WorldWideScience

Sample records for radial breathing modes

  1. Radial Breathing Modes in Cosmochemistry and Meteoritics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T.L.; Wilson, K.B.

    2009-01-01

    One area of continuing interest in cosmochemistry and meteoritics (C&M) is the identification of the nature of Q-phase, although some researchers in C&M are not reporting relevant portions of Raman spectral data. Q is the unidentified carrier of noble gases in carbonaceous chondrites (CCs). Being carbonaceous, the focus has been on any number of Q-candidates arising from the sp2 hybridization of carbon (C). These all derive from various forms of graphene, a monolayer of C atoms packed into a two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal honeycomb lattice that is the basic building block for graphitic materials of all other dimensions for sp2 allotropes of C. As a basic lattice, 2D graphene can be curled into fullerenes (0D), wrapped into carbon nanotubes or CNTs (1D), and stacked into graphite (3D). These take such additional forms as scroll-like carbon whiskers, carbon fibers, carbon onions, GPCs (graphite polyhedral crystals) [6], and GICs (graphite intercalation compounds). Although all of these have been observed in meteoritics, the issue is which can explain the Q-abundances. In brief, one or more of the 0D-3D sp2 hybridization forms of C is Q. For some Q-candidates, the radial breathing modes (RBMs) are the most important Raman active vibrational modes that exist, and bear a direct relevance to solving this puzzle. Typically in C&M they are ignored when present. Their importance is addressed here as smoking-gun signatures for certain Q-candidates and are very relevant to the ultimate identification of Q.

  2. Radial breathing mode of carbon nanotubes subjected to axial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xiao-Wen; Ni, Qing-Qing; Shi, Jin-Xing; Natsuki, Toshiaki

    2011-08-11

    In this paper, a theoretical analysis of the radial breathing mode (RBM) of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) subjected to axial pressure is presented based on an elastic continuum model. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are described as an individual elastic shell and double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) are considered to be two shells coupled through the van der Waals force. The effects of axial pressure, wave numbers and nanotube diameter on the RBM frequency are investigated in detail. The validity of these theoretical results is confirmed through the comparison of the experiment, calculation and simulation. Our results show that the RBM frequency is linearly dependent on the axial pressure and is affected by the wave numbers. We concluded that RBM frequency can be used to characterize the axial pressure acting on both ends of a CNT.

  3. Explicit solution of the radial breathing mode frequency of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tienchong Chang

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of a molecular mechanics model, an analytical solution of the radial breathing mode (RBM) frequency of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is obtained. The effects of tube chirality and tube diameter on the RBM frequency are investigated and good agreement between the present results and existing data is found. The present analytical formula indicates that the chirality and size dependent elastic properties are responsible for the effects of the chirality and small size on the RBM frequency of an SWCNT.

  4. Polarised spectroscopy of individual single-wall nanotubes: Radial-breathing mode study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay, J.; Débarre, A.; Richard, A.; Tchénio, P.; Bandow, S.; Iijima, S.

    2001-02-01

    Polarised Raman spectroscopy is performed in a randomly distributed single-wall carbon tube (SWNT) sample at the scale of an individual single-wall nanotube. A detailed analysis in the radial-breathing mode (RBM) domain is presented. Selection of either a single tiny rope of SWNTs or of a single SWNT results from the conjugated high spatial selection of confocal microscopy, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and sample dilution. The drastic modifications observed in the low-frequency Raman spectra as a function of the polarisation configuration confirm the theoretical results.

  5. Prediction of radial breathing-like modes of double-walled carbon nanotubes with arbitrary chirality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghavanloo, Esmaeal, E-mail: ghavanloo@shirazu.ac.ir; Fazelzadeh, S. Ahmad

    2014-10-15

    The radial breathing-like modes (RBLMs) of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with arbitrary chirality are investigated by a simple analytical model. For this purpose, DWCNT is considered as double concentric elastic thin cylindrical shells, which are coupled through van der Waals (vdW) forces between two adjacent tubes. Lennard-Jones potential and a molecular mechanics model are used to calculate the vdW forces and to predict the mechanical properties, respectively. The validity of these theoretical results is confirmed through the comparison of the experimental results. Finally, a new approach is proposed to determine the diameters and the chiral indices of the inner and outer tubes of the DWCNTs with high precision.

  6. Prediction of radial breathing-like modes of double-walled carbon nanotubes with arbitrary chirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavanloo, Esmaeal; Fazelzadeh, S. Ahmad

    2014-10-01

    The radial breathing-like modes (RBLMs) of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with arbitrary chirality are investigated by a simple analytical model. For this purpose, DWCNT is considered as double concentric elastic thin cylindrical shells, which are coupled through van der Waals (vdW) forces between two adjacent tubes. Lennard-Jones potential and a molecular mechanics model are used to calculate the vdW forces and to predict the mechanical properties, respectively. The validity of these theoretical results is confirmed through the comparison of the experimental results. Finally, a new approach is proposed to determine the diameters and the chiral indices of the inner and outer tubes of the DWCNTs with high precision.

  7. Adsorption effects on radial breathing mode of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiashi, Shohei; Kono, Kaname; Matsumoto, Daiki; Shitaba, Junpei; Homma, Naoki; Beniya, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Homma, Yoshikazu

    2015-04-01

    For elucidation of the adsorption effects on the vibration properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), photoluminescence and Raman scattering spectra from SWNTs at different vapor pressure of water were simultaneously measured and a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was performed. The water vapor pressure dependence and its tube diameter (dtube) dependence of the frequency of the radial breathing mode (RBM) peaks (ωRBM) and the optical transition energy (Ei i) indicate that the physical adsorption is quite important, and both ωRBM and Ei i clearly depend on the number density of adsorption molecules on the SWNT surface. A simple adsorption model, where the vibrational coupling between the surrounding adsorption layer and SWNTs via van der Waals interaction is considered for RBM, reproduces the experimental and MD simulation results of ωRBM in a wide dtube range for various SWNTs, such as isolated SWNTs in vacuum, SWNTs with adsorption water layer, and even bundled SWNTs. On the basis of the model, the variation of the relationship between ωRBM and Ei i in a Kataura plot for various SWNT samples can also be understood generally as the "environmental effects."

  8. A semi-analytical approach for calculating the equilibrium structure and radial breathing mode frequency of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J Gong; L Thompson; G Li

    2016-01-01

    A semi-analytical model for determining the equi-librium configuration and the radial breathing mode (RBM) frequency of single-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is pre-sented. By taking advantage of the symmetry characteristics, a CNT structure is represented by five independent vari-ables. A line search optimization procedure is employed to determine the equilibrium values of these variables by minimizing the potential energy. With the equilibrium con-figuration obtained, the semi-analytical model enables an efficient calculation of the RBM frequency of the CNTs. The radius and radial breathing mode frequency results obtained from the semi-analytical approach are compared with those from molecular dynamics (MD) and ab initio calculations. The results demonstrate that the semi-analytical approach offers an efficient and accurate way to determine the equilib-rium structure and radial breathing mode frequency of CNTs.

  9. A semi-analytical approach for calculating the equilibrium structure and radial breathing mode frequency of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, J.; Thompson, L.; Li, G.

    2016-12-01

    A semi-analytical model for determining the equilibrium configuration and the radial breathing mode (RBM) frequency of single-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is presented. By taking advantage of the symmetry characteristics, a CNT structure is represented by five independent variables. A line search optimization procedure is employed to determine the equilibrium values of these variables by minimizing the potential energy. With the equilibrium configuration obtained, the semi-analytical model enables an efficient calculation of the RBM frequency of the CNTs. The radius and radial breathing mode frequency results obtained from the semi-analytical approach are compared with those from molecular dynamics (MD) and ab initio calculations. The results demonstrate that the semi-analytical approach offers an efficient and accurate way to determine the equilibrium structure and radial breathing mode frequency of CNTs.

  10. A computational modeling of Raman radial breathing-like mode frequencies of fullerene encapsulated inside single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavanloo, Esmaeal; Fazelzadeh, S Ahmad; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2017-02-01

    Raman radial breathing-like mode (RBLM) frequencies of an infinite nanopeapods are calculated within the framework of a continuum-molecular based model. The nanotube-fullerene interaction is modeled via the Lennard-Jones interatomic potential. An analytical formulation is developed and is justified due to its good agreement with the experimental and atomistic-based results. Furthermore, we propose new relationships for the van der Waals (vdW) interaction coefficients between the atoms of this hybrid nanostructure. Numerical results are also obtained for various nanopeapods on the basis of the present formulation. The RBLM frequency upshifts are predicted for small single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The frequency shifts can be adequately explained by the vdW intermolecular interactions acting between the fullerene and the SWCNTs atoms. To the best of our knowledge, a simple theoretical method which can predict the Raman RBLM frequencies of the nanopeapods with high precision has not been provided hitherto. We believe that the present study is likely to fill the gap.

  11. Study of collective radial breathing-like modes in double-walled carbon nanotubes: combination of continuous two-dimensional membrane theory and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levshov, Dmitry I.; Avramenko, Marina V.; Than, Xuan-Tinh; Michel, Thierry; Arenal, Raul; Paillet, Matthieu; Rybkovskiy, Dmitry V.; Osadchy, Alexander V.; Rochal, Sergei B.; Yuzyuk, Yuri I.; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Radial breathing modes (RBMs) are widely used for the atomic structure characterization and index assignment of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from resonant Raman spectroscopy. However, for double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs), the use of conventional ωRBM(d) formulas is complicated due to the van der Waals interaction between the layers, which strongly affects the frequencies of radial modes and leads to new collective vibrations. This paper presents an alternative way to theoretically study the collective radial breathing-like modes (RBLMs) of DWNTs and to account for interlayer interaction, namely the continuous two-dimensional membrane theory. We obtain an analytical ωRBLM(do,di) relation, being the equivalent of the conventional ωRBM(d) expressions, established for SWNTs. We compare our theoretical predictions with Raman data, measured on individual index-identified suspended DWNTs, and find a good agreement between experiment and theory. Moreover, we show that the interlayer coupling in individual DWNTs strongly depends on the interlayer distance, which is manifested in the frequency shifts of the RBLMs with respect to the RBMs of the individual inner and outer tubes. In terms of characterization, this means that the combination of Raman spectroscopy data and predictions of continuous membrane theory may give additional criteria for the index identification of DWNTs, namely the interlayer distance.

  12. Coherent radial-breathing-like phonons in graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, G. D.; Nugraha, A. R. T.; Saito, R.; Stanton, C. J.

    2012-05-01

    We have developed a microscopic theory for the generation and detection of coherent phonons in armchair and zigzag graphene nanoribbons using an extended tight-binding model for the electronic states and a valence force field model for the phonons. The coherent phonon amplitudes satisfy a driven oscillator equation with the driving term depending on photoexcited carrier density. We examine the coherent phonon radial-breathing-like mode amplitudes as a function of excitation energies and nanoribbon types. For photoexcitation near the optical absorption edge the coherent phonon driving term for the radial-breathing-like mode is much larger for zigzag nanoribbons where transitions between localized edge states provide the dominant contribution to the coherent phonon driving term. Using an effective mass theory, we explain how the armchair nanoribbon width changes in response to laser excitation.

  13. Breathing Modes in Dusty Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓钢; 王爽; 潘秋惠; 刘悦; 贺明峰

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic breathing modes of dusty plasmas have been investigated in a cylindricalsystem with an axial symmetry. The linear wave solution and a "dispersion" relation were derived.It was found that in an infinite area, the mode is reduced to a "classical" dust acoustic wave inthe region away from the center. If the dusty plasma is confined in a finite region, however, thebreathing (or heart-beating) behavior would be found as observed in many experiments.

  14. A Simple Theoretical Model for Ring and Nanotube Radial Breathing Mode%环和纳米管径向呼吸振动模式的一个简单理论模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周桃; 徐灿; 张小芳; 程川; 陈亮; 许莹

    2008-01-01

    用密度泛函方法在B3LYP/6-31G(d)基组下计算了(MgO)n和(BeO)n环(n=3-10)的径向呼吸振动.大环的径向呼吸振动频率正比于环直径的倒数,但键长的变化导致频率偏离了这种线性关系.随着环直径的减小,直径倒数的三次方和键长的变化将导致频率更大地偏离线性行为.从化学键的角度出发利用一维谐振子及弹簧的串并联思想,解释了这种线性关系和偏离现象.这种模型还可以用于研究纳米管的径向呼吸振动频率.%The radial breathing modes (RBMs) of (MgO)n and (BeO)n rings (n=3-10) were calculated using the density functional theory at B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. It was found that for large rings, the radial breathing mode (RBM) frequency was inversely proportional to the centre diameter, but the variation of bond length may lead to deviations from a linear behavior. The deviations caused by inverse cubic term of diameter and variation of bond length, became dramatic with the decrease of ring diameter. From the point of chemical bond view, using one-dimensional harmonic oscillator and the method of cascade and parallel connection of "springs", the linear relation and deviations were explained. The model can be applied to nanotubes.

  15. On radial geodesic forcing of zonal modes

    CERN Document Server

    Kendl, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The elementary local and global influence of geodesic field line curvature on radial dispersion of zonal modes in magnetised plasmas is analysed with a primitive drift wave turbulence model. A net radial geodesic forcing of zonal flows and geodesic acoustic modes can not be expected in any closed toroidal magnetic confinement configuration, since the flux surface average of geodesic curvature identically vanishes. Radial motion of poloidally elongated zonal jets may occur in the presence of geodesic acoustic mode activity. Phenomenologically a radial propagation of zonal modes shows some characteristics of a classical analogon to second sound in quantum condensates.

  16. On radial geodesic forcing of zonal modes

    OpenAIRE

    Kendl, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The elementary local and global influence of geodesic field line curvature on radial dispersion of zonal modes in magnetised plasmas is analysed with a primitive drift wave turbulence model. A net radial geodesic forcing of zonal flows and geodesic acoustic modes can not be expected in any closed toroidal magnetic confinement configuration, since the flux surface average of geodesic curvature identically vanishes. Radial motion of poloidally elongated zonal jets may occur in the presence of g...

  17. Existence and Vanishing of the Breathing Mode in Strongly Correlated Finite Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Henning, C; Ludwig, P; Piel, A; Melzer, A; Bonitz, M

    2008-01-01

    One of the fundamental eigenmodes of finite interacting systems is the mode of {\\em uniform radial expansion and contraction} -- the ``breathing'' mode (BM). Here we show in a general way that this mode exists only under special conditions: i) for harmonically trapped systems with interaction potentials of the form $1/r^\\gamma$ $(\\gamma\\in\\mathbb{R}_{\

  18. Quantum breathing mode of interacting particles in harmonic traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauch, Sebastian; Hochstuhl, David; Balzer, Karsten; Bonitz, Michael

    2010-04-01

    The breathing mode - the uniform radial expansion and contraction of a system of interacting particles - is analyzed. Extending our previous work [Bauch et al 2009 Phys. Rev. B. 80 054515] we present a systematic analysis of the breathing mode for fermions with an inverse power law interaction potential w(r) ~ r-dwith d = 1,2,3 in the whole range of coupling parameters. The results thus cover the range from the ideal "gas" to the Wigner crystal-like state. In addition to exact results for two particles obtained from a solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation we present results for N = 4,6 from multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock simulations.

  19. Electronic response to nuclear breathing mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Hendrik; Ruffini, Remo [ICRANet, P.zza della Repubblica 10, I-65122 Pescara, Italy Dipartimento di Fisica and ICRA, Sapienza Università di Roma P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy); ICRANet, University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, 28 Av. de Valrose, 06103 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Xue, She-Sheng [ICRANet, P.zza della Repubblica 10, I-65122 Pescara, Italy Dipartimento di Fisica and ICRA, Sapienza Università di Roma P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    Based on our previous work on stationary oscillation modes of electrons around giant nuclei, we show how to treat a general driving force on the electron gas, such as the one generated by the breathing mode of the nucleus, by means of the spectral method. As an example we demonstrate this method for a system with Z = 10{sup 4} in β-equilibrium with the electrons compressed up to the nuclear radius. In this case the stationary modes can be obtained analytically, which allows for a very speedy numerical calculation of the final result.

  20. Quantum-coupled radial-breathing oscillations in double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kaihui; Hong, Xiaoping; Wu, Muhong; Xiao, Fajun; Wang, Wenlong; Bai, Xuedong; Ager, Joel W; Aloni, Shaul; Zettl, Alex; Wang, Enge; Wang, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Van der Waals-coupled materials, ranging from multilayers of graphene and MoS(2) to superlattices of nanoparticles, exhibit rich emerging behaviour owing to quantum coupling between individual nanoscale constituents. Double-walled carbon nanotubes provide a model system for studying such quantum coupling mediated by van der Waals interactions, because each constituent single-walled nanotube can have distinctly different physical structures and electronic properties. Here we systematically investigate quantum-coupled radial-breathing mode oscillations in chirality-defined double-walled nanotubes by combining simultaneous structural, electronic and vibrational characterizations on the same individual nanotubes. We show that these radial-breathing oscillations are collective modes characterized by concerted inner- and outer-wall motions, and determine quantitatively the tube-dependent van der Waals potential governing their vibration frequencies. We also observe strong quantum interference between Raman scattering from the inner- and outer-wall excitation pathways, the relative phase of which reveals chirality-dependent excited-state potential energy surface displacement in different nanotubes.

  1. Modeling and simulation of vibrational breathing-like modes in individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbai, K.; Rahmani, A.; Fakrach, B.; Chadli, H.; Benhamou, M.

    2014-02-01

    We study the collective vibrational breathing modes in the Raman spectrum of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MCNTs). First, a bond polarization theory and the spectral moment's method (SMM) are used to calculate the non-resonant Raman frequencies of the breathing-like modes (BLMs) and the tangential-like ones (TLMs). Second, the Raman active modes of MCNTs are computed for different diameters and numbers of layers. The obtained low frequency modes in MCNTs can be identified to each single-walled carbon nanotubes. These modes that originate from the radial breathing ones of the individual walls are strongly coupled through the concentric tube-tube van der Waals interaction. The calculated BLMs in the low-frequency region are compared with the experimental Raman data obtained from other studies. Finally, special attention is given to the comparison with Raman data on MCNTs composed of six layers.

  2. An improved equivalent circuit model of radial mode piezoelectric transformer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yihua; Huang, Wei

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, both the equivalent circuit models of the radial mode and the coupled thickness vibration mode of the radial mode piezoelectric transformer are deduced, and then with the Y-parameter matrix method and the dual-port network theory, an improved equivalent circuit model for the multilayer radial mode piezoelectric transformer is established. A radial mode transformer sample is tested to verify the equivalent circuit model. The experimental results show that the model proposed in this paper is more precise than the typical model.

  3. Breathing mode influence on craniofacial development and head posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambi-Rocha, Annel; Cabrera-Domínguez, Mª Eugenia; Domínguez-Reyes, Antonia

    2017-08-14

    The incidence of abnormal breathing and its consequences on craniofacial development is increasing, and is not limited to children with adenoid faces. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cephalometric differences in craniofacial structures and head posture between nasal breathing and oral breathing children and teenagers with a normal facial growth pattern. Ninety-eight 7-16 year-old patients with a normal facial growth pattern were clinically and radiographically evaluated. They were classified as either nasal breathing or oral breathing patients according to the predominant mode of breathing through clinical and historical evaluation, and breathing respiratory rate predomination as quantified by an airflow sensor. They were divided in two age groups (G1: 7-9) (G2: 10-16) to account for normal age-related facial growth. Oral breathing children (8.0±0.7 years) showed less nasopharyngeal cross-sectional dimension (MPP) (p=0.030), whereas other structures were similar to their nasal breathing counterparts (7.6±0.9 years). However, oral breathing teenagers (12.3±2.0 years) exhibited a greater palate length (ANS-PNS) (p=0.049), a higher vertical dimension in the lower anterior face (Xi-ANS-Pm) (p=0.015), and a lower position of the hyoid bone with respect to the mandibular plane (H-MP) (p=0.017) than their nasal breathing counterparts (12.5±1.9 years). No statistically significant differences were found in head posture. Even in individuals with a normal facial growth pattern, when compared with nasal breathing individuals, oral breathing children present differences in airway dimensions. Among adolescents, these dissimilarities include structures in the facial development and hyoid bone position. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. The effects of breathing motion on DCE-MRI images: Phantom studies simulating respiratory motion to compare CAIPARINHA-VIBE, radial VIBE, and conventional VIBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Kyung; Seo, Nieun; Kim, Bohyun; Huh, Jimi; Kim, Jeong Kon; Lee, Seung Soo; KIm, Kyung Won [Dept. of Radiology, and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In Seong [Siemens Healthcare Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nickel, Dominik [MR Application Predevelopment, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    To compare the breathing effects on dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI between controlled aliasing in parallel imaging results in higher acceleration (CAIPIRINHA)-volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE), radial VIBE with k-space-weighted image contrast view-sharing (radial-VIBE), and conventional VIBE (c-VIBE) sequences using a dedicated phantom experiment. We developed a moving platform to simulate breathing motion. We conducted dynamic scanning on a 3T machine (MAGNETOM Skyra, Siemens Healthcare) using CAIPIRINHA-VIBE, radial-VIBE, and c-VIBE for six minutes per sequence. We acquired MRI images of the phantom in both static and moving modes, and we also obtained motion-corrected images for the motion mode. We compared the signal stability and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of each sequence according to motion state and used the coefficients of variation (CoV) to determine the degree of signal stability. With motion, CAIPIRINHA-VIBE showed the best image quality, and the motion correction aligned the images very well. The CoV (%) of CAIPIRINHA-VIBE in the moving mode (18.65) decreased significantly after the motion correction (2.56) (p < 0.001). In contrast, c-VIBE showed severe breathing motion artifacts that did not improve after motion correction. For radial-VIBE, the position of the phantom in the images did not change during motion, but streak artifacts significantly degraded image quality, also after motion correction. In addition, SNR increased in both CAIPIRINHA-VIBE (from 3.37 to 9.41, p < 0.001) and radial-VIBE (from 4.3 to 4.96, p < 0.001) after motion correction. CAIPIRINHA-VIBE performed best for free-breathing DCE-MRI after motion correction, with excellent image quality.

  5. Breathing modes, body positions, and suprahyoid muscle activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, S; Ono, T; Ishiwata, Y; Kuroda, T

    2002-12-01

    To determine (1) how electromyographic activities of the genioglossus and geniohyoid muscles can be differentiated, and (2) whether changes in breathing modes and body positions have effects on the genioglossus and geniohyoid muscle activities. Ten normal subjects participated in the study. Electromyographic activities of both the genioglossus and geniohyoid muscles were recorded during nasal and oral breathing, while the subject was in the upright and supine positions. The electromyographic activities of the genioglossus and geniohyoid muscles were compared during jaw opening, swallowing, mandibular advancement, and tongue protrusion. The geniohyoid muscle showed greater electromyographic activity than the genioglossus muscle during maximal jaw opening. In addition, the geniohyoid muscle showed a shorter (P breathing modes and body positions, while there were no significant differences in the geniohyoid muscle activity. Electromyographic activities from the genioglossus and geniohyoid muscles are successfully differentiated. In addition, it appears that changes in the breathing mode and body position significantly affect the genioglossus muscle activity, but do not affect the geniohyoid muscle activity.

  6. Angular and radial mode analyzer for optical beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouraddy, Ayman F; Yarnall, Timothy M; Saleh, Bahaa E A

    2011-12-01

    We describe an approach to determining both the angular and the radial modal content of a scalar optical beam in terms of optical angular momentum modes. A modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer that incorporates a spatial rotator to determine the angular modes and an optical realization of the fractional Hankel transform (fHT) to determine the radial modes is analyzed. Varying the rotation angle and the order of the fHT produces a two-dimensional (2D) interferogram from which we extract the modal coefficients by simple 2D Fourier analysis.

  7. Recovering lost 21 cm radial modes via cosmic tidal reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Hong-Ming; Yu, Yu; Chen, Xuelei

    2016-01-01

    21 cm intensity mapping has emerged as a promising technique to map the large-scale structure of the Universe, at redshifts $z$ from 1 to 10. Unfortunately, many of the key cross correlations with photo-$z$ galaxies and the CMB have been thought to be impossible due to foreground contamination for radial modes with small wavenumbers. These modes are usually subtracted in the foreground subtraction process. We recover the lost 21 cm radial modes via cosmic tidal reconstruction and find more than 60\\% cross-correlation signal at $\\ell\\lesssim100$ and even more on larger scales can be recovered from null. The tidal reconstruction method opens up a new set of possibilities to probe our Universe and is extremely valuable not only for 21 cm surveys but also for CMB and photometric redshift observations.

  8. Cell Size Breathing and Possibilities to Introduce Cell Sleep Mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micallef, Gilbert; Mogensen, Preben; Scheck, Hans-Otto

    2010-01-01

    mode. The energy consumption and network performance of the resulting network are used to quantify the potential of this feature. The investigation is carried out on a tilt optimized network. Since putting cells into sleep mode results in a non-optimum antenna tilt configuration, this paper also...... investigates the possible gains of re-optimizing antenna tilting. The results show that by allowing sleep mode, over a restricted period of 12 hours, an energy saving of 33% is possible. While this energy saving comes at no expense of the overall network performance, the gain in average user data rate is noted...... regular upgrades in the infrastructure. While network equipment is in itself becoming more efficient, these upgrades still increase the overall energy consumption of the networks. This paper investigates the energy saving potential of exploiting cell size breathing by putting low loaded cells into sleep...

  9. Laser-induced breathing modes in metallic nanoparticles: a symmetric molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ming-Yaw; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2011-03-07

    A highly efficient simulation method based on molecular dynamics and group theory is adopted to investigate the laser-induced breathing oscillation of gold and silver nanospheres. Nanoparticles with size ranging from 5.8 to 46.2 nm are discussed. The effect due to laser-induced heating is modeled by a symmetric sudden expansion of the nanospheres by increasing the interatomic distances. A long-range empirical potential model which is capable of describing the phonon dispersion curves of noble metals in the full frequency range is established. Group theory is fully exploited to increase the computation efficiency, and the oscillation behavior of nanospheres of over 3 × 10(6) atoms can be simulated efficiently. Oscillation frequencies of nanospheres are obtained by calculating the Fourier transform of the velocity autocorrelation function. The breathing modes of nanospheres are identified as the excitation of A(1g) modes with in-phase radial displacement of atoms in the nanospheres. The resulting oscillation spectra are in very good agreement with experimental data. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  10. A note on the breathing mode of an elastic sphere in Newtonian and complex fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Galstyan, Vahe; Stone, Howard A

    2015-01-01

    Experiments on the acoustic vibrations of elastic nanostructures in fluid media have been used to study the mechanical properties of materials, as well as for mechanical and biological sensing. The medium surrounding the nanostructure is typically modeled as a Newtonian fluid. A recent experiment however suggested that high-frequency longitudinal vibration of bipyramidal nanoparticles could trigger a viscoelastic response in water-glycerol mixtures [M. Pelton et al., "Viscoelastic flows in simple liquids generated by vibrating nanostructures," Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 244502 (2013)]. Motivated by these experimental studies, we first revisit a classical continuum mechanics problem of the purely radial vibration of an elastic sphere, also called the breathing mode, in a compressible viscous fluid, and then extend our analysis to a viscoelastic medium using the Maxwell fluid model. The effects of fluid compressibility and viscoelasticity are discussed. Although in the case of longitudinal vibration of bipyramidal n...

  11. SOl-based radial-contour-mode micromechanical disk resonator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Yingqian; Zhao Zhengping; Yang Yongjun; Hu Xiaodong; Li Qian

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports a radial-contour-mode micromechanical disk resonator for radio frequency applications.This disk resonator with a gold plated layer as the electrodes,was prepared on a silicon-on-insulator wafer,which is supported by an anchor on another silicon wafer through Au-Au thermo-compression bonding.The gap between the disk and the surrounding gold electrodes is 100 nm.The radius of the disk is 20 μm and the thickness is 4.5μm.In results,the resonator shows a resonant frequency of 143 MHz and a quality factor of 5600 in vacuum.

  12. Bending and Breathing Modes of the Galactic Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Widrow, Lawrence M; Chequers, Matthew H; Cheng, Edward

    2014-01-01

    We explore the hypothesis that a passing satellite or dark matter subhalo has excited coherent oscillations of the Milky Way's stellar disk in the direction perpendicular to the Galactic midplane. This work is motivated by recent observations of spatially dependent bulk vertical motions within ~ kpc of the Sun. A satellite can transfer a fraction of its orbital energy to the disk stars as it plunges through the Galactic midplane thereby heating and thickening the disk. Bulk motions arise during the early stages of such an event when the disk is still in an unrelaxed state. We present simple toy-model calculations and simulations of disk-satellite interactions, which show that the response of the disk depends on the relative velocity of the satellite. When the component of the satellite's velocity perpendicular to the disk is small compared with that of the stars, the perturbation is predominantly a bending mode. Conversely, breathing and higher order modes are excited when the vertical velocity of the satelli...

  13. The effect of radial pressure force on rotating double tearing mode in compressible plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xian-Qu; Xiong, Guo-Zhen [Institute of Fusion Science, School of Physical Science and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Li, Xiao-Qing, E-mail: lixiaoqing912@sicnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Sichuan Normal University, Chengdu 610068 (China)

    2016-05-20

    The role of radial pressure force in the interlocking dynamics of double tearing modes (DTMs) is investigated by force balance analysis based on the compressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model. It is found that the stability of symmetric DTMs is dominated by the radial pressure force rather than the field line bending force. Owing to the compressibility of rotating plasmas, unbalanced radial forces can just result in the rotating islands drift toward each other in the radial direction but do not trigger the explosive growth of the mode in the interlocking process, which is different from that of antisymmetric DTM without flow. - Highlights: • Symmetric DTMs are dominated by the radial pressure force. • Unbalanced radial forces do not trigger the explosive growth. • Suppression of islands comes from the radial pressure force. • The radial forces provide a driving for the island radial drift.

  14. Changes in breathing while listening to read speech: the effect of reader and speech mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochet-Capellan, Amélie; Fuchs, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    The current paper extends previous work on breathing during speech perception and provides supplementary material regarding the hypothesis that adaptation of breathing during perception “could be a basis for understanding and imitating actions performed by other people” (Paccalin and Jeannerod, 2000). The experiments were designed to test how the differences in reader breathing due to speaker-specific characteristics, or differences induced by changes in loudness level or speech rate influence the listener breathing. Two readers (a male and a female) were pre-recorded while reading short texts with normal and then loud speech (both readers) or slow speech (female only). These recordings were then played back to 48 female listeners. The movements of the rib cage and abdomen were analyzed for both the readers and the listeners. Breathing profiles were characterized by the movement expansion due to inhalation and the duration of the breathing cycle. We found that both loudness and speech rate affected each reader’s breathing in different ways. Listener breathing was different when listening to the male or the female reader and to the different speech modes. However, differences in listener breathing were not systematically in the same direction as reader differences. The breathing of listeners was strongly sensitive to the order of presentation of speech mode and displayed some adaptation in the time course of the experiment in some conditions. In contrast to specific alignments of breathing previously observed in face-to-face dialog, no clear evidence for a listener–reader alignment in breathing was found in this purely auditory speech perception task. The results and methods are relevant to the question of the involvement of physiological adaptations in speech perception and to the basic mechanisms of listener–speaker coupling. PMID:24367344

  15. Changes in breathing while listening to read speech: the effect of reader and speech mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochet-Capellan, Amélie; Fuchs, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    The current paper extends previous work on breathing during speech perception and provides supplementary material regarding the hypothesis that adaptation of breathing during perception "could be a basis for understanding and imitating actions performed by other people" (Paccalin and Jeannerod, 2000). The experiments were designed to test how the differences in reader breathing due to speaker-specific characteristics, or differences induced by changes in loudness level or speech rate influence the listener breathing. Two readers (a male and a female) were pre-recorded while reading short texts with normal and then loud speech (both readers) or slow speech (female only). These recordings were then played back to 48 female listeners. The movements of the rib cage and abdomen were analyzed for both the readers and the listeners. Breathing profiles were characterized by the movement expansion due to inhalation and the duration of the breathing cycle. We found that both loudness and speech rate affected each reader's breathing in different ways. Listener breathing was different when listening to the male or the female reader and to the different speech modes. However, differences in listener breathing were not systematically in the same direction as reader differences. The breathing of listeners was strongly sensitive to the order of presentation of speech mode and displayed some adaptation in the time course of the experiment in some conditions. In contrast to specific alignments of breathing previously observed in face-to-face dialog, no clear evidence for a listener-reader alignment in breathing was found in this purely auditory speech perception task. The results and methods are relevant to the question of the involvement of physiological adaptations in speech perception and to the basic mechanisms of listener-speaker coupling.

  16. [The influence of breathing mode on the oral cavity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surtel, Anna; Klepacz, Robert; Wysokińska-Miszczuk, Joanna

    2015-12-01

    Nose breathing is one of the key factors in the proper development and functioning of the oral cavity. The air passing through the nasal cavity is warmed and humidified while dust and other particulate matter is removed. It is also important as far as bone formation is concerned. The obstruction or congestions of the upper respiratory tract may negatively affect the correct and most optimal (nasal) respiratory tract. The switch from nasal to mouth breathing may lead to serious clinical consequences. Children with the clinical diagnosis of mouth breathing are usually pale, apathetic and they lack concentration and often get tired. Disorders resulting from hypoxy may also be the reason from sleep disturbances, such as frequent waking-up, nocturia, difficulties falling aslee. The main clinical manifestations of mouth breathing appear in the craniofacial structures. Mouth breathers frequently suffer from dental malocclusions and craniofacial bone abnormalities. Chronic muscle tension around the oral cavity could result in the widening of cranio-vertebral angle, posterior position of mandibula and narrow maxillary arch. Among dental alterations the most common are class II malocclusion (total or partial) with the protrusion of the anterior teeth, cross bite (unilateral or bilateral), anterior open bite and primary crowded teeth. Apart from malocclusion, chronic gingivitis, periodontitis, candida infections and halitosis are frequently present in mouth--breathing patients.

  17. Experimental Investigation and Numerical Simulation of Air-Breathing Mode for Laser Propulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚平; 唐志平

    2004-01-01

    Laser propulsion is a new concept technique of propulsion and will have important application in future space technology. There are two main driving types: the air-breathing mode and the rocket ablation mode. Vertical flight experiments have been carried out with a simple paraboloid type lightcraft in the air-breathing mode by TEA-CO2 laser. In simulation a new model is used for LSD/LSC wave, the result shows that the momentum coupling coefficient increases with the increase of the pulse energy.

  18. CVD生长多壁碳纳米管的拉曼光谱径向呼吸振动模式观察%An observation of the radial breathing mode in the Raman spectra of CVD-grown multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Valeriy V. Bolotov; Vasiliy E. Kan; Egor V. Knyazev; Peter M. Korusenko; Sergey N. Nesov; Yuriy A. Sten`kin; Viktor A. Sachkov; Irina V.Ponomareva

    2015-01-01

    MWCNTs grown by chemical vapor deposition on SiO2/Si substrates were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, trans-mission electron microscopy ( TEM) , Auger spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy before and after an annealing at 390 ℃ for 120 min in air or chemical treatment with a HCl solution. The Raman spectroscopy was focused on the low-frequency (250-300 cm-1 ) band. It is found that the positions and full widths at half maximum of the peaks forming the 250-300 cm-1 Raman band change little with the annealing or chemical treatment. The measured inner diameters of small-diameter CNTs from TEM agree well with those from Raman spectroscopy. These indicate that the low-frequency band originates from the radial breathing oscilla-tions of carbon atoms in the inner walls of small-diameter MWCNTs.%采用拉曼光谱仪﹑透射电镜﹑俄歇能谱仪﹑X射线光电子能谱仪等研究在SiO2/Si基底上化学沉积的多壁碳纳米管( MWCNTs)经390℃的空气中热处理120 min前后与HCl溶液化学处理前后的结构变化情况. 拉曼光谱集中测试低频(250-300 cm-1 )带. 结果表明,经热处理和化学处理后,在250-300 cm-1形成的拉曼带在峰位和半宽几乎没变. 由透射电镜可知,小直径碳纳米管的内径值与拉曼光谱测试结果一致. 这些结果表明,低频带产生于小直径碳纳米管的内壁中碳原子的径向呼吸振动.

  19. Nonlinear breathing modes at a defect site in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duduială, Ciprian-Ionuţ; Wattis, Jonathan A D; Dryden, Ian L; Laughton, Charles A

    2009-12-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations of a normal DNA duplex show that breathing events typically occur on the microsecond time scale. This paper analyzes a 12 base pairs DNA duplex containing the "rogue" base difluorotoluene (F) in place of a thymine base (T), for which the breathing events occur on the nanosecond time scale. Starting from a nonlinear Klein-Gordon lattice model and adding noise and damping, we obtain a mesoscopic model of the DNA duplex close to that observed in experiments and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. The mesoscopic model is calibrated to data from the all-atom molecular dynamics package AMBER for a variety of twist angles of the DNA duplex. Defects are considered in the interchain interactions as well as in the along-chain interactions. This paper also discusses the role of the fluctuation-dissipation relations in the derivation of reduced (mesoscopic) models, the differences between the potential of mean force and the potential energies used in Klein-Gordon lattices, and how breathing can be viewed as competition between the along-chain elastic energy and the interchain binding energy.

  20. Left ventricular volume measurements with free breathing respiratory self-gated 3-dimensional golden angle radial whole-heart cine imaging - Feasibility and reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Karen; Ugander, Martin; Sigfridsson, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    To develop and evaluate a free breathing respiratory self-gated isotropic resolution technique for left ventricular (LV) volume measurements. A 3D radial trajectory with double golden-angle ordering was used for free-running data acquisition during free breathing in 9 healthy volunteers. A respiratory self-gating signal was extracted from the center of k-space and used with the electrocardiogram to bin all data into 3 respiratory and 25 cardiac phases. 3D image volumes were reconstructed and the LV endocardial border was segmented. LV volume measurements and reproducibility from 3D free breathing cine were compared to conventional 2D breath-held cine. No difference was found between 3D free breathing cine and 2D breath-held cine with regards to LV ejection fraction, stroke volume, end-systolic volume and end-diastolic volume (Pcine and 2D breath-held cine (Pcine and conventional 2D breath-held cine showed similar values and test-retest repeatability for LV volumes in healthy volunteers. 3D free breathing cine enabled retrospective sorting and arbitrary angulation of isotropic data, and could correctly measure LV volumes during free breathing acquisition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Generating higher-order radial Laguerre-Gaussian modes using a digital laser

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bell, Teboho

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Using the digital laser one can generate various types of modes, like, Laguerre-Gaussian modes. The digital laser was forced to generate high-order radial Laguerre-Gaussian modes, LGp , with zero azimuthal order, by loading a digital hologram...

  2. Free-breathing contrast-enhanced T1-weighted gradient-echo imaging with radial k-space sampling for paediatric abdominopelvic MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandarana, Hersh; Block, Kai T.; Winfeld, Matthew J.; Lala, Shailee V.; Mazori, Daniel; Giuffrida, Emalyn; Babb, James S.; Milla, Sarah S. [New York University Langone Medical Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-02-15

    To compare the image quality of contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic 3D fat-suppressed T1-weighted gradient-echo imaging with radial and conventional Cartesian k-space acquisition schemes in paediatric patients. Seventy-three consecutive paediatric patients were imaged at 1.5 T with sequential contrast-enhanced T1-weighted Cartesian (VIBE) and radial gradient echo (GRE) acquisition schemes with matching parameters when possible. Cartesian VIBE was acquired as a breath-hold or as free breathing in patients who could not suspend respiration, followed by free-breathing radial GRE in all patients. Two paediatric radiologists blinded to the acquisition schemes evaluated multiple parameters of image quality on a five-point scale, with higher score indicating a more optimal examination. Lesion presence or absence, conspicuity and edge sharpness were also evaluated. Mixed-model analysis of variance was performed to compare radial GRE and Cartesian VIBE. Radial GRE had significantly (all P < 0.001) higher scores for overall image quality, hepatic edge sharpness, hepatic vessel clarity and respiratory motion robustness than Cartesian VIBE. More lesions were detected on radial GRE by both readers than on Cartesian VIBE, with significantly higher scores for lesion conspicuity and edge sharpness (all P < 0.001). Radial GRE has better image quality and lesion conspicuity than conventional Cartesian VIBE in paediatric patients undergoing contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic MRI. (orig.)

  3. Respiratory Motion-Resolved Compressed Sensing Reconstruction of Free-Breathing Radial Acquisition for Dynamic Liver MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandarana, Hersh; Feng, Li; Ream, Justin; Wang, Annie; Babb, James S; Block, Kai Tobias; Sodickson, Daniel K; Otazo, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Demonstrate feasibility of free-breathing radial acquisition with respiratory motion-resolved compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction (XD-GRASP) for multiphase dynamic Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced liver imaging, and compare image quality to CS reconstruction with respiratory motion-averaging (GRASP) and prior conventional breath-held Cartesian-sampled datasets (BH-VIBE) in same patients. Subjects and Methods In this HIPAA-compliant prospective study, 16 subjects underwent free-breathing continuous radial acquisition during Gd-EOB-DTPA injection, and had prior BH-VIBE exam available. Acquired data were reconstructed using motion-averaging GRASP approach, in which consecutive 84-spokes were grouped in each contrast-enhanced phase for a temporal resolution of ~14 seconds. Additionally, respiratory motion-resolved reconstruction was performed from the same k-space data, by sorting each contrast-enhanced phase into multiple respiratory motion states using compressed sensing algorithm named XD-GRASP, which exploits sparsity along both the contrast-enhancement and respiratory-state dimensions. Contrast-enhanced dynamic multi-phase XD-GRASP, GRASP, and BH-VIBE images were anonymized, pooled together in a random order and presented to two board-certified radiologists for independent evaluation of image quality, with higher score indicating more optimal exam. Results XD-GRASP reconstructions had significantly (all pXD-GRASP also had higher overall image quality score in portal venous phase which was significant for Reader 1 (4.44 ± 0.5 vs. 3.75 ± 0.8; p=0.002). In addition, XD-GRASP had higher overall image quality score compared to BH-VIBE for early (Reader 1: 4.3±0.6 vs. 3.88±0.6; Reader 2: 3.81±0.8 vs. 3.50±1.0) and late (Reader 1: 4.5±0.6 vs. 3.44±0.6; Reader 2: 3.56±0.5 vs. 2.94±0.9) arterial phases. Conclusion Free-breathing motion-resolved XD-GRASP reconstructions provide diagnostic high-quality multiphase images in patients undergoing Gd

  4. Double-mode radial-non-radial RR Lyrae stars in the OGLE photometry of the Galactic bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Netzel, H; Moskalik, P

    2014-01-01

    Non-radial modes are excited in classical pulsators, both in Cepheids and in RR Lyrae stars. Firm evidence come from the first overtone pulsators, in which additional shorter period mode is detected with characteristic period ratio falling in between 0.60 and 0.65. In the case of first overtone Cepheids three separate sequences populated by nearly 200 stars are formed in the Petersen diagram, i.e. the diagram of period ratio versus longer period. In the case of first overtone RR Lyrae stars (RRc stars) situation is less clear. A dozen or so such stars are known which form a clump in the Petersen diagram without any obvious structure. Interestingly, all first overtone RR Lyrae stars for which precise space-borne photometry is available show the additional mode, which suggests that its excitation is common. Motivated by these results we searched for non-radial modes in the OGLE-III photometry of RRc stars from the Galactic bulge. We report the discovery of 147 stars, members of a new group of double-mode, radia...

  5. Free-breathing radial volumetric interpolated breathhold examination vs breath-hold cartesian volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination magnetic resonance imaging of the liver at 1.5T

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sireesha Yedururi; HyunSeon C Kang; Wei Wei; Nicolaus A Wagner-Bartak; Leonardo P Marcal; R Jason Stafford; Brandy J Willis; Janio Szklaruk

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare breath-hold cartesian volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination(cVIBE) and freebreathing radial VIBE(rVIBE) and determine whether rVIBE could replace cVIBE in routine liver magnetic resonance imaging(MRI).METHODS: In this prospective study, 15 consecutive patients scheduled for routine MRI of the abdomen underwent pre- and post-contrast breath-hold cVIBE imaging(19 s acquisition time) and free-breathing rVIBE imaging(111 s acquisition time) on a 1.5T Siemens scanner. Three radiologists with 2, 4, and 8 years post-fellowship experience in abdominal imaging evaluated all images. The radiologists were blinded to the sequence types, which were presented in a random order for each patient. For each sequence, the radiologists scored the cVIBE and rVIBE images for liver edge sharpness, hepatic vessel clarity, presence of artifacts, lesion conspicuity, fat saturation, and overall image quality using a five-point scale. RESULTS: Compared to rVIBE, cVIBE yielded significantly(P < 0.001) higher scores for liver edge sharpness(mean score, 3.87 vs 3.37), hepatic-vessel clarity(3.71 vs 3.18), artifacts(3.74 vs 3.06), lesion conspicuity(3.81 vs 3.2), and overall image quality(3.91 vs 3.24). cVIBE and rVIBE did not significantly differ in quality of fat saturation(4.12 vs 4.03, P = 0.17). The inter-observer variability with respect to differences between rVIBE and cVIBE scores was close to zero compared to random error and inter-patient variation. Quality of rVIBE images was rated as acceptable for all parameters. CONCLUSION: rVIBE cannot replace cVIBE in routine liver MRI. At 1.5T, free-breathing rVIBE yields acceptable, although slightly inferior image quality compared to breath-hold cVIBE.

  6. Evidence for breathing modes in direct current, pulsed, and high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yuchen [State Key Lab for Materials Processing and Die & Mold Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Zhou, Xue [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150000 (China); Liu, Jason X. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Anders, André, E-mail: aanders@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-01-18

    We present evidence for breathing modes in magnetron sputtering plasmas: periodic axial variations of plasma parameters with characteristic frequencies between 10 and 100 kHz. A set of azimuthally distributed probes shows synchronous oscillations of the floating potential. They appear most clearly when considering the intermediate current regime in which the direction of azimuthal spoke motion changes. Breathing oscillations were found to be superimposed on azimuthal spoke motion. Depending on pressure and current, one can also find a regime of chaotic fluctuations and one of stable discharges, the latter at high current. A pressure-current phase diagram for the different situations is proposed.

  7. Wideband radial power combiner/divider fed by a mode transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epp, Larry W. (Inventor); Hoppe, Daniel J. (Inventor); Kelley, Daniel (Inventor); Khan, Abdur R. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A radial power combiner/divider capable of a higher order (for example, N=24) of power combining/dividing and a 15% bandwidth (31 to 36 GHz). The radial power combiner/divider generally comprises an axially-oriented mode transducer coupled to a radial base. The mode transducer transduces circular TE01 waveguide into rectangular TE10 waveguide, and the unique radial base combines/divides a plurality of peripheral rectangular waveguide ports into a single circular TE01 waveguide end of the transducer. The radial base incorporates full-height waveguides that are stepped down to reduced-height waveguides to form a stepped-impedance configuration, thereby reducing the height of the waveguides inside the base and increasing the order N of combining/dividing. The reduced-height waveguides in the base converge radially to a matching post at the bottom center of the radial base which matches the reduced height rectangular waveguides into the circular waveguide that feeds the mode transducer.

  8. Excitation of radiationless anapole mode of isotropic dielectric nanoparticles with tightly focused radially polarized beam

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Lei; Bhattacharya, Nandini; Urbach, H Paul

    2016-01-01

    A high index dielectric nano-sphere can be excited and yet remain radiationless. A method to excite the non-radiating anapole mode of a high index isotropic dielectric nanosphere is presented. With tightly focused radially polarized beam illumination, the main-contributing electric dipole mode and magnetic modes can be zero with only a weak electric quadruple contributing to the total scattering. Further, with a standing wave illumination formed by two counter-propagating focused radially polarized beam under $4\\pi$ configuration, the ideal radiationless ananpole can be excited.

  9. Higher‐order mode absorption measurement of X-band choke-mode cavities in a radial line structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zha, Hao [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing CN-100086 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging, Tsinghua University, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); The European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva CH-1211 (Switzerland); Shi, Jiaru, E-mail: shij@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing CN-100086 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging, Tsinghua University, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); The European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva CH-1211 (Switzerland); Wu, Xiaowei; Chen, Huaibi [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing CN-100086 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging, Tsinghua University, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China)

    2016-04-01

    An experiment is presented to study the higher-order mode (HOM) suppression of X-band choke-mode structures with a vector network analyzer (VNA). Specific radial line disks were built to test the reflection from the corresponding damping load and different choke geometries. The mismatch between the radial lines and the VNA was calibrated through a special multi-short-load calibration method. The measured reflections of different choke geometries showed good agreement with the theoretical calculations and verified the HOM absorption feature of each geometric design.

  10. Low-frequency ultrasonic Bessel-like collimated beam generation from radial modes of piezoelectric transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillara, Vamshi Krishna; Pantea, Cristian; Sinha, Dipen N.

    2017-02-01

    We present a very simple approach to generate a collimated ultrasonic beam that exploits the natural Bessel-like vibration pattern of the radial modes of a piezoelectric disc with lateral clamping. This eliminates the need for the conventional annular Bessel pattern of the electrodes with individual electrode excitation on the piezo-disc, thus simplifying the transducer design. Numerical and experimental studies are carried out to investigate the Bessel-like vibration patterns of these radial modes showing an excellent agreement between these two studies. Measured ultrasonic beam-profiles in water from the radial modes confirm the profile to be a Bessel beam. Collimated beam generation from radial modes is investigated using a coupled electromechanical finite-element model. It is found that clamping the lateral edges of piezoelectric transducers results in a high-degree of collimation with practically no side-lobes similar to a parametric array beam. Ultrasonic beam-profile measurements in water with both free and clamped piezoelectric transducer are presented. The collimated beam generation using the present technique of using the laterally clamped radial modes finds significant applications in low-frequency imaging through highly attenuating materials.

  11. Radial transport of poloidal momentum in ASDEX Upgrade in L-mode and H-mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlmann, F.; Schrittwieser, R.; Naulin, Volker

    2012-01-01

    A reciprocating probe was used for localized measurements of the radial transport of poloidal momentum in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of ASDEX Upgrade (AUG). The probe measured poloidal and radial electric field components and density. We concentrate on three components of the momentum transport: ......: Reynolds stress, convective momentum flux and triple product of the fluctuating components of density, radial and poloidal electric field. For the evaluation we draw mainly on the probability density functions (PDFs)....

  12. Transverse craniofacial dimensions in Angle Class II, Division 1 malocclusion according to breathing mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agda Rísia David Pinto Coelho

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this longitudinal study was to assess the relation between the transverse craniofacial dimensions of subjects with Class II, Division 1 malocclusion and the breathing mode presented by them. Forty Angle Class II, Division 1 malocclusion subjects of both genders participated in the study, 23 of which were predominantly nose breathers and 17 were predominantly mouth breathers. The mean age ranged from 10 years and 9 months to 14 years - Age range 1; and from 13 years and 4 months to 16 years and 6 months - Age range 2. Measurements of six transverse craniofacial dimensions were performed in P-A teleradiographs: Total Sphenoid, Total Zygomatic, Total Nasal Cavity, Total Maxilla, Total Mastoid and Total Antegonion. The transversal craniofacial dimensions were measured and compared in both groups at age ranges 1 and 2. The longitudinal assessment of age ranges 1 and 2 showed that there was no statistically significant influence of the breathing mode on the craniofacial dimensions evaluated, or on the alteration of these dimensions. Breathing mode had no influence on craniofacial development in the sample studied.

  13. Multipolar migration: the third mode of radial neuronal migration in the developing cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Hidenori; Nakajima, Kazunori

    2003-11-05

    Two distinct modes of radial neuronal migration, locomotion and somal translocation, have been reported in the developing cerebral cortex. Although these two modes of migration have been well documented, the cortical intermediate zone contains abundant multipolar cells, and they do not resemble the cells migrating by locomotion or somal translocation. Here, we report that these multipolar cells express neuronal markers and extend multiple thin processes in various directions independently of the radial glial fibers. Time-lapse analysis of living slices revealed that the multipolar cells do not have any fixed cell polarity, and that they very dynamically extend and retract multiple processes as their cell bodies slowly move. They do not usually move straight toward the pial surface during their radial migration, but instead frequently change migration direction and rate; sometimes they even remain in almost the same position, especially when they are in the subventricular zone. Occasionally, the multipolar cells jump tangentially during their radial migration. Because the migration modality of these cells clearly differs from locomotion or somal translocation, we refer to their novel type of migration as "multipolar migration." In view of the high proportion of cells exhibiting multipolar migration, this third mode of radial migration must be an important type of migration in the developing cortex.

  14. Electromyographic evaluation of the upper lip according to the breathing mode: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldrieli Regina Ambrosio

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at analyzing and comparing longitudinally the EMG (electromyographic activity of the superior orbicularis oris muscle according to the breathing mode. The sample, 38 adolescents with Angle Class II Division 1 malocclusion with predominantly nose (PNB or mouth (PMB breathing, was evaluated at two different periods, with a two-year interval between them. For that purpose, a 16channel electromyography machine was employed, which was properly calibrated in a PC equipped with an analogue-digital converter, with utilization of surface, passive and bipolar electrodes. The RMS data (root mean square were collected at rest and in 12 movements and normalized according to time and amplitude, by the peak value of EMG, in order to allow comparisons between subjects and between periods. Comparison of the muscle function of PNB and PMB subjects at period 1 (P1, period 2 (P2 and the variation between periods (Δ did not reveal statistically significant differences between groups (p < 0.05. However, longitudinal evaluation of the muscle function in PNB and PMB subjects demonstrated different evolutions in the percentage of required EMG for accomplishment of the movements investigated. It was possible to conclude that there are differences in the percentage of electric activity of the upper lip with the growth of the subjects according to the breathing mode.

  15. Synchronization of different chaotic systems via active radial basis functions sliding mode controller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Hui-Jun; Yin You-Wei; Wang Hua-Min

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a new method to synchronize different chaotic systems with disturbances via an active radial basis function (RBF) sliding controller.This method incorporates the advantages of active control,neural network and sliding mode control.The main part of the controller is given based on the output of the RBF neural networks and the weights of these single layer networks are tuned on-line based on the sliding mode reaching law.Only several radial basis functions are required for this controller which takes the sliding mode variable as the only input.The proposed controller can make the synchronization error converge to zero quickly and can overcome external disturbances.Analysis of the stability for the controller is carried out based on the Lyapunov stability theorem.Finally,five examples are given to illustrate the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed synchronization control strategy.

  16. A radial basis function sliding mode controller for chaotic Lorenz system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Huijun [School of Electrical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)]. E-mail: realghj@yahoo.com.cn; Lin Suifang [Department of Automation, Xi' an University of Technology, Xi' an 710048 (China); Liu Junhua [School of Electrical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2006-03-06

    This Letter presents a novel method to controlling Lorenz chaos via an adaptive radial basis function sliding mode controller. The proposed scheme combines the advantages of the adaptive control, neural network and sliding mode control strategies without precise system model information. It has on-line learning ability to deal with the parametric uncertainty and disturbance by adjusting the control parameters. A sliding mode controller is designed via the Lyapunov stability theory in order to guarantee the high quality of the controlled system. The simulation results show that this method is feasible and effective for chaos control, and the robustness to parametric changes and extern disturbance is provided.

  17. Interlayer breathing and shear modes in few-trilayer MoS2 and WSe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanyuan; Luo, Xin; Li, Hai; Zhang, Jun; Araujo, Paulo T; Gan, Chee Kwan; Wu, Jumiati; Zhang, Hua; Quek, Su Ying; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Xiong, Qihua

    2013-03-13

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have recently attracted tremendous interest as potential valleytronic and nanoelectronic materials, in addition to being well-known as excellent lubricants in the bulk. The interlayer van der Waals (vdW) coupling and low-frequency phonon modes and how they evolve with the number of layers are important for both the mechanical and the electrical properties of 2D TMDs. Here we uncover the ultralow frequency interlayer breathing and shear modes in few-layer MoS2 and WSe2, prototypical layered TMDs, using both Raman spectroscopy and first principles calculations. Remarkably, the frequencies of these modes can be perfectly described using a simple linear chain model with only nearest-neighbor interactions. We show that the derived in-plane (shear) and out-of-plane (breathing) force constants from experiment remain the same from two-layer 2D crystals to the bulk materials, suggesting that the nanoscale interlayer frictional characteristics of these excellent lubricants should be independent of the number of layers.

