WorldWideScience

Sample records for radial electron temperature

  1. Filtering peripheral high temperature electrons in a cylindrical rf-driven plasmas by an axisymmetric radial magnetic field

    Hikaru Akahoshi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available High temperature electrons generated near a radial wall of a cylindrical source tube in a radiofrequency (rf inductively-coupled plasma is filtered by an axisymmetric radial magnetic field formed near the source exit by locating annular permanent magnets, where the axial magnetic field strength in the radially central region is fairly uniform inside the source tube and is close to zero near the source exit. The source is operated at 3 mTorr in argon and the rf antenna is powered by a 13.56 MHz and 400 W rf generator. Measurement of electron energy probability functions shows the presence of the peripheral high temperature electrons inside the source, while the temperature of the peripheral electrons downstream of the source is observed to be reduced.

  2. Filtering peripheral high temperature electrons in a cylindrical rf-driven plasmas by an axisymmetric radial magnetic field

    Akahoshi, Hikaru; Takahashi, Kazunori; Ando, Akira

    2018-03-01

    High temperature electrons generated near a radial wall of a cylindrical source tube in a radiofrequency (rf) inductively-coupled plasma is filtered by an axisymmetric radial magnetic field formed near the source exit by locating annular permanent magnets, where the axial magnetic field strength in the radially central region is fairly uniform inside the source tube and is close to zero near the source exit. The source is operated at 3 mTorr in argon and the rf antenna is powered by a 13.56 MHz and 400 W rf generator. Measurement of electron energy probability functions shows the presence of the peripheral high temperature electrons inside the source, while the temperature of the peripheral electrons downstream of the source is observed to be reduced.

  3. Axial- and radial-resolved electron density and excitation temperature of aluminum plasma induced by nanosecond laser: Effect of the ambient gas composition and pressure

    Mahmoud S. Dawood

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The spatial variation of the characteristics of an aluminum plasma induced by a pulsed nanosecond XeCl laser is studied in this paper. The electron density and the excitation temperature are deduced from time- and space- resolved Stark broadening of an ion line and from a Boltzmann diagram, respectively. The influence of the gas pressure (from vacuum up to atmospheric pressure and compositions (argon, nitrogen and helium on these characteristics is investigated. It is observed that the highest electron density occurs near the laser spot and decreases by moving away both from the target surface and from the plume center to its edge. The electron density increases with the gas pressure, the highest values being occurred at atmospheric pressure when the ambient gas has the highest mass, i.e. in argon. The excitation temperature is determined from the Boltzmann plot of line intensities of iron impurities present in the aluminum target. The highest temperature is observed close to the laser spot location for argon at atmospheric pressure. It decreases by moving away from the target surface in the axial direction. However, no significant variation of temperature occurs along the radial direction. The differences observed between the axial and radial direction are mainly due to the different plasma kinetics in both directions.

  4. Evaluating Uncertainties in Coronal Electron Temperature and Radial Speed Measurements Using a Simulation of the Bastille Day Eruption

    Reginald, Nelson; St. Cyr, Orville; Davila, Joseph; Rastaetter, Lutz; Török, Tibor

    2018-05-01

    Obtaining reliable measurements of plasma parameters in the Sun's corona remains an important challenge for solar physics. We previously presented a method for producing maps of electron temperature and speed of the solar corona using K-corona brightness measurements made through four color filters in visible light, which were tested for their accuracies using models of a structured, yet steady corona. In this article we test the same technique using a coronal model of the Bastille Day (14 July 2000) coronal mass ejection, which also contains quiet areas and streamers. We use the coronal electron density, temperature, and flow speed contained in the model to determine two K-coronal brightness ratios at (410.3, 390.0 nm) and (423.3, 398.7 nm) along more than 4000 lines of sight. Now assuming that for real observations, the only information we have for each line of sight are these two K-coronal brightness ratios, we use a spherically symmetric model of the corona that contains no structures to interpret these two ratios for electron temperature and speed. We then compare the interpreted (or measured) values for each line of sight with the true values from the model at the plane of the sky for that same line of sight to determine the magnitude of the errors. We show that the measured values closely match the true values in quiet areas. However, in locations of coronal structures, the measured values are predictably underestimated or overestimated compared to the true values, but can nevertheless be used to determine the positions of the structures with respect to the plane of the sky, in front or behind. Based on our results, we propose that future white-light coronagraphs be equipped to image the corona using four color filters in order to routinely create coronal maps of electron density, temperature, and flow speed.

  5. Modelling and analysis of radial thermal stresses and temperature ...

    A theoretical investigation has been undertaken to study operating temperatures, heat fluxes and radial thermal stresses in the valves of a modern diesel engine with and without air-cavity. Temperatures, heat fluxes and radial thermal stresses were measured theoretically for both cases under all four thermal loading ...

  6. Reble, a radially converging electron beam accelerator

    Ramirez, J.J.; Prestwich, K.R.

    1976-01-01

    The Reble accelerator at Sandia Laboratories is described. This accelerator was developed to provide an experimental source for studying the relevant diode physics, beam propagation, beam energy deposition in a gas using a radially converging e-beam. The nominal parameters for Reble are 1 MV, 200 kA, 20 ns e-beam pulse. The anode and cathode are concentric cylinders with the anode as the inner cylinder. The radial beam can be propagated through the thin foil anode into the laser gas volume. The design and performance of the various components of the accelerator are presented

  7. Radial Distribution Functions of Strongly Coupled Two-Temperature Plasmas

    Shaffer, Nathaniel R.; Tiwari, Sanat Kumar; Baalrud, Scott D.

    2017-10-01

    We present tests of three theoretical models for the radial distribution functions (RDFs) in two-temperature strongly coupled plasmas. RDFs are useful in extending plasma thermodynamics and kinetic theory to strong coupling, but they are usually known only for thermal equilibrium or for approximate one-component model plasmas. Accurate two-component modeling is necessary to understand the impact of strong coupling on inter-species transport, e.g., ambipolar diffusion and electron-ion temperature relaxation. We demonstrate that the Seuferling-Vogel-Toeppfer (SVT) extension of the hypernetted chain equations not only gives accurate RDFs (as compared with classical molecular dynamics simulations), but also has a simple connection with the Yukawa OCP model. This connection gives a practical means to recover the structure of the electron background from knowledge of the ion-ion RDF alone. Using the model RDFs in Effective Potential Theory, we report the first predictions of inter-species transport coefficients of strongly coupled plasmas far from equilibrium. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. PHY-1453736, AFSOR Award No. FA9550-16-1-0221, and used XSEDE computational resources.

  8. Radial and axial compression of pure electron

    Park, Y.; Soga, Y.; Mihara, Y.; Takeda, M.; Kamada, K.

    2013-01-01

    Experimental studies are carried out on compression of the density distribution of a pure electron plasma confined in a Malmberg-Penning Trap in Kanazawa University. More than six times increase of the on-axis density is observed under application of an external rotating electric field that couples to low-order Trivelpiece-Gould modes. Axial compression of the density distribution with the axial length of a factor of two is achieved by controlling the confining potential at both ends of the plasma. Substantial increase of the axial kinetic energy is observed during the axial compression. (author)

  9. Modelling and analysis of radial thermal stresses and temperature ...

    user

    it acts as an insulating medium and prevents the heat flow, hence the need of providing insulation coating on valves is ... geometry metal components (piston, liner and cylinder head) and found a satisfactory .... model. Step8: Find the radial thermal stress at all the nodal point with the use of temperature ..... Cast iron St. 70.

  10. Radial electron beam laser excitation: the REBLE report

    Ramirez, J.J.; Prestwich, K.R.

    1978-10-01

    The results of an investigation of techniques to generate high-power radially converging electron beams and the application of these beams to gas lasers is discussed. The design and performance of the REBLE accelerator that was developed for this program is presented. Reliable operation of the radial diode has been obtained at levels up to 1 MV, 200 kA, and 20 ns. It has been demonstrated that the anode current density can be made uniform to better than 15% over 1000 cm 2 areas with 100 to 250 A/cm 2 intensities. The measured total and spatially resolved energy deposition of this radial electron beam in various gases is compared with Monte Carlo calculations. In most cases, these codes give an accurate description of the beam transport and energy deposition. With the electron beam pumping xenon gas, the amplitude of xenon excimer radiation (1720 A 0 ) was radially uniform to within the experimental uncertainty. The efficiency of converting deposited electron beam energy to xenon excimer radiation was 20%

  11. Structure of the radial electric field and toroidal/poloidal flow in high temperature toroidal plasma

    Ida, Katsumi

    2001-01-01

    The structure of the radial electric field and toroidal/poloidal flow is discussed for the high temperature plasma in toroidal systems, tokamak and Heliotron type magnetic configurations. The spontaneous toroidal and poloidal flows are observed in the plasma with improved confinement. The radial electric field is mainly determined by the poloidal flow, because the contribution of toroidal flow to the radial electric field is small. The jump of radial electric field and poloidal flow are commonly observed near the plasma edge in the so-called high confinement mode (H-mode) plasmas in tokamaks and electron root plasma in stellarators including Heliotrons. In general the toroidal flow is driven by the momentum input from neutral beam injected toroidally. There is toroidal flow not driven by neutral beam in the plasma and it will be more significant in the plasma with large electric field. The direction of these spontaneous toroidal flows depends on the symmetry of magnetic field. The spontaneous toroidal flow driven by the ion temperature gradient is in the direction to increase the negative radial electric field in tokamak. The direction of spontaneous toroidal flow in Heliotron plasmas is opposite to that in tokamak plasma because of the helicity of symmetry of the magnetic field configuration. (author)

  12. Radially localized measurements of superthermal electrons using oblique electron cyclotron emission

    Preische, S.; Efthimion, P.C.; Kaye, S.M.

    1996-05-01

    It is shown that radial localization of optically tin Electron Cyclotron Emission from superthermal electrons can be imposed by observation of emission upshifted from the thermal cyclotron resonance in the horizontal midplane of a tokamak. A new and unique diagnostic has been proposed and operated to make radially localized measurements of superthermal electrons during Lower Hybrid Current Drive on the PBX-M tokamak. The superthermal electron density profile as well as moments of the electron energy distribution as a function of radius are measured during Lower Hybrid Current Drive. The time evolution of these measurements after the Lower Hybrid power is turned off are given and the observed behavior reflects the collisional isotropization of the energy distribution and radial diffusion of the spatial profile

  13. Radial transport in the Elmo Bumpy Torus in collisionless electron regimes

    Jaeger, E.F.; Hedrick, C.L.; Spong, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    One important area of disagreement between radial transport theory and the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) experiment has been the degree of collisionality of the toroidal plasma electrons. Experiment shows relatively warm electrons (kTsub(e) approximately 300-600eV) and collisionless scaling, i.e. energy confinement increasing with temperature. But results of early one-dimensional (1-D), neoclassical transport models with radially inward pointing electric fields are limited to relatively cool electrons (kTsub(e) approximately 100-200eV) and collisional scaling. In this paper these early results are extended to include lowest-order effects of ion diffusion in regions where poloidal drift frequencies are small. The effects of direct, or non-diffusive, losses in such regions are neglected along with the effects of finite radial electric fields on electron transport coefficients and of self-consistent poloidal electric fields on ion transport coefficients. Results show that solutions in the collisionless electron regime do exist. Furthermore, when the effects of finite electron ring beta on magnetic fields near the plasma edge are included, these solutions occur at power levels consistent with experiment. (author)

  14. Formation of electron-root radial electric field and its effect on thermal transport in LHD high Te plasma

    Matsuoka, Seikichi; Satake, Shinsuke; Takahashi, Hiromi; Yokoyama, Masayuki; Ido, Takeshi; Shimizu, Akihiro; Shimozuma, Takashi; Wakasa, Arimitsu; Murakami, Sadayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Neoclassical transport analyses have been performed for a high electron temperature LHD plasma with steep temperature gradient using a neoclassical transport simulation code, FORTEC-3D. It is shown that the large positive radial electric field is spontaneously formed at the core along with the increase in the electron temperature, while the neoclassical heat diffusivity remains almost unchanged. This indicates that the 1/ν-type increase expected in the neoclassical transport in helical plasmas can be avoided by the spontaneous formation of the radial electric field. At the same time, it is found that the experimentally estimated heat diffusivity is significantly reduced. This suggests that the formation process of the transport barrier in the high electron temperature plasma can be caused by the spontaneous formation of the radial electric field. (author)

  15. Relativistic properties of spherical diodes with a radial electron flux

    Chetvertkov, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    Forward and backward electron diodes with concentric spherical electrodes (inner cathode, outer anode or vice versa) are considered under the assumption that the emission is limited by the space charge and the guiding magnetic field is predominantly radial within a region of solid angle α f < 4π bounding the electron flux. The Poisson equations for the relativistic factor γ are solved for generalized model dependences. Ultrarelativistic and new nonrelativistic solutions are found, and analytic approximations to the solution near the cathode are used to carry out numerical calculations. The characteristics of forward and backward diodes turn out to be related to the exact solutions for a planar diode. Accurate approximations are found for calculating the diode parameters in a wide range of voltages; they can also be used to check the validity of the 3/2 laws and the ultrarelativistic solutions

  16. radial

    JOHN WILLIAM BRANCH

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available La creación de modelos de objetos reales es una tarea compleja para la cual se ha visto que el uso de técnicas tradicionales de modelamiento tiene restricciones. Para resolver algunos de estos problemas, los sensores de rango basados en láser se usan con frecuencia para muestrear la superficie de un objeto desde varios puntos de vista, lo que resulta en un conjunto de imágenes de rango que son registradas e integradas en un modelo final triangulado. En la práctica, debido a las propiedades reflectivas de la superficie, las oclusiones, y limitaciones de acceso, ciertas áreas de la superficie del objeto usualmente no son muestreadas, dejando huecos que pueden crear efectos indeseables en el modelo integrado. En este trabajo, presentamos un nuevo algoritmo para el llenado de huecos a partir de modelos triangulados. El algoritmo comienza localizando la frontera de las regiones donde están los huecos. Un hueco consiste de un camino cerrado de bordes de los triángulos en la frontera que tienen al menos un borde que no es compartido con ningún otro triangulo. El borde del hueco es entonces adaptado mediante un B-Spline donde la variación promedio de la torsión del la aproximación del B-spline es calculada. Utilizando un simple umbral de la variación promedio a lo largo del borde, se puede clasificar automáticamente, entre huecos reales o generados por intervención humana. Siguiendo este proceso de clasificación, se usa entonces una versión automatizada del interpolador de funciones de base radial para llenar el interior del hueco usando los bordes vecinos.

  17. Radial convection of finite ion temperature, high amplitude plasma blobs

    Wiesenberger, M.; Madsen, Jens; Kendl, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We present results from simulations of seeded blob convection in the scrape-off-layer of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We consistently incorporate high fluctuation amplitude levels and finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects using a fully nonlinear global gyrofluid model. This is in line......-field transport compared to blobs simulated with the local model. The maximal blob amplitude is significantly higher in the global simulations than in the local ones. When the ion temperature is comparable to the electron temperature, global blob simulations show a reduced blob coherence and a decreased cross...

  18. Condition of damping of anomalous radial transport, determined by ordered convective electron dynamics

    Maslov, V.I.; Barchuk, S.V.; Lapshin, V.I.; Volkov, E.D.; Melentsov, Yu.V.

    2006-01-01

    It is shown, that at development of instability due to a radial gradient of density in the crossed electric and magnetic fields in nuclear fusion installations ordering convective cells can be excited. It provides anomalous particle transport. The spatial structures of these convective cells have been constructed. The radial dimensions of these convective cells depend on their amplitudes and on a radial gradient of density. The convective-diffusion equation for radial dynamics of the electrons has been derived. At the certain value of the universal controlling parameter, the convective cell excitation and the anomalous radial transport are suppressed. (author)

  19. Effects of radial envelope modulations on the collisionless trapped-electron mode in tokamak plasmas

    Chen, Hao-Tian; Chen, Liu

    2018-05-01

    Adopting the ballooning-mode representation and including the effects of radial envelope modulations, we have derived the corresponding linear eigenmode equation for the collisionless trapped-electron mode in tokamak plasmas. Numerical solutions of the eigenmode equation indicate that finite radial envelope modulations can affect the linear stability properties both quantitatively and qualitatively via the significant modifications in the corresponding eigenmode structures.

  20. Electron Bernstein wave electron temperature profile diagnostic (invited)

    Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.; Jones, B.; Munsat, T.; Spaleta, J.; Hosea, J.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Menard, J.

    2001-01-01

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) has been employed as a standard electron temperature profile diagnostic on many tokamaks and stellarators, but most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard ECE diagnostics to measure temperature. They are either ''overdense,'' operating at high density relative to the magnetic field (e.g., ω pe >>Omega ce in a spherical torus) or they have insufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition (τ>2). Electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) are electrostatic waves that can propagate in overdense plasmas and have a high optical thickness at the electron cyclotron resonance layers as a result of their large k perp . In this article we report on measurements of EBW emission on the CDX-U spherical torus, where B 0 ∼2kG, e >∼10 13 cm -3 and T e ∼10--200eV. Results are presented for electromagnetic measurements of EBW emission, mode converted near the plasma edge. The EBW emission was absolutely calibrated and compared to the electron temperature profile measured by a multipoint Thomson scattering diagnostic. Depending on the plasma conditions, the mode-converted EBW radiation temperature was found to be ≤T e and the emission source was determined to be radially localized at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. A Langmuir triple probe and a 140 GHz interferometer were employed to measure changes in the edge density profile in the vicinity of the upper hybrid resonance where the mode conversion of the EBWs is expected to occur. Initial results suggest EBW emission and EBW heating are viable concepts for plasmas where ω pe >>Omega ce

  1. Modelling and analysis of radial thermal stresses and temperature ...

    user

    The temperature field, heat transfer rate and thermal stresses were investigated with numerical simulation models using FORTRAN FE (finite element) software. ...... specific heats, International Communications in Heat and Mass Transfer, Vol.

  2. Electron cyclotron absorption in Tokamak plasmas in the presence of radial transport of particles

    Rosa, Paulo R. da S.; Ziebell, Luiz F.

    1998-01-01

    We use quasilinear theory to study effects of particle radial transport on the electron cyclotron absorption coefficient by a current carrying plasma, in a tokamak modelated as a plasma slab. Our numerical results indicate significant modification in the profile of the electron cyclotron absorption coefficient when transport is taken into account relative to the situation without transport. (author)

  3. Temperature-monitored optical treatment for radial tissue expansion.

    Bak, Jinoh; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2017-07-01

    Esophageal stricture occurs in 7-23% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, the current treatments including stent therapy, balloon dilation, and bougienage involve limitations such as stent migration, formation of the new strictures, and snowplow effect. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the feasibility of structural expansion in tubular tissue ex vivo during temperature-monitored photothermal treatment with a diffusing applicator for esophageal stricture. Porcine liver was used as an ex vivo tissue sample for the current study. A glass tube was used to maintain a constant distance between the diffuser and tissue surface and to evaluate any variations in the luminal area after 10-W 1470-nm laser irradiation for potential stricture treatment. The 3D goniometer measurements confirmed roughly isotropic distribution with less than 10% deviation from the average angular intensity over 2π (i.e., 0.86 ± 0.09 in arbitrary unit) from the diffusing applicator. The 30-s irradiation increased the tissue temperature up to 72.5 °C, but due to temperature feedback, the interstitial tissue temperature became saturated at 70 °C (i.e., steady-state error = ±0.4 °C). The irradiation times longer than 5 s presented area expansion index of 1.00 ± 0.04, signifying that irreversible tissue denaturation permanently deformed the lumen in a circular shape and secured the equivalent luminal area to that of the glass tube. Application of a temperature feedback controller for photothermal treatment with the diffusing applicator can regulate the degree of thermal denaturation to feasibly treat esophageal stricture in a tubular tissue.

  4. Radial transport of high-energy runaway electrons in ORMAK

    Zweben, S.J.; Swain, D.W.; Fleischmann, H.H.

    1978-01-01

    The transport of high-energy runaway electrons near the outside of a low-density ORMAK discharge is investigated by measuring the flux of runaways to the outer limiter during and after an inward shift of the plasma column. The experimental results are interpreted through a runaway confinement model which includes both the classical outward displacement of the runaway orbit with increasing energy and an additional runaway spatial diffusion coefficient which simulates an unspecified source of anomalous transport. Diffusion coefficients in the range D approximately equal to 10 2 -10 4 cms -1 are found under various discharge conditions indicating a significant non-collisional runaway transport near the outside of the discharge, particularly in the presence of MHD instability. (author)

  5. Formula for radial profiles of temperature in steam-liquid sodium reactive jets

    Hobbes, P.; Mora-Perez, J.L.; Carreau, J.L.; Gbahoue, L.; Roger, F.

    1987-01-01

    One of the important problems of the study of distribution of temperatures in the reactive steam-liquid sodium jet rests in the mathematical formulation of their radial effects. During the experiment, two forms have been brought to light: from a certain distance of the injector, the radial distribution of temperature can be represented, in a classical way, by an error function curve; close to the injector, the radial profile allows for a minimum located on the axis of the jet. An energy balance permits, by dividing the jet in three parts: a central nucleus composed of practically pure gas, a gas ring plus drops and a liquid peripheral area plus bubbles, to obtain a mathematical formulation of the profiles, close to the injection which accounts quite well for the experimental points and their form

  6. Radially resolved simulation of a high-gain free electron laser amplifier

    Fawley, W.M.; Prosnitz, D.; Doss, S.; Gelinas, R.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a two-dimensional simulation of a high-gain free electron laser (FEL) amplifier is presented. The simulation solves the inhomogeneous paraxial wave equation. The source term is radially resolved and is obtained by tracking the interaction of the laser field with localized macroparticles

  7. Formation of positive radial electric field by electron cyclotron heating in compact helical system

    Idei, H.; Ida, K.; Sanuki, H.

    1994-07-01

    The radial electric field is driven to positive value by off-axis second harmonic electron cyclotron heating (ECH) in the Compact Helical System. The observed positive electric field is associated with the outward particle flux enhanced with ECH. The enhanced particle flux triggered by the production of the electrons accelerated perpendicularly to the magnetic field with ECH results in the change of the electric field. (author)

  8. Transition of radial electric field by electron cyclotron heating in stellarator plasmas

    Idei, H.; Ida, K.; Sanuki, H.

    1993-06-01

    The transition of a radial electric field from a negative to a positive value is observed in Compact Helical System when the electron loss is sufficiently enhanced by the superposition of the off-axis second harmonic electron cyclotron heating on the neutral beam heated plasmas. The observed threshold for the enhanced particle flux required to cause the transition is compared with a theoretical prediction. (author)

  9. Electron temperature measurement in Maxwellian non-isothermal beam plasma of an ion thruster

    Zhang, Zun; Tang, Haibin; Kong, Mengdi; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Junxue

    2015-01-01

    Published electron temperature profiles of the beam plasma from ion thrusters reveal many divergences both in magnitude and radial variation. In order to know exactly the radial distributions of electron temperature and understand the beam plasma characteristics, we applied five different experimental approaches to measure the spatial profiles of electron temperature and compared the agreement and disagreement of the electron temperature profiles obtained from these techniques. Experimental results show that the triple Langmuir probe and adiabatic poly-tropic law methods could provide more accurate space-resolved electron temperature of the beam plasma than other techniques. Radial electron temperature profiles indicate that the electrons in the beam plasma are non-isothermal, which is supported by a radial decrease (∼2 eV) of electron temperature as the plume plasma expands outward. Therefore, the adiabatic “poly-tropic law” is more appropriate than the isothermal “barometric law” to be used in electron temperature calculations. Moreover, the calculation results show that the electron temperature profiles derived from the “poly-tropic law” are in better agreement with the experimental data when the specific heat ratio (γ) lies in the range of 1.2-1.4 instead of 5/3

  10. Temperature and boron dependencies of buckling and radial reflector saving for VVER lattices

    Alvarez, C.

    1990-01-01

    The temperature and boron dependencies of buckling and radial reflectors savings are analyzed in this paper on the basis of the results from the calculations ZR-6M critical assembly. These dependencies are related to the physical behavior of temperature and boron reactivity coefficients for the cores of VVER-type critical facilities. As a byproduct, the parameter was also investigated and its dependence on water density was determined

  11. Temperature and boron dependencies of buckling and radial reflector savings for VVER lattices

    Alvarez, C.

    1990-01-01

    The temperature and boron dependencies of buckling and radial reflector savings are analyzed in this paper on the basis of the results from the calculations for the ZR-6M critical assembly. These dependencies are related to he physical behaviour of temperature and boron reactivity coefficients for the cores of VVER-type critical facilities. As a byproduct, the dp/dBg 2 parameter was also investigated and its dependence on water density was determined

  12. Calculation of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity considering non-uniform radial temperature distribution in the fuel rod

    Pazirandeh, Ali [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Science and Research Branch; Hooshyar Mobaraki, Almas

    2017-07-15

    The safe operation of a reactor is based on feedback models. In this paper we attempted to discuss the influence of a non-uniform radial temperature distribution on the fuel rod temperature coefficient of reactivity. The paper demonstrates that the neutron properties of a reactor core is based on effective temperature of the fuel to obtain the correct fuel temperature feedback. The value of volume-averaged temperature being used in the calculations of neutron physics with feedbacks would result in underestimating the probable event. In the calculation it is necessary to use the effective temperature of the fuel in order to provide correct accounting of the fuel temperature feedback. Fuel temperature changes in different zones of the core and consequently reactivity coefficient change are an important parameter for analysis of transient conditions. The restricting factor that compensates the inserted reactivity is the temperature reactivity coefficient and effective delayed neutron fraction.

  13. Curvature-driven instabilities in a hot-electron plasma: radial analysis

    Berk, H.L.; Van Dam, J.W.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Spong, D.A.

    1981-12-01

    The theory of unfavorable curvature-driven instabilities is developed for a plasma interacting with a hot electron ring whose drift frequencies are larger than the growth rates predicted from conventional magnetohydrodynamic theory. A z-pinch model is used to emphasize the radial structure of the problem. Stability criteria are obtained for the five possible modes of instability: the conventional hot electron interchange, a high-frequency hot electron interchange (at frequencies larger than the ion cyclotron frequency), a compressional instability, a background pressure-driven interchange, and an interacting pressure-driven interchange

  14. Strong non-radial propagation of energetic electrons in solar corona

    Klassen, A.; Dresing, N.; Gómez-Herrero, R.; Heber, B.; Veronig, A.

    2018-06-01

    Analyzing the sequence of solar energetic electron events measured at both STEREO-A (STA) and STEREO-B (STB) spacecraft during 17-21 July 2014, when their orbital separation was 34°, we found evidence of a strong non-radial electron propagation in the solar corona below the solar wind source surface. The impulsive electron events were associated with recurrent flare and jet (hereafter flare/jet) activity at the border of an isolated coronal hole situated close to the solar equator. We have focused our study on the solar energetic particle (SEP) event on 17 July 2014, during which both spacecraft detected a similar impulsive and anisotropic energetic electron event suggesting optimal connection of both spacecraft to the parent particle source, despite the large angular separation between the parent flare and the nominal magnetic footpoints on the source surface of STA and STB of 68° and 90°, respectively. Combining the remote-sensing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations, in-situ plasma, magnetic field, and energetic particle data we investigated and discuss here the origin and the propagation trajectory of energetic electrons in the solar corona. We find that the energetic electrons in the energy range of 55-195 keV together with the associated EUV jet were injected from the flare site toward the spacecraft's magnetic footpoints and propagate along a strongly non-radial and inclined magnetic field below the source surface. From stereoscopic (EUV) observations we estimated the inclination angle of the jet trajectory and the respective magnetic field of 63° ± 11° relative to the radial direction. We show how the flare accelerated electrons reach very distant longitudes in the heliosphere, when the spacecraft are nominally not connected to the particle source. This example illustrates how ballistic backmapping can occasionally fail to characterize the magnetic connectivity during SEP events. This finding also provides an additional mechanism (one among others

  15. Electron temperature anisotropy constraints in the solar wind

    Štverák, Štěpán; Trávníček, Pavel M.; Maksimovic, M.; Marsch, E.; Fazakerley, A.; Scime, E. E.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 113, A3 /2008/ (2008), A03103/1-A03103/10 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300420602 Grant - others:EU(XE) ESA-PECS project No. 98024 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501; CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : solar wind electrons * temperature anisotropy * radial Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.147, year: 2008

  16. Influence on rewetting temperature and wetting delay during rewetting rod bundle by various radial jet models

    Debbarma, Ajoy; Pandey, Krishna Murari [National Institute of Technology, Assam (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2016-03-15

    Numerical investigation of the rewetting of single sector fuel assembly of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) has been carried out to exhibit the effect of coolant jet diameters (2, 3 and 4 mm) and jet directions (Model: M, X and X2). The rewetting phenomena with various jet models are compared on the basis of rewetting temperature and wetting delay. Temperature-time curve have been evaluated from rods surfaces at different circumference, radial and axial locations of rod bundle. The cooling curve indicated the presence of vapor in respected location, where it prevents the contact between the firm and fluid phases. The peak wall temperature represents as rewetting temperature. The time period observed between initial to rewetting temperature point is wetting delay. It was noted that as improved in various jet models, rewetting temperature and wetting delay reduced, which referred the coolant stipulation in the rod bundle dominant vapor formation.

  17. Influence on rewetting temperature and wetting delay during rewetting rod bundle by various radial jet models

    Debbarma, Ajoy; Pandey, Krishna Murari

    2016-01-01

    Numerical investigation of the rewetting of single sector fuel assembly of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) has been carried out to exhibit the effect of coolant jet diameters (2, 3 and 4 mm) and jet directions (Model: M, X and X2). The rewetting phenomena with various jet models are compared on the basis of rewetting temperature and wetting delay. Temperature-time curve have been evaluated from rods surfaces at different circumference, radial and axial locations of rod bundle. The cooling curve indicated the presence of vapor in respected location, where it prevents the contact between the firm and fluid phases. The peak wall temperature represents as rewetting temperature. The time period observed between initial to rewetting temperature point is wetting delay. It was noted that as improved in various jet models, rewetting temperature and wetting delay reduced, which referred the coolant stipulation in the rod bundle dominant vapor formation.

  18. The electronic structure of radial p-n junction silicon nanowires

    Chiou, Shan-Haw; Grossman, Jeffrey

    2007-03-01

    Silicon nanowires with radial p-n junctions have recently been suggested for photovoltaic applications because incident light can be absorbed along the entire length of the wire, while photogenerated carriers only need to diffuse a maximum of one radius to reach the p-n junction. If the differential of the potential is larger than the binding energy of the electron-hole pair and has a range larger than the Bohr radius of electron-hole pair, then the charge separation mechanism will be similar to traditional silicon solar cells. However, in the small-diameter limit, where quantum confinement effects are prominent, both the exciton binding energy and the potential drop will increase, and the p-n junction itself may have a dramatically different character. We present ab initio calculations based on the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) of silicon nanowires with 2-3 nm diameter in the [111] growth direction. A radial p-n junction was formed by symmetrically doping boron and phosphorous at the same vertical level along the axis of the nanowire. The competition between the slope and character of the radial electronic potential and the exciton binding energy will presented in the context of a charge separation mechanism.

  19. Radial structure of curvature-driven instabilities in a hot-electron plasma

    Spong, D.A.; Berk, H.L.; Van Dam, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    A nonlocal analysis of curvature-driven instabilities for a hot-electron ring interacting with a warm background plasma has been made. Four different instability modes characteristic of hot-electron plasmas have been examined: the high-frequency hot-electron interchange (at frequencies larger than the ion-cyclotron frequency), the compressional Alfven instability, the interacting background pressure-driven interchange, and the conventional hot-electron interchange (at frequencies below the ion-cyclotron frequency). The decoupling condition between core and hot-electron plasmas has also been examined, and its influence on the background and hot-electron interchange stability boundaries has been studied. The assumed equilibrium plasma profiles and resulting radial mode structure differ somewhat from those used in previous local analytic estimates; however, when the analysis is calibrated to the appropriate effective radial wavelength of the nonlocal calculation, reasonable agreement is obtained. Comparison with recent experimental measurements indicates that certain of these modes may play a role in establishing operating boundaries for the ELMO Bumpy Torus-Scale (EBT-S) experiment. The calculations given here indicate the necessity of having core plasma outside the ring to prevent the destabilizing wave resonance of the precessional mode with a cold plasma

  20. Investigation of radial power and temperature effects in large-scale reflood experiments

    Motley, F.

    1983-01-01

    The largest reflood test facility in the world has been designed and constructed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The experimental test facility, known as the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF), models a full-height core section and the four primary loops of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The radial power distribution and temperature distribution were varied during the testing program. The test results indicate that the radial effects, while noticeable, do not appreciably alter the overall quenching behavior of the facility. The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) correctly predicted the experimental results of several of the tests. The code results indicate that the core flow pattern adjusts multidimensionally to mitigate the effects of increased power or stored energy

  1. Electron acceleration by a radially polarized laser pulse during ionization of low density gases

    Kunwar Pal Singh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The acceleration of electrons by a radially polarized intense laser pulse has been studied. The axial electric field of the laser is responsible for electron acceleration. The axial electric field increases with decreasing laser spot size; however, the laser pulse gets defocused sooner for smaller values and the electrons do not experience high electric field for long, reducing the energy they can reach. The electron remains confined in the electric field of the laser for longer and the electron energy peaks for the normalized laser spot size nearly equal to the normalized laser intensity parameter. Electron energy peaks for initial laser phase ϕ_{0}=π due to accelerating laser phase and decreases with transverse initial position of the electrons. The energy and angle of the emittance spectrum of the electrons generated during ionization of krypton and argon at low densities have been obtained and a right choice of laser parameters has been suggested to obtain high energy quasimonoenergetic collimated electron beams. It has been found that argon is more suitable than krypton to obtain high energy electron beams due to higher ionization potential of inner shells for the former.

  2. Comparison of Conductor-Temperature Calculations Based on Different Radial-Position-Temperature Detections for High-Voltage Power Cable

    Lin Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the calculation of the conductor temperature is related to the temperature sensor position in high-voltage power cables and four thermal circuits—based on the temperatures of insulation shield, the center of waterproof compound, the aluminum sheath, and the jacket surface are established to calculate the conductor temperature. To examine the effectiveness of conductor temperature calculations, simulation models based on flow characteristics of the air gap between the waterproof compound and the aluminum are built up, and thermocouples are placed at the four radial positions in a 110 kV cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE insulated power cable to measure the temperatures of four positions. In measurements, six cases of current heating test under three laying environments, such as duct, water, and backfilled soil were carried out. Both errors of the conductor temperature calculation and the simulation based on the temperature of insulation shield were significantly smaller than others under all laying environments. It is the uncertainty of the thermal resistivity, together with the difference of the initial temperature of each radial position by the solar radiation, which led to the above results. The thermal capacitance of the air has little impact on errors. The thermal resistance of the air gap is the largest error source. Compromising the temperature-estimation accuracy and the insulation-damage risk, the waterproof compound is the recommended sensor position to improve the accuracy of conductor-temperature calculation. When the thermal resistances were calculated correctly, the aluminum sheath is also the recommended sensor position besides the waterproof compound.

  3. Temporal and radial variation of the solar wind temperature-speed relationship

    Elliott, H. A.; Henney, C. J.; McComas, D. J.; Smith, C. W.; Vasquez, B. J.

    2012-09-01

    The solar wind temperature (T) and speed (V) are generally well correlated at ˜1 AU, except in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections where this correlation breaks down. We perform a comprehensive analysis of both the temporal and radial variation in the temperature-speed (T-V) relationship of the non-transient wind, and our analysis provides insight into both the causes of the T-V relationship and the sources of the temperature variability. Often at 1 AU the speed-temperature relationship is well represented by a single linear fit over a speed range spanning both the slow and fast wind. However, at times the fast wind from coronal holes can have a different T-V relationship than the slow wind. A good example of this was in 2003 when there was a very large and long-lived outward magnetic polarity coronal hole at low latitudes that emitted wind with speeds as fast as a polar coronal hole. The long-lived nature of the hole made it possible to clearly distinguish that some holes can have a different T-V relationship. In an earlier ACE study, we found that both the compressions and rarefactions T-V curves are linear, but the compression curve is shifted to higher temperatures. By separating compressions and rarefactions prior to determining the radial profiles of the solar wind parameters, the importance of dynamic interactions on the radial evolution of the solar wind parameters is revealed. Although the T-V relationship at 1 AU is often well described by a single linear curve, we find that the T-V relationship continually evolves with distance. Beyond ˜2.5 AU the differences between the compressions and rarefactions are quite significant and affect the shape of the overall T-V distribution to the point that a simple linear fit no longer describes the distribution well. Since additional heating of the ambient solar wind outside of interaction regions can be associated with Alfvénic fluctuations and the turbulent energy cascade, we also estimate the heating rate

  4. Wolte 5. low temperature electronics

    Balestra, F.; Dieudonne, F.; Jomaah, J.

    2002-01-01

    This book present the latest research and development results in advanced materials, technologies, devices, circuits and systems for low temperature electronics. The main themes of the papers are ranging from physics and fundamental aspects, modeling and simulation, to device and circuit design. The topics include advanced process and characterization, novel devices and cryogenic instrumentation. The papers are divided into nine sections, reflecting the main research efforts in different areas: i) deep submicron silicon MOSFETs, ii) alternative MOSFETs (SOI, innovating device architectures), iii) III-V devices, iv) other semiconductor devices (Ge devices, p-n junctions, IR sensors, semiconductor microcrystals), v) emerging devices and phenomena (nano Si-based devices, conduction and fluctuations mechanisms), vi) superconducting materials, vii) superconducting detectors, viii) superconducting devices and circuits (RSFQ, SIS mixers, metal-superconducting-semiconductor structures), ix) low temperature electronics for space applications. Six invited papers presented by internationally recognized authors, and 39 contributed papers are presented. The invited papers provide an excellent overview of today's status and progress, as well as tomorrow's challenges and trends in this important discipline for many cryogenic applications. (authors)

  5. Temperature distribution induced by electron beam in a closed cavity

    Molhem, A.G.; Soulayman, S.Sh.

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate heat transfer phenomena induced by EB in a closed cavity an experimental arrangement, which allows generating and focusing an electron beam in to closed cavity within 1 mm in diameter and measuring temperature all over any perpendicular section to the EB, is used for this purpose. Experimental data show that the radial distribution of current density and temperature is normal with pressure and location dependent parameters. Moreover, there is two distinguishable regions in the EB: one is central while the other surrounds the first one. (orig.)

  6. A Mathematical Model for Temperature Induced Loosening due to Radial Expansion of Rectangle Thread Bolted Joints

    Shiyuan Hou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a mathematical model to investigate the radial expansion induced loosening of rectangle thread bolted joints that were subjected to cyclic temperature variation, which could cause slippage between contact pairs of engaged threads and bolt bearing. Firstly, integral equations were derived for the shear stress components caused by expansion difference, as well as the bearing and thread friction torque components, which depended on the temperature variation. Secondly, the relationship of displacement components was developed based on quasi-static hypotheses. Then, treating the rotation of bolt as plastic elongation, the bolt tension's evolution was obtained by using a one-dimensional bolted joint model. Numerical results showed that the temperature variation decreased the bearing and thread friction torque components, which could lead bolted joint to loosen. Finally, the effects of some associated factors on the progress were discussed.

  7. RADIAL FORCE IMPACT ON THE FRICTION COEFFICIENT AND TEMPERATURE OF A SELF-LUBRICATING PLAIN BEARING

    Nada Bojić

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-lubricating bearings are available in spherical, plain, flanged journal, and rod end bearing configurations. They were originally developed to eliminate the need for re-lubrication, to provide lower torque and to solve application problems where the conventional metal-to-metal bearings would not perform satisfactorily, for instance, in the presence of high frequency vibrations. Among the dominant tribological parameters of the self-lubricating bearing, two could be singled out: the coefficient of friction and temperature. To determine these parameters, an experimental method was applied in this paper. By using this method, the coefficient of friction and temperature were identified and their correlation was established. The aim of this research was to determine the effect of radial force on tribological parameters in order to predict the behavior of sliding bearings with graphite in real operating conditions.

  8. Status of electron temperature and density measurement with beam emission spectroscopy on thermal helium at TEXTOR

    Schmitz, O.; Beigman, I. L.; Vainshtein, L. A.; Schweer, B.; Kantor, M.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Xu, Y.; Krychowiak, M.; Lehnen, M.; Samm, U.; Unterberg, B.

    2008-01-01

    Beam emission spectroscopy on thermal helium is used at the TEXTOR tokamak as a reliable method to obtain radial profiles of electron temperature T-e(r, t) and electron density ne(r, t). In this paper the experimental realization of this method at TEXTOR and the status of the atomic physics employed

  9. Polarization reversal of electron cyclotron wave due to radial boundary condition

    Takahashi, K.; Kaneko, T.; Hatakeyama, R.

    2004-01-01

    The electron cyclotron wave is an important plasma wave in the fields of basic plasma physics and nuclear fusion. Propagation and absorption of electromagnetic waves with electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) frequency are experimentally and theoretically investigated for the case of inhomogeneously magnetized plasma column with peripheral vacuum layer, when a left-hand polarized wave (LHPW) is selectively launched. The polarization reversal from the LHPW to the right-hand polarized wave is found to occur near the ECR point. As a result, it is clarified that the LHPW, which has been considered not to be absorbed at the ECR point, is absorbed near the ECR point. The phenomena can be explained by taking into account the effects of the radial boundary conditions. In addition, it is found that the polarization reversal point can be adjusted by the external parameters, for example, plasma radius. (authors)

  10. Radial profile of the electron distribution from electron cyclotron emission measurements

    Tribaldos, V.; Krivenski, V.

    1993-07-01

    A numerical study is presented, showing the possibility to invert the electron distribution function from a small set of non-thermal spectra, for a regime of lower hybrid current drive. (Author) 7 refs.

  11. Radial profile of the electron distribution from electron cyclotron emission measurements

    Tribaldos, V.; Krivenski, V.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical study is presented, showing the possibility to invert the electron distribution function from a small set of non-thermal spectra, for a regime of lower hybrid current drive. (Author) 7 refs

  12. Extracting kinetic freeze-out temperature and radial flow velocity from an improved Tsallis distribution

    Lao, Hai-Ling; Liu, Fu-Hu [Shanxi University, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanxi (China); Lacey, Roy A. [Stony Brook University, Departments of Chemistry and Physics, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2017-03-15

    We analyze the transverse-momentum (p{sub T}) spectra of identified particles (π{sup ±}, K{sup ±}, p, and anti p) produced in gold-gold (Au-Au) and lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions over a √(s{sub NN}) (center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair) range from 14.5 GeV (one of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energies) to 2.76 TeV (one of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies). For the spectra with a narrow p{sub T} range, an improved Tsallis distribution which is in fact the Tsallis distribution with radial flow is used. For the spectra with a wide p{sub T} range, a superposition of the improved Tsallis distribution and an inverse power law is used. Both the extracted kinetic freeze-out temperature (T{sub 0}) and radial flow velocity (β{sub T}) increase with the increase of √(s{sub NN}), which indicates a higher excitation and larger expansion of the interesting system at the LHC. Both the values of T{sub 0} and β{sub T} in central collisions are slightly larger than those in peripheral collisions, and they are independent of isospin and slightly dependent on mass. (orig.)

  13. Performance of a high-work, low-aspect-ratio turbine stator tested with a realistic inlet radial temperature gradient

    Stabe, Roy G.; Schwab, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A 0.767-scale model of a turbine stator designed for the core of a high-bypass-ratio aircraft engine was tested with uniform inlet conditions and with an inlet radial temperature profile simulating engine conditions. The principal measurements were radial and circumferential surveys of stator-exit total temperature, total pressure, and flow angle. The stator-exit flow field was also computed by using a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver. Other than temperature, there were no apparent differences in performance due to the inlet conditions. The computed results compared quite well with the experimental results.

  14. Electron temperature gradient driven instability in the tokamak boundary plasma

    Xu, X.Q.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Diamond, P.H.

    1992-01-01

    A general method is developed for calculating boundary plasma fluctuations across a magnetic separatrix in a tokamak with a divertor or a limiter. The slab model, which assumes a periodic plasma in the edge reaching the divertor or limiter plate in the scrape-off layer(SOL), should provide a good estimate, if the radial extent of the fluctuation quantities across the separatrix to the edge is small compared to that given by finite particle banana orbit. The Laplace transform is used for solving the initial value problem. The electron temperature gradient(ETG) driven instability is found to grow like t -1/2 e γmt

  15. Sea Surface Temperature Modeling using Radial Basis Function Networks With a Dynamically Weighted Particle Filter

    Ryu, Duchwan

    2013-03-01

    The sea surface temperature (SST) is an important factor of the earth climate system. A deep understanding of SST is essential for climate monitoring and prediction. In general, SST follows a nonlinear pattern in both time and location and can be modeled by a dynamic system which changes with time and location. In this article, we propose a radial basis function network-based dynamic model which is able to catch the nonlinearity of the data and propose to use the dynamically weighted particle filter to estimate the parameters of the dynamic model. We analyze the SST observed in the Caribbean Islands area after a hurricane using the proposed dynamic model. Comparing to the traditional grid-based approach that requires a supercomputer due to its high computational demand, our approach requires much less CPU time and makes real-time forecasting of SST doable on a personal computer. Supplementary materials for this article are available online. © 2013 American Statistical Association.

  16. Influence of temperature and hydrogen content on stress-induced radial hydride precipitation in Zircaloy-4 cladding

    Desquines, J., E-mail: jean.desquines@irsn.fr; Drouan, D.; Billone, M.; Puls, M.P.; March, P.; Fourgeaud, S.; Getrey, C.; Elbaz, V.; Philippe, M.

    2014-10-15

    Radial hydride precipitation in stress relieved Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings is studied using a new thermal–mechanical test. Two maximum temperatures for radial hydride precipitation heat treatment are studied, 350 and 450 °C with hydrogen contents ranging between 50 and 600 wppm. The new test provides two main results of interest: the minimum hoop stress required to precipitate radial hydrides and a maximum stress above which, all hydrides precipitate in the radial direction. Based on these two extreme stress conditions, a model is derived to determine the stress level required to obtain a given fraction of radial hydrides after high temperature thermal–mechanical heat treatment. The proposed model is validated using metallographic observation data on pressurized tubes cooled down under constant pressure. Most of the samples with reoriented hydrides are further subjected to a ductility test. Using finite element modeling, the test results are analyzed in terms of crack nucleation within radial hydrides at the outer diameter and crack growth through the thickness of the tubular samples. The combination of test results shows that samples with hydrogen contents of about 100 wppm had the lowest ductility.

  17. Correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic and improved calculation of turbulent temperature fluctuation levels on ASDEX Upgrade

    Creely, A. J.; Freethy, S. J.; Burke, W. M.; Conway, G. D.; Leccacorvi, R.; Parkin, W. C.; Terry, D. R.; White, A. E.

    2018-05-01

    A newly upgraded correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) diagnostic has been installed on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak and has begun to perform experimental measurements of electron temperature fluctuations. CECE diagnostics measure small amplitude electron temperature fluctuations by correlating closely spaced heterodyne radiometer channels. This upgrade expanded the system from six channels to thirty, allowing simultaneous measurement of fluctuation level radial profiles without repeat discharges, as well as opening up the possibility of measuring radial turbulent correlation lengths. Newly refined statistical techniques have been developed in order to accurately analyze the fluctuation data collected from the CECE system. This paper presents the hardware upgrades for this system and the analysis techniques used to interpret the raw data, as well as measurements of fluctuation spectra and fluctuation level radial profiles.

  18. Regulation of electron temperature gradient turbulence by zonal flows driven by trapped electron modes

    Asahi, Y.; Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Tsutsui, H.; Tsuji-Iio, S.

    2014-05-01

    Turbulent transport caused by electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes was investigated by means of gyrokinetic simulations. It was found that the ETG turbulence can be regulated by meso-scale zonal flows driven by trapped electron modes (TEMs), which are excited with much smaller growth rates than those of ETG modes. The zonal flows of which radial wavelengths are in between the ion and the electron banana widths are not shielded by trapped ions nor electrons, and hence they are effectively driven by the TEMs. It was also shown that an E × B shearing rate of the TEM-driven zonal flows is larger than or comparable to the growth rates of long-wavelength ETG modes and TEMs, which make a main contribution to the turbulent transport before excitation of the zonal flows.

  19. Prediction of water formation temperature in natural gas dehydrators using radial basis function (RBF neural networks

    Tatar Afshin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Raw natural gases usually contain water. It is very important to remove the water from these gases through dehydration processes due to economic reasons and safety considerations. One of the most important methods for water removal from these gases is using dehydration units which use Triethylene glycol (TEG. The TEG concentration at which all water is removed and dew point characteristics of mixture are two important parameters, which should be taken into account in TEG dehydration system. Hence, developing a reliable and accurate model to predict the performance of such a system seems to be very important in gas engineering operations. This study highlights the use of intelligent modeling techniques such as Multilayer perceptron (MLP and Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBF-ANN to predict the equilibrium water dew point in a stream of natural gas based on the TEG concentration of stream and contractor temperature. Literature data set used in this study covers temperatures from 10 °C to 80 °C and TEG concentrations from 90.000% to 99.999%. Results showed that both models are accurate in prediction of experimental data and the MLP model gives more accurate predictions compared to RBF model.

  20. Excitation of higher radial modes of azimuthal surface waves in the electron cyclotron frequency range by rotating relativistic flow of electrons in cylindrical waveguides partially filled by plasmas

    Girka, Igor O.; Pavlenko, Ivan V.; Thumm, Manfred

    2018-05-01

    Azimuthal surface waves are electromagnetic eigenwaves of cylindrical plasma-dielectric waveguides which propagate azimuthally nearby the plasma-dielectric interface across an axial external stationary magnetic field. Their eigenfrequency in particular can belong to the electron cyclotron frequency range. Excitation of azimuthal surface waves by rotating relativistic electron flows was studied in detail recently in the case of the zeroth radial mode for which the waves' radial phase change within the layer where the electrons gyrate is small. In this case, just the plasma parameters cause the main influence on the waves' dispersion properties. In the case of the first and higher radial modes, the wave eigenfrequency is higher and the wavelength is shorter than in the case of the zeroth radial mode. This gain being of interest for practical applications can be achieved without any change in the device design. The possibility of effective excitation of the higher order radial modes of azimuthal surface waves is demonstrated here. Getting shorter wavelengths of the excited waves in the case of higher radial modes is shown to be accompanied by decreasing growth rates of the waves. The results obtained here are of interest for developing new sources of electromagnetic radiation, in nano-physics and in medical physics.

  1. Phonon and electron temperature and non-Fourier heat transport in thin layers

    Carlomagno, I.; Cimmelli, V.A. [Department of Mathematics, Computer Science and Economics, University of Basilicata, Campus Macchia Romana, Viale dell' Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Sellitto, A. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2017-04-15

    We present a thermodynamic model of heat conductor which allows for different temperatures of phonons and electrons. This model is applied to calculate the steady-state radial temperature profile in a circular thin layer. The compatibility of the obtained temperature profiles with the second law of thermodynamics is investigated in view of the requirement of positive entropy production and of a nonlocal constitutive equation for the entropy flux.

  2. The Radial Variation of the Solar Wind Temperature-Speed Relationship

    Elliott, H. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    Generally, the solar wind temperature (T) and speed (V) are well correlated except in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections where this correlation breaks down. We have shown that at 1 AU the speed-temperature relationship is often well represented by a linear fit for a speed range spanning both the slow and fast wind. By examining all of the ACE and OMNI measurements, we found that when coronal holes are large the fast wind can have a different T-V relationship than the slow wind. The best example of this was in 2003 when there was a very large and long-lived outward polarity coronal hole at low latitudes. The long-lived nature of the hole made it possible to clearly distinguish that large holes can have a different T-V relationship. We found it to be rare that holes are large enough and last long enough to have enough data points to clearly demonstrate this effect. In this study we compare the 2003 coronal hole observations from ACE with the Ulysses polar coronal hole measurements. In an even earlier ACE study we found that both the compressions and rarefactions curves are linear, but the compression curve is shifted to higher temperatures. In this presentation we use Helios, Ulysses, and ACE measurements to examine how the T-V relationship varies with distance. The dynamic evolution of the solar wind parameters is revealed when we first separate compressions and rarefactions and then determine the radial profiles of the solar wind parameters. We find that T-V relationship varies with distance and in particular beyond 3 AU the differences between the compressions and rarefactions are quite important and at such distances a simple linear fit does not represent the T-V distribution very well.

  3. Radial evolution of nonthermal electron populations in the low-latitude solar wind: Helios, Cluster, and Ulysses Observations

    Štverák, Štěpán; Maksimovic, M.; Trávníček, Pavel M.; Marsch, E.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Scime, E. E.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 114, - (2009), A05104/1-A05104/15 ISSN 0148-0227 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517; CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : solar wind * radial evolution * non- thermal electron properties Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.082, year: 2009

  4. High temperature electronic gain device

    McCormick, J.B.; Depp, S.W.; Hamilton, D.J.; Kerwin, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    An integrated thermionic device suitable for use in high temperature, high radiation environments is described. Cathode and control electrodes are deposited on a first substrate facing an anode on a second substrate. The substrates are sealed to a refractory wall and evacuated to form an integrated triode vacuum tube

  5. Radial profiles of temperature and viscosity in the Earth's mantle inferred from the geoid and lateral seismic structure

    Cadek, O.; Berg, A.P. van den

    1998-01-01

    In the framework of dynamical modelling of the geoid, we have estimated basic features of the radial profile of temperature in the mantle. The applied parameterization of the geotherm directly characterizes thermal boundary layers and values of the thermal gradient in the upper and lower mantle.

  6. Reconstruction of Daily Sea Surface Temperature Based on Radial Basis Function Networks

    Zhihong Liao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A radial basis function network (RBFN method is proposed to reconstruct daily Sea surface temperatures (SSTs with limited SST samples. For the purpose of evaluating the SSTs using this method, non-biased SST samples in the Pacific Ocean (10°N–30°N, 115°E–135°E are selected when the tropical storm Hagibis arrived in June 2014, and these SST samples are obtained from the Reynolds optimum interpolation (OI v2 daily 0.25° SST (OISST products according to the distribution of AVHRR L2p SST and in-situ SST data. Furthermore, an improved nearest neighbor cluster (INNC algorithm is designed to search for the optimal hidden knots for RBFNs from both the SST samples and the background fields. Then, the reconstructed SSTs from the RBFN method are compared with the results from the OI method. The statistical results show that the RBFN method has a better performance of reconstructing SST than the OI method in the study, and that the average RMSE is 0.48 °C for the RBFN method, which is quite smaller than the value of 0.69 °C for the OI method. Additionally, the RBFN methods with different basis functions and clustering algorithms are tested, and we discover that the INNC algorithm with multi-quadric function is quite suitable for the RBFN method to reconstruct SSTs when the SST samples are sparsely distributed.

  7. Calculation of Self-consistent Radial Electric Field in Presence of Convective Electron Transport in a Stellarator

    Kernbichler, W.; Heyn, M.F.; Kasilov, S.V.

