WorldWideScience

Sample records for radial cool molecular

  1. Experimental feasibility study of radial injection cooling of three-pad radial air foil bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Suman K.

    Air foil bearings use ambient air as a lubricant allowing environment-friendly operation. When they are designed, installed, and operated properly, air foil bearings are very cost effective and reliable solution to oil-free turbomachinery. Because air is used as a lubricant, there are no mechanical contacts between the rotor and bearings and when the rotor is lifted off the bearing, near frictionless quiet operation is possible. However, due to the high speed operation, thermal management is one of the very important design factors to consider. Most widely accepted practice of the cooling method is axial cooling, which uses cooling air passing through heat exchange channels formed underneath the bearing pad. Advantage is no hardware modification to implement the axial cooling because elastic foundation structure of foil bearing serves as a heat exchange channels. Disadvantage is axial temperature gradient on the journal shaft and bearing. This work presents the experimental feasibility study of alternative cooling method using radial injection of cooling air directly on the rotor shaft. The injection speeds, number of nozzles, location of nozzles, total air flow rate are important factors determining the effectiveness of the radial injection cooling method. Effectiveness of the radial injection cooling was compared with traditional axial cooling method. A previously constructed test rig was modified to accommodate a new motor with higher torque and radial injection cooling. The radial injection cooling utilizes the direct air injection to the inlet region of air film from three locations at 120° from one another with each location having three axially separated holes. In axial cooling, a certain axial pressure gradient is applied across the bearing to induce axial cooling air through bump foil channels. For the comparison of the two methods, the same amount of cooling air flow rate was used for both axial cooling and radial injection. Cooling air flow rate was

  2. Cooling of molecular ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.; Krohn, S.; Kreckel, H.; Lammich, L.; Lange, M.; Strasser, D.; Grieser, M.; Schwalm, D.; Zajfman, D.

    2004-01-01

    An overview of the use of stored ion beams and phase space cooling (electron cooling) is given for the field of molecular physics. Emphasis is given to interactions between molecular ions and electrons studied in the electron cooler: dissociative recombination and, for internally excited molecular ions, electron-induced ro-vibrational cooling. Diagnostic methods for the transverse ion beam properties and for the internal excitation of the molecular ions are discussed, and results for phase space cooling and internal (vibrational) cooling are presented for hydrogen molecular ions

  3. Peltier cooling in molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Longji; Miao, Ruijiao; Wang, Kun; Thompson, Dakotah; Zotti, Linda Angela; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2018-02-01

    The study of thermoelectricity in molecular junctions is of fundamental interest for the development of various technologies including cooling (refrigeration) and heat-to-electricity conversion1-4. Recent experimental progress in probing the thermopower (Seebeck effect) of molecular junctions5-9 has enabled studies of the relationship between thermoelectricity and molecular structure10,11. However, observations of Peltier cooling in molecular junctions—a critical step for establishing molecular-based refrigeration—have remained inaccessible. Here, we report direct experimental observations of Peltier cooling in molecular junctions. By integrating conducting-probe atomic force microscopy12,13 with custom-fabricated picowatt-resolution calorimetric microdevices, we created an experimental platform that enables the unified characterization of electrical, thermoelectric and energy dissipation characteristics of molecular junctions. Using this platform, we studied gold junctions with prototypical molecules (Au-biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol-Au, Au-terphenyl-4,4''-dithiol-Au and Au-4,4'-bipyridine-Au) and revealed the relationship between heating or cooling and charge transmission characteristics. Our experimental conclusions are supported by self-energy-corrected density functional theory calculations. We expect these advances to stimulate studies of both thermal and thermoelectric transport in molecular junctions where the possibility of extraordinarily efficient energy conversion has been theoretically predicted2-4,14.

  4. Optimization of a radially cooled pebble bed reactor - HTR2008-58117

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, B.; Kloosterman, J. L.; Lathouwers, D.; Van Der Hagen, T. H. J. J.; Van Dam, H.

    2008-01-01

    By altering the coolant flow direction in a pebble bed reactor from axial to radial, the pressure drop can be reduced tremendously. In this case the coolant flows from the outer reflector through the pebble bed and finally to flow paths in the inner reflector. As a consequence, the fuel temperatures are elevated due to the reduced heat transfer of the coolant. However, the power profile and pebble size in a radially cooled pebble bed reactor can be optimized to achieve lower fuel temperatures than current axially cooled designs, while the low pressure drop can be maintained. The radial power profile in the core can be altered by adopting multi-pass fuel management using several radial fuel zones in the core. The optimal power profile yielding a flat temperature profile is derived analytically and is approximated by radial fuel zoning. In this case, the pebbles pass through the outer region of the core first and each consecutive pass is located in a fuel zone closer to the inner reflector. Thereby, the resulting radial distribution of the fissile material in the core is influenced and the temperature profile is close to optimal. The fuel temperature in the pebbles can be further reduced by reducing the standard pebble diameter from 6 cm to a value as low as I cm. An analytical investigation is used to demonstrate the effects on the fuel temperature and pressure drop for both radial and axial cooling. Finally, two-dimensional numerical calculations were performed, using codes for neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and fuel depletion analysis, in order to validate the results for the optimized design that were obtained from the analytical investigations. It was found that for a radially cooled design with an optimized power profile and reduced pebble diameter (below 3.5 cm) both a reduction in the pressure drop (Δp = -2.6 bar), which increases the reactor efficiency with several percent, and a reduction in the maximum fuel temperature (ΔT = -50 deg. C) can be achieved

  5. radial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOHN WILLIAM BRANCH

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available La creación de modelos de objetos reales es una tarea compleja para la cual se ha visto que el uso de técnicas tradicionales de modelamiento tiene restricciones. Para resolver algunos de estos problemas, los sensores de rango basados en láser se usan con frecuencia para muestrear la superficie de un objeto desde varios puntos de vista, lo que resulta en un conjunto de imágenes de rango que son registradas e integradas en un modelo final triangulado. En la práctica, debido a las propiedades reflectivas de la superficie, las oclusiones, y limitaciones de acceso, ciertas áreas de la superficie del objeto usualmente no son muestreadas, dejando huecos que pueden crear efectos indeseables en el modelo integrado. En este trabajo, presentamos un nuevo algoritmo para el llenado de huecos a partir de modelos triangulados. El algoritmo comienza localizando la frontera de las regiones donde están los huecos. Un hueco consiste de un camino cerrado de bordes de los triángulos en la frontera que tienen al menos un borde que no es compartido con ningún otro triangulo. El borde del hueco es entonces adaptado mediante un B-Spline donde la variación promedio de la torsión del la aproximación del B-spline es calculada. Utilizando un simple umbral de la variación promedio a lo largo del borde, se puede clasificar automáticamente, entre huecos reales o generados por intervención humana. Siguiendo este proceso de clasificación, se usa entonces una versión automatizada del interpolador de funciones de base radial para llenar el interior del hueco usando los bordes vecinos.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Collisional Cooling and Ordering of Multiply Charged Ions in a Penning Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holder, J.P.; Church, D.A.; Gruber, L.; DeWitt, H.E.; Beck, B.R.; Schneider, D.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to help design new experiments by modeling the cooling of small numbers of trapped multiply charged ions by Coulomb interactions with laser-cooled Be + ions. A Verlet algorithm is used to integrate the equations of motion of two species of point ions interacting in an ideal Penning trap. We use a time step short enough to follow the cyclotron motion of the ions. Axial and radial temperatures for each species are saved periodically. Direct heating and cooling of each species in the simulation can be performed by periodically rescaling velocities. Of interest are Fe 11+ due to a EUV-optical double resonance for imaging and manipulating the ions, and Ca 14+ since a ground state fine structure transition has a convenient wavelength in the tunable laser range

  7. POLYANA-A tool for the calculation of molecular radial distribution functions based on Molecular Dynamics trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroulis, Christos; Raptis, Theophanes; Raptis, Vasilios

    2015-12-01

    We present an application for the calculation of radial distribution functions for molecular centres of mass, based on trajectories generated by molecular simulation methods (Molecular Dynamics, Monte Carlo). When designing this application, the emphasis was placed on ease of use as well as ease of further development. In its current version, the program can read trajectories generated by the well-known DL_POLY package, but it can be easily extended to handle other formats. It is also very easy to 'hack' the program so it can compute intermolecular radial distribution functions for groups of interaction sites rather than whole molecules.

  8. Rotational laser cooling of vibrationally and translationally cold molecular ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staanum, Peter; Højbjerre, Klaus; Skyt, Peter Sandegaard

    2010-01-01

    Stationary molecules in well-defined internal states are of broad interest for physics and chemistry. In physics, this includes metrology 1, 2, 3 , quantum computing 4, 5 and many-body quantum mechanics 6, 7 , whereas in chemistry, state-prepared molecular targets are of interest for uni......-molecular reactions with coherent light fields 8, 9 , for quantum-state-selected bi-molecular reactions 10, 11, 12 and for astrochemistry 12 . Here, we demonstrate rotational ground-state cooling of vibrationally and translationally cold MgH+ ions, using a laser-cooling scheme based on excitation of a single...

  9. Rotational Laser Cooling of Vibrationally and Translationally Cold Molecular Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drewsen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    an excellent alternative to atomic qubits in the realization of a practical ion trap based quantum computer due to favourable internal state decoherence rates. In chemistry, state prepared molecular targets are an ideal starting point for uni-molecular reactions, including coherent control...... of photofragmentation through the application of various laser sources [5,6]. In cold bi-molecular reactions, where the effect of even tiny potential barriers becomes significant, experiments with state prepared molecules can yield important information on the details of the potential curves of the molecular complexes...... by sympathetic cooling with Doppler laser cooled Mg+ ions. Giving the time for the molecules to equilibrate internally to the room temperature blackbody radiation, the vibrational degree of freedom will freeze out, leaving only the rotational degree of freedom to be cooled. We report here on the implementation...

  10. Laser-cooled atomic ions as probes of molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Kenneth R.; Viteri, C. Ricardo; Clark, Craig R.; Goeders, James E.; Khanyile, Ncamiso B.; Vittorini, Grahame D. [Schools of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Computational Science and Engineering and Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2015-01-22

    Trapped laser-cooled atomic ions are a new tool for understanding cold molecular ions. The atomic ions not only sympathetically cool the molecular ions to millikelvin temperatures, but the bright atomic ion fluorescence can also serve as a detector of both molecular reactions and molecular spectra. We are working towards the detection of single molecular ion spectra by sympathetic heating spectroscopy. Sympathetic heating spectroscopy uses the coupled motion of two trapped ions to measure the spectra of one ion by observing changes in the fluorescence of the other ion. Sympathetic heating spectroscopy is a generalization of quantum logic spectroscopy, but does not require ions in the motional ground state or coherent control of the ion internal states. We have recently demonstrated this technique using two isotopes of Ca{sup +} [Phys. Rev. A, 81, 043428 (2010)]. Limits of the method and potential applications for molecular spectroscopy are discussed.

  11. Rotational Laser Cooling of Vibrationally and Translationally Cold Molecular Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drewsen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    [7,8,9]. Furthermore, in order to learn more about the chemistry in interstellar clouds, astrochemists can benefit greatly from direct measurements on cold reactions in laboratories [9]. Working with MgH+ molecular ions in a linear Paul trap, we routinely cool their translational degree of freedom...... by sympathetic cooling with Doppler laser cooled Mg+ ions. Giving the time for the molecules to equilibrate internally to the room temperature blackbody radiation, the vibrational degree of freedom will freeze out, leaving only the rotational degree of freedom to be cooled. We report here on the implementation...... results imply that, through this technique, cold molecular-ion experiments can now be carried out at cryogenic temperatures in room-temperature set-ups. References [1] Koelemeij, J. C. J., Roth, B., Wicht, A., Ernsting, I. and Schiller, S., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 173002 (2007). [2] Hudson, J. J., Sauer, B...

  12. Production and sympathetic cooling of complex molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chaobo

    2008-06-24

    This thesis reports on experimental and theoretical studies of the sympathetic cooling of complex molecular ions demonstrating that this general method for cooling atomic and molecular ions is reliable and efficient. For this purpose, complex molecular ions and barium ions have been confined simultaneously in a linear Paul trap. The complex molecular ions are generated in an electrospray ionization system and transferred to the trap via a 2 m long octopole ion guide. These molecular ions are pre-cooled by room temperature helium buffer gas so that they can be captured by the trap. The atomic barium ions are loaded from a barium evaporator oven and are laser-cooled by a 493 nm cooling laser and a 650 nm repumping laser. Due to the mutual Coulomb interaction among these charged particles, the kinetic energy of the complex molecular ions can be reduced significantly. In our experiments we have demonstrated the sympathetic cooling of various molecules (CO{sub 2}, Alexa Fluor 350, glycyrrhetinic acid, cytochrome c) covering a wide mass range from a few tens to 13000 amu. In every case the molecular ions could be cooled down to millikelvin temperatures. Photo-chemical reactions of the {sup 138}Ba{sup +} ions in the ({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) excited state with gases such as O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, or N{sub 2}O, could be observed. If the initial {sup 138}Ba{sup +} ion ensemble is cold, the produced {sup 138}BaO{sup +} ions are cold as well, with a similar temperature as the laser-cooled barium ions (a few tens of millikelvin). The back-reaction of {sup 138}BaO{sup +} ions with neutral CO to {sup 138}Ba{sup +} is possible and was observed in our experiments as well. A powerful molecular dynamics (MD) simulation program has been developed. With this program dynamic properties of ion ensembles, such as sympathetic interactions or heating effects, have been investigated and experimental results have been analyzed to obtain, for example, ion numbers and temperatures. Additionally, the

  13. Production and sympathetic cooling of complex molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Chaobo

    2008-01-01

    This thesis reports on experimental and theoretical studies of the sympathetic cooling of complex molecular ions demonstrating that this general method for cooling atomic and molecular ions is reliable and efficient. For this purpose, complex molecular ions and barium ions have been confined simultaneously in a linear Paul trap. The complex molecular ions are generated in an electrospray ionization system and transferred to the trap via a 2 m long octopole ion guide. These molecular ions are pre-cooled by room temperature helium buffer gas so that they can be captured by the trap. The atomic barium ions are loaded from a barium evaporator oven and are laser-cooled by a 493 nm cooling laser and a 650 nm repumping laser. Due to the mutual Coulomb interaction among these charged particles, the kinetic energy of the complex molecular ions can be reduced significantly. In our experiments we have demonstrated the sympathetic cooling of various molecules (CO 2 , Alexa Fluor 350, glycyrrhetinic acid, cytochrome c) covering a wide mass range from a few tens to 13000 amu. In every case the molecular ions could be cooled down to millikelvin temperatures. Photo-chemical reactions of the 138 Ba + ions in the ( 2 P 1/2 ) excited state with gases such as O 2 , CO 2 , or N 2 O, could be observed. If the initial 138 Ba + ion ensemble is cold, the produced 138 BaO + ions are cold as well, with a similar temperature as the laser-cooled barium ions (a few tens of millikelvin). The back-reaction of 138 BaO + ions with neutral CO to 138 Ba + is possible and was observed in our experiments as well. A powerful molecular dynamics (MD) simulation program has been developed. With this program dynamic properties of ion ensembles, such as sympathetic interactions or heating effects, have been investigated and experimental results have been analyzed to obtain, for example, ion numbers and temperatures. Additionally, the feasibility of nondestructive spectroscopy via an optical dipole excitation

  14. Interface tuning of current-induced cooling in molecular circuits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Foti, Giuseppe; Vázquez, Héctor

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 2 (2017), s. 1082-1088 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-19672S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : current-induced heating and cooling * molecular junction * Carbene Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 4.536, year: 2016

  15. Adsorbate-driven cooling of carbene-based molecular junctions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Foti, Giuseppe; Vázquez, Héctor

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, Oct (2017), s. 2060-2068 ISSN 2190-4286 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-19672S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 702114 - HEATEXMOL Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : adsorbate * carbene * current-induced heating and cooling * molecular junction * vibrations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.127, year: 2016

  16. Economic performance of liquid-metal fast breeder reactor and gas-cooled fast reactor radial blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsoulfanidis, N.; Jankhah, M.H.

    1979-01-01

    The economic performance of the radial blanket of a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) and a gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) has been studied based on the calculation of the net financial gain as well as the value of the levelized fuel cost. The necessary reactor physics calculations have been performed using the code CITATION, and the economic analysis has been carried out with the code ECOBLAN, which has been written for that purpose. The residence time of fuel in the blanket is the main variable of the economic analysis. Other parameters that affect the results and that have been considered are the value of plutonium, the price of heat, the effective cost of money, and the holdup time of the spent fuel before reprocessing. The results show that the radial blanket of both reactors is a producer of net positive income for a broad range of values of the parameters mentioned above. The position of the fuel in the blanket and the fuel management scheme applied affect the monetary gain. There is no significant difference between the economic performance of the blanket of an LMFBR and a GCFR

  17. Effects of total integrated solar radiation on radial fruit cracking in tomato [Lycopersicon esculentum] cultivation under rain shelter in cool uplands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.; Yanase, S.; Enya, T.; Shimazu, T.; Tanaka, I.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the cause of radial fruit cracking in tomato cultivation under rain shelter in the cool uplands in Gifu Prefecture. The effect of total integrated radiation using two types of training methods was determined over a three-year period. The percentage of refused radial fruit cracking associated with increased total integrated solar radiation from the young fruit stage to the mature green stage. Fruit cracking occurred in the training method which foliage and fruits received a large amount of light-interception. Also, as for fruits that undergo vigorous enlargement, the frequency of the radial fruit cracking increased

  18. Adiabatic Cooling for Rovibrational Spectroscopy of Molecular Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, Karin

    2017-01-01

    The field of cold molecular ions is a fast growing one, with applications in high resolution spectroscopy and metrology, the search for time variations of fundamental constants, cold chemistry and collisions, and quantum information processing, to name a few. The study of single molecular ions...... is attractive as it enables one to push the limits of spectroscopic accuracy. Non-destructive spectroscopic detection of molecular ions can be achieved by co-trapping with an easier to detect atomic ion. The ion chain has coupled motion, and transitions which change both the internal and motional states...... to the measured heating rates, almost perfectly fitting existing heating rate theory. Further, the same model successfully predicted the heating rates of the in-phase mode of a two-ion crystal, indicating that we can use it to predict the heating rates in experiments on molecule-atom chains. Adiabatic cooling...

  19. Experimental study of flat plate cooling using draft induced by a submerged radial jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argemiro Palencia-Diaz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Una investigación experimental se ha llevado a cabo para evaluar la transferencia de calor en una configuración modificada de un chorro radial sumergido, por medio del cual se puede extraer el fluido directamente debajo de la boquilla, en busca de una mejora en la velocidad de transferencia de calor. Los experimentos se llevaron a cabo para las siguientes gamas de parámetros que rigen el fenómeno: boquilla de 16 mm de diámetro, distancia entre boquilla y placa entre 10 mm a 20 mm, número de Reynolds que oscila entre 10.000 y 20.000, y calor de 10,2 – 13,6 kW/m2. La transferencia de calor se estima a través de la distribución de temperatura obtenida por medio de un dispositivo de adquisición de datos y un apropiado post-procesamiento, lo que hace posible determinar el coeficiente de transferencia de calor y el número de Nusselt para las diferentes condiciones en estudio. El uso de la extracción de fluido a través de tiro inducido genera un aumento significativo en la transferencia de calor en el área debajo de la boquilla, obteniendo valores desde 290 hasta 1500 W/m2.°C.

  20. Conceptual design of a 24--32 MW radially-cooled insert for a ≥45 T hybrid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weggel, R.J.; Hake, M.E.; Stejskal, V.

    1994-01-01

    The FBNML is designing and will fabricate a radially-cooled insert magnet to generate 70% of the field of a system, Hybrid V, to surpass 45 T in a 32 mm bore. The insert is to have an overall diameter and a maximum active coil length of 610 mm. With a background field of 14 T the system should generate 47 T at 24 MW and nearly 49 T at 32 MW. The peak stress is extremely high, calling for conductors such as Be-Cu (UNS C17510) and 24% Ag-Cu with strengths up to 1,100 MPa. The peak heat flux density also is high, nearly 12 W/mm 2 . Because the water is coldest and its velocity highest where the heat flux is highest, however, the peak temperature is only 80 C. The water flow is ∼ 200 l/s at 27 atm. The system is to be very user friendly. Access is completely unobstructed at the top. Insert removal leaves the plumbing and electrical connections intact. The massive and expensive outer coils should be long lived, the inner coil easily replaceable. During an inner coil burnout, a sleeve intercepts arcing from the inner coil to the middle one, reducing burnout severity and fault loads. The insert should be a worthy successor to those of the FBNML's world-record holding systems, Hybrids II and III

  1. A simple approach to CO cooling in molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, A. P.; Jaffa, S. E.

    2018-03-01

    Carbon monoxide plays an important role in interstellar molecular clouds, both as a coolant, and as a diagnostic molecule. However, a proper evaluation of the cooling rate due to CO requires a determination of the populations of many levels, the spontaneous and stimulated radiative de-excitation rates between these levels, and the transfer of the emitted multi-line radiation; additionally, this must be done for three isotopologues. It would be useful to have a simple analytic formulation that avoided these complications and the associated computational overhead; this could then be used in situations where CO plays an important role as a coolant, but the details of this role are not the main concern. We derive such a formulation here, by first considering the two asymptotic forms that obtain in the limits of (a) low volume-density and optical depth, and (b) high volume-density and optical depth. These forms are then combined in such a way as to fit the detailed numerical results from Goldsmith & Langer (1978, ApJ, 222, 881; hereafter GL78). The GL78 results cover low temperatures, and a range of physical conditions where the interplay of thermal and sub-thermal excitation, optical-depth effects, and the contributions from rare isotopologues, are all important. The fit is obtained using the Metropolis-Hastings method, and reproduces the results of GL78 well. It is a purely local and analytic function of state — specifically a function of the density, ρ, isothermal sound speed, a, CO abundance, XCO, and velocity divergence, ∇ṡυ. As an illustration of its use, we consider the cooling layer following a slow steady non-magnetic planar J-shock. We show that, in this idealised configuration, if the post-shock cooling is dominated by CO and its isotopologues, the thickness of the post-shock cooling layer is very small and approximately independent of the pre-shock velocity, υo, or pre-shock isothermal sound speed, ao.

  2. Application of the stabilization method to the molecular states of LiHe3+: Energies and radial couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias, A.; Mendizabal, R.; Pelayo, F.; Riera, A.; Yaez, M.

    1986-01-01

    We have used the stabilization method to perform calculations on autoionizing states of the LiHe 3+ system which are involved in Li 3+ +He collisions. The molecular energies and radial couplings are calculated with use of programs developed at our laboratory. For both short and large internuclear distances, the stabilization treatment is complemented by block-diagonalization techniques. Our calculations allow us to draw conclusions on the conditions under which these methods can be used to calculate energy positions and radial couplings for states that lie in an ionization continuum

  3. Application of the stabilization method to the molecular states of LiHeT : Energies and radial couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macias, A.; Mendizabal, R.; Pelayo, F.; Riera, A.; Yaez, M.

    1986-01-01

    We have used the stabilization method to perform calculations on autoionizing states of the LiHeT system which are involved in LiT +He collisions. The molecular energies and radial couplings are calculated with use of programs developed at our laboratory. For both short and large internuclear distances, the stabilization treatment is complemented by block-diagonalization techniques. Our calculations allow us to draw conclusions on the conditions under which these methods can be used to calculate energy positions and radial couplings for states that lie in an ionization continuum.

  4. Fast analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories with graphics processing units-Radial distribution function histogramming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, Benjamin G.; Stone, John E.; Kohlmeyer, Axel

    2011-01-01

    The calculation of radial distribution functions (RDFs) from molecular dynamics trajectory data is a common and computationally expensive analysis task. The rate limiting step in the calculation of the RDF is building a histogram of the distance between atom pairs in each trajectory frame. Here we present an implementation of this histogramming scheme for multiple graphics processing units (GPUs). The algorithm features a tiling scheme to maximize the reuse of data at the fastest levels of the GPU's memory hierarchy and dynamic load balancing to allow high performance on heterogeneous configurations of GPUs. Several versions of the RDF algorithm are presented, utilizing the specific hardware features found on different generations of GPUs. We take advantage of larger shared memory and atomic memory operations available on state-of-the-art GPUs to accelerate the code significantly. The use of atomic memory operations allows the fast, limited-capacity on-chip memory to be used much more efficiently, resulting in a fivefold increase in performance compared to the version of the algorithm without atomic operations. The ultimate version of the algorithm running in parallel on four NVIDIA GeForce GTX 480 (Fermi) GPUs was found to be 92 times faster than a multithreaded implementation running on an Intel Xeon 5550 CPU. On this multi-GPU hardware, the RDF between two selections of 1,000,000 atoms each can be calculated in 26.9 s per frame. The multi-GPU RDF algorithms described here are implemented in VMD, a widely used and freely available software package for molecular dynamics visualization and analysis.

  5. An ion cooling and state characterization apparatus for studies of molecular ion dissociative interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Shihu; Vane, C R; Bannister, M E; Havener, C C; Meyer, F W; Krause, H F; Hettich, R L; Goeringer, D E; Van Berkel, G J

    2009-01-01

    An experimental capability is being developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Multi-Charged Ion Research Facility (ORNL MIRF) to enable stored cooling and state characterization of molecular ions of essentially any mass. Ions selected from a variety of available sources are injected from the side into a 1.5 meter long electrostatic mirror trap, where excited internal states are cooled by radiative cooling. An electron beam target located near the middle of the ion-trap region, coupled with neutral fragment imaging detector systems at each end of the trap, permits state-specific studies of electron-molecular ion dissociation.

  6. Comparative study for axial and radial shuffling scheme effect on the performance of Pb-Bi cooled fast reactors with natural uranium as fuel cycle input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaki Suud; Indah Rosidah; Maryam Afifah; Ferhat Aziz; Sekimoto, H.

    2013-01-01

    Full text:Comparative study for the Design of Pb-Bi cooled fast reactors with natural uranium as fuel cycle input using special radial shuffling strategy and axial direction modified CANDLE burn-up scheme has been performed. The reactors utilizes UN-PuN as fuel, Eutectic Pb-Bi as coolant, and can be operated without refueling for 10 years in each batch. Reactor design optimization is performed to utilize natural uranium as fuel cycle input. This reactor subdivided into 6-10 regions with equal volume in radial directions. The natural uranium is initially put in region 1, and after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region 2 and the region 1 is filled by fresh natural uranium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all regions. The calculation has been done by using SRAC-Citation system code and JENDL-3.2 library. The effective multiplication factor change increases monotonously during 10 years reactor operation time. There is significant power distribution change in the central part of the core during the BOC and the EOC in the radial shuffling system. It is larger than that in the case of modified CANDLE case which use axial direction burning region move. The burn-up level of fuel is slowly grows during the first 15 years but then grow faster in the rest of burn-up history. This pattern is a little bit different from the case of modified CANDLE burn-up scheme in Axial direction in which the slow growing burn-up period is relatively longer almost half of the burn-up history. (author)

  7. Modeling of the Radial Heat Flow and Cooling Processes in a Deep Ultraviolet Cu+ Ne-CuBr Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliycho Petkov Iliev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved theoretical model of the gas temperature profile in the cross-section of an ultraviolet copper ion excited copper bromide laser is developed. The model is based on the solution of the one-dimensional heat conduction equation subject to special nonlinear boundary conditions, describing the heat interaction between the laser tube and its surroundings. It takes into account the nonuniform distribution of the volume power density along with the radius of the laser tube. The problem is reduced to the boundary value problem of the first kind. An explicit solution of this model is obtained. The model is applied for the evaluation of the gas temperature profiles of the laser in the conditions of free and forced air-cooling. Comparison with other simple models assumed constant volume power density is made. In particular, a simple expression for calculating the average gas temperature is found.

  8. Investigation of Reactivity Feedback Mechanism of Axial and Radial Expansion Effect of Metal-Fueled Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Seung-Hwan; Choi, Chi-Woong; Jeong, Tae-Kyung; Ha, Gi-Seok

    2015-01-01

    The major inherent reactivity feedback models for a ceramic fuel used in a conventional light water reactor are Doppler feedback and moderator feedback. The metal fuel has these two reactivity feedback mechanisms previously mentioned. In addition, the metal fuel has two more reactivity feedback models related to the thermal expansion phenomena of the metal fuel. Since the metal fuel has a good capability to expand according to the temperature changes of the core, two more feedback mechanisms exist. These additional two feedback mechanism are important to the inherent safety of metal fuel and can make metal-fueled SFR safer than oxide-fueled SFR. These phenomena have already been applied to safety analysis on design extended condition. In this study, the effect of these characteristics on power control capability was examined through a simple load change operation. The axial expansion mechanism is induced from the change of the fuel temperature according to the change of the power level of PGSFR. When the power increases, the fuel temperatures in the metal fuel will increase and then the reactivity will decrease due to the axial elongation of the metal fuel. To evaluate the expansion effect, 2 cases were simulated with the same scenario by using MMS-LMR code developed at KAERI. The first simulation was to analyze the change of the reactor power according to the change of BOP power without the reactivity feedback model of the axial and radial expansion of the core during the power transient event. That is to say, the core had only two reactivity feedback mechanism of Doppler and coolant temperature

  9. Design and development of LH2 cooled rolling element radial bearings for the NERVA engine turbopump. Volume 3: Phase 2: Tests on build-ups 16, 17, and 18 at NRDS, Jackass Flats, Nevada, December 1971 - March 1972

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accinelli, J. B.; Koch, D. A.; Reuter, F.

    1972-01-01

    The use of liquid hydrogen to cool the rolling element radial bearings in the nuclear engine for rocket vehicles is discussed. The fifteen hour service life goal was obtained during the tests. The increase in bearing life was also considered to be produced by: (1) improvements in bearing material, (2) bearing retainer configuration and manufacturing changes, and (3) better control of operating parameters.

  10. Thermal histories of chondrules in solar nebula shocks, including the effect of molecular line cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Melissa A.

    Chondrules are millimeter-sized, silicate (mostly ferromagnesian) igneous spheres found within chondritic meteorites. They are some of the oldest materials in our Solar System, having formed within a few million years of its birth. Chondrules were melted at high temperature (over 1800 K), while they were free-floating objects in the early solar nebula. Their petrology and chemistry constrain their formation, especially their thermal histories. Chondrules provide some of the most powerful constraints on conditions in the solar nebula. Models in which chondrule precursors melted by passage through solar nebula shocks are very promising, and meet most constraints on chondrule formation in broad brush. However, these models have been lacking in some of the relevant physics. Previous shock models have used incorrect approximations to the input radiation boundary condition, and the opacity of solids has been treated simply. Most important, a proper treatment of cooling due to molecular line emission has not been included. In this thesis, the shock model is significantly improved in order to determine if it remains consistent with observational constraints. The appropriate boundary condition for the input radiation and the proper method for calculation of the opacity of solids are determined, and a complete treatment of molecular line cooling due to water is included. Previous estimates of the effect of line cooling predicted chondrule cooling rates in excess of 10,000 K per hour. However, once molecular line cooling due to water was incorporated into the full shock model, it was found that line cooling has a minimal effect on the thermal histories of gas and chondrules. This behavior is attributed mostly to the thermal buffering of the gas due to hydrogen dissociation and recombination, which tends to keep the gas temperature at approximately 2000 K until the column densities of water become optically thick to line emission. Chondrule cooling rates in the range of 10

  11. Effects of fruit thinning, covering of the fruit truss and CO2 enrichment on radial fruit cracking in tomato [Lycopersicon esculentum] production under rain shelter in cool uplands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.; Nomura, Y.; Shimazu, T.; Tanaka, I.

    2009-01-01

    Radial fruit cracking (RFC) can contribute to serious economic losses in tomato production under rain shelter in cool uplands. In order to investigate the effects of translocation and distribution of photosynthate to the fruits during the occurrence of RFC, tomato plants were grown under treatments with fruit thinning and CO2 enrichment, which regulate the strength of sink and source, and treatments with covering of the fruit truss, which decreases solar radiation incident on the fruit surface. The occurrence of RFC was increased by fruit thinning and CO2 enrichment, and decreased by covering of fruit truss. Time course of the percentage of RFC to total harvest showed a remarkable rise toward the end of August and toward the end of October in 2004, when harvested fruit weight was increasing. These finding suggest that RFC is attributed to excessive enlargement of the fruit by promotion of translocation and distribution of photosynthate from leaves (source) to fruits (sink) and the solar radiation incident on the fruits. In addition, the relation between RFC and the generation of a cork layer is considered

  12. Identifying the molecular functions of electron transport proteins using radial basis function networks and biochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Nguyen-Quoc-Khanh; Nguyen, Trinh-Trung-Duong; Ou, Yu-Yen

    2017-05-01

    The electron transport proteins have an important role in storing and transferring electrons in cellular respiration, which is the most proficient process through which cells gather energy from consumed food. According to the molecular functions, the electron transport chain components could be formed with five complexes with several different electron carriers and functions. Therefore, identifying the molecular functions in the electron transport chain is vital for helping biologists understand the electron transport chain process and energy production in cells. This work includes two phases for discriminating electron transport proteins from transport proteins and classifying categories of five complexes in electron transport proteins. In the first phase, the performances from PSSM with AAIndex feature set were successful in identifying electron transport proteins in transport proteins with achieved sensitivity of 73.2%, specificity of 94.1%, and accuracy of 91.3%, with MCC of 0.64 for independent data set. With the second phase, our method can approach a precise model for identifying of five complexes with different molecular functions in electron transport proteins. The PSSM with AAIndex properties in five complexes achieved MCC of 0.51, 0.47, 0.42, 0.74, and 1.00 for independent data set, respectively. We suggest that our study could be a power model for determining new proteins that belongs into which molecular function of electron transport proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Unexpected mobility of OH+ and OD+ molecular ions in cooled helium gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isawa, R; Yamazoe, J; Tanuma, H; Ohtsuki, K

    2012-01-01

    Mobilities of OH + and OD + ions in cooled helium gas have been measured at gas temperature of 4.3 K. Measured mobilities of both ions as a function of an effective temperature T eff show a minimum around 80 K, and they are approaching to the polarization limits at very low T eff . These findings will be related to the extremely strong anisotropy of the interaction potential between the molecular ion and helium atom.

  14. Global transcriptomic profiling of aspen trees under elevated [CO2] to identify potential molecular mechanisms responsible for enhanced radial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hairong; Gou, Jiqing; Yordanov, Yordan; Zhang, Huaxin; Thakur, Ramesh; Jones, Wendy; Burton, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    Aspen (Populus tremuloides) trees growing under elevated [CO(2)] at a free-air CO(2) enrichment (FACE) site produced significantly more biomass than control trees. We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the observed increase in biomass by producing transcriptomic profiles of the vascular cambium zone (VCZ) and leaves, and then performed a comparative study to identify significantly changed genes and pathways after 12 years exposure to elevated [CO(2)]. In leaves, elevated [CO(2)] enhanced expression of genes related to Calvin cycle activity and linked pathways. In the VCZ, the pathways involved in cell growth, cell division, hormone metabolism, and secondary cell wall formation were altered while auxin conjugation, ABA synthesis, and cytokinin glucosylation and degradation were inhibited. Similarly, the genes involved in hemicellulose and pectin biosynthesis were enhanced, but some genes that catalyze important steps in lignin biosynthesis pathway were inhibited. Evidence from systemic analysis supported the functioning of multiple molecular mechanisms that underpin the enhanced radial growth in response to elevated [CO(2)].

  15. Sensitivity of ion-induced sputtering to the radial distribution of energy transfers: A molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mookerjee, S.; Khan, S. A.; Roy, A.; Beuve, M.; Toulemonde, M.

    2008-01-01

    Using different models for the deposition of energy on the lattice and a classical molecular dynamics approach to the subsequent transport, we evaluate how the details of the energy deposition model influence sputtering yield from a Lennard-Jones target irradiated with a MeV/u ion beam. Two energy deposition models are considered: a uniform, instantaneous deposition into a cylinder of fixed radius around the projectile ion track, used in earlier molecular dynamics and fluid dynamics simulations of sputtering yields; and an energy deposition distributed in time and space based on the formalism developed in the thermal spike model. The dependence of the sputtering yield on the total energy deposited on the target atoms is very sensitive to the energy deposition model. To clarify the origin of this strong dependence, we explore the role of the radial expansion of the electronic system prior to the transfer of its energy to the lattice. The results imply that observables such as the sputtering yield may be used as signatures of the fast electron-lattice energy transfer in the electronic energy-loss regime, and indicate the need for more experimental and theoretical investigations of these processes

  16. Cool C-shocks and high-velocity flows in molecular clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.D.; Brand, P.W.J.L.

    1990-01-01

    C-shocks can be driven through dense clouds when the neutrals and magnetic field interact weakly due to a paucity of ions. We develop a method for calculating C-shock properties with the aim of interpreting the observed high-velocity molecular hydrogen. A high Mach number approximation, corresponding to low temperatures, is employed. Under strong cooling conditions the flow is continuous even though a subsonic region may be present downstream. Analytic expressions for the maximum temperature, dissociation fraction, self-ionization level and J-shock transition are derived. (author)

  17. The molecular dynamics simulation of structure and transport properties of sheared super-cooled liquid metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Li; Liu Xiangfa; Zhang Yanning; Yang Hua; Chen Ying; Bian Xiufang

    2003-01-01

    Much more attention has been paid to the microstructure of liquid metal under non-ordinary condition recently. In this Letter, the pair correlation function (PCF), together with internal energy of sheared super-cooled liquid Co as a function of temperature has been calculated by molecular dynamics simulation based upon the embedded atom method (EAM) and analyzed compared to that under normal condition. The finding indicates that there exist three obvious peaks of PCF for liquid Co; while as the shear stress is applied to the liquid, the first and second peaks of PCF become lower, the third peak disappeared. The concentric shell structure representing short-range order of liquid still exists, however, it is weakened by the addition of shear stress, leading to the increases of disordering degree of liquid metal. The curves of energy versus temperature suggest the higher crystalline temperature compared to that under normal condition at the same cooling rate. In addition, the viscosity of super-liquid Co is calculated by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD)

  18. Redundant Sb condensation on GaSb epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy during cooling procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arpapay, B.; Şahin, S.; Arıkan, B.; Serincan, U.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of four different cooling receipts on the surface morphologies of unintentionally-doped GaSb epilayers on GaSb (100) substrates grown by molecular beam epitaxy is reported. Those receipts include three different Sb beam equivalent pressure (BEP) levels and two different termination temperatures. Surface morphologies of epilayers were examined by wet etching, surface profiler, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that during the cooling period, a Sb BEP of 4.00 × 10 −4 Pa at a termination temperature of 400 °C induces a smooth surface without Sb condensation whereas same Sb BEP at a termination temperature of 350 °C forms a 300 nm thick Sb layer on the surface. In addition, it is revealed that by applying a wet etching procedure and using a surface profiler it is possible to identify this condensed layer from the two-sloped feature of mesa profile. - Highlights: • Sb beam flux termination temperature is crucial for redundant Sb condensation. • Sb beam flux level has a role on the thickness of redundant condensed Sb layer. • Redundant Sb layer thickness can be measured by two-sloped mesa structure

  19. Core radial power profile effect on system and core cooling behavior during reflood phase of PWR-LOCA with CCTF data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Hajime; Iguchi, Tadashi; Murao, Yoshio

    1985-01-01

    In the reactor safety assessment during reflood phase of a PWR-LOCA, it is assumed implicitly that the core thermal hydraulic behavior is evaluated by the one-dimensional model with an average power rod. In order to assess the applicability of the one-dimensional treatment, integral tests were performed with various core radial power profiles using the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF) whose core includes about 2,000 heater rods. The CCTF results confirm that the core radial power profile has weak effect on the thermal hydraulic behavior in the primary system except core. It is also confirmed that the core differential pressure in the axial direction is predicted by the one-dimensional core model with an average power rod even in the case with a steep radial power profile in the core. Even though the core heat transfer coefficient is dependent on the core radial power profile, it is found that the error of the peak clad surface temperature calculation is less than 15 K using the one-dimensional model in the CCTF tests. The CCTF results support the one-dimensional treatment assumed in the reactor safety assessment. (author)

  20. A simple scaling law for the equation of state and the radial distribution functions calculated by density-functional theory molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danel, J.-F.; Kazandjian, L.

    2018-06-01

    It is shown that the equation of state (EOS) and the radial distribution functions obtained by density-functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) obey a simple scaling law. At given temperature, the thermodynamic properties and the radial distribution functions given by a DFT-MD simulation remain unchanged if the mole fractions of nuclei of given charge and the average volume per atom remain unchanged. A practical interest of this scaling law is to obtain an EOS table for a fluid from that already obtained for another fluid if it has the right characteristics. Another practical interest of this result is that an asymmetric mixture made up of light and heavy atoms requiring very different time steps can be replaced by a mixture of atoms of equal mass, which facilitates the exploration of the configuration space in a DFT-MD simulation. The scaling law is illustrated by numerical results.

  1. COOL: A code for Dynamic Monte Carlo Simulation of molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, Paolo

    2012-02-01

    Cool is a program to simulate evaporative and sympathetic cooling for a mixture of two gases co-trapped in an harmonic potential. The collisions involved are assumed to be exclusively elastic, and losses are due to evaporation from the trap. Each particle is followed individually in its trajectory, consequently properties such as spatial densities or energy distributions can be readily evaluated. The code can be used sequentially, by employing one output as input for another run. The code can be easily generalised to describe more complicated processes, such as the inclusion of inelastic collisions, or the possible presence of more than two species in the trap. New version program summaryProgram title: COOL Catalogue identifier: AEHJ_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHJ_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 097 733 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 18 425 722 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: Desktop Operating system: Linux RAM: 500 Mbytes Classification: 16.7, 23 Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEHJ_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 182 (2011) 388 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Simulation of the sympathetic process occurring for two molecular gases co-trapped in a deep optical trap. Solution method: The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method exploits the decoupling, over a short time period, of the inter-particle interaction from the trapping potential. The particle dynamics is thus exclusively driven by the external optical field. The rare inter-particle collisions are considered with an acceptance/rejection mechanism, that is, by comparing a random number to the collisional probability

  2. Effects of system size and cooling rate on the structure and properties of sodium borosilicate glasses from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lu; Du, Jincheng

    2018-01-14

    Borosilicate glasses form an important glass forming system in both glass science and technologies. The structure and property changes of borosilicate glasses as a function of thermal history in terms of cooling rate during glass formation and simulation system sizes used in classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation were investigated with recently developed composition dependent partial charge potentials. Short and medium range structural features such as boron coordination, Si and B Q n distributions, and ring size distributions were analyzed to elucidate the effects of cooling rate and simulation system size on these structure features and selected glass properties such as glass transition temperature, vibration density of states, and mechanical properties. Neutron structure factors, neutron broadened pair distribution functions, and vibrational density of states were calculated and compared with results from experiments as well as ab initio calculations to validate the structure models. The results clearly indicate that both cooling rate and system size play an important role on the structures of these glasses, mainly by affecting the 3 B and 4 B distributions and consequently properties of the glasses. It was also found that different structure features and properties converge at different sizes or cooling rates; thus convergence tests are needed in simulations of the borosilicate glasses depending on the targeted properties. The results also shed light on the complex thermal history dependence on structure and properties in borosilicate glasses and the protocols in MD simulations of these and other glass materials.

  3. Effects of system size and cooling rate on the structure and properties of sodium borosilicate glasses from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lu; Du, Jincheng

    2018-01-01

    Borosilicate glasses form an important glass forming system in both glass science and technologies. The structure and property changes of borosilicate glasses as a function of thermal history in terms of cooling rate during glass formation and simulation system sizes used in classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation were investigated with recently developed composition dependent partial charge potentials. Short and medium range structural features such as boron coordination, Si and B Qn distributions, and ring size distributions were analyzed to elucidate the effects of cooling rate and simulation system size on these structure features and selected glass properties such as glass transition temperature, vibration density of states, and mechanical properties. Neutron structure factors, neutron broadened pair distribution functions, and vibrational density of states were calculated and compared with results from experiments as well as ab initio calculations to validate the structure models. The results clearly indicate that both cooling rate and system size play an important role on the structures of these glasses, mainly by affecting the 3B and 4B distributions and consequently properties of the glasses. It was also found that different structure features and properties converge at different sizes or cooling rates; thus convergence tests are needed in simulations of the borosilicate glasses depending on the targeted properties. The results also shed light on the complex thermal history dependence on structure and properties in borosilicate glasses and the protocols in MD simulations of these and other glass materials.

  4. Pressure and cooling rate effect on polyhedron clusters in Cu-Al alloy by using molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Fatih Ahmet

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the microstructural evolution of crystal-type and icosahedral (icos)-type polyhedrons in Cu-50 at%Al alloy based on the embedded atom method (EAM) model is studied at two cooling rates under normal and high pressures by using the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method. The cluster-type index method (CTIM) which describes icos and defective icos polyhedrons and the new cluster-type index method (CTIM-2) which describes crystal-type polyhedrons have been used to perform polyhedron analysis in the model alloy system. The results of our simulations demonstrate that the effects of the cooling rate and pressure play an important role in the numbers of polyhedrons and their structures in the system.

  5. Pressure and cooling rate effect on polyhedron clusters in Cu–Al alloy by using molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celik, Fatih Ahmet, E-mail: facelik@beu.edu.tr

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the microstructural evolution of crystal-type and icosahedral (icos)-type polyhedrons in Cu–50 at%Al alloy based on the embedded atom method (EAM) model is studied at two cooling rates under normal and high pressures by using the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method. The cluster-type index method (CTIM) which describes icos and defective icos polyhedrons and the new cluster-type index method (CTIM-2) which describes crystal-type polyhedrons have been used to perform polyhedron analysis in the model alloy system. The results of our simulations demonstrate that the effects of the cooling rate and pressure play an important role in the numbers of polyhedrons and their structures in the system.

  6. Prevalence and Molecular Characteristics of Waterborne Pathogen Legionella in Industrial Cooling Tower Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lijie; Qin, Tian; Li, Yun; Zhou, Haijian; Song, Hongmei; Ren, Hongyu; Li, Liping; Li, Yongguang; Zhao, Dong

    2015-10-12

    Cooling towers are a source of Legionnaires' disease. It is important from a public health perspective to survey industrial cooling towers for the presence of Legionella. Prospective surveillance of the extent of Legionella pollution was conducted at factories in Shijiazhuang, China between March 2011 and September 2012. Overall, 35.7% of 255 industrial cooling tower water samples showed Legionella-positive, and their concentrations ranged from 100 Colony-Forming Units (CFU)/liter to 88,000 CFU/liter, with an average concentration of 9100 CFU/liter. A total of 121 isolates were obtained. All isolates were L. pneumophila, and the isolated serogroups included serogroups 1 (68 isolates, 56.2%), 6 (25, 20.7%), 5 (12, 9.9%), 8 (8, 6.6%), 3 (6, 5.0%) and 9 (2, 1.6%). All 121 isolates were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and 64 different patterns were obtained. All 121 isolates were analyzed sequence-based typing (SBT), a full 7-allele profile was obtained from 117 isolates. One hundred and seventeen isolates were divided into 49 sequence types. Two virulence genes, lvh and rtxA, are analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). 92.6% (112/121) and 98.3% (119/121) isolates carried lvh and rtxA respectively and 90.9% (110/121) of tested isolates carried both genes. Our results demonstrated high prevalence and genetic polymorphism of L. pneumophila in industrial cooling tower environments in Shijiazhang, China, and the SBT and virulence gene PCR results suggested that the isolates were pathogenic. Improved control and prevention strategies are urgently needed.

  7. Prevalence and Molecular Characteristics of Waterborne Pathogen Legionella in Industrial Cooling Tower Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijie Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cooling towers are a source of Legionnaires’ disease. It is important from a public health perspective to survey industrial cooling towers for the presence of Legionella. Prospective surveillance of the extent of Legionella pollution was conducted at factories in Shijiazhuang, China between March 2011 and September 2012. Overall, 35.7% of 255 industrial cooling tower water samples showed Legionella-positive, and their concentrations ranged from 100 Colony-Forming Units (CFU/liter to 88,000 CFU/liter, with an average concentration of 9100 CFU/liter. A total of 121 isolates were obtained. All isolates were L. pneumophila, and the isolated serogroups included serogroups 1 (68 isolates, 56.2%, 6 (25, 20.7%, 5 (12, 9.9%, 8 (8, 6.6%, 3 (6, 5.0% and 9 (2, 1.6%. All 121 isolates were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and 64 different patterns were obtained. All 121 isolates were analyzed sequence-based typing (SBT, a full 7-allele profile was obtained from 117 isolates. One hundred and seventeen isolates were divided into 49 sequence types. Two virulence genes, lvh and rtxA, are analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. 92.6% (112/121 and 98.3% (119/121 isolates carried lvh and rtxA respectively and 90.9% (110/121 of tested isolates carried both genes. Our results demonstrated high prevalence and genetic polymorphism of L. pneumophila in industrial cooling tower environments in Shijiazhang, China, and the SBT and virulence gene PCR results suggested that the isolates were pathogenic. Improved control and prevention strategies are urgently needed.

  8. Cooling water distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Richard

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  9. ISR Radial Field Magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    There were 37 (normal) + 3 (special) Radial Field magnets in the ISR to adjust vertically the closed orbit. Gap heights and strengths were 200 mm and .12 Tm in the normal magnets, 220 mm and .18 Tm in the special ones. The core length was 430 mm in both types. Due to their small length as compared to the gap heights the end fringe field errors were very important and had to be compensated by suitably shaping the poles. In order to save on cables, as these magnets were located very far from their power supplies, the coils of the normal type magnets were formed by many turns of solid cpper conductor with some interleaved layers of hollow conductor directly cooled by circulating water

  10. Cooling rate and size effects on the medium-range structure of multicomponent oxide glasses simulated by molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilocca, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    A set of molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the effect of cooling rate and system size on the medium-range structure of melt-derived multicomponent silicate glasses, represented by the quaternary 45S5 Bioglass composition. Given the significant impact of the glass degradation on applications of these materials in biomedicine and nuclear waste disposal, bulk structural features which directly affect the glass dissolution process are of particular interest. Connectivity of the silicate matrix, ion clustering and nanosegregation, distribution of ring and chain structural patterns represent critical features in this context, which can be directly extracted from the models. A key issue is represented by the effect of the computational approach on the corresponding glass models, especially in light of recent indications questioning the suitability of conventional MD approaches (that is, involving melt-and-quench of systems containing ∼10 3 atoms at cooling rates of 5-10 K/ps) when applied to model these glasses. The analysis presented here compares MD models obtained with conventional and nonconventional cooling rates and system sizes, highlighting the trend and range of convergence of specific structural features in the medium range. The present results show that time-consuming computational approaches involving much lower cooling rates and/or significantly larger system sizes are in most cases not necessary in order to obtain a reliable description of the medium-range structure of multicomponent glasses. We identify the convergence range for specific properties and use them to discuss models of several glass compositions for which a possible influence of cooling-rate or size effects had been previously hypothesized. The trends highlighted here represent an important reference to obtain reliable models of multicomponent glasses and extract converged medium-range structural features which affect the glass degradation and thus their application

  11. Cooling rate and size effects on the medium-range structure of multicomponent oxide glasses simulated by molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilocca, Antonio [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-21

    A set of molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the effect of cooling rate and system size on the medium-range structure of melt-derived multicomponent silicate glasses, represented by the quaternary 45S5 Bioglass composition. Given the significant impact of the glass degradation on applications of these materials in biomedicine and nuclear waste disposal, bulk structural features which directly affect the glass dissolution process are of particular interest. Connectivity of the silicate matrix, ion clustering and nanosegregation, distribution of ring and chain structural patterns represent critical features in this context, which can be directly extracted from the models. A key issue is represented by the effect of the computational approach on the corresponding glass models, especially in light of recent indications questioning the suitability of conventional MD approaches (that is, involving melt-and-quench of systems containing ∼10{sup 3} atoms at cooling rates of 5-10 K/ps) when applied to model these glasses. The analysis presented here compares MD models obtained with conventional and nonconventional cooling rates and system sizes, highlighting the trend and range of convergence of specific structural features in the medium range. The present results show that time-consuming computational approaches involving much lower cooling rates and/or significantly larger system sizes are in most cases not necessary in order to obtain a reliable description of the medium-range structure of multicomponent glasses. We identify the convergence range for specific properties and use them to discuss models of several glass compositions for which a possible influence of cooling-rate or size effects had been previously hypothesized. The trends highlighted here represent an important reference to obtain reliable models of multicomponent glasses and extract converged medium-range structural features which affect the glass degradation and thus their

  12. Radial nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropathy - radial nerve; Radial nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy ... Damage to one nerve group, such as the radial nerve, is called mononeuropathy . Mononeuropathy means there is damage to a single nerve. Both ...