  18. On Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition and universal breathing mode in two dimensional photon gas

    OpenAIRE

    Vyas, Vivek M.; Panigrahi, Prasanta. K.; Banerji, J.

    2013-01-01

    A system of two dimensional photon gas has recently been realized experimentally. It is pointed out that this setup can be used to observe a universal breathing mode of photon gas. It is shown that a modification in the experimental setup would open up a possibility of observing the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) phase transition in such a system. It is shown that the universal jump in the superfluid density of light in the output channel can be used as an unambiguous signature for the...

  19. On Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition and universal breathing mode in two dimensional photon gas

    CERN Document Server

    Vyas, Vivek M; Banerji, J

    2013-01-01

    A system of two dimensional photon gas has recently been realized experimentally. It is pointed out that this setup can be used to observe a universal breathing mode of photon gas. It is shown that a modification in the experimental setup would open up a possibility of observing the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) phase transition in such a system. It is shown that the universal jump in the superfluid density of light in the output channel can be used as an unambiguous signature for the experimental verification of the BKT transition.

  20. Radial localization of edge modes in Alcator C-Mod pedestals using optical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiler, C.; Terry, J. L.; Edlund, E.; Cziegler, I.; Churchill, R. M.; Hughes, J. W.; LaBombard, B.; Golfinopoulos, T.; the Alcator C-Mod Team

    2017-02-01

    Dedicated experiments in ion cyclotron range heated enhanced D-alpha (EDA) H-mode and I-mode plasmas have been performed on Alcator C-Mod to identify the location of edge fluctuations inside the pedestal and to determine their plasma frame phase velocity. For this purpose, measurements from gas puff imaging (GPI) and gas puff charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (GP-CXRS) have been collected using the same optical views. The data suggest that the EDA H-mode-specific quasi-coherent mode (QCM) is centered near the radial electric field (E r) well minimum and propagates along the ion diamagnetic drift direction in the plasma frame. The weakly coherent mode (WCM) and the geodesic acoustic mode observed in I-mode, on the other hand, are found to be located around the outer shear layer of the E r well. This results in a weak plasma frame phase velocity mostly along the electron diamagnetic drift direction for the WCM. The findings in these EDA H-mode plasmas differ from probe measurements in ohmic EDA H-mode (LaBombard et al 2014 Phys. Plasmas 21 056108), where the QCM was identified as an electron drift-wave located several mm outside the E r well minimum in a region of positive E r. To explore if instrumental effects of the optical diagnostics could be the cause of the difference, a synthetic diagnostic for GPI is introduced. This diagnostic reproduces amplitude ratios and relative radial shifts of the mode profiles determined from poloidally and toroidally oriented optics and, if instrumental effects related to GP-CXRS are also included, indicates that the measured location of the QCM and WCM relative to the E r well reported here is only weakly affected by instrumental effects.

  1. Near-unity broadband absorption designs for semiconducting nanowire arrays via localized radial mode excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountaine, Katherine T; Kendall, Christian G; Atwater, Harry A

    2014-05-05

    We report design methods for achieving near-unity broadband light absorption in sparse nanowire arrays, illustrated by results for visible absorption in GaAs nanowires on Si substrates. Sparse (unity absorption at wire resonant wavelengths due to coupling into 'leaky' radial waveguide modes of individual wires and wire-wire scattering processes. From a detailed conceptual development of radial mode resonant absorption, we demonstrate two specific geometric design approaches to achieve near unity broadband light absorption in sparse nanowire arrays: (i) introducing multiple wire radii within a small unit cell array to increase the number of resonant wavelengths, yielding a 15% absorption enhancement relative to a uniform nanowire array and (ii) tapering of nanowires to introduce a continuum of diameters and thus resonant wavelengths excited within a single wire, yielding an 18% absorption enhancement over a uniform nanowire array.

  2. Laser characterization of electric field oscillations in the Hall thruster breathing mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Christopher; Lucca Fabris, Andrea; MacDonald-Tenenbaum, Natalia; Hargus, William, Jr.; Cappelli, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Hall thrusters are a mature technology for space propulsion applications that exhibit a wide array of dynamic behavior, including plasma waves, instabilities and turbulence. One common low frequency (10-50 kHz) discharge current oscillation is the breathing mode, a cycle of neutral propellant injection, strong ionization, and ion acceleration by a steep potential gradient. A time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic non-intrusively captures this propagating ionization front in the channel of a commercial BHT-600 Hall thruster manufactured by Busek Co. Measurements of ion velocity and relative ion density (using the 5 d[ 4 ] 7 / 2 - 6 p[ 3 ] 5 / 2 Xe II transition at 834.95 nm, vacuum) reveal a dynamic electric field structure traversing the channel throughout the breathing mode cycle. This work is sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research, with Dr. M. Birkan as program manager. C.Y. acknowledges support from the DOE NSSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship under contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  3. Experimental investigation of the radial structure of energetic particle driven modes

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, L; Lauber, Ph; Por, G; Gude, A; Igochine, V; Geiger, B; Maraschek, M; Guimarais, L; Nikolaeva, V; Pokol, G I

    2016-01-01

    Alfv\\'en eigenmodes (AEs) and energetic particle modes (EPMs) are often excited by energetic particles (EPs) in tokamak plasmas. One of the main open questions concerning EP driven instabilities is the non-linear evolution of the mode structure. The aim of the present paper is to investigate the properties of beta-induced AEs (BAEs) and EP driven geodesic acoustic modes (EGAMs) observed in the ramp-up phase of off-axis NBI heated ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) discharges. This paper focuses on the changes in the mode structure of BAEs/EGAMs during the non-linear chirping phase. Our investigation has shown that in case of the observed down-chirping BAEs the changes in the radial structure are smaller than the uncertainty of our measurement. This behaviour is most probably the consequence of that BAEs are normal modes, thus their radial structure strongly depends on the background plasma parameters rather than on the EP distribution. In the case of rapidly upward chirping EGAMs the analysis consistently shows shrinkage of...

  4. WAVE-VORTEX MODE COUPLING IN ASTROPHYSICAL ACCRETION DISKS UNDER COMBINED RADIAL AND VERTICAL STRATIFICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salhi, A. [Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, 1060 Tunis (Tunisia); Lehner, T. [LUTH, UMR 8102 CNRS, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, 5 place de Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France); Godeferd, F.; Cambon, C. [Laboratoire de Mecanique des Fluides et d' Acoustique, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Universite de Lyon, UMR 5509, CNRS, INSA, UCB, F-69134 Ecully Cedex (France)

    2013-07-10

    We examine accretion disk flow under combined radial and vertical stratification utilizing a local Cartesian (or ''shearing box'') approximation. We investigate both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric disturbances with the Boussinesq approximation. Under axisymmetric disturbances, a new dispersion relation is derived. It reduces to the Solberg-Hoieland criterion in the case without vertical stratification. It shows that, asymptotically, stable radial and vertical stratification cannot induce any linear instability; Keplerian flow is accordingly stable. Previous investigations strongly suggest that the so-called bypass concept of turbulence (i.e., that fine-tuned disturbances of any inviscid smooth shear flow can reach arbitrarily large transient growth) can also be applied to Keplerian disks. We present an analysis of this process for three-dimensional plane-wave disturbances comoving with the shear flow of a general rotating shear flow under combined stable radial and vertical rotation. We demonstrate that large transient growth occurs for K{sub 2}/k{sub 1} >> 1 and k{sub 3} = 0 or k{sub 1} {approx} k{sub 3}, where k{sub 1}, K{sub 2}, and k{sub 3} are the azimuthal, radial, and vertical components of the initial wave vector, respectively. By using a generalized ''wave-vortex'' decomposition of the disturbance, we show that the large transient energy growth in a Keplerian disk is mainly generated by the transient dynamics of the vortex mode. The analysis of the power spectrum of total (kinetic+potential) energy in the azimuthal or vertical directions shows that the contribution coming from the vortex mode is dominant at large scales, while the contribution coming from the wave mode is important at small scales. These findings may be confirmed by appropriate numerical simulations in the high Reynolds number regime.

  5. On the specification of bus voltages and radial link transfer impedance modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sadik, F.M. [Khartoum Univ., Aljamaa, Khartoum (Sudan)

    2010-07-01

    No algebraic equation has been derived for the steady-state stability limit (SSSL) of radial power system components in terms of their resistive sectional impedance elements and associated scalar node voltage constraints. While many criterion have been developed in the literature for the steady state angle and voltage stability limits of systems with losses, speculation exists about certain advocated metrics for these systems in terms of stability reserve margins as a measure of the risk of blackout and the representation of reactance modes associated with Putman's model for synchronous machines. This paper presented the results of a generalized algebraic statement for the reactance modes under stability conditions in voltage-specified power system components cited in the single machine-infinite bus (SMIB) and the radial power link (RPL) systems. The direct analytical solution to the problem enabled the identification of 2 different constraint relations for the sending (E) and receiving-end voltage regulator (VR) voltages. The paper discussed the general SSSL function plan, conditions for SMIB system reactances, and index results for the voltage stability of radial lines. The results for the R2 influence and influence on radial compensation levels were also presented. Index results for non-operational reactance zones were provided. It was concluded that the algebraic solution in a full representation of system losses would enable identification of additional function discontinuities that might not reveal in a step-by-step numerical algorithm and that may account for the many unresolved transmission system phenomenon associated with SSSL predictions and capacitance compensation schemes. 11 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs., 3 appendices.

  6. Novel adaptive neural control of flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicles based on sliding mode differentiator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bu Xiangwei

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel adaptive neural control strategy is exploited for the longitudinal dynamics of a generic flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle (FAHV. By utilizing functional decomposition method, the dynamics of FAHV is decomposed into the velocity subsystem and the altitude subsystem. For each subsystem, only one neural network is employed for the unknown function approximation. To further reduce the computational burden, minimal-learning parameter (MLP technology is used to estimate the norm of ideal weight vectors rather than their elements. By introducing sliding mode differentiator (SMD to estimate the newly defined variables, there is no need for the strict-feedback form and virtual controller. Hence the developed control law is considerably simpler than the ones derived from back-stepping scheme. Finally, simulation studies are made to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control approach in spite of the flexible effects, system uncertainties and varying disturbances.

  7. Continuous high order sliding mode controller design for a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Zong, Qun; Su, Rui; Tian, Bailing

    2014-05-01

    This paper investigates the problem of tracking control with uncertainties for a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle (FAHV). In order to overcome the analytical intractability of this model, an Input-Output linearization model is constructed for the purpose of feedback control design. Then, the continuous finite time convergence high order sliding mode controller is designed for the Input-Output linearization model without uncertainties. In addition, a nonlinear disturbance observer is applied to estimate the uncertainties in order to compensate the controller and disturbance suppression, where disturbance observer and controller synthesis design is obtained. Finally, the synthesis of controller and disturbance observer is used to achieve the tracking for the velocity and altitude of the FAHV and simulations are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the control strategies.

  8. Nuclear matter incompressibility from a semi-empirical analysis of breathing-mode energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M. M.; Stocker, W.; Gleissl, P.; Brack, M.

    1989-11-01

    We check the validity and applicability of a liquid-drop model type expansion for the incompressibility KA of finite nuclei: K A = K V + K SA {-1}/{3} + (higher-order terms). Our theoretical considerations are based upon calculations of breathing-mode energies following from a density variational framework taking into account various Skyrme interactions. Using a semi-empirical procedure based upon this expansion of KA, we corroborate that new precision data for the monopole energies favour a volume coefficient KV (300±25) MeV and an appreciable surface coefficient KS (-750±80) MeV. We discuss the implication of this result for the incompressibility K∞ of infinite nuclear matter.

  9. Quantum anomaly, universal relations, and breathing mode of a two-dimensional Fermi gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Johannes

    2012-05-01

    In this Letter, we show that the classical SO(2,1) symmetry of a harmonically trapped Fermi gas in two dimensions is broken by quantum effects. The anomalous correction to the symmetry algebra is given by a two-body operator that is well known as the contact. Taking into account this modification, we are able to derive the virial theorem for the system and a universal relation for the pressure of a homogeneous gas. The existence of an undamped breathing mode is associated with the classical symmetry. We provide an estimate for the anomalous frequency shift of this oscillation at zero temperature and compare the result with a recent experiment by [E. Vogt et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 070404 (2012)]. Discrepancies are attributed to finite temperature effects.

  10. A rotary ultrasonic motor using radial bending mode of ring with nested PZT excitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-xiang LIU; Jun-kao LIU; Wei-shan CHEN; Xiao-hui YANG

    2012-01-01

    This study presents and verifies a new idea for constructing a rotary traveling wave ultrasonic motor (USM) that uses the radial bending mode of a ring.In the new design,20 trapezoid cross section slots are cut symmetrically in the outer surface of a thick duralumin alloy ring,where 20 PZT stacks are nested.In each slot,two wedging blocks are set between the PZT stack and the two sides of the slot respectively to apply preloading on the PZT ceramics.Two radial bending modes of the stator that have a phase difference of a quarter wavelength on space are generated by using the d33 operating mode of the PZT elements,and then a flexural traveling wave is formed by the superimposing of two standing waves whose amplitudes are equal and phases are different by 90° temporally.Two conical rotors are pressed to each end of the ring type stator by a coiled spring.The finite element method (FEM) simulation is developed to validate the feasibility of the proposed motor.The maximal speed and torque of the prototype are tested to be 126 r/min and 0.8 N·m,respectively.

  11. Interlayer breathing and shear modes in NbSe2 atomic layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Rui; van Baren, Jeremiah; Yan, Jia-An; Xi, Xiaoxiang; Ye, Zhipeng; Ye, Gaihua; Lu, I.-Hsi; Leong, S. M.; Lui, C. H.

    2016-09-01

    Atomically thin NbSe2 is a metallic layered transition metal dichalcogenide with novel charge-density-wave (CDW) and superconductive phases. Properties of NbSe2 atomic layers are sensitive to interlayer coupling. Here we investigate the interlayer phonons of few-layer NbSe2 by ultralow-frequency Raman spectroscopy. We observe both the interlayer breathing modes and shear modes at frequencies below 40 cm-1 for samples of 2-15 layers. Their frequency, Raman activity, and environmental instability depend systematically on the layer number. We account for these results by a combination of linear-chain model, group theory and first-principles calculations. We find that, although NbSe2 has different stacking order from MoS2, MoSe2, WS2 and WSe2, they share the same crystal symmetry groups and exhibit similar Raman selection rules for interlayer phonons. In addition, the interlayer phonon modes evolve smoothly from T = 300 to 8 K, with no observable response to the CDW formation in NbSe2. This finding indicates that the atomic registry between adjacent NbSe2 layers is well preserved in the CDW transition.

  12. Modified High Frequency Radial Spin Wave Mode Spectrum in a Chirality-Controlled Nanopillar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolthammer, J. E.; Rudge, J.; Choi, B. C.; Hong, Y. K.

    2016-09-01

    Circular magnetic spin valve nanopillars in a dual vortex configuration have dynamic characteristics strongly dependent on the interlayer dipole coupling. We report here on frequency domain properties of such nanopillars obtained by micromagnetic simulations. After the free layer is chirality switched with spin transfer torque, a radial spin wave eigenmode spectrum forms in the free layer with unusually large edge amplitude. The structure of these modes indicate a departure from the magnetostatic processes typically observed experimentally and treated analytically in low aspect ratio isolated disks. Our findings give new details of dynamic chirality control and relxation in nanopillars and raise potential signatures for experiments.

  13. Density response of the t-J model and renormalization of breathing and half-breathing phonon modes: A slave-fermion calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsch, P.; Khaliullin, G.; Oudovenko, V.

    The density fluctuation spectrum N( k, ω) is calculated for the t- J model in the low-doping regime using a slave-fermion method for the constrained fermions. The obtained results for N( k, ω) are in good agreement with diagonalization results. The density response is characterized by incoherent, momentum dependent spectral functions reaching up to energies ∼ 8 t and a low-energy structure at energy ∼ J due to transitions in the quasiparticle band. N( k, ω) is shown to lead to a strong renormalization of planar bond-streching and breathing phonon modes with a large phonon linewidth at intermediate momenta caused by the low-energy response. Our results are consistent with recent neutron scattering data, showing the peculiar behavior of these modes.

  14. Improved abdominal MRI in non-breath-holding children using a radial k-space sampling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Hyuk; Choi, Young Hun; Cheon, Jung Eun; Lee, So Mi; Cho, Hyun Hae; Shin, Su Mi; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In One

    2015-06-01

    Radial k-space sampling techniques have been shown to reduce motion artifacts in adult abdominal MRI. To compare a T2-weighted radial k-space sampling MRI pulse sequence (BLADE) with standard respiratory-triggered T2-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) in pediatric abdominal imaging. Axial BLADE and respiratory-triggered turbo spin echo sequences were performed without fat suppression in 32 abdominal MR examinations in children. We retrospectively assessed overall image quality, the presence of respiratory, peristaltic and radial artifact, and lesion conspicuity. We evaluated signal uniformity of each sequence. BLADE showed improved overall image quality (3.35 ± 0.85 vs. 2.59 ± 0.59, P sampling technique improved the quality and reduced respiratory motion artifacts in young children compared with conventional respiratory-triggered turbo spin-echo sequences.

  15. "One-Stop Shop": Free-Breathing Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Kidney Using Iterative Reconstruction and Continuous Golden-Angle Radial Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffel, Philipp; Zoellner, Frank G; Budjan, Johannes; Grimm, Robert; Block, Tobias K; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Hausmann, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate a recently introduced technique for free-breathing dynamic contrast-enhanced renal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applying a combination of radial k-space sampling, parallel imaging, and compressed sensing. The technique allows retrospective reconstruction of 2 motion-suppressed sets of images from the same acquisition: one with lower temporal resolution but improved image quality for subjective image analysis, and one with high temporal resolution for quantitative perfusion analysis. In this study, 25 patients underwent a kidney examination, including a prototypical fat-suppressed, golden-angle radial stack-of-stars T1-weighted 3-dimensional spoiled gradient-echo examination (GRASP) performed after contrast agent administration during free breathing. Images were reconstructed at temporal resolutions of 55 spokes per frame (6.2 seconds) and 13 spokes per frame (1.5 seconds). The GRASP images were evaluated by 2 blinded radiologists. First, the reconstructions with low temporal resolution underwent subjective image analysis: the radiologists assessed the best arterial phase and the best renal phase and rated image quality score for each patient on a 5-point Likert-type scale.In addition, the diagnostic confidence was rated according to a 3-point Likert-type scale. Similarly, respiratory motion artifacts and streak artifacts were rated according to a 3-point Likert-type scale.Then, the reconstructions with high temporal resolution were analyzed with a voxel-by-voxel deconvolution approach to determine the renal plasma flow, and the results were compared with values reported in previous literature. Reader 1 and reader 2 rated the overall image quality score for the best arterial phase and the best renal phase with a median image quality score of 4 (good image quality) for both phases, respectively. A high diagnostic confidence (median score of 3) was observed. There were no respiratory motion artifacts in any of the

  16. Powering low-power implants using PZT transducer discs operated in the radial mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanni, Ayodele; Vilches, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    This paper reports experimental results that are used to compare operation characteristics of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoelectric ceramic discs operated in the radial mode. The devices are driven to radially vibrate at their lowest fundamental resonant frequency and thus transmit and receive power when immersed in a liquid phantom. A number of 1 mm × 10 mm (thickness × diameter) PZT discs are characterized experimentally within a propagation tank and results discussed. On the basis of these measured characteristics, a novel application is developed and reported for the first time. This consists of a tuned LC resonator circuit which is used at the receiving disc to maximize sensitivity as well as a Seiko start-up IC S-882Z which is employed to charge a capacitor that drives a PIC microcontroller (μC) once the voltage exceeds 2 V DC. We show that a mean input power of 486 mW RMS results in 976 μW RMS received over a range of 80 mm and that this is sufficient to periodically (every 60 s) power the μC to directly drive a red LED for 5 ms with a current of 4.8 mA/flash. This approach is suitable for low-power, periodically activated analogue bio-implant applications.

  17. Effect of the radial plasma nonuniformity on the propagation of guided m = + 1 and m = - 1 modes in helicon discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliev, Yu. M.; Krämer, M.

    2016-10-01

    Theoretical as well as numerical analyses of the full set of Maxwell's equations is carried out to study non-axisymmetric ( m ≠ 0 ) guided modes in radially nonuniform helicon (HE) discharges. Unlike the axisymmetric (m = 0) modes, these modes reveal a non-reciprocal behavior with respect to the azimuthal direction. We develop the conditions for propagation and non-propagation of the various modes in the helicon parameter range, thereby focussing on the important role of the radial density gradient. Three types of modes occurring in different parameter ranges are described, i.e., the helicon (HE) mode, the electrostatic (ES) or Trivelpiece-Gould mode, and the locally coupled (LC) mode that is characterized by mode coupling (MC) in a certain region of the plasma density profile. In contrast to m = + 1 modes, the parameter range of m = - 1 modes is much more restricted as rather high densities are needed for the propagation of the helicon and LC modes. An important issue of the investigations is the rf power coupling and absorption via the various modes. Computations based on a simple antenna-plasma model show that the axial wavenumber of the antenna determines decisively which type of mode is excited. In case of LC mode excitation, the dominant role of the MC layer for the absorption is demonstrated. Finally, the rf power coupling to helicon modes is studied. The density limit for m = - 1 helicon mode propagation and the narrow magnetic field profiles of these modes are the main reasons why the rf power absorption in helicon discharges occurs via m = + 1 helicon modes.

  18. One-shot Design of Radial Mode Piezoelectric Transformer for Magneticless Power Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Kaspar Sinding; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2011-01-01

    Piezoelectric Transformer based resonant power converters are an attractive alternative to magnetic power converters in applications requiring a power level currently less than 100W. Among the benefits are a power density up to 40W/cm3, a low profile, reduced radiated EMI and high system efficiency...... due to zero voltage switching commutation. The main criteria to take advantage of these benefits are, despite the fact that a PT is a piezoelectric capacitor, is optimization the transformer to behave inductively as a means to avoid excessive hard switching losses. With this objective, the inverse...... mathematical problem has been solved, that directly links wanted electrical specifications to the mechanical dimensions of a radial mode piezoelectric transformer. The novel outcome of this study is that the soft switching ability is directly linked to the ratio between the active volume of the primary...

  19. Improved abdominal MRI in non-breath-holding children using a radial k-space sampling technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Hyuk; Choi, Young Hun; Cheon, Jung Eun; Lee, So Mi; Cho, Hyun Hae; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In One [Seoul National University Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Su Mi [SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Radial k-space sampling techniques have been shown to reduce motion artifacts in adult abdominal MRI. To compare a T2-weighted radial k-space sampling MRI pulse sequence (BLADE) with standard respiratory-triggered T2-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) in pediatric abdominal imaging. Axial BLADE and respiratory-triggered turbo spin echo sequences were performed without fat suppression in 32 abdominal MR examinations in children. We retrospectively assessed overall image quality, the presence of respiratory, peristaltic and radial artifact, and lesion conspicuity. We evaluated signal uniformity of each sequence. BLADE showed improved overall image quality (3.35 ± 0.85 vs. 2.59 ± 0.59, P < 0.001), reduced respiratory motion artifact (0.51 ± 0.56 vs. 1.89 ± 0.68, P < 0.001), and improved lesion conspicuity (3.54 ± 0.88 vs. 2.92 ± 0.77, P = 0.006) compared to respiratory triggering turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences. The bowel motion artifact scores were similar for both sequences (1.65 ± 0.77 vs. 1.79 ± 0.74, P = 0.691). BLADE introduced a radial artifact that was not observed on the respiratory triggering-TSE images (1.10 ± 0.85 vs. 0, P < 0.001). BLADE was associated with diminished signal variation compared with respiratory triggering-TSE in the liver, spleen and air (P < 0.001). The radial k-space sampling technique improved the quality and reduced respiratory motion artifacts in young children compared with conventional respiratory-triggered turbo spin-echo sequences. (orig.)

  20. BREATHING FIRE: HOW STELLAR FEEDBACK DRIVES RADIAL MIGRATION, RAPID SIZE FLUCTUATIONS, AND POPULATION GRADIENTS IN LOW-MASS GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Badry, Kareem; Geha, Marla [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Wetzel, Andrew; Hopkins, Philip F. [TAPIR, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA USA (United States); Kereš, Dusan; Chan, T. K. [Department of Physics, Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla (United States); Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André, E-mail: kareem.el-badry@yale.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and CIERA, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States)

    2016-04-01

    We examine the effects of stellar feedback and bursty star formation on low-mass galaxies (M{sub star} = 2 × 10{sup 6} − 5 × 10{sup 10} M{sub ⊙}) using the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) simulations. While previous studies emphasized the impact of feedback on dark matter profiles, we investigate the impact on the stellar component: kinematics, radial migration, size evolution, and population gradients. Feedback-driven outflows/inflows drive significant radial stellar migration over both short and long timescales via two processes: (1) outflowing/infalling gas can remain star-forming, producing young stars that migrate ∼1 kpc within their first 100 Myr, and (2) gas outflows/inflows drive strong fluctuations in the global potential, transferring energy to all stars. These processes produce several dramatic effects. First, galaxies’ effective radii can fluctuate by factors of >2 over ∼200 Myr, and these rapid size fluctuations can account for much of the observed scatter in the radius at fixed M{sub star}. Second, the cumulative effects of many outflow/infall episodes steadily heat stellar orbits, causing old stars to migrate outward most strongly. This age-dependent radial migration mixes—and even inverts—intrinsic age and metallicity gradients. Thus, the galactic-archaeology approach of calculating radial star formation histories from stellar populations at z = 0 can be severely biased. These effects are strongest at M{sub star} ≈ 10{sup 7–9.6} M{sub ⊙}, the same regime where feedback most efficiently cores galaxies. Thus, detailed measurements of stellar kinematics in low-mass galaxies can strongly constrain feedback models and test baryonic solutions to small-scale problems in ΛCDM.

  1. Effects of radial electric field on suppression of electron-temperature-gradient mode through multiscale nonlinear interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Chanho; Kaneko, Toshiro; Itoh, Kimitaka; Ida, Katsumi; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Inagaki, Shigeru; Itoh, Sanae-I.; Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    2016-11-01

    Turbulence in fluids and plasmas is ubiquitous in Nature and in the laboratory. Contrary to the importance of the ‘scale-free’ nature of cascade in neutral fluid turbulence, the turbulence in plasma is characterised by dynamics of distinct length scales. The cross-scale interactions can be highly non-symmetric so as to generate the plasma turbulence structures. Here we report that the system of hyper-fine electron-temperature-gradient (ETG) fluctuations and microscopic drift-wave (DW) fluctuations is strongly influenced by the sign of the gradient of the radial electric field through multiscale nonlinear interactions. The selective suppression effects by radial electric field inhomogeneity on DW mode induce a new route to modify ETG mode. This suppression mechanism shows disparity with respect to the sign of the radial electric field inhomogeneity, which can be driven by turbulence, so that it could be a new source for symmetry breaking in the turbulence structure formation in plasmas.

  2. Double-mode radial-non-radial RR Lyrae stars. OGLE-IV photometry of two high cadence fields in the Galactic bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Netzel, H; Moskalik, P

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the OGLE-IV photometry of the first overtone and double-mode RR Lyrae stars (RRc/RRd) in the two fields towards the Galactic bulge observed with high cadence. In 27 per cent of RRc stars we find additional non-radial mode, with characteristic period ratio, P x /P 1O \\in (0.6, 0.64). It strongly corroborates the conclusion arising from the analysis of space photometry of RRc stars, that this form of pulsation must be common. In the Petersen diagram the stars form three sequences. In 20 stars we find two or three close secondary modes simultaneously. The additional modes are clearly non-stationary. Their amplitude and/or phase vary in time. As a result, the patterns observed in the frequency spectra of these stars may be very complex. In some stars the additional modes split into doublets, triplets or appear as a more complex bands of increased power. Subharmonics of additional modes are detected in 20 per cent of stars. They also display a complex structure. Including our previous study of the OGLE-...

  3. Radial transport in the far scrape-off layer of ASDEX upgrade during L-mode and ELMy H-mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ionita, C.; Naulin, Volker; Mehlmann, F.

    2013-01-01

    The radial turbulent particle flux and the Reynolds stress in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of ASDEX Upgrade were investigated for two limited L-mode (low confinement) and one ELMy H-mode (high confinement) discharge. A fast reciprocating probe was used with a probe head containing five Langmuir...... potentials of two probes on the same poloidal meridian. In both cases, equal electron temperatures on all probe pins had to be assumed. Of the other pins one was biased to ion saturation (-70 V), whereas one was swept to record the current-voltage characteristic. A detailed statistical analysis of the plasma...... probes. One of the probe pins was protruding radially above the other pins. The radial electric field component was derived from the difference of the floating potentials of the protruding pin and another pin nearby. The poloidal electric field component was derived from the difference of the floating...

  4. Breathing FIRE: How Stellar Feedback Drives Radial Migration, Rapid Size Fluctuations, and Population Gradients in Low-Mass Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    El-Badry, Kareem; Geha, Marla; Hopkins, Philip F; Kereš, Dušan; Chan, T K; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André

    2015-01-01

    We examine the effects of stellar feedback and bursty star formation on low-mass galaxies ($M_{\\rm star}=2\\times10^6-5\\times10^{10}{\\rm M_{\\odot}}$) using the FIRE (Feedback in Realistic Environments) simulations. While previous studies emphasized the impact of feedback on dark matter profiles, we investigate the impact on the stellar component: kinematics, radial migration, size evolution, and population gradients. Feedback-driven outflows/inflows drive significant radial stellar migration over both short and long timescales via two processes: (1) outflowing/infalling gas can remain star-forming, producing young stars that migrate $\\sim1{\\rm\\,kpc}$ within their first $100 {\\rm\\,Myr}$, and (2) gas outflows/inflows drive strong fluctuations in the global potential, transferring energy to all stars. These processes produce several dramatic effects. First, galaxies' effective radii can fluctuate by factors of $>2$ over $\\sim200 {\\rm\\,Myr}$, and these rapid size fluctuations can account for much of the observed s...

  5. Evaluation of Transient Motion During Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced Multiphasic Liver Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Free-Breathing Golden-Angle Radial Sparse Parallel Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeong Hee; Lee, Jeong Min; Yu, Mi Hye; Hur, Bo Yun; Grimm, Robert; Block, Kai Tobias; Chandarana, Hersh; Kiefer, Berthold; Son, Yohan

    2017-09-11

    The aims of this study were to observe the pattern of transient motion after gadoxetic acid administration including incidence, onset, and duration, and to evaluate the clinical feasibility of free-breathing gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver magnetic resonance imaging using golden-angle radial sparse parallel (GRASP) imaging with respiratory gating. In this institutional review board-approved prospective study, 59 patients who provided informed consents were analyzed. Free-breathing dynamic T1-weighted images (T1WIs) were obtained using GRASP at 3 T after a standard dose of gadoxetic acid (0.025 mmol/kg) administration at a rate of 1 mL/s, and development of transient motion was monitored, which is defined as a distinctive respiratory frequency alteration of the self-gating MR signals. Early arterial, late arterial, and portal venous phases retrospectively reconstructed with and without respiratory gating and with different temporal resolutions (nongated 13.3-second, gated 13.3-second, gated 6-second T1WI) were evaluated for image quality and motion artifacts. Diagnostic performance in detecting focal liver lesions was compared among the 3 data sets. Transient motion (mean duration, 21.5 ± 13.0 seconds) was observed in 40.0% (23/59) of patients, 73.9% (17/23) of which developed within 15 seconds after gadoxetic acid administration. On late arterial phase, motion artifacts were significantly reduced on gated 13.3-second and 6-second T1WI (3.64 ± 0.34, 3.61 ± 0.36, respectively), compared with nongated 13.3-second T1WI (3.12 ± 0.51, P < 0.0001). Overall, image quality was the highest on gated 13.3-second T1WI (3.76 ± 0.39) followed by gated 6-second and nongated 13.3-second T1WI (3.39 ± 0.55, 2.57 ± 0.57, P < 0.0001). Only gated 6-second T1WI showed significantly higher detection performance than nongated 13.3-second T1WI (figure of merit, 0.69 [0.63-0.76]) vs 0.60 [0.56-0.65], P = 0.004). Transient motion developed in 40% (23/59) of patients shortly after

  6. 'Modal-noise' in single-mode fibers: A cautionary note for high precision radial velocity instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Halverson, Samuel; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Schwab, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Exploring the use of single-mode fibers (SMFs) in high precision Doppler spectrometers has become increasingly attractive since the advent of diffraction-limited adaptive optics systems on large-aperture telescopes. Spectrometers fed with these fibers can be made significantly smaller than typical 'seeing-limited' instruments, greatly reducing cost and overall complexity. Importantly, classical mode interference and speckle issues associated with multi-mode fibers, also known as 'modal noise', are mitigated when using SMFs, which also provide perfect radial and azimuthal image scrambling. However, these fibers do support multiple polarization modes, an issue that is generally ignored for larger-core fibers given the large number of propagation modes. Since diffraction gratings used in most high resolution astronomical instruments have dispersive properties that are sensitive to incident polarization changes, any birefringence variations in the fiber can cause variations in the efficiency profile, degrading il...

  7. Quench-induced breathing mode of one-dimensional Bose gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Bess; Carleo, Giuseppe; Johnson, Aisling; Bouchoule, Isabelle

    2014-07-18

    We measure the position- and momentum-space breathing dynamics of trapped one-dimensional Bose gases at finite temperature. The profile in real space reveals sinusoidal width oscillations whose frequency varies continuously through the quasicondensate to ideal Bose gas crossover. A comparison with theoretical models taking temperature into account is provided. In momentum space, we report the first observation of a frequency doubling in the quasicondensate regime, corresponding to a self-reflection mechanism due to the repulsive interactions. Such a mechanism is predicted for a fermionized system, and has not been observed to date. The disappearance of the frequency doubling through the crossover is mapped out experimentally, giving insights into the dynamics of the breathing evolution.

  8. Laser characterization of the unsteady 2-D ion flow field in a Hall thruster with breathing mode oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Young, Christopher; MacDonald-Tenenbaum, Natalia; Hargus, William, Jr.; Cappelli, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Hall thrusters are a mature form of electric propulsion for spacecraft. One commonly observed low frequency (10-50 kHz) discharge current oscillation in these E × B devices is the breathing mode, linked to a propagating ionization front traversing the channel. The complex time histories of ion production and acceleration in the discharge channel and near-field plume lead to interesting dynamics and interactions in the central plasma jet and downstream plume regions. A time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) diagnostic non-intrusively measures 2-D ion velocity and relative ion density throughout the plume of a commercial BHT-600 Hall thruster manufactured by Busek Co. Low velocity classes of ions observed in addition to the main accelerated population are linked to propellant ionization outside of the device. Effects of breathing mode dynamics are shown to persist far downstream where modulations in ion velocity and LIF intensity are correlated with discharge current oscillations. This work is sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research with Dr. M. Birkan as program manager. C.Y. acknowledges support from the DOE NSSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship under contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  9. “MODAL NOISE” IN SINGLE-MODE FIBERS: A CAUTIONARY NOTE FOR HIGH PRECISION RADIAL VELOCITY INSTRUMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halverson, Samuel; Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, Suvrath [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Schwab, Christian, E-mail: shalverson@psu.edu [Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia)

    2015-12-01

    Exploring the use of single-mode fibers (SMFs) in high precision Doppler spectrometers has become increasingly attractive since the advent of diffraction-limited adaptive optics systems on large-aperture telescopes. Spectrometers fed with these fibers can be made significantly smaller than typical “seeing-limited” instruments, greatly reducing cost and overall complexity. Importantly, classical mode interference and speckle issues associated with multi-mode fibers, also known as “modal noise,” are mitigated when using SMFs, which also provide perfect radial and azimuthal image scrambling. However, SMFs do support multiple polarization modes, an issue that is generally ignored for larger-core fibers given the large number of propagation modes. Since diffraction gratings used in most high resolution astronomical instruments have dispersive properties that are sensitive to incident polarization changes, any birefringence variations in the fiber can cause variations in the efficiency profile, degrading illumination stability. Here we present a cautionary note outlining how the polarization properties of SMFs can affect the radial velocity (RV) measurement precision of high resolution spectrographs. This work is immediately relevant to the rapidly expanding field of diffraction-limited, extreme precision RV spectrographs that are currently being designed and built by a number of groups.

  10. Generation of Radial Laguerre-Gaussian modes with a lower threshold using a digital laser

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bell, Teboho

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Zulu-Natal, Westville, Private Bag X 54001, Durban 4000, South Africa. 3Centre de Développement des Techniques Avancées, Division Milieux Ionisés et Lasers, P.O. Box 17 Baba Hassan, Algiers 16303, Algeria. 2Electrical field of Laguerre-Gaussian beams with radial...

  11. Finite-temperature hydrodynamics for one-dimensional Bose gases: Breathing-mode oscillations as a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchoule, I.; Szigeti, S. S.; Davis, M. J.; Kheruntsyan, K. V.

    2016-11-01

    We develop a finite-temperature hydrodynamic approach for a harmonically trapped one-dimensional quasicondensate and apply it to describe the phenomenon of frequency doubling in the breathing-mode oscillations of the quasicondensate momentum distribution. The doubling here refers to the oscillation frequency relative to the oscillations of the real-space density distribution, invoked by a sudden confinement quench. By constructing a nonequilibrium phase diagram that characterizes the regime of frequency doubling and its gradual disappearance, we find that this crossover is governed by the quench strength and the initial temperature rather than by the equilibrium-state crossover from the quasicondensate to the ideal Bose gas regime. The hydrodynamic predictions are supported by the results of numerical simulations based on a finite-temperature c -field approach and extend the utility of the hydrodynamic theory for low-dimensional quantum gases to the description of finite-temperature systems and their dynamics in momentum space.

  12. Performance of Chilled Beam with Radial Swirl Jet and Diffuse Ceiling Air Supply in Heating Mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertheussen, Bård; Mustakallio, Panu; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2013-01-01

    The performance of diffuse ceiling air supply and chilled beam with swirl jet (CSW) in heating mode (winter situation) was studied and compared with regard to the generated indoor environment. An office mock-up with one occupant was simulated in a test room (4.5 x 3.95 x 3.5 m3 (L x W x H...

  13. Radial modes of slowly rotating compact stars in the presence of magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panda, N.R. [Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar (India); Siksha ' O' Anusandhan University, Bhubaneswar (India); Mohanta, K.K. [Rairangpur College, Rairangpur, Odisha (India); Sahu, P.K. [Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar (India)

    2016-09-15

    Compact stars are composed of very high-density hadron matter. When the matter is above nuclear matter density, then there is a chance of different phases of matter such as hadron matter to quark matter. There is a possible phase which, having the quark core surrounded by a mixed phase followed by hadronic matter, may be considered as a hybrid phase inside the stars called hybrid star (HS). The star which consists of only u, d and s quarks is called quark star (QS) and the star which has only hadronic matter is called neutron star (NS). For the equation of state (EOS) of hadronic matter, we have considered the Relativistic Mean Field (RMF) theory and we incorporated the effect of strong magnetic fields. For the EOS of the quark phase we use the simple MIT bag model. We have assumed Gaussian parametrization to make the density dependent for both bag pressure in quark matter and magnetic field. We have constructed the intermediate mixed phase by using the Glendenning conjecture. Eigenfrequencies of radial pulsations of slowly rotating magnetized compact stars (NS, QS, HS) are calculated in a general relativistic formalism given by Chandrasekhar and Friedman. We have studied the effect of central density on the square of the frequencies of the compact stars in the presence of zero and strong magnetic field. (orig.)

  14. Radial modes of slowly rotating compact stars in the presence of magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, N. R.; Mohanta, K. K.; Sahu, P. K.

    2016-09-01

    Compact stars are composed of very high-density hadron matter. When the matter is above nuclear matter density, then there is a chance of different phases of matter such as hadron matter to quark matter. There is a possible phase which, having the quark core surrounded by a mixed phase followed by hadronic matter, may be considered as a hybrid phase inside the stars called hybrid star (HS). The star which consists of only u, d and s quarks is called quark star (QS) and the star which has only hadronic matter is called neutron star (NS). For the equation of state (EOS) of hadronic matter, we have considered the Relativistic Mean Field (RMF) theory and we incorporated the effect of strong magnetic fields. For the EOS of the quark phase we use the simple MIT bag model. We have assumed Gaussian parametrization to make the density dependent for both bag pressure in quark matter and magnetic field. We have constructed the intermediate mixed phase by using the Glendenning conjecture. Eigenfrequencies of radial pulsations of slowly rotating magnetized compact stars (NS, QS, HS) are calculated in a general relativistic formalism given by Chandrasekhar and Friedman. We have studied the effect of central density on the square of the frequencies of the compact stars in the presence of zero and strong magnetic field.

  15. Performance of simultaneous high temporal resolution quantitative perfusion imaging of bladder tumors and conventional multi-phase urography using a novel free-breathing continuously acquired radial compressed-sensing MRI sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Nainesh; Ream, Justin M; Zhang, Hoi Cheung; Block, Kai Tobias; Chandarana, Hersh; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the feasibility of high temporal resolution quantitative perfusion imaging of bladder tumors performed simultaneously with conventional multi-phase MR urography (MRU) using a novel free-breathing continuously acquired radial MRI sequence with compressed-sensing reconstruction. 22 patients with bladder lesions underwent MRU using GRASP (Golden-angle RAdial Sparse Parallel) acquisition. Multi-phase contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic GRASP was performed during free-breathing (1.4×1.4×3.0mm(3) voxel size; 3:44min acquisition). Two dynamic datasets were retrospectively reconstructed by combining different numbers of sequentially acquired spokes into each dynamic frame: 110 spokes per frame for 25-s temporal resolution (serving as conventional MRU for clinical interpretation) and 8 spokes per frame for 1.7-s resolution. Using 1.7-s resolution images, ROIs were placed within bladder lesions and normal bladder wall, a femoral artery arterial input function was generated, and the Generalized Kinetic Model was applied. Biopsy/cystectomy demonstrated 16 bladder tumors (13 stage≥T2, 3 stage≤T1) and 6 benign lesions. All lesions were well visualized using 25-s clinical multi-phase images. Using 1.7-s resolution images, K(trans) was significantly higher in tumors (0.38±0.24) than normal bladder (0.12±0.02=8, pMRU examinations using only one contrast injection and without additional scan time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Consequences of self-consistency violations in Hartree-Fock random-phase approximation calculations of the nuclear breathing mode energy

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, B K

    2004-01-01

    We provide for the first time accurate assessments of the consequences of violations of self-consistency in the Hartree-Fock based random phase approximation (RPA) as commonly used to calculate the energy $E_c$ of the nuclear breathing mode. Using several Skyrme interactions we find that the self-consistency violated by ignoring the spin-orbit interaction in the RPA calculation causes a spurious enhancement of the breathing mode energy for spin unsaturated systems. Contrarily, neglecting the Coulomb interaction in the RPA or performing the RPA calculations in the TJ scheme underestimates the breathing mode energy. Surprisingly, our results for the $^{90}$Zr and $^{208}$Pb nuclei for several Skyrme type effective nucleon-nucleon interactions having a wide range of nuclear matter incompressibility ($K_{nm} \\sim 215 - 275$ MeV) and symmetry energy ($J \\sim 27 - 37$ MeV) indicate that the net uncertainty ($\\delta E_c \\sim 0.3$ MeV) is comparable to the experimental one.

  17. Spectroscopic monitoring of the Herbig Ae star HD 104237. II. Non-radial pulsations, mode analysis and fundamental stellar parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Fumel, Aurelie

    2011-01-01

    Herbig Ae/Be stars are intermediate-mass pre-main sequence (PMS) stars showing signs of intense activity and strong stellar winds, whose origin is not yet understood in the frame of current theoretical models of stellar evolution for young stars. The evolutionary tracks of the earlier Herbig Ae stars cross a recently discovered PMS instability strip. Many of these stars exhibit pulsations of delta Scuti type. HD 104237 is a well-known pulsating Herbig Ae star. In this article, we reinvestigated an extensive high-resolution quasi-continuous spectroscopic data set in order to search for very faint indications of non-radial pulsations in the line profile. To do this, we worked on dynamical spectra of equivalent photospheric (LSD) profiles of HD 104237. A 2D Fourier analysis (F2D) was performed of the entire profile and the temporal variation of the central depth of the line was studied with the time-series analysis tools Period04 and SigSpec. We present a mode identification corresponding to the detected dominan...

  18. Breathing Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to breathe. Decrease work of breathing and promote airway clearance Positioning: Elevating the head of the bed. This ... to Breathing Changes.” Equipment to support ventilation and airway clearance: Portable suction units can help remove secretions from ...

  19. Radial volumetric imaging breath-hold examination (VIBE) with k-space weighted image contrast (KWIC) for dynamic gadoxetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced MRI of the liver: advantages over Cartesian VIBE in the arterial phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujinaga, Yasunari; Ohya, Ayumi; Tokoro, Hirokazu; Yamada, Akira; Ueda, Kazuhiko; Kadoya, Masumi [Shinshu University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Matsumoto (Japan); Ueda, Hitoshi; Kitou, Yoshihiro; Adachi, Yasuo; Shiobara, Aya; Tamaru, Naomichi [Radiology Division of Shinshu University Hospital, Matsumoto (Japan); Nickel, Marcel D. [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, H IM MR PI TIO Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Maruyama, Katsuya [Siemens Japan. K. K., Imaging and Therapy Systems Division, Shinagawa, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-06-15

    To compare radial volumetric imaging breath-hold examination with k-space weighted image contrast reconstruction (r-VIBE-KWIC) to Cartesian VIBE (c-VIBE) in arterial phase dynamic gadoxetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) of the liver. We reviewed 53 consecutive DCE-MRI studies performed on a 3-T unit using c-VIBE and 53 consecutive cases performed using r-VIBE-KWIC with full-frame image subset (r-VIBE{sub full}) and sub-frame image subsets (r-VIBE{sub sub}; temporal resolution, 2.5-3 s). All arterial phase images were scored by two readers on: (1) contrast-enhancement ratio (CER) in the abdominal aorta; (2) scan timing; (3) artefacts; (4) visualisation of the common, right, and left hepatic arteries. Mean abdominal aortic CERs for c-VIBE, r-VIBE{sub full}, and r-VIBE{sub sub} were 3.2, 4.3 and 6.5, respectively. There were significant differences between each group (P < 0.0001). The mean score for c-VIBE was significantly lower than that for r-VIBE{sub full} and r-VIBE{sub sub} in all factors except for visualisation of the common hepatic artery (P < 0.05). The mean score of all factors except for scan timing for r-VIBE{sub sub} was not significantly different from that for r-VIBE{sub full}. Radial VIBE-KWIC provides higher image quality than c-VIBE, and r-VIBE{sub sub} features high temporal resolution without image degradation in arterial phase DCE-MRI. circle Radial VIBE-KWIC minimised artefact and produced high-quality and high-temporal-resolution images. circle Maximum abdominal aortic enhancement was observed on sub-frame images of r-VIBE-KWIC. (orig.)

  20. Change of Radial Gap Value in Axial Compressors at Modes of Turbine Plant Heating and Shut-Down

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Laskine

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Designing of highly-efficient axial compressors is connected with their better aerodynamic cleanness. One of the ways is to minimize radial clearances for decreasing leakages and, consequently, increasing efficiency. At the same time it is necessary to exclude stator touching by rotor blades.ANSYS complex has been used to reduce a gap by 1.5–2.0-fold in comparison with the existing one.It has become possible to obtain dependences of radial displacement of peripheral blade edge and stator ring element, located above it, on heating time.Practical and research value of the paper is in the development of a methodology for calculation of heating (cooling, which can be applied while designing axial turbine machines and evaluating the possible minimization of radial gap in the case that excludes touching.

  1. Breathing Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... getting enough air. Sometimes you can have mild breathing problems because of a stuffy nose or intense ... panic attacks Allergies If you often have trouble breathing, it is important to find out the cause.

  2. Influência do padrão respiratório na morfologia craniofacial Breathing mode influence in craniofacial development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Campos Rosetti Lessa

    2005-04-01

    , with mouth breathing children and group II, with nose breathers. Standard lateral cephalometric radiographs were obtained to evaluate facial proportions using the following measures: SN.GoGn, ArGo.GoMe, N-Me, N-ANS, ANS-Me and S-Go; and the following indexes: PFH-AFH ratio: S-Go/N-Me; LFH-AFH ratio: ANS-Me/N-Me and UFH-LFH ratio: N-ANS/ANS-Me. RESULTS: It was observed that the measurements for the inclination of the mandibular plane (SN.GoGn in mouth breathing children were statistically higher than those in nasal breathing children. The posterior facial height was statistically smaller than the anterior one in mouth breathing children (PFH-AFH ratio. Thus, the upper anterior facial height was statistically smaller than the lower facial height (UFH-LFH ratio. CONCLUSION: We concluded that mouth breathing children tend to have higher mandibular inclination and more vertical growth. These findings support the influence of the breathing mode in craniofacial development.

  3. Thermodynamic efficiency analysis and cycle optimization of deeply precooled combined cycle engine in the air-breathing mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianqiang; Wang, Zhenguo; Li, Qinglian

    2017-09-01

    The efficiency calculation and cycle optimization were carried out for the Synergistic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine (SABRE) with deeply precooled combined cycle. A component-level model was developed for the engine, and exergy efficiency analysis based on the model was carried out. The methods to improve cycle efficiency have been proposed. The results indicate cycle efficiency of SABRE is between 29.7% and 41.7% along the flight trajectory, and most of the wasted exergy is occupied by the unburned hydrogen in exit gas. Exergy loss exists in each engine component, and the sum losses of main combustion chamber(CC), pre-burner(PB), precooler(PC) and 3# heat exchanger(HX3) are greater than 71.3% of the total loss. Equivalence ratio is the main influencing factor of cycle, and it can be regulated by adjusting parameters of helium loop. Increase the maximum helium outlet temperature of PC by 50 K, the total assumption of hydrogen will be saved by 4.8%, and the cycle efficiency is advanced by 3% averagely in the trajectory. Helium recirculation scheme introduces a helium recirculation loop to increase local helium flow rate of PC. It turns out the total assumption of hydrogen will be saved by 9%, that's about 1740 kg, and the cycle efficiency is advanced by 5.6% averagely.

  4. Inversion of the moment-tensor Mrr components of the 2012 Sumatra strike-slip double earthquake using radial normal modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zábranová, Eliška; Matyska, Ctirad

    2017-01-01

    On April 11, 2012, two strike-slip Sumatra earthquakes with moment magnitudes higher than 8 generated strong, preferentially horizontal, motions. If only body and surface waves are inverted, their centroid-moment-tensor (CMT) parameters producing vertical motions, in particular the Mrr components, are poorly resolved. Independent constraints can be obtained from observations of the radial free-oscillation modes. The signal of radial modes is acquired from four unperturbed superconducting gravimeter records with low noise levels in submillihertz frequency range. We show that the observed signal substantially differs from the synthetic calculations for most of the published CMTs except for the Global CMT solution, which agrees better. We perform modal inversions considering uncertainties in centroid times and calculate marginal posterior probability density function of the Mrr components. The amplitude-spectrum inversion is robust enough to estimate the intervals of admissible Mrr values. Finally, we incorporate also a phase information and reduce the trade-off between the Mrr components of the two studied events.

  5. Excitation of high-radial-order Laguerre–Gaussian modes in a solid-state laser using a lower-loss digitally controlled amplitude mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, T.; Hasnaoui, A.; Ait-Ameur, K.; Ngcobo, S.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we experimentally demonstrate selective excitation of high-radial-order Laguerre–Gaussian (LG p or LG{}p,0) modes with radial order p = 1–4 and azimuthal order l = 0 using a diode-pump solid-state laser (DPSSL) that is digitally controlled by a spatial light modulator (SLM). We encoded an amplitude mask containing p-absorbing rings, of various incompleteness (segmented) on grey-scale computer-generated digital holograms, and displayed them on an SLM which acted as an end mirror of the diode-pumped solid-state digital laser. The various incomplete (α) p-absorbing rings were digitally encoded to match the zero-intensity nulls of the desired LG p mode. We show that the creation of LG p , for p = 1 to p = 4, only requires an incomplete circular p-absorbing ring that has a completeness of ≈37.5%, giving the DPSSL resonator a lower pump threshold power while maintaining the same laser characteristics (such as beam propagation properties).

  6. Nuclear breathing mode in neutron-rich Nickel isotopes: sensitivity to the symmetry energy and the role of the continuum

    CERN Document Server

    Piekarewicz, J

    2014-01-01

    In this new era of radioactive beam facilities, the discovery of novel modes of excitation in nuclei far away from stability represents an area of intense research activity. In addition, these modes of excitation appear to be sensitive to the uncertain density dependence of the symmetry energy. We study the emergence, evolution, and nature of both the soft and giant isoscalar monopole modes as a function of neutron excess in three unstable Nickel isotopes: 56Ni, 68Ni, and 78Ni. The distribution of isoscalar monopole strength is computed in a relativistic random-phase approximation using several accurately calibrated effective interactions. In particular, a non-spectral Green's function approach is adopted that allows for an exact treatment of the continuum without any reliance on discretization. The discretization of the continuum is neither required nor admitted. In the case of 56Ni, the lack of low-energy strength results in a direct correlation between the centroid energy of the giant monopole resonance an...

  7. Model-free adaptive sliding mode controller design for generalized projective synchronization of the fractional-order chaotic system via radial basis function neural networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L M WANG

    2017-09-01

    A novel model-free adaptive sliding mode strategy is proposed for a generalized projective synchronization (GPS) between two entirely unknown fractional-order chaotic systems subject to the external disturbances. To solve the difficulties from the little knowledge about the master–slave system and to overcome the bad effects of the external disturbances on the generalized projective synchronization, the radial basis function neural networks are used to approach the packaged unknown master system and the packaged unknown slave system (including the external disturbances). Consequently, based on the slide mode technology and the neural network theory, a model-free adaptive sliding mode controller is designed to guarantee asymptotic stability of the generalized projective synchronization error. The main contribution of this paper is that a control strategy is provided for the generalized projective synchronization between two entirely unknown fractional-order chaotic systems subject to the unknown external disturbances, and the proposed control strategy only requires that the master system has the same fractional orders as the slave system. Moreover, the proposed method allows us to achieve all kinds of generalized projective chaos synchronizations by turning the user-defined parameters onto the desired values. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed method and the robustness of the controlled system.

  8. Experimental validation of non-uniformity effect of the radial electric field on the edge transport barrier formation in JT-60U H-mode plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Kensaku; Itoh, Kimitaka; Itoh, Sanae-I.; JT-60 Team

    2016-10-01

    Non-uniformity effects of the edge radial electric field (Er) on the edge transport barriers (ETBs) formation have been identified with high-spatiotemporal resolution spectroscopic measurement. We found the decisive importance of Er-curvature (2nd derivative of Er) on ETB formation during ELM-free H-mode phase, but there is only a low correlation with the Er-shear (1st derivative of Er) value at the peak of normalized ion temperature gradient in the pedestal region. Observation of a uniform toroidal MHD oscillation (i.e. Geodesic Acoustic Mode having toroidal mode number n = 0) during the ETBs formation can also support the hypothesis of turbulence suppression in association with Zonal-flow (and/or Er-curvature). Furthermore, in the ELMing phase, the effect of curvature is also quantified in terms of the relationship between pedestal width and thickness of the layer of inhomogeneous Er. This is the fundamental basis to understand the structure of transport barriers in fusion plasmas. Authors acknowledge the partial support by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (15K06657, 15H02155, 16H02442) and collaboration programmes between QST and universities and of the RIAM of Kyushu University, and by Asada Science Foundation.