    2003-01-01

    Convective transport of supra-thermal electrons can play a significant role in the energy balance of stellarators in case of high power electron cyclotron heating. Here, together with neoclassical thermal particle fluxes also the supra-thermal electron flux should be taken into account in the flux ambipolarity condition, which defines the self-consistent radial electric field. Since neoclassical particle fluxes are non-linear functions of the radial electric field, one needs an iterative procedure to solve the ambipolarity condition, where the supra-thermal electron flux has to be calculated for each iteration. A conventional Monte-Carlo method used earlier for evaluation of supra-thermal electron fluxes is rather slow for performing the iterations in reasonable computer time. In the present report, the Stochastic Mapping Technique (SMT), which is more effective than the conventional Monte Carlo method, is used instead. Here, the problem with a local monoenergetic supra-thermal particle source is considered and the effect of supra-thermal electron fluxes on both, the self-consistent radial electric field and the formation of different roots of the ambipolarity condition are studied

  8. Saturation mechanism of decaying ion temperature gradient driven turbulence with kinetic electrons

    Idomura, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We present full-f gyrokinetic simulations of the ion temperature gradient driven (ITG) turbulence including kinetic electrons. By comparing decaying ITG turbulence simulations with adiabatic and kinetic electron models, an impact of kinetic electrons on the ITG turbulence is investigated. It is found that significant electron transport occurs even in the ITG turbulence, and both ion and electron temperature profiles are relaxed. In steady states, both cases show upshifts of nonlinear critical ion temperature gradients from linear ones, while their saturation mechanisms are qualitatively different. In the adiabatic electron case, the ITG mode is stabilized by turbulence driven zonal flows. On the other hand, in the kinetic electron case, passing electrons transport shows fine resonant structures at mode rational surfaces, which generate corrugated density profiles. Such corrugated density profiles lead to fine radial electric fields following the neoclassical force balance relation. The resulting E × B shearing rate greatly exceeds the linear growth rate of the ITG mode. (author)

  9. Electronic confinement in graphene quantum rings due to substrate-induced mass radial kink.

    Xavier, L J P; da Costa, D R; Chaves, A; Pereira, J M; Farias, G A

    2016-12-21

    We investigate localized states of a quantum ring confinement in monolayer graphene defined by a circular mass-related potential, which can be induced e.g. by interaction with a substrate that breaks the sublattice symmetry, where a circular line defect provides a change in the sign of the induced mass term along the radial direction. Electronic properties are calculated analytically within the Dirac-Weyl approximation in the presence of an external magnetic field. Analytical results are also compared with those obtained by the tight-binding approach. Regardless of its sign, a mass term [Formula: see text] is expected to open a gap for low-energy electrons in Dirac cones in graphene. Both approaches confirm the existence of confined states with energies inside the gap, even when the width of the kink modelling the mass sign transition is infinitely thin. We observe that such energy levels are inversely proportional to the defect line ring radius and independent on the mass kink height. An external magnetic field is demonstrated to lift the valley degeneracy in this system and easily tune the valley index of the ground state in this system, which can be polarized on either K or [Formula: see text] valleys of the Brillouin zone, depending on the magnetic field intensity. Geometrical changes in the defect line shape are considered by assuming an elliptic line with different eccentricities. Our results suggest that any defect line that is closed in a loop, with any geometry, would produce the same qualitative results as the circular ones, as a manifestation of the topologically protected nature of the ring-like states investigated here.

  10. Determination of electron temperature and electron density in ...

    It is seen that the electron temperature increases from 5.8 × 102 oK to 7.83 × 104 oK as the pd is reduced from 130mm Hg × mm to 60 mm Hg × mm for argon. The electron densities increases from 2.8 × 1011/cm3 to 3.2 × 1011 /cm3 for the same variation of pds. For air the electron temperature increases from 3.6 × 104 oK to ...

  11. Electronic ceramics in high-temperature environments

    Searcy, A.W.; Meschi, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Simple thermodynamic means are described for understanding and predicting the influence of temperature changes, in various environments, on electronic properties of ceramics. Thermal gradients, thermal cycling, and vacuum annealing are discussed, as well as the variations of ctivities and solubilities with temperature. 7 refs

  12. Parametric dependencies of JET electron temperature profiles

    Schunke, B [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Imre, K; Riedel, K [New York Univ., NY (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The JET Ohmic, L-Mode and H-Mode electron temperature profiles obtained from the LIDAR Thomson Scattering Diagnostic are parameterized in terms of the normalized flux parameter and a set of the engineering parameters like plasma current, toroidal field, line averages electron density... It is shown that the electron temperature profiles fit a log-additive model well. It is intended to use the same model to predict the profile shape for D-T discharges in JET and in ITER. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Deep Trek High Temperature Electronics Project

    Bruce Ohme

    2007-07-31

    This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the cooperative research agreement between Honeywell and U.S. Department of Energy to develop high-temperature electronics. Objects of this development included Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) wafer process development for high temperature, supporting design tools and libraries, and high temperature integrated circuit component development including FPGA, EEPROM, high-resolution A-to-D converter, and a precision amplifier.

  14. Time-dependent electron temperature diagnostics for high-power aluminum z-pinch plasmas

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Nash, T.J.; Mock, R.C.

    1996-08-01

    Time-resolved x-ray pinhole photographs and time-integrated radially-resolved x-ray crystal-spectrometer measurements of azimuthally-symmetric aluminum-wire implosions suggest that the densest phase of the pinch is composed of a hot plasma core surrounded by a cooler plasma halo. The slope of the free-bound x-ray continuum, provides a time-resolved, model-independent diagnostic of the core electron temperature. A simultaneous measurement of the time-resolved K-shell line spectra provides the electron temperature of the spatially averaged plasma. Together, the two diagnostics support a 1-D Radiation-Hydrodynamic model prediction of a plasma whose thermalization on axis produces steep radial gradients in temperature, from temperatures in excess of a kilovolt in the core to below a kilovolt in the surrounding plasma halo

  15. Temperature measurement systems in wearable electronics

    Walczak, S.; Gołebiowski, J.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the concept of temperature measurement system, adapted to wearable electronics applications. Temperature is one of the most commonly monitored factor in smart textiles, especially in sportswear, medical and rescue products. Depending on the application, measured temperature could be used as an initial value of alert, heating, lifesaving or analysis system. The concept of the temperature measurement multi-point system, which consists of flexible screen-printed resistive sensors, placed on the T-shirt connected with the central unit and the power supply is elaborated in the paper.

  16. Development of micro-scale axial and radial turbines for low-temperature heat source driven organic Rankine cycle

    Al Jubori, Ayad; Daabo, Ahmed; Al-Dadah, Raya K.; Mahmoud, Saad; Ennil, Ali Bahr

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • One and three-dimensional analysis with real gas properties are integrated. • Micro axial and radial-inflow turbines configurations are investigated. • Five organic working fluids are considered. • The maximum total isentropic efficiency of radial-inflow turbine 83.85%. • The maximum ORC thermal efficiency based on radial-inflow turbine is 10.60%. - Abstract: Most studies on the organic Rankine cycle (ORC) focused on parametric studies and selection working fluids to maximize the performance of organic Rankine cycle but without attention for turbine design features which are crucial to achieving them. The rotational speed, expansion ratio, mass flow rate and turbine size have markedly effect on turbine performance. For this purpose organic Rankine cycle modeling, mean-line design and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics analysis were integrated for both micro axial and radial-inflow turbines with five organic fluids (R141b, R1234yf, R245fa, n-butane and n-pentane) for realistic low-temperature heat source <100 °C like solar and geothermal energy. Three-dimensional simulation is performed using ANSYS"R"1"7-CFX where three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved with k-omega shear stress transport turbulence model. Both configurations of turbines are designed at wide range of mass flow rate (0.1–0.5) kg/s for each working fluid. The results showed that n-pentane has the highest performance at all design conditions where the maximum total-to-total efficiency and power output of radial-inflow turbine are 83.85% and 8.893 kW respectively. The performance of the axial turbine was 83.48% total-to-total efficiency and 8.507 kW power output. The maximum overall size of axial turbine was 64.685 mm compared with 70.97 mm for radial-inflow turbine. R245fa has the lowest overall size for all cases. The organic Rankine cycle thermal efficiency was about 10.60% with radial-inflow turbine and 10.14% with axial turbine

  17. Sea Surface Temperature Modeling using Radial Basis Function Networks With a Dynamically Weighted Particle Filter

    Ryu, Duchwan; Liang, Faming; Mallick, Bani K.

    2013-01-01

    be modeled by a dynamic system which changes with time and location. In this article, we propose a radial basis function network-based dynamic model which is able to catch the nonlinearity of the data and propose to use the dynamically weighted particle

  18. Measurements of electron density and temperature profiles in a gas blanket experiment

    Kuthy, A.

    1979-02-01

    Radial profiles of electron density, temperature and H sub(β) intensity are presented for the rotating plasma device F-1. The hydrogen filling pressure, the average magnetic field strength at the midplane, and the power input to the discharge have been varied in the ranges 10-100 mTorr, 0.25-0.5 Tesla, and 0.1 to 1.5 MW, respectively. These experiments have been performed with the main purpose of studying the gas blanket (cold-mantle) state of the plasma. It is shown, that a simple spectroscopic method can be used to derive the radial distribution of the electron temperature in such plasmas. The observed peak temperatures and densities are in agreement with earlier theoretical estimates. (author)

  19. Regional modeling approach for analyzing harmonic stability in radial power electronics based power system

    Yoon, Changwoo; Bai, Haofeng; Wang, Xiongfei

    2015-01-01

    Stability analysis of distributed power generation system becomes complex when there are many numbers of grid inverters in the system. In order to analyze system stability, the overall network impedance will be lumped and needs to be analyzed one by one. However, using a unified bulky transfer-fu...... and then it is expanded for generalizing its concept to an overall radial structured network....

  20. Simulating radial diffusion of energetic (MeV electrons through a model of fluctuating electric and magnetic fields

    T. Sarris

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a test particle simulation is performed in a model of analytic Ultra Low Frequency, ULF, perturbations in the electric and magnetic fields of the Earth's magnetosphere. The goal of this work is to examine if the radial transport of energetic particles in quiet-time ULF magnetospheric perturbations of various azimuthal mode numbers can be described as a diffusive process and be approximated by theoretically derived radial diffusion coefficients. In the model realistic compressional electromagnetic field perturbations are constructed by a superposition of a large number of propagating electric and consistent magnetic pulses. The diffusion rates of the electrons under the effect of the fluctuating fields are calculated numerically through the test-particle simulation as a function of the radial coordinate L in a dipolar magnetosphere; these calculations are then compared to the symmetric, electromagnetic radial diffusion coefficients for compressional, poloidal perturbations in the Earth's magnetosphere. In the model the amplitude of the perturbation fields can be adjusted to represent realistic states of magnetospheric activity. Similarly, the azimuthal modulation of the fields can be adjusted to represent different azimuthal modes of fluctuations and the contribution to radial diffusion from each mode can be quantified. Two simulations of quiet-time magnetospheric variability are performed: in the first simulation, diffusion due to poloidal perturbations of mode number m=1 is calculated; in the second, the diffusion rates from multiple-mode (m=0 to m=8 perturbations are calculated. The numerical calculations of the diffusion coefficients derived from the particle orbits are found to agree with the corresponding theoretical estimates of the diffusion coefficient within a factor of two.

  1. Temperature dependent electronic conduction in semiconductors

    Roberts, G.G.; Munn, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    This review describes the temperature dependence of bulk-controlled electronic currents in semiconductors. The scope of the article is wide in that it contrasts conduction mechanisms in inorganic and organic solids and also single crystal and disordered semiconductors. In many experimental situations it is the metal-semiconductor contact or the interface between two dissimilar semiconductors that governs the temperature dependence of the conductivity. However, in order to keep the length of the review within reasonable bounds, these topics have been largely avoided and emphasis is therefore placed on bulk-limited currents. A central feature of electronic conduction in semiconductors is the concentrations of mobile electrons and holes that contribute to the conductivity. Various statistical approaches may be used to calculate these densities which are normally strongly temperature dependent. Section 1 emphasizes the relationship between the position of the Fermi level, the distribution of quantum states, the total number of electrons available and the absolute temperature of the system. The inclusion of experimental data for several materials is designed to assist the experimentalist in his interpretation of activation energy curves. Sections 2 and 3 refer to electronic conduction in disordered solids and molecular crystals, respectively. In these cases alternative approaches to the conventional band theory approach must be considered. For example, the velocities of the charge carriers are usually substantially lower than those in conventional inorganic single crystal semiconductors, thus introducing the possibility of an activated mobility. Some general electronic properties of these materials are given in the introduction to each of these sections and these help to set the conduction mechanisms in context. (orig.)

  2. Conceptual design of the Radial Gamma Ray Spectrometers system for α particle and runaway electron measurements at ITER

    Nocente, Massimo; Tardocchi, Marco; Barnsley, Robin

    2017-01-01

    We here present the principles and main physics capabilities behind the design of the radial gamma ray spectrometers (RGRS) system for alpha particle and runaway electron measurements at ITER. The diagnostic benefits from recent advances in gamma-ray spectrometry for tokamak plasmas and combines...... the measurements sensitive to α particles at characteristic resonant energies and to possible anisotropies of their slowing down distribution function. An independent assessment of the neutron rate by gamma-ray emission is also feasible. In case of runaway electrons born in disruptions with a typical duration...... of 100ms, a time resolution of at least 10ms for runaway electron studies can be achieved depending on the scenario and down to a current of 40 kA by use of external gas injection. We find that the bremsstrahlung spectrum in the MeV range from confined runaways is sensitive to the electron velocity space...

  3. Derivation of the radial profile of ion temperature from the measured energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals

    Nakamura, K; Hiraki, N; Toi, K; Itoh, S

    1980-01-01

    In the TRIAM-1 tokamak the energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals are observed by scanning the neutral energy analyzer vertically. The measured ion temperature obtained from the only energy spectrum observed in the peripheral region is much higher than that predicted by the neoclassical transport theory because of reflection (backscattering) of neutrals at the wall. The actual ion temperature profile is derived from all observed energy spectra by the numerical code in which a wall-reflection effect of neutrals and an impermeability of plasma are taken into account. The reflection coefficient is adjusted so that the calculated ion temperature profile should be the best fit for the ion temperatures measured by the Doppler broadening of the visible lines He II 4686 A and H-alpha at the relevant radial positions.

  4. Derivation of the radial profile of ion temperature from the 'measured' energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals

    Nakamura, Kazuo; Hiraki, Naoji; Toi, Kazuo; Itoh, Satoshi

    1980-01-01

    In the TRIAM-1 tokamak the energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals are observed by scanning the neutral energy analyzer vertically. The ''measured'' ion temperature obtained from only energy spectrum observed in the peripheral region is much higher than that predicted by the neoclassical transport theory because of reflection (backscattering) of neutrals at the wall. The ''actual'' ion temperature profile is derived from all observed energy spectra by using the numerical code in which a wall-reflection effect of neutrals and an impermeability of plasma are taken into account. In this numerical analysis, the reflection coefficient is adjusted so that the above calculated ion temperature profile should be best fit for the ion temperatures measured by the Doppler broadening of the visible lines HeII 4686 A and H sub(α) at the relevant radial positions. (author)

  5. Derivation of the radial profile of ion temperature from the 'measured' energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals

    Nakamura, K; Hiraki, N; Toi, K; Itoh, S [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1980-07-01

    In the TRIAM-1 tokamak the energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals are observed by scanning the neutral energy analyzer vertically. The ''measured'' ion temperature obtained from only energy spectrum observed in the peripheral region is much higher than that predicted by the neoclassical transport theory because of reflection (backscattering) of neutrals at the wall. The ''actual'' ion temperature profile is derived from all observed energy spectra by using the numerical code in which a wall-reflection effect of neutrals and an impermeability of plasma are taken into account. In this numerical analysis, the reflection coefficient is adjusted so that the above calculated ion temperature profile should be best fit for the ion temperatures measured by the Doppler broadening of the visible lines HeII 4686 A and H sub(..cap alpha..) at the relevant radial positions.

  6. Electron temperature measurement in Z-pinch

    Gerusov, A.V.; Orlov, M.M.; Terent'ev, A.R.; Khrabrov, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    Measurement of temperature of emitting plasma sheath in noncylindrical Z-pinch in neon at the stage of convergence to the axis, based on comparing the intensity of spectral lines belonging to Ne1, Ne2, is performed. Line intensity relation dependence was determined using calculations according to emitting-collision model. Spectra were recorded by electron-optical converter and relative intensity was determined by subsequent photometry of photolayer. Cylindric symmetrical MHD-calculations during which temperature and the observed line intensity relation were determined, are conducted

  7. Measurement of plasma potential and electron temperature by ball-pen probes in RFX-MOD

    Brotankova, J.; Adamek, J.; Stockel, J.; Martines, E.; Spolaore, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Serianni, G.; Vianello, N.; Zuin, M.

    2009-01-01

    The ball-pen probe (BPP) is an innovative electric probe for direct measurements of the plasma potential. This probe was developed in IPP Prague and it is based on the Katsumata probe concept. Combined measurements of the plasma potential by a BPP and floating potential by a Langmuir probe provide also the value of the electron temperature. First test of the BPP on the RFX-mod reversed field pinch in Padova has been performed in November 2006. The BPP head, made of boron nitride, is equipped with four graphite collectors, which are positioned at four different radial positions h inside four shafts hollow into the probe head. The radial profile of the plasma potential and also the electron temperature were measured

  8. Interactions between Radial Electric Field, Transport and Structure in Helical Plasmas

    Ida, Katsumi and others

    2006-01-01

    Control of the radial electric field is considered to be important in helical plasmas, because the radial electric field and its shear are expected to reduce neoclassical and anomalous transport, respectively. Particle and heat transport, that determines the radial structure of density and electron profiles, sensitive to the structure of radial electric field. On the other hand, the radial electric field itself is determined by the plasma parameters. In general, the sign of the radial electric field is determined by the plasma collisionality, while the magnitude of the radial electric field is determined by the temperature and/or density gradients. Therefore the structure of radial electric field and temperature and density are strongly coupled through the particle and heat transport and formation mechanism of radial electric field. Interactions between radial electric field, transport and structure in helical plasmas is discussed based on the experiments on Large Helical Device

  9. Investigating inhomogeneous electronic properties of radial junction solar cells using correlative microscopy

    Müller, Martin; Hývl, Matěj; Kratzer, M.; Teichert, C.; Misra, S.; Foldyna, M.; Yu, L.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.; Itoh, T.; Hájková, Zdeňka; Vetushka, Aliaksi; Ledinský, Martin; Kočka, Jan; Fejfar, Antonín

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 8 (2015), "08KA08-1"-"08KA08-5" ISSN 0021-4922 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-15357S; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14ATE004; GA ČR GA13-25747S; GA ČR GA13-12386S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA ČR GB14-37427G Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100101217 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : solar cells * radial junctions * silicon nanowires * correlative microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.122, year: 2015

  10. Comment on "A note on generalized radial mesh generation for plasma electronic structure"

    Pain, J.-Ch.

    2011-12-01

    In a recent note, B.G. Wilson and V. Sonnad [1] proposed a very useful closed form expression for the efficient generation of analytic log-linear radial meshes. The central point of the note is an implicit equation for the parameter h, involving Lambert's function W[x]. The authors mention that they are unaware of any direct proof of this equation (they obtained it by re-summing the Taylor expansion of h[α] using high-order coefficients obtained by analytic differentiation of the implicit definition using symbolic manipulation). In the present comment, we propose a direct proof of that equation.

  11. Intermittent electron density and temperature fluctuations and associated fluxes in the Alcator C-Mod scrape-off layer

    Kube, R.; Garcia, O. E.; Theodorsen, A.; Brunner, D.; Kuang, A. Q.; LaBombard, B.; Terry, J. L.

    2018-06-01

    The Alcator C-Mod mirror Langmuir probe system has been used to sample data time series of fluctuating plasma parameters in the outboard mid-plane far scrape-off layer. We present a statistical analysis of one second long time series of electron density, temperature, radial electric drift velocity and the corresponding particle and electron heat fluxes. These are sampled during stationary plasma conditions in an ohmically heated, lower single null diverted discharge. The electron density and temperature are strongly correlated and feature fluctuation statistics similar to the ion saturation current. Both electron density and temperature time series are dominated by intermittent, large-amplitude burst with an exponential distribution of both burst amplitudes and waiting times between them. The characteristic time scale of the large-amplitude bursts is approximately 15 μ {{s}}. Large-amplitude velocity fluctuations feature a slightly faster characteristic time scale and appear at a faster rate than electron density and temperature fluctuations. Describing these time series as a superposition of uncorrelated exponential pulses, we find that probability distribution functions, power spectral densities as well as auto-correlation functions of the data time series agree well with predictions from the stochastic model. The electron particle and heat fluxes present large-amplitude fluctuations. For this low-density plasma, the radial electron heat flux is dominated by convection, that is, correlations of fluctuations in the electron density and radial velocity. Hot and dense blobs contribute only a minute fraction of the total fluctuation driven heat flux.

  12. Effects of the radial electric field on confinement and trapping for non collisional electrons in TJ-II

    Guasp, J.; Liniers, M.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of radial electric fields on the non collisional losses, asymmetries at plasma border and on the Vacuum Vessel and trapping fractions for 0.1 1 KeV electrons in TJ-II are analysed. This study complements a series, already published, for ions, therefore only the main differences are stressed. Many of these effect are similar for electrons and ions, mainly the drastic decrease of losses with the electric field, the increasing peripherical loss concentration, the strong accumulation on the Hard Core (HC), the modification in the direction of the induced poloidal rotation, similar angular distributions for trapped particles, etc. Nevertheless, there appear also important differences, that in many cases are originated by the higher electron mobility, in particular a higher sensitivity to the electric field, as well to the intensity as to the sign, producing a faster drop in electron losses for positive potential and a higher asymmetry in the sign dependence. Most of these electron losses exit through the upper side of the plasma, the opposite happens for ions. The strong concentration on the HC appears, many, on the PL-1 plate (the one that is placed upside for toroidal angle φ=0 degree centigree), instead of the opposite PL-2 plate for ions.Finally, for the analysed energy range, there is no variation of electron trapping with the potential nor resonant effect. (Author) 8 refs

  13. Identifying the molecular functions of electron transport proteins using radial basis function networks and biochemical properties.

    Le, Nguyen-Quoc-Khanh; Nguyen, Trinh-Trung-Duong; Ou, Yu-Yen

    2017-05-01

    The electron transport proteins have an important role in storing and transferring electrons in cellular respiration, which is the most proficient process through which cells gather energy from consumed food. According to the molecular functions, the electron transport chain components could be formed with five complexes with several different electron carriers and functions. Therefore, identifying the molecular functions in the electron transport chain is vital for helping biologists understand the electron transport chain process and energy production in cells. This work includes two phases for discriminating electron transport proteins from transport proteins and classifying categories of five complexes in electron transport proteins. In the first phase, the performances from PSSM with AAIndex feature set were successful in identifying electron transport proteins in transport proteins with achieved sensitivity of 73.2%, specificity of 94.1%, and accuracy of 91.3%, with MCC of 0.64 for independent data set. With the second phase, our method can approach a precise model for identifying of five complexes with different molecular functions in electron transport proteins. The PSSM with AAIndex properties in five complexes achieved MCC of 0.51, 0.47, 0.42, 0.74, and 1.00 for independent data set, respectively. We suggest that our study could be a power model for determining new proteins that belongs into which molecular function of electron transport proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Performance of a high-work low aspect ration turbine tested with a realistic inlet radial temperature profile

    Stabe, R. G.; Whitney, W. J.; Moffitt, T. P.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for a 0.767 scale model of the first stage of a two-stage turbine designed for a high by-pass ratio engine. The turbine was tested with both uniform inlet conditions and with an inlet radial temperature profile simulating engine conditions. The inlet temperature profile was essentially mixed-out in the rotor. There was also substantial underturning of the exit flow at the mean diameter. Both of these effects were attributed to strong secondary flows in the rotor blading. There were no significant differences in the stage performance with either inlet condition when differences in tip clearance were considered. Performance was very close to design intent in both cases.

  15. Performance of a high-work low aspect ratio turbine tested with a realistic inlet radial temperature profile

    Stabe, R. G.; Whitney, W. J.; Moffitt, T. P.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for a 0.767 scale model of the first stage of a two-stage turbine designed for a high by-pass ratio engine. The turbine was tested with both uniform inlet conditions and with an inlet radial temperature profile simulating engine conditions. The inlet temperature profile was essentially mixed-out in the rotor. There was also substantial underturning of the exit flow at the mean diameter. Both of these effects were attributed to strong secondary flows in the rotor blading. There were no significant differences in the stage performance with either inlet condition when differences in tip clearance were considered. Performance was very close to design intent in both cases. Previously announced in STAR as N84-24589

  16. A Bayesian approach to infer the radial distribution of temperature and anisotropy in the transition zone from seismic data

    Drilleau, M.; Beucler, E.; Mocquet, A.; Verhoeven, O.; Moebs, G.; Burgos, G.; Montagner, J.

    2013-12-01

    Mineralogical transformations and matter transfers within the Earth's mantle make the 350-1000 km depth range (considered here as the mantle transition zone) highly heterogeneous and anisotropic. Most of the 3-D global tomographic models are anchored on small perturbations from 1-D models such as PREM, and are secondly interpreted in terms of temperature and composition distributions. However, the degree of heterogeneity in the transition zone can be strong enough so that the concept of a 1-D reference seismic model may be addressed. To avoid the use of any seismic reference model, we developed a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to directly interpret surface wave dispersion curves in terms of temperature and radial anisotropy distributions, considering a given composition of the mantle. These interpretations are based on laboratory measurements of elastic moduli and Birch-Murnaghan equation of state. An originality of the algorithm is its ability to explore both smoothly varying models and first-order discontinuities, using C1-Bézier curves, which interpolate the randomly chosen values for depth, temperature and radial anisotropy. This parameterization is able to generate a self-adapting parameter space exploration while reducing the computing time. Using a Bayesian exploration, the probability distributions on temperature and anisotropy are governed by uncertainties on the data set. The method was successfully applied to both synthetic data and real dispersion curves. Surface wave measurements along the Vanuatu- California path suggest a strong anisotropy above 400 km depth which decreases below, and a monotonous temperature distribution between 350 and 1000 km depth. On the contrary, a negative shear wave anisotropy of about 2 % is found at the top of the transition zone below Eurasia. Considering compositions ranging from piclogite to pyrolite, the overall temperature profile and temperature gradient are higher for the continental path than for the oceanic

  17. Study of electron temperature evolution during sawtoothing and pellet injection using thermal electron cyclotron emission in the Alcator C tokamak

    Gomez, C.C.

    1986-05-01

    A study of the electron temperature evolution has been performed using thermal electron cyclotron emission. A six channel far infrared polychromator was used to monitor the radiation eminating from six radial locations. The time resolution was <3 μs. Three events were studied, the sawtooth disruption, propagation of the sawtooth generated heatpulse and the electron temperature response to pellet injection. The sawtooth disruption in Alcator takes place in 20 to 50 μs, the energy mixing radius is approx. 8 cm or a/2. It is shown that this is inconsistent with single resonant surface Kadomtsev reconnection. Various forms of scalings for the sawtooth period and amplitude were compared. The electron heatpulse propagation has been used to estimate chi e(the electron thermal diffusivity). The fast temperature relaxation observed during pellet injection has also been studied. Electron temperature profile reconstructions have shown that the profile shape can recover to its pre-injection form in a time scale of 200 μs to 3 ms depending on pellet size

  18. Conceptual design of the radial gamma ray spectrometers system for α particle and runaway electron measurements at ITER

    Nocente, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Barnsley, R.; Bertalot, L.; Brichard, B.; Croci, G.; Brolatti, G.; Di Pace, L.; Fernandes, A.; Giacomelli, L.; Lengar, I.; Moszynski, M.; Krasilnikov, V.; Muraro, A.; Pereira, R. C.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Rigamonti, D.; Rebai, M.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Salewski, M.; Santosh, P.; Sousa, J.; Zychor, I.; Gorini, G.

    2017-07-01

    We here present the principles and main physics capabilities behind the design of the radial gamma ray spectrometers (RGRS) system for alpha particle and runaway electron measurements at ITER. The diagnostic benefits from recent advances in gamma-ray spectrometry for tokamak plasmas and combines space and high energy resolution in a single device. The RGRS system as designed can provide information on α ~ particles on a time scale of 1/10 of the slowing down time for the ITER 500 MW full power DT scenario. Spectral observations of the 3.21 and 4.44 MeV peaks from the 9\\text{Be}≤ft(α,nγ \\right){{}12}\\text{C} reaction make the measurements sensitive to α ~ particles at characteristic resonant energies and to possible anisotropies of their slowing down distribution function. An independent assessment of the neutron rate by gamma-ray emission is also feasible. In case of runaway electrons born in disruptions with a typical duration of 100 ms, a time resolution of at least 10 ms for runaway electron studies can be achieved depending on the scenario and down to a current of 40 kA by use of external gas injection. We find that the bremsstrahlung spectrum in the MeV range from confined runaways is sensitive to the electron velocity space up to E≈ 30 -40 MeV, which allows for measurements of the energy distribution of the runaway electrons at ITER.

  19. Impact of radial transport on the quasilinear plateau formation due to electron cyclotron wave absorption

    Peeters, A.G.; Westerhof, E.

    1996-01-01

    Numerical simulations using a three-dimensional Fokker-Planck code show that for small tokamaks the transport of electrons across the magnetic surfaces at a level consistent with anomalous transport has a large influence on the formation of the quasilinear plateau during electron cyclotron resonant

  20. Simulation study of radial dose due to the irradiation of a swift heavy ion aiming to advance the treatment planning system for heavy particle cancer therapy: The effect of emission angles of secondary electrons

    Moribayashi, Kengo, E-mail: moribayashi.kengo@jaea.go.jp

    2015-12-15

    A radial dose simulation model has been proposed in order to advance the treatment planning system for heavy particle cancer therapy. Here, the radial dose is the dose due to the irradiation of a heavy ion as a function of distances from this ion path. The model proposed here may overcome weak points of paradigms that are employed to produce the conventional radial dose distributions. To provide the radial dose with higher accuracy, this paper has discussed the relationship between the emission angles of secondary electrons and the radial dose. It is found that the effect of emission angles becomes stronger on the radial dose with increasing energies of the secondary electrons.

  1. Three-Dimensional Temperature Field Calculation and Analysis of an Axial-Radial Flux-Type Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor

    Dong Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This article concentrates on the steady-state thermal characteristics of the Axial-Radial Flux-Type Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor (ARFTPMSM. Firstly, the three-dimensional mathematical models for electromagnetic calculation and analyses are established, and the machine loss, including the stator loss, armature winding loss, rotor loss, and axial structure loss is calculated by using time-step Finite Element Method (FEM. Then, the loss distribution is assigned as the heat source for the thermal calculation. Secondly, the mathematical model for thermal calculation is also established. The assumptions and the boundary conditions are proposed to simplify the calculation and to improve convergence. Thirdly, the three-dimensional electromagnetic and thermal calculations of the machine, of which the armature winding and axial field winding are developed by using copper wires, are solved, from which the temperature distributions of the machine components are obtained. The experiments are carried out on the prototype with copper wires to validate the accuracy of the established models. Then, the temperature distributions of machine components under different Axial Magnetic Motive Force (AMMF are investigated. Since the machine is finally developing by using HTS wires, the temperature distributions of machine developed by utilizing High Temperature Superconducting (HTS wires, are also studied. The temperature distribution differences of the machine developed by using copper wires and HTS wires are drawn. All of these above will provide a helpful reference for the thermal calculation of the ARFTPMSM, as well as the design of the HTS coils and the cryogenic cooling system.

  2. A summary of high-temperature electronics research and development

    Thome, F.V.; King, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    Current and future needs in automative, aircraft, space, military, and well logging industries require operation of electronics at higher temperatures than today's accepted limit of 395 K. Without the availability of high-temperature electronics, many systems must operate under derated conditions or must accept severe mass penalties required by coolant systems to maintain electronic temperatures below critical levels. This paper presents ongoing research and development in the electronics community to bring high-temperature electronics to commercial realization. Much of this work was recently reviewed at the First International High-Temperature Electronics Conference held 16--20 June 1991 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. 4 refs., 1 tab

  3. Sudden Intensity Increases and Radial Gradient Changes of Cosmic Ray Mev Electrons and Protons Observed at Voyager 1 Beyond 111 AU in the Heliosheath

    Webber, W. R.; Mcdonald, F. B.; Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Heikkila, B.; Lal, N.

    2012-01-01

    Voyager 1 has entered regions of different propagation conditions for energetic cosmic rays in the outer heliosheathat a distance of about 111 AU from the Sun. The low energy 614 MeV galactic electron intensity increased by 20over a time period 10 days and the electron radial intensity gradient abruptly decreased from 19AU to 8AU at2009.7 at a radial distance of 111.2 AU. At about 2011.2 at a distance of 116.6 AU a second abrupt intensity increase of25 was observed for electrons. After the second sudden electron increase the radial intensity gradient increased to18AU. This large positive gradient and the 13 day periodic variations of 200 MeV particles observed near theend of 2011 indicate that V1 is still within the overall heliospheric modulating region. The implications of these resultsregarding the proximity of the heliopause are discussed.

  4. Effects of Recent Minimum Temperature and Water Deficit Increases on Pinus pinaster Radial Growth and Wood Density in Southern Portugal

    Kurz-Besson, Cathy B.; Lousada, José L.; Gaspar, Maria J.; Correia, Isabel E.; David, Teresa S.; Soares, Pedro M. M.; Cardoso, Rita M.; Russo, Ana; Varino, Filipa; Mériaux, Catherine; Trigo, Ricardo M.; Gouveia, Célia M.

    2016-01-01

    Western Iberia has recently shown increasing frequency of drought conditions coupled with heatwave events, leading to exacerbated limiting climatic conditions for plant growth. It is not clear to what extent wood growth and density of agroforestry species have suffered from such changes or recent extreme climate events. To address this question, tree-ring width and density chronologies were built for a Pinus pinaster stand in southern Portugal and correlated with climate variables, including the minimum, mean and maximum temperatures and the number of cold days. Monthly and maximum daily precipitations were also analyzed as well as dry spells. The drought effect was assessed using the standardized precipitation-evapotranspiration (SPEI) multi-scalar drought index, between 1 to 24-months. The climate-growth/density relationships were evaluated for the period 1958-2011. We show that both wood radial growth and density highly benefit from the strong decay of cold days and the increase of minimum temperature. Yet the benefits are hindered by long-term water deficit, which results in different levels of impact on wood radial growth and density. Despite of the intensification of long-term water deficit, tree-ring width appears to benefit from the minimum temperature increase, whereas the effects of long-term droughts significantly prevail on tree-ring density. Our results further highlight the dependency of the species on deep water sources after the juvenile stage. The impact of climate changes on long-term droughts and their repercussion on the shallow groundwater table and P. pinaster’s vulnerability are also discussed. This work provides relevant information for forest management in the semi-arid area of the Alentejo region of Portugal. It should ease the elaboration of mitigation strategies to assure P. pinaster’s production capacity and quality in response to more arid conditions in the near future in the region. PMID:27570527

  5. Effects of Recent Minimum Temperature and Water Deficit Increases on Pinus pinaster Radial Growth and Wood Density in Southern Portugal.

    Kurz-Besson, Cathy B; Lousada, José L; Gaspar, Maria J; Correia, Isabel E; David, Teresa S; Soares, Pedro M M; Cardoso, Rita M; Russo, Ana; Varino, Filipa; Mériaux, Catherine; Trigo, Ricardo M; Gouveia, Célia M

    2016-01-01

    Western Iberia has recently shown increasing frequency of drought conditions coupled with heatwave events, leading to exacerbated limiting climatic conditions for plant growth. It is not clear to what extent wood growth and density of agroforestry species have suffered from such changes or recent extreme climate events. To address this question, tree-ring width and density chronologies were built for a Pinus pinaster stand in southern Portugal and correlated with climate variables, including the minimum, mean and maximum temperatures and the number of cold days. Monthly and maximum daily precipitations were also analyzed as well as dry spells. The drought effect was assessed using the standardized precipitation-evapotranspiration (SPEI) multi-scalar drought index, between 1 to 24-months. The climate-growth/density relationships were evaluated for the period 1958-2011. We show that both wood radial growth and density highly benefit from the strong decay of cold days and the increase of minimum temperature. Yet the benefits are hindered by long-term water deficit, which results in different levels of impact on wood radial growth and density. Despite of the intensification of long-term water deficit, tree-ring width appears to benefit from the minimum temperature increase, whereas the effects of long-term droughts significantly prevail on tree-ring density. Our results further highlight the dependency of the species on deep water sources after the juvenile stage. The impact of climate changes on long-term droughts and their repercussion on the shallow groundwater table and P. pinaster's vulnerability are also discussed. This work provides relevant information for forest management in the semi-arid area of the Alentejo region of Portugal. It should ease the elaboration of mitigation strategies to assure P. pinaster's production capacity and quality in response to more arid conditions in the near future in the region.

  6. A ceramic radial insulation structure for a relativistic electron beam vacuum diode.

    Xun, Tao; Yang, Hanwu; Zhang, Jiande; Liu, Zhenxiang; Wang, Yong; Zhao, Yansong

    2008-06-01

    For one kind of a high current diode composed of a small disk-type alumina ceramic insulator water/vacuum interface, the insulation structure was designed and experimentally investigated. According to the theories of vacuum flashover and the rules for radial insulators, a "cone-column" anode outline and the cathode shielding rings were adopted. The electrostatic field along the insulator surface was obtained by finite element analysis simulating. By adjusting the outline of the anode and reshaping the shielding rings, the electric fields were well distributed and the field around the cathode triple junction was effectively controlled. Area weighted statistical method was applied to estimate the surface breakdown field. In addition, the operating process of an accelerator based on a spiral pulse forming line (PFL) was simulated through the PSPICE software to get the waveform of charging and diode voltage. The high voltage test was carried out on a water dielectric spiral PFL accelerator with long pulse duration, and results show that the diode can work stably in 420 kV, 200 ns conditions. The experimental results agree with the theoretical and simulated results.

  7. Study on radial-phase motion of a beam in the 3 cm electron linear accelerator

    Polyakov, V.A.; Shchedrin, I.S.

    1982-01-01

    Longitudinal and transverse dynamics of particles in a 3 cm electron linear accelerator (ELA) are. considered. Electron motion in the source and in the section before inlet onto the accelerating section, effect of the wave type input transformer as well as the effect of deviations of parameters of ELA supply system on oUtput characteristics of the beam have been taken into account. The results obtained permitted to explain a comparatively small value of accelerated current at the output of the LAEU-31M (38 m A). Recommendations on improvement of beam passogein the accelerating section are developed based on computerized calculations

  8. Radial focusing of a relativistic electron beam in a bipotential electrostatic lens

    Genoni, T.C.

    1994-01-01

    The focusing of a relativistic electron beam in a bipotential electrostatic lens is discussed. An iterative scheme for the solution of the paraxial ray equation is used to derive approximate analytic formulas for the lens parameters and lens transfer matrix elements. The formulas are compared to results of direct numerical integration of the paraxial ray equation

  9. Observation of electron temperature profile in HL-1M tokamak

    Cao Jianyong; Xu Deming; Ding Xuantong

    2000-01-01

    The principle and method of the electron temperature measurement by means of electron cyclotron emission (ECE) have been described. Several results under different conditions on HL-1M tokamak have been given. The hollow profile of electron temperature appears in some stages, such as current rising, pellet injection and impurity concentration in the plasma centre. When the bias voltage is applied, the electron temperature profile become steeper. All of the phenomena are related with the transport in plasma centre

  10. AFM measurements of novel solar cells. Studying electronic properties of Si-based radial junctions

    Hývl, Matěj

    -, č. 1 (2014), s. 52-53 ISSN 1439-4243 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-25747S; GA ČR GA13-12386S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : AFM measurements * conductive cantilever * electronic properties * nanowires * PF TUNA Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://www.imaging-git.com/science/scanning-probe-microscopy/afm-measurements-novel-solar- cells

  11. Effects of emitted electron temperature on the plasma sheath

    Sheehan, J. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Wang, H.; Raitses, Y.; Sydorenko, D.; Hershkowitz, N.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been known that electron emission from a surface significantly affects the sheath surrounding that surface. Typical fluid theory of a planar sheath with emitted electrons assumes that the plasma electrons follow the Boltzmann relation and the emitted electrons are emitted with zero energy and predicts a potential drop of 1.03T e /e across the sheath in the floating condition. By considering the modified velocity distribution function caused by plasma electrons lost to the wall and the half-Maxwellian distribution of the emitted electrons, it is shown that ratio of plasma electron temperature to emitted electron temperature significantly affects the sheath potential when the plasma electron temperature is within an order of magnitude of the emitted electron temperature. When the plasma electron temperature equals the emitted electron temperature the emissive sheath potential goes to zero. One dimensional particle-in-cell simulations corroborate the predictions made by this theory. The effects of the addition of a monoenergetic electron beam to the Maxwellian plasma electrons were explored, showing that the emissive sheath potential is close to the beam energy only when the emitted electron flux is less than the beam flux

  12. Research and development of asymmetrical heat transfer augmentation method in radial channels of blades for high temperature gas turbines

    Shevchenko, I. V.; Rogalev, A. N.; Garanin, I. V.; Vegera, A. N.; Kindra, V. O.

    2017-11-01

    The serpentine-like one and half-pass cooling channel systems are primarily used in blades fabricated by the lost-wax casting process. The heat transfer turbulators like cross-sectional or angled ribs used in channels of the midchord region failed to eliminate the temperature irregularity from the suction and pressure sides, which is reaching 200°C for a first stage blade of the high-pressure turbine for an aircraft engine. This paper presents the results of a numerical and experimental test of an advanced heat transfer augmentation system in radial channels developed for alignment of the temperature field from the suction and pressure sides. A numerical simulation of three-dimensional coolant flow for a wide range of Reynolds numbers was carried out using ANSYS CFX software. Effect of geometrical parameters on the heat removal asymmetry was determined. The test results of a blade with the proposed intensification system conducted in a liquid-metal thermostat confirmed the accuracy of calculations. Based on the experimental data, the dependencies for calculation of heat transfer coefficients to the cooling air in the blade studied were obtained.

  13. Electronic phase separation and high temperature superconductors

    Kivelson, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    The authors review the extensive evidence from model calculations that neutral holes in an antiferromagnet separate into hole-rich and hole-poor phases. All known solvable limits of models of holes in a Heisenberg antiferromagnet exhibit this behavior. The authors show that when the phase separation is frustrated by the introduction of long-range Coulomb interactions, the typical consequence is either a modulated (charge density wave) state or a superconducting phase. The authors then review some of the strong experimental evidence supporting an electronically-driven phase separation of the holes in the cuprate superconductors and the related Ni oxides. Finally, the authors argue that frustrated phase separation in these materials can account for many of the anomalous normal state properties of the high temperature superconductors and provide the mechanism of superconductivity. In particular, it is shown that the T-linear resistivity of the normal state is a paraconductivity associated with a novel composite pairing, although the ordered superconducting state is more conventional

  14. Validation of gyrokinetic simulations with measurements of electron temperature fluctuations and density-temperature phase angles on ASDEX Upgrade

    Freethy, S. J.; Görler, T.; Creely, A. J.; Conway, G. D.; Denk, S. S.; Happel, T.; Koenen, C.; Hennequin, P.; White, A. E.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2018-05-01

    Measurements of turbulent electron temperature fluctuation amplitudes, δTe ⊥/Te , frequency spectra, and radial correlation lengths, Lr(Te ⊥) , have been performed at ASDEX Upgrade using a newly upgraded Correlation ECE diagnostic in the range of scales k⊥scale non-linear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations of the outer core (ρtor = 0.75) of a low density, electron heated L-mode plasma, performed using the gyrokinetic simulation code, GENE. The ion and electron temperature gradients were scanned within uncertainties. It is found that gyrokinetic simulations are able to match simultaneously the electron and ion heat flux at this radius within the experimental uncertainties. The simulations were performed based on a reference discharge for which δTe ⊥/Te measurements were available, and Lr(Te ⊥) and αnT were then predicted using synthetic diagnostics prior to measurements in a repeat discharge. While temperature fluctuation amplitudes are overestimated by >50% for all simulations within the sensitivity scans performed, good quantitative agreement is found for Lr(Te ⊥) and αnT. A validation metric is used to quantify the level of agreement of individual simulations with experimental measurements, and the best agreement is found close to the experimental gradient values.

  15. Electron temperature measurements of FRX-C/LSM

    Rej, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    The electron temperature T/sub e/ has been measured with Thomson scattering field-reversed configurations (FRCs) on the Los Alamos FRX-C/LSM experiment. FRCs formed and trapped in-situ in the θ-pinch source are studied. These experiments mark the first comprehensive FRC T/sub e/ measurements in over five years with data gathered on over 400 discharges. Measurements are performed at a single point in space and time on each discharge. The Thomson scattering diagnostic consist of a Q-switched ruby laser focused from one end to a point 0.2 m from the axial midplane of the θ-pinch coil and at radius of either 0.00 or 0.10 m. Scattered light is collected, dispersed and detected with a 7-channel, triple-grating polychromator configured to detect light wavelengths between 658 and 692 nm. Photomultiplier currents are measured with gated A/D converters, with plasma background signals recorded 100-ns before and 100-ns after the laser pulse. Electron temperatures are measured at either radial position during the time interval, 10 ≤ t ≤ 70 μs, between FRC formation and the onset of the n = 2 instability which usually terminates the discharge. A variety of plasma conditions have been produced by adjusting three external parameters: the initial deuterium fill pressure p/sub O/; the reversed bias magnetic field B/sub b/; and the external magnetic field B/sub w/. The fill-pressure scan has been performed at B/sub b/ ≅ 60 mT and B/sub w/ ≅ 0.4 T with p/sub o/ set at either 2, 3, 4 or 5 mtorr. The bias-field scan, 37 ≤ B/sub b/ ≤ 95 mT, has been performed at p/sub o/ = 3 mtorr and B/sub w/ ≅ 0.4 T. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Coupled ion temperature gradient and trapped electron mode to electron temperature gradient mode gyrokinetic simulations

    Waltz, R. E.; Candy, J.; Fahey, M.

    2007-01-01

    Electron temperature gradient (ETG) transport is conventionally defined as the electron energy transport at high wave number (high-k) where ions are adiabatic and there can be no ion energy or plasma transport. Previous gyrokinetic simulations have assumed adiabatic ions (ETG-ai) and work on the small electron gyroradius scale. However such ETG-ai simulations with trapped electrons often do not have well behaved nonlinear saturation unless fully kinetic ions (ki) and proper ion scale zonal flow modes are included. Electron energy transport is separated into ETG-ki at high-k and ion temperature gradient-trapped electron mode (ITG/TEM) at low-k. Expensive (more computer-intensive), high-resolution, large-ion-scale flux-tube simulations coupling ITG/TEM and ETG-ki turbulence are presented. These require a high effective Reynolds number R≡[k(max)/k(min)] 2 =μ 2 , where μ=[ρ si /ρ si ] is the ratio of ion to electron gyroradii. Compute times scale faster than μ 3 . By comparing the coupled expensive simulations with (1) much cheaper (less compute-intensive), uncoupled, high-resolution, small, flux-tube ETG-ki and with (2) uncoupled low-resolution, large, flux-tube ITG/TEM simulations, and also by artificially turning ''off'' the low-k or high-k drives, it appears that ITG/TEM and ETG-ki transport are not strongly coupled so long as ETG-ki can access some nonadiabatic ion scale zonal flows and both high-k and low-k are linearly unstable. However expensive coupled simulations are required for physically accurate k-spectra of the transport and turbulence. Simulations with μ≥30 appear to represent the physical range μ>40. ETG-ki transport measured in ion gyro-Bohm units is weakly dependent on μ. For the mid-radius core tokamak plasma parameters studied, ETG-ki is about 10% of the electron energy transport, which in turn is about 30% of the total energy transport (with negligible ExB shear). However at large ExB shear sufficient to quench the low-k ITG

  17. Development of electron temperature measuring system by silicon drift detector

    Song Xianying; Yang Jinwei; Liao Min

    2007-12-01

    Soft X-ray spectroscopy with two channels Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) are adopted for electron temperature measuring on HL-2A tokamak in 2005. The working principle, design and first operation of the SDD soft X-ray spectroscopy are introduced. The measuring results of electron temperature are also presented. The results show that the SDD is very good detector for electron temperature measuring on HL-2A tokamak. These will become a solid basic work to establish SDD array for electron temperature profiling. (authors)

  18. Energy-filtered cold electron transport at room temperature.

    Bhadrachalam, Pradeep; Subramanian, Ramkumar; Ray, Vishva; Ma, Liang-Chieh; Wang, Weichao; Kim, Jiyoung; Cho, Kyeongjae; Koh, Seong Jin

    2014-09-10

    Fermi-Dirac electron thermal excitation is an intrinsic phenomenon that limits functionality of various electron systems. Efforts to manipulate electron thermal excitation have been successful when the entire system is cooled to cryogenic temperatures, typically distribution corresponds to an effective electron temperature of ~45 K, can be transported throughout device components without external cooling. This is accomplished using a discrete level of a quantum well, which filters out thermally excited electrons and permits only energy-suppressed electrons to participate in electron transport. The quantum well (~2 nm of Cr2O3) is formed between source (Cr) and tunnelling barrier (SiO2) in a double-barrier-tunnelling-junction structure having a quantum dot as the central island. Cold electron transport is detected from extremely narrow differential conductance peaks in electron tunnelling through CdSe quantum dots, with full widths at half maximum of only ~15 mV at room temperature.

  19. Two-temperature accretion disks with electron-positron pairs - Effects of Comptonized external soft photons

    Kusunose, Masaaki; Takahara, Fumio

    1990-01-01

    The present account of the effects of soft photons from external sources on two-temperature accretion disks in electron-positron pair equilibrium solves the energy-balance equation for a given radial distribution of the input rate of soft photons, taking into account their bremsstrahlung and Comptonization. Critical rate behavior is investigated as a function of the ratio of the energy flux of incident soft photons and the energy-generation rate. As in a previous study, the existence of a critical accretion rate is established.

  20. Determination of the electronic temperature in the torsatron TJ-I Upgrade by the two filters

    Medina, F.; Ochando, M.

    1994-07-01

    A Te monitor for the TJ-IU torsatron, based on the two-filters method, has been designed. It will consist of two surface-barrier silicon detectors looking at the same plasma region through berylium filters of different thickness. Plasma electron temperature is deduced from the ratio of the soft-x-ray fluxes transmitted through the two filters. The flexibility in magnetic configuration of TJ-IU plasmas has been taken into account in the mechanical design of this diagnostic. It will be attached to an upper 1 port of the vacuum vessel and the whole system will be movable both, to change the spatial resolution when needed and to enable the scan of the full plasma cross-section to obtain the radial profile of electron temperature in a shot-to-shot basis. (Author) 7 refs.

  1. Determination of the electronic temperature in the torsatron TJ-I Upgrade by the two filters

    Medina, F.; Ochando, M.

    1994-01-01

    A Te monitor for the TJ-IU torsatron, based on the two-filters method, has been designed. It will consist of two surface-barrier silicon detectors looking at the same plasma region through berylium filters of different thickness. Plasma electron temperature is deduced from the ratio of the soft-x-ray fluxes transmitted through the two filters. The flexibility in magnetic configuration of TJ-IU plasmas has been taken into account in the mechanical design of this diagnostic. It will be attached to an upper 1 port of the vacuum vessel and the whole system will be movable both, to change the spatial resolution when needed and to enable the scan of the full plasma cross-section to obtain the radial profile of electron temperature in a shot-to-shot basis. (Author) 7 refs

  2. Determination of the electronic temperature in the torsatron TJ-I Upgrade by the two filters

    Medina, F.; Ochando, M.

    1994-01-01

    A Te monitor for the TJ-IU torsatron, based on the two-filters method, has been designed. It will consist of two surface-barrier silicon detectors looking at the same plasma region through berilium filters of different thickness. Plasma electron temperature is deduced from the ratio of the soft-x-ray fluxes transmitted through the two filters. The flexibility in magnetic configuration of TJ-IU plasmas has been taken into account in the mechanical design of this diagnostic. It will be attached to an upper port of the vacuum vessel and the whole system will be movable both, to change the spatial resolution when needed and to enable the scan of the full plasma cross-section to obtain the radial profile of electron temperature in a shot-to-shot basis. (Author)

  3. Effect of ion orbit loss on the structure in the H-mode tokamak edge pedestal profiles of rotation velocity, radial electric field, density, and temperature

    Stacey, Weston M.

    2013-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of ion orbit loss of thermal ions and the compensating return ion current directly on the radial ion flux flowing in the plasma, and thereby indirectly on the toroidal and poloidal rotation velocity profiles, the radial electric field, density, and temperature profiles, and the interpretation of diffusive and non-diffusive transport coefficients in the plasma edge, is described. Illustrative calculations for a high-confinement H-mode DIII-D [J. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] plasma are presented and compared with experimental results. Taking into account, ion orbit loss of thermal ions and the compensating return ion current is found to have a significant effect on the structure of the radial profiles of these quantities in the edge plasma, indicating the necessity of taking ion orbit loss effects into account in interpreting or predicting these quantities

  4. Energy and temperature fluctuations in the single electron box

    Berg, Tineke L van den; Brange, Fredrik; Samuelsson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In mesoscopic and nanoscale systems at low temperatures, charge carriers are typically not in thermal equilibrium with the surrounding lattice. The resulting, non-equilibrium dynamics of electrons has only begun to be explored. Experimentally the time-dependence of the electron temperature (deviating from the lattice temperature) has been investigated in small metallic islands. Motivated by these experiments, we investigate theoretically the electronic energy and temperature fluctuations in a metallic island in the Coulomb blockade regime, tunnel coupled to an electronic reservoir, i.e. a single electron box. We show that electronic quantum tunnelling between the island and the reservoir, in the absence of any net charge or energy transport, induces fluctuations of the island electron temperature. The full distribution of the energy transfer as well as the island temperature is derived within the framework of full counting statistics. In particular, the low-frequency temperature fluctuations are analysed, fully accounting for charging effects and non-zero reservoir temperature. The experimental requirements for measuring the predicted temperature fluctuations are discussed. (paper)

  5. Electron temperature determination in LTE and non-LTE plasmas

    Eddy, T.L.

    1983-01-01

    This article discusses how most experimental investigations assume a type of ''thermal equilibrium'' in which the excited levels are assumed to be populated according to the electron kinetic temperature, in the determination of electron temperature in LTE and non-LTE plasmas. This is justified on the basis that electron collisions dominate the equilibration of adjacent excited levels as shown by Byron, Stabler and Boartz. The comparison of temperature values calculated by various common methods as a check for local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTDE) or local thermal equilibrium (LTE) of the upper excited levels and the free electrons has been shown to indicate the excitation temperature in all cases utilized. Thomas shows that the source function of the first excited level may be dominated by non-local radiation, which would usually result in a different population than local collisional excitation would provide. Ionization from upper levels is by collisional means. The result may yield different valued excitation and electron temperatures

  6. First high-temperature electronics products survey 2005.

    Normann, Randy Allen

    2006-04-01

    On April 4-5, 2005, a High-Temperature Electronics Products Workshop was held. This workshop engaged a number of governmental and private industry organizations sharing a common interest in the development of commercially available, high-temperature electronics. One of the outcomes of this meeting was an agreement to conduct an industry survey of high-temperature applications. This report covers the basic results of this survey.

  7. Observations of temperature rise during electron cyclotron heating application in Proto-MPEX

    Biewer, T. M.; Bigelow, T.; Caneses, J. F.; Diem, S. J.; Rapp, J.; Reinke, M.; Kafle, N.; Ray, H. B.; Showers, M.

    2017-10-01

    The Prototype Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX) at ORNL utilizes a variety of power systems to generate and deliver a high heat flux plasma (1 MW/m2 for these discharges) onto the surface of material targets. In the experiments described here, up to 120 kW of 13.56 MHz ``helicon'' waves are combined with 20 kW of 28 GHz microwaves to produce Deuterium plasma discharges. The 28 GHz waves are launched in a region of the device where the magnetic field is axially varying near 0.8 T, resulting in the presence of a 2nd harmonic electron cyclotron heating (ECH) resonance layer that transects the plasma column. The electron density and temperature profiles are measured using a Thomson scattering (TS) diagnostic, and indicate that the electron density is radially peaked. In the core of the plasma column the electron density is higher than the cut-off density (0.9x1019 m-3) for ECH waves to propagate and O-X-B mode conversion into electron Bernstien waves (EBW) is expected. TS measurements indicate electron temperature increases during 28 GHz wave application, rising (from 5 eV to 20 eV) as the neutral Deuterium pressure is reduced below 1 mTorr. This work was supported by the US. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  8. Changes in core electron temperature fluctuations across the ohmic energy confinement transition in Alcator C-Mod plasmas

    Sung, C.; White, A.E.; Howard, N.T.; Oi, C.Y.; Rice, J.E.; Gao, C.; Ennever, P.; Porkolab, M.; Parra, F.; Ernst, D.; Walk, J.; Hughes, J.W.; Irby, J.; Kasten, C.; Hubbard, A.E.; Greenwald, M.J.; Mikkelsen, D.