  13. Femtosecond quantum dynamics and laser-cooling in thermal molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warmuth, C.

    2000-01-01

    This work deals with coherent and incoherent vibrational phenomena in thermal systems, wave packet motion and laser-cooling. In the first part, the principle of COIN (Coherence Observation by Interference Noise) has been applied as a new approach to measuring wave packet motion. In the experiment pairs of phase-randomized femtosecond pulses with relative delay-time τ prepare interference fluctuations in the excited state population, so the variance of the correlated fluorescence intensity directly mimics the dynamics of the propagating wave packet. The scheme is demonstrated by measuring the vibrational coherence of wave packet-motion in the B-state of gaseous iodine. The COIN-interferograms obtained recover propagation, recurrences, spreading, and revivals as the typical signature of wave packets. Due to the disharmony of the B-state-potential, fractional revivals have also been found showing the potential of the COIN-technique in quantum-dynamical research. In the second part the fluorescence lifetime of trans-stilbene, isolated and in the presence of 1 atm of Ar gas, respectively, was measured as a function of the detuning of the excitation frequency from the frequency of the 0-0-transition ω 0 . The lifetime was found to decrease on both sides of ω 0 , but the dependence of the lifetime on detuning in the presence of Ar gas is much weaker than for the isolated molecule. Both observations corroborate previous theoretical predictions of laser-cooling of thermal trans-stilbene upon excitation at the ω 0 frequency. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical analysis. (author)

  14. Integrated Testing of a 4-Bed Molecular Sieve, Air-Cooled Temperature Swing Adsorption Compressor, and Sabatier Engineering Development Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, James C.; Miller, Lee; Campbell, Melissa; Mulloth, Lila; Varghese, Mini

    2006-01-01

    Accumulation and subsequent compression of carbon dioxide that is removed from the space cabin are two important processes involved in a closed-loop air revitalization scheme of the International Space Station (ISS). The 4-Bed Molecular Sieve (4BMS) of ISS currently operates in an open loop mode without a compressor. The Sabatier Engineering Development Unit (EDU) processes waste CO2 to provide water to the crew. This paper reports the integrated 4BMS, air-cooled Temperature Swing Adsorption Compressor (TSAC), and Sabatier EDU testing. The TSAC prototype was developed at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). The 4BMS was modified to a functionally flight-like condition at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Testing was conducted at MSFC. The paper provides details of the TSAC operation at various CO2 loadings and corresponding performance of the 4BMS and Sabatier.

  15. Molecular typing of Legionella pneumophila from air-conditioning cooling waters using mip gene, SBT, and FAFLP methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiangli; Li, Juntao; Zhang, Ying; Hou, Shuiping; Qu, Pinghua; Yang, Zhicong; Chen, Shouyi

    2017-08-01

    Legionella spp. are important waterborne pathogens. Molecular typing has become an important method for outbreaks investigations and source tracking of Legionnaires. In a survey program conducted by the Guangzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple serotypes Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila) were isolated from waters in air-conditioning cooling towers in urban Guangzhou region, China between 2008 and 2011. Three genotyping methods, mip (macrophage infectivity potentiator) genotyping, SBT (sequence-based typing), and FAFLP (fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis) were used to type these waterborne L. pneumophila isolates. The three methods were capable of typing all the 134 isolates and a reference strain of L. pneumophila (ATCC33153), with discriminatory indices of 0.7034, 0.9218, and 0.9376, for the mip, SBT, and FAFLP methods respectively. Among the 9 serotypes of the 134 isolates, 10, 50, and 34 molecular types were detected by the mip, SBT, and FAFLP methods respectively. The mip genotyping and SBT typing are more feasible for inter-laboratory results sharing and comparison of different types of L. pneumophila. The SBT and FAFLP typing methods were rapid with higher discriminatory abilities. Combinations of two or more of the typing methods enables more accurate typing of Legionella isolates for outbreak investigations and source tracking of Legionnaires. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Doppler-free laser spectroscopy of buffer-gas-cooled molecular radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoff, S M; Hendricks, R J; Sinclair, C D J; Tarbutt, M R; Hudson, J J; Segal, D M; Sauer, B E; Hinds, E A

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate Doppler-free saturated absorption spectroscopy of cold molecular radicals formed by laser ablation inside a cryogenic buffer gas cell. By lowering the temperature, congested regions of the spectrum can be simplified, and by using different temperatures for different regions of the spectrum a wide range of rotational states can be studied optimally. We use the technique to study the optical spectrum of YbF radicals with a resolution of 30 MHz, measuring the magnetic hyperfine parameters of the electronic ground state. The method is suitable for high-resolution spectroscopy of a great variety of molecules at controlled temperature and pressure, and is particularly well suited to those that are difficult to produce in the gas phase.

  17. Molecular dynamics study of dynamic and structural properties of supercooled liquid and glassy iron in the rapid-cooling processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Qi-Long; Huang, Duo-Hui; Yang, Jun-Sheng; Wan, Min-Jie; Wang, Fan-Hou, E-mail: eatonch@gmail.com

    2014-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were applied to study the dynamic and structural properties of supercooled liquid and glassy iron in the rapid-cooling processes. The mean-square displacement and the non-Gaussian parameter were used to describe the dynamic properties. The evolution of structural properties was investigated using the pair distribution functions and bond-angle distribution functions. Results for dynamic and structural relaxations indicate that the dynamic features are consistently correlated with the structure evolution, and there are three temperature regions as the temperature decreases: (1) at higher temperatures (1500 K, 1300 K, and 1100 K), the system remains in the liquid characteristics during the overall relaxation process. (2) At medial temperatures (1050 K, 900 K, and 700 K), a fast β-relaxation is followed by a much slower α-relaxation. There is a little change in the structural properties in the β-relaxation region, while major configuration rearrangements occurred in the α-relaxation range and the crystallization process was completed at the end of α-relaxation region. (3) At lower temperature (500 K), the system shows glassy characteristics during the overall relaxation process. In addition, the melting temperature, glass transition temperature and diffusion coefficients of supercooled liquid iron are also computed.

  18. Cooling tower calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonkova, J.

    1988-01-01

    The problems are summed up of the dynamic calculation of cooling towers with forced and natural air draft. The quantities and relations are given characterizing the simultaneous exchange of momentum, heat and mass in evaporative water cooling by atmospheric air in the packings of cooling towers. The method of solution is clarified in the calculation of evaporation criteria and thermal characteristics of countercurrent and cross current cooling systems. The procedure is demonstrated of the calculation of cooling towers, and correction curves and the effect assessed of the operating mode at constant air number or constant outlet air volume flow on their course in ventilator cooling towers. In cooling towers with the natural air draft the flow unevenness is assessed of water and air relative to its effect on the resulting cooling efficiency of the towers. The calculation is demonstrated of thermal and resistance response curves and cooling curves of hydraulically unevenly loaded towers owing to the water flow rate parameter graded radially by 20% along the cross-section of the packing. Flow rate unevenness of air due to wind impact on the outlet air flow from the tower significantly affects the temperatures of cooled water in natural air draft cooling towers of a design with lower demands on aerodynamics, as early as at wind velocity of 2 m.s -1 as was demonstrated on a concrete example. (author). 11 figs., 10 refs

  19. Cooling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, S.P.

    1994-01-01

    After an introduction to the general concepts of cooling of charged particle beams, some specific cooling methods are discussed, namely stochastic, electron and laser cooling. The treatment concentrates on the physical ideas of the cooling methods and only very crude derivations of cooling times are given. At the end three other proposed cooling schemes are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  20. Stacking with stochastic cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caspers, Fritz E-mail: Fritz.Caspers@cern.ch; Moehl, Dieter

    2004-10-11

    Accumulation of large stacks of antiprotons or ions with the aid of stochastic cooling is more delicate than cooling a constant intensity beam. Basically the difficulty stems from the fact that the optimized gain and the cooling rate are inversely proportional to the number of particles 'seen' by the cooling system. Therefore, to maintain fast stacking, the newly injected batch has to be strongly 'protected' from the Schottky noise of the stack. Vice versa the stack has to be efficiently 'shielded' against the high gain cooling system for the injected beam. In the antiproton accumulators with stacking ratios up to 10{sup 5} the problem is solved by radial separation of the injection and the stack orbits in a region of large dispersion. An array of several tapered cooling systems with a matched gain profile provides a continuous particle flux towards the high-density stack core. Shielding of the different systems from each other is obtained both through the spatial separation and via the revolution frequencies (filters). In the 'old AA', where the antiproton collection and stacking was done in one single ring, the injected beam was further shielded during cooling by means of a movable shutter. The complexity of these systems is very high. For more modest stacking ratios, one might use azimuthal rather than radial separation of stack and injected beam. Schematically half of the circumference would be used to accept and cool new beam and the remainder to house the stack. Fast gating is then required between the high gain cooling of the injected beam and the low gain stack cooling. RF-gymnastics are used to merge the pre-cooled batch with the stack, to re-create free space for the next injection, and to capture the new batch. This scheme is less demanding for the storage ring lattice, but at the expense of some reduction in stacking rate. The talk reviews the 'radial' separation schemes and also gives some

  1. Molecular characterization of viable Legionella spp. in cooling tower water samples by combined use of ethidium monoazide and PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Fujimura, Reiko; Agata, Kunio; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Viable Legionella spp. in environmental water samples were characterized phylogenetically by a clone library analysis combining the use of ethidium monoazide and quantitative PCR. To examine the diversity of Legionella spp., six cooling tower water samples and three bath water samples were collected and analyzed. A total of 617 clones were analyzed for their 16S rRNA gene sequences and classified into 99 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). The majority of OTUs were not clustered with currently described Legionella spp., suggesting the wide diversity of not-yet-cultured Legionella groups harbored in cooling tower water environments.

  2. Sequential cooling insert for turbine stator vane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Russel B

    2017-04-04

    A sequential flow cooling insert for a turbine stator vane of a small gas turbine engine, where the impingement cooling insert is formed as a single piece from a metal additive manufacturing process such as 3D metal printing, and where the insert includes a plurality of rows of radial extending impingement cooling air holes alternating with rows of radial extending return air holes on a pressure side wall, and where the insert includes a plurality of rows of chordwise extending second impingement cooling air holes on a suction side wall. The insert includes alternating rows of radial extending cooling air supply channels and return air channels that form a series of impingement cooling on the pressure side followed by the suction side of the insert.

  3. Radial nerve dysfunction (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The radial nerve travels down the arm and supplies movement to the triceps muscle at the back of the upper arm. ... the wrist and hand. The usual causes of nerve dysfunction are direct trauma, prolonged pressure on the ...

  4. Relationship between protein molecular structural makeup and metabolizable protein supply to dairy cattle from new cool-season forage corn cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekara, Saman; Khan, Nazir A.; Yu, Peiqiang

    2018-02-01

    Protein solubility, ruminal degradation and intestinal digestibility are strongly related to their inherent molecular makeup. This study was designed to quantitatively evaluate protein digestion in the rumen and intestine of dairy cattle, and estimate the content of truly metabolizable protein (MP) in newly developed cool-season forage corn cultivars. The second objective was to quantify protein inherent molecular structural characteristics using advance molecular spectroscopic technique (FT/IR-ATR) and correlate it to protein metabolic characteristics. Six new cool-season corn cultivars, including 3 Pioneer (PNR) and 3 Hyland (HL), coded as PNR-7443R, PNR-P7213R, PNR-7535R, HL-SR06, HL-SR22, HL-BAXXOS-RR, were evaluated in the present study. The metabolic characteristics, MP supply to dairy cattle, and energy synchronization properties were modeled by two protein evaluation models, namely, the Dutch DVE/OEB system and the NRC-2001 model. Both models estimated significant (P contents of microbial protein (MCP) synthesis and truly absorbable rumen undegraded protein (ARUP) among the cultivars. The NRC-2001 model estimated significant (P content and degraded protein balance (DPB) among the cultivars. The contents MCP, ARUP and MP were higher (P < 0.05) for cultivar HL-SR06, resulting in the lowest (P < 0.05) DPB. However, none of the cultivars reached the optimal target hourly effective degradability ratio [25 g N g/kg organic matter (OM)], demonstrating N deficiency in the rumen. There were non-significant differences among the cultivars in molecular-spectral intensities of protein. The amide I/II ratio had a significant correlation with ARUP (r = - 0.469; P < 0.001) and absorbable endogenous protein (AECPNRC) (P < 0.001; r = 0.612). Similarly, amide-II area had a weak but significant correlation (r = 0.299; P < 0.001) with RUP and ARUP, and with AECPNRC (P < 0.001; r = 0.411). Except total digestible nutrients and AECPNRC, the amide-I area did not show significant

  5. Stark effect of the hyperfine structure of ICl in its rovibronic ground state: Towards further molecular cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing-Hui, Wang; Xu-Ping, Shao; Xiao-Hua, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Hyperfine structures of ICl in its vibronic ground state due to the nuclear spin and electric quadruple interactions are determined by diagonalizing the effective Hamiltonian matrix. Furthermore, the Stark sub-levels are precisely determined as well. The results are helpful for electro-static manipulation (trapping or further cooling) of cold ICl molecules. For example, an electric field of 1000 V/cm can trap ICl molecules less than 637 μK in the lowest hyperfine level. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11034002), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB921602), and Qing Lan Project, China.

  6. Radial wedge flange clamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karl H.

    2002-01-01

    A radial wedge flange clamp comprising a pair of flanges each comprising a plurality of peripheral flat wedge facets having flat wedge surfaces and opposed and mating flat surfaces attached to or otherwise engaged with two elements to be joined and including a series of generally U-shaped wedge clamps each having flat wedge interior surfaces and engaging one pair of said peripheral flat wedge facets. Each of said generally U-shaped wedge clamps has in its opposing extremities apertures for the tangential insertion of bolts to apply uniform radial force to said wedge clamps when assembled about said wedge segments.

  7. Sirenomelia with radial dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, M L; Abdul Manaf, K M; Prasannakumar, D G; Kulkarni, Preethi M

    2004-05-01

    Sirenomelia is a rare anomaly usually associated with other multiple malformations. In this communication the authors report a case of sirenomelia associated with multiple malformations, which include radial hypoplasia also. Though several theories have been proposed regarding the etiology of multiple malformation syndromes in the past, the recent theory of primary developmental defect during blastogenesis holds good in this case.

  8. Radially truncated galactic discs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grijs, R. de; Kregel, M.; Wesson, K H

    2000-01-01

    Abstract: We present the first results of a systematic analysis of radially truncatedexponential discs for four galaxies of a sample of disc-dominated edge-onspiral galaxies. Edge-on galaxies are very useful for the study of truncatedgalactic discs, since we can follow their light distributions out

  9. Passive containment cooling water distribution device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Lawrence E.; Fanto, Susan V.

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using a series of radial guide elements and cascading weir boxes to collect and then distribute the cooling water into a series of distribution areas through a plurality of cascading weirs. The cooling water is then uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weir notches in the face plate of the weir box.

  10. Variable stator radial turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogo, C.; Hajek, T.; Chen, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    A radial turbine stage with a variable area nozzle was investigated. A high work capacity turbine design with a known high performance base was modified to accept a fixed vane stagger angle moveable sidewall nozzle. The nozzle area was varied by moving the forward and rearward sidewalls. Diffusing and accelerating rotor inlet ramps were evaluated in combinations with hub and shroud rotor exit rings. Performance of contoured sidewalls and the location of the sidewall split line with respect to the rotor inlet was compared to the baseline. Performance and rotor exit survey data are presented for 31 different geometries. Detail survey data at the nozzle exit are given in contour plot format for five configurations. A data base is provided for a variable geometry concept that is a viable alternative to the more common pivoted vane variable geometry radial turbine.

  11. Estimation of Radial Runout

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The demands for ride comfort quality in today's long haulage trucks are constantly growing. A part of the ride comfort problems are represented by internal vibrations caused by rotating mechanical parts. This thesis work focus on the vibrations generated from radial runout on the wheels. These long haulage trucks travel long distances on smooth highways, with a constant speed of 90 km/h resulting in a 7 Hz oscillation. This frequency creates vibrations in the cab, which can be found annoying....

  12. Radial Fuzzy Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Coufal, David

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 319, 15 July (2017), s. 1-27 ISSN 0165-0114 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13002 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : fuzzy systems * radial functions * coherence Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 2.718, year: 2016

  13. Radial Field Piezoelectric Diaphragms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, R. G.; Effinger, R. T., IV; Copeland, B. M., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    A series of active piezoelectric diaphragms were fabricated and patterned with several geometrically defined Inter-Circulating Electrodes "ICE" and Interdigitated Ring Electrodes "ICE". When a voltage potential is applied to the electrodes, the result is a radially distributed electric field that mechanically strains the piezoceramic along the Z-axis (perpendicular to the applied electric field). Unlike other piezoelectric bender actuators, these Radial Field Diaphragms (RFDs) strain concentrically yet afford high displacements (several times that of the equivalent Unimorph) while maintaining a constant circumference. One of the more intriguing aspects is that the radial strain field reverses itself along the radius of the RFD while the tangential strain remains relatively constant. The result is a Z-deflection that has a conical profile. This paper covers the fabrication and characterization of the 5 cm. (2 in.) diaphragms as a function of poling field strength, ceramic thickness, electrode type and line spacing, as well as the surface topography, the resulting strain field and displacement as a function of applied voltage at low frequencies. The unique features of these RFDs include the ability to be clamped about their perimeter with little or no change in displacement, the environmentally insulated packaging, and a highly repeatable fabrication process that uses commodity materials.

  14. Perceived radial translation during centrifugation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.E.; Correia Grácio, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Linear acceleration generally gives rise to translation perception. Centripetal acceleration during centrifugation, however, has never been reported giving rise to a radial, inward translation perception. OBJECTIVE: To study whether centrifugation can induce a radial translation

  15. Cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boernke, F.

    1975-01-01

    The need for the use of cooling systems in power plant engineering is dealt with from the point of view of a non-polluting form of energy production. The various cooling system concepts up to the modern natural-draught cooling towers are illustrated by examples. (TK/AK) [de

  16. SUB-KILOPARSEC IMAGING OF COOL MOLECULAR GAS IN TWO STRONGLY LENSED DUSTY, STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spilker, J. S.; Marrone, D. P. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Aravena, M. [Núcleo de Astronomía, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército 441, Santiago (Chile); Béthermin, M.; Breuck, C. de [European Southern Observatory, Karl Schwarzschild Straße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bothwell, M. S. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thompson Ave, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Carlstrom, J. E. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chapman, S. C.; Rotermund, K. M. [Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Collier, J. D.; Galvin, T.; Grieve, K.; O’Brien, A. [University of Western Sydney, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 2751 (Australia); Fassnacht, C. D. [Department of Physics, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Gonzalez, A. H.; Ma, J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); González-López, J. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Hezaveh, Y. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Malkan, M., E-mail: jspilker@as.arizona.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); and others

    2015-10-01

    We present spatially resolved imaging obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) of three CO lines in two high-redshift gravitationally lensed dusty star-forming galaxies, discovered by the South Pole Telescope. Strong lensing allows us to probe the structure and dynamics of the molecular gas in these two objects, at z = 2.78 and z = 5.66, with effective source-plane resolution of less than 1 kpc. We model the lensed emission from multiple CO transitions and the dust continuum in a consistent manner, finding that the cold molecular gas as traced by low-J CO always has a larger half-light radius than the 870 μm dust continuum emission. This size difference leads to up to 50% differences in the magnification factor for the cold gas compared to dust. In the z = 2.78 galaxy, these CO observations confirm that the background source is undergoing a major merger, while the velocity field of the other source is more complex. We use the ATCA CO observations and comparable resolution Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array dust continuum imaging of the same objects to constrain the CO–H{sub 2} conversion factor with three different procedures, finding good agreement between the methods and values consistent with those found for rapidly star-forming systems. We discuss these galaxies in the context of the star formation—gas mass surface density relation, noting that the change in emitting area with observed CO transition must be accounted for when comparing high-redshift galaxies to their lower redshift counterparts.

  17. Radial reflection diffraction tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Sean K.

    2012-12-18

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  18. Film cooling for a closed loop cooled airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2003-01-01

    Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending therebetween. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. At least one film cooling hole is defined through a wall of at least one of the cavities for flow communication between an interior of the cavity and an exterior of the vane. The film cooling hole(s) are defined adjacent a potential low LCF life region, so that cooling medium that bleeds out through the film cooling hole(s) reduces a thermal gradient in a vicinity thereof, thereby the increase the LCF life of that region.

  19. Cooling rate effects on structure of amorphous graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Hoang, Vo

    2015-01-01

    Simple monatomic amorphous 2D models with Honeycomb structure are obtained from 2D simple monatomic liquids with Honeycomb interaction potential (Rechtsman et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 228301 (2005)) via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Models are observed by cooling from the melt at various cooling rates. Temperature dependence of thermodynamic and structural properties including total energy, mean ring size, mean coordination number is studied in order to show evolution of structure and thermodynamics upon cooling from the melt. Structural properties of the amorphous Honeycomb structures are studied via radial distribution function (RDF), coordination number and ring distributions together with 2D visualization of the atomic configurations. Amorphous Honeycomb structures contain a large amount of structural defects including new ones which have not been previously reported yet. Cooling rate dependence of structural properties of the obtained amorphous Honeycomb structures is analyzed. Although amorphous graphene has been proposed theoretically and/or recently obtained by the experiments, our understanding of structural properties of the system is still poor. Therefore, our simulations highlight the situation and give deeper understanding of structure and thermodynamics of the glassy state of this novel 2D material

  20. Spray cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollin, Philippe.

    1975-01-01

    Spray cooling - using water spraying in air - is surveyed as a possible system for make-up (peak clipping in open circuit) or major cooling (in closed circuit) of the cooling water of the condensers in thermal power plants. Indications are given on the experiments made in France and the systems recently developed in USA, questions relating to performance, cost and environmental effects of spray devices are then dealt with [fr

  1. Radial semiconductor drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawlings, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    The conditions under which the energy resolution of a radial semiconductor drift chamber based detector system becomes dominated by the step noise from the detector dark current have been investigated. To minimise the drift chamber dark current attention should be paid to carrier generation at Si/SiO 2 interfaces. This consideration conflicts with the desire to reduce the signal risetime: a higher drift field for shorter signal pulses requires a larger area of SiO 2 . Calculations for the single shaping and pseudo Gaussian passive filters indicate that for the same degree of signal risetime sensitivity in a system dominated by the step noise from the detector dark current, the pseudo Gaussian filter gives only a 3% improvement in signal/noise and 12% improvement in rate capability compared with the single shaper performance. (orig.)

  2. The ARCS radial collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, M.B.; Abernathy, D.L.; Niedziela, J.L.; Overbay, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    We have designed, installed, and commissioned a scattered beam radial collimator for use at the ARCS Wide Angular Range Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source. The collimator has been designed to work effectively for thermal and epithermal neutrons and with a range of sample environments. Other design considerations include the accommodation of working within a high vacuum environment and having the ability to quickly install and remove the collimator from the scattered beam. The collimator is composed of collimating blades (or septa). The septa are 12 micron thick Kapton foils coated on each side with 39 microns of enriched boron carbide ( 10 B 4 C with 10 B > 96%) in an ultra-high vacuum compatible binder. The collimator blades represent an additional 22 m 2 of surface area. In the article we present collimator's design and performance and methodologies for its effective use

  3. Antiproton compression and radial measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jorgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page R D; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, achieved by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile, and its relation to that of the electron plasma. We also measure the outer radial profile by ejecting antiprotons to the trap wall using an octupole magnet.

  4. Film cooling air pocket in a closed loop cooled airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael; Osgood, Sarah Jane; Bagepalli, Radhakrishna; Webbon, Waylon Willard; Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending between them. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. To provide for air film cooing of select portions of the airfoil outer surface, at least one air pocket is defined on a wall of at least one of the cavities. Each air pocket is substantially closed with respect to the cooling medium in the cavity and cooling air pumped to the air pocket flows through outlet apertures in the wall of the airfoil to cool the same.

  5. Implications of recent research on microstructure modifications, through heat-related processing and trait alteration to bio-functions, molecular thermal stability and mobility, metabolic characteristics and nutrition in cool-climate cereal grains and other types of seeds with advanced molecular techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Yuguang; Zhang, Huihua; Yu, Peiqiang

    2018-02-16

    The cutting-edge synchrotron radiation based and globar-sourced vibrational infrared microspectroscopy have recently been developed. These novel techniques are able to reveal structure features at cellular and molecular levels with the tested tissues being intact. However, to date, the advanced techniques are unfamiliar or unknown to food and feed scientists and have not been used to study the molecular structure changes in cool-climate cereal grain seeds and other types of bio-oil and bioenergy seeds. This article aims to provide some recent research in cool-climate cereal grains and other types of seeds on molecular structures and metabolic characteristics of carbohydrate and protein, and implication of microstructure modification through heat-related processing and trait alteration to bio-functions, molecular thermal stability and mobility, and nutrition with advanced molecular techniques- synchrotron radiation based and globar-sourced vibrational infrared microspectroscopy in the areas of (1) Inherent microstructure of cereal grain seeds; (2) The nutritional values of cereal grains; (3) Impact and modification of heat-related processing to cereal grain; (4) Conventional nutrition evaluation methodology; (5) Synchrotron radiation-based and globar-sourced vibrational (micro)-spectroscopy for molecular structure study and molecular thermal stability and mobility, and (6) Recent molecular spectroscopic technique applications in research on raw, traits altered and processed cool-climate cereal grains and other types of seeds. The information described in this article gives better insights of research progress and update in cool-climate cereal grains and other seeds with advanced molecular techniques.

  6. Theory of tapered laser cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Hiromi; Wei, J.

    1998-01-01

    A theory of tapered laser cooling for fast circulating ion beams in a storage ring is constructed. The authors describe the fundamentals of this new cooling scheme, emphasizing that it might be the most promising way to beam crystallization. The cooling rates are analytically evaluated to study the ideal operating condition. They discuss the physical implication of the tapering factor of cooling laser, and show how to determine its optimum value. Molecular dynamics method is employed to demonstrate the validity of the present theory

  7. Radial expansion and multifragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelique, J.C.; Bizard, G.; Bougault, R.; Brou, R.; Buta, A.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Durand, D.; Kerambrun, A.; Le Brun, C.; Lecolley, J.F.; Lopez, O.; Louvel, M.; Meslin, C.; Nakagawa, T.; Patry, J.P.; Peter, J.; Popescu, R.; Regimbart, R.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Tamain, B.; Vient, E.; Yuasa-Nakagawa, K.; Wieloch, A.

    1998-01-01

    The light systems 36 Ar + 27 Al and 64 Zn + nat Ti were measured at several bombarding energies between ∼ 35 and 95 MeV/nucleon. It was found that the predominant part of the cross section is due to binary collisions. In this paper the focus is placed on the properties of the quasi-projectile nuclei. In the central collisions the excitation energies of the quasi-projectile reach values exceeding largely 10 MeV/nucleon. The slope of the high energy part of the distribution can give only an upper limit of the apparent temperature (the average temperature along the decay chain). The highly excited quasi-projectile may get rapidly fragmented rather than sequentially. The heavy fragments are excited and can emit light particles (n, p, d, t, 3 He, α,...) what perturbs additionally the spectrum of these particles. Concerning the expansion energy, one can determine the average kinetic energies of the product (in the quasi-projectile-framework) and compare with simulation values. To fit the experimental data an additional radial expansion energy is to be considered. The average expansion energy depends slightly on the impact parameter but it increases with E * / A, ranging from 0.4 to 1,2 MeV/nucleon for an excitation energy increasing from 7 to 10.5 MeV/nucleon. This collective radial energy seems to be independent of the fragment mass, what is possibly valid for the case of larger quasi-projectile masses. The origin of the expansion is to be determined. It may be due to a compression in the interaction zone at the initial stage of the collision, which propagates in the quasi-projectile and quasi-target, or else, may be due, simply, to the increase of thermal energy leading to a rapid fragment emission. The sequential de-excitation calculation overestimates light particle emission and consequently heavy residues, particularly, at higher excitation energies. This disagreement indicates that a sequential process can not account for the di-excitation of very hot nuclei

  8. Radial gas turbine design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krausche, S.; Ohlsson, Johan

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a program dealing with design point calculations of radial turbine machinery, including both compressor and turbine, with as few input data as possible. Some simple stress calculations and turbine metal blade temperatures were also included. This program was then implanted in a German thermodynamics program, Gasturb, a program calculating design and off-design performance of gas turbines. The calculations proceed with a lot of assumptions, necessary to finish the task, concerning pressure losses, velocity distribution, blockage, etc., and have been correlated with empirical data from VAT. Most of these values could have been input data, but to prevent the user of the program from drowning in input values, they are set as default values in the program code. The output data consist of geometry, Mach numbers, predicted component efficiency etc., and a number of graphical plots of geometry and velocity triangles. For the cases examined, the error in predicted efficiency level was within {+-} 1-2% points, and quite satisfactory errors in geometrical and thermodynamic conditions were obtained Examination paper. 18 refs, 36 figs

  9. Radial flow heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Javier

    2001-01-01

    A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

  10. Stability of radial swirl flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou, H S; Khoo, B C

    2012-01-01

    The energy gradient theory is used to examine the stability of radial swirl flows. It is found that the flow of free vortex is always stable, while the introduction of a radial flow will induce the flow to be unstable. It is also shown that the pure radial flow is stable. Thus, there is a flow angle between the pure circumferential flow and the pure radial flow at which the flow is most unstable. It is demonstrated that the magnitude of this flow angle is related to the Re number based on the radial flow rate, and it is near the pure circumferential flow. The result obtained in this study is useful for the design of vaneless diffusers of centrifugal compressors and pumps as well as other industrial devices.

  11. Ventilative Cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Kolokotroni, Maria

    This report, by venticool, summarises the outcome of the work of the initial working phase of IEA ECB Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling and is based on the findings in the participating countries. It presents a summary of the first official Annex 62 report that describes the state-of-the-art of ventil......This report, by venticool, summarises the outcome of the work of the initial working phase of IEA ECB Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling and is based on the findings in the participating countries. It presents a summary of the first official Annex 62 report that describes the state......-of-the-art of ventilative cooling potentials and limitations, its consideration in current energy performance regulations, available building components and control strategies and analysis methods and tools. In addition, the report provides twenty six examples of operational buildings using ventilative cooling ranging from...

  12. Low pressure cooling seal system for a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John J

    2014-04-01

    A low pressure cooling system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids at low pressure, such as at ambient pressure, through at least one cooling fluid supply channel and into a cooling fluid mixing chamber positioned immediately downstream from a row of turbine blades extending radially outward from a rotor assembly to prevent ingestion of hot gases into internal aspects of the rotor assembly. The low pressure cooling system may also include at least one bleed channel that may extend through the rotor assembly and exhaust cooling fluids into the cooling fluid mixing chamber to seal a gap between rotational turbine blades and a downstream, stationary turbine component. Use of ambient pressure cooling fluids by the low pressure cooling system results in tremendous efficiencies by eliminating the need for pressurized cooling fluids for sealing this gap.

  13. Hydrostatic radial bearing of centrifugal pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalicky, A.

    1976-01-01

    A hydrostatic radial pump is described characterized by the fact that part of the medium off-taken from delivery is used as a lubricating medium. Two additional bodies are placed alongside a hydrostatic bearing with coils in between them and the pump shaft; the coils have an opposite pitch. The feed channel for the hydrostatic bearing pocket is linked to delivery. The coil outlets are connected to the pump suction unit. Two rotating coils placed alongside the hydrostatic bearing will considerably simplify the communication channel design and reduce the dependence on the pump shaft deflections. The addition of another rotating coil in the close vicinity of the pump shaft or directly on the shaft further increases the efficiency. The bearing can be used in designing vertical circulating pumps for the cooling circuits of nuclear reactors. (J.B.)

  14. Numerical simulation of liquid-metal-flows in radial-toroidal-radial bends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molokov, S.; Buehler, L.

    1993-09-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic flows in a U-bend and right-angle bend are considered with reference to the radial-toroidal-radial concept of a self-cooled liquid-metal blanket. The ducts composing bends have rectangular cross-section. The applied magnetic field is aligned with the toroidal duct and perpendicular to the radial ones. At high Hartmann number the flow region is divided into cores and boundary layers of different types. The magnetohydrodynamic equations are reduced to a system of partial differential equations governing wall electric potentials and the core pressure. The system is solved numerically by two different methods. The first method is iterative with iteration between wall potential and the core pressure. The second method is a general one for the solution of the core flow equations in curvilinear coordinates generated by channel geometry and magnetic field orientation. Results obtained are in good agreement. They show, that the 3D-pressure drop of MHD flows in a U-bend is not a critical issue for blanket applications. (orig./HP) [de

  15. Cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korik, L.; Burger, R.

    1992-01-01

    What is the effect of 0.6C (1F) temperature rise across turbines, compressors, or evaporators? Enthalpy charts indicate for every 0.6C (1F) hotter water off the cooling tower will require an additional 2 1/2% more energy cost. Therefore, running 2.2C (4F) warmer due to substandard cooling towers could result in a 10% penalty for overcoming high heads and temperatures. If it costs $1,250,000.00 a year to operate the system, $125,000.00 is the energy penalty for hotter water. This paper investigates extra fuel costs involved in maintaining design electric production with cooling water 0.6C (1F) to 3C (5.5F) hotter than design. If design KWH cannot be maintained, paper will calculate dollar loss of saleable electricity. The presentation will conclude with examining the main causes of deficient cold water production. State-of-the-art upgrading and methodology available to retrofit existing cooling towers to optimize lower cooling water temperatures will be discussed

  16. Radial retinotomy in the macula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovino, J A; Marcus, D F

    1984-01-01

    Radial retinotomy is an operative procedure usually performed in the peripheral or equatorial retina. To facilitate retinal attachment, the authors used intraocular scissors to perform radial retinotomy in the macula of two patients during vitrectomy surgery. In the first patient, a retinal detachment complicated by periretinal proliferation and macula hole formation was successfully reoperated with the aid of three radial cuts in the retina at the edges of the macular hole. In the second patient, an intraoperative retinal tear in the macula during diabetic vitrectomy was also successfully repaired with the aid of radial retinotomy. In both patients, retinotomy in the macula was required because epiretinal membranes, which could not be easily delaminated, were hindering retinal reattachment.

  17. Detonation in supersonic radial outflow

    KAUST Repository

    Kasimov, Aslan R.; Korneev, Svyatoslav

    2014-01-01

    We report on the structure and dynamics of gaseous detonation stabilized in a supersonic flow emanating radially from a central source. The steady-state solutions are computed and their range of existence is investigated. Two-dimensional simulations

  18. Dedicated radial ventriculography pigtail catheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidovich, Mladen I., E-mail: miv@uic.edu

    2013-05-15

    A new dedicated cardiac ventriculography catheter was specifically designed for radial and upper arm arterial access approach. Two catheter configurations have been developed to facilitate retrograde crossing of the aortic valve and to conform to various subclavian, ascending aortic and left ventricular anatomies. The “short” dedicated radial ventriculography catheter is suited for horizontal ascending aortas, obese body habitus, short stature and small ventricular cavities. The “long” dedicated radial ventriculography catheter is suited for vertical ascending aortas, thin body habitus, tall stature and larger ventricular cavities. This new design allows for improved performance, faster and simpler insertion in the left ventricle which can reduce procedure time, radiation exposure and propensity for radial artery spasm due to excessive catheter manipulation. Two different catheter configurations allow for optimal catheter selection in a broad range of patient anatomies. The catheter is exceptionally stable during contrast power injection and provides equivalent cavity opacification to traditional femoral ventriculography catheter designs.

  19. Cooling tower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norbaeck, P; Heneby, H

    1976-01-22

    Cooling towers to be transported on road vehicles as a unit are not allowed to exceed certain dimensions. In order to improve the efficiency of such a cooling tower (of cross-flow design and box-type body) with given dimensions, it is proposed to arrange at least one of the scrubbing bodies displaceable within a module or box. Then it can be moved out of the casing into working position, thereby increasing the front surface available for the inlet of air (and with it the efficiency) by nearly a factor of two.

  20. Stochastic cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisognano, J.; Leemann, C.

    1982-03-01

    Stochastic cooling is the damping of betatron oscillations and momentum spread of a particle beam by a feedback system. In its simplest form, a pickup electrode detects the transverse positions or momenta of particles in a storage ring, and the signal produced is amplified and applied downstream to a kicker. The time delay of the cable and electronics is designed to match the transit time of particles along the arc of the storage ring between the pickup and kicker so that an individual particle receives the amplified version of the signal it produced at the pick-up. If there were only a single particle in the ring, it is obvious that betatron oscillations and momentum offset could be damped. However, in addition to its own signal, a particle receives signals from other beam particles. In the limit of an infinite number of particles, no damping could be achieved; we have Liouville's theorem with constant density of the phase space fluid. For a finite, albeit large number of particles, there remains a residue of the single particle damping which is of practical use in accumulating low phase space density beams of particles such as antiprotons. It was the realization of this fact that led to the invention of stochastic cooling by S. van der Meer in 1968. Since its conception, stochastic cooling has been the subject of much theoretical and experimental work. The earliest experiments were performed at the ISR in 1974, with the subsequent ICE studies firmly establishing the stochastic cooling technique. This work directly led to the design and construction of the Antiproton Accumulator at CERN and the beginnings of p anti p colliding beam physics at the SPS. Experiments in stochastic cooling have been performed at Fermilab in collaboration with LBL, and a design is currently under development for a anti p accumulator for the Tevatron

  1. Radial lean direct injection burner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Rafey; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2012-09-04

    A burner for use in a gas turbine engine includes a burner tube having an inlet end and an outlet end; a plurality of air passages extending axially in the burner tube configured to convey air flows from the inlet end to the outlet end; a plurality of fuel passages extending axially along the burner tube and spaced around the plurality of air passage configured to convey fuel from the inlet end to the outlet end; and a radial air swirler provided at the outlet end configured to direct the air flows radially toward the outlet end and impart swirl to the air flows. The radial air swirler includes a plurality of vanes to direct and swirl the air flows and an end plate. The end plate includes a plurality of fuel injection holes to inject the fuel radially into the swirling air flows. A method of mixing air and fuel in a burner of a gas turbine is also provided. The burner includes a burner tube including an inlet end, an outlet end, a plurality of axial air passages, and a plurality of axial fuel passages. The method includes introducing an air flow into the air passages at the inlet end; introducing a fuel into fuel passages; swirling the air flow at the outlet end; and radially injecting the fuel into the swirling air flow.

  2. A very cool cooling system

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    The NA62 Gigatracker is a jewel of technology: its sensor, which delivers the time of the crossing particles with a precision of less than 200 picoseconds (better than similar LHC detectors), has a cooling system that might become the precursor to a completely new detector technique.   The 115 metre long vacuum tank of the NA62 experiment. The NA62 Gigatracker (GTK) is composed of a set of three innovative silicon pixel detectors, whose job is to measure the arrival time and the position of the incoming beam particles. Installed in the heart of the NA62 detector, the silicon sensors are cooled down (to about -20 degrees Celsius) by a microfluidic silicon device. “The cooling system is needed to remove the heat produced by the readout chips the silicon sensor is bonded to,” explains Alessandro Mapelli, microsystems engineer working in the Physics department. “For the NA62 Gigatracker we have designed a cooling plate on top of which both the silicon sensor and the...

  3. Cooling pancakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, J.R.; Wilson, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    In theories of galaxy formation with a damping cut-off in the density fluctuation spectrum, the first non-linear structures to form are Zeldovich pancakes in which dissipation separates gas from any collisionless dark matter then present. One-dimensional numerical simulations of the collapse, shock heating, and subsequent thermal evolution of pancakes are described. Neutrinos (or any other cool collisionless particles) are followed by direct N-body methods and the gas by Eulerian hydrodynamics with conduction as well as cooling included. It is found that the pressure is relatively uniform within the shocked region and approximately equals the instantaneous ram pressure acting at the shock front. An analytic theory based upon this result accurately describes the numerical calculations. (author)

  4. Cool Sportswear

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    New athletic wear design based on the circulating liquid cooling system used in the astronaut's space suits, allows athletes to perform more strenuous activity without becoming overheated. Techni-Clothes gear incorporates packets containing a heat-absorbing gel that slips into an insulated pocket of the athletic garment and is positioned near parts of the body where heat transfer is most efficient. A gel packet is good for about one hour. Easily replaced from a supply of spares in an insulated container worn on the belt. The products, targeted primarily for runners and joggers and any other athlete whose performance may be affected by hot weather, include cooling headbands, wrist bands and running shorts with gel-pack pockets.

  5. Self-consistent radial sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1988-12-01

    The boundary layer arising in the radial vicinity of a tokamak limiter is examined, with special reference to the TEXT tokamak. It is shown that sheath structure depends upon the self-consistent effects of ion guiding-center orbit modification, as well as the radial variation of E /times/ B-induced toroidal rotation. Reasonable agreement with experiment is obtained from an idealized model which, however simplified, preserves such self-consistent effects. It is argued that the radial sheath, which occurs whenever confining magnetic field-lines lie in the plasma boundary surface, is an object of some intrinsic interest. It differs from the more familiar axial sheath because magnetized charges respond very differently to parallel and perpendicular electric fields. 11 refs., 1 fig

  6. Cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutant, C.C.

    1978-01-01

    Progress on the thermal effects project is reported with regard to physiology and distribution of Corbicula; power plant effects studies on burrowing mayfly populations; comparative thermal responses of largemouth bass from northern and southern populations; temperature selection by striped bass in Cherokee Reservoir; fish population studies; and predictive thermoregulation by fishes. Progress is also reported on the following; cause and ecological ramifications of threadfin shad impingement; entrainment project; aquaculture project; pathogenic amoeba project; and cooling tower drift project

  7. Detonation in supersonic radial outflow

    KAUST Repository

    Kasimov, Aslan R.

    2014-11-07

    We report on the structure and dynamics of gaseous detonation stabilized in a supersonic flow emanating radially from a central source. The steady-state solutions are computed and their range of existence is investigated. Two-dimensional simulations are carried out in order to explore the stability of the steady-state solutions. It is found that both collapsing and expanding two-dimensional cellular detonations exist. The latter can be stabilized by putting several rigid obstacles in the flow downstream of the steady-state sonic locus. The problem of initiation of standing detonation stabilized in the radial flow is also investigated numerically. © 2014 Cambridge University Press.

  8. The effects of nitric oxide cooling and the photodissociation of molecular oxygen on the thermosphere/ionosphere system over the Argentine Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Wells

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available In the past the global, fully coupled, time-dependent mathematical model of the Earth's thermosphere/ionosphere/plasmasphere (CTIP has been unable to reproduce accurately observed values of the maximum plasma frequency, foF2, at extreme geophysical locations such as the Argentine Islands during the summer solstice where the ionosphere remains in sunlight throughout the day. This is probably because the seasonal dependence of thermospheric cooling by 5.3 µm nitric oxide has been neglected and the photodissociation of O2 and heating rate calculations have been over-simplified. Now we have included an up-to-date calculation of the solar EUV and UV thermospheric heating rate, coupled with a new calculation of a diurnally varying O2 photodissociation rate, in the model. Seasonally dependent 5.3 µm nitric oxide cooling is also included. With these important improvements, it is found that model values of foF2 are in substantially better agreement with observation. The height of the F2-peak is reduced throughout the day, but remains within acceptable limits of values derived from observation, except at around 0600 h LT. We also carry out two studies of the sensitivity of the upper atmosphere to changes in the magnitude of nitric oxide cooling and photodissociation rates. We find that hmF2 increases with increased heating, whilst foF2 falls. The converse is true for an increase in the cooling rate. Similarly increasing the photodissociation rate increases both hmF2 and foF2. These changes are explained in terms of changes in the neutral temperature, composition and neutral wind.

  9. Helium cooling of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Baxi, C.; Bourque, R.; Dahms, C.; Inamati, S.; Ryder, R.; Sager, G.; Schleicher, R.

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of worldwide design experience and in coordination with the evolution of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) program, the application of helium as a coolant for fusion appears to be at the verge of a transition from conceptual design to engineering development. This paper presents a review of the use of helium as the coolant for fusion reactor blanket and divertor designs. The concept of a high-pressure helium cooling radial plate design was studied for both ITER and PULSAR. These designs can resolve many engineering issues, and can help with reaching the goals of low activation and high performance designs. The combination of helium cooling, advanced low-activation materials, and gas turbine technology may permit high thermal efficiency and reduced costs, resulting in the environmental advantages and competitive economics required to make fusion a 21st century power source. ((orig.))

  10. Vortex Whistle in Radial Intake

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tse, Man-Chun

    2004-01-01

    In a radial-to-axial intake with inlet guide vanes (IGV) at the entry, a strong flow circulation Gamma can be generated from the tangential flow components created by the IGVs when their setting exceed about halfclosing (approx. 45 deg...

  11. Radial head dislocation during proximal radial shaft osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazel, Antony; Bindra, Randy R

    2014-03-01

    The following case report describes a 48-year-old female patient with a longstanding both-bone forearm malunion, who underwent osteotomies of both the radius and ulna to improve symptoms of pain and lack of rotation at the wrist. The osteotomies were templated preoperatively. During surgery, after performing the planned radial shaft osteotomy, the authors recognized that the radial head was subluxated. The osteotomy was then revised from an opening wedge to a closing wedge with improvement of alignment and rotation. The case report discusses the details of the operation, as well as ways in which to avoid similar shortcomings in the future. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cool snacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G; Brock, Steen; Brunsø, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Young people snack and their snacking habits are not always healthy. We address the questions whether it is possible to develop a new snack product that adolescents will find attractive, even though it is based on ingredients as healthy as fruits and vegetables, and we argue that developing...... such a product requires an interdisciplinary effort where researchers with backgrounds in psychology, anthropology, media science, philosophy, sensory science and food science join forces. We present the COOL SNACKS project, where such a blend of competences was used first to obtain thorough insight into young...... people's snacking behaviour and then to develop and test new, healthier snacking solutions. These new snacking solutions were tested and found to be favourably accepted by young people. The paper therefore provides a proof of principle that the development of snacks that are both healthy and attractive...

  13. Cool visitors

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Pictured, from left to right: Tim Izo (saxophone, flute, guitar), Bobby Grant (tour manager), George Pajon (guitar). What do the LHC and a world-famous hip-hop group have in common? They are cool! On Saturday, 1st July, before their appearance at the Montreux Jazz Festival, three members of the 'Black Eyed Peas' came on a surprise visit to CERN, inspired by Dan Brown's Angels and Demons. At short notice, Connie Potter (Head of the ATLAS secretariat) organized a guided tour of ATLAS and the AD 'antimatter factory'. Still curious, lead vocalist Will.I.Am met CERN physicist Rolf Landua after the concert to ask many more questions on particles, CERN, and the origin of the Universe.

  14. THE NIRSPEC ULTRACOOL DWARF RADIAL VELOCITY SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, Cullen H.; Charbonneau, David; White, Russel J.

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of an infrared Doppler survey designed to detect brown dwarf and giant planetary companions to a magnitude-limited sample of ultracool dwarfs. Using the NIRSPEC spectrograph on the Keck II telescope, we obtained approximately 600 radial velocity (RV) measurements over a period of six years of a sample of 59 late-M and L dwarfs spanning spectral types M8/L0 to L6. A subsample of 46 of our targets has been observed on three or more epochs. We rely on telluric CH 4 absorption features in Earth's atmosphere as a simultaneous wavelength reference and exploit the rich set of CO absorption features found in the K-band spectra of cool stars and brown dwarfs to measure RVs and projected rotational velocities. For a bright, slowly rotating M dwarf standard we demonstrate an RV precision of 50 m s -1 and for slowly rotating L dwarfs we achieve a typical RV precision of approximately 200 m s -1 . This precision is sufficient for the detection of close-in giant planetary companions to mid-L dwarfs as well as more equal mass spectroscopic binary systems with small separations (a +0.7 -0.6 Gyr, similar to that of nearby sun-like stars. We simulate the efficiency with which we detect spectroscopic binaries and find that the rate of tight (a +8.6 -1.6 %, consistent with recent estimates in the literature of a tight binary fraction of 3%-4%.

  15. RADIAL STABILITY IN STRATIFIED STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Jonas P.; Rueda, Jorge A.

    2015-01-01

    We formulate within a generalized distributional approach the treatment of the stability against radial perturbations for both neutral and charged stratified stars in Newtonian and Einstein's gravity. We obtain from this approach the boundary conditions connecting any two phases within a star and underline its relevance for realistic models of compact stars with phase transitions, owing to the modification of the star's set of eigenmodes with respect to the continuous case

  16. Velocidades radiales en Collinder 121

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, M.; Morrell, N.

    Se han llevado a cabo observaciones espectroscópicas de unas treinta estrellas que son posibles miembros del cúmulo abierto Collinder 121. Las mismas fueron realizadas con el telescopio de 2.15m del Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO). El análisis de las velocidades radiales derivadas del material obtenido, confirma la realidad de Collinder 121, al menos desde el punto de vista cinemático. La velocidad radial baricentral (LSR) del cúmulo es de +17 ± 3 km.s-1. Esta velocidad coincide, dentro de los errores, con la velocidad radial (LSR) de la nebulosa anillo S308, la cual es de ~20 ± 10 km.s-1. Como S308 se encuentra físicamente asociada a la estrella Wolf-Rayet HD~50896, es muy probable que esta última sea un miembro de Collinder 121. Desde un punto de vista cinemático, la supergigante roja HD~50877 (K3Iab) también pertenecería a Collinder 121. Basándonos en la pertenencia de HD~50896 a Collinder 121, y en la interacción encontrada entre el viento de esta estrella y el medio interestelar circundante a la misma, se estima para este cúmulo una distancia del orden de 1 kpc.

