean radiant temperature (Tmrt). The most accurate method to quantify Tmrt is integral radiation measurements (3-D shortwave and long-wave) which require using expensive radiometer instruments. To overcome this limitation the well-known globe thermometer method was suggested to calculate Tmrt. The aim of this study was to assess the possibility of using indoor globe thermometer method in predicting outdoor mean radiant temperature under Malaysia tropical microclimate. Globe thermometer method using small and large sizes of black-painted copper globes (50mm, 150mm) were used to estimate Tmrt and compare it with the reference Tmrt estimated by integral radiation method. The results revealed that the globe thermometer method considerably overestimated Tmrt during the middle of the day and slightly underestimated it in the morning and late evening. The difference between the two methods was obvious when the amount of incoming solar radiation was high. The results also showed that the effect of globe size on the estimated Tmrt is mostly small. Though, the estimated Tmrt by the small globe showed a relatively large amount of scattering caused by rapid changes in radiation and wind speed.

  16. PAIR INFLUENCE OF WIND SPEED AND MEAN RADIANT TEMPERATURE ON OUTDOOR THERMAL COMFORT OF HUMID TROPICAL ENVIRONMENT

    Sangkertadi Sangkertadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this article is to explore knowledge of outdoor thermal comfort in humid tropical environment for urban activities especially for people in walking activity, and those who stationary/seated with moderate action. It will be characterized the pair influence of wind speed and radiant temperature on the outdoor thermal comfort. Many of researchers stated that those two microclimate variables give significant role on outdoor thermal comfort in tropical humid area. Outdoor Tropical Comfort (OTC model was used for simulation in this study. The model output is comfort scale that refers on ASHRAE definition. The model consists of two regression equations with variables of air temperature, globe temperature, wind speed, humidity and body posture, for two types of activity: walking and seated. From the results it can be stated that there is significant role of wind speed to reduce mean radiant temperature and globe temperature, when the velocity is elevated from 0.5 m/s to 2 m/s. However, the wind has not play significant role when the speed is changed from 2 m/s to 3.5 m/s. The results of the study may inspire us to implement effectiveness of electrical-fan equipment for outdoor space in order to get optimum wind speed, coupled with optimum design of shading devices to minimize radiant temperature for thermal comfort.

  17. Effects of radiant exposure and wavelength spectrum of light-curing units on chemical and physical properties of resin cements

    Adriano Fonseca Lima

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives In this study, we evaluated the influence of different radiant exposures provided by single-peak and polywave light-curing units (LCUs on the degree of conversion (DC and the mechanical properties of resin cements. Materials and Methods Six experimental groups were established for each cement (RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE; LuxaCore Dual, Ivoclar Vivadent; Variolink, DMG, according to the different radiant exposures (5, 10, and 20 J/cm2 and two LCUs (single-peak and polywave. The specimens were made (7 mm in length × 2 mm in width × 1 mm in height using silicone molds. After 24 hours of preparation, DC measurement was performed using Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The same specimens were used for the evaluation of mechanical properties (flexural strength, FS; elastic modulus, E by a three-point bending test. Data were assessed for normality, after which two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's test were performed. Results No properties of the Variolink cement were influenced by any of the considered experimental conditions. In the case of the RelyX ARC cement, DC was higher when polywave LCU was used; FS and E were not influenced by the conditions evaluated. The LuxaCore cement showed greater sensitivity to the different protocols. Conclusions On the basis of these results, both the spectrum of light emitted and the radiant exposure used could affect the properties of resin cements. However, the influence was material-dependent.

  18. The efficacy of radiant heat controls on workers' heat stress around the blast furnace of a steel industry.

    Giahi, Omid; Darvishi, Ebrahim; Aliabadi, Mohsen; Khoubi, Jamshid

    2015-01-01

    Workers' exposure to excessive heat in molten industries is mainly due to radiant heat from hot sources. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of radiant heat controls on workers heat stress around a typical blast furnace. Two main interventions were applied for reducing radiant heat around the blast furnace of a steel industry located in western Iran. These included using a heat absorbing system in the furnace body and installing reflective aluminum barrier in the main workstation. Heat stress indexes were measured before and after each intervention using the digital WBGT-meter. The results showed MRT and WBGT indexes decreased by 20 °C and 3.9 °C, respectively after using heat absorbing system and also decreased by 18.6 °C and 2.5 °C, respectively after installing a reflective barrier. These indexes decrease by 26.5 °C and 5.2 °C, respectively due to the simultaneous application of the two interventions which were statistically significant (p steel industries.

  19. Applied research on energy storage and conversion for photovoltaic and wind energy systems. Volume II. Photovoltaic systems with energy storage. Final report

    1978-01-01

    This volume of the General Electric study was directed at an evaluation of those energy storage technologies deemed best suited for use in conjunction with a photovoltaic energy conversion system in utility, residential and intermediate applications. Break-even cost goals are developed for several storage technologies in each application. These break-even costs are then compared with cost projections presented in Volume I of this report to show technologies and time frames of potential economic viability. The form of the presentation allows the reader to use more accurate storage system cost data as they become available. The report summarizes the investigations performed and presents the results, conclusions and recommendations pertaining to use of energy storage with photovoltaic energy conversion systems. Candidate storage concepts studied include (1) above ground and underground pumped hydro, (2) underground compressed air, (3) electric batteries, (4) flywheels, and (5) hydrogen production and storage. (WHK)

  20. Designing future dark energy space missions. II. Photometric redshift of space weak lensing optimized surveys

    Jouvel, S.; Kneib, J.-P.; Bernstein, G.; Ilbert, O.; Jelinsky, P.; Milliard, B.; Ealet, A.; Schimd, C.; Dahlen, T.; Arnouts, S.

    2011-08-01

    Context. With the discovery of the accelerated expansion of the universe, different observational probes have been proposed to investigate the presence of dark energy, including possible modifications to the gravitation laws by accurately measuring the expansion of the Universe and the growth of structures. We need to optimize the return from future dark energy surveys to obtain the best results from these probes. Aims: A high precision weak-lensing analysis requires not an only accurate measurement of galaxy shapes but also a precise and unbiased measurement of galaxy redshifts. The survey strategy has to be defined following both the photometric redshift and shape measurement accuracy. Methods: We define the key properties of the weak-lensing instrument and compute the effective PSF and the overall throughput and sensitivities. We then investigate the impact of the pixel scale on the sampling of the effective PSF, and place upper limits on the pixel scale. We then define the survey strategy computing the survey area including in particular both the Galactic absorption and Zodiacal light variation accross the sky. Using the Le Phare photometric redshift code and realistic galaxy mock catalog, we investigate the properties of different filter-sets and the importance of the u-band photometry quality to optimize the photometric redshift and the dark energy figure of merit (FoM). Results: Using the predicted photometric redshift quality, simple shape measurement requirements, and a proper sky model, we explore what could be an optimal weak-lensing dark energy mission based on FoM calculation. We find that we can derive the most accurate the photometric redshifts for the bulk of the faint galaxy population when filters have a resolution ℛ ~ 3.2. We show that an optimal mission would survey the sky through eight filters using two cameras (visible and near infrared). Assuming a five-year mission duration, a mirror size of 1.5 m and a 0.5 deg2 FOV with a visible pixel

  1. The HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant concept and implications for IFE

    Moir, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    HYLIFE-II is based on nonflammable, renewable-liquid-wall fusion target chambers formed with Li 2 BeF 4 molten-salt jets, a heavy-ion driver, and single-sided illumination of indirect-drive targets. Building fusion chambers from existing materials with life-of-plant structural walls behind the liquid walls, while still meeting non-nuclear grade construction and low-level waste requirements, has profound implications for IFE development. Fluid-flow work and computational fluid dynamics predict chamber clearing adequate for 6-Hz pulse rates. Predicted electricity cost is reduced about 30% to 4.4 cents/kWh at 1 GWe. Development can be foreshortened and cost reduced by obviating expensive neutron sources to develop first-wall materials. The driver and chamber can be upgraded in stages, avoiding separate and sequential facilities. The most important features of a practical inertial fusion power plant are sufficient ignition and gain in targets; a low-cost, efficient, rep-ratable driver; and low-cost targets

  2. Energy Extension Service Pilot Program: evaluation report after two years. Volume II. State reports

    None

    1980-04-01

    This report, Vol. II, presents a discussion of the operations of the ten EES pilot state programs during the period from October 1, 1977 through September 30, 1979. Each of the ten pilot states - Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming - received a grant of approximately $1.1 million to develop and implement an 18-month program beginning on October 1, 1977. In September 1978, each State received an additional $370,000 for service-delivery programs for the extension of the pilot program, April 1979 through September 1979. A case-study description of the operations of the pilot program in each State is provided here, with special attention given to the two programs selected in each State for more-detailed study and survey research. Although the thrust of this volume is descriptive, some survey data and analyses are presented for the emphasis programs. Two telephone surveys of clients and a non-client sample were conducted, one at the end of the first year of the pilot program (October 1977 - September 1978) and one at the end of the second year (October 1978 - September 1979).

  3. Modular assembly of a photovoltaic solar energy receiver

    Graven, Robert M.; Gorski, Anthony J.; Schertz, William W.; Graae, Johan E. A.

    1978-01-01

    There is provided a modular assembly of a solar energy concentrator having a photovoltaic energy receiver with passive cooling. Solar cell means are fixedly coupled to a radiant energy concentrator. Tension means bias a large area heat sink against the cell thereby allowing the cell to expand or contract with respect to the heat sink due to differential heat expansion.

  4. The energy balance of the earth's surface : a practical approach

    Bruin, de H.A.R.

    1982-01-01

    This study is devoted to the energy balance of the earth's surface with a special emphasis on practical applications. A simple picture of the energy exchange processes that take place at the ground is the following. Per unit time and area an amount of radiant energy is supplied to the surface. This

  5. Search for supersymmetry with gauge-mediated breaking in diphoton events with missing transverse energy at CDF II.

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; di Giovanni, G P; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramanov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2010-01-08

    We present the results of a search for supersymmetry with gauge-mediated breaking and chi(1)(0) --> gammaG in the gammagamma + missing transverse energy final state. In 2.6+/-0.2 fb(-1) of pp collisions at square root(s) = 1.96 TeV recorded by the CDF II detector we observe no candidate events, consistent with a standard model background expectation of 1.4+/-0.4 events. We set limits on the cross section at the 95% C.L. and place the world's best limit of 149 GeV/c2 on the chi(1)(0) mass at tau(chi(1)(0)) < 1 ns. We also exclude regions in the chi(1)(0) mass-lifetime plane for tau(chi(1)(0)) approximately < 2 ns.

  6. Galileo-invariant theory of low energy pion-nucleus scattering. II

    Mach, R.

    1983-01-01

    Two classes of Galileo-invariant optical models are constructed for pion elastic scattering by nuclei. The former, the two-body model, was obtained assuming that the pion-bound nucleon dynamics is determined by the pion-nucleon kinetic energy. In deriving the latter model, the (A+1)-body dynamics was taken into account. The technique of effective nucleon momenta maintains the nonlocal propagation of the pion-target nucleon subsystem through the nucleus in contrast with the standard static approximation. (author)

  7. Proceedings of the tenth Symposium of Atomic Energy Research. V. II

    Vidovszky, I [ed.

    2000-10-01

    The present volume contains 80 papers, presented on the tenth Symposium of Atomic Energy Research, held in Moscow, Russia, 18-22 September 2000. The papers are presented in their original form, i. e. no corrections or modifications were carried out. The content of this volume is divided into thematic groups: Core Operation, Fuel Management and Design, Spectral and Core Calculation Methods, Spent Fuel, Transmutations, Core Monitoring, Surveillance and Testing, Neutron Kinetics and reactor Dynamics Methods, Safety Issues and Analysis, Rod Drop Reactivity Measurements, according to the presentation sequence on the Symposium.

  8. Proceedings of the tenth Symposium of Atomic Energy Research. V. II

    Vidovszky, I.

    2000-10-01

    The present volume contains 80 papers, presented on the tenth Symposium of Atomic Energy Research, held in Moscow, Russia, 18-22 September 2000. The papers are presented in their original form, i. e. no corrections or modifications were carried out. The content of this volume is divided into thematic groups: Core Operation, Fuel Management and Design, Spectral and Core Calculation Methods, Spent Fuel, Transmutations, Core Monitoring, Surveillance and Testing, Neutron Kinetics and reactor Dynamics Methods, Safety Issues and Analysis, Rod Drop Reactivity Measurements, according to the presentation sequence on the Symposium

  9. Analytic model for ultrasound energy receivers and their optimal electric loads II: Experimental validation

    Gorostiaga, M.; Wapler, M. C.; Wallrabe, U.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we verify the two optimal electric load concepts based on the zero reflection condition and on the power maximization approach for ultrasound energy receivers. We test a high loss 1-3 composite transducer, and find that the measurements agree very well with the predictions of the analytic model for plate transducers that we have developed previously. Additionally, we also confirm that the power maximization and zero reflection loads are very different when the losses in the receiver are high. Finally, we compare the optimal load predictions by the KLM and the analytic models with frequency dependent attenuation to evaluate the influence of the viscosity.

  10. Proceedings of the seventeenth Symposium of Atomic Energy Research, Vol. II

    Vidovszky, Istvan

    2007-11-01

    The present volume contains 83 papers, presented on the eleventh Symposium of Atomic Energy Research, held in Yalta, Ukraine, 23-29 September 2007. The papers are presented in their original form, i. e. no corrections or modifications were carried out. The content of this volume is divided into thematic groups: Fuel Management, Spectral and Core Calculations, Core Surveillance and Monitoring, CFD Analysis, Reactor Dynamics Thermal Hydraulics and Safety Analysis, Physical Problems of Spent Fuel Decommissioning and Radwaste, Actinide Transmutation and Spent Fuel Disposal, Core Operation, Experiments and Code Validation, History of TIC/AER - according to the presentation sequence on the Symposium (Author)

  11. ENERGY SUPPLY OF COMMERTIAL GREENHOUSE WITH THE GAS DRIVEN HEAT PUMP part II

    Sit M.L.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article a scheme of connection of heat exchanger for utilization of heat of flue gases to evaporator is proposed. In proposed scheme is ensured the minimum power of ventilator for air’s feeding to the evaporator of heat pump and compensation of pulsations of temperature of flue gases and pressure of ventilator. It is shown how to optimize parameters of heat exchanger in conditions of minimum of dissipation of energy with utilization of value of entransy. It is elaborated a scheme of coordinated control system of hydraulic transmissions, that transfers power on compressor of heat pump and electrical generator.

  12. dena grid study II. Integration of renewable energy sources into the German power supply system until 2020; dena - Netzstudie II. Integration erneuerbarer Energien in die deutsche Stromversorgung bis 2020

    Agricola, Annegret C.; Seidl, Hannes; Zoch, Immo (comps.)

    2010-12-15

    With its broad system approach, dena Grid Study II describes new ways of developing Germany's integrated grid with regard to the expansion of renewable energy sources and taking not only an economically optimised conventional power generation system but also European power trading into account. Basis for detailed grid planning. Having investigated many different transmission technologies, grid management measures and options for increasing flexibility on both the supply and demand side, the study does much more than simply identify grid expansion requirements, it shows the path towards overall optimisation of the energy supply system. In addition to robustly identifying grid expansion requirements, dena Grid Study II provides a very sound basis for further detailed grid planning and the identification of specific power routes in the German power transmission grid. Increasing grid expansion requirements. dena Grid Study II investigates the expansion of electricity generation from renewable energy sources to 39 percent by 2020. However, this is just an interim goal. By as soon as 2030, the German Federal Government is planning to raise the proportion of renewable electricity generation to 50 percent. This shows that even after 2020, further adaptation of grid infrastructure will still be necessary. Practical action required. If the grid expansion required to integrate renewable energy sources is to be achieved rapidly, there is an urgent need to back up the grid expansion scenarios presented in dena Grid Study II with practical action. (orig.)

  13. Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume II. Middle United States: TRY data

    Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

    1984-08-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 22 cities in the continental United States using Test Reference Year (TRY) source weather data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

  14. Role of codeposited impurities during growth. II. Dependence of morphology on binding and barrier energies

    Sathiyanarayanan, Rajesh; Hamouda, Ajmi Bh.; Pimpinelli, A.; Einstein, T. L.

    2011-01-01

    In an accompanying article we showed that surface morphologies obtained through codeposition of a small quantity (2%) of impurities with Cu during growth (step-flow mode, θ = 40 ML) significantly depends on the lateral nearest-neighbor binding energy (ENN) to Cu adatom and the diffusion barrier (Ed) of the impurity atom on Cu(0 0 1). Based on these two energy parameters, ENN and Ed, we classify impurity atoms into four sets. We study island nucleation and growth in the presence of codeposited impurities from different sets in the submonolayer (θ⩽ 0.7 ML) regime. Similar to growth in the step-flow mode, we find different nucleation and growth behavior for impurities from different sets. We characterize these differences through variations of the number of islands (Ni) and the average island size with coverage (θ). Further, we compute the critical nucleus size (i) for all of these cases from the distribution of capture-zone areas using the generalized Wigner distribution.

  15. Proceedings of the seventeenth Symposium of Atomic Energy Research, Vol. II

    Vidovszky, Istvan [Kiadja az MTA KFKI Atomenergia Kutatointezet, H-1525 Budapest 114, P.O.Box 49 (Hungary)

    2007-11-15

    The present volume contains 83 papers, presented on the eleventh Symposium of Atomic Energy Research, held in Yalta, Ukraine, 23-29 September 2007. The papers are presented in their original form, i. e. no corrections or modifications were carried out. The content of this volume is divided into thematic groups: Fuel Management, Spectral and Core Calculations, Core Surveillance and Monitoring, CFD Analysis, Reactor Dynamics Thermal Hydraulics and Safety Analysis, Physical Problems of Spent Fuel Decommissioning and Radwaste, Actinide Transmutation and Spent Fuel Disposal, Core Operation, Experiments and Code Validation, History of TIC/AER - according to the presentation sequence on the Symposium (Author); Next corporations organizations: People's Deputy, Chairman of the Verkhovna Rada Subcommittee on Nuclear Policy and Nuclear Safety of Ukraine (Ukraine); Ministry for Fuel and Energy of Ukraine (Ukraine); Mintopenergo (Ukraine); Rosenergoatom (RU); Nuclear Safety Department of South-Ukraine NPP (Ukraine); State Nuclear Regulatory Committee of Ukraine (Ukraine); Energorisk, Ltd. (Ukraine); HmNPP (Ukraine); Khmelnitskaja NPP (Ukraine); Zaporizhzhya NPP, Energodar (Ukraine); Odessa National Polytechnic University, Odessa (Ukraine); NSC Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov (Ukraine); Subsidiary 'Analytical Research Bureau for Nuclear Safety' (Ukraine); National nuclear power generating company 'Energoatom', Detached subdivision, Chornobyl NPP (Ukraine); JSC 'SNIIP-SYSTEMATOM' (RU); Moscow State Power-Engineering Institute, State University, Moscow (RU); Innovative company SNIIP Atom, LTD (RU); Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest XI, Mueegyetem rkp. 9, 1111 (Hungary); Forschungszentrum Dresden- Rossendorf, Institute of Safety Research, P.O.B. 51 01 019, D-01314 Dresden (Germany)

  16. Excitation energy transfer in ruthenium (II)-porphyrin conjugates led to enhanced emission quantum yield and {sup 1}O{sub 2} generation

    Pan, Jie; Jiang, Lijun; Chan, Chi-Fai [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Tsoi, Tik-Hung [Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, Hung Hom, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Shiu, Kwok-Keung; Kwong, Daniel W.J. [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Wong, Wing-Tak [Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, Hung Hom, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Wong, Wai-Kwok, E-mail: wkwong@hkbu.edu.hk [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Wong, Ka-Leung, E-mail: klwong@hkbu.edu.hk [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong)

    2017-04-15

    Porphyrins are good photodynamic therapy (PDT) agents due to its flexibility for modifications to achieve tumor localization and photo-cytotoxicity against cancer. Yet they are not perfect. In a Ru(polypyridyl)-porphyrin system, the Ru(polypyridyl) moiety improves the water solubility and cell permeability. Consider the similar excited state energies between Ru(polypyridyl) and porphyrin moieties; a small perturbation (e.g. Zn(II) metalation) would lead to a marked change in the energy migration process. In this work, we have synthesized a series of porphyrins conjugated with Ru(polypyridyl) complexes using different linkers and investigated their photophysical properties, which included singlet oxygen quantum yield and their in vitro biological properties, resulting from linker variation and porphyrin modification by Zn(II) metalation. - Graphical abstract: Four amphiphilic ruthenium(II)-porphyrin complexes were prepared that display energy transfer conversion with zinc coordination, lysosome specific target, low dark toxicity and efficient photodynamic therapy.

  17. Localized multi-scale energy and vorticity analysis. II. Finite-amplitude instability theory and validation

    San Liang, X.; Robinson, Allan R.

    2007-12-01

    A novel localized finite-amplitude hydrodynamic stability analysis is established in a unified treatment for the study of real oceanic and atmospheric processes, which are in general highly nonlinear, and intermittent in space and time. We first re-state the classical definition using the multi-scale energy and vorticity analysis (MS-EVA) developed in Liang and Robinson [Liang, X.S., Robinson, A.R., 2005. Localized multiscale energy and vorticity analysis. I. Fundamentals. Dyn. Atmos. Oceans 38, 195-230], and then manipulate certain global operators to achieve the temporal and spatial localization. The key of the spatial localization is transfer-transport separation, which is made precise with the concept of perfect transfer, while relaxation of marginalization leads to the localization of time. In doing so the information of transfer lost in the averages is retrieved and an easy-to-use instability metric is obtained. The resulting metric is field-like (Eulerian), conceptually generalizing the classical formalism, a bulk notion over the whole system. In this framework, an instability has a structure, which is of particular use for open flow processes. We check the structure of baroclinic instability with the benchmark Eady model solution, and the Iceland-Faeroe Frontal (IFF) intrusion, a highly localized and nonlinear process occurring frequently in the region between Iceland and Faeroe Islands. A clear isolated baroclinic instability is identified around the intrusion, which is further found to be characterized by the transition from a spatially growing mode to a temporally growing mode. We also check the consistency of the MS-EVA dynamics with the barotropic Kuo model. An observation is that a local perturbation burst does not necessarily imply an instability: the perturbation energy could be transported from other processes occurring elsewhere. We find that our analysis yields a Kuo theorem-consistent mean-eddy interaction, which is not seen in a conventional

  18. Study of a phase change energy storage using spherical capsules. Part II: Numerical modelling

    Bedecarrats, J.P.; Castaing-Lasvignottes, J.; Strub, F.; Dumas, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work is the numerical study of an industrial process of energy storage which consists in the use of a cylindrical tank filled with encapsulated phase change materials (PCM). A particularity is present in this kind of processes; it concerns the delay of the crystallization of the PCM, called supercooling phenomenon. The development of the model for cold storage with heat transfer fluid flowing enables a detailed analysis of this process. The effects of different parameters on the behaviour of the tank, such as the inlet temperature, the flow rate, are examined when the tank is in vertical position. There is substantial agreement between the prediction and the experimental values already presented in part I.