    2013-01-01

    The first measurements of long wavelength (k y ρ s < 0.3) electron temperature fluctuations in Alcator C-Mod made with a new correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic support a long-standing hypothesis regarding the confinement transition from linear ohmic confinement (LOC) to saturated ohmic confinement (SOC). Electron temperature fluctuations decrease significantly (∼40%) crossing from LOC to SOC, consistent with a change from trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence domination to ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence as the density is increased. Linear stability analysis performed with the GYRO code (Candy and Waltz 2003 J. Comput. Phys. 186 545) shows that TEMs are dominant for long wavelength turbulence in the LOC regime and ITG modes are dominant in the SOC regime at the radial location (ρ ∼ 0.8) where the changes in electron temperature fluctuations are measured. In contrast, deeper in the core (ρ < 0.8), linear stability analysis indicates that ITG modes remain dominant across the LOC/SOC transition. This radial variation suggests that the robust global changes in confinement of energy and momentum occurring across the LOC/SOC transition are correlated to local changes in the dominant turbulent mode near the edge. (paper)

  9. Martian Electron Temperatures in the Sub Solar Region.

    Fowler, C. M.; Peterson, W. K.; Andersson, L.; Thiemann, E.; Mayyasi, M.; Yelle, R. V.; Benna, M.; Espley, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    Observations from Viking, and MAVEN have shown that the observed ionospheric electron temperatures are systematically higher than those predicted by many models. Because electron temperature is a balance between heating, cooling, and heat transport, we systematically compare the magnitude of electron heating from photoelectrons, electron cooling and heat transport, as a function of altitude within 30 degrees of the sub solar point. MAVEN observations of electron temperature and density, EUV irradiance, neutral and ion composition are used to evaluate terms in the heat equation following the framework of Matta et al. (Icarus, 2014, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2013.09.006). Our analysis is restricted to inbound orbits where the magnetic field is within 30 degrees of horizontal. MAVEN sampled the sub solar region in May 2015 and again in May 2017, in near northern spring equinoctial conditions. Solar activity was higher and the spacecraft sampled altitudes down to 120 km in 2015, compared to 160 km in 2017. We find that between 160 and 200 km the Maven electron temperatures are in thermal equilibrium, in the sub solar region, on field lines inclined less than 30 degrees to the horizontal. Above 200km the data suggest that heating from other sources, such as wave heating are significant. Below 160 km some of the discrepancy comes from measurement limitations. This is because the MAVEN instrument cannot resolve the lowest electron temperatures, and because some cooling rates scale as the difference between the electron and neutral temperatures.

  10. Anomalous plasma transport due to electron temperature gradient instability

    Tokuda, Sinji; Ito, Hiroshi; Kamimura, Tetsuo.

    1979-01-01

    The collisionless drift wave instability driven by an electron temperature inhomogeneity (electron temperature gradient instability) and the enhanced transport processes associated with it are studied using a two-and-a-half dimensional particle simulation code. The simulation results show that quasilinear diffusion in phase space is an important mechanism for the saturation of the electron temperature gradient instability. Also, the instability yields particle fluxes toward the hot plasma regions. The heat conductivity of the electron temperature perpendicular to the magnetic field, T sub(e'), is not reduced by magnetic shear but remains high, whereas the heat conductivity of the parallel temperature, T sub(e''), is effectively reduced, and the instability stabilized. (author)

  11. MICROWAVE NOISE MEASUREMENT OF ELECTRON TEMPERATURES IN AFTERGLOW PLASMAS

    Leiby, Jr., C. C.; McBee, W. D.

    1963-10-15

    Transient electron temperatures in afterglow plasmas were determined for He (5 and 10 torr), Ne, and Ne plus or minus 5% Ar (2.4 and 24 torr) by combining measurements of plasma microwave noise power, and plasma reflectivity and absorptivity. Use of a low-noise parametric preamplifier permitted continuous detection during the afterglow of noise power at 5.5 Bc in a 1 Mc bandwidth. Electron temperature decays were a function of pressure and gas but were slower than predicted by electron energy loss mechanisms. The addition of argon altered the electron density decay in the neon afterglow but the electron temperature decay was not appreciably changed. Resonances in detected noise power vs time in the afterglow were observed for two of the three plasma waveguide geometries studied. These resonances correlate with observed resonances in absorptivity and occur over the same range of electron densities for a given geometry independent of gas type and pressure. (auth)

  12. Nonlinear features of the electron temperature gradient mode and electron thermal transport in tokamaks

    Kaw, P.K.; Singh, R.; Weiland, J.G.

    2001-01-01

    Analytical investigations of several linear and nonlinear features of ETG turbulence are reported. The linear theory includes effects such as finite beta induced electromagnetic shielding, coupling to electron magnetohydrodynamic modes like whistlers etc. It is argued that nonlinearly, turbulence and transport are dominated by radially extended modes called 'streamers'. A nonlinear mechanism generating streamers based on a modulational instability theory of the ETG turbulence is also presented. The saturation levels of the streamers using a Kelvin Helmholtz secondary instability mechanism are calculated and levels of the electron thermal transport due to streamers are estimated. (author)

  13. Potential Formation in Front of an Electron Emitting Electrode in a Two-Electron Temperature Plasma

    Gyergyek, T.; Cercek, M.; Erzen, D.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma potential formation in the pre-sheath region of a floating electron emitting electrode (collector) is studied theoretically in a two-electron-temperature plasma using a static kinetic plasma-sheath model. Dependence of the collector floating potential, the plasma potential in the pre-sheath region, and the critical emission coefficient on the hot electron density and temperature is calculated. It is found that for high hot to cool electron temperature ratio a double layer like solutions exist in a certain range of hot to cool electron densities

  14. Electron Density and Temperature Measurements, and Abundance ...

    tribpo

    tics—emission lines. Dwivedi, Curdt & Wilhelm (1997, 1999a) carried out an observing sequence based on a theoretical study by Dwivedi & Mohan (1995), with intercombination/forbidden. Ne VI and Mg VI lines, which are formed at essentially the same temperature. (4 × 105 K), according to Arnaud & Rothenflug (1985).

  15. Observation of electron plasma waves in plasma of two-temperature electrons

    Ikezawa, Shunjiro; Nakamura, Yoshiharu.

    1981-01-01

    Propagation of electron plasma waves in a large and unmagnetized plasma containing two Maxwellian distributions of electrons is studied experimentally. Two kinds of plasma sources which supply electrons of different temperature are used. The temperature ratio is about 3 and the density ratio of hot to cool electrons is varied from 0 to 0.5. A small contamination of hot electrons enhances the Landau damping of the principal mode known as the Bohm-Gross mode. When the density of hot electrons is larger than about 0.2, two modes are observed. The results agree with theoretical dispersion relations when excitation efficiencies of the modes are considered. (author)

  16. Thermoluminescence in KBr:D electron irradiated at room temperature

    Paredes Campoy, J.C.; Lopez Carranza, E.

    1991-07-01

    The thermoluminescence of KBr:D samples electron irradiated at room temperature after thermal annealing at 673 K for 1 hour have been studied in the temperature range 360-730 K. The experimental TL-curve was discomposed by computer analysis in seven overlapping TL peaks, giving for them the order of the kinetics of thermal stimulation, the activation energy, the frequency factor, the relative values of the electronic concentration in traps at the initial heating temperature and the temperature at the maximum of the peak. (author). 18 refs, 1 fig., 3 tabs

  17. Electron temperature fluctuation in the HT-7 tokamak plasma observed by electron cyclotron emission imaging

    Xiao-Yuan, Xu; Jun, Wang; Yi, Yu; Yi-Zhi, Wen; Chang-Xuan, Yu; Wan-Dong, Liu; Bao-Nian, Wan; Xiang, Gao; Luhmann, N. C.; Domier, C. W.; Wang, Jian; Xia, Z. G.; Shen, Zuowei

    2009-01-01

    The fluctuation of the electron temperature has been measured by using the electron cyclotron emission imaging in the Hefei Tokamak-7 (HT-7) plasma. The electron temperature fluctuation with a broadband spectrum shows that it propagates in the electron diamagnetic drift direction, and the mean poloidal wave-number k-bar θ is calculated to be about 1.58 cm −1 , or k-bar θρ s thickapprox 0.34. It indicates that the fluctuation should come from the electron drift wave turbulence. The linear global scaling of the electron temperature fluctuation with the gradient of electron temperature is consistent with the mixing length scale qualitatively. Evolution of spectrum of the fluctuation during the sawtooth oscillation phases is investigated, and the fluctuation is found to increase with the gradient of electron temperature increasing during most phases of the sawtooth oscillation. The results indicate that the electron temperature gradient is probably the driver of the fluctuation enhancement. The steady heat flux driven by electron temperature fluctuation is estimated and compared with the results from power balance estimation. (fluids, plasmas and electric discharges)

  18. Electronic Monitoring Of Storage And Transport Temperatures Of ...

    Electronic Monitoring Of Storage And Transport Temperatures Of Thermostable Newcastle ... 22) were monitored during storage and transport from vaccine production laboratory in Temeke, Dar es ... EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  19. Electronic Modeling and Design for Extreme Temperatures, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop electronics for operation at temperatures that range from -230oC to +130oC. This new technology will minimize the requirements for external...

  20. New Temperature-Insensitive Electronically-Tunable Grounded Capacitor Simulator

    Abuelma'atti, Muhammad Taher; Khan, Muhammad Haroon

    1996-01-01

    A new circuit for simulating a grounded capacitor is presented. The circuit uses one operationalamplifier (OA), three operational-transconductance amplifiers (OTAs), and one capacitor. The realized capacitor is temperature-insensitive and electronically tunable. Experimental results are included.

  1. Plutonium Elastic Moduli, Electron Localization, and Temperature

    Migliori, Albert; Mihut-Stroe, Izabella; Betts, Jon B.

    2008-01-01

    In almost all materials, compression is accompanied naturally by stiffening. Even in materials with zero or negative thermal expansion, where warming is accompanied by volume contraction it is the volume change that primarily controls elastic stiffness. Not so in the metal plutonium. In plutonium, alloying with gallium can change the sign of thermal expansion, but for the positive thermal- expansion monoclinic phase as well as the face-centered-cubic phase with either sign of thermal expansion, and the orthorhombic phase, recent measurements of elastic moduli show soften on warming by an order of magnitude more than expected, the shear and compressional moduli track, and volume seems irrelevant. These effects point toward a novel mechanism for electron localization, and have important implication for the pressure dependence of the bulk compressibility. (authors)

  2. Nonequilibrium segregation and phase instability in alloy films during elevated-temperature irradiation in a high-voltage electron microscope

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.

    1984-05-01

    The effects of defect-production rate gradients, caused by the radial nonuniformity in the electron flux distribution, on solute segregation and phase stability in alloy films undergoing high-voltage electron-microscope (HVEM) irradiation at high temperatures are assessed. Two-dimensional (axially symmetric) compositional redistributions were calculated, taking into account both axial and transverse radial defect fluxes. It was found that when highly focused beams were employed radiation-induced segregation consisted of two stages: dominant axial segregation at the film surfaces at short irradiation times and competitive radial segregation at longer times. The average alloy composition within the irradiated region could differ greatly from that irradiated with a uniform beam, because of the additional atom transport from or to the region surrounding the irradiated zone under the influence of radial fluxes. As a result, damage-rate gradient effects must be taken into account when interpreting in-situ HVEM observations of segregation-induced phase instabilities. The theoretical predictions are compared with experimental observations of the temporal and spatial dependence of segregation-induced precipitation in thin films of Ni-Al, Ni-Ge and Ni-Si solid solutions

  3. Nonequilibrium segregation and phase instability in alloy films during elevated-temperature irradiation in a high-voltage electron microscope

    Lam, N. Q.; Okamoto, P. R.

    1984-05-01

    The effects of defect-production rate gradients, caused by the radial nonuniformity in the electron flux distribution, on solute segregation and phase stability in alloy films undergoing high-voltage electron-microscope (HVEM) irradiation at high temperatures are assessed. Two-dimensional (axially symmetric) compositional redistributions were calculated, taking into account both axial and transverse radial defect fluxes. It was found that when highly focused beams were employed radiation-induced segregation consisted of two stages: dominant axial segregation at the film surfaces at short irradiation times and competitive radial segregation at longer times. The average alloy composition within the irradiated region could differ greatly from that irradiated with a uniform beam, because of the additional atom transport from or to the region surrounding the irradiated zone under the influence of radial fluxes. Damage-rate gradient effects must be taken into account when interpreting in-situ HVEM observations of segregation-induced phase instabilities. The theoretical predictions are compared with experimental observations of the temporal and spatial dependence of segregation-induced precipitation in thin films of Ni-Al, Ni-Ge and Ni-Si solid solutions.

  4. 2-D Imaging of Electron Temperature in Tokamak Plasmas

    Munsat, T.; Mazzucato, E.; Park, H.; Domier, C.W.; Johnson, M.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Wang, J.; Xia, Z.; Classen, I.G.J.; Donne, A.J.H.; Pol, M.J. van de

    2004-01-01

    By taking advantage of recent developments in millimeter wave imaging technology, an Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) instrument, capable of simultaneously measuring 128 channels of localized electron temperature over a 2-D map in the poloidal plane, has been developed for the TEXTOR tokamak. Data from the new instrument, detailing the MHD activity associated with a sawtooth crash, is presented

  5. A temperature-sensitive allele of a putative mRNA splicing helicase down-regulates many cell wall genes and causes radial swelling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Howles, Paul A; Gebbie, Leigh K; Collings, David A; Varsani, Arvind; Broad, Ronan C; Ohms, Stephen; Birch, Rosemary J; Cork, Ann H; Arioli, Tony; Williamson, Richard E

    2016-05-01

    The putative RNA helicase encoded by the Arabidopsis gene At1g32490 is a homolog of the yeast splicing RNA helicases Prp2 and Prp22. We isolated a temperature-sensitive allele (rsw12) of the gene in a screen for root radial swelling mutants. Plants containing this allele grown at the restrictive temperature showed weak radial swelling, were stunted with reduced root elongation, and contained reduced levels of cellulose. The role of the protein was further explored by microarray analysis. By using both fold change cutoffs and a weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA) to investigate coexpression of genes, we found that the radial swelling phenotype was not linked to genes usually associated with primary cell wall biosynthesis. Instead, the mutation has strong effects on expression of secondary cell wall related genes. Many genes potentially associated with secondary walls were present in the most significant WGCNA module, as were genes coding for arabinogalactans and proteins with GPI anchors. The proportion of up-regulated genes that possess introns in rsw12 was above that expected if splicing was unrelated to the activity of the RNA helicase, suggesting that the helicase does indeed play a role in splicing in Arabidopsis. The phenotype may be due to a change in the expression of one or more genes coding for cell wall proteins.

  6. High-Temperature Electronics: A Role for Wide Bandgap Semiconductors?

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Okojie, Robert S.; Chen, Liang-Yu

    2002-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that semiconductor based electronics that can function at ambient temperatures higher than 150 C without external cooling could greatly benefit a variety of important applications, especially-in the automotive, aerospace, and energy production industries. The fact that wide bandgap semiconductors are capable of electronic functionality at much higher temperatures than silicon has partially fueled their development, particularly in the case of SiC. It appears unlikely that wide bandgap semiconductor devices will find much use in low-power transistor applications until the ambient temperature exceeds approximately 300 C, as commercially available silicon and silicon-on-insulator technologies are already satisfying requirements for digital and analog very large scale integrated circuits in this temperature range. However, practical operation of silicon power devices at ambient temperatures above 200 C appears problematic, as self-heating at higher power levels results in high internal junction temperatures and leakages. Thus, most electronic subsystems that simultaneously require high-temperature and high-power operation will necessarily be realized using wide bandgap devices, once the technology for realizing these devices become sufficiently developed that they become widely available. Technological challenges impeding the realization of beneficial wide bandgap high ambient temperature electronics, including material growth, contacts, and packaging, are briefly discussed.

  7. Antiproton compression and radial measurements

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jorgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page R D; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, achieved by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile, and its relation to that of the electron plasma. We also measure the outer radial profile by ejecting antiprotons to the trap wall using an octupole magnet.

  8. Temperature gradient driven electron transport in NSTX and Tore Supra

    Horton, W.; Wong, H.V.; Morrison, P.J.; Wurm, A.; Kim, J.H.; Perez, J.C.; Pratt, J.; Hoang, G.T.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Ball, R.

    2005-01-01

    Electron thermal fluxes are derived from the power balance for Tore Supra (TS) and NSTX discharges with centrally deposited fast wave electron heating. Measurements of the electron temperature and density profiles, combined with ray tracing computations of the power absorption profiles, allow detailed interpretation of the thermal flux versus temperature gradient. Evidence supporting the occurrence of electron temperature gradient turbulent transport in the two confinement devices is found. With control of the magnetic rotational transform profile and the heating power, internal transport barriers are created in TS and NSTX discharges. These partial transport barriers are argued to be a universal feature of transport equations in the presence of invariant tori that are intrinsic to non-monotonic rotational transforms in dynamical systems

  9. ELECTRON ENERGY DECAY IN HELIUM AFTERGLOW PLASMAS AT CRYOGENIC TEMPERATURES

    Goldan, P. D.; Cahn, J. H.; Goldstein, L.

    1963-10-15

    Studies of decaying afterglow plasmas in helium were ined near 4 deg K by immersion in a liquid helium bath. By means of a Maser Radiometer System, the electron temperature was followed below 200 deg K. Guided microwave propagation and wave interaction techniques premit determination of election number density and collision frequencies for momentum transfer. Electron temperature decay rates of the order of 150 mu sec/p(mm Hg alpha 4.2 deg K) were found. Since thermal relaxation by elastic collisions should be some two orders of magnitude faster than this, the electrons appear to be in quasiequilibrium with a slowly decaying internal heating source. Correlation of the expected decay rates of singlet metastable helium atoms with the electron temperature decay gives good agreement with the present experiment. (auth)

  10. Plasma potential and electron temperature evaluated by ball-pen and Langmuir probes in the COMPASS tokamak

    Dimitrova, M.; Popov, Tsv K.; Adamek, J.; Kovačič, J.; Ivanova, P.; Hasan, E.; López-Bruna, D.; Seidl, J.; Vondráček, P.; Dejarnac, R.; Stöckel, J.; Imríšek, M.; Panek, R.; the COMPASS Team

    2017-12-01

    The radial distributions of the main plasma parameters in the scrape-off-layer of the COMPASS tokamak are measured during L-mode and H-mode regimes by using both Langmuir and ball-pen probes mounted on a horizontal reciprocating manipulator. The radial profile of the plasma potential derived previously from Langmuir probes data by using the first derivative probe technique is compared with data derived using ball-pen probes. A good agreement can be seen between the data acquired by the two techniques during the L-mode discharge and during the H-mode regime within the inter-ELM periods. In contrast with the first derivative probe technique, the ball-pen probe technique does not require a swept voltage and, therefore, the temporal resolution is only limited by the data acquisition system. In the electron temperature evaluation, in the far scrape-off layer and in the limiter shadow, where the electron energy distribution is Maxwellian, the results from both techniques match well. In the vicinity of the last closed flux surface, where the electron energy distribution function is bi-Maxwellian, the ball-pen probe technique results are in agreement with the high-temperature components of the electron distribution only. We also discuss the application of relatively large Langmuir probes placed in parallel and perpendicularly to the magnetic field lines to studying the main plasma parameters. The results obtained by the two types of the large probes agree well. They are compared with Thomson scattering data for electron temperatures and densities. The results for the electron densities are compared also with the results from ASTRA code calculation of the electron source due to the ionization of the neutrals by fast electrons and the origin of the bi-Maxwellian electron energy distribution function is briefly discussed.

  11. Precision and resolution on Tore-Supra ECE electron temperature profile measurements

    Segui, J.L.; Molina, D.; Goniche, M.

    2003-01-01

    A 16-channel heterodyne radiometer, 2 GHz spaced, is used on Tore-Supra to measure the electron cyclotron emission in the frequency range 78-110 GHz for the O mode and 94 -126 GHz for the X mode. In the equatorial plane, a dual polarisation Gaussian optics lens antenna, with a perpendicular line of sight (with respect to the magnetic field), gives ECE measurements with very low refraction and Doppler effects. A separate O/X mode RF front-end allows the use of an IF electronic mode selector. This improves time stability calibration and gives the potentiality of simultaneous O/X mode measurements in the 94 -110 GHz RF band for polarisation studies. RF and IF filters reject the gyrotron frequency (118 GHz) in order to perform temperature measurements during ECRH plasmas. A precise absolute spectral calibration is performed outside the vacuum vessel by using a 600 deg. C black body, a digital signal averaging on the waveform generated by a mechanical chopper placed directly in front of it, and a simulation window without Fabry-Perot effects. The calibration precision leads to ECE temperature profiles which are very consistent with Thomson scattering measurements and guarantees a good stability of the ECE profiles for small changes on the magnetic field (absolute precision ± 6%, relative precision between channels ± 3%). Post-pulse data processing takes routinely into account the total magnetic field (B vacuum with ripple, B para , B dia , B pol , all with analytical formulations), the radial relativistic shift (analytical formulation is used), the refraction, not described in this paper, (cut-off detection with safety margin to avoid strong refraction), the nonthermal ECE spectra, not described in this paper, during LHCD (using an electron density threshold criterion). These previous analytical formulations are compatible with real time processing. Relativistic radial broadening simulations show that it is useful to fulfill 32 channels (1 GHz spaced). (authors)

  12. Precision and resolution on Tore-Supra ECE electron temperature profile measurements

    Segui, J.L.; Molina, D.; Goniche, M. [Association EURATOM -CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC CEA-Cadarache, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2003-07-01

    A 16-channel heterodyne radiometer, 2 GHz spaced, is used on Tore-Supra to measure the electron cyclotron emission in the frequency range 78-110 GHz for the O mode and 94 -126 GHz for the X mode. In the equatorial plane, a dual polarisation Gaussian optics lens antenna, with a perpendicular line of sight (with respect to the magnetic field), gives ECE measurements with very low refraction and Doppler effects. A separate O/X mode RF front-end allows the use of an IF electronic mode selector. This improves time stability calibration and gives the potentiality of simultaneous O/X mode measurements in the 94 -110 GHz RF band for polarisation studies. RF and IF filters reject the gyrotron frequency (118 GHz) in order to perform temperature measurements during ECRH plasmas. A precise absolute spectral calibration is performed outside the vacuum vessel by using a 600 deg. C black body, a digital signal averaging on the waveform generated by a mechanical chopper placed directly in front of it, and a simulation window without Fabry-Perot effects. The calibration precision leads to ECE temperature profiles which are very consistent with Thomson scattering measurements and guarantees a good stability of the ECE profiles for small changes on the magnetic field (absolute precision {+-} 6%, relative precision between channels {+-} 3%). Post-pulse data processing takes routinely into account the total magnetic field (B{sub vacuum} with ripple, B{sub para}, B{sub dia}, B{sub pol}, all with analytical formulations), the radial relativistic shift (analytical formulation is used), the refraction, not described in this paper, (cut-off detection with safety margin to avoid strong refraction), the nonthermal ECE spectra, not described in this paper, during LHCD (using an electron density threshold criterion). These previous analytical formulations are compatible with real time processing. Relativistic radial broadening simulations show that it is useful to fulfill 32 channels (1 GHz

  13. Analysis of electron cyclotron emission spectra of high electron temperature, supershot plasmas in TFTR

    Taylor, G.; Arunasalam, V.; Efthimion, P.C.; Grek, B.

    1993-01-01

    A primary objective of the TFTR program since 1986 has been the study and optimization of deuterium Supershot plasmas. These plasmas are predominantly heated by 90-110 keV neutral deuterium beams (P NBI /P OH >30), central ion temperatures are ∝30 keV and central electron temperatures from ECE (T ECE ) often exceed 10 keV. Central electron temperature data measured with a TV Thomson scattering (TVTS) system (T TVTS ) during the period 1987-1990 have been compared with data from three different ECE instruments on TFTR. Although T ECE ∝T TVTS for temperatures below 6 keV, there is a systematically increasing disagreement at higher electron temperatures, with T ECE ∝1.2 T TVTS for T TVTS in the range 9-10 keV. Recent theoretical work on the ECE radiation temperature of non-equilibrium plasmas indicates that for a bi-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution with a ratio of tail to bulk electron density η, a bulk temperature T b , and a hot tail temperature T h , the perpendicular ECE radiation temperature is given by T ECE ∝T b {1+η(T h /T b )}, for η ECE would be enhanced over T TVTS by a factor which depends on η and T h . This paper investigates whether the discrepancy between T TVTS and T ECE seen in TFTR Supershots at high electron temperatures is due to the presence of a hot electron tail component. The extraordinary mode ECE spectrum at the second, third and fourth harmonics is measured on the horizontal midplane by an absolutely calibrated ECE Michelson interferometer. This ECE spectrum is compared with the output from a time-independent transport code with relativistic opacity which solves the three-dimensional ECE radiation transport in a toroidally symmetric, two-dimensional geometry and uses measured electron density and temperature profiles from the TVTS system. (orig.)

  14. Ion- and electron-acoustic solitons in two-electron temperature space plasmas

    Lakhina, G. S.; Kakad, A. P.; Singh, S. V.; Verheest, F.

    2008-01-01

    Properties of ion- and electron-acoustic solitons are investigated in an unmagnetized multicomponent plasma system consisting of cold and hot electrons and hot ions using the Sagdeev pseudopotential technique. The analysis is based on fluid equations and the Poisson equation. Solitary wave solutions are found when the Mach numbers exceed some critical values. The critical Mach numbers for the ion-acoustic solitons are found to be smaller than those for electron-acoustic solitons for a given set of plasma parameters. The critical Mach numbers of ion-acoustic solitons increase with the increase of hot electron temperature and the decrease of cold electron density. On the other hand, the critical Mach numbers of electron-acoustic solitons increase with the increase of the cold electron density as well as the hot electron temperature. The ion-acoustic solitons have positive potentials for the parameters considered. However, the electron-acoustic solitons have positive or negative potentials depending whether the fractional cold electron density with respect to the ion density is greater or less than a certain critical value. Further, the amplitudes of both the ion- and electron-acoustic solitons increase with the increase of the hot electron temperature. Possible application of this model to electrostatic solitary waves observed on the auroral field lines by the Viking spacecraft is discussed

  15. Temperature dependence of electronic transport property in ferroelectric polymer films

    Zhao, X.L.; Wang, J.L., E-mail: jlwang@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Tian, B.B.; Liu, B.L.; Zou, Y.H.; Wang, X.D.; Sun, S.; Sun, J.L., E-mail: jlsun@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Meng, X.J.; Chu, J.H.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The ferroelectric polymer was fabricated by Langmuir–Blodgett method. • The electrons as the dominant injected carrier were conformed in the ferroelectric polymer films. • The leakage current conduction mechanisms in ferroelectric polymer were investigated. - Abstract: The leakage current mechanism of ferroelectric copolymer of polyvinylidene fluoride with trifluoroethylene prepared by Langmuir–Blodgett was investigated in the temperature range from 100 K to 350 K. The electron as the dominant injected carrier was observed in the ferroelectric copolymer films. The transport mechanisms in copolymer strongly depend on the temperature and applied voltage. From 100 K to 200 K, Schottky emission dominates the conduction. With temperature increasing, the Frenkel–Poole emission instead of the Schottky emission to conduct the carrier transport. When the temperature gets to 260 K, the leakage current becomes independent of temperature, and the space charge limited current conduction was observed.

  16. Effects of lower hybrid fast electron populations on electron temperature measurements at JET

    Tanzi, C.P.; Bartlett, D.V.; Schunke, B.

    1993-01-01

    The Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) system on JET has to date achieved up to 1.5 MA of driven current. This current is carried by a fast electron population with energies more than ten times the electron temperature and density about 10 -4 of the bulk plasma. This paper discusses the effects of this fast electron population on our ability to make reliable temperature measurements using ECE and reviews the effects on other plasma diagnostics which rely on ECE temperature measurements for their interpretation. (orig.)

  17. Development of tool for simulating the effect of radial electric fields on Ion-Temperature-Gradient modes in 3D configurations

    Eriksson, Lars

    2003-03-01

    The heat flux level observed in magnetic plasma confinement experiments such as tokamaks is much higher than what can be explained from neoclassical theory. There is a strong interest in the controlled nuclear fusion community to fully understand this phenomenon, called anomalous transport. One idea is that radial electric fields play a key role in the stabilization process of the electrostatic instabilities called micro instabilities that are considered responsible for the anomalous heat flux. This work studies the effect of a static ad-hoc radial electric field on microinstabilities, especially the ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven mode, within the frame of a global 3D gyrokinetic model. This will make it possible to extend the simulations done in tokamaks and helically symmetric systems to fully 313 magnetic configurations. Technically the work consists of extending the 3D gyrokinetic code Euterpe to also include the effect of the drifts induced by an imposed radial electrostatic potential. Simulations are performed in tokamak and helically symmetric configurations. The results indicate that this modified version of Euterpe can be used in studying more complex 3D fusion devices

  18. Electron spectroscopy on high-temperature superconductors and related compounds

    Knupfer, M.

    1994-01-01

    In the last two classes of materials have been discovered which distinguish themselves due to a transition into the superconducting state at relatively high temperatures. These are the cuprate superconductors and the alkali metal doped fullerenes. In this work the electronic structure of representatives of these materials, undoped and Ca-doped YBa 2 Cu 4 O 8 and A 3 C 60 (A=K, Rb), has been investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy and photoemission spectroscopy. (orig.) [de

  19. The relationship between ionospheric temperature, electron density and solar activity

    McDonald, J.N.; Williams, P.J.S.

    1980-01-01

    In studying the F-region of the ionosphere several authors have concluded that the difference between the electron temperature Tsub(e) and the ion temperature Tsub(i) is related to the electron density N. It was later noted that solar activity (S) was involved and an empirical relationship of the following form was established: Tsub(e)-Tsub(i) = A-BN+CS. The present paper extends this work using day-time data over a four year period. The results are given and discussed. A modified form of the empirical relation is proposed. (U.K.)

  20. Electron temperature effects for an ion beam source

    Uramoto, Joshin.

    1979-05-01

    A hydrogen high temperature plasma up to 200 eV is produced by acceleration of electrons in a hot hollow cathode discharge and is used as an ion beam source. Then, two characteristics are observed: A rate of the atomic ion (H + ) number increases above 70%. A perveance of the ion beam increases above 30 times compared with that of a cold plasma, while a floating potential of an ion acceleration electrode approaches an ion acceleration potential (- 500 V) according as an increment of the electron temperature. Moreover, a neutralized ion beam can be produced by only the negative floating electrode without an external power supply. (author)

  1. Electron temperature measurement of tungsten inert gas arcs

    Tanaka, Manabu; Tashiro, Shinichi

    2008-01-01

    In order to make clear the physical grounds of deviations from LTE (Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium) in the atmospheric helium TIG arcs electron temperature and LTE temperature obtained from electron number density were measured by using of line-profile analysis of the laser scattering method without an assumption of LTE. The experimental results showed that in comparison with the argon TIG arcs, the region where a deviation from LTE occurs tends to expand in higher arc current because the plasma reaches the similar state to LTE within shorter distance from the cathode due to the slower cathode jet velocity

  2. Signature of electron-phonon interaction in high temperature superconductors

    Vinod Ashokan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The theory of thermal conductivity of high temperature superconductors (HTS based on electron and phonon line width (life times formulation is developed with Quantum dynamical approach of Green's function. The frequency line width is observed as an extremely sensitive quantity in the transport phenomena of HTS as a collection of large number of scattering processes. The role of resonance scattering and electron-phonon interaction processes is found to be most prominent near critical temperature. The theory successfully explains the spectacular behaviour of high Tc superconductors in the vicinity of transition temperature. A successful agreement between theory and experiment has been obtained by analyzing the thermal conductivity data for the sample La1.8Sr0.2CuO4 in the temperature range 0 − 200K. The theory is equally and successfully applicable to all other high Tc superconductors.

  3. Time-resolving electron temperature diagnostic for ALCATOR C

    Fairfax, S.A.

    1984-05-01

    A diagnostic that provides time-resolved central electron temperatures has been designed, built, and tested on the ALCATOR C Tokamak. The diagnostic uses an array of fixed-wavelength x-ray crystal monochromators to sample the x-ray continuum and determine the absolute electron temperature. The resolution and central energy of each channel were chosen to exclude any contributions from impurity line radiation. This document describes the need for such a diagnostic, the design methodology, and the results with typical ALCATOR C plasmas. Sawtooth (m = 1) temperature oscillations were observed after pellet fueling of the plasma. This is the first time that such oscillations have been observed with an x-ray temperature diagnostic

  4. Electron microscopic observation at low temperature on superconductors

    Yokota, Yasuhiro; Hashimoto, Hatsujiro; Yoshida, Hiroyuki.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have observed superconducting materials with a high resolution electron microscope at liquid helium temperature. First, observation was carried out on Nb system intermetallic compounds such as Nb 3 Al and Nb 3 Sn of Al 5 type and Nb 3 Ge of 11 type at extremely low temperature. Next, the observation of high temperature superconductive ceramics in the state of superconductivity was attempted. In this paper, first the development of the liquid helium sample holder for a 400 kV electron microscope to realize the observation is reported. Besides, the sample holder of Gatan Co. and an extremely low temperature, high resolution electron microscope with a superconducting lens are described. The purpose of carrying out the electron microscope observation of superconductors at low temperature is the direct observation of the crystalline lattice image in the state of superconductivity. Also the structural transformation from tetragonal crystals to rhombic crystals in Al 5 type superconductors can be observed. The results of observation are reported. (K.I.)

  5. Determining coronal electron temperatures from observations with UVCS/SOHO

    Fineschi, S.; Esser, R.; Habbal, S. R.; Karovska, M.; Romoli, M.; Strachan, L.; Kohl, J. L.; Huber, M. C. E.

    1995-01-01

    The electron temperature is a fundamental physical parameter of the coronal plasma. Currently, there are no direct measurements of this quantity in the extended corona. Observations with the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) aboard the upcoming Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission can provide the most direct determination of the electron kinetic temperature (or, more precisely, the electron velocity distribution along the line of sight). This measurement is based on the observation of the Thomson-scattered Lyman alpha (Ly-alpha) profile. This observation is made particularly challenging by the fact that the integrated intensity of the electron-scattered Ly-alpha line is about 10(exp 3) times fainter than that of the resonantly-scattered Ly-alpha component. In addition, the former is distributed across 50 A (FWHM), unlike the latter that is concentrated in 1 A. These facts impose stringent requirements on the stray-light rejection properties of the coronagraph/spectrometer, and in particular on the requirements for the grating. We make use of laboratory measurements of the UVCS Ly-alpha grating stray-light, and of simulated electron-scattered Ly-alpha profiles to estimate the expected confidence levels of electron temperature determination. Models of different structures typical of the corona (e.g., streamers, coronal holes) are used for this parameter study.

  6. Survey of potential electronic applications of high temperature superconductors

    Hammond, R.B.; Bourne, L.C.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the authors present a survey of the potential electronic applications of high temperature superconductor (HTSC) thin films. During the past four years there has been substantial speculation on this topic. The authors will cover only a small fraction of the potential electronic applications that have been identified. Their treatment is influenced by the developments over the past few years in materials and device development and in market analysis. They present their view of the most promising potential applications. Superconductors have two important properties that make them attractive for electronic applications. These are (a) low surface resistance at high frequencies, and (b) the Josephson effect

  7. Impact of rotating resonant magnetic perturbation fields on plasma edge electron density and temperature

    Stoschus, H.; Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Reiser, D.; Unterberg, B.; Lehnen, M.; Reiter, D.; Samm, U.; Jakubowski, M.W.

    2012-01-01

    Rotating resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields impose a characteristic modulation to the edge electron density n e (r, t) and temperature T e (r, t) fields, which depends on the relative rotation f rel between external RMP field and plasma fluid. The n e (r, t) and T e (r, t) fields measured in the edge (r/a = 0.9–1.05) of TEXTOR L-mode plasmas are in close correlation with the local magnetic vacuum topology for low relative rotation f rel = −0.2 kHz. In comparison with the 3D neutral and plasma transport code EMC3-Eirene, this provides substantial experimental evidence that for low relative rotation level and high resonant field amplitudes (normalized radial field strength B r 4/1 /B t =2×10 -3 ), a stochastic edge with a remnant island chain dominated by diffusive transport exists. Radially outside a helical scrape-off layer, the so-called laminar zone embedded into a stochastic domain is found to exist. In contrast for high relative rotation of f rel = 1.8 kHz, the measured modulation of n e is shifted by π/2 toroidally with respect to the modelled vacuum topology. A pronounced flattening in T e (r) and a reduction in n e (r) is measured at the resonant flux surface and represents a clear signature for a magnetic island, which is phase shifted with respect to the vacuum island position. A correlated shift of the laminar zone radially outwards at the very plasma edge is observed suggesting that the actual near-field structure at the perturbation source is determined by the plasma response as well. (paper)

  8. Double-Sided Laser Heating in Radial Diffraction Geometry for Diamond Anvil Cell Deformation Experiments at Simultaneous High Pressures and Temperatures

    Miyagi, L. M.; Kunz, M.; Couper, S.; Lin, F.; Yan, J.; Doran, A.; MacDowell, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    The rheology of rocks and minerals in the Earth's deep interior plays a primary role in controlling large scale geodynamic processes such as mantle convection and slab subduction. Plastic deformation resulting from these processes can lead to texture development and associated seismic anisotropy. If a detailed understanding of the link between deformation and seismic anisotropy is established, observations of seismic anisotropy can be used to understand the dynamic state in the deep Earth. However, performing deformation experiments at lower mantle pressure and temperature conditions are extremely challenging. Thus most deformation studies have been performed either at room temperature and high pressure or at reduced pressures and high temperature. Only a few extraordinary efforts have attained pressures and temperatures relevant to lower mantle. Therefore our ability to interpret observations of lower mantle seismic anisotropy in terms of mantle flow models remains limited. In order to expand the pressure and temperature range available for deformation of deep Earth relevant mineral phases, we have developed a laser heating system for in-situ double-sided heating in radial diffraction geometry at beamline 12.2.2 of the Advanced Light Source of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This allows texture and lattice strain measurements to be recorded at simultaneous high pressures and temperatures in the diamond anvil cell. This new system is integrated into the newly built axial laser heating system to allow for rapid and reliable transitioning between double-sided laser heating in axial and radial geometries. Transitioning to radial geometry is accomplished by redirecting the laser and imaging paths from 0° and 180° to 90° and 270°. To redirect the 90° path, a motorized periscope mirror pair with an objective lens can be inserted into the downstream axial beam path. The 270° redirection is accomplished by removing the upstream axial objective lens and

  9. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser

    The temperature and electron density characterizing the plasma are measured by time-resolved spectroscopy of neutral atom and ion line emissions in the time window of 300–2000 ns. An echelle spectrograph coupled with a gated intensified charge coupled detector is used to record the plasma emissions.

  10. Electronically induced nuclear transitions - temperature dependence and Rabi oscillations

    Niez, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals with a nucleus electromagnetically coupled with the bound states of its electronic surroundings. It describes the temperature dependence of its dynamics and the onset of potential Rabi oscillations by means of a Master Equation. The latter is generalized in order to account for possible strong resonances. Throughout the paper the approximation schemes are discussed and tested. (authors)

  11. Electron-dislocation interaction at low temperatures. Progress report

    1978-01-01

    The interaction of mobile dislocations with electrons in copper and copper alloys has shown that dislocation motion in copper, at low temperature, can be treated as an analog of an underdamped oscillator. We have also shown that the viscous drag on mobile dislocations in type II superconductors can be treated as an acoustic attenuation of an elastic wave

  12. Low latitude electron temperature observed by the CHAMP satellite

    Stolle, Claudia; Truhlik, V.; Richards, P.

    2012-01-01

    Te morning overshoot (MO). Both, data and model revealed an anti-correlation between the equatorial MO amplitude and solar EUV flux at these altitudes. The CHAMP observations also reveal a post sunset electron temperature anomaly in analogy to the equatorial ionisation anomaly at altitudes below 400...

  13. Temperature dependence of electron concentration in cadmium arsenide

    Gelten, M.J.; Blom, F.A.P.

    1979-01-01

    From measurements of the temperature dependence of the electron concentration in Cd 3 As 2 , we found values for the conduction-band parameters that are in good agreement with those recently reported by Aubin, Caron, and Jay-Gerin. However, in contrast with these authors we found no small overlap,

  14. Characterization of electron temperature by simulating a multicusp ion source

    Yeon, Yeong Heum [Sungkyunkwan University, WCU Department of Energy Science, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon-si (Korea, Republic of); Ghergherehchi, Mitra; Kim, Sang Bum; Jun, Woo Jung [Sungkyunkwan University, School of Information & Communication Engineering, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon-si (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Chul; Mohamed Gad, Khaled Mohamed [Sungkyunkwan University, WCU Department of Energy Science, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon-si (Korea, Republic of); Namgoong, Ho [Sungkyunkwan University, School of Information & Communication Engineering, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon-si (Korea, Republic of); Chai, Jong Seo, E-mail: jschai@skku.edu [Sungkyunkwan University, School of Information & Communication Engineering, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon-si (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-01

    Multicusp ion sources are used in cyclotrons and linear accelerators to produce high beam currents. The structure of a multicusp ion source consists of permanent magnets, filaments, and an anode body. The configuration of the array of permanent magnets, discharge voltage of the plasma, extraction bias voltage, and structure of the multicusp ion source body decide the quality of the beam. The electrons are emitted from the filament by thermionic emission. The emission current can be calculated from thermal information pertaining to the filament, and from the applied voltage and current. The electron trajectories were calculated using CST Particle Studio to optimize the plasma. The array configuration of the permanent magnets decides the magnetic field inside the ion source. The extraction bias voltage and the structure of the multicusp ion source body decide the electric field. Optimization of the electromagnetic field was performed with these factors. CST Particle Studio was used to calculate the electron temperature with a varying permanent magnet array. Four types of permanent magnet array were simulated to optimize the electron temperature. It was found that a 2-layer full line cusp field (with inverse field) produced the best electron temperature control behavior.

  15. Electronic temperature control and measurements reactor fuel rig circuits

    Glowacki, S W

    1980-01-01

    The electronic circuits of two digital temperature meters developed for the thermocouple of Ni-NiCr type are described. The output thermocouple signal as converted by means of voltage-to-freguency converter. The frequency is measured by a digital scaler controled by quartz generator signals. One of the described meter is coupled with digital temperature controler which drives the power stage of the reactor rig heater. The internal rig temperature is measured by the thermocouple providing the input signal to the mentioned voltage-to-frequency converter, that means the circuits work in the negative feedback loop. The converter frequency-to-voltage ratio is automatically adjusted to match to thermocouple sensitivity changes in the course of the temperature variations. The accuracy of measuring system is of order of +- 1degC for thermocouple temperature changes from 523 K up to 973 K (50degC up to 700degC).

  16. The electronic temperature control and measurements reactor fuel rig circuits

    Glowacki, S.W.

    1980-01-01

    The electronic circuits of two digital temperature meters developed for the thermocouple of Ni-NiCr type are described. The output thermocouple signal as converted by means of voltage-to-freguency converter. The frequency is measured by a digital scaler controled by quartz generator signals. One of the described meter is coupled with digital temperature controler which drives the power stage of the reactor rig heater. The internal rig temperature is measured by the thermocouple providing the input signal to the mentioned voltage-to-frequency converter, that means the circuits work in the negative feedback loop. The converter frequency-to-voltage ratio is automatically adjusted to match to thermocouple sensitivity changes in the course of the temperature variations. The accuracy of measuring system is of order of +- 1degC for thermocouple temperature changes from 523 K up to 973 K (50degC up to 700degC). (author)

  17. Effect of re-heating on the hot electron temperature

    Estabrook, K.; Rosen, M.

    1980-01-01

    Resonant absorption is the direct conversion of the transverse laser light to longitudinal electron plasma waves (epw) at the critical density [10 21 (1.06 μm/lambda 0 ) 2 cm -3 ]. The oscillating longitudinal electric field of the epw heats the electrons by accelerating them down the density gradient to a temperature of approximately 21T/sub e/ 0 25 ([I(W/cm 2 )/10 16 ](lambda 0 /1.06 μm) 2 ) 0 4 . This section extends the previous work by studying the effects of magnetic fields and collisions (albedo) which return the heated electrons for further heating. A magnetic field increases their temperature and collisions do not

  18. Collisional drift waves in a plasma with electron temperature inhomogeneity

    Drake, J.F.; Hassam, A.B.

    1981-01-01

    A fluid theory of collisional electrostatic drift waves in a plasma slab with magnetic shear is presented. Both electron temperature and density gradients are included. The equations are solved analytically in all relevant regions of the parameter space defined by the magnetic shear strength and the perpendicular wavelength and explicit expressions for the growth rates are given. For shear strengths appropriate for present-day tokamak discharges the temperature gradient produces potential wells which localize the mode in the electron resistive region, well inside the ion sound turning points. Mode stability arises from a competition between the destabilizing influence of the time dependent thermal force and the stabilizing influence of electron energy dissipation. Convective energy loss is not important for shear parameters of present-day fusion devices

  19. Electron temperature in the E-region of the ionosphere

    Zalpuri, K.S.; Oyama, K.-I.

    1991-06-01

    Various heating and cooling mechanisms which are operative in the lower E-region are discussed and their relative importance in different altitude range is shown. These heating and cooling rates are then used to derive the electron temperature T e . The calculated values of electron temperature are found to be higher than neutral temperature through out the altitude range 100 ∼ 150 km, with the difference increasing with increase in altitude. However, compared to observed values of T e , the calculated values are still smaller below about 130 km. Above this altitude, the calculated values become larger. Estimation of T e for different, suggested values of heating efficiency due to dissociative recombination, show that T e profile obtained even be assuming a constant value of 1.3 eV is in fairly good agreement with those derived based on variable values of this parameter. (author)

  20. The influence of a non-uniform radial temperature distribution in the fuel on the results of calculation of transients

    Goltsev, A.O.; Davidenko, V.D.; Tsibulsky, V.F.; Lekomtsev, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the discussion of results of computational studies of transients for different ways of accounting the temperature of the fuel in the full-scale comprehensive calculations of neutron physics. The paper demonstrates that in calculation of the neutron physics, it is necessary to use the effective temperature of the fuel in order to provide for correct accounting of the fuel temperature feedback, since the value of volume-averaged temperature being used in calculations of neutron physics with feedbacks would result in underestimation of consequences of accidents, especially accidents involving the dispersion of radiation

  1. Continuous Emission Spectrum Measurement for Electron Temperature Determination in Low-Temperature Collisional Plasmas

    Liu Qiuyan; Li Hong; Chen Zhipeng; Xie Jinlin; Liu Wandong

    2011-01-01

    Continuous emission spectrum measurement is applied for the inconvenient diagnostics of low-temperature collisional plasmas. According to the physical mechanism of continuous emission, a simplified model is presented to analyze the spectrum in low temperature plasma. The validity of this model is discussed in a wide range of discharge parameters, including electron temperature and ionization degree. Through the simplified model, the continuous emission spectrum in a collisional argon internal inductively coupled plasma is experimentally measured to determine the electron temperature distribution for different gas pressures and radio-frequency powers. The inverse Abel transform is also applied for a better spatially resoluted results. Meanwhile, the result of the continuous emission spectrum measurement is compared to that of the electrostatic double probes, which indicates the effectiveness of this method. (low temperature plasma)

  2. Computer simulation of radial transport in tandem mirror machines

    Gilmore, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    A code used for simulation of classical radial transport in the 2XIIB experiment has been modified to simulate radial transport in TMX. Results have been obtained using classical transport coefficients and also using very simple trial neoclassical resonant transport coefficients. Comparison of the results obtained with solely classical transport and with both classical and neo-classical transport indicate that neoclassical transport depresses the ion density by approximately 5%. The central cell ion temperature is increased by approximately by the neo-classical transport, as is the electron temperature

  3. Electronic structure of the high-temperature oxide superconductors

    Pickett, W.E.

    1989-01-01

    Since the discovery of superconductivity above 30 K by Bednorz and Mueller in the La copper oxide system, the critical temperature has been raised to 90 K in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 and to 110 and 125 K in Bi-based and Tl-based copper oxides, respectively. In the two years since this Nobel-prize-winning discovery, a large number of electronic structure calculations have been carried out as a first step in understanding the electronic properties of these materials. In this paper these calculations (mostly of the density-functional type) are gathered and reviewed, and their results are compared with the relevant experimental data. The picture that emerges is one in which the important electronic states are dominated by the copper d and oxygen p orbitals, with strong hybridization between them. Photon, electron, and positron spectroscopies provide important information about the electronic states, and comparison with electronic structure calculations indicates that, while many features can be interpreted in terms of existing calculations, self-energy corrections (''correlations'') are important for a more detailed understanding. The antiferromagnetism that occurs in some regions of the phase diagram poses a particularly challenging problem for any detailed theory. The study of structural stability, lattice dynamics, and electron-phonon coupling in the copper oxides is also discussed. Finally, a brief review is given of the attempts so far to identify interaction constants appropriate for a model Hamiltonian treatment of many-body interactions in these materials

  4. SPECTROSCOPIC DIAGNOSIS IN ELECTRONIC TEMPERATURE OF PHOTOIONISE PLASMAS

    A. K. Ferouani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we are interested in the diagnostics in electronic temperature of a plasma purely photoionized, based on the intensity ration of lines emitted by ions helium-like, which have an atomic number Z relatively small. We considered the three lines corresponding to the transitions starting from the excited levels 1s2l towards the fundamental level 1s2 1S0, like appropriate lines. More precisely, the line of resonance w due to the transition 1s2p 1P1 --- 1s2 1 S0, the line of intercombinaison (x,y 1s2p 3 P2,1 --- 1s2 1 S0  as well as prohibited line z due to the transition 1s2 3 S1 --- 1s2 1 S0. These lines appear clearly in the spectra of astrophysical plasmas. As helium-like ion, we chose two, the oxygen O6+ (Z=8 and neon Ne8+ (Z=10. We carried out calculations of the ration of lines intensity G=(z+x+y/w of O6+ and Ne8+  according to the electronic temperature in the range going from 105 to 107 K. We will see that, like it was shown by Gabriel and Jordan in 1969 [1], this intensity ration can be very sensitive to the temperature electronic and practically independent of the electronic density. Consequently, the ration G can be used to determine in a reliable way the electronic temperature of plasma observed [2].

  5. Low temperature electron microscopy and electron diffraction of the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium

    Hayward, S.B.

    1978-09-01

    The structure of the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium was studied by high resolution electron microscopy and electron diffraction, primarily at low temperature. The handedness of the purple membrane diffraction pattern with respect to the cell membrane was determined by electron diffraction of purple membranes adsorbed to polylysine. A new method of preparing frozen specimens was used to preserve the high resolution order of the membranes in the electron microscope. High resolution imaging of glucose-embedded purple membranes at room temperature was used to relate the orientation of the diffraction pattern to the absolute orientation of the structure of the bacteriorhodopsin molecule. The purple membrane's critical dose for electron beam-induced damage was measured at room temperature and at -120 0 C, and was found to be approximately five times greater at -120 0 C. Because of this decrease in radiation sensitivity, imaging of the membrane at low temperature should result in an increased signal-to-noise ratio, and thus better statistical definition of the phases of weak reflections. Higher resolution phases may thus be extracted from images than can be determined by imaging at room temperature. To achieve this end, a high resolution, liquid nitrogen-cooled stage was built for the JEOL-100B. Once the appropriate technology for taking low dose images at very high resolution has been developed, this stage will hopefully be used to determine the high resolution structure of the purple membrane

  6. Experimental determination of the radial dose distribution in high gradient regions around 192Ir wires: Comparison of electron paramagnetic resonance imaging, films, and Monte Carlo simulations

    Kolbun, N.; Leveque, Ph.; Abboud, F.; Bol, A.; Vynckier, S.; Gallez, B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The experimental determination of doses at proximal distances from radioactive sources is difficult because of the steepness of the dose gradient. The goal of this study was to determine the relative radial dose distribution for a low dose rate 192 Ir wire source using electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) and to compare the results to those obtained using Gafchromic EBT film dosimetry and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: Lithium formate and ammonium formate were chosen as the EPR dosimetric materials and were used to form cylindrical phantoms. The dose distribution of the stable radiation-induced free radicals in the lithium formate and ammonium formate phantoms was assessed by EPRI. EBT films were also inserted inside in ammonium formate phantoms for comparison. MC simulation was performed using the MCNP4C2 software code. Results: The radical signal in irradiated ammonium formate is contained in a single narrow EPR line, with an EPR peak-to-peak linewidth narrower than that of lithium formate (∼0.64 and 1.4 mT, respectively). The spatial resolution of EPR images was enhanced by a factor of 2.3 using ammonium formate compared to lithium formate because its linewidth is about 0.75 mT narrower than that of lithium formate. The EPRI results were consistent to within 1% with those of Gafchromic EBT films and MC simulations at distances from 1.0 to 2.9 mm. The radial dose values obtained by EPRI were about 4% lower at distances from 2.9 to 4.0 mm than those determined by MC simulation and EBT film dosimetry. Conclusions: Ammonium formate is a suitable material under certain conditions for use in brachytherapy dosimetry using EPRI. In this study, the authors demonstrated that the EPRI technique allows the estimation of the relative radial dose distribution at short distances for a 192 Ir wire source.

  7. Numerical calculation of 'actual' radial profile of ion temperature from 'measured' energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals

    Nakamura, Kazuo; Hiraki, Naoji; Toi, Kazuo; Itoh, Satoshi

    1984-10-01

    The energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals are observed in the TRIAM-1 tokamak by vertical scanning of the neutral energy analyzer. The ''apparent'' ion temperature obtained directly from the energy spectrum observed in the peripheral region is much higher than that predicted by neoclassical transport theory. The ''actual'' ion temperature profile is derived numerically from the energy spectra observed at various positions taking into account the wall-reflection effect of neutrals and the impermeability of the plasma. As a result, the ''actual'' ion temperature profile is found to agree well with that predicted by neoclassical transport theory.

  8. Numerical calculation of 'actual' radial profile of ion temperature from 'measured' energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals

    Nakamura, Kazuo; Hiraki, Naoji; Toi, Kazuo; Itoh, Satoshi

    1984-01-01

    The energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals are observed in the TRIAM-1 tokamak by vertical scanning of the neutral energy analyzer. The ''apparent'' ion temperature obtained directly from the energy spectrum observed in the peripheral region is much higher than that predicted by neoclassical transport theory. The ''actual'' ion temperature profile is derived numerically from the energy spectra observed at various positions taking into account the wall-reflection effect of neutrals and the impermeability of the plasma. As a result, the ''actual'' ion temperature profile is found to agree well with that predicted by neoclassical transport theory. (author)

  9. Electron temperature diagnostics in the RFX reversed field pinch experiment

    Bartiromo, R.; Carraro, L.; Marrelli, L.; Murari, A.; Pasqualotto, R.; Puiatti, M.E.; Scarin, P.; Valisa, M.; Franz, P.; Martin, P.; Zabeo, L.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents an integrated approach to the problem of electron temperature diagnostics of the plasma in a reversed field pinch. Three different methods, sampling different portions of the electron distribution function, are adopted, namely Thomson scattering, soft X-ray spectroscopy by pulse-height analysis and filtered soft X-ray intensity ratio. A careful analysis of the different sources of systematic errors is performed and a novel statistical approach is adopted to mutually validate the three independent measurements. A satisfactory agreement is obtained over a large range of experimental conditions, indicating that in the plasma core the energy distribution function is well represented by a maxwellian. (author)

  10. Electron temperature measurements in lowdensity plasmas by helium spectroscopy

    Brenning, N.

    1977-09-01

    This method to use relative intensities of singlet and triplet lines of neutral helium to measure electron temperature in low-density plasmas is examined. Calculations from measured and theoretical data about transitions in neutral helium are carried out and compared to experimental results. It is found that relative intensities of singlet and triplet lines from neutral helium only can be used for TE determination in low-density, short-duration plasmas. The most important limiting processes are excitation from the metastable 2 3 S level and excitation transfer in collisions between electrons and excited helium atoms. An evaluation method is suggested, which minimizes the effect of these processes. (author)

  11. The effects of the recent minimum temperature and water deficit increases on Pinus pinaster wood radial growth and density in southern Portugal.

    Cathy Béatrice Kurz Besson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Western Iberia has recently shown increasing frequency of drought conditions coupled with heatwave events, leading to exacerbated limiting climatic conditions for plant growth. It is not clear to what extent wood growth and density of agroforestry species have suffered from such changes or recent extreme climate events.To address this question, tree-ring width and density chronologies were built for a P. pinaster stand in southern Portugal and correlated with climate variables, including the minimum, mean and maximum temperatures and the number of cold days. Monthly and maximum daily precipitations were also analyzed as well as dry spells. The drought effect was assessed using the standardized precipitation-evapotranspiration (SPEI multi-scalar drought index, between 1 to 24-months. The climate-growth/density relationships were evaluated for the period 1958-2011.We show that both wood radial growth and density highly benefit from the strong decay of cold days and the increase of minimum temperature. Yet the benefits are hindered by long-term water deficit, which results in different levels of impact on wood radial growth and density. Despite of the intensification of long-term water deficit, tree-ring width appears to benefit from the minimum temperature increase, whereas the effects of long-term droughts significantly prevail on tree-ring density. Our results further highlight the dependency of the species on deep water sources after the juvenile stage. The impact of climate changes on long-term droughts and their repercussion on the shallow groundwater table and P. pinaster’s vulnerability are also discussed. This work provides relevant information for forest management in the semi-arid area of the Alentejo region of Portugal. It should ease the elaboration of mitigation strategies to assure P. pinaster’s production capacity and quality in response to more arid conditions in the near future in the region.