  17. Helium-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longton, P.B.; Cowen, H.C.

    1975-01-01

    In helium cooled HTR's there is a by-pass circuit for cleaning purposes in addition to the main cooling circuit. This is to remove such impurities as hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide and water from the coolant. In this system, part of the coolant successively flows first through an oxidation bed of copper oxide and an absorption bed of silica gel, then through activated charcoal or a molecular sieve. The hydrogen and carbon monoxide impurities are absorbed and the dry gas is returned to the main cooling circuit. To lower the hydrogen/water ratio without increasing the hydrogen fraction in the main cooling circuit, some of the hydrogen fraction converted into water is added to the cooling circuit. This is done, inter alia, by bypassing the water produced in the oxidation bed before it enters the absorption bed. The rest of the by-pass circuit, however, also includes an absorption bed with a molecular sieve. This absorbs the oxidized carbon monoxide fraction. In this way, such side effects as the formation of additional methane, carburization of the materials of the by-pass circuit or loss of graphite are avoided. (DG/RF) [de

  18. Divertor cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Tadakazu; Hayashi, Katsumi; Handa, Hiroyuki

    1993-01-01

    Cooling water for a divertor cooling system cools the divertor, thereafter, passes through pipelines connecting the exit pipelines of the divertor cooling system and the inlet pipelines of a blanket cooling system and is introduced to the blanket cooling system in a vacuum vessel. It undergoes emission of neutrons, and cooling water in the divertor cooling system containing a great amount of N-16 which is generated by radioactivation of O-16 is introduced to the blanket cooling system in the vacuum vessel by way of pipelines, and after cooling, passes through exit pipelines of the blanket cooling system and is introduced to the outside of the vacuum vessel. Radiation of N-16 in the cooling water is decayed sufficiently with passage of time during cooling of the blanket, thereby enabling to decrease the amount of shielding materials such as facilities and pipelines, and ensure spaces. (N.H.)

  19. WORKSHOP: Beam cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Cooling - the control of unruly particles to provide well-behaved beams - has become a major new tool in accelerator physics. The main approaches of electron cooling pioneered by Gersh Budker at Novosibirsk and stochastic cooling by Simon van der Meer at CERN, are now complemented by additional ideas, such as laser cooling of ions and ionization cooling of muons

  20. Exceptional circles of radial potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, M; Perry, P; Siltanen, S

    2013-01-01

    A nonlinear scattering transform is studied for the two-dimensional Schrödinger equation at zero energy with a radial potential. Explicit examples are presented, both theoretically and computationally, of potentials with nontrivial singularities in the scattering transform. The singularities arise from non-uniqueness of the complex geometric optics solutions that define the scattering transform. The values of the complex spectral parameter at which the singularities appear are called exceptional points. The singularity formation is closely related to the fact that potentials of conductivity type are ‘critical’ in the sense of Murata. (paper)

  1. Renewable Heating And Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renewable heating and cooling is a set of alternative resources and technologies that can be used in place of conventional heating and cooling technologies for common applications such as water heating, space heating, space cooling and process heat.

  2. Restaurant food cooling practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura Green; Ripley, Danny; Blade, Henry; Reimann, Dave; Everstine, Karen; Nicholas, Dave; Egan, Jessica; Koktavy, Nicole; Quilliam, Daniela N

    2012-12-01

    Improper food cooling practices are a significant cause of foodborne illness, yet little is known about restaurant food cooling practices. This study was conducted to examine food cooling practices in restaurants. Specifically, the study assesses the frequency with which restaurants meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations aimed at reducing pathogen proliferation during food cooling. Members of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Environmental Health Specialists Network collected data on food cooling practices in 420 restaurants. The data collected indicate that many restaurants are not meeting FDA recommendations concerning cooling. Although most restaurant kitchen managers report that they have formal cooling processes (86%) and provide training to food workers on proper cooling (91%), many managers said that they do not have tested and verified cooling processes (39%), do not monitor time or temperature during cooling processes (41%), or do not calibrate thermometers used for monitoring temperatures (15%). Indeed, 86% of managers reported cooling processes that did not incorporate all FDA-recommended components. Additionally, restaurants do not always follow recommendations concerning specific cooling methods, such as refrigerating cooling food at shallow depths, ventilating cooling food, providing open-air space around the tops and sides of cooling food containers, and refraining from stacking cooling food containers on top of each other. Data from this study could be used by food safety programs and the restaurant industry to target training and intervention efforts concerning cooling practices. These efforts should focus on the most frequent poor cooling practices, as identified by this study.

  3. Structure evolution during the cooling and coalesced cooling processes of Cu-Co bimetallic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guojian; Wang Qiang; Li Donggang; Lue Xiao; He Jicheng

    2008-01-01

    Constant-temperature molecular dynamics with general EAM was employed to study the structure evolutions during the cooling and coalesced cooling processes of Cu-Co bimetallic clusters. It shows that the desired particle morphologies and structures can be obtained by controlling the composition and distribution of hetero atoms during synthesis process

  4. Radial smoothing and closed orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnod, L.; Cornacchia, M.; Wilson, E.

    1983-11-01

    A complete simulation leading to a description of one of the error curves must involve four phases: (1) random drawing of the six set-up points within a normal population having a standard deviation of 1.3 mm; (b) random drawing of the six vertices of the curve in the sextant mode within a normal population having a standard deviation of 1.2 mm. These vertices are to be set with respect to the axis of the error lunes, while this axis has as its origins the positions defined by the preceding drawing; (c) mathematical definition of six parabolic curves and their junctions. These latter may be curves with very slight curvatures, or segments of a straight line passing through the set-up point and having lengths no longer than one LSS. Thus one gets a mean curve for the absolute errors; (d) plotting of the actually observed radial positions with respect to the mean curve (results of smoothing)

  5. Waves on radial film flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholemari, Murali R.; Arakeri, Jaywant H.

    2005-08-01

    We study the stability of surface waves on the radial film flow created by a vertical cylindrical water jet striking a horizontal plate. In such flows, surface waves have been found to be unstable and can cause transition to turbulence. This surface-wave-induced transition is different from the well-known Tollmien-Schlichting wave-induced transition. The present study aims at understanding the instability and the transition process. We do a temporal stability analysis by assuming the flow to be locally two-dimensional but including spatial variations to first order in the basic flow. The waves are found to be dispersive, mostly unstable, and faster than the mean flow. Spatial variation is the major destabilizing factor. Experiments are done to test the results of the linear stability analysis and to document the wave breakup and transition. Comparison between theory and experiments is fairly good and indicates the adequacy of the model.

  6. Radial flow gas dynamic laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damm, F.C.

    1975-01-01

    The unique gas dynamic laser provides outward radial supersonic flow from a toroidal shaped stacked array of a plurality of nozzles, through a diffuser having ring shaped and/or linear shaped vanes, and through a cavity which is cylindrical and concentric with the stacked array, with the resultant laser beam passing through the housing parallel to the central axis of the diffuser which is coincident with the axis of the gas dynamic laser. Therefore, greater beam extraction flexibility is attainable, because of fewer flow shock disturbances, as compared to the conventional unidirectional flow gas dynamic laser in which unidirectional supersonic flow sweeps through a rectangular cavity and is exhausted through a two-dimensional diffuser. (auth)

  7. Ulnar nerve entrapment complicating radial head excision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Parfait Bienvenu Bouhelo-Pam

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several mechanisms are involved in ischemia or mechanical compression of ulnar nerve at the elbow. Presentation of case: We hereby present the case of a road accident victim, who received a radial head excision for an isolated fracture of the radial head and complicated by onset of cubital tunnel syndrome. This outcome could be the consequence of an iatrogenic valgus of the elbow due to excision of the radial head. Hitherto the surgical treatment of choice it is gradually been abandoned due to development of radial head implant arthroplasty. However, this management option is still being performed in some rural centers with low resources. Discussion: The radial head plays an important role in the stability of the elbow and his iatrogenic deformity can be complicated by cubital tunnel syndrome. Conclusion: An ulnar nerve release was performed with favorable outcome. Keywords: Cubital tunnel syndrome, Peripheral nerve palsy, Radial head excision, Elbow valgus

  8. Cooled Water Production System,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The invention refers to the field of air conditioning and regards an apparatus for obtaining cooled water . The purpose of the invention is to develop...such a system for obtaining cooled water which would permit the maximum use of the cooling effect of the water -cooling tower.

  9. Process fluid cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farquhar, N.G.; Schwab, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A system of heat exchangers is disclosed for cooling process fluids. The system is particularly applicable to cooling steam generator blowdown fluid in a nuclear plant prior to chemical purification of the fluid in which it minimizes the potential of boiling of the plant cooling water which cools the blowdown fluid

  10. Stirling Engine With Radial Flow Heat Exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, N.; Yarr, George

    1993-01-01

    Conflict between thermodynamical and structural requirements resolved. In Stirling engine of new cylindrical configuration, regenerator and acceptor and rejector heat exchangers channel flow of working gas in radial direction. Isotherms in regenerator ideally concentric cylinders, and gradient of temperature across regenerator radial rather than axial. Acceptor and rejector heat exchangers located radially inward and outward of regenerator, respectively. Enables substantial increase in power of engine without corresponding increase in diameter of pressure vessel.

  11. Rotational effects on impingement cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, A. H.; Kerrebrock, J. L.; Koo, J. J.; Preiser, U. Z.

    1987-01-01

    The present consideration of rotation effects on heat transfer in a radially exhausted, impingement-cooled turbine blade model gives attention to experimental results for Reynolds and Rossby numbers and blade/coolant temperature ratio values that are representative of small gas turbine engines. On the basis of a model that encompasses the effects of Coriolis force and buoyancy on heat transfer, bouyancy is identified as the cause of an average Nusselt number that is 20-30 percent lower than expected from previous nonrotating data. A heuristic model is proposed which predicts that the impingement jets nearest the blade roots should deflect inward, due to a centripetal force generated by their tangential velocity counter to the blade motion. Potentially serious thermal stresses must be anticipated from rotation effects in the course of blade design.

  12. Hybrid radiator cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, David M.; Smith, David S.; Yu, Wenhua; Routbort, Jules L.

    2016-03-15

    A method and hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus for implementing enhanced radiator-cooling are provided. The hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus includes an air-side finned surface for air cooling; an elongated vertically extending surface extending outwardly from the air-side finned surface on a downstream air-side of the hybrid radiator; and a water supply for selectively providing evaporative cooling with water flow by gravity on the elongated vertically extending surface.

  13. Radial head button holing: a cause of irreducible anterior radial head dislocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Su-Mi; Chai, Jee Won; You, Ja Yeon; Park, Jina [Seoul National University Seoul Metropolitan Government Boramae Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Kee Jeong [Seoul National University Seoul Metropolitan Government Boramae Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    ''Buttonholing'' of the radial head through the anterior joint capsule is a known cause of irreducible anterior radial head dislocation associated with Monteggia injuries in pediatric patients. To the best of our knowledge, no report has described an injury consisting of buttonholing of the radial head through the annular ligament and a simultaneous radial head fracture in an adolescent. In the present case, the radiographic findings were a radial head fracture with anterior dislocation and lack of the anterior fat pad sign. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) clearly demonstrated anterior dislocation of the fractured radial head through the torn annular ligament. The anterior joint capsule and proximal portion of the annular ligament were interposed between the radial head and capitellum, preventing closed reduction of the radial head. Familiarity with this condition and imaging findings will aid clinicians to make a proper diagnosis and fast decision to perform an open reduction. (orig.)

  14. Photoelectric Radial Velocities, Paper XIX Additional Spectroscopic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ian velocity curve that does justice to the measurements, but it cannot be expected to have much predictive power. Key words. Stars: late-type—stars: radial velocities—spectroscopic binaries—orbits. 0. Preamble. The 'Redman K stars' are a lot of seventh-magnitude K stars whose radial velocities were first observed by ...

  15. Radial velocities of RR Lyrae stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, S.L.; Barnes, T.G. III

    1985-01-01

    283 spectra of 57 RR Lyrae stars have been obtained using the 2.1-m telescope at McDonald Observatory. Radial velocities were determined using a software cross-correlation technique. New mean radial velocities were determined for 46 of the stars. 11 references

  16. Concepts of radial and angular kinetic energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jens Peder; Schleich, W.P.

    2002-01-01

    We consider a general central-field system in D dimensions and show that the division of the kinetic energy into radial and angular parts proceeds differently in the wave-function picture and the Weyl-Wigner phase-space picture, Thus, the radial and angular kinetic energies are different quantities...

  17. Restaurant Food Cooling Practices†

    Science.gov (United States)

    BROWN, LAURA GREEN; RIPLEY, DANNY; BLADE, HENRY; REIMANN, DAVE; EVERSTINE, KAREN; NICHOLAS, DAVE; EGAN, JESSICA; KOKTAVY, NICOLE; QUILLIAM, DANIELA N.

    2017-01-01

    Improper food cooling practices are a significant cause of foodborne illness, yet little is known about restaurant food cooling practices. This study was conducted to examine food cooling practices in restaurants. Specifically, the study assesses the frequency with which restaurants meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations aimed at reducing pathogen proliferation during food cooling. Members of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Environmental Health Specialists Network collected data on food cooling practices in 420 restaurants. The data collected indicate that many restaurants are not meeting FDA recommendations concerning cooling. Although most restaurant kitchen managers report that they have formal cooling processes (86%) and provide training to food workers on proper cooling (91%), many managers said that they do not have tested and verified cooling processes (39%), do not monitor time or temperature during cooling processes (41%), or do not calibrate thermometers used for monitoring temperatures (15%). Indeed, 86% of managers reported cooling processes that did not incorporate all FDA-recommended components. Additionally, restaurants do not always follow recommendations concerning specific cooling methods, such as refrigerating cooling food at shallow depths, ventilating cooling food, providing open-air space around the tops and sides of cooling food containers, and refraining from stacking cooling food containers on top of each other. Data from this study could be used by food safety programs and the restaurant industry to target training and intervention efforts concerning cooling practices. These efforts should focus on the most frequent poor cooling practices, as identified by this study. PMID:23212014

  18. Radial velocity asymmetries from jets with variable velocity profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerqueira, A. H.; Vasconcelos, M. J.; Velazquez, P. F.; Raga, A. C.; De Colle, F.

    2006-01-01

    We have computed a set of 3-D numerical simulations of radiatively cooling jets including variabilities in both the ejection direction (precession) and the jet velocity (intermittence), using the Yguazu-a code. In order to investigate the effects of jet rotation on the shape of the line profiles, we also introduce an initial toroidal rotation velocity profile. Since the Yguazu-a code includes an atomic/ionic network, we are able to compute the emission coefficients for several emission lines, and we generate line profiles for the Hα, [O I]λ6300, [S II]λ6716 and [N II]λ6548 lines. Using initial parameters that are suitable for the DG Tau microjet, we show that the computed radial velocity shift for the medium-velocity component of the line profile as a function of distance from the jet axis is strikingly similar for rotating and non-rotating jet models

  19. Activity-induced radial velocity variation of M dwarf stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jan Marie; Korhonen, Heidi Helena

    2012-01-01

    that can drown out a planetary signature. Cool, low-mass M dwarf stars can be highly active, which can make detection of potentially habitable planets around these stars difficult. We investigate radial velocity variations caused by different activity (spot) patterns on M dwarf stars in order to determine...... the limits of detectability for small planets orbiting active M dwarfs. We report on our progress toward the aim of answering the following questions: What types of spot patterns are realistic for M dwarf stars? What effect will spots have on M dwarf RV measurements? Can jitter from M dwarf spots mimic...... planetary signals? What is the ideal observing wavelength to reduce M dwarf jitter?...

  20. Water cooling coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, S; Ito, Y; Kazawa, Y

    1975-02-05

    Object: To provide a water cooling coil in a toroidal nuclear fusion device, in which coil is formed into a small-size in section so as not to increase dimensions, weight or the like of machineries including the coil. Structure: A conductor arranged as an outermost layer of a multiple-wind water cooling coil comprises a hollow conductor, which is directly cooled by fluid, and as a consequence, a solid conductor disposed interiorly thereof is cooled indirectly.

  1. The Cool Colors Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, second from left, a sample from the Cool Colors Project, a roof product ) (Jeff Chiu - AP) more Cool Colors make the front page of The Sacramento Bee (3rd highest circulation newspaper in California) on 14 August 2006! Read the article online or as a PDF. The Cool Colors Project

  2. Radial electric fields for improved tokamak performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downum, W.B.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of externally-imposed radial electric fields on the fusion energy output, energy multiplication, and alpha-particle ash build-up in a TFTR-sized, fusing tokamak plasma is explored. In an idealized tokamak plasma, an externally-imposed radial electric field leads to plasma rotation, but no charge current flows across the magnetic fields. However, a realistically-low neutral density profile generates a non-zero cross-field conductivity and the species dependence of this conductivity allows the electric field to selectively alter radial particle transport

  3. Radial MR images of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewes, R.C.; Miller, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    To profile optimally each portion of the meniscus, the authors use the multiangle, multisection feature of a General Electric SIGNA 1.5-T imager to produce radial images centered on each meniscus. A total of 12-15 sections are imaged at 10 0 -15 0 intervals of each meniscus, yielding perpendicular images of the entire meniscus, comparable with the arthrographic tangential views. The authors review their technique and demonstrate correlation cases between the radial gradient recalled acquisition in a steady state sequences, sagittal and coronal MR images, and arthrograms. Radial images should be a routine part of knee MR imaging

  4. Radial pattern of nuclear decay processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskra, W.; Mueller, M.; Rotter, I.; Technische Univ. Dresden

    1994-05-01

    At high level density of nuclear states, a separation of different time scales is observed (trapping effect). We calculate the radial profile of partial widths in the framework of the continuum shell model for some 1 - resonances with 2p-2h nuclear structure in 16 O as a function of the coupling strength to the continuum. A correlation between the lifetime of a nuclear state and the radial profile of the corresponding decay process is observed. We conclude from our numerical results that the trapping effect creates structures in space and time characterized by a small radial extension and a short lifetime. (orig.)

  5. Conjugate calculation of a film-cooled blade for improvement of the leading edge cooling configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Moritz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Great efforts are still put into the design process of advanced film-cooling configurations. In particular, the vanes and blades of turbine front stages have to be cooled extensively for a safe operation. The conjugate calculation technique is used for the three-dimensional thermal load prediction of a film-cooled test blade of a modern gas turbine. Thus, it becomes possible to take into account the interaction of internal flows, external flow, and heat transfer without the prescription of heat transfer coefficients. The focus of the investigation is laid on the leading edge part of the blade. The numerical model consists of all internal flow passages and cooling hole rows at the leading edge. Furthermore, the radial gap flow is also part of the model. The comparison with thermal pyrometer measurements shows that with respect to regions with high thermal load a qualitatively and quantitatively good agreement of the conjugate results and the measurements can be found. In particular, the region in the vicinity of the mid-span section is exposed to a higher thermal load, which requires further improvement of the cooling arrangement. Altogether the achieved results demonstrate that the conjugate calculation technique is applicable for reasonable prediction of three-dimensional thermal load of complex cooling configurations for blades.

  6. Radial pseudoaneurysm following diagnostic coronary angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Laudari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The radial artery access has gained popularity as a method of diagnostic coronary catheterization compared to femoral artery puncture in terms of vascular complications and early ambulation. However, very rare complication like radial artery pseudoaneurysm may occur following cardiac catheterization which may give rise to serious consequences. Here, we report a patient with radial pseudoaneurysm following diagnostic coronary angiography. Adequate and correct methodology of compression of radial artery following puncture for maintaining hemostasis is the key to prevention.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i3.12776 Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2014, Vol-10, No-3, 48-50

  7. Radial transport with perturbed magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazeltine, R. D. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    It is pointed out that the viscosity coefficient describing radial transport of toroidal angular momentum is proportional to the second power of the gyro-radius—like the corresponding coefficients for particle and heat transport—regardless of any geometrical symmetry. The observation is widely appreciated, but worth emphasizing because some literature gives the misleading impression that asymmetry can allow radial moment transport in first-order.

  8. Radial transport with perturbed magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazeltine, R. D.

    2015-01-01

    It is pointed out that the viscosity coefficient describing radial transport of toroidal angular momentum is proportional to the second power of the gyro-radius—like the corresponding coefficients for particle and heat transport—regardless of any geometrical symmetry. The observation is widely appreciated, but worth emphasizing because some literature gives the misleading impression that asymmetry can allow radial moment transport in first-order

  9. Lubrication and cooling for high speed gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, D. P.

    1985-01-01

    The problems and failures occurring with the operation of high speed gears are discussed. The gearing losses associated with high speed gearing such as tooth mesh friction, bearing friction, churning, and windage are discussed with various ways shown to help reduce these losses and thereby improve efficiency. Several different methods of oil jet lubrication for high speed gearing are given such as into mesh, out of mesh, and radial jet lubrication. The experiments and analytical results for the various methods of oil jet lubrication are shown with the strengths and weaknesses of each method discussed. The analytical and experimental results of gear lubrication and cooling at various test conditions are presented. These results show the very definite need of improved methods of gear cooling at high speed and high load conditions.

  10. SALLY, Dynamic Behaviour of Reactor Cooling Channel by Point Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiche, Chr.; Ziegenbein, D.

    1981-01-01

    1 - Nature of the physical problem solved: The dynamical behaviour of a cooling channel is calculated. Starting from an equilibrium state a perturbation is introduced into the system. That may be an outer reactivity perturbation or a change in the coolant velocity or in the coolant temperature. The neutron kinetics is treated in the framework of the one-point model. The cooling channel consists of a cladded and cooled fuel rod. The temperature distribution is taken into account as an array above a mesh of radial zones and axial layers. Heat transfer is considered in radial direction only, the thermodynamical coupling of the different layers is obtained by the coolant flow. The thermal material parameters are considered to be temperature independent. Reactivity feedback is introduced by means of reactivity coefficients for fuel, canning, and coolant. Doppler broadening is included. The first cooling cycle can be taken into account by a simple model. 2 - Method of solution: The integration of the point kinetics equations is done numerically by the P11 scheme. The system of temperature equations with constant heat resistance coefficients is solved by the method of factorization. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Given limits are: 10 radial fuel zones, 25 axial layers, 6 groups of delayed neutrons

  11. Effect mechanism of air deflectors on the cooling performance of dry cooling tower with vertical delta radiators under crosswind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yuanbin; Long, Guoqing; Sun, Fengzhong; Li, Yan; Zhang, Cuijiao; Liu, Jiabin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A 3D numerical model was set for NDDCTV to study the effect of air deflectors. • The air deflectors improve the tower performance by 1.375 °C at u c = 6 m/s for a case. • The air deflectors reduce the air inflow deviation angle θ d at most delta entries. • The reduced θ d can improve the cooling performance of former deteriorated columns. • Both the radial inflow air velocity and θ d impact the cooling performance of delta. - Abstract: To study the effect mechanism of air deflectors on dry cooling tower, a three dimensional numerical model was established, with full consideration of the delta structure. The accuracy and credibility of dry cooling tower numerical model were validated. By numerical model, the average air static pressure and the average radial inflow air velocity were computed and analyzed at delta air entry, sector air entry and exit faces. By the air inflow deviation angle θ d , the effect of air deflectors on the aerodynamic field around tower was analyzed. The water exit temperatures of θ −1 columns, θ +2 columns and cooling sectors were also presented to clarify the effect of air deflectors. It was found that the air deflectors improved the aerodynamic field around cooling columns. The reduced air inflow deviation degree at delta entry improved the cooling performance of deteriorated columns. Referring to the radial inflow air velocity u ra and the air inflow deviation degree at delta entry, the effect mechanism of air deflectors are clarified under crosswind

  12. Stability of radial and non-radial pulsation modes of massive ZAMS models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odell, A.P.; Pausenwein, A.; Weiss, W.W.; Hajek, A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have computed non-adiabatic eigenvalues for radial and non-radial pulsation modes of star models between 80 and 120 M solar with composition of chi=0.70 and Z=0.02. The radial fundamental mode is unstable in models with mass greater than 95 M solar , but the first overtone mode is always stable. The non-radial modes are all stable for all models, but the iota=2 f-mode is the closest to being driven. The non-radial modes are progressively more stable with higher iota and with higher n (for both rho- and g-modes). Thus, their results indicate that radial pulsation limits the upper mass of a star

  13. 21 CFR 866.4800 - Radial immunodiffusion plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents § 866.4800 Radial immunodiffusion plate. (a) Identification. A radial immunodiffusion plate for clinical use...

  14. Laser cooling of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Petrushkin, S V

    2009-01-01

    Laser cooling is an important emerging technology in such areas as the cooling of semiconductors. The book examines and suggests solutions for a range of problems in the development of miniature solid-state laser refrigerators, self-cooling solid-state lasers and optical echo-processors. It begins by looking at the basic theory of laser cooling before considering such topics as self-cooling of active elements of solid-state lasers, laser cooling of solid-state information media of optical echo-processors, and problems of cooling solid-state quantum processors. Laser Cooling of Solids is an important contribution to the development of compact laser-powered cryogenic refrigerators, both for the academic community and those in the microelectronics and other industries. Provides a timely review of this promising field of research and discusses the fundamentals and theory of laser cooling Particular attention is given to the physics of cooling processes and the mathematical description of these processes Reviews p...

  15. Emergency reactor cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, Ken.

    1993-01-01

    An emergency nuclear reactor cooling device comprises a water reservoir, emergency core cooling water pipelines having one end connected to a water feeding sparger, fire extinguishing facility pipelines, cooling water pressurizing pumps, a diesel driving machine for driving the pumps and a battery. In a water reservoir, cooling water is stored by an amount required for cooling the reactor upon emergency and for fire extinguishing, and fire extinguishing facility pipelines connecting the water reservoir and the fire extinguishing facility are in communication with the emergency core cooling water pipelines connected to the water feeding sparger by system connection pipelines. Pumps are operated by a diesel power generator to introduce cooling water from the reservoir to the emergency core cooling water pipelines. Then, even in a case where AC electric power source is entirely lost and the emergency core cooling system can not be used, the diesel driving machine is operated using an exclusive battery, thereby enabling to inject cooling water from the water reservoir to a reactor pressure vessel and a reactor container by the diesel drive pump. (N.H.)

  16. Molecules cooled below the Doppler limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truppe, S.; Williams, H. J.; Hambach, M.; Caldwell, L.; Fitch, N. J.; Hinds, E. A.; Sauer, B. E.; Tarbutt, M. R.

    2017-12-01

    Magneto-optical trapping and sub-Doppler cooling have been essential to most experiments with quantum degenerate gases, optical lattices, atomic fountains and many other applications. A broad set of new applications await ultracold molecules, and the extension of laser cooling to molecules has begun. A magneto-optical trap (MOT) has been demonstrated for a single molecular species, SrF, but the sub-Doppler temperatures required for many applications have not yet been reached. Here we demonstrate a MOT of a second species, CaF, and we show how to cool these molecules to 50 μK, well below the Doppler limit, using a three-dimensional optical molasses. These ultracold molecules could be loaded into optical tweezers to trap arbitrary arrays for quantum simulation, launched into a molecular fountain for testing fundamental physics, and used to study collisions and chemistry between atoms and molecules at ultracold temperatures.

  17. On the calculation of x-ray scattering signals from pairwise radial distribution functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Asmus Ougaard; Biasin, Elisa; Haldrup, Kristoffer

    2015-01-01

    We derive a formulation for evaluating (time-resolved) x-ray scattering signals of solvated chemical systems, based on pairwise radial distribution functions, with the aim of this formulation to accompany molecular dynamics simulations. The derivation is described in detail to eliminate any possi...

  18. A 3.55 keV line from DM →a→γ: predictions for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conlon, Joseph P.; Powell, Andrew J. [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3NP (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-13

    We further study a scenario in which a 3.55 keV X-ray line arises from decay of dark matter to an axion-like particle (ALP), that subsequently converts to a photon in astrophysical magnetic fields. We perform numerical simulations of Gaussian random magnetic fields with radial scaling of the magnetic field magnitude with the electron density, for both cool-core 'Perseus' and non-cool-core 'Coma' electron density profiles. Using these, we quantitatively study the resulting signal strength and morphology for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters. Our study includes the effects of fields of view that cover only the central part of the cluster, the effects of offset pointings on the radial decline of signal strength and the effects of dividing clusters into annuli. We find good agreement with current data and make predictions for future analyses and observations.

  19. Radiant Floor Cooling Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2008-01-01

    In many countries, hydronic radiant floor systems are widely used for heating all types of buildings such as residential, churches, gymnasiums, hospitals, hangars, storage buildings, industrial buildings, and smaller offices. However, few systems are used for cooling.This article describes a floor...... cooling system that includes such considerations as thermal comfort of the occupants, which design parameters will influence the cooling capacity and how the system should be controlled. Examples of applications are presented....

  20. The cooling of particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1994-10-01

    A review is given of the various methods which can be employed for cooling particle beams. These methods include radiation damping, stimulated radiation damping, ionization cooling, stochastic cooling, electron cooling, laser cooling, and laser cooling with beam coupling. Laser Cooling has provided beams of the lowest temperatures, namely 1 mK, but only for ions and only for the longitudinal temperature. Recent theoretical work has suggested how laser cooling, with the coupling of beam motion, can be used to reduce the ion beam temperature in all three directions. The majority of this paper is devoted to describing laser cooling and laser cooling with beam coupling

  1. Integrated axial and tangential serpentine cooling circuit in a turbine airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J; Rudolph, Ronald J; Dalton, John P

    2015-05-05

    A continuous serpentine cooling circuit forming a progression of radial passages (44, 45, 46, 47A, 48A) between pressure and suction side walls (52, 54) in a MID region of a turbine airfoil (24). The circuit progresses first axially, then tangentially, ending in a last radial passage (48A) adjacent to the suction side (54) and not adjacent to the pressure side (52). The passages of the axial progression (44, 45, 46) may be adjacent to both the pressure and suction side walls of the airfoil. The next to last radial passage (47A) may be adjacent to the pressure side wall and not adjacent to the suction side wall. The last two radial passages (47A, 48A) may be longer along the pressure and suction side walls respectively than they are in a width direction, providing increased direct cooling surface area on the interiors of these hot walls.

  2. Effects of Cooling Rates on Hydride Reorientation and Mechanical Properties of Zirconium Alloy Claddings under Interim Dry Storage Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Su-Jeong; Kim, Myeong-Su; Won, Chu-chin; Kim, Kyu-Tae

    2013-01-01

    As-received Zr-Nb cladding tubes and 600 ppm hydrogen-charged tubes were employed to evaluate the effects of cladding cooling rates on the extent of hydride reorientation from circumferential hydrides to radial ones and mechanical property degradations with the use of cooling rates of 2, 4 and 15 °C/min from 400 °C to room temperature simulating cladding cooling under interim dry storage conditions. The as-received cladding tubes generated nearly the same ultimate tensile strengths and plastic elongations, regardless of the cooling rates, because of a negligible hydrogen content in the cladding. The 600 ppm-H cladding tubes indicate that the slower cooling rate generated the larger radial hydride fraction and the longer radial hydrides, which resulted in greater mechanical performance degradations. The cooling rate of 2 °C/min generates an ultimate tensile strength of 758 MPa and a plastic elongation of 1.0%, whereas the cooling rate of 15 °C/min generates an ultimate tensile strength of 825 MPa and a plastic elongation of 15.0%. These remarkable mechanical property degradations of the 600 ppm-H cladding tubes with the slowest cooling rate may be characterized by cleavage fracture surface appearance enhanced by longer radial hydrides and their higher fraction that have been precipitated through a relatively larger nucleation and growth rate.

  3. Turbine airfoil cooling system with cooling systems using high and low pressure cooling fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jan H.; Messmann, Stephen John; Scribner, Carmen Andrew

    2017-10-25

    A turbine airfoil cooling system including a low pressure cooling system and a high pressure cooling system for a turbine airfoil of a gas turbine engine is disclosed. In at least one embodiment, the low pressure cooling system may be an ambient air cooling system, and the high pressure cooling system may be a compressor bleed air cooling system. In at least one embodiment, the compressor bleed air cooling system in communication with a high pressure subsystem that may be a snubber cooling system positioned within a snubber. A delivery system including a movable air supply tube may be used to separate the low and high pressure cooling subsystems. The delivery system may enable high pressure cooling air to be passed to the snubber cooling system separate from low pressure cooling fluid supplied by the low pressure cooling system to other portions of the turbine airfoil cooling system.

  4. Power electronics cooling apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanger, Philip Albert; Lindberg, Frank A.; Garcen, Walter

    2000-01-01

    A semiconductor cooling arrangement wherein a semiconductor is affixed to a thermally and electrically conducting carrier such as by brazing. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the semiconductor and carrier are closely matched to one another so that during operation they will not be overstressed mechanically due to thermal cycling. Electrical connection is made to the semiconductor and carrier, and a porous metal heat exchanger is thermally connected to the carrier. The heat exchanger is positioned within an electrically insulating cooling assembly having cooling oil flowing therethrough. The arrangement is particularly well adapted for the cooling of high power switching elements in a power bridge.

  5. Semioptimal practicable algorithmic cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, Yuval; Mor, Tal; Weinstein, Yossi

    2011-01-01

    Algorithmic cooling (AC) of spins applies entropy manipulation algorithms in open spin systems in order to cool spins far beyond Shannon's entropy bound. Algorithmic cooling of nuclear spins was demonstrated experimentally and may contribute to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Several cooling algorithms were suggested in recent years, including practicable algorithmic cooling (PAC) and exhaustive AC. Practicable algorithms have simple implementations, yet their level of cooling is far from optimal; exhaustive algorithms, on the other hand, cool much better, and some even reach (asymptotically) an optimal level of cooling, but they are not practicable. We introduce here semioptimal practicable AC (SOPAC), wherein a few cycles (typically two to six) are performed at each recursive level. Two classes of SOPAC algorithms are proposed and analyzed. Both attain cooling levels significantly better than PAC and are much more efficient than the exhaustive algorithms. These algorithms are shown to bridge the gap between PAC and exhaustive AC. In addition, we calculated the number of spins required by SOPAC in order to purify qubits for quantum computation. As few as 12 and 7 spins are required (in an ideal scenario) to yield a mildly pure spin (60% polarized) from initial polarizations of 1% and 10%, respectively. In the latter case, about five more spins are sufficient to produce a highly pure spin (99.99% polarized), which could be relevant for fault-tolerant quantum computing.

  6. Anomalies of radial and ulnar arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajani Singh

    Full Text Available Abstract During dissection conducted in an anatomy department of the right upper limb of the cadaver of a 70-year-old male, both origin and course of the radial and ulnar arteries were found to be anomalous. After descending 5.5 cm from the lower border of the teres major, the brachial artery anomalously bifurcated into a radial artery medially and an ulnar artery laterally. In the arm, the ulnar artery lay lateral to the median nerve. It followed a normal course in the forearm. The radial artery was medial to the median nerve in the arm and then, at the level of the medial epicondyle, it crossed from the medial to the lateral side of the forearm, superficial to the flexor muscles. The course of the radial artery was superficial and tortuous throughout the arm and forearm. The variations of radial and ulnar arteries described above were associated with anomalous formation and course of the median nerve in the arm. Knowledge of neurovascular anomalies are important for vascular surgeons and radiologists.

  7. Flow structure and heat exchange analysis in internal cooling channel of gas turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwaba, Ryszard; Kaczynski, Piotr; Doerffer, Piotr; Telega, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the study of the flow structure and heat transfer, and also their correlations on the four walls of a radial cooling passage model of a gas turbine blade. The investigations focus on heat transfer and aerodynamic measurements in the channel, which is an accurate representation of the configuration used in aeroengines. Correlations for the heat transfer coefficient and the pressure drop used in the design of radial cooling passages are often developed from simplified models. It is important to note that real engine passages do not have perfect rectangular cross sections, but include corner fillet, ribs with fillet radii and special orientation. Therefore, this work provides detailed fluid flow and heat transfer data for a model of radial cooling geometry which possesses very realistic features.

  8. Physical mechanism determining the radial electric field and its radial structure in a toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Katsumi; Miura, Yukitoshi; Itoh, Sanae

    1994-10-01

    Radial structures of plasma rotation and radial electric field are experimentally studied in tokamak, heliotron/torsatron and stellarator devices. The perpendicular and parallel viscosities are measured. The parallel viscosity, which is dominant in determining the toroidal velocity in heliotron/torsatron and stellarator devices, is found to be neoclassical. On the other hand, the perpendicular viscosity, which is dominant in dictating the toroidal rotation in tokamaks, is anomalous. Even without external momentum input, both a plasma rotation and a radial electric field exist in tokamaks and heliotrons/torsatrons. The observed profiles of the radial electric field do not agree with the theoretical prediction based on neoclassical transport. This is mainly due to the existence of anomalous perpendicular viscosity. The shear of the radial electric field improves particle and heat transport both in bulk and edge plasma regimes of tokamaks. (author) 95 refs

  9. Manufacturing of Precision Forgings by Radial Forging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, S.; Harrer, O.; Buchmayr, B.; Hofer, F.

    2011-01-01

    Radial forging is a multi purpose incremental forging process using four tools on the same plane. It is widely used for the forming of tool steels, super alloys as well as titanium- and refractory metals. The range of application goes from reducing the diameters of shafts, tubes, stepped shafts and axels, as well as for creating internal profiles for tubes in Near-Net-Shape and Net-Shape quality. Based on actual development of a weight optimized transmission input shaft, the specific features of radial forging technology is demonstrated. Also a Finite Element Model for the simulation of the process is shown which leads to reduced pre-processing effort and reduced computing time compared to other published simulation methods for radial forging. The finite element model can be applied to quantify the effects of different forging strategies.

  10. Optimization of the breeder zone cooling tubes of the DEMO Water-Cooled Lithium Lead breeding blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Maio, P.A.; Arena, P.; Bongiovì, G. [Dipartimento di Energia, Ingegneria dell’Informazione e Modelli Matematici, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Palermo (Italy); Chiovaro, P., E-mail: pierluigi.chiovaro@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Energia, Ingegneria dell’Informazione e Modelli Matematici, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Palermo (Italy); Del Nevo, A. [ENEA Brasimone, Camugnano, BO (Italy); Forte, R. [Dipartimento di Energia, Ingegneria dell’Informazione e Modelli Matematici, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Palermo (Italy)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Determination of an optimal configuration for the breeder zone cooling tubes. • Attention has been focused on the toroidal–radial breeder zone cooling tubes lay out. • A theoretical-computational approach based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) has been followed, adopting a qualified commercial FEM code. • Five different configurations have been investigated to optimize the breeder zone cooling tubes arrangement fulfilling all the rules prescribed by safety codes. - Abstract: The determination of an optimal configuration for the breeder zone (BZ) cooling tubes is one of the most important issues in the DEMO Water-Cooled Lithium Lead (WCLL) breeding blanket R&D activities, since BZ cooling tubes spatial distribution should ensure an efficient heat power removal from the breeder, avoiding hotspots occurrence in the thermal field. Within the framework of R&D activities supported by the HORIZON 2020 EUROfusion Consortium action on the DEMO WCLL breeding blanket design, a campaign of parametric analyses has been launched at the Department of Energy, Information Engineering and Mathematical Models of the University of Palermo (DEIM), in close cooperation with ENEA-Brasimone, in order to assess the potential influence of BZ cooling tubes number on the thermal performances of the DEMO WCLL outboard breeding blanket equatorial module under the nominal steady state operative conditions envisaged for it, optimizing their geometric configuration and taking also into account that a large number of cooling pipes can deteriorate the tritium breeding performances of the module. In particular, attention has been focused on the toroidal-radial option for the BZ tube bundles lay-out and a parametric study has been carried out taking into account different tube bundles arrangement within the module. The study has been carried out following a numerical approach, based on the finite element method (FEM), and adopting a qualified commercial FEM code. Results

  11. The simulation of molecular clouds formation in the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoperskov, S. A.; Vasiliev, E. O.; Sobolev, A. M.; Khoperskov, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    Using 3D hydrodynamic calculations we simulate formation of molecular clouds in the Galaxy. The simulations take into account molecular hydrogen chemical kinetics, cooling and heating processes. Comprehensive gravitational potential accounts for contributions from the stellar bulge, two- and four-armed spiral structure, stellar disc, dark halo and takes into account self-gravitation of the gaseous component. Gas clouds in our model form in the spiral arms due to shear and wiggle instabilities and turn into molecular clouds after t ≳ 100 Myr. At the times t ˜ 100-300 Myr the clouds form hierarchical structures and agglomerations with the sizes of 100 pc and greater. We analyse physical properties of the simulated clouds and find that synthetic statistical distributions like mass spectrum, `mass-size' relation and velocity dispersion are close to those observed in the Galaxy. The synthetic l-v (galactic longitude-radial velocity) diagram of the simulated molecular gas distribution resembles observed one and displays a structure with appearance similar to molecular ring of the Galaxy. Existence of this structure in our modelling can be explained by superposition of emission from the galactic bar and the spiral arms at ˜3-4 kpc.

  12. The Matlab Radial Basis Function Toolbox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A. Sarra

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Radial Basis Function (RBF methods are important tools for scattered data interpolation and for the solution of Partial Differential Equations in complexly shaped domains. The most straight forward approach used to evaluate the methods involves solving a linear system which is typically poorly conditioned. The Matlab Radial Basis Function toolbox features a regularization method for the ill-conditioned system, extended precision floating point arithmetic, and symmetry exploitation for the purpose of reducing flop counts of the associated numerical linear algebra algorithms.

  13. Radial velocity observations of VB10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, R.; Martin, E.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Del Burgo, C.; Rodler, F.; Montgomery, M. M.

    2011-07-01

    VB 10 is the smallest star known to harbor a planet according to the recent astrometric study of Pravdo & Shaklan [1]. Here we present near-infrared (J-band) radial velocity of VB 10 performed from high resolution (R~20,000) spectroscopy (NIRSPEC/KECK II). Our results [2] suggest radial velocity variability with amplitude of ~1 km/s, a result that is consistent with the presence of a massive planet companion around VB10 as found via long-term astrometric monitoring of the star by Pravdo & Shaklan. Employing an entirely different technique we verify the results of Pravdo & Shaklan.

  14. Plasma Signatures of Radial Field Power Dropouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucek, E.A.; Horbury, T.S.; Balogh, A.; McComas, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    A class of small scale structures, with a near-radial magnetic field and a drop in magnetic field fluctuation power, have recently been identified in the polar solar wind. An earlier study of 24 events, each lasting for 6 hours or more, identified no clear plasma signature. In an extension of that work, radial intervals lasting for 4 hours or more (89 in total), have been used to search for a statistically significant plasma signature. It was found that, despite considerable variations between intervals, there was a small but significant drop, on average, in plasma temperature, density and β during these events

  15. Reble, a radially converging electron beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, J.J.; Prestwich, K.R.

    1976-01-01

    The Reble accelerator at Sandia Laboratories is described. This accelerator was developed to provide an experimental source for studying the relevant diode physics, beam propagation, beam energy deposition in a gas using a radially converging e-beam. The nominal parameters for Reble are 1 MV, 200 kA, 20 ns e-beam pulse. The anode and cathode are concentric cylinders with the anode as the inner cylinder. The radial beam can be propagated through the thin foil anode into the laser gas volume. The design and performance of the various components of the accelerator are presented

  16. Cooling of electronic equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A. Kristensen, Anders Schmidt

    2003-01-01

    Cooling of electronic equipment is studied. The design size of electronic equipment decrease causing the thermal density to increase. This affect the cooling which can cause for example failures of critical components due to overheating or thermal induced stresses. Initially a pin fin heat sink...

  17. Solar absorption cooling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, D.S.

    2007-01-01

    As the world concerns more and more on global climate changes and depleting energy resources, solar cooling technology receives increasing interests from the public as an environment-friendly and sustainable alternative. However, making a competitive solar cooling machine for the market still

  18. Gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakilian, M.

    1977-05-01

    The present study is the second part of a general survey of Gas Cooled Reactors (GCRs). In this part, the course of development, overall performance and present development status of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTCRs) and advances of HTGR systems are reviewed. (author)

  19. Coherent electron cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko,V.

    2009-05-04

    Cooling intense high-energy hadron beams remains a major challenge in modern accelerator physics. Synchrotron radiation is still too feeble, while the efficiency of two other cooling methods, stochastic and electron, falls rapidly either at high bunch intensities (i.e. stochastic of protons) or at high energies (e-cooling). In this talk a specific scheme of a unique cooling technique, Coherent Electron Cooling, will be discussed. The idea of coherent electron cooling using electron beam instabilities was suggested by Derbenev in the early 1980s, but the scheme presented in this talk, with cooling times under an hour for 7 TeV protons in the LHC, would be possible only with present-day accelerator technology. This talk will discuss the principles and the main limitations of the Coherent Electron Cooling process. The talk will describe the main system components, based on a high-gain free electron laser driven by an energy recovery linac, and will present some numerical examples for ions and protons in RHIC and the LHC and for electron-hadron options for these colliders. BNL plans a demonstration of the idea in the near future.

  20. The final cool down

    CERN Multimedia

    Thursday 29th May, the cool-down of the final sector (sector 4-5) of LHC has begun, one week after the start of the cool-down of sector 1-2. It will take five weeks for the sectors to be cooled from room temperature to 5 K and a further two weeks to complete the cool down to 1.9 K and the commissioning of cryogenic instrumentation, as well as to fine tune the cryogenic plants and the cooling loops of cryostats.Nearly a year and half has passed since sector 7-8 was cooled for the first time in January 2007. For Laurent Tavian, AT/CRG Group Leader, reaching the final phase of the cool down is an important milestone, confirming the basic design of the cryogenic system and the ability to operate complete sectors. “All the sectors have to operate at the same time otherwise we cannot inject the beam into the machine. The stability and reliability of the cryogenic system and its utilities are now very important. That will be the new challenge for the coming months,” he explains. The status of the cool down of ...

  1. Molecular fountain.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-09-01

    A molecular fountain directs slowly moving molecules against gravity to further slow them to translational energies that they can be trapped and studied. If the molecules are initially slow enough they will return some time later to the position from which they were launched. Because this round trip time can be on the order of a second a single molecule can be observed for times sufficient to perform Hz level spectroscopy. The goal of this LDRD proposal was to construct a novel Molecular Fountain apparatus capable of producing dilute samples of molecules at near zero temperatures in well-defined user-selectable, quantum states. The slowly moving molecules used in this research are produced by the previously developed Kinematic Cooling technique, which uses a crossed atomic and molecular beam apparatus to generate single rotational level molecular samples moving slowly in the laboratory reference frame. The Kinematic Cooling technique produces cold molecules from a supersonic molecular beam via single collisions with a supersonic atomic beam. A single collision of an atom with a molecule occurring at the correct energy and relative velocity can cause a small fraction of the molecules to move very slowly vertically against gravity in the laboratory. These slowly moving molecules are captured by an electrostatic hexapole guiding field that both orients and focuses the molecules. The molecules are focused into the ionization region of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and are ionized by laser radiation. The new molecular fountain apparatus was built utilizing a new design for molecular beam apparatus that has allowed us to miniaturize the apparatus. This new design minimizes the volumes and surface area of the machine allowing smaller pumps to maintain the necessary background pressures needed for these experiments.

  2. Reactor core cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masahiro.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To safely and effectively cool down the reactor core after it has been shut down but is still hot due to after-heat. Constitution: Since the coolant extraction nozzle is situated at a location higher than the coolant injection nozzle, the coolant sprayed from the nozzle, is free from sucking immediately from the extraction nozzle and is therefore used effectively to cool the reactor core. As all the portions from the top to the bottom of the reactor are cooled simultaneously, the efficiency of the reactor cooling process is increased. Since the coolant extraction nozzle can be installed at a point considerably higher than the coolant injection nozzle, the distance from the coolant surface to the point of the coolant extraction nozzle can be made large, preventing cavitation near the coolant extraction nozzle. Therefore, without increasing the capacity of the heat exchanger, the reactor can be cooled down after a shutdown safely and efficiently. (Kawakami, Y.)

  3. Stochastic cooling at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marriner, J.

    1986-08-01

    The topics discussed are the stochastic cooling systems in use at Fermilab and some of the techniques that have been employed to meet the particular requirements of the anti-proton source. Stochastic cooling at Fermilab became of paramount importance about 5 years ago when the anti-proton source group at Fermilab abandoned the electron cooling ring in favor of a high flux anti-proton source which relied solely on stochastic cooling to achieve the phase space densities necessary for colliding proton and anti-proton beams. The Fermilab systems have constituted a substantial advance in the techniques of cooling including: large pickup arrays operating at microwave frequencies, extensive use of cryogenic techniques to reduce thermal noise, super-conducting notch filters, and the development of tools for controlling and for accurately phasing the system

  4. Cooled-Spool Piston Compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Brian G.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed cooled-spool piston compressor driven by hydraulic power and features internal cooling of piston by flowing hydraulic fluid to limit temperature of compressed gas. Provides sufficient cooling for higher compression ratios or reactive gases. Unlike conventional piston compressors, all parts of compressed gas lie at all times within relatively short distance of cooled surface so that gas cooled more effectively.

  5. On helicon wave induced radial plasma transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrzilka, V.

    1993-04-01

    Estimates of helicon wave induced radial plasma transport are presented. The wave induced transport grows or decreases in dependence on the sign of the azimuthal wave number; these changes in transport may play an important role in helicon wave plasma sources. (author) 5 figs., 18 refs

  6. Revealing the radial modes in vortex beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sephton, Bereneice C

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Light beams that carry orbital angular momentum are often approximated by modulating an initial beam, usually Gaussian, with an azimuthal phase variation to create a vortex beam. Such vortex beams are well defined azimuthally, but the radial profile...

  7. Measurement of Wear in Radial Journal Bearings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligterink, D.J.; Ligterink, D.J.; de Gee, A.W.J.

    1996-01-01

    this article, the measurement of wear in radial journal bearings is discussed, where a distinction is made between stationary and non-stationary contact conditions. Starting with Holm/Archard's wear law, equations are derived for the calculation of the specific wear rate k of the bearing material as

  8. Radial interchange motions of plasma filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Bian, N.H.; Fundamenski, W.

    2006-01-01

    on a biperiodic domain perpendicular to the magnetic field. It is demonstrated that a blob-like plasma structure develops dipolar vorticity and electrostatic potential fields, resulting in rapid radial acceleration and formation of a steep front and a trailing wake. While the dynamical evolution strongly depends...