  9. Model-free adaptive sliding mode controller design for generalized projective synchronization of the fractional-order chaotic system via radial basis function neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L. M.

    2017-09-01

    A novel model-free adaptive sliding mode strategy is proposed for a generalized projective synchronization (GPS) between two entirely unknown fractional-order chaotic systems subject to the external disturbances. To solve the difficulties from the little knowledge about the master-slave system and to overcome the bad effects of the external disturbances on the generalized projective synchronization, the radial basis function neural networks are used to approach the packaged unknown master system and the packaged unknown slave system (including the external disturbances). Consequently, based on the slide mode technology and the neural network theory, a model-free adaptive sliding mode controller is designed to guarantee asymptotic stability of the generalized projective synchronization error. The main contribution of this paper is that a control strategy is provided for the generalized projective synchronization between two entirely unknown fractional-order chaotic systems subject to the unknown external disturbances, and the proposed control strategy only requires that the master system has the same fractional orders as the slave system. Moreover, the proposed method allows us to achieve all kinds of generalized projective chaos synchronizations by turning the user-defined parameters onto the desired values. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed method and the robustness of the controlled system.

  10. Sliding-mode and proportional-derivative-type motion control with radial basis function neural network based estimators for wheeled vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamosoaji, Anugrah K.; Thuong Cat, Pham; Hong, Keum-Shik

    2014-12-01

    An obstacle avoidance problem of rear-steered wheeled vehicles in consideration of the presence of uncertainties is addressed. Modelling errors and additional uncertainties are taken into consideration. Controller designs for driving and steering motors are designed. A proportional-derivative-type driving motor controller and a sliding-mode steering controller combined with radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) based estimators are proposed. The convergence properties of the RBFNN-based estimators are proven by the Stone-Weierstrass theorem. The stability of the proposed control law is proven using Lyapunov stability analysis. The obstacle avoidance strategy utilising the sliding surface adjustment to an existing navigation method is presented. It is concluded that the driving velocity and steering-angle performances of the proposed control system are satisfactory.

  11. The complex case of V445 Lyr observed with Kepler: Two Blazhko modulations, a non-radial mode, possible triple mode RR Lyrae pulsation, and more

    CERN Document Server

    Guggenberger, E; Nemec, J M; Smolec, R; Benkő, J M; Ngeow, C -C; Cohen, J G; Sesar, B; Szabó, R; Catelan, M; Moskalik, P; Kinemuchi, K; Seader, S E; Smith, J C; Tenenbaum, P; Kjeldsen, H

    2012-01-01

    Rapid and strong changes in the Blazhko modulation of RR Lyrae stars, as they have recently been detected in high precision satellite data, have become a crucial topic in finding an explanation of the long-standing mystery of the Blazhko effect. We present here an analysis of the most extreme case detected so far, the RRab star V445 Lyr (KIC 6186029) which was observed with the Kepler space mission. V445 Lyr shows very strong cycle-to-cycle changes in its Blazhko modulation, which are caused both by a secondary long-term modulation period as well as irregular variations. In addition to the complex Blazhko modulation, V445 Lyr also shows a rich spectrum of additional peaks in the frequency range between the fundamental pulsation and the first harmonic. Among those peaks, the second radial overtone could be identified, which, combined with a metallicity estimate of [Fe/H]=-2.0 dex from spectroscopy, allowed to constrain the mass (0.55-0.65 M_sun) and luminosity (40-50 L_sun) of V445 Lyr through theoretical Pete...

  12. Cavity spatial mode-locking and high controllability of radial output coupling for circular/square plasmonic nano-resonator lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Huang, Yingyan; Ho, Seng-Tiong

    2015-02-01

    We proposed and investigated a novel output coupling scheme for a circular and a square plasmonic nano-ring laser based on a T-shaped radial coupler that is easier to realize than a tangential coupler. The amount of coupling efficiency is shown to be highly controllable from a few percent to tens of percents. This is due to the fact that the standing-wave lasing mode pattern will rotate to give the minimal cavity loss at the T-coupler's location, making the amount of output coupling surprisingly low and hence, controllable. For a non-circular cavity, other symmetry-breaking and geometry-induced scattering could result in separate mode-pattern locking. These give a few main ways to control and optimize the coupling efficiency: via widening/narrowing or rotating the T-coupler's waveguide, or, for the case of a non-circular cavity, via shifting the location of the T-coupler. We observed increased unidirectional lasing induced by either rotating the waveguide or shifting it (for non-circular cases). We simulated the coupling using Maxwell's equations based on the multi-level multi-electron FDTD (MLME-FDTD) method to realistically model the lasing and output coupling behaviors of such plasmonic semiconductor lasers.

  13. The IACOB project. IV. New predictions for high-degree non-radial mode instability domains in massive stars and their connection with macroturbulent broadening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godart, M.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Herrero, A.; Dupret, M. A.; Grötsch-Noels, A.; Salmon, S. J. A. J.; Ventura, P.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Asteroseismology is a powerful tool to access the internal structure of stars. Apart from the important impact of theoretical developments, progress in this field has been commonly associated with the analysis of time-resolved observations. Recently, the so-called macroturbulent broadening has been proposed as a complementary and less expensive way - in terms of observational time - to investigate pulsations in massive stars. Aims: We assess to what extent this ubiquitous non-rotational broadening component which shapes the line profiles of O stars and B supergiants is a spectroscopic signature of pulsation modes driven by a heat mechanism. Methods: We compute stellar main-sequence and post-main-sequence models from 3 to 70 M⊙ with the ATON stellar evolution code, and determine the instability domains for heat-driven modes for degrees ℓ = 1-20 using the adiabatic and non-adiabatic codes LOSC and MAD. We use the observational material compiled in the framework of the IACOB project to investigate possible correlations between the single snapshot line-broadening properties of a sample of ≈260 O and B-type stars and their location inside or outside the various predicted instability domains. Results: We present an homogeneous prediction for the non-radial instability domains of massive stars for degree ℓ up to 20. We provide a global picture of what to expect from an observational point of view in terms of the frequency range of excited modes, and we investigate the behavior of the instabilities with respect to stellar evolution and the degree of the mode. Furthermore, our pulsational stability analysis, once compared to the empirical results, indicates that stellar oscillations originated by a heat mechanism cannot explain alone the occurrence of the large non-rotational line-broadening component commonly detected in the O star and B supergiant domain. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated by NOTSA, and the Mercator

  14. Radial variation of whistler-mode chorus: first results from the STAFF/DWP instrument on board the Double Star TC-1 spacecraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Santolík

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available We use the first measurements of the STAFF/DWP instrument on the Double Star TC-1 spacecraft to investigate whistler-mode chorus. We present initial results of a systematic study on radial variation of dawn chorus. The chorus events show an increased intensity at L parameter above 6. This is important for the possible explanation of intensifications of chorus, which were previously observed closer to the Earth at higher latitudes. Our results also indicate that the upper band of chorus at frequencies above one-half of the electron cyclotron frequency disappears for L above 8. The lower band of chorus is observed at frequencies below 0.4 of the electron cyclotron frequency up to L of 11-12. The maxima of the chorus power spectra are found at slightly lower frequencies compared to previous studies. We do not observe any distinct evolution of the position of the chorus frequency band as a function of L. More data of the TC-1 spacecraft are needed to verify these initial results and to increase the MLT coverage.

  15. Experimental validation of non-uniformity effect of the radial electric field on the edge transport barrier formation in JT-60U H-mode plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, K.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-08-01

    The turbulent structure formation, where strongly-inhomogeneous turbulence and global electromagnetic fields are self-organized, is a fundamental mechanism that governs the evolution of high-temperature plasmas in the universe and laboratory (e.g., the generation of edge transport barrier (ETB) of the H-mode in the toroidal plasmas). The roles of inhomogeneities of radial electric field (Er) are known inevitable. In this mechanism, whether the first derivative of Er (shear) or the second derivative of Er (curvature) works most is decisive in determining the class of nontrivial solutions (which describe the barrier structure). Here we report the experimental identification of the essential role of the Er-curvature on the ETB formation, for the first time, based on the high-spatiotemporal resolution spectroscopic measurement. We found the decisive importance of Er-curvature on ETB formation during ELM-free phase, but there is only a low correlation with the Er-shear value at the peak of normalized ion temperature gradient. Furthermore, in the ELMing phase, the effect of curvature is also quantified in terms of the relationship between pedestal width and thickness of the layer of inhomogeneous Er. This is the fundamental basis to understand the structure of transport barriers in fusion plasmas.

  16. Quantification of Contralateral Breast Dose and Risk Estimate of Radiation-Induced Contralateral Breast Cancer Among Young Women Using Tangential Fields and Different Modes of Breathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurl, Brigitte, E-mail: brigitte.zurl@klinikum-graz.at [Department of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Medical University of Graz (Austria); Stranzl, Heidi; Winkler, Peter; Kapp, Karin Sigrid [Department of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Medical University of Graz (Austria)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Whole breast irradiation with deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique among left-sided breast cancer patients significantly reduces cardiac irradiation; however, a potential disadvantage is increased incidental irradiation of the contralateral breast. Methods and Materials: Contralateral breast dose (CBD) was calculated by comparing 400 treatment plans of 200 left-sided breast cancer patients whose tangential fields had been planned on gated and nongated CT data sets. Various anatomic and field parameters were analyzed for their impact on CBD. For a subgroup of patients (aged {<=}45 years) second cancer risk in the contralateral breast (CB) was modeled by applying the linear quadratic model, compound models, and compound models considering dose-volume information (DVH). Results: The mean CBD was significantly higher in DIBH with 0.69 Gy compared with 0.65 Gy in normal breathing (P=.01). The greatest impact on CBD was due to a shift of the inner field margin toward the CB in DIBH (mean 0.4 cm; range, 0-2), followed by field size in magnitude. Calculation with different risk models for CBC revealed values of excess relative risk/Gy ranging from 0.48-0.65 vs 0.46-0.61 for DIBH vs normal breathing, respectively. Conclusion: Contralateral breast dose, although within a low dose range, was mildly but significantly increased in 200 treatment plans generated under gated conditions, predominately due to a shift in the medial field margin. Risk modeling for CBC among women aged {<=}45 years also pointed to a higher risk when comparing DIBH with normal breathing. This risk, however, was substantially lower in the model considering DVH information. We think that clinical decisions should not be affected by this small increase in CBD with DIBH because DIBH is effective in reducing the dose to the heart in all patients.

  17. Breath alcohol test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcohol test - breath ... There are various brands of breath alcohol tests. Each one uses a different method to test the level of alcohol in the breath. The machine may be electronic or manual. One ...

  18. Rapid shallow breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachypnea; Breathing - rapid and shallow; Fast shallow breathing; Respiratory rate - rapid and shallow ... Shallow, rapid breathing has many possible medical causes, including: Asthma Blood clot in an artery in the lung Choking Chronic obstructive ...

  19. Breathing difficulties - first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Difficulty breathing - first aid; Dyspnea - first aid; Shortness of breath - first aid ... Breathing difficulty is almost always a medical emergency. An exception is feeling slightly winded from normal activity, ...

  20. CHARACTERISTICS OF PIEZOELECTRIC TRANSFORMER IN THE RADIAL VIBRATION MODE%径向模式振动的压电变压器特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王战; 王海; 李晗

    2014-01-01

    径向模式振动的压电变压器是由硬的压电材料建成,具有较高的机械品质因数Qm,它是沿厚度方向极化。首先根据压电变压器等效电路模型图建立压电变压器的动力学模型,根据各个负载电阻,测定的电压升压比,输出功率,效率方面的电性能,得出电压升压比与负载电阻成比例地增大,之后对不同厚度的压电变压器进行Comsol仿真,对比得出最优的压电变压器。后通过MATLAB仿真得出电阻最佳时,效率达到最大可以达到90%,升压比为1.5,对这些结果进行比较,从等效电路的分析计算,得出他们有很高的效率和稳定性,可以解决原有卫星推进器效率低、不稳定的状况。%A radial vibration mode of the piezoelectric transformer is constructed of hard piezoelectric materials having a high mechanical quality factor Qm, which is polarized in the direction of thickness. Firstly, according to the equivalent circuit model diagram of the piezoelectric transformer, the dynamic model of the piezoelectric transformer can be set up. Secondly, according to load resistors, the voltage rising ratio, the output power and the electrical properties of the efficiency, this paper draws a con-clusion that the voltage rising ratio increases as the load resistors increase. After that, the piezoelectric transformers with differ-ent thickness are simulated through Comsol and by contrast the optimal piezoelectric transformers can be obtained. Through MATLAB simulation, under the best resistor, the efficiency can reach 90%and the voltage rising ratio is 1.5. Through the com-parison of results, from the equivalent circuit analysis and calculation, they have obtained very high efficiency and stability, and can solve the problems of low efficiency and instability in the original satellite propeller.

  1. MODELING OF OPERATION OF COAXIAL-LINEAR MOTORS WITH AXIAL AND RADIAL DIRECTIONS OF MAGNETIZATION OF PERMANENT MAGNETS IN DYNAMIC MODE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Golenkov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical and experimental investigations of the amplitude, phase and inertia-power frequency characteristics of two types of coaxial-linear electric motors of back-and-forth motion with permanent magnets, which magnetization vector is directed axially and radially relative to the axis of the runner are carried out. The comparative analysis of characteristics of these motors is presented.

  2. Autochthonous Gut Bacteria in Two Indian Air-breathing Fish, Climbing Perch (Anabas testudineus) and Walking Catfish (Clarias batrachus): Mode of Association, Identification and Enzyme Producing Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Goutam; Dan, Suhas K; Nandi, Ankita; Ghosh, Pinki; Ray, Arun K

    2015-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to define the location of epithelium-associated bacteria in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of two Indian air-breathing fish, the climbing perch (Anabas testudineus) and walking catfish (Clarias batrachus). The SEM examination revealed substantial numbers of rod shaped bacterial cells associated with the microvillus brush borders of enterocytes in proximal (PI) and distal regions (DI) of the GI tract of both the fish species. Ten (two each from the PI and DI of climbing perch and three each from the PI and DI of walking catfish) isolated bacterial strains were evaluated for extracellular protease, amylase and cellulase production quantitatively. All the bacterial strains exhibited high cellulolytic activity compared to amylolytic and proteolytic activites. Only two strains, CBH6 and CBH7, isolated from the DI of walking catfish exhibited high proteolytic activity. Maximum cellulase activity was exhibited by the strain, CBF2, isolated from the PI of climbing perch. Six most promising enzyme-producing adherent bacterial strains were identified by 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis. The strain ATH1 (isolated from climbing perch) showed high similarity fo Bacillus amyloliquefaciens whereas, the remaining five strains (isolated from walking catfish) were most closely related to Bacillus licheniformis.

  3. Radial reflection diffraction tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, Sean K.

    2012-12-18

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  4. Radial Reflection diffraction tomorgraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, Sean K

    2013-11-19

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  5. What Causes Bad Breath?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness What Causes Bad Breath? KidsHealth > For Teens > What Causes Bad Breath? A A A en español ¿Qué es lo que provoca el mal aliento? Bad breath, or halitosis , can be a major problem, ...

  6. Radial Reflection Diffraction Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, S K; Norton, S J

    2003-10-10

    We develop a wave-based tomographic imaging algorithm based upon a single rotating radially outward oriented transducer. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, the transducer launches a primary field and collects the backscattered field in a ''pitch/catch'' operation. The hardware configuration, operating mode, and data collection method is identical to that of most medical intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) systems. IVUS systems form images of the medium surrounding the probe based upon ultrasonic B-scans, using a straight-ray model of sound propagation. Our goal is to develop a wave-based imaging algorithm using diffraction tomography techniques. Given the hardware configuration and the imaging method, we refer to this system as ''radial reflection diffraction tomography.'' We consider two hardware configurations: a multimonostatic mode using a single transducer as described above, and a multistatic mode consisting of a single transmitter and an aperture formed by multiple receivers. In this latter case, the entire source/receiver aperture rotates about the fixed radius. Practically, such a probe is mounted at the end of a catheter or snaking tube that can be inserted into a part or medium with the goal of forming images of the plane perpendicular to the axis of rotation. We derive an analytic expression for the multimonostatic inverse but ultimately use the new Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm to construct images using both operating modes. Applications include improved IVUS imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts with existing access holes.

  7. The IACOB project: IV. New predictions for high-degree non-radial mode instability domains in massive stars and connection with macroturbulent broadening

    CERN Document Server

    Godart, M; Herrero, A; Dupret, M A; Grötsch-Noels, A; Salmon, S J A J; Ventura, P

    2016-01-01

    Asteroseismology is a powerful tool to access the internal structure of stars. Apart from the important impact of theoretical developments, progress in this field has been commonly associated with the analysis of time-resolved observations. Recently, the so-called macroturbulent broadening has been proposed to be a complementary and less expensive way -- in terms of observational time -- to investigate pulsations in massive stars. We assess to what extent this ubiquitous non-rotational broadening component shaping the line profiles of O stars and B supergiants is a spectroscopic signature of pulsation modes driven by a heat mechanism. We compute stellar main sequence and post-main sequence models from 3 to 70Msun with the ATON stellar evolution code and determine the instability domains for heat-driven modes for degrees l=1-20 using the adiabatic and non-adiabatic codes LOSC and MAD. We use the observational material presented in Sim\\'on-D\\'iaz et al. (2016) to investigate possible correlations between the si...

  8. Study of NBI-driven chirping mode properties and radial location by the heavy ion beam probe in the TJ-II stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, A. V.; Eliseev, L. G.; Castejón, F.; Hidalgo, C.; Khabanov, P. O.; Kozachek, A. S.; Krupnik, L. I.; Liniers, M.; Lysenko, S. E.; de Pablos, J. L.; Sharapov, S. E.; Ufimtsev, M. V.; Zenin, V. N.; HIBP Group; TJ-II Team

    2016-11-01

    Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) were studied in low magnetic shear flexible heliac TJ-II (B 0  =  0.95 T, R 0  =  1.5 m,   =  0.22 m) neutral beam injection (NBI) heated plasmas (P NBI  ⩽  1.1 MW, E NBI  =  32 keV) using the heavy ion beam probe (HIBP). L-mode hydrogen plasmas heated with co-, counter- and balanced-NBI and electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) were investigated in various magnetic configurations with rotational transform ι(a)/2π  =  1/q ~ 1.5-1.6. The HIBP diagnostic is capable of simultaneously measuring the oscillations of the plasma electric potential, density and poloidal magnetic field. In earlier studies chirping modes have been observed with 250 kHz  electric potential perturbations have a ballooning character, while the density and B pol perturbations are nearly symmetric for both ECRH  +  NBI and NBI-only plasmas. On TJ-II, the dominant effect on the nonlinear evolution of the AE from the chirping state to the steady-frequency state is the magnetic configuration, determined by the vacuum ι and plasma current I pl.

  9. General Anesthesia with Preserved Spontaneous Breathing through an Intubation Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moroz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study whether spontaneous patient breathing may be preserved during elective operations under general anesthesia with tracheal intubation. Subjects and methods. One hundred and twelve patients undergoing elective surgeries under general endotracheal anesthesia were randomized into 2 groups: 1 patients who had forced mechanical ventilation in the volume-controlled mode and 2 those who received assisted ventilation as spontaneous breathing with mechanical support. Conclusion. The study shows that spontaneous breathing with mechanical support may be safely used during some surgical interventions in patients with baseline healthy lungs. Key words: Pressure Support, assisted ventilation, spontaneous breathing, general anesthesia, lung function.

  10. In vivo proton MRS of normal pancreas metabolites during breath-holding and free-breathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, T.-H. [Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, 95 Yong-An Road, Beijing (China); Jin, E.-H., E-mail: erhujin1@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, 95 Yong-An Road, Beijing (China); Shen, H. [GE China Company Ltd, Healthcare, General Electric Company, Beijing (China); Zhang, Y.; He, W. [Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, 95 Yong-An Road, Beijing (China)

    2012-07-15

    Aim: To characterize normal pancreas metabolites using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS) at 3 T under conditions of breath-holding and free-breathing. Materials and methods: The pancreases of 32 healthy volunteers were examined using {sup 1}H MRS during breath-holding and free-breathing acquisitions in a single-voxel point-resolved selective spectroscopy sequence (PRESS) technique using a 3 T MRI system. Resonances were compared between paired spectra of the two breathing modes. Furthermore, correlations between lipid (Lip) content and age, body-mass index (BMI), as well as choline (Cho) peak visibility of the normal pancreas were analysed during breath-holding. Results: Twenty-nine pairs of spectra were successfully obtained showing three major resonances, Lip, Cho, cholesterol and the unsaturated parts of the olefinic region of fatty acids (Chol + Unsat). Breath-hold spectra were generally better, with higher signal-to-noise ratios (SNR; Z=-2.646, p = 0.008) and Cho peak visible status (Z=-2.449, p = 0.014). Correlations were significant between spectra acquired by the two breathing modes, especially for Lip height, Lip area, and the area of other peaks at 1.9-4.1 ppm. However, the Lip resonance was significantly different between the spectra of the two breathing modes (p < 0.05). In the breath-holding spectra, there were significant positive correlations between Lip peak height, area, and age (r = 0.491 and 0.521, p = 0.007 and 0.004), but not between Lip peak area and BMI. There was no statistical difference in Cho resonances between males and females. The Lip peak height and area were significantly higher in the Cho peak invisible group than in the Cho peak visible group (t = 2.661 and 2.353, p = 0.030 and 0.043). Conclusion: In vivo{sup 1}H MRS of the normal pancreas at 3 T is technically feasible and can characterize several metabolites. {sup 1}H MRS during breath-holding acquisition is superior to that during free-breathing

  11. CRADA Final Report: Application of Dual-Mode Invertor Control to Commercially Available Radial-Gap Permanent Magnet Motors - Vol. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawler, J.S. (U. Tennessee-Knoxville); McKeever, J.W.; Downing, M.E.; Stahlhut, R.D (John Deere); Bremmer, R. (John Deere); Shoemaker, J.M. (John Deere); Seksarian, A.K. (john Deere); Poore, B. (John Deere); Lutz, J. (UQM)

    2006-05-01

    John Deere and Company (Deere), their partner, UQM Technologies, Inc. (UQM), and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) recently completed work on the cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) Number ORNL 04-0691 outlined in this report. CRADA 04-0691 addresses two topical issues of interest to Deere: (1) Improved characterization of hydrogen storage and heat-transfer management; and (2) Potential benefits from advanced electric motor traction-drive technologies. This report presents the findings of the collaborative examination of potential operational and cost benefits from using ORNL/PEEMRC dual-mode inverter control (DMIC) to drive permanent magnet (PM) motors in applications of interest to Deere. DMIC was initially developed and patented by ORNL to enable PM motors to be driven to speeds far above base speed where the back-electromotive force (emf) equals the source voltage where it is increasingly difficult to inject current into the motor. DMIC is a modification of conventional phase advance (CPA). DMIC's dual-speed modes are below base speed, where traditional pulse-width modulation (PWM) achieves maximum torque per ampere (amp), and above base speed, where six-step operation achieves maximum power per amp. The modification that enables DMIC adds two anti-parallel thyristors in each of the three motor phases, which consequently adds the cost of six thyristors. Two features evaluated in this collaboration with potential to justify the additional thyristor cost were a possible reduction in motor cost and savings during operation because of higher efficiency, both permitted because of lower current. The collaborative analysis showed that the reduction of motor cost and base cost of the inverter was small, while the cost of adding six thyristors was greater than anticipated. Modeling the DMIC control displayed inverter efficiency gains due to reduced current

  12. From breathing to respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitting, Jean-William

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of breathing remained an enigma for a long time. The Hippocratic school described breathing patterns but did not associate breathing with the lungs. Empedocles and Plato postulated that breathing was linked to the passage of air through pores of the skin. This was refuted by Aristotle who believed that the role of breathing was to cool the heart. In Alexandria, breakthroughs were accomplished in the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system. Later, Galen proposed an accurate description of the respiratory muscles and the mechanics of breathing. However, his heart-lung model was hampered by the traditional view of two non-communicating vascular systems - veins and arteries. After a period of stagnation in the Middle Ages, knowledge progressed with the discovery of pulmonary circulation. The comprehension of the purpose of breathing progressed by steps thanks to Boyle and Mayow among others, and culminated with the contribution of Priestley and the discovery of oxygen by Lavoisier. Only then was breathing recognized as fulfilling the purpose of respiration, or gas exchange. A century later, a controversy emerged concerning the active or passive transfer of oxygen from alveoli to the blood. August and Marie Krogh settled the dispute, showing that passive diffusion was sufficient to meet the oxygen needs.

  13. CRADA Final Report: Application of Dual-Mode Inverter Control to Commercially Available Radial-Gap Mermanent Magnet Motors - Vol. I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeever, John W [ORNL; Lawler, Jack [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Stahlhut, Ronnie D [ORNL; Bremmer, R. [John Deere -- Moline Tech Center; Shoemaker, J. M. [John Deere -- Moline Tech Center; Seksarian, A. K. [John Deere -- Moline Tech Center; Poore, B. [John Deere -- Moline Tech Center; Lutz, Jon F [ORNL

    2006-05-01

    John Deere and Company (Deere), their partner, UQM Technologies, Inc. (UQM), and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) recently completed work on the cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) Number ORNL 04-0691 outlined in this report. CRADA 04-0691 addresses two topical issues of interest to Deere: (1) Improved characterization of hydrogen storage and heat-transfer management; and (2) Potential benefits from advanced electric motor traction-drive technologies. This report presents the findings of the collaborative examination of potential operational and cost benefits from using ORNL/PEEMRC dual-mode inverter control (DMIC) to drive permanent magnet (PM) motors in applications of interest to Deere. DMIC was initially developed and patented by ORNL to enable PM motors to be driven to speeds far above base speed where the back-electromotive force (emf) equals the source voltage where it is increasingly difficult to inject current into the motor. DMIC is a modification of conventional phase advance (CPA). DMIC's dual-speed modes are below base speed, where traditional pulse-width modulation (PWM) achieves maximum torque per ampere (amp), and above base speed, where six-step operation achieves maximum power per amp. The modification that enables DMIC adds two anti-parallel thyristors in each of the three motor phases, which consequently adds the cost of six thyristors. Two features evaluated in this collaboration with potential to justify the additional thyristor cost were a possible reduction in motor cost and savings during operation because of higher efficiency, both permitted because of lower current. The collaborative analysis showed that the reduction of motor cost and base cost of the inverter was small, while the cost of adding six thyristors was greater than anticipated. Modeling the DMIC control displayed inverter efficiency gains due to reduced current

  14. Radial interchange motions of plasma filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Bian, N.H.; Fundamenski, W.

    2006-01-01

    reduces the radial velocity of isolated filaments. The results are discussed in the context of convective transport in scrape-off layer plasmas, comprising both blob-like structures in low confinement modes and edge localized mode filaments in unstable high confinement regimes. (c) 2006 American Institute...

  15. Radial coherent and intelligent states of paraxial wave equation

    CERN Document Server

    Karimi, Ebrahim; 10.1364/OL.37.002484

    2012-01-01

    Ladder operators for the radial index of the paraxial optical modes in the cylindrical coordinates are calculated. The operators obey the su(1,1) algebra commutation relations. Based on this Lie algebra, we found that coherent modes constructed as eigenstates of the destruction operator or resulting from the action of the displacement operator on the fundamental mode are different. Some properties of these two kinds of radial coherent modes are studied in detail.

  16. Minimizing Shortness of Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is also placed on proper use of the abdominal muscles to better control episodes of shortness of breath, ... Treatment & Programs Health Insights Doctors & Departments Research & Science Education & Training Make a Donation Make an Appointment Contact ...

  17. What Causes Bad Breath?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... teeth, you shouldn't have bad breath. The truth is that most people only brush their teeth ... The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart. ...

  18. Take a Deep Breath

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Everyone involved in Beijing’s Olympic Games held their breath last week, not because of the city’s famously polluted air , but in anticipation of the results of an experiment that could help to clean it up.

  19. Breathing difficulty - lying down

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... short of breath. Considerations This is a common complaint in people with some types of heart or ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  20. Shortness of Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... shortness of breath with physical exertion beyond your customary activity such as when climbing stairs. Allergic Reactions ... 75231 Copyright © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc. All rights reserved. Print ISSN: 0009-7322. Online ISSN: 1524- ...

  1. Radial deformation of single-walled carbon nanotubes on quartz substrates and the resultant anomalous diameter-dependent reaction selectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Yang; Yu Liu; Daqi Zhang; Xiao Wang; Ruoming Li; Yan Li

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the unique conjugated structure, the chemical-reaction selectivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has attracted great attention. By utilizing the radial deformation of SWNTs caused by the strong interactions with the quartz lattice, we achieve an anomalous diameter-dependent reaction selectivity of quartz lattice-oriented SWNTs in treatment with iodine vapor; this is distinctly different from the widely reported and well accepted higher reaction activity in small-diameter tubes compared to large-diameter tubes. The radial deformation of SWNTs on quartz substrate is verified by detailed Raman spectroscopy and mappings in both G-band and radial breathing mode. Due to the strong interaction between SWNTs and the quartz lattice, large-diameter tubes present a larger degree of radial deformation and more delocalized partial electrons are distributed at certain sidewall sites with high local curvature. It is thus easier for the carbon--carbon bonds at these high-curvature sites on large-diameter tubes to break down during reaction. This anomalous reaction activity offers a novel approach for selective removal of small-band~aD large-diameter tubes.

  2. Sensing the effects of mouth breathing by using 3-tesla MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan-A.; Kang, Chang-Ki

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the effects of mouth breathing and typical nasal breathing on brain function by using blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The study had two parts: the first test was a simple contrast between mouth and nasal breathing, and the second test involved combined breathing modes, e.g., mouth inspiration and nasal expiration. Eleven healthy participants performed the combined breathing task while undergoing 3T fMRI. In the group-level analysis, contrast images acquired by using an individual participantlevel analysis were processed using the one-sample t test. We also conducted a region-of-interest analysis comparing signal intensity changes between the breathing modes; the region was selected using an automated anatomical labeling map. The results demonstrated that the BOLD signal in the hippocampus and brainstem was significantly decreased in mouth breathing relative to nasal breathing. On the other hand, both the precentral and postcentral gyri showed activation that was more significant in mouth breathing compared to nasal breathing. This study suggests that the BOLD activity patterns between mouth and nasal breathing may be induced differently, especially in the hippocampus, which could provide clues to explain the effects on brain cognitive function due to mouth breathing.

  3. XD‐GRASP: Golden‐angle radial MRI with reconstruction of extra motion‐state dimensions using compressed sensing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feng, Li; Axel, Leon; Chandarana, Hersh; Block, Kai Tobias; Sodickson, Daniel K; Otazo, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    To develop a novel framework for free-breathing MRI called XD-GRASP, which sorts dynamic data into extra motion-state dimensions using the self-navigation properties of radial imaging and reconstructs...

  4. Breathing exercises for dysfunctional breathing/hyperventilation syndrome in adults

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Copyright © 2013 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by JohnWiley & Sons, Ltd. Background: Dysfunctional breathing/hyperventilation syndrome (DB/HVS) is a respiratory disorder, psychologically or physiologically based, involving breathing too deeply and/or too rapidly (hyperventilation) or erratic breathing interspersed with breath-holding or sighing (DB). DB/HVS can result in significant patient morbidity and an array of symptoms including breathlessness, chest tightness, dizziness, tre...

  5. The Air We Breathe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Dina

    2010-01-01

    Topics discussed include NASA mission to pioneer the future in space exploration, scientific discovery and aeronautics research; the role of Earth's atmosphere, atmospheric gases, layers of the Earth's atmosphere, ozone layer, air pollution, effects of air pollution on people, the Greenhouse Effect, and breathing on the International Space Station.

  6. The Breath of Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josephsen, Jens

    The present preliminary text is a short thematic presentation in biological inorganic chemistry meant to illustrate general and inorganic (especially coordination) chemistry in biochemistry. The emphasis is on molecular models to explain features of the complicated mechanisms essential to breathing...

  7. Breathing Like a Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsioloudis, Petros J.

    2010-01-01

    Being able to dive and breathe underwater has been a challenge for thousands of years. In 1980, Fuji Systems of Tokyo developed a series of prototype gills for divers as a way of demonstrating just how good its membranes are. Even though gill technology has not yet reached the point where recipients can efficiently use implants to dive underwater,…

  8. Fast and accurate exhaled breath ammonia measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solga, Steven F; Mudalel, Matthew L; Spacek, Lisa A; Risby, Terence H

    2014-06-11

    This exhaled breath ammonia method uses a fast and highly sensitive spectroscopic method known as quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) that uses a quantum cascade based laser. The monitor is coupled to a sampler that measures mouth pressure and carbon dioxide. The system is temperature controlled and specifically designed to address the reactivity of this compound. The sampler provides immediate feedback to the subject and the technician on the quality of the breath effort. Together with the quick response time of the monitor, this system is capable of accurately measuring exhaled breath ammonia representative of deep lung systemic levels. Because the system is easy to use and produces real time results, it has enabled experiments to identify factors that influence measurements. For example, mouth rinse and oral pH reproducibly and significantly affect results and therefore must be controlled. Temperature and mode of breathing are other examples. As our understanding of these factors evolves, error is reduced, and clinical studies become more meaningful. This system is very reliable and individual measurements are inexpensive. The sampler is relatively inexpensive and quite portable, but the monitor is neither. This limits options for some clinical studies and provides rational for future innovations.

  9. Novel Integration Radial and Axial Magnetic Bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth; Brown, Gary

    2000-01-01

    Typically, fully active magnetically suspended systems require one axial and two radial magnetic bearings. Combining radial and axial functions into a single device allows for more compact and elegant packaging. Furthermore, in the case of high-speed devices such as energy storage flywheels, it is beneficial to minimize shaft length to keep rotor mode frequencies as high as possible. Attempts have been made to combine radial and axial functionality, but with certain drawbacks. One approach requires magnetic control flux to flow through a bias magnet reducing control effectiveness, thus resulting in increased resistive losses. This approach also requires axial force producing magnetic flux to flow in a direction into the rotor laminate that is undesirable for minimizing eddy-current losses resulting in rotational losses. Another approach applies a conical rotor shape to what otherwise would be a radial heteropolar magnetic bearing configuration. However, positional non-linear effects are introduced with this scheme and the same windings are used for bias, radial, and axial control adding complexity to the controller and electronics. For this approach, the amount of axial capability must be limited. It would be desirable for an integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing to have the following characteristics; separate inputs for radial and axial control for electronics and control simplicity, all magnetic control fluxes should only flow through their respective air gaps and should not flow through any bias magnets for minimal resistive losses, be of a homopolar design to minimize rotational losses, position related non-linear effects should be minimized, and dependent upon the design parameters, be able to achieve any radial/axial force or power ratio as desired. The integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing described in this paper exhibits all these characteristics. Magnetic circuit design, design equations, and magnetic field modeling results will be presented.

  10. Novel Integrated Radial and Axial Magnetic Bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A.; Brown, Gary L.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Typically, fully active magnetically suspended systems require one axial and two radial magnetic bearings. Combining radial and axial functions into a single device allows for more compact and elegant packaging. Furthermore, in the case of high-speed devices such as energy storage flywheels, it is beneficial to minimize shaft length to keep rotor mode frequencies as high as possible. Attempts have been made to combine radial and axial functionality, but with certain drawbacks. One approach requires magnetic control flux to flow through a bias magnet reducing control effectiveness, thus resulting in increased resistive losses. This approach also requires axial force producing magnetic flux to flow in a direction into the rotor laminate that is undesirable for minimizing eddy-current losses resulting in rotational losses. Another approach applies a conical rotor shape to what otherwise would be a radial heteropolar magnetic bearing configuration. However, positional non-linear effects are introduced with this scheme and the same windings are used for bias, radial, and axial control adding complexity to the controller and electronics. For this approach, the amount of axial capability must be limited. It would be desirable for an integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing to have the following characteristics, separate inputs for radial and axial control for electronics and control simplicity, all magnetic control fluxes should only flow through their respective air gaps and should not flow through any bias magnets for minimal resistive losses, be of a homopolar design to minimize rotational losses, position related non-linear effects should be minimized, and dependent upon the design parameters, be able to achieve any radial/axial force or power ratio as desired. The integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing described in this paper exhibits all these characteristics. Magnetic circuit design, design equations, and analysis results will be presented.

  11. Alterações no modo respiratório, na oclusão e na fala em escolares: ocorrências e relações Alterations in breathing mode, occlusion and speech in school-age children: occurrences and relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Cristina Berwig

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: verificar a ocorrência de alterações no modo respiratório, má oclusão e distúrbio articulatório, bem como a relação entre as mesmas, em crianças de escolas públicas do município de Santa Maria/Rio Grande do Sul. MÉTODOS: 308 crianças de ambos os sexos, com idades entre 6 e 11 anos, foram submetidas às avaliações fonoaudiológica e ortodôntica, sendo selecionadas 235, de acordo com critérios de inclusão e exclusão. Das informações coletadas nas avaliações, consideraram-se o modo respiratório, a classificação da oclusão segundo Angle e as alterações oclusais vertical e transversal, bem como o distúrbio articulatório. RESULTADOS: 60,43% crianças apresentaram alterações no modo respiratório; 97,02% más oclusões de Angle; 28,94% alteração oclusal vertical e transversal e 14,89% apresentaram distúrbio articulatório. Relações significativas foram encontradas entre distúrbio articulatório e alteração oclusal vertical e transversal, modo respiratório e má oclusão de Angle e entre má oclusão de Angle e alteração oclusal vertical e transversal. CONCLUSÃO: as más oclusões e as alterações do modo respiratório foram frequentes no grupo de escolares estudados. As relações verificadas reforçam a ideia de que existe uma estreita relação entre as estruturas e funções do sistema estomatognático, razão pela qual merecem atenção de diversos profissionais da área da saúde.PURPOSE: to check the occurrence of articulation disorders, alterations in breathing mode and malocclusion as well as the relation among theses variables in public-school children. METHODS: 308 female and male children aged between 6 and 11 years were submitted to speech pathologic and orthodontic evaluations, being selected 235. From the information collected in the evaluations, we considered: breathing mode, malocclusion by Angle's classification and transverse alterations, as well as articulation disorder

  12. Radial heat flux transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiulis, A.; Buzzard, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    Unit moves heat radially from small diameter shell to larger diameter shell, or vice versa, with negligible temperature drop, making device useful wherever heating or cooling of concentrically arranged materials, substances, and structures is desired.

  13. Learn More Breathe Better

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-11-16

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a serious lung disease that makes breathing very difficult and can affect your quality of life. Learn the causes of COPD and what you can do to prevent it.  Created: 11/16/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Adult and Community Health (NCCDPHP, DACH).   Date Released: 11/16/2011.

  14. Breath Figures Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Guadarrama-Cetina, J.; González-Viñas, W

    2013-01-01

    We present experimental observations of Breath Figures (BF) which are formed by the dew of water when it condenses on a cold surface. The experiments were done in specific conditions and configurations of temperature, surfaces and mixes in controlled concentration of miscibles and immiscibles substances like the salt saturated solution, alcohol and silicon oil (C_6H_18O_2Si). The hydrophobic surfaces used on those observations are thin glasses coated with ITO (Indium Tin Oxide), 3M ECG-1700 w...

  15. 13C-methacetin breath test parameter S for liver diseases diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾文炳; 张维成; 许士元; 杨志忠; 刘纯; 朱德平; 文启彬; 申岐祥; 王先彬

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism of 13C-methacetin breath test is set forth clearly with the analysis of pharmacokinetics mode, and the measuring method of 13C-methacetin breath test and its clinical applications in the diagnosis of liver diseases are reported in detail. On the basis of comprehensive analysis of the clinical test data, the advanced diagnostic parameter S is of important significance for the application and development of breath test.

  16. Radial vortex core oscillations in Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhelst, N.; Ichmoukhamedov, T.; Tempere, J.

    2017-07-01

    Dilute ultracold quantum gases form an ideal and highly tunable system in which superfluidity can be studied. Recently quantum turbulence in Bose-Einstein condensates was reported [PRL 103, 045310 (2009)], opening up a new experimental system that can be used to study quantum turbulence. A novel feature of this system is that vortex cores now have a finite size. This means that the vortices are no longer one dimensional features in the condensate, but that the radial behaviour and excitations might also play an important role in the study of quantum turbulence in Bose-Einstein condensates. In this paper we investigate these radial modes using a simplified variational model for the vortex core. This study results in the frequencies of the radial modes, which can be compared with the frequencies of the thoroughly studied Kelvin modes. From this comparison we find that the lowest (l = 0) radial mode has a frequency in the same order of magnitude as the Kelvin modes. However the radial modes still have a larger energy than the Kelvin modes, meaning that the Kelvin modes will still constitute the preferred channel for energy decay in quantum turbulence.

  17. [Approaches to radial shaft].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoníček, J; Naňka, O; Tuček, M

    2015-10-01

    In the clinical practice, radial shaft may be exposed via two approaches, namely the posterolateral Thompson and volar (anterior) Henry approaches. A feared complication of both of them is the injury to the deep branch of the radial nerve. No consensus has been reached, yet, as to which of the two approaches is more beneficial for the proximal half of radius. According to our anatomical studies and clinical experience, Thompson approach is safe only in fractures of the middle and distal thirds of the radial shaft, but highly risky in fractures of its proximal third. Henry approach may be used in any fracture of the radial shaft and provides a safe exposure of the entire lateral and anterior surfaces of the radius.The Henry approach has three phases. In the first phase, incision is made along the line connecting the biceps brachii tendon and the styloid process of radius. Care must be taken not to damage the lateral cutaneous nerve of forearm.In the second phase, fascia is incised and the brachioradialis identified by the typical transition from the muscle belly to tendon and the shape of the tendon. On the lateral side, the brachioradialis lines the space with the radial artery and veins and the superficial branch of the radial nerve running at its bottom. On the medial side, the space is defined by the pronator teres in the proximal part and the flexor carpi radialis in the distal part. The superficial branch of the radial nerve is retracted together with the brachioradialis laterally, and the radial artery medially.In the third phase, the attachment of the pronator teres is identified by its typical tendon in the middle of convexity of the lateral surface of the radial shaft. The proximal half of the radius must be exposed very carefully in order not to damage the deep branch of the radial nerve. Dissection starts at the insertion of the pronator teres and proceeds proximally along its lateral border in interval between this muscle and insertion of the supinator

  18. Radial wedge flange clamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karl H.

    2002-01-01

    A radial wedge flange clamp comprising a pair of flanges each comprising a plurality of peripheral flat wedge facets having flat wedge surfaces and opposed and mating flat surfaces attached to or otherwise engaged with two elements to be joined and including a series of generally U-shaped wedge clamps each having flat wedge interior surfaces and engaging one pair of said peripheral flat wedge facets. Each of said generally U-shaped wedge clamps has in its opposing extremities apertures for the tangential insertion of bolts to apply uniform radial force to said wedge clamps when assembled about said wedge segments.

  19. 42 CFR 84.81 - Compressed breathing gas and liquefied breathing gas containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compressed breathing gas and liquefied breathing... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.81 Compressed breathing gas and liquefied breathing gas containers; minimum requirements. (a) Compressed breathing gas...

  20. Tongue Scrapers Only Slightly Reduce Bad Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your desktop! more... Tongue Scrapers Only Slightly Reduce Bad Breath Article Chapters Tongue Scrapers Only Slightly Reduce ... oral cavity. Reviewed: January 2012 Related Articles: Halitosis (Bad Breath) Do You Have Traveler's Breath? Does a ...

  1. Breath in the technoscientific imaginary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Arthur

    2016-12-01

    Breath has a realist function in most artistic media. It serves to remind the reader, the viewer or the spectator of the exigencies of the body. In science fiction (SF) literature and films, breath is often a plot device for human encounters with otherness, either with alien peoples, who may not breathe oxygen, or environments, where there may not be oxygen to breathe. But while there is a technoscientific quality to breath in SF, especially in its attention to physiological systems, concentrating on the technoscientific threatens to occlude other, more affective aspects raised by the literature. In order to supplement the tendency to read SF as a succession of technoscientific accounts of bodily experience, this paper recalls how SF texts draw attention to the affective, non-scientific qualities of breath, both as a metonym for life and as a metaphor for anticipation. Through an engagement with diverse examples from SF literature and films, this article considers the tension between technoscientific and affective responses to breath in order to demonstrate breath's co-determinacy in SF's blending of scientific and artistic discourses.

  2. BREATHE to Understand©

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisa, Maxine

    2015-01-01

    BREATHE is an acronym for Breathe, Reflect, Empathize, Accept, Thank, Hearten, Engage. The addition of Understand allows for a holistic approach to living a healthy and balanced life both inside and outside the classroom. This paper took form as a result of my personal, spiritual journey, as well as my teaching practice. I noticed that the…

  3. Acoustic rhinometry in mouth breathing patients: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Cardoso de Melo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: When there is a change in the physiological pattern of nasal breathing, mouth breathing may already be present. The diagnosis of mouth breathing is related to nasal patency. One way to access nasal patency is by acoustic rhinometry.OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the effectiveness of acoustic rhinometry for the diagnosis of patients with mouth breathing.METHODS: Electronic databases LILACS, MEDLINE via PubMed and Bireme, SciELO, Web of Science, Scopus, PsycInfo, CINAHL, and Science Direct, from August to December 2013, were consulted. 11,439 articles were found: 30 from LILACS, 54 from MEDLINE via Bireme, 5558 from MEDLINE via PubMed, 11 from SciELO, 2056 from Web of Science, 1734 from Scopus, 13 from PsycInfo, 1108 from CINAHL, and 875 from Science Direct. Of these, two articles were selected.RESULTS: The heterogeneity in the use of equipment and materials for the assessment of respiratory mode in these studies reveals that there is not yet consensus in the assessment and diagnosis of patients with mouth breathing.CONCLUSION: According to the articles, acoustic rhinometry has been used for almost twenty years, but controlled studies attesting to the efficacy of measuring the geometry of nasal cavities for complementary diagnosis of respiratory mode are warranted.

  4. Acoustic rhinometry in mouth breathing patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Ana Carolina Cardoso de; Gomes, Adriana de Oliveira de Camargo; Cavalcanti, Arlene Santos; Silva, Hilton Justino da

    2015-01-01

    When there is a change in the physiological pattern of nasal breathing, mouth breathing may already be present. The diagnosis of mouth breathing is related to nasal patency. One way to access nasal patency is by acoustic rhinometry. To systematically review the effectiveness of acoustic rhinometry for the diagnosis of patients with mouth breathing. Electronic databases LILACS, MEDLINE via PubMed and Bireme, SciELO, Web of Science, Scopus, PsycInfo, CINAHL, and Science Direct, from August to December 2013, were consulted. 11,439 articles were found: 30 from LILACS, 54 from MEDLINE via Bireme, 5558 from MEDLINE via PubMed, 11 from SciELO, 2056 from Web of Science, 1734 from Scopus, 13 from PsycInfo, 1108 from CINAHL, and 875 from Science Direct. Of these, two articles were selected. The heterogeneity in the use of equipment and materials for the assessment of respiratory mode in these studies reveals that there is not yet consensus in the assessment and diagnosis of patients with mouth breathing. According to the articles, acoustic rhinometry has been used for almost twenty years, but controlled studies attesting to the efficacy of measuring the geometry of nasal cavities for complementary diagnosis of respiratory mode are warranted. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. FMWC Radar for Breath Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Lau Frejstrup; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Vegas Olmos, Juan José

    We report on the experimental demonstration of an FMCW radar operating in the 25.7 - 26.6 GHz range with a repetition rate of 500 sweeps per second. The radar is able to track the breathing rate of an adult human from a distance of 1 meter. The experiments have utilized a 50 second recording window...... to accurately track the breathing rate. The radar utilizes a saw tooth modulation format and a low latency receiver. A breath tracking radar is useful both in medical scenarios, diagnosing disorders such as sleep apnea, and for home use where the user can monitor its health. Breathing is a central part of every...... radar chip which, through the use of a simple modulation scheme, is able to measure the breathing rate of an adult human from a distance. A high frequency output makes sure that the radar cannot penetrate solid obstacles which is a wanted feature in private homes where people therefore cannot measure...

  6. High-pitch coronary CT angiography in dual-source CT during free breathing vs. breath holding in patients with low heart rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bischoff, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.bischoff@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich (Germany); DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich (Germany); Meinel, Felix G. [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich (Germany); DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich (Germany); Del Prete, Alessandra [Department of Radiology Magrassi-Lanzara, Second University of Naples, Naples (Italy); Reiser, Maximilian F.; Becker, Hans-Christoph [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich (Germany); DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Background: Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is usually performed during breath holding to reduce motion artifacts caused by respiration. However, some patients are not able to follow the breathing commands adequately due to deafness, hearing impairment, agitation or pulmonary diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of high-pitch CCTA in free breathing patients when compared to breath holding patients. Methods: In this study we evaluated 40 patients (20 free breathing and 20 breath holding patients) with a heart rate of 60 bpm or below referred for CCTA who were examined on a 2nd generation dual-source CT system. Image quality of each coronary artery segment was rated using a 4-point grading scale (1: non diagnostic–4: excellent). Results: Mean heart rate during image acquisition was 52 ±5 bpm in both groups. There was no significant difference in mean image quality, slightly favoring image acquisition during breath holding (mean image quality score 3.76 ± 0.32 in breath holding patients vs. 3.61 ± 0.45 in free breathing patients; p = 0.411). Due to a smaller amount of injected contrast medium, there was a trend for signal intensity to be slightly lower in free breathing patients, but this was not statistically significant (435 ± 123 HU vs. 473 ± 117 HU; p = 0.648). Conclusion: In patients with a low heart rate who are not able to hold their breath adequately, CCTA can also be acquired during free breathing without substantial loss of image quality when using a high pitch scan mode in 2nd generation dual-source CT.

  7. Oral versus Nasal Breathing during Moderate to High Intensity Submaximal Aerobic Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chase O. LaComb

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: When comparing oral breathing versus nasal breathing, a greater volume of air can be transported through the oral passageway but nasal breathing may also have benefits at submaximal exercise intensities. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine breathing efficiency during increasing levels of submaximal aerobic exercise. Methods: Nineteen individuals (males N=9, females N=10 completed a test for maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max and on separate days 4-min treadmill runs at increasing submaximal intensities (50%, 65%, and 80% of VO2max under conditions of oral breathing or nasal breathing. Respiratory (respiration rate [RR], pulmonary ventilation [VE], metabolic (oxygen consumption [VO2], carbon dioxide production [VCO2] and efficiency measures (ventilatory equivalents for oxygen [Veq×O2-1] and carbon dioxide [Veq×CO2-1] were obtained. Data were analyzed utilizing a 2 (sex x 2 (condition x3 (intensity repeated measures ANOVA with significance accepted at p≤0.05. Results: Significant interactions existed between breathing mode and intensity such that oral breathing resulted in greater RR, VE, VO2, and VCO2 at all three submaximal intensities (p<.05.  Veq×O2-1 and Veq×CO2-1 presented findings that nasal breathing was more efficient than oral breathing during the 65% and 80% VO2max intensities (p<0.05. Conclusion: Based on this analysis, oral breathing provides greater respiratory and metabolic volumes during moderate and moderate-to-high submaximal exercise intensities, but may not translate to greater respiratory efficiency. However when all variables are considered together, it is likely that oral breathing represents the more efficient mode, particularly at higher exercise intensities.

  8. Breath of hospitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škof, Lenart

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we outline the possibilities of an ethic of care based on our self-affection and subjectivity in the ethical spaces between-two. In this we first refer to three Irigarayan concepts - breath, silence and listening from the third phase of her philosophy, and discuss them within the methodological framework of an ethics of intersubjectivity and interiority. Together with attentiveness, we analyse them as four categories of our ethical becoming. Furthermore, we argue that self-affection is based on our inchoate receptivity for the needs of the other(s) and is thus dialectical in its character. In this we critically confront some epistemological views of our ethical becoming. We wind up this paper with a proposal for an ethics towards two autonomous subjects, based on care and our shared ethical becoming - both as signs of our deepest hospitality towards the other.

  9. Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2009-01-01

    Radial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Radial Halbach magnetic bearings are based on the same principle as that of axial Halbach magnetic bearings, differing in geometry as the names of these two types of bearings suggest. Both radial and axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings were described in Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings (LEW-18066-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 7 (July 2008), page 85. In the remainder of this article, the description of the principle of operation from the cited prior article is recapitulated and updated to incorporate the present radial geometry. In simplest terms, the basic principle of levitation in an axial or radial Halbach magnetic bearing is that of the repulsive electromagnetic force between (1) a moving permanent magnet and (2) an electric current induced in a stationary electrical conductor by the motion of the magnetic field. An axial or radial Halbach bearing includes multiple permanent magnets arranged in a Halbach array ("Halbach array" is defined below) in a rotor and multiple conductors in the form of wire coils in a stator, all arranged so the rotary motion produces an axial or radial repulsion that is sufficient to levitate the rotor. A basic Halbach array (see Figure 1) consists of a row of permanent magnets, each oriented so that its magnetic field is at a right angle to that of the adjacent magnet, and the right-angle turns are sequenced so as to maximize the magnitude of the magnetic flux density on one side of the row while

  10. EPIC 201585823, a rare triple-mode RR Lyrae star discovered in K2 mission data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurtz, Donald W.; Bowman, Dominic M.; Ebo, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    We have discovered a new, rare triple-mode RR Lyr star, EPIC 201585823, in the Kepler K2 mission Campaign 1 data. This star pulsates primarily in the fundamental and first-overtone radial modes, and, in addition, a third non-radial mode. The ratio of the period of the non-radial mode to that of t...

  11. Improved Lattice Radial Quantization

    CERN Document Server

    Brower, Richard C; Fleming, George T

    2014-01-01

    Lattice radial quantization was proposed in a recent paper by Brower, Fleming and Neuberger[1] as a nonperturbative method especially suited to numerically solve Euclidean conformal field theories. The lessons learned from the lattice radial quantization of the 3D Ising model on a longitudinal cylinder with 2D Icosahedral cross-section suggested the need for an improved discretization. We consider here the use of the Finite Element Methods(FEM) to descretize the universally-equivalent $\\phi^4$ Lagrangian on $\\mathbb R \\times \\mathbb S^2$. It is argued that this lattice regularization will approach the exact conformal theory at the Wilson-Fisher fixed point in the continuum. Numerical tests are underway to support this conjecture.

  12. The ARCS radial collimator

    OpenAIRE

    Stone M.B.; Niedziela J.L.; Overbay M.A.; Abernathy D.L.

    2015-01-01

    We have designed, installed, and commissioned a scattered beam radial collimator for use at the ARCS Wide Angular Range Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source. The collimator has been designed to work effectively for thermal and epithermal neutrons and with a range of sample environments. Other design considerations include the accommodation of working within a high vacuum environment and having the ability to quickly install and remove the collimator from the scattered beam. W...

  13. Perceived radial translation during centrifugation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.E.; Correia Grácio, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Linear acceleration generally gives rise to translation perception. Centripetal acceleration during centrifugation, however, has never been reported giving rise to a radial, inward translation perception. OBJECTIVE: To study whether centrifugation can induce a radial translation percepti

  14. Antiproton compression and radial measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, G. B.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Bray, C. C.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Funakoshi, R.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Page, R. D.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; El Nasr, S. Seif; Silveira, D. M.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-08-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, achieved by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile, and its relation to that of the electron plasma. We also measure the outer radial profile by ejecting antiprotons to the trap wall using an octupole magnet.

  15. New results in RR Lyrae modeling: convective cycles, additional modes and more

    CERN Document Server

    Molnár, L; Szabó, R; Plachy, E

    2012-01-01

    Recent theoretical and observational findings breathed new life into the field of RR Lyrae stars. The ever more precise and complete measurements of the space asteroseismology missions revealed new details, such as the period doubling and the presence of the additional modes in the stars. Theoretical work also flourished: period doubling was explained and an additional mode has been detected in hydrodynamic models as well. Although the most intriguing mystery, the Blazhko-effect has remained unsolved, new findings indicate that the convective cycle model can be effectively ruled out for short- and medium-period modulations. On the other hand, the plausibility of the radial resonance model is increasing, as more and more resonances are detected both in models and stars.