  12. Electron-beam damaged high-temperature superconductor Josephson junctions

    Pauza, A.J.; Booij, W.E.; Herrmann, K.; Moore, D.F.; Blamire, M.G.; Rudman, D.A.; Vale, L.R.

    1997-01-01

    Results are presented on the fabrication and characterization of high critical temperature Josephson junctions in thin films of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ produced by the process of focused electron-beam irradiation using 350 keV electrons. The junctions so produced have uniform spatial current densities, can be described in terms of the resistive shunted junction model, and their current densities can be tailored for a given operating temperature. The physical properties of the damaged barrier can be described as a superconducting material of either reduced or zero critical temperature (T c ), which has a length of ∼15nm. The T c reduction is caused primarily by oxygen Frenkel defects in the Cu - O planes. The large beam currents used in the fabrication of the junctions mean that the extent of the barrier is limited by the incident electron-beam diameter, rather than by scattering within the film. The properties of the barrier can be calculated using a superconductor/normal/superconductor (SNS) junction model with no boundary resistance. From the SNS model, we can predict the scaling of the critical current resistance (I c R n ) product and gain insight into the factors controlling the junction properties, T c , and reproducibility. From the measured I c R n scaling data, we can predict the I c R n product of a junction at a given operating temperature with a given current density. I c R n products of ∼2mV can be achieved at 4.2 K. The reproducibility of several junctions in a number of samples can be characterized by the ratio of the maximum-to-minimum critical currents on the same substrate of less than 1.4. Stability over several months has been demonstrated at room and refrigerator temperatures (297 and 281 K) for junctions that have been initially over damaged and then annealed at temperatures ∼380K. (Abstract Truncated)

  13. State of the art of High Temperature Power Electronics

    Buttay , Cyril; Planson , Dominique; Allard , Bruno; Bergogne , Dominique; Bevilacqua , Pascal; Joubert , Charles; Lazar , Mihai; Martin , Christian; Morel , Hervé; Tournier , Dominique; Raynaud , Christophe

    2009-01-01

    International audience; High temperature power electronics has become possible with the recent availability of silicon carbide devices. This material, as other wide-bandgap semiconductors, can operate at temperatures above 500°C, whereas silicon is limited to 150-200°C. Applications such as transportation or deep oil and gas wells drilling can benefit. A few converters operating above 200°C have been demonstrated, but work is still ongoing to design and build a power system able to operate in...

  14. Ferromagnetism and temperature-dependent electronic structure in metallic films

    Herrmann, T.

    1999-01-01

    In this work the influence of the reduced translational symmetry on the magnetic properties of thin itinerant-electron films and surfaces is investigated within the strongly correlated Hubbard model. Firstly, the possibility of spontaneous ferromagnetism in the Hubbard model is discussed for the case of systems with full translational symmetry. Different approximation schemes for the solution of the many-body problem of the Hubbard model are introduced and discussed in detail. It is found that it is vital for a reasonable description of spontaneous ferromagnetism to be consistent with exact results concerning the general shape of the single-electron spectral density in the limit of strong Coulomb interaction between the electrons. The temperature dependence of the ferromagnetic solutions is discussed in detail by use of the magnetization curves as well as the spin-dependent quasi particle spectrum. For the investigation of thin films and surfaces the approximation schemes for the bulk system have to be generalized to deal with the reduced translational symmetry. The magnetic behavior of thin Hubbard films is investigated by use of the layer dependent magnetization as a function of temperature as well as the thickness of the film. The Curie-temperature is calculated as a function of the film thickness. Further, the magnetic stability at the surface is discussed in detail. Here it is found that for strong Coulomb interaction the magnetic stability at finite temperatures is reduced at the surface compared to the inner layers. This observation clearly contradicts the well-known Stoner picture of band magnetism and can be explained in terms of general arguments which are based on exact results in the limit of strong Coulomb interaction. The magnetic behavior of the Hubbard films can be analyzed in detail by inspecting the local quasi particle density of states as well as the wave vector dependent spectral density. The electronic structure is found to be strongly spin

  15. Study on ion radial acceleration in the region of virtual cathode formation on injection of relativistic electron beam into neutral gas

    Bystritskij, V.M.; Podkatov, V.I.; Chistyakov, S.A.; Yalovets, A.P.

    1982-01-01

    Results of numerical calculations and experimental investigations into different parameters of radial fluxes of deuterium ions and electrons performed in the region of virtual cathode formation when injecting a relativistic electron beam in low-pressure deuterium (10-100 μm Hg) are given. The calculations were carried out by the Monte-Carlo method within the framework of three models: Rostocker (Vsub(w) approximately equal to epsilonsub(e)/e), Olson (Vsub(w) approximately equal to (2-3)epsilonsub(e)/e) and Byistritcky (Vsub(w) approximately equal to 1.5 epsilonsub(e)/e) (where Vsub(w) - depth of a forming potential well, epsilonsub(e) - energy of beam electrons, e - electron charge). It is concluded on the basis of the comparative analysis of numerical and experimental results that there is no a deep stationary well with Vsub(w) approximately equal to (2-3)epsilonsub(e)/e, how this is postulated in the Olson model [ru

  16. Effects of electrons on the solar wind proton temperature anisotropy

    Michno, M. J.; Lazar, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2014-01-01

    Among the kinetic microinstabilities, the firehose instability is one of the most efficient mechanisms to restrict the unlimited increase of temperature anisotropy in the direction of an ambient magnetic field as predicted by adiabatic expansion of collision-poor solar wind. Indeed, the solar wind proton temperature anisotropy detected near 1 AU shows that it is constrained by the marginal firehose condition. Of the two types of firehose instabilities, namely, parallel and oblique, the literature suggests that the solar wind data conform more closely to the marginal oblique firehose condition. In the present work, however, it is shown that the parallel firehose instability threshold is markedly influenced by the presence of anisotropic electrons, such that under some circumstances, the cumulative effects of both electron and proton anisotropies could describe the observation without considering the oblique firehose mode.

  17. High Temperature Wireless Communication And Electronics For Harsh Environment Applications

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Beheim, G. M.; Ponchak, G. E.; Chen, L.-Y

    2007-01-01

    In order for future aerospace propulsion systems to meet the increasing requirements for decreased maintenance, improved capability, and increased safety, the inclusion of intelligence into the propulsion system design and operation becomes necessary. These propulsion systems will have to incorporate technology that will monitor propulsion component conditions, analyze the incoming data, and modify operating parameters to optimize propulsion system operations. This implies the development of sensors, actuators, and electronics, with associated packaging, that will be able to operate under the harsh environments present in an engine. However, given the harsh environments inherent in propulsion systems, the development of engine-compatible electronics and sensors is not straightforward. The ability of a sensor system to operate in a given environment often depends as much on the technologies supporting the sensor element as the element itself. If the supporting technology cannot handle the application, then no matter how good the sensor is itself, the sensor system will fail. An example is high temperature environments where supporting technologies are often not capable of operation in engine conditions. Further, for every sensor going into an engine environment, i.e., for every new piece of hardware that improves the in-situ intelligence of the components, communication wires almost always must follow. The communication wires may be within or between parts, or from the engine to the controller. As more hardware is added, more wires, weight, complexity, and potential for unreliability is also introduced. Thus, wireless communication combined with in-situ processing of data would significantly improve the ability to include sensors into high temperature systems and thus lead toward more intelligent engine systems. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is presently leading the development of electronics, communication systems, and sensors capable of prolonged stable

  18. Electronic Structure of the Bismuth Family of High Temperature Superconductors

    Dunn, Lisa

    2002-03-07

    High temperature superconductivity remains the central intellectual problem in condensed matter physics fifteen years after its discovery. Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) directly probes the electronic structure, and has played an important role in the field of high temperature superconductors. With the recent advances in sample growth and the photoemission technique, we are able to study the electronic structure in great detail, and address regimes that were previously inaccessible. This thesis work contains systematic photoemission studies of the electronic structure of the Bi-family of high temperature superconductors, which include the single-layer system (Bi2201), the bi-layer system (Bi2212), and the tri-layer system (Bi2223). We show that, unlike conventional BCS superconductors, phase coherence information emerges in the single particle excitation spectrum of high temperature superconductors as the superconducting peak in Bi2212. The universality and various properties of this superconducting peak are studied in various systems. We argue that the origin of the superconducting peak may provide the key to understanding the mechanism of High-Tc superconductors. In addition, we identified a new experimental energy scale in the bilayer material, the anisotropic intra-bilayer coupling energy. For a long time, it was predicted that this energy scale would cause bilayer band splitting. We observe this phenomenon, for the first time, in heavily overdoped Bi2212. This new observation requires the revision of the previous picture of the electronic excitation in the Brillouin zone boundary. As the first ARPES study of a trilayer system, various detailed electronic proper- ties of Bi2223 are examined. We show that, comparing with Bi2212, both superconducting gap and relative superconducting peak intensity become larger in Bi2223, however, the strength of the interlayer coupling within each unit cell is possibly weaker. These results suggest that the

  19. Paleoclassical electron heat transport

    Callen, J.D.

    2005-01-01

    Radial electron heat transport in low collisionality, magnetically-confined toroidal plasmas is shown to result from paleoclassical Coulomb collision processes (parallel electron heat conduction and magnetic field diffusion). In such plasmas the electron temperature equilibrates along magnetic field lines a long length L, which is the minimum of the electron collision length and a maximum effective half length of helical field lines. Thus, the diffusing field lines induce a radial electron heat diffusivity M ≅ L/(πR 0q ) ∼ 10 >> 1 times the magnetic field diffusivity η/μ 0 ≅ ν e (c/ω p ) 2 . The paleoclassical electron heat flux model provides interpretations for many features of 'anomalous' electron heat transport: magnitude and radial profile of electron heat diffusivity (in tokamaks, STs, and RFPs), Alcator scaling in high density plasmas, transport barriers around low order rational surfaces and near a separatrix, and a natural heat pinch (or minimum temperature gradient) heat flux form. (author)

  20. Electron Temperatures in W51 Complex from High Resolution, Low ...

    2001-03-09

    Mar 9, 2001 ... kinematics and local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) electron temperature (Te) of this region. H109α RRL observations by Wilsonet al.(1970) with a resolution of 4 and by Pankonin et al. (1979) with a resolution of 2.6 show that Te ∼ 6000 K in G49.5-0.4. Lower frequency observations for H137β and ...

  1. Deriving the coronal hole electron temperature: electron density dependent ionization / recombination considerations

    Doyle, John Gerard; Perez-Suarez, David; Singh, Avninda; Chapman, Steven; Bryans, Paul; Summers, Hugh; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2010-01-01

    Comparison of appropriate theoretically derived line ratios with observational data can yield estimates of a plasma's physical parameters, such as electron density or temperature. The usual practice in the calculation of the line ratio is the assumption of excitation by electrons/protons followed by radiative decay. Furthermore, it is normal to use the so-called coronal approximation, i.e. one only considers ionization and recombination to and from the ground-state. A more accurate treatment is to include ionization/recombination to and from metastable levels. Here, we apply this to two lines from adjacent ionization stages, Mg IX 368 A and Mg X 625 A, which has been shown to be a very useful temperature diagnostic. At densities typical of coronal hole conditions, the difference between the electron temperature derived assuming the zero density limit compared with the electron density dependent ionization/recombination is small. This, however, is not the case for flares where the electron density is orders of magnitude larger. The derived temperature for the coronal hole at solar maximum is around 1.04 MK compared to just below 0.82 MK at solar minimum.

  2. Active silicon x-ray for measuring electron temperature

    Snider, R.T.

    1994-07-01

    Silicon diodes are commonly used for x-ray measurements in the soft x-ray region between a few hundred ev and 20 keV. Recent work by Cho has shown that the charge collecting region in an underbiased silicon detector is the depletion depth plus some contribution from a region near the depleted region due to charge-diffusion. The depletion depth can be fully characterized as a function of the applied bias voltage and is roughly proportional to the squart root of the bias voltage. We propose a technique to exploit this effect to use the silicon within the detector as an actively controlled x-ray filter. With reasonable silicon manufacturing methods, a silicon diode detector can be constructed in which the sensitivity of the collected charge to the impinging photon energy spectrum can be changed dynamically in the visible to above the 20 keV range. This type of detector could be used to measure the electron temperature in, for example, a tokamak plasma by sweeping the applied bias voltage during a plasma discharge. The detector samples different parts of the energy spectrum during the bias sweep, and the data collected contains enough information to determine the electron temperature. Benefits and limitations of this technique will be discussed along with comparisons to similar methods for measuring electron temperature and other applications of an active silicon x-ray filter

  3. 12th International Workshop on Low Temperature Electronics

    2017-01-01

    The present volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series represents contributions from participants of the 12th International Workshop on Low Temperature Electronics held in Tempe, Arizona, USA from September 18-21, 2016. The conference was organized by the School of Earth and Space Exploration at Arizona State University.The International Workshop on Low Temperature Electronics (WOLTE) is a biennial conference devoted to the presentation and exchange of the most recent advances in the field of low temperature electronics and its applications. This international forum is open to everyone in the field.The technical program included oral presentations and posters on fundamental properties of cryogenic materials, cryogenic transistors, quantum devices and systems, astronomy and physics instrumentation, and fabrication of cryogenic devices. More than 50 scientists and engineers from various academic, government, and industrial institutions in Europe, Asia, and the Americas attended the conference.We would like to thank all speakers for their presentations and all attendees for their participation. We would also like to express our sincerest gratitude to our sponsors: Lake Shore Cryotronics, ASU NewSpace, ASU School of Earth and Space Exploration, and IRA A. Fulton Schools of Engineering for making this conference possible. (paper)

  4. Temperature dependences in electron-stimulated desorption of neutral europium

    Ageev, V N; Madey, T E

    2003-01-01

    The electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) yield for neutral europium (Eu) atoms from Eu layers adsorbed on oxygen-covered tungsten surfaces has been measured as a function of electron energy, europium coverage and degree of oxidation of tungsten, with an emphasis on effects of substrate temperature. The measurements have been carried out using a time-of-flight method and surface ionization detector. We expand on an earlier report, and compare ESD of multivalent Eu with ESD of monovalent alkali atoms, studied previously. The Eu atom ESD is a complicated function of Eu coverage, electron energy and substrate temperature. In the coverage range 0.05-0.35 monolayer (ML), overlapping resonant-like Eu atom yield peaks are observed at electron energies E sub e of 36 and 41 eV that might be associated with Eu or W shallow core level excitations. Additional resonant-like peaks are seen at E sub e of 54 and 84 eV that are associated with W 5p and 5s level excitations. The Eu atom yield peaks at 36 and 41 eV are seen only...

  5. Effects of applied dc radial electric fields on particle transport in a bumpy torus plasma

    Roth, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of applied dc radial electric fields on particle transport in a bumpy torus plasma is studied. The plasma, magnetic field, and ion heating mechanism are operated in steady state. Ion kinetic temperature is more than a factor of ten higher than electron temperature. The electric fields raise the ions to energies on the order of kilovolts and then point radially inward or outward. Plasma number density profiles are flat or triangular across the plasma diameter. It is suggested that the radial transport processes are nondiffusional and dominated by strong radial electric fields. These characteristics are caused by the absence of a second derivative in the density profile and the flat electron temperature profiles. If the electric field acting on the minor radius of the toroidal plasma points inward, plasma number density and confinement time are increased.

  6. Potentialities in electronics of new high critical temperature superconductors

    Hartemann, P.

    1989-01-01

    The main electronic applications of superconductors involve the signal processing, the electromagnetic wave detection and the magnetometry. Characteristics of devices based on conventional superconductors cooled by liquid helium are given and the changes induced by incorporating high-temperature superconductors are estimated. After a survey of new superconductor properties, the superconducting devices for analog or digital signal processing are reviewed. The gains predicted for high-temperature superconducting analog devices are considered in greater detail. Different sections deal with the infrared or (sub)millimeter wave detection. The most sensitive apparatuses for magnetic measurements are based on SQUIDs. Features of SQUIDs made of granular high-temperature superconducting material samples (grain boundaries behave as barriers of intrinsic junctions) are discussed [fr

  7. Temperature profiles on the gadolinium surface during electron beam evaporation

    Ohba, Hironori; Shibata, Takemasa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1995-03-01

    The distributions of surface temperature of gadolinium in a water-cooled copper crucible during electron beam evaporation were measured by optical pyrometry. The surface temperatures were obtained from the radiation intensity ratio of the evaporating surface and a reference light source using Planck`s law of radiation. The emitted radiation from the evaporating surface and a reference source was detected by a CCD sensor through a band pass filter of 650 nm. The measured surface temperature generally agreed with those estimated from the deposition rate and the data of the saturated vapor pressure. At high input powers, it was found that the measured value had small difference with the estimated one due to variation of the surface condition. (author).

  8. Temperature profiles on the gadolinium surface during electron beam evaporation

    Ohba, Hironori; Shibata, Takemasa

    1995-01-01

    The distributions of surface temperature of gadolinium in a water-cooled copper crucible during electron beam evaporation were measured by optical pyrometry. The surface temperatures were obtained from the radiation intensity ratio of the evaporating surface and a reference light source using Planck's law of radiation. The emitted radiation from the evaporating surface and a reference source was detected by a CCD sensor through a band pass filter of 650 nm. The measured surface temperature generally agreed with those estimated from the deposition rate and the data of the saturated vapor pressure. At high input powers, it was found that the measured value had small difference with the estimated one due to variation of the surface condition. (author)

  9. Determination of gas temperature in the plasmatron channel according to the known distribution of electronic temperature

    Gerasimov Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical method to calculate the temperature distribution of heavy particles in the channel of the plasma torch on the known distribution of the electronic temperature has been proposed. The results can be useful for a number of model calculations in determining the most effective conditions of gas blowing through the plasma torch with the purpose of heating the heavy component. This approach allows us to understand full details about the heating of cold gas, inpouring the plasma, and to estimate correctly the distribution of the gas temperature inside the channel.

  10. To the problem of electron temperature control in plasma

    Galechyan, G.A.; Anna, P.R.

    1995-01-01

    One of the main problems in low temperature plasma is control plasma parameters at fixed values of current and gas pressure in the discharge. It is known that an increase in the intensity of sound wave directed along the positive column to values in excess of a definite threshold leads to essential rise of the temperature of electrons. However, no less important is the reduction of electron temperature in the discharge down to the value less than that in plasma in the absence external influence. It is known that to reduce the electron temperature in the plasma of CO 2 laser, easily ionizable admixture are usually introduced in the discharge area with the view of increasing the overpopulation. In the present work we shall show that the value of electron temperature can be reduced by varying of sound wave intensity at its lower values. The experiment was performed on an experimental setup consisted of the tube with length 52 cm and diameter 9.8 cm, two electrodes placed at the distance of 27 cm from each other. An electrodynamical radiator of sound wave was fastened to one of tube ends. Fastened to the flange at the opposite end was a microphone for the control of sound wave parameters. The studies were performed in range of pressures from 40 to 180 Torr and discharge currents from 40 to 110 mA. The intensity of sound wave was varied from 74 to 92 dB. The measurement made at the first resonance frequency f = 150 Hz of sound in the discharge tube, at which a quarter of wave length keep within the length of the tube. The measurement of longitudinal electric field voltage in plasma of positive column was conducted with the help of two probes according to the compensation method. Besides, the measurement of gas temperature in the discharge were taken. Two thermocouple sensors were arranged at the distance of 8 cm from the anode, one of them being installed on the discharge tube axis, the second-fixed the tube wall

  11. To the problem of electron temperature control in plasma

    Galechyan, G.A. [Institute of Applied Problem of Physics, Yerevan (Armenia); Anna, P.R. [Raritan Valley Community College, Somerville, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    One of the main problems in low temperature plasma is control plasma parameters at fixed values of current and gas pressure in the discharge. It is known that an increase in the intensity of sound wave directed along the positive column to values in excess of a definite threshold leads to essential rise of the temperature of electrons. However, no less important is the reduction of electron temperature in the discharge down to the value less than that in plasma in the absence external influence. It is known that to reduce the electron temperature in the plasma of CO{sub 2} laser, easily ionizable admixture are usually introduced in the discharge area with the view of increasing the overpopulation. In the present work we shall show that the value of electron temperature can be reduced by varying of sound wave intensity at its lower values. The experiment was performed on an experimental setup consisted of the tube with length 52 cm and diameter 9.8 cm, two electrodes placed at the distance of 27 cm from each other. An electrodynamical radiator of sound wave was fastened to one of tube ends. Fastened to the flange at the opposite end was a microphone for the control of sound wave parameters. The studies were performed in range of pressures from 40 to 180 Torr and discharge currents from 40 to 110 mA. The intensity of sound wave was varied from 74 to 92 dB. The measurement made at the first resonance frequency f = 150 Hz of sound in the discharge tube, at which a quarter of wave length keep within the length of the tube. The measurement of longitudinal electric field voltage in plasma of positive column was conducted with the help of two probes according to the compensation method. Besides, the measurement of gas temperature in the discharge were taken. Two thermocouple sensors were arranged at the distance of 8 cm from the anode, one of them being installed on the discharge tube axis, the second-fixed the tube wall.

  12. Packaging Technologies for High Temperature Electronics and Sensors

    Chen, Liangyu; Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Spry, David J.; Meredith, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews ceramic substrates and thick-film metallization based packaging technologies in development for 500degC silicon carbide (SiC) electronics and sensors. Prototype high temperature ceramic chip-level packages and printed circuit boards (PCBs) based on ceramic substrates of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and aluminum nitride (AlN) have been designed and fabricated. These ceramic substrate-based chiplevel packages with gold (Au) thick-film metallization have been electrically characterized at temperatures up to 550degC. A 96% alumina based edge connector for a PCB level subsystem interconnection has also been demonstrated recently. The 96% alumina packaging system composed of chip-level packages and PCBs has been tested with high temperature SiC devices at 500degC for over 10,000 hours. In addition to tests in a laboratory environment, a SiC JFET with a packaging system composed of a 96% alumina chip-level package and an alumina printed circuit board mounted on a data acquisition circuit board was launched as a part of the MISSE-7 suite to the International Space Station via a Shuttle mission. This packaged SiC transistor was successfully tested in orbit for eighteen months. A spark-plug type sensor package designed for high temperature SiC capacitive pressure sensors was developed. This sensor package combines the high temperature interconnection system with a commercial high temperature high pressure stainless steel seal gland (electrical feed-through). Test results of a packaged high temperature capacitive pressure sensor at 500degC are also discussed. In addition to the pressure sensor package, efforts for packaging high temperature SiC diode-based gas chemical sensors are in process.

  13. Solvated electrons at elevated temperatures in different alcohols: Temperature and molecular structure effects

    Yan, Yu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Lin, Mingzhang [Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Katsumura, Yosuke, E-mail: katsu@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.j [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nuclear Professional School, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Fu, Haiying; Muroya, Yusa [Nuclear Professional School, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    The absorption spectra of solvated electrons in pentanol, hexanol and octanol are measured from 22 to 200, 22 to 175 and 50 to150 {sup o}C, respectively, at a fixed pressure of 15 MPa, using nanosecond pulse radiolysis technique. The results show that the peak positions of the absorption spectra have a red-shift (shift to longer wavelengths) as temperature increases, similar to water and other alcohols. Including the above mentioned data, a compilation of currently available experimental data on the energy of absorption maximum (E{sub max}) of solvated electrons changed with temperature in monohydric alcohols, diols and triol is presented. E{sub max} of solvated electron is larger in those alcohols that have more OH groups at all the temperatures. The molecular structure effect, including OH numbers, OH position and carbon chain length, is investigated. For the primary alcohols with same OH group number and position, the temperature coefficient increases with increase in chain length. For the alcohols with same chain length and OH numbers, temperature coefficient is larger for the symmetric alcohols than the asymmetric ones.

  14. Temperature dependence of the electronic structure of semiconductors and insulators

    Poncé, S., E-mail: samuel.pon@gmail.com; Gillet, Y.; Laflamme Janssen, J.; Gonze, X. [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility and Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, Université catholique de Louvain, Chemin des étoiles 8, bte L07.03.01, B-1348 Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium); Marini, A. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Via Salaria Km 29.3, CP 10, 00016 Monterotondo Stazione (Italy); Verstraete, M. [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility and Physique des matériaux et nanostructures, Université de Liège, Allée du 6 Août 17, B-4000 Liège (Belgium)

    2015-09-14

    The renormalization of electronic eigenenergies due to electron-phonon coupling (temperature dependence and zero-point motion effect) is sizable in many materials with light atoms. This effect, often neglected in ab initio calculations, can be computed using the perturbation-based Allen-Heine-Cardona theory in the adiabatic or non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. After a short description of the recent progresses in this field and a brief overview of the theory, we focus on the issue of phonon wavevector sampling convergence, until now poorly understood. Indeed, the renormalization is obtained numerically through a slowly converging q-point integration. For non-zero Born effective charges, we show that a divergence appears in the electron-phonon matrix elements at q → Γ, leading to a divergence of the adiabatic renormalization at band extrema. This problem is exacerbated by the slow convergence of Born effective charges with electronic wavevector sampling, which leaves residual Born effective charges in ab initio calculations on materials that are physically devoid of such charges. Here, we propose a solution that improves this convergence. However, for materials where Born effective charges are physically non-zero, the divergence of the renormalization indicates a breakdown of the adiabatic harmonic approximation, which we assess here by switching to the non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. Also, we study the convergence behavior of the renormalization and develop reliable extrapolation schemes to obtain the converged results. Finally, the adiabatic and non-adiabatic theories, with corrections for the slow Born effective charge convergence problem (and the associated divergence) are applied to the study of five semiconductors and insulators: α-AlN, β-AlN, BN, diamond, and silicon. For these five materials, we present the zero-point renormalization, temperature dependence, phonon-induced lifetime broadening, and the renormalized electronic band structure.

  15. Status of electron temperature and density measurement with beam emission spectroscopy on thermal helium at TEXTOR

    Schmitz, O; Schweer, B; Pospieszczyk, A; Lehnen, M; Samm, U; Unterberg, B; Beigman, I L; Vainshtein, L A; Kantor, M; Xu, Y; Krychowiak, M

    2008-01-01

    Beam emission spectroscopy on thermal helium is used at the TEXTOR tokamak as a reliable method to obtain radial profiles of electron temperature T e (r, t) and electron density n e (r, t). In this paper the experimental realization of this method at TEXTOR and the status of the atomic physics employed as well as the major factors for the measurement's accuracy are evaluated. On the experimental side, the hardware specifications are described and the impact of the beam atoms on the local plasma parameters is shown to be negligible. On the modeling side the collisional-radiative model (CRM) applied to infer n e and T e from the measured He line intensities is evaluated. The role of proton and deuteron collisions and of charge exchange processes is studied with a new CRM and the impact of these so far neglected processes appears to be of minor importance. Direct comparison to Thomson scattering and fast triple probe data showed that for high densities n e > 3.5 x 10 19 m -3 the T e values deduced with the established CRM are too low. However, the new atomic data set implemented in the new CRM leads in general to higher T e values. This allows us to specify the range of reliable application of BES on thermal helium to a range of 2.0 x 10 18 e 19 m -3 and 10 eV e < 250 eV which can be extended by routine application of the new CRM.

  16. Competition Between Radial Loss and EMIC Wave Scattering of MeV Electrons During Strong CME-shock Driven Storms

    Hudson, M. K.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, Z.; Malaspina, D.; Millan, R. M.; Patel, M.; Qin, M.; Shen, X.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    The two strongest storms of Solar Cycle 24, 17 March and 22 June 2015, provide a contrast between magnetospheric response to CME-shocks at equinox and solstice. The 17 March CME-shock initiated storm produced a stronger ring current response with Dst = - 223 nT, while the 22 June CME-shock initiated storm reached a minimum Dst = - 204 nT. The Van Allen Probes ECT instrument measured a dropout in flux for both events which can be characterized by magnetopause loss at higher L values prior to strong recovery1. However, rapid loss is seen at L 3 for the June storm at high energies with maximum drop in the 5.2 MeV channel of the REPT instrument coincident with the observation of EMIC waves in the H+ band by the EMFISIS wave instrument. The rapid time scale of loss can be determined from the 65 minute delay in passage of the Probe A relative to the Probe B spacecraft. The distinct behavior of lower energy electrons at higher L values has been modeled with MHD-test particle simulations, while the rapid loss of higher energy electrons is examined in terms of the minimum resonant energy criterion for EMIC wave scattering, and compared with the timescale for loss due to EMIC wave scattering which has been modeled for other storm events.2 1Baker, D. N., et al. (2016), Highly relativistic radiation belt electron acceleration, transport, and loss: Large solar storm events of March and June 2015, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 121, 6647-6660, doi:10.1002/2016JA022502. 2Li, Z., et al. (2014), Investigation of EMIC wave scattering as the cause for the BARREL 17 January 2013 relativistic electron precipitation event: A quantitative comparison of simulation with observations, Geophys. Res. Lett., 41, 8722-8729, doi:10.1002/2014GL062273.

  17. ELECTRON TEMPERATURE FLUCTUATIONS AND CROSS-FIELD HEAT TRANSPORT IN THE EDGE OF DIII-D

    RUDAKOV, DL; BOEDO, JA; MOYER, RA; KRASENINNIKOV, S; MAHDAVI, MA; McKEE, GR; PORTER, GD; STANGEBY, PC; WATKINS, JG; WEST, WP; WHYTE, DG.

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 The fluctuating E x B velocity due to electrostatic turbulence is widely accepted as a major contributor to the anomalous cross-field transport of particles and heat in the tokamak edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) plasmas. This has been confirmed by direct measurements of the turbulent E x B transport in a number of experiments. Correlated fluctuations of the plasma radial velocity v r , density n, and temperature T e result in time-average fluxes of particles and heat given by (for electrons): Equation 1--Λ r ES = r > = 1/B varφ θ ; Equation 2--Q r ES = e (tilde v) r > ∼ 3/2 kT e Λ r ES + 3 n e /2 B varφ e (tilde E) θ > Q conv + Q cond . The first term in Equation 2 is referred to as convective and the second term as conductive heat flux. Experimental determination of fluxes given by Equations 1 and 2 requires simultaneous measurements of the density, temperature and poloidal electric field fluctuations with high spatial and temporal resolution. Langmuir probes provide most readily available (if not the only) tool for such measurements. However, fast measurements of electron temperature using probes are non-trivial and are not always performed. Thus, the contribution of the T e fluctuations to the turbulent fluxes is usually neglected. Here they report results of the studies of T e fluctuations and their effect on the cross-field transport in the SOL of DIII-D

  18. Combined resistive and laser heating technique for in situ radial X-ray diffraction in the diamond anvil cell at high pressure and temperature

    Miyagi, Lowell [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Department of Earth Sciences, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana 59717 (United States); Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn; Kaercher, Pamela; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Alarcon, Eloisa Zepeda [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Raju, Selva Vennila [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); HiPSEC, Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154 (United States); Knight, Jason; MacDowell, Alastair [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Williams, Quentin [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    To extend the range of high-temperature, high-pressure studies within the diamond anvil cell, a Liermann-type diamond anvil cell with radial diffraction geometry (rDAC) was redesigned and developed for synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments at beamline 12.2.2 of the Advanced Light Source. The rDAC, equipped with graphite heating arrays, allows simultaneous resistive and laser heating while the material is subjected to high pressure. The goals are both to extend the temperature range of external (resistive) heating and to produce environments with lower temperature gradients in a simultaneously resistive- and laser-heated rDAC. Three different geomaterials were used as pilot samples to calibrate and optimize conditions for combined resistive and laser heating. For example, in Run1, FeO was loaded in a boron-mica gasket and compressed to 11 GPa then gradually resistively heated to 1007 K (1073 K at the diamond side). The laser heating was further applied to FeO to raise temperature to 2273 K. In Run2, Fe-Ni alloy was compressed to 18 GPa and resistively heated to 1785 K (1973 K at the diamond side). The combined resistive and laser heating was successfully performed again on (Mg{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1})O in Run3. In this instance, the sample was loaded in a boron-kapton gasket, compressed to 29 GPa, resistive-heated up to 1007 K (1073 K at the diamond side), and further simultaneously laser-heated to achieve a temperature in excess of 2273 K at the sample position. Diffraction patterns obtained from the experiments were deconvoluted using the Rietveld method and quantified for lattice preferred orientation of each material under extreme conditions and during phase transformation.

  19. Electron cyclotron emission measurements on JET: Michelson interferometer, new absolute calibration, and determination of electron temperature.

    Schmuck, S; Fessey, J; Gerbaud, T; Alper, B; Beurskens, M N A; de la Luna, E; Sirinelli, A; Zerbini, M

    2012-12-01

    At the fusion experiment JET, a Michelson interferometer is used to measure the spectrum of the electron cyclotron emission in the spectral range 70-500 GHz. The interferometer is absolutely calibrated using the hot/cold technique and, in consequence, the spatial profile of the plasma electron temperature is determined from the measurements. The current state of the interferometer hardware, the calibration setup, and the analysis technique for calibration and plasma operation are described. A new, full-system, absolute calibration employing continuous data acquisition has been performed recently and the calibration method and results are presented. The noise level in the measurement is very low and as a result the electron cyclotron emission spectrum and thus the spatial profile of the electron temperature are determined to within ±5% and in the most relevant region to within ±2%. The new calibration shows that the absolute response of the system has decreased by about 15% compared to that measured previously and possible reasons for this change are presented. Temperature profiles measured with the Michelson interferometer are compared with profiles measured independently using Thomson scattering diagnostics, which have also been recently refurbished and recalibrated, and agreement within experimental uncertainties is obtained.

  20. Experimental study of water absorption of electronic components and internal local temperature and humidity into electronic enclosure

    Conseil, Helene; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion reliability of electronic products is a key factor for electronics industry, and today there is a large demand for performance reliability in large spans of temperature and humidity during day and night shifts. Corrosion failures are still seen due to the effects of temperature, humidity......, differential humidity, and temperature effects simulating day/night, and the use of desiccants....

  1. Oblique electron-cyclotron-emission radial and phase detector of rotating magnetic islands applied to alignment and modulation of electron-cyclotron-current-drive for neoclassical tearing mode stabilization

    Volpe, F.; Austin, M. E.; Campbell, G.; Deterly, T.

    2012-01-01

    A two channel oblique electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer was installed on the DIII-D tokamak and interfaced to four gyrotrons. Oblique ECE was used to toroidally and radially localize rotating magnetic islands and so assist their electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) stabilization. In particular, after manipulations operated by the interfacing analogue circuit, the oblique ECE signals directly modulated the current drive in synch with the island rotation and in phase with the island O-point, for a more efficient stabilization. Apart from the different toroidal location, the diagnostic view is identical to the ECCD launch direction, which greatly simplified the real-time use of the signals. In fact, a simple toroidal extrapolation was sufficient to lock the modulation to the O-point phase. This was accomplished by a specially designed phase shifter of nearly flat response over the 1–7 kHz range. Moreover, correlation analysis of two channels slightly above and below the ECCD frequency allowed checking the radial alignment to the island, based on the fact that for satisfactory alignment the two signals are out of phase.

  2. Radial nerve dysfunction

    Neuropathy - radial nerve; Radial nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy ... Damage to one nerve group, such as the radial nerve, is called mononeuropathy . Mononeuropathy means there is damage to a single nerve. Both ...

  3. Numerical simulation of transient moisture and temperature distribution in polycarbonate and aluminum electronic enclosures

    Shojaee Nasirabadi, Parizad; Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    The challenge of developing a reliable electronic product requires huge amounts of resources and knowledge. Temperature and thermal features directly affect the life of electronic products. Furthermore, moisture can be damaging for electronic components. Nowadays, computational fluid dynamics (CF...

  4. Effective temperature of the non-equilibrium electrons in a degenerate semiconductor at low lattice temperature

    Das, B.; Basu, A.; Das, J.; Bhattacharya, D.P., E-mail: d_p_bhattacharya@rediffmail.com

    2015-10-01

    The energy balance equation for the electron–phonon system is recast taking the degeneracy of the carrier ensemble into account. The effect of degeneracy on the field dependence of the temperature of the non-equilibrium carriers has been studied by solving the same equation. The high field distribution function of the carriers is assumed to be given by the Fermi Dirac function at the field dependent carrier temperature. The distribution function has been approximated in a way that facilitates analytical solution of the problem without any serious loss of accuracy. The field dependence of the electron temperature thus obtained seems to be significantly different from what follows had the degeneracy not been taken into account. The agreement of the results obtained from the present analysis with the available experimental data for Ge and InSb are quite satisfactory. The scope of further refinement of the present theory is highlighted.

  5. Sheath and heat flow of a two-electron-temperature plasma in the presence of electron emission

    Sato, Kunihiro; Miyawaki, Fujio

    1992-01-01

    The electrostatic sheath and the heat flow of a two-electron-temperature plasma in the presence of electron emission are investigated analytically. It is shown that the energy flux is markedly enhanced to a value near the electron free-flow energy flux as a result of considerable reduction of the sheath potential due to electron emission if the fraction of hot electrons at the sheath edge is much smaller than one. If the hot- to cold-electron temperature ratio is of the order of ten and the hot electron density is comparable to the cold electron density, the action of the sheath as a thermal insulator is improved as a result of suppression of electron emission due to the space-charge effect of hot electrons. (author)

  6. Low-temperature radiative recombination of electrons with bare nuclei

    Omidvar, K.

    1993-01-01

    Aside from empirical formulas, the radiative-recombination cross section and coefficient are usually given in tabulated forms instead of analytic formulas. Here, we give analytic expressions in the form of expansions for the recombination cross section as a function of the electron energy E for low E, and for the recombination coefficient as a function of the temperature T for low T. The expansion coefficients are combinations of confluent hypergeometric functions, and are tabulated for a large number of the final principal and angular-momentum quantum numbers n and l. It is shown that the recombination cross section for arbitrary nuclear charge number Z is independent of Z, while the recombination coefficient for T/Z 2 much-lt 1.58x10 5 K increases as Z 2 . Excellent agreement is found with the published tabulated values

  7. Modified electron-acoustic and lower-hybrid drift dissipative instability in a two-electron temperature plasma

    Bose, M.

    1989-01-01

    It is often found, in fusion devices as well as in the auroral ionosphere, that the electrons consist of two distinct group, viz., hot and cold. These two-temperature electron model is sometimes convenient for analytical purposes. Thus the authors have considered a two-temperature electron plasma. In this paper, they investigated analytically the drift dissipative instabilities of modified electron-acoustic and lower-hybrid wve in a two-electron temperature plasma. It is found that the modified electron-acoustic drift dissipative mode are strongly dependent on the number density of cold electrons. From the expression of the growth rate, it is clear that these cold electrons can control the growth of this mode as well

  8. Solitary Langmuir waves in two-electron temperature plasma

    Prudkikh, V. V.; Prudkikh

    2014-06-01

    Nonlinear interaction of Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves in two-electron temperature plasma is investigated. New integrable wave interaction regime was discovered, this regime corresponds to the Langmuir soliton with three-hump amplitude, propagating with a speed close to the ion-sound speed in the conditions of strong non-isothermality of electronic components. It was discovered that besides the known analytical solution in the form of one- and two-hump waves, there exists a range of solutions in the form of solitary waves, which in the form of envelope has multi-peak structure and differs from the standard profiles described by hyperbolic functions. In case of fixed plasma parameters, different group velocities correspond to the waves with different number of peaks. It is found that the Langmuir wave package contains both even and uneven numbers of oscillations. Low-frequency potential here has uneven number of peaks. Interrelation of obtained and known earlier results are also discussed.

  9. Low-temperature epitaxy of silicon by electron beam evaporation

    Gorka, B. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Kekulestr. 5, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Dogan, P. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Kekulestr. 5, 12489 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: pinar.dogan@hmi.de; Sieber, I.; Fenske, F.; Gall, S. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Kekulestr. 5, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-07-16

    In this paper we report on homoepitaxial growth of thin Si films at substrate temperatures T{sub s} = 500-650 deg. C under non-ultra-high vacuum conditions by using electron beam evaporation. Si films were grown at high deposition rates on monocrystalline Si wafers with (100), (110) and (111) orientations. The ultra-violet visible reflectance spectra of the films show a dependence on T{sub s} and on the substrate orientation. To determine the structural quality of the films in more detail Secco etch experiments were carried out. No etch pits were found on the films grown on (100) oriented wafers. However, on films grown on (110) and (111) oriented wafers different types of etch pits could be detected. Films were also grown on polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) seed layers prepared by an Aluminum-Induced Crystallisation (AIC) process on glass substrates. Electron Backscattering Diffraction (EBSD) shows that the film growth proceeds epitaxially on the grains of the seed layer. But a considerably higher density of extended defects is revealed by Secco etch experiments.

  10. Electron temperature and pressure at the edge of ASDEX Upgrade plasmas. Estimation via electron cyclotron radiation and investigations on the effect of magnetic perturbations

    Rathgeber, Sylvia K.

    2013-01-01

    density information - the electron pressure allows a detailed study of plasma edge phenomena like ELMs or the transition from 'Low-confinement mode' (L-mode) to H-mode. It is shown how the application of non-axisymmetric MP fields acts on the edge profiles of electron temperature, density and pressure in H-modes with type-I and mitigated ELMs and during the L-H transition. Compared to type-I ELMs, mitigated ELMs tend to occur at higher edge densities, lower edge temperatures and reduced edge pressure gradients. This parameter regime can be achieved by strong gas fuelling. MP fields might support ELM mitigation by shifting the threshold between type-I and small ELMs towards slightly higher edge temperatures. The application of MPs in L-modes results in a degradation of the pressure gradient due to increased heat transport. At the L-H transition, the pressure gradient and the radial electric field shearing seem to exhibit the same value with and without MPs, while its required heating power is increased in the presence of MPs.

  11. Estimation of edge electron temperature profiles via forward modelling of the electron cyclotron radiation transport at ASDEX Upgrade

    Rathgeber, S K; Barrera, L; Eich, T; Fischer, R; Suttrop, W; Wolfrum, E; Nold, B; Willensdorfer, M

    2013-01-01

    We present a method to obtain reliable edge profiles of the electron temperature by forward modelling of the electron cyclotron radiation transport. While for the core of ASDEX Upgrade plasmas, straightforward analysis of electron cyclotron intensity measurements based on the optically thick plasma approximation is usually justified, reasonable analysis of the steep and optically thin plasma edge needs to consider broadened emission and absorption profiles and radiation transport processes. This is carried out in the framework of integrated data analysis which applies Bayesian probability theory for joint analysis of the electron density and temperature with data of different interdependent and complementary diagnostics. By this means, electron cyclotron radiation intensity delivers highly spatially resolved electron temperature data for the plasma edge. In H-mode, the edge gradient of the electron temperature can be several times higher than the one of the radiation temperature. Furthermore, we are able to reproduce the ‘shine-through’ peak—the observation of increased radiation temperatures at frequencies resonant in the optically thin scrape-off layer. This phenomenon is caused by strongly down-shifted radiation of Maxwellian tail electrons located in the H-mode edge region and, therefore, contains valuable information about the electron temperature edge gradient. (paper)

  12. Ion emission from laser-produced plasmas with two electron temperatures

    Wickens, L.M.; Allen, J.E.; Rumsby, P.T.

    1978-01-01

    An analytic theory for the expansion of a laser-produced plasma with two electron temperatures is presented. It is shown that from the ion-emission velocity spectrum such relevant parameters as the hot- to -cold-electron density ratio, the absolute hot- and cold-electron temperatures, and a sensitive measure of hot- and cold-electron temperature ratio can be deduced. A comparison with experimental results is presented

  13. Electron temperature measurements during electron cyclotron heating on PDX using a ten channel grating polychromator

    Cavallo, A.; Hsuan, H.; Boyd, D.; Grek, B.; Johnson, D.; Kritz, A.; Mikkelsen, D.; LeBlanc, B.; Takahashi, H.

    1984-10-01

    During first harmonic electron cyclotron heating (ECH) on the Princeton Divertor Experiment (PDX) (R 0 = 137 cm, a = 40 cm), electron temperature was monitored using a grating polychromator which measured second harmonic electron cyclotron emission from the low field side of the tokamak. Interference from the high power heating pulse on the broadband detectors in the grating instrument was eliminated by using a waveguide filter in the transmission line which brought the emission signal to the grating instrument. Off-axis (approx. 4 cm) location of the resonance zone resulted in heating without sawtooth or m = 1 activity. However, heating with the resonance zone at the plasma center caused very large amplitude sawteeth accompanied by strong m = 1 activity: ΔT/T/sub MAX/ approx. = 0.41, sawtooth period approx. = 4 msec, m = 1 period approx. = 90 μ sec, (11 kHz). This is the first time such intense MHD activity driven by ECH has been observed. (For both cases there was no sawtooth activity in the ohmic phase of the discharge before ECH.) At very low densities there is a clear indication that a superthermal electron population is created during ECH

  14. Electron-temperature-gradient-driven drift waves and anomalous electron energy transport

    Shukla, P.K.; Murtaza, G.; Weiland, J.

    1990-01-01

    By means of a kinetic description for ions and Braginskii's fluid model for electrons, three coupled nonlinear equations governing the dynamics of low-frequency short-wavelength electrostatic waves in the presence of equilibrium density temperature and magnetic-field gradients in a two-component magnetized plasma are derived. In the linear limit a dispersion relation that admits new instabilities of drift waves is presented. An estimate of the anomalous electron energy transport due to non-thermal drift waves is obtained by making use of the saturated wave potential, which is deduced from the mixing-length hypothesis. Stationary solutions of the nonlinear equations governing the interaction of linearly unstable drift waves are also presented. The relevance of this investigation to wave phenomena in space and laboratory plasmas is pointed out. (author)

  15. High-Temperature Electronics: Status and Future Prospects in the 21st Century

    F. Touati; F. Mnif; A. Lawati

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the state of current electronics and states the drive toward high-temperature electronics. The problems specific to high-temperature effects on conventional electronics and prospects of alternative technologies like silicon-on-insulator, silicon carbide, and diamond are discussed. Improving petroleum recovery from oil wells with hightemperature coverage of downhole electronics, making combustion processes more efficient utilizing embedded electronics, programs for More Elec...

  16. 500 C Electronic Packaging and Dielectric Materials for High Temperature Applications

    Chen, Liang-yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Spry, David J.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Hunter, Gary W.

    2016-01-01

    High-temperature environment operable sensors and electronics are required for exploring the inner solar planets and distributed control of next generation aeronautical engines. Various silicon carbide (SiC) high temperature sensors, actuators, and electronics have been demonstrated at and above 500C. A compatible packaging system is essential for long-term testing and application of high temperature electronics and sensors. High temperature passive components are also necessary for high temperature electronic systems. This talk will discuss ceramic packaging systems developed for high temperature electronics, and related testing results of SiC circuits at 500C and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) integrated circuits at temperatures beyond commercial limit facilitated by these high temperature packaging technologies. Dielectric materials for high temperature multilayers capacitors will also be discussed. High-temperature environment operable sensors and electronics are required for probing the inner solar planets and distributed control of next generation aeronautical engines. Various silicon carbide (SiC) high temperature sensors, actuators, and electronics have been demonstrated at and above 500C. A compatible packaging system is essential for long-term testing and eventual applications of high temperature electronics and sensors. High temperature passive components are also necessary for high temperature electronic systems. This talk will discuss ceramic packaging systems developed for high electronics and related testing results of SiC circuits at 500C and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) integrated circuits at temperatures beyond commercial limit facilitated by high temperature packaging technologies. Dielectric materials for high temperature multilayers capacitors will also be discussed.

  17. Temperature dependence of electron mean free path in molybdenum from ultrasonic measurements

    Almond, D P; Detwiler, D A; Rayne, J A [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA)

    1975-09-08

    The temperature dependence of the electronic mean free path in molybdenum has been obtained from ultrasonic attenuation measurements.For temperature up to 30 K a T/sup -2/ law is followed suggesting the importance of electron-electron scattering in the attenuation mechanism.

  18. Electron temperatures of inductively coupled Cl2-Ar plasmas

    Fuller, N.C.M.; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Herman, Irving P.

    2002-01-01

    Trace rare gases optical emission spectroscopy has been used to measure the electron temperature, T e , in a high-density inductively coupled Cl 2 -Ar plasma at 18 mTorr as function of the 13.56 MHz radio frequency power and Ar fraction. Only the Kr and Xe emission lines were used to determine T e , because of evidence of radiation trapping when the Ar emission lines were also used for larger Ar fractions. At 600 W (10.6 W cm-2), T e increases from ∼4.0±0.5 eV to ∼6.0±2.0 eV as the Ar fraction increases from 1% to 96%. In the H (inductive, bright) mode, T e , for a 'neat' chlorine plasma (including 1% of each He/Ne/Ar/Kr/Xe) increases only slightly from ∼3.8 to 4.0 eV as power increases from 450 to 750 W. This increase is much larger for larger Ar fractions, such as from ∼4.0 to 7.3 eV for 78% Ar. Most of these effects can be understood using the fundamental particle balance equation

  19. Rf breakdown studies in room temperature electron linac structures

    Loew, G.A.; Wang, J.W.

    1988-05-01

    This paper is an overall review of studies carried out by the authors and some of their colleagues on RF breakdown, Field Emission and RF processing in room temperature electron linac structure. The motivation behind this work is twofold: in a fundamental way, to contribute to the understanding of the RF breakdown phenomenon, and as an application, to determine the maximum electric field gradient that can be obtained and used safely in future e/sup +-/ linear colliders. Indeed, the next generation of these machines will have to reach into the TeV (10 12 eV) energy range, and the accelerating gradient will be to be of the crucial parameters affecting their design, construction and cost. For a specified total energy, the gradient sets the accelerator length, and once the RF structure, frequency and pulse repetition rate are selected, it also determines the peak and average power consumption. These three quantities are at the heart of the ultimate realizability and cost of these accelerators. 24 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs

  20. Stirling Engine With Radial Flow Heat Exchangers

    Vitale, N.; Yarr, George

    1993-01-01

    Conflict between thermodynamical and structural requirements resolved. In Stirling engine of new cylindrical configuration, regenerator and acceptor and rejector heat exchangers channel flow of working gas in radial direction. Isotherms in regenerator ideally concentric cylinders, and gradient of temperature across regenerator radial rather than axial. Acceptor and rejector heat exchangers located radially inward and outward of regenerator, respectively. Enables substantial increase in power of engine without corresponding increase in diameter of pressure vessel.

  1. An axially averaged-radial transport model of tokamak edge plasmas

    Prinja, A.K.; Conn, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    A two-zone axially averaged-radial transport model for edge plasmas is described that incorporates parallel electron and ion conduction, localized recycling, parallel electron pressure gradient effects and sheath losses. Results for high recycling show that the radial electron temperature profile is determined by parallel electron conduction over short radial distances (proportional 3 cm). At larger radius where Tsub(e) has fallen appreciably, convective transport becomes equally important. The downstream density and ion temperature profiles are very flat over the region where electron conduction dominates. This is seen to result from a sharply decaying velocity profile that follows the radial electron temperature. A one-dimensional analytical recycling model shows that at high neutral pumping rates, the plasma density at the plate, nsub(ia), scales linearly with the unperturbed background density, nsub(io). When ionization dominates nsub(ia)/nsub(io) proportional exp(nsub(io)) while in the intermediate regime nsub(ia)/nsub(io) proportional exp(proportional nsub(io)). Such behavior is qualitatively in accord with experimental observations. (orig.)

  2. Electron energy distribution function, effective electron temperature, and dust charge in the temporal afterglow of a plasma

    Denysenko, I. B.; Azarenkov, N. A.; Kersten, H.

    2016-01-01

    Analytical expressions describing the variation of electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in an afterglow of a plasma are obtained. Especially, the case when the electron energy loss is mainly due to momentum-transfer electron-neutral collisions is considered. The study is carried out for different EEDFs in the steady state, including Maxwellian and Druyvesteyn distributions. The analytical results are not only obtained for the case when the rate for momentum-transfer electron-neutral collisions is independent on electron energy but also for the case when the collisions are a power function of electron energy. Using analytical expressions for the EEDF, the effective electron temperature and charge of the dust particles, which are assumed to be present in plasma, are calculated for different afterglow durations. An analytical expression for the rate describing collection of electrons by dust particles for the case when the rate for momentum-transfer electron-neutral collisions is independent on electron energy is also derived. The EEDF profile and, as a result, the effective electron temperature and dust charge are sufficiently different in the cases when the rate for momentum-transfer electron-neutral collisions is independent on electron energy and when the rate is a power function of electron energy.

  3. Model of electron capture in low-temperature glasses

    Bartczak, W.M.; Swiatla, D.; Kroh, J.

    1983-01-01

    The new model of electron capture by a statistical variety of traps in glassy matrices is proposed. The electron capture is interpreted as the radiationless transition (assisted by multiphonon emission) of the mobile electron to the localized state in the trap. The conception of 'unfair' and 'fair' traps is introduced. The 'unfair' trap captures the mobile electron by the shallow excited state. In contrast, the 'fair' trap captures the electron by the ground state. The model calculations of the statistical distributions of the occupied electron traps are presented and discussed with respect to experimental results. (author)

  4. dual – temperature electron distribution in a laboratory plasma

    DEVEERERRY

    continuum, calculations show that a collision transition between close neighbouring ... depend on the energy distribution of free electrons but on both the excitation and ..... Germany. Postma, A. J., 1969. Calculated electron energy distribution ...

  5. Criteria governing electron plasma waves in a two-temperature plasma

    Dell, M.P.; Gledhill, I.M.A.; Hellberg, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Using a technique based on the saddle-points of the dielectric function, criteria are found which govern the behaviour of electron plasma waves in plasmas with two electron populations having different temperatures. (orig.)

  6. The impact of edge gradients in the pressure, density, ion temperature, and electron temperature on edge-localized modes

    Kleva, Robert G.; Guzdar, Parvez N.

    2011-01-01

    The magnitude of the energy and particle fluxes in simulations of edge-localized modes (ELMs) is determined by the edge gradients in the pressure, density, ion temperature, and electron temperature. The total edge pressure gradient is the dominant influence on ELMs by far. An increase (decrease) of merely 2% in the pressure gradient results in an increase (decrease) of more than a factor of ten in the size of the ELM bursts. At a fixed pressure gradient, the size of the ELM bursts decreases as the density gradient increases, while the size of the bursts increases as the electron temperature gradient or, especially, the ion temperature gradient increases.

  7. Instability and transport driven by an electron temperature gradient close to critical

    Dong, J.Q.; Jian, G.D.; Wang, A.K.; Sanuki, H.; Itoh, K.

    2003-01-01

    Electron temperature gradient (ETG) driven instability in toroidal plasmas is studied with gyrokinetic theory. The full electron kinetics is considered. The upgraded numerical scheme for solving the integral eigenvalue equations allows the study of both growing and damping modes, and thus direct calculation of critical gradient. Algebraic formulas for the critical gradient with respect to ratio of electron temperature over ion temperature and to toroidicity are given. An estimation for turbulence induced transport is presented. (author)

  8. Evaluation of COTS Electronic Parts for Extreme Temperature Use in NASA Missions

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik

    2008-01-01

    Electronic systems capable of extreme temperature operation are required for many future NASA space exploration missions where it is desirable to have smaller, lighter, and less expensive spacecraft and probes. Presently, spacecraft on-board electronics are maintained at about room temperature by use of thermal control systems. An Extreme Temperature Electronics Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on development of electronics suitable for space exploration missions. The effects of exposure to extreme temperatures and thermal cycling are being investigated for commercial-off-the-shelf components as well as for components specially developed for harsh environments. An overview of this program along with selected data is presented.

  9. Production of a large diameter ECR plasma with low electron temperature

    Koga, Mayuko; Hishikawa, Yasuhiro; Tsuchiya, Hayato; Kawai, Yoshinobu

    2006-01-01

    A large diameter plasma over 300 mm in diameter is produced by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharges using a cylindrical vacuum chamber of 400 mm in inner diameter. It is found that the plasma uniformity is improved by adding the nitrogen gas to pure Ar plasma. The electron temperature is decreased by adding the nitrogen gas. It is considered that the electron energy is absorbed in the vibrational energy of nitrogen molecules and the electron temperature decreases. Therefore, the adjunction of the nitrogen gas is considered to be effective for producing uniform and low electron temperature plasma

  10. Variations in erosive wear of metallic materials with temperature via the electron work function

    Huang, Xiaochen; Yu, Bin; Yan, X.G.; Li, D.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical properties of metals are intrinsically determined by their electron behavior, which is largely reflected by the electron work function (EWF or φ). Since the work function varies with temperature, the dependence of material properties on temperature could be predicted via variations in work function with temperature. Combining a hardness – φ relationship and the dependence of work function on temperature, a temperature-dependent model for predicting solid-particle erosion is proposed. Erosive wear losses of copper, nickel, and carbon steel as sample materials were measured at different temperatures. Results of the tests are consistent with the theoretical prediction. This study demonstrates a promising parameter, electron work function, for looking into fundamental aspects of wear phenomena, which would also help develop alternative methodologies for material design. - Highlights: • Metallic materials' wear resistance is influenced by temperature. • Electron work function (EWF) intrinsically determines materials' wear resistance. • An EWF-based temperature-dependent solid-particle erosion model is proposed.