  9. Radial transfer effects for poloidal rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallatschek, Klaus

    2010-11-01

    Radial transfer of energy or momentum is the principal agent responsible for radial structures of Geodesic Acoustic Modes (GAMs) or stationary Zonal Flows (ZF) generated by the turbulence. For the GAM, following a physical approach, it is possible to find useful expressions for the individual components of the Poynting flux or radial group velocity allowing predictions where a mathematical full analysis is unfeasible. Striking differences between up-down symmetric flux surfaces and asymmetric ones have been found. For divertor geometries, e.g., the direction of the propagation depends on the sign of the ion grad-B drift with respect to the X-point, reminiscent of a sensitive determinant of the H-mode threshold. In nonlocal turbulence computations it becomes obvious that the linear energy transfer terms can be completely overwhelmed by the action of the turbulence. In contrast, stationary ZFs are governed by the turbulent radial transfer of momentum. For sufficiently large systems, the Reynolds stress becomes a deterministic functional of the flows, which can be empirically determined from the stress response in computational turbulence studies. The functional allows predictions even on flow/turbulence states not readily obtainable from small amplitude noise, such as certain transport bifurcations or meta-stable states.

  10. Spectral problem for the radial Schroedinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vshivtsev, A.S.; Tatarintsev, A.V.; Prokopov, A.V.; Sorokin, V. N.

    1998-01-01

    For the first time, a procedure for determining spectra on the basis of generalized integral transformations is implemented for a wide class of radial Schroedinger equations. It is shown that this procedure works well for known types of potentials. Concurrently, this method makes it possible to obtain new analytic results for the Cornell potential. This may prove important for hadron physics

  11. Computing modal dispersion characteristics of radially Asymmetric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We developed a matrix theory that applies to with non-circular/circular but concentric layers fibers. And we compute the dispersion characteristics of radially unconventional fiber, known as Asymmetric Bragg fiber. An attempt has been made to determine how the modal characteristics change as circular Bragg fiber is ...

  12. Second sector cool down

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    At the beginning of July, cool-down is starting in the second LHC sector, sector 4-5. The cool down of sector 4-5 may occasionally generate mist at Point 4, like that produced last January (photo) during the cool-down of sector 7-8.Things are getting colder in the LHC. Sector 7-8 has been kept at 1.9 K for three weeks with excellent stability (see Bulletin No. 16-17 of 16 April 2007). The electrical tests in this sector have got opt to a successful start. At the beginning of July the cryogenic teams started to cool a second sector, sector 4-5. At Point 4 in Echenevex, where one of the LHC’s cryogenic plants is located, preparations for the first phase of the cool-down are underway. During this phase, the sector will first be cooled to 80 K (-193°C), the temperature of liquid nitrogen. As for the first sector, 1200 tonnes of liquid nitrogen will be used for the cool-down. In fact, the nitrogen circulates only at the surface in the ...

  13. Dry well cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki.

    1997-01-01

    A plurality of blowing ports with introduction units are disposed to a plurality of ducts in a dry well, and a cooling unit comprising a cooler, a blower and an isolating valve is disposed outside of the dry well. Cooling air and the atmosphere in the dry well are mixed to form a cooling gas and blown into the dry well to control the temperature. Since the cooling unit is disposed outside of the dry well, the maintenance of the cooling unit can be performed even during the plant operation. In addition, since dampers opened/closed depending on the temperature of the atmosphere are disposed to the introduction units for controlling the temperature of the cooling gas, the temperature of the atmosphere in the dry well can be set to a predetermined level rapidly. Since an axial flow blower is used as the blower of the cooling unit, it can be contained in a ventilation cylinder. Then, the atmosphere in the dry well flowing in the ventilation cylinder can be prevented from leaking to the outside. (N.H.)

  14. Variations in the usage and composition of a radial cocktail during radial access coronary angiography procedures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pate, G

    2011-10-01

    A survey was conducted of medication administered during radial artery cannulation for coronary angiography in 2009 in Ireland; responses were obtained for 15 of 20 centres, in 5 of which no radial access procedures were undertaken. All 10 (100%) centres which provided data used heparin and one or more anti-spasmodics; verapamil in 9 (90%), nitrate in 1 (10%), both in 2 (20%). There were significant variations in the doses used. Further work needs to be done to determine the optimum cocktail to prevent radial artery injury following coronary angiography.

  15. Radial wave crystals: radially periodic structures from anisotropic metamaterials for engineering acoustic or electromagnetic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent, Daniel; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2009-08-07

    We demonstrate that metamaterials with anisotropic properties can be used to develop a new class of periodic structures that has been named radial wave crystals. They can be sonic or photonic, and wave propagation along the radial directions is obtained through Bloch states like in usual sonic or photonic crystals. The band structure of the proposed structures can be tailored in a large amount to get exciting novel wave phenomena. For example, it is shown that acoustical cavities based on radial sonic crystals can be employed as passive devices for beam forming or dynamically orientated antennas for sound localization.

  16. The effects of mixing air distribution and heat load arrangement on the performance of ceiling radiant panels under cooling mode of operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustakallio, Panu; Kosonen, Risto; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2016-01-01

    arrangement and air distribution generated in a room by linear slot diffuser, radial multi-nozzle diffuser and radial swirl induction unit on the cooling power of radiant panels was compared. The impact on the thermal environment was also studied. Measurements were carried out without and with supply air...

  17. Cooling towers: a bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitson, M.O.

    1981-02-01

    This bibliography cites 300 selected references containing information on various aspects of large cooling tower technology, including design, construction, operation, performance, economics, and environmental effects. The towers considered include natural-draft and mechanical-draft types employing wet, dry, or combination wet-dry cooling. A few references deal with alternative cooling methods, principally ponds or spray canals. The citations were compiled for the DOE Energy Information Data Base (EDB) covering the period January to December 1980. The references are to reports from the Department of Energy and its contractors, reports from other government or private organizations, and journal articles, books, conference papers, and monographs from US originators

  18. History of nuclear cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuerti, M.

    1998-01-01

    The historical development of producing extreme low temperatures by magnetic techniques is overviewed. With electron spin methods, temperatures down to 1 mK can be achieved. With nuclear spins theoretically 10 -9 K can be produced. The idea of cooling with nuclear demagnetization is not new, it is a logical extension of the concept of electron cooling. Using nuclear demagnetization experiment with 3 T water cooled solenoids 3 mK could be produced. The cold record is held by Olli Lounasmaa in Helsinki with temperatures below 10 -9 K. (R.P.)

  19. Glass Formation of n-Butanol: Coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations Using Gay-Berne Potential Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Gui-long; Zhang, Yong-hong; Huang, Shi-ping

    2012-04-01

    Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations based on Gay-Berne potential model, we have simulated the cooling process of liquid n-butanol. A new set of GB parameters are obtained by fitting the results of density functional theory calculations. The simulations are carried out in the range of 290-50 K with temperature decrements of 10 K. The cooling characteristics are determined on the basis of the variations of the density, the potential energy and orientational order parameter with temperature, whose slopes all show discontinuity. Both the radial distribution function curves and the second-rank orientational correlation function curves exhibit splitting in the second peak. Using the discontinuous change of these thermodynamic and structure properties, we obtain the glass transition at an estimate of temperature Tg=120±10 K, which is in good agreement with experimental results 110±1 K.

  20. Influence of temperature and hydrogen content on stress-induced radial hydride precipitation in Zircaloy-4 cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desquines, J., E-mail: jean.desquines@irsn.fr; Drouan, D.; Billone, M.; Puls, M.P.; March, P.; Fourgeaud, S.; Getrey, C.; Elbaz, V.; Philippe, M.

    2014-10-15

    Radial hydride precipitation in stress relieved Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings is studied using a new thermal–mechanical test. Two maximum temperatures for radial hydride precipitation heat treatment are studied, 350 and 450 °C with hydrogen contents ranging between 50 and 600 wppm. The new test provides two main results of interest: the minimum hoop stress required to precipitate radial hydrides and a maximum stress above which, all hydrides precipitate in the radial direction. Based on these two extreme stress conditions, a model is derived to determine the stress level required to obtain a given fraction of radial hydrides after high temperature thermal–mechanical heat treatment. The proposed model is validated using metallographic observation data on pressurized tubes cooled down under constant pressure. Most of the samples with reoriented hydrides are further subjected to a ductility test. Using finite element modeling, the test results are analyzed in terms of crack nucleation within radial hydrides at the outer diameter and crack growth through the thickness of the tubular samples. The combination of test results shows that samples with hydrogen contents of about 100 wppm had the lowest ductility.

  1. Transverse and radial flow in intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vestfall, D. Gary

    1997-01-01

    We have studied transverse and radial flow in nucleus-nucleus collisions ranging in energy from 15 to 155 MeV/nucleon. We have measured the impact parameter dependence of the balance energy for Ar + Sc and compared the results with Quantum Molecular Dynamics calculations with and without momentum dependence. We have shown that transverse flow and the balance energy dependence on the isospin of the system using the systems 58 Fe + 58 Fe, 58 Ni + 58 Ni, and 58 Mn + 58 Fe. These results are compared with Boltzmann-Uehling-Uehlenbeck calculations incorporating isospin-dependence. We have measured radial flow for Ar + Sc and find that about 50% of the observed energy is related to radial flow. (author)

  2. A resting bottom sodium cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, D.

    2012-01-01

    This follows ICAPP 2011 paper 11059 'Fast Reactor with a Cold Bottom Vessel', on sodium cooled reactor vessels in thermal gradient, resting on soil. Sodium is frozen on vessel bottom plate, temperature increasing to the top. The vault cover rests on the safety vessel, the core diagrid welded to a toric collector forms a slab, supported by skirts resting on the bottom plate. Intermediate exchangers and pumps, fixed on the cover, plunge on the collector. At the vessel top, a skirt hanging from the cover plunges into sodium, leaving a thin circular slit partially filled by sodium covered by argon, providing leak-tightness and allowing vessel dilatation, as well as a radial relative holding due to sodium inertia. No 'air conditioning' at 400 deg. C is needed as for hanging vessels, and this allows a large economy. The sodium volume below the slab contains isolating refractory elements, stopping a hypothetical corium flow. The small gas volume around the vessel limits any LOCA. The liner cooling system of the concrete safety vessel may contribute to reactor cooling. The cold resting bottom vessel, proposed by the author for many years, could avoid the complete visual inspection required for hanging vessels. However, a double vessel, containing support skirts, would allow introduction of inspecting devices. Stress limiting thermal gradient is obtained by filling secondary sodium in the intermediate space. (authors)

  3. Microbial analysis of meatballs cooled with vacuum and conventional cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Hande Mutlu; Ozturk, Harun Kemal; Koçar, Gunnur

    2017-08-01

    Vacuum cooling is a rapid evaporative cooling technique and can be used for pre-cooling of leafy vegetables, mushroom, bakery, fishery, sauces, cooked food, meat and particulate foods. The aim of this study was to apply the vacuum cooling and the conventional cooling techniques for the cooling of the meatball and to show the vacuum pressure effect on the cooling time, the temperature decrease and microbial growth rate. The results of the vacuum cooling and the conventional cooling (cooling in the refrigerator) were compared with each other for different temperatures. The study shows that the conventional cooling was much slower than the vacuum cooling. Moreover, the microbial growth rate of the vacuum cooling was extremely low compared with the conventional cooling. Thus, the lowest microbial growth occurred at 0.7 kPa and the highest microbial growth was observed at 1.5 kPa for the vacuum cooling. The mass loss ratio for the conventional cooling and vacuum cooling was about 5 and 9% respectively.

  4. SALLY - a computer programme for the calculation of the dynamical behaviour of a cooling channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiche, C.; Ziegenbein, D.

    1978-12-01

    This report describes the mathematical-physical fundamentals and provides a user's manual as well as some test examples for the programme SALLY. SALLY is suitable for the calculation of the dynamical behaviour of a cooling channel under following conditions: point-kinetics, heat transfer in the fuel in radial direction only, reactivity feedback, simple model of the first cooling cycle. Reactivity, coolant inlet temperature or coolant velocity can be disturbed. (author)

  5. Independent modification on water lubrication loop of radial-axial bearing of Russian reactor coolant pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Yingbin

    2012-01-01

    Water lubrication was used for radial-axial bearings of 1391M reactor coolant pumps at both units of Tianwan Nuclear Power Plant Phase I Project, which was the first trial on large commercial pressurized water reactors in the world. As a prototype, there were inherent deficiencies leading to a series of operational events. Jiangsu Nuclear Power Corporation conducted the independent innovative technical modification to cope with the defects, and succeeded in reducing heat removal rate of the radial-axial bearings of the reactor coolant pumps, mitigating or preventing the cavitation abrasion of the bearings and improving the cooling effects. This paper illustrates the reasons of the innovative modification, the design and implementation preparation of modification program, the implementation process and evaluation of modification effect, including detailed follow-up work program. (author)

  6. Radial effects in heating and thermal stability of a sub-ignited tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, V.; Shoucri, M.M.; Thibaudeau, G.; Harten, L.; Bers, A.

    1982-02-01

    The existence of thermally stable sub-ignited equilibria of a tokamak reactor, sustained in operation by a feedback-controlled supplementary heating source, is demonstrated. The establishment of stability depends on a number of radially non-uniform, nonlinear processes whose effect is analyzed. One-dimensional (radial) stability analyses of model transport equations, together with numerical results from a 1-D transport code, are used in studying the heating of DT-plasmas in the thermonuclear regime. Plasma core supplementary heating is found to be a thermally more stable process than bulk heating. In the presence of impurity line radiation, however, core-heated temperature profiles may collapse, contracting inward from the limiter, the result of an instability caused by the increasing nature of the radiative cooling rate, with decreasing temperature. Conditions are established for the realization of a sub-ignited high-Q, toroidal reactor plasma with appreciable output power

  7. Gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Masayuki.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To enable direct cooling of reactor cores thereby improving the cooling efficiency upon accidents. Constitution: A plurality sets of heat exchange pipe groups are disposed around the reactor core, which are connected by way of communication pipes with a feedwater recycling device comprising gas/liquid separation device, recycling pump, feedwater pump and emergency water tank. Upon occurrence of loss of primary coolants accidents, the heat exchange pipe groups directly absorb the heat from the reactor core through radiation and convection. Although the water in the heat exchange pipe groups are boiled to evaporate if the forcive circulation is interrupted by the loss of electric power source, water in the emergency tank is supplied due to the head to the heat exchange pipe groups to continue the cooling. Furthermore, since the heat exchange pipe groups surround the entire circumference of the reactor core, cooling is carried out uniformly without resulting deformation or stresses due to the thermal imbalance. (Sekiya, K.)

  8. Warm and Cool Dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannlein, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Presents an art activity in which first grade students draw dinosaurs in order to learn about the concept of warm and cool colors. Explains how the activity also helped the students learn about the concept of distance when drawing. (CMK)

  9. Cooling of wood briquettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adžić Miroljub M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the experimental research of surface temperature of wood briquettes during cooling phase along the cooling line. The cooling phase is an important part of the briquette production technology. It should be performed with care, otherwise the quality of briquettes could deteriorate and possible changes of combustion characteristics of briquettes could happen. The briquette surface temperature was measured with an IR camera and a surface temperature probe at 42 sections. It was found that the temperature of briquette surface dropped from 68 to 34°C after 7 minutes spent at the cooling line. The temperature at the center of briquette, during the 6 hour storage, decreased to 38°C.

  10. Laser cooling of solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, Richard I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor [UNM

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

  11. Cooling with Superfluid Helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebrun, P; Tavian, L [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    The technical properties of helium II (‘superfluid’ helium) are presented in view of its applications to the cooling of superconducting devices, particularly in particle accelerators. Cooling schemes are discussed in terms of heat transfer performance and limitations. Large-capacity refrigeration techniques below 2 K are reviewed, with regard to thermodynamic cycles as well as process machinery. Examples drawn from existing or planned projects illustrate the presentation. Keywords: superfluid helium, cryogenics.

  12. Comparing Social Stories™ to Cool versus Not Cool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf, Justin B.; Mitchell, Erin; Townley-Cochran, Donna; McEachin, John; Taubman, Mitchell; Leaf, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    In this study we compared the cool versus not cool procedure to Social Stories™ for teaching various social behaviors to one individual diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. The researchers randomly assigned three social skills to the cool versus not cool procedure and three social skills to the Social Stories™ procedure. Naturalistic probes…

  13. WWER radial reflector modeling by diffusion codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petkov, P. T.; Mittag, S.

    2005-01-01

    The two commonly used approaches to describe the WWER radial reflectors in diffusion codes, by albedo on the core-reflector boundary and by a ring of diffusive assembly size nodes, are discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of the first approach are presented first, then the Koebke's equivalence theory is outlined and its implementation for the WWER radial reflectors is discussed. Results for the WWER-1000 reactor are presented. Then the boundary conditions on the outer reflector boundary are discussed. The possibility to divide the library into fuel assembly and reflector parts and to generate each library by a separate code package is discussed. Finally, the homogenization errors for rodded assemblies are presented and discussed (Author)

  14. Oculoauriculovertebral spectrum with radial anomaly in child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taksande, Amar; Vilhekar, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Oculoauriculovertebral spectrum (OAVS) or Goldenhar syndrome is a wide spectrum of congenital anomalies that involves structures arising from the first and second branchial arches. It is characterized by a wide spectrum of symptoms and physical features. These abnormalities mainly involve the cheekbones, jaws, mouth, ears, eyes, or vertebrae. Other conditions with ear and/or radial involvement, such as, the Nager syndrome, Holt-Oram syndrome, Radial-renal syndrome, facioauriculoradial dysplasia, Fanconi anemia, and Vertebral, Anal atresia, Cardiac, Trachea, Esophageal, Renal, and Limb (VACTERL) association should be considered for differential diagnosis. Here we report a child who had facial asymmetry, microsomia, microtia, congenital facial nerve palsy, conductive hearing loss, skin tags, iris coloboma, and preaxial polydactyly.

  15. Oculoauriculovertebral spectrum with radial anomaly in child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar Taksande

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oculoauriculovertebral spectrum (OAVS or Goldenhar syndrome is a wide spectrum of congenital anomalies that involves structures arising from the first and second branchial arches. It is characterized by a wide spectrum of symptoms and physical features. These abnormalities mainly involve the cheekbones, jaws, mouth, ears, eyes, or vertebrae. Other conditions with ear and/or radial involvement, such as, the Nager syndrome, Holt-Oram syndrome, Radial-renal syndrome, facioauriculoradial dysplasia, Fanconi anemia, and Vertebral, Anal atresia, Cardiac, Trachea, Esophageal, Renal, and Limb (VACTERL association should be considered for differential diagnosis. Here we report a child who had facial asymmetry, microsomia, microtia, congenital facial nerve palsy, conductive hearing loss, skin tags, iris coloboma, and preaxial polydactyly.

  16. Linear radial pulsation theory. Lecture 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, A.N.

    1983-01-01

    We describe a method for getting an equilibrium stellar envelope model using as input the total mass, the envelope mass, the surface effective temperature, the total surface luminosity, and the composition of the envelope. Then wih the structure of the envelope model known, we present a method for obtaining the raidal pulsation periods and growth rates for low order modes. The large amplitude pulsations observed for the yellow and red giants and supergiants are always these radial models, but for the stars nearer the main sequence, as for all of our stars and for the white dwarfs, there frequently are nonradial modes occuring also. Application of linear theory radial pulsation theory is made to the giant star sigma Scuti variables, while the linear nonradial theory will be used for the B stars in later lectures

  17. SpicyNodes Radial Map Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douma, M.; Ligierko, G.; Angelov, I.

    2008-10-01

    The need for information has increased exponentially over the past decades. The current systems for constructing, exploring, classifying, organizing, and searching information face the growing challenge of enabling their users to operate efficiently and intuitively in knowledge-heavy environments. This paper presents SpicyNodes, an advanced user interface for difficult interaction contexts. It is based on an underlying structure known as a radial map, which allows users to manipulate and interact in a natural manner with entities called nodes. This technology overcomes certain limitations of existing solutions and solves the problem of browsing complex sets of linked information. SpicyNodes is also an organic system that projects users into a living space, stimulating exploratory behavior and fostering creative thought. Our interactive radial layout is used for educational purposes and has the potential for numerous other applications.

  18. Stability of a radial immiscible drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bataille, J

    1968-11-01

    The stability of the displacement front between 2 immiscible fluids of radial flow between 2 parallel plates (Hele-Shaw model) is studied mathematically by superposing onto the circular displacement front a sinusoidal perturbation. The equations are reduced to dimensionless variables, and it is shown that the stable and unstable domains in a plot: dimensionless viscosity vs. dimensionless time are separated by a polygonal contour, each side of the contour being characterized by the (integer) number of perturbations along the circumference. There is a critical reduced time below which the perturbations are amortized but beyond which they are amplified. Experimental results have been in fair general agreement with theoretical results, the divergence between them being attributable to neglecting capillary phenomena, which may become very important at large radial distances. One test with miscible fluids has shown that even in this case, there is a critical time or an equivalent critical radius.

  19. Analysis of the JASPER Program Radial Shield Attenuation Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, C.O.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the analysis of the JASPER Program Radial Shield Attenuation Experiment are presented. The experiment was performed in 1986 at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility. It is the first of six experiments in this cooperative Japanese and American program in support of shielding designs for advanced sodium-cooled reactors. Six different shielding configurations and subconfigurations thereof were studied. The configurations were calculated with the DOT-IV two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport computer code using the R-Z geometry option, a symmetric S{sub 12} quadrature (96 directions), and cross sections from ENDF/B versions IV and V in either a 51- or 61-group structure. Auxiliary codes were used to compute detector responses and prepare cross sections and source input for the DOT-IV calculations. Calculated detector responses were compared with measured responses and the agreement was good to excellent in many cases. However, the agreement for configurations having thick steel or B{sub 4}C regions or for some very large configurations was fair to poor. The disagreement was attributed to cross-section data, broad-group structure, or high background in the measurements. In particular, it is shown that two cross-section sets for ``B give very different results for neutron transmission through the thick B{sub 4}C regions used in one set of experimental configurations. Implications for design calculations are given.

  20. Radial oxygen gradients over rat cortex arterioles

    OpenAIRE

    Galler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We present the results of the visualisation of radial oxygen gradients in rats’ cortices and their use in neurocritical management. Methods: PO2 maps of the cortex of 10 wistar rats were obtained with a camera (SensiMOD, PCO, Kehlheim, Germany). Those pictures were analyzed and edited by a custom-made software. We chose a vessel for examination. A matrix, designed to evaluate the cortical O2 partial pressure, was placed vertically to the artery and afterwards multiple regio...

  1. Variational method for integrating radial gradient field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legarda-Saenz, Ricardo; Brito-Loeza, Carlos; Rivera, Mariano; Espinosa-Romero, Arturo

    2014-12-01

    We propose a variational method for integrating information obtained from circular fringe pattern. The proposed method is a suitable choice for objects with radial symmetry. First, we analyze the information contained in the fringe pattern captured by the experimental setup and then move to formulate the problem of recovering the wavefront using techniques from calculus of variations. The performance of the method is demonstrated by numerical experiments with both synthetic and real data.

  2. Moment approach to tandem mirror radial transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebert, K.D.; Callen, J.D.

    1986-02-01

    A moment approach is proposed for the study of tandem mirror radial transport in the resonant plateau regime. The salient features of the method are described with reference to axisymmetric tokamak transport theory. In particular, the importance of momentum conservation to the establishment of the azimuthal variations in the electrostatic potential is demonstrated. Also, an ad hoc drift kinetic equation is solved to determine parallel viscosity coefficients which are required to close the moment system

  3. Numerical simulation of radial compressor stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syka, T.; Luňáček, O.

    2013-04-01

    Article describes numerical simulations of air flow in radial compressor stage in NUMECA CFD software. In simulations geometry variants with and without seals are used. During tasks evaluating was observed seals influence on flow field and performance parameters of compressor stage. Also is described CFDresults comparison with results from design software based on experimental measurements and monitoring of influence of seals construction on compressor stage efficiency.

  4. Numerical simulation of radial compressor stage

    OpenAIRE

    Luňáček O.; Syka T.

    2013-01-01

    Article describes numerical simulations of air flow in radial compressor stage in NUMECA CFD software. In simulations geometry variants with and without seals are used. During tasks evaluating was observed seals influence on flow field and performance parameters of compressor stage. Also is described CFDresults comparison with results from design software based on experimental measurements and monitoring of influence of seals construction on compressor stage efficiency.

  5. Numerical simulation of radial compressor stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luňáček O.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Article describes numerical simulations of air flow in radial compressor stage in NUMECA CFD software. In simulations geometry variants with and without seals are used. During tasks evaluating was observed seals influence on flow field and performance parameters of compressor stage. Also is described CFDresults comparison with results from design software based on experimental measurements and monitoring of influence of seals construction on compressor stage efficiency.

  6. Radial excitations in nucleon-nucleon scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestre-Brac, B.; Carbonell, J.; Gignoux, C.

    1986-01-01

    In the non-relativistic constituent quark model, the role of the radial excitations of the nucleon is studied within a resonating group approach of the nucleon-nucleon scattering. It is shown that, rather than the inclusion of new channels, it is important to include mixed-symmetry spin-isospin components in the nucleon wave function. It is also found that during the collision there is no significant deformation of the nucleon. (orig.)

  7. Learning Methods for Radial Basis Functions Networks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neruda, Roman; Kudová, Petra

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 21, - (2005), s. 1131-1142 ISSN 0167-739X R&D Projects: GA ČR GP201/03/P163; GA ČR GA201/02/0428 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : radial basis function networks * hybrid supervised learning * genetic algorithms * benchmarking Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.555, year: 2005

  8. Fast radial basis functions for engineering applications

    CERN Document Server

    Biancolini, Marco Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the first “How To” guide to the use of radial basis functions (RBF). It provides a clear vision of their potential, an overview of ready-for-use computational tools and precise guidelines to implement new engineering applications of RBF. Radial basis functions (RBF) are a mathematical tool mature enough for useful engineering applications. Their mathematical foundation is well established and the tool has proven to be effective in many fields, as the mathematical framework can be adapted in several ways. A candidate application can be faced considering the features of RBF:  multidimensional space (including 2D and 3D), numerous radial functions available, global and compact support, interpolation/regression. This great flexibility makes RBF attractive – and their great potential has only been partially discovered. This is because of the difficulty in taking a first step toward RBF as they are not commonly part of engineers’ cultural background, but also due to the numerical complex...

  9. Fuel radial design using Path Relinking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos S, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The present work shows the obtained results when implementing the combinatory optimization technique well-known as Path Re linking (Re-linkage of Trajectories), to the problem of the radial design of nuclear fuel assemblies, for boiling water reactors (BWR Boiling Water Reactor by its initials in English), this type of reactors is those that are used in the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central, Veracruz. As in any other electric power generation plant of that make use of some fuel to produce heat and that it needs each certain time (from 12 to 14 months) to make a supply of the same one, because this it wears away or it burns, in the nucleolectric plants to this activity is denominated fuel reload. In this reload different activities intervene, among those which its highlight the radial and axial designs of fuel assemblies, the patterns of control rods and the multi cycles study, each one of these stages with their own complexity. This work was limited to study in independent form the radial design, without considering the other activities. These phases are basic for the fuel reload design and of reactor operation strategies. (Author)

  10. Development of a Radial Deconsolidation Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmreich, Grant W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Montgomery, Fred C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunn, John D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    A series of experiments have been initiated to determine the retention or mobility of fission products* in AGR fuel compacts [Petti, et al. 2010]. This information is needed to refine fission product transport models. The AGR-3/4 irradiation test involved half-inch-long compacts that each contained twenty designed-to-fail (DTF) particles, with 20-μm thick carbon-coated kernels whose coatings were deliberately fabricated such that they would crack under irradiation, providing a known source of post-irradiation isotopes. The DTF particles in these compacts were axially distributed along the compact centerline so that the diffusion of fission products released from the DTF kernels would be radially symmetric [Hunn, et al. 2012; Hunn et al. 2011; Kercher, et al. 2011; Hunn, et al. 2007]. Compacts containing DTF particles were irradiated at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) [Collin, 2015]. Analysis of the diffusion of these various post-irradiation isotopes through the compact requires a method to radially deconsolidate the compacts so that nested-annular volumes may be analyzed for post-irradiation isotope inventory in the compact matrix, TRISO outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC), and DTF kernels. An effective radial deconsolidation method and apparatus appropriate to this application has been developed and parametrically characterized.

  11. Cooling Performance of TBM-shield Designed for Manufacturability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seong Dae; Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Dong Jun; Yoon, Jae Sung; Ahn, Mu Young

    2016-01-01

    Helium cooled ceramic reflector (HCCR) test blanket module (TBM) is composed of four sub-modules and a common back manifold (BM). The associated shield is a water-cooled 316L(N)-IG block with internal cooling channels. The purpose of the TBM-shield is to make the condition with the allowable neutron flux and dose rate level. The radially continuous layers of water and structure were configured. The main purpose of the shield is to reduce the neutron flux by absorbing the neutron in the structure. The water could act as the moderator and cool down the structure which is heated due to the reaction with the neutrons. The moderated neutrons are easily absorbed by the structure. It could meet the criteria for the minimum neutron flux by increasing the thickness of structure. The formation of inside cooling channel in the TBM-shield should be considered while maintaining the allowable temperature range. In this work, a manufacturing process including the formation of inside cooling channel was presented. Current design and thermal analysis results for the TBM-shield were presented. The geometry of the shield blocks was considerably changed. The coolant channel was exposed to the outer surface of the TBM-shield. The overall manufacturing process is simplified compared with the previous process of CD model

  12. Cooling Performance of TBM-shield Designed for Manufacturability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seong Dae; Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Dong Jun; Yoon, Jae Sung [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Mu Young [NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Helium cooled ceramic reflector (HCCR) test blanket module (TBM) is composed of four sub-modules and a common back manifold (BM). The associated shield is a water-cooled 316L(N)-IG block with internal cooling channels. The purpose of the TBM-shield is to make the condition with the allowable neutron flux and dose rate level. The radially continuous layers of water and structure were configured. The main purpose of the shield is to reduce the neutron flux by absorbing the neutron in the structure. The water could act as the moderator and cool down the structure which is heated due to the reaction with the neutrons. The moderated neutrons are easily absorbed by the structure. It could meet the criteria for the minimum neutron flux by increasing the thickness of structure. The formation of inside cooling channel in the TBM-shield should be considered while maintaining the allowable temperature range. In this work, a manufacturing process including the formation of inside cooling channel was presented. Current design and thermal analysis results for the TBM-shield were presented. The geometry of the shield blocks was considerably changed. The coolant channel was exposed to the outer surface of the TBM-shield. The overall manufacturing process is simplified compared with the previous process of CD model.

  13. Laser cooling of neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    A qualitative description of laser cooling of neutral atoms is given. Two of the most important mechanisms utilized in laser cooling, the so-called Doppler Cooling and Sisyphus Cooling, are reviewed. The minimum temperature reached by the atoms is derived using simple arguments. (Author) 7 refs

  14. Technology of power plant cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maulbetsch, J.S.; Zeren, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: the thermodynamics of power generation and the need for cooling water; the technical, economic, and legislative constraints within which the cooling problem must be solved; alternate cooling methods currently available or under development; the water treatment requirements of cooling systems; and some alternatives for modifying the physical impact on aquatic systems

  15. Meltdown reactor core cooling facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Tsuyoshi.

    1992-01-01

    The meltdown reactor core cooling facility comprises a meltdown reactor core cooling tank, a cooling water storage tank situates at a position higher than the meltdown reactor core cooling tank, an upper pipeline connecting the upper portions of the both of the tanks and a lower pipeline connecting the lower portions of them. Upon occurrence of reactor core meltdown, a high temperature meltdown reactor core is dropped on the cooling tank to partially melt the tank and form a hole, from which cooling water is flown out. Since the water source of the cooling water is the cooling water storage tank, a great amount of cooling water is further dropped and supplied and the reactor core is submerged and cooled by natural convection for a long period of time. Further, when the lump of the meltdown reactor core is small and the perforated hole of the meltdown reactor cooling tank is small, cooling water is boiled by the high temperature lump intruding into the meltdown reactor core cooling tank and blown out from the upper pipeline to the cooling water storage tank to supply cooling water from the lower pipeline to the meltdown reactor core cooling tank. Since it is constituted only with simple static facilities, the facility can be simplified to attain improvement of reliability. (N.H.)

  16. Cool WISPs for stellar cooling excesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannotti, Maurizio [Physical Sciences, Barry University, 11300 NE 2nd Avenue, Miami Shores, FL 33161 (United States); Irastorza, Igor; Redondo, Javier [Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad de Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, E-50009, Zaragoza, España (Spain); Ringwald, Andreas, E-mail: mgiannotti@barry.edu, E-mail: igor.irastorza@cern.ch, E-mail: jredondo@unizar.es, E-mail: andreas.ringwald@desy.de [Theory group, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-05-01

    Several stellar systems (white dwarfs, red giants, horizontal branch stars and possibly the neutron star in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A) show a mild preference for a non-standard cooling mechanism when compared with theoretical models. This exotic cooling could be provided by Weakly Interacting Slim Particles (WISPs), produced in the hot cores and abandoning the star unimpeded, contributing directly to the energy loss. Taken individually, these excesses do not show a strong statistical weight. However, if one mechanism could consistently explain several of them, the hint could be significant. We analyze the hints in terms of neutrino anomalous magnetic moments, minicharged particles, hidden photons and axion-like particles (ALPs). Among them, the ALP or a massless HP represent the best solution. Interestingly, the hinted ALP parameter space is accessible to the next generation proposed ALP searches, such as ALPS II and IAXO and the massless HP requires a multi TeV energy scale of new physics that might be accessible at the LHC.

  17. Cool WISPs for stellar cooling excesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannotti, Maurizio; Irastorza, Igor; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Several stellar systems (white dwarfs, red giants, horizontal branch stars and possibly the neutron star in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A) show a mild preference for a non-standard cooling mechanism when compared with theoretical models. This exotic cooling could be provided by Weakly Interacting Slim Particles (WISPs), produced in the hot cores and abandoning the star unimpeded, contributing directly to the energy loss. Taken individually, these excesses do not show a strong statistical weight. However, if one mechanism could consistently explain several of them, the hint could be significant. We analyze the hints in terms of neutrino anomalous magnetic moments, minicharged particles, hidden photons and axion-like particles (ALPs). Among them, the ALP or a massless HP represent the best solution. Interestingly, the hinted ALP parameter space is accessible to the next generation proposed ALP searches, such as ALPS II and IAXO and the massless HP requires a multi TeV energy scale of new physics that might be accessible at the LHC.

  18. Gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulten, R.; Trauger, D.B.

    1976-01-01

    Experience to date with operation of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors has been quite favorable. Despite problems in completion of construction and startup, three high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) units have operated well. The Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (AGR) in the United Kingdom has had an excellent operating history, and initial operation of commercial AGRs shows them to be satisfactory. The latter reactors provide direct experience in scale-up from the Windscale experiment to fullscale commercial units. The Colorado Fort St. Vrain 330-MWe prototype helium-cooled HTGR is now in the approach-to-power phase while the 300-MWe Pebble Bed THTR prototype in the Federal Republic of Germany is scheduled for completion of construction by late 1978. THTR will be the first nuclear power plant which uses a dry cooling tower. Fuel reprocessing and refabrication have been developed in the laboratory and are now entering a pilot-plant scale development. Several commercial HTGR power station orders were placed in the U.S. prior to 1975 with similar plans for stations in the FRG. However, the combined effects of inflation, reduced electric power demand, regulatory uncertainties, and pricing problems led to cancellation of the 12 reactors which were in various stages of planning, design, and licensing

  19. Gas cooled leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shutt, R.P.; Rehak, M.L.; Hornik, K.E.

    1993-01-01

    The intent of this paper is to cover as completely as possible and in sufficient detail the topics relevant to lead design. The first part identifies the problems associated with lead design, states the mathematical formulation, and shows the results of numerical and analytical solutions. The second part presents the results of a parametric study whose object is to determine the best choice for cooling method, material, and geometry. These findings axe applied in a third part to the design of high-current leads whose end temperatures are determined from the surrounding equipment. It is found that cooling method or improved heat transfer are not critical once good heat exchange is established. The range 5 5 but extends over a large of values. Mass flow needed to prevent thermal runaway varies linearly with current above a given threshold. Below that value, the mass flow is constant with current. Transient analysis shows no evidence of hysteresis. If cooling is interrupted, the mass flow needed to restore the lead to its initially cooled state grows exponentially with the time that the lead was left without cooling

  20. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Kenji; Oikawa, Hirohide.

    1990-01-01

    The device according to this invention can ensure cooling water required for emerency core cooling upon emergence such as abnormally, for example, loss of coolant accident, without using dynamic equipments such as a centrifugal pump or large-scaled tank. The device comprises a pressure accumulation tank containing a high pressure nitrogen gas and cooling water inside, a condensate storage tank, a pressure suppression pool and a jet stream pump. In this device there are disposed a pipeline for guiding cooling water in the pressure accumulation tank as a jetting water to a jetting stream pump, a pipeline for guiding cooling water stored in the condensate storage tank and the pressure suppression pool as pumped water to the jetting pump and, further, a pipeline for guiding the discharged water from the jet stream pump which is a mixed stream of pumped water and jetting water into the reactor pressure vessel. In this constitution, a sufficient amount of water ranging from relatively high pressure to low pressure can be supplied into the reactor pressure vessel, without increasing the size of the pressure accumulation tank. (I.S.)

  1. Emergency reactor cooling circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Hidefumi; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Kataoka, Yoshiyuki.

    1994-01-01

    Cooling water in a gravitationally dropping water reservoir is injected into a reactor pressure vessel passing through a pipeline upon occurrence of emergency. The pipeline is inclined downwardly having one end thereof being in communication with the pressure vessel. During normal operation, the cooling water in the upper portion of the inclined pipeline is heated by convection heat transfer from the communication portion with the pressure vessel. On the other hand, cooling water present at a position lower than the communication portion forms cooling water lumps. Accordingly, temperature stratification layers are formed in the inclined pipeline. Therefore, temperature rise of water in a vertical pipeline connected to the inclined pipeline is small. With such a constitution, the amount of heat lost from the pressure vessel by way of the water injection pipeline is reduced. Further, there is no worry that cooling water to be injected upon occurrence of emergency is boiled under reduced pressure in the injection pipeline to delay the depressurization of the pressure vessel. (I.N.)

  2. Linear theory radial and nonradial pulsations of DA dwarf stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starrfield, S.; Cox, A.N.; Hodson, S.; Pesnell, W.D.

    1982-01-01

    The Los Alamos stellar envelope and radial linear non-adiabatic computer code, along with a new Los Alamos non-radial code are used to investigate the total hydrogen mass necessary to produce the non-radial instability of DA dwarfs

  3. Radial distribution of ions in pores with a surface charge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegen, J.H.G. van der; Görtzen, J.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Hogendoorn, J.A.; Versteeg, G.F.

    2001-01-01

    A sorption model applicable to calculate the radial equilibrium concentrations of ions in the pores of ion-selective membranes with a pore structure is developed. The model is called the radial uptake model. Because the model is applied to a Nafion sulfonic layer with very small pores and the radial

  4. Oxidation of ethene in a wall-cooled packed-bed reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, E.P.S.; Borman, P.C.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1994-01-01

    The selective oxidation of ethene over a silver on α-alumina catalyst was studied in a pilot plant with a wall-cooled tubular packed bed reactor. Gas and solid temperatures in the catalyst bed were measured at different axial and radial positions as well as concentrations at different axial

  5. Radial collapse and physical mechanism of carbon nanotube with divacancy and 5-8-5 defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ya-Ping; Ling Cui-Cui; Li Gui-Xia; Zhu Hai-Feng; Zhang Meng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    By employing molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the radial collapses and elasticities of different chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with divacancy, and 5-8-5 defects. It is found that divacancy and 5-8-5 defect can reduce the collapse pressure (P c ) of SWCNT (10, 10) while 5-8-5 defect can greatly increase P c of SWCNT (17, 0). For example, 5-8-5 defect can make P c of SWCNT (17, 0) increase by 500%. A model is established to understand the effects of chirality, divacancy, and 5-8-5 defect on radial collapse of SWCNTs. The results are particularly of value for understanding the mechanical behavior of SWCNT with divacancy, and the 5-8-5 defect that may be considered as a filler of high loading composites. (paper)

  6. Core cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeppner, G.

    1980-01-01

    The reactor cooling system transports the heat liberated in the reactor core to the component - heat exchanger, steam generator or turbine - where the energy is removed. This basic task can be performed with a variety of coolants circulating in appropriately designed cooling systems. The choice of any one system is governed by principles of economics and natural policies, the design is determined by the laws of nuclear physics, thermal-hydraulics and by the requirement of reliability and public safety. PWR- and BWR- reactors today generate the bulk of nuclear energy. Their primary cooling systems are discussed under the following aspects: 1. General design, nuclear physics constraints, energy transfer, hydraulics, thermodynamics. 2. Design and performance under conditions of steady state and mild transients; control systems. 3. Design and performance under conditions of severe transients and loss of coolant accidents; safety systems. (orig./RW)

  7. Reactor cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Etsuji.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate cleaning steps in the pipelines upon reactor shut-down by connecting a filtrating and desalting device to the cooling system to thereby always clean up the water in the pipelines. Constitution: A filtrating and desalting device is connected to the pipelines in the cooling system by way of drain valves and a check valve. Desalted water is taken out from the exit of the filtrating and desalting device and injected to one end of the cooling system pipelines by way of the drain valve and the check valve and then returned by way of another drain valve to the desalting device. Water in the pipelines is thus always desalted and the cleaning step in the pipelines is no more required in the shut-down. (Kawakami, Y.)

  8. ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BEN-ZVI, I.; AHRENS, L.; BRENNAN, M.; HARRISON, M.; KEWISCH, J.; MACKAY, W.; PEGGS, S.; ROSER, T.; SATOGATA, T.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; YAKIMENKO, V.

    2001-01-01

    We introduce plans for electron-cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This project has a number of new features as electron coolers go: It will cool 100 GeV/nucleon ions with 50 MeV electrons; it will be the first attempt to cool a collider at storage-energy; and it will be the first cooler to use a bunched beam and a linear accelerator as the electron source. The linac will be superconducting with energy recovery. The electron source will be based on a photocathode gun. The project is carried out by the Collider-Accelerator Department at BNL in collaboration with the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics

  9. Muon ionization cooling experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    A neutrino factory based on a muon storage ring is the ultimate tool for studies of neutrino oscillations, including possibly leptonic CP violation. It is also the first step towards muon colliders. The performance of this new and promising line of accelerators relies heavily on the concept of ionisation cooling of minimum ionising muons, for which much R&D is required. The concept of a muon ionisation cooling experiment has been extensively studied and first steps are now being taken towards its realisation by a joint international team of accelerator and particle physicists. The aim of the workshop is to to explore at least two versions of an experiment based on existing cooling channel designs. If such an experiment is feasible, one shall then select, on the basis of effectiveness, simplicity, availability of components and overall cost, a design for the proposed experiment, and assemble the elements necessary to the presentation of a proposal. Please see workshop website.

  10. Emergency core cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzaki, Kiyoshi; Inoue, Akihiro.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To improve core cooling effect by making the operation region for a plurality of water injection pumps more broader. Constitution: An emergency reactor core cooling device actuated upon failure of recycling pipe ways is adapted to be fed with cooling water through a thermal sleeve by way of a plurality of water injection pump from pool water in a condensate storage tank and a pressure suppression chamber as water feed source. Exhaust pipes and suction pipes of each of the pumps are connected by way of switching valves and the valves are switched so that the pumps are set to a series operation if the pressure in the pressure vessel is high and the pumps are set to a parallel operation if the pressure in the pressure vessel is low. (Furukawa, Y.)

  11. Monitoring Cray Cooling Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, Don E [ORNL; Ezell, Matthew A [ORNL; Becklehimer, Jeff [Cray, Inc.; Donovan, Matthew J [ORNL; Layton, Christopher C [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    While sites generally have systems in place to monitor the health of Cray computers themselves, often the cooling systems are ignored until a computer failure requires investigation into the source of the failure. The Liebert XDP units used to cool the Cray XE/XK models as well as the Cray proprietary cooling system used for the Cray XC30 models provide data useful for health monitoring. Unfortunately, this valuable information is often available only to custom solutions not accessible by a center-wide monitoring system or is simply ignored entirely. In this paper, methods and tools used to harvest the monitoring data available are discussed, and the implementation needed to integrate the data into a center-wide monitoring system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is provided.

  12. Cooling nuclear reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, W.H.L.

    1975-01-01

    Reference is made to water or water/steam cooled reactors of the fuel cluster type. In such reactors it is usual to mount the clusters in parallel spaced relationship so that coolant can pass freely between them, the coolant being passed axially from one end of the cluster in an upward direction through the cluster and being effective for cooling under normal circumstances. It has been suggested, however, that in addition to the main coolant flow an auxiliary coolant flow be provided so as to pass laterally into the cluster or be sprayed over the top of the cluster. This auxiliary supply may be continuously in use, or may be held in reserve for use in emergencies. Arrangements for providing this auxiliary cooling are described in detail. (U.K.)

  13. Stochastic cooling for beginners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehl, D.

    1984-01-01

    These two lectures have been prepared to give a simple introduction to the principles. In Part I we try to explain stochastic cooling using the time-domain picture which starts from the pulse response of the system. In Part II the discussion is repeated, looking more closely at the frequency-domain response. An attempt is made to familiarize the beginners with some of the elementary cooling equations, from the 'single particle case' up to equations which describe the evolution of the particle distribution. (orig.)

  14. Sodium cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hokkyo, N; Inoue, K; Maeda, H

    1968-11-21

    In a sodium cooled fast neutron reactor, an ultrasonic generator is installed at a fuel assembly hold-down mechanism positioned above a blanket or fission gas reservoir located above the core. During operation of the reactor an ultrsonic wave of frequency 10/sup 3/ - 10/sup 4/ Hz is constantly transmitted to the core to resonantly inject the primary bubble with ultrasonic energy to thereby facilitate its growth. Hence, small bubbles grow gradually to prevent the sudden boiling of sodium if an accident occurs in the cooling system during operation of the reactor.

  15. Cooling pond fog studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, B.B.

    1978-01-01

    The Fog Excess Water Index (FEWI) method of fog prediction has been verified by the use of data obtained at the Dresden cooling pond during 1976 and 1977 and by a reanalysis of observations made in conjunction with a study of cooling pond simulators during 1974. For applications in which the method is applied to measurements or estimates of bulk water temperature, a critical value of about 0.7 mb appears to be most appropriate. The present analyses confirm the earlier finding that wind speed plays little part in determining the susceptibility for fog generation

  16. Methods and apparatus for radially compliant component mounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulman, David Edward [Cincinnati, OH; Darkins, Jr., Toby George; Stumpf, James Anthony [Columbus, IN; Schroder, Mark S [Greenville, SC; Lipinski, John Joseph [Simpsonville, SC

    2012-03-27

    Methods and apparatus for a mounting assembly for a liner of a gas turbine engine combustor are provided. The combustor includes a combustor liner and a radially outer annular flow sleeve. The mounting assembly includes an inner ring surrounding a radially outer surface of the liner and including a plurality of axially extending fingers. The mounting assembly also includes a radially outer ring coupled to the inner ring through a plurality of spacers that extend radially from a radially outer surface of the inner ring to the outer ring.

  17. RADIALLY MAGNETIZED PROTOPLANETARY DISK: VERTICAL PROFILE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, Matthew; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the response of a thin accretion disk to an external radial magnetic field. Our focus is on protoplanetary disks (PPDs), which are exposed during their later evolution to an intense, magnetized wind from the central star. A radial magnetic field is mixed into a thin surface layer, wound up by the disk shear, and pushed downward by a combination of turbulent mixing and ambipolar and ohmic drift. The toroidal field reaches much greater strengths than the seed vertical field that is usually invoked in PPD models, even becoming superthermal. Linear stability analysis indicates that the disk experiences the magnetorotational instability (MRI) at a higher magnetization than a vertically magnetized disk when both the effects of ambipolar and Hall drift are taken into account. Steady vertical profiles of density and magnetic field are obtained at several radii between 0.06 and 1 AU in response to a wind magnetic field B r ∼ (10 −4 –10 −2 )(r/ AU) −2 G. Careful attention is given to the radial and vertical ionization structure resulting from irradiation by stellar X-rays. The disk is more strongly magnetized closer to the star, where it can support a higher rate of mass transfer. As a result, the inner ∼1 AU of a PPD is found to evolve toward lower surface density. Mass transfer rates around 10 −8 M ⊙ yr −1 are obtained under conservative assumptions about the MRI-generated stress. The evolution of the disk and the implications for planet migration are investigated in the accompanying paper

  18. RADIALLY MAGNETIZED PROTOPLANETARY DISK: VERTICAL PROFILE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Matthew [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George St., Toronto, ON M5S 1A7 (Canada); Thompson, Christopher [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George St., Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2015-11-10

    This paper studies the response of a thin accretion disk to an external radial magnetic field. Our focus is on protoplanetary disks (PPDs), which are exposed during their later evolution to an intense, magnetized wind from the central star. A radial magnetic field is mixed into a thin surface layer, wound up by the disk shear, and pushed downward by a combination of turbulent mixing and ambipolar and ohmic drift. The toroidal field reaches much greater strengths than the seed vertical field that is usually invoked in PPD models, even becoming superthermal. Linear stability analysis indicates that the disk experiences the magnetorotational instability (MRI) at a higher magnetization than a vertically magnetized disk when both the effects of ambipolar and Hall drift are taken into account. Steady vertical profiles of density and magnetic field are obtained at several radii between 0.06 and 1 AU in response to a wind magnetic field B{sub r} ∼ (10{sup −4}–10{sup −2})(r/ AU){sup −2} G. Careful attention is given to the radial and vertical ionization structure resulting from irradiation by stellar X-rays. The disk is more strongly magnetized closer to the star, where it can support a higher rate of mass transfer. As a result, the inner ∼1 AU of a PPD is found to evolve toward lower surface density. Mass transfer rates around 10{sup −8} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} are obtained under conservative assumptions about the MRI-generated stress. The evolution of the disk and the implications for planet migration are investigated in the accompanying paper.

  19. Radial fractional Laplace operators and Hessian inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Fausto; Verbitsky, Igor E.

    In this paper we deduce a formula for the fractional Laplace operator ( on radially symmetric functions useful for some applications. We give a criterion of subharmonicity associated with (, and apply it to a problem related to the Hessian inequality of Sobolev type: ∫Rn |(u| dx⩽C∫Rn -uFk[u] dx, where Fk is the k-Hessian operator on Rn, 1⩽kFerrari et al. [5] contains the extremal functions for the Hessian Sobolev inequality of X.-J. Wang (1994) [15]. This is proved using logarithmic convexity of the Gaussian ratio of hypergeometric functions which might be of independent interest.

  20. Convex and Radially Concave Contoured Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf-Dieter Richter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Integral representations of the locally defined star-generalized surface content measures on star spheres are derived for boundary spheres of balls being convex or radially concave with respect to a fan in Rn. As a result, the general geometric measure representation of star-shaped probability distributions and the general stochastic representation of the corresponding random vectors allow additional specific interpretations in the two mentioned cases. Applications to estimating and testing hypotheses on scaling parameters are presented, and two-dimensional sample clouds are simulated.

