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Sample records for radial model describing

  1. WWER radial reflector modeling by diffusion codes

    Petkov, P. T.; Mittag, S.

    2005-01-01

    The two commonly used approaches to describe the WWER radial reflectors in diffusion codes, by albedo on the core-reflector boundary and by a ring of diffusive assembly size nodes, are discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of the first approach are presented first, then the Koebke's equivalence theory is outlined and its implementation for the WWER radial reflectors is discussed. Results for the WWER-1000 reactor are presented. Then the boundary conditions on the outer reflector boundary are discussed. The possibility to divide the library into fuel assembly and reflector parts and to generate each library by a separate code package is discussed. Finally, the homogenization errors for rodded assemblies are presented and discussed (Author)

  2. Frameworks for understanding and describing business models

    Nielsen, Christian; Roslender, Robin

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides in a chronological fashion an introduction to six frameworks that one can apply to describing, understanding and also potentially innovating business models. These six frameworks have been chosen carefully as they represent six very different perspectives on business models...... and in this manner “complement” each other. There are a multitude of varying frameworks that could be chosen from and we urge the reader to search and trial these for themselves. The six chosen models (year of release in parenthesis) are: • Service-Profit Chain (1994) • Strategic Systems Auditing (1997) • Strategy...... Maps (2001) • Intellectual Capital Statements (2003) • Chesbrough’s framework for Open Business Models (2006) • Business Model Canvas (2008)...

  3. Stability of radial and non-radial pulsation modes of massive ZAMS models

    Odell, A.P.; Pausenwein, A.; Weiss, W.W.; Hajek, A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have computed non-adiabatic eigenvalues for radial and non-radial pulsation modes of star models between 80 and 120 M solar with composition of chi=0.70 and Z=0.02. The radial fundamental mode is unstable in models with mass greater than 95 M solar , but the first overtone mode is always stable. The non-radial modes are all stable for all models, but the iota=2 f-mode is the closest to being driven. The non-radial modes are progressively more stable with higher iota and with higher n (for both rho- and g-modes). Thus, their results indicate that radial pulsation limits the upper mass of a star

  4. Inhomogeneous Markov Models for Describing Driving Patterns

    Iversen, Emil Banning; Møller, Jan K.; Morales, Juan Miguel

    2017-01-01

    . Specifically, an inhomogeneous Markov model that captures the diurnal variation in the use of a vehicle is presented. The model is defined by the time-varying probabilities of starting and ending a trip, and is justified due to the uncertainty associated with the use of the vehicle. The model is fitted to data...... collected from the actual utilization of a vehicle. Inhomogeneous Markov models imply a large number of parameters. The number of parameters in the proposed model is reduced using B-splines....

  5. Inhomogeneous Markov Models for Describing Driving Patterns

    Iversen, Jan Emil Banning; Møller, Jan Kloppenborg; Morales González, Juan Miguel

    . Specically, an inhomogeneous Markov model that captures the diurnal variation in the use of a vehicle is presented. The model is dened by the time-varying probabilities of starting and ending a trip and is justied due to the uncertainty associated with the use of the vehicle. The model is tted to data...... collected from the actual utilization of a vehicle. Inhomogeneous Markov models imply a large number of parameters. The number of parameters in the proposed model is reduced using B-splines....

  6. radial

    JOHN WILLIAM BRANCH

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available La creación de modelos de objetos reales es una tarea compleja para la cual se ha visto que el uso de técnicas tradicionales de modelamiento tiene restricciones. Para resolver algunos de estos problemas, los sensores de rango basados en láser se usan con frecuencia para muestrear la superficie de un objeto desde varios puntos de vista, lo que resulta en un conjunto de imágenes de rango que son registradas e integradas en un modelo final triangulado. En la práctica, debido a las propiedades reflectivas de la superficie, las oclusiones, y limitaciones de acceso, ciertas áreas de la superficie del objeto usualmente no son muestreadas, dejando huecos que pueden crear efectos indeseables en el modelo integrado. En este trabajo, presentamos un nuevo algoritmo para el llenado de huecos a partir de modelos triangulados. El algoritmo comienza localizando la frontera de las regiones donde están los huecos. Un hueco consiste de un camino cerrado de bordes de los triángulos en la frontera que tienen al menos un borde que no es compartido con ningún otro triangulo. El borde del hueco es entonces adaptado mediante un B-Spline donde la variación promedio de la torsión del la aproximación del B-spline es calculada. Utilizando un simple umbral de la variación promedio a lo largo del borde, se puede clasificar automáticamente, entre huecos reales o generados por intervención humana. Siguiendo este proceso de clasificación, se usa entonces una versión automatizada del interpolador de funciones de base radial para llenar el interior del hueco usando los bordes vecinos.

  7. Using Metaphorical Models for Describing Glaciers

    Felzmann, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    To date, there has only been little conceptual change research regarding conceptions about glaciers. This study used the theoretical background of embodied cognition to reconstruct different metaphorical concepts with respect to the structure of a glacier. Applying the Model of Educational Reconstruction, the conceptions of students and scientists…

  8. Modeling Approaches for Describing Microbial Population Heterogeneity

    Lencastre Fernandes, Rita

    environmental conditions. Three cases are presented and discussed in this thesis. Common to all is the use of S. cerevisiae as model organism, and the use of cell size and cell cycle position as single-cell descriptors. The first case focuses on the experimental and mathematical description of a yeast...

  9. Computer model analysis of the radial artery pressure waveform.

    Schwid, H A; Taylor, L A; Smith, N T

    1987-10-01

    Simultaneous measurements of aortic and radial artery pressures are reviewed, and a model of the cardiovascular system is presented. The model is based on resonant networks for the aorta and axillo-brachial-radial arterial system. The model chosen is a simple one, in order to make interpretation of the observed relationships clear. Despite its simplicity, the model produces realistic aortic and radial artery pressure waveforms. It demonstrates that the resonant properties of the arterial wall significantly alter the pressure waveform as it is propagated from the aorta to the radial artery. Although the mean and end-diastolic radial pressures are usually accurate estimates of the corresponding aortic pressures, the systolic pressure at the radial artery is often much higher than that of the aorta due to overshoot caused by the resonant behavior of the radial artery. The radial artery dicrotic notch is predominantly dependent on the axillo-brachial-radial arterial wall properties, rather than on the aortic valve or peripheral resistance. Hence the use of the radial artery dicrotic notch as an estimate of end systole is unreliable. The rate of systolic upstroke, dP/dt, of the radial artery waveform is a function of many factors, making it difficult to interpret. The radial artery waveform usually provides accurate estimates for mean and diastolic aortic pressures; for all other measurements it is an inadequate substitute for the aortic pressure waveform. In the presence of low forearm peripheral resistance the mean radial artery pressure may significantly underestimate the mean aortic pressure, as explained by a voltage divider model.

  10. Magnetic Circuit Model of PM Motor-Generator to Predict Radial Forces

    McLallin, Kerry (Technical Monitor); Kascak, Peter E.; Dever, Timothy P.; Jansen, Ralph H.

    2004-01-01

    A magnetic circuit model is developed for a PM motor for flywheel applications. A sample motor is designed and modeled. Motor configuration and selection of materials is discussed, and the choice of winding configuration is described. A magnetic circuit model is described, which includes the stator back iron, rotor yoke, permanent magnets, air gaps and the stator teeth. Iterative solution of this model yields flux linkages, back EMF, torque, power, and radial force at the rotor caused by eccentricity. Calculated radial forces are then used to determine motor negative stiffness.

  11. Modeling the Radial Color Profile of M31

    Semionov D.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a preliminary study of a fragment of the radial color profile of the spiral galaxy M 31 in terms of 2-D model accounting for internal extinction in the disk. The two stellar population disk model was assumed. The old dust-free disk population is represented by the double exponential law, and the young disk population, well mixed with the dust, resides in spiral arms of various scale-heights. We find a good agreement among the radial color B-R profiles produced by this simple model and the profile measured around the spiral arm S4 of M 31.

  12. Modelling and analysis of radial thermal stresses and temperature ...

    user

    it acts as an insulating medium and prevents the heat flow, hence the need of providing insulation coating on valves is ... geometry metal components (piston, liner and cylinder head) and found a satisfactory .... model. Step8: Find the radial thermal stress at all the nodal point with the use of temperature ..... Cast iron St. 70.

  13. Model for radial gas fraction profiles in vertical pipe flow

    Lucas, D.; Krepper, E.; Prasser, H.M.

    2001-01-01

    A one-dimensional model is presented, which predicts the radial volume fraction profiles from a given bubble size distribution. It bases on the assumption of an equilibrium of the forces acting on a bubble perpendicularly to the flow path (non drag forces). For the prediction of the flow pattern this model could be used within an procedure together with appropriate models for local bubble coalescence and break-up. (orig.)

  14. The solar modulation of galactic comic rays as described by a time-dependent drift model

    Le Roux, J.A.

    1990-09-01

    The modulation process is understood to be an interaction between cosmic rays and the solar wind. The heliosphere and the observed modulation of cosmic rays in the heliosphere was reviewed and the time-dependence nature of the long-term modulation of cosmic rays highligted. A two-dimensional time-dependent drift model that describes the long-term modulation of cosmic-rays is presented. Application of the time-dependent drift model during times of increased solar activity showed that drift should be reduced during such periods. Isolated Forbush decreases were also studied in an effort to explain some observed trends in the properties of the Forbush decrease as a function of radial distance. The magnitude of the Forbush decrease and its recovery time were therefore studied as a function of radial distance in the equatorial plane. 154 refs., 95 figs., 1 tab

  15. Radial Flow in a Multiphase Transport Model at FAIR Energies

    Soumya Sarkar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Azimuthal distributions of radial velocities of charged hadrons produced in nucleus-nucleus (AB collisions are compared with the corresponding azimuthal distribution of charged hadron multiplicity in the framework of a multiphase transport (AMPT model at two different collision energies. The mean radial velocity seems to be a good probe for studying radial expansion. While the anisotropic parts of the distributions indicate a kind of collective nature in the radial expansion of the intermediate “fireball,” their isotropic parts characterize a thermal motion. The present investigation is carried out keeping the upcoming Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM experiment to be held at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR in mind. As far as high-energy heavy-ion interactions are concerned, CBM will supplement the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC and Large Hadron Collider (LHC experiments. In this context our simulation results at high baryochemical potential would be interesting, when scrutinized from the perspective of an almost baryon-free environment achieved at RHIC and LHC.

  16. Model checking biological systems described using ambient calculus

    Mardare, Radu Iulian; Priami, Corrado; Qualia, Paola

    2005-01-01

    Model checking biological systems described using ambient calculus. In Proc. of the second International Workshop on Computational Methods in Systems Biology (CMSB04), Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics 3082:85-103, Springer, 2005.......Model checking biological systems described using ambient calculus. In Proc. of the second International Workshop on Computational Methods in Systems Biology (CMSB04), Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics 3082:85-103, Springer, 2005....

  17. Radial Domany-Kinzel models with mutation and selection

    Lavrentovich, Maxim O.; Korolev, Kirill S.; Nelson, David R.

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of spatial structure, genetic drift, mutation, and selective pressure on the evolutionary dynamics in a simplified model of asexual organisms colonizing a new territory. Under an appropriate coarse-graining, the evolutionary dynamics is related to the directed percolation processes that arise in voter models, the Domany-Kinzel (DK) model, contact process, and so on. We explore the differences between linear (flat front) expansions and the much less familiar radial (curved front) range expansions. For the radial expansion, we develop a generalized, off-lattice DK model that minimizes otherwise persistent lattice artifacts. With both simulations and analytical techniques, we study the survival probability of advantageous mutants, the spatial correlations between domains of neutral strains, and the dynamics of populations with deleterious mutations. “Inflation” at the frontier leads to striking differences between radial and linear expansions. For a colony with initial radius R0 expanding at velocity v, significant genetic demixing, caused by local genetic drift, occurs only up to a finite time t*=R0/v, after which portions of the colony become causally disconnected due to the inflating perimeter of the expanding front. As a result, the effect of a selective advantage is amplified relative to genetic drift, increasing the survival probability of advantageous mutants. Inflation also modifies the underlying directed percolation transition, introducing novel scaling functions and modifications similar to a finite-size effect. Finally, we consider radial range expansions with deflating perimeters, as might arise from colonization initiated along the shores of an island.

  18. Finite element modelling of radial lentotomy cuts to improve the accommodation performance of the human lens.

    Burd, H J; Wilde, G S

    2016-04-01

    The use of a femtosecond laser to form planes of cavitation bubbles within the ocular lens has been proposed as a potential treatment for presbyopia. The intended purpose of these planes of cavitation bubbles (referred to in this paper as 'cutting planes') is to increase the compliance of the lens, with a consequential increase in the amplitude of accommodation. The current paper describes a computational modelling study, based on three-dimensional finite element analysis, to investigate the relationship between the geometric arrangement of the cutting planes and the resulting improvement in lens accommodation performance. The study is limited to radial cutting planes. The effectiveness of a variety of cutting plane geometries was investigated by means of modelling studies conducted on a 45-year human lens. The results obtained from the analyses depend on the particular modelling procedures that are employed. When the lens substance is modelled as an incompressible material, radial cutting planes are found to be ineffective. However, when a poroelastic model is employed for the lens substance, radial cuts are shown to cause an increase in the computed accommodation performance of the lens. In this case, radial cuts made in the peripheral regions of the lens have a relatively small influence on the accommodation performance of the lens; the lentotomy process is seen to be more effective when cuts are made near to the polar axis. When the lens substance is modelled as a poroelastic material, the computational results suggest that useful improvements in lens accommodation performance can be achieved, provided that the radial cuts are extended to the polar axis. Radial cuts are ineffective when the lens substance is modelled as an incompressible material. Significant challenges remain in developing a safe and effective surgical procedure based on this lentotomy technique.

  19. Statistical models describing the energy signature of buildings

    Bacher, Peder; Madsen, Henrik; Thavlov, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Approximately one third of the primary energy production in Denmark is used for heating in buildings. Therefore efforts to accurately describe and improve energy performance of the building mass are very important. For this purpose statistical models describing the energy signature of a building, i...... or varying energy prices. The paper will give an overview of statistical methods and applied models based on experiments carried out in FlexHouse, which is an experimental building in SYSLAB, Risø DTU. The models are of different complexity and can provide estimates of physical quantities such as UA......-values, time constants of the building, and other parameters related to the heat dynamics. A method for selecting the most appropriate model for a given building is outlined and finally a perspective of the applications is given. Aknowledgements to the Danish Energy Saving Trust and the Interreg IV ``Vind i...

  20. Modelling of radial electric field profile for different divertor configurations

    Rozhansky, V; Kaveeva, E; Voskoboynikov, S; Counsell, G; Kirk, A; Meyer, H; Coster, D; Conway, G; Schirmer, J; Schneider, R

    2006-01-01

    The impact of divertor configuration on the structure of the radial electric field has been simulated by the B2SOLPS5.0 transport fluid code. It is shown that the change in the parallel flows in the scrape-off layer, which are transported through the separatrix due to turbulent viscosity and diffusivity, should result in variation of the radial electric field and toroidal rotation in the separatrix vicinity. The modelling predictions are compared with the measurements of the radial electric field for the low field side equatorial mid-plane of ASDEX Upgrade in lower, upper and double-null (DN) divertor configurations. The parallel (toroidal) flows in the scrape-off layer and mechanisms for their formation are analysed for different geometries. It is demonstrated that a spike in the electric field exists at the high field side equatorial mid-plane in the connected DN divertor configuration. Its origin is connected with different potential drops between the separatrix vicinity and divertor plates in the two disconnected scrape-off layers, while the separatrix should be at almost the same potential. The spike might be important for additional turbulent suppression

  1. Transport modelling including radial electric field and plasma rotation

    Fukuyama, A.; Fuji, Y.; Itoh, S.-I.

    1994-01-01

    Using a simple turbulent transport model with a constant diffusion coefficient and a fixed temperature profile, the density profile in a steady state and the transient behaviour during the co and counter neutral beam injection are studied. More consistent analysis has been initiated with a turbulent transport model based on the current diffusive high-n ballooning mode. The enhancement of the radial electric field due to ion orbit losses and the reduction of the transport due to the poloidal rotation shear are demonstrated. The preliminary calculation indicates a sensitive temperature dependence of the density profile. (author)

  2. Identifying Clusters with Mixture Models that Include Radial Velocity Observations

    Czarnatowicz, Alexis; Ybarra, Jason E.

    2018-01-01

    The study of stellar clusters plays an integral role in the study of star formation. We present a cluster mixture model that considers radial velocity data in addition to spatial data. Maximum likelihood estimation through the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm is used for parameter estimation. Our mixture model analysis can be used to distinguish adjacent or overlapping clusters, and estimate properties for each cluster.Work supported by awards from the Virginia Foundation for Independent Colleges (VFIC) Undergraduate Science Research Fellowship and The Research Experience @Bridgewater (TREB).

  3. Models for describing the thermal characteristics of building components

    Jimenez, M.J.; Madsen, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    , for example. For the analysis of these tests, dynamic analysis models and methods are required. However, a wide variety of models and methods exists, and the problem of choosing the most appropriate approach for each particular case is a non-trivial and interdisciplinary task. Knowledge of a large family....... The characteristics of each type of model are highlighted. Some available software tools for each of the methods described will be mentioned. A case study also demonstrating the difference between linear and nonlinear models is considered....... of these approaches may therefore be very useful for selecting a suitable approach for each particular case. This paper presents an overview of models that can be applied for modelling the thermal characteristics of buildings and building components using data from outdoor testing. The choice of approach depends...

  4. Icosahedral symmetry described by an incommensurately modulated crystal structure model

    Wolny, Janusz; Lebech, Bente

    1986-01-01

    A crystal structure model of an incommensurately modulated structure is presented. Although six different reciprocal vectors are used to describe the model, all calculations are done in three dimensions making calculation of the real-space structure trivial. Using this model, it is shown that both...... the positions of the bragg reflections and information about the relative intensities of these reflections are in full accordance with the diffraction patterns reported for microcrystals of the rapidly quenched Al86Mn14 alloy. It is also shown that at least the local structure possesses full icosahedral...

  5. A Model Describing Stable Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in Storage Rings

    Sannibale, F.

    2004-01-01

    We present a model describing high power stable broadband coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency region in an electron storage ring. The model includes distortion of bunch shape from the synchrotron radiation (SR), which enhances higher frequency coherent emission, and limits to stable emission due to an instability excited by the SR wakefield. It gives a quantitative explanation of several features of the recent observations of CSR at the BESSY II storage ring. We also use this model to optimize the performance of a source for stable CSR emission

  6. A model describing stable coherent synchrotron radiation in storage rings

    Sannibale, F.; Byrd, J.M.; Loftsdottir, A.; Venturini, M.; Abo-Bakr, M.; Feikes, J.; Holldack, K.; Kuske, P.; Wuestefeld, G.; Huebers, H.-W.; Warnock, R.

    2004-01-01

    We present a model describing high power stable broadband coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency region in an electron storage ring. The model includes distortion of bunch shape from the synchrotron radiation (SR), which enhances higher frequency coherent emission, and limits to stable emission due to an instability excited by the SR wakefield. It gives a quantitative explanation of several features of the recent observations of CSR at the BESSY II storage ring. We also use this model to optimize the performance of a source for stable CSR emission

  7. A Kinetic Model Describing Injury-Burden in Team Sports.

    Fuller, Colin W

    2017-12-01

    Injuries in team sports are normally characterised by the incidence, severity, and location and type of injuries sustained: these measures, however, do not provide an insight into the variable injury-burden experienced during a season. Injury burden varies according to the team's match and training loads, the rate at which injuries are sustained and the time taken for these injuries to resolve. At the present time, this time-based variation of injury burden has not been modelled. To develop a kinetic model describing the time-based injury burden experienced by teams in elite team sports and to demonstrate the model's utility. Rates of injury were quantified using a large eight-season database of rugby injuries (5253) and exposure (60,085 player-match-hours) in English professional rugby. Rates of recovery from injury were quantified using time-to-recovery analysis of the injuries. The kinetic model proposed for predicting a team's time-based injury burden is based on a composite rate equation developed from the incidence of injury, a first-order rate of recovery from injury and the team's playing load. The utility of the model was demonstrated by examining common scenarios encountered in elite rugby. The kinetic model developed describes and predicts the variable injury-burden arising from match play during a season of rugby union based on the incidence of match injuries, the rate of recovery from injury and the playing load. The model is equally applicable to other team sports and other scenarios.

  8. A model to describe the performance of the UASB reactor.

    Rodríguez-Gómez, Raúl; Renman, Gunno; Moreno, Luis; Liu, Longcheng

    2014-04-01

    A dynamic model to describe the performance of the Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactor was developed. It includes dispersion, advection, and reaction terms, as well as the resistances through which the substrate passes before its biotransformation. The UASB reactor is viewed as several continuous stirred tank reactors connected in series. The good agreement between experimental and simulated results shows that the model is able to predict the performance of the UASB reactor (i.e. substrate concentration, biomass concentration, granule size, and height of the sludge bed).

  9. Using the MWC model to describe heterotropic interactions in hemoglobin

    Rapp, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Hemoglobin is a classical model allosteric protein. Research on hemoglobin parallels the development of key cooperativity and allostery concepts, such as the ‘all-or-none’ Hill formalism, the stepwise Adair binding formulation and the concerted Monod-Wymann-Changuex (MWC) allosteric model. While it is clear that the MWC model adequately describes the cooperative binding of oxygen to hemoglobin, rationalizing the effects of H+, CO2 or organophosphate ligands on hemoglobin-oxygen saturation using the same model remains controversial. According to the MWC model, allosteric ligands exert their effect on protein function by modulating the quaternary conformational transition of the protein. However, data fitting analysis of hemoglobin oxygen saturation curves in the presence or absence of inhibitory ligands persistently revealed effects on both relative oxygen affinity (c) and conformational changes (L), elementary MWC parameters. The recent realization that data fitting analysis using the traditional MWC model equation may not provide reliable estimates for L and c thus calls for a re-examination of previous data using alternative fitting strategies. In the current manuscript, we present two simple strategies for obtaining reliable estimates for MWC mechanistic parameters of hemoglobin steady-state saturation curves in cases of both evolutionary and physiological variations. Our results suggest that the simple MWC model provides a reasonable description that can also account for heterotropic interactions in hemoglobin. The results, moreover, offer a general roadmap for successful data fitting analysis using the MWC model. PMID:28793329

  10. HERMES: A Model to Describe Deformation, Burning, Explosion, and Detonation

    Reaugh, J E

    2011-11-22

    HERMES (High Explosive Response to MEchanical Stimulus) was developed to fill the need for a model to describe an explosive response of the type described as BVR (Burn to Violent Response) or HEVR (High Explosive Violent Response). Characteristically this response leaves a substantial amount of explosive unconsumed, the time to reaction is long, and the peak pressure developed is low. In contrast, detonations characteristically consume all explosive present, the time to reaction is short, and peak pressures are high. However, most of the previous models to describe explosive response were models for detonation. The earliest models to describe the response of explosives to mechanical stimulus in computer simulations were applied to intentional detonation (performance) of nearly ideal explosives. In this case, an ideal explosive is one with a vanishingly small reaction zone. A detonation is supersonic with respect to the undetonated explosive (reactant). The reactant cannot respond to the pressure of the detonation before the detonation front arrives, so the precise compressibility of the reactant does not matter. Further, the mesh sizes that were practical for the computer resources then available were large with respect to the reaction zone. As a result, methods then used to model detonations, known as {beta}-burn or program burn, were not intended to resolve the structure of the reaction zone. Instead, these methods spread the detonation front over a few finite-difference zones, in the same spirit that artificial viscosity is used to spread the shock front in inert materials over a few finite-difference zones. These methods are still widely used when the structure of the reaction zone and the build-up to detonation are unimportant. Later detonation models resolved the reaction zone. These models were applied both to performance, particularly as it is affected by the size of the charge, and to situations in which the stimulus was less than that needed for reliable

  11. Modeling Marine Electromagnetic Survey with Radial Basis Function Networks

    Agus Arif

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A marine electromagnetic survey is an engineering endeavour to discover the location and dimension of a hydrocarbon layer under an ocean floor. In this kind of survey, an array of electric and magnetic receivers are located on the sea floor and record the scattered, refracted and reflected electromagnetic wave, which has been transmitted by an electric dipole antenna towed by a vessel. The data recorded in receivers must be processed and further analysed to estimate the hydrocarbon location and dimension. To conduct those analyses successfuly, a radial basis function (RBF network could be employed to become a forward model of the input-output relationship of the data from a marine electromagnetic survey. This type of neural networks is working based on distances between its inputs and predetermined centres of some basis functions. A previous research had been conducted to model the same marine electromagnetic survey using another type of neural networks, which is a multi layer perceptron (MLP network. By comparing their validation and training performances (mean-squared errors and correlation coefficients, it is concluded that, in this case, the MLP network is comparatively better than the RBF network[1].[1] This manuscript is an extended version of our previous paper, entitled Radial Basis Function Networks for Modeling Marine Electromagnetic Survey, which had been presented on 2011 International Conference on Electrical Engineering and Informatics, 17-19 July 2011, Bandung, Indonesia.

  12. A model for radial cesium transport in a fuel pellet

    Imoto, Shosuke

    1989-01-01

    In order to explain the radial redistribution of cesium in an irradiated pellet, a two-step release model is proposed. The first step involves the migration of cesium by atomic diffusion to some channels, such as grain boundaries and cracks, and the second step assumes a thermomigration down along the temperature gradient. Distribution profiles of cesium are obtained by numerical calculation with the present model assuming a constant and spatially uniform birth rate of cesium in the pellet. The result agrees well with the profile observed by micro-gamma scanning for the LWR fuel in the outer region of the pellet but diverges from it at the inner region. Discussion is made on the steady-state model hitherto generally utilized. (orig.)

  13. Conceptual hierarchical modeling to describe wetland plant community organization

    Little, A.M.; Guntenspergen, G.R.; Allen, T.F.H.

    2010-01-01

    Using multivariate analysis, we created a hierarchical modeling process that describes how differently-scaled environmental factors interact to affect wetland-scale plant community organization in a system of small, isolated wetlands on Mount Desert Island, Maine. We followed the procedure: 1) delineate wetland groups using cluster analysis, 2) identify differently scaled environmental gradients using non-metric multidimensional scaling, 3) order gradient hierarchical levels according to spatiotem-poral scale of fluctuation, and 4) assemble hierarchical model using group relationships with ordination axes and post-hoc tests of environmental differences. Using this process, we determined 1) large wetland size and poor surface water chemistry led to the development of shrub fen wetland vegetation, 2) Sphagnum and water chemistry differences affected fen vs. marsh / sedge meadows status within small wetlands, and 3) small-scale hydrologic differences explained transitions between forested vs. non-forested and marsh vs. sedge meadow vegetation. This hierarchical modeling process can help explain how upper level contextual processes constrain biotic community response to lower-level environmental changes. It creates models with more nuanced spatiotemporal complexity than classification and regression tree procedures. Using this process, wetland scientists will be able to generate more generalizable theories of plant community organization, and useful management models. ?? Society of Wetland Scientists 2009.

  14. Can the "standard" unitarized Regge models describe the TOTEM data?

    Alkin, A; Martynov, E

    2013-01-01

    The standard Regge poles are considered as inputs for two unitarization methods: eikonal and U-matrix. It is shown that only models with three input pomerons and two input odderons can describe the high energy data on $pp$ and $\\bar pp$ elastic scattering including the new data from Tevatron and LHC. However, it seems that the both considered models require a further modification (e.g. nonlinear reggeon trajectories and/or nonexponential vertex functions) for a more satisfactory description of the data at 19.0 GeV$\\leq \\sqrt{s}\\leq$ 7 TeV and 0.01 $\\leq |t|\\leq $14.2 GeV$^{2}$.

  15. Experimental investigation of statistical models describing distribution of counts

    Salma, I.; Zemplen-Papp, E.

    1992-01-01

    The binomial, Poisson and modified Poisson models which are used for describing the statistical nature of the distribution of counts are compared theoretically, and conclusions for application are considered. The validity of the Poisson and the modified Poisson statistical distribution for observing k events in a short time interval is investigated experimentally for various measuring times. The experiments to measure the influence of the significant radioactive decay were performed with 89 Y m (T 1/2 =16.06 s), using a multichannel analyser (4096 channels) in the multiscaling mode. According to the results, Poisson statistics describe the counting experiment for short measuring times (up to T=0.5T 1/2 ) and its application is recommended. However, analysis of the data demonstrated, with confidence, that for long measurements (T≥T 1/2 ) Poisson distribution is not valid and the modified Poisson function is preferable. The practical implications in calculating uncertainties and in optimizing the measuring time are discussed. Differences between the standard deviations evaluated on the basis of the Poisson and binomial models are especially significant for experiments with long measuring time (T/T 1/2 ≥2) and/or large detection efficiency (ε>0.30). Optimization of the measuring time for paired observations yields the same solution for either the binomial or the Poisson distribution. (orig.)

  16. Computer modeling describes gravity-related adaptation in cell cultures.

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Alexandrova, Stoyana; Usheva, Anny

    2009-12-16

    Questions about the changes of biological systems in response to hostile environmental factors are important but not easy to answer. Often, the traditional description with differential equations is difficult due to the overwhelming complexity of the living systems. Another way to describe complex systems is by simulating them with phenomenological models such as the well-known evolutionary agent-based model (EABM). Here we developed an EABM to simulate cell colonies as a multi-agent system that adapts to hyper-gravity in starvation conditions. In the model, the cell's heritable characteristics are generated and transferred randomly to offspring cells. After a qualitative validation of the model at normal gravity, we simulate cellular growth in hyper-gravity conditions. The obtained data are consistent with previously confirmed theoretical and experimental findings for bacterial behavior in environmental changes, including the experimental data from the microgravity Atlantis and the Hypergravity 3000 experiments. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to utilize an EABM with realistic qualitative description to examine the effects of hypergravity and starvation on complex cellular entities.

  17. RadVel: The Radial Velocity Modeling Toolkit

    Fulton, Benjamin J.; Petigura, Erik A.; Blunt, Sarah; Sinukoff, Evan

    2018-04-01

    RadVel is an open-source Python package for modeling Keplerian orbits in radial velocity (RV) timeseries. RadVel provides a convenient framework to fit RVs using maximum a posteriori optimization and to compute robust confidence intervals by sampling the posterior probability density via Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). RadVel allows users to float or fix parameters, impose priors, and perform Bayesian model comparison. We have implemented real-time MCMC convergence tests to ensure adequate sampling of the posterior. RadVel can output a number of publication-quality plots and tables. Users may interface with RadVel through a convenient command-line interface or directly from Python. The code is object-oriented and thus naturally extensible. We encourage contributions from the community. Documentation is available at http://radvel.readthedocs.io.

  18. Radially dependent photopeak efficiency model for Si(Li) detectors

    Cohen, D D [Australian Inst. of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Lucas Heights

    1980-12-15

    A simple five parameter model for the efficiency of a Si(Li) detector has been developed. It was found necessary to include a radially dependent efficiency even for small detectors. The model is an extension of the pioneering work of Hansen et al. but correction factors include more up to date data and explicit equations for the mass attenuation coefficients over a wide range of photons energies. Four of the five parameters needed are generally supplied by most commercial manufacturers of Si(Li) detectors. /sup 54/Mn and /sup 241/Am sources have been used to calibrate a Si(Li) to approx. +-3% over the energy range 3-60 keV.

  19. An axially averaged-radial transport model of tokamak edge plasmas

    Prinja, A.K.; Conn, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    A two-zone axially averaged-radial transport model for edge plasmas is described that incorporates parallel electron and ion conduction, localized recycling, parallel electron pressure gradient effects and sheath losses. Results for high recycling show that the radial electron temperature profile is determined by parallel electron conduction over short radial distances (proportional 3 cm). At larger radius where Tsub(e) has fallen appreciably, convective transport becomes equally important. The downstream density and ion temperature profiles are very flat over the region where electron conduction dominates. This is seen to result from a sharply decaying velocity profile that follows the radial electron temperature. A one-dimensional analytical recycling model shows that at high neutral pumping rates, the plasma density at the plate, nsub(ia), scales linearly with the unperturbed background density, nsub(io). When ionization dominates nsub(ia)/nsub(io) proportional exp(nsub(io)) while in the intermediate regime nsub(ia)/nsub(io) proportional exp(proportional nsub(io)). Such behavior is qualitatively in accord with experimental observations. (orig.)

  20. Modelling of radial electric fields and currents during divertor plate biasing on TdeV

    Lachambre, J.L.; Quirion, B.; Boucher, C.

    1994-01-01

    A simple model based on non-ambipolar radial transport and planar sheath physics is used to describe the generation of radial electric fields and currents in the scrape-off layer of the Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) during divertor plate biasing. In general, the calculated predictions compare favourably with TdeV results over a variety of plasma conditions and divertor magnetic configurations. Validated by the experiment, the model is used to study the scaling laws of perpendicular ion mobility and to test existing related theories. Finally, the model is proposed as a useful tool for the design and upgrade of biased divertors through optimization of the plate and throat geometry. (author). 35 refs, 16 figs, 1 tab

  1. Communication skills training: describing a new conceptual model.

    Brown, Richard F; Bylund, Carma L

    2008-01-01

    Current research in communication in physician-patient consultations is multidisciplinary and multimethodological. As this research has progressed, a considerable body of evidence on the best practices in physician-patient communication has been amassed. This evidence provides a foundation for communication skills training (CST) at all levels of medical education. Although the CST literature has demonstrated that communication skills can be taught, one critique of this literature is that it is not always clear which skills are being taught and whether those skills are matched with those being assessed. The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Comskil Model for CST seeks to answer those critiques by explicitly defining the important components of a consultation, based on Goals, Plans, and Actions theories and sociolinguistic theory. Sequenced guidelines as a mechanism for teaching about particular communication challenges are adapted from these other methods. The authors propose that consultation communication can be guided by an overarching goal, which is achieved through the use of a set of predetermined strategies. Strategies are common in CST; however, strategies often contain embedded communication skills. These skills can exist across strategies, and the Comskil Model seeks to make them explicit in these contexts. Separate from the skills are process tasks and cognitive appraisals that need to be addressed in teaching. The authors also describe how assessment practices foster concordance between skills taught and those assessed through careful coding of trainees' communication encounters and direct feedback.

  2. INCAS: an analytical model to describe displacement cascades

    Jumel, Stephanie E-mail: stephanie.jumel@edf.fr; Claude Van-Duysen, Jean E-mail: jean-claude.van-duysen@edf.fr

    2004-07-01

    REVE (REactor for Virtual Experiments) is an international project aimed at developing tools to simulate neutron irradiation effects in Light Water Reactor materials (Fe, Ni or Zr-based alloys). One of the important steps of the project is to characterise the displacement cascades induced by neutrons. Accordingly, the Department of Material Studies of Electricite de France developed an analytical model based on the binary collision approximation. This model, called INCAS (INtegration of CAScades), was devised to be applied on pure elements; however, it can also be used on diluted alloys (reactor pressure vessel steels, etc.) or alloys composed of atoms with close atomic numbers (stainless steels, etc.). INCAS describes displacement cascades by taking into account the nuclear collisions and electronic interactions undergone by the moving atoms. In particular, it enables to determine the mean number of sub-cascades induced by a PKA (depending on its energy) as well as the mean energy dissipated in each of them. The experimental validation of INCAS requires a large effort and could not be carried out in the framework of the study. However, it was verified that INCAS results are in conformity with those obtained from other approaches. As a first application, INCAS was applied to determine the sub-cascade spectrum induced in iron by the neutron spectrum corresponding to the central channel of the High Flux Irradiation Reactor of Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  3. INCAS: an analytical model to describe displacement cascades

    Jumel, Stéphanie; Claude Van-Duysen, Jean

    2004-07-01

    REVE (REactor for Virtual Experiments) is an international project aimed at developing tools to simulate neutron irradiation effects in Light Water Reactor materials (Fe, Ni or Zr-based alloys). One of the important steps of the project is to characterise the displacement cascades induced by neutrons. Accordingly, the Department of Material Studies of Electricité de France developed an analytical model based on the binary collision approximation. This model, called INCAS (INtegration of CAScades), was devised to be applied on pure elements; however, it can also be used on diluted alloys (reactor pressure vessel steels, etc.) or alloys composed of atoms with close atomic numbers (stainless steels, etc.). INCAS describes displacement cascades by taking into account the nuclear collisions and electronic interactions undergone by the moving atoms. In particular, it enables to determine the mean number of sub-cascades induced by a PKA (depending on its energy) as well as the mean energy dissipated in each of them. The experimental validation of INCAS requires a large effort and could not be carried out in the framework of the study. However, it was verified that INCAS results are in conformity with those obtained from other approaches. As a first application, INCAS was applied to determine the sub-cascade spectrum induced in iron by the neutron spectrum corresponding to the central channel of the High Flux Irradiation Reactor of Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  4. INCAS: an analytical model to describe displacement cascades

    Jumel, Stephanie; Claude Van-Duysen, Jean

    2004-01-01

    REVE (REactor for Virtual Experiments) is an international project aimed at developing tools to simulate neutron irradiation effects in Light Water Reactor materials (Fe, Ni or Zr-based alloys). One of the important steps of the project is to characterise the displacement cascades induced by neutrons. Accordingly, the Department of Material Studies of Electricite de France developed an analytical model based on the binary collision approximation. This model, called INCAS (INtegration of CAScades), was devised to be applied on pure elements; however, it can also be used on diluted alloys (reactor pressure vessel steels, etc.) or alloys composed of atoms with close atomic numbers (stainless steels, etc.). INCAS describes displacement cascades by taking into account the nuclear collisions and electronic interactions undergone by the moving atoms. In particular, it enables to determine the mean number of sub-cascades induced by a PKA (depending on its energy) as well as the mean energy dissipated in each of them. The experimental validation of INCAS requires a large effort and could not be carried out in the framework of the study. However, it was verified that INCAS results are in conformity with those obtained from other approaches. As a first application, INCAS was applied to determine the sub-cascade spectrum induced in iron by the neutron spectrum corresponding to the central channel of the High Flux Irradiation Reactor of Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  5. Cellular modelling of secondary radial growth in conifer trees: application to Pinus radiata (D. Don).

    Forest, Loïc; Demongeot, Jacques; Demongeota, Jacques

    2006-05-01

    The radial growth of conifer trees proceeds from the dynamics of a merismatic tissue called vascular cambium or cambium. Cambium is a thin layer of active proliferating cells. The purpose of this paper was to model the main characteristics of cambial activity and its consecutive radial growth. Cell growth is under the control of the auxin hormone indole-3-acetic. The model is composed of a discrete part, which accounts for cellular proliferation, and a continuous part involving the transport of auxin. Cambium is modeled in a two-dimensional cross-section by a cellular automaton that describes the set of all its constitutive cells. Proliferation is defined as growth and division of cambial cells under neighbouring constraints, which can eliminate some cells from the cambium. The cell-growth rate is determined from auxin concentration, calculated with the continuous model. We studied the integration of each elementary cambial cell activity into the global coherent movement of macroscopic morphogenesis. Cases of normal and abnormal growth of Pinus radiata (D. Don) are modelled. Abnormal growth includes deformed trees where gravity influences auxin transport, producing heterogeneous radial growth. Cross-sectional microscopic views are also provided to validate the model's hypothesis and results.

  6. Numerical model for radial transport in the ELMO Bumpy Torus

    Jaeger, E.F.; Hedrick, C.L.

    1977-11-01

    Neutral and charged particle densities and temperatures are calculated as functions of radius for the toroidal plasma in the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) experiment. Energy dependent ionization and charge-exchange rates, ambipolar diffusion, and self-consistent radial electric field profiles are included. Variation in magnetic field due to finite plasma pressure, effects of energetic electron rings, and transport due to drift waves and magnetic field errors are neglected. Diffusion is assumed to be neoclassical with enhanced losses at low collisionalities. The model reproduces many of the observed features of EBT operation in the quiescent toroidal (T) mode. The self-consistently calculated electric field is everywhere positive (not as in experiments) unless enhanced electron collisionality is included. Solutions for advanced EBT's are obtained and confinement parameters predicted

  7. Modelling and analysis of radial thermal stresses and temperature ...

    A theoretical investigation has been undertaken to study operating temperatures, heat fluxes and radial thermal stresses in the valves of a modern diesel engine with and without air-cavity. Temperatures, heat fluxes and radial thermal stresses were measured theoretically for both cases under all four thermal loading ...

  8. The elastic model for arbitrary radially cracked fuel implemented in COMETHE-4D

    Shihab, S [Belgonucleaire S.A., Brussels (Belgium)

    1997-08-01

    Among high burnup effects, the swelling occurring in the pellet rim is such that the fuel presents a radial bridging in its periphery. This secondary bridging has an important effect on the mechanical reaction of the fuel in case of PCI. The present paper describes the elastic mechanical model of the fuel to be implemented in COMETHE-4D which alleviates problems encountered with the previously model which assumed such bridging to occur solely in the central part of the fuel. (author). 9 refs, 4 figs.

  9. Using multistage models to describe radiation-induced leukaemia

    Little, M.P.; Muirhead, C.R.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Kleinerman, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Armitage-Doll model of carcinogenesis is fitted to data on leukaemia mortality among the Japanese atomic bomb survivors with the DS86 dosimetry and on leukaemia incidence in the International Radiation Study of Cervical Cancer patients. Two different forms of model are fitted: the first postulates up to two radiation-affected stages and the second additionally allows for the presence at birth of a non-trivial population of cells which have already accumulated the first of the mutations leading to malignancy. Among models of the first form, a model with two adjacent radiation-affected stages appears to fit the data better than other models of the first form, including both models with two affected stages in any order and models with only one affected stage. The best fitting model predicts a linear-quadratic dose-response and reductions of relative risk with increasing time after exposure and age at exposure, in agreement with what has previously been observed in the Japanese and cervical cancer data. However, on the whole it does not provide an adequate fit to either dataset. The second form of model appears to provide a rather better fit, but the optimal models have biologically implausible parameters (the number of initiated cells at birth is negative) so that this model must also be regarded as providing an unsatisfactory description of the data. (author)

  10. A new settling velocity model to describe secondary sedimentation.

    Ramin, Elham; Wágner, Dorottya S; Yde, Lars; Binning, Philip J; Rasmussen, Michael R; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen; Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2014-12-01

    Secondary settling tanks (SSTs) are the most hydraulically sensitive unit operations in biological wastewater treatment plants. The maximum permissible inflow to the plant depends on the efficiency of SSTs in separating and thickening the activated sludge. The flow conditions and solids distribution in SSTs can be predicted using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools. Despite extensive studies on the compression settling behaviour of activated sludge and the development of advanced settling velocity models for use in SST simulations, these models are not often used, due to the challenges associated with their calibration. In this study, we developed a new settling velocity model, including hindered, transient and compression settling, and showed that it can be calibrated to data from a simple, novel settling column experimental set-up using the Bayesian optimization method DREAM(ZS). In addition, correlations between the Herschel-Bulkley rheological model parameters and sludge concentration were identified with data from batch rheological experiments. A 2-D axisymmetric CFD model of a circular SST containing the new settling velocity and rheological model was validated with full-scale measurements. Finally, it was shown that the representation of compression settling in the CFD model can significantly influence the prediction of sludge distribution in the SSTs under dry- and wet-weather flow conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A new settling velocity model to describe secondary sedimentation

    Ramin, Elham; Wágner, Dorottya Sarolta; Yde, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Secondary settling tanks (SSTs) are the most hydraulically sensitive unit operations in biological wastewater treatment plants. The maximum permissible inflow to the plant depends on the efficiency of SSTs in separating and thickening the activated sludge. The flow conditions and solids...... distribution in SSTs can be predicted using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools. Despite extensive studies on the compression settling behaviour of activated sludge and the development of advanced settling velocity models for use in SST simulations, these models are not often used, due to the challenges...... associated with their calibration. In this study, we developed a new settling velocity model, including hindered, transient and compression settling, and showed that it can be calibrated to data from a simple, novel settling column experimental set-up using the Bayesian optimization method DREAM...

  12. LCM 3.0: A Language for describing Conceptual Models

    Feenstra, Remco; Wieringa, Roelf J.

    1993-01-01

    The syntax of the conceptual model specification language LCM is defined. LCM uses equational logic to specify data types and order-sorted dynamic logic to specify objects with identity and mutable state. LCM specifies database transactions as finite sets of atomic object transitions.

  13. A dynamic data based model describing nephropathia epidemica in Belgium

    Amirpour Haredasht, S.; Barrios, J.M.; Maes, P.; Verstraeten, W.W.; Clement, J.; Ducoffre, G.; Lagrou, K.; Van Ranst, M.; Coppin, P.; Berckmans, D.; Aerts, J.M.F.G.

    2011-01-01

    ropathia epidemica (NE) is a human infection caused by Puumala virus (PUUV), which is naturally carried and shed by bank voles (Myodes glareolus). Population dynamics and infectious diseases in general, such as NE, have often been modelled with mechanistic SIR (Susceptible, Infective and Remove with

  14. A general modeling framework for describing spatially structured population dynamics

    Sample, Christine; Fryxell, John; Bieri, Joanna; Federico, Paula; Earl, Julia; Wiederholt, Ruscena; Mattsson, Brady; Flockhart, Tyler; Nicol, Sam; Diffendorfer, James E.; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Erickson, Richard A.; Norris, D. Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Variation in movement across time and space fundamentally shapes the abundance and distribution of populations. Although a variety of approaches model structured population dynamics, they are limited to specific types of spatially structured populations and lack a unifying framework. Here, we propose a unified network-based framework sufficiently novel in its flexibility to capture a wide variety of spatiotemporal processes including metapopulations and a range of migratory patterns. It can accommodate different kinds of age structures, forms of population growth, dispersal, nomadism and migration, and alternative life-history strategies. Our objective was to link three general elements common to all spatially structured populations (space, time and movement) under a single mathematical framework. To do this, we adopt a network modeling approach. The spatial structure of a population is represented by a weighted and directed network. Each node and each edge has a set of attributes which vary through time. The dynamics of our network-based population is modeled with discrete time steps. Using both theoretical and real-world examples, we show how common elements recur across species with disparate movement strategies and how they can be combined under a unified mathematical framework. We illustrate how metapopulations, various migratory patterns, and nomadism can be represented with this modeling approach. We also apply our network-based framework to four organisms spanning a wide range of life histories, movement patterns, and carrying capacities. General computer code to implement our framework is provided, which can be applied to almost any spatially structured population. This framework contributes to our theoretical understanding of population dynamics and has practical management applications, including understanding the impact of perturbations on population size, distribution, and movement patterns. By working within a common framework, there is less chance

  15. Describing a Strongly Correlated Model System with Density Functional Theory.

    Kong, Jing; Proynov, Emil; Yu, Jianguo; Pachter, Ruth

    2017-07-06

    The linear chain of hydrogen atoms, a basic prototype for the transition from a metal to Mott insulator, is studied with a recent density functional theory model functional for nondynamic and strong correlation. The computed cohesive energy curve for the transition agrees well with accurate literature results. The variation of the electronic structure in this transition is characterized with a density functional descriptor that yields the atomic population of effectively localized electrons. These new methods are also applied to the study of the Peierls dimerization of the stretched even-spaced Mott insulator to a chain of H 2 molecules, a different insulator. The transitions among the two insulating states and the metallic state of the hydrogen chain system are depicted in a semiquantitative phase diagram. Overall, we demonstrate the capability of studying strongly correlated materials with a mean-field model at the fundamental level, in contrast to the general pessimistic view on such a feasibility.

  16. A flowing plasma model to describe drift waves in a cylindrical helicon discharge

    Chang, L.; Hole, M. J.; Corr, C. S.

    2011-01-01

    A two-fluid model developed originally to describe wave oscillations in the vacuum arc centrifuge, a cylindrical, rapidly rotating, low temperature, and confined plasma column, is applied to interpret plasma oscillations in a RF generated linear magnetized plasma [WOMBAT (waves on magnetized beams and turbulence)], with similar density and field strength. Compared to typical centrifuge plasmas, WOMBAT plasmas have slower normalized rotation frequency, lower temperature, and lower axial velocity. Despite these differences, the two-fluid model provides a consistent description of the WOMBAT plasma configuration and yields qualitative agreement between measured and predicted wave oscillation frequencies with axial field strength. In addition, the radial profile of the density perturbation predicted by this model is consistent with the data. Parameter scans show that the dispersion curve is sensitive to the axial field strength and the electron temperature, and the dependence of oscillation frequency with electron temperature matches the experiment. These results consolidate earlier claims that the density and floating potential oscillations are a resistive drift mode, driven by the density gradient. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed physics model of flowing plasmas in the diffusion region away from the RF source. Possible extensions to the model, including temperature nonuniformity and magnetic field oscillations, are also discussed.

  17. A Biophysical Neural Model To Describe Spatial Visual Attention

    Hugues, Etienne; Jose, Jorge V.

    2008-01-01

    Visual scenes have enormous spatial and temporal information that are transduced into neural spike trains. Psychophysical experiments indicate that only a small portion of a spatial image is consciously accessible. Electrophysiological experiments in behaving monkeys have revealed a number of modulations of the neural activity in special visual area known as V4, when the animal is paying attention directly towards a particular stimulus location. The nature of the attentional input to V4, however, remains unknown as well as to the mechanisms responsible for these modulations. We use a biophysical neural network model of V4 to address these issues. We first constrain our model to reproduce the experimental results obtained for different external stimulus configurations and without paying attention. To reproduce the known neuronal response variability, we found that the neurons should receive about equal, or balanced, levels of excitatory and inhibitory inputs and whose levels are high as they are in in vivo conditions. Next we consider attentional inputs that can induce and reproduce the observed spiking modulations. We also elucidate the role played by the neural network to generate these modulations

  18. Organisms modeling: The question of radial basis function networks

    Muzy Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There exists usually a gap between bio-inspired computational techniques and what biologists can do with these techniques in their current researches. Although biology is the root of system-theory and artifical neural networks, computer scientists are tempted to build their own systems independently of biological issues. This publication is a first-step re-evalution of an usual machine learning technique (radial basis funtion(RBF networks in the context of systems and biological reactive organisms.

  19. Comparison of CME radial velocities from a flux rope model and an ice cream cone model

    Kim, T.; Moon, Y.; Na, H.

    2011-12-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) on the Sun are the largest energy release process in the solar system and act as the primary driver of geomagnetic storms and other space weather phenomena on the Earth. So it is very important to infer their directions, velocities and three-dimensional structures. In this study, we choose two different models to infer radial velocities of halo CMEs since 2008 : (1) an ice cream cone model by Xue et al (2005) using SOHO/LASCO data, (2) a flux rope model by Thernisien et al. (2009) using the STEREO/SECCHI data. In addition, we use another flux rope model in which the separation angle of flux rope is zero, which is morphologically similar to the ice cream cone model. The comparison shows that the CME radial velocities from among each model have very good correlations (R>0.9). We will extending this comparison to other partial CMEs observed by STEREO and SOHO.

  20. Interacting Multiple Model (IMM) Fifth-Degree Spherical Simplex-Radial Cubature Kalman Filter for Maneuvering Target Tracking.

    Liu, Hua; Wu, Wen

    2017-06-13

    For improving the tracking accuracy and model switching speed of maneuvering target tracking in nonlinear systems, a new algorithm named the interacting multiple model fifth-degree spherical simplex-radial cubature Kalman filter (IMM5thSSRCKF) is proposed in this paper. The new algorithm is a combination of the interacting multiple model (IMM) filter and the fifth-degree spherical simplex-radial cubature Kalman filter (5thSSRCKF). The proposed algorithm makes use of Markov process to describe the switching probability among the models, and uses 5thSSRCKF to deal with the state estimation of each model. The 5thSSRCKF is an improved filter algorithm, which utilizes the fifth-degree spherical simplex-radial rule to improve the filtering accuracy. Finally, the tracking performance of the IMM5thSSRCKF is evaluated by simulation in a typical maneuvering target tracking scenario. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm has better tracking performance and quicker model switching speed when disposing maneuver models compared with the interacting multiple model unscented Kalman filter (IMMUKF), the interacting multiple model cubature Kalman filter (IMMCKF) and the interacting multiple model fifth-degree cubature Kalman filter (IMM5thCKF).

  1. Interacting Multiple Model (IMM Fifth-Degree Spherical Simplex-Radial Cubature Kalman Filter for Maneuvering Target Tracking

    Hua Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available For improving the tracking accuracy and model switching speed of maneuvering target tracking in nonlinear systems, a new algorithm named the interacting multiple model fifth-degree spherical simplex-radial cubature Kalman filter (IMM5thSSRCKF is proposed in this paper. The new algorithm is a combination of the interacting multiple model (IMM filter and the fifth-degree spherical simplex-radial cubature Kalman filter (5thSSRCKF. The proposed algorithm makes use of Markov process to describe the switching probability among the models, and uses 5thSSRCKF to deal with the state estimation of each model. The 5thSSRCKF is an improved filter algorithm, which utilizes the fifth-degree spherical simplex-radial rule to improve the filtering accuracy. Finally, the tracking performance of the IMM5thSSRCKF is evaluated by simulation in a typical maneuvering target tracking scenario. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm has better tracking performance and quicker model switching speed when disposing maneuver models compared with the interacting multiple model unscented Kalman filter (IMMUKF, the interacting multiple model cubature Kalman filter (IMMCKF and the interacting multiple model fifth-degree cubature Kalman filter (IMM5thCKF.

  2. Non-Radial Oscillation Modes of Superfluid Neutron Stars Modeled with CompOSE

    Prashanth Jaikumar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We compute the principal non-radial oscillation mode frequencies of Neutron Stars described with a Skyrme-like Equation of State (EoS, taking into account the possibility of neutron and proton superfluidity. Using the CompOSE database and interpolation routines to obtain the needed thermodynamic quantities, we solve the fluid oscillation equations numerically in the background of a fully relativistic star, and identify imprints of the superfluid state. Though these modes cannot be observed with current technology, increased sensitivity of future Gravitational-Wave Observatories could allow us to observe these oscillations and potentially constrain or refine models of dense matter relevant to the interior of neutron stars.

  3. Simulating radial diffusion of energetic (MeV electrons through a model of fluctuating electric and magnetic fields

    T. Sarris

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a test particle simulation is performed in a model of analytic Ultra Low Frequency, ULF, perturbations in the electric and magnetic fields of the Earth's magnetosphere. The goal of this work is to examine if the radial transport of energetic particles in quiet-time ULF magnetospheric perturbations of various azimuthal mode numbers can be described as a diffusive process and be approximated by theoretically derived radial diffusion coefficients. In the model realistic compressional electromagnetic field perturbations are constructed by a superposition of a large number of propagating electric and consistent magnetic pulses. The diffusion rates of the electrons under the effect of the fluctuating fields are calculated numerically through the test-particle simulation as a function of the radial coordinate L in a dipolar magnetosphere; these calculations are then compared to the symmetric, electromagnetic radial diffusion coefficients for compressional, poloidal perturbations in the Earth's magnetosphere. In the model the amplitude of the perturbation fields can be adjusted to represent realistic states of magnetospheric activity. Similarly, the azimuthal modulation of the fields can be adjusted to represent different azimuthal modes of fluctuations and the contribution to radial diffusion from each mode can be quantified. Two simulations of quiet-time magnetospheric variability are performed: in the first simulation, diffusion due to poloidal perturbations of mode number m=1 is calculated; in the second, the diffusion rates from multiple-mode (m=0 to m=8 perturbations are calculated. The numerical calculations of the diffusion coefficients derived from the particle orbits are found to agree with the corresponding theoretical estimates of the diffusion coefficient within a factor of two.

  4. Analysis and test of a 16-foot radial rib reflector developmental model

    Birchenough, Shawn A.

    1989-01-01

    Analytical and experimental modal tests were performed to determine the vibrational characteristics of a 16-foot diameter radial rib reflector model. Single rib analyses and experimental tests provided preliminary information relating to the reflector. A finite element model predicted mode shapes and frequencies of the reflector. The analyses correlated well with the experimental tests, verifying the modeling method used. The results indicate that five related, characteristic mode shapes form a group. The frequencies of the modes are determined by the relative phase of the radial ribs.

  5. Sea Surface Temperature Modeling using Radial Basis Function Networks With a Dynamically Weighted Particle Filter

    Ryu, Duchwan; Liang, Faming; Mallick, Bani K.

    2013-01-01

    be modeled by a dynamic system which changes with time and location. In this article, we propose a radial basis function network-based dynamic model which is able to catch the nonlinearity of the data and propose to use the dynamically weighted particle

  6. Modelling and analysis of radial thermal stresses and temperature ...

    user

    The temperature field, heat transfer rate and thermal stresses were investigated with numerical simulation models using FORTRAN FE (finite element) software. ...... specific heats, International Communications in Heat and Mass Transfer, Vol.

  7. Radial restricted solid-on-solid and etching interface-growth models

    Alves, Sidiney G.

    2018-03-01

    An approach to generate radial interfaces is presented. A radial network recursively obtained is used to implement discrete model rules designed originally for the investigation in flat substrates. I used the restricted solid-on-solid and etching models as to test the proposed scheme. The results indicate the Kardar, Parisi, and Zhang conjecture is completely verified leading to a good agreement between the interface radius fluctuation distribution and the Gaussian unitary ensemble. The evolution of the radius agrees well with the generalized conjecture, and the two-point correlation function exhibits also a good agreement with the covariance of the Airy2 process. The approach can be used to investigate radial interfaces evolution for many other classes of universality.

  8. A prediction model for the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids considering agglomeration and the radial distribution function of nanoparticles

    Zheng, Z. M.; Wang, B.

    2018-06-01

    Conventional heat transfer fluids usually have low thermal conductivity, limiting their efficiency in many applications. Many experiments have shown that adding nanosize solid particles to conventional fluids can greatly enhance their thermal conductivity. To explain this anomalous phenomenon, many theoretical investigations have been conducted in recent years. Some of this research has indicated that the particle agglomeration effect that commonly occurs in nanofluids should play an important role in such enhancement of the thermal conductivity, while some have shown that the enhancement of the effective thermal conductivity might be accounted for by the structure of nanofluids, which can be described using the radial distribution function of particles. However, theoretical predictions from these studies are not in very good agreement with experimental results. This paper proposes a prediction model for the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids, considering both the agglomeration effect and the radial distribution function of nanoparticles. The resulting theoretical predictions for several sets of nanofluids are highly consistent with experimental data.

  9. Self-consistent model for the radial current generation during fishbone activity

    Lutsenko, V.V.; Marchenko, V.S.

    2002-01-01

    Line broadened quasilinear burst model, originally developed for the bump-on-tail instability [H. L. Berk et al., Nucl. Fusion 35, 1661 (1995)], is extended to the problem of sheared flow generation by the fishbone burst. It is supposed that the radial current of the resonant fast ions can be sufficient to create the transport barrier

  10. Finite element modelling of process-integrated powder coating by radial axial rolling of rings

    Frischkorn, J.; Kebriaei, R.; Reese, S.; Moll, H.; Theisen, W.; Husmann, T.; Meier, H.

    2011-01-01

    The process-integrated powder coating by radial axial rolling of rings represents a new hybrid production technique applied in the manufacturing of large ring-shaped work pieces with functional layers. It is thought to break some limitations that come along with the hot isostatic pressing (HIP) which is used nowadays to apply the powdery layer material onto the rolled substrate ring. Within the new process the compaction of the layer material is integrated into the ring rolling and HIP becomes dispensable. Following this approach the rolling of such compound rings brings up some new challenges. The volume of a solid ring stays nearly constant during the rolling. This behaviour can be exploited to determine the infeed of the rollers needed to reach the desired ring shape. Since volume consistency cannot be guaranteed for the rolling of a compound ring the choice of appropriate infeed of the rollers is still an open question. This paper deals with the finite element (FE) simulation of this new process. First, the material model that is used to describe the compaction of the layer material is shortly reviewed. The main focus of the paper is then put on a parameterized FE ring rolling model that incorporates a control system in order to stabilize the process. Also the differences in the behaviour during the rolling stage between a compound and a solid ring will be discussed by means of simulation results.

  11. Capturing spiral radial growth of conifers using the superellipse to model tree-ring geometric shape.

    Shi, Pei-Jian; Huang, Jian-Guo; Hui, Cang; Grissino-Mayer, Henri D; Tardif, Jacques C; Zhai, Li-Hong; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Li, Bai-Lian

    2015-01-01

    Tree-rings are often assumed to approximate a circular shape when estimating forest productivity and carbon dynamics. However, tree rings are rarely, if ever, circular, thereby possibly resulting in under- or over-estimation in forest productivity and carbon sequestration. Given the crucial role played by tree ring data in assessing forest productivity and carbon storage within a context of global change, it is particularly important that mathematical models adequately render cross-sectional area increment derived from tree rings. We modeled the geometric shape of tree rings using the superellipse equation and checked its validation based on the theoretical simulation and six actual cross sections collected from three conifers. We found that the superellipse better describes the geometric shape of tree rings than the circle commonly used. We showed that a spiral growth trend exists on the radial section over time, which might be closely related to spiral grain along the longitudinal axis. The superellipse generally had higher accuracy than the circle in predicting the basal area increment, resulting in an improved estimate for the basal area. The superellipse may allow better assessing forest productivity and carbon storage in terrestrial forest ecosystems.

  12. Global 3D radiation-hydrodynamics models of AGB stars. Effects of convection and radial pulsations on atmospheric structures

    Freytag, B.; Liljegren, S.; Höfner, S.