  16. The Galactic Bulge Radial Velocity/Abundance Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, R. M.

    2012-08-01

    The Bulge Radial Velocity Assay (BRAVA) measured radial velocities for ˜ 9500 late-type giants in the Galactic bulge, predominantly from -10° Cam and planned spectroscopic modes, as well as the high resolution spectrograph. The planned Jasmine satellite series may deliver a comprehensive survey of distances and proper motions of bulge stars, and insight into the origin and importance of the X-shaped bulge.

  17. Radial Eigenmodes for a Toroidal Waveguide with Rectangular Cross Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui Li

    2012-07-01

    In applying mode expansion to solve the CSR impedance for a section of toroidal vacuum chamber with rectangular cross section, we identify the eigenvalue problem for the radial eigenmodes which is different from that for cylindrical structures. In this paper, we present the general expressions of the radial eigenmodes, and discuss the properties of the eigenvalues on the basis of the Sturm-Liouville theory.

  18. Visualizing Breath using Digital Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, P. R.; Reid, I. D.; Wilton, J. B.

    2013-02-01

    Artist Jayne Wilton and physicists Peter Hobson and Ivan Reid of Brunel University are collaborating at Brunel University on a project which aims to use a range of techniques to make visible the normally invisible dynamics of the breath and the verbal and non-verbal communication it facilitates. The breath is a source of a wide range of chemical, auditory and physical exchanges with the direct environment. Digital Holography is being investigated to enable a visually stimulating articulation of the physical trajectory of the breath as it leaves the mouth. Initial findings of this research are presented. Real time digital hologram replay allows the audience to move through holographs of breath-born particles.

  19. Selective coherent phonon mode generation in single wall carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Nugraha, Ahmad R T; Saito, Riichiro

    2016-01-01

    The ultrafast pulse-train technique is theoretically investigated to enhance a specific coherent phonon mode while suppressing the other phonon modes generated in single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). In particular, we focus on the selectivity of the radial breathing mode (RBM) and the G-band for a given SWNT. We find that if the repetition period matches with integer multiple of the RBM phonon period, the RBM amplitude could be enhanced while the amplitudes of the other modes are suppressed. As for the G-band, when we apply a repetition rate of half-integer multiple of the RBM period, the RBM could be suppressed because of destructive interference, while the G-band still survives. It is also possible to keep the G-band and suppress the RBM by applying a repetition rate that matches with integer multiple of the G-band phonon period. However, in this case we have to use a large number of laser pulses.

  20. The ARCS radial collimator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have designed, installed, and commissioned a scattered beam radial collimator for use at the ARCS Wide Angular Range Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source. The collimator has been designed to work effectively for thermal and epithermal neutrons and with a range of sample environments. Other design considerations include the accommodation of working within a high vacuum environment and having the ability to quickly install and remove the collimator from the scattered beam. We present here characterization of the collimator's performance and methodologies for its effective use.

  1. The ARCS radial collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, M. B.; Niedziela, J. L.; Overbay, M. A.; Abernathy, D. L.

    2015-01-01

    We have designed, installed, and commissioned a scattered beam radial collimator for use at the ARCS Wide Angular Range Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source. The collimator has been designed to work effectively for thermal and epithermal neutrons and with a range of sample environments. Other design considerations include the accommodation of working within a high vacuum environment and having the ability to quickly install and remove the collimator from the scattered beam. We present here characterization of the collimator's performance and methodologies for its effective use.

  2. Radial Velocities with PARAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, S.; Chakraborty, A.; Pathan, F. M.; Anandarao, B. G.

    2010-01-01

    The Physical Research Laboratory Advanced Radial-velocity All-sky Search (PARAS) is an efficient fiber-fed cross-dispersed high-resolution echelle spectrograph that will see first light in early 2010. This instrument is being built at the Physical Research laboratory (PRL) and will be attached to the 1.2m telescope at Gurushikhar Observatory at Mt. Abu, India. PARAS has a single-shot wavelength coverage of 370nm to 850nm at a spectral resolution of R 70000 and will be housed in a vacuum chamber (at 1x10-2 mbar pressure) in a highly temperature controlled environment. This renders the spectrograph extremely suitable for exoplanet searches with high velocity precision using the simultaneous Thorium-Argon wavelength calibration method. We are in the process of developing an automated data analysis pipeline for echelle data reduction and precise radial velocity extraction based on the REDUCE package of Piskunov & Valenti (2002), which is especially careful in dealing with CCD defects, extraneous noise, and cosmic ray spikes. Here we discuss the current status of the PARAS project and details and tests of the data analysis procedure, as well as results from ongoing PARAS commissioning activities.

  3. Standardization of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) collection using a feedback regulated breathing pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collection of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) fluid by cooling of expired breath is a potentially valuable approach for the detection of biomarkers associated with disease or exposure to xenobiotics. EBC is generally collected using unregulated breathing patterns, perceived to el...

  4. Effects of diaphragm breathing exercise and feedback breathing exercise on pulmonary function in healthy adults

    OpenAIRE

    Yong, Min-Sik; Lee, Hae-Yong; Lee, Yun-Seob

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated effects of diaphragm breathing exercise and feedback breathing exercise on respiratory function. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-one subjects were randomly assigned to two groups; the feedback breathing exercise group and the maneuver-diaphragm exercise group. The feedback breathing exercise group was asked to breathe with feedback breathing device, and the maneuver-diaphragm exercise group was asked to perform diaphragm respiration. Respiratory function...

  5. ISR Radial Field Magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    There were 37 (normal) + 3 (special) Radial Field magnets in the ISR to adjust vertically the closed orbit. Gap heights and strengths were 200 mm and .12 Tm in the normal magnets, 220 mm and .18 Tm in the special ones. The core length was 430 mm in both types. Due to their small length as compared to the gap heights the end fringe field errors were very important and had to be compensated by suitably shaping the poles. In order to save on cables, as these magnets were located very far from their power supplies, the coils of the normal type magnets were formed by many turns of solid cpper conductor with some interleaved layers of hollow conductor directly cooled by circulating water

  6. Antiproton compression and radial measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jorgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page R D; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, achieved by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile, and its relation to that of the electron plasma. We also measure the outer radial profile by ejecting antiprotons to the trap wall using an octupole magnet.

  7. A nonlocal shell model for mode transformation in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, M X; Li, Q M; Huang, Y

    2009-11-11

    A second-order strain gradient nonlocal shell model is established to study the mode transformation in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Nonlocal length is calibrated carefully for SWCNTs in reference to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations through analysis of nonlocal length effects on the frequencies of the radial breathing mode (RBM) and circumferential flexural modes (CFMs) and its effects on mode transformation. All analyses show that only a negative second-order nonlocal shell model is appropriate to SWCNTs. Nonlocal length is evidently related to vibration modes and the radius-to-thickness ratio. It is found that a nonlocal length is approximately 0.1 nm in an average sense when RBM frequency is concerned. A nonlocal length of 0.122-0.259 nm is indicated for the mode transformation in a selected group of armchair SWCNTs. 2:1 and 1:1 internal resonances are found for the same SWCNT based on different models, which implies that the internal resonance mechanism depends on the model employed. Furthermore, it is shown that an effective thickness of approximately 0.1 nm is more appropriate to SWCNTs than 0.066 nm.

  8. Taking a deep breath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Renato Zacharias

    2012-12-01

    be paid to language revision and reference citation. Together with its authors and readers, IJHDR contributes to the development of a kind of knowledge close to the borders of science. Therefore, to establish a valid scientific background, the articles must be clearly written, and based on sound assumptions. High-visibility for articles is a fundamental aspect desired by all authors. As an open and free access journal, IJHDR meets that condition, and we are planning to make our influence and visibility even wider. Inclusion in the major databases has paramount importance in the academic milieu, however, it should be considered as a consequence, rather than a goal. In 2013, IJHDR will chair a collaborative project with several research institutions aiming to deliver information everywhere, increasing the visibility of the published articles. Thus, now it is the time to take a deep breath, relax, and prepare you for the forthcoming work! See you in 2013!

  9. Turbine with radial acting seal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eng, Darryl S; Ebert, Todd A

    2016-11-22

    A floating brush seal in a rim cavity of a turbine in a gas turbine engine, where the floating brush seal includes a seal holder in which the floating brush seal floats, and a expandable seal that fits within two radial extending seal slots that maintains a seal with radial displacement of the floating brush seal and the seal holder.

  10. Radial gas turbine design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krausche, S.; Ohlsson, Johan

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a program dealing with design point calculations of radial turbine machinery, including both compressor and turbine, with as few input data as possible. Some simple stress calculations and turbine metal blade temperatures were also included. This program was then implanted in a German thermodynamics program, Gasturb, a program calculating design and off-design performance of gas turbines. The calculations proceed with a lot of assumptions, necessary to finish the task, concerning pressure losses, velocity distribution, blockage, etc., and have been correlated with empirical data from VAT. Most of these values could have been input data, but to prevent the user of the program from drowning in input values, they are set as default values in the program code. The output data consist of geometry, Mach numbers, predicted component efficiency etc., and a number of graphical plots of geometry and velocity triangles. For the cases examined, the error in predicted efficiency level was within {+-} 1-2% points, and quite satisfactory errors in geometrical and thermodynamic conditions were obtained Examination paper. 18 refs, 36 figs

  11. Development of radially movable multichannel Reynolds stress probe system for a cylindrical laboratory plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagashima, Yoshihiko; Yamada, Takuma; Takase, Yuichi [GSFS, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 816-8561 (Japan); Inagaki, Shigeru; Kamakaki, Kunihiro; Yagi, Masatoshi; Fujisawa, Akihide; Itoh, Sanae-I. [RIAM, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Arakawa, Hiroyuki; Kawai, Yoshinobu [IGSES, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Shinohara, Shunjiro [IE, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Itoh, Kimitaka [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    A new radially movable multichannel azimuthal probe system has been developed for measuring azimuthal and radial profiles of electrostatic Reynolds stress (RS) per mass density of microscale fluctuations for a cylindrical laboratory plasma. The system is composed of 16 probe units arranged azimuthally. Each probe unit has six electrodes to simultaneously measure azimuthal and radial electric fields for obtaining RS. The advantage of the system is that each probe unit is radially movable to measure azimuthal RS profiles at arbitrary radial locations as well as two-dimensional structures of fluctuations. The first result from temporal observation of fluctuation azimuthal profile presents that a low-frequency fluctuation (1-2 kHz) synchronizes oscillating Reynolds stress. In addition, radial scanning of the probe system simultaneously demonstrates two-dimensional patterns of mode structure and nonlinear forces with frequency f= 1.5 kHz and azimuthal mode number m= 1.

  12. Submarines, Spacecraft, and Exhaled Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    The International Association of Breath Research (IABR) meetings are an eclectic gathering of researchers in the medical, environmental and instrumentation fields; our focus is on human health as assessed by the measurement and interpretation of trace chemicals in human exhaled b...

  13. Functional Analysis and Intervention for Breath Holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Lee; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A functional analysis of breath-holding episodes in a 7-year-old girl with severe mental retardation and Cornelia-de-Lange syndrome indicated that breath holding served an operant function, primarily to gain access to attention. Use of extinction, scheduled attention, and a picture card communication system decreased breath holding. (Author/SW)

  14. Breath-holding and its breakpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, M J

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the basic properties of breath-holding in humans and the possible causes of the breath at breakpoint. The simplest objective measure of breath-holding is its duration, but even this is highly variable. Breath-holding is a voluntary act, but normal subjects appear unable to breath-hold to unconsciousness. A powerful involuntary mechanism normally overrides voluntary breath-holding and causes the breath that defines the breakpoint. The occurrence of the breakpoint breath does not appear to be caused solely by a mechanism involving lung or chest shrinkage, partial pressures of blood gases or the carotid arterial chemoreceptors. This is despite the well-known properties of breath-hold duration being prolonged by large lung inflations, hyperoxia and hypocapnia and being shortened by the converse manoeuvres and by increased metabolic rate. Breath-holding has, however, two much less well-known but important properties. First, the central respiratory rhythm appears to continue throughout breath-holding. Humans cannot therefore stop their central respiratory rhythm voluntarily. Instead, they merely suppress expression of their central respiratory rhythm and voluntarily 'hold' the chest at a chosen volume, possibly assisted by some tonic diaphragm activity. Second, breath-hold duration is prolonged by bilateral paralysis of the phrenic or vagus nerves. Possibly the contribution to the breakpoint from stimulation of diaphragm muscle chemoreceptors is greater than has previously been considered. At present there is no simple explanation for the breakpoint that encompasses all these properties.

  15. Neural mechanisms underlying breathing complexity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathe Hess

    Full Text Available Breathing is maintained and controlled by a network of automatic neurons in the brainstem that generate respiratory rhythm and receive regulatory inputs. Breathing complexity therefore arises from respiratory central pattern generators modulated by peripheral and supra-spinal inputs. Very little is known on the brainstem neural substrates underlying breathing complexity in humans. We used both experimental and theoretical approaches to decipher these mechanisms in healthy humans and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. COPD is the most frequent chronic lung disease in the general population mainly due to tobacco smoke. In patients, airflow obstruction associated with hyperinflation and respiratory muscles weakness are key factors contributing to load-capacity imbalance and hence increased respiratory drive. Unexpectedly, we found that the patients breathed with a higher level of complexity during inspiration and expiration than controls. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, we scanned the brain of the participants to analyze the activity of two small regions involved in respiratory rhythmogenesis, the rostral ventro-lateral (VL medulla (pre-Bötzinger complex and the caudal VL pons (parafacial group. fMRI revealed in controls higher activity of the VL medulla suggesting active inspiration, while in patients higher activity of the VL pons suggesting active expiration. COPD patients reactivate the parafacial to sustain ventilation. These findings may be involved in the onset of respiratory failure when the neural network becomes overwhelmed by respiratory overload We show that central neural activity correlates with airflow complexity in healthy subjects and COPD patients, at rest and during inspiratory loading. We finally used a theoretical approach of respiratory rhythmogenesis that reproduces the kernel activity of neurons involved in the automatic breathing. The model reveals how a chaotic activity in

  16. Extrathoracic and intrathoracic removal of O3 in tidal-breathing humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerrity, T.R.; Weaver, R.A.; Berntsen, J.; House, D.E.; O' Neil, J.J.

    1988-07-01

    We measured the efficiency of O3 removal from inspired air by the extrathoracic and intrathoracic airways in 18 healthy, nonsmoking, young male volunteers. Removal efficiencies were measured as a function of O3 concentration (0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 ppm), mode of breathing (nose only, mouth only, and oronasal), and respiration frequency (12 and 24 breaths/min). Subjects were placed in a controlled environmental chamber into which O3 was introduced. A small polyethylene tube was then inserted into the nose of each subject, with the tip positioned in the posterior pharynx. Samples of air were collected from the posterior pharynx through the tube and into a rapidly responding O3 analyzer yielding inspiratory and expiratory O3 concentrations in the posterior pharynx. The O3 removal efficiency of the extrathoracic airways was computed with the use of the inspiratory concentration and the chamber concentration, and intrathoracic removal efficiency was computed with the use of the inspiratory and expiratory concentrations. The mean extrathoracic removal efficiency for all measurements was 39.6 +/- 0.7% (SE), and the mean intrathoracic removal efficiency was 91.0 +/- 0.5%. Significantly less O3 was removed both extrathoracically and intrathoracically when subjects breathed at 24 breaths/min compared with 12 breaths/min (P less than 0.001). O3 concentration had no effect on extrathoracic removal efficiency, but there was a significantly greater intrathoracic removal efficiency at 0.4 ppm than at 0.1 ppm (P less than 0.05). Mode of breathing significantly affected extrathoracic removal efficiency, with less O3 removed during nasal breathing than during either mouth breathing or oronasal breathing (P less than 0.01).

  17. Acoustic Rotation Modes in Complex Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白冬雪; 王正汹; 王晓钢

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic rotation modes in complex plasmas are investigated in a cylindrical system with an axial symmetry.The linear mode solution is derived. The mode in an infinite area is reduced to a classical dust acoustic wave in the region away from the centre. When the dusty plasma is confined in a finite region, the breathing and rotating-void behaviour are observed. Vivid structures of different mode number solutions are illustrated.

  18. The cyanide gasp and spontaneous deep breaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glogowska, M; Richardson, P S

    1973-01-01

    Stimulation of the carotid body chemoreceptors with cyanide in anaesthetized rabbits usually causes a deep breath or gasp, but only if the vagus nerves are intact. This gasp has several similarities with spontaneous deep breaths in eupnoea. In paralysed rabbits, artificially ventilated, chemoreceptor stimulation induces an augmented discharge in the phrenic nerve equivalent to a gasp. In spontaneously breathing rabbits spontaneous deep breaths are more frequent with hypoxia than with normoxia. The results are interpreted in relation to (i) positive feedback from the lungs and (ii) summation of chemoreceptor and tonic vagal drive causing augmented deep breaths.

  19. Anharmonic properties of Raman modes in double wall carbon nano tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquina, J. [Universidad de los Andes, Facultad de Ciencias, Centro de Estudios Avanzados en Optica, 5101 Merida (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Power, Ch.; Gonzalez, J. [Universidad de los Andes, Facultad de Ciencias, Centro de Estudios en Semiconductores, 5101 Merida (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Broto, J. M. [Universite de Toulouse, Laboratoire National des Champs Magnetiques Intenses, CNRS UPR 3228, 31400 Toulouse (France); Flahaut, E., E-mail: castella@ula.v [Universite Paul Sabatier, Laboratoire de Chimie des Materiaux Inorganiques, UMR CNRS 5085, 31062 Toulouse (France)

    2011-07-01

    The temperature dependence of the radial breathing modes (RB Ms) and the zone-center tangential optical phonons (G-bands) of double-walled carbon nano tubes has been investigated between 300 and 700 K using Raman scattering. As expected, with increasing temperature, the frequencies of the Raman peaks, including the RB Ms and G-bands downshift simultaneously. We show here that the temperature dependence of the RB Ms can be fitted by a simple linear dependence and different RB Ms have different frequency shifts. We observe a noticeable nonlinearity in the temperature dependence of the G-band associated with the outer semiconducting tube G+ext (s). The deviation from the linear trend is due to the contribution of the third-order anharmonic term in the lattice potential energy with a pure temperature effect. An estimated value of 1.5 for the Grueneisen parameter of the G+ext (s) band was found. (Author)

  20. Lattice radial quantization by cubature

    CERN Document Server

    Neuberger, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Basic aspects of a program to put field theories quantized in radial coordinates on the lattice are presented. Only scalar fields are discussed. Simple examples are solved to illustrate the strategy when applied to the 3D Ising model.

  1. Dedicated radial ventriculography pigtail catheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidovich, Mladen I., E-mail: miv@uic.edu

    2013-05-15

    A new dedicated cardiac ventriculography catheter was specifically designed for radial and upper arm arterial access approach. Two catheter configurations have been developed to facilitate retrograde crossing of the aortic valve and to conform to various subclavian, ascending aortic and left ventricular anatomies. The “short” dedicated radial ventriculography catheter is suited for horizontal ascending aortas, obese body habitus, short stature and small ventricular cavities. The “long” dedicated radial ventriculography catheter is suited for vertical ascending aortas, thin body habitus, tall stature and larger ventricular cavities. This new design allows for improved performance, faster and simpler insertion in the left ventricle which can reduce procedure time, radiation exposure and propensity for radial artery spasm due to excessive catheter manipulation. Two different catheter configurations allow for optimal catheter selection in a broad range of patient anatomies. The catheter is exceptionally stable during contrast power injection and provides equivalent cavity opacification to traditional femoral ventriculography catheter designs.

  2. [Stahl, Leibniz, Hoffmann and breathing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvallo, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    At the beginning of the XVIII th century, Wilhelm Gottfried Leibniz and Friedrich Hoffmann criticize Georg Ernst Stahl's medical theory. They differenciate between unsound and true reasonings. Namely, they validate Stahl's definition of breath but extracting it from its animist basis and placing it in an epistemology obeying to the principle of sufficient reason and to the mechanical model. The stahlian discovery consists in understanding breath as a calorific ventilation against the ancient conception; the iatromechanists recognize its accuracy, but they try then to transpose it to a mechanical model of ventilation. Using it in a different epistemological context implies that they analyze the idea of discovery "true" in its contents, but "wrong" in its hypothesis. It impels to examine the epistemology of medical knowledge, as science and therapeutics, and in its links with the other scientific theories. Thus, if Leibniz as philosopher and Hoffmann as doctor consider Stahl's animism so important, it is because its discoveries question the fundamental principles of medicine.

  3. Time-varying respiratory system elastance: a physiological model for patients who are spontaneously breathing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeong Shiong Chiew

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Respiratory mechanics models can aid in optimising patient-specific mechanical ventilation (MV, but the applications are limited to fully sedated MV patients who have little or no spontaneously breathing efforts. This research presents a time-varying elastance (E(drs model that can be used in spontaneously breathing patients to determine their respiratory mechanics. METHODS: A time-varying respiratory elastance model is developed with a negative elastic component (E(demand, to describe the driving pressure generated during a patient initiated breathing cycle. Data from 22 patients who are partially mechanically ventilated using Pressure Support (PS and Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA are used to investigate the physiology relevance of the time-varying elastance model and its clinical potential. E(drs of every breathing cycle for each patient at different ventilation modes are presented for comparison. RESULTS: At the start of every breathing cycle initiated by patient, E(drs is 25 cmH2Os/l and thus can be used as an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS severity indicator. CONCLUSION: The E(drs model captures unique dynamic respiratory mechanics for spontaneously breathing patients with respiratory failure. The model is fully general and is applicable to both fully controlled and partially assisted MV modes.

  4. Relationships between longitudinal and radial Picea genera sound vibration parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Jun

    2006-01-01

    Longitudinal sawn wood are usually selected as samples in the study of sound properties of a musical instrument board.But in real production,radial sawn timber are cut and are also widely used as vibration component.Therefore,it is very important to evaluate the vibration properties of the board in the round,especially for the sound radiation characteristic of radial sawn timber and its relationship to longitudinal sawn timber.However,for the national and international experts,researches on radial sawn timber and its role and function in sound emission have not yet been developed.This paper describes a study of seven important spruces that grow up in the Sichuan and Heilongjiang provinces of China,and one Picea sitchensis specimen from North America.Under the high bending vibration mode,resonance frequency and other parameters of longitudinal and radial wood were tested.Analysis result disclosed the relationship between longitudinal and radial wood vibration property.An important conclusion of wood for musical instruments with proper anisotropy,fine toughness,and weak shear of longitudinal and radial vibration was inducted.

  5. Oral breathing and dental malocclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zicari, A M; Albani, F; Ntrekou, P; Rugiano, A; Duse, M; Mattei, A; Marzo, G

    2009-06-01

    Aim of the present study was to evaluate existing correlations between oral breathing and dental malocclusions. The study was conducted on a paediatric group of 71 oral breathers selected at the Allergology and Paediatric Immunology Department of Umberto I General Hospital, University of Rome "La Sapienza" (Italy). The children were selected based on inclusion/exclusion criteria. Children aged 6 to 12 years with no history of craniofacial malformations or orthodontic treatment were included. The results were compared with a control group composed of 71 patient aged 6 to 12 years with nasal breathing. After their medical history was recorded, all patients underwent orthodontic/otolaryngological clinical examinations. The following diagnostic procedures were then performed: latero-lateral projection teleradiography, orthopantomogram, dental impressions, anterior rhinomanometry before and after administering a local vasoconstrictor, nocturnal home pulse oximetry (NHPO) recording, spirometry test, skin prick test, study cast evaluation and cephalometric analysis following Tweed's principles. The intraoral examination assessed: dental class type, overbite, overjet, midlines, crossbite, and presence of parafunctional oral habits such as atypical swallowing, labial incompetence, finger sucking and sucking of the inner lip. Evaluation of the study casts involved arch perimeter and transpalatal width assessment, and space analysis. The results showed a strong correlation between oral breathing and malocclusions, which manifests itself with both dentoskeletal and functional alterations, leading to a dysfunctional malocclusive pattern. According to the authors' results, dysfunctional malocclusive pattern makes it clear that the association between oral breathing and dental malocclusions represents a self-perpetuating vicious circle in which it is difficult to establish if the primary alteration is respiratory or maxillofacial. Regardless, the problem needs to be addressed and

  6. Effects of diaphragm breathing exercise and feedback breathing exercise on pulmonary function in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Min-Sik; Lee, Hae-Yong; Lee, Yun-Seob

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated effects of diaphragm breathing exercise and feedback breathing exercise on respiratory function. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-one subjects were randomly assigned to two groups; the feedback breathing exercise group and the maneuver-diaphragm exercise group. The feedback breathing exercise group was asked to breathe with feedback breathing device, and the maneuver-diaphragm exercise group was asked to perform diaphragm respiration. Respiratory function was evaluated when a subject sat on a chair comfortably. [Results] There was a significant difference in the functional vital capacity and slow vital capacity before and after all breathing exercises. There was a significant between-group difference in functional vital capacity. However, no between-group difference was found in slow vital capacity. [Conclusion] Diaphragm breathing exercise and feedback breathing exercise can affect respiratory function.

  7. Event-Specific Quantification of Radiation Belt Radial Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, W.; Sarris, T. E.; Ozeke, L.

    2016-12-01

    Recently, there has been a great emphasis on developing event-specific inputs for radiation belt models, since they are proven critical for reproducing the observed radiation belt dynamics during strong events. For example, our DREAM3D simulation of the 8-9 October 2012 storm demonstrates that event-specific chorus wave model and seed population are critical to reproduce the strong enhancement of MeV electrons in this event. However, the observed fast electron dropout preceding the enhancement was not captured by the simulation, which could be due to the combined effects of fast outward radial diffusion of radiation belt electrons with magnetopause shadowing and enhanced electron precipitation. Without an event-specific quantification of radial diffusion, we cannot resolve the relative contribution of outward radial diffusion and precipitation to the observed electron dropout or realistically reproduce the dynamics during the event. In this work, we provide physical quantification of radial diffusion specific to the October 2012 event by including both real-time and global distributions of ULF waves from a constellation of wave measurements and event-specific estimation of ULF wave mode structure. The global maps of ULF waves during the event are constructed by combining the real-time measurements from the Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, and GOES satellites in space and a large array of ground magnetometers. The real-time ULF wave mode structure is then estimated using the new Cross-Wavelet Transform technique, applied to various azimuthally aligned pairs of ULF wave measurements that are located at the same L shells. The cross power and phase differences between the time series are calculated using the technique, based on which the wave power per mode number is estimated. Finally, the physically estimated radial diffusion coefficients specific to the event are applied to the DREAM3D model to quantify the relative contribution of radial diffusion to the electron dynamics

  8. Running and Breathing in Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramble, Dennis M.; Carrier, David R.

    1983-01-01

    Mechanical constraints appear to require that locomotion and breathing be synchronized in running mammals. Phase locking of limb and respiratory frequency has now been recorded during treadmill running in jackrabbits and during locomotion on solid ground in dogs, horses, and humans. Quadrupedal species normally synchronize the locomotor and respiratory cycles at a constant ratio of 1:1 (strides per breath) in both the trot and gallop. Human runners differ from quadrupeds in that while running they employ several phase-locked patterns (4:1, 3:1, 2:1, 1:1, 5:2, and 3:2), although a 2:1 coupling ratio appears to be favored. Even though the evolution of bipedal gait has reduced the mechanical constraints on respiration in man, thereby permitting greater flexibility in breathing pattern, it has seemingly not eliminated the need for the synchronization of respiration and body motion during sustained running. Flying birds have independently achieved phase-locked locomotor and respiratory cycles. This hints that strict locomotor-respiratory coupling may be a vital factor in the sustained aerobic exercise of endothermic vertebrates, especially those in which the stresses of locomotion tend to deform the thoracic complex.

  9. Fiber based polarization filter for radially and azimuthally polarized light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jocher, Christoph; Jauregui, Cesar; Voigtländer, Christian; Stutzki, Fabian; Nolte, Stefan; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2011-09-26

    We demonstrate a new fiber based concept to filter azimuthally or radially polarized light. This concept is based on the lifting of the modal degeneracy that takes place in high numerical aperture fibers. In such fibers, the radially and azimuthally polarized modes can be spectrally separated using a fiber Bragg grating. As a proof of principle, we filter azimuthally polarized light in a commercially available fiber in which a fiber Bragg grating has been written by a femtosecond pulsed laser. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  10. Synthesis of circularly polarized multiprobe feed radial line slot array

    OpenAIRE

    Sierra Pérez, Manuel; Salamanca, José Manuel; Vera Isasa, María; Sierra Castañer, Manuel

    1998-01-01

    In previous articles, we presented an easy way to analyze a slot array fed through a radial line and the design of an array of slots placed in an Archimedes spiral. The analysis was based on a circuit approach where the circuit parameters have been estimated using the first propagation mode in the radial line and the far field theory. The Archimedes spiral design, obtained with only one probe, has an efficiency problem due to the reflected field, that can be solved with this multiprobe design...

  11. Radial growth of an extended spoke in Saturn's B ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eplee, R. E., Jr.; Smith, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis is reported of the pattern of radial growth of an extended spoke observed in the Voyager 2 low-resolution Saturn ring 'movie'. The feature is atypical in that it orbits Saturn at the corotational rate for 1-1/2 hours after the onset of its formation and then undergoes a 40-min acceleration to sustained Keplerian velocities. A correlation between the dynamical phases and the radial growth modes of the spoke is observed, one that seems consistent with the plasma cloud model of spoke formation and evolution proposed by Goertz and Morfill (1983), taken in the limit of high charge density.

  12. TR-BREATH: Time-Reversal Breathing Rate Estimation and Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Han, Yi; Chen, Yan; Lai, Hung-Quoc; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Beibei; Liu, K J Ray

    2017-04-28

    In this paper, we introduce TR-BREATH, a timereversal (TR) based contact-free breathing monitoring system. It is capable of breathing detection and multi-person breathing rate estimation within a short period of time using off-the-shelf WiFi devices. The proposed system exploits the channel state information (CSI) to capture the miniature variations in the environment caused by breathing. To magnify the CSI variations, TRBREATH projects CSIs into the TR resonating strength (TRRS) feature space and analyzes the TRRS by the Root-MUSIC and affinity propagation algorithms. Extensive experiment results indoor demonstrate a perfect detection rate of breathing. With only 10 seconds of measurement, a mean accuracy of 99% can be obtained for single-person breathing rate estimation under the non-line-of-sight (NLOS) scenario. Furthermore, it achieves a mean accuracy of 98:65% in breathing rate estimation for a dozen people under the line-of-sight (LOS) scenario and a mean accuracy of 98:07% in breathing rate estimation of 9 people under the NLOS scenario, both with 63 seconds of measurement. Moreover, TR-BREATH can estimate the number of people with an error around 1. We also demonstrate that TR-BREATH is robust against packet loss and motions. With the prevailing of WiFi, TR-BREATH can be applied for in-home and real-time breathing monitoring.

  13. TBL教学模式下推动睡眠呼吸障碍疾病多学科交叉精细化培养的探索与实践%The refinement training exploration and practice by TBL teaching mode to promote sleep-related breathing disorder in multidisciplinary crossing teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于丹; 张辉; 韩光红; 任锦; 刘岩; 赵雪; 韩双; 谭月; 连姬

    2015-01-01

    To explore the refinement training principles, methods, contents and teaching experience, the diversification of sleep medicine on the basis of "Team work" (Team-based learning, TBL) teaching mode to promote sleep-related breathing disorder in multidisciplinary crossing teaching. We should regard sleep apnea disease as the core of teaching knowledge integration through the TBL teaching method exploration and practice in our school graduate student teaching multidisciplinary. On one hand, strengthening the multi-disciplinary Team of teachers in the teaching of cooperation consciousness to improve teaching methods and teaching philosophy and highlighting the classification of sleep-related breathing disorder disease and its correlation with whole body other organ diseases, on the other hand, to cultivate students' ability of autonomous learning by dividing the students into one study group through looking up the literature and working together to solve the questions of the teachers’ and they can be able to play their professional advantages in the multidisciplinary clinical practice to consolidate and strengthen the basic knowledge, after which they can own a professional knowledge structure in depth, breadth and knowledge overlapping characteristics and become integrated inter-disciplinary talent.%探讨以团队协作为基础的(TBL)教学模式下推动睡眠呼吸障碍疾病多学科交叉精细化培养的原则、方法、内容和课程教学的体会,以睡眠医学为核心进行教学知识的多元化整合,通过TBL教学方法探索和实践我校研究生教学多学科交叉培养模式,一方面在教学中强化多学科教师团队的协作意识,改善教学方法和教学理念,突出睡眠呼吸障碍疾病的分类及其与全身其他脏器疾病的相关性,另一方面培养学生自主学习的能力,将学生整合成一个学习小组后,通过查阅文献,共同协作,解决老师所提出的问题,使之能

  14. Lasing and mode switching in circular Bragg nanoresonators

    OpenAIRE

    Scheuer, Jacob; Green, William M. J.; DeRose, Guy; Yariv, Amnon

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate low-threshold lasing at telecommunications wavelengths from high quality circular semiconductor nanoresonators employing radial Bragg reflector single-mode emission and mode switching are observed at room temperature under optical pumping.

  15. Multiplexing of spatial modes in the mid-IR region

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gailele, Lucas M

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available ceiling in the near future. Communications using orbital angular momentum (OAM) carrying modes offers in finite dimensional states, providing means to increase link capacity by multiplexing spatially overlapping modes in both the azimuthal and radial...

  16. The cerebral cost of breathing: an FMRI case-study in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Sharman

    Full Text Available Certain motor activities--like walking or breathing--present the interesting property of proceeding either automatically or under voluntary control. In the case of breathing, brainstem structures located in the medulla are in charge of the automatic mode, whereas cortico-subcortical brain networks--including various frontal lobe areas--subtend the voluntary mode. We speculated that the involvement of cortical activity during voluntary breathing could impact both on the "resting state" pattern of cortical-subcortical connectivity, and on the recruitment of executive functions mediated by the frontal lobe. In order to test this prediction we explored a patient suffering from central congenital hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS, a very rare developmental condition secondary to brainstem dysfunction. Typically, CCHS patients demonstrate efficient cortically-controlled breathing while awake, but require mechanically-assisted ventilation during sleep to overcome the inability of brainstem structures to mediate automatic breathing. We used simultaneous EEG-fMRI recordings to compare patterns of brain activity between these two types of ventilation during wakefulness. As compared with spontaneous breathing (SB, mechanical ventilation (MV restored the default mode network (DMN associated with self-consciousness, mind-wandering, creativity and introspection in healthy subjects. SB on the other hand resulted in a specific increase of functional connectivity between brainstem and frontal lobe. Behaviorally, the patient was more efficient in cognitive tasks requiring executive control during MV than during SB, in agreement with her subjective reports in everyday life. Taken together our results provide insight into the cognitive and neural costs of spontaneous breathing in one CCHS patient, and suggest that MV during waking periods may free up frontal lobe resources, and make them available for cognitive recruitment. More generally, this study reveals how the

  17. Radial head dislocation during proximal radial shaft osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazel, Antony; Bindra, Randy R

    2014-03-01

    The following case report describes a 48-year-old female patient with a longstanding both-bone forearm malunion, who underwent osteotomies of both the radius and ulna to improve symptoms of pain and lack of rotation at the wrist. The osteotomies were templated preoperatively. During surgery, after performing the planned radial shaft osteotomy, the authors recognized that the radial head was subluxated. The osteotomy was then revised from an opening wedge to a closing wedge with improvement of alignment and rotation. The case report discusses the details of the operation, as well as ways in which to avoid similar shortcomings in the future.

  18. ELECTROSTATIC MODE ASSOCIATED WITH PINCH VELOCITY IN RFPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DELZANNO, GIAN LUCA [Los Alamos National Laboratory; FINN, JOHN M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; CHACON, LUIS [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-02-08

    The existence of a new electrostatic instability is shown for RFP (reversed field pinch) equilibria. This mode arises due to the non-zero equilibrium radial flow (pinch flow). In RFP simulations with no-stress boundary conditions on the tangential velocity at the radial wall, this electrostatic mode is unstable and dominates the nonlinear dynamics, even in the presence of the MHD modes typically responsible for the reversal of the axial magnetic field at edge. Nonlinearly, this mode leads to two beams moving azimuthally towards each other, which eventually collide. The electrostatic mode can be controlled by using Dirichlet (no-slip) boundary conditions on the azimuthal velocity at the radial wall.

  19. Radial lean direct injection burner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Rafey; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2012-09-04

    A burner for use in a gas turbine engine includes a burner tube having an inlet end and an outlet end; a plurality of air passages extending axially in the burner tube configured to convey air flows from the inlet end to the outlet end; a plurality of fuel passages extending axially along the burner tube and spaced around the plurality of air passage configured to convey fuel from the inlet end to the outlet end; and a radial air swirler provided at the outlet end configured to direct the air flows radially toward the outlet end and impart swirl to the air flows. The radial air swirler includes a plurality of vanes to direct and swirl the air flows and an end plate. The end plate includes a plurality of fuel injection holes to inject the fuel radially into the swirling air flows. A method of mixing air and fuel in a burner of a gas turbine is also provided. The burner includes a burner tube including an inlet end, an outlet end, a plurality of axial air passages, and a plurality of axial fuel passages. The method includes introducing an air flow into the air passages at the inlet end; introducing a fuel into fuel passages; swirling the air flow at the outlet end; and radially injecting the fuel into the swirling air flow.

  20. Selective coherent phonon-mode generation in single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraha, Ahmad R. T.; Hasdeo, Eddwi H.; Saito, Riichiro

    2017-02-01

    The pulse-train technique within ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy is theoretically investigated to excite a specific coherent phonon mode while suppressing the other phonon modes generated in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). In particular, we focus on the selectivity of the radial breathing mode (RBM) and the G-band for a given SWNT. We find that if the repetition period of the pulse train matches with the integer multiple of the RBM phonon period, the RBM amplitude can be maintained while the amplitudes of the other modes are suppressed. As for the G-band, when we apply a repetition period of a half-integer multiple of the RBM period, the RBM can be suppressed because of destructive interference, while the G-band still survives. It is also possible to keep the G-band and suppress the RBM by applying a repetition period that matches with the integer multiple of the G-band phonon period. However, in this case we have to use a large number of laser pulses having a property of “magic ratio” of the G-band and RBM periods.

  1. Acoustic resonances in two dimensional radial sonic crystals shells

    CERN Document Server

    Torrent, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Radial sonic crystals (RSC) are fluidlike structures infinitely periodic along the radial direction. They have been recently introduced and are only possible thanks to the anisotropy of specially designed acoustic metamaterials [see Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 103} 064301 (2009)]. We present here a comprehensive analysis of two-dimensional RSC shells, which consist of a cavity defect centered at the origin of the crystal and a finite thickness crystal shell surrounded by a fluidlike background. We develop analytic expressions demonstrating that, like for other type of crystals (photonic or phononic) with defects, these shells contain Fabry-Perot like resonances and strongly localized modes. The results are completely general and can be extended to three dimensional acoustic structures and to their photonic counterparts, the radial photonic crystals.

  2. [Breath-analysis tests in gastroenetrological diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspary, W F

    1975-12-01

    The introduction of a simple method for analysis of 14CO2 in breath allowed a more widely application of breath-tests in the diagnosis of gastroenterological diseases. During a breath-test a 14C-labelled compound is administered orally and 14CO2 is subsequently measured in breath by discontinuous samplings of 14CO2 by virtue of a trapping solution (hyamine hydroxide). Most helpful tests in gastroenterology are the 14C-glycyl-cholate breath test for detecting increased deconjugation of bile acids due to small intestinal bacterial overgrowth or bile acid malabsorption in ileal resection or Crohn's disease of the ileum, the 14C-lactose breath test in lactase deficiency, whereas the 14C-tripalmitin test seems less helpful in the diagnosis of fat malabsorption. A 14C-aminopyrine breath test may turn out to be a simple and valuable liver function test. Oral loading tests with breath analysis of H2 have shown to be helpful in the diagnosis of carbohydrate malabsorption, determination of intestinal transit time and intestinal gas production. Due to technical reasons (gas-chromatographie analysis) H2-breath analysis is still limited to research centers. Despite low radiation doses after oral administration of 14C-labelled compounds oral loading tests with H2- or 13C-analysis might be preferable in the future.

  3. Radial velocity monitoring of Kepler heartbeat stars

    CERN Document Server

    Shporer, Avi; Isaacson, Howard; Hambleton, Kelly; Thompson, Susan E; Prsa, Andrej; Kurtz, Donald W; Howard, Andrew W; O'Leary, Ryan M

    2016-01-01

    Heartbeat stars (HB stars) are a class of eccentric binary stars with close periastron passages. The characteristic photometric HB signal evident in their light curves is produced by a combination of tidal distortion, heating, and Doppler boosting near orbital periastron. Many HB stars continue to oscillate after periastron and along the entire orbit, indicative of the tidal excitation of oscillation modes within one or both stars. These systems are among the most eccentric binaries known, and they constitute astrophysical laboratories for the study of tidal effects. We have undertaken a radial velocity (RV) monitoring campaign of Kepler HB stars in order to measure their orbits. We present our first results here, including a sample of 21 Kepler HB systems, where for 19 of them we obtained the Keplerian orbit and for 3 other systems we did not detect a statistically significant RV variability. Results presented here are based on 218 spectra obtained with the Keck/HIRES spectrograph during the 2015 Kepler obse...

  4. Sleep disordered breathing in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilgay Izci Balserak

    2015-12-01

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB is very common during pregnancy, and is most likely explained by hormonal, physiological and physical changes. Maternal obesity, one of the major risk factors for SDB, together with physiological changes in pregnancy may predispose women to develop SDB. SDB has been associated with poor maternal and fetal outcomes. Thus, early identification, diagnosis and treatment of SDB are important in pregnancy. This article reviews the pregnancy-related changes affecting the severity of SDB, the epidemiology and the risk factors of SDB in pregnancy, the association of SDB with adverse pregnancy outcomes, and screening and management options specific for this population.

  5. 42 CFR 84.79 - Breathing gas; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing gas; minimum requirements. 84.79 Section...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.79 Breathing gas; minimum requirements. (a) Breathing gas used to supply... respiratory tract irritating compounds. (c) Compressed, gaseous breathing air shall meet the...

  6. 42 CFR 84.72 - Breathing tubes; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. 84.72...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.72 Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. Flexible breathing tubes used in conjunction with breathing apparatus shall be designed and constructed to prevent: (a)...

  7. 42 CFR 84.85 - Breathing bags; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing bags; minimum requirements. 84.85 Section...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.85 Breathing bags; minimum requirements. (a) Breathing bags shall have.... (b) Breathing bags shall be constructed of materials which are flexible and resistant to...

  8. Radial propagators and Wilson loops

    CERN Document Server

    Leupold, S; Leupold, Stefan; Weigert, Heribert

    1996-01-01

    We present a relation which connects the propagator in the radial (Fock-Schwinger) gauge with a gauge invariant Wilson loop. It is closely related to the well-known field strength formula and can be used to calculate the radial gauge propagator. The result is shown to diverge in four-dimensional space even for free fields, its singular nature is however naturally explained using the renormalization properties of Wilson loops with cusps and self-intersections. Using this observation we provide a consistent regularization scheme to facilitate loop calculations. Finally we compare our results with previous approaches to derive a propagator in Fock-Schwinger gauge.

  9. Detonation in supersonic radial outflow

    KAUST Repository

    Kasimov, Aslan R.

    2014-11-07

    We report on the structure and dynamics of gaseous detonation stabilized in a supersonic flow emanating radially from a central source. The steady-state solutions are computed and their range of existence is investigated. Two-dimensional simulations are carried out in order to explore the stability of the steady-state solutions. It is found that both collapsing and expanding two-dimensional cellular detonations exist. The latter can be stabilized by putting several rigid obstacles in the flow downstream of the steady-state sonic locus. The problem of initiation of standing detonation stabilized in the radial flow is also investigated numerically. © 2014 Cambridge University Press.

  10. CONGENITAL RADIAL DYSPLASIA: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatram Reddy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Congenital radial dysplasia, also referred to as radial club hand , means deficiency along the preaxial or radial side of the extremity. It ranges from hypoplasia of the thumb to variou s degrees of radial hypoplasia. We present one such rare case of type 4 congenital unilateral isolated radial dysplasia with carpel anomaly , reported to our department in SVS medical C ollege, Mahabubanagar, Telangana state

  11. News from the Breath Analysis Summit 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradi, Massimo; Mutti, Antonio

    2012-06-01

    This special section highlights some of the important work presented at the Breath Analysis Summit 2011, which was held in Parma (Italy) from 11 to 14 September 2011. The meeting, which was jointly organized by the International Association for Breath Research and the University of Parma, was attended by more than 250 delegates from 33 countries, and offered 34 invited lectures and 64 unsolicited scientific contributions. The summit was organized to provide a forum to scientists, engineers and clinicians to present their latest findings and to meet industry executives and entrepreneurs to discuss key trends, future directions and technologies available for breath analysis. A major focus was on nitric oxide, exhaled breath condensate, electronic nose, mass spectrometry and newer sensor technologies. Medical applications ranged from asthma and other respiratory diseases to gastrointestinal disease, occupational diseases, critical care and cancer. Most people identify breath tests with breathalysers used by police to estimate ethanol concentration in blood. However, breath testing has far more sophisticated applications. Breath analysis is rapidly evolving as a new frontier in medical testing for disease states in the lung and beyond. Every individual has a breath fingerprint-or 'breathprint'-that can provide useful information about his or her state of health. This breathprint comprises the many thousands of molecules that are expelled with each breath we exhale. Breath research in the past few years has uncovered the scientific and molecular basis for such clinical observations. Relying on mass spectrometry, we have been able to identify many such unique substances in exhaled breath, including gases, such as nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), and a wide array of volatile organic compounds. Exhaled breath also carries aerosolized droplets that can be collected as an exhaled breath condensate that contains endogenously produced non-volatile compounds. Breath

  12. Real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance at high temporal resolution: radial FLASH with nonlinear inverse reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merboldt Klaus-Dietmar

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional assessments of the heart by dynamic cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR commonly rely on (i electrocardiographic (ECG gating yielding pseudo real-time cine representations, (ii balanced gradient-echo sequences referred to as steady-state free precession (SSFP, and (iii breath holding or respiratory gating. Problems may therefore be due to the need for a robust ECG signal, the occurrence of arrhythmia and beat to beat variations, technical instabilities (e.g., SSFP "banding" artefacts, and limited patient compliance and comfort. Here we describe a new approach providing true real-time CMR with image acquisition times as short as 20 to 30 ms or rates of 30 to 50 frames per second. Methods The approach relies on a previously developed real-time MR method, which combines a strongly undersampled radial FLASH CMR sequence with image reconstruction by regularized nonlinear inversion. While iterative reconstructions are currently performed offline due to limited computer speed, online monitoring during scanning is accomplished using gridding reconstructions with a sliding window at the same frame rate but with lower image quality. Results Scans of healthy young subjects were performed at 3 T without ECG gating and during free breathing. The resulting images yield T1 contrast (depending on flip angle with an opposed-phase or in-phase condition for water and fat signals (depending on echo time. They completely avoid (i susceptibility-induced artefacts due to the very short echo times, (ii radiofrequency power limitations due to excitations with flip angles of 10° or less, and (iii the risk of peripheral nerve stimulation due to the use of normal gradient switching modes. For a section thickness of 8 mm, real-time images offer a spatial resolution and total acquisition time of 1.5 mm at 30 ms and 2.0 mm at 22 ms, respectively. Conclusions Though awaiting thorough clinical evaluation, this work describes a robust and

  13. Asymmetric Bessel modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlyar, V V; Kovalev, A A; Soifer, V A

    2014-04-15

    We propose a new, three-parameter family of diffraction-free asymmetric elegant Bessel modes (aB-modes) with an integer and fractional orbital angular momentum (OAM). The aB-modes are described by the nth-order Bessel function of the first kind with complex argument. The asymmetry degree of the nonparaxial aB-mode is shown to depend on a real parameter c≥0: when c=0, the aB-mode is identical to a conventional radially symmetric Bessel mode; with increasing c, the aB-mode starts to acquire a crescent form, getting stretched along the vertical axis and shifted along the horizontal axis for c≫1. On the horizontal axis, the aB-modes have a denumerable number of isolated intensity zeros that generate optical vortices with a unit topological charge of opposite sign on opposite sides of 0. At different values of the parameter c, the intensity zeros change their location on the horizontal axis, thus changing the beam's OAM. An isolated intensity zero on the optical axis generates an optical vortex with topological charge n. The OAM per photon of an aB-mode depends near-linearly on c, being equal to ℏ(n+cI1(2c)/I0(2c)), where ℏ is the Planck constant and In(x) is a modified Bessel function.

  14. Protective supplied breathing air garment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Edward L.; von Hortenau, Erik F.

    1984-07-10

    A breathing air garment for isolating a wearer from hostile environments containing toxins or irritants includes a suit and a separate head protective enclosure or hood engaging a suit collar in sealing attachment. The hood and suit collar are cylindrically shaped and dimensioned to enable the wearer to withdraw his hands from the suit sleeves to perform manual tasks within the hood interior. Breathing air is supplied from an external air line with an air delivery hose attached to the hood interior. The hose feeds air into an annular halo-like fiber-filled plenum having spaced discharge orifices attached to the hood top wall. A plurality of air exhaust/check valves located at the suit extremities cooperate with the hood air delivery system to provide a cooling flow of circulating air from the hood throughout the suit interior. A suit entry seal provided on the suit rear torso panel permits access into the suit and is sealed with an adhesive sealing flap.

  15. Submarines, spacecraft and exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleil, Joachim D; Hansel, Armin

    2012-03-01

    Foreword The International Association of Breath Research (IABR) meetings are an eclectic gathering of researchers in the medical, environmental and instrumentation fields; our focus is on human health as assessed by the measurement and interpretation of trace chemicals in human exhaled breath. What may have escaped our notice is a complementary field of research that explores the creation and maintenance of artificial atmospheres practised by the submarine air monitoring and air purification (SAMAP) community. SAMAP is comprised of manufacturers, researchers and medical professionals dealing with the engineering and instrumentation to support human life in submarines and spacecraft (including shuttlecraft and manned rockets, high-altitude aircraft, and the International Space Station (ISS)). Here, the immediate concerns are short-term survival and long-term health in fairly confined environments where one cannot simply 'open the window' for fresh air. As such, one of the main concerns is air monitoring and the main sources of contamination are CO(2) and other constituents of human exhaled breath. Since the inaugural meeting in 1994 in Adelaide, Australia, SAMAP meetings have been held every two or three years alternating between the North American and European continents. The meetings are organized by Dr Wally Mazurek (a member of IABR) of the Defense Systems Technology Organization (DSTO) of Australia, and individual meetings are co-hosted by the navies of the countries in which they are held. An overriding focus at SAMAP is life support (oxygen availability and carbon dioxide removal). Certainly, other air constituents are also important; for example, the closed environment of a submarine or the ISS can build up contaminants from consumer products, cooking, refrigeration, accidental fires, propulsion and atmosphere maintenance. However, the most immediate concern is sustaining human metabolism: removing exhaled CO(2) and replacing metabolized O(2). Another

  16. Tachoastrometry: astrometry with radial velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Pasquini, L; Lombardi, M; Monaco, L; Leão, I C; Delabre, B

    2014-01-01

    Spectra of composite systems (e.g., spectroscopic binaries) contain spatial information that can be retrieved by measuring the radial velocities (i.e., Doppler shifts) of the components in four observations with the slit rotated by 90 degrees in the sky. By using basic concepts of slit spectroscopy we show that the geometry of composite systems can be reliably retrieved by measuring only radial velocity differences taken with different slit angles. The spatial resolution is determined by the precision with which differential radial velocities can be measured. We use the UVES spectrograph at the VLT to observe the known spectroscopic binary star HD 188088 (HIP 97944), which has a maximum expected separation of 23 milli-arcseconds. We measure an astrometric signal in radial velocity of 276 \\ms, which corresponds to a separation between the two components at the time of the observations of 18 $\\pm2$ milli-arcseconds. The stars were aligned east-west. We describe a simple optical device to simultaneously record p...

  17. Geodesic acoustic modes with poloidal mode couplings ad infinitum

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Rameswar; Garbet, X; Hennequin, P; Vermare, L; Morel, P; Singh, R

    2015-01-01

    Geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) are studied, for the first time, including all poloidal mode $(m)$ couplings using drift reduced fluid equations. The nearest neighbor coupling pattern, due to geodesic curvature, leads to a semi-infinite chain model of the GAM with the mode-mode coupling matrix elements proportional to the radial wave number $k_{r}$. The infinite chain can be reduced to a renormalized bi-nodal chain with a matrix continued fractions. Convergence study of linear GAM dispersion with respect to $k_{r}$ and the $m$-spectra confirms that high m couplings become increasingly important with $k_{r}$. The radially sorted roots overlap with experimentally measured GAM frequency profile in low collisionality shots in Tore Supra thus explaining the reduced frequency of GAM in Tore Supra.

  18. 42 CFR 84.141 - Breathing gas; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Respirators § 84.141 Breathing gas; minimum requirements. (a) Breathing gas used to supply supplied-air respirators shall be respirable breathing air and contain no less than 19.5 volume-percent of oxygen....

  19. Boundary oscillations at Geotail: Windsock, breathing, and wrenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shodhan, S.; Siscoe, G. L.; Frank, L. A.; Ackerson, K. L.; Paterson, W. R.

    1996-02-01

    On March 18-19, 1993, when Geotail was beyond 150 RE down the tail, for about 30 hours it frequently transited between magnetosheath-like plasma and lobe-like plasma. The transitions take the form of smooth variation by about a factor of 10 in both density and speed. Some of the transitions are distinctly asymmetric with a fast rise to sheath-like values and a slow decline to lobe-like values. We have suggested that these transitional regions are the plasma mantle, but this raises the question of why the mantle crossed Geotail many times in 30 hours. Three possible causes are flapping of the tail in response to solar wind flow changes (the windsock mechanism), intrinsic expansions and contractions of the tail boundary, perhaps in response to substorm phases (the breathing mechanism), and an IMF-squeezed elliptical tail cross section changing its orientation to follow the IMF (the wrenching mechanism). We test these possibilities here by examining simultaneous solar wind velocity and magnetic field data from IMP 8. For the cases studied, both the windsock and the breathing mechanisms appear to contribute to the motions that cause the transitions, whereas the wrenching mechanism seems less effective. Breathing dominates on a timescale of tens of minutes, and windsock dominates on a scale of hours. Since the windsock mechanism is unavoidable, the important finding here is that the breathing mechanism appears also to operate. We use the windsock variation to estimate the thickness of the mantle at Geotail's position and find that the density drops by a factor of 10 in 9 RE. We model the mantle as a one-dimensional slow-mode expansion fan and use the model to predict the change in plasma parameters that occurs from the outer edge of the mantle to its inner edge. A comparison of the predicted profile with the observed profile shows that the model simulates the observed changes reasonably well.

  20. Relationships between hippocampal activity and breathing patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harper, R M; Poe, G R; Rector, D M;

    1998-01-01

    Single cell discharge, EEG activity, and optical changes accompanying alterations in breathing patterns, as well as the knowledge that respiratory musculature is heavily involved in movement and other behavioral acts, implicate hippocampal regions in some aspects of breathing control. The control...