  1. On radial flow between parallel disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wee, A Y L; Gorin, A

    2015-01-01

    Approximate analytical solutions are presented for converging flow in between two parallel non rotating disks. The static pressure distribution and radial component of the velocity are developed by averaging the inertial term across the gap in between parallel disks. The predicted results from the first approximation are favourable to experimental results as well as results presented by other authors. The second approximation shows that as the fluid approaches the center, the velocity at the mid channel slows down which is due to the struggle between the inertial term and the flowrate. (paper)

  2. Intraluminal milrinone for dilation of the radial artery graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rinaldi, R; Soltero, E R; Carballido, J; Mojica, J

    1999-01-01

    There is renewed interest in the use of the radial artery as a conduit for coronary artery bypass surgery. The radial artery is, however, a very muscular artery, prone to vasospasm. Milrinone, a potent vasodilator, has demonstrated vasodilatory properties superior to those of papaverine. In this report, we describe our technique of radial artery harvesting and the adjunctive use of intraluminal milrinone as a vasodilator in the preparation of this conduit for coronary artery bypass grafting. We have used these techniques in 25 patients who have undergone coronary artery bypass grafting using the radial artery. No hand ischemic complications have been observed in this group. Intraluminal milrinone appears to dilate and relax the radial artery, rendering this large conduit spasm free and very easy to use. We recommend the skeletonization technique for radial artery harvesting and the use of intraluminal milrinone as a radial artery vasodilator in routine myocardial revascularization. PMID:10524740

  3. Understanding Molecular-Ion Neutral Atom Collisions for the Production of Ultracold Molecular Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-03

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: This project was superseded and replaced by another ARO-funded project of the same name, which is still continuing. The goal...cooled atoms," IOTA -COST Workshop on molecular ions, Arosa, Switzerland. 5. E.R. Hudson, "Sympathetic cooling of molecules with laser cooled

  4. Elementary stochastic cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollestrup, A.V.; Dugan, G

    1983-12-01

    Major headings in this review include: proton sources; antiproton production; antiproton sources and Liouville, the role of the Debuncher; transverse stochastic cooling, time domain; the accumulator; frequency domain; pickups and kickers; Fokker-Planck equation; calculation of constants in the Fokker-Planck equation; and beam feedback. (GHT)

  5. ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    2001-01-01

    The Accelerator Collider Department (CAD) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is operating the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), which includes the dual-ring, 3.834 km circumference superconducting collider and the venerable AGS as the last part of the RHIC injection chain. CAD is planning on a luminosity upgrade of the machine under the designation RHIC II. One important component of the RHIC II upgrade is electron cooling of RHIC gold ion beams. For this purpose, BNL and the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics in Novosibirsk entered into a collaboration aimed initially at the development of the electron cooling conceptual design, resolution of technical issues, and finally extend the collaboration towards the construction and commissioning of the cooler. Many of the results presented in this paper are derived from the Electron Cooling for RHIC Design Report [1], produced by the, BINP team within the framework of this collaboration. BNL is also collaborating with Fermi National Laboratory, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and the University of Indiana on various aspects of electron cooling

  6. ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BEN-ZVI,I.

    2001-05-13

    The Accelerator Collider Department (CAD) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is operating the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), which includes the dual-ring, 3.834 km circumference superconducting collider and the venerable AGS as the last part of the RHIC injection chain. CAD is planning on a luminosity upgrade of the machine under the designation RHIC II. One important component of the RHIC II upgrade is electron cooling of RHIC gold ion beams. For this purpose, BNL and the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics in Novosibirsk entered into a collaboration aimed initially at the development of the electron cooling conceptual design, resolution of technical issues, and finally extend the collaboration towards the construction and commissioning of the cooler. Many of the results presented in this paper are derived from the Electron Cooling for RHIC Design Report [1], produced by the, BINP team within the framework of this collaboration. BNL is also collaborating with Fermi National Laboratory, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and the University of Indiana on various aspects of electron cooling.

  7. Cooling tower and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, J.; Ederhof, A.; Gosdowski, J.; Harms, A.; Ide, G.; Klotz, B.; Kowalczyk, R.; Necker, P.; Tesche, W.

    The influence of a cooling tower on the environment, or rather the influence of the environment on the cooling tower stands presently -along with the cooling water supply - in the middle of much discussion. The literature on these questions can hardly be overlooked by the experts concerned, especially not by the power station designers and operators. The document 'Cooling Tower and Environment' is intented to give a general idea of the important publications in this field, and to inform of the present state of technology. In this, the explanations on every section make it easier to get to know the specific subject area. In addition to older standard literature, this publication contains the best-known literature of recent years up to spring 1975, including some articles written in English. Further English literature has been collected by the ZAED (KFK) and is available at the VGB-Geschaefsstelle. Furthermore, The Bundesumweltamt compiles the literature on the subject of 'Environmental protection'. On top of that, further documentation centres are listed at the end of this text. (orig.) [de

  8. Warm and Cool Cityscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubelirer, Shelly

    2012-01-01

    Painting cityscapes is a great way to teach first-grade students about warm and cool colors. Before the painting begins, the author and her class have an in-depth discussion about big cities and what types of buildings or structures that might be seen in them. They talk about large apartment and condo buildings, skyscrapers, art museums,…

  9. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, D. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), David, CA (United States); Dakin, B. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), David, CA (United States); German, A. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), David, CA (United States)

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  10. Passive cooling containment study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, J.J.; Iotti, R.C.; Wright, R.F.

    1993-01-01

    Pressure and temperature transients of nuclear reactor containment following postulated loss of coolant accident with a coincident station blackout due to total loss of all alternating current power are studied analytically and experimentally for the full scale NPR (New Production Reactor). All the reactor and containment cooling under this condition would rely on the passive cooling system which removes reactor decay heat and provides emergency core and containment cooling. Containment passive cooling for this study takes place in the annulus between containment steel shell and concrete shield building by natural convection air flow and thermal radiation. Various heat transfer coefficients inside annular air space were investigated by running the modified CONTEMPT code CONTEMPT-NPR. In order to verify proper heat transfer coefficient, temperature, heat flux, and velocity profiles were measured inside annular air space of the test facility which is a 24 foot (7.3m) high, steam heated inner cylinder of three foot (.91m) diameter and five and half foot (1.7m) diameter outer cylinder. Comparison of CONTEMPT-NPR and WGOTHIC was done for reduced scale NPR

  11. High energy beam cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.; Herr, H.; Linnecar, T.; Millich, A.; Milss, F.; Rubbia, C.; Taylor, C.S.; Meer, S. van der; Zotter, B.

    1980-01-01

    The group concerned itself with the analysis of cooling systems whose purpose is to maintain the quality of the high energy beams in the SPS in spite of gas scattering, RF noise, magnet ripple and beam-beam interactions. Three types of systems were discussed. The status of these activities is discussed below. (orig.)

  12. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Masaki.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To actuate an automatic pressure down system (ADS) and a low pressure emergency core cooling system (ECCS) upon water level reduction of a nuclear reactor other than loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). Constitution: ADS in a BWR type reactor is disposed for reducing the pressure in a reactor container thereby enabling coolant injection from a low pressure ECCS upon LOCA. That is, ADS has been actuated by AND signal for a reactor water level low signal and a dry well pressure high signal. In the present invention, ADS can be actuated further also by AND signal of the reactor water level low signal, the high pressure ECCS and not-operation signal of reactor isolation cooling system. In such an emergency core cooling system thus constituted, ADS operates in the same manner as usual upon LOCA and, further, ADS is operated also upon loss of feedwater accident in the reactor pressure vessel in the case where there is a necessity for actuating the low pressure ECCS, although other high pressure ECCS and reactor isolation cooling system are not operated. Accordingly, it is possible to improve the reliability upon reactor core accident and mitigate the operator burden. (Horiuchi, T.)

  13. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Ken.

    1989-01-01

    In PWR type reactors, a cooling water spray portion of emergency core cooling pipelines incorporated into pipelines on high temperature side is protruded to the inside of an upper plenum. Upon rupture of primary pipelines, pressure in a pressure vessel is abruptly reduced to generate a great amount of steams in the reactor core, which are discharged at a high flow rate into the primary pipelines on high temperature side. However, since the inside of the upper plenum has a larger area and the steam flow is slow, as compared with that of the pipelines on the high temperature side, ECCS water can surely be supplied into the reactor core to promote the re-flooding of the reactor core and effectively cool the reactor. Since the nuclear reactor can effectively be cooled to enable the promotion of pressure reduction and effective supply of coolants during the period of pressure reduction upon LOCA, the capacity of the pressure accumulation vessel can be decreased. Further, the re-flooding time for the reactor is shortened to provide an effect contributing to the improvement of the safety and the reduction of the cost. (N.H.)

  14. Wind-break walls with optimized setting angles for natural draft dry cooling tower with vertical radiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Huan; Si, Fengqi; Kong, Yu; Zhu, Kangping; Yan, Wensheng

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Aerodynamic field around dry cooling tower is presented with numerical model. • Performances of cooling deltas are figured out by air inflow velocity analysis. • Setting angles of wind-break walls are optimized to improve cooling performance. • Optimized walls can reduce the interference on air inflow at low wind speeds. • Optimized walls create stronger outside secondary flow at high wind speeds. - Abstract: To get larger cooling performance enhancement for natural draft dry cooling tower with vertical cooling deltas under crosswind, setting angles of wind-break walls were optimized. Considering specific structure of each cooling delta, an efficient numerical model was established and validated by some published results. Aerodynamic fields around cooling deltas under various crosswind speeds were presented, and outlet water temperatures of the two columns of cooling delta were exported as well. It was found that for each cooling delta, there was a difference in cooling performance between the two columns, which is closely related to the characteristic of main airflow outside the tower. Using the present model, air inflow deviation angles at cooling deltas’ inlet were calculated, and the effects of air inflow deviation on outlet water temperatures of the two columns for corresponding cooling delta were explained in detail. Subsequently, at cooling deltas’ inlet along radial direction of the tower, setting angles of wind-break walls were optimized equal to air inflow deviation angles when no airflow separation appeared outside the tower, while equal to zero when outside airflow separation occurred. In addition, wind-break walls with optimized setting angles were verified to be extremely effective, compared to the previous radial walls.

  15. Cooling Tower Losses in Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Barhm Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    Cooling towers are a very important part of many chemical plants. The primary task of a cooling tower is to reject heat into the atmosphere. They represent a relatively inexpensive and dependable means of removing low-grade heat from cooling water. The make-up water source is used to replenish water lost to evaporation. Hot water from heat exchangers is sent to the cooling tower. The water exits the cooling tower and is sent back to the exchangers or to other units for further cooling.

  16. Cooling concepts for HTS components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binneberg, A.; Buschmann, H.; Neubert, J.

    1993-01-01

    HTS components require that low-cost, reliable cooling systems be used. There are no general solutions to such systems. Any cooling concept has to be tailored to the specific requirements of a system. The following has to he taken into consideration when designing cooling concepts: - cooling temperature - constancy and controllability of the cooling temperature - cooling load and refrigerating capacity - continuous or discontinuous mode - degree of automation - full serviceability or availability before evacuation -malfunctions caused by microphonic, thermal or electromagnetic effects -stationary or mobile application - investment and operating costs (orig.)

  17. Cooling out of the blue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, W.

    2006-01-01

    This article takes a look at solar cooling and air-conditioning, the use of which is becoming more and more popular. The article discusses how further research and development is necessary. The main challenge for professional experts is the optimal adaptation of building, building technology and solar-driven cooling systems to meet these new requirements. Various solar cooling technologies are looked at, including the use of surplus heat for the generation of cold for cooling systems. Small-scale solar cooling systems now being tested in trials are described. Various developments in Europe are discussed, as are the future chances for solar cooling in the market

  18. Impacts of raindrop evaporative cooling on tropical cyclone secondary eyewall formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xuyang; Guan, Liang; Yan, Ziyu

    2018-06-01

    The impacts of raindrop evaporative cooling on secondary eyewall formation (SEF) of simulated tropical cyclones are investigated using idealized numerical experiments. The results suggest that the raindrop evaporative cooling effect is beneficial to the development of secondary eyewall through the planetary boundary layer (PBL) cold pool process. The evaporative cooling-driven downdrafts bring about the surface cold pool beneath a precipitation cloud. This cold pool dynamics act as a lifting mechanism to trigger the outer convection. The radially outward propagation of spiral rainbands broadens the TC size, by which modifies the surface heat fluxes and thus outer convection. Furthermore, the unbalanced PBL process contributes to the SEF. The radially outward surface outflows forces convection at outer region and thus favors a larger TC size. A larger TC implies an enhanced inertial stability at the outer region, which favors a higher conversion efficiency of diabatic heating to kinetic energy.

  19. Spherical radial basis functions, theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hubbert, Simon; Morton, Tanya M

    2015-01-01

    This book is the first to be devoted to the theory and applications of spherical (radial) basis functions (SBFs), which is rapidly emerging as one of the most promising techniques for solving problems where approximations are needed on the surface of a sphere. The aim of the book is to provide enough theoretical and practical details for the reader to be able to implement the SBF methods to solve real world problems. The authors stress the close connection between the theory of SBFs and that of the more well-known family of radial basis functions (RBFs), which are well-established tools for solving approximation theory problems on more general domains. The unique solvability of the SBF interpolation method for data fitting problems is established and an in-depth investigation of its accuracy is provided. Two chapters are devoted to partial differential equations (PDEs). One deals with the practical implementation of an SBF-based solution to an elliptic PDE and another which describes an SBF approach for solvi...

  20. Asymptotic Solutions of Serial Radial Fuel Shuffling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Nong Chen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the mechanism of traveling wave reactors (TWRs is investigated from the mathematical physics point of view, in which a stationary fission wave is formed by radial fuel drifting. A two dimensional cylindrically symmetric core is considered and the fuel is assumed to drift radially according to a continuous fuel shuffling scheme. A one-group diffusion equation with burn-up dependent macroscopic coefficients is set up. The burn-up dependent macroscopic coefficients were assumed to be known as functions of neutron fluence. By introducing the effective multiplication factor keff, a nonlinear eigenvalue problem is formulated. The 1-D stationary cylindrical coordinate problem can be solved successively by analytical and numerical integrations for associated eigenvalues keff. Two representative 1-D examples are shown for inward and outward fuel drifting motions, respectively. The inward fuel drifting has a higher keff than the outward one. The 2-D eigenvalue problem has to be solved by a more complicated method, namely a pseudo time stepping iteration scheme. Its 2-D asymptotic solutions are obtained together with certain eigenvalues keff for several fuel inward drifting speeds. Distributions of the neutron flux, the neutron fluence, the infinity multiplication factor kinf and the normalized power are presented for two different drifting speeds.

  1. Hot radial pressing: An alternative technique for the manufacturing of plasma-facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visca, E.; Libera, S.; Mancini, A.; Mazzone, G.; Pizzuto, A.; Testani, C.

    2005-01-01

    The Hot radial pressing (HRP) manufacturing technique is based on the radial diffusion bonding principle performed between the cooling tube and the armour tile. The bonding is achieved by pressurizing the cooling tube while the joining interface is kept at the vacuum and temperature conditions. This technique has been used for the manufacturing of relevant mock-ups of the ITER divertor vertical target. Tungsten monoblock mock-ups were successfully tested to high heat flux thermal fatigue (20 MW/m 2 of absorbed heat flux for 1000 cycles). After these good results the activity is now focused on the developing of a manufacturing process suitable also for the CFC monoblock mock-ups. A FE calculation was performed to investigate the stress involved in the CFC tiles during the process and to avoid the CFC fracture. The results obtained by the FE calculation and by the test performed in air simulating a HRP manufacturing process for a CFC monoblock mock-ups is reported in the paper

  2. [Comparison of chemical quality characteristics between radial striations and non-radial striations in tuberous root of Rehmannia glutinosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Cai-Xia; Zhang, Miao; Li, Ya-Jing; Geng, Xiao-Tong; Wang, Feng-Qing; Zhang, Zhong-Yi

    2017-11-01

    An HPLC method was established to determine the contents of catalpol, acteoside, rehmaionoside A, rehmaionoside D, leonuride in three part of Rehmanni glutinosa in Beijing No.1 variety R. glutinosa during the growth period, This method, in combination with its HPLC fingerprint was used to evaluate its overall quality characteristics.The results showed that:① the content of main components of R. glutinosa varied in different growth stages ;② there was a great difference of the content of main components between theradial striations and the non-radial striations; ③ the two sections almost have the same content distribution of catalpol, acteoside and rehmaionoside D; ④the content of rehmaionoside A in non-radial striations was higher than that in radial striations,while the content of leonuride in radial striations was higher than that in non-radial striations.; ⑤the HPLC fingerprint of radial striations, non-radial striations and whole root tuber were basically identical, except for the big difference in the content of chemical components. The result of clustering displayed that the radial striations, non-radial striations, and whole root were divided into two groups. In conclusion, there was a significant difference in the quality characteristics of radial striations and non-radial striations of R. glutinosa. This research provides a reference for quality evaluation and geoherbalism of R. glutinosa. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  3. Optimizing the multicycle subrotational internal cooling of diatomic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroch, A.; Kallush, S.; Kosloff, R.

    2018-05-01

    Subrotational cooling of the AlH+ ion to the miliKelvin regime, using optimally shaped pulses, is computed. The coherent electromagnetic fields induce purity-conserved transformations and do not change the sample temperature. A decrease in a sample temperature, manifested by an increase of purity, is achieved by the complementary uncontrolled spontaneous emission which changes the entropy of the system. We employ optimal control theory to find a pulse that stirs the system into a population configuration that will result in cooling, upon multicycle excitation-emission steps. The obtained optimal transformation was shown capable to cool molecular ions to the subkelvins regime.

  4. Radial transport in the Elmo Bumpy Torus in collisionless electron regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, E.F.; Hedrick, C.L.; Spong, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    One important area of disagreement between radial transport theory and the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) experiment has been the degree of collisionality of the toroidal plasma electrons. Experiment shows relatively warm electrons (kTsub(e) approximately 300-600eV) and collisionless scaling, i.e. energy confinement increasing with temperature. But results of early one-dimensional (1-D), neoclassical transport models with radially inward pointing electric fields are limited to relatively cool electrons (kTsub(e) approximately 100-200eV) and collisional scaling. In this paper these early results are extended to include lowest-order effects of ion diffusion in regions where poloidal drift frequencies are small. The effects of direct, or non-diffusive, losses in such regions are neglected along with the effects of finite radial electric fields on electron transport coefficients and of self-consistent poloidal electric fields on ion transport coefficients. Results show that solutions in the collisionless electron regime do exist. Furthermore, when the effects of finite electron ring beta on magnetic fields near the plasma edge are included, these solutions occur at power levels consistent with experiment. (author)

  5. Magnetocaloric Effect and Thermoelectric Cooling - A Synergistic Cooling Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-16

    Thermoelectric Cooling - A Synergistic Cooling Technology Sb. GRANT NUMBER N00173-14-1-G016 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 82-2020-17 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...Magnetocaloric Effect and Thermoelectric Cooling - A Synergistic Cooling Technology NRL Grant N00173-14-l-G016 CODE 8200: Spacecraft Engineering Department...82-11-0 1: Space and Space Systems Technology General Engineering & Research, L.L.C. Technical & Administrative point of contact: Dr. Robin

  6. Warming rays in cluster cool cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colafrancesco, S.; Marchegiani, P.

    2008-06-01

    Context: Cosmic rays are confined in the atmospheres of galaxy clusters and, therefore, they can play a crucial role in the heating of their cool cores. Aims: We discuss here the thermal and non-thermal features of a model of cosmic ray heating of cluster cores that can provide a solution to the cooling-flow problems. To this aim, we generalize a model originally proposed by Colafrancesco, Dar & DeRujula (2004) and we show that our model predicts specific correlations between the thermal and non-thermal properties of galaxy clusters and enables various observational tests. Methods: The model reproduces the observed temperature distribution in clusters by using an energy balance condition in which the X-ray energy emitted by clusters is supplied, in a quasi-steady state, by the hadronic cosmic rays, which act as “warming rays” (WRs). The temperature profile of the intracluster (IC) gas is strictly correlated with the pressure distribution of the WRs and, consequently, with the non-thermal emission (radio, hard X-ray and gamma-ray) induced by the interaction of the WRs with the IC gas and the IC magnetic field. Results: The temperature distribution of the IC gas in both cool-core and non cool-core clusters is successfully predicted from the measured IC plasma density distribution. Under this contraint, the WR model is also able to reproduce the thermal and non-thermal pressure distribution in clusters, as well as their radial entropy distribution, as shown by the analysis of three clusters studied in detail: Perseus, A2199 and Hydra. The WR model provides other observable features of galaxy clusters: a correlation of the pressure ratio (WRs to thermal IC gas) with the inner cluster temperature (P_WR/P_th) ˜ (kT_inner)-2/3, a correlation of the gamma-ray luminosity with the inner cluster temperature Lγ ˜ (kT_inner)4/3, a substantial number of cool-core clusters observable with the GLAST-LAT experiment, a surface brightness of radio halos in cool-core clusters

  7. Status of helium-cooled nuclear power systems. [Development potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melese-d' Hospital, G.; Simnad, M

    1977-09-01

    Helium-cooled nuclear power systems offer a great potential for electricity generation when their long-term economic, environmental, conservation and energy self-sufficiency features are examined. The high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) has the unique capability of providing high-temperature steam for electric power and process heat uses and/or high-temperature heat for endothermic chemical reactions. A variation of the standard steam cycle HTGR is one in which the helium coolant flows directly from the core to one or more closed cycle gas turbines. The effective use of nuclear fuel resources for electric power and nuclear process heat will be greatly enhanced by the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) currently being developed. A GCFR using thorium in the radial blanket could generate sufficient U-233 to supply the fuel for three HTGRs, or enough plutonium from a depleted uranium blanket to fuel a breeder economy expanding at about 10% per year. The feasibility of utilizing helium to cool a fusion reactor is also discussed. The status of helium-cooled nuclear energy systems is summarized as a basis for assessing their prospects. 50 references.

  8. Computer model analysis of the radial artery pressure waveform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwid, H A; Taylor, L A; Smith, N T

    1987-10-01

    Simultaneous measurements of aortic and radial artery pressures are reviewed, and a model of the cardiovascular system is presented. The model is based on resonant networks for the aorta and axillo-brachial-radial arterial system. The model chosen is a simple one, in order to make interpretation of the observed relationships clear. Despite its simplicity, the model produces realistic aortic and radial artery pressure waveforms. It demonstrates that the resonant properties of the arterial wall significantly alter the pressure waveform as it is propagated from the aorta to the radial artery. Although the mean and end-diastolic radial pressures are usually accurate estimates of the corresponding aortic pressures, the systolic pressure at the radial artery is often much higher than that of the aorta due to overshoot caused by the resonant behavior of the radial artery. The radial artery dicrotic notch is predominantly dependent on the axillo-brachial-radial arterial wall properties, rather than on the aortic valve or peripheral resistance. Hence the use of the radial artery dicrotic notch as an estimate of end systole is unreliable. The rate of systolic upstroke, dP/dt, of the radial artery waveform is a function of many factors, making it difficult to interpret. The radial artery waveform usually provides accurate estimates for mean and diastolic aortic pressures; for all other measurements it is an inadequate substitute for the aortic pressure waveform. In the presence of low forearm peripheral resistance the mean radial artery pressure may significantly underestimate the mean aortic pressure, as explained by a voltage divider model.

  9. Legionella confirmation in cooling tower water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Maha; Shaheed, Raja A.; Al-Ali, Haidar H.; Al-Ghamdi, Abdullah S.; Al-Hamaqi, Ghadeer M.; Maan, Hawraa S.; Al-Mahfoodh, Zainab A.; Al-Seba, Hussain Z.

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the presence of Legionella spp in cooling tower water. Legionella proliferation in cooling tower water has serious public health implications as it can be transmitted to humans via aerosols and cause Legionnaires’ disease. Methods: Samples of cooling tower water were collected from King Fahd Hospital of the University (KFHU) (Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, 2015/2016). The water samples were analyzed by a standard Legionella culture method, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and 16S rRNA next-generation sequencing. In addition, the bacterial community composition was evaluated. Results: All samples were negative by conventional Legionella culture. In contrast, all water samples yielded positive results by real-time PCR (105 to 106 GU/L). The results of 16S rRNA next generation sequencing showed high similarity and reproducibility among the water samples. The majority of sequences were Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma-proteobacteria, and Legionella was the predominant genus. The hydrogen-oxidizing gram-negative bacterium Hydrogenophaga was present at high abundance, indicating high metabolic activity. Sphingopyxis, which is known for its resistance to antimicrobials and as a pioneer in biofilm formation, was also detected. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that monitoring of Legionella in cooling tower water would be enhanced by use of both conventional culturing and molecular methods. PMID:29436561

  10. Magnetic entropy and cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Britt Rosendahl; Kuhn, Luise Theil; Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden

    2010-01-01

    Some manifestations of magnetism are well-known and utilized on an everyday basis, e.g. using a refrigerator magnet for hanging that important note on the refrigerator door. Others are, so far, more exotic, such as cooling by making use of the magnetocaloric eect. This eect can cause a change...... in the temperature of a magnetic material when a magnetic eld is applied or removed. For many years, experimentalists have made use of dilute paramagnetic materials to achieve milliKelvin temperatures by use of the magnetocaloric eect. Also, research is done on materials, which might be used for hydrogen, helium...... or nitrogen liquefaction or for room-temperature cooling. The magnetocaloric eect can further be used to determine phase transition boundaries, if a change in the magnetic state occurs at the boundary.In this talk, I will introduce the magnetocaloric eect (MCE) and the two equations, which characterize...

  11. Self pumping magnetic cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, V; Wang, Z; Ray, A; Ramanujan, R V; Sridhar, I

    2017-01-01

    Efficient thermal management and heat recovery devices are of high technological significance for innovative energy conservation solutions. We describe a study of a self-pumping magnetic cooling device, which does not require external energy input, employing Mn–Zn ferrite nanoparticles suspended in water. The device performance depends strongly on magnetic field strength, nanoparticle content in the fluid and heat load temperature. Cooling (Δ T ) by ∼20 °C and ∼28 °C was achieved by the application of 0.3 T magnetic field when the initial temperature of the heat load was 64 °C and 87 °C, respectively. These experiments results were in good agreement with simulations performed with COMSOL Multiphysics. Our system is a self-regulating device; as the heat load increases, the magnetization of the ferrofluid decreases; leading to an increase in the fluid velocity and consequently, faster heat transfer from the heat source to the heat sink. (letter)

  12. Laser cooling at resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudkin, Yaakov; Khaykovich, Lev

    2018-05-01

    We show experimentally that three-dimensional laser cooling of lithium atoms on the D2 line is possible when the laser light is tuned exactly to resonance with the dominant atomic transition. Qualitatively, it can be understood by applying simple Doppler cooling arguments to the specific hyperfine structure of the excited state of lithium atoms, which is both dense and inverted. However, to build a quantitative theory, we must resolve to a full model which takes into account both the entire atomic structure of all 24 Zeeman sublevels and the laser light polarization. Moreover, by means of Monte Carlo simulations, we show that coherent processes play an important role in showing consistency between the theory and the experimental results.

  13. ITER cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natalizio, A.; Hollies, R.E.; Sochaski, R.O.; Stubley, P.H.

    1992-06-01

    The ITER reference system uses low-temperature water for heat removal and high-temperature helium for bake-out. As these systems share common equipment, bake-out cannot be performed until the cooling system is drained and dried, and the reactor cannot be started until the helium has been purged from the cooling system. This study examines the feasibility of using a single high-temperature fluid to perform both heat removal and bake-out. The high temperature required for bake-out would also be in the range for power production. The study examines cost, operational benefits, and impact on reactor safety of two options: a high-pressure water system, and a low-pressure organic system. It was concluded that the cost savings and operational benefits are significant; there are no significant adverse safety impacts from operating either the water system or the organic system; and the capital costs of both systems are comparable

  14. MR accuracy and arthroscopic incidence of meniscal radial tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, Thomas; Shapiro, Marc; Williams, David [Department of Radiology, Neuroimaging Institute, 27 East Hibiscus Blvd., Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2002-12-01

    A meniscal radial tear is a vertical tear that involves the inner meniscal margin. The tear is most frequent in the middle third of the lateral meniscus and may extend outward in any direction. We report (1) the arthroscopic incidence of radial tears, (2) MR signs that aid in the detection of radial tears and (3) our prospective accuracy in detection of radial tears. Design and patients. Three musculoskeletal radiologists prospectively read 200 consecutive MR examinations of the knee that went on to arthroscopy by one orthopedic surgeon. MR images were assessed for location and MR characteristics of radial tears. MR criteria used for diagnosis of a radial tear were those outlined by Tuckman et al.: truncation, abnormal morphology and/or lack of continuity or absence of the meniscus on one or more MR images. An additional criterion used was abnormal increased signal in that area on fat-saturated proton density or T2-weighted coronal and sagittal images. Prospective MR readings were correlated with the arthroscopic findings.Results. Of the 200 consecutive knee arthroscopies, 28 patients had radial tears reported arthroscopically (14% incidence). MR readings prospectively demonstrated 19 of the 28 radial tears (68% sensitivity) when the criteria for diagnosis of a radial tear were truncation or abnormal morphology of the meniscus. With the use of the additional criterion of increased signal in the area of abnormal morphology on fat-saturated T2-weighted or proton density weighted sequences, the prospective sensitivity was 25 of 28 radial tears (89% sensitivity). There were no radial tears described in MR reports that were not demonstrated on arthroscopy (i.e., there were no false positive MR readings of radial tears in these 200 patients). Radial tears are commonly seen at arthroscopy. There was a 14% incidence in this series of 200 patients who underwent arthroscopy. Prospective detection of radial tears was 68% as compared with arthroscopy when the criteria as

  15. MR accuracy and arthroscopic incidence of meniscal radial tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, Thomas; Shapiro, Marc; Williams, David

    2002-01-01

    A meniscal radial tear is a vertical tear that involves the inner meniscal margin. The tear is most frequent in the middle third of the lateral meniscus and may extend outward in any direction. We report (1) the arthroscopic incidence of radial tears, (2) MR signs that aid in the detection of radial tears and (3) our prospective accuracy in detection of radial tears. Design and patients. Three musculoskeletal radiologists prospectively read 200 consecutive MR examinations of the knee that went on to arthroscopy by one orthopedic surgeon. MR images were assessed for location and MR characteristics of radial tears. MR criteria used for diagnosis of a radial tear were those outlined by Tuckman et al.: truncation, abnormal morphology and/or lack of continuity or absence of the meniscus on one or more MR images. An additional criterion used was abnormal increased signal in that area on fat-saturated proton density or T2-weighted coronal and sagittal images. Prospective MR readings were correlated with the arthroscopic findings.Results. Of the 200 consecutive knee arthroscopies, 28 patients had radial tears reported arthroscopically (14% incidence). MR readings prospectively demonstrated 19 of the 28 radial tears (68% sensitivity) when the criteria for diagnosis of a radial tear were truncation or abnormal morphology of the meniscus. With the use of the additional criterion of increased signal in the area of abnormal morphology on fat-saturated T2-weighted or proton density weighted sequences, the prospective sensitivity was 25 of 28 radial tears (89% sensitivity). There were no radial tears described in MR reports that were not demonstrated on arthroscopy (i.e., there were no false positive MR readings of radial tears in these 200 patients). Radial tears are commonly seen at arthroscopy. There was a 14% incidence in this series of 200 patients who underwent arthroscopy. Prospective detection of radial tears was 68% as compared with arthroscopy when the criteria as

  16. Cooling your home naturally

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This fact sheet describes some alternatives to air conditioning which are common sense suggestions and low-cost retrofit options to cool a house. It first describes how to reflect heat away from roofs, walls, and windows. Blocking heat by using insulation or shading are described. The publication then discusses removing built-up heat, reducing heat-generating sources, and saving energy by selecting energy efficient retrofit appliances. A resource list is provided for further information.

  17. Cooling and dehumidifying coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, M.V.K.

    1988-01-01

    The operating features of cooling and dehumidifying coils and their constructional details are discussed. The heat transfer relations as applicable to the boiling refrigerant and a single phase fluid are presented. Methods of accounting for the effect of moisture condensation on the air side heat transfer coefficient and the fin effectiveness are explained. The logic flow necessary to analyze direct expansion coils and chilled water coils is discussed

  18. Solar heating and cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffie, J A

    1976-01-01

    Solar energy is discussed as an energy resource that can be converted into useful energy forms to meet a variety of energy needs. The review briefly explains the nature of this energy resource, the kinds of applications that can be made useful, and the status of several systems to which it has been applied. More specifically, information on solar collectors, solar water heating, solar heating of buildings, solar cooling plus other applications, are included.

  19. Cooling device for reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Kenji.

    1996-01-01

    Upon assembling a static container cooling system to an emergency reactor core cooling system using dynamic pumps in a power plant, the present invention provides a cooling device of lowered center of gravity and having a good cooling effect by lowering the position of a cooling water pool of the static container cooling system. Namely, the emergency reactor core cooling system injects water to the inside of a pressure vessel using emergency cooling water stored in a suppression pool as at least one water source upon loss of reactor coolant accident. In addition, a cooling water pool incorporating a heat exchanger is disposed at the circumference of the suppression pool at the outside of the container. A dry well and the heat exchanger are connected by way of steam supply pipes, and the heat exchanger is connected with the suppression pool by way of a gas exhaustion pipe and a condensate returning pipeline. With such a constitution, the position of the heat exchanger is made higher than an ordinary water level of the suppression pool. As a result, the emergency cooling water of the suppression pool water is injected to the pressure vessel by the operation of the reactor cooling pumps upon loss of coolant accident to cool the reactor core. (I.S.)

  20. Conduction cooling: multicrate fastbus hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowiecki, D.; Sims, W.; Larsen, R.

    1980-11-01

    Described is a new and novel approach for cooling nuclear instrumentation modules via heat conduction. The simplicity of liquid cooled crates and ease of thermal management with conduction cooled modules are described. While this system was developed primarily for the higher power levels expected with Fastbus electronics, it has many general applications

  1. Electron Cooling of RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Barton, Donald; Beavis, Dana; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bluem, Hans; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruhwiler, David L; Burger, Al; Burov, Alexey; Burrill, Andrew; Calaga, Rama; Cameron, Peter; Chang, Xiangyun; Cole, Michael; Connolly, Roger; Delayen, Jean R; Derbenev, Yaroslav S; Eidelman, Yury I; Favale, Anthony; Fedotov, Alexei V; Fischer, Wolfram; Funk, L W; Gassner, David M; Hahn, Harald; Harrison, Michael; Hershcovitch, Ady; Holmes, Douglas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Johnson, Peter; Kayran, Dmitry; Kewisch, Jorg; Kneisel, Peter; Koop, Ivan; Lambiase, Robert; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; MacKay, William W; Mahler, George; Malitsky, Nikolay; McIntyre, Gary; Meng, Wuzheng; Merminga, Lia; Meshkov, Igor; Mirabella, Kerry; Montag, Christoph; Nagaitsev, Sergei; Nehring, Thomas; Nicoletti, Tony; Oerter, Brian; Parkhomchuk, Vasily; Parzen, George; Pate, David; Phillips, Larry; Preble, Joseph P; Rank, Jim; Rao, Triveni; Rathke, John; Roser, Thomas; Russo, Thomas; Scaduto, Joseph; Schultheiss, Tom; Sekutowicz, Jacek; Shatunov, Yuri; Sidorin, Anatoly O; Skrinsky, Aleksander Nikolayevich; Smirnov, Alexander V; Smith, Kevin T; Todd, Alan M M; Trbojevic, Dejan; Troubnikov, Grigory; Wang, Gang; Wei, Jie; Williams, Neville; Wu, Kuo-Chen; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Zaltsman, Alex; Zhao, Yongxiang; ain, Animesh K

    2005-01-01

    We report progress on the R&D program for electron-cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This electron cooler is designed to cool 100 GeV/nucleon at storage energy using 54 MeV electrons. The electron source will be a superconducting RF photocathode gun. The accelerator will be a superconducting energy recovery linac. The frequency of the accelerator is set at 703.75 MHz. The maximum electron bunch frequency is 9.38 MHz, with bunch charge of 20 nC. The R&D program has the following components: The photoinjector and its photocathode, the superconducting linac cavity, start-to-end beam dynamics with magnetized electrons, electron cooling calculations including benchmarking experiments and development of a large superconducting solenoid. The photoinjector and linac cavity are being incorporated into an energy recovery linac aimed at demonstrating ampere class current at about 20 MeV. A Zeroth Order Design Report is in an advanced draft state, and can be found on the web at http://www.ags...

  2. Lamination cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippel, Wally E.; Kobayashi, Daryl M.

    2005-10-11

    An electric motor, transformer or inductor having a lamination cooling system including a stack of laminations, each defining a plurality of apertures at least partially coincident with apertures of adjacent laminations. The apertures define a plurality of cooling-fluid passageways through the lamination stack, and gaps between the adjacent laminations are sealed to prevent a liquid cooling fluid in the passageways from escaping between the laminations. The gaps are sealed by injecting a heat-cured sealant into the passageways, expelling excess sealant, and heat-curing the lamination stack. The apertures of each lamination can be coincident with the same-sized apertures of adjacent laminations to form straight passageways, or they can vary in size, shape and/or position to form non-axial passageways, angled passageways, bidirectional passageways, and manifold sections of passageways that connect a plurality of different passageway sections. Manifold members adjoin opposite ends of the lamination stack, and each is configured with one or more cavities to act as a manifold to adjacent passageway ends. Complex manifold arrangements can create bidirectional flow in a variety of patterns.

  3. ITER cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kveton, O.K.

    1990-11-01

    The present specification of the ITER cooling system does not permit its operation with water above 150 C. However, the first wall needs to be heated to higher temperatures during conditioning at 250 C and bake-out at 350 C. In order to use the cooling water for these operations the cooling system would have to operate during conditioning at 37 Bar and during bake-out at 164 Bar. This is undesirable from the safety analysis point of view, and alternative heating methods are to be found. This review suggests that superheated steam or gas heating can be used for both baking and conditioning. The blanket design must consider the use of dual heat transfer media, allowing for change from one to another in both directions. Transfer from water to gas or steam is the most intricate and risky part of the entire heating process. Superheated steam conditioning appears unfavorable. The use of inert gas is recommended, although alternative heating fluids such as organic coolant should be investigated

  4. Reactor container cooling device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Koji; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1995-11-10

    The device of the present invention efficiently lowers pressure and temperature in a reactor container upon occurrence of a severe accident in a BWR-type reactor and can cool the inside of the container for a long period of time. That is, (1) pipelines on the side of an exhaustion tower of a filter portion in a filter bent device of the reactor container are in communication with pipelines on the side of a steam inlet of a static container cooling device by way of horizontal pipelines, (2) a back flow check valve is disposed to horizontal pipelines, (3) a steam discharge valve for a pressure vessel is disposed closer to the reactor container than the joint portion between the pipelines on the side of the steam inlet and the horizontal pipelines. Upon occurrence of a severe accident, when the pressure vessel should be ruptured and steams containing aerosol in the reactor core should be filled in the reactor container, the inlet valve of the static container cooling device is closed. Steams are flown into the filter bent device of the reactor container, where the aerosols can be removed. (I.S.).

  5. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Nobuaki.

    1993-01-01

    A reactor comprises a static emergency reactor core cooling system having an automatic depressurization system and a gravitationally dropping type water injection system and a container cooling system by an isolation condenser. A depressurization pipeline of the automatic depressurization system connected to a reactor pressure vessel branches in the midway. The branched depressurizing pipelines are extended into an upper dry well and a lower dry well, in which depressurization valves are disposed at the top end portions of the pipelines respectively. If loss-of-coolant accidents should occur, the depressurization valve of the automatic depressurization system is actuated by lowering of water level in the pressure vessel. This causes nitrogen gases in the upper and the lower dry wells to transfer together with discharged steams effectively to a suppression pool passing through a bent tube. Accordingly, the gravitationally dropping type water injection system can be actuated faster. Further, subsequent cooling for the reactor vessel can be ensured sufficiently by the isolation condenser. (I.N.)

  6. Radial propagation of microturbulence in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Laurent, L.; Roubin, J.P.; Samain, A.

    1992-01-01

    Energy confinement time in tokamaks exhibits a clear dependence on global plasma parameters. This is not the case for transport coefficients; their dependence on local plasma parameters cannot be precisely established. The aim of the present paper is to give a possible explanation of this behaviour; turbulence propagates radially because of departure from cylindrical geometry. This implies that the turbulence level at a given point and hence transport coefficients are not only functions of local plasma parameters. A quantitative estimate of the propagation velocity is derived from a Lagrangian formalism. Two cases are considered: the effect of toroidicity and the effect of non linear mode-mode coupling. The consequences of this model are discussed. This process does not depend on the type of instability. For the sake of simplicity only electrostatic perturbations are considered

  7. Radial particle distributions in PARMILA simulation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boicourt, G.P.

    1984-03-01

    The estimation of beam spill in particle accelerators is becoming of greater importance as higher current designs are being funded. To the present, no numerical method for predicting beam-spill has been available. In this paper, we present an approach to the loss-estimation problem that uses probability distributions fitted to particle-simulation beams. The properties of the PARMILA code's radial particle distribution are discussed, and a broad class of probability distributions are examined to check their ability to fit it. The possibility that the PARMILA distribution is a mixture is discussed, and a fitting distribution consisting of a mixture of two generalized gamma distributions is found. An efficient algorithm to accomplish the fit is presented. Examples of the relative prediction of beam spill are given. 26 references, 18 figures, 1 table

  8. Radial expansion for spinning conformal blocks

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Miguel S.; Penedones, João; Trevisani, Emilio

    2016-07-12

    This paper develops a method to compute any bosonic conformal block as a series expansion in the optimal radial coordinate introduced by Hogervorst and Rychkov. The method reduces to the known result when the external operators are all the same scalar operator, but it allows to compute conformal blocks for external operators with spin. Moreover, we explain how to write closed form recursion relations for the coefficients of the expansions. We study three examples of four point functions in detail: one vector and three scalars; two vectors and two scalars; two spin 2 tensors and two scalars. Finally, for the case of two external vectors, we also provide a more efficient way to generate the series expansion using the analytic structure of the blocks as a function of the scaling dimension of the exchanged operator.

  9. The radial velocity variations in IC 418

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez, R.H.; Verga, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    The observations presented are part of a search for spectral and radial velocity variations among central stars of planetary nebulae and include the following new data: 1) Weak, previously undetected C III emissions are visible at 4056, 4186, 4516, 5270 and 5826 A. The famous unidentified emissions at 4485 and 4503 A were also found. 2) The He I absorptions at 4471 and 5875 A are blue-shifted relative to the nebular emissions. The same happens with Hsub(delta) and Hsub(γ), although in this case the shift can be at least partly attributed to blends with the strong He II absorptions, which are estimated to contribute about one half of the equivalent width at Hsub(delta) and Hsub(γ). 3) O III 5592 and C IV 5801, 5811 are also found in absorption. (Auth.)

  10. Doubly stochastic radial basis function methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fenglian; Yan, Liang; Ling, Leevan

    2018-06-01

    We propose a doubly stochastic radial basis function (DSRBF) method for function recoveries. Instead of a constant, we treat the RBF shape parameters as stochastic variables whose distribution were determined by a stochastic leave-one-out cross validation (LOOCV) estimation. A careful operation count is provided in order to determine the ranges of all the parameters in our methods. The overhead cost for setting up the proposed DSRBF method is O (n2) for function recovery problems with n basis. Numerical experiments confirm that the proposed method not only outperforms constant shape parameter formulation (in terms of accuracy with comparable computational cost) but also the optimal LOOCV formulation (in terms of both accuracy and computational cost).

  11. Proceedings: Cooling tower and advanced cooling systems conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    This Cooling Tower and Advanced Cooling Systems Conference was held August 30 through September 1, 1994, in St. Petersburg, Florida. The conference was sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and hosted by Florida Power Corporation to bring together utility representatives, manufacturers, researchers, and consultants. Nineteen technical papers were presented in four sessions. These sessions were devoted to the following topics: cooling tower upgrades and retrofits, cooling tower performance, cooling tower fouling, and dry and hybrid systems. On the final day, panel discussions addressed current issues in cooling tower operation and maintenance as well as research and technology needs for power plant cooling. More than 100 people attended the conference. This report contains the technical papers presented at the conference. Of the 19 papers, five concern cooling tower upgrades and retrofits, five to cooling tower performance, four discuss cooling tower fouling, and five describe dry and hybrid cooling systems. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  12. Anomalous Medial Branch of Radial Artery: A Rare Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surbhi Wadhwa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Radial artery is an important consistent vessel of the upper limb. It is a useful vascular access site for coronary procedures and its reliable anatomy has resulted in an elevation of radial forearm flaps for reconstructive surgeries of head and neck. Technical failures, in both the procedures, are mainly due to anatomical variations, such as radial loops, ectopic radial arteries or tortuosity in the vessel. We present a rare and a unique anomalous medial branch of the radial artery spiraling around the flexor carpi radialis muscle in the forearm with a high rising superficial palmar branch of radial artery. Developmentally it probably is a remanent of the normal pattern of capillary vessel maintenance and regression. Such a case is of importance for reconstructive surgeons and coronary interventionists, especially in view of its unique medial and deep course.

  13. Radial extension of drift waves in presence of velocity profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, S.; Weiland, J.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of a radially varying poloidal velocity field on the recently found radially extended toroidal drift waves is investigated analytically. The role of velocity curvature (υ φ '') is found to have robust effects on the radial model structure of the mode. For a positive value of the curvature (Usually found in the H-mode edges) the radial model envelope, similar to the sheared slab case, becomes fully outgoing. The mode is therefore stable. On the other hand, for a negative value of the curvature (usually observed in the L-mode edges) all the characteristics of conventional drift waves return back. The radial mode envelope reduces to a localized Gaussian shape and the mode is therefore unstable again for typical (magnetic) shear values in tokamaks. Velocity shear (υ φ ??) on the other hand is found to have rather insignificant role both in determining the radial model structure and stability

  14. Radial-Electric-Field Piezoelectric Diaphragm Pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Robert G.; Working, Dennis C.; Mossi, Karla; Castro, Nicholas D.; Mane, Pooma

    2009-01-01

    In a recently invented class of piezoelectric diaphragm pumps, the electrode patterns on the piezoelectric diaphragms are configured so that the electric fields in the diaphragms have symmetrical radial (along-the-surface) components in addition to through-the-thickness components. Previously, it was accepted in the piezoelectric-transducer art that in order to produce the out-of-plane bending displacement of a diaphragm needed for pumping, one must make the electric field asymmetrical through the thickness, typically by means of electrodes placed on only one side of the piezoelectric material. In the present invention, electrodes are placed on both sides and patterned so as to produce substantial radial as well as through-the-thickness components. Moreover, unlike in the prior art, the electric field can be symmetrical through the thickness. Tests have shown in a given diaphragm that an electrode configuration according to this invention produces more displacement than does a conventional one-sided electrode pattern. The invention admits of numerous variations characterized by various degrees of complexity. Figure 1 is a simplified depiction of a basic version. As in other piezoelectric diaphragm pumps of similar basic design, the prime mover is a piezoelectric diaphragm. Application of a suitable voltage to the electrodes on the diaphragm causes it to undergo out-of-plane bending. The bending displacement pushes a fluid out of, or pulls the fluid into, a chamber bounded partly by the diaphragm. Also as in other diaphragm pumps in general, check valves ensure that the fluid flows only in through one port and only out through another port.

  15. Radial stability of anisotropic strange quark stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbañil, José D.V.; Malheiro, M., E-mail: jose.arbanil@upn.pe, E-mail: malheiro@ita.br [ITA—Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica—Departamento de Física, 12228-900, São José dos Campos, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-11-01

    The influence of the anisotropy in the equilibrium and stability of strange stars is investigated through the numerical solution of the hydrostatic equilibrium equation and the radial oscillation equation, both modified from their original version to include this effect. The strange matter inside the quark stars is described by the MIT bag model equation of state. For the anisotropy two different kinds of local anisotropic σ = p {sub t} − p {sub r} are considered, where p {sub t} and p {sub r} are respectively the tangential and the radial pressure: one that is null at the star's surface defined by p {sub r} ( R ) = 0, and one that is nonnull at the surface, namely, σ {sub s} = 0 and σ {sub s} {sub ≠} {sub 0}. In the case σ {sub s} = 0, the maximum mass value and the zero frequency of oscillation are found at the same central energy density, indicating that the maximum mass marks the onset of the instability. For the case σ {sub s} {sub ≠} {sub 0}, we show that the maximum mass point and the zero frequency of oscillation coincide in the same central energy density value only in a sequence of equilibrium configurations with the same value of σ {sub s} . Thus, the stability star regions are determined always by the condition dM / d ρ {sub c} {sub >} {sub 0} only when the tangential pressure is maintained fixed at the star surface's p {sub t} ( R ). These results are also quite important to analyze the stability of other anisotropic compact objects such as neutron stars, boson stars and gravastars.

  16. Cooling lubricants; Kuehlschmierstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, W. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Breuer, D. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Blome, H. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Deininger, C. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Hahn, J.U. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Kleine, H. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Nies, E. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Pflaumbaum, W. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Stockmann, R. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Willert, G. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Sonnenschein, G. [Maschinenbau- und Metall-Berufsgenossenschaft, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    1996-08-01

    As a rule, the base substances used are certain liquid hydrocarbons from mineral oils as well as from native and synthetic oils. Through the addition of further substances the cooling lubricant takes on the particular qualities required for the use in question. Employees working with cooling lubricants are exposed to various hazards. The assessment of the concentrations at the work station is carried out on the basis of existing technical rules for contact with hazardous substances. However, the application/implementation of compulsory investigation and supervision in accordance with these rules is made difficult by the fact that cooling lubricants are, as a rule, made up of complicated compound mixtures. In addition to protecting employees from exposure to mists and vapours from the cooling lubricants, protection for the skin is also of particular importance. Cooling lubricants should not, if at all possible, be brought into contact with the skin. Cleansing the skin and skin care is just as important as changing working clothes regularly, and hygiene and cleanliness at the workplace. Unavoidable emissions are to be immediately collected at the point where they arise or are released and safely disposed of. This means taking into account all sources of emissions. The programme presented in this report therefore gives a very detailed account of the individual protective measures and provides recommendations for the design of technical protection facilities. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Als Basisstoffe dienen in der Regel bestimmte fluessige Kohlenwasserstoffverbindungen aus Mineraloelen sowie aus nativen oder synthetischen Oelen. Durch die Zugabe von weiteren Stoffen erlangt der Kuehlschmierstoff seine fuer den jeweiligen Anwendungsabfall geforderten Eigenschaften. Beschaeftigte, die mit Kuehlschmierstoffen umgehen, sind unterschiedliche Gefahren ausgesetzt. Die Beurteilung der Kuehlschmierstoffkonzentrationen in der Luft am Arbeitsplatz erfolgt auf der Grundlage bestehender

  17. A New Filtering Algorithm Utilizing Radial Velocity Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yan-feng; DU Zi-cheng; PAN Quan

    2005-01-01

    Pulse Doppler radar measurements consist of range, azimuth, elevation and radial velocity. Most of the radar tracking algorithms in engineering only utilize position measurement. The extended Kalman filter with radial velocity measureneut is presented, then a new filtering algorithm utilizing radial velocity measurement is proposed to improve tracking results and the theoretical analysis is also given. Simulation results of the new algorithm, converted measurement Kalman filter, extended Kalman filter are compared. The effectiveness of the new algorithm is verified by simulation results.