  19. Permutation invariant polynomial neural network approach to fitting potential energy surfaces. II. Four-atom systems

    Li, Jun; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2013-11-28

    A rigorous, general, and simple method to fit global and permutation invariant potential energy surfaces (PESs) using neural networks (NNs) is discussed. This so-called permutation invariant polynomial neural network (PIP-NN) method imposes permutation symmetry by using in its input a set of symmetry functions based on PIPs. For systems with more than three atoms, it is shown that the number of symmetry functions in the input vector needs to be larger than the number of internal coordinates in order to include both the primary and secondary invariant polynomials. This PIP-NN method is successfully demonstrated in three atom-triatomic reactive systems, resulting in full-dimensional global PESs with average errors on the order of meV. These PESs are used in full-dimensional quantum dynamical calculations.

  20. Self-energy operator for an electron in an external Coulomb potential. II

    Hostler, L.

    1988-01-01

    Relativistic Coulomb Sturmian matrix elements of the operator Oequivalentln(1-rho)/rho, rho = -[πx(1+iσ)xπ]/m 2 , in terms of which the self-energy operator for an electron in an external Coulomb potential has been expressed, are studied. The operator O is dealt with on a term by term basis in a Sturmian expansion. Each term of the Sturmian expansion is separated into a part whose matrix elements are analytic functions of Zα, plus a remainder evaluated in closed form by use of the Cauchy residue theorem. All ignorance about the matrix element of the general term in the Sturmian expansion of O is thereby placed entirely in the analytic part, for which an explicit integral representation is derived

  1. Scaling laws in high-energy inverse compton scattering. II. Effect of bulk motions

    Nozawa, Satoshi; Kohyama, Yasuharu; Itoh, Naoki

    2010-01-01

    We study the inverse Compton scattering of the CMB photons off high-energy nonthermal electrons. We extend the formalism obtained by the previous paper to the case where the electrons have nonzero bulk motions with respect to the CMB frame. Assuming the power-law electron distribution, we find the same scaling law for the probability distribution function P 1,K (s) as P 1 (s) which corresponds to the zero bulk motions, where the peak height and peak position depend only on the power-index parameter. We solved the rate equation analytically. It is found that the spectral intensity function also has the same scaling law. The effect of the bulk motions to the spectral intensity function is found to be small. The present study will be applicable to the analysis of the x-ray and gamma-ray emission models from various astrophysical objects with nonzero bulk motions such as radio galaxies and astrophysical jets.

  2. A finite-element visualization of quantum reactive scattering. II. Nonadiabaticity on coupled potential energy surfaces

    Warehime, Mick [Chemical Physics Program, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-2021 (United States); Kłos, Jacek; Alexander, Millard H., E-mail: mha@umd.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Institute of Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-2021 (United States)

    2015-01-21

    This is the second in a series of papers detailing a MATLAB based implementation of the finite element method applied to collinear triatomic reactions. Here, we extend our previous work to reactions on coupled potential energy surfaces. The divergence of the probability current density field associated with the two electronically adiabatic states allows us to visualize in a novel way where and how nonadiabaticity occurs. A two-dimensional investigation gives additional insight into nonadiabaticity beyond standard one-dimensional models. We study the F({sup 2}P) + HCl and F({sup 2}P) + H{sub 2} reactions as model applications. Our publicly available code (http://www2.chem.umd.edu/groups/alexander/FEM) is general and easy to use.

  3. DOE SBIR Phase II Final Technical Report - Assessing Climate Change Effects on Wind Energy

    Whiteman, Cameron [Vertum Partners LP, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Capps, Scott [Vertum Partners LP, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-11-05

    Specialized Vertum Partners software tools were prototyped, tested and commercialized to allow wind energy stakeholders to assess the uncertainties of climate change on wind power production and distribution. This project resulted in three commercially proven products and a marketing tool. The first was a Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) based resource evaluation system. The second was a web-based service providing global 10m wind data from multiple sources to wind industry subscription customers. The third product addressed the needs of our utility clients looking at climate change effects on electricity distribution. For this we collaborated on the Santa Ana Wildfire Threat Index (SAWTi), which was released publicly last quarter. Finally to promote these products and educate potential users we released “Gust or Bust”, a graphic-novel styled marketing publication.

  4. Site Energies of Active and Inactive Pheophytins in the Reaction Center of Photosystem II from Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    Acharya, K.; Neupane, B.; Zazubovich, V.; Sayre, R. T.; Picorel, R.; Seibert, M.; Jankowiak, R.

    2012-03-29

    It is widely accepted that the primary electron acceptor in various Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC) preparations is pheophytin {alpha} (Pheo {alpha}) within the D1 protein (Pheo{sub D1}), while Pheo{sub D2} (within the D2 protein) is photochemically inactive. The Pheo site energies, however, have remained elusive, due to inherent spectral congestion. While most researchers over the past two decades placed the Q{sub y}-states of Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} bands near 678-684 and 668-672 nm, respectively, recent modeling [Raszewski et al. Biophys. J. 2005, 88, 986-998; Cox et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 12364-12374] of the electronic structure of the PSII RC reversed the assignment of the active and inactive Pheos, suggesting that the mean site energy of Pheo{sub D1} is near 672 nm, whereas Pheo{sub D2} ({approx}677.5 nm) and Chl{sub D1} ({approx}680 nm) have the lowest energies (i.e., the Pheo{sub D2}-dominated exciton is the lowest excited state). In contrast, chemical pigment exchange experiments on isolated RCs suggested that both pheophytins have their Q{sub y} absorption maxima at 676-680 nm [Germano et al. Biochemistry 2001, 40, 11472-11482; Germano et al. Biophys. J. 2004, 86, 1664-1672]. To provide more insight into the site energies of both Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} (including the corresponding Q{sub x} transitions, which are often claimed to be degenerate at 543 nm) and to attest that the above two assignments are most likely incorrect, we studied a large number of isolated RC preparations from spinach and wild-type Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (at different levels of intactness) as well as the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant (D2-L209H), in which the active branch Pheo{sub D1} is genetically replaced with chlorophyll {alpha} (Chl {alpha}). We show that the Q{sub x}-/Q{sub y}-region site energies of Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} are {approx}545/680 nm and {approx}541.5/670 nm, respectively, in good agreement with our previous assignment

  5. An improved crude oil atmospheric distillation process for energy integration: Part II: New approach for energy saving by use of residual heat

    Benali, Tahar; Tondeur, Daniel; Jaubert, Jean Noël

    2012-01-01

    In Part I of this paper, it was shown on thermodynamic grounds that introducing a flash in the preheating train of an atmospheric oil distillation process, together with an appropriate introduction of the resulting vapour into the column, could potentially bring substantial energy savings, by reducing the duty of the preheating furnace, by doing some pre-fractionation and by reducing the column irreversibilities. Part II expands on this idea by showing how this can be done while keeping the throughput and the product characteristics unchanged. The outcome is that placing several flashes after the heat exchangers and feeding the corresponding vapour streams to the appropriate trays of the column reduces the pumparound flows and the heat brought to the preheating train. The resulting heat deficit may then be compensated in an additional heat exchanger by using low level heat recuperated from the products of the distillation and/or imported from other processes. The use of this residual heat reduces the furnace duty by approximately an equivalent amount. Thus high level energy (fuel-gas burnt in the furnace) is replaced by residual low level heat. The simulation with an example flowsheet shows that the savings on fuel could be as high as 21%. - Highlights: ► Flash installation in the preheating train of the crude oil distillation process. ► Pumparound streams and heat sent to the preheating train are reduced. ► A high level heat deficit is induced and replaced by low level heat. ► Considerable energy savings and greenhouse gas emissions are achieved.

  6. Sequential charged-particle and neutron activation of Flibe in the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    Latkowski, J.F.; Tobin, M.T.; Vujic, J.L.; Sanz, J.

    1996-01-01

    Most radionuclide generation/depletion codes consider only neutron reactions and assume that charged particles, which may be generated in these reactions, deposit their energy locally without undergoing further nuclear interactions. Neglect of sequential charged-particle (x,n) reactions can lead to large underestimation in the inventories of radionuclides. PCROSS code was adopted for use with the ACAB activation code to enable calculation of the effects of (x,n) reactions upon radionuclide inventories and inventory-related indices. Activation calculations were made for Flibe (2LiF + BeF 2 ) coolant in the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant design. For pure Flibe coolant, it was found that (x,n) reactions dominate the residual contact dose rate at times of interest for maintenance and decommissioning. For impure Flibe, however, radionuclides produced directly in neutron reaction dominate the contact dose rate and (x,n) reactions do not make a significant contribution. Results demonstrate potential importance of (x,n) reactions and that the relative importance of (x,n) reactions varies strongly with the composition of the material considered. Future activation calculations should consider (x,n) reactions until a method for pre-determining their importance is established

  7. Highly Controlled Synthesis and Super-Radiant Photoluminescence of Plasmonic Cube-in-Cube Nanoparticles.

    Park, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Sungi; Son, Jiwoong; Lee, Yeonhee; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2016-12-14

    The plasmonic properties of metal nanostructures have been heavily utilized for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF), but the direct photoluminescence (PL) from plasmonic metal nanostructures, especially with plasmonic coupling, has not been widely used as much as SERS and MEF due to the lack of understanding of the PL mechanism, relatively weak signals, and the poor availability of the synthetic methods for the nanostructures with strong PL signals. The direct PL from metal nanostructures is beneficial if these issues can be addressed because it does not exhibit photoblinking or photobleaching, does not require dye-labeling, and can be employed as a highly reliable optical signal that directly depends on nanostructure morphology. Herein, we designed and synthesized plasmonic cube-in-cube (CiC) nanoparticles (NPs) with a controllable interior nanogap in a high yield from Au nanocubes (AuNCs). In synthesizing the CiC NPs, we developed a galvanic void formation (GVF) process, composed of replacement/reduction and void formation steps. We unraveled the super-radiant character of the plasmonic coupling-induced plasmon mode which can result in highly enhanced PL intensity and long-lasting PL, and the PL mechanisms of these structures were analyzed and matched with the plasmon hybridization model. Importantly, the PL intensity and quantum yield (QY) of CiC NPs are 31 times and 16 times higher than those of AuNCs, respectively, which have shown the highest PL intensity and QY reported for metallic nanostructures. Finally, we confirmed the long-term photostability of the PL signal, and the signal remained stable for at least 1 h under continuous illumination.

  8. Pollutant emissions reduction and performance optimization of an industrial radiant tube burner

    Scribano, Gianfranco; Solero, Giulio; Coghe, Aldo [Dipartimento di Energetica, Politecnico di Milano, via La Masa, 34, 20156 Milano (Italy)

    2006-07-15

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation performed upon a single-ended self-recuperative radiant tube burner fuelled by natural gas in the non-premixed mode, which is used in the steel industry for surface treatment. The main goal of the research activity was a systematic investigation of the burner aimed to find the best operating conditions in terms of optimum equivalence ratio, thermal power and lower pollutant emissions. The analysis, which focused on the main parameters influencing the thermal efficiency and pollutant emissions at the exhaust (NO{sub x} and CO), has been carried out for different operating conditions of the burner: input thermal powers from 12.8 up to 18kW and equivalence ratio from 0.5 (very lean flame) to 0.95 (quasi-stoichiometric condition). To significantly reduce pollutant emissions ensuring at the same time the thermal requirements of the heating process, it has been developed a new burner configuration, in which a fraction of the exhaust gases recirculates in the main combustion region through a variable gap between the burner efflux and the inner flame tube. This internal recirculation mechanism (exhaust gases recirculation, EGR) has been favoured through the addition of a pre-combustion chamber terminated by a converging nozzle acting as a mixing/ejector to promote exhaust gas entrainment into the flame tube. The most important result of this solution was a decrease of NO{sub x} emissions at the exhaust of the order of 50% with respect to the original burner geometry, for a wide range of thermal power and equivalence ratio. (author)

  9. Self-similar cosmological solutions with dark energy. II. Black holes, naked singularities, and wormholes

    Maeda, Hideki; Harada, Tomohiro; Carr, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    We use a combination of numerical and analytical methods, exploiting the equations derived in a preceding paper, to classify all spherically symmetric self-similar solutions which are asymptotically Friedmann at large distances and contain a perfect fluid with equation of state p=(γ-1)μ with 0<γ<2/3. The expansion of the Friedmann universe is accelerated in this case. We find a one-parameter family of self-similar solutions representing a black hole embedded in a Friedmann background. This suggests that, in contrast to the positive pressure case, black holes in a universe with dark energy can grow as fast as the Hubble horizon if they are not too large. There are also self-similar solutions which contain a central naked singularity with negative mass and solutions which represent a Friedmann universe connected to either another Friedmann universe or some other cosmological model. The latter are interpreted as self-similar cosmological white hole or wormhole solutions. The throats of these wormholes are defined as two-dimensional spheres with minimal area on a spacelike hypersurface and they are all nontraversable because of the absence of a past null infinity

  10. Chemical effects of low-energy electron impact on hydrocarbons in the gas phase. II. Propene

    Derai, R.; Danon, J.

    1977-01-01

    The chemical effects of low-energy (3.5 to 15.0 eV) electron impact on propene were investigated. The setup used for the irradiations has previously been described. Appearance curves for stable products were determined, from which correlations between products and precursors were deduced. In the excitation range, the main precursors are the triplet state at 4.4 eV and various singlet states around 7.0 and 9.0 eV. Above the ionization potential, contribution from superexcited molecules and ions was noted. Superexcited molecules are formed with a much higher cross section than excited molecules. A reaction scheme was proposed to account for the chemical effects associated with excited states and the yields of excited molecules in dissociating states were derived from experimental data. Results concerning the fragmentation of propene excited in singlet states conform to photolysis data. The following new results were obtained: the decomposition of propene excited in the triplet state at 4.4 eV involves mainly C--C bond rupture; the decomposition processes of superexcited and excited molecules are similar. A higher degree of fragmentation is observed in the case of superexcited molecules

  11. Radiation vulcanization of natural rubber latex with low energy accelerator-II

    Haque, Md. Emdadul; Makuuchi, Keizo; Ikeda, Kenichi; Yoshii, Fumio; Kume, Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Mitomo, Hiroshi [Gunma Univ., Faculty of Engineering, Dept. of Biological and Chemical Engineering, Kiryu, Gunma (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    The natural rubber latex (NRL) was radiation vulcanized under a low energy electron accelerator. Accelerating voltage and maximum beam current of this accelerator are 250 kV and 10 mA respectively. Irradiation was carried out in a reaction vessel with constant stirring. The capacity of the vessel is 18 liters. Radiation vulcanization accelerators (RVA) were normal butyl acrylate (n-BA) and nonane-diol-diacrylate (NDDA). NDDA has no bad smell like that of n-BA. 20 minutes irradiation time is enough to vulcanize 14 liters of latex when 5 phr RVA (both types) are used. Maximum of {approx}30 MPa tensile strength was obtained with 5 phr NDD-A. However the remained NDDA is difficult to remove due to high molecular weight. Water-extractable proteins content was determined in dipped films for various leaching conditions without and with additive (polyvinyl alcohol, PVA). Water extractable proteins content is reduced to {<=} 41 by adding 5 phr PVA and leaching for 8 hours. The tackiness of the dipped films is reduced to 0.1 from 9 gf by mixing 6 phr PVA with the irradiated latex. Hand gloves (surgical and examination) were successfully produced from the irradiated latex. (author)

  12. Experimental and modelling analysis of an office building HVAC system based in a ground-coupled heat pump and radiant floor

    Villarino, José Ignacio; Villarino, Alberto; Fernández, Francisco Ángel

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A case study of a geothermal heat pump in an office building. • A numerical model in EnergyPlus is validated by experimental results. • An energy, economic and environmental analysis is presented. • A comparison with other technologies demonstrates the potential of the system. - Abstract: This paper shows the evaluation of the performance of a ground-coupled heat pump system monitored building providing heating, ventilating and air conditioning to an office building located in Madrid, in Spain. The system consists of one borehole exchanger, heat pump unit, radiant floor system, mechanical ventilation and data control system. A simulation model was performed with EnergyPlus software and validated. The analyzed period corresponds to the most unfavorable weather conditions in heating and cooling mode. The coefficient of performance obtained in heating and cooling mode was 3.86/5.29, considering all the energy consumption elements of the building and the thermal demand corresponding to an office operation. The CO_2 emissions obtained with a value of 34.68 kg corresponding to the period analyzed represents a low CO_2 emission system. The monitored temperatures reached set point values of 22 °C/25 °C, considered as acceptable comfort temperatures. The values obtained in the validated simulation model presented a deviation of 2% respected experimental results in heating and cooling mode. A comparative of COP_s_y_s and CO_2 emissions with other technologies is performed in order to analyze GCHP compared to other available technologies. The GCHP system is presented as a technology that can fully supply the HVAC conditions for a building and environmentally friendly.

  13. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 micrometer2 and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(-3) micrometer2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(-5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  14. Rail transportation by hydrogen vs. electrification - Case study for Ontario, Canada, II: Energy supply and distribution

    Marin, G.D.; Naterer, G.F.; Gabriel, K. [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Sciences, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-06-15

    Locomotives offer an efficient mode of transportation when compared to buses, personal vehicles or airplanes for mass transportation over frequent intercity distances. For example, a Bombardier Regina EMU train with 272 seats and a load factor of 53% will consume under 0.07 kWh/passenger-km, which is typically much lower than corresponding values for other transportation modes in similar circumstances. European countries have invested significantly over the years in train electrification. Environmentally friendly methods of transferring power to the wheels are direct electrification and hydrogen fuel cells. Various methods to produce hydrogen for utilization with fuel cell train operation are examined in this paper. This companion paper of a 2-paper set examines the overall impact of energy supply (hydrogen vs. electricity) and distribution on rail transportation, specifically in terms of costs and overall GHG emissions for a case study of GO transit along the Lakeshore corridor in Toronto. Although electrification of train services simplifies some aspects of the operation, when considered over the Lakeshore corridor alone, electrified trains lose their flexibility to serve cities outside the Lakeshore corridor. Hydrogen fuelled trains can provide a smoother transition and interoperability by operating the same routes and stations served by diesel trains today, without being limited to the Lakeshore corridor. This paper evaluates technological, operational and economic aspects of the electrification of the Lakeshore corridor, versus hydrogen train operation, including infrastructure requirements to provide service to a substantial ridership increase projected for the years 2015-2031. Various methods of hydrogen production and distribution are presented and analysed, in order to evaluate the overall life cycle of GHG emissions and costs for various train alternatives. (author)

  15. High energy physics studies. Progress report. Part I. Experimental program. Part II. Theoretical program

    Romanowski, T.A.; Tanaka, K.; Wada, W.W.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental Program: assembly of an experiment as Fermilab E-531 to measure decay lifetimes, with tagged emulsion of charmed particles produced by high energy neutrinos was finished, and data taking now is in progress. An experiment to measure prompt neutrino production at Fermilab, E-613, was approved and detailed design of it is continuing. Search for parity violation in scattering of polarized protons, an experiment E-446-ZGS at ANL, was performed with the sensitivity of 10 -6 for detection of that process and yielded null results. Another run with improved sensitivity of 10 -7 is in preparation. Data analysis of the neutrino experiment E-310 at Fermilab will continue. Trimuon events, a new discovery, were identified in those data. Analysis of data on meson production from experiments performed at the ZGS--ANL, E-397, E-420 and E-428, with charged and neutral spectrometer will continue. A new relatively broad resonance (T approx. 70 MeV) with quantum numbers IJ/sup P/ = 00 -1 was discovered in the data from E-397. Analysis of beta decay of polarized Σ - hyperons is in progress. Participation in the design of the experimental areas for the Isabelle colliding proton beam accelerator will continue. Theoretical Program: topics of current interest in particle theory which will be investigated in the coming year are: the instanton-anti-instanton QCD gauge fields, discrete symmetries which may determine quark masses in the SU(2) x U(1) model, calculation of charmed meson production in e + e - collisions and formation of gluon jets, Higgs boson production in pp collisions, calculation of Higgs boson mass in terms of vector boson mass, study of Lagrangians with gauge and Higgs scalar fields, investigation of Faddeev--Popov determinants as related to quantum chromodynamics, a study of quantum flavor dynamics and anomalies in the axial vector Ward identity and a study of super symmetry as a part of a realistic model of leptonic interactions

  16. Measuring Dark Energy Properties with Photometrically Classified Pan-STARRS Supernovae. II. Cosmological Parameters

    Jones, D. O.; Scolnic, D. M.; Riess, A. G.; Rest, A.; Kirshner, R. P.; Berger, E.; Kessler, R.; Pan, Y.-C.; Foley, R. J.; Chornock, R.; Ortega, C. A.; Challis, P. J.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Flewelling, H.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Metcalfe, N.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.; Gall, E. E. E.; Kotak, R.; McCrum, M.; Smartt, S. J.; Smith, K. W.