    2017-04-01

    Context. Observations of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with increasing spatial resolution reveal new layers of complexity of atmospheric processes on a variety of scales. Aims: To analyze the physical mechanisms that cause asymmetries and surface structures in observed images, we use detailed 3D dynamical simulations of AGB stars; these simulations self-consistently describe convection and pulsations. Methods: We used the CO5BOLD radiation-hydrodynamics code to produce an exploratory grid of global "star-in-a-box" models of the outer convective envelope and the inner atmosphere of AGB stars to study convection, pulsations, and shock waves and their dependence on stellar and numerical parameters. Results: The model dynamics are governed by the interaction of long-lasting giant convection cells, short-lived surface granules, and strong, radial, fundamental-mode pulsations. Radial pulsations and shorter wavelength, traveling, acoustic waves induce shocks on various scales in the atmosphere. Convection, waves, and shocks all contribute to the dynamical pressure and, thus, to an increase of the stellar radius and to a levitation of material into layers where dust can form. Consequently, the resulting relation of pulsation period and stellar radius is shifted toward larger radii compared to that of non-linear 1D models. The dependence of pulsation period on luminosity agrees well with observed relations. The interaction of the pulsation mode with the non-stationary convective flow causes occasional amplitude changes and phase shifts. The regularity of the pulsations decreases with decreasing gravity as the relative size of convection cells increases. The model stars do not have a well-defined surface. Instead, the light is emitted from a very extended inhomogeneous atmosphere with a complex dynamic pattern of high-contrast features. Conclusions: Our models self-consistently describe convection, convectively generated acoustic noise, fundamental-mode radial

  13. Differences in radial expansion force among inferior vena cava filter models support documented perforation rates.

    Robins, J Eli; Ragai, Ihab; Yamaguchi, Dean J

    2018-05-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are used in patients at risk for pulmonary embolism who cannot be anticoagulated. Unfortunately, these filters are not without risk, and complications include perforation, migration, and filter fracture. The most prevalent complication is filter perforation of the IVC, with incidence varying among filter models. To our knowledge, the mechanical properties of IVC filters have not been evaluated and are not readily available through the manufacturer. This study sought to determine whether differences in mechanical properties are similar to differences in documented perforation rates. The radial expansion forces of Greenfield (Boston Scientific, Marlborough, Mass), Cook Celect (Cook Medical, Bloomington, Ind), and Cook Platinum filters were analyzed with three replicates per group. The intrinsic force exerted by the filter on the measuring device was collected in real time during controlled expansion. Replicates were averaged and significance was determined by calculating analysis of covariance using SAS software (SAS Institute, Cary, NC). Each filter model generated a significantly different radial expansion force (P filter, followed by the Cook Celect and Greenfield filters. Radial force dispersion during expansion was greatest in the Cook Celect, followed by the Cook Platinum and Greenfield filters. Differences in radial expansion forces among IVC filter models are consistent with documented perforation rates. Cook Celect IVC filters have a higher incidence of perforation compared with Greenfield filters when they are left in place for >90 days. Evaluation of Cook Celect filters yielded a significantly higher radial expansion force at minimum caval diameter, with greater force dispersion during expansion. Copyright © 2018 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A model of two-stream non-radial accretion for binary X-ray pulsars

    Lipunov, V.M.

    1982-01-01

    The general case of non-radial accretion is assumed to occur in real binary systems containing X-ray pulsars. The structure and the stability of the magnetosphere, the interaction between the magnetosphere and accreted matter, as well as evolution of neutron star in close binary system are examined within the framework of the two-stream model of nonradial accretion onto a magnetized neutron star. Observable parameters of X-ray pulsars are explained in terms of the model considered. (orig.)

  15. Modeling multivariate time series on manifolds with skew radial basis functions.

    Jamshidi, Arta A; Kirby, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach for constructing nonlinear empirical mappings from high-dimensional domains to multivariate ranges. We employ radial basis functions and skew radial basis functions for constructing a model using data that are potentially scattered or sparse. The algorithm progresses iteratively, adding a new function at each step to refine the model. The placement of the functions is driven by a statistical hypothesis test that accounts for correlation in the multivariate range variables. The test is applied on training and validation data and reveals nonstatistical or geometric structure when it fails. At each step, the added function is fit to data contained in a spatiotemporally defined local region to determine the parameters--in particular, the scale of the local model. The scale of the function is determined by the zero crossings of the autocorrelation function of the residuals. The model parameters and the number of basis functions are determined automatically from the given data, and there is no need to initialize any ad hoc parameters save for the selection of the skew radial basis functions. Compactly supported skew radial basis functions are employed to improve model accuracy, order, and convergence properties. The extension of the algorithm to higher-dimensional ranges produces reduced-order models by exploiting the existence of correlation in the range variable data. Structure is tested not just in a single time series but between all pairs of time series. We illustrate the new methodologies using several illustrative problems, including modeling data on manifolds and the prediction of chaotic time series.

  16. Review of reactive kinetic models describing reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes in soil and groundwater

    Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Reductive dechlorination is a major degradation pathway of chlorinated ethenes in anaerobic subsurface environments, and reactive kinetic models describing the degradation process are needed in fate and transport models of these contaminants. However, reductive dechlorination is a complex biologi...

  17. A model describing water and salt migration in concrete during wetting/drying cycles

    Arends, T.; Taher, A.; van der Zanden, A.J.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.; Bilek, V.; Kersner, Z.

    2014-01-01

    In order to predict the life span of concrete structures, models describing the migration of chloride are needed. In this paper, a start is made with a simple, theoretical model describing water and chloride transport in a concrete sample. First, transport of water in concrete is considered with

  18. The Morphological Characteristics and Mechanical Formation of Giant Radial Dike Swarms on Venus: An Overview Emphasizing Recent Numerical Modeling Insights

    McGovern, P. J., Jr.; Grosfils, E. B.; Le Corvec, N.; Ernst, R. E.; Galgana, G. A.

    2017-12-01

    Over 200 giant radial dike swarms have been identified on Venus using Magellan data, yielding insight into morphological characteristics long since erased by erosion and other processes on Earth. Since such radial dike systems are typically associated with magma reservoirs, large volcanoes and/or larger-scale plume activity—and because dike geometry reflects stress conditions at the time of intrusion—assessing giant radial dike formation in the context of swarm morphology can place important constraints upon this fundamental volcanotectonic process. Recent numerical models reveal that, contrary to what is reported in much of the published literature, it is not easy, mechanically, to produce either large or small radial dike systems. After extensive numerical examination of reservoir inflation, however, under conditions ranging from a simple halfspace to complex flexural loading, we have thus far identified four scenarios that produce radial dike systems. Two of these scenarios yield dike systems akin to those often associated with shield and stratocone volcanoes on Earth, while the other two, our focus here, are more consistent with the giant radial dike system geometries catalogued on Venus. In this presentation we will (a) review key morphological characteristics of the giant radial systems identified on Venus, (b) briefly illustrate why it is not easy, mechanically, to produce a radial dike system, (c) present the two volcanological circumstances we have identified that do allow a giant radial dike system to form, and (d) discuss current model limitations and potentially fruitful directions for future research.

  19. Endorsement of Models Describing Sexual Response of Men and Women with a Sexual Partner

    Giraldi, Annamaria; Kristensen, Ellids; Sand, Michael

    2015-01-01

    , erectile dysfunction and dissatisfaction with sexual life were significantly related to endorsement of the Basson model or none of the models (P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: No single model of sexual response could describe men's and women's sexual responses. The majority of men and women with no sexual......INTRODUCTION: Several models have been used to describe men's and women's sexual responses. These models have been conceptualized as linear or circular models. The circular models were proposed to describe women's sexual function best. AIM: This study aims to determine whether men and women thought...... that current theoretical models of sexual responses accurately reflected their own sexual experience and to what extent this was influenced by sexual dysfunction. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of a large, broadly sampled, nonclinical population, cohort of Danish men and women. The Female Sexual Function...

  20. Extending the radial diffusion model of Falthammar to non-dipole background field

    Cunningham, Gregory Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-26

    A model for radial diffusion caused by electromagnetic disturbances was published by Falthammar (1965) using a two-parameter model of the disturbance perturbing a background dipole magnetic field. Schulz and Lanzerotti (1974) extended this model by recognizing the two parameter perturbation as the leading (non--dipole) terms of the Mead Williams magnetic field model. They emphasized that the magnetic perturbation in such a model induces an electric ield that can be calculated from the motion of field lines on which the particles are ‘frozen’. Roederer and Zhang (2014) describe how the field lines on which the particles are frozen can be calculated by tracing the unperturbed field lines from the minimum-B location to the ionospheric footpoint, and then tracing the perturbed field (which shares the same ionospheric footpoint due to the frozen -in condition) from the ionospheric footpoint back to a perturbed minimum B location. The instantaneous change n Roederer L*, dL*/dt, can then be computed as the product (dL*/dphi)*(dphi/dt). dL*/Dphi is linearly dependent on the perturbation parameters (to first order) and is obtained by computing the drift across L*-labeled perturbed field lines, while dphi/dt is related to the bounce-averaged gradient-curvature drift velocity. The advantage of assuming a dipole background magnetic field, as in these previous studies, is that the instantaneous dL*/dt can be computed analytically (with some approximations), as can the DLL that results from integrating dL*/dt over time and computing the expected value of (dL*)^2. The approach can also be applied to complex background magnetic field models like T89 or TS04, on top of which the small perturbations are added, but an analytical solution is not possible and so a numerical solution must be implemented. In this talk, I discuss our progress in implementing a numerical solution to the calculation of DL*L* using arbitrary background field models with simple electromagnetic

  1. Point kinetics model with one-dimensional (radial) heat conduction formalism

    Jain, V.K.

    1989-01-01

    A point-kinetics model with one-dimensional (radial) heat conduction formalism has been developed. The heat conduction formalism is based on corner-mesh finite difference method. To get average temperatures in various conducting regions, a novel weighting scheme has been devised. The heat conduction model has been incorporated in the point-kinetics code MRTF-FUEL. The point-kinetics equations are solved using the method of real integrating factors. It has been shown by analysing the simulation of hypothetical loss of regulation accident in NAPP reactor that the model is superior to the conventional one in accuracy and speed of computation. (author). 3 refs., 3 tabs

  2. A model for predicting the radial power profile in a fuel pin

    Palmer, I.D.; Hesketh, K.W.; Jackson, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    A simple, fast running computer program for calculating radial power profiles, throughout life, in both standard and duplex fuel pellets for all types of thermal reactor has been developed. The code sub-divides the pellet into a number of annuli for each of which it solves for the concentrations of uranium and plutonium and hence calculates a mean inverse diffusion length. The diffusion equation is solved in terms of Bessel functions and the resulting flux profile multiplied by the concentration profiles to give a radial rating profile which is normalised to unity. The model shows good agreement with the results of detailed physics calculations for different thermal reactors over a wide burn-up range. Its incorporation into the HOTROD-4C and SLEUTH-SEER-77 fuel performance codes has led to a negligible increase in running times. (author)

  3. Radial and Regge excitations in unified, grand unified and subconstituent models

    Schnitzer, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    Necessary group theoretic conditions for all elementary gauge bosons and fermions of an arbitrary renormalizable gauge theory to lie on Regge trajectories are reviewed. It is then argued that in properly unified gauge theories all particles of a given spin lie on Regge trajectories. This then implies that a properly unified gauge theory has no local U(1) factor groups, and no massive fermion singlets. A consideration of the general pattern of Regge and radial recurrences to be expected in quantum field theories suggests that the presence or absence of spin 3/2 quarks and/or leptons in the TeV region will provide crucial clues to enable one to distinguish between various classes of unified, grand unified, and subconstituent models. The correct interpretation of such excited fermions will require correlation with the higgs boson mass and possible radial and Regge excitations of the weak vector bosons. (orig.)

  4. Mathematical model for solar drying of potato cylinders with thermal conductivity radially modulated

    Trujillo Arredondo, Mariana

    2014-05-01

    A mathematical model for drying potato cylinders using solar radiation is proposed and solved analytically. The model incorporates the energy balance for the heat capacity of the potato, the radiation heat transfer from the potato toward the drying chamber and the solar radiation absorbed by the potato during the drying process. Potato cylinders are assumed to exhibit a thermal conductivity which is radially modulated. The method of the Laplace transform, with integral Bromwich and residue theorem will be applied and the analytic solutions for the temperature profiles in the potato cylinder will be derived in the form of an infinite series of Bessel functions, when the thermal conductivity is constant; and in the form of an infinite series of Heun functions, when the thermal conductivity has a linear radial modulation. All computations are performed using computer algebra, specifically Maple. It is expected that the analytical results obtained will be useful in food engineering and industry. Our results suggest some lines for future investigations such as the adoption of more general forms of radial modulation for the thermal conductivity of potato cylinders; and possible applications of other computer algebra software such as Maxima and Mathematica.

  5. Blending of Radial HF Radar Surface Current and Model Using ETKF Scheme For The Sunda Strait

    Mujiasih, Subekti; Riyadi, Mochammad; Wandono, Dr; Wayan Suardana, I.; Nyoman Gede Wiryajaya, I.; Nyoman Suarsa, I.; Hartanto, Dwi; Barth, Alexander; Beckers, Jean-Marie

    2017-04-01

    Preliminary study of data blending of surface current for Sunda Strait-Indonesia has been done using the analysis scheme of the Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (ETKF). The method is utilized to combine radial velocity from HF Radar and u and v component of velocity from Global Copernicus - Marine environment monitoring service (CMEMS) model. The initial ensemble is based on the time variability of the CMEMS model result. Data tested are from 2 CODAR Seasonde radar sites in Sunda Strait and 2 dates such as 09 September 2013 and 08 February 2016 at 12.00 UTC. The radial HF Radar data has a hourly temporal resolution, 20-60 km of spatial range, 3 km of range resolution, 5 degree of angular resolution and spatial resolution and 11.5-14 MHz of frequency range. The u and v component of the model velocity represents a daily mean with 1/12 degree spatial resolution. The radial data from one HF radar site is analyzed and the result compared to the equivalent radial velocity from CMEMS for the second HF radar site. Error checking is calculated by root mean squared error (RMSE). Calculation of ensemble analysis and ensemble mean is using Sangoma software package. The tested R which represents observation error covariance matrix, is a diagonal matrix with diagonal elements equal 0.05, 0.5 or 1.0 m2/s2. The initial ensemble members comes from a model simulation spanning a month (September 2013 or February 2016), one year (2013) or 4 years (2013-2016). The spatial distribution of the radial current are analyzed and the RMSE values obtained from independent HF radar station are optimized. It was verified that the analysis reproduces well the structure included in the analyzed HF radar data. More importantly, the analysis was also improved relative to the second independent HF radar site. RMSE of the improved analysis is better than first HF Radar site Analysis. The best result of the blending exercise was obtained for observation error variance equal to 0.05 m2/s2. This study is

  6. A revised multi-Fickian moisture transport model to describe non-Fickian effects in wood

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Damkilde, Lars; Svensson, Staffan

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a study and a refinement of the sorption rate model in a so-called multi-Fickian or multi-phase model. This type of model describes the complex moisture transport system in wood, which consists of separate water vapor and bound-water diffusion interacting through sorption...... sorption allow a simplification of the system to be modeled by a single Fickian diffusion equation. To determine the response of the system, the sorption rate model is essential. Here the function modeling the moisture-dependent adsorption rate is investigated based on existing experiments on thin wood...

  7. Radial diffusion in the Uranian radiatian belts - Inferences from satellite absorption loss models

    Hood, L. L.

    1989-01-01

    Low-energy charged particle (LECP) phase space density profiles available from the Voyager/1986 Uranus encounter are analyzed, using solutions of the time-averaged radial diffusion equation for charged particle transport in a dipolar planetary magnetic field. Profiles for lower-energy protons and electrons are first analyzed to infer radial diffusion rate as a function of L, assuming that satellite absorption is the dominant loss process and local sources for these particles are negligible. Satellite macrosignatures present in the experimentally derived profiles are approximately reproduced in several cases, lending credence to the loss model and indicating that magnetospheric distributed losses are not as rapid as satellite absorption near the minimum satellite L shells for the particles. Diffusion rates and L dependences are found to be similar to those previously inferred in the inner Jovian magnetosphere (Thomsen et al., 1977) and for the inner Saturnian magnetosphere (Hood, 1985). Profiles for higher energy electrons and protons are also analyzed using solutions that allow for the existence of significant particle sources as well as sinks. Possible implications for radial diffusion mechanisms in the Uranian radiation belts are discussed.

  8. Modeling of radial gas fraction profiles for bubble flow in vertical pipes

    Lucas, D.; Krepper, E.; Prasser, H.-M. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V., Institute of Safety Research, Dresden (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    The paper presents a method for the prediction of radial gas fraction profiles from a given bubble size distribution. The method is based on the assumption of the equilibrium of the forces acting on a bubble perpendicularly to the flow direction. Assuming a large number of bubble size classes radial distributions are calculated separately for all bubble classes. The sum of these distributions is the radial profile of the gas fraction. The results of the model are compared with experimental data for a number of gas and liquid volume flow rates. The experiments were performed at a vertical test loop (inner diameter 50 mm) in FZ-Rossendorf using a wire mesh sensor. The sensor enables the determination of void distributions in the cross section of the loop. A special evaluation procedure supplies bubble size distributions as well as local distributions of bubbles within a predefined interval of bubble sizes. There is a good agreement between experimental and calculated data. In particular the change from wall peaking to core peaking is well predicted. (authors)

  9. Modeling of radial gas fraction profiles for bubble flow in vertical pipes

    Lucas, D.; Krepper, E.; Prasser, H.-M.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents a method for the prediction of radial gas fraction profiles from a given bubble size distribution. The method is based on the assumption of the equilibrium of the forces acting on a bubble perpendicularly to the flow direction. Assuming a large number of bubble size classes radial distributions are calculated separately for all bubble classes. The sum of these distributions is the radial profile of the gas fraction. The results of the model are compared with experimental data for a number of gas and liquid volume flow rates. The experiments were performed at a vertical test loop (inner diameter 50 mm) in FZ-Rossendorf using a wire mesh sensor. The sensor enables the determination of void distributions in the cross section of the loop. A special evaluation procedure supplies bubble size distributions as well as local distributions of bubbles within a predefined interval of bubble sizes. There is a good agreement between experimental and calculated data. In particular the change from wall peaking to core peaking is well predicted. (authors)

  10. A radial distribution function-based open boundary force model for multi-centered molecules

    Neumann, Philipp

    2014-06-01

    We derive an expression for radial distribution function (RDF)-based open boundary forcing for molecules with multiple interaction sites. Due to the high-dimensionality of the molecule configuration space and missing rotational invariance, a computationally cheap, 1D approximation of the arising integral expressions as in the single-centered case is not possible anymore. We propose a simple, yet accurate model invoking standard molecule- and site-based RDFs to approximate the respective integral equation. The new open boundary force model is validated for ethane in different scenarios and shows very good agreement with data from periodic simulations. © World Scientific Publishing Company.

  11. Design and Modeling of RF Power Amplifiers with Radial Basis Function Artificial Neural Networks

    Ali Reza Zirak; Sobhan Roshani

    2016-01-01

    A radial basis function (RBF) artificial neural network model for a designed high efficiency radio frequency class-F power amplifier (PA) is presented in this paper. The presented amplifier is designed at 1.8 GHz operating frequency with 12 dB of gain and 36 dBm of 1dB output compression point. The obtained power added efficiency (PAE) for the presented PA is 76% under 26 dBm input power. The proposed RBF model uses input and DC power of the PA as inputs variables and considers output power a...

  12. Active lubrication applied to radial gas journal bearings. Part 2: Modelling improvement and experimental validation

    Pierart, Fabián G.; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2016-01-01

    Actively-controlled lubrication techniques are applied to radial gas bearings aiming at enhancing one of their most critical drawbacks, their lack of damping. A model-based control design approach is presented using simple feedback control laws, i.e. proportional controllers. The design approach...... by finite element method and the global model is used as control design tool. Active lubrication allows for significant increase in damping factor of the rotor-bearing system. Very good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained, supporting the multi-physic design tool developed....

  13. A model based on soil structural aspects describing the fate of genetically modified bacteria in soil

    Hoeven, van der N.; Elsas, van J.D.; Heijnen, C.E.

    1996-01-01

    A computer simulation model was developed which describes growth and competition of bacteria in the soil environment. In the model, soil was assumed to contain millions of pores of a few different size classes. An introduced bacterial strain, e.g. a genetically modified micro-organism (GEMMO), was

  14. CLIC Detector Concepts as described in the CDR: Differences between the GEANT4 and Engineering Models

    Elsener, K; Schlatter, D; Siegrist, N

    2011-01-01

    The CLIC_ILD and CLIC_SiD detector concepts as used for the CDR Vol. 2 in 2011 exist both in GEANT4 simulation models and in engineering layout drawings. At this early stage of a conceptual design, there are inevitably differences between these models, which are described in this note.

  15. Numerical model describing the heat transfer between combustion products and ventilation-system duct walls

    Bolstad, J.W.; Foster, R.D.; Gregory, W.S.

    1983-01-01

    A package of physical models simulating the heat transfer processes occurring between combustion gases and ducts in ventilation systems is described. The purpose of the numerical model is to predict how the combustion gas in a system heats up or cools down as it flows through the ducts in a ventilation system under fire conditions. The model treats a duct with (forced convection) combustion gases flowing on the inside and stagnant ambient air on the outside. The model is composed of five submodels of heat transfer processes along with a numerical solution procedure to evaluate them. Each of these quantities is evaluated independently using standard correlations based on experimental data. The details of the physical assumptions, simplifications, and ranges of applicability of the correlations are described. A typical application of this model to a full-scale fire test is discussed, and model predictions are compared with selected experimental data

  16. When Disorder Looks Like Order: A New Model to Explain Radial Magnetic Fields in Young Supernova Remnants

    West, J. L.; Jaffe, T.; Ferrand, G.; Safi-Harb, S.; Gaensler, B. M.

    2017-11-01

    Radial magnetic fields are observed in all known young, shell-type supernova remnants in our Galaxy, including Cas A, Tycho, Kepler, and SN1006, and yet the nature of these radial fields has not been thoroughly explored. Using a 3D model, we consider the existence and observational implications of an intrinsically radial field. We also present a new explanation of the origin of the radial pattern observed from polarization data as resulting from a selection effect due to the distribution of cosmic-ray electrons (CREs). We show that quasi-parallel acceleration can concentrate CREs at regions where the magnetic field is radial, making a completely turbulent field appear ordered, when it is in fact disordered. We discuss observational properties that may help distinguish between an intrinsically radial magnetic field and the case where it only appears radial due to the CRE distribution. We also show that the case of an intrinsically radial field with a quasi-perpendicular CRE acceleration mechanism has intriguing similarities to the observed polarization properties of SN1006.

  17. When Disorder Looks Like Order: A New Model to Explain Radial Magnetic Fields in Young Supernova Remnants

    West, J. L.; Gaensler, B. M. [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Jaffe, T. [CRESST, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ferrand, G. [RIKEN, Astrophysical Big Bang Laboratory, Wako, Saitama-ken (Japan); Safi-Harb, S., E-mail: jennifer.west@dunlap.utoronto.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2017-11-10

    Radial magnetic fields are observed in all known young, shell-type supernova remnants in our Galaxy, including Cas A, Tycho, Kepler, and SN1006, and yet the nature of these radial fields has not been thoroughly explored. Using a 3D model, we consider the existence and observational implications of an intrinsically radial field. We also present a new explanation of the origin of the radial pattern observed from polarization data as resulting from a selection effect due to the distribution of cosmic-ray electrons (CREs). We show that quasi-parallel acceleration can concentrate CREs at regions where the magnetic field is radial, making a completely turbulent field appear ordered, when it is in fact disordered. We discuss observational properties that may help distinguish between an intrinsically radial magnetic field and the case where it only appears radial due to the CRE distribution. We also show that the case of an intrinsically radial field with a quasi-perpendicular CRE acceleration mechanism has intriguing similarities to the observed polarization properties of SN1006.

  18. A simple reactivity feedback model accounting for radial core expansion effects in the liquid metal fast reactor

    Kwon, Young Min; Lee, Yong Bum; Chang, Won Pyo; Haha, Do Hee

    2002-01-01

    The radial core expansion due to the structure temperature rise is one of major negative reactivity insertion mechanisms in metallic fueled reactor. Thermal expansion is a result of both the laws of nature and the particular core design and it causes negative reactivity feedback by the combination of increased core volume captures and increased core surface leakage. The simple radial core expansion reactivity feedback model developed for the SSC-K code was evaluated by the code-to-code comparison analysis. From the comparison results, it can be stated that the radial core expansion reactivity feedback model employed into the SSC-K code may be reasonably accurate in the UTOP analysis

  19. A simple reactivity feedback model accounting for radial core expansion effects in the liquid metal fast reactor

    Kwon, Young Min; Lee, Yong Bum; Chang, Won Pyo; Haha, Do Hee [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    The radial core expansion due to the structure temperature rise is one of major negative reactivity insertion mechanisms in metallic fueled reactor. Thermal expansion is a result of both the laws of nature and the particular core design and it causes negative reactivity feedback by the combination of increased core volume captures and increased core surface leakage. The simple radial core expansion reactivity feedback model developed for the SSC-K code was evaluated by the code-to-code comparison analysis. From the comparison results, it can be stated that the radial core expansion reactivity feedback model employed into the SSC-K code may be reasonably accurate in the UTOP analysis.

  20. A standard protocol for describing individual-based and agent-based models

    Grimm, Volker; Berger, Uta; Bastiansen, Finn; Eliassen, Sigrunn; Ginot, Vincent; Giske, Jarl; Goss-Custard, John; Grand, Tamara; Heinz, Simone K.; Huse, Geir; Huth, Andreas; Jepsen, Jane U.; Jorgensen, Christian; Mooij, Wolf M.; Muller, Birgit; Pe'er, Guy; Piou, Cyril; Railsback, Steven F.; Robbins, Andrew M.; Robbins, Martha M.; Rossmanith, Eva; Ruger, Nadja; Strand, Espen; Souissi, Sami; Stillman, Richard A.; Vabo, Rune; Visser, Ute; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    Simulation models that describe autonomous individual organisms (individual based models, IBM) or agents (agent-based models, ABM) have become a widely used tool, not only in ecology, but also in many other disciplines dealing with complex systems made up of autonomous entities. However, there is no standard protocol for describing such simulation models, which can make them difficult to understand and to duplicate. This paper presents a proposed standard protocol, ODD, for describing IBMs and ABMs, developed and tested by 28 modellers who cover a wide range of fields within ecology. This protocol consists of three blocks (Overview, Design concepts, and Details), which are subdivided into seven elements: Purpose, State variables and scales, Process overview and scheduling, Design concepts, Initialization, Input, and Submodels. We explain which aspects of a model should be described in each element, and we present an example to illustrate the protocol in use. In addition, 19 examples are available in an Online Appendix. We consider ODD as a first step for establishing a more detailed common format of the description of IBMs and ABMs. Once initiated, the protocol will hopefully evolve as it becomes used by a sufficiently large proportion of modellers.

  1. A statistical model describing combined irreversible electroporation and electroporation-induced blood-brain barrier disruption.

    Sharabi, Shirley; Kos, Bor; Last, David; Guez, David; Daniels, Dianne; Harnof, Sagi; Mardor, Yael; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2016-03-01

    Electroporation-based therapies such as electrochemotherapy (ECT) and irreversible electroporation (IRE) are emerging as promising tools for treatment of tumors. When applied to the brain, electroporation can also induce transient blood-brain-barrier (BBB) disruption in volumes extending beyond IRE, thus enabling efficient drug penetration. The main objective of this study was to develop a statistical model predicting cell death and BBB disruption induced by electroporation. This model can be used for individual treatment planning. Cell death and BBB disruption models were developed based on the Peleg-Fermi model in combination with numerical models of the electric field. The model calculates the electric field thresholds for cell kill and BBB disruption and describes the dependence on the number of treatment pulses. The model was validated using in vivo experimental data consisting of rats brains MRIs post electroporation treatments. Linear regression analysis confirmed that the model described the IRE and BBB disruption volumes as a function of treatment pulses number (r(2) = 0.79; p disruption, the ratio increased with the number of pulses. BBB disruption radii were on average 67% ± 11% larger than IRE volumes. The statistical model can be used to describe the dependence of treatment-effects on the number of pulses independent of the experimental setup.

  2. NON-RADIAL OSCILLATIONS IN M-GIANT SEMI-REGULAR VARIABLES: STELLAR MODELS AND KEPLER OBSERVATIONS

    Stello, Dennis; Compton, Douglas L.; Bedding, Timothy R.; Kiss, Laszlo L.; Bellamy, Beau [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Kjeldsen, Hans [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); García, Rafael A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS, Université Paris 7 Diderot, IRFU/SAp, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Mathur, Savita, E-mail: stello@physics.usyd.edu.au [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2014-06-10

    The success of asteroseismology relies heavily on our ability to identify the frequency patterns of stellar oscillation modes. For stars like the Sun this is relatively easy because the mode frequencies follow a regular pattern described by a well-founded asymptotic relation. When a solar-like star evolves off the main sequence and onto the red giant branch its structure changes dramatically, resulting in changes in the frequency pattern of the modes. We follow the evolution of the adiabatic frequency pattern from the main sequence to near the tip of the red giant branch for a series of models. We find a significant departure from the asymptotic relation for the non-radial modes near the red giant branch tip, resulting in a triplet frequency pattern. To support our investigation we analyze almost four years of Kepler data of the most luminous stars in the field (late K and early M type) and find that their frequency spectra indeed show a triplet pattern dominated by dipole modes even for the most luminous stars in our sample. Our identification explains previous results from ground-based observations reporting fine structure in the Petersen diagram and sub-ridges in the period-luminosity diagram. Finally, we find ''new ridges'' of non-radial modes with frequencies below the fundamental mode in our model calculations, and we speculate they are related to f modes.

  3. An algorithm to detect and communicate the differences in computational models describing biological systems.

    Scharm, Martin; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Waltemath, Dagmar

    2016-02-15

    Repositories support the reuse of models and ensure transparency about results in publications linked to those models. With thousands of models available in repositories, such as the BioModels database or the Physiome Model Repository, a framework to track the differences between models and their versions is essential to compare and combine models. Difference detection not only allows users to study the history of models but also helps in the detection of errors and inconsistencies. Existing repositories lack algorithms to track a model's development over time. Focusing on SBML and CellML, we present an algorithm to accurately detect and describe differences between coexisting versions of a model with respect to (i) the models' encoding, (ii) the structure of biological networks and (iii) mathematical expressions. This algorithm is implemented in a comprehensive and open source library called BiVeS. BiVeS helps to identify and characterize changes in computational models and thereby contributes to the documentation of a model's history. Our work facilitates the reuse and extension of existing models and supports collaborative modelling. Finally, it contributes to better reproducibility of modelling results and to the challenge of model provenance. The workflow described in this article is implemented in BiVeS. BiVeS is freely available as source code and binary from sems.uni-rostock.de. The web interface BudHat demonstrates the capabilities of BiVeS at budhat.sems.uni-rostock.de. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. A consilience model to describe N2O production during biological N removal

    Domingo Felez, Carlos; Smets, Barth F.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas, is produced during biological nitrogen conversion in wastewater treatment operations. Complex mechanisms underlie N2O production by autotrophic and heterotrophic organisms, which continue to be unravelled. Mathematical models that describe nitric oxide...... (NO) and N2O dynamics have been proposed. Here, a first comprehensive model that considers all relevant NO and N2O production and consumption mechanisms is proposed. The model describes autotrophic NO production by ammonia oxidizing bacteria associated with ammonia oxidation and with nitrite reduction......, followed by NO reduction to N2O. It also considers NO and N2O as intermediates in heterotrophic denitrification in a 4-step model. Three biological NO and N2O production pathways are accounted for, improving the capabilities of existing models while not increasing their complexity. Abiotic contributions...

  5. Off-design performance loss model for radial turbines with pivoting, variable-area stators

    Meitner, P. L.; Glassman, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    An off-design performance loss model was developed for variable stator (pivoted vane), radial turbines through analytical modeling and experimental data analysis. Stator loss is determined by a viscous loss model; stator vane end-clearance leakage effects are determined by a clearance flow model. Rotor loss coefficient were obtained by analyzing the experimental data from a turbine rotor previously tested with six stators having throat areas from 20 to 144 percent of design area and were correlated with stator-to-rotor throat area ratio. An incidence loss model was selected to obtain best agreement with experimental results. Predicted turbine performance is compared with experimental results for the design rotor as well as with results for extended and cutback versions of the rotor. Sample calculations were made to show the effects of stator vane end-clearance leakage.

  6. Describing the processes of propagation and eliminating wildfires with the use of agent models

    G. A. Dorrer

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A new method of describing the processes of propagation and elimination of wildfires on the basis of agent-based modeling is proposed. The main structural units of the creation of such models are the classes of active objects (agents. Agent approach, combined with Geographic Information Systems (GIS can effectively describe the interaction of a large number of participants in the process to combat wildfires: fire spreading, fire crews, mechanization, aerial means and other. In this paper we propose a multi-agent model to predict the spread of wildfire edge and simulate the direct method of extinguishing a ground fire with non-mechanized crews. The model consist with two classes of agents, designated A and B. The burning fire edge is represented as a chain of A-agents, each of which simulates the burning of an elementary portion of vegetation fuel. Fire front movement (moving the A-agent described by the Hamilton-Jacobi equation with using the indicatrises of normal front rate of spread (figurotris. The configuration of the front calculated on basis the algorithm of mobile grids. Agents other type, B-agents, described extinguishing process; they move to the agents of A type and act on them, reducing the combustion intensity to zero. Modeling system presented as two-level coloured nested Petri Net, which describes the agents’ interaction semantics. This model is implemented as a GIS-oriented software system that can be useful both in the fire fighting management as well as in staff training tactics to fighting wildfires. Some examples of modeling decision making on а ground fire extinguishing are presented.

  7. A model to describe potential effects of chemotherapy on critical radiobiological treatments

    Rodríguez-Pérez, D.; Desco, M.M.; Antoranz, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    Although chemo- and radiotherapy can annihilate tumors on their own. they are also used in coadjuvancy: improving local effects of radiotherapy using chemotherapy as a radiosensit.izer. The effects of radiotherapy are well described by current radiobiological models. The goal of this work is to describe a discrete radiotherapy model, that has been previously used describe high radiation dose response as well as unusual radio-responses of some types of tumors (e.g. prostate cancer), to obtain a model of chemo+radiotherapy that can describe how the outcome of their combination is a more efficient removal of the tumor. Our hypothesis is that, although both treatments haven different mechanisms, both affect similar key points of cell metabolism and regulation, that lead to cellular death. Hence, we will consider a discrete model where chemotherapy may affect a fraction of the same targets destroyed by radiotherapy. Although radiotherapy reaches all cells equally, chemotherapy diffuses through a tumor attaining lower concentration in its center and higher in its surface. With our simulations we study the enhanced effect of combined therapy treatment and how it depends on the tissue critical parameters (the parameters of the lion-extensive radiobiological model), the number of “targets” aimed at by chemotherapy, and the concentration and diffusion rate of the drug inside the tumor. The results show that an equivalent, cliemo-radio-dose can be computed that allows the prediction of the lower radiation dose that causes the same effect than a radio-only treatment. (paper)

  8. A model to describe potential effects of chemotherapy on critical radiobiological treatments

    Rodríguez-Pérez, D.; Desco, M. M.; Antoranz, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    Although chemo- and radiotherapy can annihilate tumors on their own. they are also used in coadjuvancy: improving local effects of radiotherapy using chemotherapy as a radiosensit.izer. The effects of radiotherapy are well described by current radiobiological models. The goal of this work is to describe a discrete radiotherapy model, that has been previously used describe high radiation dose response as well as unusual radio-responses of some types of tumors (e.g. prostate cancer), to obtain a model of chemo+radiotherapy that can describe how the outcome of their combination is a more efficient removal of the tumor. Our hypothesis is that, although both treatments haven different mechanisms, both affect similar key points of cell metabolism and regulation, that lead to cellular death. Hence, we will consider a discrete model where chemotherapy may affect a fraction of the same targets destroyed by radiotherapy. Although radiotherapy reaches all cells equally, chemotherapy diffuses through a tumor attaining lower concentration in its center and higher in its surface. With our simulations we study the enhanced effect of combined therapy treatment and how it depends on the tissue critical parameters (the parameters of the lion-extensive radiobiological model), the number of “targets” aimed at by chemotherapy, and the concentration and diffusion rate of the drug inside the tumor. The results show that an equivalent, cliemo-radio-dose can be computed that allows the prediction of the lower radiation dose that causes the same effect than a radio-only treatment.

  9. A two component model describing nucleon structure functions in the low-x region

    Bugaev, E.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 7a, 60th October Anniversary prospect, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Mangazeev, B.V. [Irkutsk State University, 1, Karl Marx Street, Irkutsk 664003 (Russian Federation)

    2009-12-15

    A two component model describing the electromagnetic nucleon structure functions in the low-x region, based on generalized vector dominance and color dipole approaches is briefly described. The model operates with the mesons of rho-family having the mass spectrum of the form m{sub n}{sup 2}=m{sub r}ho{sup 2}(1+2n) and takes into account the nondiagonal transitions in meson-nucleon scattering. The special cut-off factors are introduced in the model, to exclude the gamma-qq-bar-V transitions in the case of narrow qq-bar-pairs. For the color dipole part of the model the well known FKS-parameterization is used.

  10. A STRUCTURAL MODEL DESCRIBE CHINESE TRADESMEN ATTITUDES TOWARDS GREEK STUDENTS CONSUMPTION BEHAVIOR

    Sofia D. ANASTASIADOU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study tests evaluates 43 Chinese tradesmen opinios describe the main factors that influnce Greek consumers’ behavior. A structural model was constructed to represent the relationship between consumer components. The model was tested for its Convergent and Discriminant Validity. Moreover it was tested for its reliability and construct reliability. The findings from this study may be used by Chinese tradesmen to develop their marketing campains and customers.

  11. Evolution of radial profiles in regular Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi dust models

    Sussman, Roberto A

    2010-01-01

    We undertake a comprehensive and rigorous analytic study of the evolution of radial profiles of covariant scalars in regular LemaItre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) dust models. We consider specifically the phenomenon of 'profile inversions' in which an initial clump profile of density, spatial curvature or the expansion scalar might evolve into a void profile (and vice versa). Previous work in the literature on models with density void profiles and/or allowing for density profile inversions is given full generalization, with some erroneous results corrected. We prove rigorously that if an evolution without shell crossings is assumed, then only the 'clump to void' inversion can occur in density profiles, and only in hyperbolic models or regions with negative spatial curvature. The profiles of spatial curvature follow similar patterns as those of the density, with 'clump to void' inversions only possible for hyperbolic models or regions. However, profiles of the expansion scalar are less restrictive, with profile inversions necessarily taking place in elliptic models. We also examine radial profiles in special LTB configurations: closed elliptic models, models with a simultaneous big bang singularity, as well as a locally collapsing elliptic region surrounded by an expanding hyperbolic background. The general analytic statements that we obtain allow for setting up the right initial conditions to construct fully regular LTB models with any specific qualitative requirements for the profiles of all scalars and their time evolution. The results presented can be very useful in guiding future numerical work on these models and in revising previous analytic work on all their applications.

  12. Muscle activation described with a differential equation model for large ensembles of locally coupled molecular motors.

    Walcott, Sam

    2014-10-01

    Molecular motors, by turning chemical energy into mechanical work, are responsible for active cellular processes. Often groups of these motors work together to perform their biological role. Motors in an ensemble are coupled and exhibit complex emergent behavior. Although large motor ensembles can be modeled with partial differential equations (PDEs) by assuming that molecules function independently of their neighbors, this assumption is violated when motors are coupled locally. It is therefore unclear how to describe the ensemble behavior of the locally coupled motors responsible for biological processes such as calcium-dependent skeletal muscle activation. Here we develop a theory to describe locally coupled motor ensembles and apply the theory to skeletal muscle activation. The central idea is that a muscle filament can be divided into two phases: an active and an inactive phase. Dynamic changes in the relative size of these phases are described by a set of linear ordinary differential equations (ODEs). As the dynamics of the active phase are described by PDEs, muscle activation is governed by a set of coupled ODEs and PDEs, building on previous PDE models. With comparison to Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that the theory captures the behavior of locally coupled ensembles. The theory also plausibly describes and predicts muscle experiments from molecular to whole muscle scales, suggesting that a micro- to macroscale muscle model is within reach.

  13. A Generic Friction Model for Radial Slider Bearing Simulation Considering Elastic and Plastic Deformation

    Günter Offner

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of component dynamics is one of the main tasks of internal combustion engine (ICE simulation. This prediction is important in order to understand complex loading conditions, which happen in a running ICE. Due to the need for fuel saving, mechanical friction, in particular in radial slider bearings, is one important investigation target. A generic friction modeling approach for radial slider bearings, which can be applied to lubricated contact regimes, will be presented in this paper. Besides viscous friction, the approach considers in particular boundary friction. The parameterization of the friction model is done using surface material and surface roughness measurement data. Furthermore, fluid properties depending on the applied oil additives are being considered. The application of the model will be demonstrated for a typical engineering task of a connecting rod big end study to outline the effects of contact surface texture. AlSn-based and polymer coated bearing shells will be analyzed and compared with respect to friction reduction effects, running-in behavior and thermal load capabilities.

  14. Model validation for radial electric field excitation during L-H transition in JFT-2M tokamak

    Kobayashi, T.; Itoh, K.; Ido, T.; Kamiya, K.; Itoh, S.-I.; Miura, Y.; Nagashima, Y.; Fujisawa, A.; Inagaki, S.; Ida, K.; Hoshino, K.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we elaborate the electric field excitation mechanism during the L-H transition in the JFT-2M tokamak. Using time derivative of the Poisson’s equation, models of the radial electric field excitation is examined. The sum of the loss-cone loss current and the neoclassical bulk viscosity current is found to behave as the experimentally evaluated radial current that excites the radial electric field. The turbulent Reynolds stress only plays a minor role. The wave convection current that produces a negative current at the edge can be important to explain the ambipolar condition in the L-mode.

  15. Sea Surface Temperature Modeling using Radial Basis Function Networks With a Dynamically Weighted Particle Filter

    Ryu, Duchwan

    2013-03-01

    The sea surface temperature (SST) is an important factor of the earth climate system. A deep understanding of SST is essential for climate monitoring and prediction. In general, SST follows a nonlinear pattern in both time and location and can be modeled by a dynamic system which changes with time and location. In this article, we propose a radial basis function network-based dynamic model which is able to catch the nonlinearity of the data and propose to use the dynamically weighted particle filter to estimate the parameters of the dynamic model. We analyze the SST observed in the Caribbean Islands area after a hurricane using the proposed dynamic model. Comparing to the traditional grid-based approach that requires a supercomputer due to its high computational demand, our approach requires much less CPU time and makes real-time forecasting of SST doable on a personal computer. Supplementary materials for this article are available online. © 2013 American Statistical Association.

  16. Robustness of a cross contamination model describing transfer of pathogens during grinding of meat

    Møller, Cleide Oliveira de Almeida; Sant’Ana, A. S.; Hansen, Solvej Katrine Holm

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate a cross contamination model for its capability of describing transfer of Salmonella spp. and L. monocytogenes during grinding of varying sizes and numbers of pieces of meats in two grinder systems. Data from 19 trials were collected. Three evaluation approaches were...

  17. Robustness of a cross contamination model describing transfer of pathogens during grinding of meat

    Møller, Cleide Oliveira de Almeida; Sant’Ana, A. S.; Hansen, Solvej Katrine Holm

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate a cross contamination model for its capability of describing transfer of Salmonella spp. and L. monocytogenes during grinding of varying sizes and numbers of pieces of meats in two grinder systems. Data from 19 trials were collected. Three evaluation approaches were a...... that grinding was influenced by sharpness of grinder knife, specific grinder and grinding temperature....

  18. Development of a Pharmacokinetic Model to Describe the Complex Pharmacokinetics of Pazopanib in Cancer Patients

    Yu, Huixin; van Erp, Nielka; Bins, Sander; Mathijssen, Ron H J; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H.; Steeghs, Neeltje; Huitema, Alwin D R

    Background and Objective: Pazopanib is a multi-targeted anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitor. This study was conducted to develop a population pharmacokinetic (popPK) model describing the complex pharmacokinetics of pazopanib in cancer patients. Methods: Pharmacokinetic data were available from 96

  19. Development of a Pharmacokinetic Model to Describe the Complex Pharmacokinetics of Pazopanib in Cancer Patients

    Yu, H.; Erp, N. van; Bins, S.; Mathijssen, R.H.; Schellens, J.H.; Beijnen, J.H.; Steeghs, N.; Huitema, A.D.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Pazopanib is a multi-targeted anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitor. This study was conducted to develop a population pharmacokinetic (popPK) model describing the complex pharmacokinetics of pazopanib in cancer patients. METHODS: Pharmacokinetic data were available from 96

  20. Structural Models Describing Placebo Treatment Effects in Schizophrenia and Other Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Reddy, Venkatesh Pilla; Kozielska, Magdalena; Johnson, Martin; Vermeulen, An; de Greef, Rik; Liu, Jing; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Danhof, Meindert; Proost, Johannes H.

    2011-01-01

    Large variation in placebo response within and among clinical trials can substantially affect conclusions about the efficacy of new medications in psychiatry. Developing a robust placebo model to describe the placebo response is important to facilitate quantification of drug effects, and eventually

  1. Early Childhood Teacher Preparation: A Tale of Authors and Multimedia, A Model of Technology Integration Described.

    Wetzel, Keith; McLean, S. V.

    1997-01-01

    Describes collaboration of two teacher educators, one in early childhood language arts and one in computers in education. Discusses advantages and disadvantages and extensions of this model, including how a college-wide survey revealed that students in teamed courses are better prepared to teach and learn with technology. (DR)

  2. Describing Growth Pattern of Bali Cows Using Non-linear Regression Models

    Mohd. Hafiz A.W

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the best fit non-linear regression model to describe the growth pattern of Bali cows. Estimates of asymptotic mature weight, rate of maturing and constant of integration were derived from Brody, von Bertalanffy, Gompertz and Logistic models which were fitted to cross-sectional data of body weight taken from 74 Bali cows raised in MARDI Research Station Muadzam Shah Pahang. Coefficient of determination (R2 and residual mean squares (MSE were used to determine the best fit model in describing the growth pattern of Bali cows. Von Bertalanffy model was the best model among the four growth functions evaluated to determine the mature weight of Bali cattle as shown by the highest R2 and lowest MSE values (0.973 and 601.9, respectively, followed by Gompertz (0.972 and 621.2, respectively, Logistic (0.971 and 648.4, respectively and Brody (0.932 and 660.5, respectively models. The correlation between rate of maturing and mature weight was found to be negative in the range of -0.170 to -0.929 for all models, indicating that animals of heavier mature weight had lower rate of maturing. The use of non-linear model could summarize the weight-age relationship into several biologically interpreted parameters compared to the entire lifespan weight-age data points that are difficult and time consuming to interpret.

  3. Comparison of six different models describing survival of mammalian cells after irradiation

    Sontag, W.

    1990-01-01

    Six different cell-survival models have been compared. All models are based on the similar assumption that irradiated cells are able to exist in one of three states. S A is the state of a totally repaired cell, in state S C the cell contains lethal lesions and in state S b the cell contains potentially lethal lesions i.e. those which either can be repaired or converted into lethal lesions. The differences between the six models lie in the different mathematical relationships between the three states. To test the six models, six different sets of experimental data were used which describe cell survival at different repair times after irradiation with sparsely ionizing irradiation. In order to compare the models, a goodness-of-fit function was used. The differences between the six models were tested by use of the nonparametric Mann-Whitney two sample test. Based on the 95% confidence limit, this required separation into three groups. (orig.)

  4. A Modeling Framework to Investigate the Radial Component of the Pushrim Force in Manual Wheelchair Propulsion

    Ackermann Marko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The ratio of tangential to total pushrim force, the so-called Fraction Effective Force (FEF, has been used to evaluate wheelchair propulsion efficiency based on the fact that only the tangential component of the force on the pushrim contributes to actual wheelchair propulsion. Experimental studies, however, consistently show low FEF values and recent experimental as well as modelling investigations have conclusively shown that a more tangential pushrim force direction can lead to a decrease and not increase in propulsion efficiency. This study aims at quantifying the contributions of active, inertial and gravitational forces to the normal pushrim component. In order to achieve this goal, an inverse dynamics-based framework is proposed to estimate individual contributions to the pushrim forces using a model of the wheelchair-user system. The results show that the radial pushrim force component arise to a great extent due to purely mechanical effects, including inertial and gravitational forces. These results corroborate previous findings according to which radial pushrim force components are not necessarily a result of inefficient propulsion strategies or hand-rim friction requirements. This study proposes a novel framework to quantify the individual contributions of active, inertial and gravitational forces to pushrim forces during wheelchair propulsion.

  5. Radial plasma drifts deduced from VLF whistler mode signals - A modelling study

    Poulter, E. M.; Andrews, M. K.; Bailey, G. J.; Moffett, R. J.

    1984-05-01

    VLF whistler mode signals have previously been used to infer radial plasma drifts in the equatorial plane of the plasmasphere and the field-aligned ionosphere-protonosphere coupling fluxes. Physical models of the plasmasphere consisting of O(+) adn H(+) ions along dipole magnetic field lines, and including radial E x B drifts, are applied to a mid-latitude flux tube appropriate to whistler mode signals received at Wellington, New Zealand, from the fixed frequency VLF transmitter NLK (18.6 kHz) in Seattle, U.S.A. These models are first shown to provide a good representation of the recorded Doppler shift and group delay data. They are then used to simulate the process of deducing the drifts and fluxes from the recorded data. Provided the initial whistler mode duct latitude and the ionospheric contributions are known, the drifts at the equatorial plane can be estimated to about + or - 20 m/s (approximately 10-15 percent), and the two hemisphere ionosphere-protonosphere coupling fluxes to about + or - 10 to the 12th/sq m-sec (approximately 40 percent).

  6. Study on Meshfree Hermite Radial Point Interpolation Method for Flexural Wave Propagation Modeling and Damage Quantification

    Hosein Ghaffarzadeh

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper investigates the numerical modeling of the flexural wave propagation in Euler-Bernoulli beams using the Hermite-type radial point interpolation method (HRPIM under the damage quantification approach. HRPIM employs radial basis functions (RBFs and their derivatives for shape function construction as a meshfree technique. The performance of Multiquadric(MQ RBF to the assessment of the reflection ratio was evaluated. HRPIM signals were compared with the theoretical and finite element responses. Results represent that MQ is a suitable RBF for HRPIM and wave propagation. However, the range of the proper shape parameters is notable. The number of field nodes is the main parameter for accurate wave propagation modeling using HRPIM. The size of support domain should be less thanan upper bound in order to prevent high error. With regard to the number of quadrature points, providing the minimum numbers of points are adequate for the stable solution, but the existence of more points in damage region does not leads to necessarily the accurate responses. It is concluded that the pure HRPIM, without any polynomial terms, is acceptable but considering a few terms will improve the accuracy; even though more terms make the problem unstable and inaccurate.

  7. Influence on rewetting temperature and wetting delay during rewetting rod bundle by various radial jet models

    Debbarma, Ajoy; Pandey, Krishna Murari [National Institute of Technology, Assam (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2016-03-15

    Numerical investigation of the rewetting of single sector fuel assembly of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) has been carried out to exhibit the effect of coolant jet diameters (2, 3 and 4 mm) and jet directions (Model: M, X and X2). The rewetting phenomena with various jet models are compared on the basis of rewetting temperature and wetting delay. Temperature-time curve have been evaluated from rods surfaces at different circumference, radial and axial locations of rod bundle. The cooling curve indicated the presence of vapor in respected location, where it prevents the contact between the firm and fluid phases. The peak wall temperature represents as rewetting temperature. The time period observed between initial to rewetting temperature point is wetting delay. It was noted that as improved in various jet models, rewetting temperature and wetting delay reduced, which referred the coolant stipulation in the rod bundle dominant vapor formation.

  8. Influence on rewetting temperature and wetting delay during rewetting rod bundle by various radial jet models

    Debbarma, Ajoy; Pandey, Krishna Murari

    2016-01-01

    Numerical investigation of the rewetting of single sector fuel assembly of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) has been carried out to exhibit the effect of coolant jet diameters (2, 3 and 4 mm) and jet directions (Model: M, X and X2). The rewetting phenomena with various jet models are compared on the basis of rewetting temperature and wetting delay. Temperature-time curve have been evaluated from rods surfaces at different circumference, radial and axial locations of rod bundle. The cooling curve indicated the presence of vapor in respected location, where it prevents the contact between the firm and fluid phases. The peak wall temperature represents as rewetting temperature. The time period observed between initial to rewetting temperature point is wetting delay. It was noted that as improved in various jet models, rewetting temperature and wetting delay reduced, which referred the coolant stipulation in the rod bundle dominant vapor formation.

  9. New Model to describe the interaction of slow neutrons with solid deuterium

    Granada, J.R

    2009-01-01

    A new scattering kernel to describe the interaction of slow neutrons with solid Deuterium was developed. The main characteristics of that system are contained in the formalism, including the lattice s density of states, the Young-Koppel quantum treatment of the rotations, and the internal molecular vibrations. The elastic processes involving coherent and incoherent contributions are fully described, as well as the spin-correlation effects. The results from the new model are compared with the best available experimental data, showing very good agreement. [es

  10. Regularization of a massless dirac model to describe anomalous electromagnetic response of Weyl semimetals

    Takane, Yoshitake

    2016-01-01

    An unbounded massless Dirac model with two nondegenerate Dirac cones is the simplest model for Weyl semimetals, which show the anomalous electromagnetic response of chiral magnetic effect (CME) and anomalous Hall effect (AHE). However, if this model is naively used to analyze the electromagnetic response within a linear response theory, it gives the result apparently inconsistent with the persuasive prediction based on a lattice model. We show that this serious difficulty is related to the breaking of current conservation in the Dirac model due to quantum anomaly and can be removed if current and charge operators are redefined to include the contribution from the anomaly. We demonstrate that the CME as well as the AHE can be properly described using newly defined operators, and clarify that the CME is determined by the competition between the contribution from the anomaly and that from low-energy electrons. (author)

  11. A theoretical model to describe progressions and regressions for exercise rehabilitation.

    Blanchard, Sam; Glasgow, Phil

    2014-08-01

    This article aims to describe a new theoretical model to simplify and aid visualisation of the clinical reasoning process involved in progressing a single exercise. Exercise prescription is a core skill for physiotherapists but is an area that is lacking in theoretical models to assist clinicians when designing exercise programs to aid rehabilitation from injury. Historical models of periodization and motor learning theories lack any visual aids to assist clinicians. The concept of the proposed model is that new stimuli can be added or exchanged with other stimuli, either intrinsic or extrinsic to the participant, in order to gradually progress an exercise whilst remaining safe and effective. The proposed model maintains the core skills of physiotherapists by assisting clinical reasoning skills, exercise prescription and goal setting. It is not limited to any one pathology or rehabilitation setting and can adapted by any level of skilled clinician. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Using concept maps to describe undergraduate students’ mental model in microbiology course

    Hamdiyati, Y.; Sudargo, F.; Redjeki, S.; Fitriani, A.

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this research was to describe students’ mental model in a mental model based-microbiology course using concept map as assessment tool. Respondents were 5th semester of undergraduate students of Biology Education of Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia. The mental modelling instrument used was concept maps. Data were taken on Bacteria sub subject. A concept map rubric was subsequently developed with a maximum score of 4. Quantitative data was converted into a qualitative one to determine mental model level, namely: emergent = score 1, transitional = score 2, close to extended = score 3, and extended = score 4. The results showed that mental model level on bacteria sub subject before the implementation of mental model based-microbiology course was at the transitional level. After implementation of mental model based-microbiology course, mental model was at transitional level, close to extended, and extended. This indicated an increase in the level of students’ mental model after the implementation of mental model based-microbiology course using concept map as assessment tool.

  13. Describing the clinical reasoning process: application of a model of enablement to a pediatric case.

    Furze, Jennifer; Nelson, Kelly; O'Hare, Megan; Ortner, Amanda; Threlkeld, A Joseph; Jensen, Gail M

    2013-04-01

    Clinical reasoning is a core tenet of physical therapy practice leading to optimal patient care. The purpose of this case was to describe the outcomes, subjective experience, and reflective clinical reasoning process for a child with cerebral palsy using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) model. Application of the ICF framework to a 9-year-old boy with spastic triplegic cerebral palsy was utilized to capture the interwoven factors present in this case. Interventions in the pool occurred twice weekly for 1 h over a 10-week period. Immediately post and 4 months post-intervention, the child made functional and meaningful gains. The family unit also developed an enjoyment of exercising together. Each individual family member described psychological, emotional, or physical health improvements. Reflection using the ICF model as a framework to discuss clinical reasoning can highlight important factors contributing to effective patient management.

  14. Development of zircaloy deformation model to describe the zircaloy-4 cladding tube during accidents

    Raff, S.

    1978-01-01

    The development of a high-temperature deformation model for Zircaloy-4 cans is primarily based on numerous well-parametrized tensile tests to get the material behaviour including statistical variance. It is shown that plastic deformation may be described by a power creep law, the coefficients of which show strong dependence on temperature in the relevant temperature region. These coefficients have been determined. A model based on these coefficients has been established which, apart from best estimate deformation, gives upper and lower bounds of possible deformation. The model derived from isothermal uniaxial tests is being verified against isothermal and transient tube burst tests. The influence of preoxidation and increased oxygen concentration during deformation is modeled on the basis of the pseudobinary Zircaloy-oxygen phase diagram. (author)

  15. Calibration and validation of a model describing complete autotrophic nitrogen removal in a granular SBR system

    Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Mutlu, Ayten Gizem; Gernaey, Krist

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A validated model describing the nitritation-anammox process in a granular sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system is an important tool for: a) design of future experiments and b) prediction of process performance during optimization, while applying process control, or during system scale......-up. RESULTS: A model was calibrated using a step-wise procedure customized for the specific needs of the system. The important steps in the procedure were initialization, steady-state and dynamic calibration, and validation. A fast and effective initialization approach was developed to approximate pseudo...... screening of the parameter space proposed by Sin et al. (2008) - to find the best fit of the model to dynamic data. Finally, the calibrated model was validated with an independent data set. CONCLUSION: The presented calibration procedure is the first customized procedure for this type of system...

  16. An empirical model describing the postnatal growth of organs in ICRP reference humans: Pt. 1

    Walker, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    An empirical model is presented for describing the postnatal mass growth of lungs in ICRP reference humans. A combined exponential and logistic function containing six parameters is fitted to ICRP 23 lung data using a weighted non-linear least squares technique. The results indicate that the model delineates the data well. Further analysis shows that reference male lungs attain a higher pubertal peak velocity (PPV) and adult mass size than female lungs, although the latter reach their PPV and adult mass size first. Furthermore, the model shows that lung growth rates in infants are two to three orders of magnitude higher than those in mature adults. This finding is important because of the possible association between higher radiation risks in infants' organs that have faster cell turnover rates compared to mature adult organs. The significance of the model for ICRP dosimetric purposes will be discussed. (author)

  17. A relativistic gauge model describing N particles bound by harmonic forces

    Filippov, A.T.

    1987-01-01

    Application of the principle of gauging to linear canonical symmetries of simplest/rudimentary/bilinear lagrangians is shown to produce a relativistic version of the Lagrangian describing N particles bound by harmonic forces. For pairwise coupled identical particles the gauge group is T 1 xU 1 , xSU N-1 . A model for the relativistic discrete string (a chain of N particles) is also discussed. All these gauge theoried of particles can be quantized by standard methods

  18. Composite model describing the excitation and de-excitation of nitrogen by an electron beam

    Kassem, A.E.; Hickman, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    Based on recent studies, the effect of re-excited ions in the emission of electron beam induced fluorescence in nitrogen has been estimated. These effects are included in the formulation of a composite model describing the excitation and de-excitation of nitrogen by an electron beam. The shortcomings of previous models, namely the dependence of the measured temperature on true gas temperature as well as the gas density, are almost completely eliminated in the range of temperatures and densities covered by the available data. (auth)

  19. Validation of mathematical models to describe fluid dynamics of a cold riser by gamma ray attenuation

    Melo, Ana Cristina Bezerra Azedo de

    2004-12-01

    The fluid dynamic behavior of a riser in a cold type FCC model was investigated by means of catalyst concentration distribution measured with gamma attenuation and simulated with a mathematical model. In the riser of the cold model, MEF, 0,032 m in diameter, 2,30 m in length the fluidized bed, whose components are air and FCC catalyst, circulates. The MEF is operated by automatic control and instruments for measuring fluid dynamic variables. An axial catalyst concentration distribution was measured using an Am-241 gamma source and a NaI detector coupled to a multichannel provided with a software for data acquisition and evaluation. The MEF was adapted for a fluid dynamic model validation which describes the flow in the riser, for example, by introducing an injector for controlling the solid flow in circulation. Mathematical models were selected from literature, analyzed and tested to simulate the fluid dynamic of the riser. A methodology for validating fluid dynamic models was studied and implemented. The stages of the work were developed according to the validation methodology, such as data planning experiments, study of the equations which describe the fluidodynamic, computational solvers application and comparison with experimental data. Operational sequences were carried out keeping the MEF conditions for measuring catalyst concentration and simultaneously measuring the fluid dynamic variables, velocity of the components and pressure drop in the riser. Following this, simulated and experimental values were compared and statistical data treatment done, aiming at the required precision to validate the fluid dynamic model. The comparison tests between experimental and simulated data were carried out under validation criteria. The fluid dynamic behavior of the riser was analyzed and the results and the agreement with literature were discussed. The adopt model was validated under the MEF operational conditions, for a 3 to 6 m/s gas velocity in the riser and a slip

  20. Suitability of parametric models to describe the hydraulic properties of an unsaturated coarse sand and gravel

    Mace, Andy; Rudolph, David L.; Kachanoski , R. Gary

    1998-01-01

    The performance of parametric models used to describe soil water retention (SWR) properties and predict unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (K) as a function of volumetric water content (θ) is examined using SWR and K(θ) data for coarse sand and gravel sediments. Six 70 cm long, 10 cm diameter cores of glacial outwash were instrumented at eight depths with porous cup ten-siometers and time domain reflectometry probes to measure soil water pressure head (h) and θ, respectively, for seven unsaturated and one saturated steady-state flow conditions. Forty-two θ(h) and K(θ) relationships were measured from the infiltration tests on the cores. Of the four SWR models compared in the analysis, the van Genuchten (1980) equation with parameters m and n restricted according to the Mualem (m = 1 - 1/n) criterion is best suited to describe the θ(h) relationships. The accuracy of two models that predict K(θ) using parameter values derived from the SWR models was also evaluated. The model developed by van Genuchten (1980) based on the theoretical expression of Mualem (1976) predicted K(θ) more accurately than the van Genuchten (1980) model based on the theory of Burdine (1953). A sensitivity analysis shows that more accurate predictions of K(θ) are achieved using SWR model parameters derived with residual water content (θr) specified according to independent measurements of θ at values of h where θ/h ∼ 0 rather than model-fit θr values. The accuracy of the model K(θ) function improves markedly when at least one value of unsaturated K is used to scale the K(θ) function predicted using the saturated K. The results of this investigation indicate that the hydraulic properties of coarse-grained sediments can be accurately described using the parametric models. In addition, data collection efforts should focus on measuring at least one value of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and as complete a set of SWR data as possible, particularly in the dry range.

  1. New deconvolution method for microscopic images based on the continuous Gaussian radial basis function interpolation model.

    Chen, Zhaoxue; Chen, Hao

    2014-01-01

    A deconvolution method based on the Gaussian radial basis function (GRBF) interpolation is proposed. Both the original image and Gaussian point spread function are expressed as the same continuous GRBF model, thus image degradation is simplified as convolution of two continuous Gaussian functions, and image deconvolution is converted to calculate the weighted coefficients of two-dimensional control points. Compared with Wiener filter and Lucy-Richardson algorithm, the GRBF method has an obvious advantage in the quality of restored images. In order to overcome such a defect of long-time computing, the method of graphic processing unit multithreading or increasing space interval of control points is adopted, respectively, to speed up the implementation of GRBF method. The experiments show that based on the continuous GRBF model, the image deconvolution can be efficiently implemented by the method, which also has a considerable reference value for the study of three-dimensional microscopic image deconvolution.