  11. Impact of nonlocal electron heat transport on the high temperature plasmas of LHD

    Tamura, N.; Inagaki, S.; Tokuzawa, T.

    2006-10-01

    Edge cooling experiments with a tracer-encapsulated solid pellet in the Large Helical Device (LHD) show a significant rise of core electron temperature (the maximum rise is around 1 keV) as well as in many tokamaks. This experimental result indicates the possible presence of the nonlocality of electron heat transport in plasmas where turbulence as a cause of anomalous transport is dominated. The nonlocal electron temperature rise in the LHD takes place in almost the same parametric domain (e.g. in a low density) as in the tokamaks. Meanwhile, the experimental results of LHD show some new aspects of nonlocal electron temperature rise, for example the delay of the nonlocal rise of core electron temperature relative to the pellet penetration time increases with the increase in collisionality in the core plasma and the decrease in electron temperature gradient scale length in the outer region of the plasma. (author)

  12. Impact of nonlocal electron heat transport on the high temperature plasmas of LHD

    Tamura, N.; Inagaki, S.; Tanaka, K.; Michael, C.; Tokuzawa, T.; Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Sakamoto, R.; Ida, K.; Itoh, K.; Kalinina, D.; Sudo, S.; Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K.; Komori, A.

    2007-01-01

    Edge cooling experiments with a tracer-encapsulated solid pellet in the large helical device (LHD) show a significant rise in core electron temperature (the maximum rise is around 1 keV) as well as in many tokamaks. This experimental result indicates the possible presence of the nonlocality of electron heat transport in plasmas where turbulence as a cause of anomalous transport dominates. The nonlocal electron temperature rise in the LHD takes place in almost the same parametric domain (e.g. in a low density) as in the tokamaks. Meanwhile, the experimental results of LHD show some new aspects of nonlocal electron temperature rise, for example the delay in the nonlocal rise of core electron temperature relative to the pellet penetration time increases with the increase both in the collisionality in the core plasma and the electron temperature gradient scale length in the outer region of the plasma

  13. Non-equilibrium thermionic electron emission for metals at high temperatures

    Domenech-Garret, J. L.; Tierno, S. P.; Conde, L.

    2015-08-01

    Stationary thermionic electron emission currents from heated metals are compared against an analytical expression derived using a non-equilibrium quantum kappa energy distribution for the electrons. The latter depends on the temperature decreasing parameter κ ( T ) , which decreases with increasing temperature and can be estimated from raw experimental data and characterizes the departure of the electron energy spectrum from equilibrium Fermi-Dirac statistics. The calculations accurately predict the measured thermionic emission currents for both high and moderate temperature ranges. The Richardson-Dushman law governs electron emission for large values of kappa or equivalently, moderate metal temperatures. The high energy tail in the electron energy distribution function that develops at higher temperatures or lower kappa values increases the emission currents well over the predictions of the classical expression. This also permits the quantitative estimation of the departure of the metal electrons from the equilibrium Fermi-Dirac statistics.

  14. Electron temperatures within magnetic clouds between 2 and 4 AU: Voyager 2 observations

    Sittler, E. C.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1998-08-01

    We have performed an analysis of Voyager 2 plasma electron observations within magnetic clouds between 2 and 4 AU identified by Burlaga and Behannon [1982]. The analysis has been confined to three of the magnetic clouds identified by Burlaga and Behannon that had high-quality data. The general properties of the plasma electrons within a magnetic cloud are that (1) the moment electron temperature anticorrelates with the electron density within the cloud, (2) the ratio Te/Tp tends to be >1, and (3) on average, Te/Tp~7.0. All three results are consistent with previous electron observations within magnetic clouds. Detailed analyses of the core and halo populations within the magnetic clouds show no evidence of either an anticorrelation between the core temperature TC and the electron density Ne or an anticorrelation between the halo temperature TH and the electron density. Within the magnetic clouds the halo component can contribute more than 50% of the electron pressure. The anticorrelation of Te relative to Ne can be traced to the density of the halo component relative to the density of the core component. The core electrons dominate the electron density. When the density goes up, the halo electrons contribute less to the electron pressure, so we get a lower Te. When the electron density goes down, the halo electrons contribute more to the electron pressure, and Te goes up. We find a relation between the electron pressure and density of the form Pe=αNeγ with γ~0.5.

  15. Effect of two-temperature electrons distribution on an electrostatic plasma sheath

    Ou, Jing; Xiang, Nong; Gan, Chunyun; Yang, Jinhong

    2013-01-01

    A magnetized collisionless plasma sheath containing two-temperature electrons is studied using a one-dimensional model in which the low-temperature electrons are described by Maxwellian distribution (MD) and high-temperature electrons are described by truncated Maxwellian distribution (TMD). Based on the ion wave approach, a modified sheath criterion including effect of TMD caused by high-temperature electrons energy above the sheath potential energy is established theoretically. The model is also used to investigate numerically the sheath structure and energy flux to the wall for plasmas parameters of an open divertor tokamak-like. Our results show that the profiles of the sheath potential, two-temperature electrons and ions densities, high-temperature electrons and ions velocities as well as the energy flux to the wall depend on the high-temperature electrons concentration, temperature, and velocity distribution function associated with sheath potential. In addition, the results obtained in the high-temperature electrons with TMD as well as with MD sheaths are compared for the different sheath potential

  16. Space Charge Saturated Sheath Regime and Electron Temperature Saturation in Hall Thrusters

    Raitses, Y.; Staack, D.; Smirnov, A.; Fisch, N.J.

    2005-01-01

    Secondary electron emission in Hall thrusters is predicted to lead to space charge saturated wall sheaths resulting in enhanced power losses in the thruster channel. Analysis of experimentally obtained electron-wall collision frequency suggests that the electron temperature saturation, which occurs at high discharge voltages, appears to be caused by a decrease of the Joule heating rather than by the enhancement of the electron energy loss at the walls due to a strong secondary electron emission

  17. Revisiting the definition of the electronic chemical potential, chemical hardness, and softness at finite temperatures

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Gázquez, José L.; Ayers, Paul W.; Vela, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We extend the definition of the electronic chemical potential (μ e ) and chemical hardness (η e ) to finite temperatures by considering a reactive chemical species as a true open system to the exchange of electrons, working exclusively within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble. As in the zero temperature derivation of these descriptors, the response of a chemical reagent to electron-transfer is determined by the response of the (average) electronic energy of the system, and not by intrinsic thermodynamic properties like the chemical potential of the electron-reservoir which is, in general, different from the electronic chemical potential, μ e . Although the dependence of the electronic energy on electron number qualitatively resembles the piecewise-continuous straight-line profile for low electronic temperatures (up to ca. 5000 K), the introduction of the temperature as a free variable smoothens this profile, so that derivatives (of all orders) of the average electronic energy with respect to the average electron number exist and can be evaluated analytically. Assuming a three-state ensemble, well-known results for the electronic chemical potential at negative (−I), positive (−A), and zero values of the fractional charge (−(I + A)/2) are recovered. Similarly, in the zero temperature limit, the chemical hardness is formally expressed as a Dirac delta function in the particle number and satisfies the well-known reciprocity relation with the global softness

  18. Revisiting the definition of the electronic chemical potential, chemical hardness, and softness at finite temperatures

    Franco-Pérez, Marco, E-mail: qimfranco@hotmail.com, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México D. F. 09340 (Mexico); Department of Chemistry, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Gázquez, José L., E-mail: qimfranco@hotmail.com, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México D. F. 09340 (Mexico); Ayers, Paul W. [Department of Chemistry, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Vela, Alberto [Departamento de Química, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados (Cinvestav), Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, México D. F. 07360 (Mexico)

    2015-10-21

    We extend the definition of the electronic chemical potential (μ{sub e}) and chemical hardness (η{sub e}) to finite temperatures by considering a reactive chemical species as a true open system to the exchange of electrons, working exclusively within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble. As in the zero temperature derivation of these descriptors, the response of a chemical reagent to electron-transfer is determined by the response of the (average) electronic energy of the system, and not by intrinsic thermodynamic properties like the chemical potential of the electron-reservoir which is, in general, different from the electronic chemical potential, μ{sub e}. Although the dependence of the electronic energy on electron number qualitatively resembles the piecewise-continuous straight-line profile for low electronic temperatures (up to ca. 5000 K), the introduction of the temperature as a free variable smoothens this profile, so that derivatives (of all orders) of the average electronic energy with respect to the average electron number exist and can be evaluated analytically. Assuming a three-state ensemble, well-known results for the electronic chemical potential at negative (−I), positive (−A), and zero values of the fractional charge (−(I + A)/2) are recovered. Similarly, in the zero temperature limit, the chemical hardness is formally expressed as a Dirac delta function in the particle number and satisfies the well-known reciprocity relation with the global softness.

  19. The kinetics of low-temperature electron-phonon relaxation in a metallic film following instantaneous heating of the electrons

    Bezuglyi, A.I.; Shklovskii, V.A.

    1997-01-01

    The theoretical analysis of experiments on pulsed laser irradiation of metallic films sputtered on insulating supports is usually based on semiphenomenological dynamical equations for the electron and phonon temperatures, an approach that ignores the nonuniformity and the nonthermal nature of the phonon distribution function. In this paper we discuss a microscopic model that describes the dynamics of the electron-phonon system in terms of kinetic equations for the electron and phonon distribution functions. Such a model provides a microscopic picture of the nonlinear energy relaxation of the electron-phonon system of a rapidly heated film. We find that in a relatively thick film the energy relaxation of electrons consists of three stages: the emission of nonequilibrium phonons by 'hot' electrons, the thermalization of electrons and phonons due to phonon reabsorption, and finally the cooling of the thermalized electron-phonon system as a result of phonon exchange between film and substrate. In thin films, where there is no reabsorption of nonequilibrium phonons, the energy relaxation consists of only one stage, the first. The relaxation dynamics of an experimentally observable quantity, the phonon contribution to the electrical conductivity of the cooling film, is directly related to the dynamics of the electron temperature, which makes it possible to use the data of experiments on the relaxation of voltage across films to establish the electron-phonon and phonon-electron collision times and the average time of phonon escape from film to substrate

  20. Positronium formation at low temperatures: The role of trapped electrons

    Hirade, T.; Maurer, F.H.J.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    2000-01-01

    Measurements have been carried out of electron spin densities (by electron spin resonance technique) and positronium (Ps) formation probability as functions of Co-60 gamma-irradiation dose in poly(methyl methacrylate) and linear poly(ethylene) at 77 K. We observe a linear relationship between...

  1. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; Ji, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Important swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. We show that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections

  2. Effective temperature of an ultracold electron source based on near-threshold photoionization

    Engelen, W.J.; Smakman, E.P.; Bakker, D.J.; Luiten, O.J.; Vredenbregt, E.J.D.

    2014-01-01

    We present a detailed description of measurements of the effective temperature of a pulsed electron source, based on near-threshold photoionization of laser-cooled atoms. The temperature is determined by electron beam waist scans, source size measurements with ion beams, and analysis with an

  3. Room temperature Compton profiles of conduction electrons in α-Ga ...

    Room temperature Compton profiles of momentum distribution of conduction electrons in -Ga metal are calculated in band model. For this purpose, the conduction electron wave functions are determined in a temperature-dependent non-local model potential. The profiles calculated along the crystallographic directions, ...

  4. High-Temperature Electronics: Status and Future Prospects in the 21st Century

    F. Touati

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the state of current electronics and states the drive toward high-temperature electronics. The problems specific to high-temperature effects on conventional electronics and prospects of alternative technologies like silicon-on-insulator, silicon carbide, and diamond are discussed. Improving petroleum recovery from oil wells with hightemperature coverage of downhole electronics, making combustion processes more efficient utilizing embedded electronics, programs for More Electric Aircraft and Vehicles necessitating distributed control systems, and environmental protection issues stress the need to use and develop high-temperature electronics. This makes high-temperature electronics a key-enabling technology in the 21st century. Actual applications using high-temperature electronics are discussed in some details. Also information and guidelines are included about supporting electronics needed to make a complete high-temperature system. The technology has been making major advancements and is expected to account for 20% of the electronics market by 2010. However, many technical challenges have to be solved.

  5. Electron-dislocation interaction at low temperatures. Progress report

    1976-01-01

    Studies of the interaction of mobile dislocations with electrons have shown that dislocation motion can be, in part, described by treating the dislocation as an underdamped oscillator. In particular, studies in lead alloys have shown tht dislocation motion can be considered as the motion of string, slightly damped by electrons, without regard for any other lattice friction. In addition we have shown that silver solutes, in lead crystals, occupy, partially, interstitial sites. Finally, we have shown that dislocations in copper interact, unexpectedly, with electrons. This is shown by measuring the influence of a magnetic field on the flow stress of copper crystals at 4.2 0 K

  6. Measurement of peripheral electron temperature by electron cyclotron emission during the H-mode transition in JFT-2M tokamak

    Hoshino, Katsumichi; Yamamoto, Takumi; Kawashima, Hisato

    1987-01-01

    Time evolution and profile of peripheral electron temperature during the H-mode like transition in a tokamak plasma is measured using the second and third harmonic of electron cyclotron emission (ECE). The so called ''H-mode'' state which has good particle/energy confinement is characterized by sudden decrease in the spectral line intensity of deuterium molecule. Such a sudden decrease in the line intensity of D α with good energy confinement is found not only in divertor discharges, but also in limiter dischargs in JFT-2M tokamak. It is found by the measurement of ECE that the peripheral electron temperature suddenly increases in both of such phases. The relation between H-transition and the peripheral electron temperature or its profile is investigated. (author)

  7. Effect of electron temperature on small-amplitude electron acoustic solitary waves in non-planar geometry

    Bansal, Sona; Aggarwal, Munish; Gill, Tarsem Singh

    2018-04-01

    Effects of electron temperature on the propagation of electron acoustic solitary waves in plasma with stationary ions, cold and superthermal hot electrons is investigated in non-planar geometry employing reductive perturbation method. Modified Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived in the small amplitude approximation limit. The analytical and numerical calculations of the KdV equation reveal that the phase velocity of the electron acoustic waves increases as one goes from planar to non planar geometry. It is shown that the electron temperature ratio changes the width and amplitude of the solitary waves and when electron temperature is not taken into account,our results completely agree with the results of Javidan & Pakzad (2012). It is found that at small values of τ , solitary wave structures behave differently in cylindrical ( {m} = 1), spherical ( {m} = 2) and planar geometry ( {m} = 0) but looks similar at large values of τ . These results may be useful to understand the solitary wave characteristics in laboratory and space environments where the plasma have multiple temperature electrons.

  8. SSVD Extreme Temperature Electronics for Planned Venus Missions, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this project is to demonstrate, based on a new class of electronic devices called solid state vacuum devices (SSVD?s), a highly promising enabling...

  9. High temperature, radiation hardened electronics for application to nuclear power plants

    Gover, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    Electronic circuits were developed and built at Sandia for many aerospace and energy systems applications. Among recent developments were high temperature electronics for geothermal well logging and radiation hardened electronics for a variety of aerospace applications. Sandia has also been active in technology transfer to commercial industry in both of these areas

  10. MIXING THE SOLAR WIND PROTON AND ELECTRON SCALES: EFFECTS OF ELECTRON TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY ON THE OBLIQUE PROTON FIREHOSE INSTABILITY

    Maneva, Y.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Viñas, A., E-mail: yana.maneva@wis.kuleuven.be [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-11-20

    The double adiabatic expansion of the nearly collisionless solar wind plasma creates conditions for the firehose instability to develop and efficiently prevent the further increase of the plasma temperature in the direction parallel to the interplanetary magnetic field. The conditions imposed by the firehose instability have been extensively studied using idealized approaches that ignore the mutual effects of electrons and protons. Recently, more realistic approaches have been proposed that take into account the interplay between electrons and protons, unveiling new regimes of the parallel oscillatory modes. However, for oblique wave propagation the instability develops distinct branches that grow much faster and may therefore be more efficient than the parallel firehose instability in constraining the temperature anisotropy of the plasma particles. This paper reports for the first time on the effects of electron plasma properties on the oblique proton firehose (PFH) instability and provides a comprehensive vision of the entire unstable wave-vector spectrum, unifying the proton and the smaller electron scales. The plasma β and temperature anisotropy regimes considered here are specific for the solar wind and magnetospheric conditions, and enable the electrons and protons to interact via the excited electromagnetic fluctuations. For the selected parameters, simultaneous electron and PFH instabilities can be observed with a dispersion spectrum of the electron firehose (EFH) extending toward the proton scales. Growth rates of the PFH instability are markedly boosted by the anisotropic electrons, especially in the oblique direction where the EFH growth rates are orders of magnitude higher.

  11. Mixing the Solar Wind Proton and Electron Scales: Effects of Electron Temperature Anisotropy on the Oblique Proton Firehose Instability

    Maneva, Y.; Lazar, M.; Vinas, A.; Poedts, S.

    2016-01-01

    The double adiabatic expansion of the nearly collisionless solar wind plasma creates conditions for the firehose instability to develop and efficiently prevent the further increase of the plasma temperature in the direction parallel to the interplanetary magnetic field. The conditions imposed by the firehose instability have been extensively studied using idealized approaches that ignore the mutual effects of electrons and protons. Recently, more realistic approaches have been proposed that take into account the interplay between electrons and protons,? unveiling new regimes of the parallel oscillatory modes. However, for oblique wave propagation the instability develops distinct branches that grow much faster and may therefore be more efficient than the parallel firehose instability in constraining the temperature anisotropy of the plasma particles. This paper reports for the first time on the effects of electron plasma properties on the oblique proton firehose (PFH) instability and provides a comprehensive vision of the entire unstable wave-vector spectrum, unifying the proton and the smaller electron scales. The plasma ß and temperature anisotropy regimes considered here are specific for the solar wind and magnetospheric conditions, and enable the electrons and protons to interact via the excited electromagnetic fluctuations. For the selected parameters, simultaneous electron and PFH instabilities can be observed with a dispersion spectrum of the electron firehose (EFH) extending toward the proton scales. Growth rates of the PFH instability are markedly boosted by the anisotropic electrons, especially in the oblique direction where the EFH growth rates are orders of magnitude higher.

  12. Room Temperature Deposition Processes Mediated By Ultrafast Photo-Excited Hot Electrons

    2014-01-30

    mechanical through resonant energy transfer. The average electron temperature (Tel) during τ2 evolves as energy is lost through optical and acoustic ...through ballistic collisions and acoustic phonons. The large difference in heat capacities between electrons and the substrate leads to negligible...temperature pyrometer indicated only a ~30oC temperature gradient between the thermocouple location and the topside of the sample which faced the

  13. A low temperature cryostat with a refrigerator for studying electron-irradiation effects on solids, 2

    Oka, Takashi; Yoshida, Toshio; Shono, Yoshihiko

    1978-01-01

    A convenient cryostat with a small cryogenic refrigerator for studying electron-irradiation effects on solids is reported. The lowest temperature at the sample room is about 10 K or less. In a temperature region below 80 K, the sample temperature can be controlled within 0.05 K. (auth.)

  14. Electron-electron attractive interaction in Maxwell-Chern-Simons QED3 at zero temperature

    Belich, H.; Ferreira Junior, M.M.; Helayel-Neto, J.A.; Ferreira Junior, M.M.

    2001-04-01

    One discusses the issue of low-energy electron-electron bound states in the Maxwell-Chern-Simons model coupled to QED 3 with spontaneous breaking of a local U(1)-symmetry. The scattering potential, in the non-relativistic limit, steaming from the electron-electron Moeller scattering, mediated by the Maxwell-Chern-Simons-Proca gauge field and the Higgs scalar, might be attractive by fine-tuning properly the physical parameters of the model. (author)

  15. The electron density and temperature distributions predicted by bow shock models of Herbig-Haro objects

    Noriega-Crespo, A.; Bohm, K.H.; Raga, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    The observable spatial electron density and temperature distributions for series of simple bow shock models, which are of special interest in the study of Herbig-Haro (H-H) objects are computed. The spatial electron density and temperature distributions are derived from forbidden line ratios. It should be possible to use these results to recognize whether an observed electron density or temperature distribution can be attributed to a bow shock, as is the case in some Herbig-Haro objects. As an example, the empirical and predicted distributions for H-H 1 are compared. The predicted electron temperature distributions give the correct temperature range and they show very good diagnostic possibilities if the forbidden O III (4959 + 5007)/4363 wavelength ratio is used. 44 refs

  16. Effects of rf power on electron density and temperature, neutral temperature, and Te fluctuations in an inductively coupled plasma

    Camparo, James; Fathi, Gilda

    2009-01-01

    Atomic clocks that fly on global-navigation satellites such as global positioning system (GPS) and Galileo employ light from low-temperature, inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) for atomic signal generation and detection (i.e., alkali/noble-gas rf-discharge lamps). In this application, the performance of the atomic clock and the capabilities of the navigation system depend sensitively on the stability of the ICP's optical emission. In order to better understand the mechanisms that might lead to instability in these rf-discharge lamps, and hence the satellite atomic clocks, we studied the optical emission from a Rb/Xe ICP as a function of the rf power driving the plasma. Surprisingly, we found that the electron density in the plasma was essentially independent of increases in rf power above its nominal value (i.e., 'rf-power gain') and that the electron temperature was only a slowly varying function of rf-power gain. The primary effect of rf power was to increase the temperature of the neutrals in the plasma, which was manifested by an increase in Rb vapor density. Interestingly, we also found evidence for electron temperature fluctuations (i.e., fluctuations in the plasma's high-energy electron content). The variance of these fluctuations scaled inversely with the plasma's mean electron temperature and was consistent with a simple model that assumed that the total electron density in the discharge was independent of rf power. Taken as a whole, our results indicate that the electrons in alkali/noble-gas ICPs are little affected by slight changes in rf power and that the primary effect of such changes is to heat the plasma's neutral species.

  17. Anomaly in the Kumakhov radiation temperature dependence at axial channeling of electrons

    Komarov, F.F.; Telegin, V.I.; Khokonov, M.Kh.

    1983-01-01

    The results of numerical solution of a kinetic equation for distribution function of axially channelled electrons obtained by Belostritsky and Kumakhov at different temperatures of crystals and calculated for the determined electron distributions spectral density of radiation are given. Analysis of the obtained dependence of the number of channelled 5 GeV electrons in tungsten along the <111> axis on depth Z has revealed that 2% of incidence beam electrons have anomalously large depths of dechannelling. Ratio of electrons with large by modulus cross section energies grows at decreasing crystal temperature from 293 to 40 K and, therefore, radiation intensity increases. Two-fold increase of radiation intensity can be attained at axial channelling of 1 GeV electrons in tungsten <111> at the temperatures of the crystal equal to 40 and 293 K and its thickness equal to 220 ..mu..m.

  18. Temperature Dependence of the Spin-Hall Conductivity of a Two-Dimensional Impure Rashba Electron Gas in the Presence of Electron-Phonon and Electron-Electron Interactions

    Yavari, H.; Mokhtari, M.; Bayervand, A.

    2015-03-01

    Based on Kubo's linear response formalism, temperature dependence of the spin-Hall conductivity of a two-dimensional impure (magnetic and nonmagnetic impurities) Rashba electron gas in the presence of electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions is analyzed theoretically. We will show that the temperature dependence of the spin-Hall conductivity is determined by the relaxation rates due to these interactions. At low temperature, the elastic lifetimes ( and are determined by magnetic and nonmagnetic impurity concentrations which are independent of the temperature, while the inelastic lifetimes ( and related to the electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions, decrease when the temperature increases. We will also show that since the spin-Hall conductivity is sensitive to temperature, we can distinguish the intrinsic and extrinsic contributions.

  19. Non-isomorphic radial wavenumber dependencies of residual zonal flows in ion and electron Larmor radius scales, and effects of initial parallel flow and electromagnetic potentials in a circular tokamak

    Yamagishi, Osamu

    2018-04-01

    Radial wavenumber dependencies of the residual zonal potential for E × B flow in a circular, large aspect ratio tokamak is investigated by means of the collisionless gyrokinetic simulations of Rosenbluth-Hinton (RH) test and the semi-analytic approach using an analytic solution of the gyrokinetic equation Rosenbluth and Hinton (1998 Phys. Rev. Lett. 80 724). By increasing the radial wavenumber from an ion Larmor radius scale {k}r{ρ }i≲ 1 to an electron Larmor radius scale {k}r{ρ }e≲ 1, the well-known level ˜ O[1/(1+1.6{q}2/\\sqrt{r/{R}0})] is retained, while the level remains O(1) when the wavenumber is decreased from the electron to the ion Larmor radius scale, if physically same adiabatic assumption is presumed for species other than the main species that is treated kinetically. The conclusion is not modified by treating both species kinetically, so that in the intermediate scale between the ion and electron Larmor radius scale it seems difficult to determine the level uniquely. The toroidal momentum conservation property in the RH test is also investigated by including an initial parallel flow in addition to the perpendicular flow. It is shown that by taking a balance between the initial parallel flow and perpendicular flows which include both E × B flow and diamagnetic flow in the initial condition, the mechanical toroidal angular momentum is approximately conserved despite the toroidal symmetry breaking due to the finite radial wavenumber zonal modes. Effect of electromagnetic potentials is also investigated. When the electromagnetic potentials are applied initially, fast oscillations which are faster than the geodesic acoustic modes are introduced in the decay phase of the zonal modes. Although the residual level in the long time limit is not modified, this can make the time required to reach the stationary zonal flows longer and may weaken the effectiveness of the turbulent transport suppression by the zonal flows.

  20. Hotspot electron temperature from x-ray continuum measurements on the NIF

    Jarrott, L. C.; Benedetti, L. R.; Chen, H.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Nagel, S. R.; Landen, O. L.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Schneider, M.; Scott, H. A.

    2016-01-01

    We report on measurements of the electron temperature in the hotspot of inertially confined, layered, spherical implosions on the National Ignition Facility using a differential filtering diagnostic. Measurements of the DT and DD ion temperatures using neutron time-of-flight detectors are complicated by the contribution of hot spot motion to the peak width, which produce an apparent temperature higher than the thermal temperature. The electron temperature is not sensitive to this non-thermal velocity and is thus a valuable input to interpreting the stagnated hot spot conditions. Here we show that the current differential filtering diagnostic provides insufficient temperature resolution for the hot spot temperatures of interest. We then propose a new differential filter configuration utilizing larger pinhole size to increase spectral fluence, as well as thicker filtration. This new configuration will improve measurement uncertainty by more than a factor of three, allowing for a more accurate hotspot temperature.

  1. Hotspot electron temperature from x-ray continuum measurements on the NIF

    Jarrott, L. C.; Benedetti, L. R.; Chen, H.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Nagel, S. R.; Landen, O. L.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Schneider, M.; Scott, H. A.

    2016-11-01

    We report on measurements of the electron temperature in the hotspot of inertially confined, layered, spherical implosions on the National Ignition Facility using a differential filtering diagnostic. Measurements of the DT and DD ion temperatures using neutron time-of-flight detectors are complicated by the contribution of hot spot motion to the peak width, which produce an apparent temperature higher than the thermal temperature. The electron temperature is not sensitive to this non-thermal velocity and is thus a valuable input to interpreting the stagnated hot spot conditions. Here we show that the current differential filtering diagnostic provides insufficient temperature resolution for the hot spot temperatures of interest. We then propose a new differential filter configuration utilizing larger pinhole size to increase spectral fluence, as well as thicker filtration. This new configuration will improve measurement uncertainty by more than a factor of three, allowing for a more accurate hotspot temperature.

  2. Hotspot electron temperature from x-ray continuum measurements on the NIF.

    Jarrott, L C; Benedetti, L R; Chen, H; Izumi, N; Khan, S F; Ma, T; Nagel, S R; Landen, O L; Pak, A; Patel, P K; Schneider, M; Scott, H A

    2016-11-01

    We report on measurements of the electron temperature in the hotspot of inertially confined, layered, spherical implosions on the National Ignition Facility using a differential filtering diagnostic. Measurements of the DT and DD ion temperatures using neutron time-of-flight detectors are complicated by the contribution of hot spot motion to the peak width, which produce an apparent temperature higher than the thermal temperature. The electron temperature is not sensitive to this non-thermal velocity and is thus a valuable input to interpreting the stagnated hot spot conditions. Here we show that the current differential filtering diagnostic provides insufficient temperature resolution for the hot spot temperatures of interest. We then propose a new differential filter configuration utilizing larger pinhole size to increase spectral fluence, as well as thicker filtration. This new configuration will improve measurement uncertainty by more than a factor of three, allowing for a more accurate hotspot temperature.

  3. Hotspot electron temperature from x-ray continuum measurements on the NIF

    Jarrott, L. C., E-mail: jarrott1@llnl.gov; Benedetti, L. R.; Chen, H.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Nagel, S. R.; Landen, O. L.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Schneider, M.; Scott, H. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We report on measurements of the electron temperature in the hotspot of inertially confined, layered, spherical implosions on the National Ignition Facility using a differential filtering diagnostic. Measurements of the DT and DD ion temperatures using neutron time-of-flight detectors are complicated by the contribution of hot spot motion to the peak width, which produce an apparent temperature higher than the thermal temperature. The electron temperature is not sensitive to this non-thermal velocity and is thus a valuable input to interpreting the stagnated hot spot conditions. Here we show that the current differential filtering diagnostic provides insufficient temperature resolution for the hot spot temperatures of interest. We then propose a new differential filter configuration utilizing larger pinhole size to increase spectral fluence, as well as thicker filtration. This new configuration will improve measurement uncertainty by more than a factor of three, allowing for a more accurate hotspot temperature.

  4. Nonlocal collisionless and collisional electron transport in low temperature plasmas

    Kaganovich, Igor

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of the talk is to describe recent advances in nonlocal electron kinetics in low-pressure plasmas. A distinctive property of partially ionized plasmas is that such plasmas are always in a non-equilibrium state: the electrons are not in thermal equilibrium with the neutral species and ions, and the electrons are also not in thermodynamic equilibrium within their own ensemble, which results in a significant departure of the electron velocity distribution function from a Maxwellian. These non-equilibrium conditions provide considerable freedom to choose optimal plasma parameters for applications, which make gas discharge plasmas remarkable tools for a variety of plasma applications, including plasma processing, discharge lighting, plasma propulsion, particle beam sources, and nanotechnology. Typical phenomena in such discharges include nonlocal electron kinetics, nonlocal electrodynamics with collisionless electron heating, and nonlinear processes in the sheaths and in the bounded plasmas. Significant progress in understanding the interaction of electromagnetic fields with real bounded plasma created by this field and the resulting changes in the structure of the applied electromagnetic field has been one of the major achievements of the last decade in this area of research [1-3]. We show on specific examples that this progress was made possible by synergy between full scale particle-in-cell simulations, analytical models, and experiments. In collaboration with Y. Raitses, A.V. Khrabrov, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ, USA; V.I. Demidov, UES, Inc., 4401 Dayton-Xenia Rd., Beavercreek, OH 45322, USA and AFRL, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433, USA; and D. Sydorenko, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. [4pt] [1] D. Sydorenko, A. Smolyakov, I. Kaganovich, and Y. Raitses, IEEE Trans. Plasma Science 34, 895 (2006); Phys. Plasmas 13, 014501 (2006); 14 013508 (2007); 15, 053506 (2008). [0pt] [2] I. D. Kaganovich, Y. Raitses, D. Sydorenko, and

  5. SiGe Based Low Temperature Electronics for Lunar Surface Applications

    Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Kolawa, Elizabeth; Blalock, Benjamin; Cressler, John

    2012-01-01

    The temperature at the permanently shadowed regions of the moon's surface is approximately -240 C. Other areas of the lunar surface experience temperatures that vary between 120 C and -180 C during the day and night respectively. To protect against the large temperature variations of the moon surface, traditional electronics used in lunar robotics systems are placed inside a thermally controlled housing which is bulky, consumes power and adds complexity to the integration and test. SiGe Based electronics have the capability to operate over wide temperature range like that of the lunar surface. Deploying low temperature SiGe electronics in a lander platform can minimize the need for the central thermal protection system and enable the development of a new generation of landers and mobility platforms with highly efficient distributed architecture. For the past five years a team consisting of NASA, university and industry researchers has been examining the low temperature and wide temperature characteristic of SiGe based transistors for developing electronics for wide temperature needs of NASA environments such as the Moon, Titan, Mars and Europa. This presentation reports on the status of the development of wide temperature SiGe based electronics for the landers and lunar surface mobility systems.

  6. Mite Biodiversity Under the Low Temperature Scanning Electron Microscope

    To date, more than 55,000 mite species have been described and only a few of them have been studied. Some mites are adapted to live deep in soil, others in fresh or sea water, some are on plants, algae, fungi or animals, and others are able to survive in both extreme cold and hot temperatures. The...

  7. Dual – Temperature Electron distribution in a Laboratory Plasma ...

    The dual-temperature distribution function is used to investigate theoretically the effect of a perturbation of Maxwell distribution function on density ratios in a laboratory plasma produced solely by collision. By assuming a foreknowledge of collision coefficients and cross-sections and an atomic model which sets at two ...

  8. Radial expansion and multifragmentation

    Angelique, J.C.; Bizard, G.; Bougault, R.; Brou, R.; Buta, A.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Durand, D.; Kerambrun, A.; Le Brun, C.; Lecolley, J.F.; Lopez, O.; Louvel, M.; Meslin, C.; Nakagawa, T.; Patry, J.P.; Peter, J.; Popescu, R.; Regimbart, R.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Tamain, B.; Vient, E.; Yuasa-Nakagawa, K.; Wieloch, A.

    1998-01-01

    The light systems 36 Ar + 27 Al and 64 Zn + nat Ti were measured at several bombarding energies between ∼ 35 and 95 MeV/nucleon. It was found that the predominant part of the cross section is due to binary collisions. In this paper the focus is placed on the properties of the quasi-projectile nuclei. In the central collisions the excitation energies of the quasi-projectile reach values exceeding largely 10 MeV/nucleon. The slope of the high energy part of the distribution can give only an upper limit of the apparent temperature (the average temperature along the decay chain). The highly excited quasi-projectile may get rapidly fragmented rather than sequentially. The heavy fragments are excited and can emit light particles (n, p, d, t, 3 He, α,...) what perturbs additionally the spectrum of these particles. Concerning the expansion energy, one can determine the average kinetic energies of the product (in the quasi-projectile-framework) and compare with simulation values. To fit the experimental data an additional radial expansion energy is to be considered. The average expansion energy depends slightly on the impact parameter but it increases with E * / A, ranging from 0.4 to 1,2 MeV/nucleon for an excitation energy increasing from 7 to 10.5 MeV/nucleon. This collective radial energy seems to be independent of the fragment mass, what is possibly valid for the case of larger quasi-projectile masses. The origin of the expansion is to be determined. It may be due to a compression in the interaction zone at the initial stage of the collision, which propagates in the quasi-projectile and quasi-target, or else, may be due, simply, to the increase of thermal energy leading to a rapid fragment emission. The sequential de-excitation calculation overestimates light particle emission and consequently heavy residues, particularly, at higher excitation energies. This disagreement indicates that a sequential process can not account for the di-excitation of very hot nuclei

  9. Defects in low temperature electron irradiated InP

    Suski, J.; Bourgoin, J.

    1984-01-01

    n and p-InP has been irradiated at 25K with 1MeV electrons and the created defects were studied by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) in the range 25K-400K. In n-InP, four traps are directly observed, with low introduction rates except for one. They anneal in three stages, and four new centers of still lower concentration appear after 70 0 C heat treatment. In p-InP, two dominant traps stable up to approx.= 400K with introduction rates close to the theoretical ones, which might be primary defects are found, while another one is clearly a secondary defect likely associated to Zn dopant. At least two of the low concentration irradiation induced electron traps, created between 25K and 100K are also secondary defects, which implies a mobility of some primary defects down to 100K at least. (author)

  10. Junction Temperature Control for More Reliable Power Electronics

    Andresen, Markus; Ma, Ke; Buticchi, Giampaolo

    2018-01-01

    The thermal stress of power electronic components is one of the most important causes of their failure. Proper thermal management plays an important role for more reliable and cost-effective energy conversion. As one of the most vulnerable and expensive components, power semiconductor components ...... the desired cost-benefit tradeoff. This paper analyzes also the many open questions of this research area. Among them, it is worth highlighting that a verification of the actual lifetime extension is still missing....

  11. Blocking layer modeling for temperature analysis of electron transfer ...

    In this article, we simulate thermal effects on the electron transfer rate from three quantum dots CdSe, CdS and CdTe to three metal oxides TiO2, SnO2 and ZnO2 in the presence of four blocking layers ZnS, ZnO, TiO2 and Al2O3, in a porous quantum dot sensitized solar cell (QDSSC) structure, using Marcus theory.

  12. Formation of presheath and current-free double layer in a two-electron-temperature plasma

    Sato, Kunihiro; Miyawaki, Fujio

    1992-02-01

    Development of the steady-state potential in a two-temperature-electron plasma in contact with the wall is investigated analytically. It is shown that if the hot- to cold electron temperature ratio is greater than ten, the potential drop in the presheath, which is allowed to have either a small value characterized by the cold electrons or a large value by the hot electrons, discontinuously changes at a critical value for the hot- to total electron density ratio. It is also found that the monotonically decreasing potential structure which consists of the first presheath, a current-free double layer, the second presheath, and the sheath can be steadily formed in a lower range of the hot- to total electron density ratio around the critical value. The current-free double layer is set up due to existence of the two electron species and cold ions generated by ionization so as to connect two presheath potentials at different levels. (author)

  13. On the electron-ion temperature ratio established by collisionless shocks

    Vink, Jacco; Broersen, Sjors; Bykov, Andrei; Gabici, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    Astrophysical shocks are often collisionless shocks, in which the changes in plasma flow and temperatures across the shock are established not through Coulomb interactions, but through electric and magnetic fields. An open question about collisionless shocks is whether electrons and ions each establish their own post-shock temperature (non-equilibration of temperatures), or whether they quickly equilibrate in the shock region. Here we provide a simple, thermodynamic, relation for the minimum electron-ion temperature ratios that should be expected as a function of Mach number. The basic assumption is that the enthalpy-flux of the electrons is conserved separately, but that all particle species should undergo the same density jump across the shock, in order for the plasma to remain charge neutral. The only form of additional electron heating that we allow for is adiabatic heating, caused by the compression of the electron gas. These assumptions result in an analytic treatment of expected electron-ion temperature ratio that agrees with observations of collisionless shocks: at low sonic Mach numbers, Ms ≲ 2, the electron-ion temperature ratio is close to unity, whereas for Mach numbers above Ms ≈ 60 the electron-ion temperature ratio asymptotically approaches a temperature ratio of Te/Ti = me/ ⟨ mi ⟩. In the intermediate Mach number range the electron-ion temperature ratio scales as Te/Ti ∝ Ms-2. In addition, we calculate the electron-ion temperature ratios under the assumption of adiabatic heating of the electrons only, which results in a higher electron-ion temperature ratio, but preserves the Te/Ti ∝ Ms-2 scaling. We also show that for magnetised shocks the electron-ion temperature ratio approaches the asymptotic value Te/Ti = me/ ⟨ mi ⟩ for lower magnetosonic Mach numbers (Mms), mainly because for a strongly magnetised shock the sonic Mach number is larger than the magnetosonic Mach number (Mms ≤ Ms). The predicted scaling of the electron

  14. Using Three-Body Recombination to Extract Electron Temperatures of Ultracold Plasmas

    Fletcher, R. S.; Zhang, X. L.; Rolston, S. L.

    2007-01-01

    Three-body recombination, an important collisional process in plasmas, increases dramatically at low electron temperatures, with an accepted scaling of T e -9/2 . We measure three-body recombination in an ultracold neutral xenon plasma by detecting recombination-created Rydberg atoms using a microwave-ionization technique. With the accepted theory (expected to be applicable for weakly coupled plasmas) and our measured rates, we extract the plasma temperatures, which are in reasonable agreement with previous measurements early in the plasma lifetime. The resulting electron temperatures indicate that the plasma continues to cool to temperatures below 1 K

  15. Thin Film Technology of High-Critical-Temperature Superconducting Electronics.

    1985-12-11

    ANALISIS OF THIN-FILM SUPERCONDUCTORS J. Talvacchio, M. A. Janocko, J. R. Gavaler, and A...in the areas of substrate preparation, niobum nitride, nlobium-tin, and molybdenum-rhenium. AN INTEGRATED DEPOSITION AND ANALISI - FACILITT The four...mobility low (64). The voids are separating 1-3 nm clusters of dense deposit. At low deposition temperatures this microstructure will persist near

  16. Influence of the Resonant Electronic Transition on the Intensity of the Raman Radial Breathing Mode of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes during Electrochemical Charging

    Kalbáč, Martin; Kavan, Ladislav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 37 (2009), s. 16408-16413 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC203/07/J067; GA AV ČR IAA400400911; GA AV ČR IAA400400804; GA AV ČR KAN200100801; GA MŠk LC510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : single-walled carbon nanotubes * radial breathing mode * electrochemistry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 4.224, year: 2009

  17. Arbitrary amplitude slow electron-acoustic solitons in three-electron temperature space plasmas

    Mbuli, L. N.; Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.

    2015-01-01

    We examine the characteristics of large amplitude slow electron-acoustic solitons supported in a four-component unmagnetised plasma composed of cool, warm, hot electrons, and cool ions. The inertia and pressure for all the species in this plasma system are retained by assuming that they are adiabatic fluids. Our findings reveal that both positive and negative potential slow electron-acoustic solitons are supported in the four-component plasma system. The polarity switch of the slow electron-acoustic solitons is determined by the number densities of the cool and warm electrons. Negative potential solitons, which are limited by the cool and warm electron number densities becoming unreal and the occurrence of negative potential double layers, are found for low values of the cool electron density, while the positive potential solitons occurring for large values of the cool electron density are only limited by positive potential double layers. Both the lower and upper Mach numbers for the slow electron-acoustic solitons are computed and discussed

  18. Radial electrical field effects in TJ-II. (Preliminary study)

    Guasp, J.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of the radial electric field upon the neoclassical transport coefficients of TJ-II helical axis Stellarator has been calculated as well on the microwave heating stage (ECRH) as on the neutral injection one (NBI). The influence of the solutions for the self-consistent ambipolar field on confinement times and temperatures has been studied by means of a zero-dimensional energy balance. The simultaneous presence of two roots, the electronic and the ionic one, is observed for the ECRH phase, while for NBI only the ionic root appears, although with a strong field intensity that could produce a favourable effect on confinement. The interest and need of the extension of these calculations to include radial profile effects by using spatial dependent transport codes in stressed

  19. Microstructural and electron-structural anomalies and high temperature superconductivity

    Gao, L.; Huang, Z.J.; Bechtold, J.; Hor, P.H.; Chu, C.W.; Xue, Y.Y.; Sun, Y.Y.; Meng, R.L.; Tao, Y.K.

    1989-01-01

    Microstructural and electron-structural anomalies have been found to exist in all HYSs by x-ray diffraction and positron annihilation experiments. These anomalies are induced either by doping near the metal-insulator phase boundary at 300 K, or by cooling the HTSs below T c . This has been taken as evidence for a charge transfer between the CuO 2 -layers and their surroundings, which suggests the importance of charge transfers and implies the importance of charge fluctuations in HTS. Several new compounds with the T'- and T*-phases have been found. Further implications of these observations are discussed

  20. Temperature and 8 MeV electron irradiation effects on GaAs solar cells

    1Department of Physics, Mangalore Institute of Technology and Engineering, ... strate were irradiated with 1 MeV electrons, they showed high radiation tolerance ... under both forward and reverse bias in the temperature range of 270–315 K ...

  1. Formation of hot spots in a superconductor observed by low-temperature scanning electron microscopy

    Eichele, R.; Seifert, H.; Huebener, R.P.

    1981-01-01

    Low-temperature scanning electron microscopy can be used for the direct observation of hot spots in a superconductor. Experiments performed at 2.10 K with tim films demonstrating the method are reported

  2. Effects of irradiation and isochronal anneal temperature on hole and electron trapping in MOS devices

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Winokur, P.S.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Riewe, L.C.; Flament, O.; Paillet, P.; Leray, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    Capacitance-voltage and thermally-stimulated-current techniques are used to estimate trapped hole and electron densities in MOS oxides as functions of irradiation and isochronal anneal temperature. Trapped-charge annealing and compensation effects are discussed

  3. Temperature impact on the primary radiolysis yields concerning the hydrous electron

    Baldacchino, G.; Vigneron, G.; Pommeret, St.

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the impact of temperature on the water radiolysis formation rate of the hydrous electron in presence of selenate di-anion SeO 4 2+ . We have used a high temperature (up to 500 Celsius degrees) optical cell coupled to the electron accelerator Alienor. It appears that the capture of the hydrous electron by selenate follows an Arrhenius law till the sub-critical range, beyond this range the kinetics of the reaction seems more erratic. We have also studied the capture of the hydrous electron by methyl-viologen (MV 2+ ) at 20 and 380 Celsius degrees. It seems that at high temperature more hydrous electrons are produced, it might be interpreted as a consequence of the shift toward the right of the following equilibrium reaction: OH - + H . ↔ e - (aq) + H 2 O. All these results need to be confirmed. (A.C.)

  4. Current profile reconstruction using electron temperature imaging diagnostics

    Tritz, K.; Stutman, D.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.F.; Finkenthal, M.; Pacella, D.; Kaita, R.; Stratton, B.; Sabbagh, S.

    2004-01-01

    Flux surface shape information can be used to constrain the current profile for reconstruction of the plasma equilibrium. One method of inferring flux surface shape relies on plasma x-ray emission; however, deviations from the flux surfaces due to impurity and density asymmetries complicate the interpretation. Electron isotherm surfaces should correspond well to the plasma flux surfaces, and equilibrium constraint modeling using this isotherm information constrains the current profile. The KFIT code is used to assess the profile uncertainty and to optimize the number, location and SNR required for the Te detectors. As Te imaging detectors we consider tangentially viewing, vertically spaced, linear gas electron multiplier arrays operated in pulse height analysis (PHA) mode and multifoil soft x-ray arrays. Isoflux coordinate sets provided by T e measurements offer a strong constraint on the equilibrium reconstruction in both a stacked horizontal array configuration and a crossed horizontal and vertical beam system, with q 0 determined to within ±4%. The required SNR can be provided with either PHA or multicolor diagnostic techniques, though the multicolor system requires ∼x4 better statistics for comparable final errors

  5. Radial gas turbine design

    Krausche, S.; Ohlsson, Johan

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a program dealing with design point calculations of radial turbine machinery, including both compressor and turbine, with as few input data as possible. Some simple stress calculations and turbine metal blade temperatures were also included. This program was then implanted in a German thermodynamics program, Gasturb, a program calculating design and off-design performance of gas turbines. The calculations proceed with a lot of assumptions, necessary to finish the task, concerning pressure losses, velocity distribution, blockage, etc., and have been correlated with empirical data from VAT. Most of these values could have been input data, but to prevent the user of the program from drowning in input values, they are set as default values in the program code. The output data consist of geometry, Mach numbers, predicted component efficiency etc., and a number of graphical plots of geometry and velocity triangles. For the cases examined, the error in predicted efficiency level was within {+-} 1-2% points, and quite satisfactory errors in geometrical and thermodynamic conditions were obtained Examination paper. 18 refs, 36 figs

  6. Electron cyclotron emission measurements on JET: Michelson interferometer, new absolute calibration, and determination of electron temperature

    Schmuck, S.; Fessey, J.; Gerbaud, T.; Alper, B.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; de la Luna, E.; Sirinelli, A.; Zerbini, M.

    2012-01-01

    At the fusion experiment JET, a Michelson interferometer is used to measure the spectrum of the electron cyclotron emission in the spectral range 70-500 GHz. The interferometer is absolutely calibrated using the hot/cold technique and, in consequence, the spatial profile of the plasma electron

  7. Spectroscopic measurements of the density and electronic temperature at the plasma edge in Tore Supra

    Lediankine, A.

    1996-01-01

    The profiles of temperature and electronic density at the plasma edge are important to study the wall-plasma interaction and the radiative layers in the Tokamak plasmas. The laser ablation technique of the lithium allows to measure the profile of electronic density. To measure the profile of temperature, it has been used for the first time, the injection of a fluorine neutral atoms beam. The experiments, the results are described in this work. (N.C.)

  8. Electron-trapping probability in natural dosemeters as a function of irradiation temperature

    Wallinga, J.; Murray, A.S.; Wintle, A.G.

    2002-01-01

    The electron-trapping probability in OSL traps as a function of irradiation temperature is investigated for sedimentary quartz and feldspar. A dependency was found for both minerals; this phenomenon could give rise to errors in dose estimation when the irradiation temperature used in laboratory...... procedures is different from that in the natural environment. No evidence was found for the existence of shallow trap saturation effects that Could give rise to a dose-rate dependency of electron trapping....

  9. Calculating the electron temperature in the lightning channel by continuous spectrum

    Xiangcheng, DONG; Jianhong, CHEN; Xiufang, WEI; Ping, YUAN

    2017-12-01

    Based on the theory of plasma continuous radiation, the relationship between the emission intensity of bremsstrahlung and recombination radiation and the plasma electron temperature is obtained. During the development process of a return stroke of ground flash, the intensity of continuous radiation spectrum is separated on the basis of the spectrums with obviously different luminous intensity at two moments. The electron temperature of the lightning discharge channel is obtained through the curve fitting of the continuous spectrum intensity. It is found that electron temperature increases with the increase of wavelength and begins to reduce after the peak. The peak temperature of the two spectra is close to 25 000 K. To be compared with the result of discrete spectrum, the electron temperature is fitted by the O I line and N II line of the spectrum respectively. The comparison shows that the high temperature value is in good agreement with the temperature of the lightning core current channel obtained from the ion line information, and the low temperature at the high band closes to the calculation result of the atomic line, at a low band is lower than the calculation of the atomic line, which reflects the temperature of the luminous channel of the outer corona.

  10. Synthesis of AuPd alloyed nanoparticles via room-temperature electron reduction with argon glow discharge as electron source.

    Yang, Manman; Wang, Zongyuan; Wang, Wei; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Argon glow discharge has been employed as a cheap, environmentally friendly, and convenient electron source for simultaneous reduction of HAuCl4 and PdCl2 on the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrate. The thermal imaging confirms that the synthesis is operated at room temperature. The reduction is conducted with a short time (30 min) under the pressure of approximately 100 Pa. This room-temperature electron reduction operates in a dry way and requires neither hydrogen nor extra heating nor chemical reducing agent. The analyses using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirm all the metallic ions have been reduced. The characterization with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) shows that AuPd alloyed nanoparticles are formed. There also exist some highly dispersed Au and Pd monometallic particles that cannot be detected by XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) because of their small particle sizes. The observed AuPd alloyed nanoparticles are spherical with an average size of 14 nm. No core-shell structure can be observed. The room-temperature electron reduction can be operated in a larger scale. It is an easy way for the synthesis of AuPd alloyed nanoparticles.

  11. COMPLETE SUPPRESSION OF THE M/N = 2/1 NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODE USING RADIALLY LOCALIZED ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D AND THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ITER

    LAHAYE, RJ; LUCE, TC; PETTY, CC; HUMPHREYS, DA; HYATT, AW; PERKINS, FW; PRATER, R; STRAIT, EJ; WADE, MR

    2003-01-01

    A271 COMPLETE SUPPRESSION OF THE M/N = 2/1 NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODE USING RADIALLY LOCALIZED ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D AND THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ITER. DIII-D experiments demonstrate the first real-time feedback control of the relative location of a narrow beam of microwaves to completely suppress and eliminate a growing tearing mode at the q = 2 surface. long wavelength tearing modes such as the m/n = 2/1 instability are particularly deleterious to tokamak operation. Confinement is seriously degraded by the island, plasma rotation can cease (mode-lock) and disruption can occur. The neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) becomes unstable due to the presence of a helically-perturbed bootstrap current and can be stabilized by replacing the missing bootstrap current in the island O-point by precisely located co-electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD). The optimum position is found when the DIII-D plasma control system (PCS) is put into a search and suppress mode that makes small radial shifts (in about 1 cm steps) in the ECCD location based on minimizing the Mirnov amplitude. Requirements for ITER are addressed

  12. Heating power at the substrate, electron temperature, and electron density in 2.45 GHz low-pressure microwave plasma

    Kais, A.; Lo, J.; Thérèse, L.; Guillot, Ph.

    2018-01-01

    To control the temperature during a plasma treatment, an understanding of the link between the plasma parameters and the fundamental process responsible for the heating is required. In this work, the power supplied by the plasma onto the surface of a glass substrate is measured using the calorimetric method. It has been shown that the powers deposited by ions and electrons, and their recombination at the surface are the main contributions to the heating power. Each contribution is estimated according to the theory commonly used in the literature. Using the corona balance, the Modified Boltzmann Plot (MBP) is employed to determine the electron temperature. A correlation between the power deposited by the plasma and the results of the MBP has been established. This correlation has been used to estimate the electron number density independent of the Langmuir probe in considered conditions.

  13. Profile modification and hot electron temperature from resonant absorption at modest intensity

    Albritton, J.R.; Langdon, A.B.

    1980-01-01

    Resonant absorption is investigated in expanding plasmas. The momentum deposition associated with the ejection of hot electrons toward low density via wavebreaking readily exceeds that of the incident laser radiation and results in significant modification of the density profile at critical. New scaling of hot electron temperature with laser and plasma parameters is presented

  14. Variations in erosive wear of metallic materials with temperature via the electron work function

    Huang, Xiaochen; Yu, Bin [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2V4 (Canada); Yan, X.G. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Science and Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China); Li, D.Y., E-mail: dongyang.li@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2V4 (Canada); School of Mechanical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Science and Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China)

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical properties of metals are intrinsically determined by their electron behavior, which is largely reflected by the electron work function (EWF or φ). Since the work function varies with temperature, the dependence of material properties on temperature could be predicted via variations in work function with temperature. Combining a hardness – φ relationship and the dependence of work function on temperature, a temperature-dependent model for predicting solid-particle erosion is proposed. Erosive wear losses of copper, nickel, and carbon steel as sample materials were measured at different temperatures. Results of the tests are consistent with the theoretical prediction. This study demonstrates a promising parameter, electron work function, for looking into fundamental aspects of wear phenomena, which would also help develop alternative methodologies for material design. - Highlights: • Metallic materials' wear resistance is influenced by temperature. • Electron work function (EWF) intrinsically determines materials' wear resistance. • An EWF-based temperature-dependent solid-particle erosion model is proposed.

  15. Neoclassical transport and radial electric fields in TJ-K

    Rahbarnia, K.; Greiner, F.; Ramisch, M.; Stroth, U.; Greiner, F.

    2003-01-01

    The neoclassical transport is investigated in the torsatron TJ-K, which is operated with a low-temperature plasma. In the low-collisionality regime neoclassical losses are not intrinsically ambipolar, leading to the formation of a radial electric field which acts on both neoclassical and turbulent transport. This electric field is measured with a combination of Langmuir and emissive probes. The data are compared with the ambipolar electric field calculated with an analytic model. The experimental fields are positive and larger than the calculated ones. Direct losses of the fast electrons might explain this discrepancy. (orig.)

  16. Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy of High Temperature Materials

    1994-01-01

    Software and hardware updates to further extend the capability of the electron microscope were carried out. A range of materials such as intermetallics, metal-matrix composites, ceramic-matrix composites, ceramics and intermetallic compounds, based on refractory elements were examined under this research. Crystal structure, size, shape and volume fraction distribution of various phases which constitute the microstructures were examined. Deformed materials were studied to understand the effect of interfacial microstructure on the deformation and fracture behavior of these materials. Specimens tested for a range of mechanical property requirements, such as stress rupture, creep, low cycle fatigue, high cycle fatigue, thermomechanical fatigue, etc. were examined. Microstructural and microchemical stability of these materials exposed to simulated operating environments were investigated. The EOIM Shuttle post-flight samples were also examined to understand the influence of low gravity processing on microstructure. In addition, fractographic analyses of Nb-Zr-W, titanium aluminide, molybdenum silicide and silicon carbide samples were carried out. Extensive characterization of sapphire fibers in the fiber-reinforced composites made by powder cloth processing was made. Finally, pressure infiltration casting of metal-matrix composites was carried out.