    2018-04-01

    We use 1169 Pan-STARRS supernovae (SNe) and 195 low-z (z used to infer unbiased cosmological parameters by using a Bayesian methodology that marginalizes over core-collapse (CC) SN contamination. Our sample contains nearly twice as many SNe as the largest previous SN Ia compilation. Combining SNe with cosmic microwave background (CMB) constraints from Planck, we measure the dark energy equation-of-state parameter w to be ‑0.989 ± 0.057 (stat+sys). If w evolves with redshift as w(a) = w 0 + w a (1 ‑ a), we find w 0 = ‑0.912 ± 0.149 and w a = ‑0.513 ± 0.826. These results are consistent with cosmological parameters from the Joint Light-curve Analysis and the Pantheon sample. We try four different photometric classification priors for Pan-STARRS SNe and two alternate ways of modeling CC SN contamination, finding that no variant gives a w differing by more than 2% from the baseline measurement. The systematic uncertainty on w due to marginalizing over CC SN contamination, {σ }wCC}=0.012, is the third-smallest source of systematic uncertainty in this work. We find limited (1.6σ) evidence for evolution of the SN color-luminosity relation with redshift, a possible systematic that could constitute a significant uncertainty in future high-z analyses. Our data provide one of the best current constraints on w, demonstrating that samples with ∼5% CC SN contamination can give competitive cosmological constraints when the contaminating distribution is marginalized over in a Bayesian framework.

  17. Potency of Solar Energy Applications in Indonesia

    Handayani, Noer Abyor; Ariyanti, Dessy

    2012-01-01

    Currently, 80% of conventional energy is used to fulfill general public's needs andindustries. The depletion of oil and gas reserves and rapid growth in conventional energyconsumption have continuously forced us to discover renewable energy sources, like solar, wind,biomass, and hydropower, to support economic development in the future. Solar energy travels at aspeed of 186,000 miles per second. Only a small part of the radiant energy that the sun emits intospace ever reaches the Earth, but t...

  18. The AquaDEB project: Physiological flexibility of aquatic animals analysed with a generic dynamic energy budget model (phase II)

    Alunno-Bruscia, Marianne; van der Veer, Henk W.; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A. L. M.

    2011-11-01

    This second special issue of the Journal of Sea Research on development and applications of Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory concludes the European Research Project AquaDEB (2007-2011). In this introductory paper we summarise the progress made during the running time of this 5 years' project, present context for the papers in this volume and discuss future directions. The main scientific objectives in AquaDEB were (i) to study and compare the sensitivity of aquatic species (mainly molluscs and fish) to environmental variability within the context of DEB theory for metabolic organisation, and (ii) to evaluate the inter-relationships between different biological levels (individual, population, ecosystem) and temporal scales (life cycle, population dynamics, evolution). AquaDEB phase I focussed on quantifying bio-energetic processes of various aquatic species ( e.g. molluscs, fish, crustaceans, algae) and phase II on: (i) comparing of energetic and physiological strategies among species through the DEB parameter values and identifying the factors responsible for any differences in bioenergetics and physiology; (ii) considering different scenarios of environmental disruption (excess of nutrients, diffuse or massive pollution, exploitation by man, climate change) to forecast effects on growth, reproduction and survival of key species; (iii) scaling up the models for a few species from the individual level up to the level of evolutionary processes. Apart from the three special issues in the Journal of Sea Research — including the DEBIB collaboration (see vol. 65 issue 2), a theme issue on DEB theory appeared in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B (vol 365, 2010); a large number of publications were produced; the third edition of the DEB book appeared (2010); open-source software was substantially expanded (over 1000 functions); a large open-source systematic collection of ecophysiological data and DEB parameters has been set up; and a series of DEB

  19. Radiant heat transfer during the natural evaporation from free surfaces exposed to solar radiation; Transferencia de calor radiante durante a evaporacao natural em superficies livres expostas a radiacao solar

    Teixeira, C O.M. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia; Hackenberg, C M [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica

    1985-12-31

    In this work a conductive-convective-radiant model which includes phase change behavior, is developed in order to determine the rate of evaporation from free surface exposed to solar radiation and consequently the most important parameters, and their effects, on the design of salt solutions concentrating natural evaporation reservoirs may be analysed. The numerical solutions of the resulting of system of equations are shown to represent very well the experimental results measured on evaporation chambers specially built for daily operations. The thermal effect of spectrally selective surfaces as coating agents for the reservoir is also analysed. (author). 11 refs., 8 figs

  20. Identification of 5g and 6g terms and revised ionization energies in the Yb II 4f14nl isoelectronic sequence

    Sugar, J.; Kaufman, V.

    1979-01-01

    The 5f-5g transitions in Lu III through Os VIII and the 5f-6g transitions in Hf IV through W VI were identified and used to redetermine the ionization energies of Yb II, Lu III, W VI, Re VII, and Os VIII. Complete line-lists and energy levels are given for the one-electron spectra Hf IV, W VI and Os VIII

  1. Identification of 5g and 6g terms and revised ionization energies in the Yb II 4f/sup 14/nl isoelectronic sequence

    Sugar, J.; Kaufman, V.

    1979-01-01

    The 5f-5g transitions in Lu III through Os VIII and the 5f-6g transitions in Hf IV through W VI were identified and used to redetermine the ionization energies of Yb II, Lu III, W VI, Re VII, and Os VIII. Complete line-lists and energy levels are given for the one-electron spectra Hf IV, W VI and Os VIII.

  2. Experimental investigation and feasibility analysis on a capillary radiant heating system based on solar and air source heat pump dual heat source

    Zhao, M.; Gu, Z.L.; Kang, W.B.; Liu, X.; Zhang, L.Y.; Jin, L.W.; Zhang, Q.L.

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: (a) Vertical temperature gradient in Case 3, (b) PMV and PPD of the test room in Case 3, (c) operating time of SPCTS and ASHP systems in Case 3 and (d) the proportion of SPCTS operating time. - Highlights: • A capillary heating system based on solar and air source heat pump was developed. • Influence of supply water temperature on solar energy saving rate was investigated. • Heating performance and thermal comfort of capillary heating system were analyzed. • Low temperature heating with capillary is suitable for solar heating system. - Abstract: Due to sustainable development, solar energy has drawn much attention and been widely applied in buildings. However, the application of solar energy is limited because of its instability, intermittency and low energy density in winter. In order to use low density and instable solar energy source for heating and improve the utilization efficiency of solar energy, a solar phase change thermal storage (SPCTS) heating system using a radiant-capillary-terminal (RCT) to effectively match the low temperature hot water, a phase change thermal storage (PCTS) to store and continuously utilize the solar energy, and an air source heat pump (ASHP) as an alternate energy, was proposed and set up in this research. Series of experiments were conducted to obtain the relation between the solar radiation utilization rate and the heating supply temperatures, and to evaluate the performance of the RCT module and the indoor thermal environment of the system for its practical application in a residential building in the north-western City of Xi’an, China. The results show that energy saving of the solar heating system can be significantly improved by reducing the supplied water temperature, and the supplied water temperature of the RCT would be no more than 35 °C. The capillary radiation heating can adopt a lower water temperature and create a good thermal comfort environment as well. These results may lead to the

  3. Comparative energies of Zn(II) cation localization as a function of the distance between two forming cation position aluminium ions in high-silica zeolites

    Kachurovskaya, N.A.; Zhidomirov, G.M.; van Santen, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    Periodical calcns. of Zn(II) metal cation stabilization in cationic positions with distantly placed aluminum ions has been performed for high-silica ferrierite. It was found that decrease of the stabilization energy at large distances between Al ions (more than 10 .ANG.) is about of 2 eV in

  4. Everolimus in advanced, progressive, well-differentiated, non-functional neuroendocrine tumors: RADIANT-4 lung subgroup analysis.

    Fazio, Nicola; Buzzoni, Roberto; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Tesselaar, Margot E; Wolin, Edward; Van Cutsem, Eric; Tomassetti, Paola; Strosberg, Jonathan; Voi, Maurizio; Bubuteishvili-Pacaud, Lida; Ridolfi, Antonia; Herbst, Fabian; Tomasek, Jiri; Singh, Simron; Pavel, Marianne; Kulke, Matthew H; Valle, Juan W; Yao, James C

    2018-01-01

    In the phase III RADIANT-4 study, everolimus improved median progression-free survival (PFS) by 7.1 months in patients with advanced, progressive, well-differentiated (grade 1 or grade 2), non-functional lung or gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) vs placebo (hazard ratio, 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.35-0.67; P < .00001). This exploratory analysis reports the outcomes of the subgroup of patients with lung NETs. In RADIANT-4, patients were randomized (2:1) to everolimus 10 mg/d or placebo, both with best supportive care. This is a post hoc analysis of the lung subgroup with PFS, by central radiology review, as the primary endpoint; secondary endpoints included objective response rate and safety measures. Ninety of the 302 patients enrolled in the study had primary lung NET (everolimus, n = 63; placebo, n = 27). Median PFS (95% CI) by central review was 9.2 (6.8-10.9) months in the everolimus arm vs 3.6 (1.9-5.1) months in the placebo arm (hazard ratio, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.28-0.88). More patients who received everolimus (58%) experienced tumor shrinkage compared with placebo (13%). Most frequently reported (≥5% incidence) grade 3-4 drug-related adverse events (everolimus vs. placebo) included stomatitis (11% vs. 0%), hyperglycemia (10% vs. 0%), and any infections (8% vs. 0%). In patients with advanced, progressive, well-differentiated, non-functional lung NET, treatment with everolimus was associated with a median PFS improvement of 5.6 months, with a safety profile similar to that of the overall RADIANT-4 cohort. These results support the use of everolimus in patients with advanced, non-functional lung NET. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (no. NCT01524783). © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  5. Direct evaluation of reflector effects on radiant flux from InGaN-based light-emitting diodes

    Masui, Hisashi; Fellows, Natalie N.; Sato, Hitoshi; Asamizu, Hirokuni; Nakamura, Shuji; Denbaars, Steven P.

    2007-08-01

    A metal layer formed on the backside of InGaN/sapphire-based light-emitting diodes deteriorates the inherent optical power output. An experimental approach of a suspended die is employed to study the effects of such metal layers via a direct comparison in radiant flux from a discrete die with and without a reflector. A sphere package that employs no reflector is proposed and fabricated. Light extraction of the sphere design is discussed; a light source in the sphere package would not have to be either an ideal point or placed at the center of the sphere, due to a finite critical angle at the sphere/air interface.

  6. Integrated thermal infrared imaging and Structure-from-Motion photogrametry to map apparent temperature and radiant hydrothermal heat flux at Mammoth Mountain, CA USA

    Lewis, Aaron; George Hilley,; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a method to create high-resolution (cm-scale) orthorectified and georeferenced maps of apparent surface temperature and radiant hydrothermal heat flux and estimate the radiant hydrothermal heat emission rate from a study area. A ground-based thermal infrared (TIR) camera was used to collect (1) a set of overlapping and offset visible imagery around the study area during the daytime and (2) time series of co-located visible and TIR imagery at one or more sites within the study area from pre-dawn to daytime. Daytime visible imagery was processed using the Structure-from-Motion photogrammetric method to create a digital elevation model onto which pre-dawn TIR imagery was orthorectified and georeferenced. Three-dimensional maps of apparent surface temperature and radiant hydrothermal heat flux were then visualized and analyzed from various computer platforms (e.g., Google Earth, ArcGIS). We demonstrate this method at the Mammoth Mountain fumarole area on Mammoth Mountain, CA. Time-averaged apparent surface temperatures and radiant hydrothermal heat fluxes were observed up to 73.7 oC and 450 W m-2, respectively, while the estimated radiant hydrothermal heat emission rate from the area was 1.54 kW. Results should provide a basis for monitoring potential volcanic unrest and mitigating hydrothermal heat-related hazards on the volcano.

  7. Standard Terminology Relating to Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conversion

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This terminology pertains to photovoltaic (radiant-to-electrical energy conversion) device performance measurements and is not a comprehensive list of terminology for photovoltaics in general. 1.2 Additional terms used in this terminology and of interest to solar energy may be found in Terminology E 772.

  8. Impact of prior therapies on everolimus activity: an exploratory analysis of RADIANT-4.

    Buzzoni, Roberto; Carnaghi, Carlo; Strosberg, Jonathan; Fazio, Nicola; Singh, Simron; Herbst, Fabian; Ridolfi, Antonia; Pavel, Marianne E; Wolin, Edward M; Valle, Juan W; Oh, Do-Youn; Yao, James C; Pommier, Rodney

    2017-01-01

    Recently, everolimus was shown to improve median progression-free survival (PFS) by 7.1 months in patients with advanced, progressive, well-differentiated, nonfunctional neuroendocrine tumors (NET) of lung or gastrointestinal (GI) tract compared with placebo (HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.35-0.67; P <0.00001) in the Phase III, RADIANT-4 study. This post hoc analysis evaluates the impact of prior therapies (somatostatin analogs [SSA], chemotherapy, and radiotherapy) on everolimus activity. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01524783. Patients were randomized (2:1) to everolimus 10 mg/day or placebo, both with best supportive care. Subgroups of patients who received prior SSA, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy (including peptide receptor radionuclide therapy) were analyzed and reported. A total of 302 patients were enrolled, of whom, 163 (54%) had any prior SSA use (mostly for tumor control), 77 (25%) received chemotherapy, and 63 (21%) were previously exposed to radiotherapy. Patients who received everolimus had longer median PFS compared with placebo, regardless of previous SSA (with SSA: 11.1 vs 4.5 months [HR, 0.56 {95% CI, 0.37-0.85}]; without SSA: 9.5 vs 3.7 months [0.57 {0.36-0.89}]), chemotherapy (with chemotherapy: 9.2 vs 2.1 months [0.35 {0.19-0.64}]; without chemotherapy: 11.2 vs 5.4 months [0.60 {0.42-0.86}]), or radiotherapy (with radiotherapy: 9.2 vs 3.0 months [0.47 {0.24-0.94}]; without radiotherapy: 11 vs 5.1 months [0.59 {0.42-0.83}]) exposure. The most frequent drug-related adverse events included stomatitis (59%-65%), fatigue (27%-35%), and diarrhea (24%-34%) among the subgroups. These results suggest that everolimus improves PFS in patients with advanced, progressive lung or GI NET, regardless of prior therapies. Safety findings were consistent with the known safety profile of everolimus in NET.

  9. Investigate the ultrasound energy assisted adsorption mechanism of nickel(II) ions onto modified magnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles: Multivariate optimization.

    Mehrabi, Fatemeh; Alipanahpour Dil, Ebrahim

    2017-07-01

    In present study, magnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles modified with (E)-N-(2-nitrobenzylidene)-2-(2-(2-nitrophenyl)imidazolidine-1-yl) ethaneamine (CoFe 2 O 4 -NPs-NBNPIEA) was synthesized and applied as novel adsorbent for ultrasound energy assisted adsorption of nickel(II) ions (Ni 2+ ) from aqueous solution. The prepared adsorbent characterized by Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), transmission electron microscope (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The dependency of adsorption percentage to variables such as pH, initial Ni 2+ ions concentration, adsorbent mass and ultrasound time were studied with response surface methodology (RSM) by considering the desirable functions. The quadratic model between the dependent and independent variables was built. The proposed method showed good agreement between the experimental data and predictive value, and it has been successfully employed to adsorption of Ni 2+ ions from aqueous solution. Subsequently, the experimental equilibrium data at different concentration of Ni 2+ ions and 10mg amount of adsorbent mass was fitted to conventional isotherm models like Langmuir, Freundlich, Tempkin, Dubinin-Radushkevich and it was revealed that the Langmuir is best model for explanation of behavior of experimental data. In addition, conventional kinetic models such as pseudo-first and second-order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion were applied and it was seen that pseudo-second-order equation is suitable to fit the experimental data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis and Optimization of Building Energy Consumption

    Chuah, Jun Wei

    Energy is one of the most important resources required by modern human society. In 2010, energy expenditures represented 10% of global gross domestic product (GDP). By 2035, global energy consumption is expected to increase by more than 50% from current levels. The increased pace of global energy consumption leads to significant environmental and socioeconomic issues: (i) carbon emissions, from the burning of fossil fuels for energy, contribute to global warming, and (ii) increased energy expenditures lead to reduced standard of living. Efficient use of energy, through energy conservation measures, is an important step toward mitigating these effects. Residential and commercial buildings represent a prime target for energy conservation, comprising 21% of global energy consumption and 40% of the total energy consumption in the United States. This thesis describes techniques for the analysis and optimization of building energy consumption. The thesis focuses on building retrofits and building energy simulation as key areas in building energy optimization and analysis. The thesis first discusses and evaluates building-level renewable energy generation as a solution toward building energy optimization. The thesis next describes a novel heating system, called localized heating. Under localized heating, building occupants are heated individually by directed radiant heaters, resulting in a considerably reduced heated space and significant heating energy savings. To support localized heating, a minimally-intrusive indoor occupant positioning system is described. The thesis then discusses occupant-level sensing (OLS) as the next frontier in building energy optimization. OLS captures the exact environmental conditions faced by each building occupant, using sensors that are carried by all building occupants. The information provided by OLS enables fine-grained optimization for unprecedented levels of energy efficiency and occupant comfort. The thesis also describes a retrofit

  11. Low energy threshold analysis of the phase I and phase II data sets of the Sudbury neutrino observatory

    Seibert, S R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hime, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, S R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rielage, K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Results are reported from a joint analysis of Phase I and Phase II data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. The effective electron kinetic energy threshold used is T{sub eff} = 3.5 MeV, the lowest analysis threshold yet achieved with water Cherenkov detector data. In units of 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2} s{sup =1}, the total flux of active-flavor neutrinos from {sup 8}B decay in the Sun measured using the neutral current (NC) reaction of neutrinos on deuterons, with no constraint on the {sup 8}B neutrino energy spectrum, is found to be {Phi}{sub NC} = 5.140{sub -0.158}{sup +0.160}(stat){sub -0.117}{sup +0.132}(syst). These uncertainties are more than a factor of two smaller than previously published results. Also presented are the spectra of recoil electrons from the charged current reaction of neutrinos on deuterons and the elastic scattering of electrons. A fit to the SNO data in which the free parameters directly describe the total {sup 8}B neutrino flux and the energy-dependent Ve survival probability provides a measure of the total {sup 8}B neutrino flux {Phi}{sub 8{sub B}} = 5.046{sub -0.152}{sup +0.159}(stat){sub -0.123}{sup +0.107}(syst). Combining these new results with results of all other solar experiments and the KamLAND reactor experiment yields best-fit values of the mixing parameters of {theta}{sub 12} = 34.06{sub -0.84}{sup +1.16} degrees and {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} = 7.59{sub -0.21}{sup +0.20} x 10{sup -5} eV{sup 2}. The global value of {Phi}{sub 8{sub B}} is extracted to a precision of {sub -2.95}{sup +2.38}%. In a three-flavor analysis the best fit value of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub 13} is 2.00{sub -1.63}{sup +2.09} x 10{sup -2}. Interpreting this as a limit implies an upper bound of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub 13} < 0.057 (95% C. L.).

  12. Reducing heat loss from the energy absorber of a solar collector

    Chao, Bei Tse; Rabl, Ari

    1976-01-01

    A device is provided for reducing convective heat loss in a cylindrical radiant energy collector. It includes a curved reflective wall in the shape of the arc of a circle positioned on the opposite side of the exit aperture from the reflective side walls of the collector. Radiant energy exiting the exit aperture is directed by the curved wall onto an energy absorber such that the portion of the absorber upon which the energy is directed faces downward to reduce convective heat loss from the absorber.

  13. Changing the PEP-II Center-of-Mass Energy Down to 10 GeV and up to 11 GeV

    Sullivan, M.

    2009-01-01

    PEP-II, the SLAC, LBNL, LLNL B-Factory was designed and optimized to run at the Upsilon 4S resonance (10.580 GeV with an 8.973 GeV e- beam and a 3.119 GeV e+ beam). The interaction region (IR) used permanent magnet dipoles to bring the beams into a head-on collision. The first focusing element for both beams was also a permanent magnet. The IR geometry, masking, beam orbits and beam pipe apertures were designed for 4S running. Even though PEP-II was optimized for the 4S, we successfully changed the center-of-mass energy (E cm ) down to the Upsilon 2S resonance and completed an E cm scan from the 4S resonance up to 11.2 GeV. The luminosity throughout most of these changes remained near 1 x 10 34 cm -2 s -1 . The E cm was changed by moving the energy of the high-energy beam (HEB). The beam energy differed by more than 20% which produced significantly different running conditions for the RF system. The energy loss per turn changed 2.5 times over this range. We describe how the beam energy was changed and discuss some of the consequences for the beam orbit in the interaction region. We also describe some of the RF issues that arose and how we solved them as the high-current HEB energy changed

  14. Optimal design approach for heating irregular-shaped objects in three-dimensional radiant furnaces using a hybrid genetic algorithm-artificial neural network method

    Darvishvand, Leila; Kamkari, Babak; Kowsary, Farshad

    2018-03-01

    In this article, a new hybrid method based on the combination of the genetic algorithm (GA) and artificial neural network (ANN) is developed to optimize the design of three-dimensional (3-D) radiant furnaces. A 3-D irregular shape design body (DB) heated inside a 3-D radiant furnace is considered as a case study. The uniform thermal conditions on the DB surfaces are obtained by minimizing an objective function. An ANN is developed to predict the objective function value which is trained through the data produced by applying the Monte Carlo method. The trained ANN is used in conjunction with the GA to find the optimal design variables. The results show that the computational time using the GA-ANN approach is significantly less than that of the conventional method. It is concluded that the integration of the ANN with GA is an efficient technique for optimization of the radiant furnaces.

  15. The effects of radiant cooling versus convective cooling on human eye tear film stability and blinking rate

    Nygaard, Linette; Uth, Simon C.; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov

    2014-01-01

    The effect of indoor temperature, radiant and convective cooling on tear film stability and eye blink frequency was examined. 24 human subjects were exposed to the non-uniform environment generated by localised chilled beam and a chilled ceiling combined with overhead mixing ventilation. The subj......The effect of indoor temperature, radiant and convective cooling on tear film stability and eye blink frequency was examined. 24 human subjects were exposed to the non-uniform environment generated by localised chilled beam and a chilled ceiling combined with overhead mixing ventilation....... The subjects participated in four two-hour experiments. The room air temperature was kept at 26 °C or 28 °C. Tear film samples were collected after 30 min of acclimatisation and at the end of the exposures. Eye blinking frequency was analysed for the first and last 15 min of each exposure. The tear film...... stability decreased as the temperature increased. The highest number of subjects with unchanged or improved tear film quality was observed with the localised chilled beam at 26 °C. A trend was found between subjects who reported eye irritation and had a bad tear film quality....