  2. A Mathematical Model for Temperature Induced Loosening due to Radial Expansion of Rectangle Thread Bolted Joints

    Shiyuan Hou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a mathematical model to investigate the radial expansion induced loosening of rectangle thread bolted joints that were subjected to cyclic temperature variation, which could cause slippage between contact pairs of engaged threads and bolt bearing. Firstly, integral equations were derived for the shear stress components caused by expansion difference, as well as the bearing and thread friction torque components, which depended on the temperature variation. Secondly, the relationship of displacement components was developed based on quasi-static hypotheses. Then, treating the rotation of bolt as plastic elongation, the bolt tension's evolution was obtained by using a one-dimensional bolted joint model. Numerical results showed that the temperature variation decreased the bearing and thread friction torque components, which could lead bolted joint to loosen. Finally, the effects of some associated factors on the progress were discussed.

  3. Initial Comparison of Direct and Legacy Modeling Approaches for Radial Core Expansion Analysis

    Shemon, Emily R.

    2016-01-01

    Radial core expansion in sodium-cooled fast reactors provides an important reactivity feedback effect. As the reactor power increases due to normal start up conditions or accident scenarios, the core and surrounding materials heat up, causing both grid plate expansion and bowing of the assembly ducts. When the core restraint system is designed correctly, the resulting structural deformations introduce negative reactivity which decreases the reactor power. Historically, an indirect procedure has been used to estimate the reactivity feedback due to structural deformation which relies upon perturbation theory and coupling legacy physics codes with limited geometry capabilities. With advancements in modeling and simulation, radial core expansion phenomena can now be modeled directly, providing an assessment of the accuracy of the reactivity feedback coefficients generated by indirect legacy methods. Recently a new capability was added to the PROTEUS-SN unstructured geometry neutron transport solver to analyze deformed meshes quickly and directly. By supplying the deformed mesh in addition to the base configuration input files, PROTEUS-SN automatically processes material adjustments including calculation of region densities to conserve mass, calculation of isotopic densities according to material models (for example, sodium density as a function of temperature), and subsequent re-homogenization of materials. To verify the new capability of directly simulating deformed meshes, PROTEUS-SN was used to compute reactivity feedback for a series of contrived yet representative deformed configurations for the Advanced Burner Test Reactor design. The indirect legacy procedure was also performed to generate reactivity feedback coefficients for the same deformed configurations. Interestingly, the legacy procedure consistently overestimated reactivity feedbacks by 35% compared to direct simulations by PROTEUS-SN. This overestimation indicates that the legacy procedures are in fact

  4. Initial Comparison of Direct and Legacy Modeling Approaches for Radial Core Expansion Analysis

    Shemon, Emily R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-10

    Radial core expansion in sodium-cooled fast reactors provides an important reactivity feedback effect. As the reactor power increases due to normal start up conditions or accident scenarios, the core and surrounding materials heat up, causing both grid plate expansion and bowing of the assembly ducts. When the core restraint system is designed correctly, the resulting structural deformations introduce negative reactivity which decreases the reactor power. Historically, an indirect procedure has been used to estimate the reactivity feedback due to structural deformation which relies upon perturbation theory and coupling legacy physics codes with limited geometry capabilities. With advancements in modeling and simulation, radial core expansion phenomena can now be modeled directly, providing an assessment of the accuracy of the reactivity feedback coefficients generated by indirect legacy methods. Recently a new capability was added to the PROTEUS-SN unstructured geometry neutron transport solver to analyze deformed meshes quickly and directly. By supplying the deformed mesh in addition to the base configuration input files, PROTEUS-SN automatically processes material adjustments including calculation of region densities to conserve mass, calculation of isotopic densities according to material models (for example, sodium density as a function of temperature), and subsequent re-homogenization of materials. To verify the new capability of directly simulating deformed meshes, PROTEUS-SN was used to compute reactivity feedback for a series of contrived yet representative deformed configurations for the Advanced Burner Test Reactor design. The indirect legacy procedure was also performed to generate reactivity feedback coefficients for the same deformed configurations. Interestingly, the legacy procedure consistently overestimated reactivity feedbacks by 35% compared to direct simulations by PROTEUS-SN. This overestimation indicates that the legacy procedures are in fact

  5. A metallic solution model with adjustable parameter for describing ternary thermodynamic properties from its binary constituents

    Fang Zheng; Qiu Guanzhou

    2007-01-01

    A metallic solution model with adjustable parameter k has been developed to predict thermodynamic properties of ternary systems from those of its constituent three binaries. In the present model, the excess Gibbs free energy for a ternary mixture is expressed as a weighted probability sum of those of binaries and the k value is determined based on an assumption that the ternary interaction generally strengthens the mixing effects for metallic solutions with weak interaction, making the Gibbs free energy of mixing of the ternary system more negative than that before considering the interaction. This point is never considered in the models currently reported, where the only difference in a geometrical definition of molar values of components is considered that do not involve thermodynamic principles but are completely empirical. The current model describes the results of experiments very well, and by adjusting the k value also agrees with those from models used widely in the literature. Three ternary systems, Mg-Cu-Ni, Zn-In-Cd, and Cd-Bi-Pb are recalculated to demonstrate the method of determining k and the precision of the model. The results of the calculations, especially those in Mg-Cu-Ni system, are better than those predicted by the current models in the literature

  6. A model describing intra-granular fission gas behaviour in oxide fuel for advanced engineering tools

    Pizzocri, D.; Pastore, G.; Barani, T.; Magni, A.; Luzzi, L.; Van Uffelen, P.; Pitts, S. A.; Alfonsi, A.; Hales, J. D.

    2018-04-01

    The description of intra-granular fission gas behaviour is a fundamental part of any model for the prediction of fission gas release and swelling in nuclear fuel. In this work we present a model describing the evolution of intra-granular fission gas bubbles in terms of bubble number density and average size, coupled to gas release to grain boundaries. The model considers the fundamental processes of single gas atom diffusion, gas bubble nucleation, re-solution and gas atom trapping at bubbles. The model is derived from a detailed cluster dynamics formulation, yet it consists of only three differential equations in its final form; hence, it can be efficiently applied in engineering fuel performance codes while retaining a physical basis. We discuss improvements relative to previous single-size models for intra-granular bubble evolution. We validate the model against experimental data, both in terms of bubble number density and average bubble radius. Lastly, we perform an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis by propagating the uncertainties in the parameters to model results.

  7. A bottom-up model to describe consumers’ preferences towards late season peaches

    Groot, E.; Albisu, L.M.

    2015-07-01

    Peaches are consumed in Mediterranean countries since ancient times. Nowadays there are few areas in Europe that produce peaches with Protected Designation of Origin (PDO), and the Calanda area is one of them. The aim of this work is to describe consumers’ preferences towards late season PDO Calanda peaches in the city of Zaragoza, Spain, by a bottom-up model. The bottom-up model proves greater amount of information than top-down models. In this approach it is estimated one utility function per consumer. Thus, it is not necessary to make assumptions about preference distributions and correlations across respondents. It was observed that preference distributions were neither normal nor independently distributed. If those preferences were estimated by top-down models, conclusions would be biased. This paper also explores a new way to describe preferences through individual utility functions. Results show that the largest behavioural group gathered origin sensitive consumers. Their utility increased if the peaches were produced in the Calanda area and, especially, when peaches had the PDO Calanda brand. In sequence, the second most valuable attribute for consumers was the price. Peach size and packaging were not so important on purchase choice decision. Nevertheless, it is advisable to avoid trading smallest size peaches (weighting around 160 g/fruit). Traders also have to be careful by using active packaging. It was found that a group of consumers disliked this kind of product, probably, because they perceived it as less natural. (Author)

  8. An extended car-following model to describe connected traffic dynamics under cyberattacks

    Wang, Pengcheng; Yu, Guizhen; Wu, Xinkai; Qin, Hongmao; Wang, Yunpeng

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the impacts of the potential cyberattacks on vehicles are modeled through an extended car-following model. To better understand the mechanism of traffic disturbance under cyberattacks, the linear and nonlinear stability analysis are conducted respectively. Particularly, linear stability analysis is performed to obtain different neutral stability conditions with various parameters; and nonlinear stability analysis is carried out by using reductive perturbation method to derive the soliton solution of the modified Korteweg de Vries equation (mKdV) near the critical point, which is used to draw coexisting stability lines. Furthermore, by applying linear and nonlinear stability analysis, traffic flow state can be divided into three states, i.e., stable, metastable and unstable states which are useful to describe shockwave dynamics and driving behaviors under cyberattacks. The theoretical results show that the proposed car-following model is capable of successfully describing the car-following behavior of connected vehicles with cyberattacks. Finally, numerical simulation using real values has confirmed the validity of theoretical analysis. The results further demonstrate our model can be used to help avoid collisions and relieve traffic congestion with cybersecurity threats.

  9. Development of a model describing virus removal process in an activated sludge basin

    Kim, T.; Shiragami, N. Unno, H. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-06-20

    The virus removal process from the liquid phase in an activated sludge basin possibly consists of physicochemical processes, such as adsorption onto sludge flocs, biological processes such as microbial predating and inactivation by virucidal components excreted by microbes. To describe properly the virus behavior in an activated sludge basin, a simple model is proposed based on the experimental data obtained using a poliovirus type 1. A three-compartments model, which include the virus in the liquid phase and in the peripheral and inner regions of sludge flocs is employed. By using the model, the Virus removal process was successfully simulated to highlight the implication of its distribution in the activated sludge basin. 17 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Digital Materials - Evaluation of the Possibilities of using Selected Hyperelastic Models to Describe Constitutive Relations

    Mańkowski, J.; Lipnicki, J.

    2017-08-01

    The authors tried to identify the parameters of numerical models of digital materials, which are a kind of composite resulting from the manufacture of the product in 3D printers. With the arrangement of several heads of the printer, the new material can result from mixing of materials with radically different properties, during the process of producing single layer of the product. The new material has properties dependent on the base materials properties and their proportions. Digital materials tensile characteristics are often non-linear and qualify to be described by hyperelastic materials models. The identification was conducted based on the results of tensile tests models, its various degrees coefficients of the polynomials to various degrees coefficients of the polynomials. The Drucker's stability criterion was also examined. Fourteen different materials were analyzed.

  11. Digital Materials – Evaluation of the Possibilities of using Selected Hyperelastic Models to Describe Constitutive Relations

    Mańkowski J.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The authors tried to identify the parameters of numerical models of digital materials, which are a kind of composite resulting from the manufacture of the product in 3D printers. With the arrangement of several heads of the printer, the new material can result from mixing of materials with radically different properties, during the process of producing single layer of the product. The new material has properties dependent on the base materials properties and their proportions. Digital materials tensile characteristics are often non-linear and qualify to be described by hyperelastic materials models. The identification was conducted based on the results of tensile tests models, its various degrees coefficients of the polynomials to various degrees coefficients of the polynomials. The Drucker’s stability criterion was also examined. Fourteen different materials were analyzed.

  12. Ordinal regression models to describe tourist satisfaction with Sintra's world heritage

    Mouriño, Helena

    2013-10-01

    In Tourism Research, ordinal regression models are becoming a very powerful tool in modelling the relationship between an ordinal response variable and a set of explanatory variables. In August and September 2010, we conducted a pioneering Tourist Survey in Sintra, Portugal. The data were obtained by face-to-face interviews at the entrances of the Palaces and Parks of Sintra. The work developed in this paper focus on two main points: tourists' perception of the entrance fees; overall level of satisfaction with this heritage site. For attaining these goals, ordinal regression models were developed. We concluded that tourist's nationality was the only significant variable to describe the perception of the admission fees. Also, Sintra's image among tourists depends not only on their nationality, but also on previous knowledge about Sintra's World Heritage status.

  13. Computational Models Describing Possible Mechanisms for Generation of Excessive Beta Oscillations in Parkinson's Disease.

    Alex Pavlides

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In Parkinson's disease, an increase in beta oscillations within the basal ganglia nuclei has been shown to be associated with difficulty in movement initiation. An important role in the generation of these oscillations is thought to be played by the motor cortex and by a network composed of the subthalamic nucleus (STN and the external segment of globus pallidus (GPe. Several alternative models have been proposed to describe the mechanisms for generation of the Parkinsonian beta oscillations. However, a recent experimental study of Tachibana and colleagues yielded results which are challenging for all published computational models of beta generation. That study investigated how the presence of beta oscillations in a primate model of Parkinson's disease is affected by blocking different connections of the STN-GPe circuit. Due to a large number of experimental conditions, the study provides strong constraints that any mechanistic model of beta generation should satisfy. In this paper we present two models consistent with the data of Tachibana et al. The first model assumes that Parkinsonian beta oscillation are generated in the cortex and the STN-GPe circuits resonates at this frequency. The second model additionally assumes that the feedback from STN-GPe circuit to cortex is important for maintaining the oscillations in the network. Predictions are made about experimental evidence that is required to differentiate between the two models, both of which are able to reproduce firing rates, oscillation frequency and effects of lesions carried out by Tachibana and colleagues. Furthermore, an analysis of the models reveals how the amplitude and frequency of the generated oscillations depend on parameters.

  14. Development of a geometric uncertainty model describing the accuracy of position-sensitive, coincidence neutron detection

    Trivelpiece, Cory L., E-mail: cory@psu.ed [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania, State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Brenizer, J.S. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania, State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2011-01-01

    A diameter of uncertainty (D{sub u}) was derived from a geometric uncertainty model describing the error that would be introduced into position-sensitive, coincidence neutron detection measurements by charged-particle transport phenomena and experimental setup. The transport of {alpha} and Li ions, produced by the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}) {sup 7}Li reaction, through free-standing boro-phosphosilicate glass (BPSG) films was modeled using the Monte Carlo code SRIM, and the results of these simulations were used as input to determine D{sub u} for position-sensitive, coincidence techniques. The results of these calculations showed that D{sub u} is dependent on encoder separation, the angle of charged particle emission, and film thickness. For certain emission scenarios, the magnitude of D{sub u} is larger than the physical size of the neutron converting media that were being modeled. Spheres of uncertainty were developed that describe the difference in flight path times among the bounding-case emission scenarios that were considered in this work. It was shown the overlapping spheres represent emission angles and particle flight path lengths that would be difficult to resolve in terms of particle time-of-flight measurements. However, based on the timing resolution of current nuclear instrumentation, emission events that yield large D{sub u} can be discriminated by logical arguments during spectral deconvolution.

  15. Radial basis functions in mathematical modelling of flow boiling in minichannels

    Hożejowska Sylwia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses heat transfer processes in flow boiling in a vertical minichannel of 1.7 mm depth with a smooth heated surface contacting fluid. The heated element for FC-72 flowing in a minichannel was a 0.45 mm thick plate made of Haynes-230 alloy. An infrared camera positioned opposite the central, axially symmetric part of the channel measured the plate temperature. K-type thermocouples and pressure converters were installed at the inlet and outlet of the minichannel. In the study radial basis functions were used to solve a problem concerning heat transfer in a heated plate supplied with the controlled direct current. According to the model assumptions, the problem is treated as twodimensional and governed by the Poisson equation. The aim of the study lies in determining the temperature field and the heat transfer coefficient. The results were verified by comparing them with those obtained by the Trefftz method.

  16. Development of the model describing highly excited states of odd deformed nuclei

    Malov, L.A.; Solov'ev, V.G.

    1975-01-01

    An approximate method is given for solving the system of equations obtained earlier for describing the structure of states with intermediate and high energies in the framework of the model taking into account the interaction of quasiparticles with phonons. The new method possesses a number of advantages over the approximate methods of solving the system of equations mentioned. The study is performed for the example of an odd deformed nucleus when several one-quasiparticle components are taken into account at the same time

  17. Critical properties of a ferroelectric superlattice described by a transverse spin-1/2 Ising model

    Tabyaoui, A; Saber, M; Baerner, K; Ainane, A

    2007-01-01

    The phase transition properties of a ferroelectric superlattice with two alternating layers A and B described by a transverse spin-1/2 Ising model have been investigated using the effective field theory within a probability distribution technique that accounts for the self spin correlation functions. The Curie temperature T c , polarization and susceptibility have been obtained. The effects of the transverse field and the ferroelectric and antiferroelectric interfacial coupling strength between two ferroelectric materials are discussed. They relate to the physical properties of antiferroelectric/ferroelectric superlattices

  18. Model describing the effect of employment of the United States military in a complex emergency.

    MacMillan, Donald S

    2005-01-01

    The end of the Cold War vastly altered the worldwide political landscape. With the loss of a main competitor, the United States (US) military has had to adapt its strategic, operational, and tactical doctrines to an ever-increasing variety of non-traditional missions, including humanitarian operations. Complex emergencies (CEs) are defined in this paper from a political and military perspective, various factors that contribute to their development are described, and issues resulting from the employment of US military forces are discussed. A model was developed to illustrate the course of a humanitarian emergency and the potential impact of a military response. The US intervention in Haiti, Northern Iraq, Kosovo, Somalia, Bosnia, and Rwanda serve as examples. A CE develops when there is civil conflict, loss of national governmental authority, a mass population movement, and massive economic failure, each leading to a general decline in food security. The military can alleviate a CE in four ways: (1) provide security for relief efforts; (2) enforce negotiated settlements; (3) provide security for non-combatants; and/or (4) employ logistical capabilities. The model incorporates Norton and Miskel's taxonomy of identifying failing states and helps illustrate the factors that lead to a CE. The model can be used to determine if and when military intervention will have the greatest impact. The model demonstrates that early military intervention and mission assignment within the core competencies of the forces can reverse the course of a CE. Further study will be needed to verify the model.

  19. Application of a mathematical model to describe the effects of chlorpyrifos on Caenorhabditis elegans development.

    Windy A Boyd

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is being assessed as an alternative model organism as part of an interagency effort to develop better means to test potentially toxic substances. As part of this effort, assays that use the COPAS Biosort flow sorting technology to record optical measurements (time of flight (TOF and extinction (EXT of individual nematodes under various chemical exposure conditions are being developed. A mathematical model has been created that uses Biosort data to quantitatively and qualitatively describe C. elegans growth, and link changes in growth rates to biological events. Chlorpyrifos, an organophosphate pesticide known to cause developmental delays and malformations in mammals, was used as a model toxicant to test the applicability of the growth model for in vivo toxicological testing.L1 larval nematodes were exposed to a range of sub-lethal chlorpyrifos concentrations (0-75 microM and measured every 12 h. In the absence of toxicant, C. elegans matured from L1s to gravid adults by 60 h. A mathematical model was used to estimate nematode size distributions at various times. Mathematical modeling of the distributions allowed the number of measured nematodes and log(EXT and log(TOF growth rates to be estimated. The model revealed three distinct growth phases. The points at which estimated growth rates changed (change points were constant across the ten chlorpyrifos concentrations. Concentration response curves with respect to several model-estimated quantities (numbers of measured nematodes, mean log(TOF and log(EXT, growth rates, and time to reach change points showed a significant decrease in C. elegans growth with increasing chlorpyrifos concentration.Effects of chlorpyrifos on C. elegans growth and development were mathematically modeled. Statistical tests confirmed a significant concentration effect on several model endpoints. This confirmed that chlorpyrifos affects C. elegans development in a concentration dependent

  20. Cosmological models described by a mixture of van der Waals fluid and dark energy

    Kremer, G.M.

    2003-01-01

    The Universe is modeled as a binary mixture whose constituents are described by a van der Waals fluid and by a dark energy density. The dark energy density is considered either as quintessence or as the Chaplygin gas. The irreversible processes concerning the energy transfer between the van der Waals fluid and the gravitational field are taken into account. This model can simulate (a) an inflationary period where the acceleration grows exponentially and the van der Waals fluid behaves like an inflaton, (b) an accelerated period where the acceleration is positive but it decreases and tends to zero whereas the energy density of the van der Waals fluid decays, (c) a decelerated period which corresponds to a matter dominated period with a non-negative pressure, and (d) a present accelerated period where the dark energy density outweighs the energy density of the van der Waals fluid

  1. Comparison of the SASSYS/SAS4A radial core expansion reactivity feedback model and the empirical correlation for FFTF

    Wigeland, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The present emphasis on inherent safety for LMR designs has resulted in a need to represent the various reactivity feedback mechanisms as accurately as possible. The dominant negative reactivity feedback has been found to result from radial expansion of the core for most postulated ATWS events. For this reason, a more detailed model for calculating the reactivity feedback from radial core expansion has been recently developed for use with the SASSYS/SAS4A Code System. The purpose of this summary is to present an extension to the model so that it is more suitable for handling a core restraint design as used in FFTF, and to compare the SASSYS/SAS4A results using this model to the empirical correlation presently being used to account for radial core expansion reactivity feedback to FFTF

  2. Double porosity model to describe both permeability change and dissolution processes

    Niibori, Yuichi; Usui, Hideo; Chida, Taiji

    2015-01-01

    Cement is a practical material for constructing the geological disposal system of radioactive wastes. The dynamic behavior of both permeability change and dissolution process caused by a high pH groundwater was explained using a double porosity model assuming that each packed particle consists of the sphere-shaped aggregation of smaller particles. This model assumes two kinds of porosities between the particle clusters and between the particles, where the former porosity change mainly controls the permeability change of the bed, and the latter porosity change controls the diffusion of OH"- ions inducing the dissolution of silica. The fundamental equations consist of a diffusion equation of spherical coordinates of OH"- ions including the first-order reaction term and some equations describing the size changes of both the particles and the particle clusters with time. The change of over-all permeability of the packed bed is evaluated by Kozeny-Carman equation and the calculated radii of particle clusters. The calculated result well describes the experimental result of both permeability change and dissolution processes. (author)

  3. A mathematical model for describing the mechanical behaviour of root canal instruments.

    Zhang, E W; Cheung, G S P; Zheng, Y F

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a general mathematical model for describing the mechanical behaviour of root canal instruments by combining a theoretical analytical approach with a numerical finite-element method. Mathematical formulas representing the longitudinal (taper, helical angle and pitch) and cross-sectional configurations and area, the bending and torsional inertia, the curvature of the boundary point and the (geometry of) loading condition were derived. Torsional and bending stresses and the resultant deformation were expressed mathematically as a function of these geometric parameters, modulus of elasticity of the material and the applied load. As illustrations, three brands of NiTi endodontic files of different cross-sectional configurations (ProTaper, Hero 642, and Mani NRT) were analysed under pure torsion and pure bending situation by entering the model into a finite-element analysis package (ANSYS). Numerical results confirmed that mathematical models were a feasible method to analyse the mechanical properties and predict the stress and deformation for root canal instruments during root canal preparation. Mathematical and numerical model can be a suitable way to examine mechanical behaviours as a criterion of the instrument design and to predict the stress and strain experienced by the endodontic instruments during root canal preparation. © 2010 International Endodontic Journal.

  4. Cosmological model with viscosity media (dark fluid) described by an effective equation of state

    Ren Jie; Meng Xinhe

    2006-01-01

    A generally parameterized equation of state (EOS) is investigated in the cosmological evolution with bulk viscosity media modelled as dark fluid, which can be regarded as a unification of dark energy and dark matter. Compared with the case of the perfect fluid, this EOS has possessed four additional parameters, which can be interpreted as the case of the non-perfect fluid with time-dependent viscosity or the model with variable cosmological constant. From this general EOS, a completely integrable dynamical equation to the scale factor is obtained with its solution explicitly given out. (i) In this parameterized model of cosmology, for a special choice of the parameters we can explain the late-time accelerating expansion universe in a new view. The early inflation, the median (relatively late time) deceleration, and the recently cosmic acceleration may be unified in a single equation. (ii) A generalized relation of the Hubble parameter scaling with the redshift is obtained for some cosmology interests. (iii) By using the SNe Ia data to fit the effective viscosity model we show that the case of matter described by p=0 plus with effective viscosity contributions can fit the observational gold data in an acceptable level

  5. Na, K, Ca, Mg, and U-series in fossil bone and the proposal of a radial diffusion–adsorption model of uranium uptake

    Cid, A.S.; Anjos, R.M.; Zamboni, C.B.; Cardoso, R.; Muniz, M.; Corona, A.; Valladares, D.L.

    2014-01-01

    Fossil bones are often the only materials available for chronological reconstruction of important archeological sites. However, since bone is an open system for uranium, it cannot be dated directly and therefore it is necessary to develop models for the U uptake. Hence, a radial diffusion–adsorption (RDA) model is described. Unlike the classic diffusion–adsorption (D–A) model, RDA uses a cylindrical geometry to describe the U uptake in fossil bones. The model was applied across a transverse section of a tibia of an extinct megamammal Macrauchenia patachonica from the La Paz Local Fauna, Montevideo State, Uruguay. Measurements of spatial distribution of Na, K, Ca, and Mg were also performed by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Gamma-ray spectrometric U-series dating was applied to determine the age of the bone sample. From U concentration profile, it was possible to observe the occurrence of a relatively slow and continuous uranium uptake under constant conditions that had not yet reached equilibrium, since the uranium distribution is a ∪-shaped closed-system. Predictions of the RDA model were obtained for a specific geochemical scenario, indicating that the effective diffusion coefficient D/R in this fossil bone is (2.4 ± 0.6)10 −12 cm 2 s −1 . Mean values of Na, K, Ca, and Mg contents along the radial line of the fossil tibia are consistent with the expected behavior for spatial distributions of these mineral elements across a modern bone section. This result indicates that the fossil tibia may have its mineral structure preserved. - Highlights: • The Radial diffusion–adsorption (RDA) model is described. • RDA uses a cylindrical geometry to describe the U uptake in fossil bones. • We show new data for an extinct Macrauchenia patachonica from Uruguay. • Spatial distributions of Na, K, Ca, Mg, and U across a fossil bone section. • Gamma-ray spectrometric U-series dating was applied to determine its age

  6. Species-free species distribution models describe macroecological properties of protected area networks.

    Robinson, Jason L; Fordyce, James A

    2017-01-01

    Among the greatest challenges facing the conservation of plants and animal species in protected areas are threats from a rapidly changing climate. An altered climate creates both challenges and opportunities for improving the management of protected areas in networks. Increasingly, quantitative tools like species distribution modeling are used to assess the performance of protected areas and predict potential responses to changing climates for groups of species, within a predictive framework. At larger geographic domains and scales, protected area network units have spatial geoclimatic properties that can be described in the gap analysis typically used to measure or aggregate the geographic distributions of species (stacked species distribution models, or S-SDM). We extend the use of species distribution modeling techniques in order to model the climate envelope (or "footprint") of individual protected areas within a network of protected areas distributed across the 48 conterminous United States and managed by the US National Park System. In our approach we treat each protected area as the geographic range of a hypothetical endemic species, then use MaxEnt and 5 uncorrelated BioClim variables to model the geographic distribution of the climatic envelope associated with each protected area unit (modeling the geographic area of park units as the range of a species). We describe the individual and aggregated climate envelopes predicted by a large network of 163 protected areas and briefly illustrate how macroecological measures of geodiversity can be derived from our analysis of the landscape ecological context of protected areas. To estimate trajectories of change in the temporal distribution of climatic features within a protected area network, we projected the climate envelopes of protected areas in current conditions onto a dataset of predicted future climatic conditions. Our results suggest that the climate envelopes of some parks may be locally unique or have

  7. The pattern of eigenfrequencies of radial overtones which is predicted for a specified Earth-model

    E. R. LAPWOOD

    1977-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1974 Anderssen and Cleary examined the distribution of eigenfrequencies
    of radial overtones in torsional oscillations of Earth-models.
    They pointed out that according to Sturm-Liouville theory this distribution
    should approach asymptotically, for large overtone number m,
    the value nnz/y, where y is the time taken by a shear-wave to travel
    along a radius from the core-mantle interface to the surface, provided
    elastic parameters vary continuously along the radius. They found that,
    for all the models which they considered, the distributions of eigenfrequencies
    deviated from the asymptote by amounts which depended on
    the existence and size of internal discontinuities. Lapwood (1975 showed
    that such deviations were to be expected from Sturm-Liouville theory,
    and McNabb, Anderssen and Lapwood (1976 extended Sturm-Liouville
    theory to apply to differential equations with discontinuous coefficients.
    Anderssen (1977 used their results to show how to predict the pattern
    of deviations —called by McNabb et al. the solotone effect— for a
    given discontinuity in an Earth-model.
    Recently Sato and Lapwood (1977, in a series of papers which will
    be referred to here simply as I, II, III, have explored the solotone effect
    for layered spherical shells, using approximations derived from an exacttheory which holds for uniform layering. They have shown how the
    form of the pattern of eigenfrequencies, which is the graph of
    S — YMUJI/N — m against m, where ,„CJI is the frequency of the m"'
    overtone in the I"' (Legendre mode of torsional oscillation, is determined
    as to periodicity (or quasi-periodicity by the thicknesses and velocities
    of the layers, and as to amplitude by the amounts of the discontinuities
    (III. The pattern of eigenfrequencies proves to be extremely sensitive
    to small changes in layer-thicknesses in a model.
    In

  8. Modelling cell cycle synchronisation in networks of coupled radial glial cells.

    Barrack, Duncan S; Thul, Rüdiger; Owen, Markus R

    2015-07-21

    Radial glial cells play a crucial role in the embryonic mammalian brain. Their proliferation is thought to be controlled, in part, by ATP mediated calcium signals. It has been hypothesised that these signals act to locally synchronise cell cycles, so that clusters of cells proliferate together, shedding daughter cells in uniform sheets. In this paper we investigate this cell cycle synchronisation by taking an ordinary differential equation model that couples the dynamics of intracellular calcium and the cell cycle and extend it to populations of cells coupled via extracellular ATP signals. Through bifurcation analysis we show that although ATP mediated calcium release can lead to cell cycle synchronisation, a number of other asynchronous oscillatory solutions including torus solutions dominate the parameter space and cell cycle synchronisation is far from guaranteed. Despite this, numerical results indicate that the transient and not the asymptotic behaviour of the system is important in accounting for cell cycle synchronisation. In particular, quiescent cells can be entrained on to the cell cycle via ATP mediated calcium signals initiated by a driving cell and crucially will cycle in near synchrony with the driving cell for the duration of neurogenesis. This behaviour is highly sensitive to the timing of ATP release, with release at the G1/S phase transition of the cell cycle far more likely to lead to near synchrony than release during mid G1 phase. This result, which suggests that ATP release timing is critical to radial glia cell cycle synchronisation, may help us to understand normal and pathological brain development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A Canine Non-Weight-Bearing Model with Radial Neurectomy for Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Xiaoxi Ji

    Full Text Available The major concern of using a large animal model to study rotator cuff repair is the high rate of repair retears. The purpose of this study was to test a non-weight-bearing (NWB canine model for rotator cuff repair research.First, in the in vitro study, 18 shoulders were randomized to 3 groups. 1 Full-width transections repaired with modified Mason-Allen sutures using 3-0 polyglactin suture, 2 Group 1 repaired using number 2 (#2 polyester braid and long-chain polyethylene suture, and 3 Partial-width transections leaving the superior 2 mm infraspinatus tendon intact without repair. In the in vivo study of 6 dogs, the infraspinatus tendon was partially transected as the same as the in vitro group 3. A radial neurectomy was performed to prevent weight bearing. The operated limb was slung in a custom-made jacket for 6 weeks.In the in vitro study, mean ultimate tensile load and stiffness in Group 2 were significantly higher than Group 1 and 3 (p<0.05. In the in vivo study, gross inspection and histology showed that the preserved superior 2-mm portion of the infraspinatus tendon remained intact with normal structure.Based on the biomechanical and histological findings, this canine NWB model may be an appropriate and useful model for studies of rotator cuff repair.

  10. Radial Basis Functional Model of Multi-Point Dieless Forming Process for Springback Reduction and Compensation

    Misganaw Abebe

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Springback in multi-point dieless forming (MDF is a common problem because of the small deformation and blank holder free boundary condition. Numerical simulations are widely used in sheet metal forming to predict the springback. However, the computational time in using the numerical tools is time costly to find the optimal process parameters value. This study proposes radial basis function (RBF to replace the numerical simulation model by using statistical analyses that are based on a design of experiment (DOE. Punch holding time, blank thickness, and curvature radius are chosen as effective process parameters for determining the springback. The Latin hypercube DOE method facilitates statistical analyses and the extraction of a prediction model in the experimental process parameter domain. Finite element (FE simulation model is conducted in the ABAQUS commercial software to generate the springback responses of the training and testing samples. The genetic algorithm is applied to find the optimal value for reducing and compensating the induced springback for the different blank thicknesses using the developed RBF prediction model. Finally, the RBF numerical result is verified by comparing with the FE simulation result of the optimal process parameters and both results show that the springback is almost negligible from the target shape.

  11. Methodological Bases for Describing Risks of the Enterprise Business Model in Integrated Reporting

    Nesterenko Oksana O.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to substantiate the methodological bases for describing the business and accounting risks of an enterprise business model in integrated reporting for their timely detection and assessment, and develop methods for their leveling or minimizing and possible prevention. It is proposed to consider risks in the process of forming integrated reporting from two sides: first, risks that arise in the business model of an organization and should be disclosed in its integrated report; second, accounting risks of integrated reporting, which should be taken into account by members of the cross-sectoral working group and management personnel in the process of forming and promulgating integrated reporting. To develop an adequate accounting and analytical tool for disclosure of information about the risks of the business model and integrated reporting, their leveling or minimization, in the article a terminological analysis of the essence of entrepreneurial and accounting risks is carried out. The entrepreneurial risk is defined as an objective-subjective economic category that characterizes the probability of negative or positive consequences of economic-social-ecological activity within the framework of the business model of an enterprise under uncertainty. The accounting risk is suggested to be understood as the probability of unfavorable consequences as a result of organizational, methodological errors in the integrated accounting system, which present threat to the quality, accuracy and reliability of the reporting information on economic, social and environmental activities in integrated reporting as well as threat of inappropriate decision-making by stakeholders based on the integrated report. For the timely identification of business risks and maximum leveling of the influence of accounting risks on the process of formation and publication of integrated reporting, in the study the place of entrepreneurial and accounting risks in

  12. Model tool to describe chemical structures in XML format utilizing structural fragments and chemical ontology.

    Sankar, Punnaivanam; Alain, Krief; Aghila, Gnanasekaran

    2010-05-24

    We have developed a model structure-editing tool, ChemEd, programmed in JAVA, which allows drawing chemical structures on a graphical user interface (GUI) by selecting appropriate structural fragments defined in a fragment library. The terms representing the structural fragments are organized in fragment ontology to provide a conceptual support. ChemEd describes the chemical structure in an XML document (ChemFul) with rich semantics explicitly encoding the details of the chemical bonding, the hybridization status, and the electron environment around each atom. The document can be further processed through suitable algorithms and with the support of external chemical ontologies to generate understandable reports about the functional groups present in the structure and their specific environment.

  13. Computer-aided Nonlinear Control System Design Using Describing Function Models

    Nassirharand, Amir

    2012-01-01

    A systematic computer-aided approach provides a versatile setting for the control engineer to overcome the complications of controller design for highly nonlinear systems. Computer-aided Nonlinear Control System Design provides such an approach based on the use of describing functions. The text deals with a large class of nonlinear systems without restrictions on the system order, the number of inputs and/or outputs or the number, type or arrangement of nonlinear terms. The strongly software-oriented methods detailed facilitate fulfillment of tight performance requirements and help the designer to think in purely nonlinear terms, avoiding the expedient of linearization which can impose substantial and unrealistic model limitations and drive up the cost of the final product. Design procedures are presented in a step-by-step algorithmic format each step being a functional unit with outputs that drive the other steps. This procedure may be easily implemented on a digital computer with example problems from mecha...

  14. Regression models describing Rosa hybrida response to day/night temperature and photosynthetic photon flux

    Hopper, D.A.; Hammer, P.A.

    1991-01-01

    A central composite rotatable design was used to estimate quadratic equations describing the relationship of irradiance, as measured by photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), and day (DT) and night (NT) temperatures to the growth and development of Rosa hybrida L. in controlled environments. Plants were subjected to 15 treatment combinations of the PPF, DT, and NT according to the coding of the design matrix. Day and night length were each 12 hours. Environmental factor ranges were chosen to include conditions representative of winter and spring commercial greenhouse production environments in the midwestern United States. After an initial hard pinch, 11 plant growth characteristics were measured every 10 days and at flowering. Four plant characteristics were recorded to describe flower bud development. Response surface equations were displayed as three-dimensional plots, with DT and NT as the base axes and the plant character on the z-axis while PPF was held constant. Response surfaces illustrated the plant response to interactions of DT and NT, while comparisons between plots at different PPF showed the overall effect of PPF. Canonical analysis of all regression models revealed the stationary point and general shape of the response surface. All stationary points of the significant models were located outside the original design space, and all but one surface was a saddle shape. Both the plots and analysis showed greater stem diameter, as well as higher fresh and dry weights of stems, leaves, and flower buds to occur at flowering under combinations of low DT (less than or equal to 17C) and low NT (less than or equal to 14C). However, low DT and NT delayed both visible bud formation and development to flowering. Increased PPF increased overall flower stem quality by increasing stem diameter and the fresh and dry weights of all plant parts at flowering, as well as decreased time until visible bud formation and flowering. These results summarize measured development at

  15. Inclusion of models to describe severe accident conditions in the fuel simulation code DIONISIO

    Lemes, Martín; Soba, Alejandro [Sección Códigos y Modelos, Gerencia Ciclo del Combustible Nuclear, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida General Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Daverio, Hernando [Gerencia Reactores y Centrales Nucleares, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida General Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Denis, Alicia [Sección Códigos y Modelos, Gerencia Ciclo del Combustible Nuclear, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida General Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2017-04-15

    The simulation of fuel rod behavior is a complex task that demands not only accurate models to describe the numerous phenomena occurring in the pellet, cladding and internal rod atmosphere but also an adequate interconnection between them. In the last years several models have been incorporated to the DIONISIO code with the purpose of increasing its precision and reliability. After the regrettable events at Fukushima, the need for codes capable of simulating nuclear fuels under accident conditions has come forth. Heat removal occurs in a quite different way than during normal operation and this fact determines a completely new set of conditions for the fuel materials. A detailed description of the different regimes the coolant may exhibit in such a wide variety of scenarios requires a thermal-hydraulic formulation not suitable to be included in a fuel performance code. Moreover, there exist a number of reliable and famous codes that perform this task. Nevertheless, and keeping in mind the purpose of building a code focused on the fuel behavior, a subroutine was developed for the DIONISIO code that performs a simplified analysis of the coolant in a PWR, restricted to the more representative situations and provides to the fuel simulation the boundary conditions necessary to reproduce accidental situations. In the present work this subroutine is described and the results of different comparisons with experimental data and with thermal-hydraulic codes are offered. It is verified that, in spite of its comparative simplicity, the predictions of this module of DIONISIO do not differ significantly from those of the specific, complex codes.

  16. Theoretical models for describing longitudinal bunch compression in the neutralized drift compression experiment

    Adam B. Sefkow

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Heavy ion drivers for warm dense matter and heavy ion fusion applications use intense charge bunches which must undergo transverse and longitudinal compression in order to meet the requisite high current densities and short pulse durations desired at the target. The neutralized drift compression experiment (NDCX at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is used to study the longitudinal neutralized drift compression of a space-charge-dominated ion beam, which occurs due to an imposed longitudinal velocity tilt and subsequent neutralization of the beam’s space charge by background plasma. Reduced theoretical models have been used in order to describe the realistic propagation of an intense charge bunch through the NDCX device. A warm-fluid model is presented as a tractable computational tool for investigating the nonideal effects associated with the experimental acceleration gap geometry and voltage waveform of the induction module, which acts as a means to pulse shape both the velocity and line density profiles. Self-similar drift compression solutions can be realized in order to transversely focus the entire charge bunch to the same focal plane in upcoming simultaneous transverse and longitudinal focusing experiments. A kinetic formalism based on the Vlasov equation has been employed in order to show that the peaks in the experimental current profiles are a result of the fact that only the central portion of the beam contributes effectively to the main compressed pulse. Significant portions of the charge bunch reside in the nonlinearly compressing part of the ion beam because of deviations between the experimental and ideal velocity tilts. Those regions form a pedestal of current around the central peak, thereby decreasing the amount of achievable longitudinal compression and increasing the pulse durations achieved at the focal plane. A hybrid fluid-Vlasov model which retains the advantages of both the fluid and kinetic approaches has been

  17. Introducing mixotrophy into a biogeochemical model describing an eutrophied coastal ecosystem: The Southern North Sea

    Ghyoot, Caroline; Lancelot, Christiane; Flynn, Kevin J.; Mitra, Aditee; Gypens, Nathalie

    2017-09-01

    Most biogeochemical/ecological models divide planktonic protists between phototrophs (phytoplankton) and heterotrophs (zooplankton). However, a large number of planktonic protists are able to combine several mechanisms of carbon and nutrient acquisition. Not representing these multiple mechanisms in biogeochemical/ecological models describing eutrophied coastal ecosystems can potentially lead to different conclusions regarding ecosystem functioning, especially regarding the success of harmful algae, which are often reported as mixotrophic. This modelling study investigates the implications for trophic dynamics of including 3 contrasting forms of mixotrophy, namely osmotrophy (using alkaline phosphatase activity, APA), non-constitutive mixotrophy (acquired phototrophy by microzooplankton) and also constitutive mixotrophy. The application is in the Southern North Sea, an ecosystem that faced, between 1985 and 2005, a significant increase in the nutrient supply N:P ratio (from 31 to 81 mol N:P). The comparison with a traditional model shows that, when the winter N:P ratio in the Southern North Sea is above 22 molN molP-1 (as occurred from mid-1990s), APA allows a 3-32% increase of annual gross primary production (GPP). In result of the higher GPP, the annual sedimentation increases as well as the bacterial production. By contrast, APA does not affect the export of matter to higher trophic levels because the increased GPP is mainly due to Phaeocystis colonies, which are not grazed by copepods. Under high irradiance, non-constitutive mixotrophy appreciably increases annual GPP, transfer to higher trophic levels, sedimentation, and nutrient remineralisation. In this ecosystem, non-constitutive mixotrophy is also observed to have an indirect stimulating effect on diatoms. Constitutive mixotrophy in nanoflagellates appears to have little influence on this ecosystem functioning. An important conclusion from this work is that contrasting forms of mixotrophy have different

  18. PERAMALAN DERET WAKTU MENGGUNAKAN MODEL FUNGSI BASIS RADIAL (RBF DAN AUTO REGRESSIVE INTEGRATED MOVING AVERAGE (ARIMA

    DT Wiyanti

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Salah satu metode peramalan yang paling dikembangkan saat ini adalah time series, yakni menggunakan pendekatan kuantitatif dengan data masa lampau yang dijadikan acuan untuk peramalan masa depan. Berbagai penelitian telah mengusulkan metode-metode untuk menyelesaikan time series, di antaranya statistik, jaringan syaraf, wavelet, dan sistem fuzzy. Metode-metode tersebut memiliki kekurangan dan keunggulan yang berbeda. Namun permasalahan yang ada dalam dunia nyata merupakan masalah yang kompleks. Satu metode saja mungkin tidak mampu mengatasi masalah tersebut dengan baik. Dalam artikel ini dibahas penggabungan dua buah metode yaitu Auto Regressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA dan Radial Basis Function (RBF. Alasan penggabungan kedua metode ini adalah karena adanya asumsi bahwa metode tunggal tidak dapat secara total mengidentifikasi semua karakteristik time series. Pada artikel ini dibahas peramalan terhadap data Indeks Harga Perdagangan Besar (IHPB dan data inflasi komoditi Indonesia; kedua data berada pada rentang tahun 2006 hingga beberapa bulan di tahun 2012. Kedua data tersebut masing-masing memiliki enam variabel. Hasil peramalan metode ARIMA-RBF dibandingkan dengan metode ARIMA dan metode RBF secara individual. Hasil analisa menunjukkan bahwa dengan metode penggabungan ARIMA dan RBF, model yang diberikan memiliki hasil yang lebih akurat dibandingkan dengan penggunaan salah satu metode saja. Hal ini terlihat dalam visual plot, MAPE, dan RMSE dari semua variabel pada dua data uji coba. The accuracy of time series forecasting is the subject of many decision-making processes. Time series use a quantitative approach to employ data from the past to make forecast for the future. Many researches have proposed several methods to solve time series, such as using statistics, neural networks, wavelets, and fuzzy systems. These methods have different advantages and disadvantages. But often the problem in the real world is just too complex that a

  19. A unified model to describe the anisotropic viscoplastic behavior of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes

    Delobelle, P.; Robinet, P.; Bouffioux, P.; Geyer, P.; Pichon, I. Le

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the constitutive equations of a unified viscoplastic model and its validation with experimental data. The mechanical tests were carried out in a temperature range of 20 to 400 C on both cold-worked stress-relieved and fully annealed Zircaloy-4 tubes. Although their geometry (14.3 by 1.2 mm) is different, the crystallographic texture was close to that expected in the cladding tubes. To characterize the anisotropy, mechanical tests were performed under both monotonic and cyclic uni- and bi-directional loadings, i.e., tension-compression, tension-torsion, and tension-internal pressure tests. The results obtained at ambient temperatures and the independence of the ratio R p = var-epsilon θθ p /var-epsilon zz p , with respect to temperature would seem to indicate that the set of anisotropy coefficients does not depend on temperature. Zircaloy-4 material also has a slight supplementary hardening during out-of-phase cyclic loading. The authors propose to extend the formulation of a unified viscoplastic model, developed and identified elsewhere for other initially isotropic materials, to the case of Zircaloy-4. Generally speaking, anisotropy is introduced through fourth order tensors affecting the flow directions, the linear kinematical hardening components, as well as the dynamic and static recoveries of the forementioned hardening variables. The ability of the model to describe all the mechanical properties of the material is shown. The application of the model to simulate mechanical tests (tension, creep, and relaxation) performed on true CWSR Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes with low tin content is also presented

  20. Comparison of three nonlinear models to describe long-term tag shedding by lake trout

    Fabrizio, Mary C.; Swanson, Bruce L.; Schram, Stephen T.; Hoff, Michael H.

    1996-01-01

    We estimated long-term tag-shedding rates for lake trout Salvelinus namaycush using two existing models and a model we developed to account for the observed permanence of some tags. Because tag design changed over the course of the study, we examined tag-shedding rates for three types of numbered anchor tags (Floy tags FD-67, FD-67C, and FD-68BC) and an unprinted anchor tag (FD-67F). Lake trout from the Gull Island Shoal region, Lake Superior, were double-tagged, and subsequent recaptures were monitored in annual surveys conducted from 1974 to 1992. We modeled tag-shedding rates, using time at liberty and probabilities of tag shedding estimated from fish released in 1974 and 1978–1983 and later recaptured. Long-term shedding of numbered anchor tags in lake trout was best described by a nonlinear model with two parameters: an instantaneous tag-shedding rate and a constant representing the proportion of tags that were never shed. Although our estimates of annual shedding rates varied with tag type (0.300 for FD-67, 0.441 for FD-67C, and 0.656 for FD-68BC), differences were not significant. About 36% of tags remained permanently affixed to the fish. Of the numbered tags that were shed (about 64%), two mechanisms contributed to tag loss: disintegration and dislodgment. Tags from about 11% of recaptured fish had disintegrated, but most tags were dislodged. Unprinted tags were shed at a significant but low rate immediately after release, but the long-term, annual shedding rate of these tags was only 0.013. Compared with unprinted tags, numbered tags dislodged at higher annual rates; we hypothesized that this was due to the greater frictional drag associated with the larger cross-sectional area of numbered tags.

  1. Yeast for Mathematicians: A Ferment of Discovery and Model Competition to Describe Data.

    Lewis, Matthew; Powell, James

    2017-02-01

    In addition to the memorization, algorithmic skills and vocabulary which are the default focus in many mathematics classrooms, professional mathematicians are expected to creatively apply known techniques, construct new mathematical approaches and communicate with and about mathematics. We propose that students can learn these professional, higher-level skills through Laboratory Experiences in Mathematical Biology which put students in the role of mathematics researcher creating mathematics to describe and understand biological data. Here we introduce a laboratory experience centered on yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) growing in a small capped flask with a jar to collect carbon dioxide created during yeast growth and respiration. The lab requires no specialized equipment and can easily be run in the context of a college math class. Students collect data and develop mathematical models to explain the data. To help place instructors in the role of mentor/collaborator (as opposed to jury/judge), we facilitate the lab using model competition judged via Bayesian Information Criterion. This article includes details about the class activity conducted, student examples and pedagogical strategies for success.

  2. Can a Linear Sigma Model Describe Walking Gauge Theories at Low Energies?

    Gasbarro, Andrew

    2018-03-01

    In recent years, many investigations of confining Yang Mills gauge theories near the edge of the conformal window have been carried out using lattice techniques. These studies have revealed that the spectrum of hadrons in nearly conformal ("walking") gauge theories differs significantly from the QCD spectrum. In particular, a light singlet scalar appears in the spectrum which is nearly degenerate with the PNGBs at the lightest currently accessible quark masses. This state is a viable candidate for a composite Higgs boson. Presently, an acceptable effective field theory (EFT) description of the light states in walking theories has not been established. Such an EFT would be useful for performing chiral extrapolations of lattice data and for serving as a bridge between lattice calculations and phenomenology. It has been shown that the chiral Lagrangian fails to describe the IR dynamics of a theory near the edge of the conformal window. Here we assess a linear sigma model as an alternate EFT description by performing explicit chiral fits to lattice data. In a combined fit to the Goldstone (pion) mass and decay constant, a tree level linear sigma model has a Χ2/d.o.f. = 0.5 compared to Χ2/d.o.f. = 29.6 from fitting nextto-leading order chiral perturbation theory. When the 0++ (σ) mass is included in the fit, Χ2/d.o.f. = 4.9. We remark on future directions for providing better fits to the σ mass.

  3. A Minimal Model Describing Hexapedal Interlimb Coordination: The Tegotae-Based Approach

    Dai Owaki

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Insects exhibit adaptive and versatile locomotion despite their minimal neural computing. Such locomotor patterns are generated via coordination between leg movements, i.e., an interlimb coordination, which is largely controlled in a distributed manner by neural circuits located in thoracic ganglia. However, the mechanism responsible for the interlimb coordination still remains elusive. Understanding this mechanism will help us to elucidate the fundamental control principle of animals' agile locomotion and to realize robots with legs that are truly adaptive and could not be developed solely by conventional control theories. This study aims at providing a “minimal" model of the interlimb coordination mechanism underlying hexapedal locomotion, in the hope that a single control principle could satisfactorily reproduce various aspects of insect locomotion. To this end, we introduce a novel concept we named “Tegotae,” a Japanese concept describing the extent to which a perceived reaction matches an expectation. By using the Tegotae-based approach, we show that a surprisingly systematic design of local sensory feedback mechanisms essential for the interlimb coordination can be realized. We also use a hexapod robot we developed to show that our mathematical model of the interlimb coordination mechanism satisfactorily reproduces various insects' gait patterns.

  4. Fast fission phenomenon, deep inelastic reactions and compound nucleus formation described within a dynamical macroscopic model

    Gregoire, C.; Ngo, C.; Remaud, B.

    1982-01-01

    We present a dynamical model to describe dissipative heavy ion reactions. It treats explicitly the relative motion of the two ions, the mass asymmetry of the system and the projection of the isospin of each ion. The deformations, which are induced during the collision, are simulated with a time-dependent interaction potential. This is done by a time-dependent transition between a sudden interaction potential in the entrance channel and an adiabatic potential in the exit channel. The model allows us to compute the compound-nucleus cross section and multidifferential cross-sections for deep inelastic reactions. In addition, for some systems, and under certain conditions which are discussed in detail, a new dissipative heavy ion collision appears: fast-fission phenomenon which has intermediate properties between deep inelastic and compound nucleus reactions. The calculated properties concerning fast fission are compared with experimental results and reproduce some of those which could not be understood as belonging to deep inelastic or compound-nucleus reactions. (orig.)

  5. Pharmacodynamic Model To Describe the Concentration-Dependent Selection of Cefotaxime-Resistant Escherichia coli

    Olofsson, Sara K.; Geli, Patricia; Andersson, Dan I.; Cars, Otto

    2005-01-01

    Antibiotic dosing regimens may vary in their capacity to select mutants. Our hypothesis was that selection of a more resistant bacterial subpopulation would increase with the time within a selective window (SW), i.e., when drug concentrations fall between the MICs of two strains. An in vitro kinetic model was used to study the selection of two Escherichia coli strains with different susceptibilities to cefotaxime. The bacterial mixtures were exposed to cefotaxime for 24 h and SWs of 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 h. A mathematical model was developed that described the selection of preexisting and newborn mutants and the post-MIC effect (PME) as functions of pharmacokinetic parameters. Our main conclusions were as follows: (i) the selection between preexisting mutants increased with the time within the SW; (ii) the emergence and selection of newborn mutants increased with the time within the SW (with a short time, only 4% of the preexisting mutants were replaced by newborn mutants, compared to the longest times, where 100% were replaced); and (iii) PME increased with the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) and was slightly more pronounced with a long elimination half-life (T1/2) than with a short T1/2 situation, when AUC is fixed. We showed that, in a dynamic competition between strains with different levels of resistance, the appearance of newborn high-level resistant mutants from the parental strains and the PME can strongly affect the outcome of the selection and that pharmacodynamic models can be used to predict the outcome of resistance development. PMID:16304176

  6. Ecohydrology in Mediterranean areas: a numerical model to describe growing seasons out of phase with precipitations

    D. Pumo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The probabilistic description of soil moisture dynamics is a relatively new topic in hydrology. The most common ecohydrological models start from a stochastic differential equation describing the soil water balance, where the unknown quantity, the soil moisture, depends both on spaces and time. Most of the solutions existing in literature are obtained in a probabilistic framework and under steady-state condition; even if this last condition allows the analytical handling of the problem, it has considerably simplified the same problem by subtracting generalities from it.

    The steady-state hypothesis, appears perfectly applicable in arid and semiarid climatic areas like those of African's or middle American's savannas, but it seems to be no more valid in areas with Mediterranean climate, where, notoriously, the wet season foregoes the growing season, recharging water into the soil. This moisture stored at the beginning of the growing season (known as soil moisture initial condition has a great importance, especially for deep-rooted vegetation, by enabling survival in absence of rainfalls during the growing season and, however, keeping the water stress low during the first period of the same season.

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the soil moisture dynamics using a simple non-steady numerical ecohydrological model. The numerical model here proposed is able to reproduce soil moisture probability density function, obtained analytically in previous studies for different climates and soils in steady-state conditions; consequently it can be used to compute both the soil moisture time-profile and the vegetation static water stress time-profile in non-steady conditions.

    Here the differences between the steady-analytical and the non-steady numerical probability density functions are analyzed, showing how the proposed numerical model is able to capture the effects of winter recharge on the soil moisture. The dynamic

  7. The generalized model of polypeptide chain describing the helix-coil transition in biopolymers

    Mamasakhlisov, E.S.; Badasyan, A.V.; Tsarukyan, A.V.; Grigoryan, A.V.; Morozov, V.F.

    2005-07-01

    In this paper we summarize some results of our theoretical investigations of helix-coil transition both in single-strand (polypeptides) and two-strand (polynucleotides) macromolecules. The Hamiltonian of the Generalized Model of Polypeptide Chain (GMPC) is introduced to describe the system in which the conformations are correlated over some dimensional range Δ (it equals 3 for polypeptide, because one H-bond fixes three pairs of rotation, for double strand DNA it equals to one chain rigidity because of impossibility of loop formation on the scale less than Δ). The Hamiltonian does not contain any parameter designed especially for helix-coil transition and uses pure molecular microscopic parameters (the energy of hydrogen bond formation, reduced partition function of repeated unit, the number of repeated units fixed by one hydrogen bond, the energies of interaction between the repeated units and the solvent molecules). To calculate averages we evaluate the partition function using the transfer-matrix approach. The GMPC allowed to describe the influence of a number of factors, affecting the transition, basing on a unified microscopic approach. Thus we obtained, that solvents change transition temperature and interval in different ways, depending on type of solvent and on energy of solvent- macromolecule interaction; stacking on the background of H-bonding increases stability and decreases cooperativity of melting. For heterogeneous DNA we could analytically derive well known formulae for transition temperature and interval. In the framework of GMPC we calculate and show the difference of two order parameters of helix-coil transition - the helicity degree, and the average fraction of repeated units in helical conformation. Given article has the aim to review the results obtained during twenty years in the context of GMPC. (author)

  8. Calculation of radial couplings in the model-potential and pseudopotential approaches: The NaH quasimolecule

    Mo, O.; Riera, A.; Yaez, M.

    1985-01-01

    We present an extension of the analytical method of Macias and Riera to calculate radial couplings, to include model potentials or (local and nonlocal) pseudopotentials, in the Hamiltonian. As an illustration, energies, couplings, and momentum matrix elements are presented and discussed for the two-effective-electron NaH quasimolecule, as a stringent test case

  9. A new model of Earth's radial conductivity structure derived from over 10 yr of satellite and observatory magnetic data

    Püthe, Christoph; Kuvshinov, Alexey; Khan, Amir

    2015-01-01

    We present a newmodel of the radial (1-D) conductivity structure of Earth's mantle. This model is derived frommore than 10 yr of magnetic measurements from the satellites ørsted, CHAMP, SAC-C and the Swarm trio as well as the global network of geomagnetic observatories. After removal of core...

  10. Time dependent emission line profiles in the radially streaming particle model of Seyfert galaxy nuclei and quasi-stellar objects

    Hubbard, R.

    1974-01-01

    The radially-streaming particle model for broad quasar and Seyfert galaxy emission features is modified to include sources of time dependence. The results are suggestive of reported observations of multiple components, variability, and transient features in the wings of Seyfert and quasi-stellar emission lines.

  11. Calculation of radial couplings in the model-potential and pseudopotential approaches: The NaH quasimolecule

    Mo, O.; Riera, A.; Yaez, M.

    1985-06-01

    We present an extension of the analytical method of Macias and Riera to calculate radial couplings, to include model potentials or (local and nonlocal) pseudopotentials, in the Hamiltonian. As an illustration, energies, couplings, and momentum matrix elements are presented and discussed for the two-effective-electron NaH quasimolecule, as a stringent test case.

  12. Softverski model estimatora radijalne brzine ciljeva / Software model of a radial velocity estimator

    Dejan S. Ivković

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available U radu je softverski modelovan novi blok u delu za obradu signala softverskog radarskog prijemnika, koji je nazvan estimator radijalne brzine. Detaljno je opisan način procene Doplerove frekvencije na osnovu MUSIC algoritma i ukratko prikazan način rada pri merenju. Svi parametri pri merenju klatera i detekcije simuliranih i realnih ciljeva dati su tabelarno, a rezultati grafički. Na osnovu analize prikazanih rezultata može se zaključiti da se pomoću projektovanog estimatora radijalne brzine može precizno proceniti Doplerov pomak u reflektovanom signalu od pokretnog cilja, a samim tim može se precizno odrediti njegova brzina. / In all analyses the MUSIC method has given better results than the FFT method. The MUSIC method proved to be better at estimation precision as well as at resolving two adjacent Doppler frequencies. On the basis of the obtained results, the designed estimator of radial velocity can be said to estimate Doppler frequency in the reflected signal from a moving target precisely, and, consequently, the target velocity. It is thus possible to improve the performances of the current radar as far as a precise estimation of velocity of detected moving targets is concerned.

  13. A radial distribution function-based open boundary force model for multi-centered molecules

    Neumann, Philipp; Eckhardt, Wolfgang; Bungartz, Hans-Joachim

    2014-01-01

    We derive an expression for radial distribution function (RDF)-based open boundary forcing for molecules with multiple interaction sites. Due to the high-dimensionality of the molecule configuration space and missing rotational invariance, a

  14. Models of disk chemical evolution focusing the pure dynamical radial mixing

    Re Fiorentin P.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We performed N-body simulations to study the dynamical evolution of a stellar disk inside a Dark Matter (DM halo. Our results evidence how a standard -radially decreasing- metallicity gradient produces a negative vϕ vs. [Fe/H] correlation, similar to that shown by the thin disk stars, while an inverse radial gradient generates a positive rotation-metallicity correlation, as that observed in the old thick population.

  15. 3D Model Studies on the Effect of Bed and Powder Type Upon Radial Static Pressure and Powder Distribution in Metallurgical Shaft Furnaces

    Panic B.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The flow of gases in metallurgical shaft furnaces has a decisive influence on the course and process efficiency. Radial changes in porosity of the bed cause uneven flow of gas along the radius of the reactor, which sometimes is deliberate and intentional. However, holdup of solid particles in descending packed beds of metallurgical shaft furnaces can lead to unintentional changes in porosity of the bed along the radial reactor. Unintentional changes in porosity often disrupt the flow of gas causing poor performance of the furnace. Such disruptions of flow may occur in the blast furnace due to high level of powder content in gas caused by large amount of coal dust/powder insufflated as fuel substitute. The paper describes the model test results of radial distribution of static pressure and powder hold up within metallurgical reactor. The measurements were carried out with the use of 3D physical model of two-phase flow gas-powder in the moving (descending packed bed. Sinter or blast furnace pellets were used as packed bed while carbon powder or iron powder were used as the powder. Wide diversity within both static pressure distribution and powder distribution along the radius of the reactor were observed once the change in the type of powder occurred.

  16. Conceptual modeling of postmortem evaluation findings to describe dairy cow deaths.

    McConnel, C S; Garry, F B; Hill, A E; Lombard, J E; Gould, D H

    2010-01-01

    Dairy cow mortality levels in the United States are excessive and increasing over time. To better define cause and effect and combat rising mortality, clearer definitions of the reasons that cows die need to be acquired through thorough necropsy-based postmortem evaluations. The current study focused on organizing information generated from postmortem evaluations into a monitoring system that is based on the fundamentals of conceptual modeling and that will potentially be translatable into on-farm relational databases. This observational study was conducted on 3 high-producing, commercial dairies in northern Colorado. Throughout the study period a thorough postmortem evaluation was performed by veterinarians on cows that died on each dairy. Postmortem data included necropsy findings, life-history features (e.g., birth date, lactation number, lactational and reproductive status), clinical history and treatments, and pertinent aspects of operational management that were subject to change and considered integral to the poor outcome. During this study, 174 postmortem evaluations were performed. Postmortem evaluation results were conceptually modeled to view each death within the context of the web of factors influencing the dairy and the cow. Categories were formulated describing mortality in terms of functional characteristics potentially amenable to easy performance evaluation, management oversight, and research. In total, 21 death categories with 7 category themes were created. Themes included specific disease processes with variable etiologies, failure of disease recognition or treatment, traumatic events, multifactorial failures linked to transition or negative energy balance issues, problems with feed management, miscellaneous events not amenable to prevention or treatment, and undetermined causes. Although postmortem evaluations provide the relevant information necessary for framing a cow's death, a restructuring of on-farm databases is needed to integrate this

  17. Rapid-relocation model for describing high-fluence retention of rare gases implanted in solids

    Wittmaack, K.