  1. Controlled Frequency Breathing Reduces Inspiratory Muscle Fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtch, Alex R; Ogle, Ben T; Sims, Patrick A; Harms, Craig A; Symons, Thorburn B; Folz, Rodney J; Zavorsky, Gerald S

    2016-08-16

    Controlled frequency breathing (CFB) is a common swim training modality involving holding one's breath for about 7 to 10 strokes before taking another breath. We sought to examine the effects of CFB training on reducing respiratory muscle fatigue. Competitive college swimmers were randomly divided into either the CFB group that breathed every 7 to 10 strokes, or a control group that breathed every 3-4 strokes. Twenty swimmers completed the study. The training intervention included 5-6 weeks (16 sessions) of 12x50-m repetitions with breathing 8-10 breaths per 50m (control group), or 2-3 breaths per 50-m (CFB group). Inspiratory muscle fatigue was defined as the decrease in maximal inspiratory mouth-pressure (MIP) between rest and 46s after a 200 yard free-style swimming race [115s (SD 7)]. Aerobic capacity, pulmonary diffusing capacity, and running economy were also measured pre and post-training. Pooled results demonstrated a 12% decrease in MIP at 46s post-race [-15 (SD 14) cm H2O, Effect size = -0.48, p training, only the CFB group prevented a decline in MIP values pre to 46 s post-race [-2 (13) cm H2O, p > 0.05]. However, swimming performance, aerobic capacity, pulmonary diffusing capacity, and running economy did not improve (p > 0.05) post-training in either group. In conclusion, CFB training appears to prevent inspiratory muscle fatigue yet no difference was found in performance outcomes.

  2. How Does a Hopping Kangaroo Breathe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliodori, Mauricio J.; Lujan, Heidi L.; Janbaih, Hussein; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    We developed a model to demonstrate how a hopping kangaroo breathes. Interestingly, a kangaroo uses less energy to breathe while hopping than while standing still. This occurs, in part, because rather than using muscle power to move air into and out of the lungs, air is pulled into (inspiration) and pushed out of (expiration) the lungs as the…

  3. Breath analysis and blood alcohol concentration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, J.A.G. & Noordzij, P.C.

    1978-01-01

    Devices for breath analysis are intended to meet the need for a simple method for determining the blood alcohol concentration. Devices have already been developed for several purposes. For applying breath analyses a compromise has to be found between users' requirements and technical

  4. Effect of resistive load on the inspiratory work and power of breathing during exertion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Powell

    Full Text Available The resistive work of breathing against an external load during inspiration (WR(I was measured at the mouth, during sub-maximal exercise in healthy participants. This measure (which excludes the elastic work component allows the relationship between resistive work and power, ventilation and exercise modality to be explored. A total of 45 adult participants with healthy lung function took part in a series of exercise protocols, in which the relationship between WR(I, power of breathing, PR(I and minute ventilation, [Formula: see text] were assessed during rest, while treadmill walking or ergometer cycling, over a range of exercise intensities (up to 150 Watts and ventilation rates (up to 48 L min(-1 with applied constant resistive loads of 0.75 and 1.5 kPa.L.sec(-1. Resting WR(I was 0.12 JL(-1 and PR(I was 0.9 W. At each resistive load, independent of the breathing pattern or exercise mode, the WR(I increased in a linear fashion at 20 mJ per litre of [Formula: see text], while PR(I increased exponentially. With increasing resistive load the work and power at any given [Formula: see text] increased exponentially. Calculation of the power to work ratio during loaded breathing suggests that loads above 1.5 kPa.L.sec(-1 make the work of resistive breathing become inhibitive at even a moderate [Formula: see text] (>30 L sec(-1. The relationship between work done and power generated while breathing against resistive loads is independent of the exercise mode (cycling or walking and that ventilation is limited by the work required to breathe, rather than an inability to maintain or generate power.

  5. Pulse pressure variation to predict fluid responsiveness in spontaneously breathing patients: tidal vs. forced inspiratory breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, D M; Lee, J M; Seo, J H; Min, J J; Jeon, Y; Bahk, J H

    2014-07-01

    We evaluated whether pulse pressure variation can predict fluid responsiveness in spontaneously breathing patients. Fifty-nine elective thoracic surgical patients were studied before induction of general anaesthesia. After volume expansion with hydroxyethyl starch 6 ml.kg(-1) , patients were defined as responders by a ≥ 15% increase in the cardiac index. Haemodynamic variables were measured before and after volume expansion and pulse pressure variations were calculated during tidal breathing and during forced inspiratory breathing. Median (IQR [range]) pulse pressure variation during forced inspiratory breathing was significantly higher in responders (n = 29) than in non-responders (n = 30) before volume expansion (18.2 (IQR 14.7-18.2 [9.3-31.3])% vs. 10.1 (IQR 8.3-12.6 [4.8-21.1])%, respectively, p breathing could predict fluid responsiveness (area under the curve 0.910, p breathing can be used to guide fluid management in spontaneously breathing patients.

  6. Discriminating between Nasal and Mouth Breathing

    CERN Document Server

    Curran, Kevin; Coyle, Damian

    2010-01-01

    The recommendation to change breathing patterns from the mouth to the nose can have a significantly positive impact upon the general well being of the individual. We classify nasal and mouth breathing by using an acoustic sensor and intelligent signal processing techniques. The overall purpose is to investigate the possibility of identifying the differences in patterns between nasal and mouth breathing in order to integrate this information into a decision support system which will form the basis of a patient monitoring and motivational feedback system to recommend the change from mouth to nasal breathing. Our findings show that the breath pattern can be discriminated in certain places of the body both by visual spectrum analysis and with a Back Propagation neural network classifier. The sound file recoded from the sensor placed on the hollow in the neck shows the most promising accuracy which is as high as 90%.

  7. BREATH OF USE AND VOCAL TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuran ACAR

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Breathable, who escorted us in every aspect of our lives and our survival is our primary activity, allowing for quality of life in a healthy way. quality of breaths taken the right technique, you need both health professional sense should perhaps take advantage of individuals who want to achieve success in life is the primary rule. When the diaphragm is born with assisted breathing lungs of every person's life starts to grow to keep up with the flurry lose this special and important skills. First and foremost, which is important for our body health, including every aspect of proper breathing, especially correct use of the voice carries particular importance. In this article, breathing subject discussed, correct breathing and our lives have tried to give us information about the benefits of both vocal training.

  8. Abortion--the breath of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joling, R J

    1974-01-01

    A scholarly review of medical-legal and biblical authority on the su bject of abortion supports abortion as a woman's right when it is performed before the fetus has had its "breath of life." Based on biblical evidence, a person becomes a living being when the soul, the "breath of life" is breathed into it. Without the "breath of life" no person exists. A fetus less than 28 weeks old is incapable of breathing alone; thus an aborted fetus that age is not truly a living human being capable of surviving independently of its mother's womb. Legal aspects include supreme, local and state court decisions defining abortion. It is ultimately expected that each person will determine what approach to take towards the abortion question. Abortion is still a personal problem regardless of supreme court decisions or ecclesiastical determinants. Religion and moral concepts should be the guiding conscience involved in the question of abortion.

  9. Non-radial Pulsations in RR Lyrae Stars from the OGLE Collection

    CERN Document Server

    Netzel, H

    2016-01-01

    RR Lyrae stars are classical pulsating stars. They pulsate mostly in the radial fundamental mode (RRab stars), in the radial first overtone mode (RRc stars), or in both modes simultaneously (RRd stars). Collection of variable stars from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) contains more than 38 000 RR Lyrae stars from the Galactic bulge. We analysed these data for RRc and RRd stars. We have found new members of radial-non-radial double-mode RR Lyrae stars, with characteristic period ratio of the two modes around 0.61. We increased the number of known RR Lyrae stars of this type by a factor of 8. We have also discovered another group of double-mode RR Lyrae stars. They pulsate in the first overtone and in another, unidentified mode, which has period longer than period of the undetected fundamental mode. The period ratios tightly cluster around 0.686. These proceedings are focused on this puzzling group. In particular, we report eight new members of the group.

  10. Effects of radial electric fields on linear ITG instabilities in W7-X and LHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemann, J.; Kleiber, R.; Borchardt, M.

    2016-07-01

    The impact of radial electric fields on the properties of linear ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) modes in stellarators is studied. Numerical simulations have been carried out with the global particle-in-cell (PIC) code EUTERPE, modelling the behaviour of ITG modes in Wendelstein 7-X and an LHD-like configuration. In general, radial electric fields seem to lead to a reduction of ITG instability growth, which can be related to the action of an induced E× B -drift. Focus is set on the modification of mode properties (frequencies, power spectrum, spatial structure and localization) to understand the observed growth rates as the result of competing stabilizing mechanisms.

  11. Time Breath of Psychological Theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tateo, Luca; Valsiner, Jaan

    2015-01-01

    Psychology as a self-aspiring, ambitious, developmental science faces the crucial limit of time—both theoretically and practically. The issue of time in constructing psychology’s theories is a major unresolved metatheoretical task. This raises several questions about generalization of knowledge......: which is the time length of breath of psychological theories? Which is the temporal dimension of psychological processes? In this article we discuss the role of different axiomatic assumptions about time in the construction of psychological theories. How could different theories include a concept...... of time—or fail to do that? How can they generalize with respect to time? The different conceptions of time often remain implicit, while shaping the concepts used in understanding psychological processes. Any preconception about time in human development will foster the generalizability of theory, as well...

  12. Identifying modes of large whispering-gallery mode resonators from the spectrum and emission pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schunk, Gerhard; Fuerst, Josef U.; Förtsch, Michael;

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the mode numbers in whispering-gallery mode resonators (WGMRs) is important for tailoring them to experimental needs. Here we report on a novel experimental mode analysis technique based on the combination of frequency analysis and far-field imaging for high mode numbers of large WGMRs....... The radial mode numbers q and the angular mode numbers p = l-m are identified and labeled via far-field imaging. The polar mode numbers l are determined unambiguously by fitting the frequency differences between individual whispering gallery modes (WGMs). This allows for the accurate determination...

  13. Severity grading in radial dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilkki, S K

    2014-11-01

    A functional scoring method to grade the usefulness and quality of the upper limbs in congenital radial dysplasia is presented. It is based on the author's examinations of 44 arms with congenital deficiency of the radius. The hand (H), wrist (W) and proximal parts (P) of the extremity are each scored from 0 to 10 points for severity. The scoring is expressed similarly to the TNM (tumour, nodes, metastasis) tumour classification, for example as H5W4P2. The maximum severity index is 30 points. A severity grade of mild is between 1 and 8 points, moderate between 9 and 16 points and severe 17 points and over. In the author's series, the grades were mild in eight, moderate in 21 and severe in 15 cases. The functional severity grading should allow better comparison of radially deficient limbs and the results of treatment between groups of patients. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Velocidades radiales en Collinder 121

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, M.; Morrell, N.

    Se han llevado a cabo observaciones espectroscópicas de unas treinta estrellas que son posibles miembros del cúmulo abierto Collinder 121. Las mismas fueron realizadas con el telescopio de 2.15m del Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO). El análisis de las velocidades radiales derivadas del material obtenido, confirma la realidad de Collinder 121, al menos desde el punto de vista cinemático. La velocidad radial baricentral (LSR) del cúmulo es de +17 ± 3 km.s-1. Esta velocidad coincide, dentro de los errores, con la velocidad radial (LSR) de la nebulosa anillo S308, la cual es de ~20 ± 10 km.s-1. Como S308 se encuentra físicamente asociada a la estrella Wolf-Rayet HD~50896, es muy probable que esta última sea un miembro de Collinder 121. Desde un punto de vista cinemático, la supergigante roja HD~50877 (K3Iab) también pertenecería a Collinder 121. Basándonos en la pertenencia de HD~50896 a Collinder 121, y en la interacción encontrada entre el viento de esta estrella y el medio interestelar circundante a la misma, se estima para este cúmulo una distancia del orden de 1 kpc.

  15. Application of LaserBreath-001 for breath acetone measurement in subjects with diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhennan; Sun, Meixiu; Chen, Zhuying; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2016-11-01

    Breath acetone is a promising biomarker of diabetes mellitus. With an integrated standalone, on-site cavity ringdown breath acetone analyzer, LaserBreath-001, we tested breath samples from 23 type 1 diabetic (T1D) patients, 312 type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients, 52 healthy subjects. In the cross-sectional studies, the obtained breath acetone concentrations were higher in the diabetic subjects compared with those in the control group. No correlation between breath acetone and simultaneous BG was observed in the T1D, T2D, and healthy subjects. A moderate positive correlation between the mean individual breath acetone concentrations and the mean individual BG levels was observed in the 20 T1D patients without ketoacidosis. In a longitudinal study, the breath acetone concentrations in a T1D patient with ketoacidosis decreased significantly and remained stable during the 5-day hospitalization. The results from a relatively large number of subjects tested indicate that an elevated mean breath acetone concentration exists in diabetic patients in general. Although many physiological parameters affect breath acetone concentrations, fast (management under a specifically controlled condition.

  16. An ultrasonic contactless sensor for breathing monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlotto, Philippe; Grimaldi, Michel; Naeck, Roomila; Ginoux, Jean-Marc

    2014-08-20

    The monitoring of human breathing activity during a long period has multiple fundamental applications in medicine. In breathing sleep disorders such as apnea, the diagnosis is based on events during which the person stops breathing for several periods during sleep. In polysomnography, the standard for sleep disordered breathing analysis, chest movement and airflow are used to monitor the respiratory activity. However, this method has serious drawbacks. Indeed, as the subject should sleep overnight in a laboratory and because of sensors being in direct contact with him, artifacts modifying sleep quality are often observed. This work investigates an analysis of the viability of an ultrasonic device to quantify the breathing activity, without contact and without any perception by the subject. Based on a low power ultrasonic active source and transducer, the device measures the frequency shift produced by the velocity difference between the exhaled air flow and the ambient environment, i.e., the Doppler effect. After acquisition and digitization, a specific signal processing is applied to separate the effects of breath from those due to subject movements from the Doppler signal. The distance between the source and the sensor, about 50 cm, and the use of ultrasound frequency well above audible frequencies, 40 kHz, allow monitoring the breathing activity without any perception by the subject, and therefore without any modification of the sleep quality which is very important for sleep disorders diagnostic applications. This work is patented (patent pending 2013-7-31 number FR.13/57569).

  17. Decreased chewing activity during mouth breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, H-Y; Yamaguchi, K

    2012-08-01

    This study examined the effect of mouth breathing on the strength and duration of vertical effect on the posterior teeth using related functional parameters during 3 min of gum chewing in 39 nasal breathers. A CO(2) sensor was placed over the mouth to detect expiratory airflow. When no airflow was detected from the mouth throughout the recording period, the subject was considered a nasal breather and enrolled in the study. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded during 3 min of gum chewing. The protocol was repeated with the nostrils occluded. The strength of the vertical effect was obtained as integrated masseter muscle EMG activity, and the duration of vertical effect was also obtained as chewing stroke count, chewing cycle variation and EMG activity duration above baseline. Baseline activity was obtained from the isotonic EMG activity during jaw movement at 1.6 Hz without making tooth contact. The duration represented the percentage of the active period above baseline relative to the 3-min chewing period. Paired t-test and repeated analysis of variance were used to compare variables between nasal and mouth breathing. The integrated EMG activity and the duration of EMG activity above baseline, chewing stroke count and chewing cycle significantly decreased during mouth breathing compared with nasal breathing (Pmouth breathing was significantly greater than nasal breathing (PMouth breathing reduces the vertical effect on the posterior teeth, which can affect the vertical position of posterior teeth negatively, leading to malocclusion.

  18. An Ultrasonic Contactless Sensor for Breathing Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Arlotto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of human breathing activity during a long period has multiple fundamental applications in medicine. In breathing sleep disorders such as apnea, the diagnosis is based on events during which the person stops breathing for several periods during sleep. In polysomnography, the standard for sleep disordered breathing analysis, chest movement and airflow are used to monitor the respiratory activity. However, this method has serious drawbacks. Indeed, as the subject should sleep overnight in a laboratory and because of sensors being in direct contact with him, artifacts modifying sleep quality are often observed. This work investigates an analysis of the viability of an ultrasonic device to quantify the breathing activity, without contact and without any perception by the subject. Based on a low power ultrasonic active source and transducer, the device measures the frequency shift produced by the velocity difference between the exhaled air flow and the ambient environment, i.e., the Doppler effect. After acquisition and digitization, a specific signal processing is applied to separate the effects of breath from those due to subject movements from the Doppler signal. The distance between the source and the sensor, about 50 cm, and the use of ultrasound frequency well above audible frequencies, 40 kHz, allow monitoring the breathing activity without any perception by the subject, and therefore without any modification of the sleep quality which is very important for sleep disorders diagnostic applications. This work is patented (patent pending 2013-7-31 number FR.13/57569.

  19. Breathing and sleep at high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainslie, Philip N; Lucas, Samuel J E; Burgess, Keith R

    2013-09-15

    We provide an updated review on the current understanding of breathing and sleep at high altitude in humans. We conclude that: (1) progressive changes in pH initiated by the respiratory alkalosis do not underlie early (48 h), complex cellular and neurochemical re-organization occurs both in the peripheral chemoreceptors as well as within the central nervous system. The latter is likely influenced by central acid-base changes secondary to the extent of the initial respiratory responses to initial exposure to high altitude; (3) sleep at high altitude is disturbed by various factors, but principally by periodic breathing; (4) the extent of periodic breathing during sleep at altitude intensifies with duration and severity of exposure; (5) complex interactions between hypoxic-induced enhancement in peripheral and central chemoreflexes and cerebral blood flow--leading to higher loop gain and breathing instability--underpin this development of periodic breathing during sleep; (6) because periodic breathing may elevate rather than reduce mean SaO2 during sleep, this may represent an adaptive rather than maladaptive response; (7) although oral acetazolamide is an effective means to reduce periodic breathing by 50-80%, recent studies using positive airway pressure devices to increase dead space, hyponotics and theophylline are emerging but appear less practical and effective compared to acetazolamide. Finally, we suggest avenues for future research, and discuss implications for understanding sleep pathology.

  20. [Hemodynamic and respiratory changes in athletes during deep breath-hold diving].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, C; La Scala, S

    2001-12-01

    The study analysed the hemodynamic and respiratory aspects of deep breath-hold diving. One male (59-year-old) and one female (32-year-old) subject were enrolled. They were both champion deep breath-hold divers. The dives were performed in the wet compartment of the hyperbaric chamber, first in thermoneutral (35 degrees C) and then cool (25 degrees C) water. The subjects were monitored using ECG recordings; percentage cannulation of the right radial artery using an aseptic technique. Stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) were measured using impedance cardiography (Bomed). Variations were observed in heart rhythm, cardiac output, arterial blood pressure and breathing. Both bradycardia and many hemodynamically effective dysrhythmias influenced CO, which showed a tendency to decrease in the diver in cool water. Changes in CO were caused by concomitant changes in HR as SV showed no significant variations. During breath-hold diving, a drop in intra-thoracic pressure is likely to enhance redistribution of blood from the periphery to the chest, which might distend the heart even more, contributing to dysrhythmogenesis. The observation that dysrhythmias were more frequent in cool water is in line with these concepts. Only two leading divers were recruited in this study and observed for hemodynamic and respiratory changes. However, these findings are in line with similar studies carried out by other authors.

  1. Effect of radial plasma transport at the magnetic throat on axial ion beam formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunchao; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2016-08-01

    Correlation between radial plasma transport and formation of an axial ion beam has been investigated in a helicon plasma reactor implemented with a convergent-divergent magnetic nozzle. The plasma discharge is sustained under a high magnetic field mode and a low magnetic field mode for which the electron energy probability function, the plasma density, the plasma potential, and the electron temperature are measured at the magnetic throat, and the two field modes show different radial parametric behaviors. Although an axial potential drop occurs in the plasma source for both field modes, an ion beam is only observed in the high field mode while not in the low field mode. The transport of energetic ions is characterized downstream of the plasma source using the delimited ion current and nonlocal ion current. A decay of ion beam strength is also observed in the diffusion chamber.

  2. Helical temperature perturbations associated with radially asymmetric magnetic island chains in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2016-12-01

    The simple analysis of Rutherford [Phys. Fluids 16, 1903 (1973)] is generalized in order to incorporate radial magnetic island asymmetry into the nonlinear theory of tearing mode stability in a low-β, large aspect-ratio, quasi-cylindrical, tokamak plasma. The calculation is restricted to cases in which the radial shifts of the island X- and O-points are (almost) equal and opposite. For the sake of simplicity, the calculation concentrates on a particular (but fairly general) class of radially asymmetric island magnetic flux-surfaces that can all be mapped to the same symmetric flux-surfaces by means of a suitable coordinate transform. The combination of island asymmetry (in which the radial shifts of the X- and O-points are almost equal and opposite) and temperature-induced changes in the inductive current profile in the immediate vicinity of the island is found to have no effect on tearing mode stability.

  3. Effects of ozone exposure: a comparison between oral and nasal breathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hynes, B.; Silverman, F.; Cole, P.; Corey, P.

    1988-09-01

    Mode of inhalation, by nose or by mouth, as a determinant of pulmonary toxicity to acute inhalant exposure has been investigated incompletely. This communication addresses whether there are significant differences in toxic pulmonary responses to acute ozone (O/sub 3/) exposure between differing modes of inhalation (nasal vs. oral breathing). Changes in the results of pulmonary function tests and symptomatology of healthy young adults were compared following both exclusive nose and exclusive mouth breathing during a 30-min exposure to approximately 0.4 ppm O/sub 3/ under conditions of moderate continuous exercise. In this single-blind, randomized, crossover study, no significant differences in either the results of pulmonary function tests or in symptomatology were found between the two modes of inhalation.

  4. New modes of assisted mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Sipmann, F

    2014-05-01

    Recent major advances in mechanical ventilation have resulted in new exciting modes of assisted ventilation. Compared to traditional ventilation modes such as assisted-controlled ventilation or pressure support ventilation, these new modes offer a number of physiological advantages derived from the improved patient control over the ventilator. By implementing advanced closed-loop control systems and using information on lung mechanics, respiratory muscle function and respiratory drive, these modes are specifically designed to improve patient-ventilator synchrony and reduce the work of breathing. Depending on their specific operational characteristics, these modes can assist spontaneous breathing efforts synchronically in time and magnitude, adapt to changing patient demands, implement automated weaning protocols, and introduce a more physiological variability in the breathing pattern. Clinicians have now the possibility to individualize and optimize ventilatory assistance during the complex transition from fully controlled to spontaneous assisted ventilation. The growing evidence of the physiological and clinical benefits of these new modes is favoring their progressive introduction into clinical practice. Future clinical trials should improve our understanding of these modes and help determine whether the claimed benefits result in better outcomes.

  5. Fast-starting for a breath: Air breathing in Hoplosternum littorale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, John Fleng

    2012-01-01

    to be food-related. Little is known about C-starts being used outside the context of escaping or feeding. Here, we test the hypothesis that air-breathing fish may use C-starts when gulping air at the surface. Air breathing is a common behaviour in many fish species when exposed to hypoxia, although certain...... species perform air-breathing in normoxia to fill their swim bladders for buoyancy control and/or sound transduction. Hoplos/emum littorale is an air-breathing freshwater catfish found in South America. Field video observations reveal that their air-breathing behaviour consists of a fast air...... overlap considerably in their kinematics (turning rates and distance covered), suggesting that air breathing in this species is performed using escapelike C-start motions. This demonstrates that C-starts in fish do not need external stimulation and can be spontaneous behaviours used outside the context...

  6. Experimental and theoretical investigations of radial microwave integrated circuits with multi-semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derycke, A. C.; Dejaeger, M.; Salmer, G.; Debouard, A.

    A theoretical and experimental study of eccentered radial pretuned modules is presented. The modules can be used with several active devices to make power oscillator modules in millimeter waves, or to make VCO modules. The model makes possible the calculation of load impedance by considering the particular mode spectrum of radial circuits. The theoretical model is sufficiently accurate to estimate the load impedance variation versus frequency and its dependence on geometrical dimensions.

  7. Pure-rotational spectrometry: a vintage analytical method applied to modern breath analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrubesh, Lawrence W; Droege, Michael W

    2013-09-01

    Pure-rotational spectrometry (PRS) is an established method, typically used to study structures and properties of polar gas-phase molecules, including isotopic and isomeric varieties. PRS has also been used as an analytical tool where it is particularly well suited for detecting or monitoring low-molecular-weight species that are found in exhaled breath. PRS is principally notable for its ultra-high spectral resolution which leads to exceptional specificity to identify molecular compounds in complex mixtures. Recent developments using carbon aerogel for pre-concentrating polar molecules from air samples have extended the sensitivity of PRS into the part-per-billion range. In this paper we describe the principles of PRS and show how it may be configured in several different modes for breath analysis. We discuss the pre-concentration concept and demonstrate its use with the PRS analyzer for alcohols and ammonia sampled directly from the breath.

  8. 46 CFR 197.456 - Breathing supply hoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing supply hoses. 197.456 Section 197.456 Shipping....456 Breathing supply hoses. (a) The diving supervisor shall insure that— (1) Each breathing supply....5 times its maximum working pressure; (2) Each breathing supply hose assembly, prior to being...

  9. 42 CFR 84.91 - Breathing resistance test; exhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; exhalation. 84.91...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.91 Breathing resistance test; exhalation. (a) Resistance to exhalation...-circuit apparatus with a breathing machine as described in § 84.88, and the exhalation resistance...

  10. 42 CFR 84.88 - Breathing bag test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing bag test. 84.88 Section 84.88 Public... RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.88 Breathing bag test. (a) Breathing bags will be tested in an air atmosphere saturated...

  11. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breath nitric oxide test system. 862.3080 Section... Systems § 862.3080 Breath nitric oxide test system. (a) Identification. A breath nitric oxide test system is a device intended to measure fractional nitric oxide in human breath. Measurement of changes...

  12. Coordination of mastication, swallowing and breathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Matsuo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The pathways for air and food cross in the pharynx. In breathing, air may flow through either the nose or the mouth; it always flows through the pharynx. During swallowing, the pharynx changes from an airway to a food channel. The pharynx is isolated from the nasal cavity and lower airway by velopharyngeal and laryngeal closure during the pharyngeal swallow. During mastication, the food bolus accumulates in the pharynx prior to swallow initiation. The structures in the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx serve multiple functions in breathing, speaking, mastication and swallowing. Thus, the fine temporal coordination of feeding among breathing, mastication and swallowing is essential to provide proper food nutrition and to prevent pulmonary aspiration. This review paper will review the temporo-spatial coordination of the movements of oral, pharyngeal, and laryngeal structures during mastication and swallowing, and temporal coordination between breathing, mastication, and swallowing.

  13. Coordination of Mastication, Swallowing and Breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Koichiro; Palmer, Jeffrey B

    2009-05-01

    The pathways for air and food cross in the pharynx. In breathing, air may flow through either the nose or the mouth, it always flows through the pharynx. During swallowing, the pharynx changes from an airway to a food channel. The pharynx is isolated from the nasal cavity and lower airway by velopharyngeal and laryngeal closure during the pharyngeal swallow. During mastication, the food bolus accumulates in the pharynx prior to swallow initiation. The structures in the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx serve multiple functions in breathing, speaking, mastication and swallowing. Thus, the fine temporal coordination of feeding among breathing, mastication and swallowing is essential to provide proper food nutrition and to prevent pulmonary aspiration. This review paper will review the temporo-spatial coordination of the movements of oral, pharyngeal, and laryngeal structures during mastication and swallowing, and temporal coordination between breathing, mastication, and swallowing.

  14. Breathing exercises for adults with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Asthma is a common long-term condition that remains poorly controlled in many people despite the availability of pharmacological interventions, evidence-based treatment guidelines and care pathways.(1) There is considerable public interest in the use of non-pharmacological approaches for the treatment of asthma.(2) A survey of people with asthma reported that many have used complementary and alternative medicine, often without the knowledge of their clinical team.(3) Such interventions include breathing techniques, herbal products, homeopathy and acupuncture. The role of breathing exercises within the management of asthma has been controversial, partly because early claims of effectiveness were exaggerated.(4) UK national guidance and international guidelines on the management of asthma have included the option of breathing exercise programmes as an adjuvant to pharmacological treatment.(5,6) Here we discuss the types of breathing exercises used and review the evidence for their effectiveness.

  15. Can Breath Test Detect Stomach Cancers Earlier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_163342.html Can Breath Test Detect Stomach Cancers Earlier? New technology may also spot esophageal cancers ... the only way to diagnose esophageal cancer or stomach cancer is with endoscopy. This method is expensive, invasive ...

  16. An introduction to the psychophysiology of breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, R

    1994-06-01

    Breathing can be viewed as an independent variable which affects emotion, cognition, and behavior as well as a dependent variable which reflects changes in emotion, cognition, and behavior. This bidirectional interaction is basic to an appreciation of the significance of breathing in terms of its relevance in research and application. The underlying premise of the present article is that since breathing is a behavior that is under voluntary as well as reflexive control, it can be modified according to the principles of both instrumental training (operant conditioning) and Pavlovian (classical) conditioning. The implications of this premise are relevant to theory, diagnosis, and treatment of stress and anxiety-related disorders (e.g., panic disorder, phobias, test anxiety, occupational strain, and related psychosomatic disorders), and to basic and applied research in the psychophysiology of breathing.

  17. ION-SCALE TURBULENCE IN THE INNER HELIOSPHERE: RADIAL DEPENDENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comisel, H.; Motschmann, U.; Büchner, J.; Narita, Y.; Nariyuki, Y. [University of Toyama, Faculty of Human Development, 3190, Gofuku, Toyama, 930-8555 (Japan)

    2015-10-20

    The evolution of the ion-scale plasma turbulence in the inner heliosphere is studied by associating the plasma parameters for hybrid-code turbulence simulations to the radial distance from the Sun via a Solar wind model based mapping procedure. Using a mapping based on a one-dimensional solar wind expansion model, the resulting ion-kinetic scale turbulence is related to the solar wind distance from the Sun. For this purpose the mapping is carried out for various values of ion beta that correspond to the heliocentric distance. It is shown that the relevant normal modes such as ion cyclotron and ion Bernstein modes will occur first at radial distances of about 0.2–0.3 AU, i.e., near the Mercury orbit. This finding can be used as a reference, a prediction to guide the in situ measurements to be performed by the upcoming Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus missions. Furthermore, a radial dependence of the wave-vector anisotropy was obtained. For astrophysical objects this means that the spatial scales of filamentary structures in interstellar media or astrophysical jets can be predicted for photometric observations.

  18. Fast and Accurate Exhaled Breath Ammonia Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Solga, Steven F; Mudalel, Matthew L; Spacek, Lisa A.; Risby, Terence H.

    2014-01-01

    This exhaled breath ammonia method uses a fast and highly sensitive spectroscopic method known as quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) that uses a quantum cascade based laser. The monitor is coupled to a sampler that measures mouth pressure and carbon dioxide. The system is temperature controlled and specifically designed to address the reactivity of this compound. The sampler provides immediate feedback to the subject and the technician on the quality of the breath effort. Toge...

  19. Radial vibrations of BPS skyrmions

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, C; Romanczukiewicz, T; Wereszczynski, A

    2016-01-01

    We study radial vibrations of spherically symmetric skyrmions in the BPS Skyrme model. Concretely, we numerically solve the linearised field equations for small fluctuations in a skyrmion background, both for linearly stable oscillations and for (unstable) resonances. This is complemented by numerical solutions of the full nonlinear system, which confirm all the results of the linear analysis. In all cases, the resulting fundamental excitation provides a rather accurate value for the Roper resonance, supporting the hypothesis that the BPS Skyrme model already gives a reasonable approximate description of this resonance.

  20. Countercurrent aortography via radial artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Hyung Kuk; Lee, Young Chun; Lee, Seung Chul; Jeon, Seok Chol; Joo, Kyung Bin; Lee, Seung Ro; Kim, Soon Yong [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-06-15

    Countercurrent aortography via radial artery was performed for detection of aortic arch anomalies in 4 infants with congenital heart disease. Author's cases of aortic arch anomalies were 3 cases of PDA, 1 case of coarctation of aorta, and 1 case of occlusion of anastomosis site on subclavian artery B-T shunt. And aberrant origin of the right SCA, interrupted aortic arch, hypoplastic aorta, anomalous origin of the right pulmonary artery from the ascending aorta can be demonstrated by this method. Countercurrent aortography affords an safe and simple method for detection of aortic arch anomalies without retrograde arterial catheterization, especially in small infants or premature babies.

  1. Optoacoustic 13C-breath test analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harde, Hermann; Helmrich, Günther; Wolff, Marcus

    2010-02-01

    The composition and concentration of exhaled volatile gases reflects the physical ability of a patient. Therefore, a breath analysis allows to recognize an infectious disease in an organ or even to identify a tumor. One of the most prominent breath tests is the 13C-urea-breath test, applied to ascertain the presence of the bacterium helicobacter pylori in the stomach wall as an indication of a gastric ulcer. In this contribution we present a new optical analyzer that employs a compact and simple set-up based on photoacoustic spectroscopy. It consists of two identical photoacoustic cells containing two breath samples, one taken before and one after capturing an isotope-marked substrate, where the most common isotope 12C is replaced to a large extent by 13C. The analyzer measures simultaneously the relative CO2 isotopologue concentrations in both samples by exciting the molecules on specially selected absorption lines with a semiconductor laser operating at a wavelength of 2.744 μm. For a reliable diagnosis changes of the 13CO2 concentration of 1% in the exhaled breath have to be detected at a concentration level of this isotope in the breath of about 500 ppm.

  2. Swimming in air-breathing fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, S; Domenici, P; McKenzie, D J

    2014-03-01

    Fishes with bimodal respiration differ in the extent of their reliance on air breathing to support aerobic metabolism, which is reflected in their lifestyles and ecologies. Many freshwater species undertake seasonal and reproductive migrations that presumably involve sustained aerobic exercise. In the six species studied to date, aerobic exercise in swim flumes stimulated air-breathing behaviour, and there is evidence that surfacing frequency and oxygen uptake from air show an exponential increase with increasing swimming speed. In some species, this was associated with an increase in the proportion of aerobic metabolism met by aerial respiration, while in others the proportion remained relatively constant. The ecological significance of anaerobic swimming activities, such as sprinting and fast-start manoeuvres during predator-prey interactions, has been little studied in air-breathing fishes. Some species practise air breathing during recovery itself, while others prefer to increase aquatic respiration, possibly to promote branchial ion exchange to restore acid-base balance, and to remain quiescent and avoid being visible to predators. Overall, the diversity of air-breathing fishes is reflected in their swimming physiology as well, and further research is needed to increase the understanding of the differences and the mechanisms through which air breathing is controlled and used during exercise.

  3. Clinical Applications of CO2 and H2 Breath Test

    OpenAIRE

    ZHAO Si-qian; Chen, Bao-Jun; LUO Zhi-fu

    2016-01-01

    Breath test is non-invasive, high sensitivity and high specificity. In this article, CO2 breath test, H2 breath test and their clinical applications were elaborated. The main applications of CO2 breath test include helicobacter pylori test, liver function detection, gastric emptying test, insulin resistance test, pancreatic exocrine secretion test, etc. H2 breath test can be applied in the diagnosis of lactose malabsorption and detecting small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. With further res...

  4. General Relativistic Non-radial Oscillations of Compact Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Zack, II; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2017-01-01

    Currently, we lack a means of identifying the type of matter at the core of compact stars, but in the future, we may be able to use gravitational wave signals produced by fluid oscillations inside compact stars to discover new phases of dense matter. To this end, we study the fluid perturbations inside compact stars such as Neutron Stars and Strange Quark Stars, focusing on modes that couple to gravitational waves. Using a modern equation of state for quark matter that incorporates interactions at moderately high densities, we implement an efficient computational scheme to solve the oscillation equations in the framework of General Relativity, and determine the complex eigenfrequencies that describe the oscillation and damping of the non-radial fluid modes. We discuss the significance of our results for future detection of these modes through gravitational waves. This work is supported in part by the CSULB Graduate Research Fellowship and by the National Science Foundation NSF PHY-1608959.

  5. A fully relativistic radial fall

    CERN Document Server

    Spallicci, Alessandro D A M

    2014-01-01

    Radial fall has historically played a momentous role. It is one of the most classical problems, the solutions of which represent the level of understanding of gravitation in a given epoch. A {\\it gedankenexperiment} in a modern frame is given by a small body, like a compact star or a solar mass black hole, captured by a supermassive black hole. The mass of the small body itself and the emission of gravitational radiation cause the departure from the geodesic path due to the back-action, that is the self-force. For radial fall, as any other non-adiabatic motion, the instantaneous identity of the radiated energy and the loss of orbital energy cannot be imposed and provide the perturbed trajectory. In the first part of this letter, we present the effects due to the self-force computed on the geodesic trajectory in the background field. Compared to the latter trajectory, in the Regge-Wheeler, harmonic and all others smoothly related gauges, a far observer concludes that the self-force pushes inward (not outward) ...

  6. Acoustic resonances in two-dimensional radial sonic crystal shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent, Daniel; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2010-07-01

    Radial sonic crystals (RSC) are fluidlike structures infinitely periodic along the radial direction that verify the Bloch theorem and are possible only if certain specially designed acoustic metamaterials with mass density anisotropy can be engineered (see Torrent and Sánchez-Dehesa 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 064301). A comprehensive analysis of two-dimensional (2D) RSC shells is reported here. A given shell is in fact a circular slab with a central cavity. These finite crystal structures contain Fabry-Perot-like resonances and modes strongly localized at the central cavity. Semi-analytical expressions are developed to obtain the quality factors of the different resonances, their symmetry features and their excitation properties. The results reported here are completely general and can be extended to equivalent 3D spherical shells and to their photonic counterparts.

  7. Radial energy transport by magnetospheric ULF waves: Effects of magnetic curvature and plasma pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouznetsov, Igor; Lotko, William

    1995-01-01

    The 'radial' transport of energy by internal ULF waves, stimulated by dayside magnetospheric boundary oscillations, is analyzed in the framework of one-fluid magnetohydrodynamics. (the term radial is used here to denote the direction orthogonal to geomagnetic flux surfaces.) The model for the inhomogeneous magnetospheric plasma and background magnetic field is axisymmetric and includes radial and parallel variations in the magnetic field, magnetic curvature, plasma density, and low but finite plasma pressure. The radial mode structure of the coupled fast and intermediate MHD waves is determined by numerical solution of the inhomogeneous wave equation; the parallel mode structure is characterized by a Wentzel-Kramer-Brillouin (WKB) approximation. Ionospheric dissipation is modeled by allowing the parallel wave number to be complex. For boudnary oscillations with frequencies in the range from 10 to 48 mHz, and using a dipole model for the background magnetic field, the combined effects of magnetic curvature and finite plasma pressure are shown to (1) enhance the amplitude of field line resonances by as much as a factor of 2 relative to values obtained in a cold plasma or box-model approximation for the dayside magnetosphere; (2) increase the energy flux delivered to a given resonance by a factor of 2-4; and (3) broaden the spectral width of the resonance by a factor of 2-3. The effects are attributed to the existence of an 'Alfven buoyancy oscillation,' which approaches the usual shear mode Alfven wave at resonance, but unlike the shear Alfven mode, it is dispersive at short perpendicular wavelengths. The form of dispersion is analogous to that of an internal atmospheric gravity wave, with the magnetic tension of the curved background field providing the restoring force and allowing radial propagation of the mode. For nominal dayside parameters, the propagation band of the Alfven buoyancy wave occurs between the location of its (field line) resonance and that of the

  8. Dispersion-managed semiconductor mode-locked ring laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resan, Bojan; Archundia, Luis; Delfyett, Peter J; Alphonse, Gerard

    2003-08-01

    A novel breathing-mode external sigma-ring-cavity semiconductor mode-locked laser is developed. Intracavity pulse compression and stretching produce linearly chirped pulses with an asymmetric exponential temporal profile. External dispersion compensation reduces the pulse duration to 274 fs (within 10% of the bandwidth limit).

  9. Breath tests: principles, problems, and promise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, C.W.; Carter, E.A.; Walker, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    Breath tests rely on the measurement of gases produced in the intestine, absorbed, and expired in the breath. Carbohydrates, such as lactose and sucrose, can be administered in ysiologic doses; if malabsorbed, they will be metabolized to hydrogen by colonic bacteria. Since hydrogen is not produced by human metabolic reactions, a rise in breath hydrogen, as measured by gas chromatography, is evidence of carbohydrate malabsorption. Likewise, a rise in breath hydrogen marks the transit time of nonabsorbable carbohydrates such as lactulose through the small intestine into the colon. Simple end-expiratory interval collection into nonsiliconized vacutainer tubes has made these noninvasive tests quite convenient to perform, but various problems, including changes in stool pH intestinal motility, or metabolic rate, may influence results. Another group of breath tests uses substrates labeled with radioactive or stable isotopes of carbon. Labeled fat substrates such as trioctanoin, tripalmitin, and triolein do not produce the expected rise in labeled breath CO/sub 2/ if there is fat malabsorption. Bile acid malabsorption and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth can be measured with labeled cholylglycine or cholyltaurine. Labeled drugs such as aminopyrine, methacetin, and phenacetin can be used as an indication of drug metabolism and liver function. Radioactive substrates have been used to trace metabolic pathways and can be measured by scintillation counters. The availability of nonradioactive stable isotopes has made these ideal for use in children and pregnant women, but the cost of substrates and the mass spectrometers to measure them has so far limited their use to research centers. It is hoped that new techniques of processing and measurement will allow further realization of the exciting potential breath analysis has in a growing list of clinical applications.

  10. Comparison of axial and radial electron beam-breakup transit-time oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwan, T.J.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Mostrom, M.A. [Mission Research Corporation, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Comparison of two configurations of a novel high-power microwave generator is presented in this article. Coupling the beam-breakup instability with the transit-time effect of the electron beam in the cavity, rapid energy exchange between the electrons and cavity modes can occur. The dominant cavity modes in the axial and radial configurations are different but their growth rates are comparable. We found that the radial configuration can have a beam impedance less than 10 {Omega} and therefore more suitable for low-voltage and high power operation. Good agreements have been obtained between linear theory and simulation for both configurations.

  11. Fast-starting for a breath: Air breathing in Hoplosternum littorale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domenici, Paolo; Norin, Tommy; Bushnell, Peter G.

    by the fall of a prey item on the water surface, and in tapping motions of goldfish, a behaviour that was interpreted to be food-related. Little is known about C-starts being used outside the context of escaping or feeding. Here, we test the hypothesis that air-breathing fish may use C-starts when gulping air...... at the surface. Air breathing is a common behaviour in many fish species when exposed to hypoxia, although certain species perform air-breathing in normoxia to fill their swim bladders for buoyancy control and/or sound transduction. Hoplosternum littorale is an air-breathing freshwater catfish found in South...... America. Field video observations reveal that their air-breathing behaviour consists of a fast air-gulping motion at the surface, followed by swimming towards the bottom. Using high-speed video in the laboratory, we compared the kinematics of spontaneous air-gulping performed by H. littorale in normoxia...

  12. Formulas for Radial Transport in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desch, Steven J.; Estrada, Paul R.; Kalyaan, Anusha; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    2017-05-01

    The quantification of the radial transport of gaseous species and solid particles is important to many applications in protoplanetary disk evolution. An especially important example is determining the location of the water snow lines in a disk, which requires computing the rates of outward radial diffusion of water vapor and the inward radial drift of icy particles; however, the application is generalized to evaporation fronts of all volatiles. We review the relevant formulas using a uniform formalism. This uniform treatment is necessary because the literature currently contains at least six mutually exclusive treatments of radial diffusion of gas, only one of which is correct. We derive the radial diffusion equations from first principles using Fick's law. For completeness, we also present the equations for radial transport of particles. These equations may be applied to studies of diffusion of gases and particles in protoplanetary and other accretion disks.

  13. de secador de flujo radial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor Durango

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presentan los resultados obtenidos en la investigación realizada para establecer la influencia e importancia de las variables cantidad de yuca, relación superficie a volumen del material de los pedazos de yuca, velocidad del ventilador y temperatura del aire de recirculación, en el proceso de secado de yuca en un modelo de secador de flujo radial. La metodología experimental utilizada fue el diseño de experimentos factoriales, la cual, mediante una serie de análisis estadísticos, posibilitó la caracterización del proceso para un tiempo de secado de tres horas y la obtención de un modelo matemático que describe su comportamiento.

  14. Diagnostics of a subsurface radial outflow from a sunspot

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, D; Lindsey, C; Jefferies, S M

    1996-01-01

    We measure the mean frequencies of acoustic waves propagating toward and away from a sunspot employing a spot-centered Fourier-Hankel decomposition of p-mode amplitudes as measured from a set of observations made at the South Pole in 1991. We demonstrate that there is a significant frequency shift between the inward and outward traveling waves which is consistent with the Doppler effect of a radial outflow from the sunspot. For p-modes of temporal frequencies of 3 mHz it is observed that the frequency shift decreases slightly with spatial frequency, for modes with degree l between 160 to 600. From the l dependence of the frequency shift, we infer that the mean radial outflow within the observed annular region (which extends between 30 and 137 Mm from the spot) increases nearly linearly with depth, reaching a magnitude of about 200 m/s at a depth of 20 Mm. This outflow exhibits properties similar to flows recently reported by Lindsey, et al. (1996) using spatially sensitive local helioseismic techniques.

  15. Ecological sounds affect breath duration more than artificial sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, Mauro; Santoro, Ilaria; Tamburini, Giorgia; Prpic, Valter; Sors, Fabrizio; Galmonte, Alessandra; Agostini, Tiziano

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that auditory rhythms affect both movement and physiological functions. We hypothesized that the ecological sounds of human breathing can affect breathing more than artificial sounds of breathing, varying in tones for inspiration and expiration. To address this question, we monitored the breath duration of participants exposed to three conditions: (a) ecological sounds of breathing, (b) artificial sounds of breathing having equal temporal features as the ecological sounds, (c) no sounds (control). We found that participants' breath duration variability was reduced in the ecological sound condition, more than in the artificial sound condition. We suggest that ecological sounds captured the timing of breathing better than artificial sounds, guiding as a consequence participants' breathing. We interpreted our results according to the Theory of Event Coding, providing further support to its validity, and suggesting its possible extension in the domain of physiological functions which are both consciously and unconsciously controlled.

  16. Radial keratotomy associated endothelial degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshirfar M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Majid Moshirfar, Andrew Ollerton, Rodmehr T Semnani, Maylon HsuJohn A Moran Eye Center, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USAPurpose: To describe the presentation and clinical course of eyes with a history of radial keratotomy (RK and varying degrees of endothelial degeneration.Methods: Retrospective case series were used.Results: Thirteen eyes (seven patients were identified with clinical findings of significant guttata and a prior history of RK. The mean age of presentation for cornea evaluation was 54.3 years (range: 38–72 years, averaging 18.7 years (range: 11–33 years after RK. The presentation of guttata varied in degree from moderate to severe. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA ranged from 20/25 to 20/80. All patients had a history of bilateral RK, except one patient who did not develop any guttata in the eye without prior RK. No patients reported a family history of Fuch’s Dystrophy. One patient underwent a penetrating keratoplasty in one eye and a Descemet’s stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK in the other eye.Conclusions: RK may induce a spectrum of endothelial degeneration. In elderly patients, the findings of guttata may signify comorbid Fuch’s dystrophy in which RK incisions could potentially hasten endothelial decomposition. In these select patients with stable cornea topography and prior RK, DSAEK may successfully treat RK endothelial degeneration.Keywords: radial keratotomy, RK, Descemet’s stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty, DSAEK, guttata, endothelial degeneration, Fuch’s dystrophy

  17. A CONSERVATIVE VIEW OF RADIAL KERATOTOMY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Steven; Olkowski; Walter; J.; Stark; John; D.; Gottsch; Gerri; Goodman; Daniel; Goodman; A.E.; Maumenee; Ivan; Esente

    1991-01-01

    It has been known for almost a century that radial keratotomy (RK) will flatten the cornea and reduce myopia. Since the introduction of radial keratotomy (RK) in the United States by Bores in 1978, there have been many published studies documenting the effects of this procedure. The questions. about radial keratotomy today are not only quantitative but also qualitative in nature. We know this technique can flatten the cornea, but how reliably can the results be predicted? Does the patient benefit suffic...

  18. Stirling Engine With Radial Flow Heat Exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, N.; Yarr, George

    1993-01-01

    Conflict between thermodynamical and structural requirements resolved. In Stirling engine of new cylindrical configuration, regenerator and acceptor and rejector heat exchangers channel flow of working gas in radial direction. Isotherms in regenerator ideally concentric cylinders, and gradient of temperature across regenerator radial rather than axial. Acceptor and rejector heat exchangers located radially inward and outward of regenerator, respectively. Enables substantial increase in power of engine without corresponding increase in diameter of pressure vessel.

  19. Hollow Cathode With Multiple Radial Orifices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Improved hollow cathode serving as source of electrons has multiple radial orifices instead of single axial orifice. Distributes ion current more smoothly, over larger area. Prototype of high-current cathodes for ion engines in spacecraft. On Earth, cathodes used in large-diameter ion sources for industrial processing of materials. Radial orientation of orifices in new design causes current to be dispersed radially in vicinity of cathode. Advantageous where desireable to produce plasma more nearly uniform over wider region around cathode.

  20. Sudarshan kriya yoga: Breathing for health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer A Zope

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breathing techniques are regularly recommended for relaxation, stress management, control of psychophysiological states, and to improve organ function. Yogic breathing, defined as a manipulation of breath movement, has been shown to positively affect immune function, autonomic nervous system imbalances, and psychological or stress-related disorders. The aim of this study was to assess and provide a comprehensive review of the physiological mechanisms, the mind-body connection, and the benefits of Sudarshan Kriya Yoga (SKY in a wide range of clinical conditions. Various online databases searched were Medline, Psychinfo, EMBASE, and Google Scholar. All the results were carefully screened and articles on SKY were selected. The references from these articles were checked to find any other potentially relevant articles. SKY, a unique yogic breathing practice, involves several types of cyclical breathing patterns, ranging from slow and calming to rapid and stimulating. There is mounting evidence to suggest that SKY can be a beneficial, low-risk, low-cost adjunct to the treatment of stress, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, stress-related medical illnesses, substance abuse, and rehabilitation of criminal offenders.

  1. Lung cancer biomarkers in exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Anton; Corradi, Massimo; Mazzone, Peter; Mutti, Antonio

    2011-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Methods for early detection of lung cancer, such as computerized tomography scanning technology, often discover a large number of small lung nodules, posing a new problem to radiologists and chest physicians. The vast majority of these nodules will be benign, but there is currently no easy way to determine which nodules represent very early lung cancer. Adjuvant testing with PET imaging and nonsurgical biopsies has a low yield for these small indeterminate nodules, carries potential morbidity and is costly. Indeed, purely morphological criteria seem to be insufficient for distinguishing lung cancer from benign nodules at early stages with sufficient confidence, therefore false positives undergoing surgical resection frequently occur. A molecular approach to the diagnosis of lung cancer through the analysis of exhaled breath could greatly improve the specificity of imaging procedures. A biomarker-driven approach to signs or symptoms possibly due to lung cancer would represent a complementary tool aimed at ruling out (with known error probability) rather than diagnosing lung cancer. Volatile and nonvolatile components of the breath are being studied as biomarkers of lung cancer. Breath testing is noninvasive and potentially inexpensive. There is promise that an accurate lung cancer breath biomarker, capable of being applied clinically, will be developed in the near future. In this article, we summarize some of the rationale for breath biomarker development, review the published literature in this field and provide thoughts regarding future directions.

  2. Sleep disordered breathing in community psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirstie N. Anderson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Sleep disturbance is prominent in many neuropsychiatric disorders and may precipitate or exacerbate a range of psychiatric conditions. Few studies have investigated sleep disordered breathing and in particular obstructive sleep apnoea in community psychiatric patients and the commonly used screening instruments have not been evaluated in patients with psychiatric disorders. The objective is to evaluate the prevalence of sleep disordered breathing in a community cohort with chronic mental illness on long term psychotropic medication, and to assess the effectiveness of commonly used screening instruments to detect abnormal sleep. Methods: 52 patients completed sleep questionnaires and 50 undertook overnight oximetry. Results: 52% (n = 26 had sleep-disordered breathing; 20% (n = 10 had moderate/severe sleep apnoea. The Epworth Sleepiness Score and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory did not predict sleep disordered breathing. Conclusions: Patients with psychiatric disorders in the community have a high rate of undiagnosed sleep disordered breathing, which is not reliably detected by established sleep disorder screening questionnaires.

  3. Pulse Ejection Presentation System Synchronized with Breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadowaki, Ami; Sato, Junta; Ohtsu, Kaori; Bannai, Yuichi; Okada, Kenichi

    Trials on transmission of olfactory information together with audio/visual information are currently being conducted in the field of multimedia. However, continuous emission of scents in high concentration creates problems of human adaptation and remnant odors in air. To overcome such problems we developed an olfactory display in conjunction with Canon Inc. This display has high emission control in the ink-jet so that it can provide stable pulse emission of scents. Humans catch a scent when they breathe in and inhale smell molecules in air. Therefore, it is important that the timing of scent presentation is synchronized with human breathing. We also developed a breath sensor which detects human inspiration. In this study, we combined the olfactory display with the breath sensor to make a pulse ejection presentation system synchronized the breath. The experimental evaluation showed that the system had more than 90 percent of detection rate. Another evaluation was held at KEIO TECHNO-MALL 2007. From questionnaire results of the participants, we found that the system made the user feel continuous sense of smell avoiding adaptation. It is expected that our system enables olfactory information to be synchronized with audio/visual information in arbitrary duration at any time.

  4. Toeplitz Operators with Essentially Radial Symbols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto C. Raimondo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For Topelitz operators with radial symbols on the disk, there are important results that characterize boundedness, compactness, and its relation to the Berezin transform. The notion of essentially radial symbol is a natural extension, in the context of multiply-connected domains, of the notion of radial symbol on the disk. In this paper we analyze the relationship between the boundary behavior of the Berezin transform and the compactness of when ∈2(Ω is essentially radial and Ω is multiply-connected domains.

  5. Stability and halo formation of a breathing axisymmetric uniform-density beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluckstern, Robert L.; Cheng, Wen-Hao; Kurennoy, Sergey S.; Ye, Huanchan

    1996-12-01

    An analysis of the stability and halo formation is presented for a breathing axisymmetric beam of uniform density [Kapchinsky-Vladimirsky (KV) beam] in a uniform focusing channel. Theoretical results are obtained for the form of modes involving nonuniform charge density. In particular, the mismatch-tune depression space is explored, both analytically and by numerical particle-in-cell simulations, to determine the stability limits and growth rates of the most unstable modes. The implications for halo formation are then explored. Halo parameters obtained by simulations are compared with predictions of an analytical model for halo formation from the breathing KV beam developed earlier. The practical applications of the results for high-current linear accelerators are discussed.