  16. Comparison of indoor air distribution and thermal environment for different combinations of radiant heating systems with mechanical ventilation systems

    Wu, Xiaozhou; Fang, Lei; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2018-01-01

    A hybrid system with a radiant heating system and a mechanical ventilation system, which is regarded as an advanced heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system, has been applied in many modern buildings worldwide. To date, almost no studies focused on comparative analysis of the indoor...... air distribution and the thermal environment for all combinations of radiant heating systems with mechanical ventilation systems. Therefore, in this article, the indoor air distribution and the thermal environment were comparatively analyzed in a room with floor heating (FH) or ceiling heating (CH......) and mixing ventilation (MV) or displacement ventilation (DV) when the supply air temperature ranged from 15.0°C to 19.0°C. The results showed that the temperature effectiveness values were 1.05–1.16 and 0.95–1.02 for MV+ FH and MV+ CH, respectively, and they were 0.78–0.91 and 0.51–0.67 for DV + FH and DV...

  17. A search for space energy alternatives

    Gilbreath, W. P.; Billman, K. W.

    1978-01-01

    This paper takes a look at a number of schemes for converting radiant energy in space to useful energy for man. These schemes are possible alternatives to the currently most studied solar power satellite concept. Possible primary collection and conversion devices discussed include the space particle flux devices, solar windmills, photovoltaic devices, photochemical cells, photoemissive converters, heat engines, dielectric energy conversion, electrostatic generators, plasma solar collectors, and thermionic schemes. Transmission devices reviewed include lasers and masers.

  18. Impact of prior therapies on everolimus activity: an exploratory analysis of RADIANT-4

    Buzzoni R

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Buzzoni,1 Carlo Carnaghi,2 Jonathan Strosberg,3 Nicola Fazio,4 Simron Singh,5 Fabian Herbst,6 Antonia Ridolfi,7 Marianne E Pavel,8 Edward M Wolin,9 Juan W Valle,10 Do-Youn Oh,11 James C Yao,12 Rodney Pommier13 1IRCCS Foundation, National Institute of Tumors, Milan, Italy; 2Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Rozzano, Italy; 3Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA; 4European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy; 5Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada; 6Novartis AG, Basel, Switzerland; 7Novartis Pharma S.A.S., Rueil-Malmaison, France; 8Medizinische Klinik 1, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany; 9Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care, Bronx, NY, USA; 10Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Manchester, The Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK; 11Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 12University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 13Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA Background: Recently, everolimus was shown to improve median progression-free survival (PFS by 7.1 months in patients with advanced, progressive, well-differentiated, nonfunctional neuroendocrine tumors (NET of lung or gastrointestinal (GI tract compared with placebo (HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.35–0.67; P<0.00001 in the Phase III, RADIANT-4 study. This post hoc analysis evaluates the impact of prior therapies (somatostatin analogs [SSA], chemotherapy, and radiotherapy on everolimus activity. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01524783. Patients and methods: Patients were randomized (2:1 to everolimus 10 mg/day or placebo, both with best supportive care. Subgroups of patients who received prior SSA, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy (including peptide receptor radionuclide therapy were analyzed and reported. Results: A total of 302 patients were enrolled, of whom, 163 (54% had any prior SSA use (mostly for tumor control, 77 (25% received

  19. Field tests on human tolerance to (LNG) fire radiant heat exposure, and attenuation effects of clothing and other objects

    Raj, Phani K.

    2008-01-01

    A series of field tests exposing mannequins clothed with civilian clothing to a 3 m x 3 m square liquefied natural gas (LNG) pool fire was conducted. Both single layer clothing and double layer clothing were used. The radiant heat flux incident outside the clothing and incident on the skin covered by clothing were measured using wide-angle radiometers, for durations of 100-200 s (per test). The levels of heat flux incident on the clothing were close to 5 kW/m 2 . The magnitude of the radiant heat attenuation factor (AF) across the thickness was determined. AF varies between 2 and higher for cotton and polyester clothing (thickness 0.286-1.347 mm); AF value of 6 was measured for 1.347 mm thickness. Single sheet newspaper held about 5 cm in front of mannequins and exposed to incident flux of 5 kW/m 2 resulted in AF of 5, and AF of 8 with double sheets. AF decreases linearly with increasing heat flux values and linearly increases with thickness. The author exposed himself, in normal civilian clothing (of full sleeve cotton/polyester shirt and jean pants), to radiant heat from a LNG fire. The exposure was for several tens of seconds to heat flux levels ranging from 3.5 kW/m 2 to 5 + kW/m 2 (exposure times from 25 s to 97 s at average heat flux values in the 4 kW/m 2 and 5 kW/m 2 range). Occasionally, he was exposed to (as high as) 7 kW/m 2 for durations of several seconds. He did not suffer any unbearable or even severe pain nor did he experience blisters or burns or any other injury on the unprotected skin of his body. The incident heat fluxes on the author were measured by a hand-held radiometer (with digital display) as well as by strapped on wide-angle radiometers connected to a computer. He could withstand the US regulatory criterion of 5 kW/m 2 (for 30 s) without suffering any damage or burns. Temperature measured on author's skin covered by clothing did not rise above the normal body temperature even after 200 s of exposure to 4 kW/m 2 average heat flux

  20. Excitation energy transfer to luminescence centers in M{sup II}MoO{sub 4} (M{sup II}=Ca, Sr, Zn, Pb) and Li{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}

    Spassky, D.A., E-mail: deris2002@mail.ru [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory 1, bld.2, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology (MISiS), Leninsky Prospekt 4, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kozlova, N.S. [National University of Science and Technology (MISiS), Leninsky Prospekt 4, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation); Nagirnyi, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Ostwaldi 1, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Savon, A.E. [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory 1, bld.2, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Hizhnyi, Yu.A.; Nedilko, S.G. [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Volodymyrska str. 64/13, 01601 Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2017-06-15

    Based on the results of spectroscopy studies and electronic band structure calculations, the analysis of excitation energy transformation into luminescence is performed for a set of molybdates M{sup II}MoO{sub 4} (M{sup II}=Ca, Sr, Zn, Pb) and Li{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}. The bandgap energies were determined from comparison of experimental and calculated reflectivity spectra as 3.3 eV for PbMoO{sub 4}, 4.3 eV for ZnMoO{sub 4}, 4.4 eV for CaMoO{sub 4}, 4.7 eV for SrMoO{sub 4}, and 4.9 eV for Li{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}. It is shown that photoluminescence excitation spectra of these materials reveal the specific features of their conduction bands. The threshold of separated charge carriers’ creation is shown to be by 1.3–1.9 eV higher than the bandgap energy in CaMoO{sub 4}, SrMoO{sub 4} and ZnMoO{sub 4}. The effect is explained by the peculiarities of conduction band structure, namely to the presence of gap between the subbands of the conduction band and to the low mobility of electrons in the lower sub-band of the conduction band.

  1. Experimental data from a full-scale facility investigating radiant and convective terminals

    Le Dreau, Jerome; Heiselberg, Per; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    The objective of this technical report is to provide information on the accuracy of the experiments performed in “the Cube” (part I, II and III). Moreover, this report lists the experimental data, which have been monitored in the test facility (part IV). These data are available online and can be...

  2. Disseny de calefacció amb terra radiant d'una casa a l'horta de Lleida mitjançant energia geotèrmica

    Fillat Sobrino, Jordi

    2008-01-01

    S'ha realitzat el disseny de calefacció d'una vivenda mitjançant energia geotèrmica de baixa temperatura, amb un bescanviador vertical de 80 m de profunditat. El sistema de calefacció és de terra radiant en forma d'espiral.

  3. Full Scale Measurements and CFD Investigations of a Wall Radiant Cooling System Based on Plastic Capillary Tubes in Thin Concrete Walls

    Mikeska, Tomás; Fan, Jianhua; Svendsen, Svend

    2017-01-01

    Densely occupied spaces such as classrooms can very often have problems with overheating. It can be difficult to cool such spaces by means of a ventilation system without creating draughts and causing discomfort for occupants. The use of a wall radiant cooling system is a suitable option for spaces...

  4. The effects of mixing air distribution and heat load arrangement on the performance of ceiling radiant panels under cooling mode of operation

    Mustakallio, Panu; Kosonen, Risto; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2016-01-01

    arrangement and air distribution generated in a room by linear slot diffuser, radial multi-nozzle diffuser and radial swirl induction unit on the cooling power of radiant panels was compared. The impact on the thermal environment was also studied. Measurements were carried out without and with supply air...

  5. A Simulation Study on the Performance of Radiant Ceilings Combined with Free-Hanging Horizontal Sound Absorbers

    Kazanci, Ongun Berk; Domínguez, L. Marcos; Rage, Niels

    2018-01-01

    using TABS, most building simulation models assume an uncovered ceiling; however, this might not be the case in practice, due to the use of free-hanging horizontal (or vertical) sound absorbers for the control of room acoustic conditions. The use of sound absorbers will decrease the performance...... of radiant ceiling cooling systems. Therefore, the quantification of the effects during the design phase is important for predicting the resulting thermal indoor environment and for system dimensioning. In this study, a two-person office room equipped with TABS was simulated using a commercially available...... simulation software with a recently developed plug-in that allows simulating the effects of horizontal sound absorbers on the performance of TABS and on the thermal indoor environment. The change in thermal indoor environment and in performance of TABS were quantified, and the simulation results were...

  6. Process evaluation of the RaDIANT community study: a dialysis facility-level intervention to increase referral for kidney transplantation.

    Hamoda, Reem E; Gander, Jennifer C; McPherson, Laura J; Arriola, Kimberly J; Cobb, Loren; Pastan, Stephen O; Plantinga, Laura; Browne, Teri; Hartmann, Erica; Mulloy, Laura; Zayas, Carlos; Krisher, Jenna; Patzer, Rachel E

    2018-01-15

    The Reducing Disparities in Access to kidNey Transplantation Community Study (RaDIANT) was an End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Network 6-developed, dialysis facility-level randomized trial testing the effectiveness of a 1-year multicomponent education and quality improvement intervention in increasing referral for kidney transplant evaluation among selected Georgia dialysis facilities. To assess implementation of the RaDIANT intervention, we conducted a process evaluation at the conclusion of the intervention period (January-December 2014). We administered a 20-item survey to the staff involved with transplant education in 67 dialysis facilities randomized to participate in intervention activities. Survey items assessed facility participation in the intervention (fidelity and reach), helpfulness and willingness to continue intervention activities (sustainability), suggestions for improving intervention components (sustainability), and factors that may have influenced participation and study outcomes (context). We defined high fidelity to the intervention as completing 11 or more activities, and high participation in an activity as having at least 75% participation across intervention facilities. Staff from 65 of the 67 dialysis facilities completed the questionnaire, and more than half (50.8%) reported high adherence (fidelity) to RaDIANT intervention requirements. Nearly two-thirds (63.1%) of facilities reported that RaDIANT intervention activities were helpful or very helpful, with 90.8% of facilities willing to continue at least one intervention component beyond the study period. Intervention components with high participation emphasized staff and patient-level education, including in-service staff orientations, patient and family education programs, and patient educational materials. Suggested improvements for intervention activities emphasized addressing financial barriers to transplantation, with financial education materials perceived as most helpful among RaDIANT

  7. Everolimus for Advanced Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours: A Subgroup Analysis Evaluating Japanese Patients in the RADIANT-3 Trial

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Okusaka, Takuji; Ikeda, Masafumi; Igarashi, Hisato; Morizane, Chigusa; Nakachi, Kohei; Tajima, Takeshi; Kasuga, Akio; Fujita, Yoshie; Furuse, Junji

    2012-01-01

    Objective Everolimus, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin, has recently demonstrated efficacy and safety in a Phase III, double-blind, randomized trial (RADIANT-3) in 410 patients with low- or intermediate-grade advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. Everolimus 10 mg/day provided a 2.4-fold improvement compared with placebo in progression-free survival, representing a 65% risk reduction for progression. The purpose of this analysis was to investigate the efficacy and safety of everolimus in the Japanese subgroup enrolled in the RADIANT-3 study. Methods Subgroup analysis of the Japanese patients was performed comparing efficacy and safety between everolimus 10 mg/day orally (n = 23) and matching placebo (n = 17). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival. Safety was evaluated on the basis of the incidence of adverse drug reactions. Results Progression-free survival was significantly prolonged with everolimus compared with placebo. The median progression-free survival was 19.45 months (95% confidence interval, 8.31–not available) with everolimus vs 2.83 months (95% confidence interval, 2.46–8.34) with placebo, resulting in an 81% risk reduction in progression (hazard ratio, 0.19; 95% confidence interval, 0.08–0.48; P< 0.001). Adverse drug reactions occurred in all 23 (100%) Japanese patients receiving everolimus and in 13 (77%) patients receiving placebo; most were grade 1/2 in severity. The most common adverse drug reactions in the everolimus group were rash (n = 20; 87%), stomatitis (n = 17; 74%), infections (n = 15; 65%), nail disorders (n = 12; 52%), epistaxis (n = 10; 44%) and pneumonitis (n = 10; 44%). Conclusions These results support the use of everolimus as a valuable treatment option for Japanese patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. PMID:22859827

  8. Development and demonstration of a gas-fired recuperative confined radiant burner (deliverable 42/43). Final report

    NONE

    2003-06-01

    The objective of the project was to develop and demonstrate an innovative, efficient, low-pollutant, recuperative gas-fired IR-system (infrared radiation) for industrial processes (hereafter referred to as the CONRAD-system). The CONRAD-system is confined, so flue gases from the combustion can be kept separated from the product. The gas/air mixture to the burner is preheated by means of the flue gas, which increases the radiant efficiency of the CONRAD-system significantly over traditional gas-fired IR burners. During the first phase of the project, the CONRAD-system was designed and developed. The conducted work included a survey on suitable burner materials, modelling of the burner system, basic design of burner construction, control etc., experimental characterisation of several preprototypes and detailed design of the internal heat exchanger in the burner. The result is a cost effective burner system with a documented radiant efficiency up to 66% and low emissions (NO{sub x} and CO) all in accordance with the criteria of success set up at the start of the project. In the second phase of the project, the burner system was established and tested in laboratory and in four selected industrial applications: 1) Drying of coatings on sand cores in the automotive industry. 2) Baking of bread/cake. 3) General purpose painting/powder curing process 4. Curing of powder paint on wood components. The results from the preliminary tests Overe used to optimise the CONRAD-system, before it was applied in the industrial processes and demonstrated. However, the optimised burners manufactured for demonstration suffered from different 'infant failures', which made the installation in an industrial environment very cumbersome, and even impossible in the food industry and the automotive industry. In the latter cases realistic laboratory tests Overe carried out and the established know how reported for use when the burner problems are overcome.(au)

  9. Prediction of liquid metal alloy radiant properties from measurements of the Hall coefficient and the direct current resistivity

    Havstad, M.A.; Qiu, T.

    1995-04-01

    The thermal radiative properties of high temperature solid and liquid metal alloys are particularly useful to research and development efforts in laser cladding and machining, electron beam welding and laser isotope separation. However the cost, complexity, and difficulty of measuring these properties have forced the use of crude estimates from the Hagen-Rubens relation, the Drude relations, or extrapolation from low temperature or otherwise flawed data (e.g., oxidized). The authors have found in this work that published values for the Hall coefficient and the electrical resistivity of liquid metal alloys can provide useful estimates of the reflectance and emittance of some groups of binary liquid metal and high temperature solid alloys. The estimation method computes the Drude free electron parameters, and thence the optical constants and the radiant properties from the dependence of the Hall coefficient and direct current resistivity on alloy composition (the Hall coefficient gives the free electron density and the resistivity gives the average time between collisions). They find that predictions of the radiant properties of molten cerium-copper alloy, which use the measured variations in the Hall coefficient and resistivity (both highly nonlinear) as a function of alloy fraction (rather than linear combinations of the values of the pure elements) yield a good comparison to published measurements of the variation of the normal spectral emittance (a different but also nonlinear function) of cerium-copper alloy at the single wavelength available for comparison, 0.645 μm. The success of the approach in the visible range is particularly notable because one expects a Drude based approach to improve with increasing wavelength from the visible into the infrared. Details of the estimation method, the comparison between the calculation and the measured emittance, and a discussion of what groups of elements may also provide agreement is given

  10. Generation IV nuclear energy systems: road map and concepts. 2. Generation II Measurement Systems for Generation IV Nuclear Power Plants

    Miller, Don W.

    2001-01-01

    need for substantial research. As we consider I and C systems in Generation IV reactors, we have the opportunity to take a much less 'timid' design philosophy than was taken in the design of I and C systems in the ALWRs. We need to make use of advanced technology to design an I and C system for the Generation IV multi-unit plant designs currently being considered. Such a design should accomplish the following: 1. provides for multi-unit control; 2. contributes to a plant design objective of a very low core damage frequency; 3. maximizes plant thermal efficiency (>50%); 4. maximizes plant capacity factor (>90%); 5. optimizes operability; 6. maximizes maintainability; 7. provides for on-line monitoring, calibration, and diagnostics; 8. provides optimum response to disturbances; 9. provides excellent load-following capability. When we consider the current situation in operating Generation I and II nuclear power plants and even Generation III ALWR design, we conclude that Generation IV reactors should employ at least Generation II measurement systems. Let us first consider data transmission, which is a form of communication, and ask the question: Do new communication-transferring methods by electrons flow in copper wires? The obvious answer is no. Virtually all new communication systems are using some electromagnetic method, such as light, microwaves, HF or VHF radio signals, and virtually no copper wires. When we envision Generation IV nuclear power plants, we should minimize the use of copper wires for data transmission. We should transmit data primarily by fiber optics and various wireless methods, some of which can penetrate thick barriers. Now let us consider sensors. If we use light for data transmission, then we should also use optical-based sensors. We should also take advantage of microprocessors, which provide opportunities to embed 'intelligence' in the sensor that can be used to increase accuracy, stability, and tolerance to external stressors (i.e., radiation

  11. Analysis of energy released from core disruptive accident of sodium cooled fast reactor using CDA-ER and VENUS-II codes

    Kang, S. H.; Ha, K. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The fast reactor has a unique feature in that rearranged core materials can produce a large increase in reactivity and recriticality. If such a rearrangement of core materials should occur rapidly, there would be a high rate of reactivity increase producing power excursions. The released energy from such an energetic recriticality might challenge the reactor vessel integrity. An analysis of the hypothetical excursions that result in the disassembly of the reactor plays an important role in a liquid metal fast reactor (LMFR) safety analysis. The analysis of such excursions generally consists of three phases (initial or pre-disassembly phase, disassembly phase, energy-work conversion phase). The first step is referred to as the 'accident initiation' or 'pre-disassembly' phase. In this phase, the accident is traced from some initiating event, such as a coolant pump failure or control rod ejection, up to a prompt critical condition where high temperatures and pressures rapidly develop in the core. Such complex processes as fuel pin failure, sodium voiding, and fuel slumping are treated in this phase. Several computer programs are available for this type of calculation, including SAS4A, MELT-II and FREADM. A number of models have been developed for this type of analysis, including the REXCO and SOCOOL-II computer programs. VENUS-II deals with the second phase (disassembly analysis). Most of the models used in the code have been based on the original work of Bethe and Tait. The disassembly motion is calculated using a set of two-dimensional hydrodynamics equations in the VENUS code. The density changes can be explicitly calculated, which in turn allows the use of a more accurate density dependent equation of state. The main functional parts of the computational model can be summarized as follows: Power and energy (point kinetics), Temperature (energy balance), Internal pressure (equation of state), Material displacement (hydrodynamics), Reactivity

  12. Analysis of energy released from core disruptive accident of sodium cooled fast reactor using CDA-ER and VENUS-II codes

    Kang, S. H.; Ha, K. S.

    2013-01-01

    The fast reactor has a unique feature in that rearranged core materials can produce a large increase in reactivity and recriticality. If such a rearrangement of core materials should occur rapidly, there would be a high rate of reactivity increase producing power excursions. The released energy from such an energetic recriticality might challenge the reactor vessel integrity. An analysis of the hypothetical excursions that result in the disassembly of the reactor plays an important role in a liquid metal fast reactor (LMFR) safety analysis. The analysis of such excursions generally consists of three phases (initial or pre-disassembly phase, disassembly phase, energy-work conversion phase). The first step is referred to as the 'accident initiation' or 'pre-disassembly' phase. In this phase, the accident is traced from some initiating event, such as a coolant pump failure or control rod ejection, up to a prompt critical condition where high temperatures and pressures rapidly develop in the core. Such complex processes as fuel pin failure, sodium voiding, and fuel slumping are treated in this phase. Several computer programs are available for this type of calculation, including SAS4A, MELT-II and FREADM. A number of models have been developed for this type of analysis, including the REXCO and SOCOOL-II computer programs. VENUS-II deals with the second phase (disassembly analysis). Most of the models used in the code have been based on the original work of Bethe and Tait. The disassembly motion is calculated using a set of two-dimensional hydrodynamics equations in the VENUS code. The density changes can be explicitly calculated, which in turn allows the use of a more accurate density dependent equation of state. The main functional parts of the computational model can be summarized as follows: Power and energy (point kinetics), Temperature (energy balance), Internal pressure (equation of state), Material displacement (hydrodynamics), Reactivity feedback (Doppler and

  13. Documentation associated with the WESF preparation for receiving 25 cesium capsules from the Applied Radiant Energy Corporation (ARECO)

    Pawlak, M.W.

    1996-10-21

    The purpose of this report is to compile all documentation associated with facility preparation of WESF to receive 25 cesium capsules from ARECO. The WESF validated it`s preparedness by completing a facility preparedness review using a performance indicator checklist.

  14. Means of increasing efficiency of CPC solar energy collector

    Chao, B.T.; Rabl, A.

    1975-06-27

    A device is provided for improving the thermal efficiency of a cylindrical radiant energy collector. A channel is placed next to and in close proximity to the nonreflective side of an energy reflective wall of a cylindrical collector. A coolant is piped through the channel and removes a portion of the nonreflective energy incident on the wall which is absorbed by the wall. The energy transferred to the coolant may be utilized in a useful manner.