    2009-09-01

    to be due to bombardment induced relocation and reemission, only the remaining 10% (or less) can be attributed to sputter erosion. The relocation efficiency is interpreted as the 'speed' of radiation enhanced diffusion towards the surface. The directionality of diffusion is attributed to the gradient of the defect density on the large-depth side of the damage distribution where most of the implanted rare gas atoms come to rest. Based on SRIM calculations, two representative parameters are defined, the peak number of lattice displacements, Nd,m, and the spacing, △ zr,d, between the peaks of the range and the damage distributions. Support in favour of rapid rare gas relocation by radiation enhanced diffusion is provided by the finding that the relocation efficiencies for Ar and Xe, which vary by up to one order of magnitude, scale as Ψ=kN/Δz, independent to the implantation energy (10-80 keV Ar, 10-500 keV Xe), within an error margin of only ± 15%. The parameter k contains the properties of the implanted rare gas atoms. A recently described computer simulation model, which assumed that the pressure established by the implanted gas drives reemission, is shown to reproduce measured Xe profiles quite well, but only at that energy at which the fitting parameter of the model was determined (140 keV). Using the same parameter at other energies, deviations by up to a factor of four are observed.

  18. Monte Carlo study of radial energy deposition from primary and secondary particles for narrow and large proton beamlet source models

    Peeler, Christopher R; Titt, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    In spot-scanning intensity-modulated proton therapy, numerous unmodulated proton beam spots are delivered over a target volume to produce a prescribed dose distribution. To accurately model field size-dependent output factors for beam spots, the energy deposition at positions radial to the central axis of the beam must be characterized. In this study, we determined the difference in the central axis dose for spot-scanned fields that results from secondary particle doses by investigating energy deposition radial to the proton beam central axis resulting from primary protons and secondary particles for mathematical point source and distributed source models. The largest difference in the central axis dose from secondary particles resulting from the use of a mathematical point source and a distributed source model was approximately 0.43%. Thus, we conclude that the central axis dose for a spot-scanned field is effectively independent of the source model used to calculate the secondary particle dose. (paper)

  19. Predictions and implications of a poisson process model to describe corrosion of transuranic waste drums

    Lyon, B.F.; Holmes, J.A.; Wilbert, K.A.

    1995-01-01

    A risk assessment methodology is described in this paper to compare risks associated with immediate or near-term retrieval of transuranic (TRU) waste drums from bermed storage versus delayed retrieval. Assuming a Poisson process adequately describes corrosion, significant breaching of drums is expected to begin at - 15 and 24 yr for pitting and general corrosion, respectively. Because of this breaching, more risk will be incurred by delayed than by immediate retrieval

  20. Development and application of an asymmetric deformation model to describe the fuel rod behaviour during LOCA

    Chakraborty, A.K.; Schubert, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    For calculation of clad ballooning from single rod and rod bundle experiments a model considering the influences of azimuthal temperature gradients due to the existing eccentricity of the pellets has been developed. This model is based on the secondary creep model of Norton and on the concentric deformation model ending in cladding burst as proposed by F. Erbacher. The new model considers the azimuthal temperature differences along the cladding and the resulting differences in deformations. With this model, calculations of cladding burst deformations from single rod and rod bundle experiments are performed with good agreement

  1. Review Of Applied Mathematical Models For Describing The Behaviour Of Aqueous Humor In Eye Structures

    Dzierka, M.; Jurczak, P.

    2015-12-01

    In the paper, currently used methods for modeling the flow of the aqueous humor through eye structures are presented. Then a computational model based on rheological models of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids is proposed. The proposed model may be used for modeling the flow of the aqueous humor through the trabecular meshwork. The trabecular meshwork is modeled as an array of rectilinear parallel capillary tubes. The flow of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids is considered. As a results of discussion mathematical equations of permeability of porous media and velocity of fluid flow through porous media have been received.

  2. Integrated model of insulin and glucose kinetics describing both hepatic glucose and pancreatic insulin regulation

    Erlandsen, Mogens; Martinussen, Christoffer; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg

    2018-01-01

    AbstractBackground and objectives Modeling of glucose kinetics has to a large extent been based on models with plasma insulin as a known forcing function. Furthermore, population-based statistical methods for parameter estimation in these models have mainly addressed random inter-individual varia......AbstractBackground and objectives Modeling of glucose kinetics has to a large extent been based on models with plasma insulin as a known forcing function. Furthermore, population-based statistical methods for parameter estimation in these models have mainly addressed random inter......-individual variations and not intra-individual variations in the parameters. Here we present an integrated whole-body model of glucose and insulin kinetics which extends the well-known two-compartment glucose minimal model. The population-based estimation technique allow for quantification of both random inter......- and intra-individual variation in selected parameters using simultaneous data series on glucose and insulin. Methods We extend the two-compartment glucose model into a whole-body model for both glucose and insulin using a simple model for the pancreas compartment which includes feedback of glucose on both...

  3. SDSS-IV MaNGA: modelling the metallicity gradients of gas and stars - radially dependent metal outflow versus IMF

    Lian, Jianhui; Thomas, Daniel; Maraston, Claudia; Goddard, Daniel; Parikh, Taniya; Fernández-Trincado, J. G.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Rong, Yu; Tang, Baitian; Yan, Renbin

    2018-05-01

    In our previous work, we found that only two scenarios are capable of reproducing the observed integrated mass-metallicity relations for the gas and stellar components of local star-forming galaxies simultaneously. One scenario invokes a time-dependent metal outflow loading factor with stronger outflows at early times. The other scenario uses a time-dependent initial mass function (IMF) slope with a steeper IMF at early times. In this work, we extend our study to investigate the radial profile of gas and stellar metallicity in local star-forming galaxies using spatially resolved spectroscopic data from the SDSS-IV MaNGA survey. We find that most galaxies show negative gradients in both gas and stellar metallicity with steeper gradients in stellar metallicity. The stellar metallicity gradients tend to be mass dependent with steeper gradients in more massive galaxies while no clear mass dependence is found for the gas metallicity gradient. Then we compare the observations with the predictions from a chemical evolution model of the radial profiles of gas and stellar metallicities. We confirm that the two scenarios proposed in our previous work are also required to explain the metallicity gradients. Based on these two scenarios, we successfully reproduce the radial profiles of gas metallicity, stellar metallicity, stellar mass surface density, and star formation rate surface density simultaneously. The origin of the negative gradient in stellar metallicity turns out to be driven by either radially dependent metal outflow or IMF slope. In contrast, the radial dependence of the gas metallicity is less constrained because of the degeneracy in model parameters.

  4. Selection of heat transfer model for describing short-pulse laser heating silica-based sensor

    Hao Xiangnan; Nie Jinsong; Li Hua; Bian Jintian

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental equations of Fourier heat transfer model and non-Fourier heat transfer model were numerically solved, with the finite difference method. The relative changes between temperature curves of the two heat transfer models were analyzed under laser irradiation with different pulse widths of 10 ns, 1 ns, 100 ps, 10 ps. The impact of different thermal relaxation time on non-Fourier model results was discussed. For pulses of pulse width less than or equal to 100 ps irradiating silicon material, the surface temperature increases slowly and carrier effect happens, which the non-Fourier model can reflect properly. As for general material, when the pulse width is less than or equal to the thermal relaxation time of material, carrier effect occurs. In this case, the non-Fourier model should be used. (authors)

  5. Non-linear modelling to describe lactation curve in Gir crossbred cows

    Yogesh C. Bangar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The modelling of lactation curve provides guidelines in formulating farm managerial practices in dairy cows. The aim of the present study was to determine the suitable non-linear model which most accurately fitted to lactation curves of five lactations in 134 Gir crossbred cows reared in Research-Cum-Development Project (RCDP on Cattle farm, MPKV (Maharashtra. Four models viz. gamma-type function, quadratic model, mixed log function and Wilmink model were fitted to each lactation separately and then compared on the basis of goodness of fit measures viz. adjusted R2, root mean square error (RMSE, Akaike’s Informaion Criteria (AIC and Bayesian Information Criteria (BIC. Results In general, highest milk yield was observed in fourth lactation whereas it was lowest in first lactation. Among the models investigated, mixed log function and gamma-type function provided best fit of the lactation curve of first and remaining lactations, respectively. Quadratic model gave least fit to lactation curve in almost all lactations. Peak yield was observed as highest and lowest in fourth and first lactation, respectively. Further, first lactation showed highest persistency but relatively higher time to achieve peak yield than other lactations. Conclusion Lactation curve modelling using gamma-type function may be helpful to setting the management strategies at farm level, however, modelling must be optimized regularly before implementing them to enhance productivity in Gir crossbred cows.

  6. Fractional single-phase-lagging heat conduction model for describing anomalous diffusion

    T.N. Mishra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The fractional single-phase-lagging (FSPL heat conduction model is obtained by combining scalar time fractional conservation equation to the single-phase-lagging (SPL heat conduction model. Based on the FSPL heat conduction model, anomalous diffusion within a finite thin film is investigated. The effect of different parameters on solution has been observed and studied the asymptotic behavior of the FSPL model. The analytical solution is obtained using Laplace transform method. The whole analysis is presented in dimensionless form. Numerical examples of particular interest have been studied and discussed in details.

  7. Validation of the TUBRNP model with the radial distribution of plutonium in MOX fuel measured by SIMS and EPMA

    O` Carroll, C; Laar, J Van De; Walker, C T [CEC Joint Research Centre, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1997-08-01

    The new model TUBRNP (TRANSURANUS burnup) predicts the radial power density distribution as a function of burnup (and hence the radial burnup profile as a function of time) together with the radial profile of plutonium. Comparisons between measurements and the prediction of the TUBRNP model have been made for UO{sub 2} LWR fuels: they were found to be in excellent agreement and it is seen that TUBRNP is a marked improved on previous models. A powerful techniques for the characterization of irradiation fuel is Electron Probe Microanalysis (EPMA). Uranium, plutonium and fission product distributions can be analysed quantitatively. A complement, providing isotopic information with a lateral resolution comparable to EPMA, is secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Recently, the technique has been successfully applied for the measurement of the radial distribution of plutonium isotopes in irradiated nuclear fuel pins. The extension of the TUBRNP model to mixed oxide fuels seems to be the natural step to take. In MOX fuels the picture is greatly complicated by the presence of the (U, Pu)O{sub 2} agglomerates. The rim effect referred to above may be masked by the high concentrations of plutonium in the bulk of the fuel. A detailed investigation of a number of MOX fuel samples has been made using the TUBRNP model. Results are presented for a range of fuels with different enrichment and burnup. Through its participation in the PRIMO and DOMO programmes, PSI in conjunction with the Institute for Transuranium Elements had the opportunity to validate the new theoretical model TUBRNP. The authors with therefore to express their thanks to the organizers and to the numerous European and Japanese organizations which have supported these two international programmes on MOX fuel behavior. 7 refs, 9 figs, 3 tabs.

  8. Steady shear rate rheology of suspensions, as described by the gaint floc model

    Stein, H.N.; Laven, J.

    2001-01-01

    The break-down of a particle network by shear is described as the development of shear planes: a region able to withstand low shear stresses may break down under a larger stress; thus with increasing shear stress and shear rate, the mutual distance (A) between successive shear planes decreases

  9. Using a Model to Describe Students' Inductive Reasoning in Problem Solving

    Canadas, Maria C.; Castro, Encarnacion; Castro, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: We present some aspects of a wider investigation (Canadas, 2007), whose main objective is to describe and characterize inductive reasoning used by Spanish students in years 9 and 10 when they work on problems that involved linear and quadratic sequences. Method: We produced a test composed of six problems with different…

  10. EMPIRICAL MODELS FOR DESCRIBING FIRE BEHAVIOR IN BRAZILIAN COMMERCIAL EUCALYPT PLANTATIONS

    Benjamin Leonardo Alves White

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Modeling forest fire behavior is an important task that can be used to assist in fire prevention and suppression operations. However, according to previous studies, the existing common worldwide fire behavior models used do not correctly estimate the fire behavior in Brazilian commercial hybrid eucalypt plantations. Therefore, this study aims to build new empirical models to predict the fire rate of spread, flame length and fuel consumption for such vegetation. To meet these objectives, 105 laboratory experimental burns were done, where the main fuel characteristics and weather variables that influence fire behavior were controlled and/or measured in each experiment. Dependent and independent variables were fitted through multiple regression analysis. The fire rate of spread proposed model is based on the wind speed, fuel bed bulk density and 1-h dead fuel moisture content (r2 = 0.86; the flame length model is based on the fuel bed depth, 1-h dead fuel moisture content and wind speed (r2 = 0.72; the fuel consumption proposed model has the 1-h dead fuel moisture, fuel bed bulk density and 1-h dead dry fuel load as independent variables (r2= 0.80. These models were used to develop a new fire behavior software, the “Eucalyptus Fire Safety System”.

  11. On radial stationary solutions to a model of non-equilibrium growth

    Escudero, C.; Hakl, Robert; Peral, I.; Torres, P.J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 3 (2013), s. 437-453 ISSN 0956-7925 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : non-equilibrium growth * radial solutions * variational methods Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.081, year: 2013 http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=8897362

  12. Regional modeling approach for analyzing harmonic stability in radial power electronics based power system

    Yoon, Changwoo; Bai, Haofeng; Wang, Xiongfei

    2015-01-01

    Stability analysis of distributed power generation system becomes complex when there are many numbers of grid inverters in the system. In order to analyze system stability, the overall network impedance will be lumped and needs to be analyzed one by one. However, using a unified bulky transfer-fu...... and then it is expanded for generalizing its concept to an overall radial structured network....

  13. Predictive models for radial sap flux variation in coniferous, diffuse-porous and ring-porous temperate trees.

    Berdanier, Aaron B; Miniat, Chelcy F; Clark, James S

    2016-08-01

    Accurately scaling sap flux observations to tree or stand levels requires accounting for variation in sap flux between wood types and by depth into the tree. However, existing models for radial variation in axial sap flux are rarely used because they are difficult to implement, there is uncertainty about their predictive ability and calibration measurements are often unavailable. Here we compare different models with a diverse sap flux data set to test the hypotheses that radial profiles differ by wood type and tree size. We show that radial variation in sap flux is dependent on wood type but independent of tree size for a range of temperate trees. The best-fitting model predicted out-of-sample sap flux observations and independent estimates of sapwood area with small errors, suggesting robustness in the new settings. We develop a method for predicting whole-tree water use with this model and include computer code for simple implementation in other studies. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  14. A simple geometrical model describing shapes of soap films suspended on two rings

    Herrmann, Felix J.; Kilvington, Charles D.; Wildenberg, Rebekah L.; Camacho, Franco E.; Walecki, Wojciech J.; Walecki, Peter S.; Walecki, Eve S.

    2016-09-01

    We measured and analysed the stability of two types of soap films suspended on two rings using the simple conical frusta-based model, where we use common definition of conical frustum as a portion of a cone that lies between two parallel planes cutting it. Using frusta-based we reproduced very well-known results for catenoid surfaces with and without a central disk. We present for the first time a simple conical frusta based spreadsheet model of the soap surface. This very simple, elementary, geometrical model produces results surprisingly well matching the experimental data and known exact analytical solutions. The experiment and the spreadsheet model can be used as a powerful teaching tool for pre-calculus and geometry students.

  15. How well do basic models describe the turbidity currents coming down Monterey and Congo Canyon?

    Cartigny, M.; Simmons, S.; Heerema, C.; Xu, J. P.; Azpiroz, M.; Clare, M. A.; Cooper, C.; Gales, J. A.; Maier, K. L.; Parsons, D. R.; Paull, C. K.; Sumner, E. J.; Talling, P.

    2017-12-01

    Turbidity currents rival rivers in their global capacity to transport sediment and organic carbon. Furthermore, turbidity currents break submarine cables that now transport >95% of our global data traffic. Accurate turbidity current models are thus needed to quantify their transport capacity and to predict the forces exerted on seafloor structures. Despite this need, existing numerical models are typically only calibrated with scaled-down laboratory measurements due to the paucity of direct measurements of field-scale turbidity currents. This lack of calibration thus leaves much uncertainty in the validity of existing models. Here we use the most detailed observations of turbidity currents yet acquired to validate one of the most fundamental models proposed for turbidity currents, the modified Chézy model. Direct measurements on which the validation is based come from two sites that feature distinctly different flow modes and grain sizes. The first are from the multi-institution Coordinated Canyon Experiment (CCE) in Monterey Canyon, California. An array of six moorings along the canyon axis captured at least 15 flow events that lasted up to hours. The second is the deep-sea Congo Canyon, where 10 finer grained flows were measured by a single mooring, each lasting several days. Moorings captured depth-resolved velocity and suspended sediment concentration at high resolution (turbidity currents; the modified Chézy model. This basic model has been very useful for river studies over the past 200 years, as it provides a rapid estimate of how flow velocity varies with changes in river level and energy slope. Chézy-type models assume that the gravitational force of the flow equals the friction of the river-bed. Modified Chézy models have been proposed for turbidity currents. However, the absence of detailed measurements of friction and sediment concentration within full-scale turbidity currents has forced modellers to make rough assumptions for these parameters. Here

  16. A Bayesian method for construction of Markov models to describe dynamics on various time-scales.

    Rains, Emily K; Andersen, Hans C

    2010-10-14

    The dynamics of many biological processes of interest, such as the folding of a protein, are slow and complicated enough that a single molecular dynamics simulation trajectory of the entire process is difficult to obtain in any reasonable amount of time. Moreover, one such simulation may not be sufficient to develop an understanding of the mechanism of the process, and multiple simulations may be necessary. One approach to circumvent this computational barrier is the use of Markov state models. These models are useful because they can be constructed using data from a large number of shorter simulations instead of a single long simulation. This paper presents a new Bayesian method for the construction of Markov models from simulation data. A Markov model is specified by (τ,P,T), where τ is the mesoscopic time step, P is a partition of configuration space into mesostates, and T is an N(P)×N(P) transition rate matrix for transitions between the mesostates in one mesoscopic time step, where N(P) is the number of mesostates in P. The method presented here is different from previous Bayesian methods in several ways. (1) The method uses Bayesian analysis to determine the partition as well as the transition probabilities. (2) The method allows the construction of a Markov model for any chosen mesoscopic time-scale τ. (3) It constructs Markov models for which the diagonal elements of T are all equal to or greater than 0.5. Such a model will be called a "consistent mesoscopic Markov model" (CMMM). Such models have important advantages for providing an understanding of the dynamics on a mesoscopic time-scale. The Bayesian method uses simulation data to find a posterior probability distribution for (P,T) for any chosen τ. This distribution can be regarded as the Bayesian probability that the kinetics observed in the atomistic simulation data on the mesoscopic time-scale τ was generated by the CMMM specified by (P,T). An optimization algorithm is used to find the most

  17. Transport in semiconductor nanowire superlattices described by coupled quantum mechanical and kinetic models.

    Alvaro, M; Bonilla, L L; Carretero, M; Melnik, R V N; Prabhakar, S

    2013-08-21

    In this paper we develop a kinetic model for the analysis of semiconductor superlattices, accounting for quantum effects. The model consists of a Boltzmann-Poisson type system of equations with simplified Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collisions, obtained from the general time-dependent Schrödinger-Poisson model using Wigner functions. This system for superlattice transport is supplemented by the quantum mechanical part of the model based on the Ben-Daniel-Duke form of the Schrödinger equation for a cylindrical superlattice of finite radius. The resulting energy spectrum is used to characterize the Fermi-Dirac distribution that appears in the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision, thereby coupling the quantum mechanical and kinetic parts of the model. The kinetic model uses the dispersion relation obtained by the generalized Kronig-Penney method, and allows us to estimate radii of quantum wire superlattices that have the same miniband widths as in experiments. It also allows us to determine more accurately the time-dependent characteristics of superlattices, in particular their current density. Results, for several experimentally grown superlattices, are discussed in the context of self-sustained coherent oscillations of the current density which are important in an increasing range of current and potential applications.

  18. Using logic model methods in systematic review synthesis: describing complex pathways in referral management interventions.

    Baxter, Susan K; Blank, Lindsay; Woods, Helen Buckley; Payne, Nick; Rimmer, Melanie; Goyder, Elizabeth

    2014-05-10

    There is increasing interest in innovative methods to carry out systematic reviews of complex interventions. Theory-based approaches, such as logic models, have been suggested as a means of providing additional insights beyond that obtained via conventional review methods. This paper reports the use of an innovative method which combines systematic review processes with logic model techniques to synthesise a broad range of literature. The potential value of the model produced was explored with stakeholders. The review identified 295 papers that met the inclusion criteria. The papers consisted of 141 intervention studies and 154 non-intervention quantitative and qualitative articles. A logic model was systematically built from these studies. The model outlines interventions, short term outcomes, moderating and mediating factors and long term demand management outcomes and impacts. Interventions were grouped into typologies of practitioner education, process change, system change, and patient intervention. Short-term outcomes identified that may result from these interventions were changed physician or patient knowledge, beliefs or attitudes and also interventions related to changed doctor-patient interaction. A range of factors which may influence whether these outcomes lead to long term change were detailed. Demand management outcomes and intended impacts included content of referral, rate of referral, and doctor or patient satisfaction. The logic model details evidence and assumptions underpinning the complex pathway from interventions to demand management impact. The method offers a useful addition to systematic review methodologies. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42013004037.

  19. RADIAL DISTRIBUTION OF STARS, GAS, AND DUST IN SINGS GALAXIES. III. MODELING THE EVOLUTION OF THE STELLAR COMPONENT IN GALAXY DISKS

    Munoz-Mateos, J. C.; Boissier, S.; Gil de Paz, A.; Zamorano, J.; Gallego, J.; Kennicutt, R. C. Jr; Moustakas, J.; Prantzos, N.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the evolution of 42 spiral galaxies in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey. We make use of ultraviolet (UV), optical, and near-infrared radial profiles, corrected for internal extinction using the total-infrared to UV ratio, to probe the emission of stellar populations of different ages as a function of galactocentric distance. We fit these radial profiles with models that describe the chemical and spectro-photometric evolution of spiral disks within a self-consistent framework. These backward evolutionary models successfully reproduce the multi-wavelength profiles of our galaxies, except for the UV profiles of some early-type disks for which the models seem to retain too much gas. From the model fitting we infer the maximum circular velocity of the rotation curve V C and the dimensionless spin parameter λ. The values of V C are in good agreement with the velocities measured in H I rotation curves. Even though our sample is not volume limited, the resulting distribution of λ is close to the lognormal function obtained in cosmological N-body simulations, peaking at λ ∼ 0.03 regardless of the total halo mass. We do not find any evident trend between λ and Hubble type, besides an increase in the scatter for the latest types. According to the model, galaxies evolve along a roughly constant mass-size relation, increasing their scale lengths as they become more massive. The radial scale length of most disks in our sample seems to have increased at a rate of 0.05-0.06 kpc Gyr -1 , although the same cannot be said of a volume-limited sample. In relative terms, the scale length has grown by 20%-25% since z = 1 and, unlike the former figure, we argue that this relative growth rate can be indeed representative of a complete galaxy sample.

  20. Radial Distribution of Stars, Gas, and Dust in SINGS Galaxies. III. Modeling the Evolution of the Stellar Component in Galaxy Disks

    Muñoz-Mateos, J. C.; Boissier, S.; Gil de Paz, A.; Zamorano, J.; Kennicutt, R. C., Jr.; Moustakas, J.; Prantzos, N.; Gallego, J.

    2011-04-01

    We analyze the evolution of 42 spiral galaxies in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey. We make use of ultraviolet (UV), optical, and near-infrared radial profiles, corrected for internal extinction using the total-infrared to UV ratio, to probe the emission of stellar populations of different ages as a function of galactocentric distance. We fit these radial profiles with models that describe the chemical and spectro-photometric evolution of spiral disks within a self-consistent framework. These backward evolutionary models successfully reproduce the multi-wavelength profiles of our galaxies, except for the UV profiles of some early-type disks for which the models seem to retain too much gas. From the model fitting we infer the maximum circular velocity of the rotation curve V C and the dimensionless spin parameter λ. The values of V C are in good agreement with the velocities measured in H I rotation curves. Even though our sample is not volume limited, the resulting distribution of λ is close to the lognormal function obtained in cosmological N-body simulations, peaking at λ ~ 0.03 regardless of the total halo mass. We do not find any evident trend between λ and Hubble type, besides an increase in the scatter for the latest types. According to the model, galaxies evolve along a roughly constant mass-size relation, increasing their scale lengths as they become more massive. The radial scale length of most disks in our sample seems to have increased at a rate of 0.05-0.06 kpc Gyr-1, although the same cannot be said of a volume-limited sample. In relative terms, the scale length has grown by 20%-25% since z = 1 and, unlike the former figure, we argue that this relative growth rate can be indeed representative of a complete galaxy sample.

  1. An empirical model to describe performance degradation for warranty abuse detection in portable electronics

    Oh, Hyunseok; Choi, Seunghyuk; Kim, Keunsu; Youn, Byeng D.; Pecht, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Portable electronics makers have introduced liquid damage indicators (LDIs) into their products to detect warranty abuse caused by water damage. However, under certain conditions, these indicators can exhibit inconsistencies in detecting liquid damage. This study is motivated by the fact that the reliability of LDIs in portable electronics is suspected. In this paper, first, the scheme of life tests is devised for LDIs in conjunction with a robust color classification rule. Second, a degradation model is proposed by considering the two physical mechanisms—(1) phase change from vapor to water and (2) water transport in the porous paper—for LDIs. Finally, the degradation model is validated with additional tests using actual smartphone sets subjected to the thermal cycling of −15 °C to 25 °C and the relative humidity of 95%. By employing the innovative life testing scheme and the novel performance degradation model, it is expected that the performance of LDIs for a particular application can be assessed quickly and accurately. - Highlights: • Devise an efficient scheme of life testing for a warranty abuse detector in portable electronics. • Develop a performance degradation model for the warranty abuse detector used in portable electronics. • Validate the performance degradation model with life tests of actual smartphone sets. • Help make a decision on warranty service in portable electronics manufacturers

  2. A model, describing the influence of water management alternatives on dike stability

    J. W. M. Lambert

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The awareness is rising that economic effects of Land Subsidence are high. Nevertheless, quantifying these economic losses is difficult and, as far as known, not yet done in a sophisticated way. Also, to be able to decide about future strategies, for example to avoid or decrease subsidence, it is necessary to know the financial consequences of measures and possible solutions. As a first step to quantify these economic effects, a MODFLOW-SCR (coupled MODFLOW-Settlements model is coupled with the model DAM. Based on the local stratigraphy, the shape and composition of the existing dike or levee, the level of the surface water and the surface level, macro-stability of the dike is calculated and – if the dike does not meet the required stability – adaptions are proposed. The model enables to separate effects that are caused by sea-level rise and the effects of subsidence. Coupling the DAM model with an economic model to calculate costs of these adaptions is under construction.

  3. Integrated compartmental model for describing the transport of solute in a fractured porous medium. [FRACPORT

    DeAngelis, D.L.; Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1984-10-01

    This report documents a model, FRACPORT, that simulates the transport of a solute through a fractured porous matrix. The model should be useful in analyzing the possible transport of radionuclides from shallow-land burial sites in humid environments. The use of the model is restricted to transport through saturated zones. The report first discusses the general modeling approach used, which is based on the Integrated Compartmental Method. The basic equations of solute transport are then presented. The model, which assumes a known water velocity field, solves these equations on two different time scales; one related to rapid transport of solute along fractures and the other related to slower transport through the porous matrix. FRACPORT is validated by application to a simple example of fractured porous medium transport that has previously been analyzed by other methods. Then its utility is demonstrated in analyzing more complex cases of pulses of solute into a fractured matrix. The report serves as a user's guide to FRACPORT. A detailed description of data input, along with a listing of input for a sample problem, is provided. 16 references, 18 figures, 3 tables.

  4. Modified VMD model with correct analytic properties for describing electromagnetic structure of He4 nucleus

    Dubnicka, S.; Lucan, L.

    1988-12-01

    A new phenomenological model for electromagnetic (e.m.) form factor (ff) of He 4 nucleus is presented, which is based on a modification of the well proved in e.m. interactions of hadrons vector-meson-dominance (VMD) model by means of an incorporation of correct He 4 ff analytic properties, nonzero vector-meson widths and the right power asymptotic behaviour predicted by the quark model. It reproduces the existing experimental information on He 4 e.m. ff in the space-like region quite well. Furthermore, couplings of all well established isoscalar vector mesons with J pc = 1 -- to He 4 nucleus are evaluated as a result of the analysis and the time-like region behaviour of He 4 e.m. ff is predicted. As a consequence of the latter the total cross section of e + e - → He 4 He-bar 4 process is calculated for the first time. (author). 17 refs, 3 figs

  5. Comparison of two mathematical models for describing heat-induced cell killing

    Roti Roti, J.L.; Henle, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    A computer-based minimization algorithm is utilized to obtain the optimum fits of two models to hyperthermic cell killing data. The models chosen are the multitarget, single-hit equation, which is in general use, and the linear-quadratic equation, which has been applied to cell killing by ionizing irradiation but not to heat-induced cell killing. The linear-quadratic equation fits hyperthermic cell killing data as well as the multitarget, single-hit equation. Both parameters of the linear-quadratic equation obey the Arrhenius law, whereas only one of the two parameters of the multitarget, single-hit equation obeys the Arrhenius law. Thus the linear-quadratic function can completely define cell killing as a function of both time and temperature. In addition, the linear-quadratic model will provide a simplified approach to the study of the synergism between heat and X irradiation

  6. Benchmarking of numerical models describing the dispersion of radionuclides in the Arctic Seas

    Scott, E.M.; Gurbutt, P.; Harms, I.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the International Arctic Seas Assessment Project (IASAP) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a working group was created to model the dispersal and transfer of radionuclides released from radioactive waste disposed of in the Kara Sea. The objectives of this group are: (1......) development of realistic and reliable assessment models for the dispersal of radioactive contaminants both within, and from, the Arctic ocean; and (2) evaluation of the contributions of different transfer mechanisms to contaminant dispersal and hence, ultimately, to the risks to human health and environment...

  7. A gauge model describing N relativistic particles bound by linear forces

    Filippov, A.T.

    1988-01-01

    A relativistic model of N particles bound by linear forces is obtained by applying the gauging procedure to the linear canonical symmteries of a simple (rudimentary) nonrelativistic N-particle Lagrangian extended to relativistic phase space. The new (gauged) Lagrangian is formally Poincare invariant, the Hamiltonian is a linear combination of first-class constraints which are closed with respect to Pisson brackets and generate the localized canonical symmteries. The gauge potentials appear as the Lagrange multipliers of the constraints. Gauge fixing and quantization of the model are also briefly discussed. 11 refs

  8. Feasibility study for a plasticity model to describe the transient thermomechanical behavior of Zircaloy. Final report

    Valanis, K.C.

    1979-11-01

    The conceptual framework of the endochronic theory is described and a summary of its capabilities, as well as past and potential applications to the mechanical response of metals to general histories of deformation, temperature, and radiation is given. The purely mechanical part of the theory is developed on the basis of the concept of intrinsic time which serves to incorporate in a unified and concise fashion the effects of strain history and strain rate on the stress response. The effects of temperature are introduced by means of the theory of deformation kinetics through its relation to the internal variable theory of irreversible thermodynamics. As a result, physically sound formulae are developed which account for the effect of temperature history on the stress response. An approach to describing irradiation effects is briefly discussed. More research would be needed to define appropriate constitutive representations for Zircaloy. The endochronic theory is also looked at from a numerical analysis viewpoint of future applications to problems of practical interest. In appendix B a first cut attempt has been made to assess the computational efficiencies of material constitutive equation approaches

  9. q-deformed Einstein's model to describe specific heat of solid

    Guha, Atanu; Das, Prasanta Kumar

    2018-04-01

    Realistic phenomena can be described more appropriately using generalized canonical ensemble, with proper parameter sets involved. We have generalized the Einstein's theory for specific heat of solid in Tsallis statistics, where the temperature fluctuation is introduced into the theory via the fluctuation parameter q. At low temperature the Einstein's curve of the specific heat in the nonextensive Tsallis scenario exactly lies on the experimental data points. Consequently this q-modified Einstein's curve is found to be overlapping with the one predicted by Debye. Considering only the temperature fluctuation effect(even without considering more than one mode of vibration is being triggered) we found that the CV vs T curve is as good as obtained by considering the different modes of vibration as suggested by Debye. Generalizing the Einstein's theory in Tsallis statistics we found that a unique value of the Einstein temperature θE along with a temperature dependent deformation parameter q(T) , can well describe the phenomena of specific heat of solid i.e. the theory is equivalent to Debye's theory with a temperature dependent θD.

  10. Development of an environment-insensitive PWR radial reflector model applicable to modern nodal reactor analysis method

    Mueller, E.M.

    1989-05-01

    This research is concerned with the development and analysis of methods for generating equivalent nodal diffusion parameters for the radial reflector of a PWR. The requirement that the equivalent reflector data be insensitive to changing core conditions is set as a principle objective. Hence, the environment dependence of the currently most reputable nodal reflector models, almost all of which are based on the nodal equivalence theory homgenization methods of Koebke and Smith, is investigated in detail. For this purpose, a special 1-D nodal equivalence theory reflector model, called the NGET model, is developed and used in 1-D and 2-D numerical experiments. The results demonstrate that these modern radial reflector models exhibit sufficient sensitivity to core conditions to warrant the development of alternative models. A new 1-D nodal reflector model, which is based on a novel combination of the nodal equivalence theory and the response matrix homogenization methods, is developed. Numerical results varify that this homogenized baffle/reflector model, which is called the NGET-RM model, is highly insensitive to changing core conditions. It is also shown that the NGET-RM model is not inferior to any of the existing 1-D nodal reflector models and that it has features which makes it an attractive alternative model for multi-dimensional reactor analysis. 61 refs., 40 figs., 36 tabs

  11. Using Rouse-Fowler model to describe radiation-induced electrical conductivity of nanocomposite materials

    Dyuryagina, N. S.; Yalovets, A. P.

    2017-05-01

    Using the Rouse-Fowler (RF) model this work studies the radiation-induced electrical conductivity of a polymer nanocomposite material with spherical nanoparticles against the intensity and exposure time of gamma-ray, concentration and size of nanoparticles. The research has found the energy distribution of localized statesinduced by nanoparticles. The studies were conducted on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) with CdS nanoparticles.

  12. Kinetic model describing the UV/H2O2 photodegradation of phenol from water

    Rubio-Clemente Ainhoa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A kinetic model for phenol transformation through the UV/H2O2 system was developed and validated. The model includes the pollutant decomposition by direct photolysis and HO•, HO2• and O2 •- oxidation. HO• scavenging effects of CO3 2-, HCO3 -, SO4 2- and Cl- were also considered, as well as the pH changes as the process proceeds. Additionally, the detrimental action of the organic matter and reaction intermediates in shielding UV and quenching HO• was incorporated. It was observed that the model can accurately predict phenol abatement using different H2O2/phenol mass ratios (495, 228 and 125, obtaining an optimal H2O2/phenol ratio of 125, leading to a phenol removal higher than 95% after 40 min of treatment, where the main oxidation species was HO•. The developed model could be relevant for calculating the optimal level of H2O2 efficiently degrading the pollutant of interest, allowing saving in costs and time.

  13. CAN A NANOFLARE MODEL OF EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIANCES DESCRIBE THE HEATING OF THE SOLAR CORONA?

    Tajfirouze, E.; Safari, H. [Department of Physics, University of Zanjan, P.O. Box 45195-313, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-01-10

    Nanoflares, the basic units of impulsive energy release, may produce much of the solar background emission. Extrapolation of the energy frequency distribution of observed microflares, which follows a power law to lower energies, can give an estimation of the importance of nanoflares for heating the solar corona. If the power-law index is greater than 2, then the nanoflare contribution is dominant. We model a time series of extreme-ultraviolet emission radiance as random flares with a power-law exponent of the flare event distribution. The model is based on three key parameters: the flare rate, the flare duration, and the power-law exponent of the flare intensity frequency distribution. We use this model to simulate emission line radiance detected in 171 A, observed by Solar Terrestrial Relation Observatory/Extreme-Ultraviolet Imager and Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. The observed light curves are matched with simulated light curves using an Artificial Neural Network, and the parameter values are determined across the active region, quiet Sun, and coronal hole. The damping rate of nanoflares is compared with the radiative losses cooling time. The effect of background emission, data cadence, and network sensitivity on the key parameters of the model is studied. Most of the observed light curves have a power-law exponent, {alpha}, greater than the critical value 2. At these sites, nanoflare heating could be significant.

  14. Exponential law as a more compatible model to describe orbits of planetary systems

    M Saeedi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available   According to the Titus-Bode law, orbits of planets in the solar system obey a geometric progression. Many investigations have been launched to improve this law. In this paper, we apply square and exponential models to planets of solar system, moons of planets, and some extra solar systems, and compare them with each other.

  15. Application of the International Water Association activated sludge models to describe aerobic sludge digestion.

    Ghorbani, M; Eskicioglu, C

    2011-12-01

    Batch and semi-continuous flow aerobic digesters were used to stabilize thickened waste-activated sludge at different initial conditions and mean solids retention times. Under dynamic conditions, total suspended solids, volatile suspended solids (VSS) and total and particulate chemical oxygen demand (COD and PCOD) were monitored in the batch reactors and effluent from the semi-continuous flow reactors. Activated Sludge Model (ASM) no. 1 and ASM no. 3 were applied to measured data (calibration data set) to evaluate the consistency and performances of models at different flow regimes for digester COD and VSS modelling. The results indicated that both ASM1 and ASM3 predicted digester COD, VSS and PCOD concentrations well (R2, Ra2 > or = 0.93). Parameter estimation concluded that compared to ASM1, ASM3 parameters were more consistent across different batch and semi-continuous flow runs with different operating conditions. Model validation on a data set independent from the calibration data successfully predicted digester COD (R2 = 0.88) and VSS (R2 = 0.94) concentrations by ASM3, while ASM1 overestimated both reactor COD (R2 = 0.74) and VSS concentrations (R2 = 0.79) after 15 days of aerobic batch digestion.

  16. Predictive model to describe water migration in cellular solid foods during storage

    Voogt, J.A.; Hirte, A.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Water migration in cellular solid foods during storage causes loss of crispness. To improve crispness retention, physical understanding of this process is needed. Mathematical models are suitable tools to gain this physical knowledge. RESULTS: Water migration in cellular solid foods

  17. Predictive model to describe water migration in cellular solid foods during storage

    Voogt, J.A.; Hirte, A.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Water migration in cellular solid foods during storage causes loss of crispness. To improve crispness retention, physical understanding of this process is needed. Mathematical models are suitable tools to gain this physical knowledge. Results: Water migration in cellular solid foods

  18. A vapour bubble collapse model to describe the fragmentation of low-melting materials

    Benz, R.; Schober, P.

    1977-11-01

    By means of a model, the fragmentation of a hot melt of metal in consequence of collapsing vapour-bubbles is investigated. In particular the paper deals with the development of the physical model-ideas for calculation of the temperature of contact that adjusts between the temperature of the melt and the coolant, of the waiting-time until bubble-nucleation occurs and of the maximal obtainable vapour-bubble-radius in dependence of the coolant-temperature. After that follows the description of the computing-program belonging to this model and of the results of an extensive parameter-study. The study examined the influence of the temperature of melt and coolant, the melted mass, the nucleation-site-density, the average maximum bubble-radius, the duration of film-breakdown and the coefficient of heat-transition. The calculation of the process of fragmentation turns out to be according to expectation, whereas the duration of this process seems to be somewhat too long. The dependence of the surface-enlargement on the subcooling of the water-bath and the initial temperature of the melt is not yet reproduced satisfactorily by the model. The reasons for this are the temperature-increase of the water-bath as well as the fact that the coupling of heat-flux-density and nucleation-site-density are not taken into consideration. Further improvement of the model is necessary and may improve the results in the sense of the experimental observations. (orig.) [de

  19. Atomic-orbital expansion model for describing ion-atom collisions at intermediate and low energies

    Lin, C.D.; Fritsch, W.

    1983-01-01

    In the description of inelastic processes in ion-atom collisions at moderate energies, the semiclassical close-coupling method is well established as the standard method. Ever since the pioneering work on H + + H in the early 60's, the standard procedure is to expand the electronic wavefunction in terms of molecular orbitals (MO) or atomic orbitals (AO) for describing collisions at, respectively, low or intermediate velocities. It has been recognized since early days that traveling orbitals are needed in the expansions in order to represent the asymptotic states in the collisions correctly. While the adoption of such traveling orbitals presents no conceptual difficulties for expansions using atomic orbitals, the situation for molecular orbitals is less clear. In recent years, various forms of traveling MO's have been proposed, but conflicting results for several well-studied systems have been reported

  20. A physical model describing the interaction of nuclear transport receptors with FG nucleoporin domain assemblies.

    Zahn, Raphael; Osmanović, Dino; Ehret, Severin; Araya Callis, Carolina; Frey, Steffen; Stewart, Murray; You, Changjiang; Görlich, Dirk; Hoogenboom, Bart W; Richter, Ralf P

    2016-04-08

    The permeability barrier of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) controls bulk nucleocytoplasmic exchange. It consists of nucleoporin domains rich in phenylalanine-glycine motifs (FG domains). As a bottom-up nanoscale model for the permeability barrier, we have used planar films produced with three different end-grafted FG domains, and quantitatively analyzed the binding of two different nuclear transport receptors (NTRs), NTF2 and Importin β, together with the concomitant film thickness changes. NTR binding caused only moderate changes in film thickness; the binding isotherms showed negative cooperativity and could all be mapped onto a single master curve. This universal NTR binding behavior - a key element for the transport selectivity of the NPC - was quantitatively reproduced by a physical model that treats FG domains as regular, flexible polymers, and NTRs as spherical colloids with a homogeneous surface, ignoring the detailed arrangement of interaction sites along FG domains and on the NTR surface.

  1. A stochastic Markov chain model to describe lung cancer growth and metastasis.

    Paul K Newton

    Full Text Available A stochastic Markov chain model for metastatic progression is developed for primary lung cancer based on a network construction of metastatic sites with dynamics modeled as an ensemble of random walkers on the network. We calculate a transition matrix, with entries (transition probabilities interpreted as random variables, and use it to construct a circular bi-directional network of primary and metastatic locations based on postmortem tissue analysis of 3827 autopsies on untreated patients documenting all primary tumor locations and metastatic sites from this population. The resulting 50 potential metastatic sites are connected by directed edges with distributed weightings, where the site connections and weightings are obtained by calculating the entries of an ensemble of transition matrices so that the steady-state distribution obtained from the long-time limit of the Markov chain dynamical system corresponds to the ensemble metastatic distribution obtained from the autopsy data set. We condition our search for a transition matrix on an initial distribution of metastatic tumors obtained from the data set. Through an iterative numerical search procedure, we adjust the entries of a sequence of approximations until a transition matrix with the correct steady-state is found (up to a numerical threshold. Since this constrained linear optimization problem is underdetermined, we characterize the statistical variance of the ensemble of transition matrices calculated using the means and variances of their singular value distributions as a diagnostic tool. We interpret the ensemble averaged transition probabilities as (approximately normally distributed random variables. The model allows us to simulate and quantify disease progression pathways and timescales of progression from the lung position to other sites and we highlight several key findings based on the model.

  2. Generating quantitative models describing the sequence specificity of biological processes with the stabilized matrix method

    Sette Alessandro

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many processes in molecular biology involve the recognition of short sequences of nucleic-or amino acids, such as the binding of immunogenic peptides to major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules. From experimental data, a model of the sequence specificity of these processes can be constructed, such as a sequence motif, a scoring matrix or an artificial neural network. The purpose of these models is two-fold. First, they can provide a summary of experimental results, allowing for a deeper understanding of the mechanisms involved in sequence recognition. Second, such models can be used to predict the experimental outcome for yet untested sequences. In the past we reported the development of a method to generate such models called the Stabilized Matrix Method (SMM. This method has been successfully applied to predicting peptide binding to MHC molecules, peptide transport by the transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP and proteasomal cleavage of protein sequences. Results Herein we report the implementation of the SMM algorithm as a publicly available software package. Specific features determining the type of problems the method is most appropriate for are discussed. Advantageous features of the package are: (1 the output generated is easy to interpret, (2 input and output are both quantitative, (3 specific computational strategies to handle experimental noise are built in, (4 the algorithm is designed to effectively handle bounded experimental data, (5 experimental data from randomized peptide libraries and conventional peptides can easily be combined, and (6 it is possible to incorporate pair interactions between positions of a sequence. Conclusion Making the SMM method publicly available enables bioinformaticians and experimental biologists to easily access it, to compare its performance to other prediction methods, and to extend it to other applications.

  3. Formulation and integration of constitutive models describing large deformations in thermoplasticity and thermoviscoplasticity

    Jansohn, W.

    1997-10-01

    This report deals with the formulation and numerical integration of constitutive models in the framework of finite deformation thermomechanics. Based on the concept of dual variables, plasticity and viscoplasticity models exhibiting nonlinear kinematic hardening as well as nonlinear isotropic hardening rules are presented. Care is taken that the evolution equations governing the hardening response fulfill the intrinsic dissipation inequality in every admissible process. In view of the development of an efficient numerical integration procedure, simplified versions of these constitutive models are supposed. In these versions, the thermoelastic strains are assumed to be small and a simplified kinematic hardening rule is considered. Additionally, in view of an implementation into the ABAQUS finite element code, the elasticity law is approximated by a hypoelasticity law. For the simplified onstitutive models, an implicit time-integration algorithm is developed. First, in order to obtain a numerical objective integration scheme, use is made of the HUGHES-WINGET-Algorithm. In the resulting system of ordinary differential equations, it can be distinguished between three differential operators representing different physical effects. The structure of this system of differential equations allows to apply an operator split scheme, which leads to an efficient integration scheme for the constitutive equations. By linearizing the integration algorithm the consistent tangent modulus is derived. In this way, the quadratic convergence of Newton's method used to solve the basic finite element equations (i.e. the finite element discretization of the governing thermomechanical field equations) is preserved. The resulting integration scheme is implemented as a user subroutine UMAT in ABAQUS. The properties of the applied algorithm are first examined by test calculations on a single element under tension-compression-loading. For demonstrating the capabilities of the constitutive theory

  4. A stochastic Markov chain model to describe lung cancer growth and metastasis.

    Newton, Paul K; Mason, Jeremy; Bethel, Kelly; Bazhenova, Lyudmila A; Nieva, Jorge; Kuhn, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A stochastic Markov chain model for metastatic progression is developed for primary lung cancer based on a network construction of metastatic sites with dynamics modeled as an ensemble of random walkers on the network. We calculate a transition matrix, with entries (transition probabilities) interpreted as random variables, and use it to construct a circular bi-directional network of primary and metastatic locations based on postmortem tissue analysis of 3827 autopsies on untreated patients documenting all primary tumor locations and metastatic sites from this population. The resulting 50 potential metastatic sites are connected by directed edges with distributed weightings, where the site connections and weightings are obtained by calculating the entries of an ensemble of transition matrices so that the steady-state distribution obtained from the long-time limit of the Markov chain dynamical system corresponds to the ensemble metastatic distribution obtained from the autopsy data set. We condition our search for a transition matrix on an initial distribution of metastatic tumors obtained from the data set. Through an iterative numerical search procedure, we adjust the entries of a sequence of approximations until a transition matrix with the correct steady-state is found (up to a numerical threshold). Since this constrained linear optimization problem is underdetermined, we characterize the statistical variance of the ensemble of transition matrices calculated using the means and variances of their singular value distributions as a diagnostic tool. We interpret the ensemble averaged transition probabilities as (approximately) normally distributed random variables. The model allows us to simulate and quantify disease progression pathways and timescales of progression from the lung position to other sites and we highlight several key findings based on the model.

  5. Lower energy radial shock wave therapy improves characteristics of hypertrophic scar in a rabbit ear model.

    Zhao, Jing-Chun; Zhang, Bo-Ru; Shi, Kai; Wang, Jian; Yu, Qing-Hua; Yu, Jia-Ao

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) on scar characteristics and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1/Smad signaling in order to explore a potential modality for the treatment of hypertrophic scars (HS). The HS model was generated in rabbit ears, then rabbits were randomly divided into 3 groups: Lower (L)-ESWT [treated with rESWT with lower energy flux density (EFD) of 0.1 mJ/mm 2 ], higher (H)-ESWT (treated with a higher EFD of 0.18 mJ/mm 2 ) and the sham ESWT group (S-ESWT; no ESWT treatment). Scar characteristics (wrinkles, texture, diameter, area, volume of elevation, hemoglobin and melanin) were assessed using the Antera 3D ® system. The protein and mRNA expression of TGF-β1, Smad2, Smad3 and Smad7 was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The Antera 3D ® results indicated that wrinkles and hemoglobin of the HS were significantly improved in both of the rESWT groups when compared with the S-ESWT group. However, these changes appeared much earlier in the L-ESWT group than the H-ESWT. Scar texture was also improved in the L-ESWT group. However, rESWT did not influence HS diameter, area, volume of elevation or melanin levels. rESWT had no effect on TGF-β1 or Smad7 expression in either of rESWT groups. Although no difference was observed in Smad2 mRNA expression in the L-ESWT group, the Smad3 mRNA and protein expression significantly decreased when compared with the H-ESWT and S-ESWT groups. By contrast, Smad2 and Smad3 mRNA expression were upregulated in the H-ESWT group. These results demonstrated that rESWT with 0.1 mJ/mm 2 EFD improved some characteristics of the HS tissue. Downregulation of Smad3 expression may underlie this inhibitory effect. Inhibition of the TGF-β1/Smad signal transduction pathway may be a potential therapeutic target for the management of HS.

  6. Phenomenological Model Describing the Formation of Peeling Defects on Hot-Rolled Duplex Stainless Steel 2205

    Yong-jun, Zhang; Hui, Zhang; Jing-tao, Han

    2017-05-01

    The chemical composition, morphology, and microstructure of peeling defects formed on the surface of sheets from steel 2205 under hot rolling are studied. The microstructure of the surface is analyzed using scanning electron and light microscopy. The zones affected are shown to contain nonmetallic inclusions of types Al2O3 and CaO - SiO2 - Al2O3 - MgO in the form of streak precipitates and to have an unfavorable content of austenite, which causes decrease in the ductility of the area. The results obtained are used to derive a five-stage phenomenological model of formation of such defects.

  7. Application of a non-equilibrium reaction model for describing horizontal well performance in foamy oil

    Luigi, A.; Saputelli, B.; Carlas, M.; Canache, P.; Lopez, E. [DPVS Exploracion y Produccion (Venezuela)

    1998-12-31

    This study was designed to determine the activation energy ranges and frequency factor ranges in chemical reactions in heavy oils of the Orinoco Belt in Venezuela, in order to account for the kinetics of physical changes that occur in the morphology of gas-oil dispersion. A non-equilibrium reaction model was used to model foamy oil behaviour observed at SDZ-182 horizontal well in the Zuata field. Results showed that activation energy for the first reaction ranged from 0 to 0.01 BTU/lb-mol and frequency factor from 0.001 to 1000 l/day. For the second reaction the activation energy was 50x10{sub 3} BTU/lb-mol and the frequency factor 2.75x10{sub 1}2 l/day. The second reaction was highly sensitive to the modifications in activation energy and frequency factor. However, both the activation energy and frequency factor were independent of variations for the first reaction. In the case of the activation energy, the results showed that the high sensitivity of this parameter reflected the impact that temperature has on the representation of foamy oil behaviour. 8 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  8. SPATIAL MODELLING FOR DESCRIBING SPATIAL VARIABILITY OF SOIL PHYSICAL PROPERTIES IN EASTERN CROATIA

    Igor Bogunović

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to characterize the field-scale spatial variability and test several interpolation methods to identify the best spatial predictor of penetration resistance (PR, bulk density (BD and gravimetric water content (GWC in the silty loam soil in Eastern Croatia. The measurements were made on a 25 x 25-m grid which created 40 individual grid cells. Soil properties were measured at the center of the grid cell deep 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm. Results demonstrated that PR and GWC displayed strong spatial dependence at 0-10 cm BD, while there was moderate and weak spatial dependence of PR, BD and GWC at depth of 10-20 cm. Semi-variogram analysis suggests that future sampling intervals for investigated parameters can be increased to 35 m in order to reduce research costs. Additionally, interpolation models recorded similar root mean square values with high predictive accuracy. Results suggest that investigated properties do not have uniform interpolation method implying the need for spatial modelling in the evaluation of these soil properties in Eastern Croatia.

  9. Describing model of empowering managers by applying structural equation modeling: A case study of universities in Ardabil

    Maryam Ghahremani Germi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Empowerment is still on the agenda as a management concept and has become a widely used management term in the last decade or so. The purpose of this research was describing model of empowering managers by applying structural equation modeling (SEM at Ardabil universities. Two hundred and twenty managers of Ardabil universities including chancellors, managers, and vice presidents of education, research, and studies participated in this study. Clear and challenging goals, evaluation of function, access to resources, and rewarding were investigated. The results indicated that the designed SEM for empowering managers at university reflects a good fitness level. As it stands out, the conceptual model in the society under investigation was used appropriately. Among variables, access to resources with 88 per cent of load factor was known as the affective variable. Evaluation of function containing 51 per cent of load factor was recognized to have less effect. Results of average rating show that evaluation of function and access to resources with 2.62 coefficients stand at first level. Due to this, they had great impact on managers' empowerment. The results of the analysis provided compelling evidence that model of empowering managers was desirable at Ardabil universities.

  10. Describing the Process of Adopting Nutrition and Fitness Apps: Behavior Stage Model Approach.

    König, Laura M; Sproesser, Gudrun; Schupp, Harald T; Renner, Britta

    2018-03-13

    Although mobile technologies such as smartphone apps are promising means for motivating people to adopt a healthier lifestyle (mHealth apps), previous studies have shown low adoption and continued use rates. Developing the means to address this issue requires further understanding of mHealth app nonusers and adoption processes. This study utilized a stage model approach based on the Precaution Adoption Process Model (PAPM), which proposes that people pass through qualitatively different motivational stages when adopting a behavior. To establish a better understanding of between-stage transitions during app adoption, this study aimed to investigate the adoption process of nutrition and fitness app usage, and the sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics and decision-making style preferences of people at different adoption stages. Participants (N=1236) were recruited onsite within the cohort study Konstanz Life Study. Use of mobile devices and nutrition and fitness apps, 5 behavior adoption stages of using nutrition and fitness apps, preference for intuition and deliberation in eating decision-making (E-PID), healthy eating style, sociodemographic variables, and body mass index (BMI) were assessed. Analysis of the 5 behavior adoption stages showed that stage 1 ("unengaged") was the most prevalent motivational stage for both nutrition and fitness app use, with half of the participants stating that they had never thought about using a nutrition app (52.41%, 533/1017), whereas less than one-third stated they had never thought about using a fitness app (29.25%, 301/1029). "Unengaged" nonusers (stage 1) showed a higher preference for an intuitive decision-making style when making eating decisions, whereas those who were already "acting" (stage 4) showed a greater preference for a deliberative decision-making style (F 4,1012 =21.83, Pdigital interventions. This study highlights that new user groups might be better reached by apps designed to address a more intuitive

  11. A computational model of pile vertical vibration in saturated soil based on the radial disturbed zone of pile driving

    Li Qiang; Shi Qian; Wang Kuihua

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a simplified computational model of pile vertical vibration was developed. The model was based on the inhomogeneous radial disturbed zone of soil in the vicinity of a pile disturbed by pile driving. The model contained two regions: the disturbed zone, which was located in the immediate vicinity of the pile, and the undisturbed region, external to the disturbed zone. In the model, excess pore pressure in the disturbed zone caused by pile driving was assumed to follow a logarithmic distribution. The relationships of stress and strain in the disturbed zone were based on the principle of effective stress under plain strain conditions. The external zone was governed by the poroelastic theory proposed by Biot. With the use of a variable separation method, an analytical solution in the frequency domain was obtained. Furthermore, a semi-analytical solution was attained by employing a numerical convolution method. Numerical results from the frequency and time domain indicated that the equivalent radius of the disturbed zone and the ratio of excess pore pressure had a significant effect on pile dynamic response. However, actual interactions between pile and soil will be weaker due to the presence of the radial disturbed zone, which is caused by pile driving. Consequently, the ideal undisturbed model overestimates the interaction between pile and soil; however, the proposed model reflects the interaction of pile and soil better than the perfect contact model. Numerical results indicate that the model can account for the time effect of pile dynamic tests.

  12. A nonlinear beam model to describe the postbuckling of wide neo-Hookean beams

    Lubbers, Luuk A.; van Hecke, Martin; Coulais, Corentin

    2017-09-01

    Wide beams can exhibit subcritical buckling, i.e. the slope of the force-displacement curve can become negative in the postbuckling regime. In this paper, we capture this intriguing behaviour by constructing a 1D nonlinear beam model, where the central ingredient is the nonlinearity in the stress-strain relation of the beams constitutive material. First, we present experimental and numerical evidence of a transition to subcritical buckling for wide neo-Hookean hyperelastic beams, when their width-to-length ratio exceeds a critical value of 12%. Second, we construct an effective 1D energy density by combining the Mindlin-Reissner kinematics with a nonlinearity in the stress-strain relation. Finally, we establish and solve the governing beam equations to analytically determine the slope of the force-displacement curve in the postbuckling regime. We find, without any adjustable parameters, excellent agreement between the 1D theory, experiments and simulations. Our work extends the understanding of the postbuckling of structures made of wide elastic beams and opens up avenues for the reverse-engineering of instabilities in soft and metamaterials.

  13. The modulation of galactic cosmic rays as described by a three-dimensional drift model

    Potgieter, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    An outline of the present state of knowledge about the effect of drift on the modulation of galactic cosmic rays is given. Various observations related to the reversal of the solar magnetic field polarity are discussed. Comprehensive numerical solutions of the steady-state cosmic-ray transport equation in an axially-symmetric three-dimensional heliosphere, including drift are presented. This is an extention of the continuing effort of the past six years to understand the effect and importance of drift on the transport of galactic cosmic rays in the heliosphere. A flat neutral sheet which coincides with the equatorial plane is assumed. A general method of calculating the drift velocity in the neutral sheet including that used previously by other authors is presented. The effect of changing various modulation parameters on the drift solutions are illustrated in detail. The real significance of drift is illustrated by using Gaussian input spectra on the modulation boundary. A carefully selected set of modulation parameters is used to illustrate to what extent a drift model can explain prominent observational features. It is concluded that drift is important in in the process of cosmic-ray transport and must as such be considered in all modulation studies, but that it is not overwhelmingly dominant as previously anticipated

  14. CAMDYN: a new model to describe the axial motion of molten fuel inside the pin of a fast breeder reactor during accident conditions

    Peter, G.

    1991-01-01

    The new in-pin fuel motion model CAMDYN (Cavity Material Dynamics) describes the axial motion of both partially and fully molten fuel inside the pin of a fast breeder reactor during accident conditions. The motion of the two types of molten fuel and the imbedded fission gas bubbles is treated both before and after cladding failure. The basic modelling approach consists of the treatment of two one-dimensional flows which are coupled by interaction terms. Each of these flows is treated compressively and with axially variable flow cross sections. The mass and energy equations of both fields are solved explicitly using upwind differencing on a fixed Eulerian grid. The two momentum equations are solved simultaneously, using the convective momentum fluxes of the previous timestep. Both partially and fully molten fuel can move axially into a central hole extending to the plenum in the case of certain hollow pellet designs. The fuel temperature calculation includes the determination of a radial temperature profile. A simple conduction freezing model is included. After cladding failure, ejection into the coolant channel is modeled

  15. Multilevel regression models describing regional patterns of invertebrate and algal responses to urbanization across the USA

    Cuffney, T.F.; Kashuba, R.; Qian, S.S.; Alameddine, I.; Cha, Y.K.; Lee, B.; Coles, J.F.; McMahon, G.

    2011-01-01

    Multilevel hierarchical regression was used to examine regional patterns in the responses of benthic macroinvertebrates and algae to urbanization across 9 metropolitan areas of the conterminous USA. Linear regressions established that responses (intercepts and slopes) to urbanization of invertebrates and algae varied among metropolitan areas. Multilevel hierarchical regression models were able to explain these differences on the basis of region-scale predictors. Regional differences in the type of land cover (agriculture or forest) being converted to urban and climatic factors (precipitation and air temperature) accounted for the differences in the response of macroinvertebrates to urbanization based on ordination scores, total richness, Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera richness, and average tolerance. Regional differences in climate and antecedent agriculture also accounted for differences in the responses of salt-tolerant diatoms, but differences in the responses of other diatom metrics (% eutraphenic, % sensitive, and % silt tolerant) were best explained by regional differences in soils (mean % clay soils). The effects of urbanization were most readily detected in regions where forest lands were being converted to urban land because agricultural development significantly degraded assemblages before urbanization and made detection of urban effects difficult. The effects of climatic factors (temperature, precipitation) on background conditions (biogeographic differences) and rates of response to urbanization were most apparent after accounting for the effects of agricultural development. The effects of climate and land cover on responses to urbanization provide strong evidence that monitoring, mitigation, and restoration efforts must be tailored for specific regions and that attainment goals (background conditions) may not be possible in regions with high levels of prior disturbance (e.g., agricultural development). ?? 2011 by The North American

  16. A holistic conceptual framework model to describe medication adherence in and guide interventions in diabetes mellitus.

    Jaam, Myriam; Awaisu, Ahmed; Mohamed Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham; Kheir, Nadir

    2018-04-01

    Nonadherence to medications in patients with diabetes, which results in poor treatment outcomes and increased healthcare costs, is commonly reported globally. Factors associated with medication adherence have also been widely studied. However, a clear and comprehensive, disease-specific conceptual framework model that captures all possible factors has not been established. This study aimed to develop a conceptual framework that addresses the complex network of barriers to medication adherence in patients with diabetes. Fourteen databases and grey literature sources were systematically searched for systematic reviews reporting barriers to medication adherence in patients with diabetes. A thematic approach was used to categorize all identified barriers from the reviews and to create a matrix representing the complex network and relations of the different barriers. Eighteen systematic reviews were identified and used for the development of the conceptual framework. Overall, six major themes emerged: patient-, medication-, disease-, provider-, system-, and societal-related factors. Each of these themes was further classified into different sub-categories. It was noted that most interactions were identified to be within the patient-related factors, which not only interact with other themes but also within the same theme. Patient's demographics as well as cultural beliefs were the most notable factors in terms of interactions with other categories and themes. The intricate network and interaction of factors identified between different themes and within individual themes indicate the complexity of the problem of adherence. This framework will potentially enhance the understanding of the complex relation between different barriers for medication adherence in diabetes and will facilitate design of more effective interventions. Future interventions for enhancing medication adherence should look at the overall factors and target multiple themes of barriers to improve patient

  17. Na, K, Ca, Mg, and U-series in fossil bone and the proposal of a radial diffusion-adsorption model of uranium uptake.