  17. Pulse pileup effects of plasma electron temperature measurements by soft x-ray energy analysis

    Dyer, G.R.; Neilson, G.H.; Kelley, G.G.

    1978-10-01

    The electron temperature of hot plasmas is conveniently derived from bremsstrahlung spectra obtained by pulse-height analysis using a lithium-compensated silicon detector. Time-resolved temperature measurements require high counting rates, with ultimate rate limited by pulse pileup. To evaluate this limit, spectral distortion due to pileup and consequent effects on temperature determination are investigated. Expressions for distorted spectra are derived as functions of Maxwellian temperature and pileup fraction for both square and triangular pulse shapes. A comparison of temperatures obtained from distorted spectra with actual values indicates that measurements with less than 10% error can be made in the absence of line radiation, even from spectra containing 40% pileup

  18. Temporal evolutions of electron temperature and density of turbulently-heated tokamak plasmas in TRIAM-1

    Hiraki, N; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, Y; Itoh, S [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1981-04-01

    The temporal evolution of the electron temperature and density are measured in a turbulent heating experiment in TRIAM-1. Skin-like profiles of the electron temperature and density are clearly observed. The anomality in the electrical resistivity of the plasma in this skin-layer is estimated, and the plasma heating in this skin-layer is regarded as being due to anomalous joule heating arising from this anomalous resistivity. The ratio of drift velocity to electron thermal velocity in the layer is also calculated, and it is shown that the conditions needed to make the current-driven ion-acoustic instability triggerable are satisfied.

  19. Nonlocal effects in a bounded low-temperature plasma with fast electrons

    DeJoseph, C. A. Jr.; Demidov, V. I.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.

    2007-01-01

    Effects associated with nonlocality of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in a bounded, low-temperature plasma containing fast electrons, can lead to a significant increase in the near-wall potential drop, leading to self-trapping of fast electrons in the plasma volume, even if the density of this group is only a small fraction (∼0.001%) of the total electron density. If self-trapping occurs, the fast electrons can substantially increase the rate of stepwise excitation, supply additional heating to slow electrons, and reduce their rate of diffusion cooling. Altering the source terms of these fast electrons will, therefore, alter the near-wall sheath and, through modification of the EEDF, a number of plasma parameters. Self-trapping of fast electrons is important in a variety of plasmas, including hollow-cathode discharges and capacitive rf discharges, and is especially pronounced in an afterglow plasma, which is a key phase of any pulse-modulated discharge. In the afterglow, the electron temperature is less than a few tenths of an electron volt, and the fast electrons will have energies typically greater than an electron volt. It is shown that in the afterglow plasma of noble gases, fast electrons, arising from Penning ionization of metastable atoms, can lead to the above condition and significantly change the plasma and sheath properties. Similar effects can be important in technologically relevant electronegative gas plasmas, where fast electrons can arise due to electron detachment in collisions of negative ions with atomic species. Both experimental and modeling results are presented to illustrate these effects

  20. Tunnel probes for measurements of the electron and ion temperature in fusion plasmas

    Gunn, J. P.; Schrittwieser, R.; Balan, P.; Ionita, C.; Stöckel, Jan; Adámek, Jiří; Ďuran, Ivan; Hron, Martin; Pánek, Radomír; Bařina, O.; Hrach, R.; Vicher, M.; Van Oost, G.; Van Rompuy, T.; Martines, E.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 10 (2004), s. 4328-4330 ISSN 0034-6748. [Topical Conference on High-Temperature Plasma Diagnostics/15th./. San Diego, 19.04.2004-22.04.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/03/0786 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : Tokamak * electron temperature * ion temperature * plasma diagnostics Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.226, year: 2004

  1. Fluctuations of the electron temperature measured by intensity interferometry on the W7-AS stellarator

    Sattler, S.

    1993-12-01

    Fluctuations of the electron temperature can cause a significant amount of the anomalous electron heat conductivity observed on fusion plasmas, even with relative amplitudes below one per cent. None of the standard diagnostics utilized for measuring the electron temperature in the confinement region of fusion plasmas is provided with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution and the sensitivity for small fluctuation amplitudes. In this work a new diagnostic for the measurement of electron temperature fluctuations in the confinement region of fusion plasmas was developed, built up, tested and successfully applied on the W7-AS Stellarator. Transport relevant fluctuations of the electron temperature can in principle be measured by radiometry of the electron cyclotron emission (ECE), but they might be buried completely in natural fluctuations of the ECE due to the thermal nature of this radiation. Fluctuations with relative amplitudes below one per cent can be measured with a temporal resolution in the μs-range and a spatial resolution of a few cm only with the help of correlation techniques. The intensity interferometry method, developed for radio astronomy, was applied here: two independent but identical radiometers are viewing the same emitting volume along crossed lines of sight. If the angle between the sightlines is chosen above a limiting value, which is determined by the spatial coherence properties of thermal radiation, the thermal noise is uncorrelated while the temperature fluctuations remain correlated. With the help of this technique relative amplitudes below 0.1% are accessible to measurement. (orig.)

  2. High-Temperature Air-Cooled Power Electronics Thermal Design: Annual Progress Report

    Waye, Scot [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Power electronics that use high-temperature devices pose a challenge for thermal management. With the devices running at higher temperatures and having a smaller footprint, the heat fluxes increase from previous power electronic designs. This project overview presents an approach to examine and design thermal management strategies through cooling technologies to keep devices within temperature limits, dissipate the heat generated by the devices and protect electrical interconnects and other components for inverter, converter, and charger applications. This analysis, validation, and demonstration intends to take a multi-scale approach over the device, module, and system levels to reduce size, weight, and cost.

  3. Determining of electron temperature profile on the cross section of a Tokamak, using ECE technique

    M. Hosseinpour

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper we have used plasma electron cyclotron emissions at the second harmonic frequency of extraordinary mode to determine the temperature profile of the plasma produced in IR-T1 Tokamak. The emissions obtained at different frequencies by a 5-channel heterodyne receiver, have been analyzed to determine the spatial variation of the electron temperature on the plasma cross section. The results have been also used to show the three-dimensional time evolution of the temperature profile during the period of confinement.

  4. The Electron Temperature of a Partially Ionized Gas in an Electric Field

    Robben, F.

    1968-03-01

    The electron temperature of a partially ionized gas in an electric field can be determined by the collision rate for momentum transfer and the collision rate for energy transfer. Mean values of these rates are defined such that a simple expression for the electron temperature is obtained, and which depends, among other things, on the ratio of these mean rates. This ratio is calculated in the Lorentz approximation for power law cross sections, and also as a function of the degree of ionization for a helium plasma. It is pointed out that the complete results of refined transport theory can be used in calculating electron mobility and electron temperature in a multicomponent plasma without undue difficulty

  5. Improved Temperature Diagnostic for Non-Neutral Plasmas with Single-Electron Resolution

    Shanman, Sabrina; Evans, Lenny; Fajans, Joel; Hunter, Eric; Nelson, Cheyenne; Sierra, Carlos; Wurtele, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    Plasma temperature diagnostics in a Penning-Malmberg trap are essential for reliably obtaining cold, non-neutral plasmas. We have developed a setup for detecting the initial electrons that escape from a trapped pure electron plasma as the confining electrode potential is slowly reduced. The setup minimizes external noise by using a silicon photomultiplier to capture light emitted from an MCP-amplified phosphor screen. To take advantage of this enhanced resolution, we have developed a new plasma temperature diagnostic analysis procedure which takes discrete electron arrival times as input. We have run extensive simulations comparing this new discrete algorithm to our existing exponential fitting algorithm. These simulations are used to explore the behavior of these two temperature diagnostic procedures at low N and at high electronic noise. This work was supported by the DOE DE-FG02-06ER54904, and the NSF 1500538-PHY.

  6. Role of lattice structure and low temperature resistivity in fast-electron-beam filamentation in carbon

    Dance, R J; Butler, N M H; Gray, R J; MacLellan, D A; Rusby, D R; Xu, H; Neely, D; McKenna, P; Scott, G G; Robinson, A P L; Zielbauer, B; Bagnoud, V; Desjarlais, M P

    2016-01-01

    The influence of low temperature (eV to tens-of-eV) electrical resistivity on the onset of the filamentation instability in fast-electron transport is investigated in targets comprising of layers of ordered (diamond) and disordered (vitreous) carbon. It is shown experimentally and numerically that the thickness of the disordered carbon layer influences the degree of filamentation of the fast-electron beam. Strong filamentation is produced if the thickness is of the order of 60 μm or greater, for an electron distribution driven by a sub-picosecond, mid-10 20 Wcm −2 laser pulse. It is shown that the position of the vitreous carbon layer relative to the fast-electron source (where the beam current density and background temperature are highest) does not have a strong effect because the resistive filamentation growth rate is high in disordered carbon over a wide range of temperatures up to the Spitzer regime. (paper)

  7. The Electron Temperature of a Partially Ionized Gas in an Electric Field

    Robben, F

    1968-03-15

    The electron temperature of a partially ionized gas in an electric field can be determined by the collision rate for momentum transfer and the collision rate for energy transfer. Mean values of these rates are defined such that a simple expression for the electron temperature is obtained, and which depends, among other things, on the ratio of these mean rates. This ratio is calculated in the Lorentz approximation for power law cross sections, and also as a function of the degree of ionization for a helium plasma. It is pointed out that the complete results of refined transport theory can be used in calculating electron mobility and electron temperature in a multicomponent plasma without undue difficulty.

  8. Method for local temperature measurement in a nanoreactor for in situ high-resolution electron microscopy.

    Vendelbo, S B; Kooyman, P J; Creemer, J F; Morana, B; Mele, L; Dona, P; Nelissen, B J; Helveg, S

    2013-10-01

    In situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of solids under reactive gas conditions can be facilitated by microelectromechanical system devices called nanoreactors. These nanoreactors are windowed cells containing nanoliter volumes of gas at ambient pressures and elevated temperatures. However, due to the high spatial confinement of the reaction environment, traditional methods for measuring process parameters, such as the local temperature, are difficult to apply. To address this issue, we devise an electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) method that probes the local temperature of the reaction volume under inspection by the electron beam. The local gas density, as measured using quantitative EELS, is combined with the inherent relation between gas density and temperature, as described by the ideal gas law, to obtain the local temperature. Using this method we determined the temperature gradient in a nanoreactor in situ, while the average, global temperature was monitored by a traditional measurement of the electrical resistivity of the heater. The local gas temperatures had a maximum of 56 °C deviation from the global heater values under the applied conditions. The local temperatures, obtained with the proposed method, are in good agreement with predictions from an analytical model. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Radial nerve dysfunction (image)

    The radial nerve travels down the arm and supplies movement to the triceps muscle at the back of the upper arm. ... the wrist and hand. The usual causes of nerve dysfunction are direct trauma, prolonged pressure on the ...

  10. Effective temperature of an ultracold electron source based on near-threshold photoionization.

    Engelen, W J; Smakman, E P; Bakker, D J; Luiten, O J; Vredenbregt, E J D

    2014-01-01

    We present a detailed description of measurements of the effective temperature of a pulsed electron source, based on near-threshold photoionization of laser-cooled atoms. The temperature is determined by electron beam waist scans, source size measurements with ion beams, and analysis with an accurate beam line model. Experimental data is presented for the source temperature as a function of the wavelength of the photoionization laser, for both nanosecond and femtosecond ionization pulses. For the nanosecond laser, temperatures as low as 14 ± 3 K were found; for femtosecond photoionization, 30 ± 5 K is possible. With a typical source size of 25 μm, this results in electron bunches with a relative transverse coherence length in the 10⁻⁴ range and an emittance of a few nm rad. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Evolution of the electron temperature profile of ohmically heated plasmas in TFTR

    Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.C.; Arunasalam, V.

    1985-08-01

    Blackbody electron cyclotron emission was used to ascertain and study the evolution and behavior of the electron temperature profile in ohmically heated plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The emission was measured with absolutely calibrated millimeter wavelength radiometers. The temperature profile normalized to the central temperature and minor radius is observed to broaden substantially with decreasing limiter safety factor q/sub a/, and is insensitive to the plasma minor radius. Sawtooth activity was seen in the core of most TFTR discharges and appeared to be associated with a flattening of the electron temperature profile within the plasma core where q less than or equal to 1. Two types of sawtooth behavior were identified in large TFTR plasmas (minor radius, a less than or equal to 0.8 m) : a typically 35 to 40 msec period ''normal'' sawtooth, and a ''compound'' sawtooth with 70 to 80 msec period

  12. Sensitivity of Inferred Electron Temperature from X-ray Emission of NIF Cryogenic DT Implosions

    Klem, Michael [Univ. of Dallas, Irving, TX (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory seeks to achieve thermonuclear ignition through inertial confinement fusion. The accurate assessment of the performance of each implosion experiment is a crucial step. Here we report on work to derive a reliable electron temperature for the cryogenic deuteriumtritium implosions completed on the NIF using the xray signal from the Ross filter diagnostic. These Xrays are dominated by bremsstrahlung emission. By fitting the xray signal measured through each of the individual Ross filters, the source bremsstrahlung spectrum can be inferred, and an electron temperature of the implosion hot spot inferred. Currently, each filter is weighted equally in this analysis. We present work quantifying the errors with such a technique and the results from investigating the contribution of each filter to the overall accuracy of the temperature inference. Using this research, we also compare the inferred electron temperature against other measured implosion quantities to develop a more complete understanding of the hotspot physics.

  13. Atomic origin of high-temperature electron trapping in metal-oxide-semiconductor devices

    Shen, Xiao, E-mail: xiao.shen@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Dhar, Sarit [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States); Pantelides, Sokrates T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2015-04-06

    MOSFETs based on wide-band-gap semiconductors are suitable for operation at high temperature, at which additional atomic-scale processes that are benign at lower temperatures can get activated, resulting in device degradation. Recently, significant enhancement of electron trapping was observed under positive bias in SiC MOSFETs at temperatures higher than 150 °C. Here, we report first-principles calculations showing that the enhanced electron trapping is associated with thermally activated capturing of a second electron by an oxygen vacancy in SiO{sub 2} by which the vacancy transforms into a structure that comprises one Si dangling bond and a bond between a five-fold and a four-fold Si atoms. The results suggest a key role of oxygen vacancies and their structural reconfigurations in the reliability of high-temperature MOS devices.

  14. Electron temperature measurement by a helium line intensity ratio method in helicon plasmas

    Boivin, R.F.; Kline, J.L.; Scime, E.E.

    2001-01-01

    Electron temperature measurements in helicon plasmas are difficult. The presence of intense rf fields in the plasma complicates the interpretation of Langmuir probe measurements. Furthermore, the non-negligible ion temperature in the plasma considerably shortens the lifetime of conventional Langmuir probes. A spectroscopic technique based on the relative intensities of neutral helium lines is used to measure the electron temperature in the HELIX (Hot hELicon eXperiment) plasma [P. A. Keiter et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 2741 (1997)]. This nonintrusive diagnostic is based on the fact that electron impact excitation rate coefficients for helium singlet and triplet states differ as a function of the electron temperature. The different aspects related to the validity of this technique to measure the electron temperature in rf generated plasmas are discussed in this paper. At low plasma density (n e ≤10 11 cm -3 ), this diagnostic is believed to be very reliable since the population of the emitting level can be easily estimated with reasonable accuracy by assuming that all excitation originates from the ground state (steady-state corona model). At higher density, secondary processes (excitation transfer, excitation from metastable, cascading) become more important and a more complex collisional radiative model must be used to predict the electron temperature. In this work, different helium transitions are examined and a suitable transition pair is identified. For an electron temperature of 10 eV, the line ratio is measured as a function of plasma density and compared to values predicted by models. The measured line ratio function is in good agreement with theory and the data suggest that the excitation transfer is the dominant secondary process in high-density plasmas

  15. Experimental observation of electron-temperature-gradient turbulence in a laboratory plasma.

    Mattoo, S K; Singh, S K; Awasthi, L M; Singh, R; Kaw, P K

    2012-06-22

    We report the observation of electron-temperature-gradient (ETG) driven turbulence in the laboratory plasma of a large volume plasma device. The removal of unutilized primary ionizing and nonthermal electrons from uniform density plasma and the imposition and control of the gradient in the electron temperature (T[Symbol: see text] T(e)) are all achieved by placing a large (2 m diameter) magnetic electron energy filter in the middle of the device. In the dressed plasma, the observed ETG turbulence in the lower hybrid range of frequencies ν = (1-80 kHz) is characterized by a broadband with a power law. The mean wave number k perpendicular ρ(e) = (0.1-0.2) satisfies the condition k perpendicular ρ(e) ≤ 1, where ρ(e) is the electron Larmor radius.

  16. Apparent increase in the thickness of superconducting particles at low temperatures measured by electron holography.

    Hirsch, J E

    2013-10-01

    We predict that superconducting particles will show an apparent increase in thickness at low temperatures when measured by electron holography. This will result not from a real thickness increase, rather from an increase in the mean inner potential sensed by the electron wave traveling through the particle, originating in expansion of the electronic wavefunction of the superconducting electrons and resulting negative charge expulsion from the interior to the surface of the superconductor, giving rise to an increase in the phase shift of the electron wavefront going through the sample relative to the wavefront going through vacuum. The temperature dependence of the observed phase shifts will yield valuable new information on the physics of the superconducting state of metals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Thomson scattering on argon surfatron plasmas at intermediate pressures: Axial profiles of the electron temperature and electron density

    Palomares, J.M.; Iordanova, E.; Veldhuizen, E.M. van; Baede, L.; Gamero, A.; Sola, A.; Mullen, J.J.A.M. van der

    2010-01-01

    The axial profiles of the electron density n e and electron temperature T e of argon surfatron plasmas in the pressure range of 6-20 mbar and microwave power between 32 and 82 W have been determined using Thomson Scattering of laser irradiation at 532 nm. For the electron density and temperature we found values in the ranges 5 x 10 18 e 19 m -3 and 1.1 e e and T e down to 8% and 3%, respectively. It is found that n e decreases in the direction of the wave propagation with a slope that is nearly constant. The slope depends on the pressure but not on the power. Just as predicted by theories we see that increasing the power leads to longer plasma columns. However, the plasmas are shorter than what is predicted by theories based on the assumption that for the plasma-wave interaction electron-atom collisions are of minor importance (the so-called collisionless regime). The plasma vanishes long before the critical value of the electron density is reached. In contrast to what is predicted by the positive column model it is found that T e does not stay constant along the column, but monotonically increases with the distance from the microwave launcher. Increases of more than 50% over 30 cm were found.

  18. High-temperature sensitivity and its acclimation for photosynthetic electron reactions of desert succulents

    Chetti, M.B.; Nobel, P.S. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

    1987-08-01

    Photosynthetic electron reactions of succulent plants from hot deserts are able to tolerate extremely high temperatures and to acclimate to seasonal increase in temperature. In this study, we report the influence of relatively long, in vivo, high-temperature treatments on electron transport reactions for two desert succulents, Agave deserti and Opuntia ficus-indica, species which can tolerate 60{degree}C. Whole chain electron transport averaged 3{degree}C more sensitive to a 1-hour high-temperature treatment than did PSII (Photosystem II) which in turn averaged 3{degree}C more sensitive than did PSI. For plants maintained at day/night air temperatures of 30{degree}C/20{degree}C, treatment at 50{degree}C cause these reactions to be inhibited an average of 39% during the first hour, an additional 31% during the next 4 hours, and 100% by 12 hours. Upon shifting the plants from 30{degree}C/20{degree}C to 45{degree}C/35{degree}C, the high temperatures where activity was inhibited 50% increased 3{degree}C to 8{degree}C for the three electron transport reactions, the half-times for acclimation averaging 5 days for A. deserti and 4 days for O. ficus-indica. For the 45{degree}C/35{degree}C plants treated at 60{degree}C for 1 hour, PSI activity was reduced by 54% for A. deserti and 36% for O. ficus-indica. Acclimation leads to a toleration of very high temperatures without substantial disruption of electron transport for these desert succulents, facilitating their survival in hot deserts. Indeed, the electron transport reactions of these species tolerate longer periods at higher temperatures than any other vascular plants so far reported.

  19. Prediction of FAD binding sites in electron transport proteins according to efficient radial basis function networks and significant amino acid pairs.

    Le, Nguyen-Quoc-Khanh; Ou, Yu-Yen

    2016-07-30

    Cellular respiration is a catabolic pathway for producing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and is the most efficient process through which cells harvest energy from consumed food. When cells undergo cellular respiration, they require a pathway to keep and transfer electrons (i.e., the electron transport chain). Due to oxidation-reduction reactions, the electron transport chain produces a transmembrane proton electrochemical gradient. In case protons flow back through this membrane, this mechanical energy is converted into chemical energy by ATP synthase. The convert process is involved in producing ATP which provides energy in a lot of cellular processes. In the electron transport chain process, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is one of the most vital molecules for carrying and transferring electrons. Therefore, predicting FAD binding sites in the electron transport chain is vital for helping biologists understand the electron transport chain process and energy production in cells. We used an independent data set to evaluate the performance of the proposed method, which had an accuracy of 69.84 %. We compared the performance of the proposed method in analyzing two newly discovered electron transport protein sequences with that of the general FAD binding predictor presented by Mishra and Raghava and determined that the accuracy of the proposed method improved by 9-45 % and its Matthew's correlation coefficient was 0.14-0.5. Furthermore, the proposed method enabled reducing the number of false positives significantly and can provide useful information for biologists. We developed a method that is based on PSSM profiles and SAAPs for identifying FAD binding sites in newly discovered electron transport protein sequences. This approach achieved a significant improvement after we added SAAPs to PSSM features to analyze FAD binding proteins in the electron transport chain. The proposed method can serve as an effective tool for predicting FAD binding sites in electron

  20. The Effects of Radial and Poloidal ExB Drifts in the Tokamak SOL

    Ou Jing; Zhu Sizheng

    2006-01-01

    The effects of radial and poloidal ExB drifts in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of a limiter tokamak are studied with a one-dimensional fluid code. The transport equations are solved in the poloidal direction with the radial influxes as the source terms. The simulation results show that in the high recycling regime, the effect of the radial ExB drift on plasma density tends to be stronger than that of the poloidal ExB drift. In the sheath-limited regime, the effects of the radial ExB drift and poloidal ExB drift on plasma density are almost equally important. Considering the influence on the electron temperature, the poloidal ExB drift tends to be more important than the radial ExB drift in both the high recycling regime and sheath-limited regime. For the normal B φ , the poloidal ExB drift tends to raise the pressure at the low field side while the radial ExB drift favours the high field side. The simulation results also show that the ExB drift influences the asymmetries on the parameter distributions at the high field side and low field side, and the distributions are much more symmetric with the field reversal

  1. Transitionless Enhanced Confinement and the Role of Radial Electric Field Shear

    Coppi, B.; Ernst, D.R.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Budny, R.V.

    1999-01-01

    Evidence for the role of radial electric field shear in enhanced confinement regimes attained without sharp bifurcations or transitions is presented. Temperature scans at constant density, created in the reheat phase following deuterium pellet injection into supershot plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [J.D. Strachan, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 58 (1987) 1004] are simulated using a first-principles transport model. The slow reheat of the ion temperature profile, during which the temperature nearly doubles, is not explained by relatively comprehensive models of transport due to Ion Temperature Gradient Driven Turbulence (ITGDT), which depends primarily on the (unchanging) electron density gradient. An extended model, including the suppression of toroidal ITGDT by self-consistent radial electric field shear, does reproduce the reheat phase

  2. Electron density and temperature in NIO1 RF source operated in oxygen and argon

    Barbisan, M.; Zaniol, B.; Cavenago, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Zanini, M.

    2017-08-01

    The NIO1 experiment, built and operated at Consorzio RFX, hosts an RF negative ion source, from which it is possible to produce a beam of maximum 130 mA in H- ions, accelerated up to 60 kV. For the preliminary tests of the extraction system the source has been operated in oxygen, whose high electronegativity allows to reach useful levels of extracted beam current. The efficiency of negative ions extraction is strongly influenced by the electron density and temperature close to the Plasma Grid, i.e. the grid of the acceleration system which faces the source. To support the tests, these parameters have been measured by means of the Optical Emission Spectroscopy diagnostic. This technique has involved the use of an oxygen-argon mixture to produce the plasma in the source. The intensities of specific Ar I and Ar II lines have been measured along lines of sight close to the Plasma Grid, and have been interpreted with the ADAS package to get the desired information. This work will describe the diagnostic hardware, the analysis method and the measured values of electron density and temperature, as function of the main source parameters (RF power, pressure, bias voltage and magnetic filter field). The main results show that not only electron density but also electron temperature increase with RF power; both decrease with increasing magnetic filter field. Variations of source pressure and plasma grid bias voltage appear to affect only electron temperature and electron density, respectively.

  3. Consequences of Part Temperature Variability in Electron Beam Melting of Ti-6Al-4V

    Fisher, Brian A.; Mireles, Jorge; Ridwan, Shakerur; Wicker, Ryan B.; Beuth, Jack

    2017-12-01

    To facilitate adoption of Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64) parts produced via additive manufacturing (AM), the ability to ensure part quality is critical. Measuring temperatures is an important component of part quality monitoring in all direct metal AM processes. In this work, surface temperatures were monitored using a custom infrared camera system attached to an Arcam electron beam melting (EBM®) machine. These temperatures were analyzed to understand their possible effect on solidification microstructure based on solidification cooling rates extracted from finite element simulations. Complicated thermal histories were seen during part builds, and temperature changes occurring during typical Ti64 builds may be large enough to affect solidification microstructure. There is, however, enough time between fusion of individual layers for spatial temperature variations (i.e., hot spots) to dissipate. This means that an effective thermal control strategy for EBM® can be based on average measured surface temperatures, ignoring temperature variability.

  4. Complex temperature evolution of the electronic structure of CaFe2As2

    Adhikary, Ganesh; Biswas, Deepnarayan; Sahadev, Nishaina; Bindu, R.; Kumar, Neeraj; Dhar, S. K.; Thamizhavel, A.; Maiti, Kalobaran

    2014-01-01

    Employing high resolution photoemission spectroscopy, we investigate the temperature evolution of the electronic structure of CaFe 2 As 2 , which is a parent compound of high temperature superconductors—CaFe 2 As 2 exhibits superconductivity under pressure as well as doping of charge carriers. Photoemission results of CaFe 2 As 2 in this study reveal a gradual shift of an energy band, α away from the chemical potential with decreasing temperature in addition to the spin density wave (SDW) transition induced Fermi surface reconstruction across SDW transition temperature. The corresponding hole pocket eventually disappears at lower temperatures, while the hole Fermi surface of the β band possessing finite p orbital character survives till the lowest temperature studied. These results, thus, reveal signature of complex charge redistribution among various energy bands as a function of temperature

  5. Time-dependent radiolytic yields at room temperature and temperature-dependent absorption spectra of the solvated electrons in polyols

    Lin Mingzhang; Mostafavi, M.; Lampre, I.; Muroya, Y.; Katsumura, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The molar extinction coefficients at the absorption maximum of the solvated electron spectrum have been evaluated to be 900, 970, and 1000 mol -1 ·m 2 for 1,2-ethanediol (12ED), 1,2-propanediol (12PD), and 1,3-propanediol (13PD), respectively. These values are two-third or three-fourth of the value usually reported in the published report. Picosecond pulse radiolysis studies have aided in depicting the radiolytic yield of the solvated electron in these solvents as a function of time from picosecond to microsecond. The radiolytic yield in these viscous solvents is found to be strongly different from that of the water solution. The temperature dependent absorption spectra of the solvated electron in 12ED, 12PD, and 13PD have been also investigated. In all the three solvents, the optical spectra shift to the red with increasing temperature. While the shape of the spectra does not change in 13PD, a widening on the blue side of the absorption band is observed in 12ED and 12PD at elevated temperatures. (authors)

  6. Effects of electron-ion temperature equilibration on inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    Xu, Barry; Hu, S X

    2011-07-01

    The electron-ion temperature relaxation essentially affects both the laser absorption in coronal plasmas and the hot-spot formation in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It has recently been reexamined for plasma conditions closely relevant to ICF implosions using either classical molecular-dynamics simulations or analytical methods. To explore the electron-ion temperature equilibration effects on ICF implosion performance, we have examined two Coulomb logarithm models by implementing them into our hydrocodes, and we have carried out hydrosimulations for ICF implosions. Compared to the Lee-More model that is currently used in our standard hydrocodes, the two models predict substantial differences in laser absorption, coronal temperatures, and neutron yields for ICF implosions at the OMEGA Laser Facility [Boehly et al. Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Such effects on the triple-picket direct-drive design at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have also been explored. Based on the validity of the two models, we have proposed a combined model of the electron-ion temperature-relaxation rate for the overall ICF plasma conditions. The hydrosimulations using the combined model for OMEGA implosions have shown ∼6% more laser absorption, ∼6%-15% higher coronal temperatures, and ∼10% more neutron yield, when compared to the Lee-More model prediction. It is also noticed that the gain for the NIF direct-drive design can be varied by ∼10% among the different electron-ion temperature-relaxation models.

  7. Temperature Dependent Electron Transport Properties of Gold Nanoparticles and Composites: Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy Investigations.

    Patil, Sumati; Datar, Suwarna; Dharmadhikari, C V

    2018-03-01

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) is used for investigating variations in electronic properties of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and its composite with urethane-methacrylate comb polymer (UMCP) as function of temperature. Films are prepared by drop casting AuNPs and UMCP in desired manner on silicon substrates. Samples are further analyzed for morphology under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). STS measurements performed in temperature range of 33 °C to 142 °C show systematic variation in current versus voltage (I-V) curves, exhibiting semiconducting to metallic transition/Schottky behavior for different samples, depending upon preparation method and as function of temperature. During current versus time (I-t) measurement for AuNPs, random telegraphic noise is observed at room temperature. Random switching of tunneling current between two discrete levels is observed for this sample. Power spectra derived from I-t show 1/f2 dependence. Statistical analysis of fluctuations shows exponential behavior with time width τ ≈ 7 ms. Local density of states (LDOS) plots derived from I-V curves of each sample show systematic shift in valance/conduction band edge towards/away from Fermi level, with respect to increase in temperature. Schottky emission is best fitted electron emission mechanism for all samples over certain range of bias voltage. Schottky plots are used to calculate barrier heights and temperature dependent measurements helped in measuring activation energies for electron transport in all samples.

  8. Generalized Lenard-Balescu calculations of electron-ion temperature relaxation in beryllium plasma.

    Fu, Zhen-Guo; Wang, Zhigang; Li, Da-Fang; Kang, Wei; Zhang, Ping

    2015-09-01

    The problem of electron-ion temperature relaxation in beryllium plasma at various densities (0.185-18.5g/cm^{3}) and temperatures [(1.0-8)×10^{3} eV] is investigated by using the generalized Lenard-Balescu theory. We consider the correlation effects between electrons and ions via classical and quantum static local field corrections. The numerical results show that the electron-ion pair distribution function at the origin approaches the maximum when the electron-electron coupling parameter equals unity. The classical result of the Coulomb logarithm is in agreement with the quantum result in both the weak (Γ_{ee}1) electron-electron coupling ranges, whereas it deviates from the quantum result at intermediate values of the coupling parameter (10^{-2}Coulomb logarithm will decrease and the corresponding relaxation rate ν_{ie} will increase. In addition, a simple fitting law ν_{ie}/ν_{ie}^{(0)}=a(ρ_{Be}/ρ_{0})^{b} is determined, where ν_{ie}^{(0)} is the relaxation rate corresponding to the normal metal density of Be and ρ_{0}, a, and b are the fitting parameters related to the temperature and the degree of ionization 〈Z〉 of the system. Our results are expected to be useful for future inertial confinement fusion experiments involving Be plasma.

  9. Apparent increase in the thickness of superconducting particles at low temperatures measured by electron holography

    Hirsch, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    We predict that superconducting particles will show an apparent increase in thickness at low temperatures when measured by electron holography. This will result not from a real thickness increase, rather from an increase in the mean inner potential sensed by the electron wave traveling through the particle, originating in expansion of the electronic wavefunction of the superconducting electrons and resulting negative charge expulsion from the interior to the surface of the superconductor, giving rise to an increase in the phase shift of the electron wavefront going through the sample relative to the wavefront going through vacuum. The temperature dependence of the observed phase shifts will yield valuable new information on the physics of the superconducting state of metals. - Highlights: • A new property of superconducting particles is predicted. • Electron holography will show an apparent increase in thickness at low temperatures. • This will result from a predicted increase in the mean inner potential. • This will originate in expulsion of electrons from the interior to the surface. • This is not predicted by the conventional BCS theory of superconductivity

  10. Excess electron mobility in ethane. Density, temperature, and electric field effects

    Doeldissen, W.; Schmidt, W.F.; Bakale, G.

    1980-01-01

    The excess electron mobility in liquid ethane was measured under orthobaric conditions as a function of temperature and electric field strength up to the critical temperature at 305.33 K. The low field mobility was found to rise strongly with temperature and exhibits a maximum value of 44 cm 2 V -1 s -1 at 2 0 below the critical temperature. At temperatures above 260 K the electron drift velocity shows a sublinear field dependence at high values of the electric field strength. These observations lead to the supposition that in liquid ethane a transition from transport via localized states to transport in extended states occurs. Measurements were also performed in fluid ethane at densities from 2.4 to 12.45 mol L -1 and temperatures from 290 to 340 K. On isochores in the vicinity of the critical density, an increase of the low field mobility with temperature was observed. This effect was found to disappear both at low (rho = 2.4 mol L -1 ) and high densities (rho greater than or equal to 9.2 mol L -1 ). In this density range, a sublinear field dependence of the drift velocities at high field strengths was noted. The critical velocity associated with the appearance of hot electrons was observed to decrease with higher densities indicating a smaller fractional energy transfer in electron molecule collisions. A compilation of electron mobilities in gaseous and liquid ethane shows that, up to densitiesof rho = 9.5 mol L -1 , μ proportional to n -1 is fulfilled if temperature effects are ignored. At intermediate densities, 9 mol L -1 -1 , a density dependence of μ proportional to rho -5 is found followed by a stronger mobility decrease toward the triple point. Positive ion mobilities measured under orthobaric conditions followed Walden's rule

  11. Oxide-cathode activation and surface temperature calculation of electron cooler

    Li Jie; Yang Xiaodong; Mao Lijun; Li Guohong; Yuan Youjin; Liu Zhanwen; Zhang Junhui; Yang Xiaotian; Ma Xiaoming; Yan Tailai

    2011-01-01

    The pollution on electron gun ceramic insulation of electron cooler restricted the operation of electron cooler at HIRFL-CSR main ring. To cool and accumulate ion beam well, the pollution was cleared and a new oxide-coated cathode was assembled. The processes of cathode replacement,vacuum chamber baking-out, and thermal decomposition of coating binders and alkaline earth metal carbonates, and cathode activation are presented. The electron gun perveance of 10.6 μA/V 1.5 was attained under the heating power of 60 W. The typical surface temperature of oxide-coated cathode that is calculated through grey-body radiation is 1 108 K which shows a comparable result to the experimental measurement 1 078 K. The perveance growth of electron gun during the electron cooler operation is also explained by partial activation of the cathode. (authors)

  12. Measurement of electron density and electron temperature of a cascaded arc plasma using laser Thomson scattering compared to an optical emission spectroscopic approach

    Yong, WANG; Cong, LI; Jielin, SHI; Xingwei, WU; Hongbin, DING

    2017-11-01

    As advanced linear plasma sources, cascaded arc plasma devices have been used to generate steady plasma with high electron density, high particle flux and low electron temperature. To measure electron density and electron temperature of the plasma device accurately, a laser Thomson scattering (LTS) system, which is generally recognized as the most precise plasma diagnostic method, has been established in our lab in Dalian University of Technology. The electron density has been measured successfully in the region of 4.5 × 1019 m-3 to 7.1 × 1020 m-3 and electron temperature in the region of 0.18 eV to 0.58 eV. For comparison, an optical emission spectroscopy (OES) system was established as well. The results showed that the electron excitation temperature (configuration temperature) measured by OES is significantly higher than the electron temperature (kinetic electron temperature) measured by LTS by up to 40% in the given discharge conditions. The results indicate that the cascaded arc plasma is recombining plasma and it is not in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). This leads to significant error using OES when characterizing the electron temperature in a non-LTE plasma.

  13. Potentialities in electronics of new high critical temperature superconductors. Potentialites en electronique des nouveaux supraconducteurs a haute temperature critique

    Hartemann, P [Thomson-CSF, 75 - Paris (FR)

    1989-09-01

    The main electronic applications of superconductors involve the signal processing, the electromagnetic wave detection and the magnetometry. Characteristics of devices based on conventional superconductors cooled by liquid helium are given and the changes induced by incorporating high-temperature superconductors are estimated. After a survey of new superconductor properties, the superconducting devices for analog or digital signal processing are reviewed. The gains predicted for high-temperature superconducting analog devices are considered in greater detail. Different sections deal with the infrared or (sub)millimeter wave detection. The most sensitive apparatuses for magnetic measurements are based on SQUIDs. Features of SQUIDs made of granular high-temperature superconducting material samples (grain boundaries behave as barriers of intrinsic junctions) are discussed.

  14. Role of temperature on static correlational properties in a spin-polarized electron gas

    Arora, Priya; Moudgil, R. K., E-mail: rkmoudgil@kuk.ac.in [Department of Physics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra – 136 119 (India); Kumar, Krishan [S. D. College (Lahore), Ambala Cantt. - 133001 (India)

    2016-05-06

    We have studied the effect of temperature on the static correlational properties of a spin-polarized three-dimensional electron gas (3DEG) over a wide coupling and temperature regime. This problem has been very recently studied by Brown et al. using the restricted path-integral Monte Carlo (RPIMC) technique in the warm-dense regime. To this endeavor, we have used the finite temperature version of the dynamical mean-field theory of Singwi et al, the so-called quantum STLS (qSTLS) approach. The static density structure factor and the static pair-correlation function are calculated, and compared with the RPIMC simulation data. We find an excellent agreement with the simulation at high temperature over a wide coupling range. However, the agreement is seen to somewhat deteriorate with decreasing temperature. The pair-correlation function is found to become small negative for small electron separation. This may be attributed to the inadequacy of the mean-field theory in dealing with the like spin electron correlations in the strong-coupling domain. A nice agreement with RPIMC data at high temperature seems to arise due to weakening of both the exchange and coulomb correlations with rising temperature.

  15. Theoretical transport analysis of density limit with radial electric field in helical plasmas

    Toda, S.; Itoh, K.

    2010-11-01

    The confinement property in helical toroidal plasmas is clarified. The analysis is performed by use of the one-dimensional transport equations with the effect of the radiative loss and the radial profile of the electric field. The analytical results in the edge region show the steep gradient in the electron temperature, which indicates the transport barrier formation. Because of the rapid increase of the radiative loss at the low electron temperature, the anomalous heat diffusivity is reduced near the edge. Next, the efficiency of the heating power input in the presence of the radiative loss is studied. The scaling of the critical density in helical devices is also derived. (author)

  16. Calibration of a two-color soft x-ray diagnostic for electron temperature measurement

    Reusch, L. M., E-mail: lmmcguire@wisc.edu; Den Hartog, D. J.; Goetz, J.; McGarry, M. B. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53703 (United States); Franz, P. [Consorzio RFX, Padova (Italy); Stephens, H. D. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53703 (United States); Pierce College Fort Steilacoom, Lakewood, Washington 98498 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The two-color soft x-ray (SXR) tomography diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus is capable of making electron temperature measurements via the double-filter technique; however, there has been a 15% systematic discrepancy between the SXR double-filter (SXR{sub DF}) temperature and Thomson scattering (TS) temperature. Here we discuss calibration of the Be filters used in the SXR{sub DF} measurement using empirical measurements of the transmission function versus energy at the BESSY II electron storage ring, electron microprobe analysis of filter contaminants, and measurement of the effective density. The calibration does not account for the TS and SXR{sub DF} discrepancy, and evidence from experiments indicates that this discrepancy is due to physics missing from the SXR{sub DF} analysis rather than instrumentation effects.

  17. Controlling competing orders via nonequilibrium acoustic phonons: Emergence of anisotropic effective electronic temperature

    Schütt, Michael; Orth, Peter P.; Levchenko, Alex; Fernandes, Rafael M.

    2018-01-01

    Ultrafast perturbations offer a unique tool to manipulate correlated systems due to their ability to promote transient behaviors with no equilibrium counterpart. A widely employed strategy is the excitation of coherent optical phonons, as they can cause significant changes in the electronic structure and interactions on short time scales. One of the issues, however, is the inevitable heating that accompanies these resonant excitations. Here, we explore a promising alternative route: the nonequilibrium excitation of acoustic phonons, which, due to their low excitation energies, generally lead to less heating. We demonstrate that driving acoustic phonons leads to the remarkable phenomenon of a momentum-dependent effective temperature, by which electronic states at different regions of the Fermi surface are subject to distinct local temperatures. Such an anisotropic effective electronic temperature can have a profound effect on the delicate balance between competing ordered states in unconventional superconductors, opening a so far unexplored avenue to control correlated phases.

  18. Measurement of turbulent electron temperature fluctuations on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak using correlated electron cyclotron emission

    Freethy, S. J., E-mail: simon.freethy@ipp.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, 85748 Garching (Germany); Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Conway, G. D.; Happel, T.; Köhn, A. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, 85748 Garching (Germany); Classen, I.; Vanovac, B. [FOM Institute DIFFER, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Creely, A. J.; White, A. E. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Turbulent temperature fluctuations are measured on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak using pairs of closely spaced, narrow-band heterodyne radiometer channels and a standard correlation technique. The pre-detection spacing and bandwidth of the radiometer channel pairs is chosen such that they are physically separated less than a turbulent correlation length, but do not overlap. The radiometer has 4 fixed filter frequency channels and two tunable filter channels for added flexibility in the measurement position. Relative temperature fluctuation amplitudes are observed in a helium plasma to be δT/T = (0.76 ± 0.02)%, (0.67 ± 0.02)%, and (0.59 ± 0.03)% at normalised toroidal flux radius of ρ{sub tor} = 0.82, 0.75, and 0.68, respectively.

  19. Shaping the solar wind electron temperature anisotropy by the interplay of core and suprathermal populations

    Shaaban Hamd, S. M.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S.; Pierrard, V.; Štverák

    2017-12-01

    We present the results of an advanced parametrization of the temperature anisotropy of electrons in the slow solar wind and the electromagnetic instabilities resulting from the interplay of their thermal core and suprathermal halo populations. A large set of observational data (from the Ulysses, Helios and Cluster missions) is used to parametrize these components and establish their correlations. Comparative analysis demonstrates for the first time a particular implication of the suprathermal electrons which are less dense but hotter than thermal electrons. The instabilities are significantly stimulated by the interplay of the core and halo populations, leading to lower thresholds which shape the observed limits of the temperature anisotropy for both the core and halo populations. This double agreement strongly suggests that the selfgenerated instabilities play the major role in constraining the electron anisotropy.

  20. Research on cw electron accelerators using room-temperature rf structures: Annual report

    1986-01-01

    This joint NBS-Los Alamos project of ''Research on CW Electron Accelerators Using Room-Temperature RF Structures'' began seven years ago with the goal of developing a technology base for cw electron accelerators. In this report we describe our progress during FY 1986 and present our plans for completion of the project. First, however, it is appropriate to review the past contributions of the project, describe its status, and indicate its future benefits

  1. Electron temperature and density relaxations during internal disruptions in TFR Tokamak plasmas

    Enriques, L.; Sand, F.

    1977-01-01

    Several diagnostics (soft X-ray, Thompson scattering, high frequency waves, and vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy) have been used on TFR Tokamak plasmas in order to show that the soft X-ray relaxations are mainly due to electron temperature relaxations, with only small variations of the electron density. Values of ΔTsub(eo)/Tsub(eo) up to 17% and of Δnsub(eo)/nsub(eo) of a few % or less have been measured. (author)

  2. Electron temperature and density relaxations during internal disruptions in TFR Tokamak plasmas

    1976-07-01

    Several diagnostics (soft X-ray, Thomson scattering, high frequency waves, and vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy) have been used on TFR Tokamak plasmas in order to show that the soft X-ray relaxations are mainly due to electron temperature relaxations, with only small variations of the electron density. Values of ΔTsub(e0)/Tsub(e0) up to 17% and of Δnsub(e0)/nsub(e0) of a few % or less have been measured

  3. High temperature electrons exhausted from rf plasma sources along a magnetic nozzle

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Akahoshi, Hikaru; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W.; Ando, Akira

    2017-08-01

    Two dimensional profiles of electron temperature are measured inside and downstream of a radiofrequency plasma thruster source having a magnetic nozzle and being immersed in vacuum. The temperature is estimated from the slope of the fully swept I-V characteristics of a Langmuir probe acquired at each spatial position and with the assumption of a Maxwellian distribution. The results show that the peripheral high temperature electrons in the magnetic nozzle originate from the upstream antenna location and are transported along the "connecting" magnetic field lines. Two-dimensional measurements of electron energy probability functions are also carried out in a second simplified laboratory device consisting of the source contiguously connected to the diffusion chamber: again the high temperature electrons are detected along the magnetic field lines intersecting the wall at the antenna location, even when the antenna location is shifted along the main axis. These results demonstrate that the peripheral energetic electrons in the magnetic nozzle mirror those created in the source tube.

  4. Whistler waves with electron temperature anisotropy and non-Maxwellian distribution functions

    M. Usman Malik

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The previous works on whistler waves with electron temperature anisotropy narrated the dependence on plasma parameters, however, they did not explore the reasons behind the observed differences. A comparative analysis of the whistler waves with different electron distributions has not been made to date. This paper attempts to address both these issues in detail by making a detailed comparison of the dispersion relations and growth rates of whistler waves with electron temperature anisotropy for Maxwellian, Cairns, kappa and generalized (r, q distributions by varying the key plasma parameters for the problem under consideration. It has been found that the growth rate of whistler instability is maximum for flat-topped distribution whereas it is minimum for the Maxwellian distribution. This work not only summarizes and complements the previous work done on the whistler waves with electron temperature anisotropy but also provides a general framework to understand the linear propagation of whistler waves with electron temperature anisotropy that is applicable in all regions of space plasmas where the satellite missions have indicated their presence.

  5. Variation of kinetic energy release with temperature and electron energy for unimolecular ionic transitions

    Rabia, M.A.; Fahmy, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    The kinetic energy released during seven unimolecular ionic transitions, generated from benzyl alcohol and benzyl amine have been studied as a function of ion source temperature and ionizing electron energy. Only, the kinetic energy released during H CN elimination from fragment [C 7 H 8 N]+ ion of benzyl amine displays a temperature dependence. For only two transitions, generated from benzyl alcohol, the kinetic energy released show a significant ionizing electron energy dependence. These results may reveal the role of the internal energy of reacting ions in producing the kinetic energy released some transitions produced from benzyl alcohol

  6. Spectroscopic measurements of plasma temperatures and electron number density in a uranium hollow cathode discharge lamp

    Shah, M.L.; Suri, B.M.; Gupta, G.P.

    2015-01-01

    The HCD (Hollow Cathode Discharge) lamps have been used as a source of free atoms of any metal, controllable by direct current in the lamp. The plasma parameters including neutral species temperature, atomic excitation temperature and electron number density in a see-through type, homemade uranium hollow cathode discharge lamp with neon as a buffer gas have been investigated using optical emission spectroscopic techniques. The neutral species temperature has been measured using the Doppler broadening of a neon atomic spectral line. The atomic excitation temperature has been measured using the Boltzmann plot method utilizing uranium atomic spectral lines. The electron number density has been determined from the Saha-Boltzmann equation utilizing uranium atomic and ionic spectral lines. To the best of our knowledge, all these three plasma parameters are simultaneously measured for the first time in a uranium hollow cathode discharge lamp

  7. Radiation and temperature effects on electronic components investigated under the CSTI high capacity power project

    Schwarze, G.E.; Niedra, J.M.; Frasca, A.J.; Wieserman, W.R.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of nuclear radiation and high temperature environments must be fully known and understood for the electronic components and materials used in both the Power Conditioning and Control subsystem and the reactor Instrumentation and Control subsystem of future high capacity nuclear space power systems. This knowledge is required by the designer of these subsystems in order to develop highly reliable, long-life power systems for future NASA missions. A review and summary of the experimental results obtained for the electronic components and materials investigated under the power management element of the CSTI high capacity power project will be presented in this paper: (1) Neutron, gamma ray, and temperature effects on power semiconductor switches, (2) Temperature and frequency effects on soft magnetic materials; and (3) Temperature effects on rare-earth permanent magnets

  8. Measurement of surface temperature profiles on liquid uranium metal during electron beam evaporation

    Ohba, Hironori; Shibata, Takemasa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-11-01

    Surface temperature distributions of liquid uranium in a water-cooled copper crucible during electron beam evaporation were measured. Evaporation surface was imaged by a lens through a band-path filter (650{+-}5 nm) and a double mirror system on a charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The video signals of the recorded image were connected to an image processor and converted to two-dimensional spectral radiance profiles. The surface temperatures were obtained from the spectral radiation intensity ratio of the evaporation surface and a freezing point of uranium and/or a reference light source using Planck`s law of radiation. The maximum temperature exceeded 3000 K and had saturation tendency with increasing electron beam input. The measured surface temperatures agreed with those estimated from deposition rates and data of saturated vapor pressure of uranium. (author)

  9. Radiation and temperature effects on electronic components investigated under the CSTI High Capacity Power Project

    Shwarze, G.E.; Wieserman, W.R.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of nuclear radiation and high temperature environments must be fully known and understood for the electronic components and materials used in both the Power Conditioning and Control subsystem and the reactor Instrumentation and Control subsystem of future high capacity nuclear space power systems. This knowledge is required by the designer of these subsystems in order to develop highly reliable, long-life power systems for future NASA missions. A review and summary of the experimental results obtained for the electronic components and materials investigated under the power management element of the CSTI high capacity power project will be presented in this paper: (1) Neutron, gamma ray, and temperature effects on power semiconductor switches, (2) Temperature and frequency effects on soft magnetic materials; and (3) Temperature effects on rare earth permanent magnets

  10. Ultra-violet recombination continuum electron temperature measurements in a non-equilibrium atmospheric argon plasma

    Gordon, M.H.; Kruger, C.H.

    1991-01-01

    Emission measurements of temperature and electron density have been made downstream of a 50 kW induction plasma torch at temperatures and electron densities ranging between 6000 K and 8500 K and 10 to the 20th and 10 to the 21st/cu cm, respectively. Absolute and relative atomic line intensities, and absolute recombination continuum in both the visible and the UV were separately interpreted in order to characterize a recombining atmospheric argon plasma. Continuum measurements made in the UV at 270 nm were used to directly determine the kinetic electron temperature, independent of a Boltzmann equilibrium, assuming only that the electron velocity distribution is Maxwellian. The data indicate that a nonequilibrium condition exists in which the bound-excited and free electrons are nearly in mutual equilibrium down to the 4P level for electron densities as low as 2 x 10 to the 20th/cu m but that both are overpopulated with respect to the ground state due to finite recombination rates. 13 refs

  11. Electronic and magnetic interactions in high temperature superconducting and high coercivity materials. Final performance report

    Cooper, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    The issue addressed in the research was how to understand what controls the competition between two types of phase transition (ordering) which may be present in a hybridizing correlated-electron system containing two transition-shell atomic species; and how the variation of behavior observed can be used to understand the mechanisms giving the observed ordered state. This is significant for understanding mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity and other states of highly correlated electron systems. Thus the research pertains to magnetic effects as related to interactions giving high temperature superconductivity; where the working hypothesis is that the essential feature governing the magnetic and superconducting behavior of copper-oxide-type systems is a cooperative valence fluctuation mechanism involving the copper ions, as mediated through hybridization effects dominated by the oxygen p electrons. (Substitution of praseodymium at the rare earth sites in the 1·2·3 material provides an interesting illustration of this mechanism since experimentally such substitution strongly suppresses and destroys the superconductivity; and, at 100% Pr, gives Pr f-electron magnetic ordering at a temperature above 16K). The research was theoretical and computational and involved use of techniques aimed at correlated-electron systems that can be described within the confines of model hamiltonians such as the Anderson lattice hamiltonian. Specific techniques used included slave boson methodology used to treat modification of electronic structure and the Mori projection operator (memory function) method used to treat magnetic response (dynamic susceptibility)

  12. Radial wedge flange clamp

    Smith, Karl H.

    2002-01-01

    A radial wedge flange clamp comprising a pair of flanges each comprising a plurality of peripheral flat wedge facets having flat wedge surfaces and opposed and mating flat surfaces attached to or otherwise engaged with two elements to be joined and including a series of generally U-shaped wedge clamps each having flat wedge interior surfaces and engaging one pair of said peripheral flat wedge facets. Each of said generally U-shaped wedge clamps has in its opposing extremities apertures for the tangential insertion of bolts to apply uniform radial force to said wedge clamps when assembled about said wedge segments.

  13. Thomson scattering on argon surfatron plasmas at intermediate pressures: Axial profiles of the electron temperature and electron density

    Palomares, J.M., E-mail: f02palij@gmail.co [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Cordoba, Campus de Rabanales, ed. C-2, 14071 Cordoba (Spain); Iordanova, E.; Veldhuizen, E.M. van; Baede, L. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Gamero, A.; Sola, A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Cordoba, Campus de Rabanales, ed. C-2, 14071 Cordoba (Spain); Mullen, J.J.A.M. van der, E-mail: j.j.a.m.v.d.Mullen@tue.n [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Cordoba, Campus de Rabanales, ed. C-2, 14071 Cordoba (Spain)

    2010-03-15

    The axial profiles of the electron density n{sub e} and electron temperature T{sub e} of argon surfatron plasmas in the pressure range of 6-20 mbar and microwave power between 32 and 82 W have been determined using Thomson Scattering of laser irradiation at 532 nm. For the electron density and temperature we found values in the ranges 5 x 10{sup 18} < n{sub e} < 8 x 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} and 1.1 < T{sub e} < 2.0 eV. Due to several improvements of the setup we could reduce the errors of n{sub e} and T{sub e} down to 8% and 3%, respectively. It is found that n{sub e} decreases in the direction of the wave propagation with a slope that is nearly constant. The slope depends on the pressure but not on the power. Just as predicted by theories we see that increasing the power leads to longer plasma columns. However, the plasmas are shorter than what is predicted by theories based on the assumption that for the plasma-wave interaction electron-atom collisions are of minor importance (the so-called collisionless regime). The plasma vanishes long before the critical value of the electron density is reached. In contrast to what is predicted by the positive column model it is found that T{sub e} does not stay constant along the column, but monotonically increases with the distance from the microwave launcher. Increases of more than 50% over 30 cm were found.

  14. Electron temperature from x-ray continuum measurements on the NIF

    Jarrott, Leonard; Bachmann, Benjamin; Benedetti, Robin; Izumi, Nobuhiko; Khan, Shahab; Landen, Otto; Ma, Tammy; Nagel, Sabrina; Pak, Arthur; Patel, Prav; Schneider, Marilyn; Springer, Paul; LLNL Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    We report on measurements of the electron temperature within the hot spot of inertially confined, layered implosions on the NIF using a titanium differential filtering x-ray diagnostic. The electron temperature from x-ray emission is insensitive to non-thermal velocity flows as is the case with ion temperature measurements and is thus a critical parameter in interpreting stagnated hot spot conditions. Here we discuss measurements using titanium filters ranging from 10 μm to 1mm in thickness with a sensitivity band of 10-30keV coupled with penumbral pinholes. The use of larger pinhole diameters increases x-ray fluence improving sensitivity of photon energies with minimal attenuation from the compressed fuel/shell. This diagnostic has been fielded on a series of cryogenic shots with DT ion temperatures ranging from 2-5keV. Analysis of the measurement will be presented along with a comparison against simulated electron temperatures and x-ray spectra as well as a comparison to DT ion temperature measurements. This work was performed under the auspices of U.S. DoE by LLNL under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Tracing Single Electrons in a Disordered Polymer Film at Room Temperature.