  15. Nuclear Energy Center Site Survey, 1975. Part II. The U.S. electric power system and the potential role of nuclear energy centers

    1976-01-01

    Information related to Nuclear Energy Centers (NEC) in the U.S. is presented concerning the U.S. electric power system today; electricity demand history and forecasts; history and forecasts of the electric utility industry; regional notes; the status, history, and forecasts of the nuclear role; power plant siting problems and practices; nuclear facilities siting problems and practices; origin and evolution of the nuclear energy center concept; conceptualized description of nuclear energy centers; potential role of nuclear energy centers; assumptions, criteria, and bases; typical evolution of a nuclear energy center; and the nuclear fuel cycle

  16. PS II model based analysis of transient fluorescence yield measured on whole leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana after excitation with light flashes of different energies.

    Belyaeva, N E; Schmitt, F-J; Paschenko, V Z; Riznichenko, G Yu; Rubin, A B; Renger, G

    2011-02-01

    Our recently presented PS II model (Belyaeva et al., 2008) was improved in order to permit a consistent simulation of Single Flash Induced Transient Fluorescence Yield (SFITFY) traces that were earlier measured by Steffen et al. (2005) on whole leaves of Arabidopsis (A.) thaliana at four different energies of the actinic flash. As the essential modification, the shape of the actinic flash was explicitly taken into account assuming that an exponentially decaying rate simulates the time dependent excitation of PS II by the 10 ns actinic flash. The maximum amplitude of this excitation exceeds that of the measuring light by 9 orders of magnitude. A very good fit of the SFITFY data was achieved in the time domain from 100 ns to 10s for all actinic flash energies (the maximum energy of 7.5 × 10¹⁶ photons/(cm²flash) is set to 100%, the relative energies of weaker actinic flashes were of ∼8%, 4%, ∼1%). Our model allows the calculation and visualization of the transient PS II redox state populations ranging from the dark adapted state, via excitation energy and electron transfer steps induced by pulse excitation, followed by final relaxation into the stationary state eventually attained under the measuring light. It turned out that the rate constants of electron transfer steps are invariant to intensity of the actinic laser flash. In marked contrast, an increase of the actinic flash energy by more than two orders of magnitude from 5.4×10¹⁴ photons/(cm²flash) to 7.5×10¹⁶ photons/(cm²flash), leads to an increase of the extent of fluorescence quenching due to carotenoid triplet (³Car) formation by a factor of 14 and of the recombination reaction between reduced primary pheophytin (Phe(-)) and P680(+) by a factor of 3 while the heat dissipation in the antenna complex remains virtually constant. The modified PS II model offers new opportunities to compare electron transfer and dissipative parameters for different species (e.g. for the green algae and the

  17. A study on spectral energy for the end of the twentieth century the basis of the NCEP reanalysis-II

    Aranha, A. F.; Veiga, J. A.; Yoshida, M. C.

    2013-05-01

    The energy cycle proposed by Lorenz (1955) is composed of the behavior of the average energy from the atmosphere and characteristics of atmospheric energy deviations from this average, respectively called basic state and perturbed state. However, it is possible to discretize the energy contained in the atmosphere disturbed state, decomposing the fields of the various disturbances or harmonics wave type, so as to measure and analyze the energy of these disorders according to their number or wavelength, this methodology described second Saltzman (1957). Therefore, in view of the spectral analysis as a methodological basis, this work aims to study the energy contained by the atmosphere in disturbed state. Considering the terms of power generation potential available for nth waves due to diabatic heating, represented by (G(n)), potential energy of nth wave (P(n)) and kinetic energy of nth wave (K(n)) and the conversion of energy between the energy nth kinetic and potential energy of waves nth waves given by (C(n)). The variables used in the calculation of the terms above are, temperature (T) orthogonal components of the wind (u, v, w) and geopotential height (G) from a data set from the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) considering daily shared values on a regular grid with a spatial resolution of 2.5° × 2.5°, distributed in 12 pressure levels (1000, 925, 850, 700, 600, 500, 400, 300, 250, 200, 150, 100 hPa ) for the 1970 to 1999 period. The results show that for kinetic energy of disturbance to nth wave, the amount of energy is somewhat dammed during for the first 10 wave numbers in this range are the planetary waves and waves. Observing this way, we can conclude that these waves are responsible for much of the kinetic energy in disturbed state. A characteristic and a difference in the distribution of energy between kinetic energy and potential energy disturbed total available to disturbance, is the derivative of the energy wavenumber presented by

  18. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    DR. AMINU

    Department of Chemistry Bayero University, P. M. B. 3011, Kano, Nigeria. E-mail: hnuhu2000@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and .... water and common organic solvents, but are readily soluble in acetone. The molar conductance measurement [Table 3] of the complex compounds in.

  19. Energy

    Meister, F.; Ott, F.

    2002-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of the current energy economy in Austria. The Austrian political aims of sustainable development and climate protection imply a reorientation of the Austrian energy policy as a whole. Energy consumption trends (1993-1998), final energy consumption by energy carrier (indexed data 1993-1999), comparative analysis of useful energy demand (1993 and 1999) and final energy consumption of renewable energy sources by sector (1996-1999) in Austria are given. The necessary measures to be taken in order to reduce the energy demand and increased the use of renewable energy are briefly mentioned. Figs. 5. (nevyjel)

  20. [Hungarian Diet and Nutritional Status Survey - OTÁP2014. II. Energy and macronutrient intake of the Hungarian population].

    Sarkadi Nagy, Eszter; Bakacs, Márta; Illés, Éva; Nagy, Barbara; Varga, Anita; Kis, Orsolya; Schreiberné Molnár, Erzsébet; Martos, Éva

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the study was to assess and monitor the dietary habits and nutrient intake of Hungarian adults. Three-day dietary records were used for dietary assessment, the sample was representative for the Hungarian population aged ≥18ys by gender and age. The mean proportion of energy from fat was higher (men: 38 energy%, women: 37 energy%), that from carbohydrates was lower (men: 45 energy%, women: 47 energy%) than recommended, the protein intake is adequate. Unfavorable change compared to the previous survey in 2009 was the increase of fat and saturated fatty acid energy percent in women, the decrease in fruit and vegetable consumption, which explains the decreased fiber intake. An increasing trend in added sugar energy percent in each age groups of both genders was observed compared to 2009. Interventions focusing on the promotion of fruit and vegetable consumption and decreasing of saturated fat and added sugar intake are needed. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(15), 587-597.

  1. Energy

    Meister, F.

    2001-01-01

    This chapter of the environmental control report deals with the environmental impact of energy production, energy conversion, atomic energy and renewable energy. The development of the energy consumption in Austria for the years 1993 to 1999 is given for the different energy types. The development of the use of renewable energy sources in Austria is given, different domestic heat-systems are compared, life cycles and environmental balance are outlined. (a.n.)

  2. Targeting hexokinase II to mitochondria to modulate energy metabolism and reduce ischaemia-reperfusion injury in heart

    Nederlof, Rianne; Eerbeek, Otto; Hollmann, Markus W.; Southworth, Richard; Zuurbier, Coert J.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrially bound hexokinase II (mtHKII) has long been known to confer cancer cells with their resilience against cell death. More recently, mtHKII has emerged as a powerful protector against cardiac cell death. mtHKII protects against ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) injury in skeletal muscle and

  3. Proceedings of the second Arab conference on the peaceful uses of atomic energy. Part II: A and B

    Barakat, M F; El-Mashri, S M [eds.

    1995-10-01

    The second Arab conference on the peaceful uses of atomic energy was held on 5-9 November, 1994 in Cairo. The specialists discussed peaceful uses of atomic energy in different sciences. The application of atomic energy techniques in the fields of reactor physics and engineering, nuclear chemistry, radioactive wastes, nuclear safety, radiobiology, soil and agriculture and environmental studies were discussed at the meeting. More than 1000 papers were presented in the meeting.

  4. Proceedings of the second Arab conference on the peaceful uses of atomic energy. Part II: A and B

    Barakat, M.F.; El-Mashri, S.M.

    1995-10-01

    The second arab conference on the peaceful uses of atomic energy was held on 5-9 November, 1994 in Cairo. The specialists discussed peaceful uses of atomic energy in different sciences. The application of atomic energy techniques in the fields of reactor physics and engineering, nuclear chemistry, radioactive wastes, nuclear safety, radiobiology, soil and agriculture and environmental studies were discussed at the meeting. More than 1000 papers were presented in the meeting

  5. Alternative Green Technology for Power Generation Using Waste-Heat Energy And Advanced Thermoelectric Materials, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is interested in advancing green technology research for achieving sustainable and environmentally friendly energy sources. Thermo-electric power generation...

  6. Phase-Change Thermal Energy Storage

    1989-11-01

    The goal of this program is to advance the engineering and scientific understanding of solar thermal technology and to establish the technology base from which private industry can develop solar thermal power production options for introduction into the competitive energy market. Solar thermal technology concentrates the solar flux using tracking mirrors or lenses onto a receiver where the solar energy is absorbed as heat and converted into electricity or incorporated into products as process heat. The two primary solar thermal technologies, central receivers and distributed receivers, employ various point and line-focus optics to concentrate sunlight. Current central receiver systems use fields of heliostats (two-axes tracking mirrors) to focus the sun's radiant energy onto a single, tower-mounted receiver. Point focus concentrators up to 17 meters in diameter track the sun in two axes and use parabolic dish mirrors or Fresnel lenses to focus radiant energy onto a receiver. Troughs and bowls are line-focus tracking reflectors that concentrate sunlight onto receiver tubes along their focal lines. Concentrating collector modules can be used alone or in a multimodule system. The concentrated radiant energy absorbed by the solar thermal receiver is transported to the conversion process by a circulating working fluid. Receiver temperatures range from 100 C in low-temperature troughs to over 1500 C in dish and central receiver systems.

  7. CFD simulation on use of polyethylene single bubble to reduce radiant heat on lecture hall

    Muhieldeen, M.W.; Adam, N.M.; Elias Salleh; Tang, S.H.; Ghezavati, H.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: In recent years, Malaysia energy consumption has increased and become comparable to larger consumers worldwide. The increased demand for artificial cooling through the use of air conditioning units in other to provide comfort would also mean increased energy usage and increased electricity cost to the occupants. This paper reviews the results from a field survey of saving energy within one type of buildings lecture theater, in Universiti Putra Malaysia. The thermal insulation material established (polyethylene single bubble) and putting on the wall which separate between the lecture theater and the exterior. The survey was undertaken at January until April in 2008. In a 3D occupant Lecture hall (L: 15 m, W: 12 m, and H: 6.6 m). In addition the environmental parameters were measured in class room to calculate the boundary condition for using CFD to compare saving energy. The results show that by using polyethylene single bubble insulation in each condition, a reduction of 2.2 degree Celsius was achieved. (author)

  8. Air-to-Water Heat Pumps With Radiant Delivery in Low-Load Homes

    Backman, C. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); German, A. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Dakin, B. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Springer, D. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Space conditioning represents nearly 50% of average residential household energy consumption, highlighting the need to identify alternative cost-effective, energy-efficient cooling and heating strategies. As homes are better built, there is an increasing need for strategies that are particularly well suited for high performance, low load homes. ARBI researchers worked with two test homes in hot-dry climates to evaluate the in-situ performance of air-to-water heat pump systems, an energy efficient space conditioning solution designed to cost-effectively provide comfort in homes with efficient, safe, and durable operation. Two monitoring projects of test houses in hot-dry climates were initiated in 2010 to test this system. Both systems were fully instrumented and have been monitored over one year to capture complete performance data over the cooling and heating seasons. Results are used to quantify energy savings, cost-effectiveness, and system performance using different operating modes and strategies. A calibrated TRNSYS model was developed and used to evaluate performance in various climate regions. This strategy is most effective in tight, insulated homes with high levels of thermal mass (i.e. exposed slab floors).

  9. Air-to-Water Heat Pumps With Radiant Delivery in Low-Load Homes

    Backman, C. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation, Davis, CA (United States). Davis Energy Group; German, A. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation, Davis, CA (United States). Davis Energy Group; Dakin, B. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation, Davis, CA (United States). Davis Energy Group; Springer, D. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation, Davis, CA (United States). Davis Energy Group

    2013-12-01

    Space conditioning represents nearly 50% of average residential household energy consumption, highlighting the need to identify alternative cost-effective, energy-efficient cooling and heating strategies. As homes are better built, there is an increasing need for strategies that are particularly well suited for high performance, low load homes. ARBI researchers worked with two test homes in hot-dry climates to evaluate the in-situ performance of air-to-water heat pump (AWHP) systems, an energy efficient space conditioning solution designed to cost-effectively provide comfort in homes with efficient, safe, and durable operation. Two monitoring projects of test houses in hot-dry climates were initiated in 2010 to test this system. Both systems were fully instrumented and have been monitored over one year to capture complete performance data over the cooling and heating seasons. Results are used to quantify energy savings, cost-effectiveness, and system performance using different operating modes and strategies. A calibrated TRNSYS model was developed and used to evaluate performance in various climate regions. This strategy is most effective in tight, insulated homes with high levels of thermal mass (i.e. exposed slab floors).

  10. The effect of urban geometry on mean radiant temperature under future climate change: a study of three European cities.

    Lau, Kevin Ka-Lun; Lindberg, Fredrik; Rayner, David; Thorsson, Sofia

    2015-07-01

    Future anthropogenic climate change is likely to increase the air temperature (T(a)) across Europe and increase the frequency, duration and magnitude of severe heat stress events. Heat stress events are generally associated with clear-sky conditions and high T(a), which give rise to high radiant heat load, i.e. mean radiant temperature (T(mrt)). In urban environments, T mrt is strongly influenced by urban geometry. The present study examines the effect of urban geometry on daytime heat stress in three European cities (Gothenburg in Sweden, Frankfurt in Germany and Porto in Portugal) under present and future climates, using T(mrt) as an indicator of heat stress. It is found that severe heat stress occurs in all three cities. Similar maximum daytime T(mrt) is found in open areas in all three cities despite of the latitudinal differences in average daytime T(mrt). In contrast, dense urban structures like narrow street canyons are able to mitigate heat stress in the summer, without causing substantial changes in T(mrt) in the winter. Although the T(mrt) averages are similar for the north-south and east-west street canyons in each city, the number of hours when T(mrt) exceeds the threshold values of 55.5 and 59.4 °C-used as indicators of moderate and severe heat stress-in the north-south canyons is much higher than that in the east-west canyons. Using statistically downscaled data from a regional climate model, it is found that the study sites were generally warmer in the future scenario, especially Porto, which would further exacerbate heat stress in urban areas. However, a decrease in solar radiation in Gothenburg and Frankfurt reduces T(mrt) in the spring, while the reduction in T(mrt) is somewhat offset by increasing T(a) in other seasons. It suggests that changes in the T(mrt) under the future scenario are dominated by variations in T(a). Nonetheless, the intra-urban differences remain relatively stable in the future. These findings suggest that dense urban

  11. Applying Fibre-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing to Near-surface Temperature Dynamics of Broadacre Cereals During Radiant Frost Events.

    Stutsel, B.; Callow, J. N.

    2017-12-01

    Radiant frost events, particularly those during the reproductive stage of winter cereal growth, cost growers millions of dollars in lost yield. Whilst synoptic drivers of frost and factors influencing temperature variation at the landscape scale are relatively well understood, there is a lack of knowledge surrounding small-scale temperature dynamics within paddocks and plot trials. Other work has also suggested a potential significant temperature gradient (several degrees) vertically from ground to canopy, but this is poorly constrained experimentally. Subtle changes in temperature are important as frost damage generally occurs in a very narrow temperature range (-2 to -5°C). Once a variety's damage threshold is reached, a 1°C difference in minimum temperature can increase damage from 10 to 90%. This study applies Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) using fibre optics to understand how minimum temperature evolves during a radiant frost. DTS assesses the difference in attenuation of Raman scattering of a light pulse travelling along a fibre optic cable to measure temperature. A bend insensitive multimode fibre was deployed in a double ended duplex configuration as a "fence" run through four times of sowing at a trial site in the Western Australian Wheatbelt. The fibre optic fence was 160m long and 800mm tall with the fibre optic cable spaced 100mm apart vertically, and calibrated in ambient water ( 10 to 15oC) and a chilled glycol ( -8 to-10 oC) baths. The temperature measurements had a spatial resolution of 0.65m and temporal resolution of 60s, providing 2,215 measurements every minute. The results of this study inform our understanding of the subtle temperature changes from the soil to canopy, providing new insight into how to place traditional temperature loggers to monitor frost damage. It also addresses questions of within-trial temperature variability, and provides an example of how novel techniques such as DTS can be used to improve the way temperature

  12. Scenario analysis of carbon emissions' anti-driving effect on Qingdao's energy structure adjustment with an optimization model, Part II: Energy system planning and management.

    Wu, C B; Huang, G H; Liu, Z P; Zhen, J L; Yin, J G

    2017-03-01

    In this study, an inexact multistage stochastic mixed-integer programming (IMSMP) method was developed for supporting regional-scale energy system planning (EPS) associated with multiple uncertainties presented as discrete intervals, probability distributions and their combinations. An IMSMP-based energy system planning (IMSMP-ESP) model was formulated for Qingdao to demonstrate its applicability. Solutions which can provide optimal patterns of energy resources generation, conversion, transmission, allocation and facility capacity expansion schemes have been obtained. The results can help local decision makers generate cost-effective energy system management schemes and gain a comprehensive tradeoff between economic objectives and environmental requirements. Moreover, taking the CO 2 emissions scenarios mentioned in Part I into consideration, the anti-driving effect of carbon emissions on energy structure adjustment was studied based on the developed model and scenario analysis. Several suggestions can be concluded from the results: (a) to ensure the smooth realization of low-carbon and sustainable development, appropriate price control and fiscal subsidy on high-cost energy resources should be considered by the decision-makers; (b) compared with coal, natural gas utilization should be strongly encouraged in order to insure that Qingdao could reach the carbon discharges peak value in 2020; (c) to guarantee Qingdao's power supply security in the future, the construction of new power plants should be emphasised instead of enhancing the transmission capacity of grid infrastructure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Vindforsk-II. An evaluation of the Wind Energy Programme from the Industry's point of view; Vindforsk-II. En utvaerdering av programmet utifraan ett industrinyttoperspektiv

    Jansson, Tommy; Segerpalm, Henrik

    2008-06-15

    This evaluation of the three-year research programme Vindforsk-II has been carried out from the perspectives of industrial value perspective and scientific merit. Two international experts, Hannele Holttinen, VTT, Finland, and Martin O L Hansen, DTU, Denmark, have been responsible for the scientific evaluation. Faugert and Co Utvaerdering AB have carried out the evaluation focusing on industrial value, coordinated the two evaluations and written this report. Vindforsk-II consists of two parts, one for basic and one for applied research projects. The goal of the programme is to produce knowledge that makes the development of wind energy and grid integration easier. The programme shall contribute to a wind sector that is increasingly competitive and that wind energy significantly contributes to the Swedish energy supply. The basic research is exclusively financed by the Swedish Energy Agency, which also finances 40% of the budget for applied research projects. The remaining 60% is financed by the Swedish energy sector, through individual contracts between each company and the programme. Vindforsk-II is a national research programme for wind energy, and in this combination lies its added value to the financiers and recipients of the programme in comparison to other RandD programmes in this area. The programme is a national endeavour focusing on basic and applied wind energy research and this makes it different from other programmes such as Vindval or Elektra. The general impression is that the three programmes are complementary rather than competitors. By being a national research programme in this area, Vindforsk-II assists in highlighting the importance of wind energy. This research programme appears important and creates valuable knowledge in the areas where it is present. The programme is a welcome addition to the research activities the bigger financiers themselves carry out, and by financing the programme and being a member of its board they can influence the

  14. Joint Thesaurus. Part I (A-L) + Part II (M-Z)[International Nuclear Information System. Energy Technology Data Exchange

    NONE

    2004-04-01

    This is the 1st revision of the INIS/ETDE Joint Thesaurus. It contains 20 953 valid descriptors and 8 600 forbidden terms. It was last updated in December 2003. The Joint Thesaurus contains the controlled terminology for indexing all information within the subject scope of both INIS (International Nuclear Information System) and ETDE (Energy Technology Data Exchange) information systems. The terminology is intended for use in subject description for input or retrieval of information in those systems. The thesaurus is a terminological control device used in translating from the natural language of documents, indexers or users into a more constrained system language It is also a controlled and dynamic vocabulary of semantically and generically related terms which covers a specific domain of knowledge. The domain of knowledge covered by this Thesaurus includes physics (in particular, plasma physics, atomic and molecular physics, and especially nuclear and high-energy physics), chemistry, materials, earth sciences, radiation biology, radioisotope effects and kinetics, applied life sciences, radiology and nuclear medicine, isotope and radiation source technology, radiation protection, radiation applications, engineering, instrumentation, fossil fuels, synthetic fuels, renewable energy sources, advanced energy systems, fission and fusion reactor technology, safeguards and inspection, waste management, environmental aspects of the production and consumption of energy from nuclear and non-nuclear sources, energy efficiency and energy conservation, economics and sociology of energy production and use, energy policy, and nuclear law. The terms in the Thesaurus are listed alphabetically, and with each alphabetic entry a word block containing the terms associated with the particular entry is displayed. In the word block, terms that have a hierarchical relationship to the entry are identified by the symbols BT and NT, for Broader Term and Narrower Term. Those with an affinitive

  15. Energy

    Bobin, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Object of sciences and technologies, energy plays a major part in economics and relations between nations. Jean-Louis Bobin, physicist, analyses the relations between man and energy and wonders about fears that delivers nowadays technologies bound to nuclear energy and about the fear of a possible shortage of energy resources. (N.C.). 17 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs

  16. NEW STRONG-LINE ABUNDANCE DIAGNOSTICS FOR H II REGIONS: EFFECTS OF κ-DISTRIBUTED ELECTRON ENERGIES AND NEW ATOMIC DATA

    Dopita, Michael A.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Nicholls, David C.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Vogt, Frédéric P. A., E-mail: Michael.Dopita@anu.edu.au [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Rd., Weston ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2013-09-01

    Recently, Nicholls et al., inspired by in situ observations of solar system astrophysical plasmas, suggested that the electrons in H II regions are characterized by a κ-distribution of energies rather than a simple Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. Here, we have collected together new atomic data within a modified photoionization code to explore the effects of both the new atomic data and the κ-distribution on the strong-line techniques used to determine chemical abundances in H II regions. By comparing the recombination temperatures (T {sub rec}) with the forbidden line temperatures (T {sub FL}), we conclude that κ ∼ 20. While representing only a mild deviation from equilibrium, this result is sufficient to strongly influence abundances determined using methods that depend on measurements of the electron temperature from forbidden lines. We present a number of new emission line ratio diagnostics that cleanly separate the two parameters determining the optical spectrum of H II regions—the ionization parameter q or U and the chemical abundance, 12+log(O/H). An automated code to extract these parameters is presented. Using the homogeneous data set from van Zee et al., we find self-consistent results between all of these different diagnostics. The systematic errors between different line ratio diagnostics are much smaller than those found in the earlier strong-line work. Overall, the effect of the κ-distribution on the strong-line abundances derived solely on the basis of theoretical models is rather small.