  6. Stability and halo formation of a breathing axisymmetric uniform-density beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gluckstern, R.L.; Cheng, W.; Kurennoy, S.S.; Ye, H. [Physics Department, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    1996-12-01

    An analysis of the stability and halo formation is presented for a breathing axisymmetric beam of uniform density [Kapchinsky-Vladimirsky (KV) beam] in a uniform focusing channel. Theoretical results are obtained for the form of modes involving nonuniform charge density. In particular, the mismatch-tune depression space is explored, both analytically and by numerical particle-in-cell simulations, to determine the stability limits and growth rates of the most unstable modes. The implications for halo formation are then explored. Halo parameters obtained by simulations are compared with predictions of an analytical model for halo formation from the breathing KV beam developed earlier. The practical applications of the results for high-current linear accelerators are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. Coupling of radial and nonradial oscillations of relativistic stars: Gauge-invariant formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passamonti, Andrea; Bruni, Marco; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2005-01-01

    Linear perturbation theory is appropriate to describe small oscillations of stars, while a mild nonlinearity is still tractable perturbatively but requires one to consider mode coupling, i.e., to take into account second order effects. It is natural to start to look at this problem by considering the coupling between linear radial and nonradial modes. A radial pulsation may be thought of as an important component of an overall mildly nonlinear oscillation, e.g., of a protoneutron star. Radial pulsations of spherical compact objects do not per se emit gravitational waves but, if the coupling between the existing first order radial and nonradial modes is efficient in driving and possibly amplifying the nonradial oscillations, one may expect the appearance of nonlinear harmonics, and gravitational radiation could then be produced to a significant level. More in general, mode coupling typically leads to an interesting phenomenology, thus it is worth investigating in the context of star perturbations. In this paper we develop the relativistic formalism to study the coupling of radial and nonradial first order perturbations of a compact spherical star. From a mathematical point of view, it is convenient to treat the two sets of perturbations as separately parametrized, using a 2-parameter perturbative expansion of the metric, the energy-momentum tensor and Einstein equations in which λ is associated with the radial modes, ɛ with the nonradial perturbations, and the λɛ terms describe the coupling. This approach provides a well-defined framework to consider the gauge dependence of perturbations, allowing us to use ɛ order gauge-invariant nonradial variables on the static background and to define new second order λɛ gauge-invariant variables representing the result of the nonlinear coupling. We present the evolution and constraint equations for our variables outlining the setup for numerical computations, and briefly discuss the surface boundary conditions in terms

  8. Technologies for Clinical Diagnosis Using Expired Human Breath Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalakkotur Lazar Mathew

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This review elucidates the technologies in the field of exhaled breath analysis. Exhaled breath gas analysis offers an inexpensive, noninvasive and rapid method for detecting a large number of compounds under various conditions for health and disease states. There are various techniques to analyze some exhaled breath gases, including spectrometry, gas chromatography and spectroscopy. This review places emphasis on some of the critical biomarkers present in exhaled human breath, and its related effects. Additionally, various medical monitoring techniques used for breath analysis have been discussed. It also includes the current scenario of breath analysis with nanotechnology-oriented techniques

  9. Radial head button holing: a cause of irreducible anterior radial head dislocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Su-Mi; Chai, Jee Won; You, Ja Yeon; Park, Jina [Seoul National University Seoul Metropolitan Government Boramae Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Kee Jeong [Seoul National University Seoul Metropolitan Government Boramae Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    ''Buttonholing'' of the radial head through the anterior joint capsule is a known cause of irreducible anterior radial head dislocation associated with Monteggia injuries in pediatric patients. To the best of our knowledge, no report has described an injury consisting of buttonholing of the radial head through the annular ligament and a simultaneous radial head fracture in an adolescent. In the present case, the radiographic findings were a radial head fracture with anterior dislocation and lack of the anterior fat pad sign. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) clearly demonstrated anterior dislocation of the fractured radial head through the torn annular ligament. The anterior joint capsule and proximal portion of the annular ligament were interposed between the radial head and capitellum, preventing closed reduction of the radial head. Familiarity with this condition and imaging findings will aid clinicians to make a proper diagnosis and fast decision to perform an open reduction. (orig.)

  10. Decompression sickness following breath-hold diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipke, J D; Gams, E; Kallweit, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Despite convincing evidence of a relationship between breath-hold diving and decompression sickness (DCS), the causal connection is only slowly being accepted. Only the more recent textbooks have acknowledged the risks of repetitive breath-hold diving. We compare four groups of breath-hold divers: (1) Japanese and Korean amas and other divers from the Pacific area, (2) instructors at naval training facilities, (3) spear fishers, and (4) free-dive athletes. While the number of amas is likely decreasing, and Scandinavian Navy training facilities recorded only a few accidents, the number of spear fishers suffering accidents is on the rise, in particular during championships or using scooters. Finally, national and international associations (e.g., International Association of Free Drives [IAFD] or Association Internationale pour Le Developpment De L'Apnee [AIDA]) promote free-diving championships including deep diving categories such as constant weight, variable weight, and no limit. A number of free-diving athletes, training for or participating in competitions, are increasingly accident prone as the world record is presently set at a depth of 171 m. This review presents data found after searching Medline and ISI Web of Science and using appropriate Internet search engines (e.g., Google). We report some 90 cases in which DCS occurred after repetitive breath-hold dives. Even today, the risk of suffering from DCS after repetitive breath-hold diving is often not acknowledged. We strongly suggest that breath-hold divers and their advisors and physicians be made aware of the possibility of DCS and of the appropriate therapeutic measures to be taken when DCS is suspected. Because the risk of suffering from DCS increases depending on depth, bottom time, rate of ascent, and duration of surface intervals, some approaches to assess the risks are presented. Regrettably, none of these approaches is widely accepted. We propose therefore the development of easily manageable

  11. Electrospray ionization of volatiles in breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Lozano, P.; de La Mora, J. Fernández

    2007-08-01

    Recent work by Zenobi and colleagues [H. Chen, A. Wortmann, W. Zhang, R. Zenobi, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 46 (2007) 580] reports that human breath charged by contact with an electrospray (ES) cloud yields many mass peaks of species such as urea, glucose, and other ions, some with molecular weights above 1000 Da. All these species are presumed to be involatile, and to originate from breath aerosols by so-called extractive electrospray ionization EESI [H. Chen, A. Venter, R.G. Cooks, Chem. Commun. (2006) 2042]. However, prior work by Fenn and colleagues [C.M. Whitehouse, F. Levin, C.K. Meng, J.B. Fenn, Proceedings of the 34th ASMS Conference on Mass Spectrometry and Allied Topics, Denver, 1986 p. 507; S. Fuerstenau, P. Kiselev, J.B. Fenn, Proceedings of the 47th ASMS Conference on Mass Spectrometry, 1999, Dallas, TX, 1999] and by Hill and colleagues [C. Wu, W.F. Siems, H.H. Hill Jr., Anal. Chem. 72 (2000) 396] have reported the ability of electrospray drops to ionize a variety of low vapor pressure substances directly from the gas phase, without an apparent need for the vapor to be brought into the charging ES in aerosol form. The Ph.D. Thesis of Martínez-Lozano [P. Martínez-Lozano Sinués, Ph.D. Thesis, Department of Thermal and Fluid Engineering, University Carlos III of Madrid; April 5, 2006 (in Spanish); http://hdl.handle.net/10016/655] had also previously argued that the numerous human breath species observed via a similar ES ionization approach were in fact ionized directly from the vapor. Here, we observe that passage of the breath stream through a submicron filter does not eliminate the majority of the breath vapors seen in the absence of the filter. We conclude that direct vapor charging is the leading mechanism in breath ionization by electrospray drops, though aerosol ionization may also play a role.

  12. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system for breath phase detection and breath cycle segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniappan, Rajkumar; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Sundaraj, Sebastian

    2017-07-01

    The monitoring of the respiratory rate is vital in several medical conditions, including sleep apnea because patients with sleep apnea exhibit an irregular respiratory rate compared with controls. Therefore, monitoring the respiratory rate by detecting the different breath phases is crucial. This study aimed to segment the breath cycles from pulmonary acoustic signals using the newly developed adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) based on breath phase detection and to subsequently evaluate the performance of the system. The normalised averaged power spectral density for each segment was fuzzified, and a set of fuzzy rules was formulated. The ANFIS was developed to detect the breath phases and subsequently perform breath cycle segmentation. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, the root mean square error (RMSE) and correlation coefficient values were calculated and analysed, and the proposed method was then validated using data collected at KIMS Hospital and the RALE standard dataset. The analysis of the correlation coefficient of the neuro-fuzzy model, which was performed to evaluate its performance, revealed a correlation strength of r = 0.9925, and the RMSE for the neuro-fuzzy model was found to equal 0.0069. The proposed neuro-fuzzy model performs better than the fuzzy inference system (FIS) in detecting the breath phases and segmenting the breath cycles and requires less rules than FIS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Breath testing and personal exposure--SIFT-MS detection of breath acetonitrile for exposure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storer, Malina; Curry, Kirsty; Squire, Marie; Kingham, Simon; Epton, Michael

    2015-05-26

    Breath testing has potential for the rapid assessment of the source and impact of exposure to air pollutants. During the development of a breath test for acetonitrile using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) raised acetonitrile concentrations in the breath of volunteers were observed that could not be explained by known sources of exposure. Workplace/laboratory exposure to acetonitrile was proposed since this was common to the volunteers with increased breath concentrations. SIFT-MS measurements of acetonitrile in breath and air were used to confirm that an academic chemistry laboratory was the source of exposure to acetonitrile, and quantify the changes that occurred to exhaled acetonitrile after exposure. High concentrations of acetonitrile were detected in the air of the chemistry laboratory. However, concentrations in the offices were not significantly different across the campus. There was a significant difference in the exhaled acetonitrile concentrations of people who worked in the chemistry laboratories (exposed) and those who did not (non-exposed). SIFT-MS testing of air and breath made it possible to determine that occupational exposure to acetonitrile in the chemistry laboratory was the cause of increased exhaled acetonitrile. Additionally, the sensitivity was adequate to measure the changes to exhaled amounts and found that breath concentrations increased quickly with short exposure and remained increased even after periods of non-exposure. There is potential to add acetonitrile to a suite of VOCs to investigate source and impact of poor air quality.

  14. Acoustic signal classification of breathing movements to virtually aid breath regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abushakra, Ahmad; Faezipour, Miad

    2013-03-01

    Monitoring breath and identifying breathing movements have settled importance in many biomedical research areas, especially in the treatment of those with breathing disorders, e.g., lung cancer patients. Moreover, virtual reality (VR) revolution and their implementations on ubiquitous hand-held devices have a lot of implications, which could be used as a simulation technology for healing purposes. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to detect and classify breathing movements. The overall VR framework is intended to encourage the subjects regulate their breath by classifying the breathing movements in real time. This paper focuses on a portion of the overall VR framework that deals with classifying the acoustic signal of respiration movements. We employ Mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCCs) along with speech segmentation techniques using voice activity detection and linear thresholding to the acoustic signal of breath captured using a microphone to depict the differences between inhale and exhale in frequency domain. For every subject, 13 MFCCs of all voiced segments are computed and plotted. The inhale and exhale phases are differentiated using the sixth MFCC order, which carries important classification information. Experimental results on a number of individuals verify our proposed classification methodology.

  15. Reynolds stress of localized toroidal modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.Z. [International Center for Theoretical Studies, Trieste (Italy); Mahajan, S.M. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Institute for Fusion Studies

    1995-02-01

    An investigation of the 2D toroidal eigenmode problem reveals the possibility of a new consistent 2D structure, the dissipative BM-II mode. In contrast to the conventional ballooning mode, the new mode is poloidally localized at {pi}/2 (or -{pi}/2), and possesses significant radial asymmetry. The radial asymmetry, in turn, allows the dissipative BM-II to generate considerably larger Reynolds stress as compared to the standard slab drift type modes. It is also shown that a wide class of localized dissipative toroidal modes are likely to be of the dissipative BM-II nature, suggesting that at the tokamak edge, the fluctuation generated Reynolds stress (a possible source of poloidal flow) can be significant.

  16. Environmental testing of escape breathing apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stengel, J W

    1982-05-03

    A new generation of 60-minute self-contained breathing apparatus was being introduced into the underground coal mining industry for use as respiratory protection during fires and mine disasters. Little field experience existed from which to predict the survivability of this new life-support equipment. A series of environmental tests was proposed consisting of exposure to heat, cold, shock, and vibration. Treated and untreated apparatus were evaluated and compared by use on human subjects and a mechanical breathing simulator. Results are reported. After field data have been collected, information may be able to be correlated with environmental testing and used as a predictor of survivability.

  17. Medication effects on sleep and breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda, Gilbert; Tsai, Sheila; Lee-Chiong, Teofilo

    2014-09-01

    Sleep respiration is regulated by circadian, endocrine, mechanical and chemical factors, and characterized by diminished ventilatory drive and changes in Pao2 and Paco2 thresholds. Hypoxemia and hypercapnia are more pronounced during rapid eye movement. Breathing is influenced by sleep stage and airway muscle tone. Patient factors include medical comorbidities and body habitus. Medications partially improve obstructive sleep apnea and stabilize periodic breathing at altitude. Potential adverse consequences of medications include precipitation or worsening of disorders. Risk factors for adverse medication effects include aging, medical disorders, and use of multiple medications that affect respiration.

  18. Finger dexterity and visual discrimination following two yoga breathing practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telles, Shirley; Singh, Nilkamal; Balkrishna, Acharya

    2012-01-01

    Practicing yoga has been shown to improve motor functions and attention. Though attention is required for fine motor and discrimination tasks, the effect of yoga breathing techniques on fine motor skills and visual discrimination has not been assessed. To study the effect of yoga breathing techniques on finger dexterity and visual discrimination. The present study consisted of one hundred and forty subjects who had enrolled for stress management. They were randomly divided into two groups, one group practiced high frequency yoga breathing while the other group practiced breath awareness. High frequency yoga breathing (kapalabhati, breath rate 1.0 Hz) and breath awareness are two yoga practices which improve attention. The immediate effect of high frequency yoga breathing and breath awareness (i) were assessed on the performance on the O'Connor finger dexterity task and (ii) (in) a shape and size discrimination task. There was a significant improvement in the finger dexterity task by 19% after kapalabhati and 9% after breath awareness (P<0.001 in both cases, repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc analyses). There was a significant reduction (P<0.001) in error (41% after kapalabhati and 21% after breath awareness) as well as time taken to complete the shape and size discrimination test (15% after kapalabhati and 15% after breath awareness; P<0.001) was also observed. Both kapalabahati and breath awareness can improve fine motor skills and visual discrimination, with a greater magnitude of change after kapalabhati.

  19. Finger dexterity and visual discrimination following two yoga breathing practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Telles

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Practicing yoga has been shown to improve motor functions and attention. Though attention is required for fine motor and discrimination tasks, the effect of yoga breathing techniques on fine motor skills and visual discrimination has not been assessed. Aim: To study the effect of yoga breathing techniques on finger dexterity and visual discrimination. Materials and Methods: The present study consisted of one hundred and forty subjects who had enrolled for stress management. They were randomly divided into two groups, one group practiced high frequency yoga breathing while the other group practiced breath awareness. High frequency yoga breathing (kapalabhati, breath rate 1.0 Hz and breath awareness are two yoga practices which improve attention. The immediate effect of high frequency yoga breathing and breath awareness (i were assessed on the performance on the O′Connor finger dexterity task and (ii (in a shape and size discrimination task. Results: There was a significant improvement in the finger dexterity task by 19% after kapalabhati and 9% after breath awareness (P<0.001 in both cases, repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc analyses. There was a significant reduction (P<0.001 in error (41% after kapalabhati and 21% after breath awareness as well as time taken to complete the shape and size discrimination test (15% after kapalabhati and 15% after breath awareness; P<0.001 was also observed. Conclusion: Both kapalabahati and breath awareness can improve fine motor skills and visual discrimination, with a greater magnitude of change after kapalabhati.

  20. Comparison of two devices and two breathing patterns for exhaled breath condensate sampling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva-Maria Hüttmann

    Full Text Available Analysis of exhaled breath condensate (EBC is a noninvasive method to access the epithelial lining fluid of the lungs. Due to standardization problems the method has not entered clinical practice. The aim of the study was to assess the comparability for two commercially available devices in healthy controls. In addition, we assessed different breathing patterns in healthy controls with protein markers to analyze the source of the EBC.EBC was collected from ten subjects using the RTube and ECoScreen Turbo in a randomized crossover design, twice with every device--once in tidal breathing and once in hyperventilation. EBC conductivity, pH, surfactant protein A, Clara cell secretory protein and total protein were assessed. Bland-Altman plots were constructed to display the influence of different devices or breathing patterns and the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC was calculated. The volatile organic compound profile was measured using the electronic nose Cyranose 320. For the analysis of these data, the linear discriminant analysis, the Mahalanobis distances and the cross-validation values (CVV were calculated.Neither the device nor the breathing pattern significantly altered EBC pH or conductivity. ICCs ranged from 0.61 to 0.92 demonstrating moderate to very good agreement. Protein measurements were greatly influenced by breathing pattern, the device used, and the way in which the results were reported. The electronic nose could distinguish between different breathing patterns and devices, resulting in Mahalanobis distances greater than 2 and CVVs ranging from 64% to 87%.EBC pH and (to a lesser extent EBC conductivity are stable parameters that are not influenced by either the device or the breathing patterns. Protein measurements remain uncertain due to problems of standardization. We conclude that the influence of the breathing maneuver translates into the necessity to keep the volume of ventilated air constant in further studies.

  1. Radial velocity measurements of the pulsating zirconium star: LS IV -14 116

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffery, C Simon; Neelamkodan, Naslim; Kerzendorf, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The helium-rich hot subdwarf LS IV -14 116 shows remarkably high surface abundances of zirconium, yttrium, strontium, and germanium, indicative of strong chemical stratification in the photosphere. It also shows photometric behaviour indicative of non-radial g-mode pulsations, despite having surface properties inconsistent with any known pulsational instability zone. We have conducted a search for radial velocity variability. This has demonstrated that at least one photometric period is observable in several absorption lines as a radial velocity variation with a semi-amplitude in excess of 5 km s$^{-1}$. A correlation between line strength and pulsation amplitude provides evidence that the photosphere pulsates differentially. The ratio of light to velocity amplitude is too small to permit the largest amplitude oscillation to be radial.

  2. Breathing adapted radiotherapy for breast cancer: comparison of free breathing gating with the breath-hold technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine Sofia; Pedersen, Anders N; Nøttrup, Trine Jakobi;

    2005-01-01

    -hold (EBH). The Varian Real-time Position Management system (RPM) was used to monitor respiratory movement and to gate the scanner. For each breathing phase, a population based internal margin (IM) was estimated based on average chest wall excursion, and incorporated into an individually optimised three...

  3. Radial and poloidal correlation reflectometry on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Hao; Zhang, Tao; Han, Xiang; Wen, Fei; Zhang, Shoubiao; Kong, Defeng; Wang, Yumin; Gao, Yu; Huang, Canbin; Cai, Jianqing; Gao, Xiang

    2015-08-01

    An X-mode polarized V band (50 GHz-75 GHz) radial and poloidal correlation reflectometry is designed and installed on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). Two frequency synthesizers (12 GHz-19 GHz) are used as sources. Signals from the sources are up-converted to V band using active quadruplers and then coupled together for launching through one single pyramidal antenna. Two poloidally separated antennae are installed to receive the reflected waves from plasma. This reflectometry system can be used for radial and poloidal correlation measurement of the electron density fluctuation. In ohmically heated plasma, the radial correlation length is about 1.5 cm measured by the system. The poloidal correlation analysis provides a means to estimate the fluctuation velocity perpendicular to the main magnetic field. In the present paper, the distance between two poloidal probing points is calculated with ray-tracing code and the propagation time is deduced from cross-phase spectrum. Fluctuation velocity perpendicular to the main magnetic field in the core of ohmically heated plasma is about from -1 km/s to -3 km/s.

  4. Radial keratotomy associated endothelial degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshirfar, Majid; Ollerton, Andrew; Semnani, Rodmehr T; Hsu, Maylon

    2012-01-01

    To describe the presentation and clinical course of eyes with a history of radial keratotomy (RK) and varying degrees of endothelial degeneration. Retrospective case series were used. Thirteen eyes (seven patients) were identified with clinical findings of significant guttata and a prior history of RK. The mean age of presentation for cornea evaluation was 54.3 years (range: 38-72 years), averaging 18.7 years (range: 11-33 years) after RK. The presentation of guttata varied in degree from moderate to severe. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) ranged from 20/25 to 20/80. All patients had a history of bilateral RK, except one patient who did not develop any guttata in the eye without prior RK. No patients reported a family history of Fuch's Dystrophy. One patient underwent a penetrating keratoplasty in one eye and a Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) in the other eye. RK may induce a spectrum of endothelial degeneration. In elderly patients, the findings of guttata may signify comorbid Fuch's dystrophy in which RK incisions could potentially hasten endothelial decomposition. In these select patients with stable cornea topography and prior RK, DSAEK may successfully treat RK endothelial degeneration.

  5. Computer Simulation of Radial Immunodiffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautman, Rodes

    1972-01-01

    Theories of diffusion with chemical reaction are reviewed as to their contributions toward developing an algorithm needed for computer simulation of immunodiffusion. The Spiers-Augustin moving sink and the Engelberg stationary sink theories show how the antibody-antigen reaction can be incorporated into boundary conditions of the free diffusion differential equations. For this, a stoichiometric precipitate was assumed and the location of precipitin lines could be predicted. The Hill simultaneous linear adsorption theory provides a mathematical device for including another special type of antibody-antigen reaction in antigen excess regions of the gel. It permits an explanation for the lowered antigen diffusion coefficient, observed in the Oudin arrangement of single linear diffusion, but does not enable prediction of the location of precipitin lines. The most promising mathematical approach for a general solution is implied in the Augustin alternating cycle theory. This assumes the immunodiffusion process can be evaluated by alternating computation cycles: free diffusion without chemical reaction and chemical reaction without diffusion. The algorithm for the free diffusion update cycle, extended to both linear and radial geometries, is given in detail since it was based on gross flow rather than more conventional expressions in terms of net flow. Limitations on the numerical integration process using this algorithm are illustrated for free diffusion from a cylindrical well. PMID:4629869

  6. Combination radial and thrust magnetic bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A combination radial and thrust magnetic bearing is disclosed that allows for both radial and thrust axes control of an associated shaft. The combination radial and thrust magnetic bearing comprises a rotor and a stator. The rotor comprises a shaft, and first and second rotor pairs each having respective rotor elements. The stator comprises first and second stator elements and a magnet-sensor disk. In one embodiment, each stator element has a plurality of split-poles and a corresponding plurality of radial force coils and, in another embodiment, each stator element does not require thrust force coils, and radial force coils are replaced by double the plurality of coils serving as an outer member of each split-pole half.

  7. An unusual cause of radial nerve palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrawal Hemendra Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurapraxia frequently occurs following traction injury to the nerve intraoperatively, leading to radial nerve palsy which usually recovers in 5-30 weeks. In our case, we had operated a distal one-third of humeral shaft fracture and fixed it with 4.5 mm limited contact dynamic compression plate. The distal neurovascular status of the limb was assessed postoperatively in the recovery room and was found to be intact and all the sensory-motor functions of the radial nerve were normal. On the second postoperative day, following the suction drain removal and dressing, patient developed immediate radial nerve palsy along with wrist drop. We reviewed theliterature and found no obvious cause for the nerve palsy and concluded that it was due to traction injury to the radial nerve while removing the suction drain in negative pressure. Key words: Radial nerve; Humeral fractures; Paralysis; Diaphyses

  8. Radial velocity moments of dark matter haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Wojtak, R; Gottlöber, S; Mamon, G A; Wojtak, Radoslaw; Lokas, Ewa L.; Gottloeber, Stefan; Mamon, Gary A.

    2005-01-01

    Using cosmological N-body simulations we study the radial velocity distribution in dark matter haloes focusing on the lowest-order even moments, dispersion and kurtosis. We determine the properties of ten massive haloes in the simulation box approximating their density distribution by the NFW formula characterized by the virial mass and concentration. We also calculate the velocity anisotropy parameter of the haloes and find it mildly radial and increasing with distance from the halo centre. The radial velocity dispersion of the haloes shows a characteristic profile with a maximum, while the radial kurtosis profile decreases with distance starting from a value close to Gaussian near the centre. We therefore confirm that dark matter haloes possess intrinsically non-Gaussian, flat-topped velocity distributions. We find that the radial velocity moments of the simulated haloes are very well reproduced by the solutions of the Jeans equations obtained for the halo parameters with the anisotropy measured in the simu...

  9. Experimental investigation of the stability of a moving radial liquid sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramati, Manjula; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh

    2013-11-01

    Experiments were conducted to understand the stability of moving radial liquid sheets formed by the head-on impingement of two co-linear water jets using laser induced fluorescence technique (LIF). Acoustic sinusoidal fluctuations were introduced at the jet impingement point and we measured the displacement of the center line of the liquid sheet (sinuous mode) and the thickness variation (varicose mode) of the disturbed liquid sheet. Our experiments show that the sinuous disturbances grow as they are convected outward in the radial direction even in the smooth regime (We accounts for the inertia of the liquid phase and the surface tension force in a radial liquid sheet while neglecting the inertial effects due to the surrounding gas phase. The authors acknowledge the financial assistance from Indo-French Center for Pro- motion of Advanced Research and also Indian institute of technology Bombay.

  10. Poloidal correlation reflectometry at W7-X: radial electric field and coherent fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windisch, T.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Velasco, JL; Könies, A.; Nührenberg, C.; Grulke, O.; Klinger, T.; the W7-X Team

    2017-10-01

    Poloidal correlation reflectometry measurements during the first plasma campaign of the optimized stellarator Wendelstein-7X are presented. The radial electric field is determined and a comparison with neoclassical calculations and shows good qualitative agreement. The measured density fluctuation spectrum exhibits coherent low- and high-frequency modes. Magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) modeling results suggest that the coherent fluctuations are caused by stable MHD-modes and Alfvén waves.

  11. Using an expiratory resistor, arterial pulse pressure variations predict fluid responsiveness during spontaneous breathing: an experimental porcine study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Michael K; Vistisen, Simon T; Koefoed-Nielsen, Jacob; Larsson, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Fluid responsiveness prediction is difficult in spontaneously breathing patients. Because the swings in intrathoracic pressure are minor during spontaneous breathing, dynamic parameters like pulse pressure variation (PPV) and systolic pressure variation (SPV) are usually small. We hypothesized that during spontaneous breathing, inspiratory and/or expiratory resistors could induce high arterial pressure variations at hypovolemia and low variations at normovolemia and hypervolemia. Furthermore, we hypothesized that SPV and PPV could predict fluid responsiveness under these conditions. Eight prone, anesthetized and spontaneously breathing pigs (20 to 25 kg) were subjected to a sequence of 30% hypovolemia, normovolemia, and 20% and 40% hypervolemia. At each volemic level, the pigs breathed in a randomized order either through an inspiratory and/or an expiratory threshold resistor (7.5 cmH2O) or only through the tracheal tube without any resistor. Hemodynamic and respiratory variables were measured during the breathing modes. Fluid responsiveness was defined as a 15% increase in stroke volume (DeltaSV) following fluid loading. Stroke volume was significantly lower at hypovolemia compared with normovolemia, but no differences were found between normovolemia and 20% or 40% hypervolemia. Compared with breathing through no resistor, SPV was magnified by all resistors at hypovolemia whereas there were no changes at normovolemia and hypervolemia. PPV was magnified by the inspiratory resistor and the combined inspiratory and expiratory resistor. Regression analysis of SPV or PPV versus DeltaSV showed the highest R2 (0.83 for SPV and 0.52 for PPV) when the expiratory resistor was applied. The corresponding sensitivity and specificity for prediction of fluid responsiveness were 100% and 100%, respectively, for SPV and 100% and 81%, respectively, for PPV. Inspiratory and/or expiratory threshold resistors magnified SPV and PPV in spontaneously breathing pigs during hypovolemia

  12. An evaluation of fresh gas flow rates for spontaneously breathing cats and small dogs on the Humphrey ADE semi-closed breathing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Elizabeth; Ticehurst, Kim E; Zaki, Sanaa

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the fresh gas flow (FGF) rate requirements for the Humphrey ADE semi-closed breathing system in the Mapleson A mode; to determine the FGF at which rebreathing occurs, and compare the efficiency of this system to the Bain (Mapleson D) system in spontaneously breathing cats and small dogs. Prospective clinical study. Twenty-five healthy (ASA score I or II) client-owned cats and dogs (mean ± SD age 4.7 ± 5.0 years, and body weight 5.64 ± 3.26 kg) undergoing elective surgery or minor procedures. Anaesthesia was maintained with isoflurane delivered via the Humphrey ADE system in the A mode using an oxygen FGF of 100 mL kg(-1) minute(-1). The FGF was then reduced incrementally by 5-10 mL kg(-1) minute(-1) at approximately five-minute intervals, until rebreathing (inspired CO(2) >5 mmHg (0.7 kPa)) was observed, after which flow rates were increased. In six animals, once the minimum FGF at which rebreathing occurred was found, the breathing system was changed to the Bain, and the effects of this FGF delivery examined, before FGF was increased. Rebreathing did not occur at the FGF recommended by the manufacturer for the ADE. The mean ± SD FGF that resulted in rebreathing was 60 ± 20 mL kg(-1) minute(-1). The mean minimum FGF at which rebreathing did not occur with the ADE was 87 ± 39 mL kg(-1) minute(-1). This FGF resulted in significant rebreathing (inspired CO(2) 8.8 ± 2.6 mmHg (1.2 ± 0.3 kPa)) on the Bain system. The FGF rates recommended for the Humphrey ADE are adequate to prevent rebreathing in spontaneously breathing cats and dogs cats and small dogs. © 2014 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  13. 42 CFR 84.195 - Breathing tubes; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Cartridge Respirators § 84.195 Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. Flexible breathing tubes used in conjunction with respirators shall be designed and constructed to prevent: (a) Restriction of free...

  14. 42 CFR 84.132 - Breathing tubes; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Respirators § 84.132 Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. Flexible breathing tubes used in conjunction with supplied-air respirators shall be designed and constructed to prevent: (a) Restriction of free...

  15. Apolo Ohno: Breathing Easier | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Breathing Easier Apolo Ohno: Breathing Easier Past Issues / Fall 2013 Table of ... skating. What does the future hold for Apolo Ohno? Even though I'm no longer skating competitively, ...

  16. Radial Velocity Monitoring of Kepler Heartbeat Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shporer, Avi; Fuller, Jim; Isaacson, Howard; Hambleton, Kelly; Thompson, Susan E.; Prša, Andrej; Kurtz, Donald W.; Howard, Andrew W.; O'Leary, Ryan M.

    2016-09-01

    Heartbeat stars (HB stars) are a class of eccentric binary stars with close periastron passages. The characteristic photometric HB signal evident in their light curves is produced by a combination of tidal distortion, heating, and Doppler boosting near orbital periastron. Many HB stars continue to oscillate after periastron and along the entire orbit, indicative of the tidal excitation of oscillation modes within one or both stars. These systems are among the most eccentric binaries known, and they constitute astrophysical laboratories for the study of tidal effects. We have undertaken a radial velocity (RV) monitoring campaign of Kepler HB stars in order to measure their orbits. We present our first results here, including a sample of 22 Kepler HB systems, where for 19 of them we obtained the Keplerian orbit and for 3 other systems we did not detect a statistically significant RV variability. Results presented here are based on 218 spectra obtained with the Keck/HIRES spectrograph during the 2015 Kepler observing season, and they have allowed us to obtain the largest sample of HB stars with orbits measured using a single instrument, which roughly doubles the number of HB stars with an RV measured orbit. The 19 systems measured here have orbital periods from 7 to 90 days and eccentricities from 0.2 to 0.9. We show that HB stars draw the upper envelope of the eccentricity-period distribution. Therefore, HB stars likely represent a population of stars currently undergoing high eccentricity migration via tidal orbital circularization, and they will allow for new tests of high eccentricity migration theories. The data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  17. Measuring breath acetone for monitoring fat loss: Review

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Endogenous acetone production is a by‐product of the fat metabolism process. Because of its small size, acetone appears in exhaled breath. Historically, endogenous acetone has been measured in exhaled breath to monitor ketosis in healthy and diabetic subjects. Recently, breath acetone concentration (BrAce) has been shown to correlate with the rate of fat loss in healthy individuals. In this review, the measurement of breath acetone in healthy subjects is evaluated for its utility in...

  18. Bayesian inversion of free oscillations for Earth's radial (an)elastic structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, R. W L; Käufl, P.J.; Valentine, A. P.; Trampert, J.

    2014-01-01

    We perform a Bayesian inversion of degree-zero spheroidal mode splitting function measurements for radial (1-D) Earth structure, in terms of the Voigt averages of P-wave (VP) and S-wave (VS) velocities, density, bulk and shear attenuation, using neural networks. The method is flexible and allows us

  19. Breathing Better with a COPD Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Now that you kNow it’s CoPD, here’s how to breathe better. You have taken the important step of being aware of your symptoms, and seeing your doctor ... care provider for testing and a diagnosis. While COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) is a serious lung ...

  20. Sleep effects on breathing and respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhary Sumer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand normal sleep pattern and physiological changes during sleep, sleep and breathing interaction, nomenclature and scales used in sleep study, discuss the effect of rapid eye movements and non-rapid eye movements while sleep and to review the effects of obstructive and restrictive lung disease on gas exchange during sleep and sleep architecture.

  1. Coordination of breathing with nonrespiratory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Donald; Leiter, James C

    2012-04-01

    Many articles in this section of Comprehensive Physiology are concerned with the development and function of a central pattern generator (CPG) for the control of breathing in vertebrate animals. The action of the respiratory CPG is extensively modified by cortical and other descending influences as well as by feedback from peripheral sensory systems. The central nervous system also incorporates other CPGs, which orchestrate a wide variety of discrete and repetitive, voluntary and involuntary movements. The coordination of breathing with these other activities requires interaction and coordination between the respiratory CPG and those governing the nonrespiratory activities. Most of these interactions are complex and poorly understood. They seem to involve both conventional synaptic crosstalk between groups of neurons and fluid identity of neurons as belonging to one CPG or another: neurons that normally participate in breathing may be temporarily borrowed or hijacked by a competing or interrupting activity. This review explores the control of breathing as it is influenced by many activities that are generally considered to be nonrespiratory. The mechanistic detail varies greatly among topics, reflecting the wide variety of pertinent experiments.

  2. Sleep-disordered breathing in acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L K Dzeranova

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Sleep-disordered breathing is higly prevalent in acromegaly, disturbing patients quality of life and increasing the risk of acute cardiovascular compications. Presented clinical case discusses key considerations for timely diagnosis of sleep apnea syndrome and treatment planning. The case of 41 y.o. woman with newly diagnosed acromegaly and concomitant sleep apnea is typical for this disease.

  3. Ineffective breathing pattern related to malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Openbrier, D R; Covey, M

    1987-03-01

    This article has highlighted the problem of malnutrition in the stable COPD patient and the critically ill, hypercatabolic patient, and has reviewed resultant mechanisms which influence the alteration of breathing pattern. These complex patients present a challenge for the nurse. Table 1 briefly summarizes the manifestations of malnutrition, goals, interventions and expected outcomes of the nursing diagnosis, ineffective breathing pattern related to malnutrition. The goal of the interventions is to modify the cause (malnutrition) of the nursing diagnosis (altered breathing pattern). The success of the interventions will lead to the achievement of expected outcome As expected outcomes are achieved, relief of signs and symptoms related to the nursing diagnosis will occur. The nurse caring for the patient with actual or potential malnutrition must be knowledgeable about the physiology of malnutrition and effect on breathing pattern. It is essential that the nurse assess and provide appropriate nutritional support and evaluate progress toward expected outcomes. In the event that expected outcomes are not achieved, reassessment with modification of interventions is necessary. Nurses play a key role in the total health care delivery to these complex patients. Further study will strengthen the research base of nursing interventions.

  4. Multi-layered breathing architectural envelope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Larsen, Andreas; Foged, Isak Worre; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2014-01-01

    A multi layered breathing envelope is developed as a method of natural ventilation. The two main layers consist of mineral wool and air permeable concrete. The mineral wool works as a dynamic insulation and the permeable concrete as a heat recovery system with a high thermal mass for heat storage...

  5. [Death by erotic asphyxiation (breath control play)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madea, Burkhard; Hagemeier, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Most cases of sexual asphyxia are due to autoerotic activity. Asphyxia due to oronasal occlusion is mostly seen in very old or very young victims. Oronasal occlusion is also used in sadomasochistic sexual practices like "breath control play" or "erotic asphyxiation". If life saving time limitations of oronasal occlusion are not observed, conviction for homicide caused by negligence is possible.

  6. Oral breathing and speech disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitos, Silvia F; Arakaki, Renata; Solé, Dirceu; Weckx, Luc L M

    2013-01-01

    To assess speech alterations in mouth-breathing children, and to correlate them with the respiratory type, etiology, gender, and age. A total of 439 mouth-breathers were evaluated, aged between 4 and 12 years. The presence of speech alterations in children older than 5 years was considered delayed speech development. The observed alterations were tongue interposition (TI), frontal lisp (FL), articulatory disorders (AD), sound omissions (SO), and lateral lisp (LL). The etiology of mouth breathing, gender, age, respiratory type, and speech disorders were correlated. Speech alterations were diagnosed in 31.2% of patients, unrelated to the respiratory type: oral or mixed. Increased frequency of articulatory disorders and more than one speech disorder were observed in males. TI was observed in 53.3% patients, followed by AD in 26.3%, and by FL in 21.9%. The co-occurrence of two or more speech alterations was observed in 24.8% of the children. Mouth breathing can affect speech development, socialization, and school performance. Early detection of mouth breathing is essential to prevent and minimize its negative effects on the overall development of individuals. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. The impact of breathing guidance and prospective gating during thoracic 4DCT imaging: an XCAT study utilizing lung cancer patient motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Sean; Kipritidis, John; Lee, Danny; Bernatowicz, Kinga; Keall, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Two interventions to overcome the deleterious impact irregular breathing has on thoracic-abdominal 4D computed tomography (4DCT) are (1) facilitating regular breathing using audiovisual biofeedback (AVB), and (2) prospective respiratory gating of the 4DCT scan based on the real-time respiratory motion. The purpose of this study was to compare the impact of AVB and gating on 4DCT imaging using the 4D eXtended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom driven by patient breathing patterns. We obtained simultaneous measurements of chest and abdominal walls, thoracic diaphragm, and tumor motion from 6 lung cancer patients under two breathing conditions: (1) AVB, and (2) free breathing. The XCAT phantom was used to simulate 4DCT acquisitions in cine and respiratory gated modes. 4DCT image quality was quantified by artefact detection (NCCdiff), mean square error (MSE), and Dice similarity coefficient of lung and tumor volumes (DSClung, DSCtumor). 4DCT acquisition times and imaging dose were recorded. In cine mode, AVB improved NCCdiff, MSE, DSClung, and DSCtumor by 20% (p  =  0.008), 23% (p  cine acquisitions by 15 s and reduced respiratory gated acquisitions by 31 s. AVB increased imaging dose in cine mode by 10%. This was the first study to quantify the impact of breathing guidance and respiratory gating on 4DCT imaging. With the exception of DSCtumor in respiratory gated mode, AVB significantly improved 4DCT image analysis metrics in both cine and respiratory gated modes over free breathing. The results demonstrate that AVB and respiratory-gating can be beneficial interventions to improve 4DCT for cancer radiation therapy, with the biggest gains achieved when these interventions are used simultaneously.

  8. A Raman cell based on hollow core photonic crystal fiber for human breath analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Kam Kong; Zeng, Haishan, E-mail: hzeng@bccrc.ca [Imaging Unit – Integrative Oncology Department, British Columbia Cancer Agency Research Centre, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada and Medical Physics Program – Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Short, Michael; Lam, Stephen; McWilliams, Annette [Imaging Unit – Integrative Oncology Department, British Columbia Cancer Agency Research Centre, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3 (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Breath analysis has a potential prospect to benefit the medical field based on its perceived advantages to become a point-of-care, easy to use, and cost-effective technology. Early studies done by mass spectrometry show that volatile organic compounds from human breath can represent certain disease states of our bodies, such as lung cancer, and revealed the potential of breath analysis. But mass spectrometry is costly and has slow-turnaround time. The authors’ goal is to develop a more portable and cost effective device based on Raman spectroscopy and hollow core-photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) for breath analysis. Methods: Raman scattering is a photon-molecular interaction based on the kinetic modes of an analyte which offers unique fingerprint type signals that allow molecular identification. HC-PCF is a novel light guide which allows light to be confined in a hollow core and it can be filled with a gaseous sample. Raman signals generated by the gaseous sample (i.e., human breath) can be guided and collected effectively for spectral analysis. Results: A Raman-cell based on HC-PCF in the near infrared wavelength range was developed and tested in a single pass forward-scattering mode for different gaseous samples. Raman spectra were obtained successfully from reference gases (hydrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide gases), ambient air, and a human breath sample. The calculated minimum detectable concentration of this system was ∼15 parts per million by volume, determined by measuring the carbon dioxide concentration in ambient air via the characteristic Raman peaks at 1286 and 1388 cm{sup −1}. Conclusions: The results of this study were compared to a previous study using HC-PCF to trap industrial gases and backward-scatter 514.5 nm light from them. The authors found that the method presented in this paper has an advantage to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This SNR advantage, coupled with the better transmission of HC-PCF in the near-IR than in the

  9. Quantification of the thorax-to-abdomen breathing ratio for breathing motion modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Benjamin M; Zhao, Tianyu; Lamb, James; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Low, Daniel A

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a methodology to quantitatively measure the thorax-to-abdomen breathing ratio from a 4DCT dataset for breathing motion modeling and breathing motion studies. The thorax-to-abdomen breathing ratio was quantified by measuring the rate of cross-sectional volume increase throughout the thorax and abdomen as a function of tidal volume. Twenty-six 16-slice 4DCT patient datasets were acquired during quiet respiration using a protocol that acquired 25 ciné scans at each couch position. Fifteen datasets included data from the neck through the pelvis. Tidal volume, measured using a spirometer and abdominal pneumatic bellows, was used as breathing-cycle surrogates. The cross-sectional volume encompassed by the skin contour when compared for each CT slice against the tidal volume exhibited a nearly linear relationship. A robust iteratively reweighted least squares regression analysis was used to determine η(i), defined as the amount of cross-sectional volume expansion at each slice i per unit tidal volume. The sum Ση(i) throughout all slices was predicted to be the ratio of the geometric expansion of the lung and the tidal volume; 1.11. The Xiphoid process was selected as the boundary between the thorax and abdomen. The Xiphoid process slice was identified in a scan acquired at mid-inhalation. The imaging protocol had not originally been designed for purposes of measuring the thorax-to-abdomen breathing ratio so the scans did not extend to the anatomy with η(i) = 0. Extrapolation of η(i)-η(i) = 0 was used to include the entire breathing volume. The thorax and abdomen regions were individually analyzed to determine the thorax-to-abdomen breathing ratios. There were 11 image datasets that had been scanned only through the thorax. For these cases, the abdomen breathing component was equal to 1.11 - Ση(i) where the sum was taken throughout the thorax. The average Ση(i) for thorax and abdomen image datasets was found to be 1.20

  10. 46 CFR 197.340 - Breathing gas supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing gas supply. 197.340 Section 197.340 Shipping... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.340 Breathing gas supply. (a) A primary breathing gas supply for surface-supplied diving must be sufficient to support the following for...

  11. 46 CFR 197.312 - Breathing supply hoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing supply hoses. 197.312 Section 197.312 Shipping... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.312 Breathing supply hoses. (a) Each breathing supply hose must— (1) Have a maximum working pressure that is equal to or exceeds— (i) The...

  12. IMPLICATIONS OF MOUTH BREATHING AND ATYPICAL SWALLOWING IN BODY POSTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronique Sousa

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Statistically significant associations were established between the breathing pattern and the horizontal alignment of acromions, as well as the horizontal and vertical alignment of the head; between the pattern of breathing and swallowing with occlusal relationship anteroposterior and occlusal relationship vertical and also between breathing pattern and swallowing with digital sucking habits and pacifier use.

  13. Oral Breathing Challenge in Participants with Vocal Attrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi; Fisher, Kimberly V.

    2003-01-01

    Vocal folds undergo osmotic challenge by mouth breathing during singing, exercising, and loud speaking. Just 15 min of obligatory oral breathing, to dry the vocal folds, increases phonation threshold pressure (P[subscript th]) and expiratory vocal effort in healthy speakers (M. Sivasankar & K. Fisher, 2002). We questioned whether oral breathing is…

  14. Human respiratory deposition of particles during oronasal breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, David L.; Proctor, Donald F.

    Deposition of particles in the tracheobronchial and pulmonary airways is computed as a function of particle size, correcting for deposition in the parallel nasal and oral airways with oronasal breathing. Thoracic deposition is lower at all sizes for oronasal breathing than for mouth breathing via tube, and is negligible for aerodynamic equivalent diameters of 10 μm or larger.

  15. 21 CFR 868.5330 - Breathing gas mixer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breathing gas mixer. 868.5330 Section 868.5330...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5330 Breathing gas mixer. (a) Identification. A breathing gas mixer is a device intended for use in conjunction with a respiratory...

  16. 42 CFR 84.90 - Breathing resistance test; inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; inhalation. 84.90...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.90 Breathing resistance test; inhalation. (a) Resistance to inhalation airflow will be measured in the facepiece or mouthpiece while the apparatus is operated by a...

  17. 42 CFR 84.122 - Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. 84... Masks § 84.122 Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. (a) Resistance to airflow will be measured in the facepiece or mouthpiece of a gas mask mounted on a breathing machine both before and...

  18. 46 CFR 197.450 - Breathing gas tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing gas tests. 197.450 Section 197.450 Shipping....450 Breathing gas tests. The diving supervisor shall insure that— (a) The output of each air... or modification. (b) Purchased supplies of breathing mixtures supplied to a diver are checked...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5240 - Anesthesia breathing circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia breathing circuit. 868.5240 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5240 Anesthesia breathing circuit. (a) Identification. An anesthesia breathing circuit is a device that is intended to administer medical gases to...

  20. 42 CFR 84.115 - Breathing tubes; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. 84.115 Section 84.115 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL... § 84.115 Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. Flexible breathing tubes used in conjunction with...

  1. 42 CFR 84.172 - Breathing tubes; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. 84.172... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.172 Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. Flexible breathing tubes used in conjunction with respirators shall be designed and constructed to prevent:...

  2. Effect of slow deep breathing (6 breaths/min) on pulmonary function in healthy volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Shravya Keerthi G, Hari Krishna Bandi, Suresh M, Mallikarjuna Reddy

    2013-01-01

    We designed this study to test the hypothesis that whether 10 minutes of slow deep breathing have any effect on pulmonary function in healthy volunteers. The main objective was to study the immediate effect of slow deep breathing on Forced vital capacity (FVC), Forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), Forced expiratory volume percent (FEV1/FVC%), Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), Forced expiratory flow 25-75%(FEF25-75%), Maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV), Slow vital capacity (SV...

  3. Real-time breath gas analysis of CO and CO2 using an EC-QCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Ramin; Schmidt, Florian M.

    2017-05-01

    Real-time breath gas analysis is a promising, non-invasive tool in medical diagnostics, and well-suited to investigate the physiology of carbon monoxide (CO), a potential biomarker for oxidative stress and respiratory diseases. A sensor for precise, breath-cycle resolved, simultaneous detection of exhaled CO (eCO) and carbon dioxide (eCO2) was developed based on a continuous wave, external-cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL), a low-volume multi-pass cell and wavelength modulation spectroscopy. The system achieves a noise-equivalent (1σ) sensitivity of 8.5 × 10-8 cm-1 Hz-1/2 and (2σ) detection limits of 9 ± 2 ppbv and 650 ± 7 ppmv at 0.14 s spectrum acquisition time for CO and CO2, respectively. Integration over 15 s yields a precision of 0.6 ppbv for CO. The fact that the eCO2 expirograms measured by capnography and laser spectroscopy have essentially identical shape confirms true real-time detection. It is found that the individual eCO exhalation profiles from healthy non-smokers have a slightly different shape than the eCO2 profiles and exhibit a clear dependence on exhalation flow rate and breath-holding time. Detection of indoor air CO and broadband breath profiling across the 93 cm-1 mode-hop-free tuning range of the EC-QCL are also demonstrated.

  4. Breathing-control lowers blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, E; Grossman, A; Schein, M H; Zimlichman, R; Gavish, B

    2001-04-01

    We hypothesise that routinely applied short sessions of slow and regular breathing can lower blood pressure (BP). Using a new technology BIM (Breathe with Interactive Music), hypertensive patients were guided towards slow and regular breathing. The present study evaluates the efficacy of the BIM in lowering BP. We studied 33 patients (23M/10F), aged 25-75 years, with uncontrolled BP. Patients were randomised into either active treatment with the BIM (n = 18) or a control treatment with a Walkman (n = 15). Treatment at home included either musically-guided breathing exercises with the BIM or listening to quiet music played by a Walkman for 10 min daily for 8 weeks. BP and heart rate were measured both at the clinic and at home with an Omron IC BP monitor. Clinic BP levels were measured at baseline, and after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment. Home BP measurements were taken daily, morning and evening, throughout the study. The two groups were matched by initial BP, age, gender, body mass index and medication status. The BP change at the clinic was -7.5/-4.0 mm Hg in the active treatment group, vs -2.9/-1.5 mm Hg in the control group (P = 0.001 for systolic BP). Analysis of home-measured data showed an average BP change of -5.0/-2.7 mm Hg in the active treatment group and -1.2/+0.9 mm Hg in the control group. Ten out of 18 (56%) were defined as responders in the active treatment group but only two out of 14 (14%) in the control group (P = 0.02). Thus, breathing exercise guided by the BIM device for 10 min daily is an effective non-pharmacological modality to reduce BP.

  5. Bench experiments comparing simulated inspiratory effort when breathing helium-oxygen mixtures to that during positive pressure support with air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Andrew R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhalation of helium-oxygen (He/O2 mixtures has been explored as a means to lower the work of breathing of patients with obstructive lung disease. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV with positive pressure support is also used for this purpose. The bench experiments presented herein were conducted in order to compare simulated patient inspiratory effort breathing He/O2 with that breathing medical air, with or without pressure support, across a range of adult, obstructive disease patterns. Methods Patient breathing was simulated using a dual-chamber mechanical test lung, with the breathing compartment connected to an ICU ventilator operated in NIV mode with medical air or He/O2 (78/22 or 65/35%. Parabolic or linear resistances were inserted at the inlet to the breathing chamber. Breathing chamber compliance was also varied. The inspiratory effort was assessed for the different gas mixtures, for three breathing patterns, with zero pressure support (simulating unassisted spontaneous breathing, and with varying levels of pressure support. Results Inspiratory effort increased with increasing resistance and decreasing compliance. At a fixed resistance and compliance, inspiratory effort increased with increasing minute ventilation, and decreased with increasing pressure support. For parabolic resistors, inspiratory effort was lower for He/O2 mixtures than for air, whereas little difference was measured for nominally linear resistance. Relatively small differences in inspiratory effort were measured between the two He/O2 mixtures. Used in combination, reductions in inspiratory effort provided by He/O2 and pressure support were additive. Conclusions The reduction in inspiratory effort afforded by breathing He/O2 is strongly dependent on the severity and type of airway obstruction. Varying helium concentration between 78% and 65% has small impact on inspiratory effort, while combining He/O2 with pressure support provides an additive

  6. Upper limb kinematic differences between breathing and non-breathing conditions in front crawl sprint swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Carla B; Sanders, Ross H; Psycharakis, Stelios G

    2015-11-26

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the breathing action in front crawl (FC) sprint swimming affects the ipsilateral upper limb kinematics relative to a non-breathing stroke cycle (SC). Ten male competitive swimmers performed two 25m FC sprints: one breathing to their preferred side (Br) and one not breathing (NBr). Both swim trials were performed through a 6.75m(3) calibrated space and recorded by six gen-locked JVC KY32 CCD cameras. A paired t-test was used to assess statistical differences between the trials, with a confidence level of pswim performance is compromised by the inclusion of taking a breath in sprint FC swimming. It was proposed that swimmers aim to orient their ipsilateral shoulder into a stronger position by stretching and rolling the shoulders more in the entry phase whilst preparing to take a breath. Swimmers should focus on lengthening the push phase by extending the elbow more and not accelerating the hand too quickly upwards when preparing to inhale.

  7. Mode Transitions in Magnetically Shielded Hall Effect Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekerak, Michael J.; Longmier, Benjamin W.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani; Hofer, Richard R.; Jorns, Benjamin A.; Polk, James E.

    2014-01-01

    A mode transition study is conducted in magnetically shielded thrusters where the magnetic field magnitude is varied to induce mode transitions. Three different oscillatory modes are identified with the 20-kW NASA-300MS-2 and the 6-kW H6MS: Mode 1) global mode similar to unshielded thrusters at low magnetic fields, Mode 2) cathode oscillations at nominal magnetic fields, and Mode 3) combined spoke, cathode and breathing mode oscillations at high magnetic fields. Mode 1 exhibits large amplitude, low frequency (1-10 kHz), breathing mode type oscillations where discharge current mean value and oscillation amplitude peak. The mean discharge current is minimized while thrust-to-power and anode efficiency are maximized in Mode 2, where higher frequency (50-90 kHz), low amplitude, cathode oscillations dominate. Thrust is maximized in Mode 3 and decreases by 5-6% with decreasing magnetic field strength. The presence or absence of spokes and strong cathode oscillations do not affect each other or discharge current. Similar to unshielded thrusters, mode transitions and plasma oscillations affect magnetically shielded thruster performance and should be characterized during system development.

  8. Evaluation of pulmonary function using single-breath-hold dual-energy computed tomography with xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoyama, Hiroyuki; Hirata, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Sakai, Kosuke; Saito, Yuriko; Mikami, Shintaro; Moriyama, Gaku; Yanagita, Hisami; Watanabe, Wataru; Otani, Katharina; Honda, Norinari; Uematsu, Kazutsugu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Xenon-enhanced dual-energy computed tomography (xenon-enhanced CT) can provide lung ventilation maps that may be useful for assessing structural and functional abnormalities of the lung. Xenon-enhanced CT has been performed using a multiple-breath-hold technique during xenon washout. We recently developed xenon-enhanced CT using a single-breath-hold technique to assess ventilation. We sought to evaluate whether xenon-enhanced CT using a single-breath-hold technique correlates with pulmonary function testing (PFT) results. Twenty-six patients, including 11 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, underwent xenon-enhanced CT and PFT. Three of the COPD patients underwent xenon-enhanced CT before and after bronchodilator treatment. Images from xenon-CT were obtained by dual-source CT during a breath-hold after a single vital-capacity inspiration of a xenon–oxygen gas mixture. Image postprocessing by 3-material decomposition generated conventional CT and xenon-enhanced images. Low-attenuation areas on xenon images matched low-attenuation areas on conventional CT in 21 cases but matched normal-attenuation areas in 5 cases. Volumes of Hounsfield unit (HU) histograms of xenon images correlated moderately and highly with vital capacity (VC) and total lung capacity (TLC), respectively (r = 0.68 and 0.85). Means and modes of histograms weakly correlated with VC (r = 0.39 and 0.38), moderately with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) (r = 0.59 and 0.56), weakly with the ratio of FEV1 to FVC (r = 0.46 and 0.42), and moderately with the ratio of FEV1 to its predicted value (r = 0.64 and 0.60). Mode and volume of histograms increased in 2 COPD patients after the improvement of FEV1 with bronchodilators. Inhalation of xenon gas caused no adverse effects. Xenon-enhanced CT using a single-breath-hold technique depicted functional abnormalities not detectable on thin-slice CT. Mode, mean, and volume of HU histograms of xenon images

  9. Roughening dynamics of spontaneous radial imbibition

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    We performed an experimental observation on the spontaneous imbibition of water in a porous media in a radial Hele-Shaw cell and confirmed Washburn's law, where r is distance and t is time. Spontaneous imbibition with a radial interface window followed scaling dynamics when the front invaded into the porous media. We found a growth exponent (\\b{eta}=0.6) that was independent of the pressure applied at the liquid inlet. The roughness exponent decreased with an increase in pressure. The roughening dynamics of two dimensional spontaneous radial imbibition obey Family-Vicsek scaling, which is different from that with a one-dimensional planar interface window.

  10. Spectral Distortion in a Radially Inhomogeneous Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Caldwell, R R

    2013-01-01

    The spectral distortion of the cosmic microwave background blackbody spectrum in a radially inhomogeneous spacetime, designed to exactly reproduce a LambdaCDM expansion history along the past light cone, is shown to exceed the upper bound established by COBE-FIRAS by a factor of approximately 3000. This simple observational test helps uncover a slew of pathological features that lie hidden inside the past light cone, including a radially contracting phase at decoupling and, if followed to its logical extreme, a naked singularity at the radially inhomogeneous Big Bang.

  11. Spectral distortion in a radially inhomogeneous cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, R. R.; Maksimova, N. A.

    2013-11-01

    The spectral distortion of the cosmic microwave background blackbody spectrum in a radially inhomogeneous space-time, designed to exactly reproduce a ΛCDM expansion history along the past light cone, is shown to exceed the upper bound established by COBE-FIRAS by a factor of approximately 3700. This simple observational test helps uncover a slew of pathological features that lie hidden inside the past light cone, including a radially contracting phase at decoupling and, if followed to its logical extreme, a naked singularity at the radially inhomogeneous big bang.