    Wilma, Kevin; Issac, Abey; Chen, Zhijian; Würthner, Frank; Hildner, Richard; Köhler, Jürgen

    2016-04-21

    The transport of charges lies at the heart of essentially all modern (opto-) electronic devices. Although inorganic semiconductors built the basis for current technologies, organic materials have become increasingly important in recent years. However, organic matter is often highly disordered, which directly impacts the charge carrier dynamics. To understand and optimize device performance, detailed knowledge of the transport mechanisms of charge carriers in disordered matter is therefore of crucial importance. Here we report on the observation of the motion of single electrons within a disordered polymer film at room temperature, using single organic chromophores as probe molecules. The migration of a single electron gives rise to a varying electric field in its vicinity, which is registered via a shift of the emission spectra (Stark shift) of a chromophore. The spectral shifts allow us to determine the electron mobility and reveal for each nanoenvironment a distinct number of different possible electron-transfer pathways within the rugged energy landscape of the disordered polymer matrix.

  16. Ion acoustic solitons in a plasma with two-temperature kappa-distributed electrons

    Baluku, T. K.; Hellberg, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Existence domains and characteristics of ion acoustic solitons are studied in a two-temperature electron plasma with both electron components being kappa-distributed, as found in Saturn's magnetosphere. As is the case for double-Boltzmann electrons, solitons of both polarities can exist over restricted ranges of fractional hot electron density ratio for this plasma model. Low κ values, which indicate increased suprathermal particles in the tail of the distribution, yield a smaller domain in the parameter space of hot density fraction and normalized soliton velocity (f, M), over which both soliton polarities are supported for a given plasma composition (the coexistence region). For some density ratios that support coexistence, solitons occur even at the lowest (critical) Mach number (i.e., at the acoustic speed), as found recently for a number of other plasma models. Like Maxwellians, low-κ distributions also support positive potential double layers over a narrow range of low fractional cool electron density (<10%).

  17. Effects of finite electron temperature on gradient drift instabilities in partially magnetized plasmas

    Lakhin, V. P.; Ilgisonis, V. I.; Smolyakov, A. I.; Sorokina, E. A.; Marusov, N. A.

    2018-01-01

    The gradient-drift instabilities of partially magnetized plasmas in plasma devices with crossed electric and magnetic fields are investigated in the framework of the two-fluid model with finite electron temperature in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. The finite electron Larmor radius (FLR) effects are also included via the gyroviscosity tensor taking into account the magnetic field gradient. This model correctly describes the electron dynamics for k⊥ρe>1 in the sense of Padé approximants (here, k⊥ and ρe are the wavenumber perpendicular to the magnetic field and the electron Larmor radius, respectively). The local dispersion relation for electrostatic plasma perturbations with the frequency in the range between the ion and electron cyclotron frequencies and propagating strictly perpendicular to the magnetic field is derived. The dispersion relation includes the effects of the equilibrium E ×B electron current, finite ion velocity, electron inertia, electron FLR, magnetic field gradients, and Debye length effects. The necessary and sufficient condition of stability is derived, and the stability boundary is found. It is shown that, in general, the electron inertia and FLR effects stabilize the short-wavelength perturbations. In some cases, such effects completely suppress the high-frequency short-wavelength modes so that only the long-wavelength low-frequency (with respect to the lower-hybrid frequency) modes remain unstable.

  18. Topological Phase Transitions in Zinc-Blende Semimetals Driven Exclusively by Electronic Temperature

    Trushin, Egor; Görling, Andreas

    2018-04-01

    We show that electronic phase transitions in zinc-blende semimetals with quadratic band touching (QBT) at the center of the Brillouin zone, like GaBi, InBi, or HgTe, can occur exclusively due to a change of the electronic temperature without the need to involve structural transformations or electron-phonon coupling. The commonly used Kohn-Sham density-functional methods based on local and semilocal density functionals employing the local density approximation (LDA) or generalized gradient approximations (GGAs), however, are not capable of describing such phenomena because they lack an intrinsic temperature dependence and account for temperature only via the occupation of bands, which essentially leads only to a shift of the Fermi level without changing the shape or topology of bands. Kohn-Sham methods using the exact temperature-dependent exchange potential, not to be confused with the Hartree-Fock exchange potential, on the other hand, describe such phase transitions. A simple modeling of correlation effects can be achieved by screening of the exchange. In the considered zinc-blende compounds the QBT is unstable at low temperatures and a transition to electronic states without QBT takes place. In the case of HgTe and GaBi Weyl points of type I and type II, respectively, emerge during the transitions. This demonstrates that Kohn-Sham methods can describe such topological phase transitions provided they are based on functionals more accurate than those within the LDA or GGA. Moreover, the electronic temperature is identified as a handle to tune topological materials.

  19. Temperature dynamics and velocity scaling laws for interchange driven, warm ion plasma filaments

    Olsen, Jeppe Miki Busk; Madsen, Jens; Nielsen, Anders Henry

    2016-01-01

    The influence of electron and ion temperature dynamics on the radial convection of isolated structures in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated by means of numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that the maximum radial velocity of these plasma blobs roughly follows the inertial velocity...

  20. Theory of Correlated Pairs of Electrons Oscillating in Resonant Quantum States to Reach the Critical Temperature in a Metal

    Aroche, Raúl Riera; Rosas-Cabrera, Rodrigo Arturo; Burgos, Rodrigo Arturo Rosas; Betancourt-Riera, René; Betancourt-Riera, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    The formation of Correlated Electron Pairs Oscillating around the Fermi level in Resonant Quantum States (CEPO-RQS), when a metal is cooled to its critical temperature T=Tc, is studied. The necessary conditions for the existence of CEPO-RQS are analyzed. The participation of electron-electron interaction screened by an electron dielectric constant of the form proposed by Thomas Fermi is considered and a physical meaning for the electron-phonon-electron interaction in the formation of the CEPO...

  1. A low temperature cryostat with a refrigerator for studying electron irradiation effects on solids

    Oka, Takashi; Yoshida, Toshio; Kitagawa, Michiharu; Yanai, Masayoshi

    1976-01-01

    A low temperature cryostat with a small cryogenic refrigerator is described which is convenient for studying irradiation effects of the energetic electrons on solids. It allows a sample to be kept about 12 K without irradiation and 15 K under the irradiation at a heating rate of 1.5 w. The sample temperature can be changed up to room temperature by adjusting the power of an attached heater and the pressure of a compressor for the refrigerator. The optical and electrical properties of the sample can be measured under and after irradiation. (auth.)

  2. Electron temperature and density profiles measurement in the TJ-1 tokamak by Thomson scattering

    Pardo, C.; Zurro, B.

    1986-01-01

    Electron temperature and density profiles of ohmically heated hydrogen plasmas in the TJ-1 tokamak have been measured by Thomson scattering. The temperature profile peaks sharply in the central region while the density profile is very flat. Temperature values between 100 and 390 eV have been measured for densities in the range of 5.10 12 to 2.6.10 13 cm -3 . Parameters characterizing TJ-1 plasma, such as confinement times Z eff , have been deduced from experimental data. Energy confinement times are compared with experimental scaling laws. (author)

  3. Sirenomelia with radial dysplasia.

    Kulkarni, M L; Abdul Manaf, K M; Prasannakumar, D G; Kulkarni, Preethi M

    2004-05-01

    Sirenomelia is a rare anomaly usually associated with other multiple malformations. In this communication the authors report a case of sirenomelia associated with multiple malformations, which include radial hypoplasia also. Though several theories have been proposed regarding the etiology of multiple malformation syndromes in the past, the recent theory of primary developmental defect during blastogenesis holds good in this case.

  4. Radially truncated galactic discs

    Grijs, R. de; Kregel, M.; Wesson, K H

    2000-01-01

    Abstract: We present the first results of a systematic analysis of radially truncatedexponential discs for four galaxies of a sample of disc-dominated edge-onspiral galaxies. Edge-on galaxies are very useful for the study of truncatedgalactic discs, since we can follow their light distributions out

  5. Probing the local, electronic and magnetic structure of matter under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure

    Torchio, R.; Boccato, S.; Cerantola, V.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present recent achievements in the field of investigation of the local, electronic and magnetic structure of the matter under extreme conditions of pressure and temperature. These results were obtained thanks to the coupling of a compact laser heating system to the energy-dispersive...

  6. The electron temperature and anisotropy in the solar wind. Comparison of the core and halo populations

    Pierrard, V.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S.; Štverák, Štěpán; Maksimovic, M.; Trávníček, Pavel M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 291, č. 7 (2016), s. 2165-2179 ISSN 0038-0938 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : solar wind * electron velocity distributions * temperature anisotropy Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.682, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11207-016-0961-7

  7. The Electron Temperature and Anisotropy in the Solar Wind. Comparison of the Core and Halo Populations

    Pierrard, V.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S.; Štverák, Štěpán; Maksimovic, M.; Trávníček, Pavel M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 291, č. 7 (2016), s. 2165-2179 ISSN 0038-0938 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-17490S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : solar wind * electron velocity distributions * temperature anisotropy Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 2.682, year: 2016

  8. Electron hopping and temperature dependent oxidation states of iron in ilvaite studied by Moessbauer effect

    Heilmann, I.U.; Staun Olsen, J.; Olsen, N.B.

    1977-01-01

    The Moessbauer spectrum of ilvaite was measured between 115 K and 898 K, and the energy dispersive X-ray powder pattern was measured between 300 K and 1123 K. Below 500 K the Moessbauer spectrum varies strongly with temperature while the X-ray spectrum remains unchanged. The results are interpreted by electron exchange between nearly identical Fe-sites in ilvaite. (Auth.)

  9. Electron density and temperature determination in a Tokamak plasma using light scattering

    Perez-Navarro Gomez, A.; Zurro Hernandez, B.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical foundation review for light scattering by plasmas is presented. Furthemore, a review of the experimental methods for electron density and temperature measurements, with spatial and time resolution, is included in a Tokamak plasma using spectral analysis of the scattered radiation. (author) [es

  10. The dust-acoustic mode in two-temperature electron plasmas with ...

    ... charging fluctuations, the dispersion peculiarities of dust-acoustic waves are studied based on dust fluid dynamics. The present results show that the effect will introduce a dissipation on the mode, and the dispersion and the dissipation depend on the temperature ratio and number density ratio of hot and cold electrons.

  11. Radiation damage relative to transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens at low temperature: a review

    Glaeser, R.M.; Taylor, K.A.

    1978-01-01

    When biological specimens are irradiated by the electron beam in the electron microscope, the specimen structure is damaged as a result of molecular excitation, ionization, and subsequent chemical reactions. The radiation damage that occurs in the normal process of electron microscopy is known to present severe limitations for imaging high resolution detail in biological specimens. The question of radiation damage at low temperatures has therefore been investigated with the view in mind of reducing somewhat the rate at which damage occurs. The radiation damage protection found for small molecule (anhydrous) organic compounds is generally rather limited or even non-existent. However, large molecule, hydrated materials show as much as a 10-fold reduction at low temperature in the rate at which radiation damage occurs, relative to the damage rate at room temperature. In the case of hydrated specimens, therefore, low temperature electron microscopy offers an important advantage as part of the overall effort required in obtaining high resolution images of complex biological structures. (author)

  12. Electron density and temperature determination in a Tokamak plasma using light scattering

    Perez-Navarro Gomerz, A.; Zurro Hernandez, B.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical foundation review for light scattering by plasmas is presented. Furthermore, we have included a review of the experimental methods for electron density and temperature measurements, with spatial and time resolution, in a Tokamak plasma using spectral analysis of the scattered radiation. (Author) 13 refs

  13. The electron temperature gradient instability in presence of a limiter with tilted plates

    Farina, D.; Pozzoli, R.; Ryutov, D.

    1994-01-01

    The analysis of the electron temperature gradient instability in the scrape-off layer is generalized to the case of non-orthogonal intersections of the magnetic field with the wall surface, a situation which is most typical for a tokamak with a limiter. (orig.)

  14. Density Gradient Stabilization of Electron Temperature Gradient Driven Turbulence in a Spherical Tokamak

    Ren, Y.; Kaye, S.M.; Mazzucato, E.; Guttenfelder, W.; Bell, R.E.; Domier, C.W.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Lee, K.C.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Smith, D.R.; Yuh, H.

    2011-01-01

    In this letter we report the first clear experimental observation of density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a fusion plasma. It is observed that longer wavelength modes, k (perpendicular) ρ s ∼< 10, are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of two decrease in the plasma effective thermal diffusivity.

  15. Electron-induced dry reforming of methane in a temperature-controlled dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    Zhang, Xuming; Cha, Min

    2013-01-01

    and thermo-chemistry in dry reforming of methane. In the tested background temperature range 297-773 K, electron-induced chemistry, as characterized by the physical properties of micro-discharges, was found to govern the conversions of CH4 and CO2, while

  16. Effect of electronic contribution on temperature-dependent thermal transport of antimony telluride thin film

    Lee, Won-Yong; Park, No-Won [Department of Physics, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Ji-Eun [Department of Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Soon-Gil, E-mail: sgyoon@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Jung-Hyuk [School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Kwon, E-mail: sangkwonlee@cau.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • We investigated thermal transport of the antimony telluride thin films. • The contribution of the electronic thermal conductivity increased up to ∼77% at 300 K. • We theoretically analyze and explain the high contribution of electronic component. - Abstract: We study the theoretical and experimental characteristics of thermal transport of 100 nm and 500 nm-thick antimony telluride (Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) thin films prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity was measured at temperatures ranging from 20 to 300 K, using four-point-probe 3-ω method. Out-of-plane thermal conductivity of the Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film was much lesser in comparison to the bulk material in the entire temperature range, confirming that the phonon- and electron-boundary scattering are enhanced in thin films. Moreover, we found that the contribution of the electronic thermal conductivity (κ{sub e}) in total thermal conductivity (κ) linearly increased up to ∼77% at 300 K with increasing temperature. We theoretically analyze and explain the high contribution of electronic component of thermal conductivity towards the total thermal conductivity of the film by a modified Callaway model. Further, we find the theoretical model predictions to correspond well with the experimental results.

  17. Oblique ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in two temperature superthermal electrons magnetized plasma

    Panwar, A.; Ryu, C. M.; Bains, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    A study is presented for the oblique propagation of ion acoustic cnoidal waves in a magnetized plasma consisting of cold ions and two temperature superthermal electrons modelled by kappa-type distributions. Using the reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear Korteweg de-Vries equation is derived, which further gives the solutions with a special type of cnoidal elliptical functions. Both compressive and rarefactive structures are found for these cnoidal waves. Nonlinear periodic cnoidal waves are explained in terms of plasma parameters depicting the Sagdeev potential and the phase curves. It is found that the density ratio of hot electrons to ions μ significantly modifies compressive/refractive wave structures. Furthermore, the combined effects of superthermality of cold and hot electrons κ c ,κ h , cold to hot electron temperature ratio σ, angle of propagation and ion cyclotron frequency ω ci have been studied in detail to analyze the height and width of compressive/refractive cnoidal waves. The findings in the present study could have important implications in understanding the physics of electrostatic wave structures in the Saturn's magnetosphere where two temperature superthermal electrons are present

  18. Translational, rotational, vibrational and electron temperatures of a gliding arc discharge

    Zhu, Jiajian; Ehn, Andreas; Gao, Jinlong

    2017-01-01

    , 0) band was used to simulate the rotational temperature (Tr) of the gliding arc discharge whereas the NO A–X (1, 0) and (0, 1) bands were used to determine its vibrational temperature (Tv). The instantaneous reduced electric field strength E/N was obtained by simultaneously measuring......Translational, rotational, vibrational and electron temperatures of a gliding arc discharge in atmospheric pressure air were experimentally investigated using in situ, non-intrusive optical diagnostic techniques. The gliding arc discharge was driven by a 35 kHz alternating current (AC) power source...... and operated in a glow-type regime. The two-dimensional distribution of the translational temperature (Tt) of the gliding arc discharge was determined using planar laser-induced Rayleigh scattering. The rotational and vibrational temperatures were obtained by simulating the experimental spectra. The OH A–X (0...

  19. Modeling of temperature profiles in an environmental transmission electron microscope using computational fluid dynamics

    Mortensen, Peter Mølgaard; Jensen, Anker Degn; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2015-01-01

    The temperature and velocity field, pressure distribution, and the temperature variation across the sample region inside an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) have been modeled by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Heating the sample area by a furnace type TEM holder...... gives rise to temperature gradients over the sample area. Three major mechanisms have been identified with respect to heat transfer in the sample area: radiation from the grid, conduction in the grid, and conduction in the gas. A parameter sensitivity analysis showed that the sample temperature...... was affected by the conductivity of the gas, the emissivity of the sample grid, and the conductivity of the grid. Ideally the grid should be polished and made from a material with good conductivity, e.g. copper. With hydrogen gas, which has the highest conductivity of the gases studied, the temperature...

  20. High-temperature electronic structure with the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green's function method

    Starrett, C. E.

    2018-05-01

    Modeling high-temperature (tens or hundreds of eV), dense plasmas is challenging due to the multitude of non-negligible physical effects including significant partial ionization and multisite effects. These effects cause the breakdown or intractability of common methods and approximations used at low temperatures, such as pseudopotentials or plane-wave basis sets. Here we explore the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green's function method at these high-temperature conditions. The method is all electron, does not rely on pseudopotentials, and uses a spherical harmonic basis set, and so avoids the aforementioned limitations. It is found to be accurate for solid density aluminum and iron plasmas when compared to a plane-wave method at low temperature, while being able to access high temperatures.

  1. Finite grid radius and thickness effects on retarding potential analyzer measured suprathermal electron density and temperature

    Knudsen, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of finite grid radius and thickness on the electron current measured by planar retarding potential analyzers (RPAs) is analyzed numerically. Depending on the plasma environment, the current is significantly reduced below that which is calculated using a theoretical equation derived for an idealized RPA having grids with infinite radius and vanishingly small thickness. A correction factor to the idealized theoretical equation is derived for the Pioneer Venus (PV) orbiter RPA (ORPA) for electron gases consisting of one or more components obeying Maxwell statistics. The error in density and temperature of Maxwellian electron distributions previously derived from ORPA data using the theoretical expression for the idealized ORPA is evaluated by comparing the densities and temperatures derived from a sample of PV ORPA data using the theoretical expression with and without the correction factor

  2. Temperature dependent transport of two dimensional electrons in the integral quantum Hall regime

    Wi, H.P.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the temperature dependent electronic transport properties of a two dimensional electron gas subject to background potential fluctuations and a perpendicular magnetic field. The author carried out an extensive temperature dependent study of the transport coefficients, in the region of an integral quantum plateau, in an In/sub x/Ga/sub 1-x/As/InP heterostructure for 4.2K 10 cm -2 meV -1 ) even at the middle between two Landau levels, which is unexpected from model calculations based on short ranged randomness. In addition, the different T dependent behavior of rho/sub xx/ between the states in the tails and those near the center of a Landau level, indicates the existence of different electron states in a Landau level. Additionally, the author reports T-dependent transport measurements in the transition region between two quantum plateaus in several different materials

  3. Electric field dependence of the temperature and drift velocity of hot electrons in n-Si

    Vass, E.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The average energy- and momentum loss rates of hot electrons interacting simultaneously with acoustic phonons, ionized and neutral impurities in n-Si are calculated quantum theoretically by means of a drifted hot Fermi-Dirac distribution. The drift velocity vd and electron temperature Te occurring in this distribution are determined self-consistently from the force- and power balance equation with respect to the charge neutrality condition. The functions Te(E) and vd(E) calculated in this way are compared with the corresponding relations obtained with help of the simple electron temperature model in order to determine the range of application of this model often used in previous treatises. (author)

  4. Temperature gradient scale length measurement: A high accuracy application of electron cyclotron emission without calibration

    Houshmandyar, S., E-mail: houshmandyar@austin.utexas.edu; Phillips, P. E.; Rowan, W. L. [Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Yang, Z. J. [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Hubbard, A. E.; Rice, J. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Wolfe, S. M. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02129 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Calibration is a crucial procedure in electron temperature (T{sub e}) inference from a typical electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostic on tokamaks. Although the calibration provides an important multiplying factor for an individual ECE channel, the parameter ΔT{sub e}/T{sub e} is independent of any calibration. Since an ECE channel measures the cyclotron emission for a particular flux surface, a non-perturbing change in toroidal magnetic field changes the view of that channel. Hence the calibration-free parameter is a measure of T{sub e} gradient. B{sub T}-jog technique is presented here which employs the parameter and the raw ECE signals for direct measurement of electron temperature gradient scale length.

  5. Temperature dependence of electron mobility, electroluminescence and photoluminescence of Alq{sub 3} in OLED

    Mu Haichuan; White, Dan; Sharpton, Buck [Office of Electronic Miniaturization, University of Alaska at Fairbanks, AK 99701 (United States); Klotzkin, David [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); De Silva, Ajith; Wagner, Hans Peter [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States)], E-mail: fnhm@uaf.edu

    2008-12-07

    The correlation of electroluminescence (EL), photoluminescence (PL) and electron mobility were investigated over temperature from 60 to 300 K in small-molecule organic light emitting diode (OLED) structures. The devices consisted of ITO/PEDOT(50 nm)/TPD(50 nm)/Alq{sub 3}(60 nm)/LiF(1 nm)/Al(90 nm), and were fabricated with high-vacuum sublimation/evaporation in a cross-linked configuration. Electron mobility was measured using an ac analysis of the device optical modulation characteristics, while PL and EL were measured by measuring optical power out at fixed pump power of 1 mW, and analysis of dc brightness-voltage (L-V) characteristics, respectively. PL intensity and mobility had a clear maximum at around 220 K, while EL efficiency was constant below 220 K and decrease monotonically above. The reason for the temperature dependent EL, PL and electron mobility behaviour will be discussed.

  6. Nonlinear theory of trapped electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in flat density H-mode plasmas

    Hahm, T.S.

    1990-12-01

    Ion temperature gradient turbulence based transport models have difficulties reconciling the recent DIII-D H-mode results where the density profile is flat, but χ e > χ i in the core region. In this work, a nonlinear theory is developed for recently discovered ion temperature gradient trapped electron modes propagating in the electron diamagnetic direction. This instability is predicted to be linearly unstable for L Ti /R approx-lt κ θ ρ s approx-lt (L Ti /R) 1/4 . They are also found to be strongly dispersive even at these long wavelengths, thereby suggesting the importance of the wave-particle-wave interactions in the nonlinear saturation phase. The fluctuation spectrum and anomalous fluxes are calculated. In accordance with the trends observed in DIII-D, the predicted electron thermal diffusivity can be larger than the ion thermal diffusivity. 17 refs., 3 figs

  7. Temperature--pressure compensation for a linear accelerator electron beam dosimeter

    Hrejsa, A.F.; Soen, J.; Jankowiak, P.

    1985-01-01

    Routine weekly calibration of a Siemens Mevatron 20 linear accelerator with 3-, 5-, 7-, 10-, 12-, 15-, and 18-MeV electron energies demonstrated fluctuations in dose/monitor unit for the electron beam on the order of 3%--6%. Evaluations and study of the problem demonstrated that the electron chamber, which is open to atmosphere, was undergoing significant temperature changes during the course of a treatment day. The inability of the chamber to compensate for these changes in temperature and pressure led to the addition of a compensating circuit by the manufacturer. The results of the addition of this circuit were evaluated for several extended periods throughout the year, and it was found that the changes in dose/monitor were reduced to approximately +- 0.5%

  8. A Statistical Study of Eiscat Electron and Ion Temperature Measurements In The E-region

    Hussey, G.; Haldoupis, C.; Schlegel, K.; Bösinger, T.

    Motivated by the large EISCAT data base, which covers over 15 years of common programme operation, and previous statistical work with EISCAT data (e.g., C. Hal- doupis, K. Schlegel, and G. Hussey, Auroral E-region electron density gradients mea- sured with EISCAT, Ann. Geopshysicae, 18, 1172-1181, 2000), a detailed statistical analysis of electron and ion EISCAT temperature measurements has been undertaken. This study was specifically concerned with the statistical dependence of heating events with other ambient parameters such as the electric field and electron density. The re- sults showed previously reported dependences such as the electron temperature being directly correlated with the ambient electric field and inversely related to the electron density. However, these correlations were found to be also dependent upon altitude. There was also evidence of the so called "Schlegel effect" (K. Schlegel, Reduced effective recombination coefficient in the disturbed polar E-region, J. Atmos. Terr. Phys., 44, 183-185, 1982); that is, the heated electron gas leads to increases in elec- tron density through a reduction in the recombination rate. This paper will present the statistical heating results and attempt to offer physical explanations and interpretations of the findings.

  9. Winter nightime ion temperatures and energetic electrons from 0go 6 plasma measurements

    Sanatani, S.; Breig, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses ion temperature and suprathermal electron flux data acquired with the retarding potential analyzer on board the ogo 6 satellite when it was in solar eclipse. Attention is directed to measurements in the 400- to 800-km height interval between midnight and predawn in the northern winter nonpolar ionosphere. Statistical analysis of data recorded during a 1-month time span permits a decoupling of horizontal and altitude effects. A distinct longitudinal variation is observed for ion temperature above 500 km, with a significant relative enhancement over the western North Altantic Altitude distributions of ion temperature are compatible with Millstone Hill profiles within the common region of this enhancement. Large fluxes of energetic electrons are observed and extend to mush lower geomagnetic latitudes in the same longitude sector. Both a direct correlation in magnitude and a strong similarity in spatial extent are demonstrated for these ion temperature and electron flux data. The location of the limiting low-altitude boundary for observation of the electron fluxes is variable, dependent on local time and season as well as longitude. Variations in this boundary are found to be consistent with a calculated conjugate solar zenith angle of 99 0 +- 2 0 describing photoproduction of energetic electrons in the southern hemisphere. The ogo 6 data are considered to be indicative of an energy source originating in the sunlit summer hemisphere and providing heat via transport of photoelectrons to a broad but preferential segment of the winter nighttime mid-latitude ionosphere. Ions at other longitudes are without access to this energy source and cool to near the neutral temperature at heights to above 800 km inthe predawn hours

  10. The potentially neglected culprit of DC surface flashover: electron migration under temperature gradients.

    Li, Chuanyang; Hu, Jun; Lin, Chuanjie; He, Jinliang

    2017-06-12

    This report intends to reveal the role of electron migration and its effects in triggering direct current (DC) surface flashover under temperature gradient conditions when using epoxy-based insulating composites. The surface potential and the surface flashover voltage are both measured using insulators that are bridged between two thermo-regulated electrodes. The space charge injection and migration properties under different temperature are detected. The results show that the surface potential rises significantly because of electron migration near the high voltage (HV) electrode under high temperature conditions, thus creating an "analogous ineffective region". The expansion of this "analogous ineffective region" results in most of the voltage drop occurring near the ground electrode, which serves as an important factor triggering positive streamers across the insulation surface. This work is helpful in understanding of DC surface flashover mechanism from a new perspective and also has important significance in design of a suitable DC insulator to avoid surface flashover problem.

  11. Characterization and Aging Test Methodology for Power Electronic Devices at High Temperature

    Ibrahim, A.; Khatir, Z.; Dupont, L.

    2011-01-01

    Power electronic modules are key elements in the chain of power conversion. The application areas include aerospace, aviation, railway, electrical distribution, automotive, home automation, oil industry ... But the use of power electronics in high temperature environments is a major strategic issue in the coming years especially in transport. However, the active components based on silicon are limited in their applications and not suitable for those require both high voltages and high ambient temperatures. The materials with wide energy gap like SiC, GaN and diamond, have the advantage of being able to exceed these limits [1,2]. These materials seem adequate to extremely harsh temperature environments and allow the reduction of cooling systems, but also the increasing of switching frequency. (author)

  12. Effect of Temperature on Nucleation of Nanocrystalline Indium Tin Oxide Synthesized by Electron-Beam Evaporation

    Shen, Yan; Zhao, Yujun; Shen, Jianxing; Xu, Xiangang

    2017-07-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) has been widely applied as a transparent conductive layer and optical window in light-emitting diodes, solar cells, and touch screens. In this paper, crystalline nano-sized ITO dendrites are obtained using an electron-beam evaporation technique. The surface morphology of the obtained ITO was studied for substrate temperatures of 25°C, 130°C, 180°C, and 300°C. Nano-sized crystalline dendrites were synthesized only at a substrate temperature of 300°C. The dendrites had a cubic structure, confirmed by the results of x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The growth mechanism of the nano-crystalline dendrites could be explained by a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth model. The catalysts of the VLS process were indium and tin droplets, confirmed by varying the substrate temperature, which further influenced the nucleation of the ITO dendrites.

  13. Distributions of the ion temperature, ion pressure, and electron density over the current sheet surface

    Kyrie, N. P., E-mail: kyrie@fpl.gpi.ru; Markov, V. S., E-mail: natalya.kyrie@yandex.ru; Frank, A. G.; Vasilkov, D. G.; Voronova, E. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    The distributions of the ion temperature, ion pressure, and electron density over the width (the major transverse dimension) of the current sheet have been studied for the first time. The current sheets were formed in discharges in argon and helium in 2D and 3D magnetic configurations. It is found that the temperature of argon ions in both 2D and 3D magnetic configurations is almost uniform over the sheet width and that argon ions are accelerated by the Ampère force. In contrast, the distributions of the electron density and the temperature of helium ions are found to be substantially nonuniform. As a result, in the 2D magnetic configuration, the ion pressure gradient across the sheet width makes a significant contribution (comparable with the Ampère force) to the acceleration of helium ions, whereas in the 3D magnetic configuration, the Ampère force is counterbalanced by the pressure gradient.

  14. Distributions of the ion temperature, ion pressure, and electron density over the current sheet surface

    Kyrie, N. P.; Markov, V. S.; Frank, A. G.; Vasilkov, D. G.; Voronova, E. V.

    2016-01-01

    The distributions of the ion temperature, ion pressure, and electron density over the width (the major transverse dimension) of the current sheet have been studied for the first time. The current sheets were formed in discharges in argon and helium in 2D and 3D magnetic configurations. It is found that the temperature of argon ions in both 2D and 3D magnetic configurations is almost uniform over the sheet width and that argon ions are accelerated by the Ampère force. In contrast, the distributions of the electron density and the temperature of helium ions are found to be substantially nonuniform. As a result, in the 2D magnetic configuration, the ion pressure gradient across the sheet width makes a significant contribution (comparable with the Ampère force) to the acceleration of helium ions, whereas in the 3D magnetic configuration, the Ampère force is counterbalanced by the pressure gradient.

  15. Electron mobility in nonpolar liquids: the effect of molecular structure, temperature and electric field

    Schmidt, W.F.

    1977-01-01

    A survey is given on the mobility of excess electrons in liquid hydrocarbons and related compounds. It was found that the mobility is strongly influenced by the molecular structure of the liquid, by the temperature, and by the electric field strength. The mobility in hydrocarbons increases as the shape of the molecule approaches a sphere. The temperature coefficient is positive in most liquids over a limited temperature although exceptions have been observed in liquid methane. The field dependence of the mobility in high mobility liquids (>10 cm 2 V -1 s -1 ) showed a decrease of the mobility at higher field strengths while in low mobility liquids ( 2 V -1 s -1 ) it showed an increase. These results are discussed on the basis of the extended and the localized electron models. The predictions of these theories are compared with the experimental results and conclusions on the validity of the underlying assumptions are drawn. (author)

  16. Observation of Flat Electron Temperature Profiles in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment

    Boyle, D. P.; Majeski, R.; Schmitt, J. C.; Auburn University, AL; Hansen, C.

    2017-01-01

    It has been predicted for over a decade that low-recycling plasma-facing components in fusion devices would allow high edge temperatures and flat or nearly flat temperature profiles. In recent experiments with lithium wall coatings in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX), a hot edge (> 200 eV) and flat electron temperature profiles have been measured following the termination of external fueling. In this work, reduced recycling was demonstrated by retention of ~ 60% of the injected hydrogen in the walls following the discharge. Electron energy confinement followed typical Ohmic confinement scaling during fueling, but did not decrease with density after fueling terminated, ultimately exceeding the scaling by ~ 200% . Lastly, achievement of the low-recycling, hot edge regime has been an important goal of LTX and lithium plasma-facing component research in general, as it has potentially significant implications for the operation, design, and cost of fusion devices.

  17. Onset temperature for Si nanostructure growth on Si substrate during high vacuum electron beam annealing.

    Fang, F; Markwitz, A

    2009-05-01

    Silicon nanostructures, called Si nanowhiskers, are successfully synthesized on Si(100) substrate by high vacuum electron beam annealing. The onset temperature and duration needed for the Si nanowhiskers to grow was investigated. It was found that the onset and growth morphology of Si nanowhiskers strongly depend on the annealing temperature and duration applied in the annealing cycle. The onset temperature for nanowhisker growth was determined as 680 degrees C using an annealing duration of 90 min and temperature ramps of +5 degrees C s(-1) for heating and -100 degrees C s(-1) for cooling. Decreasing the annealing time at peak temperature to 5 min required an increase in peak temperature to 800 degrees C to initiate the nanowhisker growth. At 900 degrees C the duration for annealing at peak temperature can be set to 0 s to grow silicon nanowhiskers. A correlation was found between the variation in annealing temperature and duration and the nanowhisker height and density. Annealing at 900 degrees C for 0 s, only 2-3 nanowhiskers (average height 2.4 nm) grow on a surface area of 5 x 5 microm, whereas more than 500 nanowhiskers with an important average height of 4.6 nm for field emission applications grow on the same surface area for a sample annealed at 970 degrees C for 0 s. Selected results are presented showing the possibility of controlling the density and height of Si nanowhisker growth for field emission applications by applying different annealing temperature and duration.

  18. Numerical model for radial transport in the ELMO Bumpy Torus

    Jaeger, E.F.; Hedrick, C.L.

    1977-11-01

    Neutral and charged particle densities and temperatures are calculated as functions of radius for the toroidal plasma in the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) experiment. Energy dependent ionization and charge-exchange rates, ambipolar diffusion, and self-consistent radial electric field profiles are included. Variation in magnetic field due to finite plasma pressure, effects of energetic electron rings, and transport due to drift waves and magnetic field errors are neglected. Diffusion is assumed to be neoclassical with enhanced losses at low collisionalities. The model reproduces many of the observed features of EBT operation in the quiescent toroidal (T) mode. The self-consistently calculated electric field is everywhere positive (not as in experiments) unless enhanced electron collisionality is included. Solutions for advanced EBT's are obtained and confinement parameters predicted

  19. Electron Sources of the Diode Type with Cathode and Anode of High Temperature Superconductors

    Korenev, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    The planar electron sources of the diode type with cathode and anode of high temperature superconductors (HTSC) are considered. Explosive emission cathode on the basis of bismuth ceramics (Bi-Ca-Sr-Cu-O) allows forming microsecond pulse (duration > 1 μs) and low energy electron beams (10-25 keV). Tube anode of HTSC in superconducting phase compresses the pulsed electron beam (K = 2-8). It leads to an increase of the beam power density. The high voltage of the generator of Arkad'ev-Marx type (U = 100-600 kV) and the generator with double L C-line are used for experiments. The pulsed method of measuring of the HTSC critical current with the help of pulsed high current electron beam is described. (author). 16 refs., 13 figs

  20. Thick-Film and LTCC Passive Components for High-Temperature Electronics

    A. Dziedzic

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available At this very moment an increasing interest in the field of high-temperature electronics is observed. This is a result of development in the area of wide-band semiconductors’ engineering but this also generates needs for passives with appropriate characteristics. This paper presents fabrication as well as electrical and stability properties of passive components (resistors, capacitors, inductors made in thick-film or Low-Temperature Co-fired Ceramics (LTCC technologies fulfilling demands of high-temperature electronics. Passives with standard dimensions usually are prepared by screen-printing whereas combination of standard screen-printing with photolithography or laser shaping are recommenced for fabrication of micropassives. Attainment of proper characteristics versus temperature as well as satisfactory long-term high-temperature stability of micropassives is more difficult than for structures with typical dimensions for thick-film and LTCC technologies because of increase of interfacial processes’ importance. However it is shown that proper selection of thick-film inks together with proper deposition method permit to prepare thick-film micropassives (microresistors, air-cored microinductors and interdigital microcapacitors suitable for the temperature range between 150°C and 400°C.

  1. A Harsh Environment Wireless Pressure Sensing Solution Utilizing High Temperature Electronics

    Yang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Pressure measurement under harsh environments, especially at high temperatures, is of great interest to many industries. The applicability of current pressure sensing technologies in extreme environments is limited by the embedded electronics which cannot survive beyond 300 °C ambient temperature as of today. In this paper, a pressure signal processing and wireless transmission module based on the cutting-edge Silicon Carbide (SiC) devices is designed and developed, for a commercial piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor from Kulite Semiconductor Products, Inc. Equipped with this advanced high-temperature SiC electronics, not only the sensor head, but the entire pressure sensor suite is capable of operating at 450 °C. The addition of wireless functionality also makes the pressure sensor more flexible in harsh environments by eliminating the costly and fragile cable connections. The proposed approach was verified through prototype fabrication and high temperature bench testing from room temperature up to 450 °C. This novel high-temperature pressure sensing technology can be applied in real-time health monitoring of many systems involving harsh environments, such as military and commercial turbine engines. PMID:23447006

  2. Temperature-dependent surface structure, composition, and electronic properties of the clean SrTiO3(111) crystal face: Low-energy-electron diffraction, Auger-electron spectroscopy, electron energy loss, and ultraviolet-photoelectron spectroscopy studies

    Lo, W.J.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    Low-energy-electron diffraction, Auger-electron spectroscopy, electron-energy-loss, and ultraviolet-photoelectron spectroscopies were used to study the structure, composition, and electron energy distribution of a clean single-crystal (111) face of strontium titanate (perovskite). The dependence of the surface chemical composition on the temperature has been observed along with corresponding changes in the surface electronic properties. High-temperature Ar-ion bombardment causes an irreversible change in the surface structure, stoichiometry, and electron energy distribution. In contrast to the TiO 2 surface, there are always significant concentrations of Ti 3+ in an annealed ordered SrTiO 3 (111) surface. This stable active Ti 3+ monolayer on top of a substrate with large surface dipole potential makes SrTiO 3 superior to TiO 2 when used as a photoanode in the photoelectrochemical cell

  3. Crystal growth and electronic structure of low-temperature phase SrMgF{sub 4}

    Atuchin, Victor V. [Laboratory of Optical Materials and Structures, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Functional Electronics Laboratory, Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Laboratory of Semiconductor and Dielectric Materials, Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Goloshumova, Alina A. [Laboratory of Crystal Growth, Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Isaenko, Ludmila I. [Laboratory of Semiconductor and Dielectric Materials, Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Laboratory of Crystal Growth, Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Jiang, Xingxing [BCCRD, Key Laboratory of Functional Crystals and Laser Technology, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Lobanov, Sergey I. [Laboratory of Crystal Growth, Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Zhang, Zhaoming [Australian Nuclear Science & Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Lin, Zheshuai, E-mail: zslin@mail.ipc.ac.cn [BCCRD, Key Laboratory of Functional Crystals and Laser Technology, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Using the vertical Bridgman method, the single crystal of low temperature phase SrMgF{sub 4} is obtained. The crystal is in a very good optical quality with the size of 10×7×5 mm{sup 3}. Detailed photoemission spectra of the element core levels are determined by a monochromatic AlKa (1486.6 eV) X-ray source. Moreover, the first-principles calculations are performed to investigate the electronic structure of SrMgF{sub 4}. A good agreement between experimental and calculated results is achieved. It is demonstrated that almost all the electronic orbitals are strongly localized and the hybridization with the others is very small, but the Mg–F bonds covalency is relatively stronger than that of Sr–F bonds. - Graphical abstract: Large size of low-temperature phase SrMgF{sub 4} crystal was obtained (right) and its electronic structure was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and first-principles calculation (left). - Highlights: • Large size single crystal of low-temperature phase SrMgF{sub 4} is obtained. • Electronic structure of SrMgF{sub 4} is measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. • Partial densities of states are determined by first-principles calculation. • Good agreement between experimental and calculated results is achieved. • Strong ionic characteristics of chemical bonds are exhibited in SrMgF{sub 4}.

  4. Spectral measurements of electron temperature in nonequilibrium highly ionized He plasma

    Korshunov, O V; Chinnov, V F; Kavyrshin, D I; Ageev, A G

    2016-01-01

    It has been experimentally shown that highly ionized He arc plasma does not achieve local thermodynamic equilibrium expected for plasmas with electron concentrations above 1 × 10 16 cm -3 like argon plasma. We have found that the reason for this deviation is strong nonisotropy of plasma. Triple electron recombination with temperatures of 2.5-3 eV is almost absent. Charged particles move from the arc ( r = 1 mm) to chamber walls due to ambipolar diffusion creating ionization nonequilibrium over the excited states rendering Boltzmann distribution and Saha equation inapplicable for determining electron temperature. A method for determining electron temperature is suggested that is based on using the relative intensities of the atomic and ion lines. Its advantage lies in an energy gap between these lines’ states over 50 eV that reduces the influence of nonequilibrium on the result. This influence can be taken into account if the ionization energies of emitting states of atom and ion have close values. The suggested method can be expanded for any media including those with dimensional nonisotropy that have both atomic and ion lines in their emission spectra. (paper)

  5. Variable stator radial turbine

    Rogo, C.; Hajek, T.; Chen, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    A radial turbine stage with a variable area nozzle was investigated. A high work capacity turbine design with a known high performance base was modified to accept a fixed vane stagger angle moveable sidewall nozzle. The nozzle area was varied by moving the forward and rearward sidewalls. Diffusing and accelerating rotor inlet ramps were evaluated in combinations with hub and shroud rotor exit rings. Performance of contoured sidewalls and the location of the sidewall split line with respect to the rotor inlet was compared to the baseline. Performance and rotor exit survey data are presented for 31 different geometries. Detail survey data at the nozzle exit are given in contour plot format for five configurations. A data base is provided for a variable geometry concept that is a viable alternative to the more common pivoted vane variable geometry radial turbine.

  6. Transport coefficients in high-temperature ionized air flows with electronic excitation

    Istomin, V. A.; Oblapenko, G. P.

    2018-01-01

    Transport coefficients are studied in high-temperature ionized air mixtures using the modified Chapman-Enskog method. The 11-component mixture N2/N2+/N /N+/O2/O2+/O /O+/N O /N O+/e- , taking into account the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom of molecules and electronic degrees of freedom of both atomic and molecular species, is considered. Using the PAINeT software package, developed by the authors of the paper, in wide temperature range calculations of the thermal conductivity, thermal diffusion, diffusion, and shear viscosity coefficients for an equilibrium ionized air mixture and non-equilibrium flow conditions for mixture compositions, characteristic of those in shock tube experiments and re-entry conditions, are performed. For the equilibrium air case, the computed transport coefficients are compared to those obtained using simplified kinetic theory algorithms. It is shown that neglecting electronic excitation leads to a significant underestimation of the thermal conductivity coefficient at temperatures higher than 25 000 K. For non-equilibrium test cases, it is shown that the thermal diffusion coefficients of neutral species and the self-diffusion coefficients of all species are strongly affected by the mixture composition, while the thermal conductivity coefficient is most strongly influenced by the degree of ionization of the flow. Neglecting electronic excitation causes noticeable underestimation of the thermal conductivity coefficient at temperatures higher than 20 000 K.

  7. Electron temperature profiles in high power neutral-beam-heated TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] plasmas

    Taylor, G.; Grek, B.; Stauffer, F.J.; Goldston, R.J.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Wieland, R.M.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1987-09-01

    In 1986, the maximum neutral beam injection (NBI) power in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was increased to 20 MW, with three beams co-parallel and one counter-parallel to I/sub p/. TFTR was operated over a wide range of plasma parameters; 2.5 19 19 m -3 . Data bases have been constructed with over 600 measured electron temperature profiles from multipoint TV Thomson scattering which span much of this parameter space. We have also examined electron temperature profile shapes from electron cyclotron emission at the fundamental ordinary mode and second harmonic extraordinary mode for a subset of these discharges. In the light of recent work on ''profile consistency'' we have analyzed these temperature profiles in the range 0.3 < (r/a) < 0.9 to determine if a profile shape exists which is insensitive to q/sub cyl/ and beam-heating profile. Data from both sides of the temperature profile [T/sub e/(R)] were mapped to magnetic flux surfaces [T/sub e/(r/a)]. Although T/sub e/(r/a), in the region where 0.3 < r/a < 0.9 was found to be slightly broader at lower q/sub cyl/, it was found to be remarkably insensitive to β/sub p/, to the fraction of NBI power injected co-parallel to I/sub p/, and to the heating profile going from peaked on axis, to hollow. 10 refs., 8 figs

  8. Estimation of Radial Runout

    Nilsson, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The demands for ride comfort quality in today's long haulage trucks are constantly growing. A part of the ride comfort problems are represented by internal vibrations caused by rotating mechanical parts. This thesis work focus on the vibrations generated from radial runout on the wheels. These long haulage trucks travel long distances on smooth highways, with a constant speed of 90 km/h resulting in a 7 Hz oscillation. This frequency creates vibrations in the cab, which can be found annoying....

  9. Radial Fuzzy Systems

    Coufal, David

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 319, 15 July (2017), s. 1-27 ISSN 0165-0114 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13002 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : fuzzy systems * radial functions * coherence Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 2.718, year: 2016

  10. High field electron-spin transport and observation of the Dyakonov-Perel spin relaxation of drifting electrons in low temperature-grown gallium arsenide

    Miah, M. Idrish

    2008-01-01

    High field electron-spin transport in low temperature-grown gallium arsenide is studied. We generate electron spins in the samples by optical pumping. During transport, we observe the Dyakonov-Perel (DP) [M.I. Dyakonov, V.I. Perel, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 60 (1971) 1954] spin relaxation of the drifting electrons. The results are discussed and are compared with those obtained in calculations of the DP spin relaxation frequency of the hot electrons. A good agreement is obtained

  11. High field electron-spin transport and observation of the Dyakonov-Perel spin relaxation of drifting electrons in low temperature-grown gallium arsenide

    Miah, M. Idrish [Nanoscale Science and Technology Centre, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh)], E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.au

    2008-11-17

    High field electron-spin transport in low temperature-grown gallium arsenide is studied. We generate electron spins in the samples by optical pumping. During transport, we observe the Dyakonov-Perel (DP) [M.I. Dyakonov, V.I. Perel, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 60 (1971) 1954] spin relaxation of the drifting electrons. The results are discussed and are compared with those obtained in calculations of the DP spin relaxation frequency of the hot electrons. A good agreement is obtained.

  12. Temperature, stress, and annealing effects on the luminescence from electron-irradiated silicon

    Jones, C. E.; Johnson, E. S.; Compton, W. D.; Noonan, J. R.; Streetman, B. G.

    1973-01-01

    Low-temperature photoluminescence spectra are presented for Si crystals which have been irradiated with high-energy electrons. Studies of isochronal annealing, stress effects, and the temperature dependences of the luminescence are used to discuss the nature of the luminescent transitions and the properties of defects. Two dominant bands present after room-temperature anneal of irradiated material are discussed, and correlations of the properties of these bands are made with known Si defects. A band between 0.8 and 1.0 eV has properties which are related to those of the divacancy, and a band between 0.6 and 0.8 eV has properties related to those of the Si-G15(K) center. Additional peaks appear in the luminescence after high-temperature anneal; the influence of impurities and the effects of annealing of these lines are discussed.

  13. The Kondo temperature of a two-dimensional electron gas with Rashba spin–orbit coupling

    Chen, Liang; Lin, Hai-Qing; Sun, Jinhua; Tang, Ho-Kin

    2016-01-01

    We use the Hirsch–Fye quantum Monte Carlo method to study the single magnetic impurity problem in a two-dimensional electron gas with Rashba spin–orbit coupling. We calculate the spin susceptibility for various values of spin–orbit coupling, Hubbard interaction, and chemical potential. The Kondo temperatures for different parameters are estimated by fitting the universal curves of spin susceptibility. We find that the Kondo temperature is almost a linear function of Rashba spin–orbit energy when the chemical potential is close to the edge of the conduction band. When the chemical potential is far away from the band edge, the Kondo temperature is independent of the spin–orbit coupling. These results demonstrate that, for single impurity problems in this system, the most important reason to change the Kondo temperature is the divergence of density of states near the band edge, and the divergence is induced by the Rashba spin–orbit coupling. (paper)

  14. Radial Field Piezoelectric Diaphragms

    Bryant, R. G.; Effinger, R. T., IV; Copeland, B. M., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    A series of active piezoelectric diaphragms were fabricated and patterned with several geometrically defined Inter-Circulating Electrodes "ICE" and Interdigitated Ring Electrodes "ICE". When a voltage potential is applied to the electrodes, the result is a radially distributed electric field that mechanically strains the piezoceramic along the Z-axis (perpendicular to the applied electric field). Unlike other piezoelectric bender actuators, these Radial Field Diaphragms (RFDs) strain concentrically yet afford high displacements (several times that of the equivalent Unimorph) while maintaining a constant circumference. One of the more intriguing aspects is that the radial strain field reverses itself along the radius of the RFD while the tangential strain remains relatively constant. The result is a Z-deflection that has a conical profile. This paper covers the fabrication and characterization of the 5 cm. (2 in.) diaphragms as a function of poling field strength, ceramic thickness, electrode type and line spacing, as well as the surface topography, the resulting strain field and displacement as a function of applied voltage at low frequencies. The unique features of these RFDs include the ability to be clamped about their perimeter with little or no change in displacement, the environmentally insulated packaging, and a highly repeatable fabrication process that uses commodity materials.

  15. The LXCat project: Electron scattering cross sections and swarm parameters for low temperature plasma modeling

    Pancheshnyi, S.; Biagi, S.; Bordage, M.C.; Hagelaar, G.J.M.; Morgan, W.L.; Phelps, A.V.; Pitchford, L.C.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: LXCat is an open-access website containing data needed for low temperature plasma modeling as well as on-line tools useful for their manipulation. Highlights: ► LXCat: an open-access website with data for low temperature plasma modeling. ► Contains compilations of electron scattering cross sections and transport data. ► Data from different contributors for many neutral, ground-state species. ► On-line tools for browsing, plotting, up/downloading data. ► On-line Boltzmann solver for calculating electron swarm parameters. - Abstract: LXCat is a dynamic, open-access, website for collecting, displaying, and downloading ELECtron SCATtering cross sections and swarm parameters (mobility, diffusion coefficient, reaction rates, etc.) required for modeling low temperature, non-equilibrium plasmas. Contributors set up individual databases, and the available databases, indicated by the contributor’s chosen title, include mainly complete sets of electron-neutral scattering cross sections, although the option for introducing partial sets of cross sections exists. A database for measured swarm parameters is also part of LXCat, and this is a growing activity. On-line tools include options for browsing, plotting, and downloading cross section data. The electron energy distribution functions (edfs) in low temperature plasmas are in general non-Maxwellian, and LXCat provides an option for execution of an on-line Boltzmann equation solver to calculate the edf in homogeneous electric fields. Thus, the user can obtain electron transport and rate coefficients (averages over the edfs) in pure gases or gas mixtures over a range of values of the reduced electric fields strength, E/N, the ratio of the electric field strength to the neutral density, using cross sections from the available databases. New contributors are welcome and anyone wishing to create a database and upload data can request a username and password. LXCat is part of a larger, community

  16. Plasma Signatures of Radial Field Power Dropouts

    Lucek, E.A.; Horbury, T.S.; Balogh, A.; McComas, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    A class of small scale structures, with a near-radial magnetic field and a drop in magnetic field fluctuation power, have recently been identified in the polar solar wind. An earlier study of 24 events, each lasting for 6 hours or more, identified no clear plasma signature. In an extension of that work, radial intervals lasting for 4 hours or more (89 in total), have been used to search for a statistically significant plasma signature. It was found that, despite considerable variations between intervals, there was a small but significant drop, on average, in plasma temperature, density and β during these events

  17. Perceived radial translation during centrifugation

    Bos, J.E.; Correia Grácio, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Linear acceleration generally gives rise to translation perception. Centripetal acceleration during centrifugation, however, has never been reported giving rise to a radial, inward translation perception. OBJECTIVE: To study whether centrifugation can induce a radial translation

  18. Microscopic Superconductivity and Room Temperature Electronics of High-Tc Cuprates

    Liu Fusui; Chen Wanfang

    2008-01-01

    This paper points out that the Landau criterion for macroscopic superfluidity of He II is only a criterion for microscopic superfluidity of 4 He, extends the Landau criterion to microscopic superconductivity in fermions (electron and hole) system and system with Cooper pairs without long-range phase coherence. This paper gives another three non-superconductive systems that are of microscopic superconductivity. This paper demonstrates that one application of microscopic superconductivity is to establish room temperature electronics of the high-T c cuprates

  19. Defect reactions on the phosphorus sublattice in low-temperature electron-irradiated InP

    Sibille, A.; Suski, J.

    1985-01-01

    This Rapid Communication describes several thermally or electronically stimulated defect reactions involving the dominant deep centers in low-temperature (25--300 K) electron-irradiated InP. Some of these reactions result in an increased concentration of the centers, thereby revealing the existence of a secondary production mechanism of the related defects. Low-energy irradiations allows one to select the type of the ejected atom (P) and gives direct evidence that only a phosphorus species, interstitial or vacancy, is involved in the creation-reaction-annealing events

  20. Generation of static magnetic fields by a test charge in a plasma with anisotropic electron temperature

    Aliev, Yu.M.; Bychenkov, V.Yu.; Frolov, A.A. (AN SSSR, Moscow. Fizicheskij Inst.)

    Structure of electomagnetic field generated with a charge in a plasma with anisotropic electron temperature has been studied. Unlike a hydrodynamical approach to study on the magnetic field qeneration with a test charge a kinetic theory describing spatial distribution of both magnetic and electrostatic components of charge field was constructed. Such theory results permit to investigate the charge field structure both at distances larger than length of free electron path and not exceeding it. The developed theory can serve as the basis for development of new methods for anisotropic plasma diagnostics.

  1. GaN-Based High Temperature and Radiation-Hard Electronics for Harsh Environments

    Son, Kyung-ah; Liao, Anna; Lung, Gerald; Gallegos, Manuel; Hatakeh, Toshiro; Harris, Richard D.; Scheick, Leif Z.; Smythe, William D.

    2010-01-01

    We develop novel GaN-based high temperature and radiation-hard electronics to realize data acquisition electronics and transmitters suitable for operations in harsh planetary environments. In this paper, we discuss our research on metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) transistors that are targeted for 500 (sup o)C operation and >2 Mrad radiation hardness. For the target device performance, we develop Schottky-free AlGaN/GaN MOS transistors, where a gate electrode is processed in a MOS layout using an Al2O3 gate dielectric layer....

  2. Is the thermal-spike model consistent with experimentally determined electron temperature?

    Ajryan, Eh.A.; Fedorov, A.V.; Kostenko, B.F.

    2000-01-01

    Carbon K-Auger electron spectra from amorphous carbon foils induced by fast heavy ions are theoretically investigated. The high-energy tail of the Auger structure showing a clear projectile charge dependence is analyzed within the thermal-spike model framework as well as in the frame of another model taking into account some kinetic features of the process. A poor comparison results between theoretically and experimentally determined temperatures are suggested to be due to an improper account of double electron excitations or due to shake-up processes which leave the system in a more energetic initial state than a statically screened core hole

  3. Effects of Solvent and Temperature on Free Radical Formation in Electronic Cigarette Aerosols.

    Bitzer, Zachary T; Goel, Reema; Reilly, Samantha M; Foulds, Jonathan; Muscat, Joshua; Elias, Ryan J; Richie, John P

    2018-01-16

    The ever-evolving market of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) presents a challenge for analyzing and characterizing the harmful products they can produce. Earlier we reported that e-cigarette aerosols can deliver high levels of reactive free radicals; however, there are few data characterizing the production of these potentially harmful oxidants. Thus, we have performed a detailed analysis of the different parameters affecting the production of free radical by e-cigarettes. Using a temperature-controlled e-cigarette device and a novel mechanism for reliably simulating e-cigarette usage conditions, including coil activation and puff flow, we analyzed the effects of temperature, wattage, and e-liquid solvent composition of propylene glycol (PG) and glycerol (GLY) on radical production. Free radicals in e-cigarette aerosols were spin-trapped and analyzed using electron paramagnetic resonance. Free radical production increased in a temperature-dependent manner, showing a nearly 2-fold increase between 100 and 300 °C under constant-temperature conditions. Free radical production under constant wattage showed an even greater increase when going from 10 to 50 W due, in part, to higher coil temperatures compared to constant-temperature conditions. The e-liquid PG content also heavily influenced free radical production, showing a nearly 3-fold increase upon comparison of ratios of 0:100 (PG:GLY) and 100:0 (PG:GLY). Increases in PG content were also associated with increases in aerosol-induced oxidation of biologically relevant lipids. These results demonstrate that the production of reactive free radicals in e-cigarette aerosols is highly solvent dependent and increases with an increase in temperature. Radical production was somewhat dependent on aerosol production at higher temperatures; however, disproportionately high levels of free radicals were observed at ≥100 °C despite limited aerosol production. Overall, these findings suggest that e-cigarettes can be

  4. The characteristics of carbon nanotubes grown at low temperature for electronic device application

    Park, Yong Seob [Department of Photoelectronics Information, Chosun College of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Junsin [School of Information and Communications Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, 440–746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaehyeong, E-mail: jaehyeong@skku.edu [School of Information and Communications Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, 440–746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-01

    For the application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in flexible electronic devices, the CNTs were grown on Corning 1737 glass substrate by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) method. To deposit the catalyst layer, TiN buffer layer of 200 nm thickness and Ni catalyst layer of 60 nm were first deposited on the glass by r.f. magnetron sputtering method. The CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2} gases are used as the synthesis gas of CNTs and the working pressure was about 2.13 kPa, and the substrate bias was about − 200 V. The growth time was from 2 min to 5 min and the microwave power was about 800 W. The substrate temperature as the main parameter was changed from 400 °C to 550 °C. The structural properties of CNTs synthesized with the substrate temperature were investigated using Raman, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy methods. The surface and electrical properties of CNTs grown by MPECVD method were studied by scanning probe microscopy and four-point probe methods. We obtained the multi-walled CNTs (MW-CNTs). Multi-walled CNTs were vertically grown on Ni/TiN/glass substrates below 500 °C without any glass deformations. As the substrate temperature was increased, the crystallinity of CNTs was improved. Ni catalyst was found at the tip of CNT by the TEM observation and the grown CNTs were found to have a multi-walled with bamboo like structure. - Highlights: • Synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. • Effects of substrate temperature on carbon nanotubes properties. • Improvement of the crystallinity with increasing substrate temperature. • Reduction of sheet resistance with increasing substrate temperature.