  17. Fitting by a pearson II function of the spatial deposited energy distribution in superconducting YBaCuO samples calculated by Monte Carlo simulation

    Cruz Inclan, Carlos M.; Leyva Fabelo, Antonio; Alfonso Vazquez, Onexis

    2001-01-01

    The spatial deposited energy distribution inside YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 superconducting ceramics irradiated with gamma rays were simulated using the codes system EGS4, based on the Monte Carlo method. The obtained distributions evidence a notable inhomogeneity, which may be one of the possible sources of inconsistent results of irradiation studies. The profiles of these distributions show asymmetrical behaviors, which may be fitted satisfactorily through a Pearson II Gamma type function. These fittings are presented in the paper and the behavior of the fitting parameters with the energy of incident photons, its number, and the experimental geometry were studied. The physical signification of each fitting parameters is discussed in the text. The exponent is related to certain mass absorption coefficient when the thick of the sample is sufficiently large

  18. Determination of the neutron energy and spatial distributions of the neutron beam from the TSR-II in the large beam shield

    Clifford, C.E.; Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1976-01-01

    The TSR-II reactor of the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility has recently been relocated within a new, fixed shield. A principal feature of the new shield is a beam port of considerably larger area than that of its predecessor. The usable neutron flux has thereby been increased by a factor of approximately 200. The bare beam neutron spectrum behind the new shield has been experimentally determined over the energy range from 0.8 to 16 MeV. A high level of fission product gamma ray background prevented measurement of bare beam spectra below 0.8 MeV, however neutron spectra in the energy range from 8 keV to 1.4 MeV were obtained for two simple, calculable shielding configurations. Also measured in the present work were weighted integral flux distributions and fast neutron dose rates

  19. Energy trading in the focus of European regulation projects. How REMIT, MiFID II, MiFIR, MAD II and EMIR will professionalize, regulate and endanger energy trading; Energiehandel im Fokus europaeischer Regulierungsvorhaben. Wie REMIT, MiFID II, MiFIR, MAD II und EMIR den Energiehandel professionalisieren, regulieren und gefaehrden

    Cieslarczyk, Michael [DLA Piper, Koeln (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Many market partners fear that new European standards and initiatives to control energy trading activities will endanger the freedom of the markets. The contribution outlines the specifications of REMIT and also goes into the other European initiatives. (orig.)

  20. Energy

    Foland, Andrew Dean

    2007-01-01

    Energy is the central concept of physics. Unable to be created or destroyed but transformable from one form to another, energy ultimately determines what is and isn''t possible in our universe. This book gives readers an appreciation for the limits of energy and the quantities of energy in the world around them. This fascinating book explores the major forms of energy: kinetic, potential, electrical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear.

  1. Doorway states in nuclear reactions as a manifestation of the 'super-radiant' mechanism

    Auerbach, N.; Zelevinsky, V.

    2007-01-01

    A mechanism is considered for generating doorway states and intermediate structure in low-energy nuclear reactions as a result of collectivization of widths of unstable intrinsic states coupled to common decay channels. At the limit of strong continuum coupling, the segregation of broad ('super-radiating') and narrow ('trapped') states occurs revealing the separation of direct and compound processes. We discuss the conditions for the appearance of intermediate structure in this process and doorways related to certain decay channels

  2. Experimental investigation of the influence of the air jet trajectory on convective heat transfer in buildings equipped with air-based and radiant cooling systems

    Le Dreau, Jerome; Heiselberg, Per; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2015-01-01

    -state and dynamic conditions. With the air-based cooling system, a dependency of the convective heat transfer on the air jet trajectory has been observed. New correlations have been developed, introducing a modified Archimedes number to account for the air flow pattern. The accuracy of the new correlations has been...... evaluated to±15%. Besides the study with an air-based cooling system, the convective heat transfer with a radiant cooling system has also been investigated. The convective flow at the activated surface is mainly driven by natural convection. For other surfaces, the complexity of the flow and the large......The complexity and diversity of airflow in buildings make the accurate definition of convective heat transfer coefficients (CHTCs) difficult. In a full-scale test facility, the convective heat transfer of two cooling systems (active chilled beam and radiant wall) has been investigated under steady...

  3. Preferred Spatial Directions in the Universe. Part II. Matter Distributed along Orbital Trajectories, and Energy Produced from It

    Borissova L.

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Using General Relativity we study the rotating space of an orbiting body (of the Earth in the Galaxy, for example. In such a space Einstein’s equations predict that: (1 the space cannot be empty; (2 it abhors a vacuum (i. e. a pure λ-field, and so it must also possess a substantive distribution (e. g. gas, dust, radiations, etc.. In order for Maxwell’s equations to satisfy Einstein’s equations, it is shown that: (1 a free electromagnetic field along the trajectory of an orbiting body must be present, by means of purely magnetic “standing” waves; (2 electromagnetic fields don’t satisfy the Einstein equations in a region of orbiting space bodies if there is no distribution of another substance (e. g. dust, gas or something else. The braking energy of a medium pervading space equals the energy of the space non-holonomic field. The energy transforms into heat and radiations within stars by a stellar energy mechanism due to the background space non-holonomity, so a star takes energy for luminosity from the space during the orbit. Employing this mechanism in an Earth-bound laboratory, we can obtain a new source of energy due to the fact that the Earth orbits in the non-holonomic fields of the space.

  4. Dispersive estimates for rational symbols and local well-posedness of the nonzero energy NV equation. II

    Kazeykina, Anna; Muñoz, Claudio

    2018-04-01

    We continue our study on the Cauchy problem for the two-dimensional Novikov-Veselov (NV) equation, integrable via the inverse scattering transform for the two dimensional Schrödinger operator at a fixed energy parameter. This work is concerned with the more involved case of a positive energy parameter. For the solution of the linearized equation we derive smoothing and Strichartz estimates by combining new estimates for two different frequency regimes, extending our previous results for the negative energy case [18]. The low frequency regime, which our previous result was not able to treat, is studied in detail. At non-low frequencies we also derive improved smoothing estimates with gain of almost one derivative. Then we combine the linear estimates with a Fourier decomposition method and Xs,b spaces to obtain local well-posedness of NV at positive energy in Hs, s > 1/2. Our result implies, in particular, that at least for s > 1/2, NV does not change its behavior from semilinear to quasilinear as energy changes sign, in contrast to the closely related Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equations. As a complement to our LWP results, we also provide some new explicit solutions of NV at zero energy, generalizations of the lumps solutions, which exhibit new and nonstandard long time behavior. In particular, these solutions blow up in infinite time in L2.

  5. Spectrum of Singly Charged Uranium (U II : Theoretical Interpretation of Energy Levels, Partition Function and Classified Ultraviolet Lines

    Ali Meftah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to improve U II analysis, the lowest configurations of both parities have been interpreted by means of the Racah-Slater parametric method, using Cowan codes. In the odd parity, including the ground state, 253 levels of the interacting configurations 5 f 3 7 s 2 + 5 f 3 6 d 7 s + 5 f 3 6 d 2 + 5 f 4 7 p + 5 f 5 are interpreted by 24 free parameters and 64 constrained ones, with a root mean square (rms deviation of 60 cm − 1 . In the even parity, the four known configurations 5 f 4 7 s , 5 f 4 6 d , 5 f 2 6 d 2 7 s , 5 f 2 6 d 7 s 2 and the unknown 5 f 2 6 d 3 form a basis for interpreting 125 levels with a rms deviation of 84 cm − 1 . Due to perturbations, the theoretical description of the higher configurations 5 f 3 7 s 7 p + 5 f 3 6 d 7 p remains unsatisfactory. The known and predicted levels of U II are used for a determination of the partition function. The parametric study led us to a re-investigation of high resolution ultraviolet spectrum of uranium recorded at the Meudon Observatory in the late eighties, of which the analysis was unachieved. In the course of the present study, a number of 451 lines of U II has been classified in the region 2344 –2955 Å. One new level has been established as 5 f 3 6 d 7 p ( 4 I 6 K ( J = 5.5 at 39113.98 ± 0.1 cm − 1 .

  6. Energy, exergy, economic (3E) analyses and multi-objective optimization of vapor absorption heat transformer using NSGA-II technique

    Jain, Vaibhav; Sachdeva, Gulshan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Study includes energy, exergy and economic analyses of absorption heat transformer. • It addresses multi-objective optimization study using NSGA-II technique. • Total annual cost and total exergy destruction are simultaneously optimized. • Results with multi-objective optimized design are more acceptable than other. - Abstract: Present paper addresses the energy, exergy and economic (3E) analyses of absorption heat transformer (AHT) working with LiBr-H 2 O fluid pair. The heat exchangers namely absorber, condenser, evaporator, generator and solution heat exchanger are designed for the size and cost estimation of AHT. Later, the effect of operating variables is examined on the system performance, size and cost. Simulation studies showed a conflict between thermodynamic and economic performance of the system. The heat exchangers with lower investment cost showed high irreversible losses and vice versa. Thus, the operating variables of systems are determined economically as well as thermodynamically by implementing non-dominated sort genetic algorithm-II (NSGA-II) technique of multi-objective optimization. In present work, if the cost based optimized design is chosen, total exergy destruction is 2.4% higher than its minimum possible value; whereas, if total exergy based optimized design is chosen, total annual cost is 6.1% higher than its minimum possible value. On the other hands, total annual cost and total exergy destruction are only 1.0% and 0.8%, respectively more from their minimum possible values with multi-objective optimized design. Thus, the multi-objective optimized design of the AHT is best outcome than any other single-objective optimized designs.

  7. Joint thesaurus Part I (A-L) + II (M-Z)[International Nuclear Information System. Energy Technology Data Exchange

    NONE

    2007-04-15

    This is the second revision of the ETDE/INIS Joint Thesaurus, including all updates up to September 2006. It contains 21 147 valid descriptors and 9 114 forbidden terms. The Joint Thesaurus contains the controlled terminology for indexing all information within the subject scopes of the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) and the Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE). The terminology is intended for use in subject descriptions for input or retrieval of information in these systems. The thesaurus is a terminological control device used in translating from the natural language of documents, indexers or users into a more constrained system language It is also a controlled and dynamic vocabulary of semantically and generically related terms which covers a specific domain of knowledge. The basic terminology in this thesaurus goes back to the 1969 edition of the EURATOM Thesaurus. The structure subsequently given to that terminology was the result of a systematic study performed by INIS subject specialists. Further expansion of the thesaurus terminology was done by ETDE to incorporate information on all forms of energy. The ETDE/INIS Joint Thesaurus is the result of continued editing, carried out in parallel to the processing of the INIS and ETDE databases. The domain of knowledge covered by the Joint Thesaurus includes physics (in particular, plasma physics, atomic and molecular physics, and especially nuclear and high-energy physics), chemistry, materials science, earth sciences, radiation biology, radioisotope effects and kinetics, applied life sciences, radiology and nuclear medicine, isotope and radiation source technology, radiation protection, radiation applications, engineering, instrumentation, fossil fuels, synthetic fuels, renewable energy sources, advanced energy systems, fission and fusion reactor technology, safeguards and inspection, waste management, environmental aspects of the production and consumption of energy from nuclear and non

  8. Quantifying the radiant exposure and effective dose in patients treated for actinic keratoses with topical photodynamic therapy using daylight and LED white light

    Manley, M.; Collins, P.; Gray, L.; O'Gorman, S.; McCavana, J.

    2018-02-01

    Daylight photodynamic therapy (dl-PDT) is as effective as conventional PDT (c-PDT) for treating actinic keratoses but has the advantage of reducing patient discomfort significantly. Topical dl-PDT and white light-PDT (wl-PDT) differ from c-PDT by way of light sources and methodology. We measured the variables associated with light dose delivery to skin surface and influence of geometry using a radiometer, a spectral radiometer and an illuminance meter. The associated errors of the measurement methods were assessed. The spectral and spatial distribution of the radiant energy from the LED white light source was evaluated in order to define the maximum treatment area, setup and treatment protocol for wl-PDT. We compared the data with two red LED light sources we use for c-PDT. The calculated effective light dose is the product of the normalised absorption spectrum of the photosensitizer, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), the irradiance spectrum and the treatment time. The effective light dose from daylight ranged from 3  ±  0.4 to 44  ±  6 J cm-2due to varying weather conditions. The effective light dose for wl-PDT was reproducible for treatments but it varied across the treatment area between 4  ±  0.1 J cm-2 at the edge and 9  ±  0.1 J cm-2 centrally. The effective light dose for the red waveband (615-645 nm) was 0.42  ±  0.05 J cm-2 on a clear day, 0.05  ±  0.01 J cm-2 on an overcast day and 0.9  ±  0.01 J cm-2 using the white light. This compares with 0.95  ±  0.01 and 0.84  ±  0.01 J cm-2 for c-PDT devices. Estimated errors associated with indirect determination of daylight effective light dose were very significant, particularly for effective light doses less than 5 J cm-2 (up to 83% for irradiance calculations). The primary source of error is in establishment of the relationship between irradiance or illuminance and effective dose. Use of the O’Mahoney model is recommended using a

  9. Modeling of mean radiant temperature based on comparison of airborne remote sensing data with surface measured data

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Chih-Yu; Matzarakis, Andreas; Liu, Jin-King; Lin, Tzu-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Assessment of outdoor thermal comfort is becoming increasingly important due to the urban heat island effect, which strongly affects the urban thermal environment. The mean radiant temperature (Tmrt) quantifies the effect of the radiation environment on humans, but it can only be estimated based on influencing parameters and factors. Knowledge of Tmrt is important for quantifying the heat load on human beings, especially during heat waves. This study estimates Tmrt using several methods, which are based on climatic data from a traditional weather station, microscale ground surface measurements, land surface temperature (LST) and light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data measured using airborne devices. Analytical results reveal that the best means of estimating Tmrt combines information about LST and surface elevation information with meteorological data from the closest weather station. The application in this method can eliminate the inconvenience of executing a wide range ground surface measurement, the insufficient resolution of satellite data and the incomplete data of current urban built environments. This method can be used to map a whole city to identify hot spots, and can be contributed to understanding human biometeorological conditions quickly and accurately.

  10. Electronic energy transfer through non-adiabatic vibrational-electronic resonance. II. 1D spectra for a dimer

    Tiwari, Vivek; Jonas, David M.

    2018-02-01

    Vibrational-electronic resonance in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes invalidates Förster's adiabatic framework for interpreting spectra and energy transfer, thus complicating determination of how the surrounding protein affects pigment properties. This paper considers the combined effects of vibrational-electronic resonance and inhomogeneous variations in the electronic excitation energies of pigments at different sites on absorption, emission, circular dichroism, and hole-burning spectra for a non-degenerate homodimer. The non-degenerate homodimer has identical pigments in different sites that generate differences in electronic energies, with parameters loosely based on bacteriochlorophyll a pigments in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson antenna protein. To explain the intensity borrowing, the excited state vibrational-electronic eigenvectors are discussed in terms of the vibrational basis localized on the individual pigments, as well as the correlated/anti-correlated vibrational basis delocalized over both pigments. Compared to those in the isolated pigment, vibrational satellites for the correlated vibration have the same frequency and precisely a factor of 2 intensity reduction through vibrational delocalization in both absorption and emission. Vibrational satellites for anti-correlated vibrations have their relaxed emission intensity reduced by over a factor 2 through vibrational and excitonic delocalization. In absorption, anti-correlated vibrational satellites borrow excitonic intensity but can be broadened away by the combination of vibronic resonance and site inhomogeneity; in parallel, their vibronically resonant excitonic partners are also broadened away. These considerations are consistent with photosynthetic antenna hole-burning spectra, where sharp vibrational and excitonic satellites are absent. Vibrational-excitonic resonance barely alters the inhomogeneously broadened linear absorption, emission, and circular dichroism spectra from those for a

  11. Causalities between CO2, electricity, and other energy variables during phase I and phase II of the EU ETS

    Keppler, Jan Horst; Mansanet-Bataller, Maria

    2010-01-01

    The topic of this article is the analysis of the interplay between daily carbon, electricity and gas price data with the European Union Emission Trading System (EU ETS) for CO 2 emissions. In a first step we have performed Granger causality tests for Phase I of the EU ETS (January 2005 until December 2007) and the first year of Phase II of the EU ETS (2008). The analysis includes both spot and forward markets - given the close interactions between the two sets of markets. The results show that during Phase I coal and gas prices, through the clean dark and spark spread, impacted CO 2 futures prices, which in return Granger caused electricity prices. During the first year of the Phase II, the short-run rent capture theory (in which electricity prices Granger cause CO 2 prices) prevailed. On the basis of the qualitative results of the Granger causality tests we obtained the formulation testable equations for quantitative analysis. Standard OLS regressions yielded statistically robust and theoretically coherent results. (author)

  12. Effects of blue diode laser (445 nm) and LED (430-480 nm) radiant heat treatments on dental glass ionomer restoratives

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Tolidis, Kosmas; Strakas, Dimitrios; Gerasimou, Paris; Sfeikos, Thrasyvoulos; Gutknecht, Norbert

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of two radiant heat treatments on water sorption, solubility and surface roughness of three conventional glass ionomer cements by using a blue diode laser (445 nm) and a light emitting diode (LED) unit (430-480 nm). Thirty disk-shaped specimens were prepared for each tested GIC (Equia Fil, Ketac Universal Aplicap and Riva Self Cure). The experimental groups (n = 10) of the study were as follows: Group 1 was the control group, in Group 2 the specimens were irradiated for 60 s at the top surface using a LED light-curing unit and in Group 3 the specimens were irradiated for 60 s at the top surface using a blue light diode laser. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests at a level of significance of a = 0.05. Radiant heat treatments with both laser and LED devices significantly decreased water sorption and solubility (p tested GICs. Blue diode laser treatment was seemed to be more effective compared to LED treatment for some of the tested materials. There were no changes in surface roughness of the GICs after the treatments (p > 0.05). Among the tested materials there were differences in water sorption and solubility (p 0.05). The use of the blue diode laser for this radiant heat treatment was harmless for the surface of the tested GICs and may be advantageous for the longevity of their restorations.

  13. Hierarchical structure of the energy landscape of proteins revisited by time series analysis. II. Investigation of explicit solvent effects

    Alakent, Burak; Camurdan, Mehmet C.; Doruker, Pemra

    2005-10-01

    Time series analysis tools are employed on the principal modes obtained from the Cα trajectories from two independent molecular-dynamics simulations of α-amylase inhibitor (tendamistat). Fluctuations inside an energy minimum (intraminimum motions), transitions between minima (interminimum motions), and relaxations in different hierarchical energy levels are investigated and compared with those encountered in vacuum by using different sampling window sizes and intervals. The low-frequency low-indexed mode relationship, established in vacuum, is also encountered in water, which shows the reliability of the important dynamics information offered by principal components analysis in water. It has been shown that examining a short data collection period (100ps) may result in a high population of overdamped modes, while some of the low-frequency oscillations (memory: future conformations are less dependent on previous conformations due to the lowering of energy barriers in hierarchical levels of the energy landscape. In short-time dynamics (sight contradicts. However, this comes about because water enhances the transitions between minima and forces the protein to reduce its already inherent inability to maintain oscillations observed in vacuum. Some of the frequencies lower than 10cm-1 are found to be overdamped, while those higher than 20cm-1 are slightly increased. As for the long-time dynamics in water, it is found that random-walk motion is maintained for approximately 200ps (about five times of that in vacuum) in the low-indexed modes, showing the lowering of energy barriers between the higher-level minima.

  14. Empirical Models for Power and Energy Requirements II : A Powered Implement Operation in Serdang Sandy Clay Loam, Malaysia

    A. F. Kheiralla

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Power and energy requirements were measured with an instrumented tractor for rotary tilling in Serdang sandy clay loam soil.  The effects of travel speed and rotor speed upon the measured data were investigated.  Power model from orthogonal regression analysis was formulated based on linear and quadratic functions of travel speed and bite length.  Fuel consumption model from regression analysis was formulated based on linear tractor PTO power as well as linear equivalent tractor PTO power.  Fuel consumption rates predicted by ASAE D497.3 were found to be 25% to 28% overestimates of the values predicted by the model developed.  However, fuel consumption rates reported by OECD Tractor Test were found to be 1% to 9% lower than the fuel consumption rates predicted by the model developed.  A comparison of power and energy requirements for both powered and draught implements showed that the disk harrow was the most energy efficient implement in terms of fuel consumption and specific energy followed by the rotary tiller, disk plough and mouldboard.  Finally, average PTO power, fuel consumption, wheel slip, wheel power and specific energy for a powered implement are presented.

  15. Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume II. Preliminary design. Part 2. System performance and supporting studies. Final report

    None,

    1979-01-01

    The preliminary design developed for the Solar Total Energy System to be installed at Fort Hood, Texas, is presented. System performance analysis and evaluation are described. Feedback of completed performance analyses on current system design and operating philosophy is discussed. The basic computer simulation techniques and assumptions are described and the resulting energy displacement analysis is presented. Supporting technical studies are presented. These include health and safety and reliability assessments; solar collector component evaluation; weather analysis; and a review of selected trade studies which address significant design alternatives. Additional supporting studies which are generally specific to the installation site are reported. These include solar availability analysis; energy load measurements; environmental impact assessment; life cycle cost and economic analysis; heat transfer fluid testing; meteorological/solar station planning; and information dissemination. (WHK)

  16. Inventory of Federal energy-related environment and safety research for FY 1978. Volume II. Project listings and indexes

    None

    1979-12-01

    This volume contains summaries of FY-1978 government-sponsored environment and safety research related to energy. Project summaries were collected by Aerospace Corporation under contract with the Department of Energy, Office of Program Coordination, under the Assistant Secretary for Environment. Summaries are arranged by log number, which groups the projects by reporting agency. The log number is a unique number assigned to each project from a block of numbers set aside for each agency. Information about the projects is included in the summary listings. This includes the project title, principal investigators, research organization, project number, contract number, supporting organization, funding level if known, related energy sources with numbers indicating percentages of effort devoted to each, and R and D categories. A brief description of each project is given, and this is followed by subject index terms that were assigned for computer searching and for generating the printed subject index in Volume IV.