  12. Discontinuity effects on radial cavity transmission lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, D.B.

    1979-04-01

    Pulse propagation in radial cavity transmission lines such as those found on a radial line accelerator is considered. Specifically, the effects of discontinuities along the line are examined in detail. It is found that previous analyses of such effects have been incorrect, and here two alternate solution techniques are presented. Depending upon the parameters of such a radial line, the discontinuity effects considered here may or may not be significant; however, if they are significant, it is recommended that the alternate solution techniques presented here be used.

  13. Non-radial pulsations in the γ Doradus star HD 195068

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankov, S.; Mathias, P.; Chapellier, E.; Le Contel, J.-M.; Sareyan, J.-P.

    2006-07-01

    We present high resolution spectroscopic observations of the γ Doradus star HD 195068. About 230 spectra were collected over 2 years. Time series analysis performed on radial velocity data shows a main peak at 1.61 d-1 , a frequency not yet detected in photometry. The Hipparcos photometric 1.25 d-1 frequency is easily recovered as is 1.30 d-1 while the third photometric frequency, 0.97 d-1 , is only marginally present. The good quality of our data, which includes 196 spectra collected over seven consecutive nights, shows that both the 1.61 d-1 and intermediate 1.27 d-1 (mixture of 1.25 and 1.30 d-1 ) frequencies are present in the line profile variations. Using the Fourier-Doppler Imaging (FDI) method, the variability associated with 1.61 d-1 can be successfully modeled by a non-radial pulsation mode ℓ=5± 1, |m|=4± 1. For the intermediate frequency 1.27 d-1 we deduce ℓ=4± 1, |m|=3± 1. Evidence that the star is not pulsating in the radial mode (ℓ=0) rules out a previous classification as an RR Lyrae type star. We investigate the time variability of FDI power spectra concluding that the observed temporal variability of modes can be explained by a beating phenomenon between closely spaced frequencies of two non-radial modes. The distribution of the oscillation power within the line profile indicates that there is a significant tangential velocity component of oscillations characteristic of high radial order gravity modes which are predicted to be observed in γ Doradus type stars.

  14. Self-Gated Free-Breathing 3D Coronary CINE Imaging with Simultaneous Water and Fat Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Nguyen, Thanh D.; Zhu, Yanchun; Spincemaille, Pascal; Prince, Martin R.; Weinsaft, Jonathan W.; Saloner, David; Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a novel technique for acquiring 3-dimensional (3D) coronary CINE magnetic resonance images with both water and fat visualization during free breathing and without external respiratory or cardiac gating. The implemented multi-echo hybrid 3D radial balanced Steady-State Free Precession (SSFP) sequence has an efficient data acquisition and is robust against motion. The k-space center along the slice encoding direction was repeatedly acquired to derive both respiratory and cardiac self-gating signals without an increase in scan time, enabling a free-breathing acquisition. The multi-echo acquisition allowed image reconstruction with water-fat separation, providing improved visualization of the coronary artery lumen. Ten healthy subjects were imaged successfully at 1.5 T, achieving a spatial resolution of 1.0×1.0×3.0 mm3 and scan time of about 5 minutes. The proposed imaging technique provided coronary vessel depiction comparable to that obtained with conventional breath-hold imaging and navigator gated free-breathing imaging. PMID:24586682

  15. Effects of awake tidal breathing, swallowing, nasal breathing, oral breathing and the Müller and Valsalva maneuvers on the dimensions of the upper airway. Evaluation by ultrafast computerized tomography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    W Stanford; J Galvin; M Rooholamini

    1988-01-01

    .... This report defines the size of the upper airway during normal tidal breathing and describes the changes that occur with swallowing, isolated nasal breathing, and isolated oral breathing and with the...

  16. Effects of awake tidal breathing, swallowing, nasal breathing, oral breathing and the Müller and Valsalva maneuvers on the dimensions of the upper airway. Evaluation by ultrafast computerized tomography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stanford, W; Galvin, J; Rooholamini, M

    1988-01-01

    .... This report defines the size of the upper airway during normal tidal breathing and describes the changes that occur with swallowing, isolated nasal breathing, and isolated oral breathing and with the...

  17. Single LP(0,n) mode excitation in multimode fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Nitin; Rustagi, Kailash C; John, Joseph

    2014-07-14

    We analyze the transmission of a Single mode - Multimode -Multimode (SMm) fiber structure with the aim of exciting a single radial mode in the second multimode fiber. We show that by appropriate choice of the length of the central multimode fiber one can obtain > 90% of the total core power in a chosen mode. We also discuss methods of removing undesirable cladding and radiation modes and estimate tolerances for practical applications.

  18. Radial Velocity Fluctuations of RZ Psc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potravnov, I. S.; Gorynya, N. A.; Grinin, V. P.; Minikulov, N. Kh.

    2014-12-01

    The behavior of the radial velocity of the UX Ori type star RZ Psc is studied. The existence of an inner cavity with a radius of about 0.7 a.u. in the circumstellar disk of this star allows to suggest the presence of a companion. A study of the radial velocity of RZ Psc based on our own measurements and published data yields no periodic component in its variability. The two most accurate measurements of V r , based on high resolution spectra obtained over a period of three months, show that the radial velocity is constant over this time interval to within 0.5 km/s. This imposes a limit of M p ≤10 M Jup on the mass of the hypothetical companion. Possible reasons for the observed strong fluctuations in the radial velocity of this star are discussed.

  19. An unusual cause of radial nerve palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hemendra Kumar Agrawal; Vipin Khatkar; Mohit Garg; Balvinder Singh; Ashish Jaiman; Vinod Kumar Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Neurapraxia frequently occurs following traction injury to the nerve intraoperatively,leading to radial nerve palsy which usually recovers in 5-30 weeks.In our case,we had operated a distal one-third of humeral shaft fracture and fixed it with 4.5 mm limited contact dynamic compression plate.The distal neurovascular status of the limb was assessed postoperatively in the recovery room and was found to be intact and all the sensory-motor functions of the radial nerve were normal.On the second postoperative day,following the suction drain removal and dressing,patient developed immediate radial nerve palsy along with wrist drop.We reviewed the literature and found no obvious cause for the nerve palsy and concluded that it was due to traction injury to the radial nerve while removing the suction drain in negative pressure.

  20. How to distinguish Hybrids from Radial Quarkonia

    CERN Document Server

    Close, Francis Edwin; Close, Frank E; Page, Philip R.

    1997-01-01

    We present arguments that reinforce the hybrid interpretation of pi(1800) and we establish that the rho(1450) and the omega(1420) can be interpreted as radial-hybrid mixtures. Some questions for future experiments are raised.

  1. Radial pseudoaneurysm following diagnostic coronary angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Laudari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The radial artery access has gained popularity as a method of diagnostic coronary catheterization compared to femoral artery puncture in terms of vascular complications and early ambulation. However, very rare complication like radial artery pseudoaneurysm may occur following cardiac catheterization which may give rise to serious consequences. Here, we report a patient with radial pseudoaneurysm following diagnostic coronary angiography. Adequate and correct methodology of compression of radial artery following puncture for maintaining hemostasis is the key to prevention.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i3.12776 Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2014, Vol-10, No-3, 48-50

  2. Solutions of relativistic radial quasipotential equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minh, V.X.; Kadyshevskii, V.G.; Zhidkov, E.P.

    1985-11-01

    A systematic approach to the investigation of relativistic radial quasipotential equations is developed. The quasipotential equations can be interpreted either as linear equations in finite differences of fourth and second orders, respectively, or as differential equations of infinite order.

  3. First Breath prenatal smoking cessation pilot study: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehn, Lisette; Lokker, Nicole; Matitz, Debra; Christiansen, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Despite the many dangers associated with smoking during pregnancy, it remains a salient public health problem for Wisconsin women. The First Breath pilot program was developed in an attempt to reduce rates of smoking during pregnancy among low-income women. Preliminary results suggest that the First Breath counseling-based approach is effective, with a quit rate of 43.8% among First Breath enrollees at 1 month postpartum. Women receiving First Breath cessation counseling also had higher quit rates at every measurement period versus women in a comparison group who were receiving whatever cessation care was available in their county in the absence of First Breath. The First Breath pilot study has demonstrated success in helping pregnant women quit smoking and in creating a model for integration of cessation services into prenatal health care service provision. It is through this success that First Breath is expanding beyond the pilot study stage to a statewide program in 2003.

  4. Information dynamics in cardiorespiratory analyses: application to controlled breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widjaja, Devy; Faes, Luca; Montalto, Alessandro; Van Diest, Ilse; Marinazzo, Daniele; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Voluntary adjustment of the breathing pattern is widely used to deal with stress-related conditions. In this study, effects of slow and fast breathing with a low and high inspiratory to expiratory time on heart rate variability (HRV) are evaluated by means of information dynamics. Information transfer is quantified both as the traditional transfer entropy as well as the cross entropy, where the latter does not condition on the past of HRV, thereby taking the highly unidirectional relation between respiration and heart rate into account. The results show that the cross entropy is more suited to quantify cardiorespiratory information transfer as this measure increases during slow breathing, indicating the increased cardiorespiratory coupling and suggesting the shift towards vagal activation during slow breathing. Additionally we found that controlled breathing, either slow or fast, results as well in an increase in cardiorespiratory coupling, compared to spontaneous breathing, which demonstrates the beneficial effects of instructed breathing.

  5. Impact of aeroelasticity on propulsion and longitudinal flight dynamics of an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, David L.; Mcminn, John D.; Pototzky, Anthony S.; Wooley, Christine L.

    1993-01-01

    Many air-breathing hypersonic aerospacecraft design concepts incorporate an elongated fuselage forebody acting as the aerodynamic compression surface for a hypersonic combustion module, or scram jet. This highly integrated design approach creates the potential for an unprecedented form of aero-propulsive-elastic interaction in which deflections of the vehicle fuselage give rise to propulsion transients, producing force and moment variations that may adversely impact the rigid body flight dynamics and/or further excite the fuselage bending modes. To investigate the potential for such interactions, a math model was developed which included the longitudinal flight dynamics, propulsion system, and first seven elastic modes of a hypersonic air-breathing vehicle. Perturbation time histories from a simulation incorporating this math model are presented that quantify the propulsive force and moment variations resulting from aeroelastic vehicle deflections. Root locus plots are presented to illustrate the effect of feeding the propulsive perturbations back into the aeroelastic model. A concluding section summarizes the implications of the observed effects for highly integrated hypersonic air-breathing vehicle concepts.

  6. Effect of Level and Downhill Running on Breathing Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D. Cook

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ventilatory equivalents for oxygen and carbon dioxide are physiological measures of breathing efficiency, and are known to be affected by the intensity and mode of exercise. We examined the effect of level running (gradient 0% and muscle-damaging downhill running (−12%, matched for oxygen uptake, on the ventilatory equivalents for oxygen ( and carbon dioxide (. Nine men (27 ± 9 years, 179 ± 7 cm, 75 ± 12 kg, : 52.0 ± 7.7 mL·kg−1·min−1 completed two 40-min running bouts (5 × 8-min with 2-min inter-bout rest, one level and one downhill. Running intensity was matched at 60% of maximal metabolic equivalent. Maximal isometric force of m.quadriceps femoris was measured before and after the running bouts. Data was analyzed with 2-way ANOVA or paired samples t-tests. Running speed (downhill: 13.5 ± 3.2, level: 9.6 ± 2.2 km·h−1 and isometric force deficits (downhill: 17.2 ± 7.6%, level: 2.0 ± 6.9% were higher for downhill running. Running bouts for level and downhill gradients had , heart rates and respiratory exchange ratio values that were not different indicating matched intensity and metabolic demands. During downhill running, the , (downhill: 29.7 ± 3.3, level: 27.2 ± 1.6 and  (downhill: 33.3 ± 2.7, level: 30.4 ± 1.9 were 7.1% and 8.3% higher (p < 0.05 than level running. In conclusion, breathing efficiency appears lower during downhill running (i.e., muscle-damaging exercise compared to level running at a similar moderate intensity.

  7. UNDERWATER STROKE KINEMATICS DURING BREATHING AND BREATH-HOLDING FRONT CRAWL SWIMMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickos Vezos

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of breathing on the three - dimensional underwater stroke kinematics of front crawl swimming. Ten female competitive freestyle swimmers participated in the study. Each subject swam a number of front crawl trials of 25 m at a constant speed under breathing and breath-holding conditions. The underwater motion of each subject's right arm was filmed using two S-VHS cameras, operating at 60 Hz, which were positioned behind two underwater viewing windows. The spatial coordinates of selected points were calculated using the DLT procedure with 30 control points and after the digital filtering of the raw data with a cut-off frequency of 6 Hz, the hand's linear displacements and velocities were calculated. The results revealed that breathing caused significantly increases in the stroke duration (t9 = 2.764; p < 0.05, the backward hand displacement relative to the water (t9 = 2.471; p<0.05 and the lateral displacement of the hand in the X - axis during the downsweep (t9 = 2.638; p < 0.05. On the contrary, the peak backward hand velocity during the insweep (t9 = 2.368; p < 0.05 and the displacement of the hand during the push phase (t9 = -2.297; p < 0.05 were greatly reduced when breathing was involved. From the above, it was concluded that breathing action in front crawl swimming caused significant modifications in both the basic stroke parameters and the overall motor pattern were, possibly due to body roll during breathing

  8. Breathing pattern, thoracoabdominal motion and muscular activity during three breathing exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Tomich

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate breathing pattern, thoracoabdominal motion and muscular activity during three breathing exercises: diaphragmatic breathing (DB, flow-oriented (Triflo II incentive spirometry and volume-oriented (Voldyne incentive spirometry. Seventeen healthy subjects (12 females, 5 males aged 23 ± 5 years (mean ± SD were studied. Calibrated respiratory inductive plethysmography was used to measure the following variables during rest (baseline and breathing exercises: tidal volume (Vt, respiratory frequency (f, rib cage contribution to Vt (RC/Vt, inspiratory duty cycle (Ti/Ttot, and phase angle (PhAng. Sternocleidomastoid muscle activity was assessed by surface electromyography. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA and Tukey or Friedman and Wilcoxon tests, with the level of significance set at P < 0.05. Comparisons between baseline and breathing exercise periods showed a significant increase of Vt and PhAng during all exercises, a significant decrease of f during DB and Voldyne, a significant increase of Ti/Ttot during Voldyne, and no significant difference in RC/Vt. Comparisons among exercises revealed higher f and sternocleidomastoid activity during Triflo II (P < 0.05 with respect to DB and Voldyne, without a significant difference in Vt, Ti/Ttot, PhAng, or RC/Vt. Exercises changed the breathing pattern and increased PhAng, a variable of thoracoabdominal asynchrony, compared to baseline. The only difference between DB and Voldyne was a significant increase of Ti/Ttot compared to baseline. Triflo II was associated with higher f values and electromyographic activity of the sternocleidomastoid. In conclusion, DB and Voldyne showed similar results while Triflo II showed disadvantages compared to the other breathing exercises.

  9. Breath analysis using laser spectroscopic techniques: breath biomarkers, spectral fingerprints, and detection limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuji; Sahay, Peeyush

    2009-01-01

    Breath analysis, a promising new field of medicine and medical instrumentation, potentially offers noninvasive, real-time, and point-of-care (POC) disease diagnostics and metabolic status monitoring. Numerous breath biomarkers have been detected and quantified so far by using the GC-MS technique. Recent advances in laser spectroscopic techniques and laser sources have driven breath analysis to new heights, moving from laboratory research to commercial reality. Laser spectroscopic detection techniques not only have high-sensitivity and high-selectivity, as equivalently offered by the MS-based techniques, but also have the advantageous features of near real-time response, low instrument costs, and POC function. Of the approximately 35 established breath biomarkers, such as acetone, ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethane, methane, and nitric oxide, 14 species in exhaled human breath have been analyzed by high-sensitivity laser spectroscopic techniques, namely, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS), integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS), cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), cavity leak-out spectroscopy (CALOS), photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS), and optical frequency comb cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OFC-CEAS). Spectral fingerprints of the measured biomarkers span from the UV to the mid-IR spectral regions and the detection limits achieved by the laser techniques range from parts per million to parts per billion levels. Sensors using the laser spectroscopic techniques for a few breath biomarkers, e.g., carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, etc. are commercially available. This review presents an update on the latest developments in laser-based breath analysis.

  10. Breath Analysis Using Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Breath Biomarkers, Spectral Fingerprints, and Detection Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peeyush Sahay

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Breath analysis, a promising new field of medicine and medical instrumentation, potentially offers noninvasive, real-time, and point-of-care (POC disease diagnostics and metabolic status monitoring. Numerous breath biomarkers have been detected and quantified so far by using the GC-MS technique. Recent advances in laser spectroscopic techniques and laser sources have driven breath analysis to new heights, moving from laboratory research to commercial reality. Laser spectroscopic detection techniques not only have high-sensitivity and high-selectivity, as equivalently offered by the MS-based techniques, but also have the advantageous features of near real-time response, low instrument costs, and POC function. Of the approximately 35 established breath biomarkers, such as acetone, ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethane, methane, and nitric oxide, 14 species in exhaled human breath have been analyzed by high-sensitivity laser spectroscopic techniques, namely, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS, cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS, integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS, cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS, cavity leak-out spectroscopy (CALOS, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS, quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS, and optical frequency comb cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OFC-CEAS. Spectral fingerprints of the measured biomarkers span from the UV to the mid-IR spectral regions and the detection limits achieved by the laser techniques range from parts per million to parts per billion levels. Sensors using the laser spectroscopic techniques for a few breath biomarkers, e.g., carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, etc. are commercially available. This review presents an update on the latest developments in laser-based breath analysis.

  11. Guidance cue for cortical radial migration discovered

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The regulatory mechanism for neuronal migration in the developing cortex is a major unsolved problem in developmental neurobiology. It is generally accepted that the migration of newborn pyramidal neurons from the ventricular zone toward upper cortical layers is guided by radial glial fibers in the developing cortex, and that the laminar structure of the cortex is formed through regulated attachment and detachment of migrating neurons with radial glial fibers.

  12. Electromechanical properties of radial active magnetic bearings

    OpenAIRE

    Antila, Matti

    1998-01-01

    Nonideal properties of the electromagnetic actuators in radial active magnetic bearings are studied. The two dimensional nonlinear stationary finite element method is used to determine the linearised parameters of a radial active magnetic bearing. The method is verified on two test machines. The accuracy is 10-15 % in the magnetic saturation region. The effect of magnetic saturation on the bearing dynamics is studied based on the root locus diagrams of the closed loop system. These diagrams s...

  13. [Early effectiveness of combining radial forearm free flap and adjacent tissue flap in reconstruction of palatomaxillary defects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongfeng; Zhang, Kai; Li, Jiancheng; Xu, Jingcheng; Liao, Shengkai; Xu, Tao

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the method of combining radial forearm free flap and adjacent tissue flap in reconstruction of palatomaxillary defects and its effectiveness. Between March 2005 and May 2010, 17 patients with palatomaxillary defects were treated. There were 11 males and 6 females with an age range of 45-74 years (mean, 62.5 years), including 1 case of benign tumor and 16 cases of malignant tumors (7 cases of squamous cell carcinoma of palate, 1 case of recurring squamous cell carcinoma of palate, 1 case of malignant melanoma of palate, 1 case of adenoid cystic carcinoma of palate, 1 case of malignant melanoma of maxilla, 1 case of ductal carcinoma of maxilla, and 4 cases of squamous cell carcinoma of maxilla). The maxillectomy defect ranged from 7.0 cm x 5.5 cm to 10.0 cm x 7.5 cm. According to Brown's classification for the maxillectomy defect, there were type II in 15 cases, type III in 2 cases. Palatomaxillary defects were repaired with radial forearm free flap and buccal fat pad in 11 cases, and with radial forearm free flap, buccal fat pad, and mandibular osteomuscular flap pedicled with temporal muscle in 6 cases. The effectiveness was evaluated after operation by observing the vitality of the flap, the functions of speech, swallowing, breath, and the facial appearance. All cases were followed up 6-12 months without tumor recurrence. All flaps and skin grafts at donor sites survived. The functions of speech, swallowing, and breath were normal without obvious opening limitation. The facial appearance was satisfactory without obvious maxillofacial deformity. No enophthalmos occurred in patients with orbital floor and infraorbital rim defects. The patients had no oronasal fistula with satisfactory oral and nasal functions. According to the type of palatomaxillary defects, it can have good early effectiveness to select combining radial forearm free flap and buccal fat pad or combining radial forearm free flap, buccal fat pad, and mandibular osteomuscular flap for

  14. Theory and hybrid simulations of the radial evolution of the solar wind turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comisel, Horia; Narita, Yasuhito; Motschmann, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Solar wind turbulence in the inner heliosphere is believed to evolve in the radial direction away from the Sun driven by various nonlinear processes. When a perturbative treatment is applicable, plasma fluctuations evolve along the dispersion relations while the frequencies deviate from the normal-mode frequency by exciting non-normal modes or sideband waves. Direct numerical simulations of magnetized plasma at the scale of ion gyro-radius or smaller using the hybrid code AIKEF show smooth transitions and evolutions into nonlinear stage with sideband wave excitations. The evolution profile of linear and nonlinear modes as well as the intrinsic nature of wave vector anisotropy can be unambiguously classified according to the values of ion plasma beta. By using a mapping based on a one-dimensional solar wind expansion model, the resulting ion kinetic scale turbulence is related to the solar distance from the Sun. We find that the relevant normal modes such as ion cyclotron and Bernstein mode will occur first at radial distance of about 0.2-0.3 AU, i.e., near the Mercury orbit. Furthermore, a radial dependence of the wave-vector anisotropy is obtained. The predominance of the filament structures highlights the strong impact of Alfvénic waves.

  15. Physical meaning of the radial index of Laguerre-Gauss beams

    CERN Document Server

    Plick, William N

    2016-01-01

    The Laguerre-Gauss modes are a class of fundamental and well-studied optical fields. These stable, shape-invariant photons - exhibiting circular-cylindrical symmetry - are familiar from laser optics, micro-mechanical manipulation, quantum optics, communication, and foundational studies in both classical optics and quantum physics. They are characterized, chiefly, by two modes numbers: the azimuthal index indicating the orbital angular momentum of the beam - which itself has spawned a burgeoning and vibrant sub-field - and the radial index, which up until recently, has largely been ignored. In this manuscript we develop a differential operator formalism for dealing with the radial modes in both the position and momentum representations, and - more importantly - give for the first time the meaning of this quantum number in terms of a well-defined physical parameter: the "intrinsic hyperbolic momentum charge".

  16. Generation of radially polarized Bessel-Gaussian beams from c-cut Nd:YVO₄ laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Sunil; Kozawa, Yuichi; Sato, Shunichi

    2014-02-15

    We experimentally demonstrate the generation of radially polarized Bessel-Gaussian beams from a c-cut Nd:YVO₄ laser with a hemispherical cavity configuration by proper mode control. The output beam has an annular-shaped intensity distribution with radial polarization. When the beam is focused, the intensity pattern changes to a multi-ring, which is a typical characteristic of the lowest transverse mode of vector Bessel-Gaussian beam. Higher-order modes of vector Bessel-Gaussian beam are also observed from the same cavity by slightly changing the cavity alignment. The experimental results show a good agreement with the simulation results for both focal and far fields. The present method is a simple and direct way for generating vector Bessel-Gaussian beams.

  17. Breathing dissipative solitons in optical microresonators

    CERN Document Server

    Lucas, Erwan; Guo, Hairun; Gorodetsky, Michael; Kippenberg, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Dissipative solitons are self-localized structures resulting from a double balance between dispersion and nonlinearity as well as dissipation and a driving force. They occur in a wide variety of fields ranging from optics, hydrodynamics to chemistry and biology. Recently, significant interest has focused on their temporal realization in driven optical microresonators, known as dissipative Kerr solitons. They provide access to coherent, chip-scale optical frequency combs, which have already been employed in optical metrology, data communication and spectroscopy. Such Kerr resonator systems can exhibit numerous localized intracavity patterns and provide rich insights into nonlinear dynamics. A particular class of solutions consists of breathing dissipative solitons, representing pulses with oscillating amplitude and duration, for which no comprehensive understanding has been presented to date. Here, we observe and study single and multiple breathing dissipative solitons in two different microresonator platforms...

  18. Protective supplied-breathing-air garment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, E.L.; von Hortenau, E.F.

    1982-05-28

    A breathing-air garment for isolating a wearer from hostile environments containing toxins or irritants is disclosed. The garment includes a suit and a separate head-protective enclosure or hood engaging a suit collar in sealing attachment. The hood and suit collar are cylindrically shaped and dimensioned to enable the wearer to withdraw his hands from the suit sleeves to perform manual tasks within the hood interior. Breathing air is supplied from an external air line with an air-delivery hose attached to the hood interior. The hose feeds air into an annular halo-like fiber-filled plenum having spaced discharge orifices attached to the hood top wall. A plurality of air exhaust/check valves located at the suit extremities cooperate with the hood air-delivery system to provide a cooling flow of circulating air from the hood throughout the suit interior. A suit entry seal provided on the suit sealed with an adhesive sealing flap.

  19. Assessment of voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold with CINE imaging for breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estoesta, Reuben Patrick; Attwood, Lani; Naehrig, Diana; Claridge-Mackonis, Elizabeth; Odgers, David; Martin, Darren; Pham, Melissa; Toohey, Joanne; Carroll, Susan

    2017-10-01

    Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold (DIBH) techniques for breast cancer radiation therapy (RT) have reduced cardiac dose compared to Free Breathing (FB). Recently, a voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold (vDIBH) technique was established using in-room lasers and skin tattoos to monitor breath-hold. An in-house quality assessment of positional reproducibility during RT delivery with vDIBH in patients with left-sided breast cancer was evaluated. The electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was used in cinematographic (CINE) mode to capture a sequence of images during beam delivery. Weekly CINE images were retrospectively assessed for 20 left-sided breast cancer patients receiving RT in vDIBH, and compared with CINE images of 20 patients treated in FB. The intra-beam motion was assessed and the distance from the beam central axis (CA) to the internal chest wall (ICW) was measured on each CINE image. These were then compared to the planned distance on digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR). The maximum intra-beam motion for any one patient measurement was 0.30 cm for vDIBH and 0.20 cm for FB. The mean difference between the distance from the CA to ICW on DRR and the equivalent distance on CINE imaging (as treated) was 0.28 cm (SD 0.17) for vDIBH patients and 0.25 cm (SD 0.14) for FB patients (P = 0.458). The measured values were comparable for patients undergoing RT in vDIBH, and for those in FB. This quality assessment showed that using in-room lasers and skin tattoos to independently monitor breath-hold in vDIBH as detected by 'on-treatment' CINE imaging is safe and effective. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  20. Coordination of mastication, swallowing and breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Koichiro Matsuo; Palmer, Jeffrey B.

    2009-01-01

    The pathways for air and food cross in the pharynx. In breathing, air may flow through either the nose or the mouth, it always flows through the pharynx. During swallowing, the pharynx changes from an airway to a food channel. The pharynx is isolated from the nasal cavity and lower airway by velopharyngeal and laryngeal closure during the pharyngeal swallow. During mastication, the food bolus accumulates in the pharynx prior to swallow initiation. The structures in the oral cavity, pharynx an...

  1. Breath tests and irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Satya Vati; Malik, Aastha

    2014-06-28

    Breath tests are non-invasive tests and can detect H₂ and CH₄ gases which are produced by bacterial fermentation of unabsorbed intestinal carbohydrate and are excreted in the breath. These tests are used in the diagnosis of carbohydrate malabsorption, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and for measuring the orocecal transit time. Malabsorption of carbohydrates is a key trigger of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-type symptoms such as diarrhea and/or constipation, bloating, excess flatulence, headaches and lack of energy. Abdominal bloating is a common nonspecific symptom which can negatively impact quality of life. It may reflect dietary imbalance, such as excess fiber intake, or may be a manifestation of IBS. However, bloating may also represent small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Patients with persistent symptoms of abdominal bloating and distension despite dietary interventions should be referred for H₂ breath testing to determine the presence or absence of bacterial overgrowth. If bacterial overgrowth is identified, patients are typically treated with antibiotics. Evaluation of IBS generally includes testing of other disorders that cause similar symptoms. Carbohydrate malabsorption (lactose, fructose, sorbitol) can cause abdominal fullness, bloating, nausea, abdominal pain, flatulence, and diarrhea, which are similar to the symptoms of IBS. However, it is unclear if these digestive disorders contribute to or cause the symptoms of IBS. Research studies show that a proper diagnosis and effective dietary intervention significantly reduces the severity and frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms in IBS. Thus, diagnosis of malabsorption of these carbohydrates in IBS using a breath test is very important to guide the clinician in the proper treatment of IBS patients.

  2. C-130J Breathing Resistance Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    flows used in the study . The simulated workloads were: 1) 60 ALPM: Rest; 2) 90 ALPM: Light Work ; 3) 125 ALPM: Moderate Work ; and 4) 150 ALPM...AFRL-RH-WP-TR-2016-0040 C-130J BREATHING RESISTANCE STUDY George W. Miller Air Force Research Laboratory Wright-Patterson Air...ASSIGNED DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT. //signed// //signed// GEORGE W. MILLER SCOTT M. GALSTER Work Unit Manager Chief, Applied

  3. Multi-layered breathing architectural envelope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Larsen, Andreas; Foged, Isak Worre; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2014-01-01

    A multi layered breathing envelope is developed as a method of natural ventilation. The two main layers consist of mineral wool and air permeable concrete. The mineral wool works as a dynamic insulation and the permeable concrete as a heat recovery system with a high thermal mass for heat storage....... The performance of the envelope is simulated and put through an optimization process. The impact of a design system on the architectural potential of Performance -based design was investigated....

  4. Breath alcohol, multisensor arrays, and electronic noses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsson, Nils; Winquist, Fredrik

    1997-01-01

    The concept behind a volatile compound mapper, or electronic nose, is to use the combination of multiple gas sensors and pattern recognition techniques to detect and quantify substances in gas mixtures. There are several different kinds of sensors which have been developed during recent years of which the base techniques are conducting polymers, piezo electrical crystals and solid state devices. In this work we have used a combination of gas sensitive field effect devices and semiconducting metal oxides. The most useful pattern recognition routine was found to be ANNs, which is a mathematical approximation of the human neural network. The aim of this work is to evaluate the possibility of using electronic noses in field instruments to detect drugs, arson residues, explosives etc. As a test application we have chosen breath alcohol measurements. There are several reasons for this. Breath samples are a quite complex mixture contains between 200 and 300 substances at trace levels. The alcohol level is low but still possible to handle. There are needs for replacing large and heavy mobile instruments with smaller devices. Current instrumentation is rather sensitive to interfering substances. The work so far has dealt with sampling, how to introduce ethanol and other substances in the breath, correlation measurements between the electronic nose and headspace GC, and how to evaluate the sensor signals.

  5. Tight focus of a radially polarized and amplitudemodulated annular multi-Gaussian beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Jian-Nong; Xu Qin-Feng; Wang Gang

    2011-01-01

    The focusing of a radially polarized beam without annular apodization ora phase filter at the entrance pupil of the objective results in a wide focus and low purity of the longitudinally polarized component.However,the presence of a physical annular apodization or phase filter makes some applications more difficult or even impossible.We propose a radially polarized and amplitude-modulated annular multi-Gaussian beam mode.Numerical simulation shows that it can be focused into a sharper focal spot of 0.125λ2 without additional apodizations or filters.The beam quality describing the purity of longitudinally polarized component is up to 86%.

  6. Determination of amphetamine and methylphenidate in exhaled breath of patients undergoing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Olof; Stephanson, Niclas; Sandqvist, Sören; Franck, Johan

    2014-08-01

    It has been discovered recently that exogenous substances are detectable in exhaled breath after intake. Exhaled breath therefore constitutes a new possible matrix in clinical pharmacology and toxicology. The present work was aimed at exploring this possibility further by a study on patients treated for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder with D-amphetamine and methylphenidate. Thirteen patients (age range: 32-61 years; 5 women) were included in the study, and breath and urine samples were collected at different times in the dose interval. Analyses of breath and urine samples were done with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods. Urine was examined for amphetamine, methylphenidate, and its metabolite ritalinic acid. Among the 9 patients who received D-amphetamine medication in daily doses of 20-100 mg, amphetamine was detected in all subjects in amounts ranging from 1200 to 30,800 picogram per filter. Among 8 patients receiving methylphenidate medication in daily doses of 80-400 mg, it was detected and quantified in 7 of the cases in amounts ranging from 150 to 10,400 picogram per filter and ritalinic acid was detected and quantified in 3 of the cases ranging from 35 to 360 picogram per filter. In 1 case, methylphenidate was only detectable in breath and urine, whereas ritalinic acid was quantifiable in urine, which could indicate noncompliance, with the 4 hours of dose regimen prescribed. In a number of cases, the sampling was performed 24 hours after the last dose intake. Identification of amphetamine and methylphenidate was based on correct chromatographic retention time and correct product ion ratio with detection performed in selected reaction monitoring mode. The results confirm that amphetamine is present in exhaled breath after intake and demonstrate for the first time the presence of methylphenidate and ritalinic acid after its intake. This gives further support to the potential use of exhaled breath for detecting drug intake.

  7. Determination of breath isoprene allows the identification of the expiratory fraction of the propofol breath signal during real-time propofol breath monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornuss, Cyrill; Dolch, Michael E; Janitza, Silke; Souza, Kimberly; Praun, Siegfried; Apfel, Christian C; Schelling, Gustav

    2013-10-01

    Real-time measurement of propofol in the breath may be used for routine clinical monitoring. However, this requires unequivocal identification of the expiratory phase of the respiratory propofol signal as only expiratory propofol reflects propofol blood concentrations. Determination of CO2 breath concentrations is the current gold standard for the identification of expiratory gas but usually requires additional equipment. Human breath also contains isoprene, a volatile organic compound with low inspiratory breath concentration and an expiratory concentration plateau. We investigated whether breath isoprene could be used similarly to CO2 to identify the expiratory fraction of the propofol breath signal. We investigated real-time breath data obtained from 40 study subjects during routine anesthesia. Propofol, isoprene, and CO2 breath concentrations were determined by a combined ion molecule reaction/electron impact mass spectrometry system. The expiratory propofol signal was identified according to breath CO2 and isoprene concentrations and presented as median of intervals of 30 s duration. Bland-Altman analysis was applied to detect differences (bias) in the expiratory propofol signal extracted by the two identification methods. We investigated propofol signals in a total of 3,590 observation intervals of 30 s duration in the 40 study subjects. In 51.4 % of the intervals (1,844/3,590) both methods extracted the same results for expiratory propofol signal. Overall bias between the two data extraction methods was -0.12 ppb. The lower and the upper limits of the 95 % CI were -0.69 and 0.45 ppb. Determination of isoprene breath concentrations allows the identification of the expiratory propofol signal during real-time breath monitoring.

  8. Nonradial modes in RR Lyrae stars from the OGLE Collection of Variable Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Netzel, Henryka; Moskalik, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) is a great source of top-quality photometry of classical pulsators. Collection of variable stars from the fourth part of the project contains more than 38 000 RR Lyrae stars. These stars pulsate mostly in the radial fundamental mode (RRab), in radial first overtone (RRc) or in both modes simultaneously (RRd). Analysis of the OGLE data allowed to detect additional non-radial modes in RRc and in RRd stars. We have found more than 260 double-mode stars with characteristic period ratio of the additional (shorter) period to first overtone period around 0.61, increasing the number of known stars of this type by factor of 10. Stars from the OGLE sample form three nearly parallel sequences in the Petersen diagram. Some stars show more than one non-radial mode simultaneously. These modes belong to different sequences.

  9. Diaphragmatic amplitude and accessory inspiratory muscle activity in nasal and mouth-breathing adults: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Maria Elaine; Boufleur, Jalusa; Soares, Juliana Corrêa; Haygert, Carlos Jesus Pereira; Ries, Lilian Gerdi Kittel; Corrêa, Eliane Castilhos Rodrigues

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the electromyographic activity of the accessory inspiratory muscles and the diaphragmatic amplitude (DA) in nasal and mouth-breathing adults. The study evaluated 38 mouth-breathing (MB group) and 38 nasal-breathing (NB group) adults, from 18 to 30years old and both sexes. Surface electromyography (sEMG) was used to evaluate the amplitude and symmetry (POC%) of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and upper trapezius (UT) muscles at rest, during nasal slow inspiration at Lung Total Capacity (LTC) and, during rapid and abrupt inspiration: Sniff, Peak Nasal Inspiratory Flow (PNIF) and Maximum Inspiratory Pressure (MIP). M-mode ultrasonography assessed the right diaphragm muscle amplitude in three different nasal inspirations: at tidal volume (TV), Sniff and inspiration at LTC. The SCM activity was significantly lower in the MB group during Sniff, PNIF (pMouth breathing reflected on lower recruitment of the accessory inspiratory muscles during fast inspiration and lower diaphragmatic amplitude, compared to nasal breathing.

  10. Radial spoke proteins of Chlamydomonas flagella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pinfen; Diener, Dennis R.; Yang, Chun; Kohno, Takahiro; Pazour, Gregory J.; Dienes, Jennifer M.; Agrin, Nathan S.; King, Stephen M.; Sale, Winfield S.; Kamiya, Ritsu; Rosenbaum, Joel L.; Witman, George B.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The radial spoke is a ubiquitous component of ‘9+2’ cilia and flagella, and plays an essential role in the control of dynein arm activity by relaying signals from the central pair of microtubules to the arms. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii radial spoke contains at least 23 proteins, only 8 of which have been characterized at the molecular level. Here, we use mass spectrometry to identify 10 additional radial spoke proteins. Many of the newly identified proteins in the spoke stalk are predicted to contain domains associated with signal transduction, including Ca2+-, AKAP- and nucleotide-binding domains. This suggests that the spoke stalk is both a scaffold for signaling molecules and itself a transducer of signals. Moreover, in addition to the recently described HSP40 family member, a second spoke stalk protein is predicted to be a molecular chaperone, implying that there is a sophisticated mechanism for the assembly of this large complex. Among the 18 spoke proteins identified to date, at least 12 have apparent homologs in humans, indicating that the radial spoke has been conserved throughout evolution. The human genes encoding these proteins are candidates for causing primary ciliary dyskinesia, a severe inherited disease involving missing or defective axonemal structures, including the radial spokes. PMID:16507594

  11. Real-time breath-hold triggering of myocardial perfusion imaging with a novel cadmium-zinc-telluride detector gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechel, Ronny R.; Pazhenkottil, Aju P.; Herzog, Bernhard A.; Husmann, Lars; Nkoulou, Rene N.; Burger, Irene A.; Valenta, Ines; Wyss, Christophe A.; Ghadri, Jelena R. [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), Zurich (Switzerland)

    2010-10-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the ability of real-time breath-hold-triggered myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using a novel cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) gamma camera to discriminate artefacts from true perfusion defects. A group of 40 patients underwent a 1-day {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin pharmacological stress/rest imaging protocol on a conventional dual detector SPECT gamma camera with and without attenuation correction (AC), immediately followed by scanning on an ultrafast CZT camera with and without real-time breath-hold triggering (instead of AC) by intermittent scanning confined to breath-hold at deep inspiration (using list mode acquisition). We studied the use of breath-hold triggering on the CZT camera and its ability to discriminate artefacts from true perfusion defects using AC SPECT MPI as the reference standard. Myocardial tracer uptake (percent of maximum) from CZT was compared to AC SPECT MPI by intraclass correlation and by calculating Bland-Altman limits of agreement. AC of SPECT MPI identified 19 apparent perfusion defects as artefacts. Of these, 13 were correctly identified and 4 were partially unmasked (decrease in extent and/or severity) by breath-hold triggering of the CZT scan. All perfusion defects verified by SPECT MPI with AC were appropriately documented by CZT with and without breath-hold triggering. This was supported by the quantitative analysis, as the correlation (r) of myocardial tracer uptake between CZT and AC SPECT improved significantly from 0.81 to 0.90 (p<0.001) when applying breath-hold triggering. Similarly, Bland-Altman limits of agreement were narrower for CZT scans with breath-hold triggering. This novel CZT camera allows real-time breath-hold triggering as a potential alternative to AC to assist in the discrimination of artefacts from true perfusion defects. (orig.)

  12. IMMEDIATE EFFECTS OF INVERSE RATIO BREATHING VERSUS DIAPHRAGMATIC BREATHING ON INSPIRATORY VITAL CAPACITY AND THORACIC EXPANSION IN ADULT HEALTHY FEMALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshipra Baban Pedamkar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The normal inspiratory to expiratory ratio is 1:2.However, the duration of inspiration can be increased voluntarily till the ratio becomes 2:1.This is called as inverse ratio breathing. The effects of inverse ratio ventilation have been studied on patients with respiratory failure and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. No studies have been carried out to study the effects of inverse ratio breathing in voluntarily breathing individuals. Hence this study was carried out to find the immediate effects of inverse ratio breathing versus diaphragmatic breathing on inspiratory vital capacity and thoracic expansion. Methods: 30 healthy adult females in the age group 20-25 years were included in the study. Inspiratory vital capacity and thoracic expansion at 2nd, 4th and 6th intercostal space was measured using a digital spirometer and an inelastic inch tape respectively. Diaphragmatic breathing was administered for one minute and the same parameters were measured again. A washout period of one day was given and same outcome measures were measured before and after individuals performed inverse ratio breathing with the help of a visual feedback video for one minute. Results: Data was analysed using Wilcoxon test. There was extremely significant difference between the mean increase in the inspiratory vital capacity and thoracic expansion at the 2nd, 4th and 6th intercostals space after inverse ratio breathing as compared to diaphragmatic breathing (p < 0.0001. Conclusion: Inspiratory vital capacity and thoracic expansion increase significantly after inverse ratio breathing.

  13. Late radial head dislocation with radial head fracture and ulnar plastic deformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinrich, Stephen D.; Butler, R. Allen

    Type 11 Monteggia lesion equivalents produced by plastic deformation of the ulna are rare. Radial head fractures in skeletally immature patients are also uncommon. We report a late presentation of a Type 11 Monteggia equivalent injury with a fracture of the radial head and neck and plastic

  14. Inflation and conformal invariance: the perspective from radial quantization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kehagias, Alex [Physics Division, National Technical University of Athens, 15780 Zografou Campus, Athens (Greece); Theoretical Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Riotto, Antonio [Department of Theoretical Physics and Center for Astroparticle Physics (CAP) 24 quai E. Ansermet, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland)

    2017-05-15

    According to the dS/CFT correspondence, correlators of fields generated during a primordial de Sitter phase are constrained by three-dimensional conformal invariance. Using the properties of radially quantized conformal field theories and the operator-state correspondence, we glean information on some points. The Higuchi bound on the masses of spin-s states in de Sitter is a direct consequence of reflection positivity in radially quantized CFT{sub 3} and the fact that scaling dimensions of operators are energies of states. The partial massless states appearing in de Sitter correspond from the boundary CFT{sub 3} perspective to boundary states with highest weight for the conformal group. Finally, we discuss the inflationary consistency relations and the role of asymptotic symmetries which transform asymptotic vacua to new physically inequivalent vacua by generating long perturbation modes. We show that on the CFT{sub 3} side, asymptotic symmetries have a nice quantum mechanics interpretation. For instance, acting with the asymptotic dilation symmetry corresponds to evolving states forward (or backward) in ''time'' and the charge generating the asymptotic symmetry transformation is the Hamiltonian itself. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Radial transmission line analysis of multi-layer structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.

    2011-03-28

    The analysis of multi-layer beam tubes is a standard problem and involves axially propagating waves. This treatment is ill suited to a short multi-layer structure such as the present example of a ferrite covered ceramic break in the beam tube at the ERL photo-cathode electron gun. This paper demonstrates that such structure can better be treated by radial wave propagation. The theoretical method is presented and numerical results are compared with measured network analyser data and Microwave Studio generated simulations. The results confirm the concept of radial transmission lines as a valid analytical method. An Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is being constructed at this laboratory for the purpose of research towards an envisioned Electron Ion Collider. One of the pertinent topics is damping of Higher Order Modes (HOM). In this ERL, the damping is provided by ferrite absorbers in the beam tube. A modified version thereof, a ceramic break surrounded by ferrite, is planed for the superconducting electron gun. The damper here is located at room temperature just outside of the gun. If used in a cavity chain, the ceramic break is in the vacuum tube at helium temperature whereas the ferrite is moved into the cryostat insulating vacuum allowing higher temperatures. The general properties of the ferrite HOM dampers have been published but are more detailed in this paper.

  16. Radial Heat Transfer Dynamics in Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Mohamed; Kim, Taejin

    2006-05-01

    The dynamics of radial heat transfer in zigzag and armchair double wall carbon nanotubes (DWCNT) have been examined using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations with the goal of understanding the role of radial phonon modes in heat transfer. The MD model uses Tersof-Brenner potential for bonded C-C interactions within each shell and non-bended van der Wall interaction between inner and outer shells. The simulation procedure involves, (1) quenching the DWNT to 0 K, (2) minimization of the potential energy and (3) raising the temperature of the outer shell to the desired steady state temperature while maintaining the inner tube at 0.1 K. The heat baths are removed from the outer and inner shell and their energies are examined. The energies of inner and outer exhibit an out of phase oscillatory behavior due the exchange of the energies between the two shells. The energy of the inner tube shows a weak gradual increase due to the temperature gradient. The beat frequencies determined from the Fourier transform of the energy oscillations of the inner and outer nanotubes were found to be in the tera Herz range. We will also discuss the temperature and length dependence of oscillatory energy exchange between the nanotube shells.

  17. The Influence of the Negative Radial Electric Field on the Orbit of Banana Particles in Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yuwen; Zhang Xiaoding; Zhang Tao; Yao Ruohe

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the patterns of influence of the negative radial electric field on the drift displacement and trajectory of charged particles, for it is essential for further investigation into the transitional mechanism of L-H Mode. In the light of superposition between the poloidal velocity of charged particles and theE ×B drift caused by the negative radial electric field, the paper offers a theoretical analysis and value simulations. Under the action of different radial electric fields, results have been obtained in regard to changes in the velocity of charged particles (mainly ions), patterns of changes in drift displacement, regional change of banana particles, and features of transition and change between trajectories of transiting particles and banana particles.

  18. Physical mechanism determining the radial electric field and its radial structure in a toroidal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ida, Katsumi; Miura, Yukitoshi; Itoh, Sanae [and others

    1994-10-01

    Radial structures of plasma rotation and radial electric field are experimentally studied in tokamak, heliotron/torsatron and stellarator devices. The perpendicular and parallel viscosities are measured. The parallel viscosity, which is dominant in determining the toroidal velocity in heliotron/torsatron and stellarator devices, is found to be neoclassical. On the other hand, the perpendicular viscosity, which is dominant in dictating the toroidal rotation in tokamaks, is anomalous. Even without external momentum input, both a plasma rotation and a radial electric field exist in tokamaks and heliotrons/torsatrons. The observed profiles of the radial electric field do not agree with the theoretical prediction based on neoclassical transport. This is mainly due to the existence of anomalous perpendicular viscosity. The shear of the radial electric field improves particle and heat transport both in bulk and edge plasma regimes of tokamaks. (author) 95 refs.

  19. Manufacturing of Precision Forgings by Radial Forging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, S.; Harrer, O.; Buchmayr, B.; Hofer, F.

    2011-01-01

    Radial forging is a multi purpose incremental forging process using four tools on the same plane. It is widely used for the forming of tool steels, super alloys as well as titanium- and refractory metals. The range of application goes from reducing the diameters of shafts, tubes, stepped shafts and axels, as well as for creating internal profiles for tubes in Near-Net-Shape and Net-Shape quality. Based on actual development of a weight optimized transmission input shaft, the specific features of radial forging technology is demonstrated. Also a Finite Element Model for the simulation of the process is shown which leads to reduced pre-processing effort and reduced computing time compared to other published simulation methods for radial forging. The finite element model can be applied to quantify the effects of different forging strategies.

  20. Non radial motions in a CDM model

    CERN Document Server

    Gambera, M

    1998-01-01

    We show how non-radial motions, originating in the outskirts of clusters of galaxies, may reduce the discrepancy between the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) predicted X-ray temperature distribution function of clusters of galaxies and the observed one and also the discrepancy between the CDM predicted two-point correlation function of clusters of galaxies and that observed. We compare Edge et al. (1990) and Henry & Arnaud (1991) data with the distribution function of X-ray temperature, calculated using Press- Schechter's (1974 - hereafter PS) theory and Evrard's (1990) prescriptions for the mass-temperature relation and taking account of the non-radial motions originating from the gravitational interaction of the quadrupole moment of the protocluster with the tidal field of the matter of the neighboring protostructures. We find that the model produces a reasonable clusters temperature distribution. We compare the two-point cluster correlation function which takes account of the non-radial motions both with that ob...

  1. Dispersion-free radial transmission lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporaso, George J [Livermore, CA; Nelson, Scott D [Patterson, CA

    2011-04-12

    A dispersion-free radial transmission line ("DFRTL") preferably for linear accelerators, having two plane conductors each with a central hole, and an electromagnetically permeable material ("EPM") between the two conductors and surrounding a channel connecting the two holes. At least one of the material parameters of relative magnetic permeability, relative dielectric permittivity, and axial width of the EPM is varied as a function of radius, so that the characteristic impedance of the DFRTL is held substantially constant, and pulse transmission therethrough is substantially dispersion-free. Preferably, the EPM is divided into concentric radial sections, with the varied material parameters held constant in each respective section but stepwise varied between sections as a step function of the radius. The radial widths of the concentric sections are selected so that pulse traversal time across each section is the same, and the varied material parameters of the concentric sections are selected to minimize traversal error.

  2. Cloaking and Magnifying Using Radial Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Kettunen, Henrik; Sihvola, Ari

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the electrostatic responses of a polarly radially anisotropic cylinder and a spherically radially anisotropic sphere. For both geometries, the permittivity components differ from each other in the radial and tangential directions. We show that choosing the ratio between these components in a certain way, these rather simple structures can be used in cloaking dielectric inclusions with arbitrary permittivity and shape in the quasi-static limit. For an ideal cloak, the contrast between the permittivity components has to tend to infinity. However, only positive permittivity values are required and a notable cloaking effect can already be observed with relatively moderate permittivity contrasts. Furthermore, we show that the polarly anisotropic cylindrical shell has a complementary capability of magnifying the response of an inner cylinder.

  3. Image scanning microscopy with radially polarized light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yun; Zhang, Yunhai; Wei, Tongda; Huang, Wei; Shi, Yaqin

    2017-03-01

    In order to improve the resolution of image scanning microscopy, we present a method based on image scanning microscopy and radially polarized light. According to the theory of image scanning microscopy, we get the effective point spread function of image scanning microscopy with the longitudinal component of radially polarized light and a 1 AU detection area, and obtain imaging results of the analyzed samples using this method. Results show that the resolution can be enhanced by 7% compared with that in image scanning microscopy with circularly polarized light, and is 1.54-fold higher than that in confocal microscopy with a pinhole of 1 AU. Additionally, the peak intensity of ISM is 1.54-fold higher than that of a confocal microscopy with a pinhole of 1 AU. In conclusion, the combination of the image scanning microscopy and the radially polarized light could improve the resolution, and it could realize high-resolution and high SNR imaging at the same time.

  4. Radial anisotropy ambient noise tomography of volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordret, Aurélien; Rivet, Diane; Shapiro, Nikolai; Jaxybulatov, Kairly; Landès, Matthieu; Koulakov, Ivan; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The use of ambient seismic noise allows us to perform surface-wave tomography of targets which could hardly be imaged by other means. The frequencies involved (~ 0.5 - 20 s), somewhere in between active seismic and regular teleseismic frequency band, make possible the high resolution imaging of intermediate-size targets like volcanic edifices. Moreover, the joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love waves dispersion curves extracted from noise correlations allows us to invert for crustal radial anisotropy. We present here the two first studies of radial anisotropy on volcanoes by showing results from Lake Toba Caldera, a super-volcano in Indonesia, and from Piton de la Fournaise volcano, a hot-spot effusive volcano on the Réunion Island (Indian Ocean). We will see how radial anisotropy can be used to infer the main fabric within a magmatic system and, consequently, its dominant type of intrusion.

  5. Individuality of breathing patterns in patients under noninvasive mechanical ventilation evidenced by chaotic global models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letellier, Christophe; Rodrigues, Giovani G.; Muir, Jean-François; Aguirre, Luis A.

    2013-03-01

    Autonomous global models based on radial basis functions were obtained from data measured from patients under noninvasive mechanical ventilation. Some of these models, which are discussed in the paper, turn out to have chaotic or quasi-periodic solutions, thus providing a first piece of evidence that the underlying dynamics of the data used to estimate the global models are likely to be chaotic or, at least, have a chaotic component. It is explicitly shown that one of such global models produces attractors characterized by a Horseshoe map, two models produce toroidal chaos, and one model produces a quasi-periodic regime. These topologically inequivalent attractors evidence the individuality of breathing profiles observed in patient under noninvasive ventilation.

  6. ABA-Cloud: support for collaborative breath research

    OpenAIRE

    Elsayed, Ibrahim; Ludescher, Thomas; King, Julian; Ager, Clemens; Trosin, Michael; Senocak, Uygar; Brezany, Peter; Feilhauer, Thomas; Amann, Anton

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces the advanced breath analysis (ABA) platform, an innovative scientific research platform for the entire breath research domain. Within the ABA project, we are investigating novel data management concepts and semantic web technologies to document breath analysis studies for the long run as well as to enable their full automatic reproducibility. We propose several concept taxonomies (a hierarchical order of terms from a glossary of terms), which can be seen as a first step ...

  7. Apparatus and method for monitoring breath acetone and diabetic diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Cao, Wenqing

    2008-08-26

    An apparatus and method for monitoring diabetes through breath acetone detection and quantitation employs a microplasma source in combination with a spectrometer. The microplasma source provides sufficient energy to produce excited acetone fragments from the breath gas that emit light. The emitted light is sent to the spectrometer, which generates an emission spectrum that is used to detect and quantify acetone in the breath gas.

  8. Development of Techniques for Trace Gas Detection in Breath

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This thesis aims to investigate the possibility of developing spectroscopic techniques for trace gas detection, with particular emphasis on their applicability to breath analysis and medical diagnostics. Whilst key breath molecules such as methane and carbon dioxide will feature throughout this work, the focus of the research is on the detection of breath acetone, a molecule strongly linked with the diabetic condition. Preliminary studies into the suitability of cavity enhanced absorption...

  9. Automatic Recognition of Breathing Route During Sleep Using Snoring Sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Tsuyoshi; Kojima, Yohichiro

    This letter classifies snoring sounds into three breathing routes (oral, nasal, and oronasal) with discriminant analysis of the power spectra and k-nearest neighbor method. It is necessary to recognize breathing route during snoring, because oral snoring is a typical symptom of sleep apnea but we cannot know our own breathing and snoring condition during sleep. As a result, about 98.8% classification rate is obtained by using leave-one-out test for performance evaluation.

  10. Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics of edge localized mode precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Z. B., E-mail: guozhipku@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing (China); WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Gwahangno 113, Yusung-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Lu [SEEE, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Wang, X. G. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing (China)

    2015-02-15

    A possible origin of edge-localized-mode (ELM) precursors based on nonlinear ideal peeling-ballooning mode is reported. Via nonlinear variational principle, a nonlinear evolution equation of the radial displacement is derived and solved, analytically. Besides an explosive growth in the initial nonlinear phase, it is found that the local displacement evolves into an oscillating state in the developed nonlinear phase. The nonlinear frequency of the ELM precursors scales as ω{sub pre}∼x{sup 1/3}ξ{sup ^}{sub ψ,in}{sup 2/3}n, with x position in radial direction, ξ{sup ^}{sub ψ,in} strength of initial perturbation, and n toroidal mode number.