  18. Vitreous veils and radial lattice in Marshall syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, Jacob W; Mohney, Brian G; Pulido, Jose S; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica

    2008-12-01

    To report the findings of membranous vitreous veils and radial lattice in a child with Marshall syndrome. Observational case report. Retrospective review of medical records and fundus photograph of a 6-year-old boy with Marshall syndrome. Vitreoretinal findings were significant for bilateral membranous vitreous veils and radial lattice degeneration. This case demonstrates the occurrence of vitreous veils and radial lattice degeneration in patients with Marshall syndrome.

  19. ANISOTROPIC THERMAL CONDUCTION AND THE COOLING FLOW PROBLEM IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrish, Ian J.; Sharma, Prateek; Quataert, Eliot

    2009-01-01

    We examine the long-standing cooling flow problem in galaxy clusters with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations of isolated clusters including radiative cooling and anisotropic thermal conduction along magnetic field lines. The central regions of the intracluster medium (ICM) can have cooling timescales of ∼200 Myr or shorter-in order to prevent a cooling catastrophe the ICM must be heated by some mechanism such as active galactic nucleus feedback or thermal conduction from the thermal reservoir at large radii. The cores of galaxy clusters are linearly unstable to the heat-flux-driven buoyancy instability (HBI), which significantly changes the thermodynamics of the cluster core. The HBI is a convective, buoyancy-driven instability that rearranges the magnetic field to be preferentially perpendicular to the temperature gradient. For a wide range of parameters, our simulations demonstrate that in the presence of the HBI, the effective radial thermal conductivity is reduced to ∼<10% of the full Spitzer conductivity. With this suppression of conductive heating, the cooling catastrophe occurs on a timescale comparable to the central cooling time of the cluster. Thermal conduction alone is thus unlikely to stabilize clusters with low central entropies and short central cooling timescales. High central entropy clusters have sufficiently long cooling times that conduction can help stave off the cooling catastrophe for cosmologically interesting timescales.

  20. Evaporative cooling of antiprotons for the production of trappable antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, D. M.; Cesar, C. L. [Instituto de Fisica - Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby BC, V5A 1S6 (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; So, C.; Wurtele, J. S. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7300 (United States); Bertsche, W. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom) and Cockroft Institute, WA4 4AD Warrington (United Kingdom); Butler, E. [CERN, PH Department, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Charlton, M.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Friesen, T.; Hydomako, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary AB, T2N 1N4 (Canada); and others

    2013-03-19

    We describe the implementation of evaporative cooling of charged particles in the ALPHA apparatus. Forced evaporation has been applied to cold samples of antiprotons held in Malmberg-Penning traps. Temperatures on the order of 10 K were obtained, while retaining a significant fraction of the initial number of particles. We have developed a model for the evaporation process based on simple rate equations and applied it succesfully to the experimental data. We have also observed radial re-distribution of the clouds following evaporation, explained by simple conservation laws. We discuss the relevance of this technique for the recent demonstration of magnetic trapping of antihydrogen.

  1. Improve crossflow cooling tower operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports how various crossflow cooling tower elements can be upgraded. A typical retrofit example is presented. In the past decade, cooling tower technology has progressed. If a cooling tower is over ten years old, chances are the heat transfer media and mechanical equipment were designed over 30 to 40 years ago. When a chemical plant expansion is projected or a facility desires to upgrade its equipment for greater output and energy efficiency, the cooling tower is usually neglected until someone discovers that the limiting factor of production is the quality of cold water returning from the cooling tower

  2. Radial Distribution Functions of Strongly Coupled Two-Temperature Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Nathaniel R.; Tiwari, Sanat Kumar; Baalrud, Scott D.

    2017-10-01

    We present tests of three theoretical models for the radial distribution functions (RDFs) in two-temperature strongly coupled plasmas. RDFs are useful in extending plasma thermodynamics and kinetic theory to strong coupling, but they are usually known only for thermal equilibrium or for approximate one-component model plasmas. Accurate two-component modeling is necessary to understand the impact of strong coupling on inter-species transport, e.g., ambipolar diffusion and electron-ion temperature relaxation. We demonstrate that the Seuferling-Vogel-Toeppfer (SVT) extension of the hypernetted chain equations not only gives accurate RDFs (as compared with classical molecular dynamics simulations), but also has a simple connection with the Yukawa OCP model. This connection gives a practical means to recover the structure of the electron background from knowledge of the ion-ion RDF alone. Using the model RDFs in Effective Potential Theory, we report the first predictions of inter-species transport coefficients of strongly coupled plasmas far from equilibrium. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. PHY-1453736, AFSOR Award No. FA9550-16-1-0221, and used XSEDE computational resources.

  3. Pseudarthrosis of radial shaft with dislocation of heads of radial and ulnar bones (case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Puseva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors presented a rare clinical case - the injury of forearm complicated by the formation of the pseudarthrosis of the radial shaft in combination with old dislocation of heads the radius and ulna. The differentiated approach to the choice of surgical tactics was proposed, which consists of several consistent stages: taking free autotransplant from the crest of iliac bone, resection of pseudarthrosis of radius with replacement of the bone defect by the graft for restoration of anatomic length, conducting combined strained osteosynthesis and elimination of dislocation of a head of radial and ulnar bones by transosseous osteosynthesis. The chosen treatment strategy allowed to restore the anatomy and function of the upper extremity.

  4. Cooling device in thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Tsutomu.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent loss of cooling effect over the entire torus structure directly after accidental toubles in a cooling device of a thermonuclear device. Constitution: Coolant recycling means of a cooling device comprises two systems, which are alternately connected with in-flow pipeways and exit pipeways of adjacent modules. The modules are cooled by way of the in-flow pipeways and the exist pipeways connected to the respective modules by means of the coolant recycling means corresponding to the respective modules. So long as one of the coolant recycling means is kept operative, since every one other modules of the torus structure is still kept cooled, the heat generated from the module put therebetween, for which the coolant recycling is interrupted, is removed by means of heat conduction or radiation from the module for which the cooling is kept continued. No back-up emergency cooling system is required and it can provide high economic reliability. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. A radial velocity survey of the Carina Nebula's O-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiminki, Megan M.; Smith, Nathan

    2018-03-01

    We have obtained multi-epoch observations of 31 O-type stars in the Carina Nebula using the CHIRON spectrograph on the CTIO/SMARTS 1.5-m telescope. We measure their radial velocities to 1-2 km s-1 precision and present new or updated orbital solutions for the binary systems HD 92607, HD 93576, HDE 303312, and HDE 305536. We also compile radial velocities from the literature for 32 additional O-type and evolved massive stars in the region. The combined data set shows a mean heliocentric radial velocity of 0.6 km s-1. We calculate a velocity dispersion of ≤9.1 km s-1, consistent with an unbound, substructured OB association. The Tr 14 cluster shows a marginally significant 5 km s-1 radial velocity offset from its neighbor Tr 16, but there are otherwise no correlations between stellar position and velocity. The O-type stars in Cr 228 and the South Pillars region have a lower velocity dispersion than the region as a whole, supporting a model of distributed massive-star formation rather than migration from the central clusters. We compare our stellar velocities to the Carina Nebula's molecular gas and find that Tr 14 shows a close kinematic association with the Northern Cloud. In contrast, Tr 16 has accelerated the Southern Cloud by 10-15 km s-1, possibly triggering further massive-star formation. The expansion of the surrounding H II region is not symmetric about the O-type stars in radial velocity space, indicating that the ionized gas is constrained by denser material on the far side.

  6. The innate origin of radial and vertical gradients in a simulated galaxy disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Julio F.; Yozin, Cameron; Loewen, Nic; Benítez-Llambay, Alejandro; Fattahi, Azadeh; Frenk, Carlos S.; Oman, Kyle A.; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom

    2018-05-01

    We examine the origin of radial and vertical gradients in the age/metallicity of the stellar component of a galaxy disc formed in the APOSTLE cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. Some of these gradients resemble those in the Milky Way, where they have sometimes been interpreted as due to internal evolution, such as scattering off giant molecular clouds, radial migration driven by spiral patterns, or orbital resonances with a bar. Secular processes play a minor role in the simulated galaxy, which lacks strong spiral or bar patterns, and where such gradients arise as a result of the gradual enrichment of a gaseous disc that is born thick but thins as it turns into stars and settles into centrifugal equilibrium. The settling is controlled by the feedback of young stars; which links the star formation, enrichment, and equilibration time-scales, inducing radial and vertical gradients in the gaseous disc and its descendent stars. The kinematics of coeval stars evolve little after birth and provide a faithful snapshot of the gaseous disc structure at the time of their formation. In this interpretation, the age-velocity dispersion relation would reflect the gradual thinning of the disc rather than the importance of secular orbit scattering; the outward flaring of stars would result from the gas disc flare rather than from radial migration; and vertical gradients would arise because the gas disc gradually thinned as it enriched. Such radial and vertical trends might just reflect the evolving properties of the parent gaseous disc, and are not necessarily the result of secular evolutionary processes.

  7. A radial velocity survey of the Carina Nebula's O-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiminki, Megan M.; Smith, Nathan

    2018-06-01

    We have obtained multi-epoch observations of 31 O-type stars in the Carina Nebula using the CHIRON spectrograph on the CTIO/SMARTS 1.5-m telescope. We measure their radial velocities to 1-2 km s-1 precision and present new or updated orbital solutions for the binary systems HD 92607, HD 93576, HDE 303312, and HDE 305536. We also compile radial velocities from the literature for 32 additional O-type and evolved massive stars in the region. The combined data set shows a mean heliocentric radial velocity of 0.6 km s-1. We calculate a velocity dispersion of ≤9.1 km s-1, consistent with an unbound, substructured OB association. The Tr 14 cluster shows a marginally significant 5 km s-1 radial velocity offset from its neighbour Tr 16, but there are otherwise no correlations between stellar position and velocity. The O-type stars in Cr 228 and the South Pillars region have a lower velocity dispersion than the region as a whole, supporting a model of distributed massive star formation rather than migration from the central clusters. We compare our stellar velocities to the Carina Nebula's molecular gas and find that Tr 14 shows a close kinematic association with the Northern Cloud. In contrast, Tr 16 has accelerated the Southern Cloud by 10-15 km s-1, possibly triggering further massive star formation. The expansion of the surrounding H II region is not symmetric about the O-type stars in radial velocity space, indicating that the ionized gas is constrained by denser material on the far side.

  8. Cooling water systems design using process integration

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gololo, KV

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Cooling water systems are generally designed with a set of heat exchangers arranged in parallel. This arrangement results in higher cooling water flowrate and low cooling water return temperature thus reducing cooling tower efficiency. Previous...

  9. Evolution of the Radial Abundance Gradient and Cold Gas along the Milky Way Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q. S.; Chang, R. X.; Yin, J.

    2014-03-01

    We have constructed a phenomenological model of the chemical evolution of the Milky Way disk, and treated the molecular and atomic gas separately. Using this model, we explore the radial profiles of oxygen abundance, the surface density of cold gas, and their time evolutions. It is shown that the model predictions are very sensitive to the adopted infall time-scale. By comparing the model predictions with the observations, we find that the model adopting the star formation law based on H_2 can properly predict the observed radial distributions of cold gas and oxygen abundance gradient along the disk. We also compare the model results with the predictions of the model which adopts the instantaneous recycling approximation (IRA), and find that the IRA assumption has little influence on the model results, especially in the low-density gas region.

  10. Fuel radial design using Path Relinking; Diseno radial de combustible usando Path Relinking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos S, Y. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The present work shows the obtained results when implementing the combinatory optimization technique well-known as Path Re linking (Re-linkage of Trajectories), to the problem of the radial design of nuclear fuel assemblies, for boiling water reactors (BWR Boiling Water Reactor by its initials in English), this type of reactors is those that are used in the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central, Veracruz. As in any other electric power generation plant of that make use of some fuel to produce heat and that it needs each certain time (from 12 to 14 months) to make a supply of the same one, because this it wears away or it burns, in the nucleolectric plants to this activity is denominated fuel reload. In this reload different activities intervene, among those which its highlight the radial and axial designs of fuel assemblies, the patterns of control rods and the multi cycles study, each one of these stages with their own complexity. This work was limited to study in independent form the radial design, without considering the other activities. These phases are basic for the fuel reload design and of reactor operation strategies. (Author)

  11. Molecular dynamics of the structure and thermodynamics of dusty ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The static structure and thermodynamic properties of two-dimensional dusty plasma are analyzed for some typical values of coupling and screening parameters using classical molecular dynamics. Radial distribution function and static structure factor are computed. The radial distribution functions display the typical ...

  12. Design of radial reinforcement for prestressed concrete containments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shen, E-mail: swang@bechtel.com [Bechtel Power Corporation, 5275 Westview Drive, BP2-2C3, Frederick, MD 21703 (United States); Munshi, Javeed A., E-mail: jamunshi@bechtel.com [Bechtel Power Corporation, 5275 Westview Drive, BP2-2C3, Frederick, MD 21703 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► A rigorous formulae is proposed to calculate radial stress within prestressed concrete containments. ► The proposed method is validated by finite element analysis in an illustrative practical example. ► A partially prestressed condition is more critical than a fully prestressed condition for radial tension. ► Practical design consideration is provided for detailing of radial reinforcement. -- Abstract: Nuclear containments are critical components for safety of nuclear power plants. Failure can result in catastrophic safety consequences as a result of leakage of radiation. Prestressed concrete containments have been used in large nuclear power plants with significant design internal pressure. These containments are generally reinforced with prestressing tendons in the circumferential (hoop) and meridional (vertical) directions. The curvature effect of the tendons introduces radial tensile stresses in the concrete shell which are generally neglected in the design of such structures. It is assumed that such tensile radial stresses are small as such no radial reinforcement is provided for this purpose. But recent instances of significant delaminations in Crystal River Unit 3 in Florida have elevated the need for reevaluation of the radial tension issue in prestressed containment. Note that currently there are no well accepted industry standards for design and detailing of radial reinforcement. This paper discusses the issue of radial tension in prestressed cylindrical and dome shaped structures and proposes formulae to calculate radial stresses. A practical example is presented to illustrate the use of the proposed method which is then verified by using state of art finite element analysis. This paper also provides some practical design consideration for detailing of radial reinforcement in prestressed containments.

  13. Superconducting magnet cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Arend, Peter C.; Fowler, William B.

    1977-01-01

    A device is provided for cooling a conductor to the superconducting state. The conductor is positioned within an inner conduit through which is flowing a supercooled liquid coolant in physical contact with the conductor. The inner conduit is positioned within an outer conduit so that an annular open space is formed therebetween. Through the annular space is flowing coolant in the boiling liquid state. Heat generated by the conductor is transferred by convection within the supercooled liquid coolant to the inner wall of the inner conduit and then is removed by the boiling liquid coolant, making the heat removal from the conductor relatively independent of conductor length.

  14. Illumination and radiative cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Shanhui; Raman, Aaswath Pattabhi; Zhu, Linxiao; Rephaeli, Eden

    2018-03-20

    Aspects of the present disclosure are directed to providing and/or controlling electromagnetic radiation. As may be implemented in accordance with one or more embodiments, an apparatus includes a first structure that contains an object, and a second structure that is transparent at solar wavelengths and emissive in the atmospheric electromagnetic radiation transparency window. The second structure operates with the first structure to pass light into the first structure for illuminating the object, and to radiatively cool the object while preserving the object's color.

  15. Rotary engine cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Charles (Inventor); Gigon, Richard M. (Inventor); Blum, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A rotary engine has a substantially trochoidal-shaped housing cavity in which a rotor planetates. A cooling system for the engine directs coolant along a single series path consisting of series connected groups of passages. Coolant enters near the intake port, passes downwardly and axially through the cooler regions of the engine, then passes upwardly and axially through the hotter regions. By first flowing through the coolest regions, coolant pressure is reduced, thus reducing the saturation temperature of the coolant and thereby enhancing the nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanism which predominates in the high heat flux region of the engine during high power level operation.

  16. Gas cooled HTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweiger, F.

    1985-01-01

    In the He-cooled, graphite-moderated HTR with spherical fuel elements, the steam generator is fixed outside the pressure vessel. The heat exchangers are above the reactor level. The hot gases stream from the reactor bottom over the heat exchanger, through an annular space around the heat exchanger and through feed lines in the side reflector of the reactor back to its top part. This way, in case of shutdown there is a supplementary natural draught that helps the inner natural circulation (chimney draught effect). (orig./PW)

  17. Onderzoeksrapportage duurzaam koelen : EOS Renewable Cooling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeze, J.; Sluis, van der S.; Wissink, E.

    2010-01-01

    For reducing energy use for cooling, alternative methods (that do not rely on electricity) are needed. Renewable cooling is based on naturally available resources such as evaporative cooling, free cooling, phase change materials, ground subcooling, solar cooling, wind cooling, night radiation &

  18. Cooling power technology at a turning point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hese, L.H.

    1978-01-01

    From freshwater cooling and efflux condenser cooling to wet recirculation cooling, hybrid and dry cooling towers, cooling tower technology has seen a development characterized by higher cooling tower costs and reduced power plant efficiency. Therefore, all research work done at the moment concentrates on making up for the economic losses connected with improved environmental protection. (orig.) [de

  19. Observational hints of radial migration in disc galaxies from CALIFA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz-Lara, T.; Pérez, I.; Florido, E.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; Sánchez-Menguiano, L.; Sánchez, S. F.; Lyubenova, M.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; van de Ven, G.; Marino, R. A.; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; Catalán-Torrecilla, C.; Costantin, L.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Galbany, L.; García-Benito, R.; Husemann, B.; Kehrig, C.; Márquez, I.; Mast, D.; Walcher, C. J.; Zibetti, S.; Ziegler, B.

    2017-01-01

    Context. According to numerical simulations, stars are not always kept at their birth galactocentric distances but they have a tendency to migrate. The importance of this radial migration in shaping galactic light distributions is still unclear. However, if radial migration is indeed important,

  20. Radial supports of face motors with slack compensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsova, I I; Gelman, A B; Krekina, T V

    1982-01-01

    The design of a radial support of a face motor with slack compensation is described, and gives the results of field tests which confirm the performance capacity of the experimental support both from the viewpoint of durability, and in relation to preventing radial slack of the face motor shaft.

  1. Radial Color Gradient in a Globular Cluster 1. M68

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukyoung Yi

    1990-12-01

    Full Text Available Stars in M68 from the observed color-magnitude diagrams with CCD were integrated to find any radial gradient. The result shows that M68 has a slightly bluer core. The main cause of these calculated radial color variations seems to come from the random distribution of giants.

  2. Modelling and analysis of radial thermal stresses and temperature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A theoretical investigation has been undertaken to study operating temperatures, heat fluxes and radial thermal stresses in the valves of a modern diesel engine with and without air-cavity. Temperatures, heat fluxes and radial thermal stresses were measured theoretically for both cases under all four thermal loading ...

  3. Radiographic study of distal radial physeal closure in thoroughbred horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vulcano, L.C.; Mamprim, M.J.; Muniz, L.M.R.; Moreira, A.F.; Luna, S.P.L.

    1997-01-01

    Monthly radiography was performed to study distal radial physeal closure in ten male and ten female Throughbred horses. The height, thoracic circumference and metacarpus circumference were also measured, Distal radial physeal closure time was sooner in females than males, and took 701 +/- 37 and 748 +/- 55 days respectively

  4. Radial distribution of the contributions to band broadening of a silica-based semi-preparative monolithic column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abia, Jude A; Mriziq, Khaled S; Guiochon, Georges A

    2009-04-01

    Using an on-column local electrochemical microdetector operated in the amperometric mode, band elution profiles were recorded at different radial locations at the exit of a 10 mm id, 100 mm long silica-based monolithic column. HETP plots were then acquired at each of these locations, and all these results were fitted to the Knox equation. This provided a spatial distribution of the values of the eddy diffusion (A), the molecular diffusion (B), and the resistance to the kinetics of mass transfer (C) terms. Results obtained indicate that the wall region yields higher A values and smaller C values than the central core region. Significant radial fluctuations of these contributions to band broadening occur throughout the exit column cross-section. This phenomenon is due to the structural radial heterogeneity of the column.

  5. Antarctica: Cooling or Warming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunde, Armin; Ludescher, Josef; Franzke, Christian

    2013-04-01

    We consider the 14 longest instrumental monthly mean temperature records from the Antarctica and analyse their correlation properties by wavelet and detrended fluctuation analysis. We show that the stations in the western and the eastern part of the Antarctica show significant long-term memory governed by Hurst exponents close to 0.8 and 0.65, respectively. In contrast, the temperature records at the inner part of the continent (South Pole and Vostok), resemble white noise. We use linear regression to estimate the respective temperature differences in the records per decade (i) for the annual data, (ii) for the summer and (iii) for the winter season. Using a recent approach by Lennartz and Bunde [1] we estimate the respective probabilities that these temperature differences can be exceeded naturally without inferring an external (anthropogenic) trend. We find that the warming in the western part of the continent and the cooling at the South Pole is due to a gradually changes in the cold extremes. For the winter months, both cooling and warming are well outside the 95 percent confidence interval, pointing to an anthropogenic origin. In the eastern Antarctica, the temperature increases and decreases are modest and well within the 95 percent confidence interval. [1] S. Lennartz and A. Bunde, Phys. Rev. E 84, 021129 (2011)

  6. Cooled spool piston compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Brian G. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hydraulically powered gas compressor receives low pressure gas and outputs a high pressure gas. The housing of the compressor defines a cylinder with a center chamber having a cross-sectional area less than the cross-sectional area of a left end chamber and a right end chamber, and a spool-type piston assembly is movable within the cylinder and includes a left end closure, a right end closure, and a center body that are in sealing engagement with the respective cylinder walls as the piston reciprocates. First and second annual compression chambers are provided between the piston enclosures and center housing portion of the compressor, thereby minimizing the spacing between the core gas and a cooled surface of the compressor. Restricted flow passageways are provided in the piston closure members and a path is provided in the central body of the piston assembly, such that hydraulic fluid flows through the piston assembly to cool the piston assembly during its operation. The compressor of the present invention may be easily adapted for a particular application, and is capable of generating high gas pressures while maintaining both the compressed gas and the compressor components within acceptable temperature limits.

  7. Radial Velocities of 41 Kepler Eclipsing Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Rachel A.; Gies, Douglas R.; Guo, Zhao; Williams, Stephen J.

    2017-12-01

    Eclipsing binaries are vital for directly determining stellar parameters without reliance on models or scaling relations. Spectroscopically derived parameters of detached and semi-detached binaries allow us to determine component masses that can inform theories of stellar and binary evolution. Here we present moderate resolution ground-based spectra of stars in close binary systems with and without (detected) tertiary companions observed by NASA’s Kepler mission and analyzed for eclipse timing variations. We obtain radial velocities and spectroscopic orbits for five single-lined and 35 double-lined systems, and confirm one false positive eclipsing binary. For the double-lined spectroscopic binaries, we also determine individual component masses and examine the mass ratio {M}2/{M}1 distribution, which is dominated by binaries with like-mass pairs and semi-detached classical Algol systems that have undergone mass transfer. Finally, we constrain the mass of the tertiary component for five double-lined binaries with previously detected companions.

  8. Nonlinear radial propagation of drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, M.

    1985-01-01

    We study the linear and the nonlinear radial propagation of drift wave energy in an inhomogeneous plasma. The drift mode excited in such a plasma is dispersive in nature. The drift wave energy spreads out symmetrically along the direction of inhomogeneity with a finite group velocity. To study the effect of the nonlinear coupling on the propagation of energy in a collision free plasma, we solve the Hasegawa-Mima equation as a mixed initial boundary-value problem. The solutions of the linearized equation are used to check the reliability of our numerical calculations. Additional checks are also performed on the invariants of the system. Our results reveal that a pulse gets distorted as it propagates through the medium. The peak of the pulse propagates with a finite velocity that depends on the amplitude of the initial pulse. The polarity of propagation depends on the initial parameters of the pulse. We have also studied drift wave propagation in a resistive plasma. The Hasegawa-Wakatani equations are used to investigate this problem

  9. Vortex Ring Dynamics in Radially Confined Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Kelley; Niebel, Casandra; Jung, Sunghwan; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2010-11-01

    Vortex ring dynamics have been studied extensively in semi-infinite quiescent volumes. However, very little is known about vortex-ring formation in wall-bounded domains where vortex wall interaction will affect both the vortex ring pinch-off and propagation velocity. This study addresses this limitation and studies vortex formation in radially confined domains to analyze the affect of vortex-ring wall interaction on the formation and propagation of the vortex ring. Vortex rings were produced using a pneumatically driven piston cylinder arrangement and were ejected into a long cylindrical tube which defined the confined downstream domain. A range of confinement domains were studied with varying confinement diameters Velocity field measurements were performed using planar Time Resolved Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (TRDPIV) and were processed using an in-house developed cross-correlation PIV algorithm. The experimental analysis was used to facilitate the development of a theoretical model to predict the variations in vortex ring circulation over time within confined domains.

  10. Core of a liquid-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, J.R.; McFall, A.

    1975-01-01

    The core of a liquid-cooled nuclear reactor, e.g. of a sodium-cooled fast reactor, is protected in such a way that the recoil wave resulting from loss of coolant in a cooling channel and caused by released gas is limited to a coolant inlet chamber of this cooling channel. The channels essentially consist of the coolant inlet chamber and a fuel chamber - with a fission gas storage plenum - through which the coolant flows. Between the two chambers, a locking device within a tube is provided offering a much larger flow resistance to the backflow of gas or coolant than in flow direction. The locking device may be a hydraulic countertorque control system, e.g. a valvular line. Other locking devices have got radially helical vanes running around an annular flow space. Furthermore, the locking device may consist of a number of needles running parallel to each other and forming a circular grid. Though it can be expanded by the forward flow - the needles are spreading - , it acts as a solid barrier for backflows. (TK) [de

  11. Modelization of cooling system components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copete, Monica; Ortega, Silvia; Vaquero, Jose Carlos; Cervantes, Eva [Westinghouse Electric (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    In the site evaluation study for licensing a new nuclear power facility, the criteria involved could be grouped in health and safety, environment, socio-economics, engineering and cost-related. These encompass different aspects such as geology, seismology, cooling system requirements, weather conditions, flooding, population, and so on. The selection of the cooling system is function of different parameters as the gross electrical output, energy consumption, available area for cooling system components, environmental conditions, water consumption, and others. Moreover, in recent years, extreme environmental conditions have been experienced and stringent water availability limits have affected water use permits. Therefore, modifications or alternatives of current cooling system designs and operation are required as well as analyses of the different possibilities of cooling systems to optimize energy production taking into account water consumption among other important variables. There are two basic cooling system configurations: - Once-through or Open-cycle; - Recirculating or Closed-cycle. In a once-through cooling system (or open-cycle), water from an external water sources passes through the steam cycle condenser and is then returned to the source at a higher temperature with some level of contaminants. To minimize the thermal impact to the water source, a cooling tower may be added in a once-through system to allow air cooling of the water (with associated losses on site due to evaporation) prior to returning the water to its source. This system has a high thermal efficiency, and its operating and capital costs are very low. So, from an economical point of view, the open-cycle is preferred to closed-cycle system, especially if there are no water limitations or environmental restrictions. In a recirculating system (or closed-cycle), cooling water exits the condenser, goes through a fixed heat sink, and is then returned to the condenser. This configuration

  12. A Comparative study of solidification of Al-Cu alloy under flow of cylindrical radial heat and the unidirectional vertically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Robert P. Rodrigues

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In spite of technological importance of solidification of metallic alloys under radial heat flow, relatively few studies have been carried out in this area. In this work the solidification of Al 4.5 wt% Cu cylinders against a steel massive mold is analyzed and compared with unidirectional solidification against a cooled mold. Initially temperature variations at different positions in the casting and in the mold were measured during solidification using a data acquisition system. These temperature variations were introduced in a numerical method in order to determine the variation of heat transfer coefficient at metal/mold interface by inverse method. The primary and secondary dendrite arm spacing variations were measured through optical microscopy. Comparisons carried out between experimental and numerical data showed that the numerical method describes well the solidification processes under radial heat flux.

  13. Review of cavity optomechanical cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yong-Chun; Hu Yu-Wen; Xiao Yun-Feng; Wong Chee Wei

    2013-01-01

    Quantum manipulation of macroscopic mechanical systems is of great interest in both fundamental physics and applications ranging from high-precision metrology to quantum information processing. For these purposes, a crucial step is to cool the mechanical system to its quantum ground state. In this review, we focus on the cavity optomechanical cooling, which exploits the cavity enhanced interaction between optical field and mechanical motion to reduce the thermal noise. Recent remarkable theoretical and experimental efforts in this field have taken a major step forward in preparing the motional quantum ground state of mesoscopic mechanical systems. This review first describes the quantum theory of cavity optomechanical cooling, including quantum noise approach and covariance approach; then, the up-to-date experimental progresses are introduced. Finally, new cooling approaches are discussed along the directions of cooling in the strong coupling regime and cooling beyond the resolved sideband limit. (topical review - quantum information)

  14. Electronic cooling using thermoelectric devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zebarjadi, M., E-mail: m.zebarjadi@rutgers.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Institute of Advanced Materials, Devices, and Nanotechnology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)

    2015-05-18

    Thermoelectric coolers or Peltier coolers are used to pump heat in the opposite direction of the natural heat flux. These coolers have also been proposed for electronic cooling, wherein the aim is to pump heat in the natural heat flux direction and from hot spots to the colder ambient temperature. In this manuscript, we show that for such applications, one needs to use thermoelectric materials with large thermal conductivity and large power factor, instead of the traditionally used high ZT thermoelectric materials. We further show that with the known thermoelectric materials, the active cooling cannot compete with passive cooling, and one needs to explore a new set of materials to provide a cooling solution better than a regular copper heat sink. We propose a set of materials and directions for exploring possible materials candidates suitable for electronic cooling. Finally, to achieve maximum cooling, we propose to use thermoelectric elements as fins attached to copper blocks.

  15. COOLING STAGES OF CRYOGENIC SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Троценко, А. В.

    2011-01-01

    The formalized definition for cooling stage of low temperature system is done. Based on existing information about the known cryogenic unit cycles the possible types of cooling stages are single out. From analyses of these stages their classification by various characteristics is suggested. The results of thermodynamic optimization of final throttle stage of cooling, which are used as working fluids helium, hydrogen and nitrogen, are shown.

  16. Stochastic cooling technology at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquinelli, R.J. E-mail: pasquin@fnal.gov

    2004-10-11

    The first antiproton cooling systems were installed and commissioned at Fermilab in 1984-1985. In the interim period, there have been several major upgrades, system improvements, and complete reincarnation of cooling systems. This paper will present some of the technology that was pioneered at Fermilab to implement stochastic cooling systems in both the Antiproton Source and Recycler accelerators. Current performance data will also be presented.

  17. Stochastic cooling technology at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.

    2004-10-01

    The first antiproton cooling systems were installed and commissioned at Fermilab in 1984-1985. In the interim period, there have been several major upgrades, system improvements, and complete reincarnation of cooling systems. This paper will present some of the technology that was pioneered at Fermilab to implement stochastic cooling systems in both the Antiproton Source and Recycler accelerators. Current performance data will also be presented.

  18. Stochastic cooling technology at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquinelli, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    The first antiproton cooling systems were installed and commissioned at Fermilab in 1984-1985. In the interim period, there have been several major upgrades, system improvements, and complete reincarnation of cooling systems. This paper will present some of the technology that was pioneered at Fermilab to implement stochastic cooling systems in both the Antiproton Source and Recycler accelerators. Current performance data will also be presented

  19. Limits on turbulent propagation of energy in cool-core clusters of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambic, C. J.; Pinto, C.; Fabian, A. C.; Sanders, J.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2018-07-01

    We place constraints on the propagation velocity of bulk turbulence within the intracluster medium of three clusters and an elliptical galaxy. Using Reflection Grating Spectrometer measurements of turbulent line broadening, we show that for these clusters, the 90 per cent upper limit on turbulent velocities when accounting for instrumental broadening is too low to propagate energy radially to the cooling radius of the clusters within the required cooling time. In this way, we extend previous Hitomi-based analysis on the Perseus cluster to more clusters, with the intention of applying these results to a future, more extensive catalogue. These results constrain models of turbulent heating in active galactic nucleus feedback by requiring a mechanism which can not only provide sufficient energy to offset radiative cooling but also resupply that energy rapidly enough to balance cooling at each cluster radius.

  20. Direct cooled power electronics substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-14

    The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

  1. Water cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a cooling water intake collector for a nuclear reactor. It includes multiple sub-collectors extending out in a generally parallel manner to each other, each one having a first end and a second one separated along their length, and multiple water outlets for connecting each one to a corresponding pressure tube of the reactor. A first end tube and a second one connect the sub-collector tubes together to their first and second ends respectively. It also includes multiple collector tubes extending transversely by crossing over the sub-collector tubes and separated from each other in the direction of these tubes. Each collector tubes has a water intake for connecting to a water pump and multiple connecting tubes separated over its length and connecting each one to the corresponding sub-collector [fr

  2. Emergency core cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubokoya, Takashi; Okataku, Yasukuni.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain the fuel soundness upon loss of primary coolant accidents in a pressure tube type nuclear reactor by injecting cooling heavy water at an early stage, to suppress the temperature of fuel cans at a lower level. Constitution: When a thermometer detects the temperature rise and a pressure gauge detects that the pressure for the primary coolants is reduced slightly from that in the normal operation upon loss of coolant accidents in the vicinity of the primary coolant circuit, heavy water is caused to flow in the heavy water feed pipeway by a controller. This enables to inject the heavy water into the reactor core in a short time upon loss of the primary coolant accidents to suppress the temperature rise in the fuel can thereby maintain the fuel soundness. (Moriyama, K.)

  3. Cooling of rectangular bars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frainer, V.J.

    1979-01-01

    A solution of the time-transient Heat Transfer Differential Equation in rectangular coordinates is presented, leading to a model which describes the temperature drop with time in rectangular bars. It is similar to an other model for cilindrical bars which has been previously developed in the Laboratory of Mechanical Metallurgy of UFRGS. Following these models, a generalization has been made, which permits cooling time evaluation for all profiles. These results are compared with experimental laboratory data in the 1200 to 800 0 C range. Some other existing models were also studied which have the purpose of studing the same phenomenon. Their mathematical forms and their evaluated values are analyzed and compared with experimental ones. (Author) [pt

  4. ATLAS' major cooling project

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    In 2005, a considerable effort has been put into commissioning the various units of ATLAS' complex cryogenic system. This is in preparation for the imminent cooling of some of the largest components of the detector in their final underground configuration. The liquid helium and nitrogen ATLAS refrigerators in USA 15. Cryogenics plays a vital role in operating massive detectors such as ATLAS. In many ways the liquefied argon, nitrogen and helium are the life-blood of the detector. ATLAS could not function without cryogens that will be constantly pumped via proximity systems to the superconducting magnets and subdetectors. In recent weeks compressors at the surface and underground refrigerators, dewars, pumps, linkages and all manner of other components related to the cryogenic system have been tested and commissioned. Fifty metres underground The helium and nitrogen refrigerators, installed inside the service cavern, are an important part of the ATLAS cryogenic system. Two independent helium refrigerators ...

  5. RADIAL VELOCITY MONITORING OF KEPLER HEARTBEAT STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shporer, Avi [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Fuller, Jim [TAPIR, Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, Mailcode 350-17, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Isaacson, Howard [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley CA 94720 (United States); Hambleton, Kelly; Prša, Andrej [Department of Astrophysics and Planetary Science, Villanova University, 800 East Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States); Thompson, Susan E. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Kurtz, Donald W. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Howard, Andrew W. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); O’Leary, Ryan M. [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, 440 UCB, Boulder, 80309-0440 (United States)

    2016-09-20

    Heartbeat stars (HB stars) are a class of eccentric binary stars with close periastron passages. The characteristic photometric HB signal evident in their light curves is produced by a combination of tidal distortion, heating, and Doppler boosting near orbital periastron. Many HB stars continue to oscillate after periastron and along the entire orbit, indicative of the tidal excitation of oscillation modes within one or both stars. These systems are among the most eccentric binaries known, and they constitute astrophysical laboratories for the study of tidal effects. We have undertaken a radial velocity (RV) monitoring campaign of Kepler HB stars in order to measure their orbits. We present our first results here, including a sample of 22 Kepler HB systems, where for 19 of them we obtained the Keplerian orbit and for 3 other systems we did not detect a statistically significant RV variability. Results presented here are based on 218 spectra obtained with the Keck/HIRES spectrograph during the 2015 Kepler observing season, and they have allowed us to obtain the largest sample of HB stars with orbits measured using a single instrument, which roughly doubles the number of HB stars with an RV measured orbit. The 19 systems measured here have orbital periods from 7 to 90 days and eccentricities from 0.2 to 0.9. We show that HB stars draw the upper envelope of the eccentricity–period distribution. Therefore, HB stars likely represent a population of stars currently undergoing high eccentricity migration via tidal orbital circularization, and they will allow for new tests of high eccentricity migration theories.

  6. Scaling laws for radial foil bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honavara Prasad, Srikanth

    The effects of fluid pressurization, structural deformation of the compliant members and heat generation in foil bearings make the design and analysis of foil bearings very complicated. The complex fluid-structural-thermal interactions in foil bearings also make modeling efforts challenging because these phenomena are governed by highly non-linear partial differential equations. Consequently, comparison of various bearing designs require detailed calculation of the flow fields (velocities, pressures), bump deflections (structural compliance) and heat transfer phenomena (viscous dissipation in the fluid, frictional heating, temperature profile etc.,) resulting in extensive computational effort (time/hardware). To obviate rigorous computations and aid in feasibility assessments of foil bearings of various sizes, NASA developed the "rule of thumb" design guidelines for estimation of journal bearing load capacity. The guidelines are based on extensive experimental data. The goal of the current work is the development of scaling laws for radial foil bearings to establish an analytical "rule of thumb" for bearing clearance and bump stiffness. The use of scale invariant Reynolds equation and experimentally observed NASA "rule of thumb" yield scale factors which can be deduced from first principles. Power-law relationships between: a. Bearing clearance and bearing radius, and b. bump stiffness and bearing radius, are obtained. The clearance and bump stiffness values obtained from scaling laws are used as inputs for Orbit simulation to study various cases. As the clearance of the bearing reaches the dimensions of the material surface roughness, asperity contact breaks the fluid film which results in wear. Similarly, as the rotor diameter increases (requiring larger bearing diameters), the load capacity of the fluid film should increase to prevent dry rubbing. This imposes limits on the size of the rotor diameter and consequently bearing diameter. Therefore, this thesis aims

  7. RADIAL VELOCITY MONITORING OF KEPLER HEARTBEAT STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shporer, Avi; Fuller, Jim; Isaacson, Howard; Hambleton, Kelly; Prša, Andrej; Thompson, Susan E.; Kurtz, Donald W.; Howard, Andrew W.; O’Leary, Ryan M.

    2016-01-01

    Heartbeat stars (HB stars) are a class of eccentric binary stars with close periastron passages. The characteristic photometric HB signal evident in their light curves is produced by a combination of tidal distortion, heating, and Doppler boosting near orbital periastron. Many HB stars continue to oscillate after periastron and along the entire orbit, indicative of the tidal excitation of oscillation modes within one or both stars. These systems are among the most eccentric binaries known, and they constitute astrophysical laboratories for the study of tidal effects. We have undertaken a radial velocity (RV) monitoring campaign of Kepler HB stars in order to measure their orbits. We present our first results here, including a sample of 22 Kepler HB systems, where for 19 of them we obtained the Keplerian orbit and for 3 other systems we did not detect a statistically significant RV variability. Results presented here are based on 218 spectra obtained with the Keck/HIRES spectrograph during the 2015 Kepler observing season, and they have allowed us to obtain the largest sample of HB stars with orbits measured using a single instrument, which roughly doubles the number of HB stars with an RV measured orbit. The 19 systems measured here have orbital periods from 7 to 90 days and eccentricities from 0.2 to 0.9. We show that HB stars draw the upper envelope of the eccentricity–period distribution. Therefore, HB stars likely represent a population of stars currently undergoing high eccentricity migration via tidal orbital circularization, and they will allow for new tests of high eccentricity migration theories.

  8. The interstellar medium and star formation of galactic disks. I. Interstellar medium and giant molecular cloud properties with diffuse far-ultraviolet and cosmic-ray backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Tan, Jonathan C.; Christie, Duncan; Bisbas, Thomas G.; Wu, Benjamin

    2018-01-01

    We present a series of adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamic simulations of flat rotation curve galactic gas disks, with a detailed treatment of the interstellar medium (ISM) physics of the atomic to molecular phase transition under the influence of diffuse far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation fields and cosmic-ray backgrounds. We explore the effects of different FUV intensities, including a model with a radial gradient designed to mimic the Milky Way. The effects of cosmic rays, including radial gradients in their heating and ionization rates, are also explored. The final simulations in this series achieve 4 pc resolution across the ˜20 kpc global disk diameter, with heating and cooling followed down to temperatures of ˜10 K. The disks are evolved for 300 Myr, which is enough time for the ISM to achieve a quasi-statistical equilibrium. In particular, the mass fraction of molecular gas is stabilized by ˜200 Myr. Additional global ISM properties are analyzed. Giant molecular clouds (GMCs) are also identified and the statistical properties of their populations are examined. GMCs are tracked as the disks evolve. GMC collisions, which may be a means of triggering star cluster formation, are counted and their rates are compared with analytic models. Relatively frequent GMC collision rates are seen in these simulations, and their implications for understanding GMC properties, including the driving of internal turbulence, are discussed.

  9. The interstellar medium and star formation of galactic disks. I. Interstellar medium and giant molecular cloud properties with diffuse far-ultraviolet and cosmic-ray backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Tan, Jonathan C.; Christie, Duncan; Bisbas, Thomas G.; Wu, Benjamin

    2018-05-01

    We present a series of adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamic simulations of flat rotation curve galactic gas disks, with a detailed treatment of the interstellar medium (ISM) physics of the atomic to molecular phase transition under the influence of diffuse far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation fields and cosmic-ray backgrounds. We explore the effects of different FUV intensities, including a model with a radial gradient designed to mimic the Milky Way. The effects of cosmic rays, including radial gradients in their heating and ionization rates, are also explored. The final simulations in this series achieve 4 pc resolution across the ˜20 kpc global disk diameter, with heating and cooling followed down to temperatures of ˜10 K. The disks are evolved for 300 Myr, which is enough time for the ISM to achieve a quasi-statistical equilibrium. In particular, the mass fraction of molecular gas is stabilized by ˜200 Myr. Additional global ISM properties are analyzed. Giant molecular clouds (GMCs) are also identified and the statistical properties of their populations are examined. GMCs are tracked as the disks evolve. GMC collisions, which may be a means of triggering star cluster formation, are counted and their rates are compared with analytic models. Relatively frequent GMC collision rates are seen in these simulations, and their implications for understanding GMC properties, including the driving of internal turbulence, are discussed.

  10. Core catcher cooling for a gas-cooled fast breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Dorner, S.; Schretzmann, K.

    1976-01-01

    Water, molten salts, and liquid metals are under discussion as coolants for the core catcher of a gas-cooled fast breeder. The authors state that there is still no technically mature method of cooling a core melt. However, the investigations carried out so far suggest that there is a solution to this problem. (RW/AK) [de

  11. Control rod homogenization in heterogeneous sodium-cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    The sodium-cooled fast reactor is one of the candidates for a sustainable nuclear reactor system. In particular, the French ASTRID project employs an axially heterogeneous design, proposed in the so-called CFV (low sodium effect) core, to enhance the inherent safety features of the reactor. This thesis focuses on the accurate modeling of the control rods, through the homogenization method. The control rods in a sodium-cooled fast reactor are used for reactivity compensation during the cycle, power shaping, and to shutdown the reactor. In previous control rod homogenization procedures, only a radial description of the geometry was implemented, hence the axially heterogeneous features of the CFV core could not be taken into account. This thesis investigates the different axial variations the control rod experiences in a CFV core, to determine the impact that these axial environments have on the control rod modeling. The methodology used in this work is based on previous homogenization procedures, the so-called equivalence procedure. The procedure was newly implemented in the PARIS code system in order to be able to use 3D geometries, and thereby be take axial effects into account. The thesis is divided into three parts. The first part investigates the impact of different neutron spectra on the homogeneous control-rod cross sections. The second part investigates the cases where the traditional radial control-rod homogenization procedure is no longer applicable in the CFV core, which was found to be 5-10 cm away from any material interface. In the third part, based on the results from the second part, a 3D model of the control rod is used to calculate homogenized control-rod cross sections. In a full core model, a study is made to investigate the impact these axial effects have on control rod-related core parameters, such as the control rod worth, the capture rates in the control rod, and the power in the adjacent fuel assemblies. All results were compared to a Monte

  12. Cooling Tower Overhaul of Secondary Cooling System in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Chul; Lee, Young Sub; Jung, Hoan Sung; Lim, In Chul [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    HANARO, an open-tank-in-pool type research reactor of 30 MWth power in Korea, has been operating normally since its initial criticality in February, 1995. For the last about ten years, A cooling tower of a secondary cooling system has been operated normally in HANARO. Last year, the cooling tower has been overhauled for preservative maintenance including fills, eliminators, wood support, water distribution system, motors, driving shafts, gear reducers, basements, blades and etc. This paper describes the results of the overhaul. As results, it is confirmed that the cooling tower maintains a good operability through a filed test. And a cooling capability will be tested when a wet bulb temperature is maintained about 28 .deg. C in summer and the reactor is operated with the full power.

  13. Pressure Dependence of the Radial Breathing Mode of Carbon Nanotubes: The Effect of Fluid Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, M. J.; Quirke, N.

    2007-04-01

    The pressure dependence of shifts in the vibrational modes of individual carbon nanotubes is strongly affected by the nature of the pressure transmitting medium as a result of adsorption at the nanotube surface. The adsorbate is treated as an elastic shell which couples with the radial breathing mode (RBM) of the nanotube via van der Waal interactions. Using analytical methods as well as molecular simulation, we observe a low frequency breathing mode for the adsorbed fluid at ˜50cm-1, as well as diameter dependent upshifts in the RBM frequency with pressure, suggesting metallic nanotubes may wet more than semiconducting ones.

  14. Equivalent elastic moduli of a zigzag single-walled carbon nanotube given by uniform radial deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ying; Qiu Xinming; Yin Yajun; Yang Fan; Fan Qinshan

    2009-01-01

    Under hydrostatic pressure, the equivalent elastic moduli of a zigzag single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) are analytically determined by energy conservation, with the consideration of the covalent bond deformation. The theoretical predictions on the transverse mechanical properties of a zigzag SWNT agree reasonably well with those given by the molecular structures mechanics simulations and also the ab initio calculations. From the simple geometry calculation, the circumferential strain is about 2-3 times of the axial strain of a zigzag SWNT under hydrostatic pressure. The bulk modulus of a zigzag SWNT is found to be 3/7 times of its radial Young's modulus.

  15. Onderzoeksrapportage duurzaam koelen : EOS Renewable Cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Broeze, J.; Sluis, van der, S.; Wissink, E.

    2010-01-01

    For reducing energy use for cooling, alternative methods (that do not rely on electricity) are needed. Renewable cooling is based on naturally available resources such as evaporative cooling, free cooling, phase change materials, ground subcooling, solar cooling, wind cooling, night radiation & storage. The project was aimed to create innovative combinations of these renewable cooling technologies and sophisticated control systems, to design renewable climate systems for various applicati...

  16. Determination of radial peculiar velocities of galaxy clusters by means of the submillimeter spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sholomitskij, G.B.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility is considered to obtain from the extraatmospheric submillimeter spectrophotometry of galaxy clusters the ratios vsub(r)/Tsub(e) for clusters intergalactic gas that permits, together with the X-ray measurements of electronic temperature Tsub(e) in the case of hot scattering gas to determine absolute radial peculiar velocities vsub(r) of galaxy clusters relative to the relic radiation. By simulating such peculiar velocities as an example for the system of bandpass filters in the wavelength range 300 μm - 2 mm the accuracy of vsub(r) estimates is proved to be about 300 km/s (not taking into account the errors in Tsub(e)) the sensitivity of deeply cooled submillimeter bolometers being 1x10 -15 W/Hzsup(1/2)

  17. Influence on rewetting temperature and wetting delay during rewetting rod bundle by various radial jet models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debbarma, Ajoy; Pandey, Krishna Murari [National Institute of Technology, Assam (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2016-03-15

    Numerical investigation of the rewetting of single sector fuel assembly of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) has been carried out to exhibit the effect of coolant jet diameters (2, 3 and 4 mm) and jet directions (Model: M, X and X2). The rewetting phenomena with various jet models are compared on the basis of rewetting temperature and wetting delay. Temperature-time curve have been evaluated from rods surfaces at different circumference, radial and axial locations of rod bundle. The cooling curve indicated the presence of vapor in respected location, where it prevents the contact between the firm and fluid phases. The peak wall temperature represents as rewetting temperature. The time period observed between initial to rewetting temperature point is wetting delay. It was noted that as improved in various jet models, rewetting temperature and wetting delay reduced, which referred the coolant stipulation in the rod bundle dominant vapor formation.

  18. Influence on rewetting temperature and wetting delay during rewetting rod bundle by various radial jet models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debbarma, Ajoy; Pandey, Krishna Murari

    2016-01-01

    Numerical investigation of the rewetting of single sector fuel assembly of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) has been carried out to exhibit the effect of coolant jet diameters (2, 3 and 4 mm) and jet directions (Model: M, X and X2). The rewetting phenomena with various jet models are compared on the basis of rewetting temperature and wetting delay. Temperature-time curve have been evaluated from rods surfaces at different circumference, radial and axial locations of rod bundle. The cooling curve indicated the presence of vapor in respected location, where it prevents the contact between the firm and fluid phases. The peak wall temperature represents as rewetting temperature. The time period observed between initial to rewetting temperature point is wetting delay. It was noted that as improved in various jet models, rewetting temperature and wetting delay reduced, which referred the coolant stipulation in the rod bundle dominant vapor formation.

  19. Radial heat transfer from fuel to moderator during LOCAs for CANDU PHW reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrandt, J.G.; So, C.B.; Gillespie, G.E.; MacLean, G.