    Cid, A S; Anjos, R M; Zamboni, C B; Cardoso, R; Muniz, M; Corona, A; Valladares, D L; Kovacs, L; Macario, K; Perea, D; Goso, C; Velasco, H

    2014-10-01

    Fossil bones are often the only materials available for chronological reconstruction of important archeological sites. However, since bone is an open system for uranium, it cannot be dated directly and therefore it is necessary to develop models for the U uptake. Hence, a radial diffusion-adsorption (RDA) model is described. Unlike the classic diffusion-adsorption (D-A) model, RDA uses a cylindrical geometry to describe the U uptake in fossil bones. The model was applied across a transverse section of a tibia of an extinct megamammal Macrauchenia patachonica from the La Paz Local Fauna, Montevideo State, Uruguay. Measurements of spatial distribution of Na, K, Ca, and Mg were also performed by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Gamma-ray spectrometric U-series dating was applied to determine the age of the bone sample. From U concentration profile, it was possible to observe the occurrence of a relatively slow and continuous uranium uptake under constant conditions that had not yet reached equilibrium, since the uranium distribution is a ∪-shaped closed-system. Predictions of the RDA model were obtained for a specific geochemical scenario, indicating that the effective diffusion coefficient D/R in this fossil bone is (2.4 ± 0.6)10(-12) cm(2)s(-1). Mean values of Na, K, Ca, and Mg contents along the radial line of the fossil tibia are consistent with the expected behavior for spatial distributions of these mineral elements across a modern bone section. This result indicates that the fossil tibia may have its mineral structure preserved. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Loss model for off-design performance analysis of radial turbines with pivoting-vane, variable-area stators

    Meitner, P. L.; Glassman, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    An off-design performance loss model for a radial turbine with pivoting, variable-area stators is developed through a combination of analytical modeling and experimental data analysis. A viscous loss model is used for the variation in stator loss with setting angle, and stator vane end-clearance leakage effects are predicted by a clearance flow model. The variation of rotor loss coefficient with stator setting angle is obtained by means of an analytical matching of experimental data for a rotor that was tested with six stators, having throat areas from 20 to 144% of the design area. An incidence loss model is selected to obtain best agreement with experimental data. The stator vane end-clearance leakage model predicts increasing mass flow and decreasing efficiency as a result of end-clearances, with changes becoming significantly larger with decreasing stator area.

  19. Application of Radial Basis Function Methods in the Development of a 95th Percentile Male Seated FEA Model.

    Vavalle, Nicholas A; Schoell, Samantha L; Weaver, Ashley A; Stitzel, Joel D; Gayzik, F Scott

    2014-11-01

    Human body finite element models (FEMs) are a valuable tool in the study of injury biomechanics. However, the traditional model development process can be time-consuming. Scaling and morphing an existing FEM is an attractive alternative for generating morphologically distinct models for further study. The objective of this work is to use a radial basis function to morph the Global Human Body Models Consortium (GHBMC) average male model (M50) to the body habitus of a 95th percentile male (M95) and to perform validation tests on the resulting model. The GHBMC M50 model (v. 4.3) was created using anthropometric and imaging data from a living subject representing a 50th percentile male. A similar dataset was collected from a 95th percentile male (22,067 total images) and was used in the morphing process. Homologous landmarks on the reference (M50) and target (M95) geometries, with the existing FE node locations (M50 model), were inputs to the morphing algorithm. The radial basis function was applied to morph the FE model. The model represented a mass of 103.3 kg and contained 2.2 million elements with 1.3 million nodes. Simulations of the M95 in seven loading scenarios were presented ranging from a chest pendulum impact to a lateral sled test. The morphed model matched anthropometric data to within a rootmean square difference of 4.4% while maintaining element quality commensurate to the M50 model and matching other anatomical ranges and targets. The simulation validation data matched experimental data well in most cases.

  20. Semimechanistic model describing gastric emptying and glucose absorption in healthy subjects and patients with type 2 diabetes

    Alskär, Oskar; Bagger, Jonatan I; Røge, Rikke M.

    2016-01-01

    The integrated glucose-insulin (IGI) model is a previously published semimechanistic model that describes plasma glucose and insulin concentrations after glucose challenges. The aim of this work was to use knowledge of physiology to improve the IGI model's description of glucose absorption and ga...... model provides a better description and improves the understanding of dynamic glucose tests involving oral glucose....... and gastric emptying after tests with varying glucose doses. The developed model's performance was compared to empirical models. To develop our model, data from oral and intravenous glucose challenges in patients with type 2 diabetes and healthy control subjects were used together with present knowledge...... glucose absorption was superior to linear absorption regardless of the gastric emptying model applied. The semiphysiological model developed performed better than previously published empirical models and allows better understanding of the mechanisms underlying glucose absorption. In conclusion, our new...

  1. A standardised graphic method for describing data privacy frameworks in primary care research using a flexible zone model.

    Kuchinke, W.; Ohmann, C.; Verheij, R.A.; Veen, E.B. van; Arvanitis, T.N.; Taweel, A.; Delaney, B.C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a model describing core concepts and principles of data flow, data privacy and confidentiality, in a simple and flexible way, using concise process descriptions and a diagrammatic notation applied to research workflow processes. The model should help to generate robust data

  2. A comparison of macroscopic models describing the collective response of sedimenting rod-like particles in shear flows

    Helzel, Christiane; Tzavaras, Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    We consider a kinetic model, which describes the sedimentation of rod-like particles in dilute suspensions under the influence of gravity, presented in Helzel and Tzavaras (submitted for publication). Here we restrict our considerations to shear flow and consider a simplified situation, where the particle orientation is restricted to the plane spanned by the direction of shear and the direction of gravity. For this simplified kinetic model we carry out a linear stability analysis and we derive two different nonlinear macroscopic models which describe the formation of clusters of higher particle density. One of these macroscopic models is based on a diffusive scaling, the other one is based on a so-called quasi-dynamic approximation. Numerical computations, which compare the predictions of the macroscopic models with the kinetic model, complete our presentation.

  3. A comparison of macroscopic models describing the collective response of sedimenting rod-like particles in shear flows

    Helzel, Christiane

    2016-07-22

    We consider a kinetic model, which describes the sedimentation of rod-like particles in dilute suspensions under the influence of gravity, presented in Helzel and Tzavaras (submitted for publication). Here we restrict our considerations to shear flow and consider a simplified situation, where the particle orientation is restricted to the plane spanned by the direction of shear and the direction of gravity. For this simplified kinetic model we carry out a linear stability analysis and we derive two different nonlinear macroscopic models which describe the formation of clusters of higher particle density. One of these macroscopic models is based on a diffusive scaling, the other one is based on a so-called quasi-dynamic approximation. Numerical computations, which compare the predictions of the macroscopic models with the kinetic model, complete our presentation.

  4. A Comparison of Models Describing Heat Transfer in the Primary Cooling Zone of a Continuous Casting Machine

    Miłkowska-Piszczek K.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of research conducted concerning the determination of thermal boundary conditions for the steel continuous casting process within the primary cooling zone. A cast slab - with dimensions of 1100 mm×220 mm - was analysed, and models described in references were compared with the authors’ model. The presented models were verified on the basis of an industrial database. The research problem was solved with the finite element method using the ProCAST software package.

  5. Modelling of pressurized water reactor fuel, rod time dependent radial heat flow with boundary element method; Modeliranje spremenljivega radijalnega toplotnega toka tlacnovodne gorivne palice z metodo robnih elementov

    Sarler, B [Institut Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Yugoslavia)

    1987-07-01

    The basic principles of the boundary element method numerical treatment of the radial flow heat diffusion equation are presented. The algorithm copes the time dependent Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions, temperature dependent material properties and regions from different materials in thermal contact. It is verified on the several analytically obtained test cases. The developed method is used for the modelling of unsteady radial heat flow in pressurized water reactor fuel rod. (author)

  6. Seismic modeling with radial basis function-generated finite differences (RBF-FD) – a simplified treatment of interfaces

    Martin, Bradley, E-mail: brma7253@colorado.edu; Fornberg, Bengt, E-mail: Fornberg@colorado.edu

    2017-04-15

    In a previous study of seismic modeling with radial basis function-generated finite differences (RBF-FD), we outlined a numerical method for solving 2-D wave equations in domains with material interfaces between different regions. The method was applicable on a mesh-free set of data nodes. It included all information about interfaces within the weights of the stencils (allowing the use of traditional time integrators), and was shown to solve problems of the 2-D elastic wave equation to 3rd-order accuracy. In the present paper, we discuss a refinement of that method that makes it simpler to implement. It can also improve accuracy for the case of smoothly-variable model parameter values near interfaces. We give several test cases that demonstrate the method solving 2-D elastic wave equation problems to 4th-order accuracy, even in the presence of smoothly-curved interfaces with jump discontinuities in the model parameters.

  7. Validation of a Simulation Model Describing the Glucose-Insulin-Glucagon Pharmacodynamics in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Ranjan, Ajenthen; Møller, Jan Kloppenborg

    Currently, no consensus exists on a model describing endogenous glucose production (EGP) as a function of glucagon concentrations. Reliable simulations to determine the glucagon dose preventing or treating hypoglycemia or to tune a dual-hormone artificial pancreas control algorithm need a validat...

  8. Biological Effectiveness and Application of Heavy Ions in Radiation Therapy Described by a Physical and Biological Model

    Olsen, Kjeld J.; Hansen, Johnny W.

    is inadequately described by an RBE-factor, whereas the complete formulation of the probability of survival must be used, as survival depends on both radiation quality and dose. The theoretical model of track structure can be used in dose-effect calculations for neutron-, high-LET, and low-LET radiation applied...... simultaneously in therapy....

  9. A standardised graphic method for describing data privacy frameworks in primary care research using a flexible zone model.

    Kuchinke, Wolfgang; Ohmann, Christian; Verheij, Robert A; van Veen, Evert-Ben; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Taweel, Adel; Delaney, Brendan C

    2014-12-01

    To develop a model describing core concepts and principles of data flow, data privacy and confidentiality, in a simple and flexible way, using concise process descriptions and a diagrammatic notation applied to research workflow processes. The model should help to generate robust data privacy frameworks for research done with patient data. Based on an exploration of EU legal requirements for data protection and privacy, data access policies, and existing privacy frameworks of research projects, basic concepts and common processes were extracted, described and incorporated into a model with a formal graphical representation and a standardised notation. The Unified Modelling Language (UML) notation was enriched by workflow and own symbols to enable the representation of extended data flow requirements, data privacy and data security requirements, privacy enhancing techniques (PET) and to allow privacy threat analysis for research scenarios. Our model is built upon the concept of three privacy zones (Care Zone, Non-care Zone and Research Zone) containing databases, data transformation operators, such as data linkers and privacy filters. Using these model components, a risk gradient for moving data from a zone of high risk for patient identification to a zone of low risk can be described. The model was applied to the analysis of data flows in several general clinical research use cases and two research scenarios from the TRANSFoRm project (e.g., finding patients for clinical research and linkage of databases). The model was validated by representing research done with the NIVEL Primary Care Database in the Netherlands. The model allows analysis of data privacy and confidentiality issues for research with patient data in a structured way and provides a framework to specify a privacy compliant data flow, to communicate privacy requirements and to identify weak points for an adequate implementation of data privacy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  10. Modeling lodgepole pine radial growth relative to climate and genetics using universal growth-trend response functions.

    McLane, Sierra C; LeMay, Valerie M; Aitken, Sally N

    2011-04-01

    Forests strongly affect Earth's carbon cycles, making our ability to forecast forest-productivity changes associated with rising temperatures and changes in precipitation increasingly critical. In this study, we model the influence of climate on annual radial growth using lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) trees grown for 34 years in a large provenance experiment in western Canada. We use a random-coefficient modeling approach to build universal growth-trend response functions that simultaneously incorporate the impacts of different provenance and site climates on radial growth trends under present and future annual (growth-year), summer, and winter climate regimes. This approach provides new depth to traditional quantitative genetics population response functions by illustrating potential changes in population dominance over time, as well as indicating the age and size at which annual growth begins declining for any population growing in any location under any present or future climate scenario within reason, given the ages and climatic conditions sampled. Our models indicate that lodgepole pine radial-growth levels maximize between 3.9 degrees and 5.1 degrees C mean growth-year temperature. This translates to productivity declining by the mid-21st century in southern and central British Columbia (BC), while increasing beyond the 2080s in northern BC and Yukon, as temperatures rise. Relative to summer climate indices, productivity is predicted to decline continuously through the 2080s in all locations, while relative to winter climate variables, the opposite trend occurs, with the growth increases caused by warmer winters potentially offsetting the summer losses. Trees from warmer provenances, i.e., from the center of the species range, perform best in nearly all of our present and future climate-scenario models. We recommend that similar models be used to analyze population growth trends relative to annual and intra-annual climate in other large-scale provenance

  11. Evidence in Support of the Independent Channel Model Describing the Sensorimotor Control of Human Stance Using a Humanoid Robot.

    Pasma, Jantsje H; Assländer, Lorenz; van Kordelaar, Joost; de Kam, Digna; Mergner, Thomas; Schouten, Alfred C

    2018-01-01

    The Independent Channel (IC) model is a commonly used linear balance control model in the frequency domain to analyze human balance control using system identification and parameter estimation. The IC model is a rudimentary and noise-free description of balance behavior in the frequency domain, where a stable model representation is not guaranteed. In this study, we conducted firstly time-domain simulations with added noise, and secondly robot experiments by implementing the IC model in a real-world robot (PostuRob II) to test the validity and stability of the model in the time domain and for real world situations. Balance behavior of seven healthy participants was measured during upright stance by applying pseudorandom continuous support surface rotations. System identification and parameter estimation were used to describe the balance behavior with the IC model in the frequency domain. The IC model with the estimated parameters from human experiments was implemented in Simulink for computer simulations including noise in the time domain and robot experiments using the humanoid robot PostuRob II. Again, system identification and parameter estimation were used to describe the simulated balance behavior. Time series, Frequency Response Functions, and estimated parameters from human experiments, computer simulations, and robot experiments were compared with each other. The computer simulations showed similar balance behavior and estimated control parameters compared to the human experiments, in the time and frequency domain. Also, the IC model was able to control the humanoid robot by keeping it upright, but showed small differences compared to the human experiments in the time and frequency domain, especially at high frequencies. We conclude that the IC model, a descriptive model in the frequency domain, can imitate human balance behavior also in the time domain, both in computer simulations with added noise and real world situations with a humanoid robot. This

  12. Evidence in Support of the Independent Channel Model Describing the Sensorimotor Control of Human Stance Using a Humanoid Robot

    Jantsje H. Pasma

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Independent Channel (IC model is a commonly used linear balance control model in the frequency domain to analyze human balance control using system identification and parameter estimation. The IC model is a rudimentary and noise-free description of balance behavior in the frequency domain, where a stable model representation is not guaranteed. In this study, we conducted firstly time-domain simulations with added noise, and secondly robot experiments by implementing the IC model in a real-world robot (PostuRob II to test the validity and stability of the model in the time domain and for real world situations. Balance behavior of seven healthy participants was measured during upright stance by applying pseudorandom continuous support surface rotations. System identification and parameter estimation were used to describe the balance behavior with the IC model in the frequency domain. The IC model with the estimated parameters from human experiments was implemented in Simulink for computer simulations including noise in the time domain and robot experiments using the humanoid robot PostuRob II. Again, system identification and parameter estimation were used to describe the simulated balance behavior. Time series, Frequency Response Functions, and estimated parameters from human experiments, computer simulations, and robot experiments were compared with each other. The computer simulations showed similar balance behavior and estimated control parameters compared to the human experiments, in the time and frequency domain. Also, the IC model was able to control the humanoid robot by keeping it upright, but showed small differences compared to the human experiments in the time and frequency domain, especially at high frequencies. We conclude that the IC model, a descriptive model in the frequency domain, can imitate human balance behavior also in the time domain, both in computer simulations with added noise and real world situations with a

  13. Is coronene better described by Clar's aromatic π-sextet model or by the AdNDP representation?

    Kumar, Anand; Duran, Miquel; Solà, Miquel

    2017-07-05

    The bonding patterns in coronene are complicated and controversial as denoted by the lack of consensus of how its electronic structure should be described. Among the different proposed descriptions, the two most representative are those generated by Clar's aromatic π-sextet and adaptative natural density partitioning (AdNDP) models. Quantum-chemical calculations at the density functional theory level are performed to evaluate the model that gives a better representation of coronene. To this end, we analyse the molecular structure of coronene, we estimate the aromaticity of its inner and outer rings using various local aromaticity descriptors, and we assess its chemical reactivity from the study of the Diels-Alder reaction with cyclopentadiene. Results obtained are compared with those computed for naphthalene and phenanthrene. Our conclusion is that Clar's π-sextet model provides the representation of coronene that better describes the physicochemical behavior of this molecule. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. KANDY - a numerical model to describe phenomena, which - in a heated and voided fuel element of an LMFBR - may occur

    Thurnay, K.

    1984-02-01

    Kandy is a model developed to describe the essential destructionphenomena of the fuel elements of an LMFBR. The fuel element is assumed to be a voided one, in which the heat generation is still going on. The main process to be modeled is the melting/bursting/evaporating of parts of the fuel pins and the subsequent dislocation of these materials in the coolant channel. The work presented summarizes the assumptions constituting the model, develops the corresponding equations of motion and describes the procedure, turning these into a system of difference-equations ready for coding. As a final part results of a testcase calculation with the Kandy-code are presentend and interpreted. (orig.) [de

  15. A new model describing the curves for repair of both DNA double-strand breaks and chromosome damage

    Foray, N.; Badie, C.; Alsbeih, G.; Malaise, E.P.; Fertil, B.

    1996-01-01

    A review of reports dealing with fittings of the data for repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and excess chromosome fragments (ECFs) shows that several models are used to fit the repair curves. Since DSBs and ECFs are correleated, it is worth developing a model describing both phenomena. The curve-fitting models used most extensively, the two repair half-times model for DSBs and the monoexponential plus residual model for ECFs, appear to be too inflexible to describe the repair curves for both DSBs and ECFs. We have therefore developed a new concept based on a variable repair half-time. According to this concept, the repair curve is continuously bending and dependent on time and probably reflects a continuous spectrum of damage repairability. The fits of the curves for DSB repair to the variable repair half-time and the variable repair half-time plus residual models were compared to those obtained with the two half-times plus residual and two half-times models. Similarly, the fits of the curves for ECF repair to the variable repair half-time and variable half-time plus residual models were compared to that obtained with the monoexponential plus residual model. The quality of fit and the dependence of adjustable parameters on the portion of the curve fitted were used as comparison criteria. We found that: (a) It is useful to postulate the existence of a residual term for unrepairable lesions, regardless of the model adopted. (b) With the two cell lines tested (a normal and a hypersensitive one), data for both DSBs and ECTs are best fitted to the variable repair half-time plus residual model, whatever the repair time range. 47 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Model-Based Optimization of Scaffold Geometry and Operating Conditions of Radial Flow Packed-Bed Bioreactors for Therapeutic Applications

    Danilo Donato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radial flow perfusion of cell-seeded hollow cylindrical porous scaffolds may overcome the transport limitations of pure diffusion and direct axial perfusion in the realization of bioengineered substitutes of failing or missing tissues. Little has been reported on the optimization criteria of such bioreactors. A steady-state model was developed, combining convective and dispersive transport of dissolved oxygen with Michaelis-Menten cellular consumption kinetics. Dimensional analysis was used to combine more effectively geometric and operational variables in the dimensionless groups determining bioreactor performance. The effectiveness of cell oxygenation was expressed in terms of non-hypoxic fractional construct volume. The model permits the optimization of the geometry of hollow cylindrical constructs, and direction and magnitude of perfusion flow, to ensure cell oxygenation and culture at controlled oxygen concentration profiles. This may help engineer tissues suitable for therapeutic and drug screening purposes.

  17. DaMoScope and its internet graphics for the visual control of adjusting mathematical models describing experimental data

    Belousov, V. I.; Ezhela, V. V.; Kuyanov, Yu. V.; Tkachenko, N. P.

    2015-01-01

    The experience of using the dynamic atlas of the experimental data and mathematical models of their description in the problems of adjusting parametric models of observable values depending on kinematic variables is presented. The functional possibilities of an image of a large number of experimental data and the models describing them are shown by examples of data and models of observable values determined by the amplitudes of elastic scattering of hadrons. The Internet implementation of an interactive tool DaMoScope and its interface with the experimental data and codes of adjusted parametric models with the parameters of the best description of data are schematically shown. The DaMoScope codes are freely available

  18. DaMoScope and its internet graphics for the visual control of adjusting mathematical models describing experimental data

    Belousov, V. I.; Ezhela, V. V.; Kuyanov, Yu. V.; Tkachenko, N. P.

    2015-12-01

    The experience of using the dynamic atlas of the experimental data and mathematical models of their description in the problems of adjusting parametric models of observable values depending on kinematic variables is presented. The functional possibilities of an image of a large number of experimental data and the models describing them are shown by examples of data and models of observable values determined by the amplitudes of elastic scattering of hadrons. The Internet implementation of an interactive tool DaMoScope and its interface with the experimental data and codes of adjusted parametric models with the parameters of the best description of data are schematically shown. The DaMoScope codes are freely available.

  19. DaMoScope and its internet graphics for the visual control of adjusting mathematical models describing experimental data

    Belousov, V. I.; Ezhela, V. V.; Kuyanov, Yu. V., E-mail: Yu.Kuyanov@gmail.com; Tkachenko, N. P. [Institute for High Energy Physics, National Research Center Kurchatov Institute, COMPAS Group (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The experience of using the dynamic atlas of the experimental data and mathematical models of their description in the problems of adjusting parametric models of observable values depending on kinematic variables is presented. The functional possibilities of an image of a large number of experimental data and the models describing them are shown by examples of data and models of observable values determined by the amplitudes of elastic scattering of hadrons. The Internet implementation of an interactive tool DaMoScope and its interface with the experimental data and codes of adjusted parametric models with the parameters of the best description of data are schematically shown. The DaMoScope codes are freely available.

  20. A New Model for Describing the Rheological Behavior of Heavy and Extra Heavy Crude Oils in the Presence of Nanoparticles

    Esteban A. Taborda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work proposes for the first time a mathematical model for describing the rheological behavior of heavy and extra-heavy crude oils in the presence of nanoparticles. This model results from the combination of two existing mathematical models. The first one applies to the rheology of pseudoplastic substances, i.e., the Herschel-Bulkley model. The second one was previously developed by our research group to model the rheology of suspensions, namely the modified Pal and Rhodes model. The proposed model is applied to heavy and extra heavy crude oils in the presence of nanoparticles, considering the effects of nanoparticles concentration and surface chemical nature, temperature, and crude oil type. All the experimental data evaluated exhibited compelling goodness of fitting, and the physical parameters in the model follow correlate well with variations in viscosity. The new model is dependent of share rate and opens new possibilities for phenomenologically understanding viscosity reduction in heavy crude by adding solid nanoparticles and favoring the scale-up in enhanced oil recovery (EOR and/or improved oil recovery (IOR process.

  1. Development and validation of a radial turbine efficiency and mass flow model at design and off-design conditions

    Serrano, José Ramón; Arnau, Francisco José; García-Cuevas, Luis Miguel; Dombrovsky, Artem; Tartoussi, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A procedure for performance maps extrapolation of any radial turbine is presented. • Non measured VGT positions, speeds and blade to jet speed ratios can be extrapolated. • Calibration coefficients that can be fitted with a limited set of map data are used. • Experimental points at high blade to jet speed ratios have been used for validation. • The extrapolation accuracy is good in different map ranges and variables. - Abstract: Turbine performance at extreme off-design conditions is growing in importance for properly computing turbocharged reciprocating internal combustion engines behaviour during urban driving conditions at current and future homologation cycles. In these cases, the turbine operates at very low flow rates and power outputs and at very high blade to jet speed ratios during transitory periods due to turbocharger wheel inertia and the high pulsation level of engine exhaust flow. This paper presents a physically based method that is able to extrapolate radial turbines reduced mass flow and adiabatic efficiency in blade speed ratio, turbine rotational speed and stator vanes position. The model uses a very narrow range of experimental data from turbine maps to fit the necessary coefficients. By using a special experimental turbocharger gas stand, experimental data have been obtained for extremely low turbine power outputs for the sake of model validation. Even if the data used for fitting only covers the turbine normal operation zone, the extrapolation model provides very good agreement with the experiments at very high blade speed ratio points; producing also good results when extrapolating in rotational speed and stator vanes position.

  2. Evaluation and Validation of a TCAT Model to Describe Non-Dilute Flow and Species Transport in Porous Media

    Weigand, T. M.; Harrison, E.; Miller, C. T.

    2017-12-01

    A thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT) model has been developed to simulate non-dilute flow and species transport in porous media. This model has the advantages of a firm connection between the microscale, or pore scale, and the macroscale; a thermodynamically consistent basis; the explicit inclusion of dissipative terms that arise from spatial gradients in pressure and chemical activity; and the ability to describe both high and low concentration displacement. The TCAT model has previously been shown to provide excellent agreement for a set of laboratory data and outperformed existing macroscale models that have been used for non-dilute flow and transport. The examined experimental dataset consisted of stable brine displacements for a large range of fluid properties. This dataset however only examined one type of porous media and had a fixed flow rate for all experiments. In this work, the TCAT model is applied to a dataset that consists of two different porous media types, constant head and flow rate conditions, varying resident fluid concentrations, and internal probes that measured the pressure and salt mass fraction. Parameter estimation is performed on a subset of the experimental data for the TCAT model as well as other existing non-dilute flow and transport models. The optimized parameters are then used for forward simulations and the accuracy of the models is compared.

  3. Users' guide to system dynamics model describing Coho salmon survival in Olema Creek, Point Reyes National Seashore, Marin County, California

    Woodward, Andrea; Torregrosa, Alicia; Madej, Mary Ann; Reichmuth, Michael; Fong, Darren

    2014-01-01

    The system dynamics model described in this report is the result of a collaboration between U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists and National Park Service (NPS) San Francisco Bay Area Network (SFAN) staff, whose goal was to develop a methodology to integrate inventory and monitoring data to better understand ecosystem dynamics and trends using salmon in Olema Creek, Marin County, California, as an example case. The SFAN began monitoring multiple life stages of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in Olema Creek during 2003 (Carlisle and others, 2013), building on previous monitoring of spawning fish and redds. They initiated water-quality and habitat monitoring, and had access to flow and weather data from other sources. This system dynamics model of the freshwater portion of the coho salmon life cycle in Olema Creek integrated 8 years of existing monitoring data, literature values, and expert opinion to investigate potential factors limiting survival and production, identify data gaps, and improve monitoring and restoration prescriptions. A system dynamics model is particularly effective when (1) data are insufficient in time series length and/or measured parameters for a statistical or mechanistic model, and (2) the model must be easily accessible by users who are not modelers. These characteristics helped us meet the following overarching goals for this model: Summarize and synthesize NPS monitoring data with data and information from other sources to describe factors and processes affecting freshwater survival of coho salmon in Olema Creek. Provide a model that can be easily manipulated to experiment with alternative values of model parameters and novel scenarios of environmental drivers. Although the model describes the ecological dynamics of Olema Creek, these dynamics are structurally similar to numerous other coastal streams along the California coast that also contain anadromous fish populations. The model developed for Olema can be used, at least as a

  4. An analytical mechanical model to describe the response of NiTi rotary endodontic files in a curved root canal

    Leroy, Agnès Marie Françoise; Bahia, Maria Guiomar de Azevedo; Ehrlacher, Alain; Buono, Vicente Tadeu Lopes

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To build a mathematical model describing the mechanical behavior of NiTi rotary files while they are rotating in a root canal. Methodology: The file was seen as a beam undergoing large transformations. The instrument was assumed to be rotating steadily in the root canal, and the geometry of the canal was considered as a known parameter of the problem. The formulae of large transformations mechanics then allowed the calculation of the Green–Lagrange strain field in the file. The non-linear mechanical behavior of NiTi was modeled as a continuous piecewise linear function, assuming that the material did not reach plastic deformation. Criteria locating the changes of behavior of NiTi were established and the tension field in the file, and the external efforts applied on it were calculated. The unknown variable of torsion was deduced from the equilibrium equation system using a Coulomb contact law which solved the problem on a cycle of rotation. Results: In order to verify that the model described well reality, three-point bending experiments were managed on superelastic NiTi wires, whose results were compared to the theoretical ones. It appeared that the model gave a good mentoring of the empirical results in the range of bending angles that interested us. Conclusions: Knowing the geometry of the root canal, one is now able to write the equations of the strain and stress fields in the endodontic instrument, and to quantify the impact of each macroscopic parameter of the problem on its response. This should be useful to predict failure of the files under rotating bending fatigue, and to optimize the geometry of the files. - Highlights: ► A mechanical model of the behavior of a NiTi endodontic instrument was developed. ► The model was validated with results of three-point bending tests on NiTi wires. ► The model is appropriate for the optimization of instruments' geometry.

  5. A Simulation Model of Focus and Radial Servos in Compact Disc Players with Disc Surface Defects

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle

    2004-01-01

    Compact Disc players have been on the market in more than two decades.As a consequence most of the control servo problems have been solved. A large remaining problem to solve is the handling of Compact Discs with severe surface defects like scratches and fingerprints. This paper introduces a method...... for making the design of controllers handling surface defects easier. A simulation model of Compact Disc players playing discs with surface defects is presented. The main novel element in the model is a model of the surface defects. That model is based on data from discs with surface defects. This model...

  6. Evaluation of a cross contamination model describing transfer of Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes during grinding of pork and beef.

    Møller, C O A; Sant'Ana, A S; Hansen, S K H; Nauta, M J; Silva, L P; Alvarenga, V O; Maffei, D; Silva, F F P; Lopes, J T; Franco, B D G M; Aabo, S; Hansen, T B

    2016-06-02

    In a previous study, a model was developed to describe the transfer and survival of Salmonella during grinding of pork (Møller, C.O.A., Nauta, M.J., Christensen, B.B., Dalgaard, P., Hansen, T.B., 2012. Modelling transfer of Salmonella typhimurium DT104 during simulation of grinding of pork. Journal of Applied Microbiology 112 (1), 90-98). The robustness of this model is now evaluated by studying its performance for predicting the transfer and survival of Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes during grinding of different types of meat (pork and beef), using two different grinders, different sizes and different numbers of pieces of meats to be ground. A total of 19 grinding trials were collected. Acceptable Simulation Zone (ASZ), visual inspection of the data, Quantitative Microbiological Risk Assessment (QMRA), as well as the Total Transfer Potential (TTP) were used as approaches to evaluate model performance and to access the quality of the cross contamination model predictions. Using the ASZ approach and considering that 70% of the observed counts have to be inside a defined acceptable zone of ±0.5 log10CFU per portion, it was found that the cross contamination parameters suggested by Møller et al. (2012) were not able to describe all 19 trials. However, for each of the collected grinding trials, the transfer event was well described when fitted to the model structure proposed by Møller et al. (2012). Parameter estimates obtained by fitting observed trials performed at different conditions, such as size and number of pieces of meat to be ground, may not be applied to describe cross contamination of unlike processing. Nevertheless, the risk estimates, as well as the TTP, revealed that the risk of disease may be reduced when the grinding of meat is performed in a grinder made of stainless steel (for all surfaces in contact with the meat), using a well-sharpened knife and holding at room temperatures lower than 4°C. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All

  7. Radial nerve dysfunction

    Neuropathy - radial nerve; Radial nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy ... Damage to one nerve group, such as the radial nerve, is called mononeuropathy . Mononeuropathy means there is damage to a single nerve. Both ...

  8. The Polyakov, Nambu and Jona-Lasinio model and its applications to describe the sub-nuclear particles

    Blanquier, E.

    2013-01-01

    To study the high energy nuclear physics and the associated phenomenon, as the quark-gluon plasma / hadronic matter phase transition, the Nambu and Jona-Lasinio model (NJL) appears as an interesting alternative to the Quantum Chromodynamics, not solvable at the considered energies. Indeed, the NJL model allows the description of quarks physics, at finite temperatures and densities. Furthermore, in order to try to correct a limitation of the NJL model, i.e. the absence of confinement, it was proposed a coupling of the quarks/antiquarks to a Polyakov loop, forming the PNJL model. The objective of this thesis is to see the possibilities offered by the NJL and PNJL models, to describe relevant sub-nuclear particles (quarks, mesons, diquarks and baryons), to study their interactions, and to proceed to a dynamical study involving these particles. After a recall of the useful tools, we modeled the u, d, s effective quarks and the mesons. Then, we described the baryons as quarks-diquarks bound states. A part of the work concerned the calculations of the cross-sections associated to the possible reactions implying these particles. Then, we incorporated these results in a computer code, in order to study the cooling of a quarks/antiquarks plasma and its hadronization. In this study, each particle evolves in a system in which the temperature and the densities are local parameters. We have two types of interactions: one due to the collisions, and the other is a remote interaction, notably between quarks. Finally, we studied the properties of our approach: qualities, limitations, and possible evolutions. (author)

  9. Modeling and simulation of the radial field electrostatic micro-motors with a variable air gap

    Camon, H. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 31 - Toulouse (France). Lab. d' Analyse et d' Architecture des Systemes; Rebiere, O.; Lefevre, Y.; Boukari, N. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 31 - Toulouse (France). Lab. d' Electrotechnique et d' Electronique Industrielle UMR 5828; Gerard, P. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. Electronique Microtechnologie et Instrumentation

    1998-05-01

    This paper presents our first contribution to the modelling of the dynamic operation of an electrostatic motor with several mechanical degrees of freedom. The key point of this modeling is the computation of the variations of the electrical parameters of the motor in function of the mechanical degrees of freedom. An analytical model of the determination of these coefficients is proposed in this paper. The results obtained are compared to those obtained by means of a 2-D and a 3-D finite element analysis. Finally the first results obtained by this first version of our electromechanical model are presented. (author)

  10. Radially and temporally resolved electric field of positive streamers in air and modelling of the induced plasma chemistry

    Hoder, T.; Šimek, M.; Bonaventura, Z.; Prukner, V.; Gordillo-Vázquez, F. J.

    2016-08-01

    The initial stages of transient luminous events (TLEs) occurring in the upper atmosphere of the Earth are, in a certain pressure range, controlled by the streamer mechanism. This paper presents the results of the first laboratory experiments to study the TLE streamer phenomena under conditions close to those of the upper atmosphere. Spectrally and highly spatiotemporally resolved emissions originating from radiative states {{\\text{N}}2}≤ft({{\\text{C}}3}{{\\Pi}u}\\right) (second positive system) and \\text{N}2+≤ft({{\\text{B}}2}Σu+\\right) (first negative system) have been recorded from the positive streamer discharge. Periodic ionizing events were generated in a barrier discharge arrangement at a pressure of 4 torr of synthetic air, i.e. simulating the pressure conditions at altitudes of ≃37 km. Employing Abel inversion on the radially scanned streamer emission and a 2D fitting procedure, access was obtained to the local spectral signatures within the over 106  m s-1 fast propagating streamers. The reduced electric field strength distribution within the streamer head was determined from the ratio of the \\text{N}2+/{{\\text{N}}2} band intensities with peak values up to 500 Td and overall duration of about 10 ns. The 2D profiles of the streamer head electric fields were used as an experimentally obtained input for kinetic simulations of the streamer-induced air plasma chemistry. The radial and temporal computed distribution of the ground vibrational levels of the radiative states involved in the radiative transitions analyzed (337.1 nm and 391.5 nm), atomic oxygen, nitrogen, nitric oxide and ozone concentrations are vizualized and discussed in comparison with available models of the streamer phase of Blue Jet discharges in the stratosphere.

  11. Evaluation of a cross contamination model describing transfer of salmonella spp. and listeria monocytogenes during grinding of pork and beef

    Møller, Cleide Oliveira de Almeida; Hansen, Tina Beck; Aabo, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The cross contamination model (Møller et al. 2012) was evaluated to investigate its capability of describing transfer of Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes during grinding of pork and beef of varying sizes (50 – 324 g) and numbers of pieces to be ground (10 – 100), in two...... processing. QMRA risk estimates and TTP both revealed that risk attribution from grinding was mainly influenced by sharpness of grinder knife > specific grinder > grinding temperature whereas the specific pathogen was of minor importance....

  12. Biological effectiveness and application of heavy ions in radiation therapy described by a physical and biological model

    Olsen, K.J.; Hansen, J.W.

    1982-12-01

    A description is given of the physical basis for applying track structure theory in the determination of the effectiveness of heavy-ion irradiation of single- and multi-hit target systems. It will be shown that for applying the theory to biological systems the effectiveness of heavy-ion irradiation is inadequately described by an RBE-factor, whereas the complete formulation of the probability of survival must be used, as survival depends on both radiation quality and dose. The theoretical model of track structure can be used in dose-effect calculations for neutron-, high-LET, and low-LET radiation applied simultaneously in therapy. (author)

  13. Applying a physical continuum model to describe the broadband X-ray spectra of accreting pulsars at high luminosity

    Pottschmidt, Katja; Hemphill, Paul B.; Wolff, Michael T.; Cheatham, Diana M.; Iwakiri, Wataru; Gottlieb, Amy M.; Falkner, Sebastian; Ballhausen, Ralf; Fuerst, Felix; Kuehnel, Matthias; Ferrigno, Carlo; Becker, Peter A.; Wood, Kent S.; Wilms, Joern

    2018-01-01

    A new window for better understanding the accretion onto strongly magnetized neutron stars in X-ray binaries is opening. In these systems the accreted material follows the magnetic field lines as it approaches the neutron star, forming accretion columns above the magnetic poles. The plasma falls toward the neutron star surface at near-relativistic speeds, losing energy by emitting X-rays. The X-ray spectral continua are commonly described using phenomenological models, i.e., power laws with different types of curved cut-offs at higher energies. Here we consider high luminosity pulsars. In these systems the mass transfer rate is high enough that the accreting plasma is thought to be decelerated in a radiation-dominated radiative shock in the accretion columns. While the theory of the emission from such shocks had already been developed by 2007, a model for direct comparison with X-ray continuum spectra in xspec or isis has only recently become available. Characteristic parameters of this model are the accretion column radius and the plasma temperature, among others. Here we analyze the broadband X-ray spectra of the accreting pulsars Centaurus X-3 and 4U 1626-67 obtained with NuSTAR. We present results from traditional empirical modeling as well as successfully apply the radiation-dominated radiative shock model. We also take the opportunity to compare to similar recent analyses of both sources using these and other observations.

  14. Modeling of radial asymmetry in lens distortion facilitated by modern optimization techniques

    De Villiers, Johan P

    2010-01-18

    Full Text Available when applied to low order models. A new tool has been created which can provide extremely accurate distortion characterization. This allows high-end photogrammetric applications to improve their accuracy even if they already use complex models... distortion with a closed form solution and inverse function, Master’s thesis ], University of Pretoria, Pretoria, RSA (2008). [4] Conrady, A., \\Decentered lens systems," Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 79, 384{390 (1919). [5] Brown, D...

  15. A Novel Dynamic Model Describing the Spread of the MERS-CoV and the Expression of Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4

    Siming Tang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS coronavirus, a newly identified pathogen, causes severe pneumonia in humans. MERS is caused by a coronavirus known as MERS-CoV, which attacks the respiratory system. The recently defined receptor for MERS-CoV, dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4, is generally expressed in endothelial and epithelial cells and has been shown to be present on cultured human nonciliated bronchiolar epithelium cells. In this paper, a class of novel four-dimensional dynamic model describing the infection of MERS-CoV is given, and then global stability of the equilibria of the model is discussed. Our results show that the spread of MERS-CoV can also be controlled by decreasing the expression rate of DPP4.

  16. A mathematical model describing the glycemic response of diabetic patients to meal and i.v. infusion of insulin.

    Fabietti, P G; Calabrese, G; Iorio, M; Bistoni, S; Brunetti, P; Sarti, E; Benedetti, M M

    2001-10-01

    Nine type 1 diabetic patients were studied for 24 hours. During this period they were given three calibrated meals. The glycemia was feedback-controlled by means of an artificial pancreas. The blood concentration of glucose and the infusion speed of the insulin were measured every minute. The experimental data referring to each of the three meals were used to estimate the parameters of a mathematical model suitable for describing the glycemic response of diabetic patients at meals and at the i.v. infusion of exogenous insulin. From the estimate a marked dispersion of the parameters was found, both interindividual and intraindividual. Nevertheless the models thus obtained seem to be usable for the synthesis of a feedback controller, especially in view of creating a portable artificial pancreas that now seems possible owing to the realization (so far experimental) of sufficiently reliable glucose concentration sensors.

  17. An analytical mechanical model to describe the response of NiTi rotary endodontic files in a curved root canal.

    Leroy, Agnès Marie Françoise; Bahia, Maria Guiomar de Azevedo; Ehrlacher, Alain; Buono, Vicente Tadeu Lopes

    2012-08-01

    To build a mathematical model describing the mechanical behavior of NiTi rotary files while they are rotating in a root canal. The file was seen as a beam undergoing large transformations. The instrument was assumed to be rotating steadily in the root canal, and the geometry of the canal was considered as a known parameter of the problem. The formulae of large transformations mechanics then allowed the calculation of the Green-Lagrange strain field in the file. The non-linear mechanical behavior of NiTi was modeled as a continuous piecewise linear function, assuming that the material did not reach plastic deformation. Criteria locating the changes of behavior of NiTi were established and the tension field in the file, and the external efforts applied on it were calculated. The unknown variable of torsion was deduced from the equilibrium equation system using a Coulomb contact law which solved the problem on a cycle of rotation. In order to verify that the model described well reality, three-point bending experiments were managed on superelastic NiTi wires, whose results were compared to the theoretical ones. It appeared that the model gave a good mentoring of the empirical results in the range of bending angles that interested us. Knowing the geometry of the root canal, one is now able to write the equations of the strain and stress fields in the endodontic instrument, and to quantify the impact of each macroscopic parameter of the problem on its response. This should be useful to predict failure of the files under rotating bending fatigue, and to optimize the geometry of the files. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. An analytical mechanical model to describe the response of NiTi rotary endodontic files in a curved root canal

    Leroy, Agnes Marie Francoise [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, School of Engineering, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Ecole des Ponts Paristech (ENPC), Champs-sur-Marne (France); Bahia, Maria Guiomar de Azevedo [Department of Restorative Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Ehrlacher, Alain [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Ecole des Ponts Paristech (ENPC), Champs-sur-Marne (France); Buono, Vicente Tadeu Lopes, E-mail: vbuono@demet.ufmg.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, School of Engineering, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2012-08-01

    Aim: To build a mathematical model describing the mechanical behavior of NiTi rotary files while they are rotating in a root canal. Methodology: The file was seen as a beam undergoing large transformations. The instrument was assumed to be rotating steadily in the root canal, and the geometry of the canal was considered as a known parameter of the problem. The formulae of large transformations mechanics then allowed the calculation of the Green-Lagrange strain field in the file. The non-linear mechanical behavior of NiTi was modeled as a continuous piecewise linear function, assuming that the material did not reach plastic deformation. Criteria locating the changes of behavior of NiTi were established and the tension field in the file, and the external efforts applied on it were calculated. The unknown variable of torsion was deduced from the equilibrium equation system using a Coulomb contact law which solved the problem on a cycle of rotation. Results: In order to verify that the model described well reality, three-point bending experiments were managed on superelastic NiTi wires, whose results were compared to the theoretical ones. It appeared that the model gave a good mentoring of the empirical results in the range of bending angles that interested us. Conclusions: Knowing the geometry of the root canal, one is now able to write the equations of the strain and stress fields in the endodontic instrument, and to quantify the impact of each macroscopic parameter of the problem on its response. This should be useful to predict failure of the files under rotating bending fatigue, and to optimize the geometry of the files. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A mechanical model of the behavior of a NiTi endodontic instrument was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The model was validated with results of three-point bending tests on NiTi wires. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The model is appropriate for the optimization of instruments' geometry.

  19. Linear radial pulsation theory. Lecture 5

    Cox, A.N.

    1983-01-01

    We describe a method for getting an equilibrium stellar envelope model using as input the total mass, the envelope mass, the surface effective temperature, the total surface luminosity, and the composition of the envelope. Then wih the structure of the envelope model known, we present a method for obtaining the raidal pulsation periods and growth rates for low order modes. The large amplitude pulsations observed for the yellow and red giants and supergiants are always these radial models, but for the stars nearer the main sequence, as for all of our stars and for the white dwarfs, there frequently are nonradial modes occuring also. Application of linear theory radial pulsation theory is made to the giant star sigma Scuti variables, while the linear nonradial theory will be used for the B stars in later lectures

  20. Discrete imaging models for three-dimensional optoacoustic tomography using radially symmetric expansion functions.

    Wang, Kun; Schoonover, Robert W; Su, Richard; Oraevsky, Alexander; Anastasio, Mark A

    2014-05-01

    Optoacoustic tomography (OAT), also known as photoacoustic tomography, is an emerging computed biomedical imaging modality that exploits optical contrast and ultrasonic detection principles. Iterative image reconstruction algorithms that are based on discrete imaging models are actively being developed for OAT due to their ability to improve image quality by incorporating accurate models of the imaging physics, instrument response, and measurement noise. In this work, we investigate the use of discrete imaging models based on Kaiser-Bessel window functions for iterative image reconstruction in OAT. A closed-form expression for the pressure produced by a Kaiser-Bessel function is calculated, which facilitates accurate computation of the system matrix. Computer-simulation and experimental studies are employed to demonstrate the potential advantages of Kaiser-Bessel function-based iterative image reconstruction in OAT.

  1. A two-phase model to describe the dissolution of ZrO2 by molten Zr

    Belloni, J.; Fichot, F.; Goyeau, B.; Gobin, D.; Quintard, M.

    2007-01-01

    In case of a hypothetical severe accident in a nuclear Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), the fuel elements in the core may reach very high temperatures (more than 2000 K). UO 2 (Uranium dioxide) pellets are enclosed by a cladding mainly composed of Zircaloy (Zr). If the temperature became higher than 2100 K (melting temperature of Zr), the UO 2 pellets would be in contact with molten Zr, resulting in the dissolution and liquefaction of UO 2 at a lower temperature than its melting points (3100 K). Several experimental and numerical investigations have led to a better understanding of this phenomenon but a comprehensive and consistent modeling is still missing. The goal of this paper is to propose a two-phase macroscopic model describing the dissolution of a solid alloy by a liquid. The model is limited to binary alloys and it is applied to the particular case of the dissolution of ZrO 2 by liquid Zr, for which experimental data are available (Hofmann et al., 1999). The model was established by using a volume averaging method. Numerical simulations are compared to experimental results and show a good agreement. (authors)

  2. QSAR models for describing the toxicological effects of ILs against Staphylococcus aureus based on norm indexes.

    He, Wensi; Yan, Fangyou; Jia, Qingzhu; Xia, Shuqian; Wang, Qiang

    2018-03-01

    The hazardous potential of ionic liquids (ILs) is becoming an issue of great concern due to their important role in many industrial fields as green agents. The mathematical model for the toxicological effects of ILs is useful for the risk assessment and design of environmentally benign ILs. The objective of this work is to develop QSAR models to describe the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) of ILs against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). A total of 169 and 101 ILs with MICs and MBCs, respectively, are used to obtain multiple linear regression models based on matrix norm indexes. The norm indexes used in this work are proposed by our research group and they are first applied to estimate the antibacterial toxicity of these ILs against S. aureus. These two models precisely and reliably calculated the IL toxicities with a square of correlation coefficient (R 2 ) of 0.919 and a standard error of estimate (SE) of 0.341 (in log unit of mM) for pMIC, and an R 2 of 0.913 and SE of 0.282 for pMBC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Numerical Modeling Describing the Effects of Heterogeneous Distributions of Asperities on the Quasi-static Evolution of Frictional Slip

    Selvadurai, P. A.; Parker, J. M.; Glaser, S. D.

    2017-12-01

    A better understanding of how slip accumulates along faults and its relation to the breakdown of shear stress is beneficial to many engineering disciplines, such as, hydraulic fracture and understanding induced seismicity (among others). Asperities forming along a preexisting fault resist the relative motion of the two sides of the interface and occur due to the interaction of the surface topographies. Here, we employ a finite element model to simulate circular partial slip asperities along a nominally flat frictional interface. Shear behavior of our partial slip asperity model closely matched the theory described by Cattaneo. The asperity model was employed to simulate a small section of an experimental fault formed between two bodies of polymethyl methacrylate, which consisted of multiple asperities whose location and sizes were directly measured using a pressure sensitive film. The quasi-static shear behavior of the interface was modeled for cyclical loading conditions, and the frictional dissipation (hysteresis) was normal stress dependent. We further our understanding by synthetically modeling lognormal size distributions of asperities that were randomly distributed in space. Synthetic distributions conserved the real contact area and aspects of the size distributions from the experimental case, allowing us to compare the constitutive behaviors based solely on spacing effects. Traction-slip behavior of the experimental interface appears to be considerably affected by spatial clustering of asperities that was not present in the randomly spaced, synthetic asperity distributions. Estimates of bulk interfacial shear stiffness were determined from the constitutive traction-slip behavior and were comparable to the theoretical estimates of multi-contact interfaces with non-interacting asperities.

  4. Indirect estimation of the Convective Lognormal Transfer function model parameters for describing solute transport in unsaturated and undisturbed soil.

    Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Vanclooster, Marnik

    2012-05-01

    Solute transport in partially saturated soils is largely affected by fluid velocity distribution and pore size distribution within the solute transport domain. Hence, it is possible to describe the solute transport process in terms of the pore size distribution of the soil, and indirectly in terms of the soil hydraulic properties. In this paper, we present a conceptual approach that allows predicting the parameters of the Convective Lognormal Transfer model from knowledge of soil moisture and the Soil Moisture Characteristic (SMC), parameterized by means of the closed-form model of Kosugi (1996). It is assumed that in partially saturated conditions, the air filled pore volume act as an inert solid phase, allowing the use of the Arya et al. (1999) pragmatic approach to estimate solute travel time statistics from the saturation degree and SMC parameters. The approach is evaluated using a set of partially saturated transport experiments as presented by Mohammadi and Vanclooster (2011). Experimental results showed that the mean solute travel time, μ(t), increases proportionally with the depth (travel distance) and decreases with flow rate. The variance of solute travel time σ²(t) first decreases with flow rate up to 0.4-0.6 Ks and subsequently increases. For all tested BTCs predicted solute transport with μ(t) estimated from the conceptual model performed much better as compared to predictions with μ(t) and σ²(t) estimated from calibration of solute transport at shallow soil depths. The use of μ(t) estimated from the conceptual model therefore increases the robustness of the CLT model in predicting solute transport in heterogeneous soils at larger depths. In view of the fact that reasonable indirect estimates of the SMC can be made from basic soil properties using pedotransfer functions, the presented approach may be useful for predicting solute transport at field or watershed scales. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Radial dose distribution around an energetic heavy ion and an ion track structure model

    Furukawa, Katsutoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ohno, Shin-ichi; Namba, Hideki; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Watanabe, Ritsuko

    1997-03-01

    Ionization currents produced in a small wall-less ionization chamber located at varying distance from the 200 MeV Ni{sup 12+} ion`path traversing Ar gas were measured and utilized to construct a track structure model. Using the LET value of 200 MeV Ni{sup 12+} and G(Fe{sup 3+}) in Fricke solutions (= 15.4) for fast electrons, we estimate G(Fe{sup 3+}) for this ion to be 5.0. (author)

  6. Optimization of vehicle compartment low frequency noise based on Radial Basis Function Neuro-Network Approximation Model

    HU Qi-guo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For reducing the vehicle compartment low frequency noise, the Optimal Latin hypercube sampling method was applied to perform experimental design for sampling in the factorial design space. The thickness parameters of the panels with larger acoustic contribution was considered as factors, as well as the vehicle mass, seventh rank modal frequency of body, peak sound pressure of test point and sound pressure root-mean-square value as responses. By using the RBF(radial basis function neuro-network method, an approximation model of four responses about six factors was established. Further more, error analysis of established approximation model was performed in this paper. To optimize the panel’s thickness parameter, the adaptive simulated annealing algorithm was im-plemented. Optimization results show that the peak sound pressure of driver’s head was reduced by 4.45dB and 5.47dB at frequency 158HZ and 134Hz respec-tively. The test point pressure were significantly reduced at other frequency as well. The results indicate that through the optimization the vehicle interior cavity noise was reduced effectively, and the acoustical comfort of the vehicle was im-proved significantly.

  7. Modeling of Tsunami Equations and Atmospheric Swirling Flows with a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and Radial Basis Functions (RBF)

    Schmidt, J.; Piret, C.; Zhang, N.; Kadlec, B. J.; Liu, Y.; Yuen, D. A.; Wright, G. B.; Sevre, E. O.

    2008-12-01

    The faster growth curves in the speed of GPUs relative to CPUs in recent years and its rapidly gained popularity has spawned a new area of development in computational technology. There is much potential in utilizing GPUs for solving evolutionary partial differential equations and producing the attendant visualization. We are concerned with modeling tsunami waves, where computational time is of extreme essence, for broadcasting warnings. In order to test the efficacy of the GPU on the set of shallow-water equations, we employed the NVIDIA board 8600M GT on a MacBook Pro. We have compared the relative speeds between the CPU and the GPU on a single processor for two types of spatial discretization based on second-order finite-differences and radial basis functions. RBFs are a more novel method based on a gridless and a multi- scale, adaptive framework. Using the NVIDIA 8600M GT, we received a speed up factor of 8 in favor of GPU for the finite-difference method and a factor of 7 for the RBF scheme. We have also studied the atmospheric dynamics problem of swirling flows over a spherical surface and found a speed-up of 5.3 using the GPU. The time steps employed for the RBF method are larger than those used in finite-differences, because of the much fewer number of nodal points needed by RBF. Thus, in modeling the same physical time, RBF acting in concert with GPU would be the fastest way to go.

  8. Gaze patterns reveal how texts are remembered: A mental model of what was described is favored over the text itself

    Traub, Franziska; Johansson, Roger; Holmqvist, Kenneth

    or incongruent with the spatial layout of the text itself. 28 participants read and recalled three texts: (1) a scene description congruent with the spatial layout of the text; (2) a scene description incongruent with the spatial layout of the text; and (3) a control text without any spatial scene content....... Recollection was performed orally while gazing at a blank screen. 
Results demonstrate that participant’s gaze patterns during recall more closely reflect the spatial layout of the scene than the physical locations of the text. We conclude that participants formed a mental model that represents the content...... of what was described, i.e., visuospatial information of the scene, which then guided the retrieval process. During their retellings, they moved the eyes across the blank screen as if they saw the scene in front of them. Whereas previous studies on the involvement of eye movements in mental imagery tasks...

  9. Marquardt's Phi mask: pitfalls of relying on fashion models and the golden ratio to describe a beautiful face.

    Holland, E

    2008-03-01

    Stephen Marquardt has derived a mask from the golden ratio that he claims represents the "ideal" facial archetype. Many have found his mask convincing, including cosmetic surgeons. However, Marquardt's mask is associated with numerous problems. The method used to examine goodness of fit with the proportions in the mask is faulty. The mask is ill-suited for non-European populations, especially sub-Saharan Africans and East Asians. The mask also appears to approximate the face shape of masculinized European women. Given that the general public strongly and overwhelmingly prefers above average facial femininity in women, white women seeking aesthetic facial surgery would be ill-advised to aim toward a better fit with Marquardt's mask. This article aims to show the proper way of assessing goodness of fit with Marquardt's mask, to address the shape of the mask as it pertains to masculinity-femininity, and to discuss the broader issue of an objective assessment of facial attractiveness. Generalized Procrustes analysis is used to show how goodness of fit with Marquardt's mask can be assessed. Thin-plate spline analysis is used to illustrate visually how sample faces, including northwestern European averages, differ from Marquardt's mask. Marquardt's mask best describes the facial proportions of masculinized white women as seen in fashion models. Marquardt's mask does not appear to describe "ideal" face shape even for white women because its proportions are inconsistent with the optimal preferences of most people, especially with regard to femininity.

  10. Can model Hamiltonians describe the electron–electron interaction in π-conjugated systems?: PAH and graphene

    Chiappe, G; Louis, E; San-Fabián, E; Vergés, J A

    2015-01-01

    Model Hamiltonians have been, and still are, a valuable tool for investigating the electronic structure of systems for which mean field theories work poorly. This review will concentrate on the application of Pariser–Parr–Pople (PPP) and Hubbard Hamiltonians to investigate some relevant properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and graphene. When presenting these two Hamiltonians we will resort to second quantisation which, although not the way chosen in its original proposal of the former, is much clearer. We will not attempt to be comprehensive, but rather our objective will be to try to provide the reader with information on what kinds of problems they will encounter and what tools they will need to solve them. One of the key issues concerning model Hamiltonians that will be treated in detail is the choice of model parameters. Although model Hamiltonians reduce the complexity of the original Hamiltonian, they cannot be solved in most cases exactly. So, we shall first consider the Hartree–Fock approximation, still the only tool for handling large systems, besides density functional theory (DFT) approaches. We proceed by discussing to what extent one may exactly solve model Hamiltonians and the Lanczos approach. We shall describe the configuration interaction (CI) method, a common technology in quantum chemistry but one rarely used to solve model Hamiltonians. In particular, we propose a variant of the Lanczos method, inspired by CI, that has the novelty of using as the seed of the Lanczos process a mean field (Hartree–Fock) determinant (the method will be named LCI). Two questions of interest related to model Hamiltonians will be discussed: (i) when including long-range interactions, how crucial is including in the Hamiltonian the electronic charge that compensates ion charges? (ii) Is it possible to reduce a Hamiltonian incorporating Coulomb interactions (PPP) to an ‘effective’ Hamiltonian including only on-site interactions (Hubbard)? The

  11. Accounting for parameter uncertainty in the definition of parametric distributions used to describe individual patient variation in health economic models

    Koen Degeling

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parametric distributions based on individual patient data can be used to represent both stochastic and parameter uncertainty. Although general guidance is available on how parameter uncertainty should be accounted for in probabilistic sensitivity analysis, there is no comprehensive guidance on reflecting parameter uncertainty in the (correlated parameters of distributions used to represent stochastic uncertainty in patient-level models. This study aims to provide this guidance by proposing appropriate methods and illustrating the impact of this uncertainty on modeling outcomes. Methods Two approaches, 1 using non-parametric bootstrapping and 2 using multivariate Normal distributions, were applied in a simulation and case study. The approaches were compared based on point-estimates and distributions of time-to-event and health economic outcomes. To assess sample size impact on the uncertainty in these outcomes, sample size was varied in the simulation study and subgroup analyses were performed for the case-study. Results Accounting for parameter uncertainty in distributions that reflect stochastic uncertainty substantially increased the uncertainty surrounding health economic outcomes, illustrated by larger confidence ellipses surrounding the cost-effectiveness point-estimates and different cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. Although both approaches performed similar for larger sample sizes (i.e. n = 500, the second approach was more sensitive to extreme values for small sample sizes (i.e. n = 25, yielding infeasible modeling outcomes. Conclusions Modelers should be aware that parameter uncertainty in distributions used to describe stochastic uncertainty needs to be reflected in probabilistic sensitivity analysis, as it could substantially impact the total amount of uncertainty surrounding health economic outcomes. If feasible, the bootstrap approach is recommended to account for this uncertainty.

  12. Accounting for parameter uncertainty in the definition of parametric distributions used to describe individual patient variation in health economic models.

    Degeling, Koen; IJzerman, Maarten J; Koopman, Miriam; Koffijberg, Hendrik

    2017-12-15

    Parametric distributions based on individual patient data can be used to represent both stochastic and parameter uncertainty. Although general guidance is available on how parameter uncertainty should be accounted for in probabilistic sensitivity analysis, there is no comprehensive guidance on reflecting parameter uncertainty in the (correlated) parameters of distributions used to represent stochastic uncertainty in patient-level models. This study aims to provide this guidance by proposing appropriate methods and illustrating the impact of this uncertainty on modeling outcomes. Two approaches, 1) using non-parametric bootstrapping and 2) using multivariate Normal distributions, were applied in a simulation and case study. The approaches were compared based on point-estimates and distributions of time-to-event and health economic outcomes. To assess sample size impact on the uncertainty in these outcomes, sample size was varied in the simulation study and subgroup analyses were performed for the case-study. Accounting for parameter uncertainty in distributions that reflect stochastic uncertainty substantially increased the uncertainty surrounding health economic outcomes, illustrated by larger confidence ellipses surrounding the cost-effectiveness point-estimates and different cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. Although both approaches performed similar for larger sample sizes (i.e. n = 500), the second approach was more sensitive to extreme values for small sample sizes (i.e. n = 25), yielding infeasible modeling outcomes. Modelers should be aware that parameter uncertainty in distributions used to describe stochastic uncertainty needs to be reflected in probabilistic sensitivity analysis, as it could substantially impact the total amount of uncertainty surrounding health economic outcomes. If feasible, the bootstrap approach is recommended to account for this uncertainty.

  13. A one-dimensional model to describe flow localization in viscoplastic slender bars subjected to super critical impact velocities

    Vaz-Romero, A.; Rodríguez-Martínez, J. A.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we investigate flow localization in viscoplastic slender bars subjected to dynamic tension. We explore loading rates above the critical impact velocity: the wave initiated in the impacted end by the applied velocity is the trigger for the localization of plastic deformation. The problem has been addressed using two kinds of numerical simulations: (1) one-dimensional finite difference calculations and (2) axisymmetric finite element computations. The latter calculations have been used to validate the capacity of the finite difference model to describe plastic flow localization at high impact velocities. The finite difference model, which highlights due to its simplicity, allows to obtain insights into the role played by the strain rate and temperature sensitivities of the material in the process of dynamic flow localization. Specifically, we have shown that viscosity can stabilize the material behavior to the point of preventing the appearance of the critical impact velocity. This is a key outcome of our investigation, which, to the best of the authors' knowledge, has not been previously reported in the literature.