  11. Contained Modes In Mirrors With Sheared Rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2010-10-08

    In mirrors with E × B rotation, a fixed azimuthal perturbation in the lab frame can appear as a wave in the rotating frame. If the rotation frequency varies with radius, the plasma-frame wave frequency will also vary radially due to the Doppler shift. A wave that propagates in the high rotation plasma region might therefore be evanescent at the plasma edge. This can lead to radially localized Alfven eigenmodes with high azimuthal mode numbers. Contained Alfven modes are found both for peaked and non-peaked rotation profiles. These modes might be useful for alpha channeling or ion heating, as the high azimuthal wave number allows the plasma wave frequency in the rotating frame to exceed the ion cyclotron frequency. __________________________________________________

  12. Mode-by-mode fluid dynamics for relativistic heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Floerchinger, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We propose to study the fluid dynamic propagation of fluctuations in relativistic heavy ion collisions differentially with respect to their azimuthal, radial and longitudinal wavelength. To this end, we introduce a background-fluctuation splitting and a Bessel-Fourier decomposition of the fluctuating modes. We demonstrate how the fluid dynamic evolution of realistic events can be build up from the propagation of individual modes. We describe the main elements of this mode-by-mode fluid dynamics, and we discuss its use in the fluid dynamic analysis of heavy ion collisions. As a first illustration, we quantify to what extent only fluctuations of sufficiently large radial wave length contribute to harmonic flow coefficients. We find that fluctuations of short wave length are suppressed not only due to larger dissipative effects, but also due to a geometrical averaging over the freeze-out hyper surface. In this way, our study further substantiates the picture that harmonic flow coefficients give access to a coars...

  13. Concepts of radial and angular kinetic energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jens Peder; Schleich, W.P.

    2002-01-01

    We consider a general central-field system in D dimensions and show that the division of the kinetic energy into radial and angular parts proceeds differently in the wave-function picture and the Weyl-Wigner phase-space picture, Thus, the radial and angular kinetic energies are different quantiti...... in the two pictures, containing different physical information, but the relation between them is well defined. We discuss this relation and illustrate its nature by examples referring to a free particle and to a ground-state hydrogen atom....

  14. Precise Near-Infrared Radial Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Plavchan, Peter; Gagne, Jonathan; Furlan, Elise; Brinkworth, Carolyn; Bottom, Michael; Tanner, Angelle; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; White, Russel; Davison, Cassy; Mills, Sean; Beichman, Chas; Johnson, John Asher; Ciardi, David; Wallace, Kent; Mennesson, Bertrand; Vasisht, Gautam; Prato, Lisa; Kane, Stephen; Crawford, Sam; Crawford, Tim; Sung, Keeyoon; Drouin, Brian; Lin, Sean; Leifer, Stephanie; Catanzarite, Joe; Henry, Todd; von Braun, Kaspar; Walp, Bernie; Geneser, Claire; Ogden, Nick; Stufflebeam, Andrew; Pohl, Garrett; Regan, Joe

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of two 2.3 micron near-infrared radial velocity surveys to detect exoplanets around 36 nearby and young M dwarfs. We use the CSHELL spectrograph (R ~46,000) at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility, combined with an isotopic methane absorption gas cell for common optical path relative wavelength calibration. We have developed a sophisticated RV forward modeling code that accounts for fringing and other instrumental artifacts present in the spectra. With a spectral grasp of only 5 nm, we are able to reach long-term radial velocity dispersions of ~20-30 m/s on our survey targets.

  15. Radial excitations of current-carrying vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Betti; Michel, Florent; Peter, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    We report on the existence of a new type of cosmic string solutions in the Witten model with U (1) × U (1) symmetry. These solutions are superconducting with radially excited condensates that exist for both gauged and ungauged currents. Our results suggest that these new configurations can be macroscopically stable, but microscopically unstable to radial perturbations. Nevertheless, they might have important consequences for the network evolution and particle emission. We discuss these effects and their possible signatures. We also comment on analogies with non-relativistic condensed matter systems where these solutions may be observable.

  16. Radial Acceleration Relation in Rotationally Supported Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaugh, Stacy S.; Lelli, Federico; Schombert, James M.

    2016-11-01

    We report a correlation between the radial acceleration traced by rotation curves and that predicted by the observed distribution of baryons. The same relation is followed by 2693 points in 153 galaxies with very different morphologies, masses, sizes, and gas fractions. The correlation persists even when dark matter dominates. Consequently, the dark matter contribution is fully specified by that of the baryons. The observed scatter is small and largely dominated by observational uncertainties. This radial acceleration relation is tantamount to a natural law for rotating galaxies.

  17. Five Lectures on Radial Basis Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Powell, Mike J.D.

    2005-01-01

    Professor Mike J. D. Powell spent three weeks at IMM in November - December 2004. During the visit he gave five lectures on radial basis functions. These notes are a TeXified version of his hand-outs, made by Hans Bruun Nielsen, IMM.......Professor Mike J. D. Powell spent three weeks at IMM in November - December 2004. During the visit he gave five lectures on radial basis functions. These notes are a TeXified version of his hand-outs, made by Hans Bruun Nielsen, IMM....

  18. Spinning, Breathing, and Flapping: Ion Periodicities in Saturn's Middle Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramer, K. M.; Kivelson, M.; Khurana, K. K.; Jia, X.; Sergis, N.; Walker, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    anticorrelated with the pressure perturbations. The anticorrelation arises because the tail is highly stretched and the plasma sheet is thin. However, at 10.5 Rs, although the data show that the magnetic pressure perturbation is still near its minimum value, the particle pressure perturbation approaches a node, contrary to what was seen in the 7.5 Rs radial bin. The simulation helps us to understand that this low measured pressure arises because the thin plasma sheet is displaced upward. The northward displacement of the plasma sheet increases with downtail distance, so flapping has little effect at 7.5 Rs, but becomes significant by 10.5 Rs. The pressure node results from plasma sheet flapping. We will show that the puzzling mix of peaks and troughs found in the data, vastly different from one local time and radial bin to the next can be interpreted in the context provided by the MHD simulation. We now understand that the signals arise as the concurrent action of a rotating perturbation moving around the middle magnetosphere, in-and-out breathing of the magnetosphere, and the up-and-down flapping of the plasma sheet.

  19. Can resistive breathing injure the lung? Implications for COPD exacerbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilakopoulos T

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Theodoros Vassilakopoulos, Dimitrios Toumpanakis Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece Abstract: In obstructive lung diseases, airway inflammation leads to bronchospasm and thus resistive breathing, especially during exacerbations. This commentary discusses experimental evidence that resistive breathing per se (the mechanical stimulus in the absence of underlying airway inflammation leads to lung injury and inflammation (mechanotransduction. The potential implications of resistive breathing-induced mechanotrasduction in COPD exacerbations are presented along with the available clinical evidence. Keywords: resistive breathing, COPD, mechanotransduction, bronchoconstriction, inflammation

  20. Sports-related lung injury during breath-hold diving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Mijacika

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The number of people practising recreational breath-hold diving is constantly growing, thereby increasing the need for knowledge of the acute and chronic effects such a sport could have on the health of participants. Breath-hold diving is potentially dangerous, mainly because of associated extreme environmental factors such as increased hydrostatic pressure, hypoxia, hypercapnia, hypothermia and strenuous exercise. In this article we focus on the effects of breath-hold diving on pulmonary function. Respiratory symptoms have been reported in almost 25% of breath-hold divers after repetitive diving sessions. Acutely, repetitive breath-hold diving may result in increased transpulmonary capillary pressure, leading to noncardiogenic oedema and/or alveolar haemorrhage. Furthermore, during a breath-hold dive, the chest and lungs are compressed by the increasing pressure of water. Rapid changes in lung air volume during descent or ascent can result in a lung injury known as pulmonary barotrauma. Factors that may influence individual susceptibility to breath-hold diving-induced lung injury range from underlying pulmonary or cardiac dysfunction to genetic predisposition. According to the available data, breath-holding does not result in chronic lung injury. However, studies of large populations of breath-hold divers are necessary to firmly exclude long-term lung damage.

  1. Sports-related lung injury during breath-hold diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijacika, Tanja; Dujic, Zeljko

    2016-12-01

    The number of people practising recreational breath-hold diving is constantly growing, thereby increasing the need for knowledge of the acute and chronic effects such a sport could have on the health of participants. Breath-hold diving is potentially dangerous, mainly because of associated extreme environmental factors such as increased hydrostatic pressure, hypoxia, hypercapnia, hypothermia and strenuous exercise.In this article we focus on the effects of breath-hold diving on pulmonary function. Respiratory symptoms have been reported in almost 25% of breath-hold divers after repetitive diving sessions. Acutely, repetitive breath-hold diving may result in increased transpulmonary capillary pressure, leading to noncardiogenic oedema and/or alveolar haemorrhage. Furthermore, during a breath-hold dive, the chest and lungs are compressed by the increasing pressure of water. Rapid changes in lung air volume during descent or ascent can result in a lung injury known as pulmonary barotrauma. Factors that may influence individual susceptibility to breath-hold diving-induced lung injury range from underlying pulmonary or cardiac dysfunction to genetic predisposition.According to the available data, breath-holding does not result in chronic lung injury. However, studies of large populations of breath-hold divers are necessary to firmly exclude long-term lung damage.

  2. Breath Analysis in Disease Diagnosis: Methodological Considerations and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Lourenço

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Breath analysis is a promising field with great potential for non-invasive diagnosis of a number of disease states. Analysis of the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs in breath with an acceptable accuracy are assessed by means of using analytical techniques with high sensitivity, accuracy, precision, low response time, and low detection limit, which are desirable characteristics for the detection of VOCs in human breath. “Breath fingerprinting”, indicative of a specific clinical status, relies on the use of multivariate statistics methods with powerful in-built algorithms. The need for standardisation of sample collection and analysis is the main issue concerning breath analysis, blocking the introduction of breath tests into clinical practice. This review describes recent scientific developments in basic research and clinical applications, namely issues concerning sampling and biochemistry, highlighting the diagnostic potential of breath analysis for disease diagnosis. Several considerations that need to be taken into account in breath analysis are documented here, including the growing need for metabolomics to deal with breath profiles.

  3. A simple optical fiber interferometer based breathing sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xixi; Liu, Dejun; Kumar, Rahul; Ng, Wai Pang; Fu, Yong-qing; Yuan, Jinhui; Yu, Chongxiu; Wu, Yufeng; Zhou, Guorui; Farrell, Gerald; Semenova, Yuliya; Wu, Qiang

    2017-03-01

    A breathing sensor has been experimentally demonstrated based on a singlemode-multimode-singlemode (SMS) fiber structure which is attached to a thin plastic film in an oxygen mask. By detecting power variations due to the macro bending applied to the SMS section by each inhalation and exhalation process, the breath state can be monitored. The proposed sensor is capable of distinguishing different types of breathing conditions including regular and irregular breath state. The sensor can be used in a strong electric/magnetic field and radioactive testing systems such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and computed tomography (CT) examinations where electrical sensors are restricted.

  4. Using acoustic sensors to discriminate between nasal and mouth breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Kevin; Yuan, Peng; Coyle, Damian

    2012-01-01

    The recommendation to change breathing patterns from the mouth to the nose can have a significantly positive impact upon the general well being of the individual. We classify nasal and mouth breathing by using an acoustic sensor and intelligent signal processing techniques. The overall purpose is to investigate the possibility of identifying the differences in patterns between nasal and mouth breathing in order to integrate this information into a decision support system which will form the basis of a patient monitoring and motivational feedback system to recommend the change from mouth to nasal breathing.

  5. Progress of air-breathing cathode in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zejie; Mahadevan, Gurumurthy Dummi; Wu, Yicheng; Zhao, Feng

    2017-07-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is an emerging technology to produce green energy and vanquish the effects of environmental contaminants. Cathodic reactions are vital for high electrical power density generated from MFCs. Recently tremendous attentions were paid towards developing high performance air-breathing cathodes. A typical air-breathing cathode comprises of electrode substrate, catalyst layer, and air-diffusion layer. Prior researches demonstrated that each component influenced the performance of air-breathing cathode MFCs. This review summarized the progress in development of the individual component and elaborated main factors to the performance of air-breathing cathode.

  6. A fibre-optic oxygen sensor for monitoring human breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rongsheng; Formenti, Federico; Obeid, Andy; Hahn, Clive E W; Farmery, Andrew D

    2013-09-01

    The development and construction of a tapered-tip fibre-optic fluorescence based oxygen sensor is described. The sensor is suitable for fast and real-time monitoring of human breathing. The sensitivity and response time of the oxygen sensor were evaluated in vitro with a gas pressure chamber system, where oxygen partial pressure was rapidly changed between 5 and 15 kPa, and then in vivo in five healthy adult participants who synchronized their breathing to a metronome set at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 breaths min(-1). A Datex Ultima medical gas analyser was used to monitor breathing rate as a comparator. The sensor's response time in vitro was less than 150 ms, which allows accurate continuous measurement of inspired and expired oxygen pressure. Measurements of breathing rate by means of our oxygen sensor and of the Datex Ultima were in strong agreement. The results demonstrate that the device can reliably resolve breathing rates up to 60 breaths min(-1), and that it is a suitable cost-effective alternative for monitoring breathing rates and end-tidal oxygen partial pressure in the clinical setting. The rapid response time of the sensor may allow its use for monitoring rapid breathing rates as occur in children and the newborn.

  7. Optimal technique for deep breathing exercises after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerdahl, E

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac surgery patients often develop a restrictive pulmonary impairment and gas exchange abnormalities in the early postoperative period. Chest physiotherapy is routinely prescribed in order to reduce or prevent these complications. Besides early mobilization, positioning and shoulder girdle exercises, various breathing exercises have been implemented as a major component of postoperative care. A variety of deep breathing maneuvres are recommended to the spontaneously breathing patient to reduce atelectasis and to improve lung function in the early postoperative period. Different breathing exercises are recommended in different parts of the world, and there is no consensus about the most effective breathing technique after cardiac surgery. Arbitrary instructions are given, and recommendations on performance and duration vary between hospitals. Deep breathing exercises are a major part of this therapy, but scientific evidence for the efficacy has been lacking until recently, and there is a lack of trials describing how postoperative breathing exercises actually should be performed. The purpose of this review is to provide a brief overview of postoperative breathing exercises for patients undergoing cardiac surgery via sternotomy, and to discuss and suggest an optimal technique for the performance of deep breathing exercises.

  8. A young male with shortness of breath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Fahmi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of primary mediastinal seminoma, which presented initially with shortness of breath and a swelling in upper part of anterior chest wall. The diagnosis of primary mediastinal seminoma was established on the basis of histologic findings and was confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis. Abdominal, pelvis and cerebral CT scan, testicular ultrasound and TC-99 MDP bone scintigraphy were negative. Chemotherapy was initiated with B.E.P. protocol (Bleomycin, Etoposide, Cisplatinum; the patient received four cycles of chemotherapy. After 8 months, the patient was seen in the clinic; he was well.

  9. Extensive Epidermoid Cyst and Breathing Difficulty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Dantas Soares

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermoid cysts are common cystic lesions in the skin, ovaries, and testicles, but their occurrence in the oral cavity is uncommon. They consist of cysts delimited by a fibrous capsule without cutaneous annexes and are lined by stratified squamous epithelium. The differential diagnosis includes ranula, dermoid cysts, and lingual thyroid. Despite their benign presentation, these cysts can cause functional limitations, requiring special clinical attention for extensive lesions located in regions that preserve vital structures. This paper aims to report a case of epidermoid cyst in patient with swallowing and breathing difficulty, highlighting the clinical and surgical planning.

  10. Exhaled Breath Condensate for Proteomic Biomarker Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean W. Harshman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Exhaled breath condensate (EBC has been established as a potential source of respiratory biomarkers. Compared to the numerous small molecules identified, the protein content of EBC has remained relatively unstudied due to the methodological and technical difficulties surrounding EBC analysis. In this review, we discuss the proteins identified in EBC, by mass spectrometry, focusing on the significance of those proteins identified. We will also review the limitations surrounding mass spectral EBC protein analysis emphasizing recommendations to enhance EBC protein identifications by mass spectrometry. Finally, we will provide insight into the future directions of the EBC proteomics field.

  11. Exhaled breath condensate pH assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Michael D; Hunt, John

    2012-08-01

    Airway pH is central to the physiologic function and cellular biology of the airway. The causes of airway acidification include (1) hypopharyngeal gastric acid reflux with or without aspiration through the vocal cords, (2) inhalation of acid fog or gas (such as chlorine), and (3) intrinsic airway acidification caused by altered airway pH homeostasis in infectious and inflammatory disease processes. The recognition that relevant airway pH deviations occur in lung diseases is opening doors to new simple and inexpensive therapies. This recognition has resulted partly from the ability to use exhaled breath condensate as a window on airway acid-base balance.

  12. System of Optoelectronic Sensors for Breath Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikołajczyk Janusz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes an integrated laser absorption system as a potential tool for breath analysis for clinical diagnostics, online therapy monitoring and metabolic disorder control. The sensors operate basing on cavity enhanced spectroscopy and multi-pass spectroscopy supported by wavelength modulation spectroscopy. The aspects concerning selection of operational spectral range and minimization of interference are also discussed. Tests results of the constructed devices collected with reference samples of biomarkers are also presented. The obtained data provide an opportunity to analyse applicability of optoelectronic sensors in medical screening.

  13. Extensive Epidermoid Cyst and Breathing Difficulty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Ciro Dantas; Gurgel, Alberto Costa; de Souza Júnior, Francisco de Assis; de Oliveira, Samila Neres; de Carvalho, Maria Goretti Freire; Oliveira, Hanieri Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Epidermoid cysts are common cystic lesions in the skin, ovaries, and testicles, but their occurrence in the oral cavity is uncommon. They consist of cysts delimited by a fibrous capsule without cutaneous annexes and are lined by stratified squamous epithelium. The differential diagnosis includes ranula, dermoid cysts, and lingual thyroid. Despite their benign presentation, these cysts can cause functional limitations, requiring special clinical attention for extensive lesions located in regions that preserve vital structures. This paper aims to report a case of epidermoid cyst in patient with swallowing and breathing difficulty, highlighting the clinical and surgical planning. PMID:26180645

  14. Appropriate sample bags and syringes for preserving breath samples in breath odor research : a technical note

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkel, E. G.; Tangerman, A.

    2008-01-01

    It is now generally accepted that the volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide are the main contributors to halitosis when of oropharyngeal origin. The VSCs hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan are the major causes of bad breath in oral malodour where

  15. Stack air-breathing membraneless glucose microfluidic biofuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-de-la-Rosa, J.; Moreno-Zuria, A.; Vallejo-Becerra, V.; Arjona, N.; Guerra-Balcázar, M.; Ledesma-García, J.; Arriaga, L. G.

    2016-11-01

    A novel stacked microfluidic fuel cell design comprising re-utilization of the anodic and cathodic solutions on the secondary cell is presented. This membraneless microfluidic fuel cell employs porous flow-through electrodes in a “V”-shape cell architecture. Enzymatic bioanodic arrays based on glucose oxidase were prepared by immobilizing the enzyme onto Toray carbon paper electrodes using tetrabutylammonium bromide, Nafion and glutaraldehyde. These electrodes were characterized through the scanning electrochemical microscope technique, evidencing a good electrochemical response due to the electronic transference observed with the presence of glucose over the entire of the electrode. Moreover, the evaluation of this microfluidic fuel cell with an air-breathing system in a double-cell mode showed a performance of 0.8951 mWcm-2 in a series connection (2.2822mAcm-2, 1.3607V), and 0.8427 mWcm-2 in a parallel connection (3.5786mAcm-2, 0.8164V).

  16. Investigation of radial wire arrays for inertial confinement fusion and radiation effects science.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, Jason Dimitri; Bland, Simon Nicholas (Imperial College, London); McBride, Ryan D.; Chittenden, Jeremy Paul (Imperial College, London); Suzuki-Vidal, Francisco Andres (Imperial College, London); Jennings, Christopher A.; Hall, Gareth Neville (Imperial College, London); Ampleford, David J.; Peyton, Bradley Philip; Lebedev, Sergey V. (Imperial College, London); Cleveland, Monica; Rogers, Thomas John; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Jones, Brent Manley; Jones, Michael C.

    2010-02-01

    Radial wire arrays provide an alternative x-ray source for Z-pinch driven Inertial Confinement Fusion. These arrays, where wires are positioned radially outwards from a central cathode to a concentric anode, have the potential to drive a more compact ICF hohlraum. A number of experiments were performed on the 7MA Saturn Generator. These experiments studied a number of potential risks in scaling radial wire arrays up from the 1MA level, where they have been shown to provide similar x-ray outputs to larger diameter cylindrical arrays, to the higher current levels required for ICF. Data indicates that at 7MA radial arrays can obtain higher power densities than cylindrical wire arrays, so may be of use for x-ray driven ICF on future facilities. Even at the 7MA level, data using Saturn's short pulse mode indicates that a radial array should be able to drive a compact hohlraum to temperatures {approx}92eV, which may be of interest for opacity experiments. These arrays are also shown to have applications to jet production for laboratory astrophysics. MHD simulations require additional physics to match the observed behavior.

  17. One-year results of cemented bipolar radial head prostheses for comminuted radial head fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laun, Reinhold

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Comminuted radial head fractures (Mason type III continue to pose a challenge to orthopedic surgeons. When internal fixation is not possible, radial head arthroplasty has been advocated as the treatment of choice. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate clinical and radiological short-term results of patients with Mason type III radial head fractures treated with a cemented bipolar radial prosthesis. Methods: Twelve patients received cemented bipolar radial head hemiarthroplasty for comminuted radial head fractures. In all patients a CT scan was obtained prior to surgical treatment to assess all associated injuries. Postoperatively an early motion protocol was applied. All patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically at an average of 12.7 months.Results: According to the Mayo Modified Wrist Score, the Mayo Elbow Performance Score, the functional rating index of Broberg and Morrey, and the DASH Score good to excellent results were obtained. Grip strength and range of motion were almost at the level of the unaffected contralateral side. Patient satisfaction was high, no instability or signs of loosening of the implant, and only mild signs of osteoarthritis were seen.Conclusion: Overall good to excellent short-term results for primary arthroplasty for comminuted radial head fractures were observed. These encouraging results warrant the conduction of further studies with long-term follow-up and more cases to see if these short-term results can be maintained over time.

  18. The Early Outcomes with Titanium Radial Head Implants in the Treatment of Radial Head Comminuted Fractures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jijun; YANG Shuhua; HU Yong

    2007-01-01

    The study assessed the early functional outcomes with cemented titanium implants of ra- dius in the treatment of comminuted fractures of radial heads. The functional outcomes of arthro- plasty with cemented titanium implants of radius in the treatment of radial head fractures (Mason Type Ⅲ: 6; Mason Type Ⅳ: 4) in l0 consecutive patients (mean age, 38 years) were evaluated over a mean time of 23.7 months (18-31 months). The patients were assessed on the basis of physical ex- amination, functional rating (Mayo) and radiographic findings. The parameters evaluated included motion, stability, pain, and grip strength. Five patients were considered to have excellent results, 4 patients had good results and 1 patient had fairly good results. There were no cases of infection, prosthetic failure, heterotopic ossification or dislocation. When medial collateral ligament was injured, radial head became the main stabilizing structure of the elbow. Titanium radial head implant may provide the stability similar to that of native radial head. We believe that titanium radial head im- plants may be indicated for the Mason Type Ⅲ and Mason Type Ⅳ radial head fractures.

  19. RBF networks with mixed radial basis functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciftcioglu, O.; Sariyildiz, I.S.

    2000-01-01

    After the introduction to neural network technology as multivariable function approximation, radial basis function (RBF) networks have been studied in many different aspects in recent years. From the theoretical viewpoint, approximation and uniqueness of the interpolation is studied and it has been

  20. Determining Enzyme Activity by Radial Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Bill D.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses advantages of radial diffusion assay in determining presence of enzyme and/or rough approximation of amount of enzyme activities. Procedures are included for the preparation of starch-agar plates, and the application and determination of enzyme. Techniques using plant materials (homogenates, tissues, ungerminated embryos, and seedlings)…

  1. Dual-radial cell thermionic fuel element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, Charles W.

    A dual-radial cell thermionic fuel element (TFE) has been proposed and partially evaluated. The cell has the capacity to produce considerably more power per gram of fuel than does a single-cell TFE, with a total electrical power in a fast reactor system of several hundred kWs, conservatively operated.

  2. Explaining Adaptive Radial-Based Direction Sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Bauwens (Luc); C.S. Bos (Charles); H.K. van Dijk (Herman); R.D. van Oest (Rutger)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn this short paper we summarize the computational steps of Adaptive Radial-Based Direction Sampling (ARDS), which can be used for Bayesian analysis of ill behaved target densities. We consider one simulation experiment in order to illustrate the good performance of ARDS relative to the

  3. Determining Enzyme Activity by Radial Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Bill D.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses advantages of radial diffusion assay in determining presence of enzyme and/or rough approximation of amount of enzyme activities. Procedures are included for the preparation of starch-agar plates, and the application and determination of enzyme. Techniques using plant materials (homogenates, tissues, ungerminated embryos, and seedlings)…

  4. Radial Distance Estimation with Tapered Whisker Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sejoon; Kim, DaeEun

    2017-07-19

    Rats use their whiskers as tactile sensors to sense their environment. Active whisking, moving whiskers back and forth continuously, is one of prominent features observed in rodents. They can discriminate different textures or extract features of a nearby object such as size, shape and distance through active whisking. There have been studies to localize objects with artificial whiskers inspired by rat whiskers. The linear whisker model based on beam theory has been used to estimate the radial distance, that is, the distance between the base of the whisker and a target object. In this paper, we investigate deflection angle measurements instead of forces or moments, based on a linear tapered whisker model to see the role of tapered whiskers found in real animals. We analyze how accurately this model estimates the radial distance, and quantify the estimation errors and noise sensitivity. We also compare the linear model simulation and nonlinear numerical solutions. It is shown that the radial distance can be estimated using deflection angles at two different positions on the tapered whisker. We argue that the tapered whisker has an advantage of estimating the radial distance better, as compared to an untapered whisker, and active sensing allows that estimation without the whisker's material property and thickness or the moment at base. In addition, we investigate the potential of passive sensing for tactile localization.

  5. Radial-Gap Motor for Ship Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamoto, Toshiyuki; Yokoyama, Minoru

    The KHI team has developed radial gap high-temperature superconducting (HTS) motors of three sizes, 1 MW-class, 3 MW, and 20 MW, to be used for electric propulsion systems for ships. The volumetric torque density of the assembled 3 MW HTS motor was recorded at 40 kNm/m3 in the load test; the world's highest in the class.

  6. Screening Sleep Disordered Breathing in Stroke Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Väyrynen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In acute stroke, OSA has been found to impair rehabilitation and increase mortality but the effect of central apnea is more unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of using limited ambulatory recording system (sleep mattress to evaluate nocturnal breathing and EOG-electrodes for sleep staging in sleep disordered breathing (SDB diagnostics in mild acute cerebral ischemia patients and to discover the prevalence of various SDB-patterns among these patients. 42 patients with mild ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack were studied. OSA was found in 22 patients (52.4%. Central apnea was found in two patients (4.8% and sustained partial obstruction in only one patient (2.4%. Sleep staging with EOG-electrodes only yielded a similar outcome as scoring with standard rules. OSA was found to be common even after mild stroke. Its early diagnosis and treatment would be favourable in order to improve recovery and reduce mortality. Our results suggest that OSA can be assessed by a limited recording setting with EOG-electrodes, sleep mattress, and pulse oximetry.

  7. Patient-specific simulation of tidal breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, M.; Wells, A. K.; Jones, I. P.; Hamill, I. S.; Veeckmans, B.; Vos, W.; Lefevre, C.; Fetitia, C.

    2016-03-01

    Patient-specific simulation of air flows in lungs is now straightforward using segmented airways trees from CT scans as the basis for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. These models generally use static geometries, which do not account for the motion of the lungs and its influence on important clinical indicators, such as airway resistance. This paper is concerned with the simulation of tidal breathing, including the dynamic motion of the lungs, and the required analysis workflow. Geometries are based on CT scans obtained at the extremes of the breathing cycle, Total Lung Capacity (TLC) and Functional Residual Capacity (FRC). It describes how topologically consistent geometries are obtained at TLC and FRC, using a `skeleton' of the network of airway branches. From this a 3D computational mesh which morphs between TLC and FRC is generated. CFD results for a number of patient-specific cases, healthy and asthmatic, are presented. Finally their potential use in evaluation of the progress of the disease is discussed, focusing on an important clinical indicator, the airway resistance.

  8. Epiglottic movements during breathing in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amis, T C; O'Neill, N; Di Somma, E; Wheatley, J R

    1998-01-01

    Using X-ray fluoroscopy we measured antero-posterior (A–P) and cranio-caudal (C–C) displacements of the epiglottic tip (ET), corniculate cartilage and hyoid bone in seven seated, normal human subjects (age 34 ± 3 years; mean ±s.e.m.; 4 males, 3 females) breathing via a nasal mask or mouthpiece with (RL) and without (UB) a fixed resistive load.During UB, via either mouth or nose, there were no significant A-P ET movements. During RL via the nose the ET at peak expiratory flow was 2.6 ± 1.3 mm cranial to its position at peak inspiratory flow (P <0.05, ANOVA). C–C movements of the ET correlated strongly with C-C movements of the corniculate cartilage and hyoid bone.The ET, corniculate cartilage and hyoid bone (at zero airflow) were situated more caudally during oral UB than for any other condition.When present, epiglottic movements during breathing do not appear to be independent of those of the larynx and hyoid. Furthermore, epiglottic position may be related to the level of upper airway resistance. PMID:9729637

  9. Exhaled Breath Condensate: Technical and Diagnostic Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstathia M. Konstantinidi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate the 30-year progress of research on exhaled breath condensate in a disease-based approach. Methods. We searched PubMed/Medline, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar using the following keywords: exhaled breath condensate (EBC, biomarkers, pH, asthma, gastroesophageal reflux (GERD, smoking, COPD, lung cancer, NSCLC, mechanical ventilation, cystic fibrosis, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, interstitial lung diseases, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, and drugs. Results. We found 12600 related articles in total in Google Scholar, 1807 in ScienceDirect, and 1081 in PubMed/Medline, published from 1980 to October 2014. 228 original investigation and review articles were eligible. Conclusions. There is rapidly increasing number of innovative articles, covering all the areas of modern respiratory medicine and expanding EBC potential clinical applications to other fields of internal medicine. However, the majority of published papers represent the results of small-scale studies and thus current knowledge must be further evaluated in large cohorts. In regard to the potential clinical use of EBC-analysis, several limitations must be pointed out, including poor reproducibility of biomarkers and absence of large surveys towards determination of reference-normal values. In conclusion, contemporary EBC-analysis is an intriguing achievement, but still in early stage when it comes to its application in clinical practice.

  10. A fully integrated standalone portable cavity ringdown breath acetone analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meixiu; Jiang, Chenyu; Gong, Zhiyong; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Chen, Zhuying; Wang, Zhennan; Kang, Meiling; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2015-09-01

    Breath analysis is a promising new technique for nonintrusive disease diagnosis and metabolic status monitoring. One challenging issue in using a breath biomarker for potential particular disease screening is to find a quantitative relationship between the concentration of the breath biomarker and clinical diagnostic parameters of the specific disease. In order to address this issue, we need a new instrument that is capable of conducting real-time, online breath analysis with high data throughput, so that a large scale of clinical test (more subjects) can be achieved in a short period of time. In this work, we report a fully integrated, standalone, portable analyzer based on the cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique for near-real time, online breath acetone measurements. The performance of the portable analyzer in measurements of breath acetone was interrogated and validated by using the certificated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results show that this new analyzer is useful for reliable online (online introduction of a breath sample without pre-treatment) breath acetone analysis with high sensitivity (57 ppb) and high data throughput (one data per second). Subsequently, the validated breath analyzer was employed for acetone measurements in 119 human subjects under various situations. The instrument design, packaging, specifications, and future improvements were also described. From an optical ringdown cavity operated by the lab-set electronics reported previously to this fully integrated standalone new instrument, we have enabled a new scientific tool suited for large scales of breath acetone analysis and created an instrument platform that can even be adopted for study of other breath biomarkers by using different lasers and ringdown mirrors covering corresponding spectral fingerprints.

  11. Radial wave crystals: radially periodic structures from anisotropic metamaterials for engineering acoustic or electromagnetic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent, Daniel; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2009-08-07

    We demonstrate that metamaterials with anisotropic properties can be used to develop a new class of periodic structures that has been named radial wave crystals. They can be sonic or photonic, and wave propagation along the radial directions is obtained through Bloch states like in usual sonic or photonic crystals. The band structure of the proposed structures can be tailored in a large amount to get exciting novel wave phenomena. For example, it is shown that acoustical cavities based on radial sonic crystals can be employed as passive devices for beam forming or dynamically orientated antennas for sound localization.

  12. Variations in the usage and composition of a radial cocktail during radial access coronary angiography procedures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pate, G

    2011-10-01

    A survey was conducted of medication administered during radial artery cannulation for coronary angiography in 2009 in Ireland; responses were obtained for 15 of 20 centres, in 5 of which no radial access procedures were undertaken. All 10 (100%) centres which provided data used heparin and one or more anti-spasmodics; verapamil in 9 (90%), nitrate in 1 (10%), both in 2 (20%). There were significant variations in the doses used. Further work needs to be done to determine the optimum cocktail to prevent radial artery injury following coronary angiography.

  13. Radial keratotomy enhancements for residual myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayton, J L; Van der Karr, M; Sanders, V

    1997-01-01

    A systematic method of performing radial keratotomy enhancements in undercorrected eyes may increase accuracy and predictability and decrease the number of procedures required. A consecutive series of 372 radial keratotomy procedures, including 110 eyes that received enhancements under a systematic protocol, was evaluated. Radial keratotomy was performed using the Reliable Keratotomy software, which uses the Thornton nomogram for primary radial keratotomy and provides a systematic method of performing enhancements. Ninety eyes (24%) received one enhancement, 16 eyes (4%) received two enhancements, and four eyes (1%) received three enhancements. Mean final spherical equivalent refraction was -0.44 D (-4.00 to +1.875 D, SD 0.86) for eyes that did not receive enhancements and -0.44 D (-2.50 to +1.00 D, SD 0.61) for eyes that had enhancements. Mean final residual myopia for the entire cohort was -0.44 D (-4.00 to +1.875 D, SD 0.79). At final examination, 242 (65%) eyes had a refraction within +/- 0.5 D and 298 (80%) within +/- 1.00. Among eyes that received enhancements, 75 (68%) had a refraction within +/- 0.50 D, and 89 (81%) within +/- 1.00 D; 40 eyes (36%) had uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 or better, 99 eyes (90%) 20/40 or better, and all but one eye (99%) 20/80 or better at the final postoperative examination. Among the entire cohort, 130 eyes (35%) had uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 or better, 312 (84%) had 20/40 or better, and 350 (94%) had 20/80 or better. No eye lost more than one line of spectacle-corrected visual acuity. A systematic approach to enhancement of undercorrected eyes after radial keratotomy, combined with accurate surgery, may reduce the need for multiple enhancements as well as the overcorrection rate, and provide improved uncorrected visual acuity.

  14. Normal modes and mode transformation of pure electron vortex beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirunavukkarasu, G.; Mousley, M.; Babiker, M.; Yuan, J.

    2017-02-01

    Electron vortex beams constitute the first class of matter vortex beams which are currently routinely produced in the laboratory. Here, we briefly review the progress of this nascent field and put forward a natural quantum basis set which we show is suitable for the description of electron vortex beams. The normal modes are truncated Bessel beams (TBBs) defined in the aperture plane or the Fourier transform of the transverse structure of the TBBs (FT-TBBs) in the focal plane of a lens with the said aperture. As these modes are eigenfunctions of the axial orbital angular momentum operator, they can provide a complete description of the two-dimensional transverse distribution of the wave function of any electron vortex beam in such a system, in analogy with the prominent role Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams played in the description of optical vortex beams. The characteristics of the normal modes of TBBs and FT-TBBs are described, including the quantized orbital angular momentum (in terms of the winding number l) and the radial index p>0. We present the experimental realization of such beams using computer-generated holograms. The mode analysis can be carried out using astigmatic transformation optics, demonstrating close analogy with the astigmatic mode transformation between LG and Hermite-Gaussian beams. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  15. Definition, discrimination, diagnosis and treatment of central breathing disturbances during sleep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Randerath, Winfried; Verbraecken, Johan; Andreas, Stefan; Arzt, Michael; Bloch, Konrad E; Brack, Thomas; Buyse, Bertien; De Backer, Wilfried; Eckert, Danny Joel; Grote, Ludger; Hagmeyer, Lars; Hedner, Jan; Jennum, Poul; La Rovere, Maria Teresa; Miltz, Carla; McNicholas, Walter T; Montserrat, Josep; Naughton, Matthew; Pepin, Jean-Louis; Pevernagie, Dirk; Sanner, Bernd; Testelmans, Dries; Tonia, Thomy; Vrijsen, Bart; Wijkstra, Peter; Levy, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of central breathing disturbances during sleep has become increasingly obvious. They present as central sleep apnoeas (CSAs) and hypopnoeas, periodic breathing with apnoeas, or irregular breathing in patients with cardiovascular, other internal or neurological disorders, and can emerg

  16. 42 CFR 84.152 - Breathing tube test; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Respirators § 84.152 Breathing tube test; minimum requirements. (a)(1) Type A and Type B supplied-air respirators shall employ one or two flexible breathing tubes of the nonkinking type which extend from the... employed on Type C supplied-air respirators of the continuous flow class shall meet the...

  17. Acute effects of cannabis on breath-holding duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Samantha G; Metrik, Jane

    2016-08-01

    Distress intolerance (an individual's perceived or actual inability to tolerate distressing psychological or physiological states) is associated with cannabis use. It is unknown whether a biobehavioral index of distress intolerance, breath-holding duration, is acutely influenced (increased or decreased) by cannabis. Such information may further inform understanding of the expression of psychological or physiological distress postcannabis use. This within-subjects study examined whether smoked marijuana with 2.7%-3.0% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), relative to placebo, acutely changed duration of breath holding. Participants (n = 88; 65.9% male) were nontreatment-seeking frequent cannabis users who smoked placebo or active THC cigarette on two separate study days and completed a breath-holding task postsmoking. Controlling for baseline breath-holding duration and participant sex, THC produced significantly shorter breath-holding durations relative to placebo. There was a significant interaction of drug administration × frequency of cannabis use, such that THC decreased breath-holding time among less frequent but not among more frequent users. Findings indicate that cannabis may exacerbate distress intolerance (via shorter breath-holding durations). As compared to less frequent cannabis users, frequent users display tolerance to cannabis' acute effects including increased ability to tolerate respiratory distress when holding breath. Objective measures of distress intolerance are sensitive to contextual factors such as acute drug intoxication, and may inform the link between cannabis use and the expression of psychological distress. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Health, social and economical consequences of sleep-disordered breathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Kjellberg, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The objective direct and indirect costs of sleep-disordered breathing (snoring, sleep apnoea (SA) and obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)) and the treatment are incompletely described.......The objective direct and indirect costs of sleep-disordered breathing (snoring, sleep apnoea (SA) and obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)) and the treatment are incompletely described....

  19. Symptoms of sleep disordered breathing and risk of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Sofie; Clark, Alice Jessie; Salo, Paula;

    2013-01-01

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) has been associated with oxidative stress, inflammation, and altered hormonal levels, all of which could affect the risk of cancer. The aim of the study is to examine if symptoms of SDB including snoring, breathing cessations, and daytime sleepiness affect...

  20. [Prevalence of mouth breathing in children from an elementary school].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felcar, Josiane Marques; Bueno, Izabele Rafael; Massan, Ana Carolina Silva; Torezan, Roberta Pereira; Cardoso, Jefferson Rosa

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this article is to identify the prevalence of mouth breathing in children from an elementary school. 496 questionnaires were answered by 1st and 4th grade children's parents or sponsors in order to identify mouth-breathing. There were questions about habits, sleeping, behavior, eating, personal care and breathing. Mann-Whitney and the Chi-square tests were used to compare the variables between mouth-breathing and nose-breathing among the groups. To measure the exposure effect of the explanatory variables on mouth breathing, the test of logistic regression was used and its magnitude was calculated through Odds Ratio. The statistical significance was set at 5%, and the rate of returned questionnaires was 84.5%. The prevalence of the mouthbreathing over this population was 56.8%. The average age was 7 years old (6-9). There was no significant statistical difference between genders, considering 49.1% male and 50.9% female. The final model of logistic regression identified the variables dribble, sleeps well (negative association) and snores as factors that predict the occurrence of the mouth-breathing. The prevalence of mouthbreathing was similar to related in the literature. The variables dribble, sleeps well (negative association) and snores may be factors that predict the occurrence of mouth-breathing.

  1. 46 CFR 154.1852 - Air breathing equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Air breathing equipment. 154.1852 Section 154.1852... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1852 Air breathing equipment. (a) The master shall ensure that a licensed officer inspects the compressed air...

  2. Measurement of Personal Exposure Using a Breathing Thermal Manikin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik

    In this paper personal exposure measurements are performed by means of the Breathing Thermal Manikin. Contaminant concentration is measured in a number of locations in the breathing zone and in the inhaled air. Two cases are investigated: exposure to different contaminant sources in a displacement...

  3. Breathing simulator of workers for respirator performance test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Hisashi; Kumita, Mikio; Honda, Takeshi; Kimura, Kazushi; Nozaki, Kosuke; Emi, Hitoshi; Otani, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Breathing machines are widely used to evaluate respirator performance but they are capable of generating only limited air flow patterns, such as, sine, triangular and square waves. In order to evaluate the respirator performance in practical use, it is desirable to test the respirator using the actual breathing patterns of wearers. However, it has been a difficult task for a breathing machine to generate such complicated flow patterns, since the human respiratory volume changes depending on the human activities and workload. In this study, we have developed an electromechanical breathing simulator and a respiration sampling device to record and reproduce worker's respiration. It is capable of generating various flow patterns by inputting breathing pattern signals recorded by a computer, as well as the fixed air flow patterns. The device is equipped with a self-control program to compensate the difference in inhalation and exhalation volume and the measurement errors on the breathing flow rate. The system was successfully applied to record the breathing patterns of workers engaging in welding and reproduced the breathing patterns.

  4. 42 CFR 84.203 - Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. 84.203 Section 84.203 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.203 Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. (a) Resistance...

  5. Breath hydrogen analysis in patients with ileoanal pouch anastomosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, E; Meyer, J N; Rumessen, J J;

    1995-01-01

    The possible influence on functional outcomes of hydrogen production in the ileoanal pouch after restorative proctocolectomy was investigated by means of lactulose H2 breath tests. Eight of 15 patients had significant increases in breath hydrogen after 10 g lactulose. One patient declined to part...

  6. Generation of radially and azimuthally polarized light by optical transmission through concentric circular nanoslits in Ag films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Xiao, Min; Sun, Kai; Wei, Qi-Huo

    2010-01-04

    Optical transmission through concentric circular nanoslits is studied in experiments and numerical simulations. Polarized optical microscopic imaging shows that the optical transmission through these apertures is spatially inhomogeneous, exhibiting colored fan texture patterns. Numerical simulations show that these colored fan texture patterns originate from the cylindrical vector polarization of the transmitted beam. Specifically, the transmitted light is in-phase radially polarized at long wavelengths due to the predominant transmission of the transverse magnetic (TM) waveguide modes; and in-phase azimuthally polarized at short wavelengths due to the increased optical transmission of the transverse electric (TE) waveguide modes. Additionally, the transmission shows a peak at the wavelength of Wood anomaly and a dip at the resonant wavelength of surface plasmon excitation; and the transmitted light at these wavelengths is a mixture of azimuthally and radially polarized fields. These interesting optical transmission behaviors of circular nanoslits provide a miniaturized way to generating radially and azimuthally polarized light.

  7. Generation of radially-polarized terahertz pulses for coupling into coaxial waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Cía, Miguel; Wu, Jiang; Liu, Huiyun; Mitrofanov, Oleg

    2016-12-01

    Coaxial waveguides exhibit no dispersion and therefore can serve as an ideal channel for transmission of broadband THz pulses. Implementation of THz coaxial waveguide systems however requires THz beams with radially-polarized distribution. We demonstrate the launching of THz pulses into coaxial waveguides using the effect of THz pulse generation at semiconductor surfaces. We find that the radial transient photo-currents produced upon optical excitation of the surface at normal incidence radiate a THz pulse with the field distribution matching the mode of the coaxial waveguide. In this simple scheme, the optical excitation beam diameter controls the spatial profile of the generated radially-polarized THz pulse and allows us to achieve efficient coupling into the TEM waveguide mode in a hollow coaxial THz waveguide. The TEM quasi-single mode THz waveguide excitation and non-dispersive propagation of a short THz pulse is verified experimentally by time-resolved near-field mapping of the THz field at the waveguide output.

  8. Investigations on high speed directly modulated microdisk lasers accounting for radial carrier hole burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong-Zhen; Lv, Xiao-Meng; Zou, Ling-Xiu; Long, Heng; Xiao, Jin-Long; Yang, Yue-De; Du, Yun

    2014-04-01

    High-speed modulation characteristics are investigated for microdisk lasers theoretically and experimentally. In rate equation analysis, the microdisk resonator is radially divided into two regions under uniform carrier density approximation in each region. The injection current profile, carrier spatial hole burning, and diffusion are accounted for in the evaluation of small-signal modulation curves and the simulation of large-signal responses. The numerical results indicate that a wide mode field pattern in radial direction has merit for high-speed modulation, which is expected for coupled modes in the microdisk lasers connected with an output waveguide. For a 15-μm-radius microdisk laser connected with a 2-μm-wide output waveguide, the measured small-signal response curves with a low-frequency roll-off are well in agreement with the simulated result at a 2-μm radial width for the mode intensity distribution. The resonant frequencies of 7.2, 5.9, and 3.9 GHz are obtained at the temperatures of 287, 298, and 312 K from the small-signal response curves, and clear eye diagrams at 12.5 Gb/s with an extinction ratio of 6.1 dB are observed for the microdisk laser at the biasing current of 38 mA and 287 K.

  9. Radial velocities of population II binary stars. II

    CERN Document Server

    Bartkevicius, A

    2006-01-01

    Here we publish the second list of radial velocities for 91 Hipparcos stars, mostly high transverse velocity binaries without previous radial velocity measurements. The measurements of radial velocities are done with a CORAVEL-type radial velocity spectrometer with an accuracy better than 1 km/s. We also present the information on eight new radial velocity variables - HD 29696, HD 117466AB, BD +28 4035AB, BD +30 2129A, BD +39 1828AB, BD +69 230A, BD +82 565A and TYC 2267-1300-1 - found from our measurements. Two stars (HD 27961AB and HD 75632AB) are suspected as possible radial velocity variables.

  10. Complex behavior of internal collapse due to self-generated radial electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Taro; Tokuda, Shinji; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Takizuka, Tomonori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Naitou, Hiroshi [Department of Electical and Electronic Engineering, Yamaguchi University, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    The density gradient effect is taken into account in the gyro-kinetic nonlinear simulation of the kinetic m=1 internal kink mode to clarify the nonlinear behavior of the internal collapse. Even when the density gradient is not so large enough to change the process of the full reconnection, the later process is changed considerably due to the self-generated radial electric field. The nonlinear growth of the 0/0 mode after the internal collapse violates the symmetrical flow of the parallel current, restricting the secondary reconnection. (author)

  11. ABA-Cloud: support for collaborative breath research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Ibrahim; Ludescher, Thomas; King, Julian; Ager, Clemens; Trosin, Michael; Senocak, Uygar; Brezany, Peter; Feilhauer, Thomas; Amann, Anton

    2013-06-01

    This paper introduces the advanced breath analysis (ABA) platform, an innovative scientific research platform for the entire breath research domain. Within the ABA project, we are investigating novel data management concepts and semantic web technologies to document breath analysis studies for the long run as well as to enable their full automatic reproducibility. We propose several concept taxonomies (a hierarchical order of terms from a glossary of terms), which can be seen as a first step toward the definition of conceptualized terms commonly used by the international community of breath researchers. They build the basis for the development of an ontology (a concept from computer science used for communication between machines and/or humans and representation and reuse of knowledge) dedicated to breath research.

  12. Influence of condensation temperature on selected exhaled breath parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manini Paola

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of changes in cooling temperature on biomarker levels in exhaled breath condensate have been little investigated. The aim of the study was to test the effect of condensation temperature on the parameters of exhaled breath condensate and the levels of selected biomarkers. Methods Exhaled breath condensate was collected from 24 healthy subjects at temperatures of -10, -5, 0 and +5 C degrees. Selected parameters (condensed volume and conductivity and biomarkers (hydrogen peroxide, malondialdehyde were measured. Results There was a progressive increase in hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde concentrations, and condensate conductivity as the cooling temperature increased; total condensate volume increased as the cooling temperature decreased. Conclusion The cooling temperature of exhaled breath condensate collection influenced selected biomarkers and potential normalizing factors (particularly conductivity in different ways ex vivo. The temperature of exhaled breath condensate collection should be controlled and reported.

  13. The effects of unilateral forced nostril breathing on cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jella, S A; Shannahoff-Khalsa, D S

    1993-11-01

    This study describes the effects of 30 minutes of unilateral forced nostril breathing on cognitive performance in 51 right-handed undergraduate psychology students (25 males and 26 females). A verbal analogies task modeled after the Miller Analogies and SAT Tests was used as a test of left-hemispheric performance and mental rotation tasks based on the Vandenburg and Kuse adaptation of Shepard and Metzler's tests were used as spatial tasks for testing right-hemispheric performance. Spatial task performance was significantly enhanced during left nostril breathing in both males and females, p = .028. Verbal task performance was greater during right nostril breathing, but not significantly p = .14. These results are discussed in comparison to other cognitive and physiological studies using unilateral forced nostril breathing. This yogic breathing technique may have useful application in treating psychophysiological disorders with hemispheric imbalances and disorders with autonomic abnormalities.

  14. Radiation Dose Reduction during Radial Cardiac Catheterization: Evaluation of a Dedicated Radial Angiography Absorption Shielding Drape

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Ertel; Jeffrey Nadelson; Adhir R. Shroff; Ranya Sweis; Dean Ferrera; Vidovich, Mladen I.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Radiation scatter protection shield drapes have been designed with the goal of decreasing radiation dose to the operators during transfemoral catheterization. We sought to investigate the impact on operator radiation exposure of various shielding drapes specifically designed for the radial approach. Background. Radial access for cardiac catheterization has increased due to improved patient comfort and decreased bleeding complications. There are concerns for increased radiation exp...

  15. Photonic systems for high precision radial velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    I will discuss new instrumentation and techniques designed to maximize the Doppler radial velocity (RV) measurement precision of next generation exoplanet discovery instruments. These systems include a novel wavelength calibration device based on an all-fiber fabry-perot interferometer, a compact and efficient optical fiber image scrambler based on a single high-index ball lens, and a unique optical fiber mode mixer. These systems have been developed specifically to overcome three technological hurdles that have classically hindered high precision RV measurements in both the optical and near-infrared (NIR), namely: lack of available wavelength calibration sources, inadequate decoupling of the spectrograph from variable telescope illumination, and speckle-induced noise due to mode interference in optical fibers. The instrumentation presented here will be applied to the Habitable-zone Planet Finder, a NIR RV instrument designed to detect rocky planets orbiting in the habitable zones of nearby M-dwarfs, and represents a critical technological step towards the detection of potentially habitable Earth-like planets. While primarily focused in the NIR, many of these systems will be adapted to future optical RV instruments as well, such as NASA's new Extreme Precision Doppler Spectrometer for the WIYN telescope.

  16. Failure Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, K. P.; Burcharth, H. F.; Ibsen, Lars Bo;

    1999-01-01

    The present appendix contains the derivation of ten different limit state equations divided on three different failure modes. Five of the limit state equations can be used independently of the characteristics of the subsoil, whereas the remaining five can be used for either drained or undrained...

  17. Entropy generation of radial rotation convective channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alić, Fikret

    2012-03-01

    The exchange of heat between two fluids is established by radial rotating pipe or a channel. The hotter fluid flows through the pipe, while the cold fluid is ambient air. Total length of pipe is made up of multiple sections of different shape and position in relation to the common axis of rotation. In such heat exchanger the hydraulic and thermal irreversibility of the hotter and colder fluid occur. Therefore, the total entropy generated within the radial rotating pipe consists of the total entropy of hotter and colder fluid, taking into account all the hydraulic and thermal irreversibility of both fluids. Finding a mathematical model of the total generated entropy is based on coupled mathematical expressions that combine hydraulic and thermal effects of both fluids with the complex geometry of the radial rotating pipe. Mathematical model follows the each section of the pipe and establishes the function between the sections, so the total generated entropy is different from section to section of the pipe. In one section of the pipe thermal irreversibility may dominate over the hydraulic irreversibility, while in another section of the pipe the situation may be reverse. In this paper, continuous analytic functions that connect sections of pipe in geometric meaning are associated with functions that describe the thermo-hydraulic effects of hotter and colder fluid. In this way, the total generated entropy of the radial rotating pipe is a continuous analytic function of any complex geometry of the rotating pipe. The above method of establishing a relationship between the continuous function of entropy with the complex geometry of the rotating pipe enables indirect monitoring of unnecessary hydraulic and thermal losses of both fluids. Therefore, continuous analytic functions of generated entropy enable analysis of hydraulic and thermal irreversibility of individual sections of pipe, as well as the possibility of improving the thermal-hydraulic performance of the rotating

  18. Electrohydrodynamic instability in an annular liquid layer with radial conductivity gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zijing; Wong, Teck Neng

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, the electrohydrodynamic stability in an annular liquid layer with a radial electrical conductivity gradient is investigated. A weak shear flow arises from a constant pressure gradient in the axial direction. In the radial direction, an electric field is applied. The three-dimensional linear instability analysis is implemented to study the influence of the inner radius, electrical conductivity gradient, shear flow, and ionic diffusion on the dynamics of the fluid layer. It is found that the critical unstable mode may either be oscillatory or stationary. The system becomes more unstable as the dimensionless inner radius a increases. When the inner radius a is small, the critical unstable mode is stationary, while it is given by three-dimensional oblique waves when a is large. When the conductivity gradient is small, the critical unstable mode is the three-dimensional oblique wave, while when the conductivity gradient is large, it would switch to the stationary mode rather than the oscillatory mode. The system becomes more unstable when the Reynolds number is slightly increased from zero. Additionally, it is found that the electrical Schmidt number has dual effects. The liquid layer becomes either more unstable or stable as the electric Schmidt number increases.

  19. Aspiration tests in aqueous foam using a breathing simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archuleta, M.M.

    1995-12-01

    Non-toxic aqueous foams are being developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) for use in crowd control, cell extractions, and group disturbances in the criminal justice prison systems. The potential for aspiration of aqueous foam during its use and the resulting adverse effects associated with complete immersion in aqueous foam is of major concern to the NIJ when examining the effectiveness and safety of using this technology as a Less-Than-Lethal weapon. This preliminary study was designed to evaluate the maximum quantity of foam that might be aspirated by an individual following total immersion in an SNL-developed aqueous foam. A.T.W. Reed Breathing simulator equipped with a 622 Silverman cam was used to simulate the aspiration of an ammonium laureth sulfate aqueous foam developed by SNL and generated at expansion ratios in the range of 500:1 to 1000:1. Although the natural instinct of an individual immersed in foam is to cover their nose and mouth with a hand or cloth, thus breaking the bubbles and decreasing the potential for aspiration, this study was performed to examine a worst case scenario where mouth breathing only was examined, and no attempt was made to block foam entry into the breathing port. Two breathing rates were examined: one that simulated a sedentary individual with a mean breathing rate of 6.27 breaths/minute, and one that simulated an agitated or heavily breathing individual with a mean breathing rate of 23.7 breaths/minute. The results of this study indicate that, if breathing in aqueous foam without movement, an air pocket forms around the nose and mouth within one minute of immersion.

  20. Selective excitation of higher-radial-order Laguerre-Gaussian beams using a solid-state digital laser

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bell, Teboho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we use a digital laser to generate high-radial-order Laguerre-Gaussian, LGp,0 modes by loading digital holograms on a phase-only spatial light modulator that act as an end mirror of a diode-end-pumped laser resonator. The digital...