    1983-01-01

    In a postulated CANDU-PHW loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) with coincident impaired emergency cooling, the axial transport of heat from the fuel by convection is reduced. This reduction in heat removal causes the fuel to heat up and the radial heat transfer to the moderator to become significant. This paper deals with two codes that predict the thermal response of fuel channels under LOCA conditions. New channel thermal radiation models in both RAMA, a thermalhydraulic code, and CHAN II, a fuel channel thermo-chemical code, are presented and their predictions are compared with the experimental results of an electrically heated bundle of 37 fuel pins. A second experiment, involving a single heated pin in a channel with flowing steam, is presented. The predictions of RAMA and CHAN II are compared with this experiment to verify the codes' thermo-chemical models. There is good agreement between the predictions of both codes and the experimental results

  20. Radial head fracture associated with posterior interosseous nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Barcellos Terra

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Fractures of the radial head and radial neck correspond to 1.7-5.4% of all fractures and approximately 30% may present associated injuries. In the literature, there are few reports of radial head fracture with posterior interosseous nerve injury. This study aimed to report a case of radial head fracture associated with posterior interosseous nerve injury. CASE REPORT: A male patient, aged 42 years, sought medical care after falling from a skateboard. The patient related pain and limitation of movement in the right elbow and difficulty to extend the fingers of the right hand. During physical examination, thumb and fingers extension deficit was observed. The wrist extension showed a slight radial deviation. After imaging, it became evident that the patient had a fracture of the radial head that was classified as grade III in the Mason classification. The patient underwent fracture fixation; at the first postoperative day, thumb and fingers extension was observed. Although rare, posterior interosseous nerve branch injury may be associated with radial head fractures. In the present case, the authors believe that neuropraxia occurred as a result of the fracture hematoma and edema.

  1. Modeling skin cooling using optical windows and cryogens during laser induced hyperthermia in a multilayer vascularized tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Rupesh; Das, Koushik; Okajima, Junnosuke; Maruyama, Shigenao; Mishra, Subhash C.

    2015-01-01

    This article deals with the spatial and the temporal evolution of tissue temperature during skin surface cooled laser induced hyperthermia. Three different skin surface cooling methodologies viz., optical window contact cooling, cryogenic spray cooling and cryogen cooled optical window contact cooling are considered. Sapphire, yttrium aluminum garnet, lithium tantalate, and magnesium oxide doped lithium niobate are the considered optical windows. The cryogens considered are liquid CO_2 and R1234yf. Heat transfer in the multilayer skin tissue embedded with thermally significant blood vessels pairs is modeled using the Pennes and Weinbaum–Jiji bioheat equations. Weinbaum–Jiji bioheat equation is used for the vascularized tissue. Laser transport in the tissue is modeled using the radiative transfer equation. Axial and radial (skin surface) temperature distributions for different combinations of optical windows and cryogens are analyzed. Liquid CO_2 cooled yttrium aluminum garnet is found to be the best surface cooling mechanism. - Highlights: • Skin surface cooled laser induced hyperthermia is studied. • A multi-layer 2-D cylindrical tissue geometry is considered. • Both Pennes and Weinbaum–Jiji bioheat models are considered. • Laser transport in the tissue is modeled using discrete ordinate method. • Results for 4 optical windows and 2 cryogens for skin cooling are presented.

  2. A Low-cost Environmental Control System for Precise Radial Velocity Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliski, David H.; Blake, Cullen H.; Halverson, Samuel

    2017-12-01

    We present an environmental control system (ECS) designed to achieve milliKelvin (mK) level temperature stability for small-scale astronomical instruments. This ECS is inexpensive and is primarily built from commercially available components. The primary application for our ECS is the high-precision Doppler spectrometer MINERVA-Red, where the thermal variations of the optical components within the instrument represent a major source of systematic error. We demonstrate ±2 mK temperature stability within a 0.5 m3 thermal enclosure using resistive heaters in conjunction with a commercially available PID controller and off-the-shelf thermal sensors. The enclosure is maintained above ambient temperature, enabling rapid cooling through heat dissipation into the surrounding environment. We demonstrate peak-to-valley (PV) temperature stability of better than 5 mK within the MINERVA-Red vacuum chamber, which is located inside the thermal enclosure, despite large temperature swings in the ambient laboratory environment. During periods of stable laboratory conditions, the PV variations within the vacuum chamber are less than 3 mK. This temperature stability is comparable to the best stability demonstrated for Doppler spectrometers currently achieving m s-1 radial velocity precision. We discuss the challenges of using commercially available thermoelectrically cooled CCD cameras in a temperature-stabilized environment, and demonstrate that the effects of variable heat output from the CCD camera body can be mitigated using PID-controlled chilled water systems. The ECS presented here could potentially provide the stable operating environment required for future compact “astrophotonic” precise radial velocity (PRV) spectrometers to achieve high Doppler measurement precision with a modest budget.

  3. Stellar Angular Momentum Distributions and Preferential Radial Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse, Rosemary; Daniel, Kathryne J.

    2018-04-01

    I will present some results from our recent investigations into the efficiency of radial migration in stellar disks of differing angular momentum distributions, within a given adopted 2D spiral disk potential. We apply to our models an analytic criterion that determines whether or not individual stars are in orbits that could lead to radial migration around the corotation resonance. We couch our results in terms of the local stellar velocity dispersion and find that the fraction of stars that could migrate radially decreases as the velocity dispersion increases. I will discuss implications and comparisons with the results of other approaches.

  4. Research on Radial Vibration of a Circular Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radial vibration of the circular plate is presented using wave propagation approach and classical method containing Bessel solution and Hankel solution for calculating the natural frequency theoretically. In cylindrical coordinate system, in order to obtain natural frequency, propagation and reflection matrices are deduced at the boundaries of free-free, fixed-fixed, and fixed-free using wave propagation approach. Furthermore, radial phononic crystal is constructed by connecting two materials periodically for the analysis of band phenomenon. Also, Finite Element Simulation (FEM is adopted to verify the theoretical results. Finally, the radial and piezoelectric effects on the band are also discussed.

  5. Influences of climate on the radial growth of lodgepole pine in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhin, S.; Lieffers, V.J. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Renewable Resources; Hogg, E.H. [Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Northern Forestry Centre, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Huang, S. [Alberta Sustainable Resource Development, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Forest Management Branch

    2008-02-15

    The forests of the Cordilleran region were used to document past relationships between tree growth and climate. Radial growth and climate relationships of lodgepole pines were examined across a network of 17 sites in Alberta over a distance of 1100 km. Pine sites were selected from a permanent plot database covering the predominant latitudinal and elevational range of lodgepole pines. An average of 21 dominant and co-dominant trees were sampled in a 50 m buffer zone. Ring-width series were detrended in 3 stages using negative exponential curves, linear regression, and low frequency standardized series (LFS). Each LFS series was detrended with a cubic-smoothing spline. Autocorrelation in each series was removed via autoregressive (AR) modelling resulting in high frequency residual series. High frequency residual (HFR) site chronologies were constructed by averaging HFR series developed at each site. Primary climate variables included mean daily minimum and maximum temperatures for each month and total monthly precipitation. Relationships between the different chronology types were then examined. Results of the study demonstrated that cool and moist conditions during the later summer months led to improved radial growth levels during the following years. Warm, dry winters and warm conditions during the autumn of the year in which the ring was formed also promoted tree growth. Results suggested that climatic warming and drying have opposing effects. It was concluded that future impacts on lodgepole pine radial growth will depend on the pattern and magnitude of changes in temperature and precipitation in each season. 55 refs., 3 tabs., 8 figs.

  6. Fuel-steel mixing and radial mesh effects in power excursion simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, X.-N.; Rineiski, A.; Gabrielli, F.; Andriolo, L.; Vezzoni, B.; Li, R.; Maschek, W.; Kiefhaber, E.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Fuel-steel mixing and radial mesh effects are significant on power excursion. • The earliest power peak is reduced and retarded by these two effects. • Unprotected loss of coolant transients in ESFR core are calculated. - Abstract: This paper deals with SIMMER-III once-through simulations of the earliest power excursion initiated by an unprotected loss of flow (ULOF) in the Working Horse design of the European Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor (ESFR). Since the sodium void effect is strictly positive in this core and dominant in the transient, a power excursion is initiated by sodium boiling in the ULOF case. Two major effects, namely (1) reactivity effects due to fuel-steel mixing after melting and (2) the radial mesh size, which were not considered originally in SIMMER simulations for ESFR, are studied. The first effect concerns the reactivity difference between the heterogeneous fuel/clad/wrapper configuration and the homogeneous mixture of steel and fuel. The full core homogenization (due to melting) effect is −2 $, though a smaller effect takes place in case of partial core melting. The second effect is due to the SIMMER sub-assembly (SA) coarse mesh treatment, where a simultaneous sodium boiling onset in all SAs belonging to one ring leads to an overestimated reactivity ramp. For investigating the influence of fuel/steel mixing effects, a lumped “homogenization” reactivity feedback has been introduced, being proportional to the molten steel mass. For improving the coarse mesh treatment, we employ finer radial meshes to take the subchannel effects into account, where the side and interior channels have different coolant velocities and temperatures. The simulation results show that these two effects have significant impacts on the earliest power excursion after the sodium boiling.

  7. Newton's Law of Cooling Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, M.

    2009-01-01

    The cooling of objects is often described by a law, attributed to Newton, which states that the temperature difference of a cooling body with respect to the surroundings decreases exponentially with time. Such behaviour has been observed for many laboratory experiments, which led to a wide acceptance of this approach. However, the heat transfer…

  8. Be Cool, Man! / Jevgeni Levik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Levik, Jevgeni

    2005-01-01

    Järg 1995. aasta kriminaalkomöödiale "Tooge jupats" ("Get Shorty") : mängufilm "Be Cool, Chili Palmer on tagasi!" ("Be Cool") : režissöör F. Gary Gray, peaosades J. Travolta ja U. Thurman : USA 2005. Lisatud J. Travolta ja U. Thurmani lühiintervjuud

  9. Core cooling system for reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Ryoichi; Amada, Tatsuo.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the function of residual heat dissipation from the reactor core in case of emergency by providing a secondary cooling system flow channel, through which fluid having been subjected to heat exchange with the fluid flowing in a primary cooling system flow channel flows, with a core residual heat removal system in parallel with a main cooling system provided with a steam generator. Constitution: Heat generated in the core during normal reactor operation is transferred from a primary cooling system flow channel to a secondary cooling system flow channel through a main heat exchanger and then transferred through a steam generator to a water-steam system flow channel. In the event if removal of heat from the core by the main cooling system becomes impossible due to such cause as breakage of the duct line of the primary cooling system flow channel or a trouble in a primary cooling system pump, a flow control valve is opened, and steam generator inlet and outlet valves are closed, thus increasing the flow rate in the core residual heat removal system. Thereafter, a blower is started to cause dissipation of the core residual heat from the flow channel of a system for heat dissipation to atmosphere. (Seki, T.)

  10. Manufacturing of small scale W monoblock mockups by hot radial pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visca, Eliseo; Testani, C.; Libera, S.; Sacchetti, M.

    2003-01-01

    In the frame of the European Technology R and D programme for International thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) and in the area of high heat flux plasma facing components (HHFC), representative small-scale mock-ups were manufactured and tested to compare different concepts and joining technologies (i.e. active brazing, hot isostatic pressing (HIPping), diffusion bonding, etc.). On the basis of the results obtained by thermal fatigue tests, the monoblock concept resulted to be the most robust one, particularly when the HIPping manufacturing technology is used. Within this programme, ENEA developed an alternative technique for manufacturing plasma-facing components with a monoblock geometry of the ITER machine. The basic idea of this technique, named hot radial pressing (HRP), is to perform a radial diffusion bonding between the cooling tube and the armour tile by pressurising the internal tube only and by keeping the process parameters within the range in which the thermo-mechanical properties of the copper alloys are not yet degraded. The HRP is performed by a standard furnace, in which only a section of the canister is heated. The manufacturing procedure and the results of the screening and fatigue thermal tests performed on the ENEA mock-ups are reported in this paper

  11. Molecular states of HeH+. Energies and dynamical couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias, A.; Riera, A.; Yanez, M.

    1983-01-01

    We complete the molecular results reported in a previous paper by presenting additional energies (for /sup 1,3/μ states) and radial couplings (between 'μ states) of the HeH + system. These results are needed to treat elastic and inelastic charge-exchange processes when full account is taken of momentum-transfer problems. We also present a formalism to calculate radial couplings between wave functions computed with the use of different variational methods and basis sets. The detailed form of the radial couplings is discussed and related to the Barat-Lichten correlation diagram. The effect of using finite basis sets in calculatig degenerate molecular energies is also discussed

  12. Theory of semiconductor laser cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupper, Greg

    Recently laser cooling of semiconductors has received renewed attention, with the hope that a semiconductor cooler might be able to achieve cryogenic temperatures. In order to study semiconductor laser cooling at cryogenic temperatures, it is crucial that the theory include both the effects of excitons and the electron-hole plasma. In this dissertation, I present a theoretical analysis of laser cooling of bulk GaAs based on a microscopic many-particle theory of absorption and luminescence of a partially ionized electron-hole plasma. This theory has been analyzed from a temperature 10K to 500K. It is shown that at high temperatures (above 300K), cooling can be modeled using older models with a few parameter changes. Below 200K, band filling effects dominate over Auger recombination. Below 30K excitonic effects are essential for laser cooling. In all cases, excitonic effects make cooling easier then predicted by a free carrier model. The initial cooling model is based on the assumption of a homogeneous undoped semiconductor. This model has been systematically modified to include effects that are present in real laser cooling experiments. The following modifications have been performed. (1) Propagation and polariton effects have been included. (2) The effect of p-doping has been included. (n-doping can be modeled in a similar fashion.) (3) In experiments, a passivation layer is required to minimize non-radiative recombination. The passivation results in a npn heterostructure. The effect of the npn heterostructure on cooling has been analyzed. (4) The effect of a Gaussian pump beam was analyzed and (5) Some of the parameters in the cooling model have a large uncertainty. The effect of modifying these parameters has been analyzed. Most of the extensions to the original theory have only had a modest effect on the overall results. However we find that the current passivation technique may not be sufficient to allow cooling. The passivation technique currently used appears

  13. Closed loop steam cooled airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widrig, Scott M.; Rudolph, Ronald J.; Wagner, Gregg P.

    2006-04-18

    An airfoil, a method of manufacturing an airfoil, and a system for cooling an airfoil is provided. The cooling system can be used with an airfoil located in the first stages of a combustion turbine within a combined cycle power generation plant and involves flowing closed loop steam through a pin array set within an airfoil. The airfoil can comprise a cavity having a cooling chamber bounded by an interior wall and an exterior wall so that steam can enter the cavity, pass through the pin array, and then return to the cavity to thereby cool the airfoil. The method of manufacturing an airfoil can include a type of lost wax investment casting process in which a pin array is cast into an airfoil to form a cooling chamber.

  14. Cooling off with physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, Chris [Unilever R and D (United Kingdom)

    2003-08-01

    You might think of ice cream as a delicious treat to be enjoyed on a sunny summer's day. However, to the ice-cream scientists who recently gathered in Thessaloniki in Greece for the 2nd International Ice Cream Symposium, it is a complex composite material. Ice cream consists of three dispersed phases: ice crystals, which have a mean size of 50 microns, air bubbles with a diameter of about 70 microns, and fat droplets with a size of 1 micron. These phases are held together by what is called the matrix - not a sci-fi film, but a viscous solution of sugars, milk proteins and polysaccharides. The microstructure, and hence the texture that you experience when you eat ice cream, is created in a freezing process that has remained fundamentally unchanged since the first ice-cream maker was patented in the 1840s. The ingredients - water, milk protein, fat, sugar, emulsifiers, stabilizers, flavours and a lot of air - are mixed together before being pasteurized and homogenized. They are then pumped into a cylinder that is cooled from the outside with a refrigerant. As the mixture touches the cylinder wall it freezes and forms ice crystals, which are quickly scraped off by a rotating blade. The blade is attached to a beater that disperses the ice crystals into the mixture. At the same time, air is injected and broken down into small bubbles by the shear that the beater generates. As the mixture passes along the cylinder, the number of ice crystals increases and its temperature drops. As a result, the viscosity of the mixture increases, so that more energy input is needed to rotate the beater. This energy is dissipated as heat, and when the ice cream reaches about -6 deg. C the energy input through the beater equals the energy removed as heat by the refrigerant. The process therefore becomes self-limiting and it is not possible to cool the ice cream any further. However, at -6 deg. C the microstructure is unstable. The ice cream therefore has to be removed from the freezer

  15. 46 CFR 153.432 - Cooling systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cooling systems. 153.432 Section 153.432 Shipping COAST... Control Systems § 153.432 Cooling systems. (a) Each cargo cooling system must have an equivalent standby... cooling system. (b) Each tankship that has a cargo tank with a required cooling system must have a manual...

  16. Granular Corneal Dystrophy Manifesting after Radial Keratotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepehr Feizi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To report manifestation of granular corneal dystrophy after radial keratotomy (RK. CASE REPORT: A 32-year-old man presented with white radial lines in both corneas. He had undergone uncomplicated RK in both eyes 8 years ago. Preoperative refraction had been OD: -3.5 -0.75@180 and OS: -3.0 -0.5@175. Uncorrected visual acuity was OD: 8/10 and OS: 7/10; best corrected visual acuity was 9/10 in both eyes with OD: -0.5 -0.5@60 and OS: -0.75 -0.5@80. Slit lamp examination revealed discrete well-demarcated whitish lesions with clear intervening stroma in the central anterior cornea consistent with granular dystrophy. Similar opacities were present within the RK incisions. CONCLUSION: Granular dystrophy deposits may appear within RK incisions besides other previously reported locations.

  1. Endoscopic Radial Artery Harvest for Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Ming Chiu

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: Endoscopic harvest of the radial artery is technically demanding, but excellent results can be achieved. The endoscopic approach can provide suitable conduits in a less invasive way than the open harvest technique.

  2. Analyzing radial acceleration with a smartphone acceleration sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Patrik; Kuhn, Jochen

    2013-03-01

    This paper continues the sequence of experiments using the acceleration sensor of smartphones (for description of the function and the use of the acceleration sensor, see Ref. 1) within this column, in this case for analyzing the radial acceleration.

  3. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Akira; Kobayashi, Masahide.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To enable a stable operation of an emergency core cooling system by preventing the system from the automatic stopping at an abnormally high level of the reactor water during its operation. Constitution: A pump flow rate signal and a reactor water level signal are used and, when the reactor water level is increased to a predetermined level, the pump flow rate is controlled by the reactor water level signal instead of the flow rate signal. Specifically, when the reactor water level is gradually increased by the water injection from the pump and exceeds a setting signal for the water level, the water level deviation signal acts as a demand signal for the decrease in the flow rate of the pump and the output signal from the water level controller is also decreased depending on the control constant. At a certain point, the output signal from the water level controller becomes smaller than the output signal from the flow rate controller. Thus, the output signal from the water level controller is outputted as the output signal for the lower level preference device. In this way, the reactor water level and the pump flow rate can be controlled within a range not exceeding the predetermined pump flow rate. (Horiuchi, T.)

  4. Cooling water injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inai, Nobuhiko.

    1989-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, ECCS system is constituted as a so-called stand-by system which is not used during usual operation and there is a significant discontinuity in relation with the usual system. It is extremely important that ECCS operates upon occurrence of accidents just as specified. In view of the above in the present invention, the stand-by system is disposed along the same line with the usual system. That is, a driving water supply pump for supplying driving water to a jet pump is driven by a driving mechanism. The driving mechanism drives continuously the driving water supply pump in a case if an expected accident such as loss of the function of the water supply pump, as well as during normal operation. That is, all of the water supply pump, jet pump, driving water supply pump and driving mechanism therefor are caused to operate also during normal operation. The operation of them are not initiated upon accident. Thus, the cooling water injection system can perform at high reliability to remarkably improve the plant safety. (K.M.)

  5. Magnet cooling economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmer, J.F.; Liggett, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    The recommendation to use superfluid helium II in superconducting magnet design has become more prevalent in recent years. Advanced fusion reactor studies such as the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study recently completed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLML) have based superconducting magnet design on the use of He II because of reduced magnet volume, improved stability characteristics, or increased superconductor critical current at fields above 9 Tesla. This paper reports the results of a study to determine the capital costs ($/watt) and the operating costs (watts/watt) of refrigeration systems in the 1.8K to 300K temperature range. The cost data is applied to a 1.8K magnet that is subject to neutronic heating wherein the magnet case is insulated from the winding so that the case can be cooled at a higher temperature (less costly) than the winding. The life cycle cost (capital plus operating) is reported as a function of coil temperature and insulation thickness. In some cases there is an optimum, least-cost thickness. In addition, the basic data can be used to evaluate the impact of neutron shielding effectiveness trades on the combined shield, magnet, cryorefrigerator, and operating life cycle cost

  6. Heat Transfer and Friction Studies in a Tilted and Rib-Roughened Trailing-Edge Cooling Cavity with and without the Trailing-Edge Cooling Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Taslim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Local and average heat transfer coefficients and friction factors were measured in a test section simulating the trailing-edge cooling cavity of a turbine airfoil. The test rig with a trapezoidal cross-sectional area was rib-roughened on two opposite sides of the trapezoid (airfoil pressure and suction sides with tapered ribs to conform to the cooling cavity shape and had a 22-degree tilt in the flow direction upstream of the ribs that affected the heat transfer coefficients on the two rib-roughened surfaces. The radial cooling flow traveled from the airfoil root to the tip while exiting through 22 cooling holes along the airfoil trailing-edge. Two rib geometries, with and without the presence of the trailing-edge cooling holes, were examined. The numerical model contained the entire trailing-edge channel, ribs, and trailing-edge cooling holes to simulate exactly the tested geometry. A pressure-correction based, multiblock, multigrid, unstructured/adaptive commercial software was used in this investigation. Realizable k-ε turbulence model in conjunction with enhanced wall treatment approach for the near wall regions was used for turbulence closure. The applied thermal boundary conditions to the CFD models matched the test boundary conditions. Comparisons are made between the experimental and numerical results.

  7. Endoscopic versus open radial artery harvest and mammario-radial versus aorto-radial grafting in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carranza, Christian L; Ballegaard, Martin; Werner, Mads U

    2014-01-01

    the postoperative complications will be registered, and we will evaluate muscular function, scar appearance, vascular supply to the hand, and the graft patency including the patency of the central radial artery anastomosis. A patency evaluation by multi-slice computer tomography will be done at one year...... to aorto-radial revascularisation techniques but this objective is exploratory. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01848886.Danish Ethics committee number: H-3-2012-116.Danish Data Protection Agency: 2007-58-0015/jr.n:30-0838....

  8. Anterior transposition of the radial nerve--a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakkanti, Madhusudhan R; Roberts, Craig S; Murphy, Joshua; Acland, Robert D

    2008-01-01

    The radial nerve is at risk during the posterior plating of the humerus. The purpose of this anatomic study was to assess the extent of radial nerve dissection required for anterior transposition through the fracture site (transfracture anterior transposition). A cadaver study was conducted approaching the humerus by a posterior midline incision. The extent of dissection of the nerve necessary for plate fixation of the humerus fracture was measured. An osteotomy was created to model a humeral shaft fracture at the spiral groove (OTA classification 12-A2, 12-A3). The radial nerve was then transposed anterior to the humeral shaft through the fracture site. The additional dissection of the radial nerve and the extent of release of soft tissue from the humerus shaft to achieve the transposition were measured. Plating required a dissection of the radial nerve 1.78 cm proximal and 2.13 cm distal to the spiral groove. Transfracture anterior transposition of the radial nerve required an average dissection of 2.24 cm proximal and 2.68 cm distal to the spiral groove. The lateral intermuscular septum had to be released for 2.21 cm on the distal fragment to maintain laxity of the transposed nerve. Transfracture anterior transposition of the radial nerve before plating is feasible with dissection proximal and distal to the spiral groove and elevation of the lateral intermuscular septum. Potential clinical advantages of this technique include enhanced fracture site visualization, application of broader plates, and protection of the radial nerve during the internal fixation.

  9. Radial-piston pump for drive of test machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizhegorodov, A. I.; Gavrilin, A. N.; Moyzes, B. B.; Cherkasov, A. I.; Zharkevich, O. M.; Zhetessova, G. S.; Savelyeva, N. A.

    2018-01-01

    The article reviews the development of radial-piston pump with phase control and alternating-flow mode for seismic-testing platforms and other test machines. The prospects for use of the developed device are proved. It is noted that the method of frequency modulation with the detection of the natural frequencies is easily realized by using the radial-piston pump. The prospects of further research are given proof.

  10. Radially Polarized Conical Beam from an Embedded Etched Fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Kalaidji , D.; Spajer , M.; Marthouret , N.; Grosjean , T.

    2009-01-01

    International audience; We propose a method for producing a conical beam based on the lateral refraction of the TM01 mode from a two-mode fiber after chemical etching of the cladding, and for controlling its radial polarization. The whole power of the guided mode is transferred to the refracted beam with low diffraction. Polarization control by a series of azimuthal detectors and a stress controller affords the transmission of a stabilized radial polarization through an optical fiber. A solid...

  11. Luxation of the radial carpal bone in a cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, G.D.C.

    1996-01-01

    A case of radial carpal bone luxation in the cat and its management is described. Open reduction was performed and surgically maintained, in combination with repair of rupture of the short radial collateral ligament and joint capsule. The carpus was supported for one month following surgery by application of transarticular external fixation. Four months after treatment the cat was sound, despite evidence of degenerative joint disease. The mechanism of luxation appears to be analogous to that seen in the dog

  12. Introducing radiality constraints in capacitated location-routing problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Mirledy Toro Ocampo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce a unified mathematical formulation for the Capacitated Vehicle Routing Problem (CVRP and for the Capacitated Location Routing Problem (CLRP, adopting radiality constraints in order to guarantee valid routes and eliminate subtours. This idea is inspired by formulations already employed in electric power distribution networks, which requires a radial topology in its operation. The results show that the proposed formulation greatly improves the convergence of the solver.

  13. REGIONAL VARIATIONS IN THE DENSE GAS HEATING AND COOLING IN M51 FROM HERSCHEL FAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkin, T. J.; Wilson, C. D.; Schirm, M. R. P.; Foyle, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Baes, M.; De Looze, I. [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Boquien, M.; Boselli, A. [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille-LAM, Université d' Aix-Marseille and CNRS, UMR7326, 38 rue F. Joliot-Curie, F-13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Cooray, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Cormier, D. [Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Karczewski, O. Ł. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lebouteiller, V.; Madden, S. C.; Sauvage, M. [CEA, Laboratoire AIM, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Roussel, H. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR7095 CNRS, Université Pierre and Marie Curie, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Spinoglio, L., E-mail: parkintj@mcmaster.ca [Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, INAF-IAPS, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

    2013-10-20

    We present Herschel PACS and SPIRE spectroscopy of the most important far-infrared cooling lines in M51, [C II](158 μm), [N II](122 and 205 μm), [O I](63 and 145 μm), and [O III](88 μm). We compare the observed flux of these lines with the predicted flux from a photon-dominated region model to determine characteristics of the cold gas such as density, temperature, and the far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation field, G{sub 0}, resolving details on physical scales of roughly 600 pc. We find an average [C II]/F{sub TIR} of 4 × 10{sup –3}, in agreement with previous studies of other galaxies. A pixel-by-pixel analysis of four distinct regions of M51 shows a radially decreasing trend in both the FUV radiation field, G{sub 0}, and the hydrogen density, n, peaking in the nucleus of the galaxy, and then falling off out to the arm and interarm regions. We see for the first time that the FUV flux and gas density are similar in the differing environments of the arm and interarm regions, suggesting that the inherent physical properties of the molecular clouds in both regions are essentially the same.

  14. Illumination Profile & Dispersion Variation Effects on Radial Velocity Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieves, Nolan; Ge, Jian; Thomas, Neil B.; Ma, Bo; Li, Rui; SDSS-III

    2015-01-01

    The Multi-object APO Radial-Velocity Exoplanet Large-Area Survey (MARVELS) measures radial velocities using a fiber-fed dispersed fixed-delay interferometer (DFDI) with a moderate dispersion spectrograph. This setup allows a unique insight into the 2D illumination profile from the fiber on to the dispersion grating. Illumination profile investigations show large changes in the profile over time and fiber location. These profile changes are correlated with dispersion changes and long-term radial velocity offsets, a major problem within the MARVELS radial velocity data. Characterizing illumination profiles creates a method to both detect and correct radial velocity offsets, allowing for better planet detection. Here we report our early results from this study including improvement of radial velocity data points from detected giant planet candidates. We also report an illumination profile experiment conducted at the Kitt Peak National Observatory using the EXPERT instrument, which has a DFDI mode similar to MARVELS. Using profile controlling octagonal-shaped fibers, long term offsets over a 3 month time period were reduced from ~50 m/s to within the photon limit of ~4 m/s.

  15. Channeling of protons through radial deformed carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borka Jovanović, V., E-mail: vborka@vinca.rs [Atomic Physics Laboratory (040), Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Borka, D. [Atomic Physics Laboratory (040), Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Galijaš, S.M.D. [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 368, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2017-05-18

    Highlights: • For the first time we presented theoretically obtained distributions of channeled protons with radially deformed SWNT. • Our findings indicate that influence of the radial deformation is very strong and it should not be omitted in simulations. • We show that the spatial and angular distributions depend strongly of level of radial deformation of nanotube. • Our obtained results can be compared with measured distributions to reveal the presence of various types of defects in SWNT. - Abstract: In this paper we have presented a theoretical investigation of the channeling of 1 GeV protons with the radial deformed (10, 0) single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). We have calculated channeling potential within the deformed nanotubes. For the first time we presented theoretically obtained spatial and angular distributions of channeled protons with radially deformed SWNT. We used a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation technique. We show that the spatial and angular distributions depend strongly of level of radial deformation of nanotube. These results may be useful for nanotube characterization and production and guiding of nanosized ion beams.

  16. Stochastic cooling in muon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.A.; Sessler, A.M.

    1993-09-01

    Analysis of muon production techniques for high energy colliders indicates the need for rapid and effective beam cooling in order that one achieve luminosities > 10 30 cm -2 s -1 as required for high energy physics experiments. This paper considers stochastic cooling to increase the phase space density of the muons in the collider. Even at muon energies greater than 100 GeV, the number of muons per bunch must be limited to ∼10 3 for the cooling rate to be less than the muon lifetime. With such a small number of muons per bunch, the final beam emittance implied by the luminosity requirement is well below the thermodynamic limit for beam electronics at practical temperatures. Rapid bunch stacking after the cooling process can raise the number of muons per bunch to a level consistent with both the luminosity goals and with practical temperatures for the stochastic cooling electronics. A major advantage of our stochastic cooling/stacking scheme over scenarios that employ only ionization cooling is that the power on the production target can be reduced below 1 MW

  17. Sympathetic cooling and crystallization of ions in a linear Paul trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drewsen, M.; Bowe, P.; Hornekaer, L.; Brodersen, C.; Schiffer, J.P.; Hangst, J.S.; Schiffer, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Coulomb crystals, containing up to a few hundred ions of which more than 50% were cooled sympathetically by the Coulomb interaction with laser cooled Mg + ions, have been produced in a linear Paul trap. By controlling the balance of the radiation pressure from the two cooling lasers, the Coulomb crystals could be segregated according to ion species. Previous studies of ion crystals and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the temperature may be around 10 mK or lower. The obtained results indicate that a wide range of atomic and molecular ions, which due to their internal structures are not amenable to direct laser cooling, can be effectively cooled and localized (crystallized) in linear Paul traps. For high resolution spectroscopy of such ions this may turn out to be very useful. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  18. Hybrid cooling tower Neckarwestheim 2 cooling function, emission, plume dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braeuning, G.; Ernst, G.; Maeule, R.; Necker, P.

    1990-01-01

    The fan-assisted hybrid cooling tower of the 1300 MW power plant Gemeinschafts-Kernkraftwerk Neckarwestheim 2 was designed and constructed based on results from theoretical and experimental studies and experiences from a smaller prototype. The wet part acts in counterflow. The dry part is arranged above the wet part. Each part contains 44 fans. Special attention was payed to the ducts which mix the dry into the wet plume. The cooling function and state, mass flow and contents of the emission were measured. The dispersion of the plume in the atmosphere was observed. The central results are presented in this paper. The cooling function corresponds to the predictions. The content of drifted cooling water in the plume is extremely low. The high velocity of the plume in the exit causes an undisturbed flow into the atmosphere. The hybrid operation reduces visible plumes strongly, especially in warmer and drier ambient air

  19. Emergency cooling system for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, R.K.; Burylo, P.S.

    1975-01-01

    The site of the gas-cooled reactor with direct-circuit gas turbine is preferably the sea coast. An emergency cooling system with safety valve and emergency feed-water addition is designed which affects at least a part of the reactor core coolant after leaving the core. The emergency cooling system includes a water emergency cooling circuit with heat exchanger for the core coolant. The safety valve releases water or steam from the emergency coolant circuit when a certain temperature is exceeded; this is, however, replaced by the emergency feed-water. If the gas turbine exhibits a high and low pressure turbine stage, which are flowed through by coolant one behind another, a part of the coolant can be removed in front of each part turbine by two valves and be added to the haet exchanger. (RW/LH) [de

  20. Increased radial glia quiescence, decreased reactivation upon injury and unaltered neuroblast behavior underlie decreased neurogenesis in the aging zebrafish telencephalon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, Kathrin; Glashauser, Lena; Sprungala, Susanne; Hesl, Birgit; Fritschle, Maike; Ninkovic, Jovica; Godinho, Leanne; Chapouton, Prisca

    2013-09-01

    The zebrafish has recently become a source of new data on the mechanisms of neural stem cell (NSC) maintenance and ongoing neurogenesis in adult brains. In this vertebrate, neurogenesis occurs at high levels in all ventricular regions of the brain, and brain injuries recover successfully, owing to the recruitment of radial glia, which function as NSCs. This new vertebrate model of adult neurogenesis is thus advancing our knowledge of the molecular cues in use for the activation of NSCs and fate of their progeny. Because the regenerative potential of somatic stem cells generally weakens with increasing age, it is important to assess the extent to which zebrafish NSC potential decreases or remains unaltered with age. We found that neurogenesis in the ventricular zone, in the olfactory bulb, and in a newly identified parenchymal zone of the telencephalon indeed declines as the fish ages and that oligodendrogenesis also declines. In the ventricular zone, the radial glial cell population remains largely unaltered morphologically but enters less frequently into the cell cycle and hence produces fewer neuroblasts. The neuroblasts themselves do not change their behavior with age and produce the same number of postmitotic neurons. Thus, decreased neurogenesis in the physiologically aging zebrafish brain is correlated with an increasing quiescence of radial glia. After injuries, radial glia in aged brains are reactivated, and the percentage of cell cycle entry is increased in the radial glia population. However, this reaction is far less pronounced than in younger animals, pointing to irreversible changes in aging zebrafish radial glia. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Radial cracks and fracture mechanism of radially oriented ring 2:17 type SmCo magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Jianjun; Pan Dean; Zhou Hao; Yin Fuzheng; Tao Siwu; Zhang Shengen; Qu Xuanhui

    2009-01-01

    Radially oriented ring 2:17 type SmCo magnets have different microstructure in the radial direction (easy magnetization) and axial direction (hard magnetization). The structure of the cross-section in radial direction is close-packed atomic plane, which shows cellular microstructure. The microstructure of the cross-section in axial direction consists of a mixture of rhombic microstructure and parallel lamella phases. So the magnets have obvious anisotropy of thermal expansion in different directions. The difference of the thermal expansion coefficients reaches the maximum value at 830-860 deg. C, which leads to radial cracks during quenching. The magnets have high brittlement because there are fewer slip systems in crystal structure. The fracture is brittle cleavage fracture.

  2. The Cool 100 book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haselip, J.; Pointing, D.

    2011-07-01

    The aim of The Cool 100 book is to document 100 inspiring, educational and practical examples of sustainable and accessible energy supply solutions created by, or suitable for, isolated communities in the cooler regions of the world. The book features the following projects, explored in detail: 1. Promoting Unst Renewable Energy (PURE) project, a pioneering project that demonstrates how wind power and hydrogen technologies can be combined to meet the energy needs of a remote industrial estate on the island of Unst in the British Isles. 2. The EDISON project, or Electric vehicles in a Distributed and Integrated market using Sustainable energy and Open Networks that explored increased renewable energy use and electric vehicle operation in Denmark, with a case study on the island of Bornholm. 3. The Sarfannguit Wireless Electricity Reading project, which has significantly improved utility metering and enabled improved energy management, reduced electricity demand, and the introduction of renewable energy technologies in the isolated villages of Greenland. 4. The Renewable Energy Croft and Hydrogen facility, which uses innovative technologies to support a gardening facility in the Outer Hebrides (Scotland), and is also a working laboratory for students of the local university to develop a hydrogen energy economy. 5. The Samsoe Renewable Energy Island in Denmark, an iconic example of how an island community can consume only green electricity by using a range of innovative technologies and behavioural changes to reduce demand and to harness green energy resources. 6. The Hydrogen Office Project which demonstrates how a commercial office in the coastal town of Methil in Scotland can be supported by a novel renewable, hydrogen and fuel cell energy system, and how the local community is engaged with the project. 7. The Northern Sustainable House in Nunavut, Canada, which explores the process and results of a project to design and implement housing for local families that

  3. CO$_2$ cooling experience (LHCb)

    CERN Document Server

    Van Lysebetten, Ann; Verlaat, Bart

    2007-01-01

    The thermal control system of the LHCb VErtex LOcator (VELO) is a two-phase C0$_2$ cooling system based on the 2-Phase Accumulator Controlled Loop (2PACL) method. Liquid carbon dioxide is mechanically pumped in a closed loop, chilled by a water-cooled freon chiller and evaporated in the VELO detector. The main goal of the system is the permanent cooling of the VELO silicon sensors and of the heat producing front-end electronics inside a vacuum environment. This paper describes the design and the performance of the system. First results obtained during commissioning are also presented.

  4. Cooling towers principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, G B; Osborn, Peter D

    1990-01-01

    Cooling Towers: Principles and Practice, Third Edition, aims to provide the reader with a better understanding of the theory and practice, so that installations are correctly designed and operated. As with all branches of engineering, new technology calls for a level of technical knowledge which becomes progressively higher; this new edition seeks to ensure that the principles and practice of cooling towers are set against a background of up-to-date technology. The book is organized into three sections. Section A on cooling tower practice covers topics such as the design and operation of c

  5. Combined Radial and Femoral Access Strategy and Radial-Femoral Rendezvous in Patients With Long and Complex Iliac Occlusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Elias B; Mogabgab, Owen N; Baydoun, Hassan

    2018-01-01

    We present cases of complex, calcified iliac occlusive disease revascularized via a combined radial-femoral access strategy. Through a 6-French, 125-cm transradial guiding catheter, antegrade guidewires and catheters are advanced into the iliac occlusion, while retrograde devices are advanced transfemorally. The transradial and transfemoral channels communicate, allowing the devices to cross the occlusion into the true lumen (radial-femoral antegrade-retrograde rendezvous).

  6. Design Concepts for Cooled Ceramic Composite Turbine Vane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert J.; Parikh, Ankur H.; Nagpal, VInod K.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop design concepts for a cooled ceramic vane to be used in the first stage of the High Pressure Turbine(HPT). To insure that the design concepts were relevant to the gas turbine industry needs, Honeywell International Inc. was subcontracted to provide technical guidance for this work. The work performed under this contract can be divided into three broad categories. The first was an analysis of the cycle benefits arising from the higher temperature capability of Ceramic Matrix Composite(CMC) compared with conventional metallic vane materials. The second category was a series of structural analyses for variations in the internal configuration of first stage vane for the High Pressure Turbine(HPT) of a CF6 class commercial airline engine. The third category was analysis for a radial cooled turbine vanes for use in turboshaft engine applications. The size, shape and internal configuration of the turboshaft engine vanes were selected to investigate a cooling concept appropriate to small CMC vanes.

  7. Verification of Thermal Models of Internally Cooled Gas Turbine Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Shevchenko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation of temperature field of cooled turbine blades is a required element of gas turbine engine design process. The verification is usually performed on the basis of results of test of full-size blade prototype on a gas-dynamic test bench. A method of calorimetric measurement in a molten metal thermostat for verification of a thermal model of cooled blade is proposed in this paper. The method allows obtaining local values of heat flux in each point of blade surface within a single experiment. The error of determination of local heat transfer coefficients using this method does not exceed 8% for blades with radial channels. An important feature of the method is that the heat load remains unchanged during the experiment and the blade outer surface temperature equals zinc melting point. The verification of thermal-hydraulic model of high-pressure turbine blade with cooling allowing asymmetrical heat removal from pressure and suction sides was carried out using the developed method. An analysis of heat transfer coefficients confirmed the high level of heat transfer in the leading edge, whose value is comparable with jet impingement heat transfer. The maximum of the heat transfer coefficients is shifted from the critical point of the leading edge to the pressure side.

  8. Thermal dimensioning of wet natural draft cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourillot, Claudine.

    1975-01-01

    The conventional models of calculating wet natural draft cooling systems include two different parts. First, the thermal calculation of the dispersion is made either with an ''exact'' method of separating convection and evaporation phenomena and taking account for the steam in exces in the saturated air, or with a ''simplified'' method considering the heat transfer in the whole as resulting of a difference in enthalpies. (The latter is the Merkel theory). Secondly, the draft equation is solved for calculating air flow rate. Values of the mass transfer coefficients and pressure drops of the dispersion being needed for the computation, test bench measurements are made by the designers. As for counter-current cooling systems the models of the dispersion calculation are one-dimensional models not allowing the radial flow and air temperature distributions to be simulated; exchanges inside the rain zone are also neglected. As for crossed-current cooling systems the flow geometry entails a more complicated two-dimensional model to be used for the dispersion. In both cases, the dependence on meteorological factors such as wind, height gradients of temperature, or sunny features are disregarded [fr

  9. Passive low energy cooling of buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Givoni, Baruch

    1994-01-01

    A practical sourcebook for building designers, providing comprehensive discussion of the impact of basic architectural choices on cooling efficiency, including the layout and orientation of the structure, window size and shading, exterior color, and even the use of plantings around the site. All major varieties of passive cooling systems are presented, with extensive analysis of performance in different types of buildings and in different climates: ventilation; radiant cooling; evaporative cooling; soil cooling; and cooling of outdoor spaces.

  10. Aneurisma idiopático de artéria radial: relato de caso Idiopathic radial artery aneurysm: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Ernani Meira Jr.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Os aneurismas da artéria radial são extremamente raros. Em sua maioria, consistem de pseudoaneurismas pós-traumáticos. Os aneurismas da artéria radial verdadeiros podem ser idiopáticos, congênitos, pós-estenóticos ou associados a patologias, tais como vasculites e doenças do tecido conjuntivo. Foi relatado um caso de aneurisma idiopático de artéria radial em uma criança de três anos, que, após completa investigação diagnóstica complementar, foi submetida à ressecção cirúrgica.Radial artery aneurysms are extremely rare. Post-traumatic pseudoaneurysms are the vast majority. True radial artery aneurysms can be idiopathic, congenital, poststenotic, or associated with some pathologies, such as vasculitis and conjunctive tissue diseases. We report a case of an idiopathic aneurysm of the radial artery in a three-year-old child who was submitted to surgical resection after a complete diagnostic approach.

  11. Monolayer graphene dispersion and radiative cooling for high power LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Tun-Jen; Eyassu, Tsehaye; Henderson, Kimberly; Kim, Taesam; Lin, Chhiu-Tsu

    2013-10-01

    Molecular fan, a radiative cooling by thin film, has been developed and its application for compact electronic devices has been evaluated. The enhanced surface emissivity and heat dissipation efficiency of the molecular fan coating are shown to correlate with the quantization of lattice modes in active nanomaterials. The highly quantized G and 2D bands in graphene are achieved by our dispersion technique, and then incorporated in an organic-inorganic acrylate emulsion to form a coating assembly on heat sinks (for LED and CPU). This water-based dielectric layer coating has been formulated and applied on metal core printed circuit boards. The heat dissipation efficiency and breakdown voltage are evaluated by a temperature-monitoring system and a high-voltage breakdown tester. The molecular fan coating on heat dissipation units is able to decrease the equilibrium junction temperature by 29.1 ° C, while functioning as a dielectric layer with a high breakdown voltage (>5 kV). The heat dissipation performance of the molecular fan coating applied on LED devices shows that the coated 50 W LED gives an enhanced cooling of 20% at constant light brightness. The schematics of monolayer graphene dispersion, undispersed graphene platelet, and continuous graphene sheet are illustrated and discussed to explain the mechanisms of radiative cooling, radiative/non-radiative, and non-radiative heat re-accumulation.

  12. Monolayer graphene dispersion and radiative cooling for high power LED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiao, Tun-Jen; Eyassu, Tsehaye; Henderson, Kimberly; Kim, Taesam; Lin, Chhiu-Tsu

    2013-01-01

    Molecular fan, a radiative cooling by thin film, has been developed and its application for compact electronic devices has been evaluated. The enhanced surface emissivity and heat dissipation efficiency of the molecular fan coating are shown to correlate with the quantization of lattice modes in active nanomaterials. The highly quantized G and 2D bands in graphene are achieved by our dispersion technique, and then incorporated in an organic-inorganic acrylate emulsion to form a coating assembly on heat sinks (for LED and CPU). This water-based dielectric layer coating has been formulated and applied on metal core printed circuit boards. The heat dissipation efficiency and breakdown voltage are evaluated by a temperature-monitoring system and a high-voltage breakdown tester. The molecular fan coating on heat dissipation units is able to decrease the equilibrium junction temperature by 29.1 ° C, while functioning as a dielectric layer with a high breakdown voltage (>5 kV). The heat dissipation performance of the molecular fan coating applied on LED devices shows that the coated 50 W LED gives an enhanced cooling of 20% at constant light brightness. The schematics of monolayer graphene dispersion, undispersed graphene platelet, and continuous graphene sheet are illustrated and discussed to explain the mechanisms of radiative cooling, radiative/non-radiative, and non-radiative heat re-accumulation. (paper)

  13. Energy Savers: Cool Summer Tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.

    2001-01-01

    A tri-fold brochure addressing energy-saving tips for homeowners ranging from low- or no-cost suggestions to higher cost suggestions for longer-term savings. Cooling, windows, weatherizing, and landscaping are addressed

  14. Extended analysis of cooling curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djurdjevic, M.B.; Kierkus, W.T.; Liliac, R.E.; Sokolowski, J.H.

    2002-01-01

    Thermal Analysis (TA) is the measurement of changes in a physical property of a material that is heated through a phase transformation temperature range. The temperature changes in the material are recorded as a function of the heating or cooling time in such a manner that allows for the detection of phase transformations. In order to increase accuracy, characteristic points on the cooling curve have been identified using the first derivative curve plotted versus time. In this paper, an alternative approach to the analysis of the cooling curve has been proposed. The first derivative curve has been plotted versus temperature and all characteristic points have been identified with the same accuracy achieved using the traditional method. The new cooling curve analysis also enables the Dendrite Coherency Point (DCP) to be detected using only one thermocouple. (author)

  15. Geothermal heat can cool, too

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellstein, J.

    2008-01-01

    This article takes a look at how geothermal energy can not only be used to supply heating energy, but also be used to provide cooling too. The article reports on a conference on heating and cooling with geothermal energy that was held in Duebendorf, Switzerland, in March 2008. The influence of climate change on needs for heating and cooling and the need for additional knowledge and data on deeper rock layers is noted. The seasonal use of geothermal systems to provide heating in winter and cooling in summer is discussed. The planning of geothermal probe fields and their simulation is addressed. As an example, the geothermal installations under the recently renewed and extended 'Dolder Grand' luxury hotel in Zurich are quoted. The new SIA 384/6 norm on geothermal probes issued by the Swiss Association of Architects SIA is briefly reviewed.

  16. Rehabilitation for distal radial fractures in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handoll, Helen H G; Elliott, Joanne

    2015-09-25

    Fracture of the distal radius is a common clinical problem, particularly in older people with osteoporosis. There is considerable variation in the management, including rehabilitation, of these fractures. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2002 and last updated in 2006. To examine the effects of rehabilitation interventions in adults with conservatively or surgically treated distal radial fractures. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2014; Issue 12), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, PEDro, OTseeker and other databases, trial registers, conference proceedings and reference lists of articles. We did not apply any language restrictions. The date of the last search was 12 January 2015. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs evaluating rehabilitation as part of the management of fractures of the distal radius sustained by adults. Rehabilitation interventions such as active and passive mobilisation exercises, and training for activities of daily living, could be used on their own or in combination, and be applied in various ways by various clinicians. The review authors independently screened and selected trials, and reviewed eligible trials. We contacted study authors for additional information. We did not pool data. We included 26 trials, involving 1269 mainly female and older patients. With few exceptions, these studies did not include people with serious fracture or treatment-related complications, or older people with comorbidities and poor overall function that would have precluded trial participation or required more intensive treatment. Only four of the 23 comparisons covered by these 26 trials were evaluated by more than one trial. Participants of 15 trials were initially treated conservatively, involving plaster cast immobilisation. Initial treatment was surgery (external fixation or internal fixation) for all participants

  17. Cooling methods for power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspersic, B.; Fabjan, L.; Petelin, S.

    1977-01-01

    There are some results of measurements carried out on the wet cooling tower 275 MWe at TE Sostanj and on the experimental cooling tower at Jozef Stefan Institute, as well. They are including: the measurements of the output air conditions, the measurements of the cross current of water film and vapour-air flowing through two plates, and the distribution of velocity in boundary layer measured by anemometer

  18. Induced draught circular cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanquet, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    Induced draught atmospheric cooling towers are described, to wit those in which the circulation is by power fans. This technique with fans grouped together in the centre enables a single tower to be used and provides an excellent integration of the steam wreath into the atmosphere. This type of cooling tower has been chosen for fitting out two 900 MW units of the Chinon power station in France [fr

  19. DETERMINATION OF RADIATOR COOLING SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Yakubovich

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a methodology for calculation of a radiator cooling surface with due account of heat transfer non-uniformity on depth of its core. Calculation of radiator cooling surfaces of «Belarus-1221» and «Belarus-3022» tractors has been carried out in the paper. The paper also advances standard size series of radiators for powerful «Belarus» tractor type.

  20. Cryogenic cooling system for HTS cable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Shigeru [Taiyo Nippon Sanso, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    Recently, Research and development activity of HTS (High Temperature Superconducting) power application is very progressive worldwide. Especially, HTS cable system and HTSFCL (HTS Fault current limiter) system are proceeding to practical stages. In such system and equipment, cryogenic cooling system, which makes HTS equipment cooled lower than critical temperature, is one of crucial components. In this article, cryogenic cooling system for HTS application, mainly cable, is reviewed. Cryogenic cooling system can be categorized into conduction cooling system and immersion cooling system. In practical HTS power application area, immersion cooling system with sub-cooled liquid nitrogen is preferred. The immersion cooling system is besides grouped into open cycle system and closed cycle system. Turbo-Brayton refrigerator is a key component for closed cycle system. Those two cooling systems are focused in this article. And, each design and component of the cooling system is explained.