  5. Low-Temperature Electron Beam-Induced Transformations of Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals

    2017-01-01

    Cesium lead halide perovskite (CsPbX3, with X = Br, Cl, I) nanocrystals have been found to undergo severe modifications under the high-energy electron beam irradiation of a transmission electron microscope (80/200 keV). In particular, in our previous work, together with halogen desorption, Pb2+ ions were found to be reduced to Pb0 and then diffused to form lead nanoparticles at temperatures above −40 °C. Here, we present a detailed irradiation study of CsPbBr3 nanocrystals at temperatures below −40 °C, a range in which the diffusion of Pb0 atoms/clusters is drastically suppressed. Under these conditions, the irradiation instead induces the nucleation of randomly oriented CsBr, CsPb, and PbBr2 crystalline domains. In addition to the Br desorption, which accompanies Pb2+ reduction at all the temperatures, Br is also desorbed from the CsBr and PbBr2 domains at low temperatures, leading to a more pronounced Br loss, thus the final products are mainly composed of Cs and Pb. The overall transformation involves the creation of voids, which coalesce upon further exposure, as demonstrated in both nanosheets and nanocuboids. Our results show that although low temperatures hinder the formation of Pb nanoparticles in CsPbBr3 nanocrystals when irradiated, the nanocrystals are nevertheless unstable. Consequently, we suggest that an optimum combination of temperature range, electron energy, and dose rate needs to be carefully chosen for the characterization of halide perovskite nanocrystals to minimize both the Pb nanoparticle formation and the structural decomposition. PMID:28983524

  6. Algorithm Development for Multi-Energy SXR based Electron Temperature Profile Reconstruction

    Clayton, D. J.; Tritz, K.; Finkenthal, M.; Kumar, D.; Stutman, D.

    2012-10-01

    New techniques utilizing computational tools such as neural networks and genetic algorithms are being developed to infer plasma electron temperature profiles on fast time scales (> 10 kHz) from multi-energy soft-x-ray (ME-SXR) diagnostics. Traditionally, a two-foil SXR technique, using the ratio of filtered continuum emission measured by two SXR detectors, has been employed on fusion devices as an indirect method of measuring electron temperature. However, these measurements can be susceptible to large errors due to uncertainties in time-evolving impurity density profiles, leading to unreliable temperature measurements. To correct this problem, measurements using ME-SXR diagnostics, which use three or more filtered SXR arrays to distinguish line and continuum emission from various impurities, in conjunction with constraints from spectroscopic diagnostics, can be used to account for unknown or time evolving impurity profiles [K. Tritz et al, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. Vol. 56, No. 12 (2011), PP9.00067]. On NSTX, ME-SXR diagnostics can be used for fast (10-100 kHz) temperature profile measurements, using a Thomson scattering diagnostic (60 Hz) for periodic normalization. The use of more advanced algorithms, such as neural network processing, can decouple the reconstruction of the temperature profile from spectral modeling.

  7. Electrical conductivity of Dirac/Schrödinger hybrid electron systems at finite temperature

    Khanh, Nguyen Quoc; Linh, Dang Khanh

    2018-04-01

    We calculate the dielectric function of a system composed of a Bernal bilayer graphene (BLG) and an ordinary two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), separated by a spacer, as a function of temperature T, interlayer distance d and spacer dielectric constant ε2 . Based on the results for dielectric function, we calculate the finite-temperature electrical conductivity of the first layer in presence of the second one due to the screened Coulomb scattering. We also compare our results with those of BLG-BLG, BLG systems and study the effect of 2DEG materials on the conductivity.

  8. The Use of Low Temperature Detectors for Direct Measurements of the Mass of the Electron Neutrino

    A. Nucciotti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have witnessed many exciting breakthroughs in neutrino physics. The detection of neutrino oscillations has proved that neutrinos are massive particles, but the assessment of their absolute mass scale is still an outstanding challenge in today particle physics and cosmology. Since low temperature detectors were first proposed for neutrino physics experiments in 1984, there has been tremendous technical progress: today this technique offers the high energy resolution and scalability required to perform competitive experiments challenging the lowest electron neutrino masses. This paper reviews the thirty-year effort aimed at realizing calorimetric measurements with sub-eV neutrino mass sensitivity using low temperature detectors.

  9. Modeling of temperature profiles in an environmental transmission electron microscope using computational fluid dynamics

    Mølgaard Mortensen, Peter; Willum Hansen, Thomas; Birkedal Wagner, Jakob; Degn Jensen, Anker

    2015-01-01

    The temperature and velocity field, pressure distribution, and the temperature variation across the sample region inside an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) have been modeled by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Heating the sample area by a furnace type TEM holder gives rise to temperature gradients over the sample area. Three major mechanisms have been identified with respect to heat transfer in the sample area: radiation from the grid, conduction in the grid, and conduction in the gas. A parameter sensitivity analysis showed that the sample temperature was affected by the conductivity of the gas, the emissivity of the sample grid, and the conductivity of the grid. Ideally the grid should be polished and made from a material with good conductivity, e.g. copper. With hydrogen gas, which has the highest conductivity of the gases studied, the temperature difference over the TEM grid is less than 5 °C, at what must be considered typical conditions, and it is concluded that the conditions on the sample grid in the ETEM can be considered as isothermal during general use. - Highlights: • Computational fluid dynamics used for mapping flow and temperature in ETEM setup. • Temperature gradient across TEM grid in furnace based heating holder very small in ETEM. • Conduction from TEM grid and gas in addition to radiation from TEM grid most important. • Pressure drop in ETEM limited to the pressure limiting apertures

  10. The temperature dependence of quantum spin pumping generated using electron spin resonance with three-magnon splittings

    Nakata, Kouki

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of the Schwinger–Keldysh formalism, we have closely investigated the temperature dependence of quantum spin pumping generated using electron spin resonance. We have clarified that three-magnon splittings excite non-zero modes of magnons and characterize the temperature dependence of quantum spin pumping generated using electron spin resonance. (paper)

  11. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of excitons in two-dimensional-semiconductors as a function of temperature

    Tizei, Luiz H. G.; Lin, Yung-Chang; Lu, Ang-Yd; Li, Lain-Jong; Suenaga, Kazu

    2016-01-01

    We have explored the benefits of performing monochromated Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy(EELS) in samples at cryogenic temperatures. As an example, we have observed the excitonic absorption peaks in single layer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides. These peaks appear separated by small energies due to spin orbit coupling. We have been able to distinguish the split for MoS2 below 300 K and for MoSe2 below 220 K. However, the distinction between peaks is only clear at 150 K. We have measured the change in absorption threshold between 150 K and 770 K for MoS2 and MoSe2. We discuss the effect of carbon and ice contamination in EELSspectra. The increased spectral resolution available made possible with modern monochromators in electron microscopes will require the development of stable sample holders which reaches temperatures far below that of liquid nitrogen.

  12. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of excitons in two-dimensional-semiconductors as a function of temperature

    Tizei, Luiz H. G.

    2016-04-21

    We have explored the benefits of performing monochromated Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy(EELS) in samples at cryogenic temperatures. As an example, we have observed the excitonic absorption peaks in single layer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides. These peaks appear separated by small energies due to spin orbit coupling. We have been able to distinguish the split for MoS2 below 300 K and for MoSe2 below 220 K. However, the distinction between peaks is only clear at 150 K. We have measured the change in absorption threshold between 150 K and 770 K for MoS2 and MoSe2. We discuss the effect of carbon and ice contamination in EELSspectra. The increased spectral resolution available made possible with modern monochromators in electron microscopes will require the development of stable sample holders which reaches temperatures far below that of liquid nitrogen.

  13. Proceedings of the workshop on 'anomalous electronic states and physical properties in high-temperature superconductors'

    Arai, Masatoshi; Kajimoto, Ryoichi

    2007-03-01

    A workshop entitled 'Anomalous Electronic States and Physical Properties in High-Temperature Superconductors' was held on November 7-8, 2006 at Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University. In the workshop, leading scientists in the field of high-T c superconductivity, both experimentalists and theorists, gathered in a hall to report the recent progress of the study, clarify the problems to be solved, and discuss the future prospects. The workshop was jointly organized by Specially Promoted Research of MEXT, Development of the 4D Spaces Access Neutron Spectrometer and Elucidation of the Mechanism of Oxide High-T c Superconductivity' (repr. by M. Arai, JAEA) and by the Inter-university Cooperative Research Program of the Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 'Anomalous Electronic States and Physical Properties in High-Temperature Superconductors' (repr. by T. Tohyama, Kyoto Univ.). This report includes abstracts and materials of the presentations in the workshop. (author)

  14. Dielectric constant and laser beam propagation in an underdense collisional plasma: effects of electron temperature

    Xia Xiongping; Qin Zhen; Xu Bin; Cai Zebin

    2011-01-01

    Dielectric constant and laser beam propagation in an underdense collisional plasma are investigated, using the wave and dielectric function equations, for their dependence on the electron temperature. Simulation results show that, due to the influence of the ponderomotive force there is a nonlinear variation of electron temperature in an underdense collisional plasma, and this leads to a complicated and interesting nonlinear variation of dielectric constant; this nonlinear variation of dielectric constant directly affects the beam propagation and gives rise to laser beam self-focusing in some spatial-temporal regions; in particular, the beam width and the beam intensity present an oscillatory variation in the self-focusing region. The influence of several parameters on the dielectric function and beam self-focusing is discussed.

  15. High-temperature electron-hole superfluidity with strong anisotropic gaps in double phosphorene monolayers

    Saberi-Pouya, S.; Zarenia, M.; Perali, A.; Vazifehshenas, T.; Peeters, F. M.

    2018-05-01

    Excitonic superfluidity in double phosphorene monolayers is investigated using the BCS mean-field equations. Highly anisotropic superfluidity is predicted where we found that the maximum superfluid gap is in the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) regime along the armchair direction and in the BCS-BEC crossover regime along the zigzag direction. We estimate the highest Kosterlitz-Thouless transition temperature with maximum value up to ˜90 K with onset carrier densities as high as 4 ×1012cm-2 . This transition temperature is significantly larger than what is found in double electron-hole few-layers graphene. Our results can guide experimental research toward the realization of anisotropic condensate states in electron-hole phosphorene monolayers.

  16. Temporal evolutions of electron temperature and density with edge localized mode in the JT-60U divertor plasma

    Nakano, T; Kubo, H; Asakura, N

    2010-01-01

    From the intensity ratios of the three He I lines measured at 20 kHz, the temporal evolutions of the electron temperature and density during and after the power and the particle flow into the divertor plasma caused by edge localized modes are determined. The electron temperature increases from 70 eV to 80 eV with increasing D α intensity. Then, at the peak of D α intensity, the electron temperature starts decreasing down to 60 eV. The electron density increases from 0.1 x 10 19 m -3 to 0.3 x 10 19 m -3 with increasing D α intensity, and then starts to decrease more gradually compared with the electron temperature after the peak of D α intensity. It is interpreted that the increase of the electron temperature is ascribed to the power and the particle flow into the divertor plasma, and that the decrease of the electron temperature and the increase of the electron density are ascribed to the ionization of the recycled neutrals, which consumes the electron energy and produces electrons.

  17. Derivation of electron density and temperature from (S II) and (O II) line intensity ratios

    Canto, J; Meaburn, J; Theokas, A C [Manchester Univ. (UK). Dept of Astronomy; Elliott, K H [Anglo-Australian Observatory, Epping (Australia)

    1980-12-01

    Line intensity ratios for (S II) and (O II) due to collisional de-excitation are briefly discussed. Comparison is made between various reaction rate parameters presented by separate investigators. Included are observations of ratios obtained from the Orion nebula which experimentally confirm the reaction rates of Pradhan as best representing the observed distribution of these ratios. (O II) and (S II) contour plots are also presented, which allow effective electron temperatures and densities to be estimated from pairs of line ratios.

  18. Observation of a new plasma regime with stationary electron temperature oscillations on Tore Supra

    Artaud, J.F.; Giruzzi, G.; Imbeaux, F.; Segui, J.L.; Garbet, X.

    2003-01-01

    This document is a copy of the slides presented on the 9. joint US-European Transport Task Force meeting. The first part is devoted to the experimental observations of a new tokamak plasma regime with stationary electron temperature oscillations. The oscillations appear on ECE spontaneously, sometimes associated with a transition to the LHEP regime. The second part presents an interpretation of these oscillations by analogy with a predator-prey system. (A.L.B.)

  19. Latitudinal variation of the topside electron temperature at different levels of solar activity

    Truhlík, Vladimír; Bilitza, D.; Třísková, Ludmila

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 6 (2009), s. 693-700 ISSN 0273-1177 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300420603 Grant - others: NASA (US) NNH06CD17C Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Electron temperature * Solar activity variation * Latitudinal dependence Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.079, year: 2009

  20. Electron density and temperature profile diagnostics for C-2 field reversed configuration plasmas

    Deng, B. H.; Kinley, J. S.; Schroeder, J. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    The 9-point Thomson scattering diagnostic system for the C-2 field reversed configuration plasmas is improved and the measured electron temperature profiles are consistent with theoretical expectations. Rayleigh scattering revealed a finite line width of the ruby laser emission, which complicates density calibration. Taking advantage of the plasma wobble motion, density profile reconstruction accuracy from the 6-chord two-color CO{sub 2}/HeNe interferometer data is improved.

  1. A Technique for Temperature and Ultimate Load Calculations of Thin Targets in a Pulsed Electron Beam

    Hansen, Jørgen-Walther; Lundsager, Per

    1979-01-01

    A technique is presented for the calculation of transient temperature distributions and ultimate load of rotationally symmetric thin membranes with uniform lateral load and exposed to a pulsed electron beam from a linear accelerator. Heat transfer by conduction is considered the only transfer...... mechanism. The ultimate load is calculated on the basis of large plastic strain analysis. Analysis of one aluminum and one titanium membrane is shown....

  2. Low-temperature annealing of radiation defects in electron-irradiated gallium phosphide

    Kolb, A.A.; Megela, I.G.; Buturlakin, A.P.; Goyer, D.B.

    1990-01-01

    The isochronal annealing of radiation defects in high-energy electron irradiated n-GaP monocrystals within the 77 to 300 K range has been investigated by optical and electrical techniques. The changes in conductance and charge carrier mobility as functions of annealing temperature as well as the variation of optical absorption spectra of GaP under irradiation and annealing provide evidence that most of radiation defects are likely secondary complexes of defects

  3. Measurement of the electron and ion temperatures by the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on joint Texas experimental tokamak

    Yan, W.; Chen, Z. Y., E-mail: zychen@hust.edu.cn; Huang, D. W.; Tong, R. H.; Wang, S. Y.; Wei, Y. N.; Ma, T. K.; Zhuang, G. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Jin, W. [Center of Interface Dynamics for Sustainability, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan 610200 (China); Lee, S. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Shi, Y. J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    An x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer has been developed on joint Texas experimental tokamak for the measurement of electron and ion temperatures from the K{sub α} spectra of helium-like argon and its satellite lines. A two-dimensional multi-wire proportional counter has been applied to detect the spectra. The electron and ion temperatures have been obtained from the Voigt fitting with the spectra of helium-like argon ions. The profiles of electron and ion temperatures show the dependence on electron density in ohmic plasmas.

  4. Electron temperature measurements by the plasma line technique at the French incoherent scatter radar facilities

    Kofman, W.; Lejeune, G.; Hagfors, T.; Bauer, P.

    1981-01-01

    The results of experiments aimed at the determination of the electron temperature by a plasma line technique are presented. Using the multistatic capabilities of the French incoherent scatter radar, the plasma line frequencies were simultaneously measured at two receiving stations (Mende and Nancay) at the altitude corresponding to the maximum of the F layer. Different plasma line frequencies are measued because of different effective k vectors that appear in the thermal term of the plasma dispersion relation. We derive and apply two data analysis procedures that enable us to determine this frequency difference. Comparison of this measured frequency difference to that calculated using the ion component electron temperature demonstrates that the plasma lines could indeed be used to determine the electron temperature. A strong dependence of the power in the plasma line as a function of the angle between k vector and magnetic field is observed in agreement with the theory. The future developments of this technique with the EISCAT radar facilities are discussed

  5. Electron-induced dry reforming of methane in a temperature-controlled dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    Zhang, Xuming

    2013-09-23

    Dry reforming of methane has the potential to reduce the greenhouse gases methane and carbon dioxide and to generate hydrogen-rich syngas. In reforming methane, plasma-assisted reforming processes may have advantages over catalytic processes because they are free from coking and their response time for mobile applications is quick. Although plasma-assisted reforming techniques have seen recent developments, systematic studies that clarify the roles that electron-induced chemistry and thermo-chemistry play are needed for a full understanding of the mechanisms of plasma-assisted reformation. Here, we developed a temperature-controlled coaxial dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) apparatus to investigate the relative importance of electron-induced chemistry and thermo-chemistry in dry reforming of methane. In the tested background temperature range 297-773 K, electron-induced chemistry, as characterized by the physical properties of micro-discharges, was found to govern the conversions of CH4 and CO2, while thermo-chemistry influenced the product selectivities because they were found to depend on the background temperature. Comparisons with results from arc-jet reformation indicated that thermo-chemistry is an efficient conversion method. Our findings may improve designs of plasma-assisted reformers by using relatively hotter plasma sources. However, detailed chemical kinetic studies are needed. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  6. Electron-induced dry reforming of methane in a temperature-controlled dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    Zhang, Xuming; Cha, Min Suk

    2013-01-01

    Dry reforming of methane has the potential to reduce the greenhouse gases methane and carbon dioxide and to generate hydrogen-rich syngas. In reforming methane, plasma-assisted reforming processes may have advantages over catalytic processes because they are free from coking and their response time for mobile applications is quick. Although plasma-assisted reforming techniques have seen recent developments, systematic studies that clarify the roles that electron-induced chemistry and thermo-chemistry play are needed for a full understanding of the mechanisms of plasma-assisted reformation. Here, we developed a temperature-controlled coaxial dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) apparatus to investigate the relative importance of electron-induced chemistry and thermo-chemistry in dry reforming of methane. In the tested background temperature range 297–773 K, electron-induced chemistry, as characterized by the physical properties of micro-discharges, was found to govern the conversions of CH 4 and CO 2 , while thermo-chemistry influenced the product selectivities because they were found to depend on the background temperature. Comparisons with results from arc-jet reformation indicated that thermo-chemistry is an efficient conversion method. Our findings may improve designs of plasma-assisted reformers by using relatively hotter plasma sources. However, detailed chemical kinetic studies are needed. (paper)

  7. Nonlinear theory for the parametric instability with comparable electron and ion temperatures

    Oberman, C.

    1972-01-01

    The basic linear theory of the parametric instability driven by a pump E 0 sin ω 0 t oscillating near the electron plasma frequency is reviewed. An expression is derived for the temporal nonlinear development of the fluctuation spectrum of the excited waves. For plasma with comparable electron and ion temperatures nonlinear Landau damping of electron plasma waves on ions provides the dominant nonlinearity. The steady state solutions are examined both analytically and numerically in the limit when the spontaneous emission term is small. The characteristics of the plasma wave spectrum agrees well with the general features of ionospheric observations. The enhanced dissipation rate of the pump due to the presence of the fluctuations agrees with laboratory observations. (U.S.)

  8. Low-temperature (200 C or below) fabrication of diamond films for electronic application

    Hiraki, A.

    2003-01-01

    Fabrication of Diamond (including Diamond Like Carbon: DLC) films as electronic materials, for example: to be used as electron-emitter, requires several following conditions. They are: 1 ) Low temperature fabrication (or deposition on several substrates and sometimes ones with low melting point, like glasses) below 400 C, 2) Wide area film deposition onto wide substrates of several square inches, like Si wafer and glass substrate, 3) Reproducible deposition of well defined film quality, 4) others. In these respects, we have initiated, in the author's laboratories at Osaka University and Kochi University of Technology, a quite new approach to satisfy the above requirements by using microwave plasma CVD under a magnetic field to be called as m agneto-active plasma CVD . The films fabricated by the magnets-active plasma CVD and also recently by cathodic arc methods combined with cur special nano-seeding method, have been utilized for electron emitter to exhibit very high efficiency. (Author)

  9. CRESU studies of electron attachment and Penning ionization at temperatures down to 48 K

    Le Garrec, J.L.; Mitchell, J.B.A.; Rowe, B.R.

    1996-01-01

    The object of the present report is to present results obtained for electron attachment and Penning ionization, obtained with the addition of a Langmuir probe to the measurement apparatus. Measurements of the rate coefficients for electron attachment and Penning ionization are performed using the standard techniques for the flow reactors. Rate coefficients for the Penning ionisation of argon, nitrogen molecule, oxygen molecule by helium metastable are presented. The results obtained concerning the attachment of electrons to SF 6 (non-dissociative), CCl 2 F 2 (producing Cl - ), and CF 3 Br as a function of temperature are presented. The differences observed, and the variation of the value of β below 100 K, provides evidence of the strong influence of the internal state (probably vibrational) of the CF 3 Br molecule on its dissociative attachment

  10. Quantitative explanation of some electron temperature profiles measured in situ in the high latitude ionospheric E-region

    Schlegel, K.; Oyama, Koh-ichiro; Hirao, Kunio

    1983-01-01

    E region electron temperature profiles obtained with a rocket experiment in the Antarctica are compared to theoretical electron temperatures calculated from a model. The main heat source in this model is the heating of the electron gas by unstable plasma waves. Very good agreement between both temperatures is obtained between 105 and 115 km altitude, where this heating mechanism is effective. The agreement is also good below this altitude range, after a refinement of the data analysis procedure for the measured temperatures. Several important consequences of the good agreement are pointed out. (author)

  11. Structural changes of radial forging die surface during service under thermo-mechanical fatigue

    Nematzadeh, Fardin; Akbarpour, Mohammad Reza; Kokabi, Amir Hosein; Sadrnezhaad, Seyed Khatiboleslam

    2009-01-01

    Radial forging is one of the modern open die forging techniques and has a wide application in producing machine parts. During operation at high temperatures, severe temperature change associated with mechanical loads and the resultant wearing of the die surface lead to intense variation in strain on the die surface. Therefore, under this operating condition, thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) occurs on the surface of the radial forging die. TMF decreases the life of the die severely. In the present research, different layers were deposited on a 1.2714 steel die by SMAW and GTAW, with a weld wire of UDIMET 520. The microstructure of the radial forging die surface was investigated during welding and service using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. The results revealed that, after welding, the structure of the radial forging die surface includes the γ matrix with a homogeneous distribution of fine semi-spherical carbides. The weld structure consisted mostly of columnar dendrites with low grain boundaries. Also, microstructural investigation of the die surface during operation showed that the weld structure of the die surface has remained without any considerable change. Only dendrites were deformed and broken. Moreover, grain boundaries of the dendrites were revealed during service.

  12. A stability analysis of electron-positron pair equilibria of a two-temperature plasma cloud

    Sikora, M [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (USA); Zbyszewska, M [Polska Akademia Nauk, Warsaw (Poland). Centrum Astronomiczne

    1986-01-01

    The stability of a two-temperature homogeneous static plasma cloud against pair density perturbations is examined. We assumed that the electrons and positrons, cooled via radiation process, are reheated via Coulomb interactions with much hotter protons. Pair equilibrium plasma states are shown to be unstable if deltan{sub e}/deltan{sub p}<0 and deltan{sub e}/deltaT{sub p}<0 on the equilibrium surface n{sub e}{sup eq}(n{sub p},T{sub p}), where n{sub e}=n{sub +}+n{sub -}, n{sub p} and T{sub p} denote electron plus positron density, proton density and proton temperature, respectively. The minimum proton temperature and maximum proton density for which unstable states can appear are: (kT{sub p}){sub min} approx few x m{sub e}c{sup 2} and (n{sub p}){sub max} approx few/Rsigma{sub T}, where R is the plasma cloud radius. We discuss our results in the context of an accreting black hole model assuming that the proton temperature is close to its virial value, kT{sub p}{sup vir} approx GMm{sub p}/R and that subsonic accretion flow is realized at R < tens Schwarzschild radii. The unstable states then correspond to the luminosity range 0.01 L{sub Edd}electron temperature range 2 x 10{sup 9}K

  13. Development of Ultra Low-Temperature Electronics for the AEgIS Experiment

    Kaltenbacher, Thomas; Kellerbauer, Alban; Doser, Michael; Caspers, Friedhelm

    This thesis presents the development of electronics for operation at cryogenic temperatures, with particular emphasis on the cryogenic electronics required for the Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy (AEgIS) experiment at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN). The research is focused on a highly sensitive charged particle detection system for a Penning trap, on cryogenic low-pass filters and on a low-loss DC-contact RF switch. The detection system consists of a high quality factor tuned circuit including a superconducting coil, and a low-noise amplifier. Since the experimental setup of the AEgIS experiment requires it, the developed electronics must reliably operate at 4.2 K (~269C) and in high constant magnetic field of more than 1 Tesla. Therefore, the performance of the cryogenic electronic designs were carefully evaluated at low-temperature/high magnetic field, the result of which have important implications for the AEgIS experiment. Moreover, a new possibility of ...

  14. Preparation of the Crosslinked Polyethersulfone Films by High Temperature Electron-Beam Irradiation

    Li, J.

    2006-01-01

    The aromatic polymers, mainly so called engineering plastics, were famed for the good stability under irradiation. However, high temperature irradiation of the aromatic polymers can result the crosslinked structure, due to the improved molecular mobility. Polyethersulfone (PES) is a wide used engineering plastic because of the high performance and high thermal stability. PES films were irradiated by electron-beam under nitrogen atmosphere above the glass transition temperature and then the covalently crosslinked PES (RX-PES) films were obtained. The irradiations were also performed at ambient temperature for comparison. The network structure formation of the RX-PES films was confirmed by the appearance of the gel, which were measured by soaking the irradiated PES films in the N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) at room temperature. When the PES films were irradiated to 300 kGy, there was gel appeared. The gel percent increased with the increasing in the absorbed dose, and saturated when the absorbed dose exceeded 1200 kGy. However, there was no gel formed for the PES films irradiated at ambient temperature even to 2250 kGy. The G(S) and G(X) were calculated according to the Y-crosslinking mechanism. The results values are consistent in error range. G(S) of 0.10 and G(X) of 0.23 were obtained. As calculated, almost all the macromolecular radicals produced by chain scission were used for crosslinking. Also, the glass transition temperature of the RX-PES films increased with the increasing in the absorbed doses, while the glass transition temperature of the PES films irradiated at ambient temperature decreased with the increasing in the absorbed doses. The blending films of the PES with FEP or ETFE were prepared and the high temperature irradiation effects were also studies

  15. Radial reflection diffraction tomography

    Lehman, Sean K.

    2012-12-18

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  16. Temperature dependence of binary and ternary recombination of H3+ ions with electrons

    Glosik, J.; Plasil, R.; Korolov, I.; Kotrik, T.; Novotny, O.; Hlavenka, P.; Dohnal, P.; Varju, J.; Kokoouline, V.; Greene, Chris H.

    2009-01-01

    We study binary and the recently discovered process of ternary He-assisted recombination of H 3 + ions with electrons in a low-temperature afterglow plasma. The experiments are carried out over a broad range of pressures and temperatures of an afterglow plasma in a helium buffer gas. Binary and He-assisted ternary recombination are observed and the corresponding recombination rate coefficients are extracted for temperatures from 77 to 330 K. We describe the observed ternary recombination as a two-step mechanism: first, a rotationally excited long-lived neutral molecule H 3 * is formed in electron-H 3 + collisions. Second, the H 3 * molecule collides with a helium atom that leads to the formation of a very long-lived Rydberg state with high orbital momentum. We present calculations of the lifetimes of H 3 * and of the ternary recombination rate coefficients for para- and ortho-H 3 + . The calculations show a large difference between the ternary recombination rate coefficients of ortho- and para-H 3 + at temperatures below 300 K. The measured binary and ternary rate coefficients are in reasonable agreement with the calculated values.

  17. Temperature dependence of binary and ternary recombination of H3+ ions with electrons

    Glosík, J.; Plašil, R.; Korolov, I.; Kotrík, T.; Novotný, O.; Hlavenka, P.; Dohnal, P.; Varju, J.; Kokoouline, V.; Greene, Chris H.

    2009-05-01

    We study binary and the recently discovered process of ternary He-assisted recombination of H3+ ions with electrons in a low-temperature afterglow plasma. The experiments are carried out over a broad range of pressures and temperatures of an afterglow plasma in a helium buffer gas. Binary and He-assisted ternary recombination are observed and the corresponding recombination rate coefficients are extracted for temperatures from 77 to 330 K. We describe the observed ternary recombination as a two-step mechanism: first, a rotationally excited long-lived neutral molecule H3∗ is formed in electron- H3+ collisions. Second, the H3∗ molecule collides with a helium atom that leads to the formation of a very long-lived Rydberg state with high orbital momentum. We present calculations of the lifetimes of H3∗ and of the ternary recombination rate coefficients for para- and ortho- H3+ . The calculations show a large difference between the ternary recombination rate coefficients of ortho- and para- H3+ at temperatures below 300 K. The measured binary and ternary rate coefficients are in reasonable agreement with the calculated values.

  18. Electron and ion temperatures: a comparison of ground-based incoherent scatter and AE-C satellite measurements

    Benson, R.F.; Bauer, P.; Brace, L.H.; Carlson, H.C.; Hagen, J.; Hanson, W.B.; Hoegy, W.R.; Torr, M.R.; Wickwar, V.B.

    1977-01-01

    The Atmosphere Exploere-C satellite (AE-C) is uniquely suited for correlative studies with ground-based stations because its on-board propulsion system enables a desired ground station overflight condition to be maintained for a period of several weeks. It also provides the first low-altitude (below 260 km) comparison of satellite and incoherent scatter electron and ion temperatures. More than 40 comparisons of remote and in situ measurements were made by using data from AE-C and four incoherent scatter stations (Arecibo, Chatanika, Millstone Hill, and St. Santin). The results indicate very good agreement between satellite and ground measurements of the ion temperature, the average satellite retarding potential analyzer temperatures differing from the average incoherent scatter temperatures by -2% at St. Santin, +3% at Millstone Hill, and +2% at Arecibo. The electron temperatures also agree well, the average satellite temperatures exceeding the average incoherent scatter temperatures by 3% at St. Santin, 2% at Arecibo, and 11% at Millstone Hill. Several temperature comparisons were made between AE-C and Chatanika. In spite of the highly variable ionosphere often encountered at this high-latitude location, good agreement was obtained between the in situ and remote measurements of electron and ion temperatures. Longitudinal variations are found to be very important in the comparisons of electron temperature in some locations. The agreement between the electron temperatures is considerably better than that found in some earlier comparisons involving satellities at higher altitudes

  19. High Temperature Terahertz Detectors Realized by a GaN High Electron Mobility Transistor

    Hou, H. W.; Liu, Z.; Teng, J. H.; Palacios, T.; Chua, S. J.

    2017-04-01

    In this work, a high temperature THz detector based on a GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) with nano antenna structures was fabricated and demonstrated to be able to work up to 200 °C. The THz responsivity and noise equivalent power (NEP) of the device were characterized at 0.14 THz radiation over a wide temperature range from room temperature to 200 °C. A high responsivity Rv of 15.5 and 2.7 kV/W and a low NEP of 0.58 and 10 pW/Hz0.5 were obtained at room temperature and 200 °C, respectively. The advantages of the GaN HEMT over other types of field effect transistors for high temperature terahertz detection are discussed. The physical mechanisms responsible for the temperature dependence of the responsivity and NEP of the GaN HEMT are also analyzed thoroughly.

  20. Low temperature calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy of helium bubbles in Cu

    Syskakis, E.

    1985-08-01

    Helium has been introduced into 100 μm thick pure Cu specimens by implantation of α-particles at T = 300 K. Post-implantation annealing of the specimens at high temperatures caused helium to precipitate into bubbles. We have measured the low-temperature heat capacity of helium confined in bubbles of average radius of less than 100 A. The size of the bubbles was obtained by transmission electron microscope investigations. We have observed that helium liquifies at low temperatures and undergoes the transition to the superfluid state in bubbles of average radius larger than 35 A. The confining geometry of bubbles is new and possesses unique features for investigations of confined helium. It provides the possibility to study properties of extremely small, spherical, completely isolated Bose ''particles'' consisting of 10 4 helium atoms each. Furthermore, as we show, it can be known with better accuracy than formerly investigated confining geometries. (orig./BHO)

  1. Mechanistic insights into the room temperature transitions of polytetrafluoroethylene during electron-beam irradiation

    Fu, Congli; Yu, Xianwei; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Wang, Xiuli; Gu, Aiqun; Xie, Meiju; Chen, Chen; Yu, Zili

    2017-11-01

    In order to recognize the characteristic thermal transitions of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) occurring at 19 °C and 30 °C, PTFE is irradiated on electron beam accelerator at room temperature and analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results suggest that the two transition temperatures decrease considerably with increasing irradiation doses. Based on the results of structural analysis, the decrease of the two transition temperatures is supposed to be highly relevant to the structural changes. In particular, the content and structure of the side groups generated in PTFE are responsible for the variations of the two thermal transitions after irradiation, offering fundamental insights into the reaction mechanisms of PTFE during irradiation.

  2. Low temperature electron beam irradiation effects on the lactate dehydrogenase activity

    Catana, D.; Hategan, Alina; Oproiu, C.; Popescu, Alina; Hategan, Dora; Morariu, V. V.

    1998-01-01

    The direct and indirect effects of 5 MeV electron beam irradiation in the range 0-400 Gy at 20 deg. C, -3 deg. C and -196 deg. C on the global enzymatic activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) have been studied. Our results showed a monoexponential decrease in the enzymatic activity of irradiated LDH at all irradiation temperatures independently of direct or indirect action of radiation. The temperature gradient used to lower the temperature of the samples to -196 deg. C drastically influences the results. Our data suggest that freeze-thawing in two steps down to -196 deg. C make LDH insensitive to irradiation, while one step freeze-thawing procedure results in a gradual activity loss with increasing dose irradiation. This data can be interpreted in terms of different conformational changes during the particular freeze-thawing process. (authors)

  3. Temperature dependence of the cross section for the fragmentation of thymine via dissociative electron attachment

    Kopyra, Janina [Faculty of Science, Siedlce University, 3 Maja 54, 08-110 Siedlce (Poland); Abdoul-Carime, Hassan, E-mail: hcarime@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon1, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, 43 Bd du 11 novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2015-05-07

    Providing experimental values for absolute Dissociative Electron Attachment (DEA) cross sections for nucleobases at realistic biological conditions is a considerable challenge. In this work, we provide the temperature dependence of the cross section, σ, of the dehydrogenated thymine anion (T − H){sup −} produced via DEA. Within the 393-443 K temperature range, it is observed that σ varies by one order of magnitude. By extrapolating to a temperature of 313 K, the relative DEA cross section for the production of the dehydrogenated thymine anion at an incident energy of 1 eV decreases by 2 orders of magnitude and the absolute value reaches approximately 6 × 10{sup −19} cm{sup 2}. These quantitative measurements provide a benchmark for theoretical prediction and also a contribution to a more accurate description of the effects of ionizing radiation on molecular medium.

  4. The drift velocity of electrons in carbon dioxide at temperatures between 193 and 573 K

    Elford, M.T.; Haddad, G.N.

    1980-01-01

    The drift velocity of electrons in carbon dioxide has been measured at gas temperatures ranging from 193 to 573 K and at E/N values up to 20 Td at 193 K, 50 Td at 293 K and 40 Td at 573 K. The measured drift velocities were found to decrease linearly with increasing gas number density at a given value of E/N for gas temperatures less than 293 K. This dependence has been attributed to multiple scattering and the data have been extrapolated to zero number density to correct for this effect. Comparisons are made with previous measurements where available. The present data for the variation of μN(thermal) with temperature agree to within the experimental error with the data of Pact et al. (1962)

  5. The influence of electron irradiation at the various temperatures and annealing on carriers mobility at the low temperatures in neutron transmutation doped gallium arsenide

    Korshunov, F.P.; Kurilovich, N.F.; Prokhorenko, T.A.; Troshchinskii, V.T.; Shesholko, V.K.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of electron irradiation at the various temperatures and annealing on measured at T=100 K carriers mobility in neutron transmutation doped GaAs have been investigated. It was detected that rate of mobility decreasing with irradiation dose increasing decreases when irradiation temperature increases. It was shown that at the same time it take place the radiation defects creating and their particular or full annealing (in the dependence on irradiation temperature). Radiation stimulated annealing (annealing that take place during irradiation at the elevated temperatures) is more effective than the annealing at the same temperatures that take place after crystals are irradiated at room temperature. It means that any defects annealing during irradiation at elevated temperatures take place at more low temperatures than that during annealing after irradiation at room temperature

  6. Electron thermal energy transport research based on dynamical relationship between heat flux and temperature gradient

    Notake, Takashi; Inagaki, Shigeru; Tamura, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    In the nuclear fusion plasmas, both of thermal energy and particle transport governed by turbulent flow are anomalously enhanced more than neoclassical levels. Thus, to clarify a relationship between the turbulent flow and the anomalous transports has been the most worthwhile work. There are experimental results that the turbulent flow induces various phenomena on transport processes such as non-linearity, transition, hysteresis, multi-branches and non-locality. We are approaching these complicated problems by analyzing not conventional power balance but these phenomena directly. They are recognized as dynamical trajectories in the flux and gradient space and must be a clue to comprehend a physical mechanism of arcane anomalous transport. Especially, to elucidate the mechanism for electron thermal energy transport is critical in the fusion plasma researches because the burning plasmas will be sustained by alpha-particle heating. In large helical device, the dynamical relationships between electron thermal energy fluxes and electron temperature gradients are investigated by using modulated electron cyclotron resonance heating and modern electron cyclotron emission diagnostic systems. Some trajectories such as hysteresis loop or line segments with steep slope which represent non-linear property are observed in the experiment. (author)

  7. Ion acoustic solitons in a plasma with two-temperature kappa-distributed electrons

    Baluku, T. K.; Hellberg, M. A. [School of Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa)

    2012-01-15

    Existence domains and characteristics of ion acoustic solitons are studied in a two-temperature electron plasma with both electron components being kappa-distributed, as found in Saturn's magnetosphere. As is the case for double-Boltzmann electrons, solitons of both polarities can exist over restricted ranges of fractional hot electron density ratio for this plasma model. Low {kappa} values, which indicate increased suprathermal particles in the tail of the distribution, yield a smaller domain in the parameter space of hot density fraction and normalized soliton velocity (f, M), over which both soliton polarities are supported for a given plasma composition (the coexistence region). For some density ratios that support coexistence, solitons occur even at the lowest (critical) Mach number (i.e., at the acoustic speed), as found recently for a number of other plasma models. Like Maxwellians, low-{kappa} distributions also support positive potential double layers over a narrow range of low fractional cool electron density (<10%).

  8. Two-dimensional distribution of electron temperature in ergodic layer of LHD measured from line intensity ratio of CIV and NeVIII

    Wang, Erhui; Morita, Shigeru; Goto, Motoshi; Murakami, Izumi; Oishi, Tetsutarou; Dong, Chunfeng

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional distribution of impurity lines emitted from ergodic layer with stochastic magnetic field lines in Large Helical Device (LHD) has been observed using a space-resolved extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer. The two-dimensional electron temperature distribution in the ergodic layer is successfully measured using the line intensity ratio of Li-like NeVIII 2s-3p ( 2 S 1/2 - 2 P 3/2 : 88.09 Å, 2 S 1/2 - 2 P 1/2 : 88.13 Å) to 2p-3s ( 2 P 1/2 - 2 S 1/2 : 102.91 Å, 2 P 3/2 - 2 S 1/2 : 103.09 Å) transitions emitted from radial location near Last Closed Flux Surface (LCFS). The intensity ratio analyzed with ADAS code shows no dependence on the electron density below 10 14 cm -3 . The result indicates a little higher temperature, i.e., 220 eV, in the poloidal location at high-field side near helical coils called O-point compared to the temperature near X-point, i.e., 170 eV. The electron temperature profile is also measured at the edge boundary of ergodic layer using the line intensity ratio of Li-like CIV 2p-3d ( 2 P 1/2 - 2 D 3/2 : 384.03 Å, 2 P 3/2 - 2 D 5/2 : 384.18 Å) to 2p-3s ( 2 P 1/2 - 2 S 1/2 : 419.53 Å, 2 P 3/2 - 2 S 1/2 : 419.71 Å) transitions. The intensity ratios analyzed with CHIANTI, ADAS and T.Kawachi codes show a slightly higher temperature near O-point, i.e., 25 eV for CHIANTI, 21 eV for ADAS and 11 eV for T.Kawachi's codes, compared to the temperature at X-point, i.e., 15 - 21 eV for CHIANTI, 9 - 15 eV for ADAS and 6 - 9 eV for T.Kawachi codes. It suggests that the transport coefficient in the ergodic layer is varied with three-dimensional structure. (author)

  9. Non-monotonic behavior of electron temperature in argon inductively coupled plasma and its analysis via novel electron mean energy equation

    Zhao, Shu-Xia

    2018-03-01

    In this work, the behavior of electron temperature against the power in argon inductively coupled plasma is investigated by a fluid model. The model properly reproduces the non-monotonic variation of temperature with power observed in experiments. By means of a novel electron mean energy equation proposed for the first time in this article, this electron temperature behavior is interpreted. In the overall considered power range, the skin effect of radio frequency electric field results in localized deposited power density, responsible for an increase of electron temperature with power by means of one parameter defined as power density divided by electron density. At low powers, the rate fraction of multistep and Penning ionizations of metastables that consume electron energy two times significantly increases with power, which dominates over the skin effect and consequently leads to the decrease of temperature with power. In the middle power regime, a transition region of temperature is given by the competition between the ionizing effect of metastables and the skin effect of electric field. The power location where the temperature alters its trend moves to the low power end as increasing the pressure due to the lack of metastables. The non-monotonic curve of temperature is asymmetric at the short chamber due to the weak role of skin effect in increasing the temperature and tends symmetric when axially prolonging the chamber. Still, the validity of the fluid model in this prediction is estimated and the role of neutral gas heating is guessed. This finding is helpful for people understanding the different trends of temperature with power in the literature.

  10. Electron migration in hydrated biopolymers following pulsed irradiation at low temperatures

    Lith, D. van.

    1987-01-01

    Charge migration in biopolymer-water mixtures and the effect of water concentration on the charge migration is investigated by measuring the electrical conductivity and the light emission with the pulse radiolysis technique. A preliminary account of the microwave conductivity observed in hydrated DNA and collagen at low temperature after pulsed irradiation is given. The results show that when hydrated DNA or collagen are irradiated at low temperatures, conductivity transients with microsecond lifetime are observed. It is tentatively concluded that these transients are due to the highly mobile dry electron. The effect of water concentration on mobility, lifetime and migration distance of the electron is discussed. The effect of additives to the hydrated systems on the behaviour of the electron is described. It is shown that the observed effects of the additives confirm the earlier conclusions that the dry electron is the species responsible for the radiation induced conductivity. The water concentration in the DNA- and collagen-systems could be varied only between zero and approximately fifty percent, due to inhomogeneities which occur at higher water concentrations. Experiments on gelatin, a biopolymer which forms homogeneous samples with levels of hydration varying from almost zero to 100% water (ice) are described. Both the radiation induced and the dark microwave conductivity have been studied as a function of water content. Preliminary results of a study of the light emission from pulse irradiated DNA-water mixtures are reported in an attempt to establish a relation between the observed electron migration and the formation of excited states via charge neutralization. (Auth.)

  11. A proposal for both plasma ion- and electron-temperature diagnostics under simultaneous incidence of particles and x-rays into a semiconductor on the basis of a proposed model for a semiconductor detector response

    Numakura, T; Cho, T; Kohagura, J; Hirata, M; Minami, R; Yoshida, M; Nakashima, Y; Tamano, T; Yatsu, K; Miyoshi, S

    2003-01-01

    A method is proposed for obtaining radial profiles of plasma temperatures of both plasma ion (T i ) and electron (T e ) simultaneously by the use of a semiconductor detector array. The method is based on our developed particle-response model for a semiconductor detector; in particular, the response theory is constructed for giving the applicability in particle energies ranging down to a kiloelectronvolt. Calculated results from our model are in fairly good agreement with experimental data on the detector response of incident particle beams with energies in the range 100 eV to a few kiloelectronvolts. On the basis of the verification of the proposed model, an idea of the use of a developed semiconductor detector array covered with 'reliably unbreakable' ultrathin SiO 2 'dead-layer filters' having various nanometre-order thicknesses is applied for simultaneous T i and T e analyses by using charge-exchange neutral particles and x-rays from plasmas. Radial profiles of T i and T e are obtained in a single plasma discharge alone, and the data reliability is independently cross-checked by a radial scan of a conventional charge-exchange neutral-particle analyser system as well as a 50-channel microchannel plate x-ray diagnostics system in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

  12. High Total Ionizing Dose and Temperature Effects on Micro- and Nano-electronic Devices

    Gaillardin, M.; Martinez, M.; Paillet, P.; Leray, J.L.; Marcandella, C.; Duhamel, O.; Raine, M.; Richard, N.; Girard, S.; Ouerdane, Y.; Boukenter, A.; Goiffon, V.; Magnan, P.; Andrieu, F.; Barraud, S.; Faynot, O.

    2013-06-01

    This paper investigates the vulnerability of several micro- and nano-electronic technologies to a mixed harsh environment including high total ionizing dose at MGy levels and high temperature. Such operating conditions have been revealed recently for several applications like new security systems in existing or future nuclear power plants, fusion experiments, or deep space missions. In this work, the competing effects already reported in literature of ionizing radiations and temperature are characterized in elementary devices made of MOS transistors from several technologies. First, devices are irradiated using a radiation laboratory X-ray source up to MGy dose levels at room temperature. Devices are grounded during irradiation to simulate a circuit which waits for a wake up signal, representing most of the lifetime of an integrated circuit operating in a harsh environment. Devices are then annealed at several temperatures to discuss the post-irradiation behavior and to determine whether an elevated temperature is an issue or not for circuit function in mixed harsh environments. (authors)

  13. Transformations of gold nanoparticles investigated using variable temperature high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    Young, N.P. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Huis, M.A. van; Zandbergen, H.W. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technolgy, Lorentzweg 1, NL-2628CJ, Delft, The Netherlands. (Netherlands); Xu, H. [Department of Geology and Geophysics, and Materials Science Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Kirkland, A.I., E-mail: angus.kirkland@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Recently designed advanced in-situ specimen holders for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used in studies of gold nanoparticles. We report results of variable temperature TEM experiments in which structural transformations have been correlated with specimen temperature, allowing general trends to be identified. Transformation to a decahedral morphology for particles in the size range 5-12 nm was observed for the majority of particles regardless of their initial structure. Following in-situ annealing, decahedra were found to be stable at room temperature, confirming this as the equilibrium morphology, in agreement with recently calculated phase diagrams. Other transitions at low temperature in addition to surface roughening have also been observed and correlated with the same nanoscale phase diagram. Investigations of gold particles at high temperature have revealed evidence for co-existing solid and liquid phases. Overall, these results are important in a more precise understanding of the structure and action of catalytic gold nanoparticles and in the experimental verification of theoretical calculations.

  14. Electron beam physical vapor deposition of thin ruby films for remote temperature sensing

    Li Wei; Coppens, Zachary J.; Greg Walker, D.; Valentine, Jason G.

    2013-01-01

    Thermographic phosphors (TGPs) possessing temperature-dependent photoluminescence properties have a wide range of uses in thermometry due to their remote access and large temperature sensitivity range. However, in most cases, phosphors are synthesized in powder form, which prevents their use in high resolution micro and nanoscale thermal microscopy. In the present study, we investigate the use of electron beam physical vapor deposition to fabricate thin films of chromium-doped aluminum oxide (Cr-Al 2 O 3 , ruby) thermographic phosphors. Although as-deposited films were amorphous and exhibited weak photoluminescence, the films regained the stoichiometry and α-Al 2 O 3 crystal structure of the combustion synthesized source powder after thermal annealing. As a consequence, the annealed films exhibit both strong photoluminescence and a temperature-dependent lifetime that decreases from 2.9 ms at 298 K to 2.1 ms at 370 K. Ruby films were also deposited on multiple substrates. To ensure a continuous film with smooth surface morphology and strong photoluminescence, we use a sapphire substrate, which is thermal expansion coefficient and lattice matched to the film. These thin ruby films can potentially be used as remote temperature sensors for probing the local temperatures of micro and nanoscale structures.

  15. Finite-Temperature Variational Monte Carlo Method for Strongly Correlated Electron Systems

    Takai, Kensaku; Ido, Kota; Misawa, Takahiro; Yamaji, Youhei; Imada, Masatoshi

    2016-03-01

    A new computational method for finite-temperature properties of strongly correlated electrons is proposed by extending the variational Monte Carlo method originally developed for the ground state. The method is based on the path integral in the imaginary-time formulation, starting from the infinite-temperature state that is well approximated by a small number of certain random initial states. Lower temperatures are progressively reached by the imaginary-time evolution. The algorithm follows the framework of the quantum transfer matrix and finite-temperature Lanczos methods, but we extend them to treat much larger system sizes without the negative sign problem by optimizing the truncated Hilbert space on the basis of the time-dependent variational principle (TDVP). This optimization algorithm is equivalent to the stochastic reconfiguration (SR) method that has been frequently used for the ground state to optimally truncate the Hilbert space. The obtained finite-temperature states allow an interpretation based on the thermal pure quantum (TPQ) state instead of the conventional canonical-ensemble average. Our method is tested for the one- and two-dimensional Hubbard models and its accuracy and efficiency are demonstrated.

  16. Electron temperature determination from the HeI 3889 angstroem and 5016 angstroem line intensities

    Brenning, N.

    1979-03-01

    The possibility of determining electron temperature by helium spectro scopy in low-density (n(sub e) 2 m - ) plasmas is discussed. It is concluded that most lines can only be used at very low densities (n(sub e) 1 m - ) because the line intensities are highly influenced by secondary processes, such as electron impact induced transitions between excited levels or excitations from metastable levels. The density range where measurements are possible can extended if the influence of these secondary processes on the line intensities can be determined. For most helium I lines this is impossible for lack of atomic data. However, there are two exceptions, the 3889 angstroem (3 3 P yields 2 3 S) and the 5016 angstroem (3 1 yields 2 1 S) lines. The influence from secondary processes on these lines is calculated, and methods are developed which can be used for measurement of electron temperatures T(sub e 1 m - . The use of the methods is illustrated by a experiment where they have been successfully applied. (author)

  17. Electron temperature in field reversed configurations and theta pinches with closed magnetic field lines

    Newton, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    Field-reversed configurations (FRC) and theta pinches with trapped reversed bias field are essentially the same magnetic confinement systems using closed magnetic field lines inside an open-ended magnetic flux tube. A simple model of joule heating and parallel electron thermal conduction along the open flux lines to an external heat sink gives the electron temperature as Tsub(e)(eV) approx.= 0.05 Bsup(2/3)(G)Lsup(1/3)(cm), where B is the magnetic field and L is the coil length. This model appears to agree with measurements from present FRC experiments and past theta-pinch experiments which cover a range of 40-900 eV. The energy balance in the model is dominated by (a) parallel electron thermal conduction along the open field lines which has a steep temperature dependence, Q is proportional to Tsub(e)sup(7/2), and (b) the assumed rapid perpendicular transport in the plasma bulk which, in experiments to date, may be due to the small number of ion gyroradii across the plasma. (author)

  18. Experimental study of electron temperature gradient influence on impurity turbulent transport in fusion plasmas

    Villegas, D.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding impurity transport is a key to an optimal regime for a future fusion device. In this thesis, the theoretical and experimental influence of the electron temperature gradient R/L Te on heavy impurity transport is analyzed both in Tore Supra and ASDEX Upgrade. The electron temperature profile is modified locally by heating the plasma with little ECRH power deposited at two different radii. Experimental results have been obtained with the impurity transport code (ITC) which has been completed with a genetic algorithm allowing to determine the transport coefficient profiles with more accuracy. Transport coefficient profiles obtained by a quasilinear gyrokinetic code named QuaLiKiz are consistent with the experimental ones despite experimental uncertainties on gradients. In the core dominated by electron modes, the lower R/L Te the lower the nickel diffusion coefficient. The latter tends linearly to the neoclassical level when the instability threshold is approached. The experimental threshold is in agreement with the one computed by QuaLiKiz. Further out, where the plasma is dominated by ITG, which are independent of R/L Te , both experimental and simulated results show no modification in the diffusion coefficient profile. Furthermore, the convection velocity profile is not modified. This is attributed to a very small contribution of the thermodiffusion (1/Z dependence) in the total convection. On ASDEX, the preliminary results, very different from the Tore Supra ones, show a internal transport barrier for impurities located at the same radius as the strong ECRH power deposit. (author) [fr

  19. Finding high-temperature superconductors by metallizing the σ-bonding electrons

    Gao Miao; Lu Zhongyi; Xiang Tao

    2015-01-01

    Raising superconducting transition temperature (T_c) is an important task of fundamental research on superconductivity. It is also a prerequisite for the large scale application of superconductors. Since the microscopic mechanism of high-T_c superconductivity is unknown, the conventional approach for increasing T_c is either to apply high pressure to a material which has the potential to become superconducting, or to push it close to an antiferromagnetic or some other quantum instability point by chemical doping. In this article, the authors point out that another general approach for raising T_c is to lift the σ-bonding bands to the Fermi level, or to metallize the σ-bonding elections. This approach can increase the probability of finding a novel high-T_c superconductor because the coupling of σ-bonding electrons with phonons is generally strong and the superconducting transition induced by this interaction can occur at relatively high temperatures. After elucidating the underlying mechanism, the authors discuss a number of schemes to metallize σ-bonding electrons, and present their recent prediction for the crystalline and electronic structures of two potential high-T_c superconductors, Li_2B_3C and Li_3B_4C_2, with T_c higher than 50 K. (authors)

  20. Linear temperature behavior of thermopower and strong electron-electron scattering in thick F-doped SnO2 films

    Lang, Wen-Jing; Li, Zhi-Qing

    2014-07-01

    Both the semi-classical and quantum transport properties of F-doped SnO2 thick films (˜1 μm) were investigated experimentally. We found that the resistivity caused by the thermal phonons obeys Bloch-Grüneisen law from ˜90 to 300 K, while only the diffusive thermopower, which varies linearly with temperature from 300 down to 10 K, can be observed. The phonon-drag thermopower is completely suppressed due to the long electron-phonon relaxation time in the compound. These observations, together with the fact that the carrier concentration has negligible temperature dependence, indicate that the conduction electrons in F-doped SnO2 films possess free-electron-like characteristics. At low temperatures, the electron-electron scattering dominates over the electron-phonon scattering and governs the inelastic scattering process. The theoretical predications of scattering rates of large- and small-energy-transfer electron-electron scattering processes, which are negligibly weak in three-dimensional disordered conventional conductors, are quantitatively tested in this lower carrier concentration and free-electron-like highly degenerate semiconductor.