  14. Application of inverse modeling technique to describe hydrogeochemical processes responsible to spatial distribution of groundwater quality along flowpath

    Tjahyo NugrohoAdji

    2013-07-01

    The result shows that firstly, the aquifer within the research area can be grouped into several aquifer systems (i.e. denudational hill, colluvial plain, alluvial plain, and beach ridges from recharge to discharge which generally have potential groundwater resources in terms of the depth and fluctuation of groundwater table. Secondly, flownets analysis gives three flowpaths that are plausible to be modeled in order to describe their hydrogeochemical reactions. Thirdly, the Saturation Indices (SI analysis shows that there are a positive correlation between the mineral occurrence and composition and the value of SI from recharge to discharge. In addition, The Mass Balance Model indicates that dissolution and precipitation of aquifer minerals is dominantly change the chemical composition along flowpath and the rate of the mass transfer between two wells shows a discrepancy and be certain of the percentage of the nature of aquifer mineral. Lastly, there is an interesting characteristic of mass balance chemical reaction occurs which is the entire chemical reaction shows that the sum of smallest mineral fmmol/litre will firstly always totally be reacted.

  15. Models describing mackerel (Scomber scombrus early life growth in the North and Northwest of the Iberian Peninsula in 2000

    Begoña Villamor

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Mackerel (Scomber scombrus in early life stages were captured in 2000 in the north and northwest of the Iberian Peninsula (ICES Divisions VIIIc and IXa North. Daily rings on their otolith sagittae were identified. Otoliths from 377 larvae and post-larvae caught in April and May 2000, ranging in length from 2.3 to 23.7 mm LS (Standard length and ranging in age from 7 to 38 days after hatching were analysed. Additionally, 68 otoliths from juveniles and pre-recruits caught between July and October 2000 with a length range of 121-202 mm LS and aged between 65-186 days after hatching were analysed. Gompertz and Logistic growth models were fitted to the pooled length at age data of the larvae-postlarvae and juveniles-pre-recruits. As length at hatch is assumed in the literature to be 3.0 mm, the models were applied in two ways; not forced to pass through L0=3.0 mm and forced to pass through L0=3.0 mm. The unforced logistic growth curve appeared to be the most suitable for describing growth during the first year of life of mackerel (L? = 191.6 mm; K= 0.070; t0= 66.7 d.

  16. An extended model based on the modified Nernst-Planck equation for describing transdermal iontophoresis of weak electrolytes.

    Imanidis, Georgios; Luetolf, Peter

    2006-07-01

    An extended model for iontophoretic enhancement of transdermal drug permeation under constant voltage is described based on the previously modified Nernst-Planck equation, which included the effect of convective solvent flow. This model resulted in an analytical expression for the enhancement factor as a function of applied voltage, convective flow velocity due to electroosmosis, ratio of lipid to aqueous pathway passive permeability, and weighted average net ionic valence of the permeant in the aqueous epidermis domain. The shift of pH in the epidermis compared to bulk caused by the electrical double layer at the lipid-aqueous domain interface was evaluated using the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. This was solved numerically for representative surface charge densities and yielded pH differences between bulk and epidermal aqueous domain between 0.05 and 0.4 pH units. The developed model was used to analyze the experimental enhancement of an amphoteric weak electrolyte measured in vitro using human cadaver epidermis and a voltage of 250 mV at different pH values. Parameter values characterizing the involved factors were determined that yielded the experimental enhancement factors and passive permeability coefficients at all pH values. The model provided a very good agreement between experimental and calculated enhancement and passive permeability. The deduced parameters showed (i) that the pH shift in the aqueous permeation pathway had a notable effect on the ionic valence and the partitioning of the drug in this domain for a high surface charge density and depending on the pK(a) and pI of the drug in relation to the bulk pH; (ii) the magnitude and the direction of convective transport due to electroosmosis typically reflected the density and sign, respectively, of surface charge of the tissue and its effect on enhancement was substantial for bulk pH values differing from the pI of epidermal tissue; (iii) the aqueous pathway predominantly determined passive

  17. Modelling the radial distribution of the inventory of U and Pu isotopes in PWR fuel rods at high burnup

    Furlano, L.; Marino, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays trends on nuclear reactors are to take advantage of a more efficient use of the fuels. In this way, goals like decreasing the volume of radioactive wastes, increasing life time in the reactor, extended burnup and accident-tolerance fuels are taken as the principal guidelines for the design and construction for actual nuclear fuels. The development of tools and the capability of prediction of the behaviour of nuclear fuels under irradiation let us design and improve the new demanding conditions without neglecting the security and economics. In this way, the study of the evolution and details of the fissile material of the fuel in particular the 235 U inventory evolution and the 239 Pu production and evolution are demanding conditions. We implemented the PILR code, based on the RAPID model, for the radial distribution of U and Pu radioisotopes. The aim of this work is to determine production and disappearance of Pu and U isotopes during the irradiation of commercial and experimental fuel rods. (author)

  18. Biomechanical study of prophylactic internal fixation of the radial osteocutaneous donor site using the sheep tibia model.

    Avery, C M E; Best, A; Patterson, P; Rolton, J; Ponter, A R S

    2007-09-01

    This study investigated the strengthening effect of different types of plate and position after osteotomy of the sheep tibia, which is a model for the radial osteocutaneous donor site. Fifty matched pairs of adult sheep tibias were tested in torsion and four-point bending. Firstly, the weakening effect of an osteotomy was compared with the intact bone. Then pairs of bones with an osteotomy were compared with and without reinforcement with different types of 3.5mm plate. The plate was placed in either the anterior (over the defect) or posterior (on the intact cortex) position. In torsion the mean strength of the intact bone was 45% greater than after osteotomy (P=0.02). The reinforced bone was on average 61% stronger than the unreinforced bone (Pbone was 188% greater than after osteotomy (P=0.02). The reinforced bone was on average 184% stronger then the unreinforced bone (P<0.001). The tibia was able to withstand much greater loads in bending. The dynamic compression plate was the strongest reinforcement in both torsion and bending. The position of the plate did not alter the strengthening effect in torsion but the posterior position resisted greater bending loads (P=0.01). This may not be relevant in clinical practice as the radius is likely to fracture first as a result of lower torsional forces.

  19. Optical and Near-infrared Radial Velocity Content of M Dwarfs: Testing Models with Barnard’s Star

    Artigau, Étienne; Malo, Lison; Doyon, René; Figueira, Pedro; Delfosse, Xavier; Astudillo-Defru, Nicola

    2018-05-01

    High-precision radial velocity (RV) measurements have been central in the study of exoplanets during the last two decades, from the early discovery of hot Jupiters, to the recent mass measurements of Earth-sized planets uncovered by transit surveys. While optical RV is now a mature field, there is currently a strong effort to push the technique into the near-infrared domain (chiefly Y, J, H, and K bandpasses) to probe planetary systems around late-type stars. The combined lower mass and luminosity of M dwarfs leads to an increased reflex RV signal for planets in the habitable zone compared to Sun-like stars. The estimates on the detectability of planets rely on various instrumental characteristics but also on a prior knowledge of the stellar spectrum. While the overall properties of M dwarf spectra have been extensively tested against observations, the same is not true for their detailed line profiles, which leads to significant uncertainties when converting a given signal-to-noise ratio to a corresponding RV precision as attainable on a given spectrograph. By combining archival CRIRES and HARPS data with ESPaDOnS data of Barnard’s star, we show that state-of-the-art atmosphere models over-predict the Y- and J-band RV content by more than a factor of ∼2, while under-predicting the H- and K-band content by half.

  20. A physically-based analytical model to describe effective excess charge for streaming potential generation in saturated porous media

    Jougnot, D.; Guarracino, L.

    2016-12-01

    The self-potential (SP) method is considered by most researchers the only geophysical method that is directly sensitive to groundwater flow. One source of SP signals, the so-called streaming potential, results from the presence of an electrical double layer at the mineral-pore water interface. When water flows through the pore space, it gives rise to a streaming current and a resulting measurable electrical voltage. Different approaches have been proposed to predict streaming potentials in porous media. One approach is based on the excess charge which is effectively dragged in the medium by the water flow. Following a recent theoretical framework, we developed a physically-based analytical model to predict the effective excess charge in saturated porous media. In this study, the porous media is described by a bundle of capillary tubes with a fractal pore-size distribution. First, an analytical relationship is derived to determine the effective excess charge for a single capillary tube as a function of the pore water salinity. Then, this relationship is used to obtain both exact and approximated expressions for the effective excess charge at the Representative Elementary Volume (REV) scale. The resulting analytical relationship allows the determination of the effective excess charge as a function of pore water salinity, fractal dimension and hydraulic parameters like porosity and permeability, which are also obtained at the REV scale. This new model has been successfully tested against data from the literature of different sources. One of the main finding of this study is that it provides a mechanistic explanation to the empirical dependence between the effective excess charge and the permeability that has been found by various researchers. The proposed petrophysical relationship also contributes to understand the role of porosity and water salinity on effective excess charge and will help to push further the use of streaming potential to monitor groundwater flow.

  1. Mechanisms for improving mass transfer in food with ultrasound technology: Describing the phenomena in two model cases.

    Miano, Alberto Claudio; Ibarz, Albert; Augusto, Pedro Esteves Duarte

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work was to demonstrate how ultrasound mechanisms (direct and indirect effects) improve the mass transfer phenomena in food processing, and which part of the process they are more effective in. Two model cases were evaluated: the hydration of sorghum grain (with two water activities) and the influx of a pigment into melon cylinders. Different treatments enabled us to evaluate and discriminate both direct (inertial flow and "sponge effect") and indirect effects (micro channel formation), alternating pre-treatments and treatments using an ultrasonic bath (20 kHz of frequency and 28 W/L of volumetric power) and a traditional water-bath. It was demonstrated that both the effects of ultrasound technology are more effective in food with higher water activity, the micro channels only forming in moist food. Moreover, micro channel formation could also be observed using agar gel cylinders, verifying the random formation of these due to cavitation. The direct effects were shown to be important in mass transfer enhancement not only in moist food, but also in dry food, this being improved by the micro channels formed and the porosity of the food. In conclusion, the improvement in mass transfer due to direct and indirect effects was firstly discriminated and described. It was proven that both phenomena are important for mass transfer in moist foods, while only the direct effects are important for dry foods. Based on these results, better processing using ultrasound technology can be obtained. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A Graphic Overlay Method for Selection of Osteotomy Site in Chronic Radial Head Dislocation: An Evaluation of 3D-printed Bone Models.

    Kim, Hui Taek; Ahn, Tae Young; Jang, Jae Hoon; Kim, Kang Hee; Lee, Sung Jae; Jung, Duk Young

    2017-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography imaging is now being used to generate 3D models for planning orthopaedic surgery, but the process remains time consuming and expensive. For chronic radial head dislocation, we have designed a graphic overlay approach that employs selected 3D computer images and widely available software to simplify the process of osteotomy site selection. We studied 5 patients (2 traumatic and 3 congenital) with unilateral radial head dislocation. These patients were treated with surgery based on traditional radiographs, but they also had full sets of 3D CT imaging done both before and after their surgery: these 3D CT images form the basis for this study. From the 3D CT images, each patient generated 3 sets of 3D-printed bone models: 2 copies of the preoperative condition, and 1 copy of the postoperative condition. One set of the preoperative models was then actually osteotomized and fixed in the manner suggested by our graphic technique. Arcs of rotation of the 3 sets of 3D-printed bone models were then compared. Arcs of rotation of the 3 groups of bone models were significantly different, with the models osteotomized accordingly to our graphic technique having the widest arcs. For chronic radial head dislocation, our graphic overlay approach simplifies the selection of the osteotomy site(s). Three-dimensional-printed bone models suggest that this approach could improve range of motion of the forearm in actual surgical practice. Level IV-therapeutic study.

  3. One-dimensional Fermi accelerator model with moving wall described by a nonlinear van der Pol oscillator.

    Botari, Tiago; Leonel, Edson D

    2013-01-01

    A modification of the one-dimensional Fermi accelerator model is considered in this work. The dynamics of a classical particle of mass m, confined to bounce elastically between two rigid walls where one is described by a nonlinear van der Pol type oscillator while the other one is fixed, working as a reinjection mechanism of the particle for a next collision, is carefully made by the use of a two-dimensional nonlinear mapping. Two cases are considered: (i) the situation where the particle has mass negligible as compared to the mass of the moving wall and does not affect the motion of it; and (ii) the case where collisions of the particle do affect the movement of the moving wall. For case (i) the phase space is of mixed type leading us to observe a scaling of the average velocity as a function of the parameter (χ) controlling the nonlinearity of the moving wall. For large χ, a diffusion on the velocity is observed leading to the conclusion that Fermi acceleration is taking place. On the other hand, for case (ii), the motion of the moving wall is affected by collisions with the particle. However, due to the properties of the van der Pol oscillator, the moving wall relaxes again to a limit cycle. Such kind of motion absorbs part of the energy of the particle leading to a suppression of the unlimited energy gain as observed in case (i). The phase space shows a set of attractors of different periods whose basin of attraction has a complicated organization.

  4. Radial head button holing: a cause of irreducible anterior radial head dislocation

    Shin, Su-Mi; Chai, Jee Won; You, Ja Yeon; Park, Jina [Seoul National University Seoul Metropolitan Government Boramae Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Kee Jeong [Seoul National University Seoul Metropolitan Government Boramae Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    ''Buttonholing'' of the radial head through the anterior joint capsule is a known cause of irreducible anterior radial head dislocation associated with Monteggia injuries in pediatric patients. To the best of our knowledge, no report has described an injury consisting of buttonholing of the radial head through the annular ligament and a simultaneous radial head fracture in an adolescent. In the present case, the radiographic findings were a radial head fracture with anterior dislocation and lack of the anterior fat pad sign. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) clearly demonstrated anterior dislocation of the fractured radial head through the torn annular ligament. The anterior joint capsule and proximal portion of the annular ligament were interposed between the radial head and capitellum, preventing closed reduction of the radial head. Familiarity with this condition and imaging findings will aid clinicians to make a proper diagnosis and fast decision to perform an open reduction. (orig.)

  5. A resorbable antibiotic-eluting polymer composite bone void filler for perioperative infection prevention in a rabbit radial defect model.

    Benjamin D Brooks

    Full Text Available Nearly 1.3 million total joint replacement procedures are performed in the United States annually, with numbers projected to rise exponentially in the coming decades. Although finite infection rates for these procedures remain consistently low, device-related infections represent a significant cause of implant failure, requiring secondary or revision procedures. Revision procedures manifest several-fold higher infection recurrence rates. Importantly, many revision surgeries, infected or not, require bone void fillers to support the host bone and provide a sufficient tissue bed for new hardware placement. Antibiotic-eluting bone void fillers (ABVF, providing both osteoconductive and antimicrobial properties, represent one approach for reducing rates of orthopedic device-related infections. Using a solvent-free, molten-cast process, a polymer-controlled antibiotic-eluting calcium carbonate hydroxyapatite (HAP ceramic composite BVF (ABVF was fabricated, characterized, and evaluated in vivo using a bacterial challenge in a rabbit radial defect window model. ABVF loaded with tobramycin eliminated the infectious burden in rabbits challenged with a clinically relevant strain of Staphylococcus aureus (inoculum as high as 10⁷ CFU. Histological, microbiological, and radiographic methods were used to detail the effects of ABVF on microbial challenge to host bone after 8 weeks in vivo. In contrast to the HAP/BVF controls, which provided no antibiotic protection and required euthanasia 3 weeks post-operatively, tobramycin-releasing ABVF animals showed no signs of infection (clinical, microbiological, or radiographic when euthanized at the 8-week study endpoint. ABVF sites did exhibit fibrous encapsulation around the implant at 8 weeks. Local antibiotic release from ABVF to orthopedic sites requiring bone void fillers eliminated the periprosthetic bacterial challenge in this 8-week in vivo study, confirming previous in vitro results.

  6. Item response theory and structural equation modelling for ordinal data: Describing the relationship between KIDSCREEN and Life-H.

    Titman, Andrew C; Lancaster, Gillian A; Colver, Allan F

    2016-10-01

    Both item response theory and structural equation models are useful in the analysis of ordered categorical responses from health assessment questionnaires. We highlight the advantages and disadvantages of the item response theory and structural equation modelling approaches to modelling ordinal data, from within a community health setting. Using data from the SPARCLE project focussing on children with cerebral palsy, this paper investigates the relationship between two ordinal rating scales, the KIDSCREEN, which measures quality-of-life, and Life-H, which measures participation. Practical issues relating to fitting models, such as non-positive definite observed or fitted correlation matrices, and approaches to assessing model fit are discussed. item response theory models allow properties such as the conditional independence of particular domains of a measurement instrument to be assessed. When, as with the SPARCLE data, the latent traits are multidimensional, structural equation models generally provide a much more convenient modelling framework. © The Author(s) 2013.

  7. Linear mixed-effects models to describe individual tree crown width for China-fir in Fujian Province, southeast China.

    Hao, Xu; Yujun, Sun; Xinjie, Wang; Jin, Wang; Yao, Fu

    2015-01-01

    A multiple linear model was developed for individual tree crown width of Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook in Fujian province, southeast China. Data were obtained from 55 sample plots of pure China-fir plantation stands. An Ordinary Linear Least Squares (OLS) regression was used to establish the crown width model. To adjust for correlations between observations from the same sample plots, we developed one level linear mixed-effects (LME) models based on the multiple linear model, which take into account the random effects of plots. The best random effects combinations for the LME models were determined by the Akaike's information criterion, the Bayesian information criterion and the -2logarithm likelihood. Heteroscedasticity was reduced by three residual variance functions: the power function, the exponential function and the constant plus power function. The spatial correlation was modeled by three correlation structures: the first-order autoregressive structure [AR(1)], a combination of first-order autoregressive and moving average structures [ARMA(1,1)], and the compound symmetry structure (CS). Then, the LME model was compared to the multiple linear model using the absolute mean residual (AMR), the root mean square error (RMSE), and the adjusted coefficient of determination (adj-R2). For individual tree crown width models, the one level LME model showed the best performance. An independent dataset was used to test the performance of the models and to demonstrate the advantage of calibrating LME models.

  8. Goals and Values in School: A Model Developed for Describing, Evaluating and Changing the Social Climate of Learning Environments

    Allodi, Mara Westling

    2010-01-01

    This paper defines a broad model of the psychosocial climate in educational settings. The model was developed from a general theory of learning environments, on a theory of human values and on empirical studies of children's evaluations of their schools. The contents of the model are creativity, stimulation, achievement, self-efficacy, creativity,…

  9. Populations of Radial Glial Cells Respond Differently to Reelin and Neuregulin1 in a Ferret Model of Cortical Dysplasia

    2010-10-28

    postnatally [11,12,13,14,15]. Ferrets are also the smallest mammals with a convoluted cortex [16]. Proliferation of intermediate progenitor cells in ferrets...24th day of development (E24) disrupts early cortical development, resulting in a thin and poorly laminated cortex, where neurons migrating radially and

  10. Extension of the GroIMP modelling platform to allow easy specification of differential equations describing biological processes within plant models

    Hemmerling, R.; Evers, J.B.; Smolenova, K.; Buck-Sorlin, G.H.; Kurth, W.

    2013-01-01

    In simulation models of plant development, physiological processes taking place in plants are typically described in terms of ODEs (Ordinary Differential Equations). On the one hand, those processes drive the development of the plant structure and on the other hand, the developed structure again

  11. Development of a cloud microphysical model and parameterizations to describe the effect of CCN on warm cloud

    N. Kuba

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available First, a hybrid cloud microphysical model was developed that incorporates both Lagrangian and Eulerian frameworks to study quantitatively the effect of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN on the precipitation of warm clouds. A parcel model and a grid model comprise the cloud model. The condensation growth of CCN in each parcel is estimated in a Lagrangian framework. Changes in cloud droplet size distribution arising from condensation and coalescence are calculated on grid points using a two-moment bin method in a semi-Lagrangian framework. Sedimentation and advection are estimated in the Eulerian framework between grid points. Results from the cloud model show that an increase in the number of CCN affects both the amount and the area of precipitation. Additionally, results from the hybrid microphysical model and Kessler's parameterization were compared. Second, new parameterizations were developed that estimate the number and size distribution of cloud droplets given the updraft velocity and the number of CCN. The parameterizations were derived from the results of numerous numerical experiments that used the cloud microphysical parcel model. The input information of CCN for these parameterizations is only several values of CCN spectrum (they are given by CCN counter for example. It is more convenient than conventional parameterizations those need values concerned with CCN spectrum, C and k in the equation of N=CSk, or, breadth, total number and median radius, for example. The new parameterizations' predictions of initial cloud droplet size distribution for the bin method were verified by using the aforesaid hybrid microphysical model. The newly developed parameterizations will save computing time, and can effectively approximate components of cloud microphysics in a non-hydrostatic cloud model. The parameterizations are useful not only in the bin method in the regional cloud-resolving model but also both for a two-moment bulk microphysical model and

  12. Challenges involved in the development of models describing the running hot of engines; Herausforderungen bei der Entwicklung von Motorwarmlaufmodellen

    Unterguggenberger, Peter; Salbrechter, Sebastian; Jauk, Thomas; Wimmer, Andreas [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Verbrennungskraftmaschinen und Thermodynamik (IVT)

    2012-11-01

    Currently, all potential must be tapped in order to reach the increasingly tighter CO{sub 2} limits for vehicles. From the variety of possible options for reducing fuel consumption, the contribution of improved heat management should not be ignored since increased friction during warm-up results in greater fuel consumption. Engine warm-up models that calculate thermal behavior and fuel consumption are a relatively inexpensive alternative to empirical measures. In order to achieve satisfactory simulation results, the exact modeling of thermal behavior as well as friction conditions is necessary. This paper identifies the demands placed on the individual submodels based on the requirements for precision that thermal warm-up models must meet. Before treating the friction model it will explain the development of the heat input model in detail. In addition, it presents the test program needed to establish and validate the simulation model with the required measurement accuracy. (orig.)

  13. A unified degree day model describes survivorship of Copitarsia corruda Pogue & Simmons (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) at different constant temperatures

    N.N. G& #243; mez; R.C. Venette; J.R. Gould; D.F. Winograd

    2009-01-01

    Predictions of survivorship are critical to quantify the probability of establishment by an alien invasive species, but survival curves rarely distinguish between the effects of temperature on development versus senescence. We report chronological and physiological age-based survival curves for a potentially invasive noctuid, recently described as Copitarsia...

  14. Modeling of the Radial Heat Flow and Cooling Processes in a Deep Ultraviolet Cu+ Ne-CuBr Laser

    Iliycho Petkov Iliev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved theoretical model of the gas temperature profile in the cross-section of an ultraviolet copper ion excited copper bromide laser is developed. The model is based on the solution of the one-dimensional heat conduction equation subject to special nonlinear boundary conditions, describing the heat interaction between the laser tube and its surroundings. It takes into account the nonuniform distribution of the volume power density along with the radius of the laser tube. The problem is reduced to the boundary value problem of the first kind. An explicit solution of this model is obtained. The model is applied for the evaluation of the gas temperature profiles of the laser in the conditions of free and forced air-cooling. Comparison with other simple models assumed constant volume power density is made. In particular, a simple expression for calculating the average gas temperature is found.

  15. Development of a mathematical model describing hydrolysis and co-fermentation of C6 and C5 sugars

    Morales Rodriguez, Ricardo; Gernaey, Krist; Meyer, Anne S.

    2010-01-01

    saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) of C6 and C5 sugars. Model construction has been carried out by combining existing mathematical models for enzymatic hydrolysis on the one hand and co-fermentation on the other hand. An inhibition of ethanol on cellulose conversion was introduced in order to increase...

  16. Analytical model to describe the thermal behavior of a heat discharge system in roofs; Modelo analitico que describe el comportamiento termico de un sistema de descarga de calor en techos

    Hernandez-Gomez, V.H.; Contreras-Espinosa, J.J.; Gonzalez-Ortiz, G.; Morillon-Galvez, D.; Fernandez-Zayas, J.L. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: vichugo@servidor.unam.mx; jjuancon2000@yahoo.com.mx; gilberto_gonzalez25@hotmail.com; damg@pumas.iingen.unam.mx; JFernandezZ@iingen.unam.mx

    2012-01-15

    The present study proposes an analytical model which describes the thermal behavior of a heat discharge system in roof, when the surfaces that constitute it are not translucent. Such a model derives from a thermal balance carried out to a heat discharge system in roofs. To validate it, an experimental prototype that allows simulating the thermal behavior of a heat discharge system in wall and roof was used, and the results were compared to those obtained with the proposed analytical model. It was found that the thermal behavior of the analytical model is similar to the thermal behavior of the experimental prototype; a worthless variation was detected among their respective outcome (The difference of temperatures can be caused by the heat transfer coefficient, of which no studies defining its behavior accurately have been found). Therefore, it can be considered that the proposed analytical model can be employed to simulate the thermal behavior of a heat discharge system in roofs when the surfaces that constitute it are opaque. [Spanish] En el presente estudio se propone un modelo analitico que describe el comportamiento termico de un sistema de descarga de calor en techo, cuando las superficies que lo componen no son translucidos. Dicho modelo surge a partir de un balance termico realizado a un sistema de descarga de calor en techos. Para validarlo, se realizaron dos corridas experimentales en un prototipo que permite simular el comportamiento termico de un sistema de descarga de calor en techo y se compararon los resultados medidos con los calculados por el modelo analitico propuesto. Se encontro que, el comportamiento termico del modelo analitico es similar al comportamiento termico del prototipo experimental, se detecto una variacion despreciable entre los valores arrojados por ambos modelos (la diferencia de temperaturas puede estar ocasionada por la obtencion del coeficiente convectivo de transferencia de calor, del cual no se han encontrado estudios que

  17. BLOW-3A. A theoretical model to describe transient two-phase flow conditions in LMFBR coolant channels

    Bottoni, M.; Struwe, D.

    1982-12-01

    The computer programme BLOW-3A describes sodium boiling phenomena in subassemblies of fast breeder reactors as well as in in-pile or out-of-pile experiments simulating different failure conditions. This report presents a complete documentation of the code from three main viewpoints: the theoretical foundations of the programme are first described with particular reference to the most recent developments; the structure of the programme is then explained in all details necessary for the user to get a rapid acquaintance with it; eventually several examples of the programme validation are discussed thus enabling the reader to acquire a full picture of the possible applications of the code and at the same time to know its validity range. (orig.) [de

  18. The Atkinson-Shiffrin model is ill-defined and does not correctly describe the Murdock free recall data

    Tarnow, Dr. Eugen

    2009-01-01

    The Atkinson-Shiffrin (1968) model, the de facto standard model of short term memory cited thousands of times, fits the characteristically bowed free recall curves from Murdock (1962) well. However, it is long overdue to note that it is not a theoretically convincing explanation and that it does not fit all of the experimental relationships in the Murdock data. To obtain a qualitatively correct fit of the bowing I show that four model concepts have to work together. “Long term memory” is ...

  19. A Monte Carlo-adjusted goodness-of-fit test for parametric models describing spatial point patterns

    Dao, Ngocanh; Genton, Marc G.

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the goodness-of-fit (GOF) for intricate parametric spatial point process models is important for many application fields. When the probability density of the statistic of the GOF test is intractable, a commonly used procedure is the Monte

  20. Study of market model describing the contrary behaviors of informed and uninformed agents: Being minority and being majority

    Zhang, Yu-Xia; Liao, Hao; Medo, Matus; Shang, Ming-Sheng; Yeung, Chi Ho

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we analyze the contrary behaviors of the informed investors and uniformed investors, and then construct a competition model with two groups of agents, namely agents who intend to stay in minority and those who intend to stay in majority. We find two kinds of competitions, inter- and intra-groups. The model shows periodic fluctuation feature. The average distribution of strategies illustrates a prominent central peak which is relevant to the peak-fat-tail character of price change distribution in stock markets. Furthermore, in the modified model the tolerance time parameter makes the agents diversified. Finally, we compare the strategies distribution with the price change distribution in real stock market, and we conclude that contrary behavior rules and tolerance time parameter are indeed valid in the description of market model.

  1. The inverse Gamma process: A family of continuous stochastic models for describing state-dependent deterioration phenomena

    Guida, M.; Pulcini, G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes the family of non-stationary inverse Gamma processes for modeling state-dependent deterioration processes with nonlinear trend. The proposed family of processes, which is based on the assumption that the “inverse” time process is Gamma, is mathematically more tractable than previously proposed state-dependent processes, because, unlike the previous models, the inverse Gamma process is a time-continuous and state-continuous model and does not require discretization of time and state. The conditional distribution of the deterioration growth over a generic time interval, the conditional distribution of the residual life and the residual reliability of the unit, given the current state, are provided. Point and interval estimation of the parameters which index the proposed process, as well as of several quantities of interest, are also discussed. Finally, the proposed model is applied to the wear process of the liners of some Diesel engines which was previously analyzed and proved to be a purely state-dependent process. The comparison of the inferential results obtained under the competitor models shows the ability of the Inverse Gamma process to adequately model the observed state-dependent wear process

  2. A model for describing the eutrophication in a heavily regulated coastal lagoon. Application to the Albufera of Valencia (Spain).

    del Barrio Fernández, Pilar; Gómez, Andrés García; Alba, Javier García; Díaz, César Álvarez; Revilla Cortezón, José Antonio

    2012-12-15

    A simplified two-dimensional eutrophication model was developed to simulate temporal and spatial variations of chlorophyll-a in heavily regulated coastal lagoons. This model considers the hydrodynamics of the whole study area, the regulated connexion of the lagoon with the sea, the variability of the input and output nutrient loads, the flux from the sediments to the water column, the phytoplankton growth and mortality kinetics, and the zooplankton grazing. The model was calibrated and validated by applying it to the Albufera of Valencia, a hypertrophic system whose connection to the sea is strongly regulated by a system of sluice-gates. The calibration and validation results presented a significant agreement between the model and the data obtained in several surveys. The accuracy was evaluated using a quantitative analysis, in which the average uncertainty of the model prediction was less than 6%. The results confirmed an expected phytoplankton bloom in April and October, achieving mean maximum values around 250 μg l(-1) of chlorophyll-a. A mass balance revealed that the eutrophication process is magnified by the input loads of nutrients, mainly from the sediments, as well as by the limited connection of the lagoon with the sea. This study has shown that the developed model is an efficient tool to manage the eutrophication problem in heavily regulated coastal lagoons. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The radial distribution of plutonium in high burnup UO2 fuels

    Lassmann, K.; O'Carroll, C.; Laar, J. van de; Walker, C.T.

    1994-01-01

    A new model (TUBRNP) is described which predicts the radial power density distribution as a function of burnup (and hence the radial burnup profile as a function of time) together with the radial profile of uranium and plutonium isotopes. Comparisons between measurements and the predictions of the TUBRNP model are made on fuels with enrichments in the range 2.9 to 8.25% and with burnups between 21 000 and 64 000 MWd/t. It is shown to be in excellent agreement with experimental measurements and is a marked improvement on earlier versions. (orig.)

  4. Measurements and modeling of transport and impurity radial profiles in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    Kuldkepp, M.; Brunsell, P. R.; Cecconello, M.; Dux, R.; Menmuir, S.; Rachlew, E.

    2006-09-01

    Radial impurity profiles of oxygen in the rebuilt reversed field pinch EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)] have been measured with a multichannel spectrometer. Absolute ion densities for oxygen peak between 1-4×1010cm-3 for a central electron density of 1×1013cm-3. Transport simulations with the one-dimensional transport code STRAHL with a diffusion coefficient of 20m2 s-1 yield density profiles similar to those measured. Direct measurement of the ion profile evolution during pulsed poloidal current drive suggests that the diffusion coefficient is reduced by a factor ˜2 in the core but remains unaffected toward the edge. Core transport is not significantly affected by the radial magnetic field growth seen at the edge in discharges without feedback control. This indicates that the mode core amplitude remains the same while the mode eigenfunction increases at the edge.

  5. Measurements and modeling of transport and impurity radial profiles in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    Kuldkepp, M.; Brunsell, P. R.; Cecconello, M.; Dux, R.; Menmuir, S.; Rachlew, E.

    2006-01-01

    Radial impurity profiles of oxygen in the rebuilt reversed field pinch EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)] have been measured with a multichannel spectrometer. Absolute ion densities for oxygen peak between 1-4x10 10 cm -3 for a central electron density of 1x10 13 cm -3 . Transport simulations with the one-dimensional transport code STRAHL with a diffusion coefficient of 20 m 2 s -1 yield density profiles similar to those measured. Direct measurement of the ion profile evolution during pulsed poloidal current drive suggests that the diffusion coefficient is reduced by a factor ∼2 in the core but remains unaffected toward the edge. Core transport is not significantly affected by the radial magnetic field growth seen at the edge in discharges without feedback control. This indicates that the mode core amplitude remains the same while the mode eigenfunction increases at the edge

  6. A Physically Based Analytical Model to Describe Effective Excess Charge for Streaming Potential Generation in Water Saturated Porous Media

    Guarracino, L.; Jougnot, D.

    2018-01-01

    Among the different contributions generating self-potential, the streaming potential is of particular interest in hydrogeology for its sensitivity to water flow. Estimating water flux in porous media using streaming potential data relies on our capacity to understand, model, and upscale the electrokinetic coupling at the mineral-solution interface. Different approaches have been proposed to predict streaming potential generation in porous media. One of these approaches is the flux averaging which is based on determining the excess charge which is effectively dragged in the medium by water flow. In this study, we develop a physically based analytical model to predict the effective excess charge in saturated porous media using a flux-averaging approach in a bundle of capillary tubes with a fractal pore size distribution. The proposed model allows the determination of the effective excess charge as a function of pore water ionic concentration and hydrogeological parameters like porosity, permeability, and tortuosity. The new model has been successfully tested against different set of experimental data from the literature. One of the main findings of this study is the mechanistic explanation to the empirical dependence between the effective excess charge and the permeability that has been found by several researchers. The proposed model also highlights the link to other lithological properties, and it is able to reproduce the evolution of effective excess charge with electrolyte concentrations.

  7. Amicus Plato, sed magis amica veritas: plots must obey the laws they refer to and models shall describe biophysical reality!

    Katkov, Igor I

    2011-06-01

    In the companion paper, we discussed in details proper linearization, calculation of the inactive osmotic volume, and analysis of the results on the Boyle-vant' Hoff plots. In this Letter, we briefly address some common errors and misconceptions in osmotic modeling and propose some approaches, namely: (1) inapplicability of the Kedem-Katchalsky formalism model in regards to the cryobiophysical reality, (2) calculation of the membrane hydraulic conductivity L(p) in the presence of permeable solutes, (3) proper linearization of the Arrhenius plots for the solute membrane permeability, (4) erroneous use of the term "toxicity" for the cryoprotective agents, and (5) advantages of the relativistic permeability approach (RP) developed by us vs. traditional ("classic") 2-parameter model. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. On one peculiarity of the model describing the interaction of the electron beam with the semiconductor surface

    Stepovich, M. A.; Amrastanov, A. N.; Seregina, E. V.; Filippov, M. N.

    2018-01-01

    The problem of heat distribution in semiconductor materials irradiated with sharply focused electron beams in the absence of heat exchange between the target and the external medium is considered by mathematical modeling methods. For a quantitative description of energy losses by probe electrons a model based on a separate description of the contributions of absorbed in the target and backscattered electrons and applicable to a wide class of solids and a range of primary electron energies is used. Using the features of this approach, the nonmonotonic dependence of the temperature of the maximum heating in the target on the energy of the primary electrons is explained. Some modeling results are illustrated for semiconductor materials of electronic engineering.

  9. A physics-based crystallographic modeling framework for describing the thermal creep behavior of Fe-Cr alloys

    Wen, Wei [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Capolungo, Laurent [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Patra, Anirban [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tome, Carlos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-02

    This Report addresses the Milestone M2MS-16LA0501032 of NEAMS Program (“Develop hardening model for FeCrAl cladding), with a deadline of 09/30/2016. Here we report a constitutive law for thermal creep of FeCrAl. This Report adds to and complements the one for Milestone M3MS-16LA0501034 (“Interface hardening models with MOOSE-BISON”), where we presented a hardening law for irradiated FeCrAl. The last component of our polycrystal-based constitutive behavior, namely, an irradiation creep model for FeCrAl, will be developed as part of the FY17 Milestones, and the three regimes will be coupled and interfaced with MOOSE-BISON.

  10. Evaluation of a cross contamination model describing transfer of Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes during grinding of pork and beef

    Møller, Cleide Oliveira de Almeida; Sant'Ana, A.S.; Hansen, Solvej Katrine Holm

    2016-01-01

    A cross contamination model was challenged and evaluated applying a new approach.•QMRA and Total Transfer Potential (TTP) were included.•Transfer estimates were not applicable for unlike processing.•The risk of disease may be reduced when using a stainless steel grinder.•Well-sharpened knife, and...

  11. A Strategy for Describing the Biosphere at Candidate Sites for Repositories of Nuclear Waste: Linking Ecosystem and Landscape Modeling

    Lindborg, Tobias; Loefgren, Anders; Soederbaeck, Bjoern; Kautsky, Ulrik; Lindborg, Regina; Bradshaw, Clare

    2006-01-01

    To provide information necessary for a license application for a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. has started site investigations at two sites in Sweden. In this paper, we present a strategy to integrate site-specific ecosystem data into spatially explicit models needed for safety assessment studies and the environmental impact assessment. The site-specific description of ecosystems is developed by building discipline-specific models from primary data and by identifying interactions and stocks and flows of matter among functional units at the sites. The conceptual model is a helpful initial tool for defining properties needed to quantify system processes, which may reveal new interfaces between disciplines, providing a variety of new opportunities to enhance the understanding of the linkages between ecosystem characteristics and the functional properties of landscapes. This type of integrated ecosystem-landscape characterization model has an important role in forming the implementation of a safety assessment for a deep repository

  12. Radial distribution of ions in pores with a surface charge

    Stegen, J.H.G. van der; Görtzen, J.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Hogendoorn, J.A.; Versteeg, G.F.

    2001-01-01

    A sorption model applicable to calculate the radial equilibrium concentrations of ions in the pores of ion-selective membranes with a pore structure is developed. The model is called the radial uptake model. Because the model is applied to a Nafion sulfonic layer with very small pores and the radial

  13. Application of the NDHA model to describe N2O dynamics in activated sludge mixed culture biomass

    Domingo-Felez, Carlos; Smets, Barth F.

    A pseudo-mechanistic model describing three biological nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) production pathways was calibrated for an activated sludge mixed culture biomass treating municipal wastewater with laboratory-scale experiments. The model (NDHA) comprehensively describes N2O produci...

  14. Conjunction of radial basis function interpolator and artificial intelligence models for time-space modeling of contaminant transport in porous media

    Nourani, Vahid; Mousavi, Shahram; Dabrowska, Dominika; Sadikoglu, Fahreddin

    2017-05-01

    As an innovation, both black box and physical-based models were incorporated into simulating groundwater flow and contaminant transport. Time series of groundwater level (GL) and chloride concentration (CC) observed at different piezometers of study plain were firstly de-noised by the wavelet-based de-noising approach. The effect of de-noised data on the performance of artificial neural network (ANN) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was evaluated. Wavelet transform coherence was employed for spatial clustering of piezometers. Then for each cluster, ANN and ANFIS models were trained to predict GL and CC values. Finally, considering the predicted water heads of piezometers as interior conditions, the radial basis function as a meshless method which solves partial differential equations of GFCT, was used to estimate GL and CC values at any point within the plain where there is not any piezometer. Results indicated that efficiency of ANFIS based spatiotemporal model was more than ANN based model up to 13%.

  15. Performance of flash profile and napping with and without training for describing small sensory differences in a model wine

    Liu, Jing; Grønbeck, Marlene Schou; Di Monaco, Rosella

    2016-01-01

    . In this study different variations of two rapid sensory methods, one based on holistic assessment – Napping, and one based on attribute evaluation – Flash Profile, were tested for the evaluation of the flavour in wine. Model wines were developed with control over the sensory differences in terms of sensory...... to arrange samples on the sheet) or the product (familiarisation with the sensory properties of the wines) improved the outcome compared to the classical Napping protocol. The classical Flash Profile protocol and its modified version including a Napping with subsequent attributes generation as the word...... generation step and limiting the number of attributes for ranking gave a similar sample space. The Napping method could best highlight qualitative sample differences, whereas the Flash Profile provided a more precise product mapping on quantitative differences between model wines....

  16. Accounting for parameter uncertainty in the definition of parametric distributions used to describe individual patient variation in health economic models

    Degeling, Koen; IJzerman, Maarten J.; Koopman, Miriam; Koffijberg, Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    Background Parametric distributions based on individual patient data can be used to represent both stochastic and parameter uncertainty. Although general guidance is available on how parameter uncertainty should be accounted for in probabilistic sensitivity analysis, there is no comprehensive guidance on reflecting parameter uncertainty in the (correlated) parameters of distributions used to represent stochastic uncertainty in patient-level models. This study aims to provide this guidance by ...

  17. A Simple Model to Describe the Relationship among Rainfall, Groundwater and Land Subsidence under a Heterogeneous Aquifer

    Zheng, Y. Y.; Chen, Y. L.; Lin, H. R.; Huang, S. Y.; Yeh, T. C. J.; Wen, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    Land subsidence is a very serious problem of Zhuoshui River alluvial fan, Taiwan. The main reason of land subsidence is a compression of soil, but the compression measured in the wide area is very extensive (Maryam et al., 2013; Linlin et al., 2014). Chen et al. [2010] studied the linear relationship between groundwater level and subsurface altitude variations from Global Positioning System (GPS) station in Zhuoshui River alluvial fan. But the subsurface altitude data were only from two GPS stations. Their distributions are spared and small, not enough to express the altitude variations of Zhuoshui River alluvial fan. Hung et al. [2011] used Interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) to measure the surface subsidence in Zhuoshui River alluvial fan, but haven't compared with groundwater level. The study compares the correlation between rainfall events and groundwater level and compares the correlation between groundwater level and subsurface altitude, these two correlation affected by heterogeneous soil. From these relationships, a numerical model is built to simulate the land subsidence variations and estimate the coefficient of aquifer soil compressibility. Finally, the model can estimate the long-term land subsidence. Keywords: Land Subsidence, InSAR, Groundwater Level, Numerical Model, Correlation Analyses

  18. Chemical reaction networks as a model to describe UVC- and radiolytically-induced reactions of simple compounds.

    Dondi, Daniele; Merli, Daniele; Albini, Angelo; Zeffiro, Alberto; Serpone, Nick

    2012-05-01

    When a chemical system is submitted to high energy sources (UV, ionizing radiation, plasma sparks, etc.), as is expected to be the case of prebiotic chemistry studies, a plethora of reactive intermediates could form. If oxygen is present in excess, carbon dioxide and water are the major products. More interesting is the case of reducing conditions where synthetic pathways are also possible. This article examines the theoretical modeling of such systems with random-generated chemical networks. Four types of random-generated chemical networks were considered that originated from a combination of two connection topologies (viz., Poisson and scale-free) with reversible and irreversible chemical reactions. The results were analyzed taking into account the number of the most abundant products required for reaching 50% of the total number of moles of compounds at equilibrium, as this may be related to an actual problem of complex mixture analysis. The model accounts for multi-component reaction systems with no a priori knowledge of reacting species and the intermediates involved if system components are sufficiently interconnected. The approach taken is relevant to an earlier study on reactions that may have occurred in prebiotic systems where only a few compounds were detected. A validation of the model was attained on the basis of results of UVC and radiolytic reactions of prebiotic mixtures of low molecular weight compounds likely present on the primeval Earth.

  19. Capitalizing on Citizen Science Data for Validating Models and Generating Hypotheses Describing Meteorological Drivers of Mosquito-Borne Disease Risk

    Boger, R. A.; Low, R.; Paull, S.; Anyamba, A.; Soebiyanto, R. P.

    2017-12-01

    Temperature and precipitation are important drivers of mosquito population dynamics, and a growing set of models have been proposed to characterize these relationships. Validation of these models, and development of broader theories across mosquito species and regions could nonetheless be improved by comparing observations from a global dataset of mosquito larvae with satellite-based measurements of meteorological variables. Citizen science data can be particularly useful for two such aspects of research into the meteorological drivers of mosquito populations: i) Broad-scale validation of mosquito distribution models and ii) Generation of quantitative hypotheses regarding changes to mosquito abundance and phenology across scales. The recently released GLOBE Observer Mosquito Habitat Mapper (GO-MHM) app engages citizen scientists in identifying vector taxa, mapping breeding sites and decommissioning non-natural habitats, and provides a potentially useful new tool for validating mosquito ubiquity projections based on the analysis of remotely sensed environmental data. Our early work with GO-MHM data focuses on two objectives: validating citizen science reports of Aedes aegypti distribution through comparison with accepted scientific data sources, and exploring the relationship between extreme temperature and precipitation events and subsequent observations of mosquito larvae. Ultimately the goal is to develop testable hypotheses regarding the shape and character of this relationship between mosquito species and regions.

  20. How Mathematics Describes Life

    Teklu, Abraham

    2017-01-01

    The circle of life is something we have all heard of from somewhere, but we don't usually try to calculate it. For some time we have been working on analyzing a predator-prey model to better understand how mathematics can describe life, in particular the interaction between two different species. The model we are analyzing is called the Holling-Tanner model, and it cannot be solved analytically. The Holling-Tanner model is a very common model in population dynamics because it is a simple descriptor of how predators and prey interact. The model is a system of two differential equations. The model is not specific to any particular set of species and so it can describe predator-prey species ranging from lions and zebras to white blood cells and infections. One thing all these systems have in common are critical points. A critical point is a value for both populations that keeps both populations constant. It is important because at this point the differential equations are equal to zero. For this model there are two critical points, a predator free critical point and a coexistence critical point. Most of the analysis we did is on the coexistence critical point because the predator free critical point is always unstable and frankly less interesting than the coexistence critical point. What we did is consider two regimes for the differential equations, large B and small B. B, A, and C are parameters in the differential equations that control the system where B measures how responsive the predators are to change in the population, A represents predation of the prey, and C represents the satiation point of the prey population. For the large B case we were able to approximate the system of differential equations by a single scalar equation. For the small B case we were able to predict the limit cycle. The limit cycle is a process of the predator and prey populations growing and shrinking periodically. This model has a limit cycle in the regime of small B, that we solved for

  1. Modelling of turbulent hydrocarbon combustion. Test of different reactor concepts for describing the interactions between turbulence and chemistry

    Mueller, C; Kremer, H [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Lehrstuhl fuer Energieanlagentechnik, Bochum (Germany); Kilpinen, P; Hupa, M [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland). Combustion Chemistry Research Group

    1998-12-31

    The detailed modelling of turbulent reactive flows with CFD-codes is a major challenge in combustion science. One method of combining highly developed turbulence models and detailed chemistry in CFD-codes is the application of reactor based turbulence chemistry interaction models. In this work the influence of different reactor concepts on methane and NO{sub x} chemistry in turbulent reactive flows was investigated. Besides the classical reactor approaches, a plug flow reactor (PFR) and a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR), the Eddy-Dissipation Combustion Model (EDX) and the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) were included. Based on a detailed reaction scheme and a simplified 2-step mechanism studies were performed in a simplified computational grid consisting of 5 cells. The investigations cover a temperature range from 1273 K to 1673 K and consider fuel-rich and fuel-lean gas mixtures as well as turbulent and highly turbulent flow conditions. All test cases investigated in this study showed a strong influence of the reactor residence time on the species conversion processes. Due to this characteristic strong deviations were found for the species trends resulting from the different reactor approaches. However, this influence was only concentrated on the `near burner region` and after 4-5 cells hardly any deviation and residence time dependence could be found. The importance of the residence time dependence increased when the species conversion was accelerated as it is the case for overstoichiometric combustion conditions and increased temperatures. The study focused furthermore on the fine structure in the EDC. Unlike the classical approach this part of the cell was modelled as a PFR instead of a PSR. For high temperature conditions there was hardly any difference between both reactor types. However, decreasing the temperature led to obvious deviations. Finally, the effect of the selective species transport between the cells on the conversion process was investigated

  2. Incorporating NDVI in a gravity model setting to describe spatio-temporal patterns of Lyme borreliosis incidence

    Barrios, J. M.; Verstraeten, W. W.; Farifteh, J.; Maes, P.; Aerts, J. M.; Coppin, P.

    2012-04-01

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is the most common tick-borne disease in Europe and incidence growth has been reported in several European countries during the last decade. LB is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and the main vector of this pathogen in Europe is the tick Ixodes ricinus. LB incidence and spatial spread is greatly dependent on environmental conditions impacting habitat, demography and trophic interactions of ticks and the wide range of organisms ticks parasite. The landscape configuration is also a major determinant of tick habitat conditions and -very important- of the fashion and intensity of human interaction with vegetated areas, i.e. human exposure to the pathogen. Hence, spatial notions as distance and adjacency between urban and vegetated environments are related to human exposure to tick bites and, thus, to risk. This work tested the adequacy of a gravity model setting to model the observed spatio-temporal pattern of LB as a function of location and size of urban and vegetated areas and the seasonal and annual change in the vegetation dynamics as expressed by MODIS NDVI. Opting for this approach implies an analogy with Newton's law of universal gravitation in which the attraction forces between two bodies are directly proportional to the bodies mass and inversely proportional to distance. Similar implementations have proven useful in fields like trade modeling, health care service planning, disease mapping among other. In our implementation, the size of human settlements and vegetated systems and the distance separating these landscape elements are considered the 'bodies'; and the 'attraction' between them is an indicator of exposure to pathogen. A novel element of this implementation is the incorporation of NDVI to account for the seasonal and annual variation in risk. The importance of incorporating this indicator of vegetation activity resides in the fact that alterations of LB incidence pattern observed the last decade have been ascribed

  3. Modelling of turbulent hydrocarbon combustion. Test of different reactor concepts for describing the interactions between turbulence and chemistry

    Mueller, C.; Kremer, H. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Lehrstuhl fuer Energieanlagentechnik, Bochum (Germany); Kilpinen, P.; Hupa, M. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland). Combustion Chemistry Research Group

    1997-12-31

    The detailed modelling of turbulent reactive flows with CFD-codes is a major challenge in combustion science. One method of combining highly developed turbulence models and detailed chemistry in CFD-codes is the application of reactor based turbulence chemistry interaction models. In this work the influence of different reactor concepts on methane and NO{sub x} chemistry in turbulent reactive flows was investigated. Besides the classical reactor approaches, a plug flow reactor (PFR) and a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR), the Eddy-Dissipation Combustion Model (EDX) and the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) were included. Based on a detailed reaction scheme and a simplified 2-step mechanism studies were performed in a simplified computational grid consisting of 5 cells. The investigations cover a temperature range from 1273 K to 1673 K and consider fuel-rich and fuel-lean gas mixtures as well as turbulent and highly turbulent flow conditions. All test cases investigated in this study showed a strong influence of the reactor residence time on the species conversion processes. Due to this characteristic strong deviations were found for the species trends resulting from the different reactor approaches. However, this influence was only concentrated on the `near burner region` and after 4-5 cells hardly any deviation and residence time dependence could be found. The importance of the residence time dependence increased when the species conversion was accelerated as it is the case for overstoichiometric combustion conditions and increased temperatures. The study focused furthermore on the fine structure in the EDC. Unlike the classical approach this part of the cell was modelled as a PFR instead of a PSR. For high temperature conditions there was hardly any difference between both reactor types. However, decreasing the temperature led to obvious deviations. Finally, the effect of the selective species transport between the cells on the conversion process was investigated

  4. Self-consistent radial sheath

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1988-12-01

    The boundary layer arising in the radial vicinity of a tokamak limiter is examined, with special reference to the TEXT tokamak. It is shown that sheath structure depends upon the self-consistent effects of ion guiding-center orbit modification, as well as the radial variation of E /times/ B-induced toroidal rotation. Reasonable agreement with experiment is obtained from an idealized model which, however simplified, preserves such self-consistent effects. It is argued that the radial sheath, which occurs whenever confining magnetic field-lines lie in the plasma boundary surface, is an object of some intrinsic interest. It differs from the more familiar axial sheath because magnetized charges respond very differently to parallel and perpendicular electric fields. 11 refs., 1 fig

  5. A Monte Carlo-adjusted goodness-of-fit test for parametric models describing spatial point patterns

    Dao, Ngocanh

    2014-04-03

    Assessing the goodness-of-fit (GOF) for intricate parametric spatial point process models is important for many application fields. When the probability density of the statistic of the GOF test is intractable, a commonly used procedure is the Monte Carlo GOF test. Additionally, if the data comprise a single dataset, a popular version of the test plugs a parameter estimate in the hypothesized parametric model to generate data for theMonte Carlo GOF test. In this case, the test is invalid because the resulting empirical level does not reach the nominal level. In this article, we propose a method consisting of nested Monte Carlo simulations which has the following advantages: the bias of the resulting empirical level of the test is eliminated, hence the empirical levels can always reach the nominal level, and information about inhomogeneity of the data can be provided.We theoretically justify our testing procedure using Taylor expansions and demonstrate that it is correctly sized through various simulation studies. In our first data application, we discover, in agreement with Illian et al., that Phlebocarya filifolia plants near Perth, Australia, can follow a homogeneous Poisson clustered process that provides insight into the propagation mechanism of these plants. In our second data application, we find, in contrast to Diggle, that a pairwise interaction model provides a good fit to the micro-anatomy data of amacrine cells designed for analyzing the developmental growth of immature retina cells in rabbits. This article has supplementary material online. © 2013 American Statistical Association, Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and Interface Foundation of North America.

  6. A simple model describing the nonlinear dynamics of the dusk/dawn asymmetry in the high-latitude thermospheric flow

    Gundlach, J. P.; Larsen, M. F.; Mikkelsen, I. S.

    1988-01-01

    A simple nonlinear, axisymmetric, shallow-water numerical model has been used to study the asymmetry in the neutral flow between the dusk and dawn sides of the auroral oval. The results indicate that the Coriolis force and the curvature terms are nearly in balance on the evening side and require only a small pressure gradient to effect adjustment. The result is smaller neutral velocities near dawn and larger velocities near dusk than would be the case for a linearized treatment. A consequence is that more gravity wave energy is produced on the morning side than on the evening side.

  7. A multi-physics modelling framework to describe the behaviour of nano-scale multilayer systems undergoing irradiation damage

    Villani, Aurelien

    2015-01-01

    Radiation damage is known to lead to material failure and thus is of critical importance to lifetime and safety within nuclear reactors. While mechanical behaviour of materials under irradiation has been the subject of numerous studies, the current predictive capabilities of such phenomena appear limited. The clustering of point defects such as vacancies and self interstitial atoms gives rise to creep, void swelling and material embrittlement. Nano-scale metallic multilayer systems have be shown to have the ability to evacuate such point defects, hence delaying the occurrence of critical damage. In addition, they exhibit outstanding mechanical properties. The objective of this work is to develop a thermodynamically consistent continuum framework at the meso and nano-scales, which accounts for the major physical processes encountered in such metallic multilayer systems and is able to predict their microstructural evolution and behavior under irradiation. Mainly three physical phenomena are addressed in the present work: stress-diffusion coupling and diffusion induced creep, the void nucleation and growth in multilayer systems under irradiation, and the interaction of dislocations with the multilayer interfaces. In this framework, the microstructure is explicitly modeled, in order to account accurately for their effects on the system behavior. The diffusion creep strain rate is related to the gradient of the vacancy flux. A Cahn-Hilliard approach is used to model void nucleation and growth, and the diffusion equations for vacancies and self interstitial atoms are complemented to take into account the production of point defects due to irradiation cascades, the mutual recombination of defects and their evacuation through grain boundaries. In metallic multilayers, an interface affected zone is defined, with an additional slip plane to model the interface shearable character, and where dislocations cores are able to spread. The model is then implemented numerically

  8. Propagation of a radial phased-locked Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere.

    Zhou, Guoquan

    2011-11-21

    A radial phased-locked (PL) Lorentz beam array provides an appropriate theoretical model to describe a coherent diode laser array, which is an efficient radiation source for high-power beaming use. The propagation of a radial PL Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere is investigated. Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel integral and some mathematical techniques, analytical formulae for the average intensity and the effective beam size of a radial PL Lorentz beam array are derived in turbulent atmosphere. The average intensity distribution and the spreading properties of a radial PL Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere are numerically calculated. The influences of the beam parameters and the structure constant of the atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of a radial PL Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere are discussed in detail. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  9. PFLOTRAN User Manual: A Massively Parallel Reactive Flow and Transport Model for Describing Surface and Subsurface Processes

    Lichtner, Peter C. [OFM Research, Redmond, WA (United States); Hammond, Glenn E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lu, Chuan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bisht, Gautam [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Andre, Benjamin [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mills, Richard [Intel Corporation, Portland, OR (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Kumar, Jitendra [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-20

    PFLOTRAN solves a system of generally nonlinear partial differential equations describing multi-phase, multicomponent and multiscale reactive flow and transport in porous materials. The code is designed to run on massively parallel computing architectures as well as workstations and laptops (e.g. Hammond et al., 2011). Parallelization is achieved through domain decomposition using the PETSc (Portable Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation) libraries for the parallelization framework (Balay et al., 1997). PFLOTRAN has been developed from the ground up for parallel scalability and has been run on up to 218 processor cores with problem sizes up to 2 billion degrees of freedom. Written in object oriented Fortran 90, the code requires the latest compilers compatible with Fortran 2003. At the time of this writing this requires gcc 4.7.x, Intel 12.1.x and PGC compilers. As a requirement of running problems with a large number of degrees of freedom, PFLOTRAN allows reading input data that is too large to fit into memory allotted to a single processor core. The current limitation to the problem size PFLOTRAN can handle is the limitation of the HDF5 file format used for parallel IO to 32 bit integers. Noting that 232 = 4; 294; 967; 296, this gives an estimate of the maximum problem size that can be currently run with PFLOTRAN. Hopefully this limitation will be remedied in the near future.

  10. A new multiscale model to describe a modified Hall-Petch relation at different scales for nano and micro materials

    Fadhil, Sadeem Abbas; Alrawi, Aoday Hashim; Azeez, Jazeel H.; Hassan, Mohsen A.

    2018-04-01

    In the present work, a multiscale model is presented and used to modify the Hall-Petch relation for different scales from nano to micro. The modified Hall-Petch relation is derived from a multiscale equation that determines the cohesive energy between the atoms and their neighboring grains. This brings with it a new term that was originally ignored even in the atomistic models. The new term makes it easy to combine all other effects to derive one modified equation for the Hall-Petch relation that works for all scales together, without the need to divide the scales into two scales, each scale with a different equation, as it is usually done in other works. Due to that, applying the new relation does not require a previous knowledge of the grain size distribution. This makes the new derived relation more consistent and easier to be applied for all scales. The new relation is used to fit the data for Copper and Nickel and it is applied well for the whole range of grain sizes from nano to micro scales.

  11. Improved rigorous upper bounds for transport due to passive advection described by simple models of bounded systems

    Kim, Chang-Bae; Krommes, J.A.

    1988-08-01

    The work of Krommes and Smith on rigorous upper bounds for the turbulent transport of a passively advected scalar [/ital Ann. Phys./ 177:246 (1987)] is extended in two directions: (1) For their ''reference model,'' improved upper bounds are obtained by utilizing more sophisticated two-time constraints which include the effects of cross-correlations up to fourth order. Numerical solutions of the model stochastic differential equation are also obtained; they show that the new bounds compare quite favorably with the exact results, even at large Reynolds and Kubo numbers. (2) The theory is extended to take account of a finite spatial autocorrelation length L/sub c/. As a reasonably generic example, the problem of particle transport due to statistically specified stochastic magnetic fields in a collisionless turbulent plasma is revisited. A bound is obtained which reduces for small L/sub c/ to the quasilinear limit and for large L/sub c/ to the strong turbulence limit, and which provides a reasonable and rigorous interpolation for intermediate values of L/sub c/. 18 refs., 6 figs

  12. The Landau-Lifshitz equation describes the Ising spin correlation function in the free-fermion model

    Rutkevich, S B

    1998-01-01

    We consider time and space dependence of the Ising spin correlation function in a continuous one-dimensional free-fermion model. By the Ising spin we imply the 'sign' variable, which takes alternating +-1 values in adjacent domains bounded by domain walls (fermionic world paths). The two-point correlation function is expressed in terms of the solution of the Cauchy problem for a nonlinear partial differential equation, which is proved to be equivalent to the exactly solvable Landau-Lifshitz equation. A new zero-curvature representation for this equation is presented. In turn, the initial condition for the Cauchy problem is given by the solution of a nonlinear ordinary differential equation, which has also been derived. In the Ising limit the above-mentioned partial and ordinary differential equations reduce to the sine-Gordon and Painleve III equations, respectively. (author)

  13. Model calculations of doubly closed shell nuclei in the integral-differential equation approach describing the two body correlations

    Brizzi, R.; Fabre de la Ripelle, M.; Lassaut, M.

    1999-01-01

    The binding energies and root mean square radii obtained from the Integro-Differential Equation Approach (IDEA) and from the Weight Function Approximation (WFA) of the IDEA for an even number of bosons and for 12 C, 16 O and 40 Ca are compared to those recently obtained by the Variational Monte Carlo, Fermi Hypernetted Chain and Coupled Cluster expansion method with model potentials. The IDEA provides numbers very similar to those obtained by other methods although it takes only two-body correlations into account. The analytical expression of the wave function for the WFA is given for bosons in ground state when the interaction pair is outside the potential range. Due to its simple structure, the equations of the IDEA can easily be extended to realistic interaction for nuclei like it has already been done for the tri-nucleon and the 4 He. (authors)

  14. Learned helplessness or expectancy-value? A psychological model for describing the experiences of different categories of unemployed people.

    García Rodríguez, Y

    1997-06-01

    Various studies have explored the relationships between unemployment and expectation of success, commitment to work, motivation, causal attributions, self-esteem and depression. A model is proposed that assumes the relationships between these variables are moderated by (a) whether or not the unemployed individual is seeking a first job and (b) age. It is proposed that for the unemployed who are seeking their first job (seekers) the relationships among these variables will be consistent with expectancy-value theory, but for those who have had a previous job (losers), the relationships will be more consistent with learned helplessness theory. It is further assumed that within this latter group the young losers will experience "universal helplessness" whereas the adult losers will experience "personal helplessness".

  15. Development of a model to describe organic films on aerosol particles and cloud droplets. Final report; Entwicklung eines Modells zur Beschreibung organischer Filme auf Aerosolteilchen und Wolkentropfen. Abschlussbericht

    Forkel, R. (ed.); Seidl, W.