  17. Inventory of Federal energy-related environment and safety research for FY 1978. Volume II. Project listings and indexes

    1979-12-01

    This volume contains summaries of FY-1978 government-sponsored environment and safety research related to energy. Project summaries were collected by Aerospace Corporation under contract with the Department of Energy, Office of Program Coordination, under the Assistant Secretary for Environment. Summaries are arranged by log number, which groups the projects by reporting agency. The log number is a unique number assigned to each project from a block of numbers set aside for each agency. Information about the projects is included in the summary listings. This includes the project title, principal investigators, research organization, project number, contract number, supporting organization, funding level if known, related energy sources with numbers indicating percentages of effort devoted to each, and R and D categories. A brief description of each project is given, and this is followed by subject index terms that were assigned for computer searching and for generating the printed subject index in Volume IV

  18. Energy productivity, fertilization rate and profitability of wheat production after various predecessors II.Profitability of wheat production

    Z. Uhr

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. In the course of our study on the adaptation of modern genotypes common winter wheat (Triticum aestivum to the requirements of sustainable agriculture data were received concerning the influence of the predecessor and nitrogen fertilizer rate on energy efficiency and recyclable nitrogen fertilization and profitability of productivity.We share these data with the scientific community, as they are up-to-date and informative in both theoretical and practical aspects. The analyses are based on data from field experiments fertilizer derived after predecessor cereals – regular crop of sorghum, millet, maize and legumes after predecessor - separate sowing of chickpeas. Energy efficiency of nitrogen fertilization was calculated as the ratio between the energy supplied in the additional grain yield and energy input in the form of fertilizers. Refundable efficiency of nitrogen fertilization is the additional amount of nitrogen accumulated in the grain, with respect to the applied nitrogen fertilization. Economic profitability of production is evaluated by coefficient R = P/Ra (ratio of benefits/costs. The results show that energy efficiency and recyclable nitrogen fertilization are on average five times higher after cereal than after legumes predecessor, and decreased with increasing the fertilizer rate, the decrease was statistically significant only for the first item (exponent. Profitability ratio of production after the introduction of legumes predecessor in crop rotation increases by an average of 42% and retains maximum values of fertilization levels 0.06, 0.12 and 0.18 t/ha nitrogen. Profitability of wheat production using pre-legumes crop is not determined by the parameters nitrogen fertilizer rate and energy efficiency of nitrogen fertilization and refundable efficiency of nitrogen fertilization.

  19. Improved age-diffusion model for low-energy electron transport in solids. II. Application to secondary emission from aluminum

    Dubus, A.; Devooght, J.; Dehaes, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    The ''improved age-diffusion'' model for secondary-electron transport is applied to aluminum. Electron cross sections for inelastic collisions with the free-electron gas using the Lindhard dielectric function and for elastic collisions with the randomly distributed ionic cores are used in the calculations. The most important characteristics of backward secondary-electron emission induced by low-energy electrons on polycrystalline Al targets are calculated and compared to experimental results and to Monte Carlo calculations. The model appears to predict the electronic yield, the energy spectra, and the spatial dependence of secondary emission with reasonable accuracy

  20. Microscopically based energy density functionals for nuclei using the density matrix expansion. II. Full optimization and validation

    Navarro Pérez, R.; Schunck, N.; Dyhdalo, A.; Furnstahl, R. J.; Bogner, S. K.

    2018-05-01

    Background: Energy density functional methods provide a generic framework to compute properties of atomic nuclei starting from models of nuclear potentials and the rules of quantum mechanics. Until now, the overwhelming majority of functionals have been constructed either from empirical nuclear potentials such as the Skyrme or Gogny forces, or from systematic gradient-like expansions in the spirit of the density functional theory for atoms. Purpose: We seek to obtain a usable form of the nuclear energy density functional that is rooted in the modern theory of nuclear forces. We thus consider a functional obtained from the density matrix expansion of local nuclear potentials from chiral effective field theory. We propose a parametrization of this functional carefully calibrated and validated on selected ground-state properties that is suitable for large-scale calculations of nuclear properties. Methods: Our energy functional comprises two main components. The first component is a non-local functional of the density and corresponds to the direct part (Hartree term) of the expectation value of local chiral potentials on a Slater determinant. Contributions to the mean field and the energy of this term are computed by expanding the spatial, finite-range components of the chiral potential onto Gaussian functions. The second component is a local functional of the density and is obtained by applying the density matrix expansion to the exchange part (Fock term) of the expectation value of the local chiral potential. We apply the UNEDF2 optimization protocol to determine the coupling constants of this energy functional. Results: We obtain a set of microscopically constrained functionals for local chiral potentials from leading order up to next-to-next-to-leading order with and without three-body forces and contributions from Δ excitations. These functionals are validated on the calculation of nuclear and neutron matter, nuclear mass tables, single-particle shell structure

  1. The ionizing effect of low-energy cosmic rays from a class II object on its protoplanetary disc

    Rodgers-Lee, D.; Taylor, A. M.; Ray, T. P.; Downes, T. P.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the ionizing effect of low-energy cosmic rays (CRs) from a young star on its protoplanetary disc (PPD). We consider specifically the effect of ∼3 GeV protons injected at the inner edge of the PPD. An increase in the ionization fraction as a result of these CRs could allow the magnetorotational instability to operate in otherwise magnetically dead regions of the disc. For the typical values assumed we find an ionization rate of ζCR ∼ 10-17 s-1 at 1 au. The transport equation is solved by treating the propagation of the CRs as diffusive. We find for increasing diffusion coefficients the CRs penetrate further in the PPD, while varying the mass density profile of the disc is found to have little effect. We investigate the effect of an energy spectrum of CRs. The influence of a disc wind is examined by including an advective term. For advective wind speeds between 1 and 100 km s-1 diffusion dominates at all radii considered here (out to 10 au) for reasonable diffusion coefficients. Overall, we find that low-energy CRs can significantly ionize the mid-plane of PPDs out to ∼1 au. By increasing the luminosity or energy of the CRs, within plausible limits, their radial influence could increase to ∼2 au at the mid-plane but it remains challenging to significantly ionize the mid-plane further out.

  2. Grid connected integrated community energy system. Phase II: final stage 2 report. Outline specifications of cogeneration plant; continued

    1978-03-22

    Specifications are presented for the electrical equipment, site preparation, building construction and mechanical systems for a dual-purpose power plant to be located on the University of Minnesota campus. This power plant will supply steam and electrical power to a grid-connected Integrated Community Energy System. (LCL)

  3. The AquaDEB project: Physiological flexibility of aquatic animals analysed with a generic dynamic energy budget model (phase II).

    Alunno-Bruscia, M.; v.d. Veer, H.; Kooijman, S.A.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    This second special issue of the Journal of Sea Research on development and applications of Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory concludes the European Research Project AquaDEB (2007-2011). In this introductory paper we summarise the progress made during the running time of this 5. years' project,

  4. Grid connected integrated community energy system. Phase II: final stage 2 report. Preliminary design of cogeneration plant

    1978-03-22

    The preliminary design of a dual-purpose power plant to be located on the University of Minnesota is described. This coal-fired plant will produce steam and electric power for a grid-connected Integrated Community Energy System. (LCL)

  5. Exchange-Hole Dipole Dispersion Model for Accurate Energy Ranking in Molecular Crystal Structure Prediction II: Nonplanar Molecules.

    Whittleton, Sarah R; Otero-de-la-Roza, A; Johnson, Erin R

    2017-11-14

    The crystal structure prediction (CSP) of a given compound from its molecular diagram is a fundamental challenge in computational chemistry with implications in relevant technological fields. A key component of CSP is the method to calculate the lattice energy of a crystal, which allows the ranking of candidate structures. This work is the second part of our investigation to assess the potential of the exchange-hole dipole moment (XDM) dispersion model for crystal structure prediction. In this article, we study the relatively large, nonplanar, mostly flexible molecules in the first five blind tests held by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre. Four of the seven experimental structures are predicted as the energy minimum, and thermal effects are demonstrated to have a large impact on the ranking of at least another compound. As in the first part of this series, delocalization error affects the results for a single crystal (compound X), in this case by detrimentally overstabilizing the π-conjugated conformation of the monomer. Overall, B86bPBE-XDM correctly predicts 16 of the 21 compounds in the five blind tests, a result similar to the one obtained using the best CSP method available to date (dispersion-corrected PW91 by Neumann et al.). Perhaps more importantly, the systems for which B86bPBE-XDM fails to predict the experimental structure as the energy minimum are mostly the same as with Neumann's method, which suggests that similar difficulties (absence of vibrational free energy corrections, delocalization error,...) are not limited to B86bPBE-XDM but affect GGA-based DFT-methods in general. Our work confirms B86bPBE-XDM as an excellent option for crystal energy ranking in CSP and offers a guide to identify crystals (organic salts, conjugated flexible systems) where difficulties may appear.

  6. Energy

    Robertson, William C

    2002-01-01

    Confounded by kinetic energy? Suspect that teaching about simple machines isn t really so simple? Exasperated by electricity? If you fear the study of energy is beyond you, this entertaining book will do more than introduce you to the topic. It will help you actually understand it. At the book s heart are easy-to-grasp explanations of energy basics work, kinetic energy, potential energy, and the transformation of energy and energy as it relates to simple machines, heat energy, temperature, and heat transfer. Irreverent author Bill Robertson suggests activities that bring the basic concepts of energy to life with common household objects. Each chapter ends with a summary and an applications section that uses practical examples such as roller coasters and home heating systems to explain energy transformations and convection cells. The final chapter brings together key concepts in an easy-to-grasp explanation of how electricity is generated. Energy is the second book in the Stop Faking It! series published by NS...

  7. Inventory of Federal energy-related environment and safety research for FY 1979. Volume II. Project listings and indexes

    None

    1980-12-01

    This volume contains summaries of FY 1979 government-sponsored environment and safety research related to energy arranged by log number, which groups the projects by reporting agency. The log number is a unique number assigned to each project from a block of numbers set aside for each contributing agency. Information elements included in the summary listings are project title, principal investigators, research organization, project number, contract number, supporting organization, funding level, related energy sources with numbers indicating percentages of effort devoted to each, and R and D categories. A brief description of each project is given, and this is followed by subject index terms that were assigned for computer searching and for generating the printed subject index in the back of this volume.

  8. Inventory of Federal energy-related environment and safety research for FY 1979. Volume II. Project listings and indexes

    1980-12-01

    This volume contains summaries of FY 1979 government-sponsored environment and safety research related to energy arranged by log number, which groups the projects by reporting agency. The log number is a unique number assigned to each project from a block of numbers set aside for each contributing agency. Information elements included in the summary listings are project title, principal investigators, research organization, project number, contract number, supporting organization, funding level, related energy sources with numbers indicating percentages of effort devoted to each, and R and D categories. A brief description of each project is given, and this is followed by subject index terms that were assigned for computer searching and for generating the printed subject index in the back of this volume

  9. The AquaDEB project: Physiological flexibility of aquatic animals analysed with a generic dynamic energy budget model (phase II)

    Alunno-bruscia, Marianne; Van Der Veer, Henk; Kooijman, S. A. L. M.

    2011-01-01

    This second special issue of the Journal of Sea Research on development and applications of Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory concludes the European Research Project AquaDEB (2007–2011). In this introductory paper we summarise the progress made during the running time of this 5 years’ project, present context for the papers in this volume and discuss future directions. The main scientific objectives in AquaDEB were (i) to study and compare the sensitivity of aquatic species (mainly molluscs ...

  10. Dynamic analysis of hybrid energy systems under flexible operation and variable renewable generation – Part II: Dynamic cost analysis

    Garcia, Humberto E.; Mohanty, Amit; Lin, Wen-Chiao; Cherry, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic analysis of HES (hybrid energy systems) under flexible operation and variable renewable generation is considered in this two-part communication to better understand various challenges and opportunities associated with the high system variability arising from the integration of renewable energy into the power grid. Advanced HES solutions are investigated in which multiple forms of energy commodities, such as electricity and chemical products, may be exchanged. In particular, a comparative dynamic cost analysis is conducted in this part two of the communication to determine best HES options. The cost function includes a set of metrics for computing fixed costs, such as fixed operations and maintenance and overnight capital costs, and also variable operational costs, such as cost of operational variability, variable operations and maintenance cost, and cost of environmental impact, together with revenues. Assuming natural gas, coal, and nuclear as primary heat sources, preliminary results identify the level of renewable penetration at which a given advanced HES option (e.g., a nuclear hybrid) becomes increasingly more economical than a traditional electricity-only generation solution. Conditions are also revealed under which carbon resources may be better utilized as carbon sources for chemical production rather than as combustion material for electricity generation. - Highlights: ► Dynamic analysis of HES to investigate challenges related to renewable penetration. ► Evaluation of dynamic synergies among HES constituents on system performance. ► Comparison of traditional versus advanced HES candidates. ► Dynamic cost analysis of HES candidates to investigate their economic viability. ► Identification of conditions under which an energy commodity may be best utilized

  11. Modern technology electrolysis for power application. II. The impact of the energy market on the hydrogen economy

    LaRoche, U [Brown Boveri AG, Baden, Switzerland; Bidard, R

    1979-01-01

    This paper considers the effects of the energy market on the use of hydrogen as a fuel and discusses various schemes of supplanting fossil fuels. Different fossil fuel substitution models in various parts of the western community result in rather different timing of market penetration needs and possibilities. This requires a consideration of the time span needed to implement different technologies in the choice of hydrogen production methods.

  12. Observational study on the fine structure and dynamics of a solar jet. II. Energy release process revealed by spectral analysis

    Sakaue, Takahito; Tei, Akiko; Asai, Ayumi; Ueno, Satoru; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2018-01-01

    We report on a solar jet phenomenon associated with the C5.4 class flare on 2014 November 11. The data of the jet was provided by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) aboard Hinode, and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and Domeless Solar Telescope (DST) at Hida Observatory, Kyoto University. These plentiful data enabled us to present this series of papers to discuss all the processes of the observed phenomena, including energy storage, event trigger, and energy release. In this paper, we focus on the energy release process of the observed jet, and mainly describe our spectral analysis on the Hα data of DST to investigate the internal structure of the Hα jet and its temporal evolution. This analysis reveals that in the physical quantity distributions of the Hα jet, such as line-of-sight velocity and optical thickness, there is a significant gradient in the direction crossing the jet. We interpret this internal structure as the consequence of the migration of the energy release site, based on the idea of ubiquitous reconnection. Moreover, by measuring the horizontal flow of the fine structures in the jet, we succeeded in deriving the three-dimensional velocity field and the line-of-sight acceleration field of the Hα jet. The analysis result indicates that part of the ejecta in the Hα jet experienced additional acceleration after it had been ejected from the lower atmosphere. This secondary acceleration was found to occur in the vicinity of the intersection between the trajectories of the Hα jet and the X-ray jet observed by Hinode/XRT. We propose that a fundamental cause of this phenomenon is magnetic reconnection involving the plasmoid in the observed jet.

  13. Creation of high-energy phonons by four-phonon processes in anisotropic phonon system of He II

    Adamenko, I.N.; Nemchenko, K.E.; Slipko, V.A.; Kitsenko, Yu.A.; Wyatt, A.F.G.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of the creation of high-energy phonons (h-phonons) by a pulse of low-energy phonons (I-phonons) moving from a heater to a detector in superfluid helium, is solved. The rate of h-phonon creation is obtained and it is shown that created h-phonons occupy a much smaller solid angle in momentum space, than the I-phonons. Analytical expression for the creation rate of h-phonon, along the symmetry axis of a pulse, are derived. It allows us to get useful approximate analytical expressions for creation rate of h-phonons. The time dependences of the parameters which describe the I-phonon pulse are obtained. This shows that half of the initial energy of I-phonon pulse can be transferred into h-phonons. The results of the calculations are compared with experimental data and we show that this theory explains a number of experimental results. The value of the momentum, which separates the I- and h-phonon subsystems, is found

  14. the Ĝ infrared search for extraterrestrial civilizations with large energy supplies. II. Framework, strategy, and first result

    Wright, J. T.; Griffith, R. L.; Sigurdsson, S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802 (United States); Povich, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, 3801 West Temple Avenue, Pomona, CA 91768 (United States); Mullan, B. [Blue Marble Space Institution of Science, P.O. Box 85561, Seattle, WA 98145-1561 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We describe the framework and strategy of the Ĝ infrared search for extraterrestrial civilizations with large energy supplies, which will use the wide-field infrared surveys of WISE and Spitzer to search for these civilizations' waste heat. We develop a formalism for translating mid-infrared photometry into quantitative upper limits on extraterrestrial energy supplies. We discuss the likely sources of false positives, how dust can and will contaminate our search, and prospects for distinguishing dust from alien waste heat. We argue that galaxy-spanning civilizations may be easier to distinguish from natural sources than circumstellar civilizations (i.e., Dyson spheres), although GAIA will significantly improve our capability to identify the latter. We present a zeroth order null result of our search based on the WISE all-sky catalog: we show, for the first time, that Kardashev Type III civilizations (as Kardashev originally defined them) are very rare in the local universe. More sophisticated searches can extend our methodology to smaller waste heat luminosities, and potentially entirely rule out (or detect) both Kardashev Type III civilizations and new physics that allows for unlimited 'free' energy generation.

  15. the Ĝ infrared search for extraterrestrial civilizations with large energy supplies. II. Framework, strategy, and first result

    Wright, J. T.; Griffith, R. L.; Sigurdsson, S.; Povich, M. S.; Mullan, B.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the framework and strategy of the Ĝ infrared search for extraterrestrial civilizations with large energy supplies, which will use the wide-field infrared surveys of WISE and Spitzer to search for these civilizations' waste heat. We develop a formalism for translating mid-infrared photometry into quantitative upper limits on extraterrestrial energy supplies. We discuss the likely sources of false positives, how dust can and will contaminate our search, and prospects for distinguishing dust from alien waste heat. We argue that galaxy-spanning civilizations may be easier to distinguish from natural sources than circumstellar civilizations (i.e., Dyson spheres), although GAIA will significantly improve our capability to identify the latter. We present a zeroth order null result of our search based on the WISE all-sky catalog: we show, for the first time, that Kardashev Type III civilizations (as Kardashev originally defined them) are very rare in the local universe. More sophisticated searches can extend our methodology to smaller waste heat luminosities, and potentially entirely rule out (or detect) both Kardashev Type III civilizations and new physics that allows for unlimited 'free' energy generation.

  16. The Ĝ Infrared Search for Extraterrestrial Civilizations with Large Energy Supplies. II. Framework, Strategy, and First Result

    Wright, J. T.; Griffith, R. L.; Sigurdsson, S.; Povich, M. S.; Mullan, B.

    2014-09-01

    We describe the framework and strategy of the Ĝ infrared search for extraterrestrial civilizations with large energy supplies, which will use the wide-field infrared surveys of WISE and Spitzer to search for these civilizations' waste heat. We develop a formalism for translating mid-infrared photometry into quantitative upper limits on extraterrestrial energy supplies. We discuss the likely sources of false positives, how dust can and will contaminate our search, and prospects for distinguishing dust from alien waste heat. We argue that galaxy-spanning civilizations may be easier to distinguish from natural sources than circumstellar civilizations (i.e., Dyson spheres), although GAIA will significantly improve our capability to identify the latter. We present a zeroth order null result of our search based on the WISE all-sky catalog: we show, for the first time, that Kardashev Type III civilizations (as Kardashev originally defined them) are very rare in the local universe. More sophisticated searches can extend our methodology to smaller waste heat luminosities, and potentially entirely rule out (or detect) both Kardashev Type III civilizations and new physics that allows for unlimited "free" energy generation.

  17. Sigmund Freud: pioneer in energy healing.

    Edwards, Stephen D; Edwards, David J

    2010-02-01

    Energy healing is a popular contemporary term for forms of healing that facilitate a natural healing process through harmonizing, rebalancing, and releasing energy flow disturbed or blocked by disease and illness. Biographical evidence indicates that Freud used physical, suggestive, and radiant forms of energy healing, and that his personal life, metapsychology, and psychoanalysis were founded on dynamic, energetic experiences and conceptualizations. Analysis of Freud's life and work leads to the conclusion that in experience, theory, and practice, Freud typified the traditional role of therapist and was a pioneer in modern forms of energy healing.

  18. Energy

    1975-10-01

    On the occasion of the World Environment Day the Norwegian Ministry for the Environment held a conference on growth problems in energy consumption. The themes which were treated were energy conservation, hydroelectric power, the role of nuclear power, radioactive waste disposal, fossil fuel resources, ecological limits, pollution and international aspects. Nuclear energy forms the main theme of one lecture and an aspect of several others. (JIW)

  19. Energy

    Torriti, Jacopo

    2016-01-01

    The impact of energy policy measures has been assessed with various appraisal and evaluation tools since the 1960s. Decision analysis, environmental impact assessment and strategic environmental assessment are all notable examples of progenitors of Regulatory Impact Assessment (RIA) in the assessment of energy policies, programmes and projects. This chapter provides overview of policy tools which have been historically applied to assess the impacts of energy policies, programmes and projects....