  1. Observational hints of radial migration in disc galaxies from CALIFA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Lara, T.; Pérez, I.; Florido, E.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; Sánchez-Menguiano, L.; Sánchez, S. F.; Lyubenova, M.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; van de Ven, G.; Marino, R. A.; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; Catalán-Torrecilla, C.; Costantin, L.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Galbany, L.; García-Benito, R.; Husemann, B.; Kehrig, C.; Márquez, I.; Mast, D.; Walcher, C. J.; Zibetti, S.; Ziegler, B.; Califa Team

    2017-07-01

    Context. According to numerical simulations, stars are not always kept at their birth galactocentric distances but they have a tendency to migrate. The importance of this radial migration in shaping galactic light distributions is still unclear. However, if radial migration is indeed important, galaxies with different surface brightness (SB) profiles must display differences in their stellar population properties. Aims: We investigate the role of radial migration in the light distribution and radial stellar content by comparing the inner colour, age, and metallicity gradients for galaxies with different SB profiles. We define these inner parts, avoiding the bulge and bar regions and up to around three disc scale lengths (type I, pure exponential) or the break radius (type II, downbending; type III, upbending). Methods: We analysed 214 spiral galaxies from the CALIFA survey covering different SB profiles. We made use of GASP2D and SDSS data to characterise the light distribution and obtain colour profiles of these spiral galaxies. The stellar age and metallicity profiles were computed using a methodology based on full-spectrum fitting techniques (pPXF, GANDALF, and STECKMAP) to the Integral Field Spectroscopic CALIFA data. Results: The distributions of the colour, stellar age, and stellar metallicity gradients in the inner parts for galaxies displaying different SB profiles are unalike as suggested by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Anderson-Darling tests. We find a trend in which type II galaxies show the steepest profiles of all, type III show the shallowest, and type I display an intermediate behaviour. Conclusions: These results are consistent with a scenario in which radial migration is more efficient for type III galaxies than for type I systems, where type II galaxies present the lowest radial migration efficiency. In such a scenario, radial migration mixes the stellar content, thereby flattening the radial stellar properties and shaping different SB profiles. However

  2. Effect of the radial electric field on turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreras, B.A.; Lynch, V.E.

    1990-01-01

    For many years, the neoclassical transport theory for three- dimensional magnetic configurations, such as magnetic mirrors, ELMO Bumpy Tori (EBTs), and stellarators, has recognized the critical role of the radial electric field in the confinement. It was in these confinement devices that the first experimental measurements of the radial electric field were made and correlated with confinement losses. In tokamaks, the axisymmetry implies that the neoclassical fluxes are ambipolar and, as a consequence, independent of the radial electric field. However, axisymmetry is not strict in a tokamak with turbulent fluctuations, and near the limiter ambipolarity clearly breaks down. Therefore, the question of the effect of the radial electric field on tokamak confinement has been raised in recent years. In particular, the radial electric field has been proposed to explain the transition from L-mode to H-mode confinement. There is some initial experimental evidence supporting this type of explanation, although there is not yet a self-consistent theory explaining the generation of the electric field and its effect on the transport. Here, a brief review of recent results is presented. 27 refs., 4 figs

  3. Radial Structure Scaffolds Convolution Patterns of Developing Cerebral Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Jalil Razavi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Commonly-preserved radial convolution is a prominent characteristic of the mammalian cerebral cortex. Endeavors from multiple disciplines have been devoted for decades to explore the causes for this enigmatic structure. However, the underlying mechanisms that lead to consistent cortical convolution patterns still remain poorly understood. In this work, inspired by prior studies, we propose and evaluate a plausible theory that radial convolution during the early development of the brain is sculptured by radial structures consisting of radial glial cells (RGCs and maturing axons. Specifically, the regionally heterogeneous development and distribution of RGCs controlled by Trnp1 regulate the convex and concave convolution patterns (gyri and sulci in the radial direction, while the interplay of RGCs' effects on convolution and axons regulates the convex (gyral convolution patterns. This theory is assessed by observations and measurements in literature from multiple disciplines such as neurobiology, genetics, biomechanics, etc., at multiple scales to date. Particularly, this theory is further validated by multimodal imaging data analysis and computational simulations in this study. We offer a versatile and descriptive study model that can provide reasonable explanations of observations, experiments, and simulations of the characteristic mammalian cortical folding.

  4. Comparison of Deterministic and Probabilistic Radial Distribution Systems Load Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Atma Ram; Kumar, Ashwani

    2017-12-01

    Distribution system network today is facing the challenge of meeting increased load demands from the industrial, commercial and residential sectors. The pattern of load is highly dependent on consumer behavior and temporal factors such as season of the year, day of the week or time of the day. For deterministic radial distribution load flow studies load is taken as constant. But, load varies continually with a high degree of uncertainty. So, there is a need to model probable realistic load. Monte-Carlo Simulation is used to model the probable realistic load by generating random values of active and reactive power load from the mean and standard deviation of the load and for solving a Deterministic Radial Load Flow with these values. The probabilistic solution is reconstructed from deterministic data obtained for each simulation. The main contribution of the work is: Finding impact of probable realistic ZIP load modeling on balanced radial distribution load flow. Finding impact of probable realistic ZIP load modeling on unbalanced radial distribution load flow. Compare the voltage profile and losses with probable realistic ZIP load modeling for balanced and unbalanced radial distribution load flow.

  5. The effect of radial migration on galactic disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera-Ciro, Carlos; D'Onghia, Elena; Navarro, Julio; Abadi, Mario

    2014-01-01

    We study the radial migration of stars driven by recurring multi-arm spiral features in an exponential disk embedded in a dark matter halo. The spiral perturbations redistribute angular momentum within the disk and lead to substantial radial displacements of individual stars, in a manner that largely preserves the circularity of their orbits and that results, after 5 Gyr (∼40 full rotations at the disk scale length), in little radial heating and no appreciable changes to the vertical or radial structure of the disk. Our results clarify a number of issues related to the spatial distribution and kinematics of migrators. In particular, we find that migrators are a heavily biased subset of stars with preferentially low vertical velocity dispersions. This 'provenance bias' for migrators is not surprising in hindsight, for stars with small vertical excursions spend more time near the disk plane, and thus respond more readily to non-axisymmetric perturbations. We also find that the vertical velocity dispersion of outward migrators always decreases, whereas the opposite holds for inward migrators. To first order, newly arrived migrators simply replace stars that have migrated off to other radii, thus inheriting the vertical bias of the latter. Extreme migrators might therefore be recognized, if present, by the unexpectedly small amplitude of their vertical excursions. Our results show that migration, understood as changes in angular momentum that preserve circularity, can strongly affect the thin disk, but cast doubts on models that envision the Galactic thick disk as a relic of radial migration.

  6. A user's evaluation of radial flow HEPA filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purcell, J.A.

    1992-07-01

    High efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters of rectangular cross section have been used to remove particulates and the associated radioactivity from air ventilation streams since the advent of nuclear materials processing. Use of round axial flow HEPA filters is also longstanding. The advantages of radial flow filters in a circular configuration have been well demonstrated in UKAEA during the last 5--7 years. An evaluation of radial flow filters for fissile process gloveboxes reveals several substantial benefits in addition to the advantages claimed in UKAEA Facilities. The radial flow filter may be provided in a favorable geometry resulting in improved criticality safety. The filter configuration lends to in-place testing at the glovebox to exhaust duct interface. This will achieve compliance with DOE Order 6430.1A, Section 99.0.2. Preliminary testing at SRS for radial flow filters manufactured by Flanders Filters, Inc. revealed compliance in all the usual specifications for filtration efficiency, pressure differential and materials of construction. An evaluation, further detailed in this report, indicates that the radial flow HEPA filter should be considered for inclusion in new ventilation system designs

  7. Emergency cooling system for a liquid metal cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Ryoichi; Fujiwara, Toshikatsu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To suitably cool liquid metal as coolant in emergency in a liquid metal cooled reactor by providing a detector for the pressure loss of the liquid metal passing through a cooling device in a loop in which the liquid metal is flowed and communicating the detector with a coolant flow regulator. Constitution: A nuclear reactor is stopped in nuclear reaction by control element or the like in emergency. If decay heat is continuously generated for a while and secondary coolant is insufficiently cooled with water or steam flowed through a steam and water loop, a cooler is started. That is, low temperature air is supplied by a blower through an inlet damper to the cooler to cool the secondary coolant flowed into the cooler through a bypass pipe so as to finally safely stop an entire plant. Since the liquid metal is altered in its physical properties by the temperature at this time, it is detected to regulate the opening of the valve of the damper according to the detected value. (Sekiya, K.)

  8. Parametric feedback cooling of a single atom inside on optical cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatjana Wilk

    2014-01-01

    An optical cavity can be used as a kind of intensifier to study radiation features of an atom, which are hard to detect in free space, like squeezing. Such experiments make use of strong coupling between atom and cavity mode, which experimentally requires the atom to be well localized in the cavity mode. This can be achieved using feedback on the atomic motion: from intensity variations of a probe beam transmitted through the cavity information about the atomic motion is gained, which is used to synchronously modulate the trapping potential holding the atom, leading to cooling and better localization. Here, we report on efficient parametric feedback cooling of a single atom held in an intra-cavity standing wave dipole trap. In contrast to previous feedback strategies, this scheme cools the fast axial oscillation of the atom as well as the slower radial motion. (author)

  9. Radial Fingering in a Porous Medium Digitation radiale dans un milieu poreux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni W.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The theory of immiscible radial displacement in a Hele-Shaw cell is extended to the case of a porous medium contained between two closely-spaced parallel plates, and experiments are described for the displacement of glycerine by paraffin oil in such a system. Data are presented for the number of fingers, the breakthrough time, and the glycerine recovery, for a range of flowrates varying through three orders of magnitude. Good agreement between theory and experiment is observed. La théorie s'appliquant aux déplacements radiaux dans les cellules Hele-Shaw a été étendue à un système qui consiste en une couche mince de milieux poreux encapsulée entre deux plaques en verre. Dans cet article, on examine les déplacements de la glycérine par de l'huile de paraffine. En faisant varier le débit de l'huile de paraffine dans un intervalle de trois ordres de grandeur, on a étudié les variables telles que le nombre de digitations, le temps de percée et le taux de récupération de la glycérine. On a observé un bon accord entre la théorie et les résultats expérimentaux.

  10. Radial mixing of material in the asterodial zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzmaikina, T.V.; Safronov, V.S.; Weidenschilling, S.J.

    1989-01-01

    The asteroid belt shows radial zoning of compositional structure. The most abundant types are successively S, C and P types from the inner to the outer parts of the main belt, and D type in the Trojan clouds. Boundaries between compositional zones are not sharp, but gradual transitions over scales ∼1 AU in semimajor axis. The authors examine processes for producing this structure before, during and after the accretion of asteroids. The initial structure is established by temperature and composition gradients in the turbulent solar nebula during the collapse of the presolar cloud. The radial scale of the zoning, comparable to the disk thickness, favors disk models with relatively low turbulent viscosity. Radial decay of solid bodies due to gas drag during settling to the central plane and planetesimal formation probably causes only a small degree of mixing, due to the systematic nature of drag-induced motions

  11. Point Set Denoising Using Bootstrap-Based Radial Basis Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khang Jie Liew

    Full Text Available This paper examines the application of a bootstrap test error estimation of radial basis functions, specifically thin-plate spline fitting, in surface smoothing. The presence of noisy data is a common issue of the point set model that is generated from 3D scanning devices, and hence, point set denoising is one of the main concerns in point set modelling. Bootstrap test error estimation, which is applied when searching for the smoothing parameters of radial basis functions, is revisited. The main contribution of this paper is a smoothing algorithm that relies on a bootstrap-based radial basis function. The proposed method incorporates a k-nearest neighbour search and then projects the point set to the approximated thin-plate spline surface. Therefore, the denoising process is achieved, and the features are well preserved. A comparison of the proposed method with other smoothing methods is also carried out in this study.

  12. Point Set Denoising Using Bootstrap-Based Radial Basis Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Khang Jie; Ramli, Ahmad; Abd Majid, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the application of a bootstrap test error estimation of radial basis functions, specifically thin-plate spline fitting, in surface smoothing. The presence of noisy data is a common issue of the point set model that is generated from 3D scanning devices, and hence, point set denoising is one of the main concerns in point set modelling. Bootstrap test error estimation, which is applied when searching for the smoothing parameters of radial basis functions, is revisited. The main contribution of this paper is a smoothing algorithm that relies on a bootstrap-based radial basis function. The proposed method incorporates a k-nearest neighbour search and then projects the point set to the approximated thin-plate spline surface. Therefore, the denoising process is achieved, and the features are well preserved. A comparison of the proposed method with other smoothing methods is also carried out in this study.

  13. Rayleigh-Taylor instability of cylindrical jets with radial motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiang M. [GE Nuclear, Wilmington, NC (United States); Schrock, V.E.; Peterson, P.F. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor instability of an interface between fluids with different densities subjected to accelleration normal to itself has interested researchers for almost a century. The classic analyses of a flat interface by Rayleigh and Taylor have shown that this type of instability depends on the direction of acceleration and the density differences of the two fluids. Plesset later analyzed the stability of a spherically symmetric flows (and a spherical interface) and concluded that the instability also depends on the velocity of the interface as well as the direction and magnitude of radial acceleration. The instability induced by radial motion in cylindrical systems seems to have been neglected by previous researchers. This paper analyzes the Rayleigh-Taylor type of the spherical case, the radial velocity also plays an important role. As an application, the example of a liquid jet surface in an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) reactor design is analyzed.

  14. Mixed-Degree Spherical Simplex-Radial Cubature Kalman Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyuan Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional low degree spherical simplex-radial cubature Kalman filters often generate low filtering accuracy or even diverge for handling highly nonlinear systems. The high-degree Kalman filters can improve filtering accuracy at the cost of increasing computational complexity; nevertheless their stability will be influenced by the negative weights existing in the high-dimensional systems. To efficiently improve filtering accuracy and stability, a novel mixed-degree spherical simplex-radial cubature Kalman filter (MSSRCKF is proposed in this paper. The accuracy analysis shows that the true posterior mean and covariance calculated by the proposed MSSRCKF can agree accurately with the third-order moment and the second-order moment, respectively. Simulation results show that, in comparison with the conventional spherical simplex-radial cubature Kalman filters that are based on the same degrees, the proposed MSSRCKF can perform superior results from the aspects of filtering accuracy and computational complexity.

  15. The atomic coilgun and single-photon cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libson, Adam, E-mail: alibson@physics.utexas.edu; Bannerman, Stephen Travis; Clark, Robert J.; Mazur, Thomas R.; Raizen, Mark G. [University of Texas at Austin, Center for Nonlinear Dynamics and Department of Physics (United States)

    2012-12-15

    As the simplest atom, hydrogen has a unique role as a testing ground of fundamental physics. Precision measurements of the hydrogen atomic structure provide stringent tests of current theory, while tritium is an excellent candidate for studies of {beta}-decay and possible measurement of the neutrino rest mass. Furthermore, precision measurement of antihydrogen would allow for tests of fundamental symmetries. Methods demonstrated in our lab provide an avenue by which hydrogen isotopes can be trapped and cooled to near the recoil limit. The atomic coilgun, which we have demonstrated with metastable neon and molecular oxygen, provides a general method of stopping a supersonic beam of any paramagnetic species. This tool provides a method by which hydrogen and its isotopes can be magnetically trapped at around 100 mK using a room temperature apparatus. Another tool developed in our laboratory, single-photon cooling, allows further cooling of a trapped sample to near the recoil limit. This cooling method has already been demonstrated on a trapped sample of rubidium. We report on the progress of implementing these methods to trap and cool hydrogen isotopes, and on the prospects for using cold trapped hydrogen for precision measurements.

  16. Atmospheric emissions from power plant cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micheletti, W.

    2006-01-01

    Power plant recirculated cooling systems (cooling towers) are not typically thought of as potential sources of air pollution. However, atmospheric emissions can be important considerations that may influence cooling tower design and operation. This paper discusses relevant U.S. environmental regulations for potential atmospheric pollutants from power plant cooling towers, and various methods for estimating and controlling these emissions. (orig.)

  17. Power semiconductor device adaptive cooling assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    The invention relates to a power semiconductor device (100) cooling assembly for cooling a power semiconductor device (100), wherein the assembly comprises an actively cooled heat sink (102) and a controller (208; 300), wherein the controller (208; 300) is adapted for adjusting the cooling

  18. Impingement jet cooling in gas turbines

    CERN Document Server

    Amano, R S

    2014-01-01

    Due to the requirement for enhanced cooling technologies on modern gas turbine engines, advanced research and development has had to take place in field of thermal engineering. Impingement jet cooling is one of the most effective in terms of cooling, manufacturability and cost. This is the first to book to focus on impingement cooling alone.

  19. Specific cooling capacity of liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, R. A.; Adcock, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    The assumed cooling process and the method used to calculate the specific cooling capacity of liquid nitrogen are described, and the simple equation fitted to the calculated specific cooling capacity data, together with the graphical form calculated values of the specific cooling capacity of nitrogen for stagnation temperatures from saturation to 350 K and stagnation pressures from 1 to 10 atmospheres, are given.

  20. 14 CFR 29.908 - Cooling fans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cooling fans. 29.908 Section 29.908... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 29.908 Cooling fans. For cooling fans that are a part of a powerplant installation the following apply: (a) Category A. For cooling fans installed...

  1. Sharp Dissection versus Electrocautery for Radial Artery Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzban, Mehrab; Arya, Reza; Mandegar, Mohammad Hossein; Karimi, Abbas Ali; Abbasi, Kiomars; Movahed, Namvar; Abbasi, Seyed Hesameddin

    2006-01-01

    Radial arteries have been increasingly used during the last decade as conduits for coronary artery revascularization. Although various harvesting techniques have been described, there has been little comparative study of arterial damage and patency. A radial artery graft was used in 44 consecutive patients, who were randomly divided into 2 groups. In the 1st group, the radial artery was harvested by sharp dissection and in the 2nd, by electrocautery. These groups were compared with regard to radial artery free flow, harvest time, number of clips used, complications, and endothelial damage. Radial artery free flow before and after intraluminal administration of papaverine was significantly greater in the electrocautery group (84.3 ± 50.7 mL/min and 109.7 ± 68.5 mL/min) than in the sharp-dissection group (52.9 ± 18.3 mL/min and 69.6 ± 28.2 mL/ min) (P =0.003). Harvesting time by electrocautery was significantly shorter (25.4 ± 4.3 min vs 34.4 ± 5.9 min) (P =0.0001). Electrocautery consumed an average of 9.76 clips, versus 22.45 clips consumed by sharp dissection. The 2 groups were not different regarding postoperative complications, except for 3 cases of temporary paresthesia of the thumb in the electrocautery group; histopathologic examination found no endothelial damage. We conclude that radial artery harvesting by electrocautery is faster and more economical than harvesting by sharp dissection and is associated with better intraoperative flow and good preservation of endothelial integrity. PMID:16572861

  2. Cool colored coating and phase change materials as complementary cooling strategies for building cooling load reduction in tropics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Jiawei; Kumarasamy, Karthikeyan; Zingre, Kishor T.; Yang, Jinglei; Wan, Man Pun; Yang, En-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Cool colored coating and PCM are two complementary passive cooling strategies. • A PCM cool colored coating system is developed. • The coating reduces cooling energy by 8.5% and is effective yearly in tropical Singapore. - Abstract: Cool colored coating and phase change materials (PCM) are two passive cooling strategies often used separately in many studies and applications. This paper investigated the integration of cool colored coating and PCM for building cooling through experimental and numerical studies. Results showed that cool colored coating and PCM are two complementary passive cooling strategies that could be used concurrently in tropical climate where cool colored coating in the form of paint serves as the “first protection” to reflect solar radiation and a thin layer of PCM forms the “second protection” to absorb the conductive heat that cannot be handled by cool paint. Unlike other climate zones where PCM is only seasonally effective and cool paint is only beneficial during summer, the application of the proposed PCM cool colored coating in building envelope could be effective throughout the entire year with a monthly cooling energy saving ranging from 5 to 12% due to the uniform climatic condition all year round in tropical Singapore.

  3. Interactions between Radial Electric Field, Transport and Structure in Helical Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Katsumi and others

    2006-01-01

    Control of the radial electric field is considered to be important in helical plasmas, because the radial electric field and its shear are expected to reduce neoclassical and anomalous transport, respectively. Particle and heat transport, that determines the radial structure of density and electron profiles, sensitive to the structure of radial electric field. On the other hand, the radial electric field itself is determined by the plasma parameters. In general, the sign of the radial electric field is determined by the plasma collisionality, while the magnitude of the radial electric field is determined by the temperature and/or density gradients. Therefore the structure of radial electric field and temperature and density are strongly coupled through the particle and heat transport and formation mechanism of radial electric field. Interactions between radial electric field, transport and structure in helical plasmas is discussed based on the experiments on Large Helical Device

  4. New cooling regulation technology of secondary cooling station in DCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xuan; Yan, Jun-wei; Zhu, Dong-sheng; Liu, Fei-long; Lei, Jun-xi [The Key Lab of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical and Energy Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Liang, Lie-quan [The Key Lab of E-Commerce Market Application Technology of Guangdong Province, Guangdong University of Business Studies, Guangzhou 510320 (China)

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, a kind of new control technology of secondary cooling station (constant flow rate/variable temperature difference) in district cooling system (DCS) is proposed in view of serial consequences including low efficiency and high operating cost caused by low temperature of supply water in DCS. This technology has been applied in DCS of Guangzhou University City. The result has already indicated that such technology can increase the supply and return temperatures of buildings, return water temperature of primary side in the plate heat exchanger unit, moreover, the efficiency of both the chiller and the whole system are improved significantly. (author)

  5. Bilateral radial neck fractures – A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABY Ng

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Radial head and neck fractures are the most frequently seen elbow fractures. The usual cause of this injury is a fall onto an outstretched hand with a partly flexed elbow. We report here an unusual case of bilateral non-displaced radial neck fractures in a patient who presented with complaints of pain in both elbows following a simple fall. This case highlights the need for a high index of suspicion in the diagnosis of multiple injuries, no matter how `trivial` the mechanism of injury.

  6. Monte Carlo based radial shield design of typical PWR reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gul, Anas; Khan, Rustam; Qureshi, M. Ayub; Azeem, Muhammad Waqar; Raza, S.A. [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Stummer, Thomas [Technische Univ. Wien (Austria). Atominst.

    2016-11-15

    Neutron and gamma flux and dose equivalent rate distribution are analysed in radial and shields of a typical PWR type reactor based on the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNP5. The ENDF/B-VI continuous energy cross-section library has been employed for the criticality and shielding analysis. The computed results are in good agreement with the reference results (maximum difference is less than 56 %). It implies that MCNP5 a good tool for accurate prediction of neutron and gamma flux and dose rates in radial shield around the core of PWR type reactors.

  7. Imaging of radial wrist pain. I. Imaging modalities and anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ryan Ka Lok; Griffith, James F.; Ng, Alex Wing Hung [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, Shatin (China); Wong, Clara Wing Yee [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Shatin (China)

    2014-06-15

    Radial wrist pain is a common clinical complaint. The relatively complex anatomy in this region, combined with the small size of the anatomical structures and occasionally subtle imaging findings, can pose problems when trying to localize the exact cause of pain. To fully comprehend the underlying pathology, one needs a good understanding of both radial-sided wrist anatomy and the relative merits of the different imaging techniques used to assess these structures. In part I of this review, these aspects will be discussed. (orig.)

  8. Bessel-like beams modulated by arbitrary radial functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman; Wiggins

    2000-06-01

    An approximate method for determining the radial and axial intensity of a Bessel-like beam is presented for the general case in which a radial Bessel distribution of any order is modulated by an arbitrary function. For Bessel-Gauss, generalized Bessel-Gauss, and Bessel-super-Gauss beams, this simple approximation yields results that are very close to the exact values, while they are exact for Bessel beams. A practical beam that can be generated with a combination of simple lenses is also analyzed and illustrated.

  9. Radial multipliers on amalgamated free products of II-factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möller, Sören

    2014-01-01

    Let ℳi be a family of II1-factors, containing a common II1-subfactor 풩, such that [ℳi : 풩] ∈ ℕ0 for all i. Furthermore, let ϕ: ℕ0 → ℂ. We show that if a Hankel matrix related to ϕ is trace-class, then there exists a unique completely bounded map Mϕ on the amalgamated free product of the ℳi...... with amalgamation over 풩, which acts as a radial multiplier. Hereby, we extend a result of Haagerup and the author for radial multipliers on reduced free products of unital C*- and von Neumann algebras....

  10. Communication between radial nerve and medial cutaneous nerve of forearm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R R Marathe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radial nerve is usually a branch of the posterior cord of the brachial plexus. It innervates triceps, anconeous, brachialis, brachioradialis, extensor carpi radialis longus muscles and gives the posterior cutaneous nerve of the arm, lower lateral cutaneous nerve of arm, posterior cutaneous nerve of forearm; without exhibiting any communication with the medial cutaneous nerve of forearm or any other nerve. We report communication between the radial nerve and medial cutaneous nerve of forearm on the left side in a 58-year-old male cadaver. The right sided structures were found to be normal. Neurosurgeons should keep such variations in mind while performing the surgeries of axilla and upper arm.

  11. Tight focusing of radially polarized circular Airy vortex beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Musheng; Huang, Sujuan; Shao, Wei

    2017-11-01

    Tight focusing properties of radially polarized circular Airy vortex beams (CAVB) are studied numerically. The light field expressions for the focused fields are derived based on vectorial Debye theory. We also study the relationship between focal profiles, such as light intensity distribution, radius of focal spot and focal length, and the parameters of CAVB. Numerical results demonstrate that we can generate a radially polarized CAVB with super-long focal length, super-strong longitudinal intensity or subwavelength focused spot at the focal plane by properly choosing the parameters of incident light and high numerical aperture (NA) lens. These results have potential applications for optical trapping, optical storage and particle acceleration.

  12. Studies of radial distortions of the ATLAS Inner Detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The measurement of the absolute momentum scale of charged particles provided by the ATLAS inner detector is affected by biases related to geometrical deformations which are not well constrained by the track-based alignment procedure. The focus of this note is on momentum biases related to radial distortions of the inner detector. The $J/\\psi$, $\\Upsilon$, and $Z$-boson resonances decaying into pairs of muons are used to study and quantify such radial distortions in the barrel region of the inner detector. The analysis is performed on data collected in 2016 during Run 2 of the Large Hadron Collider, and corresponding to 33 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity.

  13. Bifurcated transition of radial transport in the HIEI tandem mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, O.; Yasaka, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Transition to a high radial confinement mode in a mirror plasma is triggered by limiter biasing. Sheared plasma rotation is induced in the high confinement phase which is characterized by reduction of edge turbulence and a confinement enhancement factor of 2-4. Edge plasma parameters related to radial confinement show a hysteresis phenomenon as a function of bias voltage or bias current, leading to the fact that transition from low to high confinement mode occurs between the bifurcated states. A transition model based on azimuthal momentum balance is employed to clarify physics of the observed bifurcation. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  14. Modeling the Radial Color Profile of M31

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semionov D.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a preliminary study of a fragment of the radial color profile of the spiral galaxy M 31 in terms of 2-D model accounting for internal extinction in the disk. The two stellar population disk model was assumed. The old dust-free disk population is represented by the double exponential law, and the young disk population, well mixed with the dust, resides in spiral arms of various scale-heights. We find a good agreement among the radial color B-R profiles produced by this simple model and the profile measured around the spiral arm S4 of M 31.

  15. Radially polarized conical beam from an embedded etched fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaidji, Djamel; Spajer, Michel; Marthouret, Nadège; Grosjean, Thierry

    2009-06-15

    We propose a method for producing a conical beam based on the lateral refraction of the TM(01) mode from a two-mode fiber after chemical etching of the cladding, and for controlling its radial polarization. The whole power of the guided mode is transferred to the refracted beam with low diffraction. Polarization control by a series of azimuthal detectors and a stress controller affords the transmission of a stabilized radial polarization through an optical fiber. A solid component usable for many applications has been obtained.

  16. Transport profiles induced by radially localized modes in tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beklemishev, A.D.; Horton, W.

    1991-04-01

    We describe a new approach to the calculation of turbulent transport coefficients for radially localized modes. The theory takes into account the nonuniformity of the distribution of rational (resonant) magnetic surfaces in minor radius. This distribution function is proportional to the density of available states of excitation. The resulting density of state correction qualitatively changes the radial profile of the transport coefficients, as compared to the usual local diffusivity formulae. The correction factor calculated for the η i -mode transport allows a much better agreement of χ i with the experimental data than previously achieved. 8 refs., 3 figs

  17. THE RADIAL VELOCITY EXPERIMENT (RAVE): THIRD DATA RELEASE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebert, A.; Williams, M. E. K.; Siviero, A.; Boeche, C.; Steinmetz, M.; De Jong, R. S.; Enke, H.; Anguiano, B.; Reid, W.; Ritter, A.; Fulbright, J.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Munari, U.; Zwitter, T.; Watson, F. G.; Burton, D.; Cass, C. J. P.; Fiegert, K.; Hartley, M.; Russel, K. S.

    2011-01-01

    We present the third data release of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) which is the first milestone of the RAVE project, releasing the full pilot survey. The catalog contains 83,072 radial velocity measurements for 77,461 stars in the southern celestial hemisphere, as well as stellar parameters for 39,833 stars. This paper describes the content of the new release, the new processing pipeline, as well as an updated calibration for the metallicity based upon the observation of additional standard stars. Spectra will be made available in a future release. The data release can be accessed via the RAVE Web site.

  18. Computer simulation of radial transport in tandem mirror machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmore, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    A code used for simulation of classical radial transport in the 2XIIB experiment has been modified to simulate radial transport in TMX. Results have been obtained using classical transport coefficients and also using very simple trial neoclassical resonant transport coefficients. Comparison of the results obtained with solely classical transport and with both classical and neo-classical transport indicate that neoclassical transport depresses the ion density by approximately 5%. The central cell ion temperature is increased by approximately by the neo-classical transport, as is the electron temperature

  19. Matching problems in pulse power radial transmission lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittag, K.; Brandelik, A.

    1984-12-01

    In this report we study the power transfer from a generator along a coaxial transmission line followed by a radial transmission line into a load, which in our application is a pseudo-spark plasma of about one millimeter diameter and about 15 cm in length. First the theoretical background based on transmission line theory is described. Then numerical results are presented. The main conclusion is that when matching the pulse power generator to the pseudo-spark plasma, the effect of the impedance transformation caused by the radial transmission line has to be taken into account. The conditions to obtain an optimal match are described. (orig.) [de

  20. The CERES/NA45 radial drift Time Projection Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamová, D.; Agakichiev, G.; Antończyk, D.; Appelshäuser, H.; Belaga, V.; Bielčíková, J.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Campagnolo, R.; Cherlin, A.; Damjanović, S.; Dietel, T.; Dietrich, L.; Drees, A.; Dubitzky, W.; Esumi, S. I.; Filimonov, K.; Fraenkel, Z.; Garabatos, C.; Glässel, P.; Hering, G.; Holeczek, J.; Kushpil, V.; Marín, A.; Milošević, J.; Milov, A.; Miśkowiec, D.; Musa, L.; Panebrattsev, Y.; Pechenova, O.; Petráček, V.; Pfeiffer, A.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Richter, M.; Sako, H.; Schäfer, E.; Schmitz, W.; Schukraft, J.; Seipp, W.; Sharma, A.; Shimansky, S.; Stachel, J.; Šumbera, M.; Tilsner, H.; Tserruya, I.; Wessels, J. P.; Wienold, T.; Windelband, B.; Wurm, J. P.; Xie, W.; Yurevich, S.; Yurevich, V.

    2008-08-01

    The design, calibration, and performance of the first radial drift Time Projection Chamber (TPC) are presented. The TPC was built and installed at the CERES/NA45 experiment at the CERN SPS in the late nineties, with the objective to improve the momentum resolution of the spectrometer. The upgraded experiment took data twice, in 1999 and in 2000. After a detailed study of residual distortions a spatial resolution of 340 μm in the azimuthal and 640 μm in the radial direction was achieved, corresponding to a momentum resolution of Δp/p=√{(1%·p/GeV)2+(2%)2}.

  1. The CERES/NA45 radial drift Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2073202; Antonczyk, D; Appelshäuser, H; Belaga, V; Bielcikova, J; Braun-Munzinger, P; Campagnolo, R; Cherlin, A; Damjanovic, S; Dietel, T; Dietrich, L; Drees, A; Dubitzky, W; Esumi, S I; Filimonov, K; Fraenkel, Zeev; Garabatos, C; Glässel, P; Hering, G; Holeczek, J; Kushpil, V; Marin, A; Milosevic, J; Milov, A; Mikowiec, D; Musa, L; Panebratsev, Yu A; Pechenova, O; Petretracek, V; Pfeiffer, A; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Richter, M; Sako, H; Schäfer, E; Schmitz, W; Schükraft, J; Seipp, W; Sharma, A; Shimansky, S; Stachel, J; Sumbera, M; Tilsner, H; Tserruya, Itzhak; Wessels, J P; Wienoldh, T; Windelband, B; Wurm, J P; Xie, W; Yurevich, S; Yurevich, V

    2008-01-01

    The design, calibration, and performance of the first radial drift Time Projection Chamber (TPC) are presented. The TPC was built and installed at the CERES/NA45 experiment at the CERN SPS in the late nineties, with the objective to improve the momentum resolution of the spectrometer. The upgraded experiment took data twice, in 1999 and in 2000. After a detailed study of residual distortions a spatial resolution of 340 um in the azimuthal and 640 um in the radial direction was achieved, corresponding to a momentum resolution of Dp/p = sqrt{(1% * p/GeV)^2 + (2%)^2}.

  2. MRI of radial displacement of the meniscus in the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jian; Lv Houshan; Lao Shan; Guan Zhenpeng; Hong Nan; Liang Hao

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To describe the phenomenon of radial displacement of the meniscus of the knees in the study population with MR imaging, and to establish MRI diagnostic criteria for radial displacement of the meniscus and displacement index. Methods: MR signs of radial displacement of the meniscus were evaluated retrospectively in 398 patients with knee symptoms who were examined with non- weight bearing MR images from Jan. 2000 to Feb. 2004. The patients younger than 18 years old, with joint effusion or serious arthropathy were excluded and 312 patients were eligible to be enrolled in this study. The criterion for radial displacement of the meniscus was defined as the location of the edge of meniscal body beyond the femoral and tibial outer border line. A displacement index, defined as the ratio of meniscal overhang to meniscal width, was used to quantify meniscal displacement. Results: The prevalence of radial displacement of the meniscus was 16.7% (52/312) and 13.9% (21/151) in right knee and 19.3% (31/161 )in left knee, respectively. There was no significant difference between left and right knee (χ 2 =1.60, P>0.05) and the ratio between medial and lateral meniscus was 7.8:1. The average displacement index was 0.54±0.24. The displacement indices were significant higher in older group (F=3.63, P<0.05). The incidence and indices of radial displacement of the meniscus for patients under or above 50 year older were 12.0%(17/142), 0.46±0.22 and 20.6% (35/170), 0.64±0.20, respectively. Difference was highly significant (t=0.84, P<0.01). Conclusion: It was concluded that radial displacement of the meniscus in knees was not a rare finding with MR imaging in patients with knee symptoms. The incidence increased in older age group. Further investigations were recommended to understand the etiology and clinical significance of the phenomenon of radial displacement of the meniscus. (authors)

  3. Beam Cooling with ionisation losses

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, Carlo; Kadi, Y; Vlachoudis, V

    2006-01-01

    A novel type of particle "cooling", called Ionization Cooling, is applicable to slow (v of the order of 0.1c) ions stored in a small ring. The many traversals through a thin foil enhance the nuclear reaction probability, in a steady configuration in which ionisation losses are recovered at each turn by a RF-cavity. For a uniform target "foil" the longitudinal momentum spread diverges exponentially since faster (slower) particles ionise less (more) than the average. In order to "cool" also longitudinally, a chromaticity has to be introduced with a wedge shaped "foil". Multiple scattering and straggling are then "cooled" in all three dimensions, with a method similar to the one of synchrotron cooling, but valid for low energy ions. Particles then stably circulate in the beam indefinitely, until they undergo for instance nuclear processes in the thin target foil. This new method is under consideration for the nuclear production of a few MeV/A ion beams. Simple reactions, for instance Li 7 + D Li 8 + p, are more ...

  4. Newton's law of cooling revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollmer, M

    2009-01-01

    The cooling of objects is often described by a law, attributed to Newton, which states that the temperature difference of a cooling body with respect to the surroundings decreases exponentially with time. Such behaviour has been observed for many laboratory experiments, which led to a wide acceptance of this approach. However, the heat transfer from any object to its surrounding is not only due to conduction and convection but also due to radiation. The latter does not vary linearly with temperature difference, which leads to deviations from Newton's law. This paper presents a theoretical analysis of the cooling of objects with a small Biot number. It is shown that Newton's law of cooling, i.e. simple exponential behaviour, is mostly valid if temperature differences are below a certain threshold which depends on the experimental conditions. For any larger temperature differences appreciable deviations occur which need the complete nonlinear treatment. This is demonstrated by results of some laboratory experiments which use IR imaging to measure surface temperatures of solid cooling objects with temperature differences of up to 300 K.

  5. TPX heating and cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kungl, D.J.; Knutson, D.S.; Costello, J.; Stoenescu, S.; Yemin, L.

    1995-01-01

    TPX, while having primarily super-conducting coils that do not require water cooling, still has very significant water cooling requirements for the plasma heating systems, vacuum vessel, plasma facing components, diagnostics, and ancillary equipment. This is accentuated by the 1000-second pulse requirement. Two major design changes, which have significantly affected the TPX Heating and Cooling System, have been made since the conceptual design review in March of 1993. This paper will discuss these changes and review the current status of the conceptual design. The first change involves replacing the vacuum vessel neutron shielding configuration of lead/glass composite tile by a much simpler and more reliable borated water shield. The second change reduces the operating temperature of the vacuum vessel from 150 C to ≥50 C. With this temperature reduction, all in-vessel components and the vessel will be supplied by coolant at a common ≥50 C inlet temperature. In all, six different heating and cooling supply requirements (temperature, pressure, water quality) for the various TPX components must be met. This paper will detail these requirements and provide an overview of the Heating and Cooling System design while focusing on the ramifications of the TPX changes described above

  6. Cooling clothing utilizing water evaporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakoi, Tomonori; Tominaga, Naoto; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2014-01-01

    . To prevent wet discomfort, the T-shirt was made of a polyester material having a water-repellent silicon coating on the inner surface. The chest, front upper arms, and nape of the neck were adopted as the cooling areas of the human body. We conducted human subject experiments in an office with air......We developed cooling clothing that utilizes water evaporation to cool the human body and has a mechanism to control the cooling intensity. Clean water was supplied to the outer surface of the T-shirt of the cooling clothing, and a small fan was used to enhance evaporation on this outer surface...... temperature ranging from 27.4 to 30.7 °C to establish a suitable water supply control method. A water supply control method that prevents water accumulation in the T-shirt and water dribbling was validated; this method is established based on the concept of the water evaporation capacity under the applied...

  7. Cool diffusion flames of butane isomers activated by ozone in the counterflow

    KAUST Repository

    Alfazazi, Adamu

    2018-02-02

    Ignition in low temperature combustion engines is governed by a coupling between low-temperature oxidation kinetics and diffusive transport. Therefore, a detailed understanding of the coupled effects of heat release, low-temperature oxidation chemistry, and molecular transport in cool flames is imperative to the advancement of new combustion concepts. This study provides an understanding of the low temperature cool flame behavior of butane isomers in the counterflow configuration through the addition of ozone. The initiation and extinction limits of butane isomers’ cool flames have been investigated under a variety of strain rates. Results revealed that, with ozone addition, establishment of butane cool diffusion flames was successful at low and moderate strain rates. iso-Butane has lower reactivity than n-butane, as shown by higher fuel mole fractions needed for cool flame initiation and lower extinction strain rate limits. Ozone addition showed a significant influence on the initiation and sustenance of cool diffusion flames; as ozone-less cool diffusion flame of butane isomers could not be established even at high fuel mole fractions. The structure of a stable n-butane cool diffusion flame was qualitatively examined using a time of flight mass spectrometer. Numerical simulations were performed using a detailed chemical kinetic model and molecular transport to simulate the extinction limits of the cool diffusion flames of the tested fuels. The model qualitatively captured experimental trends for both fuels and ozone levels, but over-predicted extinction limits of the flames. Reactions involving low-temperature species predominantly govern extinction limits of cool flames. The simulations were used to understand the effects of methyl branching on the behavior of n-butane and iso-butane cool diffusion flames.

  8. To cool, but not too cool: that is the question--immersion cooling for hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nigel A S; Caldwell, Joanne N; Van den Heuvel, Anne M J; Patterson, Mark J

    2008-11-01

    Patient cooling time can impact upon the prognosis of heat illness. Although ice-cold-water immersion will rapidly extract heat, access to ice or cold water may be limited in hot climates. Indeed, some have concerns regarding the sudden cold-water immersion of hyperthermic individuals, whereas others believe that cutaneous vasoconstriction may reduce convective heat transfer from the core. It was hypothesized that warmer immersion temperatures, which induce less powerful vasoconstriction, may still facilitate rapid cooling in hyperthermic individuals. Eight males participated in three trials and were heated to an esophageal temperature of 39.5 degrees C by exercising in the heat (36 degrees C, 50% relative humidity) while wearing a water-perfusion garment (40 degrees C). Subjects were cooled using each of the following methods: air (20-22 degrees C), cold-water immersion (14 degrees C), and temperate-water immersion (26 degrees C). The time to reach an esophageal temperature of 37.5 degrees C averaged 22.81 min (air), 2.16 min (cold), and 2.91 min (temperate). Whereas each of the between-trial comparisons was statistically significant (P < 0.05), cooling in temperate water took only marginally longer than that in cold water, and one cannot imagine that the 45-s cooling time difference would have any meaningful physiological or clinical implications. It is assumed that this rapid heat loss was due to a less powerful peripheral vasoconstrictor response, with central heat being more rapidly transported to the skin surface for dissipation. Although the core-to-water thermal gradient was much smaller with temperate-water cooling, greater skin and deeper tissue blood flows would support a superior convective heat delivery. Thus, a sustained physiological mechanism (blood flow) appears to have countered a less powerful thermal gradient, resulting in clinically insignificant differences in heat extraction between the cold and temperate cooling trials.

  9. Wireless sensor network adaptive cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, T. [SynapSense Corp., Folsom, CA (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Options for reducing data centre cooling energy requirements and their cost savings were discussed with particular reference to a wireless control solution developed by SynapSense Corporation. The wireless sensor network reduces cooling energy use at data centres by providing improved air flow management through the installation of cold aisle containment. The use of this low cost, non-invasive wireless sensor network has reduced the cooling energy use in a data center at BC Hydro by 30 per cent. The system also reduced the server and storage fan energy by 3 per cent by maintaining inlet air temperature below ASHRAE recommended operating range. The distribution of low power, low cost wireless sensors has enabled visualization tools that are changing the way that data centres are managed. The annual savings have been estimated at 4,560,000 kWh and the annual carbon dioxide abatement is approximately 1,400 metric tons. tabs., figs.

  10. Cooled Beam Diagnostics on LEIR

    CERN Document Server

    Tranquille, G; Carli, C; Chanel, M; Prieto, V; Sautier, R; Tan, J

    2008-01-01

    Electron cooling is central in the preparation of dense bunches of lead beams for the LHC. Ion beam pulses from the LINAC3 are transformed into short highbrightness bunches using multi-turn injection, cooling and accumulation in the Low Energy Ion Ring, LEIR [1]. The cooling process must therefore be continuously monitored in order to guarantee that the lead ions have the required characteristics in terms of beam size and momentum spread. In LEIR a number of systems have been developed to perform these measurements. These include Schottky diagnostics, ionisation profile monitors and scrapers. Along with their associated acquisition and analysis software packages these instruments have proved to be invaluable for the optimisation of the electron cooler.

  11. Assessment of cooling tower impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This guideline describes the state of the art of the meteorological impact of wet cooling towers that are about 80 m to 170 m high, and have a waste heat power in the range of 1000 MW and 2500 MW. The physical processes occurring in the lowest layer of the atmosphere and their impact in the dispersion of cooling tower emissions are represented. On the basis of these facts, the impact on weather or climate in the vicinity of a high wet cooling tower is estimated. Thereby the results of the latest investigations (observations, measurements, and modeling) on the different locations of plants as well as their different power and construction types are taken into consideration. (orig.) [de

  12. Forced draft wet cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daubert, A.; Caudron, L.; Viollet, P.L.

    1975-01-01

    The disposal of the heat released from a 1000MW power plant needs a natural draft tower of about 130m of diameter at the base, and 170m height, or a cooling system with a draft forced by about forty vans, a hundred meters in diameter, and thirty meters height. The plumes from atmospheric cooling systems form, in terms of fluid mechanics, hot jets in a cross current. They consist in complex flows that must be finely investigated with experimental and computer means. The study, currently being performed at the National Hydraulics Laboratory, shows that as far as the length and height of visible plumes are concerned, the comparison is favorable to some types of forced draft cooling system, for low and medium velocities, (below 5 or 6m/s at 10m height. Beyond these velocities, the forced draft sends the plume up to smaller heights, but the plume is generally more dilute [fr

  13. Emergency cooling device for reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Hisamichi; Naito, Masanori; Sato, Chikara; Chino, Koichi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To pour high pressure cooling water into a core, when coolant is lost in a boiling water reactor, thereby restraining the rise of fuel cladding. Structure: A control rod guiding pipe, which is moved up and down by a control rod, is mounted on the bottom of a pressure vessel, the control rod guiding pipe being communicated with a high pressure cooling water tank positioned externally of the pressure vessel, and a differential in pressure between the pressure vessel and the aforesaid tank is detected when trouble of coolant loss occurs, and the high pressure cooling water within the tank is poured into the core through the control rod guiding pipe to restrain the rise of fuel cladding. (Kamimura, M.)

  14. Emergency cooling apparatus for reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, S.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is described which has the core surrounded by coolant and an inert cover gas all sealed within a container, an emergency cooling apparatus employing a detector that will detect cover gas or coolant, particularly liquid sodium, leaking from the container of the reactor, to release a heat exchange material that is inert to the coolant, which heat exchange material is cooled during operation of the reactor. The heat exchange material may be liquid niitrogen or a combination of spheres and liquid nitrogen, for example, and is introduced so as to contact the coolant that has leaked from the container quickly so as to rapidly cool the coolant to prevent or extinguish combustion. (Official Gazette)

  15. Cooling many particles at once

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitiello, G.; Knight, P.; Beige, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We propose a mechanism for the collective cooling of a large number N of trapped particles to very low temperatures by applying red-detuned laser fields and coupling them to the quantized field inside an optical resonator. The dynamics is described by what appear to be rate equations but where some of the major quantities are coherences and not populations. It is shown that the cooperative behaviour of the system provides cooling rates of the same order of magnitude as the cavity decay rate. This constitutes a significant speed-up compared to other cooling mechanisms since this rate can, in principle, be as large as the square root of N times the single-particle cavity or laser coupling constants. (author)

  16. Mid-section of a can-annular gas turbine engine with a cooling system for the transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, David J.; Rodriguez, Jose L.

    2015-12-08

    A cooling system is provided for a transition (420) of a gas turbine engine (410). The cooling system includes a cowling (460) configured to receive an air flow (111) from an outlet of a compressor section of the gas turbine engine (410). The cowling (460) is positioned adjacent to a region of the transition (420) to cool the transition region upon circulation of the air flow within the cowling (460). The cooling system further includes a manifold (121) to directly couple the air flow (111) from the compressor section outlet to an inlet (462) of the cowling (460). The cowling (460) is configured to circulate the air flow (111) within an interior space (426) of the cowling (460) that extends radially outward from an inner diameter (423) of the cowling to an outer diameter (424) of the cowling at an outer surface.

  17. Probing Molecular Ions With Laser-Cooled Atomic Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-11

    1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA, 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no...multiphoton dissociation spectroscopy of CaH+ in a Coulomb crystal, and quantum logic spectroscopy of CaH+. The first two goals have been completed and the...dissociation technique benefits from larger ion number in a three- dimensional Coulomb crystal. We used this technique to measure the for the first time

  18. Permeability enhancement by shock cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Reuschlé, Thierry; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The permeability of an efficient reservoir, e.g. a geothermal reservoir, should be sufficient to permit the circulation of fluids. Generally speaking, permeability decreases over the life cycle of the geothermal system. As a result, is usually necessary to artificially maintain and enhance the natural permeability of these systems. One of the methods of enhancement -- studied here -- is thermal stimulation (injecting cold water at low pressure). This goal of this method is to encourage new thermal cracks within the reservoir host rocks, thereby increasing reservoir permeability. To investigate the development of thermal microcracking in the laboratory we selected two granites: a fine-grained (Garibaldi Grey granite, grain size = 0.5 mm) and a course-grained granite (Lanhelin granite, grain size = 2 mm). Both granites have an initial porosity of about 1%. Our samples were heated to a range of temperatures (100-1000 °C) and were either cooled slowly (1 °C/min) or shock cooled (100 °C/s). A systematic microstructural (2D crack area density, using standard stereological techniques, and 3D BET specific surface area measurements) and rock physical property (porosity, P-wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability) analysis was undertaken to understand the influence of slow and shock cooling on our reservoir granites. Microstructurally, we observe that the 2D crack surface area per unit volume and the specific surface area increase as a result of thermal stressing, and, for the same maximum temperature, crack surface area is higher in the shock cooled samples. This observation is echoed by our rock physical property measurements: we see greater changes for the shock cooled samples. We can conclude that shock cooling is an extremely efficient method of generating thermal microcracks and modifying rock physical properties. Our study highlights that thermal treatments are likely to be an efficient method for the "matrix" permeability enhancement of

  19. Simulated Measurements of Cooling in Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohayai, Tanaz [IIT, Chicago; Rogers, Chris [Rutherford; Snopok, Pavel [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Cooled muon beams set the basis for the exploration of physics of flavour at a Neutrino Factory and for multi-TeV collisions at a Muon Collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) measures beam emittance before and after an ionization cooling cell and aims to demonstrate emittance reduction in muon beams. In the current MICE Step IV configuration, the MICE muon beam passes through low-Z absorber material for reducing its transverse emittance through ionization energy loss. Two scintillating fiber tracking detectors, housed in spectrometer solenoid modules upstream and downstream of the absorber are used for reconstructing position and momentum of individual muons for calculating transverse emittance reduction. However, due to existence of non-linear effects in beam optics, transverse emittance growth can be observed. Therefore, it is crucial to develop algorithms that are insensitive to this apparent emittance growth. We describe a different figure of merit for measuring muon cooling which is the direct measurement of the phase space density.

  20. Beam Dynamics With Electron Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Uesugi, T; Noda, K; Shibuya, S; Syresin, E M

    2004-01-01

    Electron cooling experiments have been carried out at HIMAC in order to develop new technologies in heavy-ion therapy and related researches. The cool-stacking method, in particular, has been studied to increase the intensity of heavy-ions. The maximum stack intensity was 2 mA, above which a fast ion losses occurred simulatneously with the vertical coherent oscillations. The instability depends on the working point, the stacked ion-density and the electron-beam density. The instability was suppressed by reducing the peak ion-density with RF-knockout heating.