    2000-12-01

    Organic substances with polar groups are enriched on water surfaces and can form monomolecular surface films which can reduce the surface tension. A new model to describe surface films is presented, which describes in detail the film forming properties of fatty acids with up to 22 carbon atoms. The model is applied to measured concentrations of fatty acids (from the literature) in rain water and on aerosol particles and cloud droplets. An investigation of the sources of fatty acids has shown, that abrasion of the wax layer on leaves and needles is the main sources for surface film material in the western USA. Anthropogenic sources in urban areas are meat preparation and cigarette smoke. The agreement between model results and measurements when the model was applied to rain water confirms the original assumption that fatty acids are a main compound of surface films in rain water. For humid aerosol particles the application of the model on measured concentrations of fatty acids only showed strongly diluted films. Only for remote forest areas in western USA concentrated films were found, with the surface tension reduced by 20 to 30%. On cloud droplets the surface films is still more diluted than on aerosol particles. For all investigated cases the films was too much diluted to have an effect on the activation process of cloud droplets. (orig.) [German] Organische Substanzen mit polaren Gruppen reichern sich an der Wasseroberflaeche an und koennen monomolekulare Oberflaechenfilme bilden, die zu einer Verringerung der Oberflaechenspannung fuehren. Es wird ein neues Modell zur Beschreibung eines Oberflaechenfilms beschrieben, das detailliert die filmbildenden Eigenschaften der Fettsaeuren mit bis zu 22 Kohlenstoffatomen erfasst. Dieses Modell ist auf gemessene Konzentrationen von Fettsaeuren (Literaturdaten) in Regenwasser und auf atmosphaerischen Aerosolteilchen und Wolkentropfen angewandt worden. Eine Betrachtung der Quellen der Fettsaeuren zeigte, dass der Abrieb der

  16. Chaotic-Dynamical Conceptual Model to Describe Fluid Flow and Contaminant Transport in a Fractured Vadose Zone

    Faybishenko, Boris; Doughty, Christine; Geller, Jil T.

    1999-01-01

    DOE faces the remediation of numerous contaminated sites, such as those at Hanford, INEEL, LLNL, and LBNL, where organic and/or radioactive wastes were intentionally or accidentally released to the vadose zone from surface spills, underground tanks, cribs, shallow ponds, and deep wells. Migration of these contaminants through the vadose zone has led to the contamination of (or threatens to contaminate) underlying groundwater. A key issue in choosing a corrective action plan to clean up contaminated sites is the determination of the location, total mass, mobility and travel time to receptors for contaminants moving in the vadose zone. These problems are difficult to solve in a technically defensible and accurate manner because contaminants travel downward intermittently, through narrow pathways, driven by variations in environmental conditions. These preferential flow pathways can be difficult to find and predict. The primary objective of this project is to determine if and when dynamical chaos theory can be used to investigate infiltration of fluid and contaminant transport in heterogeneous soils and fractured rocks. The objective of this project is being achieved through the following activities: Development of multi scale conceptual models and mathematical and numerical algorithms for flow and transport, which incorporate both (a) the spatial variability of heterogeneous porous and fractured media and (b) the temporal dynamics of flow and transport; Development of appropriate experimental field and laboratory techniques needed to detect diagnostic parameters for chaotic behavior of flow; Evaluation of chaotic behavior of flow in laboratory and field experiments using methods from non-linear dynamics; Evaluation of the impact these dynamics may have on contaminant transport through heterogeneous fractured rocks and soils and remediation efforts. This approach is based on the consideration of multi scale spatial heterogeneity and flow phenomena that are affected by

  17. A plant wide aqueous phase chemistry model describing pH variations and ion speciation/pairing in wastewater treatment process models

    Flores-Alsina, X.; Mbamba, C. Kazadi; Solon, K.

    cationic/anionic loads. In this way, the general applicability/flexibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated by implementing the aqueous phase chemistry module in some of the most frequently used WWTP process simulation models. Finally, it is shown how traditional wastewater modelling studies can......, require a major, but unavoidable, additional degree of complexity when representing cationic/anionic behaviour in Activated Sludge (AS)/Anaerobic Digestion (AD) systems (Ikumi et al., 2014). In this paper, a plant-wide aqueous phase chemistry module describing pH variations plus ion speciation...... of Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs) in order to reduce the overall stiffness of the system, thereby enhancing simulation speed. Additionally, a multi-dimensional version of the Newton-Raphson algorithm is applied to handle the existing multiple algebraic inter-dependencies (Solon et al., 2015...

  18. Geometry Analysis and Effect of Turbulence Model on the Radial Rotor Turbo-Expander Design for Small Organic Rankine Cycle System

    Maulana Arifin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC is one of the most promising technology for small electric power generations. The geometry analysis and the effect of turbulence model on the radial turbo-expanders design for small ORC power generation systems were discussed in this paper. The rotor blades and performance were calculated using several working fluids such as R134a, R143a, R245fa, n-Pentane, and R123. Subsequently, a numerical study was carried out in the fluid flow area with R134a and R123 as the working fluids. Analyses were performed using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD ANSYS Multiphysics on two real gas models, with the k-epsilon and SST (shear stress transport turbulence models. The result shows the distribution of Mach number, pressure, velocity and temperature along the rotor blade of the radial turbo-expanders and estimation of performance at various operating conditions. The operating conditions are as follow: 250,000 grid mesh flow area, real gas model SST at steady state condition, 0.4 kg/s of mass flow rate, 15,000 rpm rotor speed, 5 bar inlet pressure, and 373K inlet temperature. By using those conditions, CFD analysis shows that the turbo-expander able to produce 6.7 kW and 5.5 kW of power when using R134a and R123, respectively.

  19. Incorporation of FcRn-mediated disposition model to describe the population pharmacokinetics of therapeutic monoclonal IgG antibody in clinical patients.

    Ng, Chee M

    2016-03-01

    The two-compartment linear model used to describe the population pharmacokinetics (PK) of many therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (TMAbs) offered little biological insight to antibody disposition in humans. The purpose of this study is to develop a semi-mechanistic FcRn-mediated IgG disposition model to describe the population PK of TMAbs in clinical patients. A standard two-compartment linear PK model from a previously published population PK model of pertuzumab was used to simulate intensive PK data of 100 subjects for model development. Two different semi-mechanistic FcRn-mediated IgG disposition models were developed and First Order Conditional Estimation (FOCE) with the interaction method in NONMEM was used to obtain the final model estimates. The performances of these models were then compared with the two-compartment linear PK model used to simulate the data for model development. A semi-mechanistic FcRn-mediated IgG disposition model consisting of a peripheral tissue compartment and FcRn-containing endosomes in the central compartment best describes the simulated pertuzumab population PK data. This developed semi-mechanistic population PK model had the same number of model parameters, produced very similar concentration-time profiles but provided additional biological insight to the FcRn-mediated IgG disposition in human subjects compared with the standard linear two-compartment linear PK model. This first reported semi-mechanistic model may serve as an important model framework for developing future population PK models of TMAbs in clinical patients. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Radial head dislocation during proximal radial shaft osteotomy.

    Hazel, Antony; Bindra, Randy R

    2014-03-01

    The following case report describes a 48-year-old female patient with a longstanding both-bone forearm malunion, who underwent osteotomies of both the radius and ulna to improve symptoms of pain and lack of rotation at the wrist. The osteotomies were templated preoperatively. During surgery, after performing the planned radial shaft osteotomy, the authors recognized that the radial head was subluxated. The osteotomy was then revised from an opening wedge to a closing wedge with improvement of alignment and rotation. The case report discusses the details of the operation, as well as ways in which to avoid similar shortcomings in the future. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of different two-pathway models for describing the combined effect of DO and nitrite on the nitrous oxide production by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria.

    Lang, Longqi; Pocquet, Mathieu; Ni, Bing-Jie; Yuan, Zhiguo; Spérandio, Mathieu

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this work is to compare the capability of two recently proposed two-pathway models for predicting nitrous oxide (N 2 O) production by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) for varying ranges of dissolved oxygen (DO) and nitrite. The first model includes the electron carriers whereas the second model is based on direct coupling of electron donors and acceptors. Simulations are confronted to extensive sets of experiments (43 batches) from different studies with three different microbial systems. Despite their different mathematical structures, both models could well and similarly describe the combined effect of DO and nitrite on N 2 O production rate and emission factor. The model-predicted contributions for nitrifier denitrification pathway and hydroxylamine pathway also matched well with the available isotopic measurements. Based on sensitivity analysis, calibration procedures are described and discussed for facilitating the future use of those models.

  2. An Exact Formula for Calculating Inverse Radial Lens Distortions

    Pierre Drap

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a new approach to calculating the inverse of radial distortions. The method presented here provides a model of reverse radial distortion, currently modeled by a polynomial expression, that proposes another polynomial expression where the new coefficients are a function of the original ones. After describing the state of the art, the proposed method is developed. It is based on a formal calculus involving a power series used to deduce a recursive formula for the new coefficients. We present several implementations of this method and describe the experiments conducted to assess the validity of the new approach. Such an approach, non-iterative, using another polynomial expression, able to be deduced from the first one, can actually be interesting in terms of performance, reuse of existing software, or bridging between different existing software tools that do not consider distortion from the same point of view.

  3. RADIAL VELOCITY OBSERVATIONS AND LIGHT CURVE NOISE MODELING CONFIRM THAT KEPLER-91b IS A GIANT PLANET ORBITING A GIANT STAR

    Barclay, Thomas; Huber, Daniel; Rowe, Jason F.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Kepler-91b is a rare example of a transiting hot Jupiter around a red giant star, providing the possibility to study the formation and composition of hot Jupiters under different conditions compared to main-sequence stars. However, the planetary nature of Kepler-91b, which was confirmed using phase-curve variations by Lillo-Box et al., was recently called into question based on a re-analysis of Kepler data. We have obtained ground-based radial velocity observations from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and unambiguously confirm the planetary nature of Kepler-91b by simultaneously modeling the Kepler and radial velocity data. The star exhibits temporally correlated noise due to stellar granulation which we model as a Gaussian Process. We hypothesize that it is this noise component that led previous studies to suspect Kepler-91b to be a false positive. Our work confirms the conclusions presented by Lillo-Box et al. that Kepler-91b is a 0.73 ± 0.13 M Jup planet orbiting a red giant star

  4. Radial nerve dysfunction (image)

    The radial nerve travels down the arm and supplies movement to the triceps muscle at the back of the upper arm. ... the wrist and hand. The usual causes of nerve dysfunction are direct trauma, prolonged pressure on the ...

  5. Radial expansion and multifragmentation

    Angelique, J.C.; Bizard, G.; Bougault, R.; Brou, R.; Buta, A.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Durand, D.; Kerambrun, A.; Le Brun, C.; Lecolley, J.F.; Lopez, O.; Louvel, M.; Meslin, C.; Nakagawa, T.; Patry, J.P.; Peter, J.; Popescu, R.; Regimbart, R.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Tamain, B.; Vient, E.; Yuasa-Nakagawa, K.; Wieloch, A.

    1998-01-01

    The light systems 36 Ar + 27 Al and 64 Zn + nat Ti were measured at several bombarding energies between ∼ 35 and 95 MeV/nucleon. It was found that the predominant part of the cross section is due to binary collisions. In this paper the focus is placed on the properties of the quasi-projectile nuclei. In the central collisions the excitation energies of the quasi-projectile reach values exceeding largely 10 MeV/nucleon. The slope of the high energy part of the distribution can give only an upper limit of the apparent temperature (the average temperature along the decay chain). The highly excited quasi-projectile may get rapidly fragmented rather than sequentially. The heavy fragments are excited and can emit light particles (n, p, d, t, 3 He, α,...) what perturbs additionally the spectrum of these particles. Concerning the expansion energy, one can determine the average kinetic energies of the product (in the quasi-projectile-framework) and compare with simulation values. To fit the experimental data an additional radial expansion energy is to be considered. The average expansion energy depends slightly on the impact parameter but it increases with E * / A, ranging from 0.4 to 1,2 MeV/nucleon for an excitation energy increasing from 7 to 10.5 MeV/nucleon. This collective radial energy seems to be independent of the fragment mass, what is possibly valid for the case of larger quasi-projectile masses. The origin of the expansion is to be determined. It may be due to a compression in the interaction zone at the initial stage of the collision, which propagates in the quasi-projectile and quasi-target, or else, may be due, simply, to the increase of thermal energy leading to a rapid fragment emission. The sequential de-excitation calculation overestimates light particle emission and consequently heavy residues, particularly, at higher excitation energies. This disagreement indicates that a sequential process can not account for the di-excitation of very hot nuclei

  6. Development and Application of a Category System to Describe Pre-Service Science Teachers' Activities in the Process of Scientific Modelling

    Krell, Moritz; Walzer, Christine; Hergert, Susann; Krüger, Dirk

    2017-09-01

    As part of their professional competencies, science teachers need an elaborate meta-modelling knowledge as well as modelling skills in order to guide and monitor modelling practices of their students. However, qualitative studies about (pre-service) science teachers' modelling practices are rare. This study provides a category system which is suitable to analyse and to describe pre-service science teachers' modelling activities and to infer modelling strategies. The category system was developed based on theoretical considerations and was inductively refined within the methodological frame of qualitative content analysis. For the inductive refinement, modelling practices of pre-service teachers (n = 4) have been video-taped and analysed. In this study, one case was selected to demonstrate the application of the category system to infer modelling strategies. The contribution of this study for science education research and science teacher education is discussed.

  7. A model framework to describe growth-linked biodegradation of trace-level pesticides in the presence of coincidental carbon substrates and microbes

    Liu, Li; Helbling, Damian E.; Kohler, Hans-Peter E.

    2014-01-01

    described were: the growth-linked biodegradation of micropollutant at environmentally relevant concentrations; the effect of coincidental assimilable organic carbon substrates; and the effect of coincidental microbes that compete for assimilable organic carbon substrates. We used Monod kinetic models...... to describe substrate utilization and microbial growth rates for specific pesticide and degrader pairs. We then extended the model to include terms for utilization of assimilable organic carbon substrates by the specific degrader and coincidental microbes, growth on assimilable organic carbon substrates......, challenges remain in developing engineered remediation strategies for pesticide-contaminated environments because the fundamental processes that regulate growth-linked biodegradation of pesticides in natural environments remain poorly understood. In this research, we developed a model framework to describe...

  8. Oxygen distribution in packed-bed membrane reactors for partial oxidations: effect of the radial porosity profiles on the product selectivity

    Kurten, U.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    A two-dimensional, pseudohomogeneous reactor model was presented to describe the radial and axial concentration profiles in a packed-bed membrane reactor and the local velocity field while accounting for the influences due to the distributive membrane flow and the radial porosity profile. The effect

  9. RADIAL STABILITY IN STRATIFIED STARS

    Pereira, Jonas P.; Rueda, Jorge A.

    2015-01-01

    We formulate within a generalized distributional approach the treatment of the stability against radial perturbations for both neutral and charged stratified stars in Newtonian and Einstein's gravity. We obtain from this approach the boundary conditions connecting any two phases within a star and underline its relevance for realistic models of compact stars with phase transitions, owing to the modification of the star's set of eigenmodes with respect to the continuous case

  10. Radial transport with perturbed magnetic field

    Hazeltine, R. D. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    It is pointed out that the viscosity coefficient describing radial transport of toroidal angular momentum is proportional to the second power of the gyro-radius—like the corresponding coefficients for particle and heat transport—regardless of any geometrical symmetry. The observation is widely appreciated, but worth emphasizing because some literature gives the misleading impression that asymmetry can allow radial moment transport in first-order.

  11. Radial transport with perturbed magnetic field

    Hazeltine, R. D.

    2015-01-01

    It is pointed out that the viscosity coefficient describing radial transport of toroidal angular momentum is proportional to the second power of the gyro-radius—like the corresponding coefficients for particle and heat transport—regardless of any geometrical symmetry. The observation is widely appreciated, but worth emphasizing because some literature gives the misleading impression that asymmetry can allow radial moment transport in first-order

  12. Designing an artificial neural network using radial basis function to model exergetic efficiency of nanofluids in mini double pipe heat exchanger

    Ghasemi, Nahid; Aghayari, Reza; Maddah, Heydar

    2018-06-01

    The present study aims at predicting and optimizing exergetic efficiency of TiO2-Al2O3/water nanofluid at different Reynolds numbers, volume fractions and twisted ratios using Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) and experimental data. Central Composite Design (CCD) and cascade Radial Basis Function (RBF) were used to display the significant levels of the analyzed factors on the exergetic efficiency. The size of TiO2-Al2O3/water nanocomposite was 20-70 nm. The parameters of ANN model were adapted by a training algorithm of radial basis function (RBF) with a wide range of experimental data set. Total mean square error and correlation coefficient were used to evaluate the results which the best result was obtained from double layer perceptron neural network with 30 neurons in which total Mean Square Error(MSE) and correlation coefficient (R2) were equal to 0.002 and 0.999, respectively. This indicated successful prediction of the network. Moreover, the proposed equation for predicting exergetic efficiency was extremely successful. According to the optimal curves, the optimum designing parameters of double pipe heat exchanger with inner twisted tape and nanofluid under the constrains of exergetic efficiency 0.937 are found to be Reynolds number 2500, twisted ratio 2.5 and volume fraction( v/v%) 0.05.

  13. The environmental effect on the radial breathing mode of carbon nanotubes. II. Shell model approximation for internally and externally adsorbed fluids

    Longhurst, M. J.; Quirke, N.

    2006-11-01

    We have previously shown that the upshift in the radial breathing mode (RBM) of closed (or infinite) carbon nanotubes in solution is almost entirely due to coupling of the RBM with an adsorbed layer of fluid on the nanotube surface. The upshift can be modeled analytically by considering the adsorbed fluid as an infinitesimally thin shell, which interacts with the nanotube via a continuum Lennard-Jones potential. Here we extend the model to include internally as well as externally adsorbed waterlike molecules, and find that filling the nanotubes leads to an additional upshift of two to six wave numbers. We show that using molecular dynamics, the RBM can be accurately reproduced by replacing the fluid molecules with a mean field harmonic shell potential, greatly reducing simulation times.

  14. Radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy improves cerebral blood flow and neurological function in a rat model of cerebral ischemia.

    Kang, Nan; Zhang, Jing; Yu, Xiaotong; Ma, Yuewen

    2017-01-01

    We performed middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats to investigate the effect and some of the underlying mechanisms of radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) in cerebral ischemia rats. We measured neurological function and cerebral blood flow (CBF) using a full-field laser perfusion imager and brain infarct volume on days 3, 12, and 30. Immunofluorescence, western blot, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques were used to detect the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), nestin, Wnt3a, and β-catenin in the ischemic hemisphere. The dose of rESWT used on the head revealed remarkable advantages over sham rESWT, as demonstrated by improved neurological function scores, increased CBF, and reduced brain infarct volume. Furthermore, applying rESWT to the head and limbs enhanced short-term neurological function. Our results confirmed that rESWT can induce VEGF expression over an extended period with a profound effect, which may be the primary reason for CBF recovery. High NSE and nestin expression levels suggest that rESWT enhanced the number of neurons and neural stem cells (NSCs). Wnt3a and β-catenin expression were up-regulated in the ischemic hemisphere, indicating that rESWT promoted NSC proliferation and differentiation via the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Overall, our findings suggest that an appropriate rESWT dose delivered to the head of rats helps restore neurological function and CBF, and additional application of rESWT to the limbs is more effective than treating the head alone.

  15. Petrology and geochemistry of the orbicular granitoid of Caldera, northern Chile. Models and hypotheses on the formation of radial orbicular textures

    Díaz-Alvarado, Juan; Rodríguez, Natalia; Rodríguez, Carmen; Fernández, Carlos; Constanzo, Ítalo

    2017-07-01

    The orbicular granitoid of Caldera, located at the northern part of the Chilean Coastal Range, is a spectacular example of radial textures in orbicular structures. The orbicular body crops out as a 375 m2 tabular to lensoidal intrusive sheet emplaced in the Lower Jurassic Relincho pluton. The orbicular structures are 3-7 cm in diameter ellipsoids hosted in a porphyritic matrix. The orbicules are comprised by a Qtz-dioritic core (3-5 cm in diameter) composed by Pl + Hbl + Qtz + Bt ± Kfs with equiaxial textures and a gabbroic shell (2-3 cm in diameter) characterized by feathery and radiate textures with a plagioclase + hornblende paragenesis. The radial shell crystals are rooted and orthogonally disposed in the irregular contact with the core. The radial shell, called here inner shell, is in contact with the granodioritic equiaxial interorbicular matrix through a 2-3 mm wide poikilitic band around the orbicule (outer shell). The outer shell and the matrix surrounding the orbicules are characterized by the presence of large hornblende and biotite oikocrystals that include fine-grained rounded plagioclase and magnetite. The oikocrystals of both the outer shell and the matrix have a circumferential arrangement around the orbicule, i.e. orthogonal to the radial inner shell. The coarse-grained granodioritic interorbicular matrix present pegmatitic domains with large acicular hornblende and K-feldspar megacrysts. This work presents a review of the textural characteristics of the orbicules and a complete new mineral and whole-rock geochemical study of the different parts of the orbicular granitoid, together with thermobarometric and crystallographic data, and theoretical modeling of the crystallization and element partitioning processes. We propose a model for the formation of the orbicular radial textures consisting of several processes that are suggested to occur fast and consecutively: superheating, volatile exsolution, undercooling, geochemical fractionation and

  16. A stock market forecasting model combining two-directional two-dimensional principal component analysis and radial basis function neural network.

    Guo, Zhiqiang; Wang, Huaiqing; Yang, Jie; Miller, David J

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose and implement a hybrid model combining two-directional two-dimensional principal component analysis ((2D)2PCA) and a Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN) to forecast stock market behavior. First, 36 stock market technical variables are selected as the input features, and a sliding window is used to obtain the input data of the model. Next, (2D)2PCA is utilized to reduce the dimension of the data and extract its intrinsic features. Finally, an RBFNN accepts the data processed by (2D)2PCA to forecast the next day's stock price or movement. The proposed model is used on the Shanghai stock market index, and the experiments show that the model achieves a good level of fitness. The proposed model is then compared with one that uses the traditional dimension reduction method principal component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA). The empirical results show that the proposed model outperforms the PCA-based model, as well as alternative models based on ICA and on the multilayer perceptron.

  17. Revisiting Earth's radial seismic structure using a Bayesian neural network approach

    de Wit, R.W.L.

    2015-01-01

    The gross features of seismic observations can be explained by relatively simple spherically symmetric (1-D) models of wave velocities, density and attenuation, which describe the Earth's average(radial) structure. 1-D earth models are often used as a reference for studies on Earth's thermo-chemical

  18. Turbulence in tokamak plasmas. Effect of a radial electric field shear; Turbulence dans les plasmas de tokamaks. Effet d`un cisaillement de champ electrique radial

    Payan, J

    1994-05-01

    After a review of turbulence and transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas and the radial electric field shear effect in various tokamaks, experimental measurements obtained at Tore Supra by the means of the ALTAIR plasma diagnostic technique, are presented. Electronic drift waves destabilization mechanisms, which are the main features that could describe the experimentally observed microturbulence, are then examined. The effect of a radial electric field shear on electronic drift waves is then introduced, and results with ohmic heating are studied together with relations between turbulence and transport. The possible existence of ionic waves is rejected, and a spectral frequency modelization is presented, based on the existence of an electric field sheared radial profile. The position of the inversion point of this field is calculated for different values of the mean density and the plasma current, and the modelization is applied to the TEXT tokamak. The radial electric field at Tore Supra is then estimated. The effect of the ergodic divertor on turbulence and abnormal transport is then described and the density fluctuation radial profile in presence of the ergodic divertor is modelled. 80 figs., 120 refs.

  19. Radial pattern of nuclear decay processes

    Iskra, W.; Mueller, M.; Rotter, I.; Technische Univ. Dresden

    1994-05-01

    At high level density of nuclear states, a separation of different time scales is observed (trapping effect). We calculate the radial profile of partial widths in the framework of the continuum shell model for some 1 - resonances with 2p-2h nuclear structure in 16 O as a function of the coupling strength to the continuum. A correlation between the lifetime of a nuclear state and the radial profile of the corresponding decay process is observed. We conclude from our numerical results that the trapping effect creates structures in space and time characterized by a small radial extension and a short lifetime. (orig.)

  20. Radial wedge flange clamp

    Smith, Karl H.

    2002-01-01

    A radial wedge flange clamp comprising a pair of flanges each comprising a plurality of peripheral flat wedge facets having flat wedge surfaces and opposed and mating flat surfaces attached to or otherwise engaged with two elements to be joined and including a series of generally U-shaped wedge clamps each having flat wedge interior surfaces and engaging one pair of said peripheral flat wedge facets. Each of said generally U-shaped wedge clamps has in its opposing extremities apertures for the tangential insertion of bolts to apply uniform radial force to said wedge clamps when assembled about said wedge segments.

  1. Application of the dosimetric model described by Humm to target 131I monoclonal antibodies to leukaemic cells in the cerebrospinal fluid

    Papanastassiou, V.; Pizer, B.L.; Kemshead, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    In 1986 Humm suggested a dosimetric model for targeted radiation therapy that considered both the physical characteristics of the radionuclide used and the morphology of the targeted tumour. Using this model he described the dose advantage due to antibody binding in terms of a ratio of tumour radiation dose to that of normal tissue. The model applied to non-solid tumours assumes no cell clumping and hence no cross-fire effect. The authors demonstrate the direct application of the model to a particular clinical scenario; the targeting of 131 I monoclonal antibodies to leukaemic cells within the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In this situation the dose advantage is much higher than the figure reported by Humm, which was arrived at by considering a more general application of the model. (author)

  2. LINEAR MIXED MODEL TO DESCRIBE THE BASAL AREA INCREMENT FOR INDIVUDUAL CEDRO (Cedrela odorata L.TREES IN OCCIDENTAL AMAZON, BRAZIL

    Thiago Augusto da Cunha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliable growth data from trees are important to establish a rational forest management. Characteristics from trees, like the size, crown architecture and competition indices have been used to mathematically describe the increment efficiently when associated with them. However, the precise role of these effects in the growth-modeling destined to tropical trees needs to be further studied. Here it is reconstructed the basal area increment (BAI of individual Cedrela odorata trees, sampled at Amazon forest, to develop a growth- model using potential-predictors like: (1 classical tree size; (2 morphometric data; (3 competition and (4 social position including liana loads. Despite the large variation in tree size and growth, we observed that these kinds of predictor variables described well the BAI in level of individual tree. The fitted mixed model achieve a high efficiency (R2=92.7 % and predicted 3-years BAI over bark for trees of Cedrela odorata ranging from 10 to 110 cm at diameter at breast height. Tree height, steam slenderness and crown formal demonstrated high influence in the BAI growth model and explaining most of the growth variance (Partial R2=87.2%. Competition variables had negative influence on the BAI, however, explained about 7% of the total variation. The introduction of a random parameter on the regressions model (mixed modelprocedure has demonstrated a better significance approach to the data observed and showed more realistic predictions than the fixed model.

  3. A model framework to describe growth-linked biodegradation of trace-level pollutants in the presence of coincidental carbon substrates and microbes.

    Liu, Li; Helbling, Damian E; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Smets, Barth F

    2014-11-18

    Pollutants such as pesticides and their degradation products occur ubiquitously in natural aquatic environments at trace concentrations (μg L(-1) and lower). Microbial biodegradation processes have long been known to contribute to the attenuation of pesticides in contaminated environments. However, challenges remain in developing engineered remediation strategies for pesticide-contaminated environments because the fundamental processes that regulate growth-linked biodegradation of pesticides in natural environments remain poorly understood. In this research, we developed a model framework to describe growth-linked biodegradation of pesticides at trace concentrations. We used experimental data reported in the literature or novel simulations to explore three fundamental kinetic processes in isolation. We then combine these kinetic processes into a unified model framework. The three kinetic processes described were: the growth-linked biodegradation of micropollutant at environmentally relevant concentrations; the effect of coincidental assimilable organic carbon substrates; and the effect of coincidental microbes that compete for assimilable organic carbon substrates. We used Monod kinetic models to describe substrate utilization and microbial growth rates for specific pesticide and degrader pairs. We then extended the model to include terms for utilization of assimilable organic carbon substrates by the specific degrader and coincidental microbes, growth on assimilable organic carbon substrates by the specific degrader and coincidental microbes, and endogenous metabolism. The proposed model framework enables interpretation and description of a range of experimental observations on micropollutant biodegradation. The model provides a useful tool to identify environmental conditions with respect to the occurrence of assimilable organic carbon and coincidental microbes that may result in enhanced or reduced micropollutant biodegradation.

  4. Sirenomelia with radial dysplasia.

    Kulkarni, M L; Abdul Manaf, K M; Prasannakumar, D G; Kulkarni, Preethi M

    2004-05-01

    Sirenomelia is a rare anomaly usually associated with other multiple malformations. In this communication the authors report a case of sirenomelia associated with multiple malformations, which include radial hypoplasia also. Though several theories have been proposed regarding the etiology of multiple malformation syndromes in the past, the recent theory of primary developmental defect during blastogenesis holds good in this case.

  5. Radially truncated galactic discs

    Grijs, R. de; Kregel, M.; Wesson, K H

    2000-01-01

    Abstract: We present the first results of a systematic analysis of radially truncatedexponential discs for four galaxies of a sample of disc-dominated edge-onspiral galaxies. Edge-on galaxies are very useful for the study of truncatedgalactic discs, since we can follow their light distributions out

  6. The European Distribution of Sus Scrofa. Model Outputs from the Project Described within the Poster – Where are All the Boars? An Attempt to Gain a Continental Perspective

    Neil Stewart Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wild boar is a host of a number of arthropod-vectored diseases and its numbers are on the rise in mainland Europe. The species potentially impacts ecosystems, humans and farming practices and so its distribution is of interest to policy makers in a number of fields beyond that of the primarily epidemiological goal of this study. Three statistical model outputs describing the distribution and abundance of the species Sus scrofa (Wild boar are included in this data package. The extent of this dataset covers continental Europe. These data were presented as a poster [1] at the conference Genes, Ecosystems and Risk of Infection (GERI 2015. The first of the three models provide a European map presenting the probability of presence of Sus scrofa, which can be used to describe the likely geographical distribution of the species. The second and third models provide indices to help describe the likely abundance across the continent. The two indices include “the proportion of suitable habitat where presence is estimated” and a simple classification of boar abundance across Europe using quantiles of existing abundance data and proxies.

  7. Pharmacobezoars described and demystified.

    Simpson, Serge-Emile

    2011-02-01

    A bezoar is a concretion of foreign material that forms and persists in the gastrointestinal tract. Bezoars are classified by their material origins. Phytobezoars contain plant material, trichobezoars contain hair, lactobezoars contain milk proteins, and pharmacobezoars contain pharmaceutical products. Tablets, suspensions, and even insoluble drug delivery vehicles can, on rare occasions, and sometimes under specific circumstances, form pharmacobezoars. The goal of this review is to catalog and examine all of the available reports in the English language medical literature that convincingly describe the formation and management of pharmacobezoars. Articles included in this review were identified by performing searches using the terms "bezoar," "pharmacobezoar," and "concretion" in the following databases: OVID MEDLINE, PubMed, and JSTOR. The complete MEDLINE and JSTOR holdings were included in the search without date ranges. The results were limited to English language publications. Articles that described nonmedication bezoars were not included in the review. Articles describing phytobezoars, food bezoars, fecal impactions, illicit drug packet ingestions, enteral feeding material bezoars, and hygroscopic diet aid bezoars were excluded. The bibliographic references within the articles already accumulated were then examined in order to gather additional pharmacobezoar cases. The cases are grouped by pharmaceutical agent that formed the bezoar, and groupings are arranged in alphabetical order. Discussions and conclusions specific to each pharmaceutical agent are included in that agent's subheading. Patterns and themes that emerged in the review of the assembled case reports are reviewed and presented in a more concise format. Pharmacobezoars form under a wide variety of circumstances and in a wide variety of patients. They are difficult to diagnose reliably. Rules for suspecting, diagnosing, and properly managing a pharmacobezoar are highly dependent on the

  8. [Deep mycoses rarely described].

    Charles, D

    1986-01-01

    Beside deep mycoses very well known: histoplasmosis, candidosis, cryptococcosis, there are other mycoses less frequently described. Some of them are endemic in some countries: South American blastomycosis in Brazil, coccidioidomycosis in California; some others are cosmopolitan and may affect everyone: sporotrichosis, or may affect only immunodeficient persons: mucormycosis. They do not spare Africa, we may encounter basidiobolomycosis, rhinophycomycosis, dermatophytosis, sporotrichosis and, more recently reported, rhinosporidiosis. Important therapeutic progresses have been accomplished with amphotericin B and with antifungus imidazole compounds (miconazole and ketoconazole). Surgical intervention is sometime recommended in chromomycosis and rhinosporidiosis.

  9. Low-dimensional models of ‘Neuro-glio-vascular unit’ for describing neural dynamics under normal and energy-starved conditions

    Karishma eChhabria

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The motivation of developing simple minimal models for neuro-glio-vascular system arises from a recent modeling study elucidating the bidirectional information flow within the neuro-glio-vascular system having 89 dynamic equations (Chander and Chakravarthy 2012. While this was one of the first attempts at formulating a comprehensive model for neuro-glia-vascular system, it poses severe restrictions in scaling up to network levels. On the contrary, low dimensional models are convenient devices in simulating large networks that also provide an intuitive understanding of the complex interactions occurring within the neuro-glio-vascular system. The key idea underlying the proposed models is to describe the glio-vascular system as a lumped system which takes neural firing rate as input and returns an ‘energy’ variable (analogous to ATP as output. To this end we present two models: Biophysical neuro-energy (Model #1 with 5 variables, comprising of KATP channel activity governed by neuronal ATP dynamics and the Dynamic threshold (Model #2 with 3 variables depicting the dependence of neural firing threshold on the ATP dynamics. Both the models show different firing regimes such as continuous spiking, phasic and tonic bursting depending on the ATP production coefficient, εp and external current. We then demonstrate that in a network comprising of such energy-dependent neuron units, εp could modulate the Local field potential (LFP frequency and amplitude. Interestingly, low frequency LFP dominates under low εp conditions, which is thought to be reminiscent of seizure-like activity observed in epilepsy. The proposed ‘neuron-energy’ unit may be implemented in building models of neuro-glio-vascular networks to simulate data obtained from multimodal neuroimaging systems such as fNIRS-EEG and fMRI-EEG. Such models could also provide a theoretical basis for devising optimal neurorehabilitation strategies such as non-invasive brain stimulation for

  10. Low-Dimensional Models of "Neuro-Glio-Vascular Unit" for Describing Neural Dynamics under Normal and Energy-Starved Conditions.

    Chhabria, Karishma; Chakravarthy, V Srinivasa

    2016-01-01

    The motivation of developing simple minimal models for neuro-glio-vascular (NGV) system arises from a recent modeling study elucidating the bidirectional information flow within the NGV system having 89 dynamic equations (1). While this was one of the first attempts at formulating a comprehensive model for neuro-glio-vascular system, it poses severe restrictions in scaling up to network levels. On the contrary, low--dimensional models are convenient devices in simulating large networks that also provide an intuitive understanding of the complex interactions occurring within the NGV system. The key idea underlying the proposed models is to describe the glio-vascular system as a lumped system, which takes neural firing rate as input and returns an "energy" variable (analogous to ATP) as output. To this end, we present two models: biophysical neuro-energy (Model 1 with five variables), comprising KATP channel activity governed by neuronal ATP dynamics, and the dynamic threshold (Model 2 with three variables), depicting the dependence of neural firing threshold on the ATP dynamics. Both the models show different firing regimes, such as continuous spiking, phasic, and tonic bursting depending on the ATP production coefficient, ɛp, and external current. We then demonstrate that in a network comprising such energy-dependent neuron units, ɛp could modulate the local field potential (LFP) frequency and amplitude. Interestingly, low-frequency LFP dominates under low ɛp conditions, which is thought to be reminiscent of seizure-like activity observed in epilepsy. The proposed "neuron-energy" unit may be implemented in building models of NGV networks to simulate data obtained from multimodal neuroimaging systems, such as functional near infrared spectroscopy coupled to electroencephalogram and functional magnetic resonance imaging coupled to electroencephalogram. Such models could also provide a theoretical basis for devising optimal neurorehabilitation strategies, such as

  11. Review Team Focused Modeling Analysis of Radial Collector Well Operation on the Hypersaline Groundwater Plume beneath the Turkey Point Site near Homestead, Florida

    Oostrom, Martinus; Vail, Lance W.

    2016-01-01

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory served as members of a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission review team for the Florida Power & Light Company's application for two combined construction permits and operating licenses (combined licenses or COLs) for two proposed new reactor units-Turkey Point Units 6 and 7. The review team evaluated the environmental impacts of the proposed action based on the October 29, 2014 revision of the COL application, including the Environmental Report, responses to requests for additional information, and supplemental information. As part of this effort, team members tasked with assessing the environmental effects of proposed construction and operation of Units 6 and 7 at the Turkey Point site reviewed two separate modeling studies that analyzed the interaction between surface water and groundwater that would be altered by the operation of radial collector wells (RCWs) at the site. To further confirm their understanding of the groundwater hydrodynamics and to consider whether certain actions, proposed after the two earlier modeling studies were completed, would alter the earlier conclusions documented by the review team in their draft environmental impact statement (EIS; NRC 2015), a third modeling analysis was performed. The third modeling analysis is discussed in this report.

  12. Review Team Focused Modeling Analysis of Radial Collector Well Operation on the Hypersaline Groundwater Plume beneath the Turkey Point Site near Homestead, Florida

    Oostrom, Martinus [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vail, Lance W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory served as members of a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission review team for the Florida Power & Light Company’s application for two combined construction permits and operating licenses (combined licenses or COLs) for two proposed new reactor units—Turkey Point Units 6 and 7. The review team evaluated the environmental impacts of the proposed action based on the October 29, 2014 revision of the COL application, including the Environmental Report, responses to requests for additional information, and supplemental information. As part of this effort, team members tasked with assessing the environmental effects of proposed construction and operation of Units 6 and 7 at the Turkey Point site reviewed two separate modeling studies that analyzed the interaction between surface water and groundwater that would be altered by the operation of radial collector wells (RCWs) at the site. To further confirm their understanding of the groundwater hydrodynamics and to consider whether certain actions, proposed after the two earlier modeling studies were completed, would alter the earlier conclusions documented by the review team in their draft environmental impact statement (EIS; NRC 2015), a third modeling analysis was performed. The third modeling analysis is discussed in this report.

  13. Multibody Dynamics of a Fluid Power Radial Piston Motor Including Transient Hydrodynamic Pressure Models of Lubricating Gaps

    Johansen, Per; Rømer, Daniel; Andersen, Torben Ole

    2014-01-01

    The increasing interest in hydraulic transmissions in wind and wave energy applications has created an incentive for the development of high efficiency fluid power machinery. Modeling and analysis of fluid power machinery loss mechanisms are necessary in order to accommodate this demand. At present...... fully coupled thermo-elastic models has been used to simulate and study loss mechanisms in various tribological interfaces. Consequently, a reasonable focus of further development is to couple the interface models and the rigid body mechanics of fluid power machinery. The focus of the current paper...

  14. Intraluminal milrinone for dilation of the radial artery graft.

    García-Rinaldi, R; Soltero, E R; Carballido, J; Mojica, J

    1999-01-01

    There is renewed interest in the use of the radial artery as a conduit for coronary artery bypass surgery. The radial artery is, however, a very muscular artery, prone to vasospasm. Milrinone, a potent vasodilator, has demonstrated vasodilatory properties superior to those of papaverine. In this report, we describe our technique of radial artery harvesting and the adjunctive use of intraluminal milrinone as a vasodilator in the preparation of this conduit for coronary artery bypass grafting. We have used these techniques in 25 patients who have undergone coronary artery bypass grafting using the radial artery. No hand ischemic complications have been observed in this group. Intraluminal milrinone appears to dilate and relax the radial artery, rendering this large conduit spasm free and very easy to use. We recommend the skeletonization technique for radial artery harvesting and the use of intraluminal milrinone as a radial artery vasodilator in routine myocardial revascularization. PMID:10524740

  15. Brandon mathematical model describing the effect of calcination and reduction parameters on specific surface area of UO{sub 2} powders

    Hung, Nguyen Trong; Thuan, Le Ba [Institute for Technology of Radioactive and Rare Elements (ITRRE), 48 Lang Ha, Dong Da, Ha Noi (Viet Nam); Van Khoai, Do [Micro-Emission Ltd., 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1211 (Japan); Lee, Jin-Young, E-mail: jinlee@kigam.re.kr [Convergence Research Center for Development of Mineral Resources (DMR), Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), Daejeon, 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Jyothi, Rajesh Kumar, E-mail: rkumarphd@kigam.re.kr [Convergence Research Center for Development of Mineral Resources (DMR), Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), Daejeon, 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) powder has been widely used to prepare fuel pellets for commercial light water nuclear reactors. Among typical characteristics of the powder, specific surface area (SSA) is one of the most important parameter that determines the sintering ability of UO{sub 2} powder. This paper built up a mathematical model describing the effect of the fabrication parameters on SSA of UO{sub 2} powders. To the best of our knowledge, the Brandon model is used for the first time to describe the relationship between the essential fabrication parameters [reduction temperature (T{sub R}), calcination temperature (T{sub C}), calcination time (t{sub C}) and reduction time (t{sub R})] and SSA of the obtained UO{sub 2} powder product. The proposed model was tested with Wilcoxon's rank sum test, showing a good agreement with the experimental parameters. The proposed model can be used to predict and control the SSA of UO{sub 2} powder.

  16. A plant-wide aqueous phase chemistry module describing pH variations and ion speciation/pairing in wastewater treatment process models.

    Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Kazadi Mbamba, Christian; Solon, Kimberly; Vrecko, Darko; Tait, Stephan; Batstone, Damien J; Jeppsson, Ulf; Gernaey, Krist V

    2015-11-15

    There is a growing interest within the Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) modelling community to correctly describe physico-chemical processes after many years of mainly focusing on biokinetics. Indeed, future modelling needs, such as a plant-wide phosphorus (P) description, require a major, but unavoidable, additional degree of complexity when representing cationic/anionic behaviour in Activated Sludge (AS)/Anaerobic Digestion (AD) systems. In this paper, a plant-wide aqueous phase chemistry module describing pH variations plus ion speciation/pairing is presented and interfaced with industry standard models. The module accounts for extensive consideration of non-ideality, including ion activities instead of molar concentrations and complex ion pairing. The general equilibria are formulated as a set of Differential Algebraic Equations (DAEs) instead of Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs) in order to reduce the overall stiffness of the system, thereby enhancing simulation speed. Additionally, a multi-dimensional version of the Newton-Raphson algorithm is applied to handle the existing multiple algebraic inter-dependencies. The latter is reinforced with the Simulated Annealing method to increase the robustness of the solver making the system not so dependent of the initial conditions. Simulation results show pH predictions when describing Biological Nutrient Removal (BNR) by the activated sludge models (ASM) 1, 2d and 3 comparing the performance of a nitrogen removal (WWTP1) and a combined nitrogen and phosphorus removal (WWTP2) treatment plant configuration under different anaerobic/anoxic/aerobic conditions. The same framework is implemented in the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 2 (BSM2) version of the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) (WWTP3) as well, predicting pH values at different cationic/anionic loads. In this way, the general applicability/flexibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated, by implementing the aqueous phase chemistry module in some

  17. Pseudospin model to describe transport properties in Bi2Sr2(CazPr1-z)Cu2O8+y

    Bastone, E.C.; Pires, A.S.T.; Silva, P.R.

    2001-01-01

    A pseudo-spin model is proposed, as a means to describe some transport properties (resistivity and Hall mobility) in Bi 2 Sr 2 (Ca z Pr 1-z )Cu 2 O 8+y . Our model is based in a double-well potential where tunneling in a given site and interaction between different lattice sites are allowed only through the excited states. Doping of the pure system by the addition of Pr increases the ratio between the activation energy and the tunneling constant. The model Hamiltonian displays some features which are present in the hydrogen-bonded ferroelectrics. Its dynamics is treated in the random phase approximation and the characteristic frequency (time) is used in a Drude formula in order to obtain some transport properties of the system, namely the electric resistivity and the Hall mobility. The quantities calculated in this work are compared with the experimental data given by Beschoten et al. (1996). (orig.)

  18. LANDPLANER (LANDscape, Plants, LANdslide and ERosion): a model to describe the dynamic response of slopes (or basins) under different changing scenarios

    Rossi, Mauro; Torri, Dino; Santi, Elisa; Bacaro, Giovanni; Marchesini, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    approaches have been proposed to model separately landslide and erosion processes, only few attempts were made to model both jointly, mostly integrating pre-existing models. To overcome this limitation we develop a new model called LANDPLANER (LANDscape, Plants, LANdslide and ERosion), specifically design to describe the dynamic response of slopes (or basins) under different changing scenarios including: (i) changes of meteorological factors, (ii) changes of vegetation or land-use, (iii) and changes of slope morphology. The was applied in different study area in order to check its basic assumptions, and to test its general operability and applicability. Results show a reasonable model behaviors and confirm its easy applicability in real cases.

  19. Secondary Science Teachers Making Sense of Model-Based Classroom Instruction: Understanding the Learning and Learning Pathways Teachers Describe as Supporting Changes in Teaching Practice

    Hvidsten, Connie J.

    Connie J. Hvidsten September 2016 Education Secondary Science Teachers Making Sense of Model-Based Classroom Instruction: Understanding the Learning and Learning Pathways Teachers Describe as Supporting Changes in Teaching Practice This dissertation consists of three papers analyzing writings and interviews of experienced secondary science teachers during and after a two-year professional development (PD) program focused on model-based reasoning (MBR). MBR is an approach to science instruction that provides opportunities for students to use conceptual models to make sense of natural phenomena in ways that are similar to the use of models within the scientific community. The aim of this research is to better understand the learning and learning pathways teachers identified as valuable in supporting changes in their teaching practice. To accomplish this aim, the papers analyze the ways teachers 1) ascribe their learning to various aspects of the program, 2) describe what they learned, and 3) reflect on the impact the PD had on their teaching practice. Twenty-one secondary science teachers completed the Innovations in Science Instruction through Modeling (ISIM) program from 2007 through 2009. Commonalities in the written reflections and interview responses led to a set of generalizable findings related to the impacts and outcomes of the PD. The first of the three papers describes elements of the ISIM program that teachers associated with their own learning. One of the most frequently mentioned PD feature was being in the position of an adult learner. Embedding learning in instructional practice by collaboratively developing and revising lessons, and observing the lessons in one-another's classrooms provided a sense of professional community, accountability, and support teachers reported were necessary to overcome the challenges of implementing new pedagogical practices. Additionally, teachers described that opportunities to reflect on their learning and connect their

  20. WE-AB-BRA-02: Development of Biomechanical Models to Describe Dose-Volume Response to Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) Patients

    McCulloch, M; Polan, D; Feng, M; Lawrence, T; Haken, R Ten; Brock, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies have shown that radiotherapy treatment for liver metastases causes marked liver hypertrophy in areas receiving low dose and atrophy/fibrosis in areas receiving high dose. The purpose of this work is to develop and evaluate a biomechanical model-based dose-response model to describe these liver responses to SBRT. Methods: In this retrospective study, a biomechanical model-based deformable registration algorithm, Morfeus, was expanded to include dose-based boundary conditions. Liver and tumor volumes were contoured on the planning images and CT/MR images three months post-RT and converted to finite element models. A thermal expansion-based relationship correlating the delivered dose and volume response was generated from 22 patients previously treated. This coefficient, combined with the planned dose, was applied as an additional boundary condition to describe the volumetric response of the liver of an additional cohort of metastatic liver patients treated with SBRT. The accuracy of the model was evaluated based on overall volumetric liver comparisons and the target registration error (TRE) using the average deviations in positions of identified vascular bifurcations on each set of registered images, with a target accuracy of the 2.5mm isotropic dose grid (vector dimension 4.3mm). Results: The thermal expansion coefficient models the volumetric change of the liver to within 3%. The accuracy of Morfeus with dose-expansion boundary conditions a TRE of 5.7±2.8mm compared to 11.2±3.7mm using rigid registration and 8.9±0.28mm using Morfeus with only spatial boundary conditions. Conclusion: A biomechanical model has been developed to describe the volumetric and spatial response of the liver to SBRT. This work will enable the improvement of correlating functional imaging with delivered dose, the mapping of the delivered dose from one treatment onto the planning images for a subsequent treatment, and will further provide information to assist

  1. PROBING THE ROLE OF DYNAMICAL FRICTION IN SHAPING THE BSS RADIAL DISTRIBUTION. I. SEMI-ANALYTICAL MODELS AND PRELIMINARY N-BODY SIMULATIONS

    Miocchi, P.; Lanzoni, B.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Alessandrini, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Pasquato, M.; Lee, Y.-W. [Department of Astronomy and Center for Galaxy Evolution Research, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Vesperini, E. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)

    2015-01-20

    We present semi-analytical models and simplified N-body simulations with 10{sup 4} particles aimed at probing the role of dynamical friction (DF) in determining the radial distribution of blue straggler stars (BSSs) in globular clusters. The semi-analytical models show that DF (which is the only evolutionary mechanism at work) is responsible for the formation of a bimodal distribution with a dip progressively moving toward the external regions of the cluster. However, these models fail to reproduce the formation of the long-lived central peak observed in all dynamically evolved clusters. The results of N-body simulations confirm the formation of a sharp central peak, which remains as a stable feature over time regardless of the initial concentration of the system. In spite of noisy behavior, a bimodal distribution forms in many cases, with the size of the dip increasing as a function of time. In the most advanced stages, the distribution becomes monotonic. These results are in agreement with the observations. Also, the shape of the peak and the location of the minimum (which, in most of cases, is within 10 core radii) turn out to be consistent with observational results. For a more detailed and close comparison with observations, including a proper calibration of the timescales of the dynamical processes driving the evolution of the BSS spatial distribution, more realistic simulations will be necessary.

  2. New Described Dermatological Disorders

    Müzeyyen Gönül

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many advances in dermatology have been made in recent years. In the present review article, newly described disorders from the last six years are presented in detail. We divided these reports into different sections, including syndromes, autoinflammatory diseases, tumors, and unclassified disease. Syndromes included are “circumferential skin creases Kunze type” and “unusual type of pachyonychia congenita or a new syndrome”; autoinflammatory diseases include “chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE syndrome,” “pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PASH syndrome,” and “pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PAPASH syndrome”; tumors include “acquired reactive digital fibroma,” “onychocytic matricoma and onychocytic carcinoma,” “infundibulocystic nail bed squamous cell carcinoma,” and “acral histiocytic nodules”; unclassified disorders include “saurian papulosis,” “symmetrical acrokeratoderma,” “confetti-like macular atrophy,” and “skin spicules,” “erythema papulosa semicircularis recidivans.”

  3. Variable stator radial turbine

    Rogo, C.; Hajek, T.; Chen, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    A radial turbine stage with a variable area nozzle was investigated. A high work capacity turbine design with a known high performance base was modified to accept a fixed vane stagger angle moveable sidewall nozzle. The nozzle area was varied by moving the forward and rearward sidewalls. Diffusing and accelerating rotor inlet ramps were evaluated in combinations with hub and shroud rotor exit rings. Performance of contoured sidewalls and the location of the sidewall split line with respect to the rotor inlet was compared to the baseline. Performance and rotor exit survey data are presented for 31 different geometries. Detail survey data at the nozzle exit are given in contour plot format for five configurations. A data base is provided for a variable geometry concept that is a viable alternative to the more common pivoted vane variable geometry radial turbine.

  4. Turbulence in tokamak plasmas. Effect of a radial electric field shear

    Payan, J.

    1994-05-01

    After a review of turbulence and transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas and the radial electric field shear effect in various tokamaks, experimental measurements obtained at Tore Supra by the means of the ALTAIR plasma diagnostic technique, are presented. Electronic drift waves destabilization mechanisms, which are the main features that could describe the experimentally observed microturbulence, are then examined. The effect of a radial electric field shear on electronic drift waves is then introduced, and results with ohmic heating are studied together with relations between turbulence and transport. The possible existence of ionic waves is rejected, and a spectral frequency modelization is presented, based on the existence of an electric field sheared radial profile. The position of the inversion point of this field is calculated for different values of the mean density and the plasma current, and the modelization is applied to the TEXT tokamak. The radial electric field at Tore Supra is then estimated. The effect of the ergodic divertor on turbulence and abnormal transport is then described and the density fluctuation radial profile in presence of the ergodic divertor is modelled. 80 figs., 120 refs

  5. Estimation of Radial Runout

    Nilsson, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The demands for ride comfort quality in today's long haulage trucks are constantly growing. A part of the ride comfort problems are represented by internal vibrations caused by rotating mechanical parts. This thesis work focus on the vibrations generated from radial runout on the wheels. These long haulage trucks travel long distances on smooth highways, with a constant speed of 90 km/h resulting in a 7 Hz oscillation. This frequency creates vibrations in the cab, which can be found annoying....

  6. Radial Fuzzy Systems

    Coufal, David

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 319, 15 July (2017), s. 1-27 ISSN 0165-0114 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13002 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : fuzzy systems * radial functions * coherence Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 2.718, year: 2016

  7. Modelling and Analysis of Radial Flux Surface Mounted Direct-Driven PMSG in Small Scale Wind Turbine

    Theint Zar Htet

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the modelling and analysis of permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG which are used in direct driven small scale wind turbines. The 3 kW PM generator which is driven directly without gear system is analyzed by Ansoft Maxwell 2D RMxprt. The performance analysis of generator includes the cogging torque in two teeth, induced coil voltages under load, winding current under load, airgap flux density distribution and so on. The modelling analysis is based on the 2D finite element techniques. In an electrical machine, an accurate determination of the geometry parameters is a vital role. The proper performance results of 3kW PMSG in small scale wind turbine can be seen in this paper.

  8. Real-time deformation of human soft tissues: A radial basis meshless 3D model based on Marquardt's algorithm.

    Zhou, Jianyong; Luo, Zu; Li, Chunquan; Deng, Mi

    2018-01-01

    When the meshless method is used to establish the mathematical-mechanical model of human soft tissues, it is necessary to define the space occupied by human tissues as the problem domain and the boundary of the domain as the surface of those tissues. Nodes should be distributed in both the problem domain and on the boundaries. Under external force, the displacement of the node is computed by the meshless method to represent the deformation of biological soft tissues. However, computation by the meshless method consumes too much time, which will affect the simulation of real-time deformation of human tissues in virtual surgery. In this article, the Marquardt's Algorithm is proposed to fit the nodal displacement at the problem domain's boundary and obtain the relationship between surface deformation and force. When different external forces are applied, the deformation of soft tissues can be quickly obtained based on this relationship. The analysis and discussion show that the improved model equations with Marquardt's Algorithm not only can simulate the deformation in real-time but also preserve the authenticity of the deformation model's physical properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Radial Field Piezoelectric Diaphragms

    Bryant, R. G.; Effinger, R. T., IV; Copeland, B. M., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    A series of active piezoelectric diaphragms were fabricated and patterned with several geometrically defined Inter-Circulating Electrodes "ICE" and Interdigitated Ring Electrodes "ICE". When a voltage potential is applied to the electrodes, the result is a radially distributed electric field that mechanically strains the piezoceramic along the Z-axis (perpendicular to the applied electric field). Unlike other piezoelectric bender actuators, these Radial Field Diaphragms (RFDs) strain concentrically yet afford high displacements (several times that of the equivalent Unimorph) while maintaining a constant circumference. One of the more intriguing aspects is that the radial strain field reverses itself along the radius of the RFD while the tangential strain remains relatively constant. The result is a Z-deflection that has a conical profile. This paper covers the fabrication and characterization of the 5 cm. (2 in.) diaphragms as a function of poling field strength, ceramic thickness, electrode type and line spacing, as well as the surface topography, the resulting strain field and displacement as a function of applied voltage at low frequencies. The unique features of these RFDs include the ability to be clamped about their perimeter with little or no change in displacement, the environmentally insulated packaging, and a highly repeatable fabrication process that uses commodity materials.

  10. Thin viscoelastic disc subjected to radial non-stationary loading

    Adámek V.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of non-stationary wave phenomena in isotropic viscoelastic solids using analytical approaches is the aim of this paper. Concretely, the problem of a thin homogeneous disc subjected to radial pressure load nonzero on the part of its rim is solved. The external excitation is described by the Heaviside function in time, so the nonstationary state of stress is induced in the disc. Dissipative material behaviour of solid studied is represented by the discrete material model of standard linear viscoelastic solid in the Zener configuration. After the derivation of motion equations final form, the method of integral transforms in combination with the Fourier method is used for finding the problem solution. The solving process results in the derivation of integral transforms of radial and circumferential displacement components. Finally, the type of derived functions singularities and possible methods for their inverse Laplace transform are mentioned.

  11. A hybrid self-adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization–Genetic Algorithm–Radial Basis Function model for annual electricity demand prediction

    Yu, Shiwei; Wang, Ke; Wei, Yi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A hybrid self-adaptive PSO–GA-RBF model is proposed for electricity demand prediction. • Each mixed-coding particle is composed by two coding parts of binary and real. • Five independent variables have been selected to predict future electricity consumption in Wuhan. • The proposed model has a simpler structure or higher estimating precision than other ANN models. • No matter what the scenario, the electricity consumption of Wuhan will grow rapidly. - Abstract: The present study proposes a hybrid Particle Swarm Optimization and Genetic Algorithm optimized Radial Basis Function (PSO–GA-RBF) neural network for prediction of annual electricity demand. In the model, each mixed-coding particle (or chromosome) is composed of two coding parts, binary and real, which optimizes the structure of the RBF by GA operation and the parameters of the basis and weights by a PSO–GA implementation. Five independent variables have been selected to predict future electricity consumption in Wuhan by using optimized networks. The results shows that (1) the proposed PSO–GA-RBF model has a simpler network structure (fewer hidden neurons) or higher estimation precision than other selected ANN models; and (2) no matter what the scenario, the electricity consumption of Wuhan will grow rapidly at average annual growth rates of about 9.7–11.5%. By 2020, the electricity demand in the planning scenario, the highest among the scenarios, will be 95.85 billion kW h. The lowest demand is estimated for the business-as-usual scenario, and will be 88.45 billion kW h

  12. Perceived radial translation during centrifugation

    Bos, J.E.; Correia Grácio, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Linear acceleration generally gives rise to translation perception. Centripetal acceleration during centrifugation, however, has never been reported giving rise to a radial, inward translation perception. OBJECTIVE: To study whether centrifugation can induce a radial translation

  13. A plant-wide aqueous phase chemistry module describing pH variations and ion speciation/pairing in wastewater treatment process models

    Flores Alsina, Xavier; Kazadi Mbamba, Christian; Solon, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    at different cationic/anionic loads. In this way, the general applicability/flexibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated, by implementing the aqueous phase chemistry module in some of the most frequently used WWTP process simulation models. Finally, it is shown how traditional wastewater modelling......, but unavoidable, additional degree of complexity when representing cationic/anionic behaviour in Activated Sludge (AS)/Anaerobic Digestion (AD) systems. In this paper, a plant-wide aqueous phase chemistry module describing pH variations plus ion speciation/pairing is presented and interfaced with industry......) in order to reduce the overall stiffness of the system, thereby enhancing simulation speed. Additionally, a multi-dimensional version of the Newton-Raphson algorithm is applied to handle the existing multiple algebraic inter-dependencies. The latter is reinforced with the Simulated Annealing method...

  14. Unifying Pore Network Modeling, Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) Theory and Experiment to Describe Impact of Spatial Heterogeneities on Solute Dispersion at Multiple Length-scales

    Bijeljic, B.; Blunt, M. J.; Rhodes, M. E.

    2009-04-01

    This talk will describe and highlight the advantages offered by a novel methodology that unifies pore network modeling, CTRW theory and experiment in description of solute dispersion in porous media. Solute transport in a porous medium is characterized by the interplay of advection and diffusion (described by Peclet number, Pe) that cause dispersion of solute particles. Dispersion is traditionally described by dispersion coefficients, D, that are commonly calculated from the spatial moments of the plume. Using a pore-scale network model based on particle tracking, the rich Peclet-number dependence of dispersion coefficient is predicted from first principles and is shown to compare well with experimental data for restricted diffusion, transition, power-law and mechanical dispersion regimes in the asymptotic limit. In the asymptotic limit D is constant and can be used in an averaged advection-dispersion equation. However, it is highly important to recognize that, until the velocity field is fully sampled, the particle transport is non-Gaussian and D possesses temporal or spatial variation. Furthermore, temporal probability density functions (PDF) of tracer particles are studied in pore networks and an excellent agreement for the spectrum of transition times for particles from pore to pore is obtained between network model results and CTRW theory. Based on the truncated power-law interpretation of PDF-s, the physical origin of the power-law scaling of dispersion coefficient vs. Peclet number has been explained for unconsolidated porous media, sands and a number of sandstones, arriving at the same conclusion from numerical network modelling, analytic CTRW theory and experiment. The length traveled by solute plumes before Gaussian behaviour is reached increases with an increase in heterogeneity and/or Pe. This opens up the question on the nature of dispersion in natural systems where the heterogeneities at the larger scales will significantly increase the range of

  15. Empirical model based on Weibull distribution describing the destruction kinetics of natural microbiota in pineapple (Ananas comosus L.) puree during high-pressure processing.

    Chakraborty, Snehasis; Rao, Pavuluri Srinivasa; Mishra, Hari Niwas

    2015-10-15

    High pressure inactivation of natural microbiota viz. aerobic mesophiles (AM), psychrotrophs (PC), yeasts and molds (YM), total coliforms (TC) and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in pineapple puree was studied within the experimental domain of 0.1-600 MPa and 30-50 °C with a treatment time up to 20 min. A complete destruction of yeasts and molds was obtained at 500 MPa/50 °C/15 min; whereas no counts were detected for TC and LAB at 300 MPa/30 °C/15 min. A maximum of two log cycle reductions was obtained for YM during pulse pressurization at the severe process intensity of 600 MPa/50 °C/20 min. The Weibull model clearly described the non-linearity of the survival curves during the isobaric period. The tailing effect, as confirmed by the shape parameter (β) of the survival curve, was obtained in case of YM (β1) was observed for the other microbial groups. Analogous to thermal death kinetics, the activation energy (Ea, kJ·mol(-1)) and the activation volume (Va, mL·mol(-1)) values were computed further to describe the temperature and pressure dependencies of the scale parameter (δ, min), respectively. A higher δ value was obtained for each microbe at a lower temperature and it decreased with an increase in pressure. A secondary kinetic model was developed describing the inactivation rate (k, min(-1)) as a function of pressure (P, MPa) and temperature (T, K) including the dependencies of Ea and Va on P and T, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Neutron and gamma-ray spectra measurement on the model of the KS-150 reactor radial shielding

    Holman, M.; Hogel, J.; Marik, J.; Kovarik, K.; Franc, L.; Vespalec, R.