  20. Solar heating by radiant floor: Experimental results and emission reduction obtained with a micro photovoltaic–heat pump system

    Izquierdo, M.; Agustín-Camacho, P. de

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This work presents a PVT multicrystalline solar heating system for buildings. • The PV DC electricity generated was converted to AC to drive an air–water heat pump. • Experimental results obtained from December 1, 2012 to April 30, 2013 are detailed. • An environmental study is also presented. - Abstract: An experimental research with a solar photovoltaic thermal (PVT) micro grid feeding a reversible air–water, 6 kW heating capacity heat pump, has been carried out from December 2012 to April 2013. Its purpose is to heat a laboratory that is used as a house prototype for the study of heating/cooling systems. It was built in accordance with the 2013 Spanish CTE, and has an area of 35 m 2 divided into two internal rooms: one of them housing the storage system, the solar controller, the inverter and the control system; the other one is occupied by three people. Its main thermal characteristics are: UA = 125 W/°C and a maximum thermal load about 6.0 kW at the initial time. The PVT field consists of 12 modules, with a total area of 15.7 m 2 and useful area of 14 m 2 . Each module is composed of 48 polycrystalline silicon cells of 243.4 cm 2 , which with a nominal efficiency 14% can generate a power of 180 W, being the total nominal power installed 2.16 kW. The PV system stores electricity in 250 Ah batteries from where is converted from DC to AC through a 3.0 kW inverter that feeds the heat pump. This works supplying 840 l/h of hot water at 35–45 °C to the radiant floor. The data storing system is recording variables such as solar radiation; temperatures; input power to batteries; heat produced; heat transferred by the radiant floor; heat pump’s COP; isolated ratio; and solar fraction. The objective of this work is to present and discuss the experimental results and the emission reduction of CO 2 obtained during the period from 01/12/2012 to 30/04/2013, including the detailed results of two representative days of Madrid’s climate: 28

  1. Radiation containment at a 1 MW high energy electron accelerator: Status of LCLS-II radiation physics design

    Leitner M. Santana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available LCLS-II will add a 4 GeV, 1 MHz, SCRF electron accelerator in the first 700 meters of the SLAC 2-mile Linac, as well as adjustable gap polarized undulators in the down-beam electron lines, to produce tunable, fully coherent X-rays in programmable bunch patterns. This facility will work in unison with the existing Linac Coherent Light Source, which uses the legacy copper cavities in the last third of the linac to deliver electrons between 2 and 17 GeV to an undulator line. The upgrade plan includes new beam lines, five stages of state of the art collimation that shall clean the high-power beam well up-beam of the radio-sensitive undulators, and new electron and photon beam dumps. This paper describes the challenges encountered to define efficient measures to protect machine, personnel, public and the environment from the potentially destructive power of the beam, while maximizing the reuse of existing components and infrastructure, and allowing for complex operational modes.

  2. Energies

    2003-01-01

    In the framework of the National Debate on the energies in a context of a sustainable development some associations for the environment organized a debate on the nuclear interest facing the renewable energies. The first part presents the nuclear energy as a possible solution to fight against the greenhouse effect and the associated problem of the wastes management. The second part gives information on the solar energy and the possibilities of heat and electric power production. A presentation of the FEE (French wind power association) on the situation and the development of the wind power in France, is also provided. (A.L.B.)

  3. Rigorous quantitative elemental microanalysis by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS) with spectrum processing by NIST DTSA-II

    Newbury, Dale E.; Ritchie, Nicholas W. M.

    2014-09-01

    Quantitative electron-excited x-ray microanalysis by scanning electron microscopy/silicon drift detector energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (SEM/SDD-EDS) is capable of achieving high accuracy and high precision equivalent to that of the high spectral resolution wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometer even when severe peak interference occurs. The throughput of the SDD-EDS enables high count spectra to be measured that are stable in calibration and resolution (peak shape) across the full deadtime range. With this high spectral stability, multiple linear least squares peak fitting is successful for separating overlapping peaks and spectral background. Careful specimen preparation is necessary to remove topography on unknowns and standards. The standards-based matrix correction procedure embedded in the NIST DTSA-II software engine returns quantitative results supported by a complete error budget, including estimates of the uncertainties from measurement statistics and from the physical basis of the matrix corrections. NIST DTSA-II is available free for Java-platforms at: http://www.cstl.nist.gov/div837/837.02/epq/dtsa2/index.html).

  4. Daytime relapse of the mean radiant temperature based on the six-directional method under unobstructed solar radiation.

    Kántor, Noémi; Lin, Tzu-Ping; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    This study contributes to the knowledge about the capabilities of the popular "six-directional method" describing the radiation fields outdoors. In Taiwan, measurements were carried out with three orthogonally placed net radiometers to determine the mean radiant temperature (T(mrt)). The short- and long-wave radiation flux densities from the six perpendicular directions were recorded in the daylight hours of 12 days. During unobstructed direct irradiation, a specific daytime relapse was found in the temporal course of the T(mrt) values referring to the reference shapes of a standing man and also of a sphere. This relapse can be related to the short-wave fluxes reaching the body from the lateral directions. Through deeper analysis, an instrumental shortcoming of the six-directional technique was discovered. The pyranometer pairs of the same net radiometer have a 10-15-min long "blind spot" when the sun beams are nearly perpendicular to them. The blind-spot period is supposed to be shorter with steeper solar azimuth curve on the daylight period. This means that the locations with lower geographical latitude, and the summertime measurements, are affected less by this instrumental problem. A methodological shortcoming of the six-directional technique was also demonstrated. Namely, the sum of the short-wave flux densities from the lateral directions is sensitive to the orientation of the radiometers, and therefore by deviating from the original directions, the T(mrt) decrease on clear sunny days will occur in different times and will be different in extent.

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Amaris Homes, Afton Model

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2017-09-01

    Amaris Homes built this 3,734-ft2 home in Afton, Minnesota, to the performance criteria of the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. A high-efficiency gas boiler provides hot water for the zoned radiant floor system as well as for faucets and showers. A high-efficiency heat pump provides zoned cooling.

  6. Operation of heat pumps for smart grid integrated buildings with thermal energy storage

    Finck, C.J.; Li, R.; Zeiler, W.

    2017-01-01

    A small scale office building consisting of radiant heating, a heat pump, and a water thermal energy storage tank is implemented in an optimal control framework. The optimal control aims to minimize operational electricity costs of the heat pump based on real-time power spot market prices. Optimal

  7. Selecting optimum locations for co-located wave and wind energy farms. Part II: A case study

    Astariz, S.; Iglesias, G.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The benefits of wave and wind combined systems relative to independent farms are analysed. • This purpose is carried out through a case study off the Danish coast. • The power production, power smoothing and shadow effect are analysed. • Hindcast and measured wave and wind data from 2005 to 2015 are used. • Third-generation models of winds and waves (WAsP and SWAN) are used. - Abstract: Combined energy systems present an opportunity to enhance the competitiveness of renewables and overcome other challenges of these novel renewables by realising the synergies between them. Among the different possibilities for combined systems, this work focuses on wave and wind co-located farms with the aim of assessing their benefits relative to standalone wind farms. To this end we estimate the energy production, investigate the power smoothing and shadow effect, and quantify the reduction in downtime achieved by the co-located farm through a case study off the Danish coast – a promising area for co-located farms based on the available resource and other considerations including technical constraints. The analysis is carried out based on hindcast data and observations extending from 2005 to 2015, and by means of state-of-the-art numerical models of the wind and wave fields – WAsP and SWAN, respectively. It is found that the energy yield per unit area with the combined wave-wind farm increases by 3.4% relative to a standalone wind farm, the downtime periods decrease by 58% and the power output variability reduces by 12.5%. Moreover, the capital and operational expenditures (CAPEX and OPEX, respectively) would also be significantly reduced thanks to the synergies realised through the combination of wind and wave power.

  8. Intercomparison of radiation protection devices in a high-energy stray neutron field, Part II: Bonner sphere spectrometry

    Wiegel, B.; Agosteo, S.; Bedogni, R.; Caresana, M.; Esposito, A.; Fehrenbacher, G.; Ferrarini, M.; Hohmann, E.; Hranitzky, C.; Kasper, A.; Khurana, S.; Mares, V.; Reginatto, M.; Rollet, S.; Ruehm, W.; Schardt, D.; Silari, M.; Simmer, G.; Weitzenegger, E.

    2009-01-01

    The European Commission has funded within its 6th Framework Programme a three-year project (2005-2007) called CONRAD, COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry. A major task of the CONRAD Work Package 'complex mixed radiation fields at workplaces' was to organise a benchmark exercise in a workplace field at a high-energy particle accelerator where neutrons are the dominant radiation component. The CONRAD benchmark exercise took place at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany in July 2006. In this paper, the results of the spectrometry using four extended -range Bonner sphere spectrometers of four different institutes are reported. Outside Cave A the neutron spectra were measured with three spectrometers at six selected positions and ambient dose equivalent values were derived for use in the intercomparison with other area monitors and dosemeters. At a common position all three spectrometers were used to allow a direct comparison of their results which acts as an internal quality assurance. The comparison of the neutron spectra measured by the different groups shows very good agreement. A detailed analysis presents some differences between the shapes of the spectra and possible sources of these differences are discussed. However, the ability of Bonner sphere spectrometers to provide reliable integral quantities like fluence and ambient dose equivalent is well demonstrated in this exercise. The fluence and dose results derived by the three groups agree very well within the given uncertainties, not only with respect to the total energy region present in this environment but also for selected energy regions which contribute in certain strength to the total values. In addition to the positions outside Cave A one spectrometer was used to measure the neutron spectrum at one position in the entry maze of Cave A. In this case a comparison was possible to earlier measurements.

  9. Enhancing the effective energy barrier of a Dy(III) SMM using a bridged diamagnetic Zn(II) ion.

    Upadhyay, Apoorva; Singh, Saurabh Kumar; Das, Chinmoy; Mondol, Ranajit; Langley, Stuart K; Murray, Keith S; Rajaraman, Gopalan; Shanmugam, Maheswaran

    2014-08-18

    Field induced single-molecule-magnet behaviour is observed for both a heterodinuclear [ZnDy(L(-))2](3+) complex (1) and a mononuclear [Dy(HL)2](3+) complex (2), with effective energy barriers of 83 cm(-1) and 16 cm(-1), respectively. Insights into the relaxation mechanism(s) and barrier heights are provided via ab initio and DFT calculations. Our findings reveal an interesting observation that the U(eff) of SMMs can be enhanced by incorporating diamagnetic metal ions.

  10. The legal regime governing the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. II. International Regulations. Pt.1. Regulations on peaceful uses

    1979-12-01

    The first volume on atomic energy law published by CNEN reproduced national laws and regulations in that field. This book constitutes part one of the second volume and deals with international nuclear conventions and cooperation as at 30 June 1978. It reproduces the instruments and conventions which set up the international nuclear agencies, recommendations in the field of radiation protection and nuclear safety, the nuclear third party liability conventions, the international instruments concerning technical and scientific cooperation and finally, the bilateral cooperation agreements between Italy and other nations and its agreements with international organizations (NEA) [fr

  11. I. Exchange currents in electron scattering from light nuclei. II. Heavy-ion scattering at intermediate and high energy

    Dubach, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a formalism that will allow one to search the wide variety of transitions presented by nuclei in order to locate situations in which the exchange-current effects are important or dominant and thus allow one to study the contributions of the meson exchanges to the electromagnetic densities within the nucleus. The nuclei studied are assumed to be described in a shell model using harmonic oscillator wave functions. The formalism needed to allow one to do a multipole analysis of these exchange currents within 1s and 1p nuclei is developed. This formalism is then applied to an examination of electron scattering from a series of light nuclei: 3 He, 6 Li, 7 Li, 9 Be, and 10 B. Three significant effects due to the inclusion of exchange currents are seen: (1) The exchange currents can often introduce new structure into the form factors. (2) At larger momentum transfer (700 to 1000 MeV/c) the exchange current contributions to the form factor dominate the simpler one-body form factor by a few orders of magnitude. (3) The exchange currents can excite E4 and M5 multipoles in the p shell which are forbidden to the simpler one-body currents. The elastic scattering of two heavy ions at intermediate and high energies (compared to the Coulomb barrier) is examined in the formalism of the WKB and ''Glauber theory'' approximations. As a concrete example, the scattering of 16 O from 60 Ni is studied assuming an optical-model potential that fits elastic scattering data at low energies. One immediate result is that the WKB approximation agrees quite well with ''exact'' numerical calculations at energies as low as 60 MeV. The Glauber theory fails below about 1 GeV but correction terms are developed that can extend the usefulness of the Glauber theory to much lower energies. The model problem of scattering from a black-sphere model of the nucleus is briefly examined

  12. Förster resonance energy transfer, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. II. Hybrid cumulant expansion.

    Ma, Jian; Moix, Jeremy; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-03-07

    We develop a hybrid cumulant expansion method to account for the system-bath entanglement in the emission spectrum in the multi-chromophoric Förster transfer rate. In traditional perturbative treatments, the emission spectrum is usually expanded with respect to the system-bath coupling term in both real and imaginary time. This perturbative treatment gives a reliable absorption spectrum, where the bath is Gaussian and only the real-time expansion is involved. For the emission spectrum, the initial state is an entangled state of the system plus bath. Traditional perturbative methods are problematic when the excitations are delocalized and the energy gap is larger than the thermal energy, since the second-order expansion cannot predict the displacement of the bath. In the present method, the real-time dynamics is carried out by using the 2nd-order cumulant expansion method, while the displacement of the bath is treated more accurately by utilizing the exact reduced density matrix of the system. In a sense, the hybrid cumulant expansion is based on a generalized version of linear response theory with entangled initial states.

  13. Analysis of a general circulation model. II - Distribution of kinetic energy in the South Atlantic and Kuroshio/Oyashio systems

    Garraffo, Zulema; Garzoli, Silvia L.; Haxby, William; Olson, Donald

    1992-01-01

    It was found (Garzoli et al., 1992) that the general circulation model of Semtner and Chervin (1992) provides accurate descriptions of the Brazil-Malvinas and the Kuroshio/Oyashio confluence systems, except for the fact that the model prediction shows less variability than that present in observations. This paper investigates the problem of model variability by analyzing the mean and the eddy kinetic energy from the model and comparing the values with the Geosat altimeter observations for the South Atlantic Ocean and for the Kuroshio system. It is found that, while the model shows transient eddy activity in the areas that overlap the Geosat observations, the energy level of the model transient motions is considerably smaller following an arch along the bottom topography. The same was found from the comparisons made with values obtained from FGGE and surface drifters. It is suggested that the model is poorly resolving instabilities in the confluence front, and is not resolving other transients appearing in regions of marked topography.

  14. MVP/GMVP II, MC Codes for Neutron and Photon Transport Calc. based on Continuous Energy and Multigroup Methods

    2005-01-01

    A - Description of program or function: (1) Problems to be solved: MVP/GMVP can solve eigenvalue and fixed-source problems. The multigroup code GMVP can solve forward and adjoint problems for neutron, photon and neutron-photon coupled transport. The continuous-energy code MVP can solve only the forward problems. Both codes can also perform time-dependent calculations. (2) Geometry description: MVP/GMVP employs combinatorial geometry to describe the calculation geometry. It describes spatial regions by the combination of the 3-dimensional objects (BODIes). Currently, the following objects (BODIes) can be used. - BODIes with linear surfaces: half space, parallelepiped, right parallelepiped, wedge, right hexagonal prism; - BODIes with quadratic surface and linear surfaces: cylinder, sphere, truncated right cone, truncated elliptic cone, ellipsoid by rotation, general ellipsoid; - Arbitrary quadratic surface and torus. The rectangular and hexagonal lattice geometry can be used to describe the repeated geometry. Furthermore, the statistical geometry model is available to treat coated fuel particles or pebbles for high temperature reactors. (3) Particle sources: The various forms of energy-, angle-, space- and time-dependent distribution functions can be specified. (4) Cross sections: The ANISN-type PL cross sections or the double-differential cross sections can be used in the multigroup code GMVP. On the other hand, the specific cross section libraries are used in the continuous-energy code MVP. The libraries are generated from the evaluated nuclear data (JENDL-3.3, ENDF/B-VI, JEF-3.0 etc.) by using the LICEM code. The neutron cross sections in the unresolved resonance region are described by the probability table method. The neutron cross sections at arbitrary temperatures are available for MVP by just specifying the temperatures in the input data. (5) Boundary conditions: Vacuum, perfect reflective, isotropic reflective (white), periodic boundary conditions can be

  15. Ab initio effective core potentials including relativistic effects. II. Potential energy curves for Xe2, Xe+2, and Xe*2

    Ermler, W.C.; Lee, Y.S.; Pitzer, K.S.; Winter, N.W.

    1978-01-01

    Potential energy curves for the ground 1 Σ + /sub g/ state of Xe 2 , the first four states of the Xe + 2 ions, and the eight Xe* 2 excimer states corresponding to the addition of a 6ssigma/sub g/ Rydberg electron to these ion cores have been computed using averaged relativistic effective core potentials (AREP) and the self-consistent field approximation for the valence electrons. The calculations were carried out using the LS-coupling scheme with the effects of spin--orbit coupling included in the resulting potential energy curves using an empirical procedure. A comparison of nonrelativistic and averaged relativistic EP's and subsequent molecular calculations indicates that relativistic effects arising from the mass--velocity and Darwin terms are not important for these properties of Xe 2 molecules. Spectroscopic constants for Xe + 2 are in good agreement with all electron CI calculations suggesting that the computed values for Xe* 2 excimers should be reliable. The lifetime for the O/sub u/ + state of the Xe 2 * is computed to be 5.6 nsec which is in the range of the experimentally determined values

  16. Extending market activities for a distribution company in hourly-ahead energy and reserve markets-Part II: Numerical results

    Mashhour, M.; Golkar, M.A.; Moghaddas-Tafreshi, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    The present work is to show the application and implementation of the algorithms and models proposed in part I. It also represents the simulation results of (a) extracting a lumped financial model (the aggregated model) of the distribution system with distributed generations (DGs) and interruptible loads (ILs), (b) distribution company's (DISCO's) process of decision-making, based on the created financial model, on allocating its generating capability for internal usage and proposing to the hourly-ahead energy and reserve markets, and (c) a profit-based network reconfiguration methodology that increases the DISCO's technical ability and directs its financial affairs towards more profitable transactions in the upcoming markets. The function of the algorithms used for detecting unfeasible configurations, namely loop path and/or isolated part in the network are shown and well exemplified. Influential factors in DISCO's generating capability and in the coefficients of DISCO's internal cost function (ICF) are investigated. The present study substantiates the ICF-based optimization method by comparing the relevant results with the results obtained based on the use of total cost function (TCF). Several scenarios on market prices of energy and reserve and on the contingency probability factor pertaining to the real-time generation in reserve market are considered. Simulation results indicate that getting more economical benefits, DISCO may necessarily play different roles in the market and change the network configuration, at different hours.

  17. ENERGY CONSERVATION AND GRAVITY WAVES IN SOUND-PROOF TREATMENTS OF STELLAR INTERIORS. II. LAGRANGIAN CONSTRAINED ANALYSIS

    Vasil, Geoffrey M.; Lecoanet, Daniel; Brown, Benjamin P.; Zweibel, Ellen G.; Wood, Toby S.

    2013-01-01

    The speed of sound greatly exceeds typical flow velocities in many stellar and planetary interiors. To follow the slow evolution of subsonic motions, various sound-proof models attempt to remove fast acoustic waves while retaining stratified convection and buoyancy dynamics. In astrophysics, anelastic models typically receive the most attention in the class of sound-filtered stratified models. Generally, anelastic models remain valid in nearly adiabatically stratified regions like stellar convection zones, but may break down in strongly sub-adiabatic, stably stratified layers common in stellar radiative zones. However, studying stellar rotation, circulation, and dynamos requires understanding the complex coupling between convection and radiative zones, and this requires robust equations valid in both regimes. Here we extend the analysis of equation sets begun in Brown et al., which studied anelastic models, to two types of pseudo-incompressible models. This class of models has received attention in atmospheric applications, and more recently in studies of white-dwarf supernova progenitors. We demonstrate that one model conserves energy but the other does not. We use Lagrangian variational methods to extend the energy conserving model to a general equation of state, and dub the resulting equation set the generalized pseudo-incompressible (GPI) model. We show that the GPI equations suitably capture low-frequency phenomena in both convection and radiative zones in stars and other stratified systems, and we provide recommendations for converting low-Mach number codes to this equation set

  18. Fiscal Year 1986 Department of Energy authorization (basic research programs). Volume II-B. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy Development and Applications of the Committee on Science and Technology, US House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, February 28, 1985

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Volume II-B of the hearing record contains Appendix 3 and Appendix 4 of Volume II-A. Appendix 3 provides supporting materials on the accomplishments and project summaries of the various departments under the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. This includes DOE supported work in engineering, chemistry, biology, mathematics, geology, and the energy sciences. Appendix 4 provides summaries of DOE supported work on high energy physics, which investigates the nature of matter and the behavior of matter and energy. Over 90% of the funding for this work comes from DOE, which is responsible for national planning in the effort to develop accelerator facilities, the superconducting super collider, and other physics programs

  19. Gamble II Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Gamble II produces a high-voltage (2 MV), high-current (1 MA), short (100 ns) pulse of energy of either positive or negative polarity. This terawatt power...

  20. High Energy Physics Forum for Computational Excellence: Working Group Reports (I. Applications Software II. Software Libraries and Tools III. Systems)

    Habib, Salman [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Roser, Robert [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); LeCompte, Tom [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Marshall, Zach [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Borgland, Anders [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Viren, Brett [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Nugent, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Asai, Makato [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bauerdick, Lothar [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Finkel, Hal [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gottlieb, Steve [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Hoeche, Stefan [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sheldon, Paul [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Vay, Jean-Luc [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Elmer, Peter [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Kirby, Michael [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Patton, Simon [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Potekhin, Maxim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yanny, Brian [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Calafiura, Paolo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dart, Eli [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gutsche, Oliver [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Izubuchi, Taku [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lyon, Adam [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Petravick, Don [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA)

    2015-10-29

    Computing plays an essential role in all aspects of high energy physics. As computational technology evolves rapidly in new directions, and data throughput and volume continue to follow a steep trend-line, it is important for the HEP community to develop an effective response to a series of expected challenges. In order to help shape the desired response, the HEP Forum for Computational Excellence (HEP-FCE) initiated a roadmap planning activity with two key overlapping drivers -- 1) software effectiveness, and 2) infrastructure and expertise advancement. The HEP-FCE formed three working groups, 1) Applications Software, 2) Software Libraries and Tools, and 3) Systems (including systems software), to provide an overview of the current status of HEP computing and to present findings and opportunities for the desired HEP computational roadmap. The final versions of the reports are combined in this document, and are presented along with introductory material.