    1977-01-01

    A shortened model of the peripheral region of the KS-150 reactor core consisting of two rows of fuel elements and a reflector was constructed from the peripheral fuel elements of the KS-150 reactor core in an experiment on the TR-0 reactor. The mockup of the thermal shield (10 cm of steel), the pressure vessel (15 cm of steel) and the inner wall of the water biological shielding (2 cm of steel) of the KS-150 reactor were erected outside the TR-0 vessel. Fast neutron and gamma spectra were measured with a stilbene crystal scintillation spectrometer. The resonance neutron spectra were measured with 197 Au, 63 Cu and 23 Na resonance activation detectors. Fast neutron spectra inside the reactor were measured with a 10 mm diameter by 10 mm thick stilbene crystal spectrometer, outside the reactor with a 10 mm diameter by 10 mm thick and a 20 mm diameter by 20 mm thick stilbene crystal spectrometer. Neutron spectra in the energy regions of 1 eV to 3 keV and 0.6 MeV to 0.8 MeV were obtained on the core periphery, on the reflector half-thickness and in front of and behind the reactor thermal shield. Gamma spectra were obtained in front of and behind the thermal shield. It was found that the attenuation of neutron fluxes by the reflector and the thermal shield increased with increasing energy while gamma radiation attenuation decreased with increasing energy. It was not possible to obtain the neutron spectrum in the 10 to 600 keV energy range because suitable detection instrumentation was not available. (J.P.)

  17. Radial extension of drift waves in presence of velocity profiles

    Sen, S.; Weiland, J.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of a radially varying poloidal velocity field on the recently found radially extended toroidal drift waves is investigated analytically. The role of velocity curvature (υ φ '') is found to have robust effects on the radial model structure of the mode. For a positive value of the curvature (Usually found in the H-mode edges) the radial model envelope, similar to the sheared slab case, becomes fully outgoing. The mode is therefore stable. On the other hand, for a negative value of the curvature (usually observed in the L-mode edges) all the characteristics of conventional drift waves return back. The radial mode envelope reduces to a localized Gaussian shape and the mode is therefore unstable again for typical (magnetic) shear values in tokamaks. Velocity shear (υ φ ??) on the other hand is found to have rather insignificant role both in determining the radial model structure and stability

  18. A parametric model to describe neutron spectra around high-energy electron accelerators and its application in neutron spectrometry with Bonner Spheres

    Bedogni, Roberto; Pelliccioni, Maurizio; Esposito, Adolfo

    2010-03-01

    Due to the increased interest of the scientific community in the applications of synchrotron light, there is an increasing demand of high-energy electron facilities, testified by the construction of several new facilities worldwide. The radiation protection around such facilities requires accurate experimental methods to determine the dose due to prompt radiation fields. Neutron fields, in particular, are the most complex to measure, because they extend in energy from thermal (10 -8 MeV) up to hundreds MeV and because the responses of dosemeters and survey meters usually have large energy dependence. The Bonner Spheres Spectrometer (BSS) is in practice the only instrument able to respond over the whole energy range of interest, and for this reason it is frequently used to derive neutron spectra and dosimetric quantities in accelerator workplaces. Nevertheless, complex unfolding algorithms are needed to derive the neutron spectra from the experimental BSS data. This paper presents a parametric model specially developed for the unfolding of the experimental data measured with BSS around high-energy electron accelerators. The work consists of the following stages: (1) Generation with the FLUKA code, of a set of neutron spectra representing the radiation environment around accelerators with different electron energies; (2) formulation of a parametric model able to describe these spectra, with particular attention to the high-energy component (>10 MeV), which may be responsible for a large part of the dose in workplaces; and (3) implementation of this model in an existing unfolding code.

  19. A parametric model to describe neutron spectra around high-energy electron accelerators and its application in neutron spectrometry with Bonner Spheres

    Bedogni, Roberto; Pelliccioni, Maurizio; Esposito, Adolfo

    2010-01-01

    Due to the increased interest of the scientific community in the applications of synchrotron light, there is an increasing demand of high-energy electron facilities, testified by the construction of several new facilities worldwide. The radiation protection around such facilities requires accurate experimental methods to determine the dose due to prompt radiation fields. Neutron fields, in particular, are the most complex to measure, because they extend in energy from thermal (10 -8 MeV) up to hundreds MeV and because the responses of dosemeters and survey meters usually have large energy dependence. The Bonner Spheres Spectrometer (BSS) is in practice the only instrument able to respond over the whole energy range of interest, and for this reason it is frequently used to derive neutron spectra and dosimetric quantities in accelerator workplaces. Nevertheless, complex unfolding algorithms are needed to derive the neutron spectra from the experimental BSS data. This paper presents a parametric model specially developed for the unfolding of the experimental data measured with BSS around high-energy electron accelerators. The work consists of the following stages: (1) Generation with the FLUKA code, of a set of neutron spectra representing the radiation environment around accelerators with different electron energies; (2) formulation of a parametric model able to describe these spectra, with particular attention to the high-energy component (>10 MeV), which may be responsible for a large part of the dose in workplaces; and (3) implementation of this model in an existing unfolding code.

  20. Where have I been? Where should I go? Spatial working memory on a radial arm maze in a rat model of depression.

    Sophie Helene Richter

    Full Text Available Disturbances in cognitive functioning are among the most debilitating problems experienced by patients with major depression. Investigations of these deficits in animals help to extend and refine our understanding of human emotional disorder, while at the same time providing valid tools to study higher executive functions in animals. We employ the "learned helplessness" genetic rat model of depression in studying working memory using an eight arm radial maze procedure with temporal delay. This so-called delayed spatial win-shift task consists of three phases, training, delay and test, requiring rats to hold information on-line across a retention interval and making choices based on this information in the test phase. According to a 2×2 factorial design, working memory performance of thirty-one congenitally helpless (cLH and non-helpless (cNLH rats was tested on eighteen trials, additionally imposing two different delay durations, 30 s and 15 min, respectively. While not observing a general cognitive deficit in cLH rats, the delay length greatly influenced maze performance. Notably, performance was most impaired in cLH rats tested with the shorter 30 s delay, suggesting a stress-related disruption of attentional processes in rats that are more sensitive to stress. Our study provides direct animal homologues of clinically important measures in human research, and contributes to the non-invasive assessment of cognitive deficits associated with depression.

  1. Reble, a radially converging electron beam accelerator

    Ramirez, J.J.; Prestwich, K.R.

    1976-01-01

    The Reble accelerator at Sandia Laboratories is described. This accelerator was developed to provide an experimental source for studying the relevant diode physics, beam propagation, beam energy deposition in a gas using a radially converging e-beam. The nominal parameters for Reble are 1 MV, 200 kA, 20 ns e-beam pulse. The anode and cathode are concentric cylinders with the anode as the inner cylinder. The radial beam can be propagated through the thin foil anode into the laser gas volume. The design and performance of the various components of the accelerator are presented

  2. Radial reflection diffraction tomography

    Lehman, Sean K.

    2012-12-18

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  3. Anomalies of radial and ulnar arteries

    Rajani Singh

    Full Text Available Abstract During dissection conducted in an anatomy department of the right upper limb of the cadaver of a 70-year-old male, both origin and course of the radial and ulnar arteries were found to be anomalous. After descending 5.5 cm from the lower border of the teres major, the brachial artery anomalously bifurcated into a radial artery medially and an ulnar artery laterally. In the arm, the ulnar artery lay lateral to the median nerve. It followed a normal course in the forearm. The radial artery was medial to the median nerve in the arm and then, at the level of the medial epicondyle, it crossed from the medial to the lateral side of the forearm, superficial to the flexor muscles. The course of the radial artery was superficial and tortuous throughout the arm and forearm. The variations of radial and ulnar arteries described above were associated with anomalous formation and course of the median nerve in the arm. Knowledge of neurovascular anomalies are important for vascular surgeons and radiologists.

  4. Manufacturing of Precision Forgings by Radial Forging

    Wallner, S.; Harrer, O.; Buchmayr, B.; Hofer, F.

    2011-01-01

    Radial forging is a multi purpose incremental forging process using four tools on the same plane. It is widely used for the forming of tool steels, super alloys as well as titanium- and refractory metals. The range of application goes from reducing the diameters of shafts, tubes, stepped shafts and axels, as well as for creating internal profiles for tubes in Near-Net-Shape and Net-Shape quality. Based on actual development of a weight optimized transmission input shaft, the specific features of radial forging technology is demonstrated. Also a Finite Element Model for the simulation of the process is shown which leads to reduced pre-processing effort and reduced computing time compared to other published simulation methods for radial forging. The finite element model can be applied to quantify the effects of different forging strategies.

  5. Radial supports of face motors with slack compensation

    Kuznetsova, I I; Gelman, A B; Krekina, T V

    1982-01-01

    The design of a radial support of a face motor with slack compensation is described, and gives the results of field tests which confirm the performance capacity of the experimental support both from the viewpoint of durability, and in relation to preventing radial slack of the face motor shaft.

  6. A Weibull model to describe antimicrobial kinetics of oregano and lemongrass essential oils against Salmonella Enteritidis in ground beef during refrigerated storage.

    de Oliveira, Thales Leandro Coutinho; Soares, Rodrigo de Araújo; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf

    2013-03-01

    The antimicrobial effect of oregano (Origanum vulgare L.) and lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf.) essential oils (EOs) against Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis in in vitro experiments, and inoculated in ground bovine meat during refrigerated storage (4±2 °C) for 6 days was evaluated. The Weibull model was tested to fit survival/inactivation bacterial curves (estimating of p and δ parameters). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value for both EOs on S. Enteritidis was 3.90 μl/ml. The EO concentrations applied in the ground beef were 3.90, 7.80 and 15.60 μl/g, based on MIC levels and possible activity reduction by food constituents. Both evaluated EOs in all tested levels, showed antimicrobial effects, with microbial populations reducing (p≤0.05) along time storage. Evaluating fit-quality parameters (RSS and RSE) Weibull models are able to describe the inactivation curves of EOs against S. Enteritidis. The application of EOs in processed meats can be used to control pathogens during refrigerated shelf-life. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Radial stability of anisotropic strange quark stars

    Arbañil, José D.V.; Malheiro, M., E-mail: jose.arbanil@upn.pe, E-mail: malheiro@ita.br [ITA—Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica—Departamento de Física, 12228-900, São José dos Campos, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-11-01

    The influence of the anisotropy in the equilibrium and stability of strange stars is investigated through the numerical solution of the hydrostatic equilibrium equation and the radial oscillation equation, both modified from their original version to include this effect. The strange matter inside the quark stars is described by the MIT bag model equation of state. For the anisotropy two different kinds of local anisotropic σ = p {sub t} − p {sub r} are considered, where p {sub t} and p {sub r} are respectively the tangential and the radial pressure: one that is null at the star's surface defined by p {sub r} ( R ) = 0, and one that is nonnull at the surface, namely, σ {sub s} = 0 and σ {sub s} {sub ≠} {sub 0}. In the case σ {sub s} = 0, the maximum mass value and the zero frequency of oscillation are found at the same central energy density, indicating that the maximum mass marks the onset of the instability. For the case σ {sub s} {sub ≠} {sub 0}, we show that the maximum mass point and the zero frequency of oscillation coincide in the same central energy density value only in a sequence of equilibrium configurations with the same value of σ {sub s} . Thus, the stability star regions are determined always by the condition dM / d ρ {sub c} {sub >} {sub 0} only when the tangential pressure is maintained fixed at the star surface's p {sub t} ( R ). These results are also quite important to analyze the stability of other anisotropic compact objects such as neutron stars, boson stars and gravastars.

  8. Investigation of radial shear in the wall-base juncture of a 1:4 scale prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    Dameron, R.A.; Rashid, Y.R. [ANATECH Corp., San Diego, CA (United States); Luk, V.K.; Hessheimer, M.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Construction of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) model is underway as part of a cooperative containment research program at Sandia National Laboratories. The work is co-sponsored by the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Preliminary analyses of the Sandia 1:4 Scale PCCV Model have determined axisymmetric global behavior and have estimated the potential for failure in several areas, including the wall-base juncture and near penetrations. Though the liner tearing failure mode has been emphasized, the assumption of a liner tearing failure mode is largely based on experience with reinforced concrete containments. For the PCCV, the potential for shear failure at or near the liner tearing pressure may be considerable and requires detailed investigation. This paper examines the behavior of the PCCV in the region most susceptible to a radial shear failure, the wall-basemat juncture region. Prediction of shear failure in concrete structures is a difficult goal, both experimentally and analytically. As a structure begins to deform under an applied system of forces that produce shear, other deformation modes such as bending and tension/compression begin to influence the response. Analytically, difficulties lie in characterizing the decrease in shear stiffness and shear stress and in predicting the associated transfer of stress to reinforcement as cracks become wider and more extensive. This paper examines existing methods for representing concrete shear response and existing criteria for predicting shear failure, and it discusses application of these methods and criteria to the study of the 1:4 scale PCCV.

  9. Investigation of radial shear in the wall-base juncture of a 1:4 scale prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    Dameron, R.A.; Rashid, Y.R.; Luk, V.K.; Hessheimer, M.F.

    1998-04-01

    Construction of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) model is underway as part of a cooperative containment research program at Sandia National Laboratories. The work is co-sponsored by the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Preliminary analyses of the Sandia 1:4 Scale PCCV Model have determined axisymmetric global behavior and have estimated the potential for failure in several areas, including the wall-base juncture and near penetrations. Though the liner tearing failure mode has been emphasized, the assumption of a liner tearing failure mode is largely based on experience with reinforced concrete containments. For the PCCV, the potential for shear failure at or near the liner tearing pressure may be considerable and requires detailed investigation. This paper examines the behavior of the PCCV in the region most susceptible to a radial shear failure, the wall-basemat juncture region. Prediction of shear failure in concrete structures is a difficult goal, both experimentally and analytically. As a structure begins to deform under an applied system of forces that produce shear, other deformation modes such as bending and tension/compression begin to influence the response. Analytically, difficulties lie in characterizing the decrease in shear stiffness and shear stress and in predicting the associated transfer of stress to reinforcement as cracks become wider and more extensive. This paper examines existing methods for representing concrete shear response and existing criteria for predicting shear failure, and it discusses application of these methods and criteria to the study of the 1:4 scale PCCV

  10. Numerical simulation of radial compressor stage

    Syka, T.; Luňáček, O.

    2013-04-01

    Article describes numerical simulations of air flow in radial compressor stage in NUMECA CFD software. In simulations geometry variants with and without seals are used. During tasks evaluating was observed seals influence on flow field and performance parameters of compressor stage. Also is described CFDresults comparison with results from design software based on experimental measurements and monitoring of influence of seals construction on compressor stage efficiency.

  11. Numerical simulation of radial compressor stage

    Luňáček O.; Syka T.

    2013-01-01

    Article describes numerical simulations of air flow in radial compressor stage in NUMECA CFD software. In simulations geometry variants with and without seals are used. During tasks evaluating was observed seals influence on flow field and performance parameters of compressor stage. Also is described CFDresults comparison with results from design software based on experimental measurements and monitoring of influence of seals construction on compressor stage efficiency.

  12. Numerical simulation of radial compressor stage

    Luňáček O.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Article describes numerical simulations of air flow in radial compressor stage in NUMECA CFD software. In simulations geometry variants with and without seals are used. During tasks evaluating was observed seals influence on flow field and performance parameters of compressor stage. Also is described CFDresults comparison with results from design software based on experimental measurements and monitoring of influence of seals construction on compressor stage efficiency.

  13. Radial and tangential friction in heavy ion strongly damped collisions

    Jain, A.K.; Sarma, N.

    1979-01-01

    Deeply inelastic heavy ion collisions have been successfully described in terms of a nucleon exchange mechanism between two nucleon clouds. This model has also predicted the large angular momentum that is induced in the colliding nuclei. However computations were simplified in the earlier work by assuming that the friction was perturbation on the elastic scattering trajectory. Results of a more rigorous calculation are reported and the effect of modification of the trajectory on the energy transfer, the angular momentum induced and on the ratio of the radial to the tangential friction coefficients is reported. (auth.)

  14. Mathematical models to describe iontophoretic transport in vitro and in vivo and the effect of current application on the skin barrier.

    Gratieri, Taís; Kalia, Yogeshvar N

    2013-02-01

    more esoteric "constant phase element"; the latter provides a better mathematical description of the "non-ideal" behaviour of skin impedance. However, in addition to simply providing a "mathematical" fit of the observed data, it is essential to relate these circuit elements to biological structures present in the skin. More recently, attention has also turned to what happens when the permeant crosses the epidermis and reaches the systemic circulation and pharmacokinetic models have been proposed to interpret data from iontophoretic delivery studies in vivo. Here, we provide an overview of mathematical models that have been proposed to describe (i) the effect of current application on the skin and the implications for potential iontophoretic transport pathways, (ii) electrotransport kinetics and (iii) the fate of iontophoretically delivered drugs once they enter the systemic circulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Radial semiconductor drift chambers

    Rawlings, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    The conditions under which the energy resolution of a radial semiconductor drift chamber based detector system becomes dominated by the step noise from the detector dark current have been investigated. To minimise the drift chamber dark current attention should be paid to carrier generation at Si/SiO 2 interfaces. This consideration conflicts with the desire to reduce the signal risetime: a higher drift field for shorter signal pulses requires a larger area of SiO 2 . Calculations for the single shaping and pseudo Gaussian passive filters indicate that for the same degree of signal risetime sensitivity in a system dominated by the step noise from the detector dark current, the pseudo Gaussian filter gives only a 3% improvement in signal/noise and 12% improvement in rate capability compared with the single shaper performance. (orig.)

  16. ISR Radial Field Magnet

    1983-01-01

    There were 37 (normal) + 3 (special) Radial Field magnets in the ISR to adjust vertically the closed orbit. Gap heights and strengths were 200 mm and .12 Tm in the normal magnets, 220 mm and .18 Tm in the special ones. The core length was 430 mm in both types. Due to their small length as compared to the gap heights the end fringe field errors were very important and had to be compensated by suitably shaping the poles. In order to save on cables, as these magnets were located very far from their power supplies, the coils of the normal type magnets were formed by many turns of solid cpper conductor with some interleaved layers of hollow conductor directly cooled by circulating water

  17. The ARCS radial collimator

    Stone, M.B.; Abernathy, D.L.; Niedziela, J.L.; Overbay, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    We have designed, installed, and commissioned a scattered beam radial collimator for use at the ARCS Wide Angular Range Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source. The collimator has been designed to work effectively for thermal and epithermal neutrons and with a range of sample environments. Other design considerations include the accommodation of working within a high vacuum environment and having the ability to quickly install and remove the collimator from the scattered beam. The collimator is composed of collimating blades (or septa). The septa are 12 micron thick Kapton foils coated on each side with 39 microns of enriched boron carbide ( 10 B 4 C with 10 B > 96%) in an ultra-high vacuum compatible binder. The collimator blades represent an additional 22 m 2 of surface area. In the article we present collimator's design and performance and methodologies for its effective use

  18. Predictive modelling of grain size distributions from marine electromagnetic profiling data using end-member analysis and a radial basis function network

    Baasch, B.; M"uller, H.; von Dobeneck, T.

    2018-04-01

    In this work we present a new methodology to predict grain-size distributions from geophysical data. Specifically, electric conductivity and magnetic susceptibility of seafloor sediments recovered from electromagnetic profiling data are used to predict grain-size distributions along shelf-wide survey lines. Field data from the NW Iberian shelf are investigated and reveal a strong relation between the electromagnetic properties and grain-size distribution. The here presented workflow combines unsupervised and supervised machine learning techniques. Nonnegative matrix factorisation is used to determine grain-size end-members from sediment surface samples. Four end-members were found which well represent the variety of sediments in the study area. A radial-basis function network modified for prediction of compositional data is then used to estimate the abundances of these end-members from the electromagnetic properties. The end-members together with their predicted abundances are finally back transformed to grain-size distributions. A minimum spatial variation constraint is implemented in the training of the network to avoid overfitting and to respect the spatial distribution of sediment patterns. The predicted models are tested via leave-one-out cross-validation revealing high prediction accuracy with coefficients of determination (R2) between 0.76 and 0.89. The predicted grain-size distributions represent the well-known sediment facies and patterns on the NW Iberian shelf and provide new insights into their distribution, transition and dynamics. This study suggests that electromagnetic benthic profiling in combination with machine learning techniques is a powerful tool to estimate grain-size distribution of marine sediments.

  19. Effect of Magnetic Mirror on the Asymmetry of the Radial Profile of Near-Wall Conductivity in Hall Thrusters

    Yu Daren; Liu Hui; Fu Haiyang

    2009-01-01

    Considering the actual magnetic field configuration in a Hall thruster, the effect of magnetic mirror on the radial profile of near-wall conductivity (NWC) is studied in this paper. The plasma electron dynamic process is described by the test particle method. The Monte Carlo scheme is used to solve this model. The radial profile of electron mobility is obtained and the role of magnetic mirror in NWC is analysed both theoretically and numerically. The numerical results show that the electron mobility peak due to NWC is inversely proportional to the magnetic mirror ratio and the asymmetry of electron mobility along the radial direction gets greater when the magnetic mirror is considered. This effect indicates that apart from the disparity in the magnetic field strength, the difference in the magnetic mirror ratio near the inner and outer walls would actually augment the asymmetry of the radial profile of NWC in Hall thrusters.

  20. Waves on radial film flows

    Cholemari, Murali R.; Arakeri, Jaywant H.

    2005-08-01

    We study the stability of surface waves on the radial film flow created by a vertical cylindrical water jet striking a horizontal plate. In such flows, surface waves have been found to be unstable and can cause transition to turbulence. This surface-wave-induced transition is different from the well-known Tollmien-Schlichting wave-induced transition. The present study aims at understanding the instability and the transition process. We do a temporal stability analysis by assuming the flow to be locally two-dimensional but including spatial variations to first order in the basic flow. The waves are found to be dispersive, mostly unstable, and faster than the mean flow. Spatial variation is the major destabilizing factor. Experiments are done to test the results of the linear stability analysis and to document the wave breakup and transition. Comparison between theory and experiments is fairly good and indicates the adequacy of the model.

  1. Antiproton compression and radial measurements

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jorgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page R D; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, achieved by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile, and its relation to that of the electron plasma. We also measure the outer radial profile by ejecting antiprotons to the trap wall using an octupole magnet.

  2. MR accuracy and arthroscopic incidence of meniscal radial tears

    Magee, Thomas; Shapiro, Marc; Williams, David [Department of Radiology, Neuroimaging Institute, 27 East Hibiscus Blvd., Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2002-12-01

    A meniscal radial tear is a vertical tear that involves the inner meniscal margin. The tear is most frequent in the middle third of the lateral meniscus and may extend outward in any direction. We report (1) the arthroscopic incidence of radial tears, (2) MR signs that aid in the detection of radial tears and (3) our prospective accuracy in detection of radial tears. Design and patients. Three musculoskeletal radiologists prospectively read 200 consecutive MR examinations of the knee that went on to arthroscopy by one orthopedic surgeon. MR images were assessed for location and MR characteristics of radial tears. MR criteria used for diagnosis of a radial tear were those outlined by Tuckman et al.: truncation, abnormal morphology and/or lack of continuity or absence of the meniscus on one or more MR images. An additional criterion used was abnormal increased signal in that area on fat-saturated proton density or T2-weighted coronal and sagittal images. Prospective MR readings were correlated with the arthroscopic findings.Results. Of the 200 consecutive knee arthroscopies, 28 patients had radial tears reported arthroscopically (14% incidence). MR readings prospectively demonstrated 19 of the 28 radial tears (68% sensitivity) when the criteria for diagnosis of a radial tear were truncation or abnormal morphology of the meniscus. With the use of the additional criterion of increased signal in the area of abnormal morphology on fat-saturated T2-weighted or proton density weighted sequences, the prospective sensitivity was 25 of 28 radial tears (89% sensitivity). There were no radial tears described in MR reports that were not demonstrated on arthroscopy (i.e., there were no false positive MR readings of radial tears in these 200 patients). Radial tears are commonly seen at arthroscopy. There was a 14% incidence in this series of 200 patients who underwent arthroscopy. Prospective detection of radial tears was 68% as compared with arthroscopy when the criteria as

  3. MR accuracy and arthroscopic incidence of meniscal radial tears

    Magee, Thomas; Shapiro, Marc; Williams, David

    2002-01-01

    A meniscal radial tear is a vertical tear that involves the inner meniscal margin. The tear is most frequent in the middle third of the lateral meniscus and may extend outward in any direction. We report (1) the arthroscopic incidence of radial tears, (2) MR signs that aid in the detection of radial tears and (3) our prospective accuracy in detection of radial tears. Design and patients. Three musculoskeletal radiologists prospectively read 200 consecutive MR examinations of the knee that went on to arthroscopy by one orthopedic surgeon. MR images were assessed for location and MR characteristics of radial tears. MR criteria used for diagnosis of a radial tear were those outlined by Tuckman et al.: truncation, abnormal morphology and/or lack of continuity or absence of the meniscus on one or more MR images. An additional criterion used was abnormal increased signal in that area on fat-saturated proton density or T2-weighted coronal and sagittal images. Prospective MR readings were correlated with the arthroscopic findings.Results. Of the 200 consecutive knee arthroscopies, 28 patients had radial tears reported arthroscopically (14% incidence). MR readings prospectively demonstrated 19 of the 28 radial tears (68% sensitivity) when the criteria for diagnosis of a radial tear were truncation or abnormal morphology of the meniscus. With the use of the additional criterion of increased signal in the area of abnormal morphology on fat-saturated T2-weighted or proton density weighted sequences, the prospective sensitivity was 25 of 28 radial tears (89% sensitivity). There were no radial tears described in MR reports that were not demonstrated on arthroscopy (i.e., there were no false positive MR readings of radial tears in these 200 patients). Radial tears are commonly seen at arthroscopy. There was a 14% incidence in this series of 200 patients who underwent arthroscopy. Prospective detection of radial tears was 68% as compared with arthroscopy when the criteria as

  4. MODELING OF OPERATION OF COAXIAL-LINEAR MOTORS WITH AXIAL AND RADIAL DIRECTIONS OF MAGNETIZATION OF PERMANENT MAGNETS IN DYNAMIC MODE

    G.M. Golenkov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical and experimental investigations of the amplitude, phase and inertia-power frequency characteristics of two types of coaxial-linear electric motors of back-and-forth motion with permanent magnets, which magnetization vector is directed axially and radially relative to the axis of the runner are carried out. The comparative analysis of characteristics of these motors is presented.

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Gas-Phase Radial Dispersion in Fixed Beds with Wall Effects

    Anthony G. Dixon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The effective medium approach to radial fixed bed dispersion models, in which radial dispersion of mass is superimposed on axial plug flow, is based on a constant effective dispersion coefficient, DT. For packed beds of a small tube-to-particle diameter ratio (N, the experimentally-observed decrease in this parameter near the tube wall is accounted for by a lumped resistance located at the tube wall, the wall mass transfer coefficient km. This work presents validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations to obtain detailed radial velocity and concentration profiles for eight different computer-generated packed tubes of spheres in the range 5.04 ≤ N ≤ 9.3 and over a range of flow rates 87 ≤ Re ≤ 870 where Re is based on superficial velocity and the particle diameter dp. Initial runs with pure air gave axial velocity profiles vz(r averaged over the length of the packing. Then, simulations with the tube wall coated with methane yielded radial concentration profiles. A model with only DT could not describe the radial concentration profiles. The two-parameter model with DT and km agreed better with the bed-center concentration profiles, but not with the sharp decreases in concentration close to the tube wall. A three-parameter model based on classical two-layer mixing length theory, with a wall-function for the decrease in transverse radial convective transport in the near-wall region, showed greatly improved ability to reproduce the near-wall concentration profiles.

  6. Radial gas turbine design

    Krausche, S.; Ohlsson, Johan

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a program dealing with design point calculations of radial turbine machinery, including both compressor and turbine, with as few input data as possible. Some simple stress calculations and turbine metal blade temperatures were also included. This program was then implanted in a German thermodynamics program, Gasturb, a program calculating design and off-design performance of gas turbines. The calculations proceed with a lot of assumptions, necessary to finish the task, concerning pressure losses, velocity distribution, blockage, etc., and have been correlated with empirical data from VAT. Most of these values could have been input data, but to prevent the user of the program from drowning in input values, they are set as default values in the program code. The output data consist of geometry, Mach numbers, predicted component efficiency etc., and a number of graphical plots of geometry and velocity triangles. For the cases examined, the error in predicted efficiency level was within {+-} 1-2% points, and quite satisfactory errors in geometrical and thermodynamic conditions were obtained Examination paper. 18 refs, 36 figs

  7. Radial flow heat exchanger

    Valenzuela, Javier

    2001-01-01

    A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

  8. Stability of radial swirl flows

    Dou, H S; Khoo, B C

    2012-01-01

    The energy gradient theory is used to examine the stability of radial swirl flows. It is found that the flow of free vortex is always stable, while the introduction of a radial flow will induce the flow to be unstable. It is also shown that the pure radial flow is stable. Thus, there is a flow angle between the pure circumferential flow and the pure radial flow at which the flow is most unstable. It is demonstrated that the magnitude of this flow angle is related to the Re number based on the radial flow rate, and it is near the pure circumferential flow. The result obtained in this study is useful for the design of vaneless diffusers of centrifugal compressors and pumps as well as other industrial devices.

  9. Procedure to describe clavicular motion.

    Gutierrez Delgado, Guivey; De Beule, Matthieu; Ortega Cardentey, Dolgis R; Segers, Patrick; Iznaga Benítez, Arsenio M; Rodríguez Moliner, Tania; Verhegghe, Benedict; Palmans, Tanneke; Van Hoof, Tom; Van Tongel, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    For many years, researchers have attempted to describe shoulder motions by using different mathematical methods. The aim of this study was to describe a procedure to quantify clavicular motion. The procedure proposed for the kinematic analysis consists of 4 main processes: 3 transcortical pins in the clavicle, motion capture, obtaining 3-dimensional bone models, and data processing. Clavicular motion by abduction (30° to 150°) and flexion (55° to 165°) were characterized by an increment of retraction of 27° to 33°, elevation of 25° to 28°, and posterior rotation of 14° to 15°, respectively. In circumduction, clavicular movement described an ellipse, which was reflected by retraction and elevation. Kinematic analysis shows that the articular surfaces move by simultaneously rolling and sliding on the convex surface of the sternum for the 3 movements of abduction, flexion, and circumduction. The use of 3 body landmarks in the clavicle and the direct measurement of bone allowed description of the osteokinematic and arthrokinematic movement of the clavicle. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of em>Hydrobia ulvaeem> and microphytobenthos on cohesive sediment dynamics on an intertidal mudflat described by means of numerical modelling

    Lumborg, Ulrik; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Pejrup, Morten

    2006-01-01

    been used as input to the 2D hydrodynamic numerical model MIKE 21 MT. The model was used to investigate the effect that differences in the benthic communities may have on the net deposition. The model included computation of hydrodynamics, wave fields and cohesive sediment dynamics. Based...

  11. Moment approach to tandem mirror radial transport

    Siebert, K.D.; Callen, J.D.

    1986-02-01

    A moment approach is proposed for the study of tandem mirror radial transport in the resonant plateau regime. The salient features of the method are described with reference to axisymmetric tokamak transport theory. In particular, the importance of momentum conservation to the establishment of the azimuthal variations in the electrostatic potential is demonstrated. Also, an ad hoc drift kinetic equation is solved to determine parallel viscosity coefficients which are required to close the moment system

  12. Comparison of Tibiofemoral Contact Mechanics After Various Transtibial and All-Inside Fixation Techniques for Medial Meniscus Posterior Root Radial Tears in a Porcine Model.

    Chung, Kyu Sung; Choi, Choong Hyeok; Bae, Tae Soo; Ha, Jeong Ku; Jun, Dal Jae; Wang, Joon Ho; Kim, Jin Goo

    2018-04-01

    To compare tibiofemoral contact mechanics after fixation for medial meniscus posterior root radial tears (MMPRTs). Seven fresh knees from mature pigs were used. Each knee was tested under 5 conditions: normal knee, MMPRT, pullout fixation with simple sutures, fixation with modified Mason-Allen sutures, and all-inside fixation using Fastfix 360. The peak contact pressure and contact surface area were evaluated using a capacitive sensor positioned between the meniscus and tibial plateau, under a 1,000-N compression force, at different flexion angles (0°, 30°, 60°, and 90°). The peak contact pressure was significantly higher in MMPRTs than in normal knees (P = .018). Although the peak contact pressure decreased significantly after fixation at all flexion angles (P = .031), it never recovered to the values noted in the normal meniscus. No difference was observed among fixation groups (P = .054). The contact surface area was significantly lower in MMPRTs than in the normal meniscus (P = .018) and increased significantly after fixation at all flexion angles (P = .018) but did not recover to within normal limits. For all flexion angles except 60°, the contact surface area was significantly higher for fixation with Mason-Allen sutures than for fixation with simple sutures or all-inside fixation (P = .027). At 90° of flexion, the contact surface area was significantly better for fixation with simple sutures than for all-inside fixation (P = .031). The peak contact pressure and contact surface area improved significantly after fixation, regardless of the fixation method, but did not recover to the levels noted in the normal meniscus after any type of fixation. Among the fixation methods evaluated in this time 0 study, fixation using modified Mason-Allen sutures provided a superior contact surface area compared with that noted after fixation using simple sutures or all-inside fixation, except at 60° of flexion. However, this study had insufficient power to

  13. A model of turbocharger radial turbines appropriate to be used in zero- and one-dimensional gas dynamics codes for internal combustion engines modelling

    Serrano, J.R.; Arnau, F.J.; Dolz, V.; Tiseira, A. [CMT-Motores Termicos, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Cervello, C. [Conselleria de Cultura, Educacion y Deporte, Generalitat Valenciana (Spain)

    2008-12-15

    The paper presents a model of fixed and variable geometry turbines. The aim of this model is to provide an efficient boundary condition to model turbocharged internal combustion engines with zero- and one-dimensional gas dynamic codes. The model is based from its very conception on the measured characteristics of the turbine. Nevertheless, it is capable of extrapolating operating conditions that differ from those included in the turbine maps, since the engines usually work within these zones. The presented model has been implemented in a one-dimensional gas dynamic code and has been used to calculate unsteady operating conditions for several turbines. The results obtained have been compared with success against pressure-time histories measured upstream and downstream of the turbine during on-engine operation. (author)

  14. A model of turbocharger radial turbines appropriate to be used in zero- and one-dimensional gas dynamics codes for internal combustion engines modelling

    Serrano, J.R.; Arnau, F.J.; Dolz, V.; Tiseira, A.; Cervello, C.

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a model of fixed and variable geometry turbines. The aim of this model is to provide an efficient boundary condition to model turbocharged internal combustion engines with zero- and one-dimensional gas dynamic codes. The model is based from its very conception on the measured characteristics of the turbine. Nevertheless, it is capable of extrapolating operating conditions that differ from those included in the turbine maps, since the engines usually work within these zones. The presented model has been implemented in a one-dimensional gas dynamic code and has been used to calculate unsteady operating conditions for several turbines. The results obtained have been compared with success against pressure-time histories measured upstream and downstream of the turbine during on-engine operation

  15. PLUTON: A Three-Group Model for the Radial Distribution of Plutonium, Burnup, and Power Profiles in Highly Irradiated LWR Fuel Rods

    Lemehov, Sergei; Nakamura, Jinichi; Suzuki, Motoe

    2001-01-01

    A three-group model (PLUTON) is described, which predicts the power density distribution, plutonium buildup, and burnup profiles across the fuel pellet radius as a function of in-pile time and parameters characterizing the type of reactor system with respect to fuel temperature and changes of density during the irradiation period. The PLUTON model is a part of two fuel performance codes (ASFAD and FEMAXI-V), which provide all necessary input for this model, mainly local temperatures and fuel matrix density across the radius. Comparisons between measurements and predictions of the PLUTON model are made on fuels with enrichments in the range 2.9 to 8.25% and with burnup between 21 000 and 64 000 MWd/t. It is shown that the PLUTON predictions are in good agreement with measurements as well as with predictions of the well-known TUBRNP model. The proposed model is flexibly applicable for all types of light water reactor (LWR) fuels, including mixed oxide, and for fuel tested in the Organization for Economic Corporation and Development's Halden heavy water reactor. The PLUTON three-group model is based on analytical (theoretical) consideration of neutron absorption in a resonant region of the fuel in its apparent form. It makes the model more flexible in comparison with the semi-empirical TUBRNP one-group model and allows the physically based model analysis of commercial LWR-type fuels at high burnup as well as analysis of experimental fuel rods tested in the Halden heavy water reactor, which is one of the main test reactors in the world. The differences in fuel behavior in the Halden reactor in terms of burnup distribution and plutonium buildup can be more clearly understood with the PLUTON model

  16. Developments to the Sylvan stand structure model to describe wood quality changes in southern bottomland hardwood forests because of forest management

    Ian R. Scott

    2009-01-01

    Growth models can produce a wealth of detailed information that is often very difficult to perceive because it is frequently presented either as summary tables, stand view or landscape view visualizations. We have developed new tools for use with the Sylvan model (Larsen 1994) that allow the analysis of wood-quality changes as a consequence of forest management....

  17. Sensitivity analysis of a radionuclide transfer model describing contaminated vegetation in Fukushima prefecture, using Morris and Sobol' - Application of sensitivity analysis on a radionuclides transfer model in the environment describing weeds contamination in Fukushima Prefecture, using Morris method and Sobol' indices indices

    Nicoulaud-Gouin, V.; Metivier, J.M.; Gonze, M.A. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire-PRP-ENV/SERIS/LM2E (France); Garcia-Sanchez, L. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire-PRPENV/SERIS/L2BT (France)

    2014-07-01

    The increasing spatial and temporal complexity of models demands methods capable of ranking the influence of their large numbers of parameters. This question specifically arises in assessment studies on the consequences of the Fukushima accident. Sensitivity analysis aims at measuring the influence of input variability on the output response. Generally, two main approaches are distinguished (Saltelli, 2001, Iooss, 2011): - Screening approach, less expensive in computation time and allowing to identify non influential parameters; - Measures of importance, introducing finer quantitative indices. In this category, there are regression-based methods, assuming a linear or monotonic response (Pearson coefficient, Spearman coefficient), and variance-based methods, without assumptions on the model but requiring an increasingly prohibitive number of evaluations when the number of parameters increases. These approaches are available in various statistical programs (notably R) but are still poorly integrated in modelling platforms of radioecological risk assessment. This work aimed at illustrating the benefits of sensitivity analysis in the course of radioecological risk assessments This study used two complementary state-of-art global sensitivity analysis methods: - The screening method of Morris (Morris, 1991; Campolongo et al., 2007) based on limited model evaluations with a one-at-a-time (OAT) design; - The variance-based Sobol' sensitivity analysis (Saltelli, 2002) based a large number of model evaluations in the parameter space with a quasi-random sampling (Owen, 2003). Sensitivity analyses were applied on a dynamic Soil-Plant Deposition Model (Gonze et al., submitted to this conference) predicting foliar concentration in weeds after atmospheric radionuclide fallout. The Soil-Plant Deposition Model considers two foliage pools and a root pool, and describes foliar biomass growth with a Verhulst model. The developed semi-analytic formulation of foliar concentration

  18. A comparison of Reduced Life Expectancy (RLE) model with Haber's Rule to describe effects of exposure time on toxicity

    Verma, Vibha; Yu, Qiming J.; Connell, Des W.

    2015-01-01

    The Reduced Life Expectancy (RLE) Model (LC 50  = [ln(NLE) – ln(LT 50 )]/d) has been proposed as an alternative to Haber's Rule. The model is based on a linear relationship between LC 50 (Lethal Exposure Concentration) and lnLT 50 (Lethal Exposure Time) and uses NLE (Normal Life Expectancy) as a limiting point as well as a long term data point (where d is a constant). The purposes of this paper were to compare the RLE Model with Haber's Rule with available toxicity data and to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each approach. When LT 50 is relatively short and LC 50 is high, Haber's Rule is consistent with the RLE model. But the difference between the two was evident in the situation when LT 50 is relatively long and LC 50 is low where the RLE model is a marked departure from Haber's Rule. The RLE Model can be used to appropriately evaluate long term effects of exposure. - Highlights: • The strength and weakness of Haber's Rule in relation to the RLE model is needed. • Haber's Rule now used universally is quite inappropriate for environmental toxicity. • Normal life expectancy, a new parameter l is used to evaluate effects of exposure time on toxicity. • According to RLE model when LC 50 approaches zero, then LT 50  = Normal Life Expectancy. • The RLE model can be used to evaluate long term effects of exposure-accurately and easily. - The RLE approach is a more appropriate alternative particularly to evaluate long term effects of exposure. It can be easily used to estimate long term effects of exposure

  19. A new predictive dynamic model describing the effect of the ambient temperature and the convective heat transfer coefficient on bacterial growth.

    Ben Yaghlene, H; Leguerinel, I; Hamdi, M; Mafart, P

    2009-07-31

    In this study, predictive microbiology and food engineering were combined in order to develop a new analytical model predicting the bacterial growth under dynamic temperature conditions. The proposed model associates a simplified primary bacterial growth model without lag, the secondary Ratkowsky "square root" model and a simplified two-parameter heat transfer model regarding an infinite slab. The model takes into consideration the product thickness, its thermal properties, the ambient air temperature, the convective heat transfer coefficient and the growth parameters of the micro organism of concern. For the validation of the overall model, five different combinations of ambient air temperature (ranging from 8 degrees C to 12 degrees C), product thickness (ranging from 1 cm to 6 cm) and convective heat transfer coefficient (ranging from 8 W/(m(2) K) to 60 W/(m(2) K)) were tested during a cooling procedure. Moreover, three different ambient air temperature scenarios assuming alternated cooling and heating stages, drawn from real refrigerated food processes, were tested. General agreement between predicted and observed bacterial growth was obtained and less than 5% of the experimental data fell outside the 95% confidence bands estimated by the bootstrap percentile method, at all the tested conditions. Accordingly, the overall model was successfully validated for isothermal and dynamic refrigeration cycles allowing for temperature dynamic changes at the centre and at the surface of the product. The major impact of the convective heat transfer coefficient and the product thickness on bacterial growth during the product cooling was demonstrated. For instance, the time needed for the same level of bacterial growth to be reached at the product's half thickness was estimated to be 5 and 16.5 h at low and high convection level, respectively. Moreover, simulation results demonstrated that the predicted bacterial growth at the air ambient temperature cannot be assumed to be

  20. Gaussian radial growth

    Jónsdóttir, Kristjana Ýr; Jensen, Eva B. Vedel

    The growth of planar and spatial objects is often modelled using one-dimensional size parameters, e.g. volume, area or average radius. We take a more detailed approach and model how the boundary of a growing object expands in time. We mainly consider star-shaped planar objects. The model can...... be regarded as a dynamic deformable template model. The limiting shape of the object may be circular but this is only one possibility among a range of limiting shapes. An application to tumour growth is presented. Two extensions of the model, involving time series and Lévy bases, respectively, are briefly...

  1. Radial retinotomy in the macula.

    Bovino, J A; Marcus, D F

    1984-01-01

    Radial retinotomy is an operative procedure usually performed in the peripheral or equatorial retina. To facilitate retinal attachment, the authors used intraocular scissors to perform radial retinotomy in the macula of two patients during vitrectomy surgery. In the first patient, a retinal detachment complicated by periretinal proliferation and macula hole formation was successfully reoperated with the aid of three radial cuts in the retina at the edges of the macular hole. In the second patient, an intraoperative retinal tear in the macula during diabetic vitrectomy was also successfully repaired with the aid of radial retinotomy. In both patients, retinotomy in the macula was required because epiretinal membranes, which could not be easily delaminated, were hindering retinal reattachment.

  2. Detonation in supersonic radial outflow

    Kasimov, Aslan R.; Korneev, Svyatoslav

    2014-01-01

    We report on the structure and dynamics of gaseous detonation stabilized in a supersonic flow emanating radially from a central source. The steady-state solutions are computed and their range of existence is investigated. Two-dimensional simulations

  3. Dedicated radial ventriculography pigtail catheter

    Vidovich, Mladen I., E-mail: miv@uic.edu

    2013-05-15

    A new dedicated cardiac ventriculography catheter was specifically designed for radial and upper arm arterial access approach. Two catheter configurations have been developed to facilitate retrograde crossing of the aortic valve and to conform to various subclavian, ascending aortic and left ventricular anatomies. The “short” dedicated radial ventriculography catheter is suited for horizontal ascending aortas, obese body habitus, short stature and small ventricular cavities. The “long” dedicated radial ventriculography catheter is suited for vertical ascending aortas, thin body habitus, tall stature and larger ventricular cavities. This new design allows for improved performance, faster and simpler insertion in the left ventricle which can reduce procedure time, radiation exposure and propensity for radial artery spasm due to excessive catheter manipulation. Two different catheter configurations allow for optimal catheter selection in a broad range of patient anatomies. The catheter is exceptionally stable during contrast power injection and provides equivalent cavity opacification to traditional femoral ventriculography catheter designs.

  4. Experimental and numerical investigations to describe the failure behaviour of steels of different toughness by means of damage models. Final report

    Kussmaul, K.; Seidenfuss, M.; Elsaesser, K.; Mayer, U.; Zies, G.

    1995-08-01

    Within the scope of the project the applicability of local approach models to different steels in reactor technology was investigated. To this two ferritic and one austenitic material were investigated. The metallographic investigations carried out in this project prove the fact that the fracture development of the three investigated materials can be divided in three phases: Void initiation, void growth, and void coalescence. The focus of the research project was to determine the parameters required for the local approach models if possible with the help of metallographic investigations. In order to obtain quantitative results with realistic expenditure an automatic imagine evaluation system was adapted. In the course of the project it could be found that two out of the maximum six damage parameters of the Rousselier model were constant for all three materials. There is an indication that these two parameters are independent of the material and can generally be assumed as constant. The investigations have proved that the selected local approach models are adequate for calculating the failure behaviour of smooth, notched and precracked specimens under static load. The parameters required for the damage models are independent of geometry and size, and so a transferability of the parameters is possible. (orig./MM) [de

  5. Describing Compton scattering and two-quanta positron annihilation based on Compton profiles: Two models suited for the Monte Carlo method

    Bohlen, TT; Patera, V; Sala, P R

    2012-01-01

    An accurate description of the basic physics processes of Compton scattering and positron annihilation in matter requires the consideration of atomic shell structure effects and, in specific, the momentum distributions of the atomic electrons. Two algorithms which model Compton scattering and two-quanta positron annihilation at rest accounting for shell structure effects are proposed. Two-quanta positron annihilation is a physics process which is of particular importance for applications such as positron emission tomography (PET). Both models use a detailed description of the processes which incorporate consistently Doppler broadening and binding effects. This together with the relatively low level of complexity of the models makes them particularly suited to be employed by fast sampling methods for Monte Carlo particle transport. Momentum distributions of shell electrons are obtained from parametrized one-electron Compton profiles. For conduction electrons, momentum distributions are derived in the framework...

  6. A model to describe the surface gradient-nanograin formation and property of friction stir processed laser Co-Cr-Ni-Mo alloy

    Li, Ruidi; Yuan, Tiechui; Qiu, Zili

    2014-07-01

    A gradient-nanograin surface layer of Co-base alloy was prepared by friction stir processing (FSP) of laser-clad coating in this work. However, it is lack of a quantitatively function relationship between grain refinement and FSP conditions. Based on this, an analytic model is derived for the correlations between carbide size, hardness and rotary speed, layer depth during in-situ FSP of laser-clad Co-Cr-Ni-Mo alloy. The model is based on the principle of typical plastic flow in friction welding and dynamic recrystallization. The FSP experiment for modification of laser-clad Co-based alloy was conducted and its gradient nanograin and hardness were characterized. It shows that the model is consistent with experimental results.

  7. Linear mixed-effects models to describe length-weight relationships for yellow croaker (Larimichthys Polyactis) along the north coast of China.

    Ma, Qiuyun; Jiao, Yan; Ren, Yiping

    2017-01-01

    In this study, length-weight relationships and relative condition factors were analyzed for Yellow Croaker (Larimichthys polyactis) along the north coast of China. Data covered six regions from north to south: Yellow River Estuary, Coastal Waters of Northern Shandong, Jiaozhou Bay, Coastal Waters of Qingdao, Haizhou Bay, and South Yellow Sea. In total 3,275 individuals were collected during six years (2008, 2011-2015). One generalized linear model, two simply linear models and nine linear mixed effect models that applied the effects from regions and/or years to coefficient a and/or the exponent b were studied and compared. Among these twelve models, the linear mixed effect model with random effects from both regions and years fit the data best, with lowest Akaike information criterion value and mean absolute error. In this model, the estimated a was 0.0192, with 95% confidence interval 0.0178~0.0308, and the estimated exponent b was 2.917 with 95% confidence interval 2.731~2.945. Estimates for a and b with the random effects in intercept and coefficient from Region and Year, ranged from 0.013 to 0.023 and from 2.835 to 3.017, respectively. Both regions and years had effects on parameters a and b, while the effects from years were shown to be much larger than those from regions. Except for Coastal Waters of Northern Shandong, a decreased from north to south. Condition factors relative to reference years of 1960, 1986, 2005, 2007, 2008~2009 and 2010 revealed that the body shape of Yellow Croaker became thinner in recent years. Furthermore relative condition factors varied among months, years, regions and length. The values of a and relative condition factors decreased, when the environmental pollution became worse, therefore, length-weight relationships could be an indicator for the environment quality. Results from this study provided basic description of current condition of Yellow Croaker along the north coast of China.

  8. A model of the FAD redox cycle describes the dynamics of the effect of the geomagnetic field on the human visual system.

    Thoss, Franz; Bartsch, Bengt

    2017-12-01

    In experimental studies, we could show that the visual threshold of man is influenced by the geomagnetic field. One of the results was that the threshold shows periodic fluctuations when the vertical component of the field is reversed periodically. The maximum of these oscillations occurred at a period duration of 110 s. To explain this phenomenon, we chose the process that likely underlies the navigation of birds in the geomagnetic field: the light reaction of the FAD component of cryptochrome in the retina. The human retina contains cryptpochrome like the bird retina. Based on the investigations of Müller and Ahmad (J Biol Chem 286:21033-21040, 2011) and Solov'yov and Schulten (J Phys Chem B 116:1089-1099, 2012), we designed a model of the light-induced reduction and subsequent reoxidation of FAD. This model contains a radical pair, whose interconversion dynamics are affected by the geomagnetic field. The parameters of the model were partly calculated from the data of our experimental investigation and partly taken from the results of other authors. These parameters were then optimized by adjusting the model behaviour to the experimental results. The simulation of the finished model shows that the concentrations of all substances included show really oscillations with the frequency of the modelled magnetic field. After optimization of the parameters, the oscillations of FAD and FADH* show maximal amplitude at a period duration of 110 s, as was observed in the experiment. This makes it most likely that the signal, which influences the visual system, originates from FADH* (signalling state).

  9. To the calculation technique and interpretation of atom radial distribution curves in ternary alloy systems

    Dutchak, Ya.I.; Frenchko, V.S.; Voznyak, O.M.

    1975-01-01

    Certain models of the structure of three-component melts are considered: the ''quasi-eutectic'' one, the model of statistical distribution of atoms and the ''polystructural'' model. The analytical expressions are given for the area under the first maximum of the curve describing the radial distribution of atoms for certain versions of the ''polystructural'' model. On the example of In-Ga-Ga and Bi-Cd-Sn eutectic melts the possibility of estimating the nature of atomic ordering in three-component melts through checking the models under consideration has been demonstrated

  10. Exhaustive Classification of the Invariant Solutions for a Specific Nonlinear Model Describing Near Planar and Marginally Long-Wave Unstable Interfaces for Phase Transition

    Ahangari, Fatemeh

    2018-05-01

    Problems of thermodynamic phase transition originate inherently in solidification, combustion and various other significant fields. If the transition region among two locally stable phases is adequately narrow, the dynamics can be modeled by an interface motion. This paper is devoted to exhaustive analysis of the invariant solutions for a modified Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation in two spatial and one temporal dimensions is presented. This nonlinear partial differential equation asymptotically characterizes near planar interfaces, which are marginally long-wave unstable. For this purpose, by applying the classical symmetry method for this model the classical symmetry operators are attained. Moreover, the structure of the Lie algebra of symmetries is discussed and the optimal system of subalgebras, which yields the preliminary classification of group invariant solutions is constructed. Mainly, the Lie invariants corresponding to the infinitesimal symmetry generators as well as associated similarity reduced equations are also pointed out. Furthermore, the nonclassical symmetries of this nonlinear PDE are also comprehensively investigated.

  11. Radial excitations in nucleon-nucleon scattering

    Silvestre-Brac, B.; Carbonell, J.; Gignoux, C.

    1986-01-01

    In the non-relativistic constituent quark model, the role of the radial excitations of the nucleon is studied within a resonating group approach of the nucleon-nucleon scattering. It is shown that, rather than the inclusion of new channels, it is important to include mixed-symmetry spin-isospin components in the nucleon wave function. It is also found that during the collision there is no significant deformation of the nucleon. (orig.)

  12. On use of radial evanescence remain term in kinematic hardening

    Geyer, P.

    1995-10-01

    A fine modelling of the material' behaviour can be necessary to study the mechanical strength of nuclear power plant' components under cyclic loads. Ratchetting is one of the last phenomena for which numerical models have to be improved. We discuss in this paper on use of radial evanescence remain term in kinematic hardening to improve the description of ratchetting in biaxial loading tests. It's well known that Chaboche elastoplastic model with two non linear kinematic hardening variables initially proposed by Armstrong and Frederick, usually over-predicts accumulation of ratchetting strain. Burlet and Cailletaud proposed in 1987 a non linear kinematic rule with a radial evanescence remain term. The two models lead to identical formulation for proportional loadings. In the case of a biaxial loading test (primary+secondary loading), Burlet and Cailletaud model leads to accommodation, when Chaboche one's leads to ratchetting with a constant increment of strain. So we can have an under-estimate with the first model and an over-estimate with the second. An easy method to improve the description of ratchetting is to combine the two kinematic rules. Such an idea is already used by Delobelle in his model. With analytical results in the case of tension-torsion tests, we show in a first part of the paper, the interest of radial evanescence remain term in the non linear kinematic rule to describe ratchetting: we give the conditions to get adaptation, accommodation or ratchetting and the value of the strain increment in the last case. In the second part of the paper, we propose to modify the elastoplastic Chaboche model by coupling the two types of hardening by means of two scalar parameters which can be identified independently on biaxial loading tests. Identification of these two parameters returns to speculate on the directions of strain in order to adjust the ratchetting to experimental observations. We use the experimental results on the austenitic steel 316L at room

  13. Luxation of the radial carpal bone in a cat

    Pitcher, G.D.C.

    1996-01-01

    A case of radial carpal bone luxation in the cat and its management is described. Open reduction was performed and surgically maintained, in combination with repair of rupture of the short radial collateral ligament and joint capsule. The carpus was supported for one month following surgery by application of transarticular external fixation. Four months after treatment the cat was sound, despite evidence of degenerative joint disease. The mechanism of luxation appears to be analogous to that seen in the dog

  14. Experimental Verification of a New Model Describing the Influence of Incomplete Signal Extinction Ratio on the Sensitivity Degradation due to Multiple Interferometric Crosstalk

    Liu, Fenghai; Rasmussen, Christian Jørgen; Pedersen, Rune Johan Skullerud

    1999-01-01

    Larger optical penalties than predicted by a Gaussian crosstalk model are found both in our experiments and in the literature when investigating signals including multiple interferometric crosstalk contributions. We attribute this to an imperfect signal extinction ratio. In this letter, simple...... analytical relations for crosstalk induced power penalties are derived taking the signal extinction ratio into account and excellent agreement with 10-Gb/s experiments is obtained. Both theory and experiment show the importance of the signal extinction ratio in connection with interferometric crosstalk....

  15. Is the fluid mosaic (and the accompanying raft hypothesis a suitable model to describe fundamental features of biological membranes? What may be missing?

    Luis Alberto Bagatolli

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The structure, dynamics, and stability of lipid bilayers are controlled by thermodynamic forces, leading to overall tensionless membranes with a distinct lateral organization and a conspicuous lateral pressure profile. Bilayers are also subject to built-in curvature-stress instabilities that may be released locally or globally in terms of morphological changes leading to the formation of non-lamellar and curved structures. A key controller of the bilayer’s propensity to form curved structures is the average molecular shape of the different lipid molecules. Via the curvature stress, molecular shape mediates a coupling to membrane-protein function and provides a set of physical mechanisms for formation of lipid domains and laterally differentiated regions in the plane of the membrane. Unfortunately, these relevant physical features of membranes are often ignored in the most popular models for biological membranes. Results from a number of experimental and theoretical studies emphasize the significance of these fundamental physical properties and call for a refinement of the fluid mosaic model (and the accompanying raft hypothesis.

  16. Genistein, a general kinase inhibitor, as a potential antiviral for arenaviral hemorrhagic fever as described in the Pirital virus-Syrian golden hamster model.

    Vela, Eric M; Knostman, Katherine A; Mott, Jason M; Warren, Richard L; Garver, Jennifer N; Vela, Lela Johnson; Stammen, Rachelle L

    2010-09-01

    Arenaviruses are rodent-borne negative strand RNA viruses and infection of these viruses in humans may result in disease and hemorrhagic fever. To date, supportive care, ribavirin, and in some cases immune plasma remain the foremost treatment options for arenaviral hemorrhagic fever. Research with the hemorrhagic fever causing-arenaviruses usually requires a Biosafety level (BSL)-4 environment; however, surrogate animal model systems have been developed to preliminarily study and screen various vaccines and antivirals. The Syrian golden hamster-Pirital virus (PIRV) surrogate model of hemorrhagic fever provides an opportunity to test new antivirals in an ABSL-3 setting. Thus, we challenged hamsters, implanted with telemetry, with PIRV and observed viremia and tissue viral titers, and changes in core body temperature, hematology, clinical chemistry, and coagulation parameters. Physical signs of disease of the PIRV-infected hamsters included weight loss, lethargy, petechial rashes, epistaxis, ocular orbital and rectal hemorrhage, and visible signs of neurologic disorders. However, treating animals with genistein, a plant derived isoflavone and general kinase inhibitor, resulted in increased survival rates and led to an improved clinical profile. In all, the results from this study demonstrate the potential of a general kinase inhibitor genistein as an antiviral against arenaviral hemorrhagic fever. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Determination of radial profile of ICF hot spot's state by multi-objective parameters optimization

    Dong Jianjun; Deng Bo; Cao Zhurong; Ding Yongkun; Jiang Shaoen

    2014-01-01

    A method using multi-objective parameters optimization is presented to determine the radial profile of hot spot temperature and density. And a parameter space which contain five variables: the temperatures at center and the interface of fuel and remain ablator, the maximum model density of remain ablator, the mass ratio of remain ablator to initial ablator and the position of interface between fuel and the remain ablator, is used to described the hot spot radial temperature and density. Two objective functions are set as the variances of normalized intensity profile from experiment X-ray images and the theory calculation. Another objective function is set as the variance of experiment average temperature of hot spot and the average temperature calculated by theoretical model. The optimized parameters are obtained by multi-objective genetic algorithm searching for the five dimension parameter space, thereby the optimized radial temperature and density profiles can be determined. The radial temperature and density profiles of hot spot by experiment data measured by KB microscope cooperating with X-ray film are presented. It is observed that the temperature profile is strongly correlated to the objective functions. (authors)

  18. Describing and analysing primary health care system support for chronic illness care in Indigenous communities in Australia's Northern Territory – use of the Chronic Care Model

    Stewart Allison

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indigenous Australians experience disproportionately high prevalence of, and morbidity and mortality from chronic illness such as diabetes, renal disease and cardiovascular disease. Improving the understanding of how Indigenous primary care systems are organised to deliver chronic illness care will inform efforts to improve the quality of care for Indigenous people. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in 12 Indigenous communities in Australia's Northern Territory. Using the Chronic Care Model as a framework, we carried out a mail-out survey to collect information on material, financial and human resources relating to chronic illness care in participating health centres. Follow up face-to-face interviews with health centre staff were conducted to identify successes and difficulties in the systems in relation to providing chronic illness care to community members. Results Participating health centres had distinct areas of strength and weakness in each component of systems: 1 organisational influence – strengthened by inclusion of chronic illness goals in business plans, appointment of designated chronic disease coordinators and introduction of external clinical audits, but weakened by lack of training in disease prevention and health promotion and limited access to Medicare funding; 2 community linkages – facilitated by working together with community organisations (e.g. local stores and running community-based programs (e.g. "health week", but detracted by a shortage of staff especially of Aboriginal health workers working in the community; 3 self management – promoted through patient education and goal setting with clients, but impeded by limited focus on family and community-based activities due to understaffing; 4 decision support – facilitated by distribution of clinical guidelines and their integration with daily care, but limited by inadequate access to and support from specialists; 5 delivery system

  19. Study of dynamical properties in a bi-dimensional model describing the prey–predator dynamics with strong Allee effect in prey.

    Partha Mandal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we analyze a bi-dimensional differential equation system obtained by considering Holling type II functional response in prey–predator model with strong Allee effect in prey. One of the important consequence of this modification is the existence of separatrix curve which divides the behaviour of the trajectories in the phase plane. The results show that the origin is an attractor for any set of parameter values. Axial equilibrium points are stable or unstable according to the different parametric restrictions. The unique positive equilibrium point, if it exists, can be either an attractor or a repeller surrounded by a limit cycle, whose stability and uniqueness are also established. Therefore long-term coexistence of both populations is possible or they can go to extinction. Conditions on the parameter values are derived to show that the positive equilibrium point can be emerged or annihilated through transcritical bifurcation at axial equilibrium points. The existence of two heteroclinic curves is also established. It is also demonstrated that the origin is a global attractor in the phase plane for some parameter values, which implies that there are satisfying conditions where both populations can go to extinction. Ecological interpretations of all analytical results are provided thoroughly.

  20. Radial lean direct injection burner

    Khan, Abdul Rafey; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2012-09-04

    A burner for use in a gas turbine engine includes a burner tube having an inlet end and an outlet end; a plurality of air passages extending axially in the burner tube configured to convey air flows from the inlet end to the outlet end; a plurality of fuel passages extending axially along the burner tube and spaced around the plurality of air passage configured to convey fuel from the inlet end to the outlet end; and a radial air swirler provided at the outlet end configured to direct the air flows radially toward the outlet end and impart swirl to the air flows. The radial air swirler includes a plurality of vanes to direct and swirl the air flows and an end plate. The end plate includes a plurality of fuel injection holes to inject the fuel radially into the swirling air flows. A method of mixing air and fuel in a burner of a gas turbine is also provided. The burner includes a burner tube including an inlet end, an outlet end, a plurality of axial air passages, and a plurality of axial fuel passages. The method includes introducing an air flow into the air passages at the inlet end; introducing a fuel into fuel passages; swirling the air flow at the outlet end; and radially injecting the fuel into the swirling air flow.